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Sample records for prepubertal obese children

  1. Elevated energy expenditure and reduced energy intake in obese prepubertal children: paradox of poor dietary reliability in obesity?

    PubMed

    Maffeis, C; Schutz, Y; Zaffanello, M; Piccoli, R; Pinelli, L

    1994-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the validity of two common methods used to assess energy intake. A 3-day weighed dietary record and a dietary history were collected and compared with the total daily energy expenditure (TEE) assessed by the heart rate method in a group of 12 obese and 12 nonobese prepubertal children (mean age 9.3 +/- 1.1 years vs 9.3 +/- 0.4 years). The TEE value was higher in obese than in nonobese children (9.89 +/- 1.08 vs 8.13 +/- 1.39 MJ/day; p < 0.01). Energy intake assessed by the dietary record was significantly lower than TEE in the obese children (7.06 +/- 0.98 MJ/day; p < 0.001) but comparable to TEE in the nonobese children (8.03 +/- 0.99 MJ/day; p = not significant). Energy intake assessed by diet history was lower than TEE in the obese children (8.37 +/- 1.35 MJ/day, p < 0.05) but close to TEE in the nonobese children (8.64 +/- 1.54 MJ/day, p = not significant). These results suggest that obese children underreport food intake and that the dietary record and the diet history are not valid means of assessing energy intake in obese prepubertal children.

  2. Insulin resistance in prepubertal obese children correlates with sex-dependent early onset metabolomic alterations

    PubMed Central

    Mastrangelo, A; Martos-Moreno, G Á; García, A; Barrios, V; Rupérez, F J; Chowen, J A; Barbas, C; Argente, J

    2016-01-01

    Background: Insulin resistance (IR) is usually the first metabolic alteration diagnosed in obese children and the key risk factor for development of comorbidities. The factors determining whether or not IR develops as a result of excess body mass index (BMI) are still not completely understood. Objectives: This study aimed to elucidate the mechanisms underpinning the predisposition toward hyperinsulinemia-related complications in obese children by using a metabolomic strategy that allows a profound interpretation of metabolic profiles potentially affected by IR. Methods: Serum from 60 prepubertal obese children (30 girls/30 boys, 50% IR and 50% non-IR in each group, but with similar BMIs) were analyzed by using liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry, gas chromatography–mass spectrometry and capillary electrophoresis–mass spectrometry following an untargeted metabolomics approach. Validation was then performed on a group of 100 additional children with the same characteristics. Results: When obese children with and without IR were compared, 47 metabolites out of 818 compounds (P<0.05) obtained after data pre-processing were found to be significantly different. Bile acids exhibit the greatest changes (that is, approximately a 90% increase in IR). The majority of metabolites differing between groups were lysophospholipids (15) and amino acids (17), indicating inflammation and central carbon metabolism as the most altered processes in impaired insulin signaling. Multivariate analysis (OPLS-DA models) showed subtle differences between groups that were magnified when females were analyzed alone. Conclusions: Inflammation and central carbon metabolism, together with the contribution of the gut microbiota, are the most altered processes in obese children with impaired insulin signaling in a sex-specific fashion despite their prepubertal status. PMID:27163744

  3. Deleterious effects of obesity on physical fitness in pre-pubertal children.

    PubMed

    Ceschia, Arianna; Giacomini, Stefano; Santarossa, Simone; Rugo, Miriam; Salvadego, Desy; Da Ponte, Alessandro; Driussi, Caterina; Mihaleje, Martina; Poser, Stefano; Lazzer, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of obesity in children has increased dramatically during the past decades in Europe and understanding physical fitness and its components in children is critical to design and implement effective interventions. The objective of the present study was to analyse the association between physical fitness (aerobic, speed, agility, power, flexibility and balance) and body mass index (BMI) in pre-pubertal children. A total of 2411 healthy schoolchildren (7-11 years) participated in this study. Anthropometric characteristics and body composition were assessed by skinfold thickness. Physical fitness was measured by nine physical fitness tests: endurance running, 20 m running speed, agility, handgrip strength, standing long jump and squat jump, sit and reach, medicine ball forward throw and static balance. No relevant differences were observed between boys and girls regarding anthropometric characteristics, body composition and physical fitness. However, overweight and obese children showed significantly lower physical fitness levels in endurance running, speed and agility (mean: +18.8, +5.5 and +14.5% of time to complete tasks, respectively), lower limb power normalised to body mass (-23.3%) and balance tests (number of falls: +165.5%) than their normal weight counterparts. On the other hand, obesity did not affect handgrip, throwing and flexibility. In conclusion, increased BMI was associated with lower performance capabilities limiting proper motor skill development, which directly affects the ability of children to take on sports skills. Actions undertaken to promote children's wellness and fitness should be prioritised and introduced early in life with the aim of enhancing physical fitness as well as preventing overweight and obesity.

  4. The Influence of Socio-Economic Status on the Long-Term Effect of Family-Based Obesity Treatment Intervention in Prepubertal Overweight Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Langnase, Kristina; Asbeck, Inga; Mast, Mareike; Muller, Manfred J.

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to assess the effect of the socio-economic status (SES) on long-term outcomes of a family-based obesity treatment intervention in prepubertal children. A total of 52 overweight and 26 normal weight children were investigated. Nutritional status, intake of fruit, vegetables and low fat foods, in-between meals, sports…

  5. Associations of glucocorticoid receptor and corticosteroid-binding globulin gene polymorphisms on fat mass and fat mass distribution in prepubertal obese children.

    PubMed

    Barat, Pascal; Corcuff, Jean-Benoît; Tauber, Maïté; Moisan, Marie-Pierre

    2012-12-01

    Previous studies conducted in adult obese patients have shown that glucocorticoid receptor and corticosteroid-binding globulin gene polymorphisms influence cortisol-driven obesity and metabolic parameters. We investigated the impact of these polymorphisms in prepubertal obese children that were thoroughly examined for hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis activity and for metabolic and obesity parameters. Obese children carrier of the allele G of the BclI polymorphism within glucocorticoid receptor gene tend to present a higher percentage of fat mass as well as a decreased cortisol suppression after low-dose dexamethasone as found in adult studies. Additionally, these allele G carriers show a strong correlation between truncal fat mass distribution and cortisol response to a standardized lunch, whereas this correlation is weak in allele C carriers. No differences were found for obesity or metabolic parameters between genotypes at the corticosteroid-binding globulin locus. However, allele 90 carriers present increased 24-h free urinary cortisol. Overall, this study provides new data showing the influence of glucocorticoid receptor and corticosteroid-binding globulin genes in obesity and/or cortisol action in prepubertal obese children.

  6. Excessive Refined Carbohydrates and Scarce Micronutrients Intakes Increase Inflammatory Mediators and Insulin Resistance in Prepubertal and Pubertal Obese Children Independently of Obesity

    PubMed Central

    López-Alarcón, Mardia; Perichart-Perera, Otilia; Rodríguez-Cruz, Maricela; Armenta-Álvarez, Andrea; Bram-Falcón, María Teresa; Mayorga-Ochoa, Marielle

    2014-01-01

    Background. Low-grade inflammation is the link between obesity and insulin resistance. Because physiologic insulin resistance occurs at puberty, obese pubertal children are at higher risk for insulin resistance. Excessive diets in refined carbohydrates and saturated fats are risk factors for insulin resistance, but calcium, magnesium, vitamin-D, and the omega-3 fatty acids likely protect against inflammation and insulin resistance. Objective. To analyze interactions among dietary saturated fat, refined carbohydrates, calcium, magnesium, vitamin D, and omega-3 fatty acids on the risk of inflammation and insulin resistance in a sample of prepubertal and pubertal children. Methods. A sample of 229 children from Mexico City was analyzed in a cross-sectional design. Anthropometric measurements, 24 h recall questionnaires, and blood samples were obtained. Serum insulin, glucose, calcium, magnesium, 25-OHD3, C-reactive protein, leptin, adiponectin, and erythrocytes fatty acids were measured. Parametric and nonparametric statistics were used for analysis. Results. While mean macronutrients intake was excessive, micronutrients intake was deficient (P < 0.01). Inflammation determinants were central obesity and magnesium-deficient diets. Determinants of insulin resistance were carbohydrates intake and circulating magnesium and adiponectin. Conclusions. Magnesium-deficient diets are determinants of inflammation, while high intake of refined carbohydrates is a risk factor for insulin resistance, independently of central adiposity. PMID:25477716

  7. Visceral fat in prepubertal children: Influence of obesity, anthropometry, ethnicity, gender, diet, and growth.

    PubMed

    Goran, Michael I.

    1999-01-01

    Visceral fat, or intra-abdominal adipose tissue (IAAT) lies deep within the abdominal cavity and can only be directly quantified with imaging techniques. IAAT has been detected in children as young as 5 years of age. IAAT generally increases in proportion with general fatness, but the relationship between IAAT and total body fat is complex; in children, a major portion of the variance in IAAT is independent of total body fat. The waist-to-hip ratio and the trunk:extremity skinfold ratio are not good indices of IAAT in children, and central skinfolds and waist circumference alone are highly correlated with IAAT as well as subcutaneous abdominal adipose tissue (r = 0.85-0.92). African-American children have less IAAT than Caucasian children, and gender differences in IAAT become more apparent after adolescence. Preliminary evidence in children suggests that IAAT may have a stronger influence on cardiovascular risk factors than dietary fat intake. Preliminary evidence in children also suggests that acquisition of IAAT during growth is a linear process that occurs in proportion to general increases in body fat. The study of the regulation of IAAT acquisition during childhood development and its relationship with long-term disease risk is in its early infancy and further studies are required. Am. J. Hum. Biol. 11:201-207, 1999. Copyright 1999 Wiley-Liss, Inc. PMID:11533944

  8. Complementary Effects of Genetic Variations in LEPR on Body Composition and Soluble Leptin Receptor Concentration after 3-Month Lifestyle Intervention in Prepubertal Obese Children.

    PubMed

    Gajewska, Joanna; Kuryłowicz, Alina; Mierzejewska, Ewa; Ambroszkiewicz, Jadwiga; Chełchowska, Magdalena; Weker, Halina; Puzianowska-Kuźnicka, Monika

    2016-01-01

    In obese individuals, weight loss might be affected by variants of the adipokine-encoding genes. We verified whether selected functional single nucleotide polymorphisms in LEP, LEPR and ADIPOQ are associated with changes in serum levels of the respective adipokines and weight loss in 100 prepubertal obese (SDS-BMI > 2) Caucasian children undergoing lifestyle intervention. Frequencies of the -2548G > A LEP, Q223R LEPR, K656N LEPR, -11377C > G and -11426A > G ADIPOQ polymorphisms were analyzed by restriction fragment length polymorphism. Serum adipokine and soluble leptin receptor (sOB-R) concentrations were measured using the ELISA method. Among the analyzed polymorphisms, only LEPR polymorphisms were associated with changes of SDS-BMI or sOB-R concentrations in children after therapy. Carriers of the wild-type K665N and at least one minor Q223R allele had the greatest likelihood of losing weight (OR = 5.09, p = 0.006), an increase in sOB-R (ptrend = 0.022) and decrease in SDS-BMI correlated with the decrease of fat mass (p < 0.001). In contrast, carrying of the wild-type Q223R and at least one minor K665N allele were associated with a decrease in sOB-R concentrations and a decrease in SDS-BMI correlated with a decrease in fat-free mass (p = 0.002). We suggest that the combination of different LEPR variants, not a single variant, might determine predisposition to weight loss in the prepubertal period. PMID:27240401

  9. Mental Health Intervention with Prepubertal Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, Roger A.; And Others

    Little research has examined the practical techniques employed by psychologists working with children. To examine current practices in child psychotherapy, licensed psychologists in the state of Texas completed questionnaires about mental health intervention efforts with prepubertal children. Almost half of the 724 respondents indicated that they…

  10. Endothelial function in pre-pubertal children at risk of developing cardiomyopathy: a new frontier

    PubMed Central

    Tavares, Aline Cristina; Bocchi, Edimar Alcides; Guimarães, Guilherme Veiga

    2012-01-01

    Although it is known that obesity, diabetes, and Kawasaki's disease play important roles in systemic inflammation and in the development of both endothelial dysfunction and cardiomyopathy, there is a lack of data regarding the endothelial function of pre-pubertal children suffering from cardiomyopathy. In this study, we performed a systematic review of the literature on pre-pubertal children at risk of developing cardiomyopathy to assess the endothelial function of pre-pubertal children at risk of developing cardiomyopathy. We searched the published literature indexed in PubMed, Bireme and SciELO using the keywords ‘endothelial', ‘children', ‘pediatric' and ‘infant' and then compiled a systematic review. The end points were age, the pubertal stage, sex differences, the method used for the endothelial evaluation and the endothelial values themselves. No studies on children with cardiomyopathy were found. Only 11 papers were selected for our complete analysis, where these included reports on the flow-mediated percentage dilatation, the values of which were 9.80±1.80, 5.90±1.29, 4.50±0.70, and 7.10±1.27 for healthy, obese, diabetic and pre-pubertal children with Kawasaki's disease, respectively. There was no significant difference in the dilatation, independent of the endothelium, either among the groups or between the genders for both of the measurements in children; similar results have been found in adolescents and adults. The endothelial function in cardiomyopathic children remains unclear because of the lack of data; nevertheless, the known dysfunctions in children with obesity, type 1 diabetes and Kawasaki's disease may influence the severity of the cardiovascular symptoms, the prognosis, and the mortality rate. The results of this study encourage future research into the consequences of endothelial dysfunction in pre-pubertal children. PMID:22473410

  11. Determinants of fat mass in prepubertal children.

    PubMed

    Müller, M J; Grund, A; Krause, H; Siewers, M; Bosy-Westphal, A; Rieckert, H

    2002-11-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare variables of metabolism, physical activity and fitness to body composition in normal and overweight children in a cross-sectional study design. Body composition was assessed by anthropometric measurements and bioelectrical impedance analysis in forty-eight prepubertal children (age 5-11 years, thirteen normal-weight, thirty-five overweight). Total energy expenditure (EE) was measured by combination of indirect calorimetry (for measurement of resting EE) and individually calibrated 24 h heart-rate (HR) monitoring. Activity-related EE and physical activity level (PAL) were calculated. Time spent with min-by-min HR>FLEX HR was also used as a marker of moderate habitual and vigorous activities. Aerobic fitness (O2 pulse (O2 consumption:HR at submaximal steady-state heart rate), submaximal O2 consumption (VO2submaximal), RER at a HR of 170 beats per min) was determined by bicycle ergometry. Muscle strength of the legs (maximal isometric strength of musculus quadriceps and of musculus ischiocruralis (Fa max and Fb max respectively)) was measured by computer tensiometry. When compared with normal children, overweight children had higher skinfold thicknesses (sum of skinfold thicknesses at four sites +160 %), fat mass (+142 %), waist (+24 %) and hip circumferences (+14 %), resting EE (+13 %) and RER (+5 %). No significant group differences were found for fat-free mass, muscle mass, total EE, activity-related EE, PAL, HR>FLEX HR, VO2submaximal, O2 pulse, Fa max and Fb max as well as the fat-free mass- or muscle mass-adjusted values for resting EE, aerobic fitness and muscle strength. When compared with normal children, overweight children had a lower measured v. estimated resting EE (Delta resting EE) and spent more time watching television. There were positive relationships between fat-free mass(x) and resting EE(x), total EE(y), aerobic fitness(y) and muscle strength(y), but only Delta resting EE(x) and HR>FLEX HR(x) correlated

  12. Prepubertal children with a history of extra-uterine growth restriction exhibit low-grade inflammation.

    PubMed

    Ortiz-Espejo, María; Pérez-Navero, Juan Luis; Olza-Meneses, Josune; Muñoz-Villanueva, María Carmen; Aguilera-García, Concepción María; Gil-Campos, Mercedes

    2014-08-14

    Intra-uterine growth restriction (IUGR) may induce significant metabolic and inflammatory anomalies, increasing the risk of obesity and CVD later in life. Similarly, alterations in the adipose tissue may lead to metabolic changes in children with a history of extra-uterine growth restriction (EUGR). These mechanisms may induce alterations in immune response during early life. The aim of the present study was to compare pro-inflammatory markers in prepubertal EUGR children with those in a reference population. A total of thirty-eight prepubertal children with a history of EUGR and a reference group including 123 healthy age- and sex-matched children were selected. Perinatal data were examined. In the prepubertal stage, the concentrations of inflammatory biomarkers were measured in both groups. The serum concentrations of C-reactive protein (CRP) and plasma concentrations of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), IL-6, IL-8, monocyte chemotactic protein type 1 (MCP-1), neural growth factor, TNF-α and plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 were determined. The plasma concentrations of inflammatory biomarkers CRP, HGF, IL-8, MCP-1 and TNF-α were higher in the EUGR group than in the reference group (P< 0·001). After adjustment for gestational age, birth weight and length, blood pressure values and TNF-α concentrations remained higher in the EUGR group than in the reference group. Therefore, further investigations should be conducted in EUGR children to evaluate the potential negative impact of metabolic, nutritional and pro-inflammatory changes induced by the EUGR condition.

  13. Periodic leg movements in prepubertal children with sleep disturbance.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Sandra; Guilleminault, Christian

    2004-11-01

    This study's aims were to determine: (1) prevalence of periodic leg movements (PLMs) in walking prepubertal children consulting a sleep clinic for any sleep disorder; (2) associations between PLMs and other sleep and medical disorders; and (3) the response of other sleep disorders to treatment with the dopamine agonist pramipexol. Clinical evaluation and polysomnography were carried out for a period of 12 months on 252 consecutively seen, prepubertal children with sleep disorders (156 males, 96 females; aged 15mo to 11y, mean 7y 1mo, SD3y 10mo). Sleep disorders unrelated to PLMs were treated, and six children received pramipexol for PLMs. Follow-up included clinical evaluation and polysomnography. Twenty-three per cent of children were diagnosed with PLMs on the basis of polysomnography. The presence of PLMs had usually been unrecognized clinically. The only clinical symptom that could be related to periodic limb movement disorder was a report of leg pains at morning awakening. Only two of 58 children had PLMs without other clinical or polysomnographic findings. Comorbidity seen with PLMs included neuropsychiatric syndromes (n=20), isolated sleep disordered breathing (SDB; n=29), and several other comorbid conditions (n=7). Seven of 11 children seen with attention-deficit-hyperactivity disorder also had PLMs. Surgery for SDB was associated with subsequent cessation of PLMs in 15 of 29 children. Five out of six children with PLMs who received pramipexol were able to tolerate the drug and experienced a complete disappearance of their PLMs. Presence of chronic fatigue, sleepiness, disrupted nocturnal sleep, and difficulties in falling asleep should lead to a systematic search for PLMs that is independent of associated syndromes. Isolated treatment of SDB might help eliminate some, but not all, PLMs. PMID:15540638

  14. Sexual development in prepubertal obese boys: a 4-year longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Lingling; Zhao, Jian; Bai, Yinglong; Liu, Li; Zheng, Linlin; Jia, Lihong; Yao, Xingjia

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate whether or not sexual development differs between boys with prepubertal obesity and boys of normal weight. We enrolled healthy obese and normoweight schoolboys from Shenyang City, Liaoning, China. Eligible boys were at Tanner stage 1 and 8 years of age at baseline. We measured testosterone and estradiol concentrations in the saliva and assessed auxology annually for 4 years. In all 56 obese and 56 normoweight boys, the height, weight, body composition, and sex organ volume increased with age. The percentages of body fat, fat mass, and lean mass were all higher in obese than in normoweight boys. The mean testicular volume was smaller in obese boys than in normoweight boys. The sex hormone concentrations increased with age, except for testosterone in obese boys in year 3 of follow-up. In year 4, estradiol concentrations were significantly higher in obese boys than in normoweight boys. Excessive adiposity in prepubertal boys might affect testicular volume, possibly because of high estradiol and low testosterone concentrations.

  15. Gender differences in cadmium and cotinine levels in prepubertal children

    SciTech Connect

    Fucic, A.; Plavec, D; Casteleyn, L.; Aerts, D.; Biot, P.; Katsonouri, A.; Cerna, M.; Knudsen, L.E.; Castano, A.; Rudnai, P.; Gutleb, A.; Ligocka, D.; Lupsa, I-R.; Berglund, M.; Horvat, M.; Halzlova, K.; Schoeters, G.; Koppen, G.; Hadjipanayis, A.; Krskova, A.; and others

    2015-08-15

    Susceptibility to environmental stressors has been described for fetal and early childhood development. However, the possible susceptibility of the prepubertal period, characterized by the orchestration of the organism towards sexual maturation and adulthood has been poorly investigated and exposure data are scarce. In the current study levels of cadmium (Cd), cotinine and creatinine in urine were analyzed in a subsample 216 children from 12 European countries within the DEMOCOPHES project. The children were divided into six age–sex groups: boys (6–8 years, 9–10 years and 11 years old), and girls (6–7 years, 8–9 years, 10–11 years). The number of subjects per group was between 23 and 53. The cut off values were set at 0.1 µg/L for Cd, and 0.8 µg/L for cotinine defined according to the highest limit of quantification. The levels of Cd and cotinine were adjusted for creatinine level. In the total subsample group, the median level of Cd was 0.180 µg/L (range 0.10–0.69 µg/L), and for cotinine the median wet weight value was 1.50 µg/L (range 0.80–39.91 µg/L). There was no significant difference in creatinine and cotinine levels between genders and age groups. There was a significant correlation between levels of cadmium and creatinine in all children of both genders. This shows that even at such low levels the possible effect of cadmium on kidney function was present and measurable. An increase in Cd levels was evident with age. Cadmium levels were significantly different between 6–7 year old girls, 11 year old boys and 10–11 year old girls. As there was a balanced distribution in the number of subjects from countries included in the study, bias due to data clustering was not probable. The impact of low Cd levels on kidney function and gender differences in Cd levels needs further investigation. - Highlights: • In 216 children from 6 to 11 years old the median level of Cd was 0.18 µg/L. • The median level of cotinine was 1.50 µg/L.

  16. Obesity, Physical Activity - Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilliam, Thomas B.

    Childhood obesity starts at a very early age, and preventive measures taken early enough may retard the development of fat cells. It appears that physical activity plays an important role in reducing obesity. The activity program must start early, in preschool days. It is felt that screening children for obesity when they first enter school and…

  17. Site-specific differences of insulin action in adipose tissue derived from normal prepubertal children

    SciTech Connect

    Grohmann, Malcolm; Stewart, Claire; Welsh, Gavin; Hunt, Linda; Tavare, Jeremy; Holly, Jeff; Shield, Julian; Sabin, Matt; Crowne, Elizabeth . E-mail: Liz.Crowne@ubht.swest.nhs.uk

    2005-08-15

    Body fat distribution determines obesity-related morbidity in adults but little is known of the aetiology or pathophysiology in children. This study investigates differences in insulin-mediated metabolism in primary cell cultures of subcutaneous and visceral preadipocytes derived from prepubertal children. The impact of differentiation and responses to TNF{alpha} exposure was also investigated. Proliferation rates were greater in subcutaneous versus visceral preadipocytes (41 h(3) versus 69 h(4); P = 0.008). Insulin caused a dose-dependent increase in GSK-3 phosphorylation and an increase in MAPK phosphorylation over time, with increased sensitivity in subcutaneous preadipocytes. Post-differentiation, dose-dependent increases in GSK-3 phosphorylation were maintained, while MAPK phosphorylation was identical in both subtypes. No changes were observed in insulin receptor abundance pre-/post-differentiation. GLUT4 abundance was significantly increased in visceral versus subcutaneous adipocytes by 76(4)%; P = 0.03), coincidental with increased insulin-stimulated 2-deoxy-glucose transport (+150(26)% versus +79(10)%; P = 0.014) and further elevated by acute exposure to TNF{alpha} (+230(52)%; P = 0.019 versus +123(24)%; P = 0.025, respectively). TNF{alpha} also significantly increased basal glucose transport rates (+44(14)%; P = 0.006 versus +34(11)%; P = 0.007) and GLUT1 localisation to the plasma membrane. These data establish site-specific differences in subcutaneous and visceral fat cells from children. Responses to insulin varied with differentiation and TNF{alpha} exposure in the two depots, consistent with parallel changes in GLUT1/4 abundance and localisation.

  18. Circulating kisspeptin levels exhibit sexual dimorphism in adults, are increased in obese prepubertal girls and do not suffer modifications in girls with idiopathic central precocious puberty.

    PubMed

    Pita, Jimena; Barrios, Vicente; Gavela-Pérez, Teresa; Martos-Moreno, Gabriel Á; Muñoz-Calvo, María T; Pozo, Jesús; Rovira, Adela; Argente, Jesús; Soriano-Guillén, Leandro

    2011-09-01

    The system KISS1-KISS1R is one of the main regulators of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis and constitutes a link between metabolism and reproduction through its interaction with leptin. The aim of this study was to clarify the possible utility of kisspeptin as a pubertal marker and/or the possible influence of nutritional status in kisspeptin levels. To this end, we have studied kisspeptin plasma levels throughout sexual development and in prepubertal obese girls and girls affected by idiopathic central precocious puberty (CPP). Plasma kisspeptin concentrations were analyzed by RIA. An increase in kisspeptin levels was observed in adult females compared to healthy prepubertal and pubertal girls (p<0.001) and to adult males (p<0.001). Additionally, kisspeptin was increased in prepubertal obese girls compared to healthy prepubertal girls (p<0.01) and girls with idiopathic CPP (p<0.05). As revealed by the regression analysis, in prepubertal healthy and obese girls and girls with idiopathic CCP, the parameters that influenced kisspeptin levels were BMI (R(2)=0.10, p<0.05) and leptin levels (R(2)=0.14, p<0.01). In conclusion, kisspeptin levels do not seem to be a good pubertal marker. The results obtained in prepubertal and idiopathic CCP girls point to a relationship between leptin, BMI and kisspeptin at least in this group, and suggest a possible role for adipose tissue in the modulation kisspeptin synthesis.

  19. Hypothalamic obesity in children.

    PubMed

    Bereket, A; Kiess, W; Lustig, R H; Muller, H L; Goldstone, A P; Weiss, R; Yavuz, Y; Hochberg, Z

    2012-09-01

    Hypothalamic obesity is an intractable form of obesity syndrome that was initially described in patients with hypothalamic tumours and surgical damage. However, this definition is now expanded to include obesity developing after a variety of insults, including intracranial infections, infiltrations, trauma, vascular problems and hydrocephalus, in addition to acquired or congenital functional defects in central energy homeostasis in children with the so-called common obesity. The pathogenetic mechanisms underlying hypothalamic obesity are complex and multifactorial. Weight gain results from damage to the ventromedial hypothalamus, which leads, variously, to hyperphagia, a low-resting metabolic rate; autonomic imbalance; growth hormone-, gonadotropins and thyroid-stimulating hormone deficiency; hypomobility; and insomnia. Hypothalamic obesity did not receive enough attention, as evidenced by rarity of studies in this group of patients. A satellite symposium was held during the European Congress of Obesity in May 2011, in Istanbul, Turkey, to discuss recent developments and concepts regarding pathophysiology and management of hypothalamic obesity in children. An international group of leading researchers presented certain aspects of the problem. This paper summarizes the highlights of this symposium. Understanding the central role of the hypothalamus in the regulation of feeding and energy metabolism will help us gain insights into the pathogenesis and management of common obesity.

  20. Anthropometry, glucose homeostasis, and lipid profile in prepubertal children born early, full, or late term.

    PubMed

    Derraik, José G B; Savage, Tim; Miles, Harriet L; Mouat, Fran; Hofman, Paul L; Cutfield, Wayne S

    2014-09-29

    To examine differences in growth and metabolism in prepubertal children born early term, full term, and late term. We retrospectively studied 294 prepubertal children aged 7.3 years (range 3.0-12.1 years). Children were separated into those born early term (37 0/7-38 6/7 weeks of gestation; n = 68), full term (39 0/7-40 6/7 weeks; n = 179), and late term (41 0/7-41 6/7 weeks; n = 47). Clinical assessments included anthropometry, DXA-derived body composition, fasting lipids, and glucose homeostasis. Statistical models accounted for important confounding factors, such as gender, age, birth weight SDS, birth order, and parental variables. When birth weight was adjusted for sex and gestational age (birth weight SDS), late terms were heavier than both early (p = 0.034) and full (p = 0.020) terms. Early term children were shorter than both full (p = 0.010) and late (p = 0.049) term children, but differences in height disappeared following correction for parents' heights. There were no differences in glucose homeostasis, BMI SDS, adiposity, or fat distribution between groups. Lipid profiles were also similar. When important confounding factors were accounted for, there were no meaningful differences in anthropometry, glucose homeostasis, and lipid profile among children born early term, full term, or late term.

  1. Anthropometry, glucose homeostasis, and lipid profile in prepubertal children born early, full, or late term

    PubMed Central

    Derraik, José G. B.; Savage, Tim; Miles, Harriet L.; Mouat, Fran; Hofman, Paul L.; Cutfield, Wayne S.

    2014-01-01

    To examine differences in growth and metabolism in prepubertal children born early term, full term, and late term. We retrospectively studied 294 prepubertal children aged 7.3 years (range 3.0–12.1 years). Children were separated into those born early term (37 0/7–38 6/7 weeks of gestation; n = 68), full term (39 0/7–40 6/7 weeks; n = 179), and late term (41 0/7–41 6/7 weeks; n = 47). Clinical assessments included anthropometry, DXA-derived body composition, fasting lipids, and glucose homeostasis. Statistical models accounted for important confounding factors, such as gender, age, birth weight SDS, birth order, and parental variables. When birth weight was adjusted for sex and gestational age (birth weight SDS), late terms were heavier than both early (p = 0.034) and full (p = 0.020) terms. Early term children were shorter than both full (p = 0.010) and late (p = 0.049) term children, but differences in height disappeared following correction for parents' heights. There were no differences in glucose homeostasis, BMI SDS, adiposity, or fat distribution between groups. Lipid profiles were also similar. When important confounding factors were accounted for, there were no meaningful differences in anthropometry, glucose homeostasis, and lipid profile among children born early term, full term, or late term. PMID:25263327

  2. Hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular function in prepubertal children with chronic liver disease.

    PubMed

    Vaiani, Elisa; Ciocca, Mirta; Cuarterolo, Miriam; Imventarza, Oscar; Rivarola, Marco A; Belgorosky, Alicia

    2002-03-01

    Adult patients with chronic liver disease (CLD) show clinical and biochemical signs of hypogonadism and estrogenization. However, no information is available on hypothalamo-pituitary-testicular function in prepubertal or early pubertal children with CLD. Eighteen prepubertal children with CLD, aged 5.8+/-5.5 years (mean +/- SD; range 0.32-12.8), were studied. Most of them had moderate liver function abnormality. Height was slightly decreased (SDS: -1.44-/+1.88) but weight for height was adequate. Serum gonadotropins were evaluated as a function of age. In the age group younger than 1 year (n = 7), serum LH was elevated (4.88+/-6.22 IU/l) when compared with a group of 39 control children (1.2+/-1.65), while serum FSH was normal. In this young group, serum testosterone was normal, but serum estradiol was significantly increased (24.1+/-19.7 pg/ml) when compared with the control group (6.5+/-3.54). In contrast, in the age group older than 2 years, no difference between patients with CLD and controls was observed, either in serum gonadotropins or in serum sex hormones. Taking the 18 patients with CLD together, serum SHBG (113.7+/-51 nmol/l; mean +/- SD) was significantly higher than in normal controls (76+/-38 nmol/l, n = 91, p <0.001). Moreover, and different from normal controls, no change with age was observed in serum SHBG, total testosterone or bioavailable testosterone (non-SHBG-bound). Normal testosterone response to hCG stimulation (>1 ng/ml) was found in a subgroup of 11 children with CLD. By contrast, eight of 11 patients with CLD had an inadequate decrease in SHBG after androgen stimulation. In conclusion, we observed that during the first year of life, a period which includes the postnatal activation of the hypothalamo-pituitary-testicular axis, there is an elevation of serum LH and serum estradiol that suggests the existence of a moderate deficiency of Leydig cell function. This disorder is no longer observed in older prepubertal children. Similar to

  3. Quantitative ultrasound bone measurements in pre-pubertal children with type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Chobot, Agata P; Haffke, Anna; Polanska, Joanna; Halaba, Zenon P; Deja, Grazyna; Jarosz-Chobot, Przemyslawa; Pluskiewicz, Wojciech

    2012-07-01

    This case-control study aimed to assess bone status in children with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). Fifty-seven pre-pubertal patients (37 boys, aged 7.9 ± 2.5 years, T1DM duration 3.1 ± 1.6 years) and 171 age-matched healthy controls (111 boys) were studied. Quantitative ultrasound (QUS) was used to measure amplitude dependent speed of sound (Ad-SoS) at hand phalanges (expressed as standard deviation score [SDS]). Anthropometric and disease-related data (including mean HbA(1c) from whole T1DM duration [T], last year [Y], examination day [D]) were collected. Mean Ad-SoS SDS in patients -0.13 ± 1.32 (95% confidence interval [CI] -0.48, 0.22) was similar to that of controls. Subgroups discriminated according to HbA(1c) D, Y and T (cut-off 7.0%) did not differ regarding analyzed parameters. In patients, Ad-SoS SDS was comparable for both genders. Multivariable stepwise regression analysis showed significant negative influence of diabetes duration on Ad-SoS SDS. QUS findings in pre-pubertal children with T1DM do not differ from those in healthy children. Disease duration seems to affect negatively Ad-SoS SDS. However, independent prospective studies are needed to elucidate the true associations.

  4. Defining overweight and obesity - children

    MedlinePlus

    ... your child has. Measuring body fat and diagnosing obesity in children is different than measuring these things in adults. ... 44. US Preventive Services Task Force. Screening for obesity in ... adolescents: US Preventive Services Task Force recommendation ...

  5. Predicting total fat mass from skinfold thicknesses in Japanese prepubertal children: a cross-sectional and longitudinal validation.

    PubMed

    Midorikawa, Taishi; Ohta, Megumi; Hikihara, Yuki; Torii, Suguru; Bemben, Michael G; Sakamoto, Shizuo

    2011-01-01

    The present study was performed to develop regression based prediction equations for fat mass from skinfold thickness in Japanese children, and to investigate the cross-sectional and longitudinal validity of these equations. A total of 127 healthy Japanese prepubertal children aged 6-12 years were randomly separated into two groups: the model development group (54 boys and 44 girls) and the cross-sectional validation group (18 boys and 11 girls). Fat mass was initially determined by using DXA (Hologic Delphi A-QDR whole-body scanner) to provide reference data. Then, fat thickness was measured at triceps and subscapular using an Eiken-type skinfold calipers. Multiple anthropometric and DXA measures were obtained one year later for 28 of the original 127 subjects (longitudinal validation group: 14 boys and 14 girls). Strong significant correlations were observed between total fat mass by DXA measurement and the skinfold thickness × height measures by caliper in the model development group of boys and girls (R2=0.91-0.92, p<0.01). When these fat mass prediction equations were applied to the cross-sectional and longitudinal validation groups, the measured total fat mass was also very similar to the predicted fat mass. In addition, there were significant correlations between the measured and predicted total fat mass for boys and girls, respectively, although Bland-Altman analysis indicated a bias in cross-sectional validation group. Skinfold-derived prediction equations underestimate for obese children but are generally useful for estimating total fat mass in field research.

  6. Central Adiposity is Negatively Associated with Hippocampal-Dependent Relational Memory among Overweight and Obese Children

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Naiman A.; Baym, Carol L.; Monti, Jim M.; Raine, Lauren B.; Drollette, Eric S.; Scudder, Mark R.; Moore, R. Davis; Kramer, Arthur F.; Hillman, Charles H.; Cohen, Neal J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess associations between adiposity and hippocampal-dependent and hippocampal-independent memory forms among prepubertal children. Study design Prepubertal children (7–9-year-olds, n = 126), classified as non-overweight (<85th %tile BMI-for-age [n = 73]) or overweight/obese (≥85th %tile BMI-for-age [n = 53]), completed relational (hippocampal-dependent) and item (hippocampal-independent) memory tasks, and performance was assessed with both direct (behavioral accuracy) and indirect (preferential disproportionate viewing [PDV]) measures. Adiposity (%whole body fat mass, subcutaneous abdominal adipose tissue, visceral adipose tissue, and total abdominal adipose tissue) was assessed using DXA. Backward regressions identified significant (P <0.05) predictive models of memory performance. Covariates included age, sex, pubertal timing, socioeconomic status, IQ, oxygen consumption (VO2max), and body mass index (BMI) z-score. Results Among overweight/obese children, total abdominal adipose tissue was a significant negative predictor of relational memory behavioral accuracy, and pubertal timing together with socioeconomic status jointly predicted the PDV measure of relational memory. In contrast, among non-overweight children, male sex predicted item memory behavioral accuracy, and a model consisting of socioeconomic status and BMI z-score jointly predicted the PDV measure of relational memory. Conclusions Regional, and not whole body, fat deposition was selectively and negatively associated with hippocampal-dependent relational memory among overweight/obese prepubertal children. PMID:25454939

  7. Stunting delays maturation of triceps surae mechanical properties and motor performance in prepubertal children.

    PubMed

    Paiva, Maria das Graças; Souza, Thaysa O L; Canon, Francis; Pérot, Chantal; Xavier, Luciana C C; Ferraz, Karla M; Osório, Mônica M; Manhães-de-Castro, Raul; Lambertz, Daniel

    2012-12-01

    Malnutrition can lead to possible irreversible consequences in the development of muscle function and some of them are yet poorly characterized. The present study evaluated the mechanical properties of the triceps surae and motor performance in stunted (S) and eutrophic (E) prepubertal children (9 years ± 6 months). Height-for-age ratio was used as indicator of stunting due to early malnutrition, according to the World Health Organization. Torque was determined by maximal voluntary contractions (MVC) and musculotendinous (MT) stiffness was achieved through quick-release tests to obtain MT stiffness index (SI(MT)) and passive stiffness (K (p)) from linear MT stiffness-torque relationships. Percutaneous supramaximal electrically elicited contractions determined twitch torque (Pt) and electromechanical delay (EMD). Motor performance was evaluated by balance test. S group presented significantly lower MVC and a trend of lower Pt values indicating lower capacities to develop force under voluntary or induced conditions. Significantly higher SI(MT) and EMD values were observed, while K (p) and motor performance in balance were significantly lower. Higher SI(MT) values have been reported previously in youngest prepubertal children, indicating that immature activation capacities can mask MT stiffness assessment during voluntary contractions, taking into consideration the higher EMD values as a measure of muscle stiffness contribution. Lower K (p) may indicate a delay in the maturation of tendinous tissue in S group, influencing motor performance in balance. The present study shows that malnutrition leads to adaptation of intrinsic MT elastic properties, but depends on the level of the observed structure.

  8. Relationship of handgrip strength with anthropometric and body composition variables in prepubertal children.

    PubMed

    Jürimäe, T; Hurbo, T; Jürimäe, J

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the relationship of handgrip strength with basic anthropometric variables, hand anthropometric variables, total body and hand composition, total body and hand bone mineral density (BMD) and bone mineral content (BMC) in prepubertal children aged between 8 and 11 years (n=64, 27 boys, 37 girls). Height and body mass were measured and body mass index (BMI kg/m2) was calculated. Biceps and triceps skinfolds, arm relaxed, arm flexed, forearm and wrist girths, acromiale-radiale, radiale-stylion-radiale and midstylion-dactylion length and humerus breadth were measured. Specific hand anthropometric variables according to Visnapuu and Jürimäe [2007. Handgrip strength and hand dimensions in young handball and basketball players. J. Strength Cond. Res. 21, 923-929] were used. Five fingers' spans, fingers' lengths and perimeters of the hand were measured. Total body and right-hand fat percentage, fat mass and lean mass (LBM) were measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). Right-hand BMC and BMD were analysed from the bone variables. Maximal handgrip strength of the right hand was measured with the hand dynamometer. Stepwise multiple regression analysis indicated that the most important predictive value from the basic anthropometric variables was body height, explaining 76.1% (R2 x 100), 40.7% and 50.6% of the handgrip strength in boys, girls and total group, respectively. Measured skinfold thicknesses and breadths were not related to handgrip strength in any group. Forearm girths significantly predicted handgrip strength in boys (30.8%), girls (43.4%) and total group (43.4%). As a rule, handgrip strength was more dependent on the anthropometric and body composition variables in boys than girls. It was concluded that body height, forearm girth, midstylion-dactylion and acromiale-radiale length and hand LBM and BMC are the most limiting factors influencing handgrip strength in prepubertal children.

  9. Bioelectrical impedance vector analysis for evaluating zinc supplementation in prepubertal and healthy children

    PubMed Central

    Dantas, Márcia Marília Gomes; Rocha, Érika Dantas Medeiros; Brito, Naira Josele Neves; Alves, Camila Xavier; França, Mardone Cavalcante; Almeida, Maria das Graças; Brandão-Neto, José

    2015-01-01

    Background The prevalence of abnormal nutritional status has increased in children and adolescents. Nutritional assessment is important for monitoring the health and nutritional status. Bioelectrical impedance vector analysis (BIVA) combines changes in tissue hydration and structure and body composition that can be assessed. Objectives The objective of this study was to use BIVA to evaluate nutritional status in 60 prepubertal children, aged between 8 and 9 years, supplemented with zinc, to detect possible changes in body composition. Design We performed a randomized, controlled, triple-blind study. The children were divided into the control group (CG; sorbitol 10%, n=29) or the experimental group (EG; 10 mg Zn/day, n=31), and the duration of the experiment was 3 months. Anthropometric assessments were performed for all of the children. Results The body mass index-for-age increased after oral zinc supplementation in the EG (p=0.005). BIVA indicated that the CG demonstrated a tendency for dehydration and decreased soft tissue and the EG demonstrated a tendency for increased soft tissue, primarily the fat-free mass. After analyses of BIVA ellipses, we observed that this method could detect improvements in body composition in healthy children supplemented with zinc. Conclusions These results suggest that BIVA could be an auxiliary method for studying a small population undergoing zinc intervention. PMID:26425922

  10. Marked elevation of adrenal steroids, especially androgens, in saliva of prepubertal autistic children.

    PubMed

    Majewska, Maria Dorota; Hill, Martin; Urbanowicz, Ewa; Rok-Bujko, Paulina; Bieńkowski, Przemysław; Namysłowska, Irena; Mierzejewski, Paweł

    2014-06-01

    Autism is diagnosed on the basis of behavioral manifestations, but its biomarkers are not well defined. A strong gender bias typifying autism (it is 4-5 times more prevalent in males) suggests involvement of steroid hormones in autism pathobiology. In order to evaluate the potential roles of such hormones in autism, we compared the salivary levels of 22 steroids in prepubertal autistic male and female children from two age groups (3-4 and 7-9 years old) with those in healthy controls. The steroids were analyzed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and radioimmunoassay. Statistical analysis (ANOVA) revealed that autistic children had significantly higher salivary concentrations of many steroid hormones (both C21 and C19) than control children. These anomalies were more prominent in older autistic children and in boys. The levels of androgens (androstenediol, dehydroepiandrosterone, androsterone and their polar conjugates) were especially increased, indicative of precocious adrenarche and predictive of early puberty. The concentrations of the steroid precursor, pregnenolone, and of several pregnanolones were also higher in autistic than in healthy children, but cortisol levels were not different. Some steroids, whose levels are raised in autism (allopregnanolone, androsterone, pregnenolone, dehydroepiandrosterone and their sulfate conjugates) are neuroactive and modulate GABA, glutamate, and opioid neurotransmission, affecting brain development and functioning. These steroids may contribute to autism pathobiology and symptoms such as elevated anxiety, sleep disturbances, sensory deficits, and stereotypies among others. We suggest that salivary levels of selected steroids may serve as biomarkers of autism pathology useful for monitoring the progress of therapy.

  11. Biobehavioral factors are associated with obesity in Puerto Rican children.

    PubMed

    Tanasescu, M; Ferris, A M; Himmelgreen, D A; Rodriguez, N; Pérez-Escamilla, R

    2000-07-01

    The purpose of this case-control study was to identify predictors of obesity among Puerto Rican children from Hartford, CT. The study included 53 prepubertal children, 31 girls and 22 boys, between 7 and 10 y of age. Children were classified as obese [n = 29, body mass index (BMI) >/= 85th percentile] or controls (n = 24, BMI < 85th percentile). Multivariate logistic regression analyses indicated that frequency of fruit juice consumption [odds ratio (OR), 95% confidence interval (CI); 4.02, 1.48-10.95], hours of daily TV viewing (1.86, 1.02-3.42), maternal BMI (1.39, 1.10-1.77) and lower dairy product intake (0.41, 0.19-0.93) were associated with obesity. Television viewing was correlated (P < 0.05) with lower physical activity in girls, and with higher snacking frequency and sweets consumption in boys. Obese children were more likely than controls to have higher systolic and diastolic blood pressures and to have experienced more ear infections and diarrhea during the previous year. Results provide evidence of the multifactorial nature of childhood obesity in this community.

  12. Effects of resistance training on tendon mechanical properties and rapid force production in prepubertal children

    PubMed Central

    Waugh, C. M.; Korff, T.; Fath, F.

    2014-01-01

    Children develop lower levels of muscle force, and at slower rates, than adults. Although strength training in children is expected to reduce this differential, a synchronous adaptation in the tendon must be achieved to ensure forces continue to be transmitted to the skeleton with efficiency while minimizing the risk of strain-related tendon injury. We hypothesized that resistance training (RT) would alter tendon mechanical properties in children concomitantly with changes in force production characteristics. Twenty prepubertal children (age 8.9 ± 0.3 yr) were equally divided into control (nontraining) and experimental (training) groups. The training group completed a 10-wk RT intervention consisting of 2–3 sets of 8–15 plantar flexion contractions performed twice weekly on a recumbent calf-raise machine. Achilles tendon properties (cross-sectional area, elongation, stress, strain, stiffness, and Young's modulus), electromechanical delay (EMD; time between the onset of muscle activity and force), rate of force development (RFD; slope of the force-time curve), and rate of electromyographic (EMG) increase (REI; slope of the EMG time curve) were measured before and after RT. Tendon stiffness and Young's modulus increased significantly after RT in the experimental group only (∼29% and ∼25%, respectively); all other tendon properties were not significantly altered, although there were mean decreases in both peak tendon strain and strain at a given force level (14% and 24%, respectively; not significant) which may have implications for tendon injury risk and muscle fiber mechanics. A decrease of ∼13% in EMD was found after RT for the experimental group, which paralleled the increase in tendon stiffness (r = −0.59); however, RFD and REI were unchanged. The present data show that the Achilles tendon adapts to RT in prepubertal children and is paralleled by a change in EMD, although the magnitude of this change did not appear to be sufficient to influence RFD

  13. Retinol-binding protein 4 correlates with triglycerides but not insulin resistance in prepubertal children with and without premature adrenarche

    PubMed Central

    Sopher, Aviva B.; Gerken, Adrienne T.; Lee, Eun-Ju; Blaner, William E.; Deeds, Stefanie; Gallagher, Dympna; Shungu, Dikoma C.; Mao, Xiangling; Hassoun, Abeer; McMahon, Donald J.; Oberfield, Sharon E.

    2013-01-01

    Background Retinol-binding protein 4 (RBP4) has been proposed as an early marker for insulin resistance (IR), but no prior studies have addressed RBP4 in an exclusively prepubertal population. Children with premature adrenarche (PA) are at increased risk for IR and metabolic syndrome (MeS), thus finding an appropriate early marker for IR in this population would allow for early intervention and prevention of morbidity related to IR and MeS. Objective To determine whether prepubertal children with PA have higher levels of RBP4 than controls and whether RBP4 correlates with comorbidities of metabolic disease in prepubertal children. Subjects This study comprised 49 prepubertal children (24 with PA and 25 control subjects), 20 boys and 29 girls, who were between the ages of 5 and 9 years. Methods This was a cross-sectional, case-control study conducted in a subspecialty ambulatory clinic based in a quaternary care center. RBP4 levels, hormonal values, lipids and response to an oral glucose tolerance test were evaluated in children with PA and controls, and body composition measures were obtained in a subset of patients (n=18). Results RBP4 correlated with triglycerides (r = 0.57, P < 0.0001) but did not correlate with IR in a body mass index z-score-adjusted Pearson correlation analysis. There was no difference in RBP4 levels between the PA and control groups. Conclusions These findings suggest that RBP4 may be an early marker of dyslipidemia, which may herald future onset of hepatic IR, polycystic ovary syndrome and MeS. PMID:22145457

  14. Children with a Prepubertal and Early Adolescent Bipolar Disorder Phenotype from Pediatric Versus Psychiatric Facilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tillman, Rebecca; Geller, Barbara; Frazier, Jeanne; Beringer, Linda; Zimerman, Betsy; Klages, Tricia; Bolhofner, Kristine

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To examine characteristics between subjects with a prepubertal and early adolescent bipolar disorder phenotype from pediatric versus psychiatric venues. Method: Subjects (N = 93) with a prepubertal and early adolescent bipolar disorder phenotype were obtained through consecutive new case ascertainment from designated pediatric and…

  15. Nutritional assessment methods for zinc supplementation in prepubertal non-zinc-deficient children

    PubMed Central

    Lopes, Márcia Marília Gomes Dantas; de Brito, Naira Josele Neves; de Medeiros Rocha, Érika Dantas; França, Mardone Cavalcante; de Almeida, Maria das Graças; Brandão-Neto, José

    2015-01-01

    Background Zinc is an essential nutrient that is required for numerous metabolic functions, and zinc deficiency results in growth retardation, cell-mediated immune dysfunction, and cognitive impairment. Objective This study evaluated nutritional assessment methods for zinc supplementation in prepubertal non-zinc-deficient children. Design We performed a randomised, controlled, triple-blind study. The children were divided into a control group (10% sorbitol, n=31) and an experimental group (10 mg Zn/day, n=31) for 3 months. Anthropometric and dietary assessments as well as bioelectrical measurements were performed in all children. Results Our study showed (1) an increased body mass index for age and an increased phase angle in the experimental group; (2) a positive correlation between nutritional assessment parameters in both groups; (3) increased soft tissue, and mainly fat-free mass, in the body composition of the experimental group, as determined using bioelectrical impedance vector analysis; (4) increased consumption of all nutrients, including zinc, in the experimental group; and (5) an increased serum zinc concentration in both groups (p<0.0001). Conclusions Given that a reference for body composition analysis does not exist for intervention studies, longitudinal studies are needed to investigate vector migration during zinc supplementation. These results reinforce the importance of employing multiple techniques to assess the nutritional status of populations. PMID:26507491

  16. Maximal aerobic power during running and cycling in obese and non-obese children.

    PubMed

    Maffeis, C; Schena, F; Zaffanello, M; Zoccante, L; Schutz, Y; Pinelli, L

    1994-01-01

    The maximal aerobic capacity while running and cycling was measured in 22 prepubertal children (mean age +/- SD 9.5 +/- 0.8 years): 14 obese (47.3 +/- 10 kg) and 8 non-obese (31.1 +/- 6.1 kg). Oxygen consumption (VO2) and carbon dioxide production were measured by an open circuit method. Steady state VO2 was determined at different levels of exercise up to the maximal power on the cycloergometer (92 W in obese and 77 W in non-obese subjects) and up to the maximal running speed on the treadmill at a 2% slope (8.3 km/h in obese and 9.0 km/h in lean children). Expressed in absolute values, the VO2max in obese children was significantly higher than in controls (1.55 +/- 0.29 l/min versus 1.23 +/- 0.22 l/min, p < 0.05) for the treadmill test and comparable in the two groups (1.4 +/- 0.2 l/min versus 1.16 +/- 0.2 l/min, ns) for the cycloergometer test. When VO2max was expressed per kg fat free mass, the difference between the two groups disappeared for both tests. These data suggest that obese children had no limitation of maximal aerobic power. Therefore, the magnitude of the workload prescribed when a physical activity program is intended for the therapy of childhood obesity, it should be designed to increase caloric output rather than to improve cardiorespiratory fitness.

  17. Relationships between legs bone mineral density, anthropometry and jumping height in prepubertal children.

    PubMed

    Jürimäe, Toivo; Hurbo, Tanya; Jürimäe, Jaak

    2008-03-01

    The aim of this study was to determine how the legs bone mineral density (BMD) is influenced by anthropometry and vertical jumping height in prepubertal children. In total, 64 8-11-year-old schoolchildren (27 boys and 37 girls) were studied. All children were at Tanner stage 1. The subjects' height and body mass were measured and BMI calculated. The following anthropometric parameters directly connected with leg were measured: skinfolds--front thigh and medial calf girths--gluteal, thigh, mid-thigh, calf and ankle; lengths--iliospinale height, trochanterion height, trochanteriontibiale laterale, tibiale-laterale height and tibiale mediale-spyrion tibiale; and breadths--biiliocristal, foot length and biepicondylar femur. Total body and legs fat mass and fat %, lean body mass (LBM) and both legs BMD were measured by DXA. Maximal jumping height was measured on the contact mat. Stepwise multiple regression analysis indicated that body height in boys (54.6%; R2 x 100) and body mass in girls (57.3%) were the most important basic anthropometric parameters that influenced BMD in legs. From the measured skinfolds, that of the front thigh characterized legs BMD by 24.9-35.6%. From the girths, the most important parameter to characterize legs BMD was that of calf (50.0-59.1%). Tibiale laterale height was the only length parameter which was highly related with legs BMD (51.1-54.5%). Biepicondylar femur was the most important breadth parameter which characterized legs BMD (51.0-54.8%). Femur breadth and tibiale-laterale height were selected (68.7%) in boys, and tibiale-laterale height and front thigh skinfold thickness (66.0%) in girls when all measured leg anthropometric parameters were analyzed together. From the body composition parameters, the most important parameter to characterize legs BMD was legs LBM (48.9-59.5%). Jumping height did not correlate with legs BMD in any studied groups. In summary, the present study demonstrated that legs LBM together with tibiale

  18. Suppression of urinary and plasma follicle-stimulating hormone by exogenous estrogens in prepubertal and pubertal children.

    PubMed

    Kelch, R P; Kaplan, S L; Ghumbach, M M

    1973-05-01

    Clomiphene citrate, an "anti-estrogen" with mild estrogenic properties, inhibits rather than stimulates gonadotropin excretion in prepubertal and early pubertal children. These and other data suggest that the sensitivity of the hypothalamic-pituitary "gonadostat" decreases at the onset of puberty. To test this hypothesis further, the daily excretion of urinary follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH) was determined in 19 children (5 "short normals" and 14 with isolated human growth hormone (HGH) deficiency) who were given ethinyl estradiol (EE) 1.4-14.7 mug/m(2) per day (2-10 mug/day) for 4 to 7 days. In addition, plasma and urinary gonadotropins and plasma estrogens were serially determined in two prepubertal females(with isolated HGH deficiency) given two injections (24 h apart) of estradiol benzoate, 10 mug/kg. FSH and LH concentrations in plasma and kaolin-acetone urinary concentrates and plasma 17beta-estradiol (E(2)) and estrone (E(1)) were measured by radioimmunoassays. 2-3 mug/m(2) per day of EE significantly suppressed urinary FSH (and LH when detected in the control period) in two out of six prepubertal children, while all doses >5 mug/m(2) per day suppressed urinary gonadotropins to undetectable levels in eight prepubertal subjects. In early to midpubertal subjects. 2-10 mug/m(2) per day of EE produced a slight suppression of urinary FSH, but failed to suppress to undetectable levels. Two subjects in late puberty (stage 4) did not suppress their urinary FSH while on 7 and 8.3 mug/m(2) per day. In both subjects treated with estradiol benzoate, plasma FSH promptly decreased after the first injection. Urinary FSH was suppressed to <0.1 IU/day on day 2 and urinary and plasma gonadotropins remained suppressed for the duration of the study (3 days). Plasma E(2) and E(1) rose from prepubertal values to peak concentrations of 150 to 250 pg/ml (E(2)), and 50 and 100 pg/ml (E(1)) at approximately 36 h. We conclude that the hypothalamic

  19. Maternal obesity disturbs the postnatal development of gonocytes in the rat without impairment of testis structure at prepubertal age.

    PubMed

    Christante, Caroline Maria; Taboga, Sebastião Roberto; Pinto-Fochi, Maria Etelvina; Góes, Rejane Maira

    2013-12-01

    In this study, we evaluated whether maternal obesity (MO) affects testis development and gonocyte differentiation in the rat from 0.5 to 14.5 postnatal days. Male Wistar rats were used at 0.5, 4.5, 7.5, and 14.5 days post partum (dpp). These rats were born from obese mothers, previously fed with a high-fat diet (20% saturated fat), for 15 weeks, or normal mothers that had received a balanced murine diet (4% lipids). MO did not affect testis weight or histology at birth but changed the migratory behavior of gonocytes. The density of relocated cells was higher in MO pups at 0.5 dpp, decreased at 4.5 dpp, and differed from those of control pups, where density increased exponentially from 0.5 to 7.5 dpp. The numerical density of gonocytes within seminiferous cords did not vary in MO, in relation to control neonates, for any age considered, but the testis weight was 50% lower at 4.5 dpp. A wide variation in plasmatic testosterone and estrogen levels was observed among the groups during the first week of age and MO pups exhibited higher steroid concentrations at 4.5 dpp, in comparison with controls. At this age, higher estrogen levels of MO pups impaired the gonocyte proliferation. At 7.5 dpp, the testicular size and other parameters of gonocyte development are retrieved. In conclusion, MO and saturated lipid diets disturb gonocyte development and sexual steroid levels during the first days of life, with recovery at prepubertal age.

  20. [EPIDIDYMO-ORCHITIS IN PREPUBERTAL CHILDREN--PREVALENCE, ETIOLOGY, SUGGESTED DIAGNOSIS ALGORITHM].

    PubMed

    Halachmi, Sarel

    2015-12-01

    Gonadal inflammation (GI) is a common disease that may affect prepubertal boys. Neonates may suffer from bacterial infection due to congenital or aging processes affecting the urinary tract. This inflammatory process is also prevalent in prepubertal boys. However, in this group, the etiology, the needed imaging modalities and proper management have not yet been clearly defined. This manuscript will systematically review the various etiologies causing GI in pre-pubertal boys, discuss the proper imaging needed, and image interpretation and will provide treatment and follow-up recommendations. PMID:26897785

  1. Bone Density, Osteocalcin and Deoxypyridinoline for Early Detection of Osteoporosis in Obese Children

    PubMed Central

    El-Dorry, Ghada; Ashry, Hala; Ibrahim, Tarek; Elias, Tahany; Alzaree, Fatma

    2015-01-01

    AIM: This study aimed at comparing between bone density using DEXA, serum osteocalcin and urinary DPD in obese and non obese prepubertal children. METHODS: After taking the consent of eighty children they were subjected to: full examination, anthropometric measurements, blood samples were withdrawn to determine serum osteocalcin, Ca, Ph, alkaline phosphatase, and urinary DPD. Bone densities, body composition of the whole body were examined using DEXA. Data were analyzed using SPSS. RESULTS: All anthropometric variables showed significant increase in obese children except for height in comparison to control group. Total mass, lean + BMC, lean, fat, area, BMC, BMD and Z score of the whole body were significantly increased in obese children. Serum calcium showed significant increase while alkaline phosphatase was significantly decreased in obese children. DPD showed no significant difference between obese and non obese children. Significant negative correlation was found between ca, lean, lean + BMC and total mass. Serum alkaline phosphatase showed also a significant negative correlation with (lean + BMC and total mass). Serum osteocalcin showed negative significant correlation with area, BMC, BMD, lean and Z score. CONCLUSION: Obese children showed significant increase in anthropometric and DEXA parameters, increase in serum calcium and significant decrease in serum alkaline phosphatase. Osteocalcin was negatively correlated with most of DEXA results. PMID:27275260

  2. Major cardiac surgery induces an increase in sex steroids in prepubertal children.

    PubMed

    Heckmann, Matthias; d'Uscio, Claudia H; de Laffolie, Jan; Neuhaeuser, Christoph; Bödeker, Rolf-Hasso; Thul, Josef; Schranz, Dietmar; Frey, Brigitte M

    2014-03-01

    While the neuroprotective benefits of estrogen and progesterone in critical illness are well established, the data regarding the effects of androgens are conflicting. Surgical repair of congenital heart disease is associated with significant morbidity and mortality, but there are scant data regarding the postoperative metabolism of sex steroids in this setting. The objective of this prospective observational study was to compare the postoperative sex steroid patterns in pediatric patients undergoing major cardiac surgery (MCS) versus those undergoing less intensive non-cardiac surgery. Urinary excretion rates of estrogen, progesterone, and androgen metabolites (μg/mmol creatinine/m(2) body surface area) were determined in 24-h urine samples before and after surgery using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry in 29 children undergoing scheduled MCS and in 17 control children undergoing conventional non-cardiac surgery. Eight of the MCS patients had Down's syndrome. There were no significant differences in age, weight, or sex between the groups. Seven patients from the MCS group showed multi-organ dysfunction after surgery. Before surgery, the median concentrations of 17β-estradiol, pregnanediol, 5α-dihydrotestosterone (DHT), and dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) were (control/MCS) 0.1/0.1 (NS), 12.4/11.3 (NS), 4.7/4.4 (NS), and 2.9/1.1 (p=0.02). Postoperatively, the median delta 17β-estradiol, delta pregnanediol, delta DHT, and delta DHEA were (control/MCS) 0.2/6.4 (p=0.0002), -3.2/23.4 (p=0.013), -0.6/3.7 (p=0.0004), and 0.5/4.2 (p=0.004). Postoperative changes did not differ according to sex. We conclude that MCS, but not less intensive non-cardiac surgery, induced a distinct postoperative increase in sex steroid levels. These findings suggest that sex steroids have a role in postoperative metabolism following MCS in prepubertal children.

  3. Is there an association between variables of postural control and strength in prepubertal children?

    PubMed

    Granacher, Urs; Gollhofer, Albert

    2012-01-01

    The risk of sustaining falls and sports-related injuries is particularly high in children. Deficits in balance and muscle strength represent 2 important intrinsic fall and injury-risk factors. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between variables of static and dynamic postural control and isometric and dynamic muscle strength and to find out whether there is an association between measures of postural control and muscle strength in prepubertal children. Thirty children participated in this study (age 6.7 ± 0.5 years; body mass index 16.0 ± 1.8 kg·m(-2)). Biomechanic tests included the measurements of maximal isometric torque and rate of force development (RFD) of the plantar flexors on an isokinetic device, jumping power and height (countermovement jump [CMJ]) on a force plate, and the assessment of static and dynamic posture during bipedal stance on a balance platform. The significance level was set at p < 0.05. No significant associations were observed between variables of static and dynamic postural control. Significant positive correlations were detected between the RFD of the plantar flexors and CMJ height (r = 0.425, p < 0.01). No statistically significant associations were found between measures of postural control and muscle strength. The nonsignificant correlations between static and dynamic postural control and muscle strength imply that primarily dynamic measures of postural control should be incorporated in fall and injury-risk assessment and that postural control and muscle strength appear to be independent of each other and may have to be trained in a complementary manner for fall and injury-preventive purposes. PMID:22201695

  4. Perianal findings in prepubertal children selected for nonabuse: a descriptive study.

    PubMed

    McCann, J; Voris, J; Simon, M; Wells, R

    1989-01-01

    The results of the perianal portion of a project designed to collect normative data of the anogenital anatomy from a representative sample of prepubertal children is presented. A total of 318 children were examined by three physicians from a child sexual abuse evaluation program. After screening for the onset of puberty and the possibility of undetected abuse, 267 subjects remained. The sample included 161 girls and 106 boys ranging in age from 2 months to 11 years. The perianal findings that were encountered with the greatest frequency included erythema (41%), increased pigmentation (30%), and venous engorgement (52%) after two minutes in the knee-chest position. Wedge-shaped smooth areas in the midline, with or without depressions, were found both anterior and posterior to the anus in 26% of the children. Anal skin tags/folds were discovered anterior to the anus in 11%. In 49% of the children there was some dilatation of the anus which opened and closed intermittently in 62%. Flattening of the anal verge and rugae occurred during dilatation by the midpoint of the examination in 44% and 34%, respectively. Perianal findings that were found infrequently in all subgroups included skin tags/folds (0%) and scars (1%) outside the midline, anal dilatation greater than 20 mm without the presence of stool in the rectal ampulla (1.2%), irregularity of the anal orifice after complete dilatation (3%), and prominence of the anal verge (3%). No abrasions, hematomas, fissures, or hemorrhoids were encountered. Less commonly detected findings within specific subgroups included perianal erythema in girls (32%) as compared to boys (57%), pigmentation in the lighter skinned white children (22%) when compared to black (53%) and Hispanic (58%) children, and venous congestion at the beginning of the examination (7%) when compared to the same findings after four minutes in the knee-chest position (73%). There were no perianal skin tags/folds found in the boys. The relatively high

  5. Obesity and inflammation in children.

    PubMed

    Schwarzenberg, Sarah Jane; Sinaiko, Alan R

    2006-12-01

    Systemic inflammation is present in children and adults with obesity. Inflammation associated with obesity appears to be central to the development of insulin resistance and atherosclerosis and may be important in the pathogenesis of other comorbid conditions. Although generally considered an inert energy storage tissue, white adipose tissue is a metabolically active organ. It produces a number of inflammatory cytokines and acute-phase reactants. Inflammation associated with obesity declines after weight loss and with exercise. It may also be possible to modify obesity-associated inflammation with medications, reducing comorbidities without weight loss. The study of inflammation in the context of excessive adipose tissue is central to understanding obesity and modifying its impact on patients.

  6. Dosing dilemmas in obese children.

    PubMed

    Mulla, H; Johnson, T N

    2010-08-01

    With the epidemic of childhood obesity, it is not uncommon for prescribers to puzzle over an appropriate drug dose for an obese child. Defining the optimum therapeutic dose of a drug relies on an understanding of pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. Both these processes can be affected by body composition and the physiological changes that occur in obese children. As a rule of thumb, 75% of excess weight in obese subjects is fat mass, and the remainder lean mass. Although it is reasonable to assume that increases in fat mass alter the distribution of lipophilic drugs and increases in lean mass alter drug clearance, good quality and consistent clinical data supporting these assumptions are lacking for the majority of drugs. The relatively few clinical studies that have evaluated the impact of obesity have often been limited by poor design and insufficient sample size. Moreover, clinical studies conducted during drug development rarely include (or are required to include) obese subjects. Guidance on dosing obese children ought to be provided by drug manufacturers. This could be achieved by including obese patients in studies where possible, enabling the effect of body size on pharmacotherapy to be evaluated. This approach could be further augmented by the use of physiologically based-pharmacokinetic models during early (preclinical) development to predict the impact of obesity on drug disposition, and subsequent clinical studies later in development to provide confirmatory proof. In the meantime, for the majority of drugs already prescribed in children, particularly those where the therapeutic range is narrow or there is significant toxicity, the lack of a validated body size descriptor to use at the bedside means the choice of dose will rely on empirical experience and application of the precautionary principle. PMID:20585055

  7. Establishing abdominal height cut-offs and their association with conventional indices of obesity among Arab children and adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Al-Daghri, Nasser; Alokail, Majed; Al-Attas, Omar; Sabico, Shaun; Kumar, Sudhesh

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Obesity, particularly childhood obesity is common in the Middle East, but no studies have examined the relationship of sagittal abdominal diameter (SAD) or abdominal height to conventional markers of obesity in this region. This is the first study to document the association of SAD with measures of obesity among Arab children and adolescents. METHODS: Nine hundred sixty-four Saudi children aged 5-17 years (365 prepubertal, including 146 boys and 219 girls; 249 pubertal, including 125 boys and 124 girls; and 350 postpubertal, including 198 boys and 152 girls) were included in this cross-sectional study. RESULTS: SAD was significantly correlated with indices of obesity regardless of gender, but was strongest among pubertal boys. The cut-off values were as follows: for prepubertal children, 14 cm (equivalent to 50th percentile among girls and 60th percentile among boys); for pubertal children, 15 cm for girls (30th percentile) and 16 cm for boys (50th percentile), and for postpubertal, 21.5 cm for girls (70th percentile) and 22 cm for boys (80th percentile). CONCLUSION: SAD is a reliable indicator of visceral obesity among Arab children and adolescents in particular. Prospective studies should be done to determine whether such an association translates to a promising risk factor for hard endpoints such as diabetes mellitus and coronary heart disease. PMID:20427937

  8. [Obesity in children].

    PubMed

    Azcona, C; Patiño, A; Ramos, M; Ruza, E; Raggio, S; Alonso, L

    2000-01-01

    Obesity during childhood and adolescence is an increasingly common complaint in our daily clinical practice. The increase in its prevalence makes paediatrician worry about this disease, which is now considered an epidemic by the World Health Organisation. Obesity is a complex disease. Its aetiology is not yet clear, due to the multiple factors involved: environment, genetics, behaviour, life style, neuroendocrinology and metabolism. Persistent obesity increases the risk of suffering from diabetes, cardiovascular disease, hypertension, and gallbladder disease. The treatment of obesity is problematic and there are few patients who persist on a long term weight reduction programme. A multidisciplinary approach is therefore required. Paediatricians, dieticians, nurses, psychologists and psychiatrist should intervene in the treatment programme. Dietary changes must combine a decrease in energy intake and an increase in energy expenditure, inculcating both healthy eating habits and lifestyle without interfering in the child's growth and development.

  9. High prevalence of lipoatrophy in pre-pubertal South African children on antiretroviral therapy: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Despite changes in WHO guidelines, stavudine is still used extensively for treatment of pediatric HIV in the developing world. Lipoatrophy in sub-Saharan African children can be stigmatizing and have far-reaching consequences. The severity and extent of lipoatrophy in pre-pubertal children living in sub-Saharan Africa is unknown. Methods In this cross-sectional study, children who were 3-12 years old, on antiretroviral therapy and pre-pubertal were recruited from a Family HIV Clinic in South Africa. Lipoatrophy was identified and graded by consensus between two HIV pediatricians using a standardized grading scale. A professional dietician performed formal dietary assessment and anthropometric measurements of trunk and limb fat. Previous antiretroviral exposures were recorded. In a Dual-Energy X-ray Absorbtiometry (DXA) substudy body composition was determined in 42 participants. Results Among 100 recruits, the prevalence of visually obvious lipoatrophy was 36% (95% CI: 27%–45%). Anthropometry and DXA measurements corroborated the clinical diagnosis of lipoatrophy: Both confirmed significant, substantial extremity fat loss in children with visually obvious lipoatrophy, when adjusted for age and sex. Adjusted odds ratio for developing lipoatrophy was 1.9 (95% CI: 1.3 - 2.9) for each additional year of accumulated exposure to standard dose stavudine. Cumulative time on standard dose stavudine was significantly associated with reductions in biceps and triceps skin-fold thickness (p=0.008). Conclusions The prevalence of visually obvious lipoatrophy in pre-pubertal South African children on antiretroviral therapy is high. The amount of stavudine that children are exposed to needs review. Resources are needed to enable low-and-middle-income countries to provide suitable pediatric-formulated alternatives to stavudine-based pediatric regimens. The standard stavudine dose for children may need to be reduced. Diagnosis of lipoatrophy at an early stage is

  10. Obesity in children

    MedlinePlus

    ... exercise choices. Food may be used as a reward or to comfort a child. These learned habits ... your child is not athletic, find ways to motivate your child to be more active. Encourage children ...

  11. Prediction and validation of total and regional skeletal muscle volume using B-mode ultrasonography in Japanese prepubertal children.

    PubMed

    Midorikawa, Taishi; Ohta, Megumi; Hikihara, Yuki; Torii, Suguru; Sakamoto, Shizuo

    2015-10-28

    Very few effective field methods are available for accurate, non-invasive estimation of skeletal muscle volume (SMV) and mass in children. We aimed to develop regression-based prediction equations for SMV, using ultrasonography, in Japanese prepubertal children, and to assess the validity of these equations. In total, 145 healthy Japanese prepubertal children aged 6-12 years were randomly divided into two groups: the model development group (sixty boys, thirty-seven girls) and the validation group (twenty-nine boys, nineteen girls). Reference data in the form of contiguous MRI with 1-cm slice thickness were obtained from the first cervical vertebra to the ankle joints. The SMV was calculated by the summation of digitised cross-sectional areas. Muscle thickness was measured using B-mode ultrasonography at nine sites in different regions. In the model development group, strong, statistically significant correlations were observed between the site-matched SMV (total, arms, trunk, thigh and lower legs) measured by MRI and the muscle thickness×height measures obtained by ultrasonography, for both boys and girls. When these SMV prediction equations were applied to the validation groups, the measured total and regional SMV were also very similar to the values predicted for boys and girls, respectively. With the exception of the trunk region in girls, the Bland-Altman analysis for the validation group did not indicate any bias for either boys or girls. These results suggest that ultrasonography-derived prediction equations for boys and girls are useful for the estimation of total and regional SMV.

  12. There's Something about Obesity: Culture, Contagion, Rationality, and Children's Responses to Drinks "Created" by Obese Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klaczynski, Paul A.

    2008-01-01

    Theories of the development of obesity stereotypes cannot easily explain the stigma associated with being obese. Evidence that important similarities exist between the symptoms of obesity and contagious illnesses, young children have "theories" of illnesses, and obesity stereotypes are among the earliest that children develop led to the hypothesis…

  13. Increased Risk for Vitamin D Deficiency in Obese Children with Both Celiac Disease and Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Setty-Shah, Nithya; Nwosu, Benjamin Udoka

    2014-01-01

    Background. It is unknown whether the coexistence of type 1 diabetes (T1D) and celiac disease (CD) increases the risk for vitamin D deficiency. Aims. To determine the vitamin D status and the risk for vitamin D deficiency in prepubertal children with both T1D and CD compared to controls, TID, and CD. Subjects and Methods. Characteristics of 62 prepubertal children of age 2–13 y with either CD + T1D (n = 22, 9.9 ± 3.1 y), CD only (n = 18, 8.9 ± 3.3 y), or T1D only (n = 22, 10.1 ± 2.8 y) were compared to 49 controls of the age of 8.0 ± 2.6 years. Vitamin D deficiency was defined as 25(OH)D < 50 nmol/L, overweight as BMI of >85th but <95th percentile, and obesity as BMI > 95th percentile. Results. The 4 groups had no difference in 25(OH)D (ANOVA P = 0.123) before stratification into normal-weight versus overweight/obese subtypes. Following stratification, 25(OH)D differed significantly between the subgroups (F(3,98) = 10.109, ANOVA P < 0.001). Post-hoc analysis showed a significantly lower 25(OH)D in the overweight/obese CD + T1D compared to the overweight/obese controls (P = 0.039) and the overweight/obese CD (P = 0.003). Subjects with CD + T1D were 3 times more likely to be vitamin D deficient (OR = 3.1 [0.8–11.9], P = 0.098), compared to controls. Conclusions. The coexistence of T1D and CD in overweight/obese prepubertal children may be associated with lower vitamin D concentration. PMID:25548555

  14. Obesity, Nutrition, and Asthma in Children.

    PubMed

    Lang, Jason E

    2012-06-01

    Obesity rates have increased dramatically among children in many parts of the world, especially in North America and several other English-speaking countries. The impact of obesity on pediatric health has become a major prevention initiative by the Obama administration and several public health organizations. Children with obesity are at increased risk for developing asthma, which is already one of the most common chronic diseases among children. The cause underlying obesity's impact on asthma risk is unknown. Commonly cited potential etiologies include airway smooth muscle dysfunction from thoracic restriction, obesity-related circulating inflammation priming the lung, and obesity-related comorbidities mediating asthma symptom development. Each of these theories does not fit precisely with all of the data that have accumulated over the last decade. In this review, I will explore other possible causes including: (1) dietary characteristics common in Westernized countries that might lead to both obesity and asthma; (2) reductions in physical activity; and (3) genetic alterations that increase the propensity to both obesity and asthma together. Next, I will review the current data on how obesity affects common characteristics of asthma such as airway inflammation, lung function, risk of exacerbation, atopy, and response to treatment. Obesity in children with asthma appears to be associated with greater airflow obstruction and a mildly diminished response to inhaled corticosteroids. Little objective evidence in children suggests that obesity significantly heightens the risk of exacerbation or worsens disease stability in children. Lastly, I will discuss the current literature that suggests that obese children with asthma generally should receive the same guidelines-based management as lean children. However, interventions that encourage daily physical activity, weight-loss, normalization of nutrient levels, and monitoring of common obesity-related sequelae should be

  15. Teasing and Bullying of Obese Children

    MedlinePlus

    ... Español Text Size Email Print Share Teasing and Bullying of Obese and Overweight Children: How Parents Can ... and Children Should Respond to This Type of Bullying Tell an adult. Stay in a group. As ...

  16. Factors associated with abdominal obesity in children

    PubMed Central

    Melzer, Matheus Ribeiro Theodósio Fernandes; Magrini, Isabella Mastrangi; Domene, Semíramis Martins Álvares; Martins, Paula Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To identify the association of dietary, socioeconomic factors, sedentary behaviors and maternal nutritional status with abdominal obesity in children. Methods: A cross-sectional study with household-based survey, in 36 randomly selected census tracts in the city of Santos, SP. 357 families were interviewed and questionnaires and anthropometric measurements were applied in mothers and their 3-10 years-old children. Assessment of abdominal obesity was made by maternal and child's waist circumference measurement; for classification used cut-off points proposed by World Health Organization (1998) and Taylor et al. (2000) were applied. The association between variables was performed by multiple logistic regression analysis. Results: 30.5% of children had abdominal obesity. Associations with children's and maternal nutritional status and high socioeconomic status were shown in the univariate analysis. In the regression model, children's body mass index for age (OR=93.7; 95%CI 39.3-223.3), female gender (OR=4.1; 95%CI 1.8-9.3) and maternal abdominal obesity (OR=2.7; 95%CI 1.2-6.0) were significantly associated with children's abdominal obesity, regardless of the socioeconomic status. Conclusions: Abdominal obesity in children seems to be associated with maternal nutritional status, other indicators of their own nutritional status and female gender. Intervention programs for control of childhood obesity and prevention of metabolic syndrome should consider the interaction of the nutritional status of mothers and their children. PMID:26298655

  17. Prevention of obesity in preschool children.

    PubMed

    Lanigan, Julie; Barber, Sally; Singhal, Atul

    2010-05-01

    Obesity is a serious problem that affects children from diverse ethnic backgrounds in both industrialised and developing countries. Worldwide, an estimated twenty-two million children <5 years of age were overweight in 2007. In the UK if current trends continue an estimated one-quarter of all children <16 years of age will be obese by 2050. Recent evidence suggests that most obesity is established during the preschool years, and because one in five obese 4 year olds will become obese adults this situation has major implications for public health. The causes of obesity in preschool children are complex and multifactorial. Although 30-50% of the predisposition towards obesity in preschool children can be explained by genetic factors, environmental influences also play a crucial role. The preschool period in particular is a pivotal time during which long-term dietary and physical activity habits are established, with potential lifelong effects on health. However, research in this age-group is limited. Previous studies have aimed to improve diet, increase physical activity and achieve behavioural change. However, few of these studies have been successful and there is an urgent need, therefore, for the development of evidence-based interventions aimed at the prevention of preschool obesity.

  18. Plasma concentrations of retinol in obese children and adolescents: relationship to metabolic syndrome components

    PubMed Central

    Teske, Márcia; Melges, Ana Paula B.; de Souza, Fabíola Isabel S.; Fonseca, Fernando Luiz A.; Sarni, Roseli Oselka S.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate obese children and adolescents' retinol plasma levels and to correlate them with metabolic syndrome components. Methods: Cross-sectional study with 61 obese children and adolescents (body mass index Z score - ZBMI>+2). Pubertal development, arterial blood pressure, body weight and height for nutritional classification and waist circumference were obtained. A 15mL blood sample was collected (after a 12-hour fasting in a low luminosity room) for retinol determination (cut-off inadequate if <30µg/dL), lipid profile (HDL-c, LDL-c, and triglycerides), oral glucose tolerance test (fasting and 120 minutes) and for high sensitivity C-reactive protein. Spearman correlation and multiple linear regression were used in the statistical analysis. Results: Mean age was 10.7±2.7 years. There was a predominance of male gender 38/61 (62%) and pre-pubertal 35/61 (57%) subjects. The average plasmatic retinol was 48.5±18.6ug/dL. Retinol deficiency and severe obesity were observed in 6/61 (10%) and 36/61 (59%), respectively. Glucose level at 120 minutes was the independent and predictive variable of plasma retinol levels [β=-0.286 (95%CI -0.013 - -0.001)]. Conclusions: An independent and inverse association between plasma retinol levels and glucose tolerance was observed, suggesting an important contribution of this vitamin in the morbidities associated to obesity in children and adolescents. PMID:24676190

  19. Musculoskeletal pain in overweight and obese children

    PubMed Central

    Smith, S M; Sumar, B; Dixon, K A

    2014-01-01

    This review seeks to provide a current overview of musculoskeletal pain in overweight and obese children. Databases searched were Academic Search Complete, CINAHL, Medline, Proquest Health and Medical Complete, Scopus, Google Scholar, SPORTDiscuss and Trove for studies published between 1 January 2000 and 30 December 2012. We used a broad definition of children within a 3- to 18-year age range. The search strategy included the following terms: obesity, morbid obesity, overweight, pain, musculoskeletal pain, child, adolescent, chronic pain, back pain, lower back pain, knee pain, hip pain, foot pain and pelvic pain. Two authors independently assessed each record, and any disagreement was resolved by the third author. Data were analysed using a narrative thematic approach owing to the heterogeneity of reported outcome measures. Ninety-seven records were initially identified using a variety of terms associated with children, obesity and musculoskeletal pain. Ten studies were included for thematic analysis when predetermined inclusion criteria were applied. Bone deformity and dysfunction, pain reporting and the impact of children being overweight or obese on physical activity, exercise and quality of life were the three themes identified from the literature. Chronic pain, obesity and a reduction in physical functioning and activity may contribute to a cycle of weight gain that affects a child's quality of life. Future studies are required to examine the sequela of overweight and obese children experiencing chronic musculoskeletal pain. PMID:24077005

  20. Musculoskeletal pain in overweight and obese children.

    PubMed

    Smith, S M; Sumar, B; Dixon, K A

    2014-01-01

    This review seeks to provide a current overview of musculoskeletal pain in overweight and obese children. Databases searched were Academic Search Complete, CINAHL, Medline, Proquest Health and Medical Complete, Scopus, Google Scholar, SPORTDiscuss and Trove for studies published between 1 January 2000 and 30 December 2012. We used a broad definition of children within a 3- to 18-year age range. The search strategy included the following terms: obesity, morbid obesity, overweight, pain, musculoskeletal pain, child, adolescent, chronic pain, back pain, lower back pain, knee pain, hip pain, foot pain and pelvic pain. Two authors independently assessed each record, and any disagreement was resolved by the third author. Data were analysed using a narrative thematic approach owing to the heterogeneity of reported outcome measures. Ninety-seven records were initially identified using a variety of terms associated with children, obesity and musculoskeletal pain. Ten studies were included for thematic analysis when predetermined inclusion criteria were applied. Bone deformity and dysfunction, pain reporting and the impact of children being overweight or obese on physical activity, exercise and quality of life were the three themes identified from the literature. Chronic pain, obesity and a reduction in physical functioning and activity may contribute to a cycle of weight gain that affects a child's quality of life. Future studies are required to examine the sequela of overweight and obese children experiencing chronic musculoskeletal pain. PMID:24077005

  1. Overweight and Obesity in Children and Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Koyuncuoğlu Güngör, Neslihan

    2014-01-01

    Obesity among children, adolescents and adults has emerged as one of the most serious public health concerns in the 21st century. The worldwide prevalence of childhood obesity has increased remarkably over the past 3 decades. The growing prevalence of childhood obesity has also led to appearance of obesity-related comorbid disease entities at an early age. Childhood obesity can adversely affect nearly every organ system and often causes serious consequences, including hypertension, dyslipidemia, insulin resistance, dysglycemia, fatty liver disease and psychosocial complications. It is also a major contributor to increasing healthcare expenditures. For all these reasons, it is important to prevent childhood obesity as well as to identify overweight and obese children at an early stage so they can begin treatment and attain and maintain a healthy weight. At present, pharmacotherapy options for treatment of pediatric obesity are very limited. Therefore, establishing a comprehensive management program that emphasizes appropriate nutrition, exercise and behavioral modification is crucial. The physician’s role should expand beyond the clinical setting to the community to serve as a role model and to advocate for prevention and early treatment of obesity. PMID:25241606

  2. Overweight and obesity in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Güngör, Neslihan Koyuncuoğlu

    2014-09-01

    Obesity among children, adolescents and adults has emerged as one of the most serious public health concerns in the 21st century. The worldwide prevalence of childhood obesity has increased remarkably over the past 3 decades. The growing prevalence of childhood obesity has also led to appearance of obesity-related comorbid disease entities at an early age. Childhood obesity can adversely affect nearly every organ system and often causes serious consequences, including hypertension, dyslipidemia, insulin resistance, dysglycemia, fatty liver disease and psychosocial complications. It is also a major contributor to increasing healthcare expenditures. For all these reasons, it is important to prevent childhood obesity as well as to identify overweight and obese children at an early stage so they can begin treatment and attain and maintain a healthy weight. At present, pharmacotherapy options for treatment of pediatric obesity are very limited. Therefore, establishing a comprehensive management program that emphasizes appropriate nutrition, exercise and behavioral modification is crucial. The physician's role should expand beyond the clinical setting to the community to serve as a role model and to advocate for prevention and early treatment of obesity. PMID:25241606

  3. Obesity in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Curtin, Carol; Jojic, Mirjana; Bandini, Linda G.

    2014-01-01

    Research suggests that children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) have a prevalence of obesity at least as high as that seen in typically developing (TD) children. Many of the risk factors for children with ASD are likely the same as for TD children, especially within the context of today's obesogenic environment. However, the unique needs and challenges that this population faces may also render them more susceptible to the adverse effects of typical risk factors, and they may also be vulnerable to additional risk factors not shared by children in the general population. Psychopharmacological treatment, genetics, disordered sleep, atypical eating patterns, and challenges for engaging in sufficient physical activity may be uniquely associated with the development of obesity in children with ASD. Obesity and its associated sequelae potentially represent a significant threat to independent living, self-care, quality of life, and health for individuals with ASD. This article provides a summary of the literature on the prevalence of obesity in children with ASD and the putative obesity risk factors that this population may experience. PMID:24614764

  4. Physical activity and fitness in obese children.

    PubMed

    Huttunen, N P; Knip, M; Paavilainen, T

    1986-01-01

    Daily physical activity and physical fitness were studied in 31 obese and 31 normal-weight children matched for age and sex. The ages of the children ranged from 5.7 to 16.1 years. The history of their physical activity was examined using a questionnaire completed by the child and the parents. Physical fitness was measured using a two-stage exercise test on a bicycle ergometer. There were no significant differences in daily activities between the obese and the non-obese children, while the sports grades at school were lower and participation in the training teams of sports clubs was less frequent among obese than normal-weight subjects. The obese children were physically less fit than the normal-weight subjects as judged from the pedalling time in exercise test (P less than 0.05) and from the maximum oxygen consumption (VO2 max) related to lean body mass (LBM) (P less than 0.001). Twenty-seven children participated for 1 year in a weight-reduction programme which comprised individual nutrition counselling, guidance on physical activities and supportive therapy. The reduction in weight was successful in 25 out of 27 children and VO2 max increased on average from 44.2 to 47.1 ml/min/kg of LBM (P less than 0.025). There was no change in the time used for physical activities during the weight reduction period although the children's participation in the training teams of sports clubs increased. It was concluded that obese children are less fit than their non-obese counterparts. Weight reduction results, however, in an improvement of the maximum oxygen consumption towards normal.

  5. Antioxidant enzymes activities in obese Tunisian children

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The oxidant stress, expected to increase in obese adults, has an important role in the pathogenesis of many diseases. It results when free radical formation is greatly increased or protective antioxidant mechanisms are compromised. The main objective of this study is to evaluate the antioxidant response to obesity-related stress in healthy children. Methods A hundred and six healthy children (54 obese and 52 controls), aged 6–12 years old, participated in this study. The collected data included anthropometric measures, blood pressure, fasting glucose, total cholesterol, triglycerides and enzymatic antioxidants (Superoxide dismutase: SOD, Catalase: CAT and Glutathione peroxidase: GPx). Results The first step antioxidant response, estimated by the SOD activity, was significantly higher in obese children compared with normal-weight controls (p < 0.05). Mean activities of anti-radical GPx and CAT enzymes were not affected by the BMI increase. Although, total cholesterol levels were statistically higher in the obese group, there was no significant association with the SOD activity. Conclusions The obesity-related increase of the oxidant stress can be observed even in the childhood period. In addition to the complications of an increased BMI, obesity itself can be considered as an independent risk factor of free radical production resulting in an increased antioxidant response. PMID:23360568

  6. Externality, environment, and obesity in children.

    PubMed

    Stager, S F

    1981-07-01

    On the assumption that external responsiveness and environmental characteristics jointly determine whether a child will achieve an excessive weight gain, perpetuating and maintaining obesity, probability hierarchy was hypothesized and tested. Ss of the study were 24 obese and 24 average-weight, white boys, mean age 9 years, 5 months. An auditory distraction task and Kagan's Matching Familiar Figures Test were used to measure auditory and visual responsivity to external cues, respectively. Socioeconomic status was used as an indicator of the childhood environment. As predicted, the greatest percentages of obese children were observed in the lower-socioeconomic, external group, followed by the lower-socioeconomic, internal group and middle-socioeconomic, external group. The smallest percentage of obese children was observed in the middle-socioeconomic, internal group.

  7. [Prevention and treatment of obesity in children].

    PubMed

    Togashi, Kenji; Iguchi, Kosei; Masuda, Hidenari

    2013-02-01

    The prevalence of childhood obesity and its comorbidities is high in Japan. Increasing prevalence of obesity among children emphasizes the importance of focusing on primary prevention to avoid health complications later in life. We emphasize the prevention of obesity by recommending breast-feeding of infants for at least 6 months and advocating that schools provide for 60 min of moderate to vigorous daily exercise in all grades. Treatment interventions include behavioral therapy, reduction in sedentary behavior, and dietary and exercise education. After dietary treatment combined with exercise treatment, the areas of subcutaneous and visceral fat decreased significantly. These data suggest that dietary treatment combined with exercise treatment in obese children normalizes the distribution of abdominal fat and reduces the risk factors for chronic disease.

  8. Interventions for treating obesity in children.

    PubMed

    De Miguel-Etayo, Pilar; Bueno, Gloria; Garagorri, Jesús M; Moreno, Luis A

    2013-01-01

    Childhood obesity remains an important public health concern and prevention programmes should be the priority in order to decrease the prevalence of obesity. The aim of this review is to summarize the most effective types of intervention for treating obesity in children and adolescents. A number of identified strategies used to treat childhood obesity range from lifestyle approaches, pharmacotherapy to surgical intervention. Dietary treatment of obese children and adolescents should aim to ensure adequate growth and development by reducing excessive fat mass accumulation, avoiding loss of lean body mass, improving well-being and self-esteem, and preventing cyclical weight regain. Management protocols involve behaviour modifications, family support, and lifestyle changes which are difficult to put into practice and may require multidisciplinary professional teams. The cornerstone of weight loss programmes is to achieve a negative energy balance. There is evidence that dietary interventions are more effective in achieving weight loss when combined with other strategies, such as increasing physical activity levels and/or psychological interventions to promote behavioural changes. Psychological interventions have been employed in an effort to achieve long-term maintenance of behavioural change. Childhood obesity treatments should involve a combination of lifestyle changes including strategies to reduce energy intake, increase physical activity, reduce sedentary activities, facilitate family involvement and change behaviours associated with eating and physical activity. However, drug therapy in obese children must not be used as isolated treatment but as complementary to the traditional treatments of diet, physical activity and lifestyle changes. Besides, surgical procedures have been used to treat severe morbid obesity in children and adolescents when more conservative treatments have proven to be inadequate. PMID:24029793

  9. Controlled Study of Encopresis and Enuresis in Children with a Prepubertal and Early Adolescent Bipolar-I Disorder Phenotype

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klages, Tricia; Geller, Barbara; Tillman, Rebecca; Bolhofner, Kristine; Zimerman, Betsy

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To examine the prevalence of encopresis/enuresis, relationship between maternal hostility and encopresis, parent-child concordance of reporting encopresis/enuresis, and familial aggregation of enuresis in subjects with a prepubertal and early adolescent bipolar-I disorder phenotype (PEA-BP), attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder…

  10. Autonomic nervous system functions in obese children.

    PubMed

    Yakinci, C; Mungen, B; Karabiber, H; Tayfun, M; Evereklioglu, C

    2000-05-01

    Childhood obesity is a complex syndrome, probably due to the multiplicity of contributing factors, contradictory literature information about etiology, prognosis, prevention and treatment. In the recent reports, autonomic nervous system (ANS) dysfunction has been documented in adult obesity. Autonomic nervous system functions in obese children are not clear. This study was planned to investigate autonomic nervous system function in childhood (7-13 years of age) obesity. Study and control groups consisted of 33 simple obese (23 boys and ten girls, mean age 9.5+/-1.4 years) and 30 healthy children (18 boys and 12 girls, mean age 10.1+/-1.8 years), respectively. Four non-invasive autonomic nervous system function tests (Orthostatic test, Valsalva ratio, 30/15 ratio, Heart rate responses to deep breathing) and general ophthalmic examination were performed on both groups. The difference between the obese and control groups was found statistically significant in Valsalva ratio, 30/15 ratio and Heart rate responses to deep breathing (P<0.025), and insignificant in Orthostatic test (P>0.05). Ophthalmic examinations were normal. The result of these tests suggested normal activity of sympathetic, and hypoactivity of parasympathetic nervous system, implying parasympathetic nervous system dysfunction as a risk factor or associated finding in childhood obesity. PMID:10814895

  11. Corticosteroid therapy-induced obesity in children.

    PubMed

    Merritt, R J; Hack, S L; Kalsch, M; Olson, D

    1986-03-01

    The severity and persistence of corticosteroid-induced obesity were evaluated retrospectively in 23 children aged 1-14 yrs requiring more than 60 days of therapy with prednisone for idiopathic nephrotic syndrome. Mean relative weight (after clearing of proteinuria) at initiation of therapy was 107 +/- 10 percent. Peak relative weight on therapy was 119 +/- 15 percent following a mean total of 31 months of cumulative steroid therapy. The most recent available relative weight in remission at least 6 months following cessation of therapy was 107 +/- 18 percent. The number of children whose relative weight exceeded 120 percent at initiation of, during and following therapy was 3, 10, and 4, respectively. In those with normal initial relative weight (less than 110%) there was no persistent obesity. Two of three initially obese patients (relative weight greater than 120%) remained obese. All patients with persistent obesity following therapy had initial relative weight of at least 110 percent and peak relative weight of more than 130 percent. The risk of persistent obesity as a result of chronic corticosteroid therapy in initially normal weight children who do not exceed 130 percent relative weight during therapy appears to be small.

  12. Posturography characteristics of obese children with and without associated disorders.

    PubMed

    Steinberg, Nili; Nemet, Dan; Kohen-Raz, Reuven; Zeev, Aviva; Pantanowitz, Michal; Eliakim, Alon

    2013-04-01

    A group of 59 obese children ages 6-12 years were interviewed for current medical diagnoses (e.g., Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder- ADHD, and clumsiness) and later were examined posturographically for balance and stability. General stability of all the obese children deviated significantly from norms. 32.2% of the obese children had a pattern of balance that could indicate orthopedic problems. Obese children with ADHD or perceived clumsiness had significantly worse balance and postural performance compared to other obese children. Balance and posture among obese children without suspicion of problems were similar to non-obese controls. In conclusion, obese children with associated disorders (such as ADHD and perceived clumsiness) manifested disturbance in balance control. Thus, physical activity interventions for these children should include safety measures to decrease the chances of falling and subsequent injury. PMID:24032331

  13. Baseline Body Composition in Prepubertal Short Stature Children with Severe and Moderate Growth Hormone Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Klesiewicz, Marta

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To compare body composition parameters in short children with severe versus moderate and no growth hormone deficiency (GHD). Design and Method. 61 children (40 boys) were studied. Height SDS, BMI Z-score, waist/height ratio (W/HtR), and body composition parameters (BIA) as fat tissue (FAT%), fat-free mass (FFM%), predicted muscle mass (PMM%), and total body water (TBW%) were evaluated. GH secretion in the overnight profile and two stimulation tests and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) level were measured. Results. Overall, in 16 (26%) moderate (7.0 > peak GH < 10 ng/mL) and in 11 (18%) severe (GH ≤ 7.0 ng/mL) GHD was diagnosed. In children with sGHD BMI Z-score, W/HtR and FAT% were significantly higher, while FFM%, PMM%, and TBW% were significantly lower versus mGHD and versus noGHD subgroups. No significant differences between mGHD and noGHD were found. There were no differences in height SDS and IGF-1 SDS between evaluated subgroups. Night GH peak level correlated significantly with FAT%, FFM%, PMM%, and TBW%, (p < 0.05) in the entire group. Conclusions. Only sGHD is associated with significant impairment of body composition. Body composition analysis may be a useful tool in distinguishing between its severe and moderate form of GHD.

  14. Baseline Body Composition in Prepubertal Short Stature Children with Severe and Moderate Growth Hormone Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Klesiewicz, Marta

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To compare body composition parameters in short children with severe versus moderate and no growth hormone deficiency (GHD). Design and Method. 61 children (40 boys) were studied. Height SDS, BMI Z-score, waist/height ratio (W/HtR), and body composition parameters (BIA) as fat tissue (FAT%), fat-free mass (FFM%), predicted muscle mass (PMM%), and total body water (TBW%) were evaluated. GH secretion in the overnight profile and two stimulation tests and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) level were measured. Results. Overall, in 16 (26%) moderate (7.0 > peak GH < 10 ng/mL) and in 11 (18%) severe (GH ≤ 7.0 ng/mL) GHD was diagnosed. In children with sGHD BMI Z-score, W/HtR and FAT% were significantly higher, while FFM%, PMM%, and TBW% were significantly lower versus mGHD and versus noGHD subgroups. No significant differences between mGHD and noGHD were found. There were no differences in height SDS and IGF-1 SDS between evaluated subgroups. Night GH peak level correlated significantly with FAT%, FFM%, PMM%, and TBW%, (p < 0.05) in the entire group. Conclusions. Only sGHD is associated with significant impairment of body composition. Body composition analysis may be a useful tool in distinguishing between its severe and moderate form of GHD. PMID:27656208

  15. Baseline Body Composition in Prepubertal Short Stature Children with Severe and Moderate Growth Hormone Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Matusik, Pawel; Klesiewicz, Marta; Klos, Karolina; Stasiulewicz, Martyna; Barylak, Aleksandra; Nazarkiewicz, Patrycja; Malecka-Tendera, Ewa

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To compare body composition parameters in short children with severe versus moderate and no growth hormone deficiency (GHD). Design and Method. 61 children (40 boys) were studied. Height SDS, BMI Z-score, waist/height ratio (W/HtR), and body composition parameters (BIA) as fat tissue (FAT%), fat-free mass (FFM%), predicted muscle mass (PMM%), and total body water (TBW%) were evaluated. GH secretion in the overnight profile and two stimulation tests and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) level were measured. Results. Overall, in 16 (26%) moderate (7.0 > peak GH < 10 ng/mL) and in 11 (18%) severe (GH ≤ 7.0 ng/mL) GHD was diagnosed. In children with sGHD BMI Z-score, W/HtR and FAT% were significantly higher, while FFM%, PMM%, and TBW% were significantly lower versus mGHD and versus noGHD subgroups. No significant differences between mGHD and noGHD were found. There were no differences in height SDS and IGF-1 SDS between evaluated subgroups. Night GH peak level correlated significantly with FAT%, FFM%, PMM%, and TBW%, (p < 0.05) in the entire group. Conclusions. Only sGHD is associated with significant impairment of body composition. Body composition analysis may be a useful tool in distinguishing between its severe and moderate form of GHD. PMID:27656208

  16. Obesity Prevention for Children with Developmental Disabilities

    PubMed Central

    Curtin, Carol; Hubbard, Kristie; Sikich, Linmarie; Bedford, James; Bandini, Linda

    2014-01-01

    The prevention of obesity in children with DD is a pressing public health issue, with implications for health status, independent living, and quality of life. Substantial evidence suggests that children with developmental disabilities (DD), including those with intellectual disabilities (ID) and autism spectrum disorder (ASD), have a prevalence of obesity at least as high if not higher than their typically developing peers. The paper reviews what is known about the classic and unique risk factors for childhood obesity in these groups of children, including dietary, physical activity, sedentary behavior, and family factors, as well as medication use. We use evidence from the literature to make the case that primary prevention at the individual/family, school and community levels will require tailoring of strategies and adapting existing intervention approaches. PMID:25530916

  17. Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Obese Children and Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Rumińska, Małgorzata; Majcher, Anna; Pyrzak, Beata; Czerwonogrodzka-Senczyna, Aneta; Brzewski, Michał; Demkow, Urszula

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to analyze cardiometabolic risk factors andcarotid intima-media thickness (IMT) in obese children. We studied 122 obese children fulfilling the criteria of the International Obesity Task Force and 58 non-obese children. Anthropometric parameters, blood pressure, lipid profile, C-reactive protein, and adiponectin were assessed in all children. Glucose and insulin during the oral glucose tolerance test were assessed in obese children. The IMT was determined using ultrasound B-mode imaging in 81 obese and 32 non-obese children. We found that obese children had significantly higher levels of lipid andother non-lipid atherogenic indicators, but lower levels of adiponectin compared with non-obese children. The difference in the mean carotid IMT was insignificant in the two groups. Taking the combined groups, the level of adiponectin correlated negatively with body mass index and lipid atherogenic indicators. The IMT strongly correlated with systolic blood pressure in obese children. In the children fulfilling the criteria of metabolic syndrome, 17 out of the 84 obese children older than 10 years of age, IMT was greater than in those who did not fulfil these criteria. We conclude that the coexistence of abdominal obesity with abnormal lipid profile and hypertension leads to the early development of atherosclerosis accompanied by increased carotid intima-media thickness. Obesity initiates the atherosclerotic processes in early childhood. PMID:26453070

  18. Beverage intake and obesity in Australian children

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background There have been increases in the obesity and overweight rates in Australian children over the past 25 years and it has been suggested that sugar sweetened beverages (SSB) have played a role in this increase. Objective The objectives of this study were to: (1) examine SSB intakes in the 2007 Australian Children's Nutrition and Physical Activity Survey (2) relate SSB intake to rates of overweight and obesity, socio-economic status (SES), TV viewing time, and activity levels and (3) compare 2007 SSB intakes with data from the 1995 National Nutrition Survey. Design A computer assisted 24 h dietary recall in 4,400 children aged 2-16 years was performed. Results In the 2007 survey 47% of all children reported drinking SSBs with 25% consuming sugar sweetened soft drinks on the day of the survey. The mean consumption of soft drink was 436 g/d/consumer. Activity levels were unrelated to SSB consumption. Television viewing was positively related to soft drink consumption with a difference of 55 g/day from bottom to top tertile of time spent TV viewing (p = 0.015) in children aged 9-16 years. 55% of SSB consumption occurred at home and 10% occurred at school. Lower SES status was associated with a greater prevalence of SSB consumption- 30% for the lowest SES quartile vs 19% in the highest quartile. The proportion of overweight who consumed SSBs (which excludes 100% fruit) was not different from the non-overweight children although the proportion of SSB consumers in the 6% of children who were obese was significant compared with the non-overweight children (59% vs 47%, p < 0.05). In the 2007 survey 23% of children were overweight (17%) or obese (6%) while in the 1995 survey this figure was 21%. The proportion of children consuming SSBs in 1995 and 2007 for selected age groups were: 2-3 years - 25.8% and 12.8% respectively and 4-7 years - 33.6% and 20.5% respectively (p < 0.001 for both). Conclusions This cross-sectional data set provides evidence that SSB

  19. INFLUENCE OF SLEEP ON OBESITY IN CHILDREN.

    PubMed

    Anton-Paduraru, Dana-teodora; Teslariu, Oana; Mocanu, Veronica

    2016-01-01

    Childhood obesity is a global epidemic with long term implications. The main cause of obesity is an increase in calorie intake and a decrease in physical activity, but also there is clear evidence suggesting a link between the duration and quality of sleep and obesity risk. Good sleep habits are involved in increased ability to concentrate at school, improvement of general state, immune system development, increased quality of life. On the other hand, there are several mechanisms by which chronic sleep deprivation induces weight gain: disturbance of hormones that control hunger center, increased time for meals, reduced physical activity, metabolic changes. Recently, nighttime sleep duration has declined, in contrast with the increasing prevalence of obesity. Childhood sleep habits have a long term effect on weight, with repercussions even into adulthood. This is the reason why there is increasing interest to include sleep quality on the list for childhood obesity prevention. Sleep represents an important and independent risk factor of obesity in children and adolescents and it should be taken into consideration in the management of obesity.

  20. INFLUENCE OF SLEEP ON OBESITY IN CHILDREN.

    PubMed

    Anton-Paduraru, Dana-teodora; Teslariu, Oana; Mocanu, Veronica

    2016-01-01

    Childhood obesity is a global epidemic with long term implications. The main cause of obesity is an increase in calorie intake and a decrease in physical activity, but also there is clear evidence suggesting a link between the duration and quality of sleep and obesity risk. Good sleep habits are involved in increased ability to concentrate at school, improvement of general state, immune system development, increased quality of life. On the other hand, there are several mechanisms by which chronic sleep deprivation induces weight gain: disturbance of hormones that control hunger center, increased time for meals, reduced physical activity, metabolic changes. Recently, nighttime sleep duration has declined, in contrast with the increasing prevalence of obesity. Childhood sleep habits have a long term effect on weight, with repercussions even into adulthood. This is the reason why there is increasing interest to include sleep quality on the list for childhood obesity prevention. Sleep represents an important and independent risk factor of obesity in children and adolescents and it should be taken into consideration in the management of obesity. PMID:27483699

  1. Children, adolescents, obesity, and the media.

    PubMed

    Strasburger, Victor C

    2011-07-01

    Obesity has become a worldwide public health problem. Considerable research has shown that the media contribute to the development of child and adolescent obesity, although the exact mechanism remains unclear. Screen time may displace more active pursuits, advertising of junk food and fast food increases children's requests for those particular foods and products, snacking increases while watching TV or movies, and late-night screen time may interfere with getting adequate amounts of sleep, which is a known risk factor for obesity. Sufficient evidence exists to warrant a ban on junk-food or fast-food advertising in children's TV programming. Pediatricians need to ask 2 questions about media use at every well-child or well-adolescent visit: (1) How much screen time is being spent per day? and (2) Is there a TV set or Internet connection in the child's bedroom? PMID:21708800

  2. Children, adolescents, obesity, and the media.

    PubMed

    Strasburger, Victor C

    2011-07-01

    Obesity has become a worldwide public health problem. Considerable research has shown that the media contribute to the development of child and adolescent obesity, although the exact mechanism remains unclear. Screen time may displace more active pursuits, advertising of junk food and fast food increases children's requests for those particular foods and products, snacking increases while watching TV or movies, and late-night screen time may interfere with getting adequate amounts of sleep, which is a known risk factor for obesity. Sufficient evidence exists to warrant a ban on junk-food or fast-food advertising in children's TV programming. Pediatricians need to ask 2 questions about media use at every well-child or well-adolescent visit: (1) How much screen time is being spent per day? and (2) Is there a TV set or Internet connection in the child's bedroom?

  3. Weight management for children with severe obesity.

    PubMed

    2016-09-28

    In areas where weight management services are not established, an integrated approach is required to sustain results. This article in Primary Health Care suggests using a stepped care approach using a model such as SHINE (Self, Help, Independence, Nutrition and Exercise). This model can be used to provide a holistic and integrative care pathway for children and young people with severe obesity. PMID:27682573

  4. Gas exchange during exercise in obese children.

    PubMed

    Zanconato, S; Baraldi, E; Santuz, P; Rigon, F; Vido, L; Da Dalt, L; Zacchello, F

    1989-06-01

    Twenty-three obese children, aged 9 to 14 years, ranging in percentage overweight from 26% to 83% (median 51.6% +/- 16.3%), and 37 normal-weight children, matched for sex, age and height, performed a maximal exercise test on a treadmill. Cardiorespiratory performance was assessed by determination of the ventilatory anaerobic threshold (VAT) expressed in ml O2/min per kg and as a percent of maximal oxygen uptake (% VO2max). VAT and VO2max related to body weight were significantly lower (P less than 0.01) in the obese than in the normal-weight children. VAT % VO2max was similar in the two groups. A significant correlation was found between VAT and VO2max both in the obese (r = 0.85) and in the control groups (r = 0.79). The habitual level of physical activity was lower in the obese subjects compared to the control subjects (P less than 0.001). In conclusion our study shows that physical fitness of overweight children is quantitatively lowered and that it can be assessed by VAT. VAT does not require a maximal test and is particularly useful in the ergometric study of subjects with exercise intolerance.

  5. Dietary Fiber Is Positively Associated with Cognitive Control among Prepubertal Children12

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Naiman A; Raine, Lauren B; Drollette, Eric S; Scudder, Mark R; Kramer, Arthur F; Hillman, Charles H

    2015-01-01

    Background: Converging evidence now indicates that aerobic fitness and adiposity are key correlates of childhood cognitive function and brain health. However, the evidence relating dietary intake to executive function/cognitive control remains limited. Objective: The current study assessed cross-sectional associations between performance on an attentional inhibition task and dietary fatty acids (FAs), fiber, and overall diet quality among children aged 7–9 y (n = 65). Methods: Attentional inhibition was assessed by using a modified flanker task. Three-day food records were used to conduct nutrient-level analyses and to calculate diet quality (Healthy Eating Index–2005) scores. Results: Bivariate correlations revealed that socioeconomic status and sex were not related to task performance or diet measures. However, age, intelligence quotient (IQ), pubertal staging, maximal oxygen uptake (V̇O2max), and percentage of fat mass (%fat mass) correlated with task accuracy. Hierarchical regression models were used to determine the relation between diet variables and task accuracy and reaction time across both congruent and incongruent trials of the flanker task. After adjustment of confounding variables (age, IQ, pubertal staging, V̇O2max, and %fat mass), congruent accuracy was positively associated with insoluble fiber (β = 0.26, P = 0.03) and total dietary fiber (β = 0.23, P = 0.05). Incongruent response accuracy was positively associated with insoluble fiber (β = 0.35, P < 0.01), pectins (β = 0.25, P = 0.04), and total dietary fiber (β = 0.32, P < 0.01). Higher diet quality was related to lower accuracy interference (β = −0.26, P = 0.03), whereas higher total FA intake was related to greater accuracy interference (β = 0.24, P = 0.04). No statistically significant associations were observed between diet variables and reaction time measures. Conclusion: These results demonstrate that children’s diet quality, specifically dietary fiber, is an important

  6. Economic Differences in Risk Factors for Obesity among Overweight and Obese Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Hee Soon; Ham, Ok Kyung; Jang, Mi Na; Yun, Hyun Jung; Park, Jiyoung

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to identify the economic differences in familial, physiological, psychological, and lifestyle characteristics associated with overweight and obese children in South Korea. A total of 407 overweight and obese children participated in the study. The obesity rate was 69.0% and the prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MS) was…

  7. VNN1 Gene Expression Levels and the G-137T Polymorphism Are Associated with HDL-C Levels in Mexican Prepubertal Children

    PubMed Central

    Jacobo-Albavera, Leonor; Aguayo-de la Rosa, Pablo I.; Villarreal-Molina, Teresa; Villamil-Ramírez, Hugo; León-Mimila, Paola; Romero-Hidalgo, Sandra; López-Contreras, Blanca E.; Sánchez-Muñoz, Fausto; Bojalil, Rafael; González-Barrios, Juan Antonio; Aguilar-Salinas, Carlos A.; Canizales-Quinteros, Samuel

    2012-01-01

    Background VNN1 gene expression levels and the G-137T polymorphism have been associated with high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) levels in Mexican American adults. We aim to evaluate the contribution of VNN1 gene expression and the G-137T variant to HDL-C levels and other metabolic traits in Mexican prepubertal children. Methodology/Principal Findings VNN1 mRNA expression levels were quantified in peripheral blood leukocytes from 224 unrelated Mexican-Mestizo children aged 6–8 years (107 boys and 117 girls) and were genotyped for the G-137T variant (rs4897612). To account for population stratification, a panel of 10 ancestry informative markers was analyzed. After adjustment for admixture, the TT genotype was significantly associated with lower VNN1 mRNA expression levels (P = 2.9 × 10−5), decreased HDL-C levels (β = −6.19, P = 0.028) and with higher body mass index (BMI) z-score (β = 0.48, P = 0.024) in the total sample. In addition, VNN1 expression showed a positive correlation with HDL-C levels (r = 0.220; P = 0.017) and a negative correlation with BMI z-score (r = −0.225; P = 0.015) only in girls. Conclusion/Significance Our data suggest that VNN1 gene expression and the G-137T variant are associated with HDL-C levels in Mexican children, particularly in prepubertal girls. PMID:23185446

  8. Predictors of weight reduction in obese children.

    PubMed

    Nuutinen, O; Knip, M

    1992-11-01

    The characteristics of successful and unsuccessful weight losers were studied in 48 obese children (relative weight > 120%) aged 6-15 years who were treated for 1 year and observed for another. Successful weight loss was defined as a decrease in relative weight of > or = 0.8 in the standard deviation score (SDS) at the end of the study. Thirty-two children were treated intensively, 16 with individual counselling and 16 in group therapy, while the remaining 16 children were treated conventionally in a school health care setting. Three children dropped out of the study. In 2 years, the relative body weight decreased by 1.7 SDS in those who were successful weight losers (n = 21, 47%), but remained unchanged in those who had been unsuccessful (n = 24). At baseline there were no differences between the two groups. At 1 year, the successful weight losers had lower body weight (P < 0.05), less lean body mass (0.05) and lower fasting concentrations of circulating insulin (P < 0.01) than the unsuccessful children did. A decrease in mothers' body mass index (BMI) and in documented energy intake over the first year as well as energy intake at 1 year were significant predictors of success at 2 years. The combination of these three predictors resulted in correct classification of about 3/4 of the cases as successful or unsuccessful weight losers. It appears, however, difficult to develop a clinically useful model for predicting the treatment outcome in obese children.

  9. Children's Perceptions of Obesity and Health

    PubMed Central

    Skelton, Joseph A.; Irby, Megan Bennett; Guzman, M. Angelica; Beech, Bettina M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Hispanic boys are one of the most at-risk groups for the development of obesity, yet few effective interventions have been reported. The objective of this study was to assess Hispanic boys' perceptions of health and obesity to inform future, targeted interventions. Methods This is a qualitative and quantitative study of Hispanic boys aged 8 to 12 years in Forsyth County, North Carolina (n = 25). Three focus groups were conducted combined with anthropometrics and measures of body image. Interview guides were developed to elicit children's perceptions of obesity, nutrition, physical activity, and family influences over health behaviors. Focus group comments were recorded and transcribed. Transcripts were coded using a multistage inductive approach, and grounded theory was used to analyze responses. Results The following 6 themes emerged: boys had a limited and superficial understanding of health, nutrition, and activity; perceptions of health were based on muscular appearance, frequency of exercise, and media messages; boys had negative perceptions of overweight children and physical performance; family meals were infrequent and unstructured; boys prefer restaurants with fast food, buffets, and entertainment; and neighborhood safety influences activity participation. Boys did not mention parents as influencers of health and habits. Conclusions From their findings, the authors have outlined several key areas that will inform clinicians and researchers in the prevention and treatment of obesity in this highly vulnerable population. PMID:24723991

  10. Obesity in Children and Adolescents: Health Effects and Imaging Implications.

    PubMed

    Faguy, Kathryn

    2016-01-01

    Overweight and obesity are pandemic health problems, not just among the adult population, but in children and adolescents as well. This article presents information on the prevalence, causes, prevention, and treatment of overweight and obesity in young people, with particular focus on the medical and psychological complications associated with the diseases. In addition, the challenges of imaging the obese pediatric population are discussed, and public policy changes that could help reverse obesity trends in children and adolescents are introduced.

  11. Obesity in children with brachial plexus birth palsy.

    PubMed

    Singh, Avreeta K; Mills, Janith; Bauer, Andrea S; Ezaki, Marybeth

    2015-11-01

    Fetal macrosomia is associated with a 14-fold increased risk of brachial plexus birth palsy (BPBP), and is a predictor of childhood obesity. The purpose of this study was to identify the relationships between BPBP, fetal macrosomia, and childhood obesity. We retrospectively reviewed 214 children with BPBP. The average age was 8 years and 53% had a Narakas 1 grade BPBP. Overall, 49% of children were normal weight, 22% overweight, and 29% obese. Of the children with a history of fetal macrosomia, 41% were obese; a statistically significant difference. Overall quality of life scores, however, were not correlated with obesity. PMID:26163865

  12. Obesity in children with brachial plexus birth palsy.

    PubMed

    Singh, Avreeta K; Mills, Janith; Bauer, Andrea S; Ezaki, Marybeth

    2015-11-01

    Fetal macrosomia is associated with a 14-fold increased risk of brachial plexus birth palsy (BPBP), and is a predictor of childhood obesity. The purpose of this study was to identify the relationships between BPBP, fetal macrosomia, and childhood obesity. We retrospectively reviewed 214 children with BPBP. The average age was 8 years and 53% had a Narakas 1 grade BPBP. Overall, 49% of children were normal weight, 22% overweight, and 29% obese. Of the children with a history of fetal macrosomia, 41% were obese; a statistically significant difference. Overall quality of life scores, however, were not correlated with obesity.

  13. Children's understandings’ of obesity, a thematic analysis

    PubMed Central

    Fielden, Amy L.; Sillence, Elizabeth; Little, Linda

    2011-01-01

    Childhood obesity is a major concern in today's society. Research suggests the inclusion of the views and understandings of a target group facilitates strategies that have better efficacy. The objective of this study was to explore the concepts and themes that make up children's understandings of the causes and consequences of obesity. Participants were selected from Reception (4–5 years old) and Year 6 (10–11 years old), and attended a school in an area of Sunderland, in North East England. Participants were separated according to age and gender, resulting in four focus groups, run across two sessions. A thematic analysis (Braun & Clarke, 2006) identified overarching themes evident across all groups, suggesting the key concepts that contribute to children's understandings of obesity are “Knowledge through Education,” “Role Models,” “Fat is Bad,” and “Mixed Messages.” The implications of these findings and considerations of the methodology are discussed in full. PMID:21897830

  14. Comparison between parameters from maximal cycle ergometer test first without respiratory gas analysis and thereafter with respiratory gas analysis among healthy prepubertal children.

    PubMed

    Tompuri, Tuomo T; Lintu, Niina; Soininen, Sonja; Laitinen, Tomi; Lakka, Timo Antero

    2016-06-01

    It is important to distinguish true and clinically relevant changes and methodological noise from measure to measure. In the clinical practice, maximal cycle ergometer tests are typically performed first without respiratory gas analysis and thereafter, if needed, with respiratory gas analysis. Therefore, we report a comparison of parameters from maximal cycle ergometer exercise tests that were done first without respiratory gas analysis and thereafter with it in 38 prepubertal and healthy children (20 girls, 18 boys). The Bland-Altman method was used to assess agreement in maximal workload (WMAX), heart rate (HR), and systolic blood pressure (SBP) between rest and maximum. Girls achieved higher WMAX in the exercise tests with respiratory gas analysis compared with exercise tests without respiratory gas analysis (p = 0.016), whereas WMAX was similar in the tests among boys. Maximal HR (proportional offset, -1%; coefficients of variation, 3.3%) and highest SBP (proportional offset, 3%; coefficients of variation, 10.6%) were similar in the tests among children. Precision and agreement for HR improved and precision for SBP worsened with increasing exercise intensity. Heteroscedasticity was not observed for WMAX, HR, or SBP. We conclude that maximal cycle ergometer tests without and with respiratory gas analysis can be used consecutively because measurement of respiratory gases did not impair performance or have a significant effect on the maximality of the exercise tests. Our results suggest that similar references can be used for children who accept or refuse using a mask during a maximal exercise test. PMID:27163556

  15. Comparison between parameters from maximal cycle ergometer test first without respiratory gas analysis and thereafter with respiratory gas analysis among healthy prepubertal children.

    PubMed

    Tompuri, Tuomo T; Lintu, Niina; Soininen, Sonja; Laitinen, Tomi; Lakka, Timo Antero

    2016-06-01

    It is important to distinguish true and clinically relevant changes and methodological noise from measure to measure. In the clinical practice, maximal cycle ergometer tests are typically performed first without respiratory gas analysis and thereafter, if needed, with respiratory gas analysis. Therefore, we report a comparison of parameters from maximal cycle ergometer exercise tests that were done first without respiratory gas analysis and thereafter with it in 38 prepubertal and healthy children (20 girls, 18 boys). The Bland-Altman method was used to assess agreement in maximal workload (WMAX), heart rate (HR), and systolic blood pressure (SBP) between rest and maximum. Girls achieved higher WMAX in the exercise tests with respiratory gas analysis compared with exercise tests without respiratory gas analysis (p = 0.016), whereas WMAX was similar in the tests among boys. Maximal HR (proportional offset, -1%; coefficients of variation, 3.3%) and highest SBP (proportional offset, 3%; coefficients of variation, 10.6%) were similar in the tests among children. Precision and agreement for HR improved and precision for SBP worsened with increasing exercise intensity. Heteroscedasticity was not observed for WMAX, HR, or SBP. We conclude that maximal cycle ergometer tests without and with respiratory gas analysis can be used consecutively because measurement of respiratory gases did not impair performance or have a significant effect on the maximality of the exercise tests. Our results suggest that similar references can be used for children who accept or refuse using a mask during a maximal exercise test.

  16. The Neurocognitive Performance of Visuospatial Attention in Children with Obesity.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Chia-Liang; Chen, Fu-Chen; Pan, Chien-Yu; Tseng, Yu-Ting

    2016-01-01

    The present study investigates the behavioral performance and event-related potentials (ERPs) in children with obesity and healthy weight children when performing a visuospatial attention task. Twenty-six children with obesity (obese group) and 26 healthy weight children (control group) were recruited. Their behavioral performance during a variant of the Posner paradigm was measured, and brain ERPs were recorded concurrently. The behavioral data revealed that the obese group responded more slowly, especially in the invalid condition, and exhibited a deficit in attentional inhibition capacity as compared to the control group. In terms of cognitive electrophysiological performance, although the obese group did not show significant differences on P3 latency elicited by the target stimuli when compared to the control group, they exhibited smaller P3 amplitudes when performing the visuospatial attention task. These results broaden previous findings, and indicate that childhood obesity is associated with a reduced ability to modulate the executive function network which supports visuospatial attention. PMID:27458421

  17. The Neurocognitive Performance of Visuospatial Attention in Children with Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Chia-Liang; Chen, Fu-Chen; Pan, Chien-Yu; Tseng, Yu-Ting

    2016-01-01

    The present study investigates the behavioral performance and event-related potentials (ERPs) in children with obesity and healthy weight children when performing a visuospatial attention task. Twenty-six children with obesity (obese group) and 26 healthy weight children (control group) were recruited. Their behavioral performance during a variant of the Posner paradigm was measured, and brain ERPs were recorded concurrently. The behavioral data revealed that the obese group responded more slowly, especially in the invalid condition, and exhibited a deficit in attentional inhibition capacity as compared to the control group. In terms of cognitive electrophysiological performance, although the obese group did not show significant differences on P3 latency elicited by the target stimuli when compared to the control group, they exhibited smaller P3 amplitudes when performing the visuospatial attention task. These results broaden previous findings, and indicate that childhood obesity is associated with a reduced ability to modulate the executive function network which supports visuospatial attention. PMID:27458421

  18. Obesity in children with developmental and/or physical disabilities.

    PubMed

    Bandini, Linda; Danielson, Melissa; Esposito, Layla E; Foley, John T; Fox, Michael H; Frey, Georgia C; Fleming, Richard K; Krahn, Gloria; Must, Aviva; Porretta, David L; Rodgers, Anne Brown; Stanish, Heidi; Urv, Tiina; Vogel, Lawrence C; Humphries, Kathleen

    2015-07-01

    Children with developmental or physical disabilities, many of whom face serious health-related conditions, also are affected by the current obesity crisis. Although evidence indicates that children with disabilities have a higher prevalence of obesity than do children without disabilities, little is known of the actual magnitude of the problem in this population. To address this concern, the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) held a conference on obesity in children with intellectual, developmental, or physical disabilities, bringing together scientists and practitioners in the fields of obesity and disability to foster collaboration, identify barriers to healthy weight status in populations with disabilities, propose avenues to solutions through research and practice, and develop a research agenda to address the problem. This article describes current knowledge about prevalence of obesity in this population, discusses factors influencing obesity risk, and summarizes recommendations for research presented at the conference.

  19. Arterial compliance in obese children: implications for cardiovascular health.

    PubMed

    Tryggestad, Jeanie B; Short, Kevin R

    2014-10-01

    Recent work showed that arterial compliance may be elevated unexpectedly in obese children, attributable to accelerated growth and maturation. We hypothesize that children with obesity or Type 2 diabetes may reach peak arterial maturation earlier in life and then experience an earlier, and potentially more rapid, decline in arterial compliance, leading toward earlier cardiovascular disease development. PMID:25062003

  20. Tonic Hyper-Connectivity of Reward Neurocircuitry in Obese Children

    PubMed Central

    Black, William R.; Lepping, Rebecca J.; Bruce, Amanda S.; Powell, Joshua N.; Bruce, Jared M.; Martin, Laura E.; Davis, Ann M.; Brooks, William M.; Savage, Cary R.; Simmons, W. Kyle

    2014-01-01

    Objective Obese children demonstrate less activation in prefrontal regions associated with self-control and inhibition when presented with food cues and advertisements. The current study evaluates the differences between obese and healthy weight children in resting-state functional connectivity to these brain regions. Design and Methods Seed regions in bilateral middle frontal gyri were chosen based on previous task-based analysis showing differences between obese and healthy weight children’s responses to food-associated stimuli. Functional connectivity to these seed regions was measured in resting-state scans collected in obese and lean children undergoing fMRI. Results Obese children exhibited greater resting-state functional connectivity than healthy weight children between the left middle frontal gyrus and reward-related regions in the left ventromedial prefrontal cortex, as well as the left lateral OFC. Conclusion Previously published results demonstrate that obese children exhibit less activity in brain regions associated with self-control when viewing motivationally salient food advertisements. Here we show that obese children also have tonically greater input to these self-control regions from reward neurocircuitry. The greater functional connectivity between reward and self-control regions, in conjunction with weaker activation of self-control neurocircuitry, may render these children more susceptible to food advertisements, placing them at elevated risk for over-feeding and obesity. PMID:24634397

  1. The Future of Children: Spring 2006. Childhood Obesity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paxson, Christina, Ed.; Donahue, Elisabeth, Ed.; Orleans, Tracy, Ed.; Grisso, Jeane Ann, Ed.

    2006-01-01

    The third volume of "The Future of Children" examines the causes and consequences of increasing rates of obesity and overweight among children. It also reviews specific policies and programs aimed at reducing obesity and overweight and the related health problems that result. Contents include: (1) Introducing the Issue (Christina Paxson, Elisabeth…

  2. Obesity in Children - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Obesity in Children URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/ ... V W XYZ List of All Topics All Obesity in Children - Multiple Languages To use the sharing features on ...

  3. Association of Obesity with Proteasomal Gene Polymorphisms in Children

    PubMed Central

    Kupca, Sarmite; Paramonova, Natalija; Sugoka, Olga; Rinkuza, Irena; Trapina, Ilva; Daugule, Ilva; Sipols, Alfred J.; Rumba-Rozenfelde, Ingrida

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to ascertain possible associations between childhood obesity, its anthropometric and clinical parameters, and three loci of proteasomal genes rs2277460 (PSMA6 c.-110C>A), rs1048990 (PSMA6 c.-8C>G), and rs2348071 (PSMA3 c. 543+138G>A) implicated in obesity-related diseases. Obese subjects included 94 otherwise healthy children in Latvia. Loci were genotyped and then analyzed using polymerase chain reactions, with results compared to those of 191 nonobese controls. PSMA3 SNP frequency differences between obese children and controls, while not reaching significance, suggested a trend. These differences, however, proved highly significant (P < 0.002) in the subset of children reporting a family history of obesity. Among obese children denying such history, PSMA6 c.-8C>G SNP differences, while being nonsignificant, likewise suggested a trend in comparison to the nonobese controls. No PSMA6 c.-110C>A SNP differences were detected in the obese group or its subsets. Finally, PSMA3 SNP differences were significantly associated (P < 0.05) with circulating low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL) levels. Our results clearly implicate the PSMA3 gene locus as an obesity risk factor in those Latvian children with a family history of obesity. While being speculative, the clinical results are suggestive of altered circulatory LDL levels playing a possible role in the etiology of obesity in the young. PMID:24455213

  4. Pathophysiology of hypertension in obese children: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Wirix, A J G; Kaspers, P J; Nauta, J; Chinapaw, M J M; Kist-van Holthe, J E

    2015-10-01

    Hypertension is increasingly common in overweight and obese children. The mechanisms behind the development of hypertension in obesity are complex, and evidence is limited. In order to effectively treat obese children for hypertension, it is important to have a deeper understanding of the pathophysiology of hypertension in obese children. The present review summarizes the main factors associated with hypertension in obese children and discusses their potential role in its pathophysiology. Systematic searches were conducted in PubMed and EMBASE for articles published up to October 2014. In total, 60 relevant studies were included. The methodological quality of the included studies ranged from weak to strong. Several factors important in the development of hypertension in obese children have been suggested, including endocrine determinants, such as corticosteroids and adipokines, sympathetic nervous system activity, disturbed sodium homeostasis, as well as oxidative stress, inflammation and endothelial dysfunction. Understanding the pathophysiology of hypertension in overweight and obese children is important and could have implications for its screening and treatment. Based on solely cross-sectional observational studies, it is impossible to infer causality. Longitudinal studies of high methodological quality are needed to gain more insight into the complex mechanisms behind the development of hypertension in obese children. PMID:26098701

  5. Abdominal obesity is an independent risk factor for increased carotid intima- media thickness in obese children.

    PubMed

    Hacihamdioğlu, Bülent; Okutan, Vedat; Yozgat, Yilmaz; Yildirim, Düzgün; Kocaoğlu, Murat; Lenk, Mustafa Koray; Ozcan, Okan

    2011-01-01

    We aimed in this study to investigate carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) in obese children and evaluate the relationship of IMT to various cardiovascular risk factors. One-hundred four obese children (9.3 +/- 2.5 years) and 30 healthy age-matched control subjects were enrolled in the study. All children were assessed for fasting levels of glucose, insulin, lipid profile, skinfold thickness (SFT), waist circumference (WC), and blood pressure (BP). Insulin resistance was estimated by the homeostasis model assessment (HOMA) index. Carotid IMT measurements and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) were diagnosed with ultrasonographic findings. IMT was significantly higher in obese children compared to controls (0.49 +/- 0.05 vs. 0.40 +/- 0.02 mm, p < 0.001). Significant positive correlations were found between increased carotid IMT and body fat percentage (BFP), body mass index (BMI), age, height, systolic BP, WC, SFT, triglyceride and insulin levels, and insulin resistance index. In a linear logistic regression analysis, the only parameter affecting the increase in carotid IMT was WC (beta: 0.589, p < 0.001). Furthermore, IMT was increased significantly in obese children with NAFLD when compared to obese children without NAFLD (0.54 +/- 0.04 vs. 0.48 +/- 0.05 mm, p < 0.001). Children with abdominal obesity are at increased risk for atherosclerosis, and WC can be used to determine the atherosclerosis risk in obese children.

  6. Overweight and obesity in Portuguese children: prevalence and correlates.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Thayse Natacha; Katzmarzyk, Peter T; dos Santos, Fernanda K; Souza, Michele; Pereira, Sara; Maia, José A R

    2014-11-03

    There are widespread differences in overweight/obesity prevalence in children, and understanding the reasons for this is very important. The present study aims: (I) to conduct a meta-analysis on overweight/obesity prevalence in Portuguese children; (II) to identify differences in biological and behavioural characteristics between normal-weight and overweight/obese children; and (III) to investigate the importance of individual- and school-level correlates of variation in children's BMI using multilevel modelling. A search was done for all published papers including Portuguese children during the last decade; further, 686 Portuguese children (9-11 years old) were sampled and their BMI, family income, maturity offset, nutritional habits, physical activity, sedentariness, sleep time, and school environment information were collected. Results showed a stabilization of overweight/obesity during the last decade, 30.6% (95%CI: 0.287-0.34) for boys, 28.4% (95%CI: 0.23-0.35) for girls, and 30.3% (95%CI: 0.27-0.34) for boys and girls together. Differences between weight groups were only found in individual-level biological traits. The multilevel analysis did not identify significant contributions of school-level variables to children's BMI variation. In conclusion, no increase was found in the prevalence of overweight/obesity among Portuguese children since 2000. Normal-weight and overweight/obese children only differ in individual-level characteristics, and school context variables were not related to variation in BMI.

  7. Proteomic analysis allows for early detection of potential markers of metabolic impairment in very young obese children

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Early diagnosis of initial metabolic derangements in young obese children could influence their management; however, this impairment is frequently not overt, but subtle and undetectable by routinely used clinical assays. Our aim was to evaluate the ability of serum proteomic analysis to detect these incipient metabolic alterations in comparison to standard clinical methods and to identify new candidate biomarkers. Methods A cross-sectional study of fasting serum samples from twenty-two prepubertal, Caucasian obese (OB; 9.22 ± 1.93 years; 3.43 ± 1.08 BMI-SDS) and twenty-one lean controls (C; 8.50 ± 1.98 years; -0.48 ± 0.81 BMI-SDS) and a prospective study of fasting serum samples from twenty prepubertal, Caucasian obese children (11 insulin resistant [IR]) before (4.77 ± 1.30 BMI-SDS) and after weight reduction (2.57 ± 1.29 BMI-SDS) by conservative treatment in a reference hospital (Pros-OB) was performed. Proteomic analysis (two-dimension-eletrophoresis + mass spectrometry analysis) of serum and comparative evaluation of the sensitivity of routinely used assays in the clinics to detect the observed differences in protein expression level, as well as their relationship with anthropometric features, insulin resistance indexes, lipid profile and adipokine levels were carried out. Results Study of the intensity data from proteomic analysis showed a decrease of several isoforms of apolipoprotein-A1, apo-J/clusterin, vitamin D binding protein, transthyretin in OBvs. C, with some changes in these proteins being enhanced by IR and partially reversed after weight loss. Expression of low molecular weight isoforms of haptoglobin was increased in OB, enhanced in IR and again decreased after weight loss, being positively correlated with serum interleukin-6 and NAMPT/visfatin levels. After statistical correction for multiple comparisons, significance remained for a single isoform of low MW haptoglobin (OB vs. C and IR vs. non-IR) and

  8. [Overweight and obesity in preschool children: an underestimated problem?].

    PubMed

    Bielecka-Jasiocha, Joanna; Majcher, Anna; Pyrzak, Beata; Janczarska, Danuta; Rumińska, Małgorzata

    2009-01-01

    The spread of overweight and obesity is alarming in the face of metabolic syndrome development and its consequences. As obesity becomes a social norm, a lack of adequate attention seems to be noticed. In the development of obesity special attention is focused on preschool and pubertal periods, as they are considered as critical in the development of obesity and its persistence into adulthood. We have analyzed anthropological parameters of 302 overweight and obese children, patients of the Department of Pediatrics and Endocrinology between 2004-2007. Children were at the age from 1.5 y to 18.25 y. Overweight was diagnosed when BMI > or =1 SDS, obesity when BMI > or =2 SDS. 77% of boys and 86% of girls were obese. The mean value of BMI, expressed as SDS BMI, was +4.3 SDS (girls) and +4.5 SDS (boys) in children under 6 yrs, +3.03 SDS (girls) and +2.95 SDS (boys) in children between 6-14 yrs, +3.95 SDS (girls) and +4.08 (boys) in children above 14 yrs. The youngest group (i.e. under 6 yrs), although comparatively most obese, was sparse: 7% of all girls and 5.6% of all boys. The oldest group (i.e.above 14 yrs) was plentiful (45.6% of all girls and 27.8% of all boys) and comparatively very obese. Data of parents' weight status were completed in 56% of cases: 31.2% of mothers and 41.5% of fathers were overweight, 33.3% of mothers and 50.8% of fathers were obese. These observations can suggest that overweight and obesity can be underestimated and/or ignored/ disregarded in preschool and pubertal children. It seems to be alarming as these two periods of life are critical in the development of obesity. Special attention should be applied in the field of prevention of obesity, especially in younger children, and early identification of overweight small children and/ or children at risk of obesity.

  9. Association between socioeconomic status and obesity in children.

    PubMed

    Bilić-Kirin, Vesna; Gmajnić, Rudika; Burazin, Jelena; Milicić, Valerija; Buljan, Vesna; Ivanko, Marija

    2014-06-01

    The perception of obesity among people has not changed significantly regardless numerous public educational programs. Reasons for obesity pandemics are numerous and complex, but can be mostly resumed to life-style changes. The aim of this research was to determine connection between socioeconomic factors and obesity with children of our region. Study included pupils aged 7-8 from 19 first grades in 8 primary schools in Osijek-Baranya County. Body height and weight were measured and socioeconomic data status were collected. Socioeconomic status included data on marital status, educational level, employment, number of children in the family, kindergarten attendance and urban/rural location and also smoking habits of parents. BMI was calculated as a parameter for obesity assessment according to Croatian reference values. Total of 372 children were measured. There were 6.5% of overweight children (BMI between 90th and 97th percentile) and 2.4% of obese children (BMI above 97th percentile). The prevalence of obese children in our research was 8.9%. Obesity is not influenced by rural/urban residence, marital status of parents, number of children in the family, mother's education, or by parents' smoking habits. Positive correlation between obesity and father's education and parents' unemployment was found. Available literature data, same as our study, did not show consistent association between socioeconomic factors and obesity with children. Contradictory results of different studies can be a result of a small sample, difference in study design and different criteria for defining categories within investigated socioeconomic factor.

  10. Factors Associated with Early Platelet Activation in Obese Children

    PubMed Central

    García, Anel Gómez; Núñez, Guillermina García; Sandoval, Martha Eva Viveros; Castellanos, Sergio Gutierrez; Aguilar, Cleto Alvarez

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the factors associated with platelet activation in obese children. Design Cross-sectional study. Setting Department of Pediatrics of Regional Hospital N∘ 1 of Mexican Institute of Social Security in Morelia, Michoacán, Mexico. Participants 79 obese and 64 non-obese children between the ages of 5 and 10 years. Main Outcomes Measures Obese children (body mass index [BMI] >85 in growth curves for Centers for Disease Control/National Center for Health Statistics), and the control group of 64 non-obese children (percentile <85), % body fat, platelet activation was assessed by sP-selectin. Other measures were leptin, uric acid (UA), von Willebrand Factor (vWF), plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI-1), lipid profile, and glucose. Results Obese children displayed higher plasma sP-selectin, leptin, PAI-1, and vWF than non-obese children. In the univariate logistic regression analysis, leptin, vWF, UA, and high density lipoprotein (HDL), but not with PAI-1, were factors associated with platelet activation. By stepwise linear regression analysis adjusted by sex and age, the best predictor variables for platelet activation were leptin (β:0.381; t:4.665; P=0.0001), vWF (β:0.211; t:2.926; P=0.004), UA (β:0.166; t:2.146; P=0.034), and HDL (β:−0.215; t:−2.819; P=0.006). Conclusions Obese children have a higher risk of developing early platelet activation. Factors associated with platelet activation were Leptin, vWF, UA, and HDL. Further studies involving larger numbers of patients over a longer duration are needed to understand the possible molecular mechanism underlying the association between leptin, vWF, and UA and endothelial activation and/or endothelial damage/dysfunction in obese children and its influence in cardiovascular disease in adults. PMID:24415745

  11. Perception of Childhood Obesity in Mothers of Preschool Children

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hae Ok; Kim, Gyo Nam; Park, Euna

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to identify the perception of childhood obesity in mothers of preschool children using Q methodology. Methods A total of 38 Q statements about childhood obesity were obtained from 41 participants. The QUANL PC program was used to analyze the results. Results There were three types of perception toward obesity in mothers of preschool children: the “authoritative discipline type,” the “generous home meal focused type,” and the “home meal based on household financial situation type.” Conclusion The perception of mothers toward childhood obesity can affect the extent of maternal interaction with children or meal preparation for the family. Based on these results, it is necessary to plan specific programs according to the types of maternal perception toward childhood obesity. PMID:25938022

  12. The Association between Maltreatment and Obesity among Preschool Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitaker, Robert C.; Phillips, Shannon M.; Orzol, Sean M.; Burdette, Hillary L.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether child maltreatment is associated with obesity in preschool children. Methods: Data were obtained from the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study, a birth cohort study of 4898 children born between 1998 and 2000 in 20 large US cities. At 3 years of age, 2412 of these children had their height and weight measured,…

  13. Association between eating behavior scores and obesity in Chilean children

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Inadequate eating behavior and physical inactivity contribute to the current epidemic of childhood obesity. The aim of this study was to assess the association between eating behavior scores and childhood obesity in Chilean children. Design and methods We recruited 126 obese, 44 overweight and 124 normal-weight Chilean children (6-12 years-old; both genders) according to the International Obesity Task Force (IOTF) criteria. Eating behavior scores were calculated using the Child Eating Behavior Questionnaire (CEBQ). Factorial analysis in the culturally-adapted questionnaire for Chilean population was used to confirm the original eight-factor structure of CEBQ. The Cronbach's alpha statistic (>0.7 in most subscales) was used to assess internal consistency. Non-parametric methods were used to assess case-control associations. Results Eating behavior scores were strongly associated with childhood obesity in Chilean children. Childhood obesity was directly associated with high scores in the subscales "enjoyment of food" (P < 0.0001), "emotional overeating" (P < 0.001) and "food responsiveness" (P < 0.0001). Food-avoidant subscales "satiety responsiveness" and "slowness in eating" were inversely associated with childhood obesity (P < 0.001). There was a graded relation between the magnitude of these eating behavior scores across groups of normal-weight, overweight and obesity groups. Conclusion Our study shows a strong and graded association between specific eating behavior scores and childhood obesity in Chile. PMID:21985269

  14. Quantitative differences in intestinal Faecalibacterium prausnitzii in obese Indian children.

    PubMed

    Balamurugan, Ramadass; George, Gemlyn; Kabeerdoss, Jayakanthan; Hepsiba, Jancy; Chandragunasekaran, Aarthy M S; Ramakrishna, Balakrishnan S

    2010-02-01

    Gut bacteria contribute to energy conservation in man through their ability to ferment unabsorbed carbohydrate. The present study examined the composition of predominant faecal microbiota in obese and non-obese children. The participants (n 28) aged 11-14 years provided fresh faecal samples and completed a dietary survey consisting of 24 h diet recall and a FFQ of commonly used foods taken over the previous 3 months. Faecal bacteria were quantitated by real-time PCR using primers targeted at 16S rDNA. Of the participants, fifteen (seven female) were obese, with median BMI-for-age at the 99th percentile (range 97 to>99) while thirteen participants (seven female) were normal weight, with median BMI-for age being at the 50th percentile (range 1-85). Consumption of energy, carbohydrates, fat and protein was not significantly different between the obese and non-obese participants. There was no significant difference between the two groups in faecal levels of Bacteroides-Prevotella, Bifidobacterium species, Lactobacillus acidophilus group or Eubacterium rectale. Levels of Faecalibacterium prausnitzii were significantly higher in obese children than in non-obese participants (P = 0.0253). We concluded that the finding of increased numbers of F. prausnitzii in the faeces of obese children in south India adds to the growing information on alterations in faecal microbiota in obesity.

  15. Obesity in School Children with Intellectual Disabilities in France

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salaun, Laureline; Berthouze-Aranda, Sophie

    2011-01-01

    Background: The aims of this study were to assess the prevalence of obesity in school children with intellectual disabilities and to determine the most appropriate indicators of obesity measurement. Materials and Methods: The weight, height, body mass index (BMI), waist circumference, waist-to-height ratio and body fat percentage as measured by…

  16. [Dental status in children and adolescents diagnosed with obesity].

    PubMed

    Galkina, Iu V; Gavrilova, O A; Piekalnits, I Ia; Dianov, O A

    2015-01-01

    Dental status was studied in 168 obese teenagers aged from 12 to 17 years. The study revealed high prevalence in this group of teenagers of oral pathology like caries and fluorosis, inflammatory periodontal disease in 75% of children and poor oral hygiene level. One should consider high need for development of treatment-and-prophylactic measures for improvement of dental status in obese teenagers.

  17. A genetic contribution to circulating cytokines and obesity in children

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cytokines are considered to be involved in obesity-related metabolic diseases. Study objectives are to determine the heritability of circulating cytokine levels, to investigate pleiotropy between cytokines and obesity traits, and to present genome scan results for cytokines in 1030 Hispanic children...

  18. Obesity and Other Predictors of Absenteeism in Philadelphia School Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rappaport, Elizabeth B.; Daskalakis, Constantine; Andrel, Jocelyn

    2011-01-01

    Background: Limited data indicate that obese children are absent from school more than their normal-weight peers. We analyzed administrative data from a large urban school district to investigate the association of obesity and student sociodemographic characteristics with absenteeism. Methods: We analyzed 291,040 records, representing 165,056…

  19. Muscle force and power in obese and overweight children.

    PubMed

    Rauch, R; Veilleux, L-N; Rauch, F; Bock, D; Welisch, E; Filler, G; Robinson, T; Burrill, E; Norozi, K

    2012-06-01

    The study investigated differences in skeletal muscle function between obese and non-obese children using a force platform. Forty obese children and adolescents (age range 8 to 18 years; 21 girls) and 40 age- and sex-matched controls performed two tests: (1) single two-legged jump, a countermovement jump for maximal height; (2) multiple one-legged hopping on the forefoot, a test of maximal force. In the single two-legged jump, obese subjects had higher absolute peak force (1.62 kN vs 1.09 kN) and peak power (2.46 kW vs 2.06 kW), but lower body weight-related peak force (2.10 vs 2.33) and lower peak power per body mass (30.9 W/kg vs 41.6 W/kg). Jump height (29.3 cm vs 37.5 cm) and maximal vertical velocity (1.92 ms(-1) vs 2.31 ms(-1)) were reduced in obese children. In multiple one-legged hopping, obese subjects had 72% and 84% higher absolute peak force on the left and right foot, respectively. However, forces relative to body weight were 24% and 23% lower in the obese group than in the control group. In conclusion, obese children and adolescents have increased muscle force and power. This partly compensates for the effect of high body weight on muscle performance.

  20. Parental Anthropometric Indices and Obesity in Children.

    PubMed

    Koomanaee, Shahin; Tabrizi, Manijeh; Naderi, Novin; Hassanzadeh Rad, Afagh; Boloky Moghaddam, Kobra; Dalili, Setila

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the correlation between each parent's Body Mass Index (BMI) and maternal age with weight status of children. This was an analytic cross-sectional study which was conducted on 12-year-old students from different areas in Rasht, north part of Iran. The checklist included demographic characteristics such as age, maternal age during childbirth, student and maternal height and weight, child rank. Data were analyzed by Pearson correlation analysis, paired t-test and ANOVA test and chi-square in SPSS software 19.0. A P-value less than 0.05 were considered statistically significant. A total of 200 adolescents participated in this study consisted of 106 (53%) boys. Results showed a significant correlation between students' BMI and parental BMI and father's weight. Also, there was a significant correlation between students' weight with parental BMI and father's weight, and birth rankIn conclusion, the role of the family in changing nutritional habits of children must be considered because through parental education and changing their perceptions we can prevent obesity.

  1. Parental Anthropometric Indices and Obesity in Children.

    PubMed

    Koomanaee, Shahin; Tabrizi, Manijeh; Naderi, Novin; Hassanzadeh Rad, Afagh; Boloky Moghaddam, Kobra; Dalili, Setila

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the correlation between each parent's Body Mass Index (BMI) and maternal age with weight status of children. This was an analytic cross-sectional study which was conducted on 12-year-old students from different areas in Rasht, north part of Iran. The checklist included demographic characteristics such as age, maternal age during childbirth, student and maternal height and weight, child rank. Data were analyzed by Pearson correlation analysis, paired t-test and ANOVA test and chi-square in SPSS software 19.0. A P-value less than 0.05 were considered statistically significant. A total of 200 adolescents participated in this study consisted of 106 (53%) boys. Results showed a significant correlation between students' BMI and parental BMI and father's weight. Also, there was a significant correlation between students' weight with parental BMI and father's weight, and birth rankIn conclusion, the role of the family in changing nutritional habits of children must be considered because through parental education and changing their perceptions we can prevent obesity. PMID:27309269

  2. Johnny's Not Jumping: Can We Help Obese Children?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Javernick, Ellen

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the problem of overweight and obese preschoolers, particularly those in an academic preschool situation, which traditionally allows children to function without specific objectives related to physical fitness. Offers recommendations for integrating a balanced fitness program. (Author/RWB)

  3. Objectively measured habitual physical activity and sedentary behaviour in obese and non-obese Malaysian children.

    PubMed

    Wafa, Sharifah Wajihah; Hamzaid, Hana; Talib, Ruzita Abd; Reilly, John J

    2014-04-01

    The present study examined objectively measured physical activity in Malaysian children and compared the differences in physical levels between obese and healthy weight children. Eighty-six obese children were matched for age and sex with 86 healthy weight children with median age 9.5 years. Habitual physical activity and sedentary behaviour were measured over 5 days using Actigraph accelerometers. Time spent sedentary was significantly higher in the obese group (90% vs. 86% of daytime; p = 0.001). Moderate-to-vigorous-intensity physical activity was significantly higher in the healthy weight group (1.2 vs. 0.7% of daytime, p < 0.001). In both healthy weight and obese children, physical activity levels were exceptionally low, although moderate-to-vigorous-intensity physical activity was significantly lower in the obese group than the healthy weight group. Efforts to prevent and treat obesity in Malaysian children will need a substantial focus on the promotion of reductions in sedentary behaviour and increases in physical activity. PMID:24213306

  4. Objectively measured habitual physical activity and sedentary behaviour in obese and non-obese Malaysian children.

    PubMed

    Wafa, Sharifah Wajihah; Hamzaid, Hana; Talib, Ruzita Abd; Reilly, John J

    2014-04-01

    The present study examined objectively measured physical activity in Malaysian children and compared the differences in physical levels between obese and healthy weight children. Eighty-six obese children were matched for age and sex with 86 healthy weight children with median age 9.5 years. Habitual physical activity and sedentary behaviour were measured over 5 days using Actigraph accelerometers. Time spent sedentary was significantly higher in the obese group (90% vs. 86% of daytime; p = 0.001). Moderate-to-vigorous-intensity physical activity was significantly higher in the healthy weight group (1.2 vs. 0.7% of daytime, p < 0.001). In both healthy weight and obese children, physical activity levels were exceptionally low, although moderate-to-vigorous-intensity physical activity was significantly lower in the obese group than the healthy weight group. Efforts to prevent and treat obesity in Malaysian children will need a substantial focus on the promotion of reductions in sedentary behaviour and increases in physical activity.

  5. Activity Participation Intensity Is Associated with Skeletal Development in Pre-Pubertal Children with Developmental Coordination Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsang, William W. N.; Guo, X.; Fong, Shirley S. M.; Mak, Kwok-Kei; Pang, Marco Y. C.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This study aimed (1) to compare the skeletal maturity and activity participation pattern between children with and without developmental coordination disorder (DCD); and (2) to determine whether activity participation pattern was associated with the skeletal development among children with DCD. Materials and methods: Thirty-three children…

  6. MedlinePlus: Obesity in Children

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pediatrics) Related Issues Is My Child's Appetite Normal? (Food and Nutrition Service) - PDF Pediatric Obesity and Ear, Nose, and Throat Disorders (American Academy of Otolaryngology--Head and Neck Surgery) Specifics Organic Causes of Weight Gain and Obesity (American Academy ...

  7. Early cardiac abnormalities in obese children: importance of obesity per se versus associated cardiovascular risk factors.

    PubMed

    Van Putte-Katier, Nienke; Rooman, Raoul P; Haas, Lenneke; Verhulst, Stijn L; Desager, Kristien N; Ramet, José; Suys, Bert E

    2008-08-01

    We investigated whether obese children and adolescents have early echocardiographic signs of subclinical cardiac dysfunction and evaluated the respective influence of obesity per se versus parameters of carbohydrate and lipid metabolism that are frequently abnormal in obese subjects. The role of tissue Doppler imaging as a screening tool for these abnormalities was explored. Blood pressure and echocardiographic parameters, including tissue Doppler measurements of the septal mitral annulus were evaluated in 49 obese children and adolescents and 45 age and sex matched controls. The respective influence of obesity versus parameters of carbohydrate and lipid metabolism was examined with linear regression analysis. Obese subjects showed significantly larger left ventricular wall dimensions (posterior wall, septum, and left ventricular mass index) and signs of early diastolic filling abnormalities on conventional and tissue Doppler echocardiography compared with nonobese subjects. Multiple regression analysis showed that mainly BMI-SD scores and/or body surface area explained significant proportions of the variance of the early cardiac abnormalities. In conclusion, young, obese children and adolescents have significant changes in left ventricular wall dimensions and early diastolic filling compared with nonobese subjects. Obesity per se and not the parameters of carbohydrate and lipid metabolism predicted the early cardiac abnormalities.

  8. Association between obesity and asthma in Japanese preschool children.

    PubMed

    Okabe, Yoshie; Adachi, Yuichi; Itazawa, Toshiko; Yoshida, Koichi; Ohya, Yukihiro; Odajima, Hiroshi; Akasawa, Akira; Miyawaki, Toshio

    2012-09-01

    Obesity may increase the risk of subsequent asthma. We have previously reported that there is a clear association between obesity and asthma in Japanese school-aged children. To evaluate whether a similar association exists in younger children, a nationwide cross-sectional questionnaire-based survey was performed focusing on children aged 4-5 yr. A child who had experienced wheezing during the past 12 months and had ever been diagnosed with asthma by a physician was defined as having current asthma. Overweight and underweight were defined as BMI ≥90th percentile and ≤10th percentile, respectively, according to the reference values for Japanese children from 1978 to 1981. After excluding 2547 children because of incomplete data, 34,699 children were analyzed. Current asthma was significantly more prevalent in overweight children compared with underweight and normal weight children (13.2% for overweight vs. 10.5% for underweight and 11.1% for normal weight; both p < 0.001). Even after adjusting for other variables, such as gender, other coexisting allergic diseases, and parental history of asthma, there was an association between overweight and current asthma (adjusted odds ratio: 1.23, 95% CI: 1.10-1.38, p < 0.001). Even in preschool children, obesity is already associated with asthma, and there was no gender effect on this association. Physicians should consider the impact of obesity when managing asthma in younger children.

  9. Characterization of the immune inflammatory profile in obese asthmatic children.

    PubMed

    Magrone, Thea; Simone, Maria; Altamura, Maria; Munno, Irene

    2014-01-01

    Asthma and obesity are two common disorders often associated in children and characterized by an inflammatory status. Growing evidences support a connection between obesity and asthma since weight reduction can improve asthmatic symptoms. In this study, we have enrolled eighty children: 17 non asthmatics and non obese, 19 obese, 28 asthmatics-obese and, 16 asthmatics non-obese, respectively. In all participants, respiratory functional tests and body mass index (BMI) were calculated. Moreover, systemic inflammation of biomarkers such as T helper (h)1-type, Th2-type and T regulatory-type serum cytokines along with major adipokines was determined. Data will show that the association between asthma and obesity leads to a predominant Th1-type response with an increase in pro-inflammatory cytokines. This inflammatory profile in asthmatics-obese children is sustained by elevated serum levels of leptin and visfatin, while adiponectin concentration is rather diminished. Finally, levels of systemic inflammatory biomarkers positively correlate with the increase in BMI values in all population subgroups.

  10. Are Dietary Intakes Related to Obesity in Children?

    PubMed Central

    Papandreou, Dimitrios; Makedou, Kali; Zormpa, Areti; Karampola, Maria; Ioannou, Anastasia; Hitoglou-Makedou, Areti

    2016-01-01

    AIM: The purpose of this study was to report obesity status and identify any dietary substances that may be related to obesity in healthy school children from Northern Greece. METHODS: Four hundred and twenty-five (n = 425) children were randomly selected to participate in the study. A 24-h recall of three days (two weekdays and one weekend day) was used to analyze the dietary data of the subjects. RESULTS: Out of 425 subjects, 146 (34.3%) of them were found to be overweight and obese. Energy, protein, carbohydrate and thiamin intake was statistically positively correlated with obesity while dietary iron intake was statistically negatively correlated with obesity. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that the children with dietary iron deficiency were 1.128 (95% CI: 0.002, 0.161 P < 0.031) times more likely of being obese compared to the normal group after adjustment for energy intake. CONCLUSIONS: Although most of the dietary intakes of our subjects were adequate, special consideration should be given to energy, carbohydrate, protein, and sugar and iron intake especially and its relation to obesity. Furthermore, additional studies are required to investigate any possible relation of low dietary iron consumption and obesity. PMID:27335587

  11. Obesity and Asthma in Children: Current and Future Therapeutic Options

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    With the childhood prevalence of obesity and asthma increasing, it is important for pediatric professionals to appreciate that obesity modifies the diagnosis and management of asthma. These disease modifications present challenges to clinical management, including decreased responsiveness to controller therapy and decreased quality-of-life compared to normal weight asthmatic children. While consensus guidelines do not currently suggest specific changes in asthma management for obese patients, management of some patients may be improved with consideration of the latest evidence. This Current Opinion article briefly summarizes what is known regarding the complex relationship between obesity and asthma in children, and discusses practical issues associated with the diagnosis and effective clinical management of asthma in obese children. On average, obese patients with asthma do not respond as well to inhaled corticosteroid therapy. Management approaches including weight loss and routine exercise are safe, and may improve important asthma outcomes. Asthma providers should learn to facilitate weight loss for their obese patients. In addition, pharmacologic interventions for weight loss in obese asthma, though not currently recommended, may soon be considered. PMID:24604125

  12. Ultrasound image of the thyroid gland in obese children

    PubMed Central

    Kosiak, Wojciech; Korpal-Szczyrska, Maria; Myśliwiec, Małgorzata

    2015-01-01

    Obesity as a disease of affluence also affects younger children. Numerous observations suggest a link between excessive body weight and thyroid function disorders. Subclinical hypothyroidism has been diagnosed increasingly frequently in patients with obesity. A growing number of papers also point to morphological changes of the thyroid gland in the ultrasound examination in obese children. These reports mainly concern changes in echogenicity. The present paper discusses the most important aspects of this topic on the basis of the literature as well as containing a brief analysis based on own experiences. PMID:26807299

  13. Oxidative stress and nitric oxide are increased in obese children and correlate with cardiometabolic risk and renal function.

    PubMed

    Correia-Costa, Liane; Sousa, Teresa; Morato, Manuela; Cosme, Dina; Afonso, Joana; Areias, José C; Schaefer, Franz; Guerra, António; Afonso, Alberto C; Azevedo, Ana; Albino-Teixeira, António

    2016-09-01

    Oxidative stress and nitric oxide (NO) appear to represent important links between obesity and cardiovascular, metabolic and/or renal disease. We investigated whether oxidative stress and NO production/metabolism are increased in overweight and obese prepubertal children and correlate with cardiometabolic risk and renal function. We performed a cross-sectional evaluation of 313 children aged 8-9 years. Anthropometrics, 24-h ambulatory blood pressure, pulse wave velocity (PWV), insulin resistance (homoeostasis model assessment index (HOMA-IR)), inflammatory/metabolic biomarkers, estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), plasma total antioxidant status (TAS), plasma and urinary isoprostanes (P-Isop, U-Isop), urinary hydrogen peroxide (U-H2O2), and plasma and urinary nitrates and nitrites (P-NOx, U-NOx) were compared among normal weight, overweight and obese groups, according to WHO BMI z-score reference. U-Isop were increased in the obese group, whereas U-NOx were increased in both overweight and obese children. U-Isop were positively correlated with U-H2O2, myeloperoxidase (MPO), high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, HOMA-IR and TAG. TAS correlated negatively with U-Isop and MPO and positively with PWV. HOMA-IR and U-H2O2 were associated with higher U-Isop, independently of BMI and eGFR, and total cholesterol and U-H2O2 were associated with U-NOx, independently of BMI, eGFR values and P-NOx concentration. In overweight and obese children, eGFR decreased across P-NOx tertiles (median: 139·3 (25th, 75th percentile 128·0, 146·5), 128·0 (25th, 75th percentile 121·5, 140·4), 129·5 (25th, 75th percentile 119·4, 138·3), P for linear trend=0·003). We conclude that oxidant status and NO are increased in relation to fat accumulation and, even in young children, they translate into higher values of cardiometabolic risk markers and affect renal function. PMID:27480380

  14. Association between obesity and asthma in preschool Mexican children.

    PubMed

    Vàzquez-Nava, Francisco; Morales Romero, Jaime; Crodova Fernandez, José A; Saldívar-González, Atenogenes H; Vázquez-Rodriguez, Carlos F; Barrientos Gomez, Maria del C; Lin-Ochoa, Dolorez; Vázquez Rodríguez, Eliza M

    2010-07-07

    The elevated prevalence of obesity as well as of asthma in preschool children has prompted investigators to speculate that obesity in childhood might be a causal factor in the development of asthma. The results obtained to date are debatable. We investigated the association between obesity and asthma in 1,160 preschool Mexican children. Diagnosis of asthma was performed using the International Study of Asthma and Allergy in Childhood (ISAAC) questionnaire. The body mass index (BMI) in units of kg/m2 was determined, and children were categorized according to age- and gender-specific criteria, such as normal weight (5th-85th percentile), overweight (> or =85th and <95th percentile), and obesity (> or =95th percentile). Power test for logistic regression model was calculated. We found no association between overweight (adjusted OR = 1.02; 95% CI = 0.66-1.58), obesity (adjusted OR = 0.94; 95% CI = 0.68-1.30), and wheezing during the last year as determined by logistic regression model adjusted. We did not find an association between overweight, obesity, and asthma-associated hospitalizations. Further longitudinal studies are required to provide a better understanding of the relationship between obesity and asthma in preschool children.

  15. Serum lipid & lipoprotein profiles of obese Chinese children.

    PubMed

    Ho, T F; Paramsothy, S; Aw, T C; Yip, W C

    1996-03-01

    The serum lipid and lipoprotein levels of 59 obese Chinese children with a mean age of 13.0 years and mean relative weight of 164.2% were analysed. Between 40% to 54% of these children had elevated lipid and lipoprotein levels and about 78% had reduced high density lipoprotein (HDL) level when compared to healthy American and Japanese children. The obese children also had higher mean levels of total cholesterol (TC) and lower HDL compared to male adults in the local population. Those with elevated TC had higher mean relative weight (170% vs 159%, p < 0.05). In view of the close association between hyperlipidaemia and atherosclerosis, obese children should be carefully screened and managed to prevent long term morbidity and mortality of coronary artery disease. PMID:10967982

  16. Similarities between obesity in pets and children: the addiction model.

    PubMed

    Pretlow, Robert A; Corbee, Ronald J

    2016-09-01

    Obesity in pets is a frustrating, major health problem. Obesity in human children is similar. Prevailing theories accounting for the rising obesity rates - for example, poor nutrition and sedentary activity - are being challenged. Obesity interventions in both pets and children have produced modest short-term but poor long-term results. New strategies are needed. A novel theory posits that obesity in pets and children is due to 'treats' and excessive meal amounts given by the 'pet-parent' and child-parent to obtain affection from the pet/child, which enables 'eating addiction' in the pet/child and results in parental 'co-dependence'. Pet-parents and child-parents may even become hostage to the treats/food to avoid the ire of the pet/child. Eating addiction in the pet/child also may be brought about by emotional factors such as stress, independent of parental co-dependence. An applicable treatment for child obesity has been trialled using classic addiction withdrawal/abstinence techniques, as well as behavioural addiction methods, with significant results. Both the child and the parent progress through withdrawal from specific 'problem foods', next from snacking (non-specific foods) and finally from excessive portions at meals (gradual reductions). This approach should adapt well for pets and pet-parents. Pet obesity is more 'pure' than child obesity, in that contributing factors and treatment points are essentially under the control of the pet-parent. Pet obesity might thus serve as an ideal test bed for the treatment and prevention of child obesity, with focus primarily on parental behaviours. Sharing information between the fields of pet and child obesity would be mutually beneficial. PMID:27469280

  17. Evidence in Obese Children: Contribution of Hyperlipidemia, Obesity-Inflammation, and Insulin Sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chi-Jen; Jian, Deng-Yuan; Lin, Ming-Wei; Zhao, Jun-Zhi; Ho, Low-Tone; Juan, Chi-Chang

    2015-01-01

    Background Evidence shows a high incidence of insulin resistance, inflammation and dyslipidemia in adult obesity. The aim of this study was to assess the relevance of inflammatory markers, circulating lipids, and insulin sensitivity in overweight/obese children. Methods We enrolled 45 male children (aged 6 to 13 years, lean control = 16, obese = 19, overweight = 10) in this study. The plasma total cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, triglyceride, glucose and insulin levels, the circulating levels of inflammatory factors, such as TNF-α, IL-6, and MCP-1, and the high-sensitive CRP level were determined using quantitative colorimetric sandwich ELISA kits. Results Compared with the lean control subjects, the obese subjects had obvious insulin resistance, abnormal lipid profiles, and low-grade inflammation. The overweight subjects only exhibited significant insulin resistance and low-grade inflammation. Both TNF-α and leptin levels were higher in the overweight/obese subjects. A concurrent correlation analysis showed that body mass index (BMI) percentile and fasting insulin were positively correlated with insulin resistance, lipid profiles, and inflammatory markers but negatively correlated with adiponectin. A factor analysis identified three domains that explained 74.08% of the total variance among the obese children (factor 1: lipid, 46.05%; factor 2: obesity-inflammation, 15.38%; factor 3: insulin sensitivity domains, 12.65%). Conclusions Our findings suggest that lipid, obesity-inflammation, and insulin sensitivity domains predominantly exist among obese children. These factors might be applied to predict the outcomes of cardiovascular diseases in the future. PMID:26011530

  18. Maternal work and children's diet, activity, and obesity.

    PubMed

    Datar, Ashlesha; Nicosia, Nancy; Shier, Victoria

    2014-04-01

    Mothers' work hours are likely to affect their time allocation towards activities related to children's diet, activity and well-being. For example, mothers who work more may be more reliant on processed foods, foods prepared away from home and school meal programs for their children's meals. A greater number of work hours may also lead to more unsupervised time for children that may, in turn, allow for an increase in unhealthy behaviors among their children such as snacking and sedentary activities such as TV watching. Using data on a national cohort of children, we examine the relationship between mothers' average weekly work hours during their children's school years on children's dietary and activity behaviors, BMI and obesity in 5th and 8th grade. Our results are consistent with findings from the literature that maternal work hours are positively associated with children's BMI and obesity especially among children with higher socioeconomic status. Unlike previous papers, our detailed data on children's behaviors allow us to speak directly to affected behaviors that may contribute to the increased BMI. We show that children whose mothers work more consume more unhealthy foods (e.g. soda, fast food) and less healthy foods (e.g. fruits, vegetables, milk) and watch more television. Although they report being slightly more physically active, likely due to organized physical activities, the BMI and obesity results suggest that the deterioration in diet and increase in sedentary behaviors dominate.

  19. Overweight and Obesity among Children with Developmental Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De, Sukanya; Small, Jacqueline; Baur, Louise A.

    2008-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of overweight and obesity in children with developmental disabilities attending a metropolitan Diagnosis and Assessment Service. Method: A retrospective chart review was carried out for 98 children (67 male) aged 2-18 years. Data on age, sex, weight, height, and severity of…

  20. Obesity Rates in Special Populations of Children and Potential Interventions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holcomb, Matthew J.; Pufpaff, Lisa A.; McIntosh, David E.

    2009-01-01

    Childhood obesity has become a problem of epidemic proportions in the United States, but much of the research has focused on prevention and intervention programs, which target the general population of school children. Overlooked in the literature are children with special needs (including autism, genetic disorders, Down syndrome, and Prader-Willi…

  1. Association of beverage consumption with obesity in Mexican American children

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To determine the association of beverage consumption with obesity in Mexican American school-aged children. Cross-sectional study using the baseline data from a cohort study. Mothers and children answered questions about the frequency and quantity of the child's consumption of soda, diet soda, other...

  2. Obesity and type 2 diabetes in children: epidemiology and treatment.

    PubMed

    Pulgaron, Elizabeth R; Delamater, Alan M

    2014-08-01

    The incidence of overweight and obesity among children has increased dramatically in recent decades, with about one-third of children in the U.S. currently being either overweight or obese. Being overweight in early childhood increases risk for later obesity. There is evidence for the efficacy of family-based behavioral treatment to control weight and improve health outcomes. Obesity-related health risks have been documented, including metabolic syndrome. There is also increasing incidence of type 2 diabetes (T2D) among youth in recent years, with obesity and family history of T2D generally present. Lower income and ethnic minority status are associated with both obesity and T2D in youth. Most youth with T2D do not achieve optimal glycemic control, and are at high risk for later health complications. Obesity and T2D represent significant public health issues with potentially great personal and societal cost. Research addressing the prevention of obesity and T2D among youth is urgently needed.

  3. Obesity and Type 2 Diabetes in Children: Epidemiology and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Pulgaron, Elizabeth R.; Delamater, Alan M.

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of overweight and obesity among children has increased dramatically in recent decades, with about one-third of children in the U.S. currently being either overweight or obese. Being overweight in early childhood increases risk for later obesity. There is evidence for the efficacy of family-based behavioral treatment to control weight and improve health outcomes. Obesity-related health risks have been documented, including metabolic syndrome. There is also increasing incidence of type 2 diabetes (T2D) among youth in recent years, with obesity and family history of T2D generally present. Lower income and ethnic minority status are associated with both obesity and T2D in youth. Most youth with T2D do not achieve optimal glycemic control, and are at high risk for later health complications. Obesity and T2D represent significant public health issues with potentially great personal and societal cost. Research addressing the prevention of obesity and T2D among youth is urgently needed. PMID:24919749

  4. Differences in dietary pattern between obese and eutrophic children

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Excessive consumption of energy is a decisive factor of obesity, but a simple quantitative assessment of consumption between obese and eutrophic individuals not always explains the problem, raising questions about the importance of the qualitative aspects of food. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the differences in nutrient composition and meal patterns between eutrophic and obese schoolchildren. Methods The diet of 83 children (42 obese and 41 eutrophic), aged between 7 and 11 years of age, was assessed by two non-consecutive dietary recalls. After the software analysis of macro and micronutrients composition, the different types and amount of legumes, fruits and vegetables were analyzed to verify the dietary patterns. Results No differences were verified in energy consumption between the groups (eutrophic = 1934.2 ± 672.7 kcal, obese = 1835.8 ± 621.2 kcal). In general, children showed consumption within the recommended ranges of carbohydrates, lipids and proteins. The average consumption of fiber was higher in the eutrophic group (20.7 g) when compared to the obese group (14.8 g). The dietary fiber was strongly correlated with the number of servings of beans (r = 0.77), when compared to fruits (r = 0.44) and leafy vegetables (r = 0.13). It was also observed that the higher the consumption of fiber and beans, the lower the proportion of dietary fat (r = -0.22) in the diet. Generally, there was a low consumption of fiber (20.7 g = eutrophic group/14.8 g = obese group), beans (1.1 portions in the eutrophic and obese groups), fruits (0.7 portions eutrophic group and 0.6 obese group) and vegetables (1.3 eutrophic group and 1.1 obese group). Conclusions It is concluded that the obesity was more related to a dietary pattern of low intake of dietary fiber than excessive energy consumption and macronutrients imbalance. PMID:22206728

  5. Pubertal Development and Prepubertal Height and Weight Jointly Predict Young Adult Height and Body Mass Index in a Prospective Study in South Africa12

    PubMed Central

    Martorell, Reynaldo; Richter, Linda M

    2016-01-01

    Background: Height and adiposity track over childhood, but few studies, to our knowledge, have longitudinally examined the mediating relation of the timing and progression of puberty. Objective: We assessed interrelations between prepubertal height and body mass index, the progression through puberty, and young adult height and adiposity. Methods: We analyzed data from the Birth to Twenty Plus study (females, n = 823; males, n = 765). Serial measures of anthropometry and pubertal development were obtained between ages 9 and 16 y. We used latent class growth analysis to categorize pubertal development with respect to pubic hair (females and males), breasts (females), and genitalia (males) development. Adult height and weight were obtained at ages 18 to 20 y. Results: Among females, higher latent class (earlier initiation and faster progression through puberty) was associated with an increased risk of obesity [pubic hair class 3 compared with class 1: RR, 3.41 (95% CI: 1.57, 7.44)] and inconsistent associations with height. Among males, higher latent class was associated with increased adult height [pubic hair development class 3 compared with class 1: 2.43 cm (95% CI: 0.88, 4.00)] and increased risk of overweight/obesity [pubic hair development class 3 compared with class 1: OR, 3.44 (95% CI: 1.44, 8.20)]. In females, the association with adult height became inverse after adjusting for prepubertal height [pubic hair development class 3 compared with class 1: females, −1.31 cm (95% CI: −2.32, −0.31)]; in males, the association with height was attenuated with this adjustment [−0.56 cm (95% CI: −1.63, 0.52)]. Associations with adiposity were attenuated after adjusting for prepubertal adiposity. Conclusions: Progression through puberty modifies the relation between prepubertal and adult anthropometry. Screening for early or rapid progression of puberty might identify children at an increased risk of becoming overweight or obese adults. PMID:27335138

  6. Effect of conjugated linoleic acid on body fat accretion in overweight or obese children123

    PubMed Central

    Racine, Natalie M; Watras, Abigail C; Carrel, Aaron L; Allen, David B; McVean, Jennifer J; Clark, Robert R; O'Brien, Abigail R; O'Shea, Marianne; Scott, Corey E

    2010-01-01

    Background: Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) is a supplemental dietary fatty acid that decreases fat mass accretion in young animals. Objective: The aim of this study was to determine CLA's efficacy with regard to change in fat and body mass index (BMI; in kg/m2) in children. Design: We conducted a 7 ± 0.5-mo randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of CLA in 62 prepubertal children aged 6–10 y who were overweight or obese but otherwise healthy. The subjects were randomly assigned to receive 3 g/d of 80% CLA (50:50 cis-9,trans-11 and trans-10,cis-12 isomers) or placebo in chocolate milk. Results: Fifty-three subjects completed the trial (n = 28 in the CLA group, n = 25 in the placebo group). CLA attenuated the increase in BMI (0.5 ± 0.8) compared with placebo (1.1 ± 1.1) (P = 0.05). The percentage change in body fat measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry was smaller (P = 0.001) in the CLA group (−0.5 ± 2.1%) than in the placebo group (1.3 ± 1.8%). The change in abdominal body fat as a percentage of total body weight was smaller (P = 0.02) in the CLA group (−0.09 ± 0.9%) than in the placebo group (0.43 ± 0.6%). There were no significant changes in plasma glucose, insulin, or LDL cholesterol between groups. Plasma HDL cholesterol decreased significantly more (P = 0.05) in the CLA group (−5.1 ± 7.3 mg/dL) than in the placebo group (−0.7 ± 8 mg/dL). Bone mineral accretion was lower (P = 0.04) in the CLA group (0.05 ± 0.03 kg) than in the placebo group (0.07 ± 0.03 kg). Reported gastrointestinal symptoms did not differ significantly between groups. Conclusions: CLA supplementation for 7 ± 0.5 mo decreased body fatness in 6–10-y-old children who were overweight or obese but did not improve plasma lipids or glucose and decreased HDL more than in the placebo group. Long-term investigation of the safety and efficacy of CLA supplementation in children is recommended. PMID:20200257

  7. Motor abilities and aerobic fitness of obese children.

    PubMed

    Korsten-Reck, U; Kaspar, T; Korsten, K; Kromeyer-Hauschild, K; Bös, K; Berg, A; Dickhuth, H-H

    2007-09-01

    Obesity is considered to be epidemic worldwide. Stopping further progression interdisciplinary, outpatient intervention therapy programs for obese children have become increasingly important. FITOC (Freiburg Intervention Trial for Obese Children) consists of a combination of organized sports, behavioral therapy and nutritional advice. The effectiveness of the therapy is determined on the basis of anthropometrical and physical performance data. The purpose of this report is to give a differentiated view of the motor abilities of obese children and to describe changes in the course of the therapy program FITOC. Data were collected on n = 49 obese children (BMI > 97th percentile) aged 8 - 12 in a pretest at the beginning and posttest at the end of the intensive phase of the therapy. These data were compared with an age-matched German reference group. Besides the General Sports-Motor Test (Allgemeiner Sportmotorischer Test [AST]), the BMI-SDS values, the body fat mass (FM %) and the aerobic capacity (Watt/kg body weight) were recorded. In the pretest, the running exercise results and the aerobic capacity checked ranged significantly below the values of the reference group. The performance in the coordinative tests of the AST was differentiated. The medicine-ball toss was significantly above average of the reference group. In the posttest, the BMI-SDS values and the body fat mass (% FM) decreased (p < 0.001) and the aerobic capacity improved (p < 0.001). Performance in all motor abilities tests improved and the difference between the strength of the obese children and the strength of the reference group decreased. This study demonstrates that in obese children weight-bearing activities are below average but not all motor abilities.

  8. [EARLY MOTHER-CHILD BONDING FACTORS ASSOCIATED WITH CHILDREN OBESITY].

    PubMed

    Vargas Martínez, Gabriela; Cruzat Mandich, Claudia; Díaz Castrillón, Fernanda; Moore Infante, Catalina; Ulloa Jiménez, Valentina

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study is to describe the experience of a group of mothers with obese children, regarding how early bond affects the relationship that both have with food and this, in turn, impacts on childhood obesity. The present study has a qualitative, exploratory and descriptive design. The sample consists of five chilean women between 22 and 39 years old, with obese children between 2 and 4 years old. In-depth interviews were carried out and open coding strategy was used as method of analysis. Results show a tendency of mothers to establish insecure attachment relations, difficulties of tuning and expression of affection, and a predominance of a permissive parenting style around food. This has important implications for prevention and treatment of obesity, focusing on the attachment bond between mother and child.

  9. Obesity and physical activity in children of immigrants.

    PubMed

    Gualdi-Russo, Emanuela; Zaccagni, Luciana; Manzon, Vanessa S; Masotti, Sabrina; Rinaldo, Natascia; Khyatti, Meriem

    2014-08-01

    Childhood overweight and obesity have increased in recent decades, reaching alarming proportions. Children with a migrant background seem to be particularly at risk of developing overweight and obesity. This article provides an overview of the prevalence of overweight or obesity among North African (NA) children living in their own countries or as immigrants in Europe. The aim is to show the effect of the migration process on this trend and to discuss its possible contributing factors. Publications were identified by a systematic search of PubMed and the existing literature. Original longitudinal or cross-sectional studies on the prevalence of childhood and adolescent overweight and obesity and of physical activity among ethnic groups from North Africa compared with the native population were reviewed. The results confirmed that children of NA origin in Europe have higher levels of overweight and obesity than the native ones, especially girls. However, this trend can also be detected in urban areas of NA countries. Important factors contributing to the increase of overweight and obesity among children and adolescents are discussed, in particular the westernization of eating habits, the level of physical activity and body image perception. The review shows that factors linked to acculturation in the host society and others maintained from the country of origin come into play in determining childhood overweight and obesity among NA immigrants in Europe. The importance of health promotion targeting the groups most at risk of childhood overweight and obesity, i.e. aspects of a healthy diet and the benefits of physical activity, is underlined. PMID:25107997

  10. Obesity and physical activity in children of immigrants.

    PubMed

    Gualdi-Russo, Emanuela; Zaccagni, Luciana; Manzon, Vanessa S; Masotti, Sabrina; Rinaldo, Natascia; Khyatti, Meriem

    2014-08-01

    Childhood overweight and obesity have increased in recent decades, reaching alarming proportions. Children with a migrant background seem to be particularly at risk of developing overweight and obesity. This article provides an overview of the prevalence of overweight or obesity among North African (NA) children living in their own countries or as immigrants in Europe. The aim is to show the effect of the migration process on this trend and to discuss its possible contributing factors. Publications were identified by a systematic search of PubMed and the existing literature. Original longitudinal or cross-sectional studies on the prevalence of childhood and adolescent overweight and obesity and of physical activity among ethnic groups from North Africa compared with the native population were reviewed. The results confirmed that children of NA origin in Europe have higher levels of overweight and obesity than the native ones, especially girls. However, this trend can also be detected in urban areas of NA countries. Important factors contributing to the increase of overweight and obesity among children and adolescents are discussed, in particular the westernization of eating habits, the level of physical activity and body image perception. The review shows that factors linked to acculturation in the host society and others maintained from the country of origin come into play in determining childhood overweight and obesity among NA immigrants in Europe. The importance of health promotion targeting the groups most at risk of childhood overweight and obesity, i.e. aspects of a healthy diet and the benefits of physical activity, is underlined.

  11. [Dental status in children and adolescents diagnosed with obesity].

    PubMed

    Galkina, Iu V; Gavrilova, O A; Piekalnits, I Ia; Dianov, O A

    2015-01-01

    Dental status was studied in 168 obese teenagers aged from 12 to 17 years. The study revealed high prevalence in this group of teenagers of oral pathology like caries and fluorosis, inflammatory periodontal disease in 75% of children and poor oral hygiene level. One should consider high need for development of treatment-and-prophylactic measures for improvement of dental status in obese teenagers. PMID:25909618

  12. Overweight and Obesity in Portuguese Children: Prevalence and Correlates

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Thayse Natacha; Katzmarzyk, Peter T.; dos Santos, Fernanda K.; Souza, Michele; Pereira, Sara; Maia, José A. R.

    2014-01-01

    There are widespread differences in overweight/obesity prevalence in children, and understanding the reasons for this is very important. The present study aims: (I) to conduct a meta-analysis on overweight/obesity prevalence in Portuguese children; (II) to identify differences in biological and behavioural characteristics between normal-weight and overweight/obese children; and (III) to investigate the importance of individual- and school-level correlates of variation in children’s BMI using multilevel modelling. A search was done for all published papers including Portuguese children during the last decade; further, 686 Portuguese children (9–11 years old) were sampled and their BMI, family income, maturity offset, nutritional habits, physical activity, sedentariness, sleep time, and school environment information were collected. Results showed a stabilization of overweight/obesity during the last decade, 30.6% (95%CI: 0.287–0.34) for boys, 28.4% (95%CI: 0.23–0.35) for girls, and 30.3% (95%CI: 0.27–0.34) for boys and girls together. Differences between weight groups were only found in individual-level biological traits. The multilevel analysis did not identify significant contributions of school-level variables to children’s BMI variation. In conclusion, no increase was found in the prevalence of overweight/obesity among Portuguese children since 2000. Normal-weight and overweight/obese children only differ in individual-level characteristics, and school context variables were not related to variation in BMI. PMID:25372884

  13. Independent and Combined Effects of Sex and Biological Maturation on Motor Coordination and Performance in Prepubertal Children.

    PubMed

    Luz, Leonardo G O; Cumming, Sean P; Duarte, João P; Valente-Dos-Santos, João; Almeida, Maria J; Machado-Rodrigues, Aristides; Padez, Cristina; Carmo, Bruno Cleiton M; Santos, Rute; Seabra, André; Coelho-E-Silva, Manuel J

    2016-04-01

    Sex differences and maturation-associated variation in fitness and motor coordination were examined in children aged 8-9 years (n = 128, 67 girls). Assessments included stature and body mass, two-component body composition, percentage of predicted adult stature (as an index of biological maturation), and motor performance and coordination (Körperkoordinationstest für Kinder). Compared to girls, boys were less advanced in maturation status, possessed larger fat mass, demonstrated superior performances in six tests of fitness, and obtained one superior score on the Körperkoordinationstest für Kinder. After controlling for somatic maturation, sex differences persisted in the two multivariate domains: motor performance and motor coordination.

  14. Atherogenic Dyslipidemia and Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Obese Children

    PubMed Central

    D'Adamo, Ebe; Guardamagna, Ornella; Chiarelli, Francesco; Liccardo, Daniela; Ferrari, Federica; Nobili, Valerio

    2015-01-01

    Childhood obesity when associated with serum lipoprotein changes triggers atherosclerosis. Evidences suggest that the atherosclerotic process begins in childhood and that the extent of early atherosclerosis of the aorta and coronary arteries can be associated with lipoprotein levels and obesity. Furthermore, many studies in childhood demonstrate an important relationship between parameters of insulin sensitivity, body fat distribution, and the development of lipid abnormalities. This review focuses on the most recent findings on the relationship between obesity, dyslipidemia, and cardiovascular risk in children. PMID:25663838

  15. High Prevalence of Dyslipidemia and Insulin Resistance in HIV-Infected Pre-Pubertal African Children on Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Innes, Steve; Abdullah, Kameelah L.; Haubrich, Richard; Cotton, Mark F.; Browne, Sara H.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Data describing the true extent of antiretroviral therapy (ART)-induced dyslipidemia and insulin resistance in perinatally-infected children on ART in Africa is sparse. METHODS Fasting total cholesterol, LDL, HDL, triglycerides, insulin and glucose were performed on the first 100, of 190 pediatric ART clinic attendees. Diet assessment was performed by a trained dietician. Lipoatrophy was formally graded by consensus between two expert HIV pediatricians. Durations of previous ART exposures, clinical stage, pre-ART viral load, nadir and current CD4 were recorded. Dual energy X-ray Absorptiometry (DEXA) was performed on a subset of 42 patients selected semi-randomly. RESULTS Prevalences of insulin resistance, abnormal total cholesterol, LDL, HDL and triglyceride were 10%, 13%, 12%, 13 % and 9% respectively. Overall, 40% had at least one lipid abnormality or insulin resistance. Adjusted mean LDL cholesterol increased by 0.24mmol/L for each additional year of cumulative lopinavir/r exposure (p=0.03) after correcting for age, gender, body mass index, previous stavudine exposure, age at ART initiation, dietary fat and refined carbohydrate, while adjusted mean LDL cholesterol was 0.9mmol/L higher in children exposed to efavirenz within the previous six months (p=0.02). Adjusting for age, gender and ethnicity, DEXA revealed that greater trunk fat and lower peripheral subcutaneous fat were associated with elevated triglycerides but not with total cholesterol, LDL, HDL or HOMA. Similarly, the presence of visually obvious lipoatrophy was associated with elevated triglycerides but not with total cholesterol, LDL, HDL, HOMA or lactate. CONCLUSIONS Prevalences of insulin resistance and dyslipidemia were high. Cumulative lopinovir is an independent risk factor for dyslipidemia, with efavirenz exposure having only transitory effect. PMID:26421804

  16. [Management of children and adolescents with severe obesity].

    PubMed

    Valerio, G; Licenziati, M R; Tanas, R; Morino, G; Ambruzzi, A M; Balsamo, A; Brambilla, P; Bruzzi, P; Calcaterra, V; Crinò, A; De Falco, R; Franzese, A; Giordano, U; Grugni, G; Iaccarino Idelson, P; Iughetti, L; Maffeis, C; Manco, M; Miraglia Del Giudice, E; Mozzillo, E; Zito, E; Bernasconi, S

    2012-08-01

    Obesity is a complex public health issue. Recent data indicate the increasing prevalence and severity of obesity in children. Severe obesity is a real chronic condition for the difficulties of long-term clinical treatment, the high drop-out rate, the large burden of health and psychological problems and the high probability of persistence in adulthood. A staged approach for weight management is recommended. The establishment of permanent healthy lifestyle habits aimed at healthy eating, increasing physical activity and reducing sedentary behavior is the first outcome, because of the long-term health benefits of these behaviors. Improvement in medical conditions is also an important sign of long-term health benefits. Rapid weight loss is not pursued, for the implications on growth ad pubertal development and the risk of inducing eating disorders. Children and adolescents with severe obesity should be referred to a pediatric weight management center that has access to a multidisciplinary team with expertise in childhood obesity. This article provides pediatricians a comprehensive and evidence based update on treatment recommendations of severe obesity in children and adolescents.

  17. Do parents of obese children use ineffective parenting strategies?

    PubMed

    Morawska, Alina; West, Felicity

    2013-12-01

    Research has shown mixed findings about the relationship between parenting style and child lifestyle outcomes. This paper describes a cross-sectional study that aimed to clarify the relationship between ineffective parenting and childhood obesity by using multiple measures of child and family functioning. Sixty-two families with an obese child (aged four to 11 years) were matched with 62 families with a healthy weight child on key sociodemographic variables. Significant differences were found on several measures, including general parenting style, domain-specific parenting practices, and parenting self-efficacy (d = .53 to 1.96). Parents of obese children were more likely to use permissive and coercive discipline techniques, and to lack confidence in managing children's lifestyle behaviour. In contrast, parents of healthy weight children were more likely to implement specific strategies for promoting a healthy lifestyle.

  18. Do parents of obese children use ineffective parenting strategies?

    PubMed

    Morawska, Alina; West, Felicity

    2013-12-01

    Research has shown mixed findings about the relationship between parenting style and child lifestyle outcomes. This paper describes a cross-sectional study that aimed to clarify the relationship between ineffective parenting and childhood obesity by using multiple measures of child and family functioning. Sixty-two families with an obese child (aged four to 11 years) were matched with 62 families with a healthy weight child on key sociodemographic variables. Significant differences were found on several measures, including general parenting style, domain-specific parenting practices, and parenting self-efficacy (d = .53 to 1.96). Parents of obese children were more likely to use permissive and coercive discipline techniques, and to lack confidence in managing children's lifestyle behaviour. In contrast, parents of healthy weight children were more likely to implement specific strategies for promoting a healthy lifestyle. PMID:23711490

  19. Vulvovaginitis in prepubertal girls

    PubMed Central

    Stricker, T; Navratil, F; Sennhauser, F

    2003-01-01

    This retrospective study evaluated the clinical features and findings in bacterial cultures and in microscopic examination of vaginal secretions in 80 prepubertal girls, aged 2–12 years, with vulvovaginitis. Vaginal secretions were obtained directly from the vagina with a sterile catheter carefully inserted into the vagina. Pathogenic bacteria were isolated in 36% of cases. In 59% of these cases the isolated pathogen was group A ß-haemolytic streptococcus. Candida was not found in any of the patients. The finding of leucocytes in vaginal secretions as an indicator for growth of pathogenic bacteria had a sensitivity of 83% and a specificity of 59%. Antimicrobial treatment should therefore be based on bacteriological findings of vaginal secretions and not on the presence of leucocytes alone. PMID:12651758

  20. Obesity and growth during childhood and puberty.

    PubMed

    Marcovecchio, M Loredana; Chiarelli, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    Growth during childhood and adolescence occurs at different rates and is influenced by the interaction between genetic and environmental factors. Nutritional status plays an important role in regulating growth, and excess body weight early in life can influence growth patterns. Childhood obesity is a growing and alarming problem, associated with several short-term and long-term metabolic and cardiovascular complications. In addition, there is evidence suggesting that excess adiposity during childhood influences growth patterns and pubertal development. Several studies have shown that during prepubertal years obese children have higher height velocity and accelerated bone age compared to lean subjects. However, this prepubertal advantage in growth tends to gradually decrease during puberty, when obese children show a reduced growth spurt compared with lean subjects. Growth hormone (GH) secretion in obese children is reduced, therefore suggesting that increased growth is GH independent. Factors which have been implicated in the accelerated growth in obese children include increased leptin and insulin levels, adrenal androgens, insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1, IGF-binding protein-1 and GH-binding proteins. Excess body weight during childhood can also influence pubertal development, through an effect on timing of pubertal onset and levels of pubertal hormonal levels. There is clear evidence indicating that obesity leads to early appearance of pubertal signs in girls. In addition, obese girls are also at increased risk of hyperandrogenism. In boys, excess adiposity has been associated with advanced puberty in some studies, whereas others have reported a delay in pubertal onset. The existing evidence on the association between childhood and adolescence obesity underlines a further reason for fighting the epidemics of childhood obesity; that is preventing abnormal growth and pubertal patterns.

  1. Causes and risks for obesity - children

    MedlinePlus

    ... conditions can increase a child's appetite. These include hormone disorders or low thyroid function , and certain medicines, such as steroids or anti-seizure medications. Over time, any of these can increase the risk of obesity.

  2. Evaluation of Obesity in School-Age Children.

    PubMed

    Dobashi, Kazushige

    2016-01-01

    To prevent obesity in middle age, early precautions and interventions are required during childhood. Therefore, it is very important to accurately evaluate the degree of overweight in children. Body mass index (BMI) is widely used worldwide in adults, but not in children. Because standard BMI, which is calculated using the average height and weight for age, changes widely during growth, a constant cut-off point cannot be set for children. An international unified method defining childhood obesity has not been established. In many countries, BMI-for-age percentile (BMI%) value or Z (standard deviation) score is used, whereas in Japan, the percentage of overweight (POW), which is the modified weight-for-height method, is used. We compared BMI% values with POW values obtained using the anthropometric data of elementary and junior high school students based on the Japanese school survey conducted in 2000 and found that the values for the degree of overweight were significantly different between the two methods. It became clear that tall students were easily defined as being overweight, whereas short students tended to be evaluated as being underweight when using BMI%. POW method seemed to be more appropriate than BMI% for school-age children. Abdominal obesity, excess visceral adipose tissue (VAT), is highly associated with obesity-related complications. Waist circumference (WC) is now accepted as an appropriate guide to VAT accumulation. The cut-off value of WC defining excess VAT is 80 cm at the umbilical level in Japanese school-age children. It is not easy to decide the obesity criteria and optimum WC in school-age children. Childhood obesity should be discussed more internationally.

  3. Association between obesity and dental caries in Chinese children.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ligeng; Chang, Rui; Mu, Ying; Deng, Xiuli; Wu, Fei; Zhang, Shasha; Zhou, Dongyan

    2013-01-01

    The study sought to analyze the association between dental caries and obesity in Chinese children, and to investigate the protective and risk factors of dental caries. A total of 280 children aged 7-12 years voluntarily answered the caries examination and questionnaire. Caries was measured using the International Caries Detection and Assessment System. According to the Chinese body mass index, the participants were grouped overweight or normal-weight. The logistic regression model showed no correlation between dental caries and obesity. Drinking yogurt and chewing gum are protective factors, whereas oral breathing and genetic predisposition to caries are risk factors.

  4. Physician Perspectives on Obesity Screening in Hospitalized Children.

    PubMed

    Lee, Diana S; Gross, Elissa; Rinke, Michael L

    2016-09-01

    Nearly one-third of the children in the United States are obese or overweight and face associated physical and mental health issues.(1,2) Parents often misperceive and underreport their child's weight status.(3-5) This misperception is a major barrier to increasing healthy lifestyle choices, such as limiting screen time, increasing physical activity, improving diet, and participating in prevention programs.(6-8) Increasing parental awareness of children's weight status is an important initial step in addressing the obesity epidemic.

  5. Management of obesity in children differs from that of adults.

    PubMed

    Hoey, Hilary

    2014-11-01

    Obesity in childhood is a very common disorder with an increasing prevalence. It is one of the most serious public health challenges. The objectives of the present paper are to increase the awareness of the problem of obesity in childhood, its serious complications and the need for prevention. Overweight and obese children are likely to remain obese into adulthood and more likely to develop serious complications including health problems such as diabetes and CVD, as well as psychological and social challenges. Overweight and obesity are largely preventable. In adults it is difficult to reduce excessive weight gain once it has become established, thus children should be considered the priority population for intervention strategies and prevention. Nutrition, exercise, weight gain in infancy, genetic and environmental factors, all contribute to the aetiology. Prevention and treatment of obesity in childhood requires education and empowerment of families relating to diet and exercise, along with the regulation and control of food marketing and clear nutritional labelling. The eating and physical activity behaviour of a child is strongly influenced by environmental and social factors. Therefore treatment will have only limited success in an environment where adequate physical activity is inhibited and the consumption of high-energy food is stimulated. Government investment in a health promotion programme addressing the issue of obesity in the population as a whole, with particular emphasis on the prevention and management of obesity in childhood is vital. The family doctor and multidisciplinary team play an important role. Regular visits to the family doctor, including growth assessment, will help motivate the family to restrict energy intake and to increase exercise. Therefore the prevention of childhood obesity needs high priority. PMID:25115345

  6. Metabolic Cost, Mechanical Work, and Efficiency during Normal Walking in Obese and Normal-Weight Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Liang; Chen, Peijie; Zhuang, Jie; Zhang, Yanxin; Walt, Sharon

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: This study aimed to investigate the influence of childhood obesity on energetic cost during normal walking and to determine if obese children choose a walking strategy optimizing their gait pattern. Method: Sixteen obese children with no functional abnormalities were matched by age and gender with 16 normal-weight children. All…

  7. Childhood obesity treatment: targeting parents exclusively v. parents and children.

    PubMed

    Golan, Moria; Kaufman, Vered; Shahar, Danit R

    2006-05-01

    There is a consensus that interventions to prevent and treat childhood obesity should involve the family; however, the extent of the child's involvement has received little attention. The goal of the present study was to evaluate the relative efficacy of treating childhood obesity via a family-based health-centred intervention, targeting parents alone v. parents and obese children together. Thirty-two families with obese children of 6-11 years of age were randomised into groups, in which participants were provided for 6 months a comprehensive educational and behavioural programme for a healthy lifestyle. These groups differed in their main agent of change: parents-only v. the parents and the obese child. In both groups, parents were encouraged to foster authoritative parenting styles (parents are both firm and supportive; assume a leadership role in the environmental change with appropriate granting of child's autonomy). Only the intervention aimed at parents-only resulted in a significant reduction in the percentage overweight at the end of the programme (P=0.02) as well as at the 1-year follow-up meeting. The differences between groups at both times were significant (P<0.05). A greater reduction in food stimuli in the home (P<0.05) was noted in the parents-only group. In both groups, the parents' weight status did not change. Regression analysis shows that the level of attendance in sessions explained 28 % of the variability in the children's weight status change, the treatment group explained another 10 %, and the improvement in the obesogenic load explained 11 % of the variability. These results suggest that omitting the obese child from active participation in the health-centred programme may be beneficial for weight loss and for the promotion of a healthy lifestyle among obese children.

  8. Neurocognitive correlates of obesity and obesity-related behaviors in children and adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Liang, J.; Matheson, BE.; Kaye, WH.; Boutelle, KN.

    2015-01-01

    Childhood obesity rates have risen dramatically over the past few decades. Although obesity has been linked to poorer neurocognitive functioning in adults, much less is known about this relationship in children and adolescents. Therefore, we conducted a systematic review to examine the relationship between obesity and obesity-related behaviors with neurocognitive functioning in youth. We reviewed articles from 1976 to 2013 using PsycInfo, PubMed, Medline and Google Scholar. Search terms included cognitive function, neurocognitive function/performance, executive function, impulsivity, self-regulation, effortful control, cognitive control, inhibition, delayed gratification, memory, attention, language, motor, visuo-spatial, academic achievement, obesity, overweight, body mass index, waist-hip ratio, adiposity and body fat. Articles were excluded if participants had health problems known to affect cognitive functioning, the study used imaging as the only outcome measure, they were non-peer-reviewed dissertations, theses, review papers, commentaries, or they were non-English articles. Sixty-seven studies met inclusion criteria for this review. Overall, we found data that support a negative relationship between obesity and various aspects of neurocognitive functioning, such as executive functioning, attention, visuo-spatial performance, and motor skill. The existing literature is mixed on the effects among obesity, general cognitive functioning, language, learning, memory, and academic achievement. Executive dysfunction is associated with obesity-related behaviors, such as increased intake, disinhibited eating, and less physical activity. Physical activity is positively linked with motor skill. More longitudinal research is needed to determine the directionality of such relationships, to point towards crucial intervention time periods in the development of children, and to inform effective treatment programs. PMID:23913029

  9. Metabolic flexibility and obesity in children and youth.

    PubMed

    Aucouturier, J; Duché, P; Timmons, B W

    2011-05-01

    The concept of metabolic flexibility describes the ability of skeletal muscle to switch between the oxidation of lipid as a fuel during fasting periods to the oxidation of carbohydrate during insulin stimulated period. Alterations in energy metabolism in adults with obesity, insulin resistance and/or type 2 diabetes induce a state of impaired metabolic flexibility, or metabolic inflexibility. Despite the increase in the prevalence of type 2 diabetes in obese children and youth, less is known about the factors involved in the development of metabolic inflexibility in the paediatric population. Metabolic flexibility is conditioned by nutrient partitioning in response to feeding, substrate mobilization and delivery to skeletal muscle during fasting or exercising condition, and skeletal muscle oxidative capacity. Our aim in this review was to identify among these factors those making obese children at risk of metabolic inflexibility. The development of ectopic rather than peripheral fat storage appears to be a factor strongly linked with a reduced metabolic flexibility. Tissue growth and maturation are determinants of impaired energy metabolism later in life but also as a promising way to reverse metabolic inflexibility given the plasticity of many tissues in youth. Finally, we have attempted to identify perspectives for future investigations of metabolic flexibility in obese children that will improve our understanding of the genesis of metabolic diseases associated with obesity. PMID:20977601

  10. Associations among the Degree of Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease, Metabolic Syndrome, Degree of Obesity in Children, and Parental Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Min-Su; Kim, Sorina; Jang, Joon-Hyuck; Park, Jong Yoon; Kang, Hyun-Sik; Lee, Mu Sook

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To analyze the associations among the degrees of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) by ultrasonography and metabolic syndrome, degrees of obesity in children, and degrees of parental obesity. Methods A total of 198 children with obesity who visited a pediatric obesity clinic were prospectively enrolled in this study. The severity of NAFLD based on ultrasonography was classified into no, mild, moderate, or severe NAFLD group. The degree of obesity based on the percentage over standard weight for height per sex was classified into mild, moderate, or severe. Results Of 132 patients evaluated for the degree of NAFLD and metabolic syndrome, the p-value of correlation between the two factors was 0.009. Therefore, metabolic syndrome might significantly affect the degree of NAFLD. Of 158 patients evaluated for the degree of NAFLD and the degree of obesity, the p-value of correlation between the two factors was 0.122. Of 154 patients evaluated for the degree of obesity and father's obesity, the p-value was 0.076. Of 159 patients evaluated for the degree of obesity and mother's obesity, the p-value was 0.000, indicating that mother's obesity could significantly affect the degree of obesity in children. Of 142 patients evaluated for the degree of obesity and metabolic syndrome, the p-value was 0.288. Conclusion Metabolic syndrome might significantly affect the degree of nonalcoholic fatty liver in children. In addition, mother's obesity might be a significant factor that affects the degree of obesity in children. PMID:27738602

  11. Externality and locus of control in obese children.

    PubMed

    Isbitsky, J R; White, D R

    1981-03-01

    Fifty-nine obese and normal-weight children, aged 8-12 years were compared on two dimensions of "externality," previously examined in obese adults. Significant sex difference indicated that boys generally ate more than girls and held more internal locus of control expectancies. However, obese and normal-weight children were not differentiated by their performance on either a food-related or three nonfood-related measures of external-cue responsiveness, nor by their locus of control expectancies. Furthermore, the various measures were neither strongly nor consistently intercorrelated, providing little support for the notion of a single underlying dimension of "externality." The contribution of physiological, sensory, cognitive-motivational, and sociocultural parameters to the regulation of eating behavior was discussed.

  12. [Narcolepsy in sleepy obese children. Two case reports].

    PubMed

    Rives-Lange, C; Karsenty, A; Chantereau, H; Oderda, L; Dubern, B; Lecendreux, M; Tounian, P

    2016-06-01

    Narcolepsy is a disabling disorder, characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness, irresistible sleep attacks, and partial or complete cataplexy. Many cases of obesity and precocious puberty have been reported in narcoleptic children, suggesting that the deficiency of hypocretin in narcolepsy could also be implicated in appetite stimulation. We report the observations of two young girls, who were referred for obesity and who developed narcolepsy accompanied by an abrupt weight gain. In both cases, specific drugs promoted wakefulness and overweight stabilization. Narcolepsy has to be suspected in sleepy obese children and not misdiagnosed as obstructive apnea. A nocturnal polysomnography with multiple sleep latency tests should be performed to confirm the diagnosis and begin specific treatment that is effective for sleep disorders and weight gain. PMID:27133373

  13. [Children with obesity and declining linear growth curve: Cushing's disease?].

    PubMed

    van Wezel, Esther M; van Santen, Hanneke M; van Furth, Wouter R; Reneman, Liesbeth; Bisschop, Peter H; van Trotsenburg, A S Paul

    2012-01-01

    We describe two children who presented with extreme weight gain and failure to grow in height, and who were both diagnosed with Cushing's disease. Following preoperative metyrapone treatment, both children successfully underwent curative transsphenoidal surgery. While obesity is a common and increasing problem in childhood, Cushing's disease is rare. The combination of weight gain and growth failure in a child is an alarming sign in which underlying endocrine disease must be ruled out.

  14. Child obesity associated with social disadvantage of children's neighborhoods.

    PubMed

    Grow, H Mollie Greves; Cook, Andrea J; Arterburn, David E; Saelens, Brian E; Drewnowski, Adam; Lozano, Paula

    2010-08-01

    Evidence suggests variability in adult obesity risk at a small-scale geographic area is associated with differences in neighborhood socioeconomic status (SES). However, the extent to which geographic variability in child obesity is associated with neighborhood SES is unknown. The objective of this paper was to estimate risk of child obesity associated with multiple census tract SES measures and race within a large urban U.S. county. Height, weight, age, sex, medical insurance type and census tract residence were obtained for 6-18 year old children (n=8616) who received medical care at a health plan in King County, Washington, in 2006. Spatial analyses examined the individual risk of obesity (BMI > or = 95th percentile) with 2000 US census tract measures of median household income, home ownership, adult female education level, single parent households, and race as predictors. Conditional autoregressive regression models that incorporated adjacent census tracts (spatial autocorrelation) were applied to each census tract variable, adjusting for individual variables. We found that in adjusted spatial models, child obesity risk was significantly associated with each census tract variable in the expected direction: lower household income, lower home ownership, and for each 10% increase in less educated women, and single parent households, as well as non-white residents. In a spatial model including all variables, the SES/race variables explained approximately 24% of geographic variability in child obesity. Results indicated that living in census tracts with social disadvantage defined by multiple different measures was associated with child obesity among insured children in a large U.S. urban county. These results contribute new information on relationships between broader social and economic context and child obesity risk using robust spatial analyses. PMID:20541306

  15. Applying Motivational Interviewing to Counselling Overweight and Obese Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindhe Soderlund, Lena; Nordqvist, Cecilia; Angbratt, Marianne; Nilsen, Per

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify barriers and facilitators to nurses' application of motivational interviewing (MI) to counselling overweight and obese children aged 5 and 7 years, accompanied by their parents. Ten welfare centre and school health service nurses trained and practiced MI for 6 months, then participated in focus group…

  16. Externality and Locus of Control in Obese Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Isbitsky, Joyce Renee; White, Donna Romano

    1981-01-01

    Significant sex differences indicated that boys generally ate more than girls and held more internal locus of control expectancies. However, obese and normal-weighted children were not differentiated by their performance on either food-related measures nor by their locus of control expectancies. (Author/MP)

  17. Behavioral Assessment of Physical Activity in Obese Preschool Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hustyi, Kristin M.; Normand, Matthew P.; Larson, Tracy A.

    2011-01-01

    We measured changes in physical activity in 2 obese preschool children when a package intervention was evaluated in a reversal design. Physical activity was measured via direct observation and pedometers. Although the intervention produced only modest increases in activity, the results provide preliminary concurrent validation for the dependent…

  18. Obesity status trajectory groups among elementary school children

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Little is known about patterns in the transition from healthy weight to overweight or obesity during the elementary school years. This study examined whether there were distinct body mass index (BMI) trajectory groups among elementary school children, and predictors of trajectory group membership. T...

  19. Gastroesophageal Reflux Affects Sleep Quality in Snoring Obese Children

    PubMed Central

    Woodley, Frederick W; Skaggs, Beth; Di Lorenzo, Carlo; Eneli, Ihuoma; Splaingard, Mark; Mousa, Hayat

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study was performed to evaluate the quality of sleep in snoring obese children without obstructive sleep apnea (OSA); and to study the possible relationship between sleep interruption and gastroesophageal reflux (GER) in snoring obese children. Methods Study subjects included 13 snoring obese children who were referred to our sleep lab for possible sleep-disordered breathing. Patients underwent multichannel intraluminal impedance and esophageal pH monitoring with simultaneous polysomnography. Exclusion criteria included history of fundoplication, cystic fibrosis, and infants under the age of 2 years. Significant association between arousals and awakenings with previous reflux were defined by symptom-association probability using 2-minute intervals. Results Sleep efficiency ranged from 67-97% (median 81%). A total of 111 reflux episodes (90% acidic) were detected during sleep, but there were more episodes per hour during awake periods after sleep onset than during sleep (median 2.3 vs. 0.6, p=0.04). There were 279 total awakenings during the sleep study; 56 (20.1%) of them in 9 patients (69.2%) were preceded by reflux episodes (55 acid, 1 non-acid). In 5 patients (38.5%), awakenings were significantly associated with reflux. Conclusion The data suggest that acid GER causes sleep interruptions in obese children who have symptoms of snoring or restless sleep and without evidence of OSA. PMID:27066445

  20. Do obese children perceive submaximal and maximal exertion differently?

    PubMed

    Belanger, Kevin; Breithaupt, Peter; Ferraro, Zachary M; Barrowman, Nick; Rutherford, Jane; Hadjiyannakis, Stasia; Colley, Rachel C; Adamo, Kristi B

    2013-01-01

    We examined how obese children perceive a maximal cardiorespiratory fitness test compared with a submaximal cardiorespiratory fitness test. Twenty-one obese children (body mass index ≥95th percentile, ages 10-17 years) completed maximal and submaximal cardiorespiratory fitness tests on 2 separate occasions. Oxygen consumption (VO2) and overall perceived exertion (Borg 15-category scale) were measured in both fitness tests. At comparable workloads, perceived exertion was rated significantly higher (P < 0.001) in the submaximal cardiorespiratory fitness test compared with the maximal cardiorespiratory fitness test. The submaximal cardiorespiratory fitness test was significantly longer than the maximal test (14:21 ± 04:04 seconds vs. 12:48 ± 03:27 seconds, P < 0.001). Our data indicate that at the same relative intensity, obese children report comparable or even higher perceived exertion during submaximal fitness testing than during maximal fitness testing. Perceived exertion in a sample of children and youth with obesity may be influenced by test duration and protocol design.

  1. Xanthine Oxidase and Cardiovascular Risk in Obese Children

    PubMed Central

    Tam, Harrison K.; Kelly, Aaron S.; Metzig, Andrea M.; Steinberger, Julia

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: Pathological mechanisms of how childhood obesity leads to increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) are not fully characterized. Oxidative-stress–related enzymes, such as xanthine oxidase (XO), have been linked to obesity, endothelial dysfunction, and CVD in adults, but little is known about this pathway in children. The aim of this study was to determine whether differential XO activity is associated with endothelial dysfunction, CVD risk factors, or cytokine levels. Methods: Fasting plasma samples were obtained from obese (BMI ≥95th percentile; n=20) and age- and gender-matched healthy weight (BMI >5th and <85th percentile; n=22) children and adolescents (mean age, 12±3 years) to quantify XO activity. In addition, fasting cholesterol, insulin, glucose, blood pressure, endothelial function, and cytokine levels were assessed. Results: We observed a 3.8-fold increase in plasma XO activity in obese, compared to healthy weight, children (118±21 vs. 31±9 nU/mg of protein; p<0.001). Plasma XO activity was correlated with BMI z-score (r=0.41), waist circumference (r=0.41), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (r=−0.32), oxidized low-density lipoprotein (r=0.57), adiponectin (r=−0.53), and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (r=−0.59). Conclusion: XO activity is highly elevated in obese children and correlates with CVD risk factors, suggesting that XO may play a role in increasing cardiovascular risk early in life in the context of obesity. PMID:24568669

  2. Blood pressure and arterial stiffness in obese children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Hvidt, Kristian Nebelin

    2015-03-01

    Obesity, elevated blood pressure (BP) and arterial stiffness are risk factors for cardiovascular disease. A strong relationship exists between obesity and elevated BP in both children and adults. Obesity and elevated BP in childhood track into adult life increasing the risk of cardiovascular disease in adulthood. Ambulatory BP is the most precise measure to evaluate the BP burden, whereas carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (cfPWV) is regarded as the gold standard for evaluating arterial (i.e. aortic) stiffness. These measures might contribute to a better understanding of obesity's adverse impact on the cardiovascular system, and ultimately a better prevention and treatment of childhood obesity. The overall aim of the present PhD thesis is to investigate arterial stiffness and 24-hour BP in obese children and adolescents, and evaluate whether these measures are influenced by weight reduction. The present PhD thesis is based on four scientific papers.  In a cross-sectional design, 104 severe obese children and adolescents with an age of 10-18 years were recruited when newly referred to the Children's Obesity Clinic, Holbæk University Hospital, and compared to 50 normal weighted age and gender matched control individuals. Ambulatory BP was measured, and cfPWV was investigated in two ways in respect to the distance measure of aorta; the previously recommended length - the so called subtracted distance, and the currently recommended length - the direct distance. In a longitudinal design, the obese patients were re-investigated after one-year of lifestyle intervention at the Children's Obesity Clinic in purpose of reducing the degree of obesity. In the cross-sectional design, the obese group had higher measures of obesity, while matched for age, gender and height, when compared to the control group. In the longitudinal design, 74% of the 72 followed up obese patients experienced a significant weight reduction. CfPWV was dependent on the method used to measure the

  3. Cardiac autonomic dysfunction in obese normotensive children and adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Freitas, Isabelle Magalhães G.; Miranda, Josiane Aparecida; Mira, Pedro Augusto C.; Lanna, Carla Marcia M.; Lima, Jorge Roberto P.; Laterza, Mateus Camaroti

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To test the hypothesis that obese normotensive children and adolescents present impaired cardiac autonomic control compared to non-obese normotensive ones. METHODS: For this cross-sectional study, 66 children and adolescents were divided into the following groups: Obese (n=31, 12±3 years old) and Non-Obese (n=35, 13±3 years old). Obesity was defined as body mass index greater than the 95th percentile for age and gender. Blood pressure was measured by oscillometric method after 15 minutes of rest in supine position. The heart rate was continuously registered during ten minutes in the supine position with spontaneous breathing. The cardiac autonomic control was assessed by heart rate variability, which was calculated from the five-minute minor variance of the signal. The derivations were the index that indicates the proportion of the number of times in which normal adjacent R-R intervals present differences >50 miliseconds (pNN50), for the time domain, and, for the spectral analysis, low (LF) and high frequency (HF) bands, besides the low and high frequencies ratio (LF/HF). The results were expressed as mean±standard deviation and compared by Student's t-test or Mann-Whitney's U-test. RESULTS: Systolic blood pressure (116±14 versus 114±13mmHg, p=0.693) and diastolic blood pressure (59±8 versus 60±11mmHg, p=0.458) were similar between the Obese and Non-Obese groups. The pNN50 index (29±21 versus 43±23, p=0.015) and HF band (54±20 versus 64±14 normalized units - n.u., p=0.023) were lower in the Obese Group. The LF band (46±20 versus 36±14 n.u., p=0.023) and LF/HF ratio (1.3±1.6 versus 0.7±0.4, p=0.044) were higher in Obese Group. CONCLUSIONS: Obese normotensive children and adolescents present impairment of cardiac autonomic control. PMID:25119757

  4. School-Based Obesity Prevention Intervention in Chilean Children: Effective in Controlling, but not Reducing Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Kain, Juliana; Concha, Fernando; Moreno, Lorena; Leyton, Bárbara

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the effectiveness of a 12-month multicomponent obesity prevention intervention. Setting. 9 elementary schools in Santiago, Chile. Subjects. 6–8 y old low-income children (N = 1474). Design. Randomized controlled study; 5 intervention/4 control schools. We trained teachers to deliver nutrition contents and improve the quality of PE classes. We determined % healthy snacks brought from home, children's nutrition knowledge, nutritional status, duration of PE classes, and % time in moderate/vigorous activity (MVA). Effectiveness was determined by comparing Δ BMI Z between intervention and control children using PROCMIXED. Results. % obesity increased in boys from both types of schools and in girls from control schools, while decreasing in girls from intervention schools (all nonsignificant). % class time in MVA declined (24.5–16.2) while remaining unchanged (24.8–23.7%) in classes conducted by untrained and trained teachers, respectively. In boys, BMI Z declined (1.33–1.24) and increased (1.22–1.35) in intervention and control schools, respectively. In girls, BMI Z remained unchanged in intervention schools, while increasing significantly in control schools (0.91–1.06, P = 0.024). Interaction group ∗ time was significant for boys (P < 0.0001) and girls (P = 0.004). Conclusions. This intervention was effective in controlling obesity, but not preventing it. Even though impact was small, results showed that when no intervention is implemented, obesity increases. PMID:24872892

  5. [Life style of children and obesity in a population of 5-year-old children].

    PubMed

    Locard, E; Mamelle, N; Munoz, F; Miginiac, M; Billette, A; Rey, S

    1992-01-01

    The increasing level of childhood obesity has prompted some research into the early risk factors likely to lead to preventive measures. A case-control study was conducted of a five year-old population in the Rhône and Isère administrative "départements" of France during the children's first visit to primary school, with the participation of 327 obese children and 704 controls. Anthropometric data on the children since birth, together with data on their lifestyles, were collected in interviews with parents. "Family obesity" and "obesity at birth" were found to be closely related to the child's obesity at five years old (adjusted OR = 2.7 and 2.1 respectively). Of the environmental factors, the hypothesis tested paid specific attention to television viewing, snacks between meals and lack of sleep. These three variables were all found to be risk factors of obesity at five years old. However after allowing for parental obesity, the only remaining significant risk factor for obesity at five was lack of sleep (adjusted OR = 1.4). The pathogenic assumptions raised by these results are discussed.

  6. Antibiotic administration and the development of obesity in children.

    PubMed

    Principi, Nicola; Esposito, Susanna

    2016-03-01

    Antibiotics are the most common prescription drugs administered at the paediatric age, however their administration can cause unwanted problems. Among these issues, antibiotic-induced gut microbiota dysbiosis has appeared as an emerging issue and has been associated with obesity. This problem is particularly relevant in children because they are frequently treated with antibiotics. Early development of obesity increases the risk of adult obesity, which is associated with the emergence of very severe clinical problems. Dysbiosis induced in the first periods of life can have the most relevant practical consequences because a decrease in the number of microbes and their substitution with other microbes dramatically modifies the development of the immune system as well as glucose and lipid metabolism. Unfortunately, not all of the mechanisms that could explain the relationship between gut microbiota modification and the development of obesity have been defined. Consequently, no definitive therapeutic approach has been elucidated. Probiotics and prebiotics could play a role in treating microbial dysbiosis because the addition of specific bacterial strains has been associated with normal weight and has been demonstrated to be useful in clinical conditions other than obesity that are caused by microbiota disruption. Considering that antibiotics are commonly prescribed and that obesity is increasing in paediatric patients, further studies specifically designed to evaluate how to disrupt the relationship between antibiotics and dysbiosis are urgently needed. Presently, paediatricians have to consider dysbiosis to be a new and serious reason for the judicious use of antibiotics in clinical practice. PMID:26895606

  7. Antibiotic administration and the development of obesity in children.

    PubMed

    Principi, Nicola; Esposito, Susanna

    2016-03-01

    Antibiotics are the most common prescription drugs administered at the paediatric age, however their administration can cause unwanted problems. Among these issues, antibiotic-induced gut microbiota dysbiosis has appeared as an emerging issue and has been associated with obesity. This problem is particularly relevant in children because they are frequently treated with antibiotics. Early development of obesity increases the risk of adult obesity, which is associated with the emergence of very severe clinical problems. Dysbiosis induced in the first periods of life can have the most relevant practical consequences because a decrease in the number of microbes and their substitution with other microbes dramatically modifies the development of the immune system as well as glucose and lipid metabolism. Unfortunately, not all of the mechanisms that could explain the relationship between gut microbiota modification and the development of obesity have been defined. Consequently, no definitive therapeutic approach has been elucidated. Probiotics and prebiotics could play a role in treating microbial dysbiosis because the addition of specific bacterial strains has been associated with normal weight and has been demonstrated to be useful in clinical conditions other than obesity that are caused by microbiota disruption. Considering that antibiotics are commonly prescribed and that obesity is increasing in paediatric patients, further studies specifically designed to evaluate how to disrupt the relationship between antibiotics and dysbiosis are urgently needed. Presently, paediatricians have to consider dysbiosis to be a new and serious reason for the judicious use of antibiotics in clinical practice.

  8. Obese Mexican American children have elevated MCP-1, TNF-alpha, monocyte concentration, and dyslipidemia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Obesity is an independent risk factor for chronic disease. The prevalence of obesity is especially high among Mexican American children. Peripheral blood monocytes are altered with obesity contributing to elevated systemic inflammation and increased risk of chronic disease. In addition, obesity alte...

  9. Ecological risk model of childhood obesity in Chinese immigrant children.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Nan; Cheah, Charissa S L

    2015-07-01

    Chinese Americans are the largest and fastest growing Asian American subgroup, increasing about one-third during the 2000s. Despite the slender Asian stereotype, nearly one-third of 6-to-11 year old Chinese American children were found to be overweight (above the 85th percentile in BMI). Importantly, unique and severe health risks are associated with being overweight/obese in Chinese. Unfortunately, Chinese immigrant children have been neglected in the literature on obesity. This review aimed to identify factors at various levels of the ecological model that may place Chinese immigrant children at risk for being overweight/obese in the U.S. Key contextual factors at the micro-, meso-, exo-, macro- and chronosystem were identified guided by Bronfenbrenner's ecological systems theory. The corresponding mediating and moderating processes among the factors were also reviewed and proposed. By presenting a conceptual framework and relevant research, this review can provide a basic framework for directing future interdisciplinary research in seeking solutions to childhood obesity within this understudied population.

  10. [Health consequences of obesity in children and adolescents].

    PubMed

    Valerio, G; Licenziati, M R; Manco, M; Ambruzzi, A M; Bacchini, D; Baraldi, E; Bona, G; Bruzzi, P; Cerutti, F; Corciulo, N; Crinò, A; Franzese, A; Grugni, G; Iughetti, L; Lenta, S; Maffeis, C; Marzuillo, P; Miraglia Del Giudice, E; Morandi, A; Morino, G; Moro, B; Perrone, L; Prodam, F; Ricotti, R; Santamaria, F; Zito, E; Tanas, R

    2014-10-01

    Obesity in childhood is associated with the presence of complications that can undermine health immediately or in the long term. Several conditions, such as pulmonary or orthopedic complications are strictly associated with the severity of overweight, since they are directly associated to the mechanic stress of fat tissue on the airways or on the bones. Other conditions, such as metabolic or liver complications, although increasing with the extent of overweight, are associated with insulin resistance, which can be modulated by different other factors (ethnicity, genetics, fat distribution) and can occur in overweight children as well. No less important are psychological correlates, such as depression and stigma, which can seriously affect the health related quality of life. Pediatric services for the care of childhood obesity need to be able to screen overweight and obese children for the presence of physical and psychological complications, which can be still reversed by weight loss. This article provides pediatricians a comprehensive update on the main complications in obese children and adolescents and their treatment.

  11. Ecological Risk Model of Childhood Obesity in Chinese Immigrant Children

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Nan; Cheah, Charissa S. L.

    2015-01-01

    Chinese Americans are the largest and fastest growing Asian American subgroup, increasing about one-third during the 2000s. Despite the slender Asian stereotype, nearly one-third of 6-to-11 years old Chinese American children were found to be overweight (above the 85th percentile in BMI). Importantly, unique and severe health risks are associated with being overweight/obese in Chinese. Unfortunately, Chinese immigrant children have been neglected in the literature on obesity. This review aimed to identify factors at various levels of the ecological model that may place Chinese immigrant children at risk for being overweight/obese in the U.S. Key contextual factors at the micro-, meso-, exo-, macro- and chronosystem were identified guided by Bronfenbrenner’s ecological systems theory. The corresponding mediating and moderating processes among the factors were also reviewed and proposed. By presenting a conceptual framework and relevant research, this review can provide a basic framework for directing future interdisciplinary research in seeking solutions to childhood obesity within this understudied population. PMID:25728887

  12. [Strategies for obesity prevention in children and adolescents].

    PubMed

    Sichieri, Rosely; Souza, Rita Adriana de

    2008-01-01

    Few studies on treatment or prevention of obesity have shown significant results. Theoretically, in children and adolescents as compared to adults, prevention of excessive weight gain should be easy due to the energy expended during growth, associated with more time spent in leisure-time activities. However, numerous factors that stimulate overeating and sedentary behaviors are difficult to overcome. Additionally, most intervention studies have focused on a minor portion of the many factors associated with obesity. Important aspects of the obesity epidemic such as the role of the food industry, fast food chains, advertising, and a lifestyle that limits children to sedentary activities and overeating cannot be explored by a traditional clinical trial design. At any rate, among the published interventions, those including the family in weight-reduction strategies have shown the best results, as compared to children-centered approaches. Meanwhile, studies on specific nutrient or dietary composition (such as calcium, protein, or glycemic index) related to prevention or treatment of obesity have failed to yield good results. Reducing the intake of high-sugar carbonated drinks and juices has shown promising but still inconclusive results. PMID:18670698

  13. Prevalence of obesity among affluent school children in Dhaka.

    PubMed

    Mohsin, F; Tayyeb, S; Baki, A; Sarker, S; Zabeen, B; Begum, T; Azad, K; Nahar, N

    2010-10-01

    A cross sectional study was conducted in September 2006 in one of the private schools in Dhaka, Bangladesh to see the prevalence of obesity among affluent school children and adolescents. Informed consent was taken from school authority to take anthropometric measurement of all school children. Standing height was measured with a stadiometer and weight with a bathroom scale. Waist and hip circumference were measured with a measuring tape. The body mass index (BMI) was calculated using weight in kilogram/(height in meter)2 formula. Obesity was defined as BMI≥95th percentile for age and sex, over weight as BMI≥85th percentile for age and sex, normal weight as BMI between 5th and 84th percentile and underweight as BMI <5th percentile. Official centers for disease control (CDC) growth chart for boys and girls age 2-20 years was used. Children and adolescents were divided into group 1(3-5 years), Group 2(6-9years), group 3(10-13 years) and group 4(14-18 years). There were a total of 468 children and adolescents (male 266, female 202). In group 1 there were 110 children, in group 2 there were177 children, in group 3 and 4 there were 149 and 32 adolescents respectively. The prevalence of obesity was 17.9%, higher among males (19.9%), compared to females (15.3%). Obesity was highest (27.7%) in group 2, 14.5% in group 1, 10.7% in group 3 and 9.4% in group 4. PMID:20956898

  14. Associations of Six Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms in Obesity-Related Genes With BMI and Risk of Obesity in Chinese Children

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Lijun; Xi, Bo; Zhang, Meixian; Shen, Yue; Zhao, Xiaoyuan; Cheng, Hong; Hou, Dongqing; Sun, Dandan; Ott, Jurg; Wang, Xingyu; Mi, Jie

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Childhood obesity strongly predisposes to some adult diseases. Recently, genome-wide association (GWA) studies in Caucasians identified multiple single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with BMI and obesity. The associations of those SNPs with BMI and obesity among other ethnicities are not fully described, especially in children. Among those previously identified SNPs, we selected six (rs7138803, rs1805081, rs6499640, rs17782313, rs6265, and rs10938397, in or near obesity-related genes FAIM2, NPC1, FTO, MC4R, BDNF, and GNPDA2, respectively) because of the relatively high minor allele frequencies in Chinese individuals and tested the associations of the SNPs with BMI and obesity in Chinese children. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We investigated the associations of these SNPs with BMI and obesity in school-aged children. A total of 3,503 children participated in the study, including 1,229 obese, 655 overweight, and 1,619 normal-weight children (diagnosed by the Chinese age- and sex-specific BMI cutoffs). RESULTS After age and sex adjustment and correction for multiple testing, the SNPs rs17782313, rs6265, and rs10938397 were associated with BMI (P = 1.0 × 10−5, 0.038, and 0.00093, respectively) and also obesity (P = 5.0 × 10−6, 0.043, and 0.00085, respectively) in the Chinese children. The SNPs rs17782313 and rs10938397 were also significantly associated with waist circumference, waist-to-height ratio, and fat mass percentage. CONCLUSIONS Results of this study support obesity-related genes in adults as important genes for BMI variation in children and suggest that some SNPs identified by GWA studies in Caucasians also confer risk for obesity in Chinese children. PMID:20843981

  15. Breast carcinoma in a prepubertal girl.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Syed Tausif; Singh, Sudipto Kumar; Mukherjee, Tanmoy; Banerjee, Manju

    2014-04-15

    Breast carcinoma is a very rare disease in children. We present a rare case of breast cancer in an 11-year-old prepubertal girl. Clinically, it was a case of locally advanced breast cancer (T4bN1M0). The core biopsy report showed adenocarcinoma of the not otherwise specified (NOS) variety (oestrogen receptor-negative, progesterone receptor-negative and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-negative). Diagnosis was late in this case due to lack of suspicion. A modified radical mastectomy was considered to be adequate treatment. Histologically, it was adenocarcinoma NOS, which is rare in young girls (the secretory type being more common). Incidence, differential diagnoses, investigation and management of breast carcinoma in young girls are discussed. The purpose of reporting this case is to highlight that prevention and early detection of breast carcinoma in children is very important.

  16. Risk Factors for Subclinical Atherosclerosis in Diabetic and Obese Children

    PubMed Central

    Faienza, Maria Felicia; Acquafredda, Angelo; Tesse, Riccardina; Luce, Vincenza; Ventura, Annamaria; Maggialetti, Nicola; Monteduro, Mariantonietta; Giordano, Paola; Cavallo, Luciano

    2013-01-01

    Background. Increased carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT) is considered a marker of early-onset atherosclerosis and it seems to predict cardiovascular events both in obese and diabetic subjects. We aimed to evaluate early signs of atherosclerosis and investigate for predisposing factors in children and adolescents affected by type 1 diabetes (T1DM) or obesity, comparing them with healthy controls. Methods. Out of 71 enrolled subjects (mean age 12.8 ± 2.3 years), 26 had T1DM and 24 were obese, while 21 age- and sex-matched subjects acted as controls. cIMT was measured using standardized methods. Serum glucose, insulin, cholesterol, triglycerides and C-reactive protein levels were evaluated. An oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) was performed in obese subjects. Results. Diabetic and obese individuals showed higher cIMT mean values than healthy controls (p<0.005). cIMT of the three examined segments correlated positively with fasting glucose levels and negatively with units of insulin/kg/day administered in T1DM individuals. A positive correlation between insulin levels (basal and after oral glucose load) and cIMT of common, internal and external carotid artery was found in obese subjects (p<0.03). High density cholesterol levels represented a protective factor for cIMT in this latter group of the study population. Conclusions. Our findings show that cIMT correlates with high insulin levels (a sign of insulin resistance) in obese patients and with high fasting glucose levels (a sign of relative insulin deficiency) in T1DM subjects, confirming the need of reducing hyperinsulinism and monitoring blood glucose levels in these subjects to prevent atherosclerosis. PMID:23423872

  17. Hispanic parents of overweight and obese children and their outcome expectations for children's television viewing: A qualitative study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Our objective was to explore parental outcome expectations (OE) regarding children's television (TV) viewing among parents of overweight or obese children. We conducted a qualitative study using semi-structured interviews with 20 parents of 5- to 8-year-old overweight or obese children. We found tha...

  18. Suboptimal Clinical Documentation in Young Children with Severe Obesity at Tertiary Care Centers

    PubMed Central

    Brady, Cassandra C.; Lingren, Todd; Woo, Jessica G.; Kennebeck, Stephanie S.; Namjou-Khales, Bahram; Roach, Ashton; Bickel, Jonathan P.; Patibandla, Nandan; Savova, Guergana K.; Solti, Imre; Holm, Ingrid A.; Harley, John B.; Kohane, Isaac S.; Crimmins, Nancy A.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives. The prevalence of severe obesity in children has doubled in the past decade. The objective of this study is to identify the clinical documentation of obesity in young children with a BMI ≥ 99th percentile at two large tertiary care pediatric hospitals. Methods. We used a standardized algorithm utilizing data from electronic health records to identify children with severe early onset obesity (BMI ≥ 99th percentile at age <6 years). We extracted descriptive terms and ICD-9 codes to evaluate documentation of obesity at Boston Children's Hospital and Cincinnati Children's Hospital and Medical Center between 2007 and 2014. Results. A total of 9887 visit records of 2588 children with severe early onset obesity were identified. Based on predefined criteria for documentation of obesity, 21.5% of children (13.5% of visits) had positive documentation, which varied by institution. Documentation in children first seen under 2 years of age was lower than in older children (15% versus 26%). Documentation was significantly higher in girls (29% versus 17%, p < 0.001), African American children (27% versus 19% in whites, p < 0.001), and the obesity focused specialty clinics (70% versus 15% in primary care and 9% in other subspecialty clinics, p < 0.001). Conclusions. There is significant opportunity for improvement in documentation of obesity in young children, even years after the 2007 AAP guidelines for management of obesity.

  19. Suboptimal Clinical Documentation in Young Children with Severe Obesity at Tertiary Care Centers

    PubMed Central

    Brady, Cassandra C.; Lingren, Todd; Woo, Jessica G.; Kennebeck, Stephanie S.; Namjou-Khales, Bahram; Roach, Ashton; Bickel, Jonathan P.; Patibandla, Nandan; Savova, Guergana K.; Solti, Imre; Holm, Ingrid A.; Harley, John B.; Kohane, Isaac S.; Crimmins, Nancy A.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives. The prevalence of severe obesity in children has doubled in the past decade. The objective of this study is to identify the clinical documentation of obesity in young children with a BMI ≥ 99th percentile at two large tertiary care pediatric hospitals. Methods. We used a standardized algorithm utilizing data from electronic health records to identify children with severe early onset obesity (BMI ≥ 99th percentile at age <6 years). We extracted descriptive terms and ICD-9 codes to evaluate documentation of obesity at Boston Children's Hospital and Cincinnati Children's Hospital and Medical Center between 2007 and 2014. Results. A total of 9887 visit records of 2588 children with severe early onset obesity were identified. Based on predefined criteria for documentation of obesity, 21.5% of children (13.5% of visits) had positive documentation, which varied by institution. Documentation in children first seen under 2 years of age was lower than in older children (15% versus 26%). Documentation was significantly higher in girls (29% versus 17%, p < 0.001), African American children (27% versus 19% in whites, p < 0.001), and the obesity focused specialty clinics (70% versus 15% in primary care and 9% in other subspecialty clinics, p < 0.001). Conclusions. There is significant opportunity for improvement in documentation of obesity in young children, even years after the 2007 AAP guidelines for management of obesity. PMID:27698673

  20. Associations of Television Content Type and Obesity in Children

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Janice F.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives. We tested the associations of content types of children's television viewing with subsequent body mass index (BMI) to assess the plausibility of different causal pathways. Methods. We used time-use diary data from the Panel Survey of Income Dynamics to measure television viewing categorized by format and educational and commercial content. Analyses were stratified by age because children younger than 7 years are less able to understand the persuasive intent of advertising. BMI z scores in 2002 were regressed on television viewing, sociodemographic variables, mother's BMI, and BMI in 1997 (for older children only). Results. Among children aged 0 to 6 years in 1997, commercial viewing in 1997 was significantly associated with BMI z scores in 2002 in fully adjusted regressions. Among children older than 6 years, commercial viewing in 2002 was associated with 2002 BMI. These results were robust after adjustment for exercise and eating while watching television. Conclusions. The evidence does not support the contention that television viewing contributes to obesity because it is a sedentary activity. Television advertising, rather than viewing per se, is associated with obesity. PMID:20019313

  1. The relationship between adenovirus-36 seropositivity, obesity and metabolic profile in Turkish children and adults.

    PubMed

    Karamese, M; Altoparlak, U; Turgut, A; Aydogdu, S; Karamese, S Aksak

    2015-12-01

    Obesity potentially arising from viral infection is known as 'infectobesity'. The latest reports suggest that adenovirus-36 (Adv36) is related to obesity in adults and children. Our aim was not only to determine the Adv36 seropositivity in both obese and non-obese children and adults, but also to investigate correlations between antibody positivity and serum lipid profiles. Both Adv36 positivity and tumour-necrosis-factor-alpha, leptin and interleukin-6 levels were detected in blood samples collected from 146 children and 130 adults by ELISA. Fasting plasma triglycerides, total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein levels were also measured. Adv36 positivity was determined to be 27·1% and 6% in obese and non-obese children and 17·5% and 4% in obese and non-obese adults, respectively. There was no difference with regard to total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein, triglyceride, tumour-necrosis-factor-alpha and interleukin-6 levels (P > 0·05). However, there was a significant difference between groups in terms of leptin levels (P < 0·05). We determined the prevalence of Adv36 positivity in obese children and adults. Our results showed that Adv36 may be an obesity agent for both adults and children, parallel with current literature data. However, the available data on a possible relationship between Adv36 infection and obesity both in children and adults do not completely solve the problem.

  2. Peer effects on obesity in a sample of European children.

    PubMed

    Gwozdz, Wencke; Sousa-Poza, Alfonso; Reisch, Lucia A; Bammann, Karin; Eiben, Gabriele; Kourides, Yiannis; Kovács, Éva; Lauria, Fabio; Konstabel, Kenn; Santaliestra-Pasias, Alba M; Vyncke, Krishna; Pigeot, Iris

    2015-07-01

    This study analyzes peer effects on childhood obesity using data from the first two waves of the IDEFICS study, which applies several anthropometric and other measures of fatness to approximately 14,000 children aged two to nine participating in both waves in 16 regions of eight European countries. Peers are defined as same-sex children in the same school and age group. The results show that peer effects do exist in this European sample but that they differ among both regions and different fatness measures. Peer effects are larger in Spain, Italy, and Cyprus--the more collectivist regions in our sample--while waist circumference generally gives rise to larger peer effects than BMI. We also provide evidence that parental misperceptions of their own children's weight goes hand in hand with fatter peer groups, supporting the notion that in making such assessments, parents compare their children's weight with that of friends and schoolmates.

  3. Peer effects on obesity in a sample of European children.

    PubMed

    Gwozdz, Wencke; Sousa-Poza, Alfonso; Reisch, Lucia A; Bammann, Karin; Eiben, Gabriele; Kourides, Yiannis; Kovács, Éva; Lauria, Fabio; Konstabel, Kenn; Santaliestra-Pasias, Alba M; Vyncke, Krishna; Pigeot, Iris

    2015-07-01

    This study analyzes peer effects on childhood obesity using data from the first two waves of the IDEFICS study, which applies several anthropometric and other measures of fatness to approximately 14,000 children aged two to nine participating in both waves in 16 regions of eight European countries. Peers are defined as same-sex children in the same school and age group. The results show that peer effects do exist in this European sample but that they differ among both regions and different fatness measures. Peer effects are larger in Spain, Italy, and Cyprus--the more collectivist regions in our sample--while waist circumference generally gives rise to larger peer effects than BMI. We also provide evidence that parental misperceptions of their own children's weight goes hand in hand with fatter peer groups, supporting the notion that in making such assessments, parents compare their children's weight with that of friends and schoolmates. PMID:26115518

  4. Parents’ perception of children's obesity, in Al-Qassim, Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Al-Mohaimeed, Abdulrahman A.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Although the prevalence of childhood obesity has increased significantly in Saudi Arabia, parents are unable to appreciate obesity in their child. The objective of the study was to identify the percentage of parents who misclassify the status of child's weight, and determine whether there is a difference between those parents whose children are overweight and obese and those with children of normal weight. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study included 601 children aged 6-10 years. The children were recruited from the primary schools located in Al-Qassim, Saudi Arabia. The body mass index of the children was assessed in the school, and their parents responded to a self-administered questionnaire which contained questions on parental perception of the children's weight/obesity status. Data were entered and analyzed using SPSS. Results: Parents with overweight/obese children had significantly more misclassification than those with normal weight children. Ninety percent of parents of the 81 overweight children misclassified and reported that their child had normal weight, while 65% of parents of the 61 obese children, misclassified the child's weight status. Conclusions: The level of misclassification of children's weight status by parents is high. Saudi parents with overweight and obese children do not recognize their child's weight status. Parents’ awareness of childhood obesity and its negative health impact needs to be improved. PMID:27625586

  5. Parents’ perception of children's obesity, in Al-Qassim, Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Al-Mohaimeed, Abdulrahman A.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Although the prevalence of childhood obesity has increased significantly in Saudi Arabia, parents are unable to appreciate obesity in their child. The objective of the study was to identify the percentage of parents who misclassify the status of child's weight, and determine whether there is a difference between those parents whose children are overweight and obese and those with children of normal weight. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study included 601 children aged 6-10 years. The children were recruited from the primary schools located in Al-Qassim, Saudi Arabia. The body mass index of the children was assessed in the school, and their parents responded to a self-administered questionnaire which contained questions on parental perception of the children's weight/obesity status. Data were entered and analyzed using SPSS. Results: Parents with overweight/obese children had significantly more misclassification than those with normal weight children. Ninety percent of parents of the 81 overweight children misclassified and reported that their child had normal weight, while 65% of parents of the 61 obese children, misclassified the child's weight status. Conclusions: The level of misclassification of children's weight status by parents is high. Saudi parents with overweight and obese children do not recognize their child's weight status. Parents’ awareness of childhood obesity and its negative health impact needs to be improved.

  6. Autonomic dysfunction: a possible pathophysiological pathway underlying the association between sleep and obesity in children at-risk for obesity.

    PubMed

    Jarrin, Denise C; McGrath, Jennifer J; Poirier, Paul; Quality Cohort Collaborative Group

    2015-02-01

    While mounting evidence suggests that sleep plays an important role in the etiology of obesity, the underlying pathogenic pathways are complex and unresolved. Experimental sleep deprivation studies demonstrate sympathovagal imbalance, indicative of diminished parasympathetic activity and/or heightened sympathetic activity, is consequent to poor sleep. Further, obese children exhibit sympathovagal imbalance, particularly during the night, compared to non-obese children. The question remains whether sympathovagal imbalance is one potential pathophysiological pathway underlying the association between sleep and obesity. The aim of the present study was to examine whether sympathovagal imbalance contributed to the association between sleep and obesity in children. Participants included 564 children aged 10 to 12 years (M = 11.67, SD = 0.95; 43.5% girls) from the QUALITY Cohort, a longitudinal study of children at-risk for the development of obesity. While children were at-risk due to confirmed parental obesity status, 57.7% of children were of normal body mass index (5-85th percentile). Sleep duration, sleep timing, and sleep disturbances were based on child- and parent-report. Anthropometrics were measured for central adiposity (waist circumference) and body composition (body mass index, fat mass index). Sympathovagal imbalance was derived from heart rate variability spectral analyses. Estimated path coefficients revealed that sympathovagal imbalance partially contributed to the association between poor sleep (later bedtimes, sleep-disordered breathing) and obesity. These findings highlight the importance of better understanding sympathovagal imbalance and its role in the etiology and maintenance of obesity. Future research should consider investigating nocturnal sympathovagal balance in youth.

  7. Overweight and Obesity among secondary school children in Central Italy.

    PubMed

    De Vito, E; La Torre, G; Langiano, E; Berardi, D; Ricciardi, G

    1999-08-01

    conditions of parents, mother's educational level and amount of weekly physical activity were observed. Number of children in the family, parents' age and job do not appear to be correlated to obesity or risk of overweight. Our results show that, although the prevalence of obesity in the students population in the Province of Frosinone is comparable to other Italian Provinces and lower than other industrialised countries such as USA, the percentage of students at risk of overweight is particularly high. Main risk factors for developing obesity seem to be linked to parents' nutritional conditions, mother's educational level and children's physical inactivity and this should lead to intensify efforts for preventive interventions both at family level (focused on parents) and at school.

  8. [Obesity in children and its relationship with chronic kidney disease].

    PubMed

    Zurita-Cruz, Jessie Nallely; Villasís-Keever, Miguel Ángel

    2016-01-01

    In the last decades, obesity and chronic kidney disease (CKD) have increased worldwide, in parallel. This article focuses on the current issues of obesity on renal damage, with special emphasis on what happens at pediatric ages. While obesity has been linked closely with type 2 diabetes mellitus and hypertension, reduced insulin sensitivity is a direct mechanism for renal damage. The pathophysiologic mechanisms on renal damage include glomerular hyperfiltration and hypertrophy, hypercellularity and broadening of the mesangial regions, while the lack of sensitivity to insulin increases the effects of angiotensin II, exacerbates proteinuria and induces the production of inflammatory cytokines. Many epidemiological studies have documented the relationship of increased BMI with the development of ERC, but most of these studies have been conducted in adults. In children, the information is scarce, but is consistent with findings in adults. In contrast, there are studies which show that interventions aimed to improve weight loss and limit renal damage and proteinuria is reduced, the blood pressure and glomerular filtration rate. Allthe above make us think on the need to improve efforts to reduce the prevalence of obesity from the early stages of life, which could reduce the number of patients with CKD in the future. PMID:27197109

  9. Overweight and Obesity Prevalence among Public School Children in Guam

    PubMed Central

    Paulino, Yvette C.; Guerrero, Rachael T. Leon; Uncangco, Alyssa A.; Rosadino, Mary Grace; Quinene, Julietta C.; Natividad, Zenaida N.

    2015-01-01

    Background The Government of Guam passed Public Law 28-87, which established the collection of child Body Mass Index (BMI) measurements in the Guam Department of Education (GDOE). This paper aimed to analyze the BMI data and report the childhood obesity prevalence on Guam. Methods Secondary analysis was performed on a repeated cross-section of 106,827 children in the GDOE from 2010 to 2014. Age- and sex-specific prevalence estimates and 95% Confidence Intervals (CI) by weight status were calculated for each year. Test for trends in the high weight status were performed. Results The childhood obesity prevalence was 23.1% (95% CI, 22.9%–23.4%). It declined from 23.6% (95% CI, 23.1%–24.1%) in 2010–2011 to 22.6% (95% CI, 22.1%–23.0%) in 2013–2014 (p=.007). Conclusion Childhood obesity on Guam has declined, though it remains higher than the U.S. Mainland. Continued BMI data collection is needed to monitor childhood obesity and measure the impact of Public Law 28-87. PMID:25981088

  10. Abdominal fat and metabolic risk in obese children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Revenga-Frauca, J; González-Gil, E M; Bueno-Lozano, G; De Miguel-Etayo, P; Velasco-Martínez, P; Rey-López, J P; Bueno-Lozano, O; Moreno, L A

    2009-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate fat distribution, mainly abdominal fat, and its relationship with metabolic risk variables in a group of 126 children and adolescents (60 males and 66 females) aged 5.0 to 14.9. According to IOTF criteria, 46 were classified as normal weight, 28 overweight and 52 obese. Weight, height, waist (WC) and hip circumferences were measured. The body mass index (BMI) was calculated. Total body fat, trunkal and abdominal fat were also assessed by dual energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA). Glucose, insulin, HDL-Cholesterol, triglycerides (TG), ferritine, homocystein and C-reactive protein (CRP) were measured. Obesity status was related with insulin concentrations, CRP, TG and HDL. Obese patients had higher abdominal fat and higher CRP values than overweight and normal subjects. All markers of central body adiposity were related with insulin and lipid metabolism; however, they were not related with homocystein or ferritin. A simple anthropometric measurement, like waist circumference, seems to be a good predictor of the majority of the obesity related metabolic risk variables. PMID:20358355

  11. [Obesity in children and its relationship with chronic kidney disease].

    PubMed

    Zurita-Cruz, Jessie Nallely; Villasís-Keever, Miguel Ángel

    2016-01-01

    In the last decades, obesity and chronic kidney disease (CKD) have increased worldwide, in parallel. This article focuses on the current issues of obesity on renal damage, with special emphasis on what happens at pediatric ages. While obesity has been linked closely with type 2 diabetes mellitus and hypertension, reduced insulin sensitivity is a direct mechanism for renal damage. The pathophysiologic mechanisms on renal damage include glomerular hyperfiltration and hypertrophy, hypercellularity and broadening of the mesangial regions, while the lack of sensitivity to insulin increases the effects of angiotensin II, exacerbates proteinuria and induces the production of inflammatory cytokines. Many epidemiological studies have documented the relationship of increased BMI with the development of ERC, but most of these studies have been conducted in adults. In children, the information is scarce, but is consistent with findings in adults. In contrast, there are studies which show that interventions aimed to improve weight loss and limit renal damage and proteinuria is reduced, the blood pressure and glomerular filtration rate. Allthe above make us think on the need to improve efforts to reduce the prevalence of obesity from the early stages of life, which could reduce the number of patients with CKD in the future.

  12. Prevalence of obesity and abdominal obesity from four to 16 years old children living in the Mexico-USA border.

    PubMed

    Bacardí-Gascón, Montserrat; Jones, Elizabeth G; Jiménez-Cruz, Arturo

    2013-01-01

    The prevalence of obesity among Mexicans is alarming in both the child and adult populations. The objective of this study was to determine the levels of overweight, obesity and abdominal obesity in pre-school (PS), elementary (ES), and middle high (MHS) public school children from Tijuana. From February to April of 2011, a bietapic random sample was selected by cluster method of 30 PS, 30 ES, and 30 MHS children. And a sample of 30 groups for each level was chosen. Twenty elementary teachers and eight graduate students were trained at one central location on how to take anthropometric measurements using a portable scale, a stadiometer, and a measuring tape to determine weight, height, and waist circumference. Body Mass Index values were computed and compared to age/gender BMI percentiles according to WHO criteria. Waist circumference for-age at the 90th percentile from NHANES III (Mexican-American) was used to define abdominal obesity. The sample was composed of 646 PS children, 961 ES children, and 1,095 MHS children. Their ages ranged from 4- 16 years. Results showed an overall prevalence of overweight and obesity in younger than 5y preschool children (> 2 SD) of 23.1%, in ≥ 5 y PS (> 1 SD) of 33.8%, in ES children of 46.3%, and in MHS children of 41.9%. Abdominal obesity in PS children was 18%, in ES children was 16.7%, and in MHS children was 15.2%. These results warrant immediate and comprehensive actions to prevent a critical public health problem in Mexico.

  13. Prevalence of obesity and abdominal obesity from four to 16 years old children living in the Mexico-USA border.

    PubMed

    Bacardí-Gascón, Montserrat; Jones, Elizabeth G; Jiménez-Cruz, Arturo

    2013-01-01

    The prevalence of obesity among Mexicans is alarming in both the child and adult populations. The objective of this study was to determine the levels of overweight, obesity and abdominal obesity in pre-school (PS), elementary (ES), and middle high (MHS) public school children from Tijuana. From February to April of 2011, a bietapic random sample was selected by cluster method of 30 PS, 30 ES, and 30 MHS children. And a sample of 30 groups for each level was chosen. Twenty elementary teachers and eight graduate students were trained at one central location on how to take anthropometric measurements using a portable scale, a stadiometer, and a measuring tape to determine weight, height, and waist circumference. Body Mass Index values were computed and compared to age/gender BMI percentiles according to WHO criteria. Waist circumference for-age at the 90th percentile from NHANES III (Mexican-American) was used to define abdominal obesity. The sample was composed of 646 PS children, 961 ES children, and 1,095 MHS children. Their ages ranged from 4- 16 years. Results showed an overall prevalence of overweight and obesity in younger than 5y preschool children (> 2 SD) of 23.1%, in ≥ 5 y PS (> 1 SD) of 33.8%, in ES children of 46.3%, and in MHS children of 41.9%. Abdominal obesity in PS children was 18%, in ES children was 16.7%, and in MHS children was 15.2%. These results warrant immediate and comprehensive actions to prevent a critical public health problem in Mexico. PMID:23822701

  14. Being overweight and obese: Black children ages 2-5 years.

    PubMed

    Hudson, Cindy E

    2008-01-01

    Obesity in children is a significant public health concern. The prevalence of obesity in Black preschoolers (ages 2-5 years) is slightly higher than in whites. However, by age 6, Black children experience higher obesity prevalence. The consequences to health throughout childhood and into adulthood have both medical and economic cost to individuals and society. Factors associated with obesity in preschool children are lifestyle behaviors such as diet, level of activity, culture, environment, and parental perceptions. Programs should target young Black children and their families to reduce the incidence of obesity and promoting healthy behaviors could aid in eliminating health disparities and improving quality of life. Nurses need to provide comprehensive culturally appropriate strategies at community and individual/family levels to prevent overweight and obesity in children.

  15. Evaluation of oxidant-antioxidant status in overweight and morbidly obese Saudi children

    PubMed Central

    Albuali, Waleed H

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the antioxidant enzymes and oxidative products in overweight and obese Saudi children before the onset of metabolic complications. METHODS: The study was carried out on 231 Saudi children. They were classified into three groups: uncomplicated overweight, uncomplicated morbid obesity, and the matched age group as control. All subjects underwent anthropometric measurements and activities of superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), glutathione reductase, the concentrations of reduced GSH, malondialdehyde (MDA) oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) and advanced oxidation protein products (AOPPs) were measured in the blood of these groups. RESULTS: Overweight and obese children had a significantly higher body mass index, while obese children only had a significantly higher waist-to-hip ratio compared to that of the control group. The enzyme activities under study were significantly elevated in the overweight group, although they were significantly reduced among obese children. The concentration of GSH was reduced in both the overweight and obese groups. The mean values of ox-LDL, MDA and AOPP were non-significantly increased in overweight children, while they were significantly elevated in obese children compared to that of normal weight children. A significant disturbance of oxidant-antioxidant status was observed in severely morbid children. CONCLUSION: The increase of oxidative stress in obese children is associated with the increase in AOPPs and MDA which reflects an imbalance between reactive oxygen species production and antioxidant defense. PMID:25254179

  16. Health-related quality of life in a clinical sample of obese children and adolescents

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Obesity affects ethnic minority groups disproportionately, especially in the pediatric population. However, little is known about the impact of obesity on health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in children and adolescents from mixed-ethnic samples. The purpose of this study was to: 1) measure HRQoL in a mixed-ethnic clinical sample of obese children and adolescents, 2) compare HRQoL assessments in obese participants and healthy controls, and 3) compare HRQoL in obese children and adolescents according to their pubertal status. Methods A clinical sample of children and adolescents with obesity (n = 96) and healthy children and adolescents attending local schools (n = 444) completed the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory (PedsQL; UK version 4). Age-appropriate versions were self-administered by children and adolescents aged 8-18 years, and interview administered to children aged 5-7 years. Multiple regression analyses controlling for age, gender, pubertal status, and ethnicity were used to compare the PedsQL scores of the two samples. Results The clinical sample of obese children and adolescents had poorer HRQoL scores on all dimensions of the PedsQL compared to the healthy controls (p < 0.005). Subsequent analyses also demonstrated that in this sample of mixed-ethnic children and adolescents, prepubescent obese children achieved the poorest scores in the emotional functioning dimension. Conclusions Obesity significantly impacts on physical, emotional, social and school functioning of mixed-ethnic children and adolescents. Clinicians need to be aware of the significant impact of obesity on all aspects of functioning. More effort is required to target interventions to improve the quality of life of children with obesity. PMID:21078146

  17. Raising healthy children: Moral and political responsibility for childhood obesity.

    PubMed

    Purcell, Megan

    2010-12-01

    Childhood obesity and chronic disease rates continue to climb, but policy and programme responses are mainly limited to education and awareness activities. These encourage individuals to make responsible lifestyle choices. Regulation and environmental change have a minor role, as they involve more intrusive roles for government, invading traditionally private domains of nutrition and physical activity. But to address children's health needs, today's emphasis on self-management is inappropriate. Children, especially the very young, are dependent and vulnerable. I describe why the current public health strategies, with their political and moral foundations, remain ineffective. The foundations are based primarily upon the traditional liberal understanding of the public/private divide, while neglecting to recognize the legal obligations and implications of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child and theories of justice and citizenship as they apply to children.

  18. Raising healthy children: Moral and political responsibility for childhood obesity.

    PubMed

    Purcell, Megan

    2010-12-01

    Childhood obesity and chronic disease rates continue to climb, but policy and programme responses are mainly limited to education and awareness activities. These encourage individuals to make responsible lifestyle choices. Regulation and environmental change have a minor role, as they involve more intrusive roles for government, invading traditionally private domains of nutrition and physical activity. But to address children's health needs, today's emphasis on self-management is inappropriate. Children, especially the very young, are dependent and vulnerable. I describe why the current public health strategies, with their political and moral foundations, remain ineffective. The foundations are based primarily upon the traditional liberal understanding of the public/private divide, while neglecting to recognize the legal obligations and implications of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child and theories of justice and citizenship as they apply to children. PMID:21119650

  19. Metabolic profil in a group of obese Moroccan children enrolled in schools in the city of Rabat

    PubMed Central

    Mouane, Nezha; Dekkaki, Imane Cherkaoui; Ettair, Said; Meskini, Toufik; Khalloufi, Nabil; Bouklouze, Aziz; Barkat, Amina

    2014-01-01

    Introduction To determine the metabolic profile in a group of obese children in Morocco. Methods The BMI, the waist circumference, the blood pressure and metabolic parameters in 73 children (37 obese and 36 normal) were compared. Results 80% of obese children had abdominal obesity (p <0.0001). For systolic blood pressure among children who have a higher value than the 95th percentile, 85.7% were obese and 14.3% children are normal children. For diastolic blood pressure, 83.34% of obese children had higher diastolic blood pressure values in the 95th percentile and 16.6% of normal children have a higher value than the 95th percentile (p=0.013). No obese child had hyperglycemia. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome was 21.6%. Conclusion Obesity is number one risk of cardiovascular disease for children. Early detection can help for an appropriate care. PMID:25977740

  20. Descriptive analysis of eating regulation in obese and nonobese children.

    PubMed

    Epstein, L H; Parker, L; McCoy, J F; McGee, G

    Bite rate, sip rate, and concurrent activities of six 7-yr-old children, three obese and three nonobese, were observed at lunchtime over a six-month period. A procedure for decreasing bite rate, putting eating utensils down between bites, was implemented in a multiple-baseline across-subjects design. Sip rates and concurrent activities were observed to assess behavioral covariations. In addition, bite rate and amount of food completed were computed over six food categories to analyze food preferences. Results indicated the control of bite rate acorss all subjects, with a significant reduction in amount of food consumed. Correlations between the response classes indicated they were at least partially independent. Differences in eating behavior of obese and nonobese subjects were observed for breadstuffs and milk drinking. PMID:1002629

  1. Treating obesity in children and adolescents: a review.

    PubMed Central

    Coates, T J; Thoresen, C E

    1978-01-01

    Researchers and health practitioners are becoming increasingly concerned with the problems associated with obesity among children and adolescents. Obesity tends to persist into adulthood and to be associated with a variety of physical and psychological problems. Treatment approaches used to date are generally impotent, but some promising short-term results have been achieved with some forms of dietary counseling, exercise programs, total environmental management, and behavior therapy. But even with these strategies, clinically significant weight loss is rare and advances during treatment are rarely maintained. Radical departures from current treatment strategies are needed in the form of more structured and intensive treatments, family involvement, and training in problem solving. Closer adherence to sound scientific methodology might at least provide a foundation from which more effective treatments might be developed. PMID:626257

  2. Dyslipidemia in Overweight and Obese School-Aged Children.

    PubMed

    Finn, Pamela

    2015-09-01

    Dyslipidemia often affects overweight and obese adolescents and can be present along with hypertension, insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes, and polycystic ovarian syndrome. This article is the third of six discussing the comorbidities of childhood obesity and will focus on the individual parts of the lipid profile and the impact of dyslipidemia on the heart and other body systems. Since few pharmacologic therapies are approved to treat dyslipidemia in children and adolescents younger than 18, treatment consists of lifestyle changes that can be supported and modeled by the school nurse. The school nurse can also be an advocate for a healthy lifestyle in the school district and community. More success in the treatment of dyslipidemia will be realized with less attention to changing the individual and more attention to changing the wider populations, including schools and the community. PMID:26219905

  3. The influence of leptin on Th1/Th2 balance in obese children with asthma*

    PubMed Central

    Youssef, Doaa Mohammed; Elbehidy, Rabab Mohamed; Shokry, Dina Mahamoud; Elbehidy, Eman Mohamed

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: In individuals with asthma, obesity induces the production of leptin and is associated with disease severity. Our objective was to evaluate the levels of serum leptin and their effect on Th1/Th2 balance in obese and non-obese children with asthma, as well as to investigate the association between serum leptin levels and clinical outcomes. METHODS: We evaluated 50 atopic children with physician-diagnosed moderate-to-severe persistent asthma and 20 controls. The children with asthma were divided into two groups, by body mass index percentile: obese (n = 25) and non-obese (n = 25). From all subjects, we collected peripheral blood samples in order to determine the levels of leptin, IFN-γ, and IL-4. Asthma severity was assessed by an asthma symptom score, and the results were correlated with the parameters studied. RESULTS: Serum leptin levels were significantly higher in the obese asthma group than in the non-obese asthma group, as well as being significantly higher in the children with asthma than in the controls, whereas IFN-γ levels were significantly higher and IL-4 levels were significantly lower in the obese asthma group than in the non-obese asthma group. In addition, the obese asthma group showed higher asthma symptom scores and significantly lower FEV1 (% of predicted) than did the non-obese asthma group. There was a significant positive correlation between leptin and IFN-γ levels only in the obese asthma group. CONCLUSIONS: Although leptin is involved in the pathogenesis of asthma in obese and non-obese children, its effect is more pronounced in the former. In the presence of high leptin levels, only obese children with asthma exhibited Th1 polarization, with higher IFN-γ levels and greater asthma severity. PMID:24310629

  4. Patterns of Obesity among Children and Adolescents with Intellectual Disabilities in Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Jin-Ding; Yen, Chia-Feng; Li, Chi-Wei; Wu, Jia-Ling

    2005-01-01

    Background: Obesity and the health problems associated with it have substantial economic consequences for health care systems. Little information is available concerning obesity-related problems among people with intellectual disabilities. The aims of this study were to analyse patterns of obesity among children and adolescents with intellectual…

  5. High Prevalence of Obesity in Ambulatory Children and Adolescents with Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, L.; Van de Ven, L.; Katsarou, V.; Rentziou, E.; Doran, M.; Jackson, P.; Reilly, J. J.; Wilson, D.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Obesity prevalence is unusually high among adults with intellectual disability (ID). There is limited and conflicting evidence on obesity prevalence among ambulatory children and adolescents with ID. The present study aimed to estimate obesity prevalence in this group and to compare with population prevalence. Methods: Survey of nine…

  6. Obesity-Related Hormones in Low-Income Preschool-Age Children: Implications for School Readiness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Alison L.; Lumeng, Carey N.; Delproposto, Jennifer; Florek, Brian; Wendorf, Kristin; Lumeng, Julie C.

    2013-01-01

    Mechanisms underlying socioeconomic disparities in school readiness and health outcomes, particularly obesity, among preschool-aged children are complex and poorly understood. Obesity can induce changes in proteins in the circulation that contribute to the negative impact of obesity on health; such changes may relate to cognitive and emotion…

  7. Mexican-American children have different elevation of metabolic biomarkers that is proportional to obesity status

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There is a health disparity for obesity among Mexican Americans compared with other racial/ethnic groups. In particular, Mexican American children who are obese are likely to become obese adults. The purpose of this study was to examine traditional and nontraditional risk factors in a subset of Mexi...

  8. Obese, Mexican-American children have elevated non-traditional metabolic risk factors

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There is a health disparity for obesity amongst Mexican-Americans compared to other race/ethnic groups. In particular Mexican-American children who are obese are likely to become obese adults. The purpose of this study was to examine traditional and non-traditional risk factors in a subset of Mexica...

  9. Achalasia mimicking prepubertal anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Richterich, Andreas; Brunner, Romuald; Resch, Franz

    2003-04-01

    A 9-year-old girl presents for continuing weight loss of 10 kg over the course of 1 year. Medical history showed three episodes of pneumonia requiring hospital admission in the 6 months before presentation and 4 months of weekly psychotherapy for anorexia nervosa. A thorough history of eating behavior and a review of systems revealed not only typical aspects of prepubertal anorexia nervosa but also vomiting at night while asleep, difficulty drinking liquids, epigastric pain, and a frequent experience of "a lump in the throat"; these symptoms were not suggestive of a diagnosis of anorexia nervosa but rather of esophageal achalasia. The patient was transferred to the Department of Pediatrics, and a diagnosis of esophageal achalasia was made by chest x-ray and barium swallow. After dilatation and botulinum toxin application, the patient regained weight easily and was discharged in stable condition. In this case, esophageal achalasia mimicked prepubertal anorexia nervosa.

  10. Externality as a function of obesity in children: pervasive style or eating-specific attribute?

    PubMed

    Costanzo, P R; Woody, E Z

    1979-12-01

    The developmental sources of the link between stylistic externality and food-related externality found in the obese by Schacter and others were explored by testing whether the externality phenomena that have been found to differentiate obese and normal adults are also discriminators of obese and normal children. The results suggest that obese children as young as 7-12 years of age show an external responsiveness to salient food cues but not yet a generally external perceptual style. The implications of these findings for the development of obese externality are examined.

  11. The built environment and obesity among low-income preschool children.

    PubMed

    Salois, Matthew J

    2012-05-01

    In spite of the evidence that adult obesity is influenced by environmental factors, the influence of the environment on childhood obesity remains under-investigated. This paper examines the association of the built environment with the prevalence of obesity in low-income preschool children. Built environment indicators include measures relating to food choice and physical activity. The relationship of the environment with childhood obesity is further stratified by urban-rural location. Overall, the built environment is associated with the prevalence of obesity in low-income preschool children, although the impact of the environment is affected by urban-rural status. Results imply broad-scope for community-level interventions.

  12. The perceptions of obese school children in Hong Kong toward their weight-loss experience.

    PubMed

    Wong, E M Y; Sit, J W H; Tarrant, M A; Cheng, M M H

    2012-10-01

    Most studies related to addressing weight management of obese children have focused on understanding the perceptions of parents and health professionals. This study identifies the factors that obese children who have tried to lose weight perceive as affecting their efforts. This descriptive qualitative study has sought to identify factors affecting obese children's weight-loss decision making and process and to explore the development of an effective weight-loss program. This study screened 603 primary school children equivalent to U.S. Grades 5 and 6 of age 10-12. Seventy-nine out of 93 obese children who had been trying on their own to lose weight for at least 1 month formed 6 focus groups. Four themes were identified: Making the decision, self-efficacy, social influences, and environmental constraints. The results suggest that the design of a weight-loss program for obese children should include the contribution of family members, school, and health professionals. PMID:22427318

  13. Drug Dosing in Obese Children: A Systematic Review of Current Pharmacokinetic Data

    PubMed Central

    Harskamp-van Ginkel, Margreet W.; Hill, Kevin D.; Becker, Kristian; Testoni, Daniela; Cohen-Wolkowiez, Michael; Gonzalez, Daniel; Barrett, Jeffrey S.; Benjamin, Daniel K.; Siegel, David A.; Banks, Patricia; Watt, Kevin M.

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Obesity affects nearly one sixth of U.S. children and results in alterations to body composition and physiology that can affect drug disposition, possibly leading to therapeutic failure or toxicity. The depth of available literature regarding obesity’s effect on drug safety, pharmacokinetics (PK) and dosing in obese children is unknown. OBJECTIVE To perform a systematic literature review describing the current evidence of the effect of obesity on drug disposition in children. EVIDENCE REVIEW We searched the Medline, Cochrane, and Embase databases (January 1970–December 2012) and included studies if they contained clearance, volume of distribution, or drug concentration data in obese children (age ≤18 years). We compared exposure and weight-normalized volume of distribution and clearance between obese and non-obese children. We explored the relationship between drug physicochemical properties and clearance and volume of distribution. FINDINGS Twenty studies met inclusion criteria and contained pharmacokinetic data for 21 drugs. The median number of obese children studied per drug was 10 (range 1–112), ages ranged from 0–29 years. Dosing schema varied and were based on a fixed dose (n=6, 29%), body weight (n=10, 48%), and body surface area (n=4, 19%). Clinically significant pharmacokinetic alterations were observed in obese children for 65% (11/17) of studied drugs. Pharmacokinetic alterations resulted in substantial differences in exposure between obese and non-obese children for 38% (5/13) of drugs. We found no association between drug lipophilicity or Biopharmaceutical Drug Disposition Classification System class and changes in volume of distribution or clearance due to obesity. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Consensus is lacking on the most appropriate weight-based dosing strategy. Prospective pharmacokinetic trials in obese children are needed to ensure therapeutic efficacy and enhance drug safety. PMID:25961828

  14. Whole-Body and Hepatic Insulin Resistance in Obese Children

    PubMed Central

    Ibarra-Reynoso, Lorena del Rocío; Pisarchyk, Liudmila; Pérez-Luque, Elva Leticia; Garay-Sevilla, Ma. Eugenia; Malacara, Juan Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Background Insulin resistance may be assessed as whole body or hepatic. Objective To study factors associated with both types of insulin resistance. Methods Cross-sectional study of 182 obese children. Somatometric measurements were registered, and the following three adiposity indexes were compared: BMI, waist-to-height ratio and visceral adiposity. Whole-body insulin resistance was evaluated using HOMA-IR, with 2.5 as the cut-off point. Hepatic insulin resistance was considered for IGFBP-1 level quartiles 1 to 3 (<6.67 ng/ml). We determined metabolite and hormone levels and performed a liver ultrasound. Results The majority, 73.1%, of obese children had whole-body insulin resistance and hepatic insulin resistance, while 7% did not have either type. HOMA-IR was negatively associated with IGFBP-1 and positively associated with BMI, triglycerides, leptin and mother's BMI. Girls had increased HOMA-IR. IGFBP-1 was negatively associated with waist-to-height ratio, age, leptin, HOMA-IR and IGF-I. We did not find HOMA-IR or IGFBP-1 associated with fatty liver. Conclusion In school-aged children, BMI is the best metric to predict whole-body insulin resistance, and waist-to-height ratio is the best predictor of hepatic insulin resistance, indicating that central obesity is important for hepatic insulin resistance. The reciprocal negative association of IGFBP-1 and HOMA-IR may represent a strong interaction of the physiological processes of both whole-body and hepatic insulin resistance. PMID:25411786

  15. Television viewing and overweight and obesity amongst children.

    PubMed

    Kapil, Umesh; Bhadoria, Ajeet Singh

    2014-01-01

    The process of modernization has brought about changes in lifestyle of people leading to improvement in standard of living but it is associated with certain unwanted life styles like decreased physical activity and increased sedentary work. Thus, improvement in motorized transport availability of house hold gadgets like washing machine, vaccum cleaners, dish washers all tend to reduce activity level. Obese and overweight individuals are less active than their lean counterparts. Cross sectional data often reveals that there is an inverse relationship between BMI and physical activity both among adults and children.

  16. [Carbohydrate metabolism disorders among obese children and adolescents. Diabetes mellitus type 2].

    PubMed

    Sergeyev, E; Wagner, I; Neef, M; Adler, M; Körner, A; Kiess, W

    2013-04-01

    As obesity has become more prevalent, the incidence of type 2 diabetes mellitus in children and adolescents has also increased. Obesity during adolescence leads to an increased risk for disease and premature death during adulthood, independent of obesity during adulthood. Obesity is the major risk factor impacting insulin sensitivity. Subjects with insulin resistance are at risk for progression to diabetes. Type 2 diabetes mellitus in obese children and adolescents is frequently asymptomatic. It is essential to identify children at high risk who need aggressive lifestyle modification focused on weight reduction and increased physical activity. Early detection and therapy of obese children and adolescents with type 2 diabetes may reduce the risk of cardiometabolic consequences and other long-term complications in adulthood.

  17. Diagnosis of a trend towards obesity in preschool children: a longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Yücel, Oya; Kinik, Sibel Tulgar; Aka, Sibel

    2011-06-01

    The study was planned to determine identifiable starting points of a trend towards obesity and the influence of variables in preschool children aged 0 to 6 years. In this longitudinal follow-up study, 102 children were enrolled. Anthropometric measurements such as weight-height centiles (specific for gender and age group), weight-height growth velocities, and body mass indices were taken annually and compared within each group from birth to 6 years. Family history and lifestyle variables were also recorded and compared. Our study has shown that gender does not affect the trend towards obesity. In obese children, the earliest sign of a trend was the rapid increase of weight and weight gain velocity after 6 months. There were upward trends in the BMI values indicating obesity at 1 year of age in boys and at 6 months of age in girls. The height was higher in obese children than in non-obese ones after 4 years of age. Paternal obesity and having an obese sibling were significant risk factors for obesity. In conclusion, 6 months are considered to be the most critical periods for evaluating the development of obesity in childhood. The efforts for preventing obesity should be initiated at 6 months of age.

  18. Differences in Home Food and Activity Environments between Obese and Healthy Weight Families of Preschool Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boles, Richard E.; Scharf, Cynthia; Filigno, Stephanie S.; Saelens, Brian E.; Stark, Lori J.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To develop and test a home food and activity instrument to discriminate between the home environments of obese and healthy weight preschool children. Design: A modified questionnaire about home environments was tested as an observation tool. Setting: Family homes. Participants: A total of 35 obese children with at least 1 obese…

  19. Factors Influencing Health-Related Quality of Life of Overweight and Obese Children in South Korea

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Hee Soon; Park, Jiyoung; Ma, Yumi; Ham, Ok Kyung

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify factors influencing health-related quality of life (HRQoL) of overweight and obese children in Korea. This study employed a cross-sectional descriptive study design. A total of 132 overweight and obese children participated in the study. Anthropometric measurements included body mass index, percent body…

  20. Brain gray and white matter differences in healthy normal weight and obese children

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To compare brain gray and white matter development in healthy normal weight and obese children. Twenty-four healthy 8- to 10-year-old children whose body mass index was either <75th percentile (normal weight) or >95th percentile (obese) completed an MRI examination which included T1-weighted three-d...

  1. Prevalence of Overweight and Obesity in Children with Intellectual Disabilities in Korea

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choi, Eunsook; Park, HyunJu; Ha, Yeongmi; Hwang, Won Ju

    2012-01-01

    Background: Overweight and obesity in children with intellectual disabilities may be a major health threat. The purpose of this study was to examine the prevalence of overweight and obesity in Korean children with intellectual disabilities aged 7-18 years who did not have specific genetic syndromes or physical disabilities. Materials and methods:…

  2. The Relationship between Television Viewing and Obesity in Young Children: A Review of Existing Explanations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenvey, Vickii B.

    2007-01-01

    It has often been proposed that young (three to six years old) children's television viewing habits contribute to early-onset obesity. Three explanations that link television viewing patterns of young children with the development of obesity are considered. First, television viewing displaces time available for physical activity, reduces energy…

  3. Factors Associated with Mothers' Obesity Stigma and Young Children's Weight Stereotypes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holub, Shayla C.; Tan, Cin Cin; Patel, Sanobar L.

    2011-01-01

    Parents and children hold negative attitudes about obesity, but little is known about individual differences in obesity stigma. The current study examined authoritarian parenting style, beliefs about the controllability of weight and fear of fat in relation to mothers' dislike of overweight individuals. Factors related to children's weight…

  4. Prevalence of Obesity and Overweight Among School Children Aged 8-18 Years in Rajkot, Gujarat.

    PubMed

    Chudasama, Rajesh K; Eshwar, Tkm; Eshwar, Subhasini T; Thakkar, Dhara

    2016-08-01

    A total of 1496 school children aged 8-18 years (79.1% boys) participated in this study. Prevalence of obesity and overweight was estimated by using three different growth standards. Revised IAP 2015 growth standards detected more obese and overweight children than WHO 2007 and IOTF standards. PMID:27395837

  5. The Perceptions of Obese School Children in Hong Kong toward Their Weight-Loss Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, E. M. Y.; Sit, J. W. H.; Tarrant, M. A.; Cheng, M. M. H.

    2012-01-01

    Most studies related to addressing weight management of obese children have focused on understanding the perceptions of parents and health professionals. This study identifies the factors that obese children who have tried to lose weight perceive as affecting their efforts. This descriptive qualitative study has sought to identify factors…

  6. A Characterization of Movement Skills in Obese Children with and without Prader-Willi Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lam, Melanie Y.; Rubin, Daniela A.; Duran, Andrea T.; Chavoya, Frank A.; White, Elizabeth; Rose, Debra J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was twofold: (a) to measure and compare motor proficiency in obese children with Prader-Willi syndrome (OB-PWS) to that in obese children without PWS (OB), and (b) to compare motor proficiency in OB-PWS and OB to normative data. Method: Motor proficiency was measured using the Bruininks-Oseretsky Test of Motor…

  7. Television viewing, computer use, obesity, and adiposity in US preschool children

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There is limited evidence in preschool children linking media use, such as television/video viewing and computer use, to obesity and adiposity. We tested three hypotheses in preschool children: 1) that watching > 2 hours of TV/videos daily is associated with obesity and adiposity, 2) that computer u...

  8. Relation Between Body-Esteem and Self-Esteem of Obese and Normal Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mendelson, Beverley Katz; White, Donna Romano

    1982-01-01

    Normal and obese children completed self-esteem and body-esteem questionnaires. Body-esteem was significantly correlated with self-esteem and percentage overweight. Body-esteem and relative weight were correlated; self-esteem and relative weight were not related. The body/self-esteem relation was the same for normal and obese children. (Author/RD)

  9. Overweight and obesity among Hispanic children entering foster care: a preliminary examination of polyvictimization.

    PubMed

    Schneiderman, Janet U; Smith, Caitlin; Arnold-Clark, Janet S; Fuentes, Jorge; Duan, Lei; Palinkas, Lawrence A

    2013-11-01

    This retrospective medical chart review examined the prevalence of overweight/obesity (≥85th percentile) and obesity (≥95th percentile) in Hispanic foster children aged 2-18 years in Los Angeles, California. Logistic regression was used for boys and girls separately to analyze polyvictimization (i.e., one vs. two or more types of maltreatment), type of maltreatment (abuse vs. neglect), and age-group as risk factors for overweight and obesity. Almost 40% of participants were overweight/obese, with the highest prevalence (47.7%) observed among children aged 12-18. Children aged 6-18 were at an increased risk of overweight/obesity and obesity compared with children aged 2-5. Although polyvictimization has been shown to have adverse health effects, in this study, it was related to slightly lower odds of obesity for boys but was unrelated to high weight for girls. Addressing the obesity epidemic among Hispanic foster children is vital to preventing continued obesity and the development of obesity-related health problems, especially by focusing on important community and family influences.

  10. Overweight and obesity among Hispanic children entering foster care: a preliminary examination of polyvictimization.

    PubMed

    Schneiderman, Janet U; Smith, Caitlin; Arnold-Clark, Janet S; Fuentes, Jorge; Duan, Lei; Palinkas, Lawrence A

    2013-11-01

    This retrospective medical chart review examined the prevalence of overweight/obesity (≥85th percentile) and obesity (≥95th percentile) in Hispanic foster children aged 2-18 years in Los Angeles, California. Logistic regression was used for boys and girls separately to analyze polyvictimization (i.e., one vs. two or more types of maltreatment), type of maltreatment (abuse vs. neglect), and age-group as risk factors for overweight and obesity. Almost 40% of participants were overweight/obese, with the highest prevalence (47.7%) observed among children aged 12-18. Children aged 6-18 were at an increased risk of overweight/obesity and obesity compared with children aged 2-5. Although polyvictimization has been shown to have adverse health effects, in this study, it was related to slightly lower odds of obesity for boys but was unrelated to high weight for girls. Addressing the obesity epidemic among Hispanic foster children is vital to preventing continued obesity and the development of obesity-related health problems, especially by focusing on important community and family influences. PMID:24137014

  11. [Dietary interventions and social care for treating obesity in children].

    PubMed

    Wiegand, S; Bau, A-M; Babitsch, B

    2011-05-01

    The prevalence of obesity and associated comorbidities among children and adolescents has risen worldwide throughout the past 3 decades. To break this trend, population-based activities in health promotion/prevention and health care are necessary. Studies showed that long-term eating behavior improvement with the cooperation of the patient's family together with child-friendly organization support both individual therapeutic improvements as well as a relevant reduction of obesity prevalence. A significant BMI reduction can be achieved with a normal varied diet, whose energetic value is 300-400 kcal/day below the patient's daily energetic needs, due to the lower consumption of fat and sugar. This requires, however, that the entire family be willing to change their unhealthy eating behaviors (e.g., soft drinks and fast food) and to introduce regular meals into their daily routine. Sensibly, most therapies combine diet therapy with increased physical activity and parental training. Controlled media consumption, active leisure-time behavior, and a structured daily routine are further conditions for successful weight reduction. The high-risk groups for pediatric obesity, i.e., families with migration background and/or low socioeconomic status, have been poorly reached by established programs. PMID:21547643

  12. Is sleep deprivation a contributor to obesity in children?

    PubMed

    Chaput, Jean-Philippe

    2016-03-01

    Chronic lack of sleep (called "sleep deprivation") is common in modern societies with 24/7 availability of commodities. Accumulating evidence supports the role of reduced sleep as contributing to the current obesity epidemic in children and youth. Longitudinal studies have consistently shown that short sleep duration is associated with weight gain and the development of obesity. Recent experimental studies have reported that sleep restriction leads to weight gain in humans. Increased food intake appears to be the main mechanism by which insufficient sleep results in weight gain. Voluntary sleep restriction has been shown to increase snacking, the number of meals eaten per day, and the preference for energy-dense foods. Although the causes of sleep loss in the pediatric population are numerous, more research looking at screen exposure before bedtime and its effects on sleep is needed given the pervasiveness of electronic media devices in today's environment. Health professionals should routinely ask questions about sleep and promote a good night's sleep because insufficient sleep impacts activity and eating behaviors. Future research should examine the clinical benefits of increasing sleep duration on eating behaviors and body weight control and determine the importance of adequate sleep to improve the treatment of obesity.

  13. Mediterranean-style diet reduces metabolic syndrome components in obese children and adolescents with obesity

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The beneficial effects of the Mediterranean diet have been amply proven in adults with cardiovascular risk factors. The effects of this diet have not been extensively assessed in pediatric populations with obesity, insulin resistance (IR) and metabolic syndrome (MetS). The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of the Mediterranean style diet (MSD) to decrease cardiovascular risk factors in children and adolescents with obesity. Methods Participants were randomly assigned to a MSD rich in polyunsaturated fatty acids, fiber, flavonoids and antioxidants (60% of energy from carbohydrate, 25% from fat, and 15% from protein, (n = 24); or a standard diet (55% of carbohydrate, 30% from fat and 15% from protein, (n = 25), the caloric ingest was individualized. At baseline and 16-week of intervention, the glucose, triglycerides (TG), total cholesterol (TC), HDL-C, LDL-C were measured as well as the body composition and anthropometric data. The diet compliance was determined by the 24-hour recalls. Paired Student’s t and Macnemar’s test were used to compare effects in biochemical, body composition, anthropometric, and dietary variables. Results The MSD group had a significantly decrease in BMI, lean mass, fat mass, glucose, TC, TG, HDL-C and LDL-C. (p < 0.05); the diet compliance increased consumption of omega 9 fatty acids, zinc, vitamin E, selenium, and decreased consumption of saturated fatty acids (p < 0.05). The standard diet group decrease in glucose levels and frequency of glucose >100 mg/dL (p < 0.05). Conclusion The MSD improves the BMI, glucose and lipid profile in children and adolescents with obesity and any MetS component. PMID:24997634

  14. Appropriate care for children with eating disorders and obesity.

    PubMed

    El-Radhi, A Sahib

    Eating disorders are essentially psychological diseases that are characterised by abnormal eating habits. Anorexia nervosa and bulimia are the most common forms of eating disorders. There is an increased recognition of eating disorders among both men and women, and growing numbers of children and teenagers seeking help for eating disorders. Fear of body-weight gain is central to both anorexia nervosa and bulimia. Before the diagnosis of an eating disorder is made, it is essential to exclude organic diseases that may present with similar symptoms to eating disorders. Management initially should focus on correcting the nutritional deficiencies and dehydration at a paediatric or paediatric gastroenterology department, followed by a multidisciplinary approach. At the other extreme, the prevalence of obesity in children is increasing at an alarming rate, and presents a serious public health challenge.

  15. Overweight and obesity at school entry among migrant and German children: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Will, Beata; Zeeb, Hajo; Baune, Bernhard T

    2005-01-01

    Background Overweight and obesity have become a global epidemic and are increasing rapidly in both childhood and adolescence. Obesity is linked both to socioeconomic status and to ethnicity among adults. It is unclear whether similar associations exist in childhood. The aim of the present study was to assess differences in overweight and obesity in migrant and German children at school entry. Methods The body mass index (BMI) was calculated for 525 children attending the 2002 compulsory pre-school medical examinations in 12 schools in Bielefeld, Germany. We applied international BMI cut off points for overweight and obesity by sex and age. The migration status of children was based on sociodemographic data obtained from parents who were interviewed separately. Results The overall prevalence of overweight in children aged 6–7 was 11.9% (overweight incl. obesity), the obesity prevalence was 2.5%. The prevalence of overweight and obesity was higher for migrant children (14.7% and 3.1%) than for German children (9.1% and 1.9%). When stratified by parental social status, migrant children had a significantly higher prevalence of overweight than German children in the highest social class. (27.6% vs. 10.0%, p = 0.032) Regression models including country/region and socioeconomic status as independent variables indicated similar results. The patterns of overweight among migrant children differed only slightly depending on duration of stay of their family in Germany. Conclusion Our data indicate that children from ethnic minorities in Germany are more frequently overweight or obese than German children. Social class as well as family duration of stay after immigration influence the pattern of overweight and obesity in children at school entry. PMID:15882467

  16. Nutrition and Immune System in Children with Simple Obesity.

    PubMed

    Czerwonogrodzka-Senczyna, Aneta; Janusz, Malgorzata; Jeznach-Steinhagen, Anna; Demkow, Urszula; Pyrzak, Beata

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate dietary factors in nutrition influencing the immune system of children and teenagers suffering from simple obesity. The study involved 100 children and teenagers aged 7-18 with simple obesity. Nutritional data were obtained from 3-day food records. The consumed nutrients, including immunomodulators and immunostimulants, were estimated based on the nutrition interview. The results were compared with the nutritional norms. On average, the proportion of n-6:n-3 fatty acids equalled 10:1. Among the amino acids, the highest intake values in the diet were observed for glutamine (13,694.6 mg/day). The study demonstrates inadequate intake levels of iron (73% of recommended dietary allowance, RDA), vitamin C (65% of RDA), and vitamin D (11% of RDA) taking into account the median values for the entire study group. The median daily intake of other nutrients exceeded the RDA values. The diets of the participants in this study were not properly balanced with respect to immunomodulators, which may contribute to the occurrence of immunological disorders and immunodeficiency in this group of patients.

  17. How low-income mothers with overweight preschool children make sense of obesity.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Cayce C; Sherman, Susan N; Whitaker, Robert C

    2010-04-01

    Epidemiologic and qualitative studies have found that most mothers with overweight preschool children do not think their children are overweight. This might present a challenge for clinicians who wish to address obesity in young children. To understand mothers' perceptions of their overweight children's weight, we conducted semistructured interviews with 21 mothers of overweight preschool children enrolled in Kentucky's Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children. Although these mothers did not label their children as overweight, they were worried about children's weight, particularly as it related to their emotional well-being. These worries about obesity were reflected in three central tensions that shaped the way mothers perceived their children's weight and informed maternal feeding strategies: (a) nature vs. nurture, (b) medical authority vs. lived experience, and (c) relieving immediate stress vs. preventing long-term consequences. Acknowledging mothers' concerns and tensions might help clinicians communicate more effectively with them about obesity.

  18. How low-income mothers with overweight preschool children make sense of obesity.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Cayce C; Sherman, Susan N; Whitaker, Robert C

    2010-04-01

    Epidemiologic and qualitative studies have found that most mothers with overweight preschool children do not think their children are overweight. This might present a challenge for clinicians who wish to address obesity in young children. To understand mothers' perceptions of their overweight children's weight, we conducted semistructured interviews with 21 mothers of overweight preschool children enrolled in Kentucky's Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children. Although these mothers did not label their children as overweight, they were worried about children's weight, particularly as it related to their emotional well-being. These worries about obesity were reflected in three central tensions that shaped the way mothers perceived their children's weight and informed maternal feeding strategies: (a) nature vs. nurture, (b) medical authority vs. lived experience, and (c) relieving immediate stress vs. preventing long-term consequences. Acknowledging mothers' concerns and tensions might help clinicians communicate more effectively with them about obesity. PMID:20147505

  19. [Morphofunctional condition of the pancreas in children and teenagers with obesity and metabolic syndrome].

    PubMed

    Bokova, T A; Ursova, N I; Rimarchuk, G V; Lebedeva, A V

    2008-01-01

    30 childs and teenagers (6- 15-years-old) were examined (16 boys and 14 girls). The signs of metabolic syndrome were revealed in 13 persons (43%) (VOZ, 1999). Echogenicity of pancreatic acinar tissue was reinforced in all persons with obesity, (80%) hyperechogenic inclusions were observed in 67% of the patients. Trustworthy correlation of the pancreatic head size, pancreatic tail size and the obesity degree as well as the disease duration was demonstrated. Postprandial pancreatic reaction was reduced in the most part of the patients with obesity (77%). Postprandial pancreatic reaction was more significantly reduced in the children with obesity and metabolic syndrome than in the children with obesity, who hasn't the signs of metabolic syndrome (15,3% and 7,5%). So, it is necessary the special examination of the children with obesity to reveal chronic pancreatitis.

  20. Contribution of Common Genetic Variants to Obesity and Obesity-Related Traits in Mexican Children and Adults

    PubMed Central

    Villalobos-Comparán, Marisela; Villarreal-Molina, Teresa; Romero-Hidalgo, Sandra; López-Contreras, Blanca; Gutiérrez-Vidal, Roxana; Vega-Badillo, Joel; Jacobo-Albavera, Leonor; Posadas-Romeros, Carlos; Canizalez-Román, Adrián; Río-Navarro, Blanca Del; Campos-Pérez, Francisco; Acuña-Alonzo, Victor; Aguilar-Salinas, Carlos; Canizales-Quinteros, Samuel

    2013-01-01

    Background Several studies have identified multiple obesity-associated loci mainly in European populations. However, their contribution to obesity in other ethnicities such as Mexicans is largely unknown. The aim of this study was to examine 26 obesity-associated single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in a sample of Mexican mestizos. Methods 9 SNPs in biological candidate genes showing replications (PPARG, ADRB3, ADRB2, LEPR, GNB3, UCP3, ADIPOQ, UCP2, and NR3C1), and 17 SNPs in or near genes associated with obesity in first, second and third wave GWAS (INSIG2, FTO, MC4R, TMEM18, FAIM2/BCDIN3, BDNF, SH2B1, GNPDA2, NEGR1, KCTD15, SEC16B/RASAL2, NPC1, SFRF10/ETV5, MAF, PRL, MTCH2, and PTER) were genotyped in 1,156 unrelated Mexican-Mestizos including 683 cases (441 obese class I/II and 242 obese class III) and 473 normal-weight controls. In a second stage we selected 12 of the SNPs showing nominal associations with obesity, to seek associations with quantitative obesity-related traits in 3 cohorts including 1,218 Mexican Mestizo children, 945 Mexican Mestizo adults, and 543 Indigenous Mexican adults. Results After adjusting for age, sex and admixture, significant associations with obesity were found for 6 genes in the case-control study (ADIPOQ, FTO, TMEM18, INSIG2, FAIM2/BCDIN3 and BDNF). In addition, SH2B1 was associated only with class I/II obesity and MC4R only with class III obesity. SNPs located at or near FAIM2/BCDIN3, TMEM18, INSIG2, GNPDA2 and SEC16B/RASAL2 were significantly associated with BMI and/or WC in the combined analysis of Mexican-mestizo children and adults, and FTO locus was significantly associated with increased BMI in Indigenous Mexican populations. Conclusions Our findings replicate the association of 8 obesity-related SNPs with obesity risk in Mexican adults, and confirm the role of some of these SNPs in BMI in Mexican adults and children. PMID:23950976

  1. Obesity prevalence among low-income, preschool-aged children - United States, 1998-2008.

    PubMed

    2009-07-24

    Childhood obesity continues to be a leading public health concern that disproportionately affects low-income and minority children. Children who are obese in their preschool years are more likely to be obese in adolescence and adulthood and to develop diabetes, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, asthma, and sleep apnea. One of the Healthy People 2010 objectives (19-3) is to reduce to 5% the proportion of children and adolescents who are obese. CDC's Pediatric Nutrition Surveillance System (PedNSS) is the only source of nationally compiled obesity surveillance data obtained at the state and local level for low-income, preschool-aged children participating in federally funded health and nutrition programs. To describe progress in reducing childhood obesity, CDC examined trends and current prevalence in obesity using PedNSS data submitted by participating states, territories, and Indian tribal organizations during 1998-2008. The findings indicated that obesity prevalence among low-income, preschool-aged children increased steadily from 12.4% in 1998 to 14.5% in 2003, but subsequently remained essentially the same, with a 14.6% prevalence in 2008. Reducing childhood obesity will require effective prevention strategies that focus on environments and policies promoting physical activity and a healthy diet for families, child care centers, and communities.

  2. Obesity as a Risk Factor for Urinary Tract Infection in Children.

    PubMed

    Grier, William R; Kratimenos, Panagiotis; Singh, Sabina; Guaghan, John P; Koutroulis, Ioannis

    2016-09-01

    Childhood obesity is a nationwide epidemic with an estimated 16% to 18% of children and adolescents qualifying as obese and another 21% to 24% considered overweight. Obesity has been linked to an increased risk of developing serious infections. Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project-Kids' Inpatient Database 2009 was queried to analyze national trends in patient encounters, specifically those listing patients as comorbid obese and then identified those with urinary tract infection (UTI) as primary or secondary diagnosis. Propensity matching was used to calculate risk for UTI in the inpatient obese pediatric population. A total of 86 638 pediatric hospital admissions were enrolled in the study of which 41 819 included the diagnosis of obesity, and a UTI was diagnosed in 2445 of the cases. In a propensity-matched sample, matched for age, sex, race, and diabetes mellitus, the risk of UTI was increased by 45% in obese females. Obese males did not have a significantly increased risk for UTI.

  3. Microbiological findings in prepubertal girls with vulvovaginitis.

    PubMed

    Sikanić-Dugić, Nives; Pustisek, Nives; Hirsl-Hećej, Vlasta; Lukić-Grlić, Amarela

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the study was to define the most common causes, symptoms and clinical features of vulvovaginitis in prepubertal girls, and to evaluate treatment success depending on the causative agent involved. The study included 115 girls aged 2-8 (mean 4.8) years, presenting with vulvovaginitis to the Outpatient Clinic for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology, Zagreb Children's Hospital, between September 2006 and July 2007. Medical history data were obtained from parents. Vaginal samples were collected for microbiological culture by using cotton-tipped swabs moistened with saline. All samples were referred to microbiology laboratory, where standard microbiological diagnostic procedures were performed. Selective and non-selective media were used. Of 115 study patients, 43 (37.4%) had received antibiotic therapy more than one month prior to their visit to the Clinic, mainly for upper respiratory tract infection. The most common presenting symptom was increased vaginal discharge usually noticed on the pants or diaper, found in 26 of 115 (22.6%) patients, followed by vulvar redness in 16 (13.9%), burning in seven (6.1%), itching in the vulvovaginal area in seven (6.1%), soreness in six (5.2%), odor in three (2.6%) patients, and two or more of these symptoms in another 50 (43.5%) patients. Fifty-nine of 115 children had normal clinical finding on gynecologic examination. Among the remaining 56 children, the most common finding was erythema observed in 19, vaginal discharge in ten, and a combination of discharge and erythema in 13 patients. Of 115 study patients, causative agents were isolated from vaginal culture in 38 (33%) cases. Of these, 21 grew group A beta hemolytic streptococcus, five patients Haemophilus influenzae, three Escherichia coli, two Enterococcus spp., and one each Staphylococcus aureus, Proteus mirabilis, and Streptococcus pneumoniae. Antibiotic therapy was administered in 31 of these 38 patients, except for those cases where intestinal bacteria and

  4. The effect of fasting hyperinsulinaemia on physical fitness in obese children.

    PubMed

    Molnàr, D; Pòrszàsz, J

    1990-05-01

    Treadmill stress testing was carried out according to the Bruce protocol on 14 non-hyperinsulinaemic and 11 hyperinsulinaemic obese children and on 43 age-matched controls. The obese groups were matched for body weight, body composition, physical activity and plasma lipid values. Body composition was calculated on the basis of four skinfold measurements. Exercise duration and physical working capacity corrected for body weight and lean body mass were decreased in the obese children (P less than 0.01). The hyperinsulinaemic obese children had lower physical working capacities (in absolute values and when corrected for body weight and lean body mass) than the non-hyperinsulinaemic obese children (P less than 0.05). The exercise period was not significantly different in the two obese subgroups. While fasting plasma insulin levels showed a significant negative correlation with exercise duration and relative physical working capacity in the obese children, the anthropometric parameters did not. It is suggested that the decreased physical fitness in obese children is further aggravated in those with hyperinsulinaemia.

  5. Impact of obesity on kidney function and blood pressure in children

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Wei; Cheung, Wai W; Mak, Robert H

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, obesity has become an increasingly important epidemic health problem in children and adolescents. The prevalence of the overweight status in children grew from 5% to 11% from 1960s to 1990s. The epidemic of obesity has been paralleled by an increase in the incidence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and hypertension. Results of several studies have demonstrated that obesity and metabolic syndrome were independent predictors of renal injury. The pathophysiology of obesity related hypertension is complex, including activation of sympathetic nervous system, renin angiotensin aldosterone system, hyperinsulinemia and inflammation. These same mechanisms likely contribute to the development of increased blood pressure in children. This review summarizes the recent epidemiologic data linking obesity with CKD and hypertension in children, as well as the potential mechanisms. PMID:25949935

  6. Naturalistic observation of the snack-selecting behavior of obese and nonobese children.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, T P; Walley, P B; Anderson-Smith, S; Drabman, R S

    1982-01-01

    No previous study has examined the snack-selecting behavior of children although information from such a study may be useful in preventing and treating obesity or in determining its etiology. To provide data on this behavior, male (n=190) and female (n=166) children were unobtrusively observed purchasing snacks in either of two movie theaters. The amount of soft drinks and snack foods that were selected was recorded, and the corresponding caloric values were determined. Ratings were also made for obesity and sex. No differences for obesity or sex emerged on the measure of amount of calories selected. The implications of these results for the treatment of obesity are discussed.

  7. Obesity

    MedlinePlus

    Morbid obesity; Fat - obese ... is because the body stores unused calories as fat. Obesity can be caused by: Eating more food ... use your BMI to estimate how much body fat you have. Your waist measurement is another way ...

  8. Gaps in Drug Dosing for Obese Children: A Systematic Review of Commonly Prescribed Acute Care Medications

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, Stevie; Siegel, David; Benjamin, Daniel K.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Approximately 1 out of 6 children in the United States is obese. This has important implications for drug dosing and safety, as pharmacokinetic (PK) changes are known to occur in obesity due to altered body composition and physiology. Inappropriate drug dosing can limit therapeutic efficacy and increase drug-related toxicity for obese children. Few systematic reviews examining PK and drug dosing in obese children have been performed. Methods We identified 25 acute care drugs from the Strategic National Stockpile and Acute Care Supportive Drugs List and performed a systematic review for each drug in 3 study populations: obese children (2–18 years of age), normal weight children, and obese adults. For each study population, we first reviewed a drug’s Food and Drug Administration (FDA) label, followed by a systematic literature review. From the literature, we extracted drug PK data, biochemical properties, and dosing information. We then reviewed data in 3 age subpopulations (2–7 years, 8–12 years, and 13–18 years) for obese and normal weight children and by route of drug administration (intramuscular, intravenous, by mouth, and inhaled). If sufficient PK data were not available by age/route of administration, a data gap was identified. Findings Only 2/25 acute care drugs (8%) contained dosing information on the FDA label for each obese children and adults compared with 22/25 (88%) for normal weight children. We found no sufficient PK data in the literature for any of the acute care drugs in obese children. Sufficient PK data were found for 7/25 acute care drugs (28%) in normal weight children and 3/25 (12%) in obese adults. Implications Insufficient information exists to guide dosing in obese children for any of the acute care drugs reviewed. This knowledge gap is alarming, given the known PK changes that occur in the setting of obesity. Future clinical trials examining the PK of acute care medications in obese children should be prioritized. PMID

  9. Impact of pubertal development and physical activity on heart rate variability in overweight and obese children in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Chen, Su-Ru; Chiu, Hung-Wen; Lee, Yann-Jinn; Sheen, Tzong-Chi; Jeng, Chii

    2012-08-01

    Child obesity is frequently associated with dysfunction of autonomic nervous system. Children in pubertal development were suggested to be vulnerable to autonomic nervous system problems such as decrease of heart rate variability from dysregulation of metabolic control. This study explored the influence of pubertal development on autonomic nervous system function in overweight and obese children and the concurrent effects of their physical activity. Eighty-four overweight or obese children and 87 normal weighted controls were recruited. Autonomic nervous system function was studied by measuring heart rate variability. Results showed that the overweight/obese children had significantly lower heart rate variability. Overweight/obese children in puberty had significantly lower heart rate variability which was positively correlated with their physical activity levels. In conclusion, overweight/obesity adversely affects the autonomic nervous system function of children especially during their pubertal development. Overweight/obese children should be encouraged to engage in physical activities during puberty to improve their autonomic nervous system function.

  10. [Obesity and metabolic syndrome in children and adolescents].

    PubMed

    Rosende, Andrés; Pellegrini, Carlos; Iglesias, Ricardo

    2013-01-01

    Obesity and the metabolic syndrome are closely related to the cases of cardiovascular disease; they are usually regarded as belonging to the adult population but are seen with increasing frequency in children and adolescents. There is evidence that atherosclerotic lesions occur most often in young people with obesity. The factors involved in this pandemic are manifold and range from genetic-biological to cultural changes. The family and the environment in which the child develops play a key role in the adoption of habits related to diet and physical activity. This problem does not respect borders and cultures but all countries are being affected, even more those of middle-income. State and Society as a whole can play a role oriented to modify this environment. The restriction on sales of unhealthy food and the fight against the sedentary lifestyle are urgently needed to be applied. The impact that these disorders will have in terms of cardiovascular disease, has not yet reached its true dimension. PMID:24152409

  11. Perspectives on Obesity Programs at Children's Hospitals: Insights From Senior Program Administrators

    PubMed Central

    Norwood, Victoria; Hampl, Sarah; Ferris, Michelle; Hibbeln, Trillium; Patterson, Kellee; Pomietto, Maureen; Hassink, Sandra

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The obesity epidemic has resulted in an increasing number of children needing multidisciplinary obesity treatment. To meet this need, pediatric obesity programs have arisen, particularly in children's hospitals. In 2008, the National Association of Children's Hospitals and Related Institutions (NACHRI) convened FOCUS on a Fitter Future, a group drawn from NACHRI member institutions, to investigate the needs, barriers, and capacity-building in these programs. METHODS: Senior administrators of the 47 NACHRI member hospitals that completed an application to participate in the FOCUS group were invited to complete a Web-based survey. The survey targeted 4 key areas: (1) perceived value of the obesity program; (2) funding mechanisms; (3) administrative challenges; and (4) sustainability of the programs. RESULTS: Nearly three-quarters of the respondents reported that their obesity programs were integrated into their hospitals' strategic plans. Obesity programs added value to their institutions because the programs met the needs of patients and families (97%), met the needs of health care providers (91%), prevented future health problems in children (85%), and increased visibility in the community (79%). Lack of reimbursement (82%) and high operating costs (71%) were the most frequently cited challenges. Respondents most frequently identified demonstration of program effectiveness (79%) as a factor that is necessary for ensuring program sustainability. CONCLUSIONS: Hospital administrators view tackling childhood obesity as integral to their mission to care for children. Our results serve to inform hospital clinicians and administrators as they develop and implement sustainable pediatric obesity programs. PMID:21885650

  12. Parental factors associated with obesity in children with disability: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    McGillivray, J; McVilly, K; Skouteris, H; Boganin, C

    2013-07-01

    The current literature on obesity in typically developing children shows that the family context, and specifically the way parents parent their children are major determinants of childhood obesity. The influence of these factors on obesity in children with disability, however, remains unclear. A systematic review of the literature was undertaken to identify the parental and parenting risk factors associated with obesity in children and adolescents with disability. Articles were identified through Medline, Academic Search Complete, PsycINFO, ProQuest, ISI, CINAHL, Cochrane and Scopus databases. There was no restriction on publication dates. The inclusion criteria were empirical papers that tested associations between parental and parenting risk factors and obesity in children and adolescents with intellectual and other developmental disabilities. Only 11 studies met the selection criteria and subsequently included in this review. Results suggest that obesity in children and adolescents with disability may be associated with socioeconomic status; parents' body mass index, perception and attitude towards their children's weight and physical activity; and levels of activity in both parents and children. Firm conclusions about these associations cannot be reached, however, due to mixed findings and methodological limitations of the studies. Recommendations for future research are provided. PMID:23527696

  13. Parental factors associated with obesity in children with disability: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    McGillivray, J; McVilly, K; Skouteris, H; Boganin, C

    2013-07-01

    The current literature on obesity in typically developing children shows that the family context, and specifically the way parents parent their children are major determinants of childhood obesity. The influence of these factors on obesity in children with disability, however, remains unclear. A systematic review of the literature was undertaken to identify the parental and parenting risk factors associated with obesity in children and adolescents with disability. Articles were identified through Medline, Academic Search Complete, PsycINFO, ProQuest, ISI, CINAHL, Cochrane and Scopus databases. There was no restriction on publication dates. The inclusion criteria were empirical papers that tested associations between parental and parenting risk factors and obesity in children and adolescents with intellectual and other developmental disabilities. Only 11 studies met the selection criteria and subsequently included in this review. Results suggest that obesity in children and adolescents with disability may be associated with socioeconomic status; parents' body mass index, perception and attitude towards their children's weight and physical activity; and levels of activity in both parents and children. Firm conclusions about these associations cannot be reached, however, due to mixed findings and methodological limitations of the studies. Recommendations for future research are provided.

  14. Ability to control persistent asthma in obese versus non-obese children enrolled in an asthma-specific disease management program (breathmobile).

    PubMed

    Kwong, K Y; Rhandhawa, I; Saxena, J; Morphew, T; Jones, C A

    2006-11-01

    To determine if asthma control was more difficult to achieve in obese versus non-obese asthmatic children, retrospective analysis was performed on obese and non-obese Los Angeles inner-city children (2 to 18 years of age) with persistent asthma. No difference in time required to achieve control of asthma, ability to maintain control of asthma, baseline pulmonary functions, and number of controllers prescribed was found between the two groups. We conclude that in a Los Angeles inner-city pediatric population, obesity is not a factor in the ability to control asthma.

  15. Prevalence of Obesity among Children and Adolescents in the United States and Canada. NCHS Data Brief. Number 211

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carroll, Margaret D.; Navaneelan, Tanya; Bryan, Shirley; Ogden, Cynthia L.

    2015-01-01

    About one-quarter of Canadian adults and more than one-third of adults in the United States are obese. Obese children are at risk of becoming obese adults and can experience immediate health consequences such as psychosocial stress, elevated blood pressure and cholesterol, and abnormal glucose tolerance. Monitoring trends in childhood obesity is…

  16. The Role of Obesity in the Development of Left Ventricular Hypertrophy Among Children and Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Brady, Tammy M

    2016-01-01

    Both obesity and hypertension have increased substantially among children over the last several decades. At the same time, mounting evidence has pointed to the role of these and other cardiovascular disease risk factors on the development of end organ damage such as left ventricular hypertrophy in children. While traditionally thought to occur in response to an increased afterload as in systemic hypertension, evidence demonstrates that obesity is associated with left ventricular hypertrophy independent of blood pressure. Both hemodynamic and non-hemodynamic factors contribute to the pathogenesis of obesity-related left ventricular remodeling. However, more contemporary research suggests that adiposity and blood pressure have a greater effect on left ventricular geometry when present together than when present alone. Normalization of left ventricular mass in obese hypertensive individuals requires achievement of both normotension and weight loss. Additional strategies are needed to promote the cardiovascular health of children, with greater emphasis placed on obesity prevention.

  17. The Role of Obesity in the Development of Left Ventricular Hypertrophy Among Children and Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Brady, Tammy M

    2016-01-01

    Both obesity and hypertension have increased substantially among children over the last several decades. At the same time, mounting evidence has pointed to the role of these and other cardiovascular disease risk factors on the development of end organ damage such as left ventricular hypertrophy in children. While traditionally thought to occur in response to an increased afterload as in systemic hypertension, evidence demonstrates that obesity is associated with left ventricular hypertrophy independent of blood pressure. Both hemodynamic and non-hemodynamic factors contribute to the pathogenesis of obesity-related left ventricular remodeling. However, more contemporary research suggests that adiposity and blood pressure have a greater effect on left ventricular geometry when present together than when present alone. Normalization of left ventricular mass in obese hypertensive individuals requires achievement of both normotension and weight loss. Additional strategies are needed to promote the cardiovascular health of children, with greater emphasis placed on obesity prevention. PMID:26700209

  18. Arsenic methylation capacity and obesity are associated with insulin resistance in obese children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hsiu-Chen; Huang, Yung-Kai; Shiue, Horng-Sheng; Chen, Liang-Sien; Choy, Cheuk-Sing; Huang, Shiau-Rung; Han, Bor-Cheng; Hsueh, Yu-Mei

    2014-12-01

    The goal of the present study was to compare the arsenic methylation capacities in elementary school and junior high school students in an area of Taiwan with low arsenic exposure, and explore the influence of both arsenic methylation capacity and obesity on insulin resistance in these children and adolescents using the HOMA-IR index. We recruited 303 elementary school students and 319 junior high school students in Taipei City from September 2007 to November 2011. Concentrations of inorganic arsenic (arsenite + arsenate), monomethylarsonic acid (MMA(V)) and dimethylarsinic acid (DMA(V)) were determined by a high-performance liquid chromatography-linked hydride generator and atomic absorption spectrometry. Insulin resistance was determined by HOMA-IR. Elementary school students had significantly lower inorganic arsenic percentage and a higher DMA(V) percentage than junior high school students. It seems that the former had better arsenic methylation capability than the latter. The HOMA-IR value was significantly and positively related to the sum of the urinary inorganic and methylated arsenic (TotalAs) concentrations and also the BMI Z score, with the regression coefficients (β) being 0.058 (p < 0.001) and 0.001 (p = 0.027), respectively. The higher BMI values and higher TotalAs concentration were associated with higher HOMA-IR values in children and adolescents in Taiwan. PMID:25241017

  19. Arsenic methylation capacity and obesity are associated with insulin resistance in obese children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hsiu-Chen; Huang, Yung-Kai; Shiue, Horng-Sheng; Chen, Liang-Sien; Choy, Cheuk-Sing; Huang, Shiau-Rung; Han, Bor-Cheng; Hsueh, Yu-Mei

    2014-12-01

    The goal of the present study was to compare the arsenic methylation capacities in elementary school and junior high school students in an area of Taiwan with low arsenic exposure, and explore the influence of both arsenic methylation capacity and obesity on insulin resistance in these children and adolescents using the HOMA-IR index. We recruited 303 elementary school students and 319 junior high school students in Taipei City from September 2007 to November 2011. Concentrations of inorganic arsenic (arsenite + arsenate), monomethylarsonic acid (MMA(V)) and dimethylarsinic acid (DMA(V)) were determined by a high-performance liquid chromatography-linked hydride generator and atomic absorption spectrometry. Insulin resistance was determined by HOMA-IR. Elementary school students had significantly lower inorganic arsenic percentage and a higher DMA(V) percentage than junior high school students. It seems that the former had better arsenic methylation capability than the latter. The HOMA-IR value was significantly and positively related to the sum of the urinary inorganic and methylated arsenic (TotalAs) concentrations and also the BMI Z score, with the regression coefficients (β) being 0.058 (p < 0.001) and 0.001 (p = 0.027), respectively. The higher BMI values and higher TotalAs concentration were associated with higher HOMA-IR values in children and adolescents in Taiwan.

  20. Obese parents – obese children? Psychological-psychiatric risk factors of parental behavior and experience for the development of obesity in children aged 0–3: study protocol

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The incidences of childhood overweight and obesity have increased substantially and with them the prevalence of associated somatic and psychiatric health problems. Therefore, it is important to identify modifiable risk factors for early childhood overweight in order to develop effective prevention or intervention programs. Besides biological factors, familial interactions and parental behavioral patterns may influence children’s weight development. Longitudinal investigation of children at overweight risk could help to detect significant risk and protective factors. We aim to describe infants’ weight development over time and identify risk and protective factors for the incidence of childhood obesity. Based on our findings we will draw up a risk model that will lay the foundation for an intervention/prevention program. Methods/Design We present the protocol of a prospective longitudinal study in which we investigate families with children aged from 6 months to 47 months. In half of the families at least one parent is obese (risk group), in the other half both parents are normal weight (control group). Based on developmental and health-psychological models, we consider measurements at three levels: the child, the parents and parent–child-relationship. Three assessment points are approximately one year apart. At each assessment point we evaluate the psychological, social, and behavioral situation of the parents as well as the physical and psychosocial development of the child. Parents are interviewed, fill in questionnaires, and take part in standardized interaction tasks with their child in a feeding and in a playing context in our research laboratory. The quality of these video-taped parent–child interactions is assessed by analyzing them with standardized, validated instruments according to scientific standards. Discussion Strengths of the presented study are the prospective longitudinal design, the multi-informant approach, including the

  1. Metabolic Rate: A Factor in Developing Obesity in Children with Down Syndrome?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chad, Karen; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Resting metabolic rate and its relation to selected anthropomorphic measures were determined in 11 male and 7 female noninstitutionalized children with Down Syndrome. Dietary analysis was performed to determine the children's nutritional status. Results have implications for the prevention and treatment of obesity in children with Down Syndrome.…

  2. Association of fasting insulin with serum lipids and blood pressure in Kuwaiti children.

    PubMed

    Moussa, M A; Shaltout, A A; Nkansa-Dwamena, D; Mourad, M; Al-Sheikh, N; Agha, N; Galal, D O

    1998-04-01

    To examine the association of hyperinsulinemia with the atherogenic risk profile in children, we studied the relationships of the fasting plasma insulin level with indices of obesity (body mass index [BMI] and sum of triceps and subscapular skinfold thickness [SFT]), body fat distribution (waist to hip ratio [WHR]), serum lipid, lipoprotein, and apolipoprotein levels, and blood pressure in a case-control study of 460 Kuwaiti prepubertal obese children aged 6 to 13 years matched by age and sex to 460 prepubertal non-obese controls. Obese children were ascertained in a representative cross-sectional study of 2,400 school children. Fasting insulin levels were positively correlated (P < .001) with serum triglyceride (TG) and very-low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) cholesterol levels and negatively correlated with high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol levels. No significant associations were observed between insulin and total cholesterol (TC), cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) or apolipoprotein A-I (apo A-I). Stronger associations of insulin levels with lipoprotein fractions were observed in obese versus non-obese controls. Obese children had a higher concentration of apo B and a lower apo A-I:B ratio (P < .001). Insulin and the insulin to glucose ratio increased with age in obese children, whereas there were slight changes in non-obese children. TG and HDL cholesterol levels and systolic blood pressure (SBP) were significantly different across insulin quartiles in boys and girls. We conclude that the fasting plasma insulin level may be used as a marker for the development of obesity-associated metabolic disorders and elevated blood pressure in children.

  3. Fast food intake and prevalence of obesity in school children in Riyadh City.

    PubMed

    Almuhanna, Monira Abdulrahman; Alsaif, Mohammed; Alsaadi, Muslim; Almajwal, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Childhood obesity has become a new challenge for healthcare providers. The issue is not limited to certain parts of the world; its prevalence is increasing worldwide. The causes of obesity are poorly understood and continue to be debated and studied. It is a multifactorial disorder which involves dietary, behavioral, environmental as well as genetic factors. The increased consumption of more energy-dense, nutrient-poor foods with high levels of sugar and saturated fats, combined with reduced physical activity, have led to high obesity rates among children. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of dietary intake on the occurrence of childhood obesity, and study other associated factors including the education, occupation and income of parents and the living status. Normal healthy school girls (n =196) and school boys (n = 85) between the age of 6- 15 were recruited for the study. We found that obesity among children in Riyadh City was significantly associated with fast food intake (p = 0.0280). It was also observed that 72.5% of the overweight or obese students consumed fast food at least 4 times/week, and the other 15.9% were taking fast food 1- 3 times/week, while only 11.6% of the same overweight or obese group did not consume any fast food/ week. Father's and mother's occupations were not significantly correlated to their children's body weight. The prevalence of childhood obesity is changing and increasing yearly and is attributed to the nutritional risk factors for the Saudi school-age children. It is interesting to know that most of overweight or obese school students belonged to the families of highincome. Parents must take necessary precautions for the diet of their children and should adopt healthy life style in order to prevent or manage obesity of their children. PMID:27493393

  4. An innovative summer camp program improves weight and self-esteem in obese children

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To determine the potential benefits of a residential summer camp to treat childhood obesity, 21 obese, multiethnic children (aged 11.4 +/- 1.4 years; body mass index [BMI] percentile 98.5 +/- 1.4; BMI z score 2.30 +/- 0.33) from a diverse socioeconomic background were enrolled in a 2-week summer cam...

  5. Perceptions of School Nurses regarding Obesity in School-Age Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moyers, Pamela; Bugle, Linda; Jackson, Elaine

    2005-01-01

    Obesity is epidemic in the nation's school-age population with African American and Hispanic children and adolescents specifically at risk. School nurses at elementary and middle public schools in the Missouri 8th Congressional District were surveyed regarding their perceptions of childhood obesity. School nurses supported preventive interventions…

  6. Does consumption of high-fructose corn syrup beverages cause obesity in children?

    PubMed

    Morgan, R E

    2013-08-01

    The consumption of high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS) beverages has increased since the 1970s. At the same time, childhood obesity is on the rise, causing children to be at risk of heart disease, diabetes and other diseases. Healthcare providers have attributed childhood obesity to the consumption of HFCS in the form of beverages. This article will look at the available research and determine if there is scientific evidence underlying the idea that sweetened soft drinks, especially those containing HFCS, could cause or contribute to childhood obesity. A thorough literature search was performed using the ISI Web of Sciences, PubMed and Scopus databases within the years 2006-2012. The search generated 19 results. The articles were screened, and six were deemed eligible: four systematic reviews and two meta-analyses. Two systematic reviews found that there is no relationship between consumption of HFCS beverages and obesity in children. The other two systematic reviews found possible links between HFCS and childhood obesity. The meta-analysis articles found that consumption of HFCS beverages can contribute to childhood obesity, and limitation of sweetened beverages may help decrease obesity in children. Available research studies demonstrate inconclusive scientific evidence definitively linking HFCS to obesity in children.

  7. Is it time for bed? Short sleep duration increases risk of obesity in Mexican American children

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cross-sectional studies show that sleep is related to childhood obesity. We aimed to examine the longitudinal impact of sleep on the risk of obesity in Mexican American children. We evaluated 229 Mexican American 8–10-year-olds and their mothers at base- line and at 12- and 24-month follow-ups. Slee...

  8. Keeping Children Active: What You Can Do to Fight Childhood Obesity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pica, Rae

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the author talks about childhood obesity and explores ways to fight this condition. The author shares some activities to get children moving to positively impact childhood obesity. These include: "Stand Up/Sit Down;" "Quick Clean-Up;" and "Get Ready Spaghetti."

  9. Children, Teachers, and Families Working Together to Prevent Childhood Obesity: Intervention Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stegelin, Dolores A.

    2008-01-01

    Obesity rates for children, adolescents, and adults continue to escalate in the United States and globally. Educators, health specialists, psychologists, and sociologists are studying the complex problems related to early obesity. Like other health problems, prevention and early detection are the most effective strategies. The causes and…

  10. Neighborhood context and racial/ethnic differences in young children's obesity: structural barriers to interventions.

    PubMed

    Kimbro, Rachel Tolbert; Denney, Justin T

    2013-10-01

    Numerous studies in the last ten years have investigated racial/ethnic disparities in obesity for young children. Increasing attention is paid to the influence of neighborhood environments - social and physical-on a variety of young children's health outcomes. This work identifies resource-based and community-based mechanisms that impede on the maintenance of healthy weights for young children in socioeconomically depressed areas, and shows consistently higher rates of obesity in more deprived areas. None of this work, however, has explored whether area deprivation or the race/nativity composition of neighborhoods contributes to racial/ethnic disparities in young children's obesity. Utilizing restricted geo-coded data from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study (Kindergarten) (N = 17,540), we utilize multilevel logistic regression models to show that neighborhood level measures do little to explain racial and ethnic differences in childhood obesity. However, living in neighborhoods with higher levels of poverty, lower levels of education, and a higher proportion of black residents is associated with increased child obesity risk after considering a host of relevant individual level factors. In addition, living in neighborhoods with a higher proportion of foreign-born residents is associated with reduced child obesity risk. Although well-intentioned childhood obesity intervention programs aimed at changing individual-level behaviors are important, our results highlight the importance of considering neighborhood structural factors for child obesity prevention.

  11. Does consumption of high-fructose corn syrup beverages cause obesity in children?

    PubMed

    Morgan, R E

    2013-08-01

    The consumption of high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS) beverages has increased since the 1970s. At the same time, childhood obesity is on the rise, causing children to be at risk of heart disease, diabetes and other diseases. Healthcare providers have attributed childhood obesity to the consumption of HFCS in the form of beverages. This article will look at the available research and determine if there is scientific evidence underlying the idea that sweetened soft drinks, especially those containing HFCS, could cause or contribute to childhood obesity. A thorough literature search was performed using the ISI Web of Sciences, PubMed and Scopus databases within the years 2006-2012. The search generated 19 results. The articles were screened, and six were deemed eligible: four systematic reviews and two meta-analyses. Two systematic reviews found that there is no relationship between consumption of HFCS beverages and obesity in children. The other two systematic reviews found possible links between HFCS and childhood obesity. The meta-analysis articles found that consumption of HFCS beverages can contribute to childhood obesity, and limitation of sweetened beverages may help decrease obesity in children. Available research studies demonstrate inconclusive scientific evidence definitively linking HFCS to obesity in children. PMID:23630060

  12. Racial/Ethnic Differences in Obesity Trends Among Young Low-Income Children

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Liping; McGuire, Lisa C.; Blanck, Heidi M.; May-Murriel, Ashleigh L.; Grummer-Strawn, Laurence M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Racial/ethnic differences in recent obesity trends have not been reported among young low-income children. The purpose of this study is to examine trends in obesity prevalence from 1998 through 2011 by race/ethnicity among low-income children aged 2–4 years. Methods The study was based on measured weight and height records of 29,040,851 participants of federally funded health and nutrition programs from 30 states and the District of Columbia, which provided data each year from 1998 through 2011. More than 80% of data were collected through the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children, and about 50% of eligible children were included. In 2014, joinpoint regression was used to identify the inflection years when significant changes in obesity trends occurred and piecewise logistic regression was used to examine annual changes in obesity prevalence before and after the inflection years controlling for age, sex, and race/ethnicity. Results The overall obesity prevalence increased from 13.05% in 1998 to 15.21% in 2003, and decreased slightly to 14.74% in 2011. The increasing trends among non-Hispanic white, non-Hispanic black, and Hispanic children began decreasing in 2003. Asian/Pacific Islander was the only racial/ethnic group with a continual decreasing trend in obesity prevalence from 1998 (14.34%) through 2011 (11.66%). Among American Indian/Alaska Native children, obesity prevalence consistently increased from 16.32% in 1998 to 21.11% in 2011, although the annual increases slowed since 2001. Conclusions The study findings indicate modest recent declines in obesity prevalence for most racial/ethnic groups of low-income children aged 2–4 years. However, obesity prevalence remains high. PMID:25891056

  13. Overweight and Obesity among Children: An Evaluation of a Walking Program.

    PubMed

    Zuraikat, Nashat; Dugan, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the prevalence of overweight and obesity among 5,158 school-age children and to evaluate the effectiveness of a walking program to encourage physical activity among children in Western Pennsylvania. According to the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), obesity in school-age children affects approximately 19% of children 6-11 years old in the United States (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention 2010c ). Data were collected over six years. The results of the study revealed the prevalence of obesity and overweight was higher than the national averages: 36% versus 20%. The results also revealed the walking program to be beneficial in reducing students' prevalence of obesity and overweight and keeping them moving.

  14. [Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in children: a new complication of obesity].

    PubMed

    Bocca, G; Stolk, R P; Scheenstra, R; Sauer, P J J

    2008-11-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) comprises a range of chronic liver diseases from simple steatosis to steatohepatitis and cirrhosis with liver failure. In children, NAFLD is mainly associated with obesity and metabolic syndrome, the results of an unhealthy lifestyle. Insulin resistance and free fatty acids play a key role in the pathogenesis of NAFLD. NAFLD can therefore be seen as a metabolic complication of obesity. Since the prevalence of obesity in Dutch children is increasing, the prevalence of NAFLD in children is expected to increase as well. Prevention of obesity and identification of children with an increased risk of NAFLD are important steps in preventing irreversible liver damage. Lifestyle changes aimed at improving insulin sensitivity through healthy food and sufficient physical activity are essential in the treatment of NAFLD. Pharmacological treatment may have additional value.

  15. Explaining overweight and obesity in children and adolescents of Asian Indian origin: the Calcutta childhood obesity study.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Arnab

    2014-01-01

    The present study was aimed to find out the prevalence of overweight and obesity and its associated factors among Bengalee children and adolescents in the Kolkata, India. A total of 1061 Bengalee school children and adolescents (610 boys and 451 girls) participated and were divided into three age groups: Group I = 8-11 years; Group II = 12-15 years and Group III = 16-18 years. Overweight and obesity were defined as: Overweight (between ≥85 th and <95 th percentile) and obesity (≥95 th percentile). Multivariate regression analyses (adjusted for age and sex) of body mass index (BMI) revealed that about 18% (R2 = 0.185) of total variance of BMI could be explained by monthly family income, participants think obese, consumption of too much junk foodstuffs, breakfast skip, extra consumption of salt, and computer hours. Sedentary lifestyles, including increasing fast food preferences may be responsible for increasing occurrence of pediatric and adolescent obesity in this population. PMID:24820988

  16. [Nutritional status of preschool children attending the Chilean National Nursery Schools Council Programs (JUNJI): assessment of the agreement among anthropometric indicators of obesity and central obesity].

    PubMed

    Gutiérez-Gómez, Yareni; Kain, Juliana; Uauy, Ricardo; Galván, Marcos; Corvalán, Camila

    2009-03-01

    Historically, the anthropometric assessment of nutritional welfare programs has been targeted to assess nutritional deficiencies based on weight-to-age and height-to-age indicators. Recently, given the increase on childhood obesity, it has been also recommended the measurement of indicators of obesity (i.e., weight-to-height) and central obesity (i.e., waist circumference). However, the agreement of these indicators in preschool children is unclear. The aims of this study were: (1) assess the nutritional status of children attending the Chilean National Nursery Schools Council Program (JUNJI); (2) assess the agreement between general and central obesity anthropometric measurements in these children. In 574 girls and 580 boys, 3.0 to 5.9 years old, we measured: weight, height, waist and hip circumference, and five skinfolds. We used the WHO 2006 growth standards to estimate Z-scores. We defined general obesity as WHZ or BAZ= 2, and central obesity as waist circumference > or =90 percentile of NHANES III. The participants were on average slightly shorter but considerably heavier and obese than the reference populations. Prevalence of general obesity was close to 16% with both indicators while prevalence of central obesity reached 15%. There was good agreement among general obesity indicators and central obesity indicators (Kappa = 0.6-0.7). In summary, we found a high prevalence of obesity and central obesity among Chilean preschool children beneficiaries of a welfare program. At this age, there was a good agreement among general obesity indicators and central obesity indicators. These results suggest that waist circumferences measurements should not be incorporated to the program.

  17. Bullying and Victimization in Overweight and Obese Outpatient Children and Adolescents: An Italian Multicentric Study

    PubMed Central

    Garrasi, Alessandra; Corciulo, Nicola; Driul, Daniela; Tanas, Rita; Fiumani, Perla Maria; Di Pietro, Elena; Pesce, Sabino; Crinò, Antonino; Maltoni, Giulio; Iughetti, Lorenzo; Sartorio, Alessandro; Deiana, Manuela; Lombardi, Francesca

    2015-01-01

    Objective Being overweight or obese is one of the most common reasons that children and adolescents are teased at school. We carried out a study in order to investigate: i) the relation between weight status and school bullying and ii) the relation between weight status categories and types of victimization and bullying in an outpatient sample of Italian children and adolescents with different degrees of overweight from minimal overweight up to severe obesity. Participants/Methods Nine-hundred-forty-seven outpatient children and adolescents (age range 6.0–14.0 years) were recruited in 14 hospitals distributed over the country of Italy. The participants were classified as normal-weight (N = 129), overweight (N = 126), moderately obese (N = 568), and severely obese (N = 124). The nature and extent of verbal, physical and relational bullying and victimization were assessed with an adapted version of the revised Olweus bully-victim questionnaire. Each participant was coded as bully, victim, bully-victim, or not involved. Results Normal-weight and overweight participants were less involved in bullying than obese participants; severely obese males were more involved in the double role of bully and victim. Severely obese children and adolescents suffered not only from verbal victimization but also from physical victimization and exclusion from group activities. Weight status categories were not directly related to bullying behaviour; however severely obese males perpetrated more bullying behaviour compared to severely obese females. Conclusions Obesity and bullying among children and adolescents are of ongoing concern worldwide and may be closely related. Common strategies of intervention are needed to cope with these two social health challenges. PMID:26606393

  18. Family-based Obesity Treatment in Children with Disabilities

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Callie L.; Irby, Megan B.; Houle, Timothy T.; Skelton, Joseph A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess the relative effectiveness of an interdisciplinary, family-centered, tertiary-care pediatric weight management program for the treatment of patients with and without cognitive disabilities (CD). Methods Retrospective analysis of the clinical database of a tertiary-care pediatric weight management clinic (N=453), extracting data from electronic health records including longitudinal change in weight status (BMI z-score) and frequency of attrition from treatment. Upon review of medical records, children enrolled in the treatment program were classified as having no CD (N=342) or CD (N=111). Results At baseline, there were no between-group differences in body mass index (BMI) or BMI z-score. After 4 months of treatment, 66% (299) of patients remained enrolled, and complete case-data was available for 219 children in final analyses. There were no statistically significant differences in attrition between the two groups (no CD vs. CD). Mean change in BMI z-score across all groups was −0.03 ± 0.13, p < 0.001. Change in BMI z-score was significantly greater among patients with cognitive disabilities (−0.07 ± 0.15) compared to those without disabilities (−0.03 ± 0.12) (difference: 0.04, 95% CI: 0.005 to 0.08, p = 0.029). These change estimates were observed after adjusting for processes potentially associated with attrition. Conclusions Children with CD treated in an interdisciplinary, family-centered obesity clinic had similar or better outcomes compared to peers without CD. This success may be attributable to the patient-centered nature of this behavioral weight management program, which focused on leveraging the unique strengths and capabilities of each individual patient and family. PMID:25748977

  19. [Consequences of obesity in children and teenagers: a problem that requires attention].

    PubMed

    Liria, Reyna

    2012-01-01

    Obesity is a worldwide pandemic and children are a vulnerable group. In America, it was estimated that in 2010, 15.2% of 18 year-old children could suffer from this. Obesity in children and teenagers has a negative impact on health and on the load of diseases at this stage of life, and later on in adulthood, having a negative impact on the economy of a country due to the rise of risks of chronic diseases, health expenses and indirect costs as a result of the disease. Peru is going through an epidemiological transition, with unsolved malnutrition problems and high child obesity rates (10% of children under five), thus being one of the countries with a higher increase of child obesity in recent years in Latin America. Childhood and adolescence are considered critical periods because eating habits and physical activity start at this point; and because most obese children and teenagers will maintain those habits until they reach adulthood. For this reason, it is essential to seek strategies and interventions that prevent overweight and obesity among children and teenagers in order to improve the health conditions of a country.

  20. Stigma, Obesity, and the Health of the Nation's Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Puhl, Rebecca M.; Latner, Janet D.

    2007-01-01

    Preventing childhood obesity has become a top priority in efforts to improve our nation's public health. Although much research is needed to address this health crisis, it is important to approach childhood obesity with an understanding of the social stigma that obese youths face, which is pervasive and can have serious consequences for emotional…

  1. Elevated Urinary T Helper 1 Chemokine Levels in Newly Diagnosed Hypertensive Obese Children

    PubMed Central

    Övünç Hacıhamdioğlu, Duygu; Zeybek, Cengiz; Gök, Faysal; Pekel, Aysel; Muşabak, Uğur

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Increasing evidence suggests that T helper (Th) cells play a significant role in the pathogenesis of hypertension. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of obesity and anti-hypertensive treatment on urinary Th1 chemokines. Methods: The study groups consisted of three types of patients: hypertensive obese, healthy, and non-hypertensive obese. Pre-treatment and post-treatment samples of the hypertensive obese group and one sample from the other two groups were evaluated for urinary chemokine: regulated on activation, normal T cell expressed and secreted (RANTES), interferon-gamma-inducible protein 10 (IP10), and monokine induced by interferon-gamma (MIG). In the hypertensive obese group, urine microalbumin: creatinine ratio was examined before and after treatment. We recommended lifestyle changes to all patients. Captopril was started in those who could not be controlled with lifestyle changes and those who had stage 2 hypertension. Results: Twenty-four hypertensive obese (mean age 13.1), 27 healthy (mean age 11.2) and 22 non-hypertensive obese (mean age 11.5) children were investigated. The pre-treatment urine albumin: creatinine ratio was positively correlated with pre-treatment MIG levels (r=0.41, p<0.05). RANTES was significantly higher in the pre-treatment hypertensive and non-hypertensive obese group than in the controls. The urinary IP10 and MIG levels were higher in the pre-treatment hypertensive obese group than in the non-hypertensive obese. Comparison of the pre- and post-treatment values indicated significant decreases in RANTES, IP10, and MIG levels in the hypertensive obese group (p<0.05). Conclusion: Th1 cells could be activated in obese hypertensive children before the onset of clinical indicators of target organ damage. Urinary RANTES seemed to be affected by both hypertension and obesity, and urinary IP10 and MIG seemed to be affected predominantly by hypertension. PMID:26831550

  2. Obesity

    MedlinePlus

    Obesity means having too much body fat. It is different from being overweight, which means weighing too ... what's considered healthy for his or her height. Obesity occurs over time when you eat more calories ...

  3. Self-esteem and quality of life in obese children and adolescents: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, Lucy J; Parsons, Tessa J; Hill, Andrew J

    2010-08-01

    Although an increasing number of children and adolescents are becoming obese, the psychological morbidities associated with obesity are not well established. Existing reviews report modest associations between obesity and global self-esteem. However, none have examined how this affects multi-component assessments of self-esteem and quality of life in young people with defined obesity. A literature search identified 17 self-esteem and 25 quality of life studies of cross-sectional, longitudinal or intervention design published since 1994. Child-completed and parent-proxy assessments were consistent in showing significant reductions in global self-esteem and quality of life in obese youth. Competences particularly affected were physical competence, appearance and social functioning. There were no clear differences in effects between children and adolescents, and evidence on gender and ethnicity was lacking. Competency improvements occurred in the presence and absence of weight loss, suggesting their value as intervention outcomes and the need for further investigation.

  4. Demographic and placement variables associated with overweight and obesity in children in long-term foster care.

    PubMed

    Schneiderman, Janet U; Arnold-Clark, Janet S; Smith, Caitlin; Duan, Lei; Fuentes, Jorge

    2013-11-01

    Overweight and obesity is a growing problem for children in foster care. This study describes the prevalence of overweight and obesity in an urban, ethnic minority population of children ages 2-19 in long-term foster care (N = 312) in Los Angeles, California. It also investigates whether demographics or placement settings are related to high body mass index. The estimates of prevalence of overweight/obesity (≥85th percentile) and obesity (≥95th percentile) were presented for gender, age, ethnicity, and placement type. Multiple logistic regression was used to examine potential associations between demographic and placement variables and weight status. The prevalence of overweight/obesity was almost 40 % and obesity was 23 % for the study population. Children placed in a group home had the highest prevalence of overweight/obesity (60 %) and obesity (43 %) compared to other types of placement. Within this study, older children (ages 12-19) were more likely to be overweight/obese than normal weight compared to children between 2 and 5 years old when controlling for gender, ethnicity and placement (OR = 2.10, CI = 1.14-3.87). These findings suggest that older age and long-term foster care in general may be risk factors for obesity. Child welfare agencies and health care providers need to work together to train caregivers with children in long-term foster care in obesity treatment interventions and obesity prevention strategies.

  5. Demographic and placement variables associated with overweight and obesity in children in long-term foster care.

    PubMed

    Schneiderman, Janet U; Arnold-Clark, Janet S; Smith, Caitlin; Duan, Lei; Fuentes, Jorge

    2013-11-01

    Overweight and obesity is a growing problem for children in foster care. This study describes the prevalence of overweight and obesity in an urban, ethnic minority population of children ages 2-19 in long-term foster care (N = 312) in Los Angeles, California. It also investigates whether demographics or placement settings are related to high body mass index. The estimates of prevalence of overweight/obesity (≥85th percentile) and obesity (≥95th percentile) were presented for gender, age, ethnicity, and placement type. Multiple logistic regression was used to examine potential associations between demographic and placement variables and weight status. The prevalence of overweight/obesity was almost 40 % and obesity was 23 % for the study population. Children placed in a group home had the highest prevalence of overweight/obesity (60 %) and obesity (43 %) compared to other types of placement. Within this study, older children (ages 12-19) were more likely to be overweight/obese than normal weight compared to children between 2 and 5 years old when controlling for gender, ethnicity and placement (OR = 2.10, CI = 1.14-3.87). These findings suggest that older age and long-term foster care in general may be risk factors for obesity. Child welfare agencies and health care providers need to work together to train caregivers with children in long-term foster care in obesity treatment interventions and obesity prevention strategies. PMID:23124799

  6. Obesity Prevention Programs in Children: Impact on Weight, Shape and Food Concern.

    PubMed

    Cinelli, Renata L; O'Dea, Jennifer A

    2016-03-01

    Childhood overweight and obesity have an estimated prevalence of 10 % globally. High body mass index (BMI) is a known major predictor of body dissatisfaction, problem eating, low self-esteem, bullying and poor social and health outcomes for children. Childhood is also a time when lifelong habits are established, and as such is a time where prevention efforts have a high chance of success if implemented appropriately. Obesity prevention in children also has the potential to create weight, shape and food concerns in children and as such programs should focus on the principle first, do no harm. This paper canvasses existing literature and intervention program data to make the following recommendations for effective childhood obesity prevention: Programs should be educative for both children and their parents, programs should be inclusive of the whole family, there should be a focus on health and growth, not weight, and parents, schools and children should all be involved. PMID:26842805

  7. Sensory Patterns, Obesity, and Physical Activity Participation of Children With Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    PubMed

    Lawson, Lisa Mische; Foster, Lauren

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is a public health concern for the population in general and for children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) specifically. The purpose of this study was to understand relationships between sensory patterns, obesity, and physical activity engagement of children with ASD (N = 77) sampled from a specialized community-based swimming program. This retrospective correlational study analyzed program data. Results show that almost half (42.2%) of the children were overweight or obese, and sensory avoiding behaviors were related to higher body mass index (BMI). Children participated in few formal and informal physically active recreation activities. Sensory seeking behaviors were associated with increased participation in informal activities, and higher BMI was associated with less participation in both formal and informal activities. Practitioners should consider sensory processing patterns and BMI when developing community-based programs to promote physical activity of children with ASD. PMID:27548863

  8. The effect of weight control on lipid changes in obese children.

    PubMed

    Epstein, L H; Kuller, L H; Wing, R R; Valoski, A; McCurley, J

    1989-04-01

    The effects of weight change on serum lipid changes were assessed in a sample of 56 obese children randomly assigned to family-based behavioral obesity treatment vs controls given no treatment. Fasting serum lipid levels, height, weight, and fitness were measured at program entry and after 6 months of treatment. Children assigned to treatment showed significantly greater relative weight and weight changes than children in the control group, and the weight changes were significantly related to reductions in fasting serum triglyceride and total serum cholesterol levels and increases in high-density lipoprotein serum cholesterol. Results after 5 years of follow-up available for a small sample of treated children showed that a change in relative weight and fitness from 6 months to 5 years was also associated with changes in the high-density lipoprotein level. These results suggest that weight control in obese preadolescent children may be associated with improvement in lipoprotein profiles.

  9. Perceived Parental Social Support and Moderate-to-Vigorous Physical Activity in Children at Risk of Obesity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brunet, Jennifer; Sabiston, Catherine M.; O'Loughlin, Jennifer; Mathieu, Marie-Eve; Tremblay, Angelo; Barnett, Tracie A.; Lambert, Marie

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Identification of factors that relate to physical activity behavior in children at higher risk for weight problems--namely, children with obese parents--is key to informing the development of effective interventions to promote physical activity and reduce obesity. The purpose of our study was to examine children's perceptions of…

  10. Metabolic Syndrome Based on IDF Criteria in a Sample of Normal Weight and Obese School Children.

    PubMed

    Quah, Y V; Poh, B K; Ismail, M N

    2010-08-01

    Metabolic syndrome was once reported only in adults but is now occurring more frequently in children. This study compared the incidence of metabolic syndrome and its components among normal and obese children using the 2007 International Diabetes Federation (IDF) pediatric definition for metabolic syndrome. Subjects comprised 78 school children aged 8-10 years, with 34 obese and 44 normal weight children. Body weight, height, and waist circumference (WC) were measured and body mass index was calculated. Clinical profiles measured included fasting blood glucose, triglyceride, HDL cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, total cholesterol, and blood pressure. Metabolic syndrome (MS) was defined using the 2007 IDF pediatric criteria. Obese subjects had a significantly (p< 0.001) higher mean BMI (26.0 ± 3.6 kg/m2) compared to normal weight subjects (15.1 ± 0.8 kg/m2). Only one obese subject (1.3% of subjects) had metabolic syndrome based on the IDF definition, but all obese subjects had at least one component of metabolic syndrome. In comparison, no normal weight subjects had metabolic syndrome and only 9.1% of normal weight subjects had at least one component of metabolic syndrome. The most common component was central obesity, observed in 43.6% of subjects having WC equal to or greater than the 90th percentile. In concurrence with central obesity as the core feature of the IDF criteria, WC showed the strongest correlation with indicators of obesity such as BMI (r=0.938, p< 0.001), fat mass (r=0.912, p< 0.001) and fat-free mass (r=0.863, p< 0.001). We conclude that the problem of metabolic syndrome is more prominent among obese children, although the incidence of MS as defined by the 2007 pediatric IDF criteria, is low in this population (1.3%). PMID:22691926

  11. Decreased response to inhaled steroids in overweight and obese asthmatic children

    PubMed Central

    Forno, Erick; Lescher, Rachel; Strunk, Robert; Weiss, Scott; Fuhlbrigge, Anne; Celedón, Juan C.

    2011-01-01

    Background The mechanisms and consequences of the observed association between obesity and childhood asthma are unclear. Objectives To determine the effect of obesity on treatment responses to inhaled corticosteroids in asthmatic children. Methods We performed a post hoc analysis to evaluate the interaction between body mass index (BMI) and treatment with inhaled budesonide on lung function in the Childhood Asthma Management Program (CAMP) trial. Participants were then stratified into overweight/obese and non-overweight, and their response to inhaled budesonide was analyzed longitudinally over the 4 years of the trial. Results There was a significant interaction between BMI and budesonide for pre-BD FEV1/FVC (P=0.0007) and bronchodilator response (BDR) (P=0.049), and a non-significant trend for an interaction between BMI and budesonide on pre-BD FEV1 (P=0.15). Non-overweight children showed significant improvement with inhaled budesonide in lung function (FEV1, FEV1/FVC, and BDR) during the early (years 1–2) and late stages (years 3–4) of the trial. Overweight/obese children had improved FEV1 and BDR during the early but not the late stage of the trial, and showed no improvement in FEV1/FVC. When comparing time points where both groups showed significant response, the degree of improvement among non-overweight children was significantly greater than in overweight/obese children at most visits. Non-overweight children had a 44% reduction in the risk of ER visits or hospitalizations throughout the trial (P=0.001); there was no reduction in risk among overweight/obese (P=0.97). Conclusions Compared to children of normal weight, overweight/obese children in CAMP showed a decreased response to inhaled budesonide on measures of lung function and ER visits/hospitalizations for asthma. PMID:21377042

  12. Influence of Body Composition on Lung Function and Respiratory Muscle Strength in Children With Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Costa Junior, Dirceu; Peixoto-Souza, Fabiana S.; Araujo, Poliane N.; Barbalho-Moulin, Marcela C.; Alves, Viviane C.; Gomes, Evelim L. F. D.; Costa, Dirceu

    2016-01-01

    Background Obesity affects lung function and respiratory muscle strength. The aim of the present study was to assess lung function and respiratory muscle strength in children with obesity and determine the influence of body composition on these variables. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted involving 75 children (40 with obesity and 35 within the ideal weight range) aged 6 - 10 years. Body mass index, z score, waist circumference, body composition (tetrapolar bioimpedance), respiratory muscle strength and lung function (spirometry) were evaluated. Results Children with obesity exhibited larger quantities of both lean and fat mass in comparison to those in the ideal weight range. No significant differences were found between groups regarding the respective reference values for respiratory muscle strength. Male children with obesity demonstrated significantly lower lung function values (forced expiratory volume in the first second % (FEV1%) and FEV1/forced vital capacity % (FVC%) : 93.76 ± 9.78 and 92.29 ± 3.8, respectively) in comparison to males in the ideal weight range (99.87 ± 9.72 and 96.31 ± 4.82, respectively). The regression models demonstrated that the spirometric variables were influenced by all body composition variables. Conclusion Children with obesity demonstrated a reduction in lung volume and capacity. Thus, anthropometric and body composition characteristics may be predictive factors for altered lung function. PMID:26767078

  13. Identification of an obese eating style in 4-year-old children born at high and low risk for obesity.

    PubMed

    Berkowitz, Robert I; Moore, Renee' H; Faith, Myles S; Stallings, Virginia A; Kral, Tanja V E; Stunkard, Albert J

    2010-03-01

    This study tested whether children's eating behavior and parental feeding prompts during a laboratory test meal differ among children born at high risk (HR) or low risk (LR) for obesity and are associated with excess child weight gain. At 4 years of age, 32 HR children (mean maternal prepregnancy BMI = 30.4 kg/m(2)) and 29 LR children (maternal BMI = 19.6 kg/m(2)) consumed a test meal in which their eating behavior was assessed, including rate of caloric consumption, mouthfuls/min, and requests for food. Parental prompts for the child to eat also were measured at year 4, and child body composition was measured at ages 4 and 6 years. T-tests, and logistic and multiple regression analyses tested study aims. Results indicated that HR and LR children did not differ in eating rate or parental feeding prompts. Greater maternal BMI, child mouthfuls of food/min, and total caloric intake/min during the test meal predicted an increased risk of being overweight or obese at age 6, whereas greater active mealtime was associated with a reduced risk of being overweight or obese. Regression analyses indicated that only mouthfuls of food/min predicted changes in BMI from 4 to 6 years, and mouthfuls of food/min and gender predicted 2-year changes in sum of skinfolds and total body fat. Thus, a rapid eating style, characterized by increased mouthfuls of food/min, may be a behavioral marker for the development of childhood obesity. PMID:19779474

  14. SGA Children in Pediatric Primary Care

    PubMed Central

    Gallo, Patrizia; Cioffi, Luigi; Limauro, Raffaele; Farris, Evelina; Bianco, Vincenzo; Sassi, Roberto; De Giovanni, Maria; Gallo, Valeria; D’Onofrio, Antonietta; Di Maio, Salvatore

    2016-01-01

    Background: Epidemiologic evidences suggest a strong association between low birth weight and some diseases in adult life ( hypertension, diabetes, cardiovascular diseases).Aim of this study was to evaluate the obesity/overweight prevalence in a population of children born small for gestation age, SGA children 400, 208 males and 192 females compared to a population of children born appropriate for gestational age 6818 AGA children, 3502 males and 3316 females, during childhood. Our intention was also to build the natural history of weight gain during prepubertal age in children born SGA and AGA. Design and Methods: Observational prospective longitudinal study. We followed our patients from January2001 up to December 2010; weight, height and body mass index (BMI) were evaluated in all the SGA and AGA children. BMI z-score range for defining overweight and obesity was, respectively, 1.13 to 1.7 and >1.7 according to CDC growth charts. Results: In transversal evaluation, we prove that 10-year-old SGA females are twice obese and more overweight compared to equal age AGA females. In longitudinal evaluation, we highlight different observations: SGA children obese at 2 years are still obese at 10 years; the number of obese SGA children increases gradually until the age of 10; AGA children, appear to be less obese than SGA children at 10 years. Conclusion: SGA males and females are more obese at 5 and 10 years compared to the AGA population. Primary care pediatricians, through early detection of the children at risk, can carry out an effective obesity prevention project in SGA children. PMID:27583297

  15. Prevalence and Trends of Obesity among Chinese Korean Nationality Children and Adolescents, 1991–2010

    PubMed Central

    ZHAO, Chunhua; MA, Yana; PAN, Chenwei; CHEN, Xing; SUN, Hongpeng

    2016-01-01

    Background: Obesity has become a serious problem for Chinese Han nationality. This research aimed to evaluate the prevalence of and trends in obesity among Chinese Korean nationality children and adolescents (1991–2010). Methods: We used data from Chinese National Surveys on Students’ Constitution and Health (CNSSCH). CNSSCH was utilized to monitor Chinese students’ health condition and released its data every 5 yr (1991, 1995, 2000, 2005 and 2010). The standard weight-for-height was the 80th percentile for sex- and age-specific growth charts based on the 1985 CNSSCH data. Obesity was defined as ≧120% of standard weight-for-height. Results: The total age-adjusted prevalence of obesity was 15.9% (95% confidence interval (CI), 14.9–16.9%) among Chinese Korean children and adolescents aged 7 to 18 yr. Children or adolescents who were boys (Rate ratios (RR), 1.35; 95% CI, 1.19–1.53) or aged 10–12 (RR, 1.38; 95% CI, 1.17–1.63) were more likely to be obese. The trend analysis of the 19-yr period implied a serious annual increasing trend during 1991–2000 (RR, 1.05; 95% CI, 1.02–1.07) and during 2000–2010 (RR,, 1.12; 95% CI, 1.11–1.13). Chinese Korean children may also be more likely to become obese than Han nationality children during 1991–2010. Conclusion: A serious and continuous increasing trend was in the prevalence of obesity among Chinese Korean children and adolescents during 1991–2010. Childhood obesity had become a serious problem. This prognosis is worrisome.

  16. Prevalence and Trends of Obesity among Chinese Korean Nationality Children and Adolescents, 1991–2010

    PubMed Central

    ZHAO, Chunhua; MA, Yana; PAN, Chenwei; CHEN, Xing; SUN, Hongpeng

    2016-01-01

    Background: Obesity has become a serious problem for Chinese Han nationality. This research aimed to evaluate the prevalence of and trends in obesity among Chinese Korean nationality children and adolescents (1991–2010). Methods: We used data from Chinese National Surveys on Students’ Constitution and Health (CNSSCH). CNSSCH was utilized to monitor Chinese students’ health condition and released its data every 5 yr (1991, 1995, 2000, 2005 and 2010). The standard weight-for-height was the 80th percentile for sex- and age-specific growth charts based on the 1985 CNSSCH data. Obesity was defined as ≧120% of standard weight-for-height. Results: The total age-adjusted prevalence of obesity was 15.9% (95% confidence interval (CI), 14.9–16.9%) among Chinese Korean children and adolescents aged 7 to 18 yr. Children or adolescents who were boys (Rate ratios (RR), 1.35; 95% CI, 1.19–1.53) or aged 10–12 (RR, 1.38; 95% CI, 1.17–1.63) were more likely to be obese. The trend analysis of the 19-yr period implied a serious annual increasing trend during 1991–2000 (RR, 1.05; 95% CI, 1.02–1.07) and during 2000–2010 (RR,, 1.12; 95% CI, 1.11–1.13). Chinese Korean children may also be more likely to become obese than Han nationality children during 1991–2010. Conclusion: A serious and continuous increasing trend was in the prevalence of obesity among Chinese Korean children and adolescents during 1991–2010. Childhood obesity had become a serious problem. This prognosis is worrisome. PMID:27648414

  17. Vascular Risks and Management of Obesity in Children and Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Jolliffe, Courtney J; Janssen, Ian

    2006-01-01

    Childhood obesity has reached epidemic proportions in many countries. Pediatric obesity is associated with the development of cardiovascular (CV) risk factors including type 2 diabetes, hypertension, dyslipidemia, and the metabolic syndrome. It is also associated with an increased risk of CV disease (CVD) in adulthood. Moreover, obesity and CVD risk factors in obese youth tend to track into adulthood, further increasing the risk of adult CVD. Consequently, the treatment and prevention of childhood overweight and obesity has become a public health priority. Proper nutrition and increased physical activity are the main focus of these efforts; however, few studies have shown positive results. Treatment options for obesity in youth also include pharmacotherapy and surgery. While pharmacotherapy appears promising, additional evidence is needed, especially with respect to the long-term impact, before it becomes a widespread treatment option in the pediatric population. PMID:17319462

  18. The role of uric acid in the insulin resistance in children and adolescents with obesity

    PubMed Central

    de Miranda, Josiane Aparecida; Almeida, Guilherme Gomide; Martins, Raissa Isabelle Leão; Cunha, Mariana Botrel; Belo, Vanessa Almeida; dos Santos, José Eduardo Tanus; Mourão-Júnior, Carlos Alberto; Lanna, Carla Márcia Moreira

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the association between serum uric acid levels and insulin resistance in children and adolescents with obesity. Methods: Cross-sectional study with 245 children and adolescents (134 obese and 111 controls), aged 8-18 years. The anthropometric variables (weight, height and waist circumference), blood pressure and biochemical parameters were collected. The clinical characteristics of the groups were analyzed by t-test or chi-square test. To evaluate the association between uric acid levels and insulin resistance the Pearson's test and logistic regression were applied. Results: The prevalence of insulin resistance was 26.9%. The anthropometric variables, systolic and diastolic blood pressure and biochemical variables were significantly higher in the obese group (p<0.001), except for the high-density-lipoprotein cholesterol. There was a positive and significant correlation between anthropometric variables and uric acid with HOMA-IR in the obese and in the control groups, which was higher in the obese group and in the total sample. The logistic regression model that included age, gender and obesity, showed an odds ratio of uric acid as a variable associated with insulin resistance of 1.91 (95%CI 1.40-2.62; p<−0.001). Conclusions: The increase in serum uric acid showed a positive statistical correlation with insulin resistance and it is associated with and increased risk of insulin resistance in obese children and adolescents. PMID:26300523

  19. Obesity prevalence estimates in a Canadian regional population of preschool children using variant growth references

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Childhood obesity is a public health problem in Canada. Accurate measurement of a health problem is crucial in defining its burden. The objective of this study is to compare the prevalence estimates of overweight and obesity in preschool children using three growth references. Methods Weights and heights were measured on 1026 preschool children born in Newfoundland and Labrador (NL), Canada, and body mass index calculated. The prevalence of overweight and obesity was determined and statistical comparisons conducted among the three growth references; the Centres for Disease Control (CDC), the International Obesity Task Force (IOTF) and the World Health Organization (WHO). Results CDC and IOTF produced similar estimates of the prevalence of overweight, 19.1% versus 18.2% while the WHO reported a higher prevalence 26.7% (p < .001). The CDC classified twice as many children as obese compared to the IOTF 16.6% versus 8.3% (p < .001) and a third more than the WHO 16.6% versus 11.3% (p < .01). There was variable level of agreement between methods. Conclusions The CDC reported a much higher prevalence of obesity compared to the other references. The prevalence of childhood obesity is dependent on the growth reference used. PMID:21356057

  20. Community participatory physical activity intervention targets children at high risk for obesity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This community participatory research evaluated the feasibility of a summer soccer and nutrition education program to increase physical activity (PA) in rural Mississippi Delta children at high risk of obesity and previously not exposed to soccer. Children aged 4-12 were recruited through school and...

  1. An innovative summer camp program improves weight and self-esteem in obese children

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Obese children benefit from structured life-style changes and need help with self-esteem, which is lower when compared to normal-weight children. Summer camp might offer an opportunity to achieve a healthy lifestyle and to improve weight and self-esteem. he objective is to determine the effectivenes...

  2. Physical Activity Levels of Non-Overweight, Overweight, and Obese Children during Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pathare, Neeti; Piche, Kelly; Nicosia, Andrea; Haskvitz, Esther

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine physical activity (PA) levels of young children classified by body mass index (BMI) (non-overweight, overweight, and obese) during physical education classes. Method: Participants included 82 children (45 boys, 37 girls; 7.5 ± 1.2 years). PA was determined by the number of steps measured with…

  3. Interrelation between obesity, oral health and life-style factors among Turkish school children.

    PubMed

    Cinar, Ayse Basak; Murtomaa, Heikki

    2011-04-01

    Obesity, dental caries and periodontal diseases are among major public health concerns which may affect children's growth and development. This study seeks any clustering between obesity, oral health and life-style factors among school children in Istanbul, Turkey. A cross-sectional study of children, 10- to 12-year-olds, from a public and a private school was undertaken with questionnaires for children and their mothers and child oral health data, in Istanbul (n = 611). DMFS (number of decayed, missing and filled surfaces of permanent teeth), CPI (Community Periodontal Index), body mass index (BMI) and life-style factors (tooth-brushing frequency, milk consumption at breakfast and bedtimes on school nights) of children were examined. Data analysis included factor analysis, Student's t test and Chi-square tests by cross-tabulation. Public school children were more dentally diseased but less obese than were those in private school (P < 0.001). They more frequently had calculus (62%) and reported non-recommended tooth-brushing (68%) than did those in private school (37%, 56%; P < 0.05). Principal component analysis revealed that DMFS, CPI and BMI shared the same cluster among all children. A need exists for addressing obesity, oral health and nutrition jointly in health promotion strategies to improve children's well-being and empower good life-style factors.

  4. Risk Factors Associated with Obesity in Children of Different Racial Backgrounds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Urrutia-Rojas, Ximena; Ahmad, Naveed; Bayona, Manuel; Bae, Sejong; Rivers, Patrick A; Singh, Karan P

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study is to determine specific risk factors associated with obesity among African American, Hispanic and Caucasian children. Design: This is a cross-sectional study conducted on 1076 fifth grade children from 17 elementary schools at Fort Worth, Texas. Data were collected through questionnaires and physical…

  5. Feasibility of an obesity intervention for paediatric primary care targeting parenting and children: Helping HAND

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The primary care setting offers the opportunity to reach children and parents to encourage healthy lifestyle behaviours, and improve weight status among children. Our objective was to test the feasibility of Helping HAND (Healthy Activity and Nutrition Directions), an obesity intervention for 5- to...

  6. Linking Obesity and Activity Level with Children's Television and Video Game Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vandewater, Elizabeth A.; Shim, Mi-suk; Caplovitz, Allison G.

    2004-01-01

    This study examined the links between childhood obesity, activity participation and television and video game use in a nationally representative sample of children (N=2831) ages 1-12 using age-normed body mass index (BMI) ratings. Results indicated that while television use was not related to children's weight status, video game use was. Children…

  7. Prevalence and Health Correlates of Overweight and Obesity in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    PubMed

    Dreyer Gillette, Meredith L; Borner, Kelsey B; Nadler, Cy B; Poppert, Katrina M; Odar Stough, Cathleen; Swinburne Romine, Rebecca; Davis, Ann M

    2015-09-01

    Children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) may be at increased risk for overweight and obesity, but little information is known about correlates of overweight and obesity in this population. This study compared prevalence rates of parent-reported overweight and obesity and specific health behaviors (i.e., parent report of child sleep, family meal patterns, child screen time, and child physical activity) among children with ASD (N = more than 900 [weighted to represent 690,000; age 10-17]) compared with children without ASD using data from a nationally representative sample. Additionally, the relationship between specific health behaviors (i.e., child sleep, family meals, screen time, and physical activity) and weight status was examined in the ASD population. Data were from the National Survey of Children's Health 2011-2012. Results indicate that children with ASD were more likely to be obese but not more likely to be overweight than non-ASD youth. Children with ASD engaged in physical activity less than children without ASD, but no differences were found on sleep, most measures of screen time, and mealtimes. However, parent perceived poorer sleep was associated with increased weight status, and fewer family meals were associated with normal weight status among children with ASD.

  8. Outcomes of a pilot obesity prevention plus intervention targeting children and parenting practices

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Prevention-Plus interventions for primary care offer a venue to intervene with both children and parents for child obesity treatment. Such interventions can promote effective parenting practices that encourage healthy eating, physical activity (PA), and lower TV use among children. Test for feasibil...

  9. Evaluation of treatment effects in obese children with co-morbid medical or psychiatric conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The need for effective treatments for pediatric overweight is well known. We evaluated the applicability of an evidence-based treatment in an applied clinic setting that includes children with severe obesity and comorbid medical or psychiatric conditions. Forty-eight overweight children and their fa...

  10. Obesity and Motor Coordination Ability in Taiwanese Children with and without Developmental Coordination Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhu, Yi-Ching; Wu, Sheng K.; Cairney, John

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the associations between obesity and motor coordination ability in Taiwanese children with and without developmental coordination disorder (DCD). 2029 children (1078 boys, 951 girls) aged nine to ten years were chosen randomly from 14 elementary schools across Taiwan. We used bioelectrical impedance…

  11. Wheezing, Sleeping, and Worrying: The Hidden Risks of Asthma and Obesity in School-Age Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fiese, Barbara H.; Everhart, Robin S.; Wildenger, Leah

    2009-01-01

    The present study investigated the co-occurrence of asthma and obesity in a sample of 193 children (mean age = 7.76 years). Specifically, this study was interested in delineating the associated comorbidities of internalizing symptoms and sleep disruptions among younger (younger than 7 years) and older elementary age children with asthma who were…

  12. Food Insecurity Increases the Odds of Obesity Among Young Hispanic Children.

    PubMed

    Papas, Mia A; Trabulsi, Jillian C; Dahl, Alicia; Dominick, Gregory

    2016-10-01

    Obesity is a growing public health concern and is more prevalent among low-income and minority populations. Food insecurity may increase the odds of obesity in children. We investigated the association between food insecurity and obesity among low-income, Hispanic, mother-child dyads (n = 74). The United States Department of Agriculture 18-item Household Food Security Survey was used to determine food security status. The majority of households were food insecure (74 %) and one-third (30 %) of children were obese. Food insecurity increased the odds of childhood obesity (OR 10.2; 95 % CI 1.2, 85.5) with stronger associations found within households where mothers were also overweight/obese compared to normal weight (p-for interaction < 0.05). Rates of household food insecurity and childhood obesity were high among this low-income Hispanic sample. Future studies should elucidate the mechanisms through which food insecurity impacts childhood obesity.

  13. Obesity-promoting factors in Mexican children and adolescents: challenges and opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Aceves-Martins, Magaly; Llauradó, Elisabet; Tarro, Lucia; Solà, Rosa; Giralt, Montse

    2016-01-01

    Background Mexico is a developing country with one of the highest youth obesity rates worldwide; >34% of children and adolescents between 5 and 19 years of age are overweight or obese. Objectives The current review seeks to compile, describe, and analyze dietary conditions, physical activity, socioeconomic status, and cultural factors that create and exacerbate an obesogenic environment among Mexican youth. Design A narrative review was performed using PubMed and the Cochrane Library databases, as well as grey literature data from the Mexican government, academics, and statistical reports from nongovernmental organizations, included in electronic formats. Results The recent socioeconomic and nutritional transition has resulted in reduced healthy meal options at public schools, high rates of sedentary lifestyles among adolescents, lack of open spaces and playgrounds, socioeconomic deprivation, false or misunderstood sociocultural traditional beliefs, misconceptions about health, a high percentage of overweight or obese adults, and low rates of maternal breastfeeding. Some of the factors identified are exacerbating the obesity problem in this population. Current evidence also shows that more policies and health programs are needed for prevention of childhood and adolescent obesity. Mexico presents alarming obesity levels, which need to be curtailed and urgently reversed. Conclusions The present narrative review presents an overview of dietary, physical activity, societal and cultural preconceptions that are potentially modifiable obesity-promoting factors in Mexican youth. Measures to control these factors need to be implemented in all similar developing countries by governments, policy makers, stakeholders, and health care professionals to tackle obesity in children and young people. PMID:26787421

  14. Obesity and Bronchodilator Response in Black and Hispanic Children and Adolescents With Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Castellanos, Elizabeth; Thakur, Neeta; Oh, Sam S.; Eng, Celeste; Davis, Adam; Meade, Kelley; LeNoir, Michael A.; Avila, Pedro C.; Farber, Harold J.; Serebrisky, Denise; Brigino-Buenaventura, Emerita; Rodriguez-Cintron, William; Kumar, Rajesh; Bibbins-Domingo, Kirsten; Thyne, Shannon M.; Sen, Saunak; Rodriguez-Santana, Jose R.; Borrell, Luisa N.; Burchard, Esteban G.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Obesity is associated with poor asthma control, increased asthma morbidity, and decreased response to inhaled corticosteroids. We hypothesized that obesity would be associated with decreased bronchodilator responsiveness in children and adolescents with asthma. In addition, we hypothesized that subjects who were obese and unresponsive to bronchodilator would have worse asthma control and would require more asthma controller medications. METHODS: In the Study of African Americans, Asthma, Genes, and Environments (SAGE II) and the Genes-environments and Admixture in Latino Americans (GALA II) study, two identical, parallel, case-control studies of asthma, we examined the association between obesity and bronchodilator response in 2,963 black and Latino subjects enrolled from 2008 to 2013 using multivariable logistic regression. Using bronchodilator responsiveness, we compared asthma symptoms, controller medication usage, and asthma exacerbations between nonobese (< 95th% BMI) and obese (≥ 95th% BMI) subjects. RESULTS: The odds of being bronchodilator unresponsive were 24% (OR, 1.24; 95% CI, 1.03-1.49) higher among obese children and adolescents compared with their not obese counterparts after adjustment for age, race/ethnicity, sex, recruitment site, baseline lung function (FEV1/FVC), and controller medication. Bronchodilator-unresponsive obese subjects were more likely to report wheezing (OR, 1.38; 95% CI, 1.13-1.70), being awakened at night (OR, 1.34; 95% CI, 1.09-1.65), using leukotriene receptor inhibitors (OR, 1.33; 95% CI, 1.05-1.70), and using inhaled corticosteroid with long-acting β2-agonist (OR, 1.37; 95% CI, 1.05-1.78) than were their nonobese counterpart. These associations were not seen in the bronchodilator-responsive group. CONCLUSIONS: Obesity is associated with bronchodilator unresponsiveness among black and Latino children and adolescents with asthma. The findings on obesity and bronchodilator unresponsiveness represent a unique

  15. Lipoprotein lipase gene polymorphisms and risks of childhood obesity in Chinese preschool children.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li N; Yu, Qing; Xiong, Yan; Liu, Lin F; Zhang, Zhen; Zhang, Xue N; Cheng, Hao; Wang, Bei

    2011-10-01

    Childhood obesity is increasingly prevalent in the community and is related to many adult diseases. Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) plays a central role in dyslipidemia, and polymorphisms of the LPL gene may result in the disturbance in the lipid's metabolism. The aim of this study is to test the hypothesis that genetic variants of LPL and serum lipid levels are associated with the risk of childhood obesity. We genotyped +495T > G and PvuII T > C in an LPL gene and measured the serum lipid levels in a case-control study of 124 obese children and 346 frequency-matched normal controls in preschool Chinese children. The variant genotypes of LPL + 495GG and PvuII CC were associated with a significantly increased risk of childhood obesity [adjusted odds ratio (OR) = 2.39, 95% CI = 1.09-5.23 for +495 GG; adjusted OR = 2.00, 95% CI = 1.04-3.83 for PvuII CC], compared with their wild-type genotypes, respectively. In addition, compared with the lower serum level cut off by the control median, the higher level of serum triglyceride (TG) (>0.59 mmol/L) was associated with a 1.32-fold increased risk of childhood obesity, and the higher level of high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDLC) (>1.14 mmol/L) was associated with a 36% decrease in risk of childhood obesity. Furthermore, the median levels of TG were higher in obese children carrying LPL +495TT/TG and PvuII TT/CT genotypes than those in controls, the HDLC levels were lower in obese children carrying LPL +495TG and PvuII CT/CC genotypes than those in controls. In conclusion, the LPL gene +495T > G and PvuII T > C polymorphisms may modulate the magnitude of dyslipidemia in Chinese early-onset obesity.

  16. Factors influencing health-related quality of life of overweight and obese children in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hee Soon; Park, Jiyoung; Ma, Yumi; Ham, Ok Kyung

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify factors influencing health-related quality of life (HRQoL) of overweight and obese children in Korea. This study employed a cross-sectional descriptive study design. A total of 132 overweight and obese children participated in the study. Anthropometric measurements included body mass index, percent body fat, and waist-hip ratio. The instruments included lifestyle patterns, psychosocial characteristics (stress, self-esteem, and depression), and HRQoL. The study found that significant predictors of HRQoL included self-esteem, depression, and physical stress; these variables accounted for 58.7% of the variance (p < .05), while children with low monthly household income had significantly lower HRQoL, compared with that of their counterparts (p < .05). HRQoL has multiple dimensions, thus, in addition to lifestyle change, health programs for overweight and obese children should focus on psychological health, and consider social and environmental factors as well.

  17. Clustering of attitudes towards obesity: a mixed methods study of Australian parents and children

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Current population-based anti-obesity campaigns often target individuals based on either weight or socio-demographic characteristics, and give a ‘mass’ message about personal responsibility. There is a recognition that attempts to influence attitudes and opinions may be more effective if they resonate with the beliefs that different groups have about the causes of, and solutions for, obesity. Limited research has explored how attitudinal factors may inform the development of both upstream and downstream social marketing initiatives. Methods Computer-assisted face-to-face interviews were conducted with 159 parents and 184 of their children (aged 9–18 years old) in two Australian states. A mixed methods approach was used to assess attitudes towards obesity, and elucidate why different groups held various attitudes towards obesity. Participants were quantitatively assessed on eight dimensions relating to the severity and extent, causes and responsibility, possible remedies, and messaging strategies. Cluster analysis was used to determine attitudinal clusters. Participants were also able to qualify each answer. Qualitative responses were analysed both within and across attitudinal clusters using a constant comparative method. Results Three clusters were identified. Concerned Internalisers (27% of the sample) judged that obesity was a serious health problem, that Australia had among the highest levels of obesity in the world and that prevalence was rapidly increasing. They situated the causes and remedies for the obesity crisis in individual choices. Concerned Externalisers (38% of the sample) held similar views about the severity and extent of the obesity crisis. However, they saw responsibility and remedies as a societal rather than an individual issue. The final cluster, the Moderates, which contained significantly more children and males, believed that obesity was not such an important public health issue, and judged the extent of obesity to be

  18. Differences in home food and activity environments between obese and healthy weight families of preschool children

    PubMed Central

    Boles, Richard E.; Scharf, Cynthia; Filigno, Stephanie S.; Saelens, Brian E.; Stark, Lori J.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To develop and test a home food and activity instrument to discriminate between the home environments of obese and healthy weight preschool children. Design A modified questionnaire about home environments was tested as an observation tool. Setting Family homes. Participants Thirty-five obese children with at least one obese caregiver were compared to forty-seven healthy weight children with no obese caregivers. Main Outcome Measures Home observation assessments were conducted to evaluate the availability of devices supporting activity behaviors and foods based on availability, accessibility, and readiness to be eaten. Analysis Agreement statistics were conducted to analyze psychometrics and MANOVAs were conducted to assess group differences, significance, P < .05. Results Home observations showed acceptable agreement statistics between independent coders across food and activity items. Families of obese preschoolers were significantly less likely to have fresh vegetables available or accessible in the home, were more likely to have a TV in the obese child’s bedroom and had fewer physical activity devices compared to healthy weight preschoolers. Conclusions and Implications Families of young children live in home environments that were discriminatively characterized based on home observations. Future tool refinement will further clarify the impact of the home environment on early growth. PMID:23380192

  19. The effect of obesity on outcome of unrelated cord blood transplant in children with malignant diseases.

    PubMed

    Pine, M; Wang, L; Harrell, F E; Calder, C; Manes, B; Evans, M; Domm, J; Frangoul, H

    2011-10-01

    Obesity has become a pandemic, affecting both children and adults. We sought to determine the effect of obesity among 200 children who were prospectively enrolled on a multicenter cord blood transplant (CBT) trial. All patients received myeloablative preparative regimens. Children were classified into groups according to body mass index percentile. Normal weight was defined as body mass index between the 5th and 85th percentile (n=117), overweight between the 85th and 95th percentile (n=35) and obesity above 95th percentile (n=39) for age and gender. A total of 55 patients (27%) had AML, 113 patients (57%) had ALL and 32 patients (16%) had other malignant diseases. There was no evidence for a difference in all major characteristics among the groups. Time to neutrophil and platelet engraftment, TRM, risk of acute GVHD, disease-free survival and OS were not significantly different in overweight or obese patients compared with normal weight patients. There was a trend towards increased risk of chronic GVHD in obese patients (P=0.05) compared with normal weight patients. In conclusion, there is insufficient evidence from this sample that obesity has an effect on multiple outcomes after unrelated CBT in children with malignant diseases.

  20. A systematic review of the association between obesity and asthma in children

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Pei-Ching; Kieckhefer, Gail M.; Gau, Bih-Shya

    2013-01-01

    Aims To provide a comprehensive integration of contemporary studies focusing on the relationship between obesity and asthma in paediatric populations. Background The simultaneous increase in asthma and obesity prevalence has been widely discussed over the past twenty years. Although studies have discovered a positive correlation between the two, evidence-based findings are needed to develop nursing interventions. Data Sources An electronic database search was conducted for studies published between January 1966 - May 2011. Additional articles were identified through the reference lists of reviewed papers. Review Methods A quantitative systematic review was undertaken to aggregate evidence regarding the association between obesity and asthma in children. Inclusion/exclusion criteria and quality appraisal were applied to ensure research primarily designed to study the relationship between obesity and asthma in children was included. Results The majority of studies support a positive association between obesity and asthma in children. Among correlates recognized as important effect modifiers, gender was the most prominent, with obese girls more likely to have asthma diagnoses than obese boys. Scrutinization of covariates in selected studies revealed that most related to children's demographic characteristics and were inconsistent across the studies. Conclusions This review was designed to integrate contemporary scientific findings on the association between obesity and asthma by including a large number of studies with variant research designs. To identify high-risk groups and develop nursing interventions to help children affected by both epidemics, more interdisciplinary and well-designed investigations focusing on an expanded spectrum of correlates including demographic and behavioural factors are warranted. PMID:23560878

  1. Secular Trends in Overweight and Obesity among Urban Children in Guangzhou China, 2007-2011

    PubMed Central

    MA, Lu; ZHU, Yanna; MAI, Jincheng; JING, Jin; LIU, Zhaomin; JIN, Yu; GUO, Li; CHEN, Yajun

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background No studies have been reported on children obesity prevalence of Guangzhou, one of the most urbanized areas in China. This study tracks the secular trends of obesity prevalence of children. Methods The data were derived from the surveys on students’ constitution and health carried out by government. Randomly, 3832 students in 2007, 13141 in 2008, 14052 in 2009, 13750 in 2010, and 15225 in 2011, aged 7-12 years, from urban primary school were examined. Anthropometric parameters were measured in all students. Results The mean of body mass index increased significantly from 16.6 in 2008 to 16.8 in 2011 in the total group of children, and the total prevalence of overweight and obesity increased from 9.4 and 6.2 to 10.5 and 7.5 from 2007 to 2011, respectively. The minimum value of the mean body mass index and the overweight and obesity prevalence in the total age group all appeared in 2008. The prevalence of overweight and obesity in males was significantly higher than that in females in each year among the 5 years. Conclusion Although the prevalence of children obesity in Guangzhou in 2011 is still lower than the average values of Chinese large coastal cities, a significant increase was found in their prevalence from 2007 to 2011 and the total obesity prevalence of children is even higher than that of adolescent. Furthermore, we found that the minimum value of overweight and obesity prevalence of the total group and almost all gender-specific age groups appeared in 2008. PMID:26060774

  2. Calcium supplementation and weight bearing physical activity--do they have a combined effect on the bone density of pre-pubertal children?

    PubMed

    Ward, K A; Roberts, S A; Adams, J E; Lanham-New, S; Mughal, M Z

    2007-10-01

    The adaptation of bone to exercise has been shown to be modified by dietary calcium intake. The aim of this randomised controlled trial was to investigate whether there was a differential response to calcium supplementation in elite gymnasts and school children controls. The primary hypothesis was that gymnasts who took calcium supplements would have greater increases in cortical and trabecular volumetric bone mineral density (vBMD) at the radius and tibia. Secondary outcomes studied were changes in bone geometry at the radius and tibia and lumbar spine and whole body measurements. Children were randomised to 12 months daily supplementation of 500 mg elemental calcium (1250 mg (in the form of calcium carbonate salt)) or placebo. Outcome measures were assessed using peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT) (distal and diaphyseal radius and tibia) and dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) (lumbar spine and whole body). Eighty-six subjects participated in the trial (44 gymnasts, 42 controls) and 75 subjects completed the trial (39 gymnasts, 36 controls). Data were analysed by analysis of covariance adjusting for baseline value of bone parameters, age, height, gender and puberty, and delay between baseline measurement and start of intervention. The primary analysis was for a calcium-exercise interaction; a pooled calcium effect with no interaction was also tested. Results are presented as ratios (95% confidence intervals). At the distal tibia, trabecular vBMD showed a significant interaction (p=0.04), with controls (1.00: 0.99, 1.09) responding more than gymnasts (0.98: 0.94, 1.02) to supplementation. At the distal radius, change in trabecular vBMD was not significant (p=0.05). There were no differences in change in cortical vBMD at either site between the gymnasts and controls (tibia: p=0.82, radius: p=0.88). For all other secondary outcomes at radius, tibia, spine and whole body no significant interactions were found. In conclusion, there was no beneficial

  3. Obesity Severity, Dietary Behaviors, and Lifestyle Risks Vary by Race/Ethnicity and Age in a Northern California Cohort of Children with Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Ford, Margaret C.; Gordon, Nancy P.; Howell, Amanda; Green, Cheryl E.; Greenspan, Louise C.; Chandra, Malini; Mellor, R. Grant; Lo, Joan C.

    2016-01-01

    Identification of modifiable behaviors is important for pediatric weight management and obesity prevention programs. This study examined obesogenic behaviors in children with obesity in a Northern California obesity intervention program using data from a parent/teen-completed intake questionnaire covering dietary and lifestyle behaviors (frequency of breakfast, family meals, unhealthy snacking and beverages, fruit/vegetable intake, sleep, screen time, and exercise). Among 7956 children with BMI ≥ 95th percentile, 45.5% were females and 14.2% were 3–5, 44.2% were 6–11, and 41.6% were 12–17 years old. One-quarter (24.9%) were non-Hispanic white, 11.3% were black, 43.5% were Hispanic, and 12.0% were Asian/Pacific Islander. Severe obesity was prevalent (37.4%), especially among blacks, Hispanics, and older children, and was associated with less frequent breakfast and exercise and excess screen time, and in young children it was associated with consumption of sweetened beverages or juice. Unhealthy dietary behaviors, screen time, limited exercise, and sleep were more prevalent in older children and in selected black, Hispanic, and Asian subgroups, where consumption of sweetened beverages or juice was especially high. Overall, obesity severity and obesogenic behaviors increased with age and varied by gender and race/ethnicity. We identified several key prevalent modifiable behaviors that can be targeted by healthcare professionals to reduce obesity when counseling children with obesity and their parents. PMID:26885385

  4. The importance of definition in diagnosing obesity: a review of studies of children in China.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shu; Binns, Colin W; Zhang, Yuexiao

    2012-03-01

    The prevalence of childhood overweight and obesity in China has increased in recent decades. However, studies reported from China use several different definitions and growth references, making it difficult to compare the rates of obesity from different regions. It also makes it difficult to establish the extent of secular trends in obesity and to make international comparisons. This article reviews the definitions of childhood obesity used in Chinese studies published over the past 10 years. The majority (79%) of the Chinese studies used a definition of >120% of the mean value of the National Center for Health Statistics reference population to diagnose childhood obesity. Only 7 studies (9%) conducted in China measured childhood obesity using age-specific and sex-specific body mass index (BMI) cutoffs, including International Obesity Task Force cutoffs, Centers for Disease Control 2000 and World Health Organization 2006 BMI curves, and Chinese BMI curves. It is important that a consistent and applicable definition is used and all studies accurately define the obesity with growth reference, cutoff criteria, sample selection, and age distribution. The use of sex-specific and age-specific BMI cutoffs should be considered when undertaking future studies of obesity in Chinese children.

  5. Obesity in preschool children: an intervention programme in primary health care in Singapore.

    PubMed

    Ray, R; Lim, L H; Ling, S L

    1994-05-01

    The Programme on Prevention and Management of Obesity in Preschool Children, aged three to six years, was implemented in 17 Primary Health Clinics in November 1991. The study sample comprised 1128 preschool children who qualified to enter the obesity register, using the defined criteria for obesity of 2 standard deviations above the normal weight for height and age. This group was divided into three categories, namely, mildly overweight (120% to below 140%), moderately overweight (140% to below 160%), and severely overweight (above 160%). The severely overweight category was referred to dietitians for follow-up management, while the other two categories were managed by the clinic staff through pre-planned nurse-conducted counselling sessions. In this paper, we analysed the first 1128 preschool children aged three to six years on the Programme with respect to their demographic characteristics; medical conditions; family history of obesity, diabetes, hypertension and ischaemic heart disease; number of siblings and parents' educational and occupational status. The Malay children showed significantly more severe grades of obesity compared to the Chinese and Indian children. A family history of obesity and hypertension among the three groups were significant (P < 0.001). After one year of follow-up with the intervention programme, the following were found: 40.4% (456) of the children improved in their obesity status and 20.2% (228) reached normal status. The severe, moderate and mild categories reduced from 6.3% to 5.9%, 29.3% to 23.2% and 64.4% to 50.7% respectively and was found to be statistically significant (P < 0.05).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7944246

  6. Effect of folic acid on homocysteine and insulin resistance of overweight and obese children and adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Dehkordi, Elham Hashemi; Sedehi, Morteza; Shahraki, Zohre Gholipour; Najafi, Reza

    2016-01-01

    Background: Considering the increasing trend of childhood obesity and subsequent burden of the disease in Iran and other countries and importance of early life intervention for achieving sustained effect on health of children and adolescents, this study aimed to investigate the effect of two different dose of folic acid on homocysteine (Hcy) level and insulin resistance of obese children. Materials and Methods: In this randomized, double-blind controlled clinical trial study, 60 obese and overweight children aged 5–12 years were enrolled. Selected obese children randomly allocated in two interventional (1 mg/day folic acid and 5 mg/day folic acid, for 8 weeks) and one control groups. Biochemical measurements including folic acid, Hcy, insulin and insulin resistance were measured between and within groups before and after trial. Results: In each group, 20 obese children were studied. The three groups were age and sex matched. After folic acid administration, mean of Hcy, insulin resistance and insulin decreased significantly in two groups which folic acid administrated with two different doses (P < 0.05). The reduction in studied biochemical variables was similar in two interventional groups (1 and 5 mg folic acid daily) (P > 0.05). Mean differences for Hcy, insulin resistance and insulin, in two intervention groups were significantly higher than the control group (P < 0.0001). Mean differences of Hcy, insulin resistance and insulin, in two intervention groups were not different significantly (P > 0.05). Conclusion: The findings of current trial showed that folic acid in two studied doses could be a safe and effective supplement for obese children to reduce Hcy level and insulin resistance, which consequently could prevent obesity-related complications including cardiovascular and metabolic disorders. PMID:27274503

  7. Obesity and Health Risk of Children in the Mississippi Delta

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gamble, Abigail; Waddell, Dwight; Ford, M. Allison; Bentley, John P.; Woodyard, Catherine D.; Hallam, Jeffrey S.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Mississippi (MS) Delta adults and youth report obesity rates far exceeding those of the state and nation. State law requires in-school physical activity and nutrition practices to address childhood obesity but does not require evaluation of outcomes, specifically the impact on weight-related outcomes. This paper offers 3 things: (1)…

  8. Obesity and Socioeconomic Status in Children and Adolescents: United States, 2005-2008. NCHS Data Brief. Number 51

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ogden, Cynthia L.; Lamb, Molly M.; Carroll, Margaret D.; Flegal, Katherine M.

    2010-01-01

    In 2007-2008 almost 17% of children and adolescents aged 2-19 years were obese. Childhood obesity often tracks to adulthood and, in the short run, childhood obesity can lead to psychosocial problems and cardiovascular risk factors such as high blood pressure, high cholesterol, and abnormal glucose tolerance or diabetes. Studies have suggested that…

  9. Obesity and Developmental Functioning among Children Aged 2-4 Years. National Poverty Center Working Paper Series #08-07

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cawley, John; Spiess, C. Katharina

    2008-01-01

    In developed countries, obesity tends to be associated with worse labor market outcomes. One possible reason is that obesity leads to less human capital formation early in life. This paper investigates the association between obesity and the developmental functioning of children at younger ages (2-4 years) than ever previously examined. Data from…

  10. Energy intake of Swedish overweight and obese children is underestimated using a diet history interview.

    PubMed

    Waling, Maria U; Larsson, Christel L

    2009-03-01

    Estimating energy intake (EI) of a child by using a diet history interview (DHI) method may be a challenge because of difficulty for the child to remember what has been eaten as well as to report portion sizes. The aim of this research was to validate reported EI from a DHI in children classified as overweight or obese by comparing the reported EI to total energy expenditure (TEE) measured by 2 objective measures. Eighty-five 10.5- +/- 1.1-y-old overweight and obese children, with help from 1 or 2 parents, reported their EI 2 wk retrospectively in a DHI. Reported EI was compared with TEE, as measured by SenseWear armband (n = 85) and the doubly-labeled water (DLW) method (n = 21), during the same period as the DHI. Reported EI was underestimated by 14% when validated against both the armband and DLW method. Underestimation did not differ between boys and girls. However, the EI of obese children was underestimated by 22%, which is twice the rate as for the overweight children (95% CI: 0.55, 3.08). Underestimated EI was negatively correlated with BMI (r = -0.38; P = <0.01) as well as age (r = -0.21; P = 0.05). EI is underestimated to a higher extent among children with higher BMI and higher age when using a DHI method. The findings show the importance of validating dietary intake of children in general and in overweight and obese children in particular.

  11. Obesity in question: understandings of body shape, self and normalcy among children in Malta.

    PubMed

    Martin, Gillian M

    2015-02-01

    Childhood obesity is a major public health concern in contemporary Malta. This article applies a critical realist approach to exploring body shape in young children, recognising fatness and obesity to be both a biologically and a socially constructed phenomenon. The agentic status of the child is central to the research design aimed at exploring understandings of body shape and how they impact on relational dynamics in the lived experiences of young children in Malta. Ethnographic methods were used in a school setting, working with children (n = 134) in two age groups: 5 and 10-year olds. The findings show a marked difference in the two groups. The obese 5-year-olds, buffered by robust protective strategies in their primary group, seem to be unaware of any difference in body shape. This situation changes in the older group where the fat body is stigmatised and obese children develop private coping strategies to deal with the physical disadvantages, taunting and exclusion by their peers. The data show that there is a culturally entrenched fluidity in the lay concept of obesity that impacts on the process of embodiment in young children and may have a lasting effect on body shape and weight.

  12. Neck Circumference as a Predictor of Adiposity among Healthy and Obese Children

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Nayera E.; Atef, Abeer; El-Masry, Sahar A.; Ibrahim, Amany; Shady, Mones M. Abu; Al-Tohamy, Muhammad; Kamel, Iman H.; Elashry, Galal Ismail Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Obesity, particularly in the upper part of body, is a major health problem. Because body mass index (BMI) does not adequately describe regional adiposity, other indices of body fatness are being explored. OBJECTIVES: To determine if neck circumference is a valid measure of adiposity (fat distribution) among group of Egyptian children. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: This is a cross sectional study, included 50 obese subjects, aged 7 - 12 years recruited from Endocrine, obesity and Metabolism Pediatric Unit at Children Hospital, Cairo University and 50 healthy children, age and sex matched. All children were subjected to blood pressure assessment (systolic SBP and diastolic DBP), and anthropometric assessment (body weight, height, neck circumference (NC), waist (WC) and hip (HC) circumferences, and skin fold thicknesses at three sites: biceps, triceps and sub scapular. BMI [weight (kg)/height (m2)] was calculated. RESULTS: In healthy females, significant associations were detected between NC and SBP, DBP and all anthropometric measurements. However, in healthy males NC was not significantly associated with BMI, SBP and DBP. In the obese group; both sexes; insignificant association was found between NC and SBP, DBP, BMI and skinfold thickness. CONCLUSION: NC is related to fat distribution among normal healthy female children. However, this relation disappears with increasing adiposity. The results do not support the use of NC as a useful screening tool for childhood obesity. PMID:27275287

  13. Delivery by caesarean section and risk of obesity in preschool age children: a prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Huh, Susanna Y; Rifas-Shiman, Sheryl L; Zera, Chloe A; Edwards, Janet W Rich; Oken, Emily; Weiss, Scott T; Gillman, Matthew W

    2013-01-01

    Objective To examine whether delivery by caesarean section is a risk factor for childhood obesity. Design Prospective pre-birth cohort study (Project Viva). Setting Eight outpatient multi-specialty practices based in the Boston, Massachusetts area. Participants We recruited women during early pregnancy between 1999 and 2002, and followed their children after birth. We included 1255 children with body composition measured at 3 years of age. Main outcome measures Body mass index (BMI) z-score, obesity (BMI for age and sex ≥ 95th percentile), and sum of triceps + subscapular skinfold thicknesses, at 3 years of age. Results 284 children (22.6 percent) were delivered by caesarean section. At age 3, 15.7% of children delivered by caesarean section were obese, compared with 7.5% of children born vaginally. In multivariable logistic and linear regression models adjusting for maternal pre-pregnancy BMI, birth weight, and other covariates, birth by caesarean section was associated with a higher odds of obesity at age 3 (OR 2.10, 95%CI 1.36 to 3.23), higher mean BMI z-score (0.20 units, 95% CI 0.07 to 0.33), and higher sum of triceps + subscapular skinfold thicknesses (0.94 mm, 95% CI 0.36 to 1.51). Conclusions Infants delivered by caesarean section may be at increased risk of childhood obesity. Further studies are needed to confirm our findings and to explore mechanisms underlying this association. PMID:22623615

  14. Physical Examination Findings Among Children and Adolescents With Obesity: An Evidence-Based Review.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Sarah; Lazorick, Suzanne; Hampl, Sarah; Skelton, Joseph A; Wood, Charles; Collier, David; Perrin, Eliana M

    2016-02-01

    Overweight and obesity affects 1 in 3 US children and adolescents. Clinical recommendations have largely focused on screening guidelines and counseling strategies. However, the physical examination of the child or adolescent with obesity can provide the clinician with additional information to guide management decisions. This expert-based review focuses on physical examination findings specific to children and adolescents with obesity. For each physical examination element, the authors define the finding and its prevalence among pediatric patients with obesity, discuss the importance and relevance of the finding, describe known techniques to assess severity, and review evidence regarding the need for additional evaluation. The recommendations presented represent a comprehensive review of current evidence as well as expert opinion. The goal of this review is to highlight the importance of conducting a targeted physical examination during pediatric weight management visits.

  15. Obesity and sedentarism in children and adolescents: what should be bone?

    PubMed

    Santaliestra-Pasías, Alba M; Rey-López, Juan Pablo; Moreno Aznar, Luis A

    2013-09-01

    Paediatric overweight continues to be a public health problem, and the etiology of obesity is multifactorial and complex. Dietary patterns, physical activity (PA) and sedentary behaviors are acknowledged as major behavioural determinants of obesity. New technologies and electronic based activities have produced a decrease in PA levels, and an increase in sedentary activities in children and adolescents. Potential mechanisms that explain the association between TV viewing and childhood obesity are: displacement of PA, unhealthy food preferences produced by food advertisements, a higher energy intake by automatic eating and overconsumption caused by distraction. Interventions aimed to reduce time in sedentary behaviours are in children generally positive. However, their benefits on adiposity markers are small. Thus, if global and macro-level obesogenic factors are not changed substantially, the interventions oriented to prevent obesity will produce small benefits.

  16. Impact of mother tongue and gender on overweight, obesity and extreme obesity in 24,989 Viennese children/adolescents (2-16 years).

    PubMed

    Segna, Daniel; Widhalm, Harald; Pandey, Maitrayee P; Zehetmayer, Sonja; Dietrich, Sabine; Widhalm, Kurt

    2012-11-01

    The present survey aims at determining the prevalence of extreme obesity (defined as a body mass index (BMI) ≥ 99.5th percentile) for the first time in Austria and at investigating the relationship between weight status and mother tongue in a representative Viennese sample of 24,989 children and adolescents (2-16 years) with a percentage of approximately 46 % of migration background.Directly measured anthropometric data on body weight and height were collected and BMI was calculated. Prevalence of overweight, obesity and extreme obesity was determined for every subgroup according to mother tongue using the German national reference criteria by Kromeyer-Hauschild et al.In this sample, 2.1 % of all children and adolescents had to be classified as being extremely obese. More boys (2.3 %) than girls (1.9 %) suffered from extreme obesity (p = 0.048). Total 1.7 % of children and adolescents with German as their native language, 2.5 % of Turkish native speakers and 2.9 % of children and adolescents with another mother tongue were extremely obese (p ≤ 0.001). The highest prevalence of overweight or obesity was found in Turkish-native-speaking children and adolescents (p ≤ 0.001), whereas the lowest one was found in German-native-speaking children and adolescents (p ≤ 0.001).This large study clearly shows that extreme obesity is a common disease and largely neglected. Apparently, another native language than German, as an indicator for a migration background, may be associated with a substantially higher probability for the development of extreme obesity in Vienna, Austria. Thus, effective preventive measures to overcome obesity are urgently needed.

  17. [Preventing Obesity in Children: Which Factors Impede and Which Facilitate the Parental Access to Prevention Programmes?].

    PubMed

    Warschburger, P; Kröller, K; Jahnke, D

    2015-09-01

    Preschool children of deprived obese parents are a risk group for the development of childhood obesity. The risk sensitiveness, perceived courses of action and barriers as well as motivational aspects of these patients for the participation in a prevention programme were analysed using focused interviews and questionnaires. Based upon the results, a target group-specific parent training was designed. A pilot evaluation study showed promising results.

  18. Effects of Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Obesity on Exercise Function in Children

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Carla A.; Selvadurai, Hiran; Baur, Louise A.; Waters, Karen A.

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: Evaluate the relative contributions of weight status and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) to cardiopulmonary exercise responses in children. Design: Prospective, cross-sectional study. Participants underwent anthropometric measurements, overnight polysomnography, spirometry, cardiopulmonary exercise function testing on a cycle ergometer, and cardiac doppler imaging. OSA was defined as ≥ 1 obstructive apnea or hypopnea per hour of sleep (OAHI). The effect of OSA on exercise function was evaluated after the parameters were corrected for body mass index (BMI) z-scores. Similarly, the effect of obesity on exercise function was examined when the variables were adjusted for OAHI. Setting: Tertiary pediatric hospital. Participants: Healthy weight and obese children, aged 7–12 y. Interventions: N/A. Measurements and Results: Seventy-one children were studied. In comparison with weight-matched children without OSA, children with OSA had a lower cardiac output, stroke volume index, heart rate, and oxygen consumption (VO2 peak) at peak exercise capacity. After adjusting for BMI z-score, children with OSA had 1.5 L/min (95% confidence interval -2.3 to -0.6 L/min; P = 0.001) lower cardiac output at peak exercise capacity, but minute ventilation and ventilatory responses to exercise were not affected. Obesity was only associated with physical deconditioning. Cardiac dysfunction was associated with the frequency of respiratory-related arousals, the severity of hypoxia, and heart rate during sleep. Conclusions: Children with OSA are exercise limited due to a reduced cardiac output and VO2 peak at peak exercise capacity, independent of their weight status. Comorbid OSA can further decrease exercise performance in obese children. Citation: Evans CA, Selvadurai H, Baur LA, Waters KA. Effects of obstructive sleep apnea and obesity on exercise function in children. SLEEP 2014;37(6):1103-1110. PMID:24882905

  19. [Effect of therapeutic exercise on physical fitness in a school health program for obese children].

    PubMed

    Suzuki, M; Tatsumi, M

    1993-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to determined characteristics of physical fitness in obese children, and to examine the effect of a diet-exercise program, developed in our laboratory, on the physical fitness of these children. To accomplish the first objective, a physical fitness test consisting of 11 items was administered on 126 obese and normal weight children (boys 83, girls 43) matched for age, sex, and stature. The children, 9-10 years of age, were pupils from 11 public elementary schools in Morioka, Iwate, Japan. To accomplish the second objective, 92 obese children participated in a study. The children were divided into experimental and control groups. Children in the experimental group (n = 50) participated in a diet-exercise program for three months, while children in the control group (n = 42) were left alone without taking part in the program. The results of this study are summarized as follows; 1. The obese children were found to be significantly inferior to the normal-weight children in fitness items such as standing long jump, pull-ups, sit-ups, step test, and total fitness scores. While no differences in lying trunk extension and standing trunk flexion for body flexibility were observed, the obese children were found to be superior to the normal weight children in static strength such as grip and back strengths. 2. The poor physical fitness of the obese children was found to be negatively affected by their excess body fat, rather than body weight, and that this trend was more pronounced for boys than for girls. 3. The intervention study clearly demonstrated that children in the experimental group improved in physical fitness for most items, especially in abdominal muscle endurance, aerobic capacity, and total physical fitness. 4. It was shown that the diet-exercise program, which comprised guidance on physical exercise and individual nutrition counseling was very useful, because the participants should decrease a considerable in percent overweight

  20. Relation of fat-mass and obesity-associated gene polymorphism to fat mass content and body mass index in obese children.

    PubMed

    Pyrzak, Beata; Wisniewska, Alicja; Majcher, Anna; Tysarowski, Andrzej; Demkow, Urszula

    2013-01-01

    Fat mass content, fat distribution, and fat-mass and obesity associated (FTO) gene have been reported among a broad spectrum of genetic variation connected with body weight. The aim of our study was to investigate whether the T/A rs9939609 polymorphism of the FTO gene may influence obesity and metabolic indices in children. A 160 children were examined (136 obese and 24 non-obese). The anthropometric measurements and calculations included: height, weight, waist and hip circumference, sum of the thickness of 3 and 10 skin folds, % of fat content, % FAT- BIA , % LBM-BIA. BMI, SDS of BMI, WHR, and WHtR. Fasting plasma total cholesterol (TC), HDL and LDL-cholesterol, triglycerides (TG), oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), and HOMA-IR were analyzed and the blood pressure were measured. The rs9939609 polymorphism of FTO gene was genotyped by allele-specific real-time polymerase chain- reaction (RT-PCR). We found that the mean concentrations of TC, TG, LDLC, and HOMA-IR were significantly higher, and HDL was lower in the obese than in non-obese children. The presence of TT, but not AA alleles, related to the percentage of fat content, BMI, and z-score of BMI. None of the other anthropometric indices did differ between the children with gene polymorphism and wild homozygous. In conclusion, rs9939609 polymorphism in the fat-mass and obesity-associated gene is associated with BMI and the percent of fat content in children.

  1. Prevalence and differentials of overweight and obesity in preschool children in Sub-Saharan Africa

    PubMed Central

    Gebremedhin, Samson

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine the prevalence and differentials of overweight/obesity (body mass index (BMI)-for-age z-score >2) in preschool children in Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). Design Cross-sectional study. Setting The study was conducted on the basis of the data of 26 Demographic and Health Surveys carried out in SSA since 2010. Participants The records of 155 726 children aged 0–59 months were included in the analysis. Primary outcome Overweight/obesity. Results The prevalence of overweight/obesity was 6.8% (95% CI 6.7% to 6.9%). Among the countries represented, higher figures were reported in Sierra Leone (16.9%), Comoros (15.9%) and Malawi (14.5%), whereas lower prevalence was found in Ethiopia (3.0%), Togo (2.6) and Senegal (2.0%). In 11 of the countries, overweight/obesity was more prevalent than wasting. It is estimated that in the whole subcontinent, 10.7 million children were affected by the problem. The prevalence of overweight/obesity was slightly higher in boys than in girls. Overweight/obesity was three times more frequent in stunted children than in normal children. The risk also significantly increased with increasing maternal BMI and birth weight and decreased with increasing maternal age, maternal education, child's age and number of siblings. On the other hand, no significant association was observed with national gross domestic product per capita, place of residence (urban–rural) and household wealth index. Conclusion Childhood overweight/obesity has become a sizeable problem in the subcontinent. PMID:26700276

  2. Parental depression, family functioning and obesity among African American children.

    PubMed

    Davis, Melvin; Young, LaShun; Davis, Sheila P; Moll, George

    2008-01-01

    Obesity has reached an epidemic level in America (National Center for Health Statistics [NCHS] 1999), and this epidemic is more acute for African Americans than for other groups of Americans. In this study, 44 parent-child dyads completed measurements of height, depression, and body fat composition. In addition, parents completed a demographic questionnaire, and instruments, which measured family functioning, parental psychopathology, child behavior, and cardiovascular risks. Several models emerged for predicting childhood and parental body mass index, parental depression, and child behavioral problems. Findings indicated a role for parental depression in childhood obesity. These findings are discussed in light of Bandura's Social Cognitive Theory, and the family's role in childhood obesity.

  3. Parental depression, family functioning, and obesity among African American children.

    PubMed

    Davis, Melvin; Young, LaShun; Davis, Sheila P; Moll, George

    2011-01-01

    Obesity has reached an epidemic level in America (National Center for Health Statistics [NCHS] 1999), and this epidemic is more acute for African Americans than for other groups of Americans. In this study, 44 parent-child dyads completed measurements of height, weight, depression, and body fat composition. In addition, parents completed a demographic questionnaire, and instruments, which measured family functioning, parental psychopathology, child behavior, and cardiovascular risks. Several models emerged for predicting childhood and parental body mass index, parental depression, and child behavioral problems. Findings indicated a role for parental depression in childhood obesity. These findings are discussed in light of Bandura's Social Cognitive Theory, and the family's role in childhood obesity.

  4. Inflammatory Markers and Obstructive Sleep Apnea in Obese Children: The NANOS Study

    PubMed Central

    Gileles-Hillel, Alex; Alonso-Álvarez, María Luz; Kheirandish-Gozal, Leila; Peris, Eduard; Cordero-Guevara, José Aurelio; Terán-Santos, Joaquin; Martinez, Mónica Gonzalez; Jurado-Luque, María José; Corral-Peñafiel, Jaime; Duran-Cantolla, Joaquin; Gozal, David

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Obesity and obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSA) are common coexisting conditions associated with a chronic low-grade inflammatory state underlying some of the cognitive, metabolic, and cardiovascular morbidities. Aim. To examine the levels of inflammatory markers in obese community-dwelling children with OSA, as compared to no-OSA, and their association with clinical and polysomnographic (PSG) variables. Methods. In this cross-sectional, prospective multicenter study, healthy obese Spanish children (ages 4–15 years) were randomly selected and underwent nocturnal PSG followed by a morning fasting blood draw. Plasma samples were assayed for multiple inflammatory markers. Results. 204 children were enrolled in the study; 75 had OSA, defined by an obstructive respiratory disturbance index (RDI) of 3 events/hour total sleep time (TST). BMI, gender, and age were similar in OSA and no-OSA children. Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) levels were significantly higher in OSA children, with interleukin-6 concentrations being higher in moderate-severe OSA (i.e., AHI > 5/hrTST; P < 0.01), while MCP-1 levels were associated with more prolonged nocturnal hypercapnia (P < 0.001). Conclusion. IL-6, MCP-1, and PAI-1 are altered in the context of OSA among community-based obese children further reinforcing the proinflammatory effects of sleep disorders such as OSA. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01322763. PMID:24991089

  5. After-school program to reduce obesity in minority children: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Madsen, Kristine A; Thompson, Hannah R; Wlasiuk, Lidya; Queliza, Emily; Schmidt, Colin; Newman, Thomas B

    2009-12-01

    This study explored a community-based after-school program's effect on obesity in minority children. Study participants included 178 third through fifth graders (47% Latino, 25% Asian, and 18% African-American) enrolled in America SCORES Bay Area. Outcomes were attendance, change in fitness (20-meter shuttle test), and body mass index (BMI) z-score over eight months. At baseline, 52 percent of children were overweight or obese. Children attended SCORES > 4 days/week and fitness significantly improved (p < 0.01). BMI z-score decreased by 0.04 (p = 0.10) overall, and by 0.05 (p = 0.08) among obese children, but increased among African-American children. These results suggest that SCORES increases fitness and may improve BMI in some minority children. Effect modification by race may relate to differential growth patterns or engagement in SCORES. These findings suggest community-based programs could effectively address obesity. A randomized trial of the SCORES program is warranted to rigorously examine this type of after-school program's impact on child health.

  6. Obesity in Hong Kong Chinese preschool children: where are all the nurses?

    PubMed

    Chan, Christine M S; Deave, Toity; Greenhalgh, Trisha

    2010-08-01

    We report an ethnographic study of 10 preschool children aged 2-6 years recruited from kindergartens in Hong Kong, 6 of whom were overweight or obese. Each was followed for 12-18 months. We confirmed previously described risk factors and showed how these interacted to produce obesity in some but not all at-risk children. Despite much rhetoric in the literature about holistic care of the preschool child, we were struck by the lack of coordinated professional input to the needs of children at risk of obesity and by the absence of nursing input in particular. We argue that a "whole-systems" nursing role, based in the community and with remit that includes clinical care, education, and policy, is urgently needed, as well as review examples of such roles from other countries.

  7. [School of the rational nutrition for children and adolescents with obesity].

    PubMed

    Shcherbakova, M Iu; Poriadina, G I; Kovaleva, E A

    2012-01-01

    The article presents the principles of the classes organizations in the school of the rational nutrition for children and adolescents with overweight and obesity, and also for their parents. The school consists of six interactive lessons, which explains the negative consequences of obesity, understand the basic principles of optimal diet. Each class has "minilections", that adapted for both children and parents and accompanied by interactive dialogues, which are attended by all family members of children who are overweight or obese. Presented own observational data for 20 families that attended school. A positive result was achieved in 15 families. The article analyzes the reasons that didn't lead to the expected result in 5 families.

  8. Is Acanthosis Nigricans a Reliable Indicator for Risk of Type 2 Diabetes in Obese Children and Adolescents?: A Systematic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abraham, Cilymol; Rozmus, Cathy L.

    2012-01-01

    Obesity and type 2 diabetes is becoming a major health problem affecting children and adolescents in the United States. This article reviews the current literature examining the association between the presence of acanthosis nigricans (AN) and risk for developing type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in obese children and adolescents. Ethnicity, family…

  9. Self-Management Training for Chinese Obese Children at Risk for Metabolic Syndrome: Effectiveness and Implications for School Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ling, Jiying; Anderson, Laura M.; Ji, Hong

    2015-01-01

    This article reviews the results of a school-based self-management intervention for Chinese obese children at risk for metabolic syndrome. Twenty-eight Chinese obese children (M age?=?10 years) and their parents participated in the study. Metabolic syndrome risk factors were measured pre- and post-intervention. The risk factors included Body Mass…

  10. Effectiveness of the modified progressive aerobic capacity endurance run test for assessing aerobic fitness in Hispanic children who are obese

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the progressive aerobic capacity endurance run (PACER) and a newly designed modified PACER (MPACER) for assessing aerobic fitness in Hispanic children who are obese. Thirty-nine (aged 7-12 years) children who were considered obese (= 95 ...

  11. Obesity in children and adolescents with chronic pain: Associations with pain and activity limitations

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Anna C.; Samuelson, Bethany; Palermo, Tonya M.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives Obesity is associated with functional disability in adults with chronic pain, but less is known about obesity among youth with chronic pain. The purpose of this study was to 1) identify the prevalence of overweight and obesity in children and adolescents receiving treatment for chronic pain, and 2) examine associations between Body Mass Index (BMI), pain intensity, and activity limitations in this population. Methods Data was obtained from records of 118 patients, ages 8 to 18, seen in a multidisciplinary pediatric pain clinic. Information about age, gender, pain problem, duration and severity, medical diagnoses, medications, height and weight were collected from medical records and intake questionnaires. The CDC’s pediatric BMI calculator was used to obtain percentile and category (underweight, healthy weight, overweight, obese). Children and parents completed the Child Activity Limitations Interview-21 (CALI-21), a self-report measure of activity limitations. Results A significantly higher rate of overweight and obesity was observed among youth with chronic pain compared to a normative sample. BMI percentile was predictive of concurrent limitations in vigorous activities, according to parent report. Discussion BMI percentile and weight status may contribute to activity limitations among children and adolescents with chronic pain. Weight status is an important factor to consider in the context of treatment of chronic pain and disability in children and adolescents. PMID:20664337

  12. Identifying patterns of eating and physical activity in children: a latent class analysis of obesity risk.

    PubMed

    Huh, Jimi; Riggs, Nathaniel R; Spruijt-Metz, Donna; Chou, Chih-Ping; Huang, Zhaoqing; Pentz, Maryann

    2011-03-01

    We used latent class analysis (LCA) to identify heterogeneous subgroups with respect to behavioral obesity risk factors in a sample of 4th grade children (n = 997) residing in Southern California. Multiple dimensions assessing physical activity, eating and sedentary behavior, and weight perceptions were explored. A set of 11 latent class indicators were used in the analysis. The final model yielded a five-class solution: "High-sedentary, high-fat/high-sugar (HF/HS) snacks, not weight conscious," "dieting without exercise, weight conscious," "high-sedentary, HF/HS snacks, weight conscious," "active, healthy eating," and "low healthy, snack food, inactive, not weight conscious." The results suggested distinct subtypes of children with respect to obesity-related risk behaviors. Ethnicity, gender, and a socioeconomic status proxy variable significantly predicted the above latent classes. Overweight or obese weight status was determined based on the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention BMI (kg/m²)-for-age-and-sex percentile (overweight, 85th percentile ≤ BMI < 95th percentile; obese, 95th percentile ≤ BMI). The identified latent subgroup membership, in turn, was associated with the children's weight categories. The results suggest that intervention programs could be refined or targeted based on children's characteristics to promote effective pediatric obesity interventions.

  13. [TREATMENT MODALITIES OF LABIAL FUSION IN PREPUBERTAL GIRLS].

    PubMed

    Morić, Bernardica Valent; Lesar, Tatjana

    2014-12-01

    Labial adhesion is a thin membranous fusion of the labia minora of varying length. It is not a rare condition in prepubertal girls, but since it is often asymptomatic, it remains undiagnosed. It is usually discovered during regular check-ups or when the fusion results in post-void dripping, bacteriuria, vaginal irritation, dysuria, urinary tract infection or obstruction. The cause of labial adhesions is unclear. Chronic irritation of the vulva in combination with poor hygiene is believed to be important etiologic factors. A theory of hypoestrogenic status in prepubertal girls as a potential etiologic factor for labial adhesions is no longer widely accepted, since a recent study concluded that there was no difference in estrogen levels between children with and those without labial adhesions. Treatment options include conservative management with topical estrogen or betmethasone creams or, when indicated, manual separation or surgery. Topical estrogen and betamethasone creams are generally considered safe and effective treatment of labial adhesions, even over prolonged periods of time, with minimal if any side effects. No guidelines have been structured for the limits or duration of topical therapy, but most authors agree that optimal treatment should last from 1 to 2 or 3 months on twice-a-day regimen. Parental education concerning appropriate application technique is important not only for the success of treatment, but also to avoid the possible side effects. PMID:26285472

  14. The prevalence of obesity in children with autism: a secondary data analysis using nationally representative data from the National Survey of Children's Health

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The prevalence of childhood obesity has increased dramatically in the last two decades and numerous efforts to understand, intervene on, and prevent this significant threat to children's health are underway for many segments of the pediatric population. Understanding the prevalence of obesity in populations of children with developmental disorders is an important undertaking, as the factors that give rise to obesity may not be the same as for typically developing children, and because prevention and treatment efforts may need to be tailored to meet their needs and the needs of their families. The goal of the current study was to estimate the prevalence of obesity in children and adolescents with autism. Methods This study was a secondary data analysis of cross-sectional nationally representative data collected by telephone interview of parents/guardians on 85,272 children ages 3-17 from the 2003-2004 National Survey of Children's Health (NSCH). Autism was determined by response to the question, "Has a doctor or health professional ever told you that your child has autism?" Children and adolescents were classified as obese accordingto CDC guidelines for body mass index (BMI) for age and sex. Results The prevalence of obesity in children with autism was 30.4% compared to 23.6% of children without autism (p = .075). The unadjusted odds of obesity in children with autism was 1.42 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.00, 2.02, p = .052) compared to children without autism. Conclusions Based on US nationally representative data, children with autism have a prevalence of obesity at least as high as children overall. These findings suggest that additional research is warranted to understand better the factors that influence the development of obesity in this population of children. PMID:20178579

  15. Sleep Patterns of a Primarily Obese Sample of Treatment-Seeking Children

    PubMed Central

    Graef, Danielle M.; Janicke, David M.; McCrae, Christina S.

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: To examine the sleep patterns and the role of day of the week and school break in these patterns within a primarily obese sample of children. Methods: Participants included 143 obese children (8-12 years) and their parents initiating treatment in a weight-management study in a community-based setting. Demographics, anthropometrics, and objectively measured sleep (i.e., with use of Sensewear Armbands) were collected prior to treatment. Results: Sleep duration was insufficient in our sample, as approximately 88% obtained less than 8 hours of sleep (mean = 6.92, standard deviation = 0.85). Those with lower total sleep time included older children, those identified as African American (compared to those identified as Caucasian), and those identified as Non-Hispanic (compared to those identified as Hispanic). Children on school break initiated sleep later than those in school the week of measurement. Children woke later on weekends and when on school break. There were no differences in day of the week or school break in predicting child sleep duration and total wake time (p's > 0.05). Conclusions: This study is one of the first to examine sleep patterns within a primarily obese sample of treatment-seeking rural children. There is a need for research to develop a better understanding of how sleep may affect health functioning and weight management, as well as quality of life and psychosocial functioning of children who are overweight or obese. Clinical Trials Information: Title of trial: Extension Family Lifestyle Intervention Project (E-FLIP for Kids). Clinical-Trials.gov identifier: NCT01820338. NIH/NIDDK Grant #: 1R18DK082374-01. Citation: Graef DM, Janicke DM, McCrae CS. Sleep patterns of a primarily obese sample of treatment-seeking children. J Clin Sleep Med 2014;10(10):1111-1117. PMID:25317092

  16. Challenges in the pharmacologic management of obesity and secondary dyslipidemia in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Mary Jayne; Jellerson, Kevin D; Snow, Michael Z; Zacchetti, Michelle L

    2013-10-01

    The rise in childhood obesity has lead to an increased number of children with lipid abnormalities and the predominance of a combined dyslipidemic pattern characterized by a moderate-to-severe elevation in triglycerides, normal-to-mild mild elevation in LDL cholesterol and reduced HDL cholesterol. Although recently published National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute (NHLBI) guidelines represent a significant step forward in managing primary dyslipidemias in pediatric patients, there is still no general consensus regarding the pharmacologic treatment of obesity-related lipid abnormalities in children. The use of early pharmacologic intervention to control dyslipidemias and reduce cardiovascular risk in young children is only expected to increase given the steady increase in obesity and emergence of atherosclerotic disease in pre-adolescents. Despite the increasing use of lipid-lowering therapy in children over the last few years, diet and lifestyle modification remain the first line therapy. Given the challenges of instituting and maintaining lifestyle modification in pediatric patients, however, it is likely that institution of drug therapy may be required in many children. Of all the medications currently available, the fibric acid derivatives have a cholesterol lowering profile that is most likely to be effective in obese children with the high TG/low HDL phenotype and data from a recently published study of gemfibrozil in children with metabolic syndrome are promising. However, additional information regarding the short and long-term safety and efficacy of fibrate therapy in children with obesity-related lipid disorders is needed before use of these agents can be recommended.

  17. Common variants of IL6, LEPR, and PBEF1 are associated with obesity in Indian children.

    PubMed

    Tabassum, Rubina; Mahendran, Yuvaraj; Dwivedi, Om Prakash; Chauhan, Ganesh; Ghosh, Saurabh; Marwaha, Raman K; Tandon, Nikhil; Bharadwaj, Dwaipayan

    2012-03-01

    The increasing prevalence of obesity in urban Indian children is indicative of an impending crisis of metabolic disorders. Although perturbations in the secretion of adipokines and inflammatory molecules in childhood obesity are well documented, the contribution of common variants of genes encoding them is not well investigated. We assessed the association of 125 common variants from 21 genes, encoding adipocytokines and inflammatory markers in 1,325 urban Indian children (862 normal weight [NW group] and 463 overweight/obese [OW/OB group]) and replicated top loci in 1,843 Indian children (1,399 NW children and 444 OW/OB children). Variants of four genes (PBEF1 [rs3801266] [P = 4.5 × 10(-4)], IL6 [rs2069845] [P = 8.7 × 10(-4)], LEPR [rs1137100] [P = 1.8 × 10(-3)], and IL6R [rs7514452] [P = 2.1 × 10(-3)]) were top signals in the discovery sample. Associations of rs2069845, rs1137100, and rs3801266 were replicated (P = 7.9 × 10(-4), 8.3 × 10(-3), and 0.036, respectively) and corroborated in meta-analysis (P = 2.3 × 10(-6), 3.9 × 10(-5), and 4.3 × 10(-4), respectively) that remained significant after multiple testing corrections. These variants also were associated with quantitative measures of adiposity (weight, BMI, and waist and hip circumferences). Allele dosage analysis of rs2069845, rs1137100, and rs3801266 revealed that children with five to six risk alleles had an approximately four times increased risk of obesity than children with less than two risk alleles (P = 1.2 × 10(-7)). In conclusion, our results demonstrate the association of the common variants of IL6, LEPR, and PBEF1 with obesity in Indian children.

  18. Effect of diet and controlled exercise on weight loss in obese children.

    PubMed

    Epstein, L H; Wing, R R; Penner, B C; Kress, M J

    1985-09-01

    The effects of adding exercise to diet for weight control in obese children were evaluated by randomizing obese girls to one of two groups: diet and diet plus exercise. During the first 6 weeks of the treatment, children exercised in a supervised three times a week exercise program, in which they walked or ran 3 miles. Significant decreases from baseline weight and in percent overweight were observed for both groups during the year of treatment. Significant decreases in percent overweight were observed at 0 to 2 months and then at 2 to 6 months for the children who were exercising, whereas percent overweight in children in the diet-alone group decreased only from 0 to 2 months. In addition, a significant improvement in fitness was observed only for children in the diet plus exercise group.

  19. Role of obesity in otitis media in children.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Sameer; Arjmand, Ellis; Sidell, Douglas

    2014-11-01

    The ongoing childhood obesity epidemic has garnered significant attention among healthcare providers due to its short- and long-term sequelae. Multiple diseases have been associated with obesity, not limited to hypertension, diabetes, and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Over the past decade, the relationships between obesity and otologic conditions have been investigated. In this setting, otitis media has remained the focus of research, representing one of the most common pediatric illnesses. Initial studies suggesting a relationship between the two conditions have been supported with epidemiological studies controlling for socioeconomic factors. The purpose of this article is to review our current understanding of the relationship between otitis media and obesity and to discuss the healthcare implications of this association. In addition, several identifiable factors associated with each condition are discussed, as are potential pathophysiologic mechanisms that may help to elucidate the complex and multifactorial relationship between the two disease entities. PMID:25183362

  20. Sugar-Sweetened Beverages and Obesity among Children and Adolescents: A Review of Systematic Literature Reviews

    PubMed Central

    Bucher Della Torre, Sophie

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: The prevalence of overweight and obesity among children and adolescents has increased worldwide and has reached alarming proportions. Currently, sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) are the primary source of added sugar in the diet of children and adolescents. Contradictive findings from studies and reviews have fueled an endless debate on the role of SSBs in the development of childhood obesity. Methods: The primary aim of the present review of reviews was to assess how review- and study-level methodological factors explain conflicting results across reviews and meta-analyses by providing an up-to-date synthesis of recent evidence regarding the association between SSB consumption and weight gain, overweight, and obesity in a population of 6-month-old to 19-year-old children and adolescents. The secondary aim was to assess the quality of included reviews using the Assessment of Multiple SysTemAtic Reviews (AMSTAR) measurement tool. Systematic literature reviews and meta-analyses were included. The literature search was performed through the platforms Pubmed/Medline, Cinahl, and Web of Knowledge. Results: Thirteen reviews and meta-analyses were included. Nine reviews concluded that there was a direct association between SSBs and obesity in children and adolescents and four others did not. The quality of the included reviews was low to moderate, and the two reviews with the highest quality scores showed discrepant results. Conclusions: The majority of reviews concluded that there was a direct association between SSB consumption and weight gain, overweight, and obesity in children and adolescents. However, recent evidence from well-conducted meta-analyses shows discrepant results regarding the association between SSB and weight gain, overweight, and obesity among children and adolescents. Improving methodological quality of studies and reviews as well as ensuring responsible conduct of research and scientific integrity is essential for the provision

  1. Are obese children truly unfit? Minimizing the confounding effect of body size on the exercise response.

    PubMed

    Cooper, D M; Poage, J; Barstow, T J; Springer, C

    1990-02-01

    To test the hypothesis that obese children are unfit (i.e., have abnormal responses to exercise testing consistent with reduced levels of habitual physical activity), we used new analytic strategies in studies of 18 obese children performing cycle ergometry. The subject's weight (mean +/- SD) was 168 +/- 24% that predicted by height, and the age range was 9 to 17 years. Size-independent measures of exercise (e.g., the ratio of oxygen uptake (VO2) to work rate during progressive exercise and the temporal response of VO2, carbon dioxide output (VCO2), and minute ventilation (VE) at the onset of exercise) were used. The ability to perform external mechanical work was corrected for VO2 at unloaded pedaling (change in maximum oxygen uptake (delta VO2max) and in anaerobic threshold (delta AT). On average, obese children's responses were in the normal range: delta VO2max, 104 +/- 41% (+/- SD) predicted (by age); delta AT, 85 +/- 51%; ratio of change in VE to change in VCO2, 111 +/- 21% and ratio of change in VO2 to change in work rate, 100 +/- 24%, but six of the obese children had values of delta VO2max or delta AT that were more than 2 SD below normal. In addition, obese children did not have increased delta VO2max or delta AT with age as observed in nonobese children. Although the response time of VO2 was normal (99 +/- 32% of predicted), those for both VCO2 and VE were prolonged. We conclude that the finding of obesity in a child is not a reliable indicator of poor fitness but that testing cardiorespiratory responses to exercise can be used to identify subjects with serious impairment and to individualize therapy.

  2. Urinary levels of endocrine-disrupting chemicals, including bisphenols, bisphenol A diglycidyl ethers, benzophenones, parabens, and triclosan in obese and non-obese Indian children.

    PubMed

    Xue, Jingchuan; Wu, Qian; Sakthivel, Sivasubramanian; Pavithran, Praveen V; Vasukutty, Jayakumar R; Kannan, Kurunthachalam

    2015-02-01

    Obesity has been recognized as a major global public health concern. In particular, childhood obesity is a major risk factor for other health issues, such as type 2 diabetes, in later stages of life. A few earlier studies have associated exposure to endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) with childhood obesity. There is limited information, however, on exposure to EDCs and childhood obesity in India. In this study, urinary levels of 26 EDCs were determined in 49 obese and 27 non-obese Indian children. Eleven EDCs, including 2,2-bis(4-hydroxyphenyl)propane (BPA), 4,4'-sulfonyldiphenol (BPS), methyl paraben (MeP), ethyl paraben (EtP), propyl paraben (PrP), 4-hydroxybenzoic acid (4-HB), 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid (3,4-DHB), triclosan (TCS), benzophenone-3 (BP3), bisphenol A diglycidyl ether (BADGE), and bisphenol A bis(2,3-dihydroxypropyl) glycidyl ether (BADGE·2H2O) were found in >70% of urine samples. No significant associations were found between childhood obesity and most target chemicals studied, except for 3,4-DHB, which showed a significant positive association. Urinary concentrations of 3,4-DHB were higher in obese children than in non-obese children, independent of age, sex, family income, parent education, physical activity, and urinary creatinine. Urinary concentrations of several EDCs were higher in Indian children than the concentrations reported for children in the USA and China. To our knowledge, this is the first study to report urinary concentrations of several EDCs in Indian children.

  3. Trends in the Prevalence of Morbid and Severe Obesity in Australian Children Aged 7-15 Years, 1985-2012

    PubMed Central

    Garnett, Sarah P.; Baur, Louise A.; Jones, Aimee M. D.; Hardy, Louise L.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Children with severe obesity have greater risk of adverse health outcomes. The purpose of this study was to assess trends in the prevalence of morbid and severe obesity in Australian children between 1985 and 2012. Methods Secondary analysis of four national Australian cross-sectional surveys of measured height/weight in 7–15 year olds: Australian Health and Fitness Survey 1985 (n = 8,486), National Nutrition Survey 1995 (n = 1,541), the National Children’s Nutrition and Physical Activity Survey 2007 (n = 2,585) and the National Health Survey 2012 (n = 2,940). International Obesity Taskforce cut-point was used for morbid obesity (equivalent to a BMI ≥35kg/m2 at age 18 years). Severe obesity class 2 was defined as BMI ≥120% and <140% of the 95th percentile of the CDC 2000 growth charts or a BMI ≥35 and <40, and severe obesity class 3 as BMI ≥140% of the 95th percentile or a BMI ≥40. Results Between 1985 and 2012 the prevalence of morbid obesity increased from 0.2% to 1.8%, class 2 severe obesity from 0.3% to 2.0%, and class 3 from 0.1% to 0.5%. Children with morbid obesity represented 11.3% of children with obesity in 1985 and increased to 22.5% in 2012 (P = 0.005). Children with severe obesity represented 19.3% of children with obesity in 1985 and increased to 32.0% in 2012 (P = 0.016). The greatest increase was observed between 1995 and 2007. The proportion of children who were classified as morbidly or severely obese was not significantly different between 2007 and 2012, nor was it significantly different between age and sex groups. Conclusion Prevalence of morbid and severe obesity among children is low, but has significantly increased between 1985 and 2012. In contrast to overweight and obese children, children with morbid obesity require tertiary intervention. Failure to treat these children will have significant implications for the individual child and community. PMID:27171503

  4. [Interventions to control overweight and obesity in children and adolescents in Peru].

    PubMed

    Aquino-Vivanco, Óscar; Aramburu, Adolfo; Munares-García, Óscar; Gómez-Guizado, Guillermo; García-Torres, Elizabeth; Donaires-Toscano, Fernando; Fiestas, Fabián

    2013-04-01

    Overweight and obesity in children and adolescents represent a serious public health problem in Peru, with high costs for society that require the implementation of a set of public policies directed toward its control. Thus, interventions have been proposed as the regulation of advertising of unhealthy foods, self-regulation, the implementation of kiosks healthy and nutritional labeling. From the analysis of the problem of overweight and obesity in children and adolescents in Peru, this article is a narrative review of such interventions. PMID:23949515

  5. Association between obesity and ECG variables in children and adolescents: A cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    SUN, GUO-ZHE; LI, YANG; ZHOU, XING-HU; GUO, XIAO-FAN; ZHANG, XIN-GANG; ZHENG, LI-QIANG; LI, YUAN; JIAO, YUN-DI; SUN, YING-XIAN

    2013-01-01

    Obesity exhibits a wide variety of electrocardiogram (ECG) abnormalities in adults, which often lead to cardiovascular events. However, there is currently no evidence of an association between obesity and ECG variables in children and adolescents. The present study aimed to explore the associations between obesity and ECG intervals and axes in children and adolescents. A cross-sectional observational study of 5,556 students aged 5–18 years was performed. Anthropometric data, blood pressure and standard 12-lead ECGs were collected for each participant. ECG variables were measured manually based on the temporal alignment of simultaneous 12 leads using a CV200 ECG Work Station. Overweight and obese groups demonstrated significantly longer PR intervals, wider QRS durations and leftward shifts of frontal P-wave, QRS and T-wave axes, while the obese group also demonstrated significantly higher heart rates, compared with normal weight groups within normotensive or hypertensive subjects (P<0.05). Abdominal obesity was also associated with longer PR intervals, wider QRS duration and a leftward shift of frontal ECG axes compared with normal waist circumference (WC) within normotensive or hypertensive subjects (P<0.05). Gender was a possible factor affecting the ECG variables. Furthermore, the ECG variables, including PR interval, QRS duration and frontal P-wave, QRS and T-wave axes, were significantly linearly correlated with body mass index, WC and waist-to-height ratio adjusted for age, gender, ethnicity and blood pressure. However, there was no significant association between obesity and the corrected QT interval (P>0.05). The results of the current study indicate that in children and adolescents, general and abdominal obesity is associated with longer PR intervals, wider QRS duration and a leftward shift of frontal P-wave, QRS and T-wave axes, independent of age, gender, ethnicity and blood pressure. PMID:24255675

  6. Expression of candidate genes associated with obesity in peripheral white blood cells of Mexican children

    PubMed Central

    Ulloa-Martínez, Marcela; Burguete-García, Ana I.; Murugesan, Selvasankar; Hoyo-Vadillo, Carlos; Cruz-Lopez, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Obesity is a chronic, complex, and multifactorial disease, characterized by excess body fat. Diverse studies of the human genome have led to the identification of susceptibility genes that contribute to obesity. However, relatively few studies have addressed specifically the association between the level of expression of these genes and obesity. Material and methods We studied 160 healthy and obese unrelated Mexican children aged 6 to 14 years. We measured the transcriptional expression of 20 genes associated with obesity, in addition to the biochemical parameters, in peripheral white blood cells. The detection of mRNA levels was performed using the OpenArray Real-Time PCR System (Applied Biosystems). Results Obese children exhibited higher values of fasting glucose (p = 0.034), fasting insulin (p = 0.004), low-density lipoprotein (p = 0.006), triglycerides (p < 0.001), systolic blood pressure and diastolic blood pressure (p < 0.001), and lower values of high-density lipoprotein (p < 0.001) compared to lean children. Analysis of transcriptional expression data showed a difference for ADRB1 (p = 0.0297), ADIPOR1 (p = 0.0317), GHRL (p = 0.0060) and FTO (p = 0.0348) genes. Conclusions Our results suggest that changes in the expression level of the studied genes are involved in biological processes implicated in the development of childhood obesity. Our study contributes new perspectives for a better understanding of biological processes involved in obesity. The protocol was approved by the National Committee and Ethical Committee Board from the Mexican Social Security Institute (IMSS) (IMSS FIS/IMSS/PRIO/10/011). PMID:27695486

  7. Obese children, adults and senior citizens in the eyes of the general public: results of a representative study on stigma and causation of obesity.

    PubMed

    Sikorski, Claudia; Luppa, Melanie; Brähler, Elmar; König, Hans-Helmut; Riedel-Heller, Steffi G

    2012-01-01

    Obese individuals are blamed for their excess weight based on causal attribution to the individual. It is unclear whether obese individuals of different age groups and gender are faced with the same amount of stigmatization. This information is important in order to identify groups of individuals at risk for higher stigmatization and discrimination. A telephone interview was conducted in a representative sample of 3,003 participants. Experimental manipulation was realized by vignettes describing obese and normal-weight children, adults and senior citizens. Stigmatizing attitudes were measured by semantic differential. Causal attribution was assessed. Internal factors were rated with highest agreement rates as a cause for the vignette's obesity. Lack of activity behavior and eating too much are the most supported causes. Importance of causes differed for the different vignettes. For the child, external causes were considered more important. The overweight vignette was rated consistently more negatively. Higher educational attainment and personal obesity were associated with lower stigmatizing attitudes. The vignette of the obese child was rated more negatively compared to that of an adult or senior citizen. Obesity is seen as a controllable condition, but for children external factors are seen as well. Despite this finding, they are faced with higher stigmatizing attitudes in the general public, contradicting attribution theory assumptions. Internal and external attribution were found to be inter-correlated. Obese children are the population most at risk for being confronted with stigmatization, making them a target point in stigma-reduction campaigns. PMID:23071664

  8. Pediatric Psychopharmacology for Prepubertal Internalizing Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kubiszyn, Tom; Carlson, John S.; DeHay, Tamara

    2005-01-01

    Evidence-based studies of drug, psychosocial and combined treatments for prepubertal internalizing disorders (depression, obsessive-compulsive disorder [OCD], and non-OCD anxiety) were reviewed. No age effects were found. Although no combined studies met evidence-based criteria, efficacious and possibly efficacious psychosocial and pharmacological…

  9. [Overweight and obesity prevalence in children and adolescents from a private school in Recife

    PubMed

    Balaban, G; Silva, G A

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine the prevalence of overweight and obesity in students from a private school in Recife; compare the prevalence rates of overweight and obesity in boys and girls and in different age groups (children and adolescents) and verify the correlation between body mass index and triceps skinfold thickness in this population. METHODS: Cross-sectional study with 762 students (332 children and 430 adolescents) from a middle/upper class school in Recife, in 1999. Overweight was defined as body mass index equal or above the 85th percentile for age and gender. Obesity was defined as body mass index and triceps skinfold thickness equal or above the 85th percentile. RESULTS: The prevalence rates were 26.2% (95%CI = 23 to 29%) for overweight, and 8.5% (CI95% = 6.5 to 10.5%) for obesity. Overweight was more prevalent among children (34.3%) than among adolescents (20.0%) (P<0.001). Obesity was more frequent among children (14.2%) than among adolescents (4.2%) (P<0.001). The prevalence of overweight in boys (34.6%) was higher than in girls (20.6%) (P<0.001). The prevalence of obesity was also higher in boys (14.7%) than in girls (4.4%) (P<0.001). The correlation coefficient between body mass index and triceps skinfold thickness was equal to 0.64 (95%CI = 0.60 to 0.68). CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of overweight in our study population was as high as that found in industrialized countries; obesity, however, was less frequent.

  10. Weight loss associated with exercise training restores ventilatory efficiency in obese children.

    PubMed

    Prado, D M; Silva, A G; Trombetta, I C; Ribeiro, M M; Nicolau, C M; Guazzelli, I C; Matos, L N; Negrao, C E; Villares, S M

    2009-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that in obese children: 1) Ventilatory efficiency (VentE) is decreased during graded exercise; and 2) Weight loss through diet alone (D) improves VentE, and 3) diet associated with exercise training (DET) leads to greater improvement in VentE than by D. Thirty-eight obese children (10+/-0.2 years; BMI >95th percentile) were randomly divided into two study groups: D (n=17; BMI=30+/-1 kg/m (2)) and DET (n=21; 28+/-1 kg/m (2)). Ten lean children were included in a control group (10+/-0.3 years; 17+/-0.5 kg/m (2)). All children performed maximal treadmill testing with respiratory gas analysis (breath-by-breath) to determine the ventilatory anaerobic threshold (VAT) and peak oxygen consumption (VO (2) peak). VentE was determined by the VE/VCO (2) method at VAT. Obese children showed lower VO (2) peak and lower VentE than controls (p<0.05). After interventions, all obese children reduced body weight (p<0.05). D group did not improve in terms of VO (2) peak or VentE (p>0.05). In contrast, the DET group showed increased VO (2) peak (p=0.01) and improved VentE (DeltaVE/VCO (2)=-6.1+/-0.9; p=0.01). VentE is decreased in obese children, where weight loss by means of DET, but not D alone, improves VentE and cardiorespiratory fitness during graded exercise.

  11. Leptin receptor gene Gln223Arg polymorphism is not associated with obesity and metabolic syndrome in Turkish children.

    PubMed

    Komşu-Ornek, Zuhal; Demirel, Fatma; Dursun, Ahmet; Ermiş, Bahri; Pişkin, Etem; Bideci, Aysun

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the relationship between leptin receptor gene (LEPR) Gln223Arg polymorphism and obesity in Turkish children. Ninety-two obese and 99 lean children (between 5-15 years) were included in the study. Twenty-three of the obese children were diagnosed with metabolic syndrome. Blood samples were collected for morning fasting blood glucose, insulin, leptin, and lipid level measurements. LEPR Gln223Arg polymorphism was analyzed by restriction fragment length polymorphism. Significant differences were observed in anthropometric measurements, fasting blood glucose, insulin, leptin, and lipid levels between obese and lean children. Serum leptin levels were markedly higher in obese children. No significant association was noted between Gln223Arg polymorphism and serum leptin, insulin and lipid levels. There were no differences in the genotype frequencies or allele distribution for Gln223Arg polymorphism among obese, obese with metabolic syndrome and lean children. Our findings suggest that there is no association between Gln223Arg polymorphism and obesity in Turkish children.

  12. [15 years of the Kiel Obesity Prevention Study (KOPS). Results and its importance for obesity prevention in children and adolescents].

    PubMed

    Plachta-Danielzik, S; Landsberg, B; Lange, D; Langnäse, K; Müller, M J

    2011-03-01

    The Kiel Obesity Prevention Study (KOPS) has been performed since 1996 and aims to characterize determinants and to prevent overweight. A total of 15,251 children and adolescents aged 5-16 years were recruited, of whom 780 and 92, respectively, underwent school-based and family-based interventions. Long-term evaluation of the school-based intervention was available over 4 and 8 years, while family-based intervention was evaluated over 1 year. The prevalence of overweight was 18.8% for the whole KOPS cohort. Determinants of overweight were parental overweight and obesity, low socioeconomic status (SES), early life factors, and lifestyle factors. School-based intervention ameliorated the weight status of children of high SES and of normal weight mothers over the long-term. The intervention effect was small but within the expectable range as calculated from analysis of determinants. Alternative outcome variables (e.g., fat mass) and new evaluation approaches (e.g., excess gain in fat mass) gave no detailed information of the intervention success. Family-based intervention showed that even with this individual approach children of low SES could not be reached.

  13. Influence of Obesity on Foot Loading Characteristics in Gait for Children Aged 1 to 12 Years

    PubMed Central

    Mueller, Steffen; Carlsohn, Anja; Mueller, Juliane; Baur, Heiner; Mayer, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Background Overweight and obesity are increasing health problems that are not restricted to adults only. Childhood obesity is associated with metabolic, psychological and musculoskeletal comorbidities. However, knowledge about the effect of obesity on the foot function across maturation is lacking. Decreased foot function with disproportional loading characteristics is expected for obese children. The aim of this study was to examine foot loading characteristics during gait of normal-weight, overweight and obese children aged 1–12 years. Methods A total of 10382 children aged one to twelve years were enrolled in the study. Finally, 7575 children (m/f: n = 3630/3945; 7.0±2.9yr; 1.23±0.19m; 26.6±10.6kg; BMI: 17.1±2.4kg/m2) were included for (complete case) data analysis. Children were categorized to normal-weight (≥3rd and <90th percentile; n = 6458), overweight (≥90rd and <97th percentile; n = 746) or obese (>97th percentile; n = 371) according to the German reference system that is based on age and gender-specific body mass indices (BMI). Plantar pressure measurements were assessed during gait on an instrumented walkway. Contact area, arch index (AI), peak pressure (PP) and force time integral (FTI) were calculated for the total, fore-, mid- and hindfoot. Data was analyzed descriptively (mean ± SD) followed by ANOVA/Welch-test (according to homogeneity of variances: yes/no) for group differences according to BMI categorization (normal-weight, overweight, obesity) and for each age group 1 to 12yrs (post-hoc Tukey Kramer/Dunnett’s C; α = 0.05). Results Mean walking velocity was 0.95 ± 0.25 m/s with no differences between normal-weight, overweight or obese children (p = 0.0841). Results show higher foot contact area, arch index, peak pressure and force time integral in overweight and obese children (p<0.001). Obese children showed the 1.48-fold (1 year-old) to 3.49-fold (10 year-old) midfoot loading (FTI) compared to normal-weight. Conclusion Additional

  14. Breastfeeding and time of complementary food introduction as predictors of obesity in children.

    PubMed

    Škledar, Mariana Turčić; Milošević, Milan

    2015-03-01

    Although obesity is a multifactorial disorder caused by various behavioural, genetic and environmental influences, early life factors affecting certain critical periods during childhood (prenatal period, adiposity rebound period at 3-5 years and around 5-7 years, as well as puberty) are important in promoting obesity in adulthood. The objective was to determine the association between the birth weight, birth length, breastfeeding and time of introduction of complementary food with obesity among 302 healthy Caucasian children 6-7 years old. Binary logistic regression analysis was used to assess the impact of a number of perinatal and socioeconomic confounding factors on the likelihood for overweight and obesity among children. The level of significance was set at p <0.05. Our findings indicate that duration of breastfeeding for at least 3 months, with introduction of complementary food after the age of 6 months have an important role in preventing obesity. This findings are crucial for planning preventive strategies to prevent further increases in the prevalence of overweight and obesity.

  15. Association between obesity and the severity of ambulatory hypertension in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Babinska, Katarina; Kovacs, Laszlo; Janko, Viktor; Dallos, Tomas; Feber, Janusz

    2012-01-01

    The goal of our study was to analyze the association between obesity and the severity of ambulatory hypertension in obese children. A total of 109 patients with primary obesity ages 7 to 18 years (mean ± SD age 14.1 ± 3.1) were enrolled. Patients were divided into three groups according to body mass index (BMI) Z-scores: group 1 (n = 27): BMI >1.65 and < 3.28 standard deviation scores (SDS); group 2 (n = 55): BMI >3.29 and <4.91 SDS; group 3 (n = 27): BMI >4.92 SDS. Definition and staging of ambulatory hypertension was based on blood pressure (BP) levels and BP load, obtained from ambulatory BP monitoring (ABPM). Only 24% had ambulatory normotension, 25% had ambulatory prehypertension, 3% had hypertension, and 48% had severe ambulatory hypertension. The severity of hypertension increased significantly with the degree of obesity (P = .0027). Daytime systolic, diastolic, and mean arterial BPs increased significantly with increased BMI, whereas the nighttime pressure remained elevated regardless of the degree of obesity. Isolated nighttime hypertension was observed in 25% of patients and 38% were classified as nondippers. Almost 50% of children with obesity and hypertension detected on ABPM suffer from severe ambulatory hypertension. BMI is associated with the severity of ambulatory hypertension and the increase of daytime BP.

  16. Obesity and sugar-sweetened beverages in African-American preschool children: a longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Lim, Sungwoo; Zoellner, Jamie M; Lee, Joyce M; Burt, Brian A; Sandretto, Anita M; Sohn, Woosung; Ismail, Amid I; Lepkowski, James M

    2009-06-01

    A representative sample of 365 low-income African-American preschool children aged 3-5 years was studied to determine the association between sugar-sweetened beverage consumption (soda, fruit drinks, and both combined) and overweight and obesity. Children were examined at a dental clinic in 2002-2003 and again after 2 years. Dietary information was collected using the Block Kids Food Frequency Questionnaire. A BMI score was computed from recorded height and weight. Overweight and obesity were defined by national reference age-sex specific BMI: those with an age-sex specific BMI>or=85th, but <95th percentile as overweight and those with BMI>or=95th age-sex specific percentile as obese. The prevalence of overweight was 12.9% in baseline, and increased to 18.7% after 2 years. The prevalence of obesity increased from 10.3 to 20.4% during the same period. Baseline intake of soda and all sugar-sweetened beverages were positively associated with baseline BMI z-scores. After adjusting for covariates, additional intake of fruit drinks and all sugar-sweetened beverages at baseline showed significantly higher odds of incidence of overweight over 2 years. Among a longitudinal cohort of African-American preschool children, high consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages was significantly associated with an increased risk for obesity.

  17. Calcium intake, serum vitamin D and obesity in children: is there an association?

    PubMed Central

    da Cunha, Kelly Aparecida; Magalhães, Elma Izze da Silva; Loureiro, Laís Monteiro Rodrigues; Sant'Ana, Luciana Ferreira da Rocha; Ribeiro, Andréia Queiroz; de Novaes, Juliana Farias

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the association between calcium intake and serum vitamin D levels and childhood obesity by an integrative review. DATA SOURCE: The research was conducted in the databases PubMed/medLine, Science Direct and SciELO with 2001 to 2014 publications. We used the combined terms in English: ''children'' and ''calcium'' or ''children'' and ''vitamin D'' associated with the descriptors: ''obesity'', ''adiposity'' or ''body fat'' for all bases. Cross-sectional and cohort studies, as well as clinical trials, were included. Review articles or those that that have not addressed the association of interest were excluded. DATA SYNTHESIS: Eight articles were part of this review, five of which were related to calcium and three to vitamin D. Most studies had a longitudinal design. The analyzed studies found an association between calcium intake and obesity, especially when age and sex were considered. Inverse relationship between serum vitamin D and measures of adiposity in children has been observed and this association was influenced by the sex of the patient and by the seasons of the year. CONCLUSIONS: The studies reviewed showed an association between calcium and vitamin D with childhood obesity. Considering the possible protective effect of these micronutrients in relation to childhood obesity, preventive public health actions should be designed, with emphasis on nutritional education. PMID:25890445

  18. Dyslipidemia is Associated with Unfit and Overweight-Obese Children and Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Reuter, Cézane Priscila; da Silva, Priscila Tatiana; Renner, Jane Dagmar Pollo; de Mello, Elza Daniel; Valim, Andréia Rosane de Moura; Pasa, Luiza; da Silva, Rafaela; Burgos, Miria Suzana

    2016-01-01

    Background Both poor aerobic fitness and obesity, separately, are associated with abnormal lipid profiles. Objective To identify possible relationships of dyslipidemia with cardiorespiratory fitness and obesity, evaluated together, in children and adolescents. Methods This cross-sectional study included 1,243 children and adolescents (563 males and 680 females) between 7 and 17 years of age from 19 schools. Obesity was assessed using body mass index (BMI) measurements, and cardiorespiratory fitness was determined via a 9-minute run/walk test. To analyze the lipid profile of each subject, the following markers were used: total cholesterol, cholesterol fractions (high-density lipoprotein and low-density lipoprotein) and triglycerides. Data were analyzed using SPSS v. 20.0, via prevalence ratio (PR), using the Poisson regression. Results Dyslipidemia is more prevalent among unfit/overweight-obese children and adolescents compared with fit/underweight-normal weight boys (PR: 1.25; p = 0.007) and girls (PR: 1.30, p = 0.001). Conclusions The prevalence of dyslipidemia is directly related to both obesity and lower levels of cardiorespiratory fitness. PMID:26885973

  19. No Association between Obesity and Behavior in Low-income, Preschool Latino Children

    PubMed Central

    Nagata, Jason M.; Hagan, Melissa J.; Heyman, Melvin B.; Wojcicki, Janet M.

    2015-01-01

    Background The relationship between behavioral problems and obesity in early childhood in Latinos is largely unknown. Methods Cross-sectional anthropometric and behavioral data of children at three years of age were gathered from a cohort of 174 children of Latina mothers at two San Francisco hospitals. Child behaviors were assessed using the preschool Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL/11/2–5). Logistic regression was used to analyze the association between behavior and obesity. Results At three years, 27.7% were obese. There were no associations between affective (OR = 1.89; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.42–8.59), anxiety (OR = 1.86; 95% CI 0.53–6.47), pervasive developmental (OR = 0.42; 95% CI 0.13–1.36), attention deficit hyperactivity (OR = 0.58; 95% CI 0.12–2.76), or oppositional defiant (OR = 6.49; 95% CI 0.65–64.49) problems and obesity. Conclusions Though psychological problems and obesity are associated among older children and adolescents, there was no association in Latino three-year olds in a low-income sample. PMID:25913339

  20. Growth and obesity in 7-year-old Croatian children: secular changes from 1991 to 2008.

    PubMed

    Bralić, Irena; Tahirović, Husref; Matanić, Dubravka

    2011-12-01

    The study analyses secular changes in body weight, height and body mass index (BMI) in children in the Splitsko-dalmatinska County, Croatia, in the period from 1991 to 2008. The overweight/obesity trends from 1991 to 1999 and from 2000 to 2008 are assessed. The study included three cohorts of healthy 7-year-old children, measured during their regular medical examination before enrolment at school: 1991 (n = 514), 1999 (n = 428) and 2008 (n = 452), in a total of 1,394 children, 686 (49.21%) of whom were girls. Overweight/obesity was defined according to the International Obesity Task Force criteria. From 1991 to 2008, there was a statistically significant rise in body weight and BMI in boys and girls (1.47 vs 1.50 kg; 0.55 vs 0.75 kg) and height in boys (1.4 cm). In 2008, the girls were 0.14 kg heavier and 0.39 cm taller than the girls of the same age measured in 1999, but their BMI was lower by 0.02 units. The frequency of obesity rose from 1991 to 2008 by 1.4 times in boys and 1.7 times in girls. The prevalence of obesity in girls rose from 1991 to 1999 (from 4.3% to 8.6%), but in 2008, it fell (7.1%). The prevalence of obesity in boys fell in 1999 (from 4.3% to 3.9%) but rose in 2008 (6.2%). The values of body weight, height and BMI in the observed population moved from 1991 to 2008 towards higher WHO standard values, which is descriptive of the problem of obesity and supports the need to consider the choice of cut-off points for obesity/overweight in local and national studies. In conclusion, the slowdown noticed in secular changes in body weight and BMI is encouraging and shows the importance of continuous paediatric health care for children, combined with an altered attitude in society towards obesity in children.

  1. Parental depression, family functioning, and obesity among African American children.

    PubMed

    Davis, Melvin; Young, LaShun; Davis, Sheila P; Moll, George

    2011-01-01

    Obesity has reached an epidemic level in America (National Center for Health Statistics [NCHS] 1999), and this epidemic is more acute for African Americans than for other groups ofAmericans. In this study, 44 parent-child dyads completed measurements of height, weight, depression, and body fat composition. In addition, parents completed a demographic questionnaire, and instruments, which measured family functioning, parental psychopathology, child behavior, and cardiovascular risks. Several models emerged for predicting childhood and parental body mass index, parental depression, and child behavioral problems. Findings indicated a role for parental depression in childhood obesity. These findings are discussed in light of Bandura 's Social Cognitive Theory, and the family's role in childhood obesity.

  2. How Can We Better Prevent Obesity in Children?

    PubMed

    Visscher, Tommy L S; Kremers, Stef P J

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this review is to discuss the state of the art regarding the field of health promotion in the context of childhood obesity prevention in order to learn how we can better prevent childhood obesity. Challenges have been identified that exist within the different steps of health promotion programme development and implementation. Important steps forward include studying behaviours and determinants of behaviours as clusters, upgrading the importance of distal environmental factors in modelling determinants and understanding determinants as a dynamic system: a complex of interacting elements. An important note is that the process of implementation and the analysis thereof should more often come before the analysis of behaviours and the determinants of behaviour. In applied research, the expertise from the 'real world' practitioners should be used in an early stage to find out whether the answers on research questions really help us in preventing childhood obesity.

  3. Power-Up: A Collaborative After-School Program to Prevent Obesity in African American Children

    PubMed Central

    Choudhry, Shahid; McClinton-Powell, Lori; Solomon, Marla; Davis, Dawnavan; Lipton, Rebecca; Darukhanavala, Amy; Steenes, Althera; Selvaraj, Kavitha; Gielissen, Katherine; Love, Lorne; Salahuddin, Renee; Embil, Frank K.; Huo, Dezheng; Chin, Marshall H.; Quinn, Michael T.; Burnet, Deborah L.

    2013-01-01

    Background Schools represent a key potential venue for addressing childhood obesity. Objective To assess the feasibility of Power-Up, an after-school program to decrease obesity risk among African American children, using community-based participatory research (CBPR) principles. Methods Teachers led 14 weekly nutrition and physical activity sessions during after-school care at the Woodlawn Community School on Chicago’s South Side. Forty African American children ages 5 to 12 participated; their 28 parents discussed similar topics weekly at pickup time, and families practiced relevant skills at home. Pre- and post-intervention anthropometrics, blood pressure, dietary measures, and health knowledge and beliefs for children and parents were compared in univariate analysis. Results At baseline, 26% of children were overweight; 28% were obese. Post-intervention, mean body mass index (BMI) z scores decreased from 1.05 to 0.81 (p < .0001). Changes were more pronounced for overweight (−0.206 z-score units) than for obese children (−0.062 z-score units; p = .01). Girls decreased their combined prevalence of overweight/obesity from 52% to 46%; prevalence across these categories did not change for boys. The prevalence of healthful attitudes rose, including plans to “eat more foods that are good for you” (77% to 90%; p = .027) and “planning to try some new sports” (80% to 88%; p = .007). Conclusion Children in the Power-Up program reduced mean BMI z scores significantly. The after-school venue proved feasible. The use of CBPR principles helped to integrate Power-Up into school activities and contributed to likelihood of sustainability. Engaging parents effectively in the after-school time frame proved challenging; additional strate gies to engage parents are under development. Plans are underway to evaluate this intervention through a randomized study. PMID:22616204

  4. Risk factors of obesity in preschool children in an urban area in China.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Leshan; He, Guoping; Zhang, Jingping; Xie, Rihua; Walker, Mark; Wen, Shi Wu

    2011-11-01

    To assess risk factors of childhood obesity, we carried out a case-control study in ten kindergartens in Changsha, the capital city in the Chinese province of Hunan, between July 1 and December 31, 2007. Height and weight measurements were obtained from annual physical examinations for children attending these kindergartens. Obesity was defined according to the International Obesity Task Force cutoff for body mass index (BMI). For each obese child, one child with normal BMI, matched by kindergarten class, sex, age (within 3 months), and height (within 3 cm) were chosen as controls. The parents of the study subjects were asked to complete a questionnaire about their children, including perinatal factors, infant feeding, and current lifestyle factors. Univariate analysis was performed first to compare the distribution of risk factors between cases and controls. Conditional logistic regression analysis was used to assess independent risk factors of childhood obesity. A total of 162 subjects (81 pairs of cases and controls) were included in the final analysis. The results showed that the adjusted odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals for childhood obesity were 8.88 (2.41-32.70), 5.23 (1.24-22.04), 10.96 (2.08-21.64), and 6.72 (1.55-29.12), respectively, for macrosomia, cesarean delivery, early solid foods initiation (<4 months), and fetal musical education. We conclude that macrosomia, cesarean delivery, early initiation of solid foods, and fetal musical education are associated with increased risk of obesity in preschool children in urban China.

  5. Why are poorer children at higher risk of obesity and overweight? A UK cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Sacker, Amanda

    2016-01-01

    Background: There is limited evidence on which risk factors attenuate income inequalities in child overweight and obesity; whether and why these inequalities widen as children age. Method: Eleven thousand nine hundred and sixty five singletons had complete data at age 5 and 9384 at age 11 from the Millennium Cohort Study (UK). Overweight (age 5 : 15%; age 11 : 20%) and obesity (age 5 : 5%; age 11 : 6%) were defined using the International Obesity Taskforce body mass index cut-points. To measure socioeconomic inequalities, we used quintiles of family income and as risk factors, we considered markers of maternal health behaviours and of children’s physical activity, sedentary behaviours and diet. Binary and multinomial logistic regression models were used. Results: The unadjusted analyses revealed stark income inequalities in the risk of obesity at age 5 and 11. At age 5, children in the bottom income quintile had 2.0 (95% CI: 1.4–2.8) increased relative risk of being obese whilst at age 11 they had 3.0 (95% CI: 2.0–4.5) increased risk compared to children in the top income quintile. Similar income inequalities in the risk of overweight emerged by age 11. Physical activity and diet were particularly important in explaining inequalities. Income inequalities in obesity and overweight widened significantly between age 5 and 11 and a similar set of risk factors protected against upward and promoted downward movements across weight categories. Conclusions: To reduce income inequalities in overweight and obesity and their widening across childhood the results support the need of early interventions which take account of multiple risk factors. PMID:26659411

  6. Asthma and obesity in children: current evidence and potential systems biology approaches.

    PubMed

    Frey, U; Latzin, P; Usemann, J; Maccora, J; Zumsteg, U; Kriemler, S

    2015-01-01

    Both obesity and asthma are highly prevalent, complex diseases modified by multiple factors. Genetic, developmental, lung mechanical, immunological and behavioural factors have all been suggested as playing a causal role between the two entities; however, their complex mechanistic interactions are still poorly understood and evidence of causality in children remains scant. Equally lacking is evidence of effective treatment strategies, despite the fact that imbalances at vulnerable phases in childhood can impact long-term health. This review is targeted at both clinicians frequently faced with the dilemma of how to investigate and treat the obese asthmatic child and researchers interested in the topic. Highlighting the breadth of the spectrum of factors involved, this review collates evidence regarding the investigation and treatment of asthma in obese children, particularly in comparison with current approaches in 'difficult-to-treat' childhood asthma. Finally, the authors propose hypotheses for future research from a systems-based perspective.

  7. Dietary and Physical Activity/Inactivity Factors Associated with Obesity in School-Aged Children123

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Rodriguez, Marcela; Melendez, Guillermo; Nieto, Claudia; Aranda, Marisol; Pfeffer, Frania

    2012-01-01

    Diet and physical activity (PA) are essential components of nutritional status. Adequate nutrition and an active lifestyle are key factors during childhood, because food habits track into adulthood. Children spend more time in school than in any other environment away from home. Studying the diet factors and patterns of PA that affect obesity risk in children during school hours and the complete school day can help identify opportunities to lower this risk. We directly measured the time children spent performing moderate to vigorous PA (MVPA) at school, compared the amount and intensity of PA during school hours with after-school hours, and tried to determine if diet behaviors and PA or inactivity were associated with excess weight and body fat. This cross-sectional study included 143 normal-weight (NLW) and 48 obese children aged 8–10 y. Diet data were obtained from two 24-h recalls. Body composition was measured by bioimpedance. Screen time and sports participation data were self-reported. NLW children drank/ate more dairy servings than the obese children, who consumed more fruit-flavored water than the NLW group. Consumption of soft drinks, sugar-added juices, and fresh juices was low in both groups. Children were less active during school hours than after school. MVPA was lower during school hours in the obese group than in the NLW group. Schools, parents, and authorities should be more involved in promoting strategies to improve the dietary habits and PA levels of school-aged children, because this group is not achieving the recommended level of daily MVPA. PMID:22798003

  8. Overweight, obesity, high blood pressure and lifestyle factors among Mexican children and their parents

    PubMed Central

    Vergara-Castañeda, Arely; Colín-Ramírez, Eloisa; Orea-Tejeda, Arturo

    2010-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to identify associations in the prevalence of overweight, obesity and high blood pressure between children and their parents, as well as their eating and physical patterns. Methods In this cross-sectional study, we obtained data on 83 pairs of school-aged children and one of their parents relating to dietary habits and various physical parameters, including the body mass index (BMI) and blood pressure of the children, which were adjusted by age and gender. Both the children and the parents were asked to complete a questionnaire aimed at providing measures of eating behavior. The questions focused on the consumption of fruit and vegetables and soda drinks as well as on physical activity patterns. Parent BMI was calculated from self-reported height and weight values. Results Obesity was diagnosed in 10.8% of the children, and the prevalence of overweight was 28.9%. There was a relationship between a child’s weight status and that of his/her parent according to the BMI; 45% of overweight/obese children had overweight/obese parents. In addition, a parent’s fruit and vegetable consumption was associated with his/her child’s fruit and vegetable consumption (r = 0.47, p < 0.001), and both were associated with soda drink consumption in both parents and children (r = 0.30, p < 0.001). Conclusion Our results confirmed that there is a relationship between the weight status, fruit and vegetable consumption and soda drink intake of children and those of their parents. PMID:21432567

  9. Obesity Prevention and Treatment in School-aged Children, Adolescents, and Young Adults—Where Do We Go from Here?

    PubMed Central

    Karp, Sharon M.; Gesell, Sabina B.

    2015-01-01

    The rise in the rate of obesity in school-aged children, adolescents, and young adults in the last 30 years is a clear healthcare crisis that needs to be addressed. Despite recent national reports in the United States highlighting positive downward trends in the rate of obesity in younger children, we are still faced with approximately 12.7 million children struggling with obesity. Given the immediate and long-term health consequences of obesity, much time and effort has been expended to address this epidemic. Yet, despite these efforts, we still only see limited, short-term success from most interventions. Without changes to how we address childhood obesity, we will continue to see inadequate improvements in the health of our children. Clinicians and researchers need to be lobbying for evidence-based policy changes, such as those identified by systems science, in order to improve the nation’s health. PMID:26161007

  10. The Relationship Between Neighborhood Quality and Obesity among Children. NBER Working Paper No. 14985

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sen, Bisakha; Mennemeyer, Stephen; Gary, Lisa C.

    2009-01-01

    It has long been posited by scientists that we need to have a better understanding in the role that larger contextual factors -- like neighborhood quality and the built environment -- may have on the nation's obesity crisis. This paper explores whether maternal perceptions of neighborhood quality affect children's bodyweight outcomes, and whether…

  11. The Impact of Physical Education on Obesity among Elementary School Children. NBER Working Paper No. 18341

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cawley, John; Frisvold, David; Meyerhoefer, Chad

    2012-01-01

    In response to the dramatic rise in childhood obesity, the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and other organizations have advocated increasing the time that elementary school children spend in physical education (PE) classes. However, little is known about the effect of PE on child weight. This paper measures that effect by instrumenting for child…

  12. Individual, Family, and Community Environmental Correlates of Obesity in Latino Elementary School Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elder, John P.; Arredondo, Elva M.; Campbell, Nadia; Baquero, Barbara; Duerksen, Susan; Ayala, Guadalupe; Crespo, Noc C.; Slymen, Donald; McKenzie, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Background: The prevalence of overweight children has reached epidemic proportions, and affects Latinos youth more than other subgroups in the United States. Given the prevalence of obesity and its economic consequences, community health initiatives have shifted toward primary prevention at younger ages. Methods: Data representing all levels of…

  13. Risk factors of overweight and obesity among preschool children with different ethnic background.

    PubMed

    Toselli, Stefania; Zaccagni, Luciana; Celenza, Francesca; Albertini, Augusta; Gualdi-Russo, Emanuela

    2015-08-01

    In this study, we evaluated the risk factors associated with overweight and obesity in 2,640 preschool children in Italy taking into account the ethnic background of the parents. Height and weight were measured and BMI was calculated. Personal and lifestyle data for the children (birth weight, type of breastfeeding, sleep duration, skipping breakfast, snacking, physical activity) and parents (ethnicity, educational level, occupation, weight, height) were collected by means of a questionnaire. Italian and Other European children generally showed the highest percentage of normal weight, while the other ethnic groups presented a greater imbalance. Overweight and obesity were high in African males, who also presented high birth weight. Breastfeeding was most common, although formula feeding was significantly higher in Italians than in immigrants. Immigrants, particularly males, tended to skip breakfast more than Italians. Physical activity was significantly higher in Italians than in immigrants. In the parents, underweight was particularly high in Italian and Other mothers. African parents had high rates of overweight and obesity and a low educational level. The most common profession was worker for the fathers and housewife for the mothers, with the exception of Italians in which clerical work prevailed. Multiple linear regression analysis showed that the BMI of children was closely related to the BMI of the parents and the birth weight. Hence, these are the most informative parameters in preventing obesity.

  14. SNAP Participation in Preschool-Aged Children and Prevalence of Overweight and Obesity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simmons, Shannon; Alexander, Jeffrey L.; Ewing, Helen; Whetzel, Stephanie

    2012-01-01

    Background: An increased prevalence of overweight and obesity for adults on government-funded nutrition assistance, such as the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), has been observed; however, this association among preschool-aged children is not well understood. Longitudinal research designs tracking changes in body mass…

  15. Evidential Value That Exercise Improves BMI z-Score in Overweight and Obese Children and Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Kelley, George A.; Kelley, Kristi S.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Given the cardiovascular disease (CVD) related importance of understanding the true effects of exercise on adiposity in overweight and obese children and adolescents, this study examined whether there is evidential value to rule out excessive and inappropriate reporting of statistically significant results, a major problem in the published literature, with respect to exercise-induced improvements in BMI z-score among overweight and obese children and adolescents. Methods. Using data from a previous meta-analysis of 10 published studies that included 835 overweight and obese children and adolescents, a novel, recently developed approach (p-curve) was used to test for evidential value and rule out selective reporting of findings. Chi-squared tests (χ2) were used to test for statistical significance with alpha (p) values <0.05 considered statistically significant. Results. Six of 10 findings (60%) were statistically significant. Statistically significant right-skew to rule out selective reporting was found (χ2 = 38.8, p = 0.0001). Conversely, studies neither lacked evidential value (χ2 = 6.8, p = 0.87) nor lacked evidential value and were intensely p-hacked (χ2 = 4.3, p = 0.98). Conclusion. Evidential value results confirm that exercise reduces BMI z-score in overweight and obese children and adolescents, an important therapeutic strategy for treating and preventing CVD. PMID:26509145

  16. A Controlled Evaluation of a School-Based Obesity Prevention in Turkish School Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toruner, Ebru Kilicarslan; Savaser, Sevim

    2010-01-01

    This research was conducted to assess the effect of a weight management program in Turkish school children with overweight and obesity. Forty one students formed the intervention group while 40 students formed the control group in two elementary schools. Students in intervention group were given seven training sessions in a period of 2.5 months.…

  17. Chronic Overeating without Obesity in Children with Developmental Disabilities: Description of a New Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ayoob, Keith-Thomas; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Thirteen children (ages 3.1 to 5.2 years) referred for developmental delay and excessive eating (without obesity) were evaluated. Commonalities included being in foster care, prenatal drug exposure, and abnormally withdrawn and/or aggressive behavior. (Author/DB)

  18. Obesity, High-Calorie Food Intake, and Academic Achievement Trends among U.S. School Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Jian; O'Connell, Ann A.

    2012-01-01

    The authors investigated children's self-reported high-calorie food intake in Grade 5 and its relationship to trends in obesity status and academic achievement over the first 6 years of school. They used 3-level hierarchical linear models in the large-scale database (the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study--Kindergarten Cohort). Findings indicated…

  19. Child care choices, food intake, and children's obesity status in the United States.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Bidisha; Powell, Lisa M

    2014-07-01

    This article studies two pathways in which selection into different types of child care settings may affect likelihood of childhood obesity. Frequency of intake of high energy-dense and low energy-dense food items may vary across care settings, affecting weight outcomes. We find that increased use of paid and regulated care settings, such as center care and Head Start, is associated with higher consumption of fruits and vegetables. Among children from single-mother households, the probability of obesity increases by 15 percentage point with an increase in intake of soft drinks from four to six times a week to daily consumption and by 25 percentage point with an increase in intake of fast food from one to three times a week to four to six times a week. Among children from two-parent households, eating vegetables one additional time a day is associated with 10 percentage point decreased probability of obesity, while one additional drink of juice a day is associated with 10 percentage point increased probability of obesity. Second, variation across care types could be manifested through differences in the structure of the physical environment not captured by differences in food intake alone. This type of effect is found to be marginal and is statistically significant among children from two-parent households only. Data are used from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study - Birth Cohort surveys (N=10,700; years=2001-2008). Children's age ranged from four to six years in the sample.

  20. Pituitary response to thyrotropin releasing hormone in children with overweight and obesity.

    PubMed

    Rijks, Jesse; Penders, Bas; Dorenbos, Elke; Straetemans, Saartje; Gerver, Willem-Jan; Vreugdenhil, Anita

    2016-01-01

    Thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) concentrations in the high normal range are common in children with overweight and obesity, and associated with increased cardiovascular disease risk. Prior studies aiming at unravelling the mechanisms underlying these high TSH concentrations mainly focused on factors promoting thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH) production as a cause for high TSH concentrations. However, it is unknown whether TSH release of the pituitary in response to TRH is affected in children with overweight and obesity. Here we describe TSH release of the pituitary in response to exogenous TRH in 73 euthyroid children (39% males) with overweight or (morbid) obesity. Baseline TSH concentrations (0.9-5.5 mU/L) were not associated with BMI z score, whereas these concentrations were positively associated with TSH concentrations 20 minutes after TRH administration (r(2) = 0.484, p < 0.001) and the TSH incremental area under the curve during the TRH stimulation test (r(2) = 0.307, p < 0.001). These results suggest that pituitary TSH release in response to TRH stimulation might be an important factor contributing to high normal serum TSH concentrations, which is a regular finding in children with overweight and obesity. The clinical significance and the intermediate factors contributing to pituitary TSH release need to be elucidated in future studies. PMID:27485208

  1. Television Viewing, Computer Use, Obesity, And Adiposity In US Preschool Children

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We tested whether three sedentary activities were associated with obesity and adiposity in U.S. preschool children: 1) watching >2 hours/day of TV/videos, 2) computer use, and 3) >2 hours/day of media use (TV/videos and computer use). We conducted a cross-sectional study using nationally representat...

  2. Child care choices, food intake, and children's obesity status in the United States.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Bidisha; Powell, Lisa M

    2014-07-01

    This article studies two pathways in which selection into different types of child care settings may affect likelihood of childhood obesity. Frequency of intake of high energy-dense and low energy-dense food items may vary across care settings, affecting weight outcomes. We find that increased use of paid and regulated care settings, such as center care and Head Start, is associated with higher consumption of fruits and vegetables. Among children from single-mother households, the probability of obesity increases by 15 percentage point with an increase in intake of soft drinks from four to six times a week to daily consumption and by 25 percentage point with an increase in intake of fast food from one to three times a week to four to six times a week. Among children from two-parent households, eating vegetables one additional time a day is associated with 10 percentage point decreased probability of obesity, while one additional drink of juice a day is associated with 10 percentage point increased probability of obesity. Second, variation across care types could be manifested through differences in the structure of the physical environment not captured by differences in food intake alone. This type of effect is found to be marginal and is statistically significant among children from two-parent households only. Data are used from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study - Birth Cohort surveys (N=10,700; years=2001-2008). Children's age ranged from four to six years in the sample. PMID:24958453

  3. Pituitary response to thyrotropin releasing hormone in children with overweight and obesity

    PubMed Central

    Rijks, Jesse; Penders, Bas; Dorenbos, Elke; Straetemans, Saartje; Gerver, Willem-Jan; Vreugdenhil, Anita

    2016-01-01

    Thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) concentrations in the high normal range are common in children with overweight and obesity, and associated with increased cardiovascular disease risk. Prior studies aiming at unravelling the mechanisms underlying these high TSH concentrations mainly focused on factors promoting thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH) production as a cause for high TSH concentrations. However, it is unknown whether TSH release of the pituitary in response to TRH is affected in children with overweight and obesity. Here we describe TSH release of the pituitary in response to exogenous TRH in 73 euthyroid children (39% males) with overweight or (morbid) obesity. Baseline TSH concentrations (0.9–5.5 mU/L) were not associated with BMI z score, whereas these concentrations were positively associated with TSH concentrations 20 minutes after TRH administration (r2 = 0.484, p < 0.001) and the TSH incremental area under the curve during the TRH stimulation test (r2 = 0.307, p < 0.001). These results suggest that pituitary TSH release in response to TRH stimulation might be an important factor contributing to high normal serum TSH concentrations, which is a regular finding in children with overweight and obesity. The clinical significance and the intermediate factors contributing to pituitary TSH release need to be elucidated in future studies. PMID:27485208

  4. Bariatric surgery for obese children and adolescents: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Black, J A; White, B; Viner, R M; Simmons, R K

    2013-08-01

    The number of obese young people continues to rise, with a corresponding increase in extreme obesity and paediatric-adolescent bariatric surgery. We aimed to (i) systematically review the literature on bariatric surgery in children and adolescents; (ii) meta-analyse change in body mass index (BMI) 1-year post-surgery and (iii) report complications, co-morbidity resolution and health-related quality of life (HRQoL). A systematic literature search (1955-2013) was performed to examine adjustable gastric band, sleeve gastrectomy, Roux-en-Y gastric bypass or biliopancreatic diversions operations among obese children and adolescents. Change in BMI a year after surgery was meta-analysed using a random effects model. In total, 637 patients from 23 studies were included in the meta-analysis. There were significant decreases in BMI at 1 year (average weighted mean BMI difference: -13.5 kg m(-2) ; 95% confidence interval [CI] -14.1 to -11.9). Complications were inconsistently reported. There was some evidence of co-morbidity resolution and improvements in HRQol post-surgery. Bariatric surgery leads to significant short-term weight loss in obese children and adolescents. However, the risks of complications are not well defined in the literature. Long-term, prospectively designed studies, with clear reporting of complications and co-morbidity resolution, alongside measures of HRQol, are needed to firmly establish the harms and benefits of bariatric surgery in children and adolescents.

  5. Excellent Intra and Inter-Observer Reproducibility of Wrist Circumference Measurements in Obese Children and Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Campagna, Giuseppe; Zampetti, Simona; Gallozzi, Alessia; Giansanti, Sara; Chiesa, Claudio; Pacifico, Lucia; Buzzetti, Raffaella

    2016-01-01

    In a previous study, we found that wrist circumference, in particular its bone component, was associated with insulin resistance in a population of overweight/obese children. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the intra- and inter-operator variability in wrist circumference measurement in a population of obese children and adolescents. One hundred and two (54 male and 48 female) obese children and adolescents were consecutively enrolled. In all subjects wrist circumferences were measured by two different operators two times to assess intra- and inter-operator variability. Statistical analysis was performed using SAS v.9.4 and JMP v.12. Measurements of wrist circumference showed excellent inter-operator reliability with Intra class Correlation Coefficients (ICC) of 0.96 and ICC of 0.97 for the first and the second measurement, respectively. The intra-operator reliability was, also, very strong with a Concordance Correlation Coefficient (CCC) of 0.98 for both operators. The high reproducibility demonstrated in our results suggests that wrist circumference measurement, being safe, non-invasive and repeatable can be easily used in out-patient settings to identify youths with increased risk of insulin-resistance. This can avoid testing the entire population of overweight/obese children for insulin resistance parameters. PMID:27294398

  6. Evidential Value That Exercise Improves BMI z-Score in Overweight and Obese Children and Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Kelley, George A; Kelley, Kristi S

    2015-01-01

    Background. Given the cardiovascular disease (CVD) related importance of understanding the true effects of exercise on adiposity in overweight and obese children and adolescents, this study examined whether there is evidential value to rule out excessive and inappropriate reporting of statistically significant results, a major problem in the published literature, with respect to exercise-induced improvements in BMI z-score among overweight and obese children and adolescents. Methods. Using data from a previous meta-analysis of 10 published studies that included 835 overweight and obese children and adolescents, a novel, recently developed approach (p-curve) was used to test for evidential value and rule out selective reporting of findings. Chi-squared tests (χ (2)) were used to test for statistical significance with alpha (p) values <0.05 considered statistically significant. Results. Six of 10 findings (60%) were statistically significant. Statistically significant right-skew to rule out selective reporting was found (χ (2) = 38.8, p = 0.0001). Conversely, studies neither lacked evidential value (χ (2) = 6.8, p = 0.87) nor lacked evidential value and were intensely p-hacked (χ (2) = 4.3, p = 0.98). Conclusion. Evidential value results confirm that exercise reduces BMI z-score in overweight and obese children and adolescents, an important therapeutic strategy for treating and preventing CVD.

  7. Longitudinal body composition of children born to normal weight, overweight and obese mothers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objective: The longitudinal trajectories of body composition of children born to normal weight, overweight and obese mothers have not been evaluated using precise body composition methods. This study investigated the relationship between maternal pre-pregnancy BMI and offspring body composition traj...

  8. Dietary patterns are associated with overweight and obesity in Mexican school-age children.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Ramírez, Sonia; Mundo-Rosas, Verónica; García-Guerra, Armando; Shamah-Levy, Teresa

    2011-09-01

    In Mexico, about one third of school-age population is overweight or obese and the diet is one of the main determinants. The purpose of this study was to identify the dietary patterns of Mexican school-age children and to determine their association with the risk of overweight/obesity. This study included 8252 school-age children who participated in the 2006 National Health and Nutrition Survey (ENSANUT-2006). Dietary data were collected using a 7-day Food Frequency Questionnaire (FFQ). Foods were classified into 25 groups and dietary patterns were defined by cluster analysis. Body Mass Index and prevalence of overweight/obesity were calculated. Logistic regression models were used to evaluate the association between dietary patterns and overweight/obesity. Five dietary patterns were identified: Rural dietary pattern (high intake of tortilla and legumes), sweet cereal and corn dishes pattern (high intake of sugary cereals, tortilla, and maize products); diverse pattern (intake of several food groups); western pattern (high intake of sweetened beverages, fried snacks, industrial snack cakes, and sugary cereals), and whole milk and sweet pattern (high intake of whole milk and sweets). We found that children with sweet cereal and corn dishes and western dietary patterns showed an association with overweight and obesity (prevalence ratio 1.29 and 1.35, respectively, using as reference the rural dietary pattern). Patterns characterized by high intakes of sugary cereals, sweetened beverages, industrial snack, cakes, whole milk, and sweets were associated with a higher risk of overweight/obesity among in Mexican school-age children.

  9. A multi-tiered approach to addressing the mental health issues surrounding obesity in children and youth.

    PubMed

    Bazyk, Susan; Winne, Rebecca

    2013-04-01

    Obesity in children and youth is a major public health concern known to have a significant impact on physical and mental health. Although traditional approaches to obesity have emphasized diet and exercise at the individual level, broader attention to the mental health consequences of obesity is crucial. Individuals who are obese live in a world where they are often less accepted resulting in social exclusion and discrimination. A public health multi-tiered approach to obesity focusing on mental health promotion, prevention, and individualized intervention is presented.

  10. Correlates and Suspected Causes of Obesity in Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crothers, Laura M.; Kehle, Thomas J.; Bray, Melissa A.; Theodore, Lea A.

    2009-01-01

    The correlates and suspected causes of the intractable condition obesity are complex and involve environmental and heritable, psychological and physical variables. Overall, the factors associated with and possible causes of it are not clearly understood. Although there exists some ambiguity in the research regarding the degree of happiness in…

  11. Vulvovaginitis in prepubertal girls: the importance of group A Streptococcus.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, R H; Wientzen, R L; Barsanti, R G

    1982-04-01

    We report four cases of group A streptococcal vulvovaginitis in prepubertal children. All cases were acute in onset. This illness presents with nonspecific signs and symptoms of labial inflammation. In a suburban community, streptococcal vulvovaginitis in prepubescent girls may be more common then genital infections due to Neisseria gonorrhoeae. Since media used for the selective isolation of N gonorrhoeae do not readily support the growth of streptococci, we suggest that the routine bacteriologic approach to the diagnosis of vulvovaginitis in young girls include inoculation of the culture swab on 5% sheep blood agar and the application of a bacitracin disk (taxo A disc) to detect any small beta-hemolytic, presumptively group A streptococcal colonies after overnight incubation. Penicillin therapy results in prompt cure.

  12. Beyond Sleep Duration: Distinct Sleep Dimensions are Associated with Obesity in Children and Adolescent’s

    PubMed Central

    Jarrin, Denise C.; McGrath, Jennifer J.; Drake, Christopher L.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Short sleep duration is recognized as a significant risk factor in childhood obesity; however, the question as to how sleep contributes to the development of obesity remains largely unknown. The majority of pediatric studies have relied on sleep duration as the exclusive measure of sleep; this insular approach may be misleading given that sleep is a dynamic multidimensional construct beyond sleep duration, including sleep disturbances and patterns. While these sleep dimensions partly overlap, it is necessary to determine their independent relation with obesity, which in turn, may inform a more comprehensive understanding of putative pathophysiological mechanisms linking sleep and obesity. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether sleep dimensions including sleep duration, disturbances, and patterns were individually associated with obesity, independent of multiple covariates. The second objective was to examine whether sleep disturbances and patterns were independently associated with obesity, after adjusting for sleep duration. Method Participants included 240 healthy children and adolescents (Mage=12.60, SD=1.98; 45.8% females). Anthropometric measures included measured waist and hip circumference, body mass index Z-score and percent body fat. Subjective sleep measures included sleep duration, sleep disturbances, sleep quality, and sleep patterns from youth- and parental-report. Results Youth with larger adiposity and body composition measures reported poorer sleep quality (βavg=−0.14, p<.01), more sleep disturbances (βavg=0.13, p<.05), and showed a delayed sleep phase pattern (βavg=0.15, p<.05), independent of age, sex, pubertal status, physical activity, screen time, socioeconomic status, and sleep duration. Shorter sleep duration was significantly associated with obesity; however, this link was attenuated after adjustment of covariates. Conclusions Results suggest sleep measures beyond duration may more precisely capture influences

  13. Overweight and Obesity Among Children and Adolescents with Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Fuglestad, Anita J.; Boys, Christopher J.; Chang, Pi-Nian; Miller, Bradley S.; Eckerle, Judith K.; Deling, Lindsay; Fink, Birgit A.; Hoecker, Heather L.; Hickey, Marie K.; Jimenez-Vega, Jose M.; Wozniak, Jeffrey R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Because prenatal alcohol exposure is associated with growth deficiency, little attention has been paid to the potential for overweight and obesity in children with fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD). This study examined the prevalence of overweight/obesity (body mass index [BMI]) in a large clinical sample of children with FASD. Methods Children, aged 2 to 19 years, who were evaluated for FASD at University Clinics, included 445 with an FASD diagnosis and 171 with No-FASD diagnosis. Prevalence of overweight/obesity (BMI ≥85 percentile) was compared to national and state prevalence. BMI was examined in relation to FASD diagnosis, gender, and age. Dietary intake data were examined for a young subsample (n = 42). Results Thirty-four percent with any FASD diagnosis were overweight or obese, which did not differ from the No-FASD group or U.S. prevalence. Underweight was prevalent in those with fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) (17%). However, increased rates of overweight/obesity were seen in those with partial FAS (40%). Among adolescents, those with any FASD diagnosis had increased overweight/obesity (42%), particularly among females (50%). The rate in adolescent females with FASD (50%) was nearly 3 times higher than state prevalence for adolescent females (17 to 18%), p < 0.001. In the young subsample, those who were overweight/obese consumed more calories, protein, and total fat per day than those who were not overweight or obese. Conclusions Rates of overweight/obesity are increased in children with partial FAS. In adolescents, rates are increased for any FASD diagnosis (particularly in females). Results are suggestive of possible metabolic/endocrine disruption in FASD—a hypothesis for which there is evidence from animal models. These data suggest that clinicians may consider prenatal alcohol exposure as a risk factor for metabolic/endocrine disruption, should evaluate diet as a risk in this population, and may need to target interventions to females

  14. Socioeconomic status indicators, physical activity, and overweight/obesity in Brazilian children

    PubMed Central

    Matsudo, Victor Keihan Rodrigues; Ferrari, Gerson Luis de Moraes; Araújo, Timóteo Leandro; Oliveira, Luis Carlos; Mire, Emily; Barreira, Tiago V; Tudor-Locke, Catrine; Katzmarzyk, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To analyze the associations between socioeconomic status (SES) indicators and physical activity and overweight/obesity in children. Methods: 485 children wore accelerometers for 7 days. Variables included time in sedentary behavior and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA), and steps/day. Children were further categorized as meeting or not meeting guidelines of ≥60min/day MVPA and ≥12,000 steps/day. Body mass index (BMI) and body fat percentage (BF%) were measured using bioelectrical impedance. Overweight/obesity was defined as BMI >+1 SD and BF% ≥85th percentile. Parents answered questionnaires that questioned total annual household income, parental education level, parental employment status and automobile ownership. Results: Children averaged 59.5min/day in MVPA (44.1% met MVPA guidelines), and 9639 steps/day (18.4% met steps/day guidelines). 45.4% and 33% were overweight/obese classified by BMI and BF% respectively. Higher relative total annual household income level (Odds Ratio 0.31; 95% confidence interval=0.15-0.65), and relatively higher maternal (OR=0.38; 95%CI=0.20-0.72) and paternal (OR=0.36; 95%CI=0.17-0.75) education levels were associated with lower odds of children meeting MVPA guidelines. Household automobile ownership was associated with lower odds of children meeting MVPA (OR=0.48; 95%CI=0.31-0.75) and steps/day guidelines (OR=0.44; 95%CI=0.26-0.74). Conclusions: SES indicators were not associated with overweight/obesity, but higher SES was associated with lower odds of children meeting MVPA guidelines. PMID:26975562

  15. Physical fitness of obese school children in Hat Yai, southern Thailand.

    PubMed

    Pongprapai, S; Mo-suwan, L; Leelasamran, W

    1994-06-01

    259 primary school children (average age 9.2 years) were randomly selected from three groups of children whose weights-for-height were 90-110% (normal 111), > 110-120% (over weight 25), and > 120% (obesity 123) of reference values for Bangkok children. They underwent physical fitness tests which included measurement of speed (50 meters run), flexibility (sit-reach), abdominal strength and endurance (30 seconds sit-up), vital capacity (spirometer), and indirect maximum oxygen uptake (VO2 max-submaximal bicycle ergometer). The results showed that all physical fitness tests were statistically significantly different (p < 0.05) between groups, except for flexibility in boys. But for the girls, only 50 meters run, sit-up and VO2 max showed statistically significant differences (p < 0.05). In the comparison of physical fitness tests between sexes, normal weight boys did better than girls (p < 0.05) for all tests except flexibility. There were no statistically significant differences between sexes in overweight and obese children. This study demonstrated that physical fitness of obese children was worse than that of normal children in both sexes, especially as measured by 50 meters run, sit-up and VO2 max tests. Thus, promotion of exercise in obese children should be stimulated to develop better physical fitness and weight reduction. In comparison of physical fitness between the sexes, boys had better physical fitness than girls, significant in the normal weight group only. There is no definite explanation as to why increase in weight results in no difference of physical fitness between sexes. Lifestyle, physical skills, and genetic determinants should be considered for interpretation of physical fitness. PMID:7855656

  16. Recent trends in the prevalence of overweight and obesity among Canadian children

    PubMed Central

    Rodd, Celia; Sharma, Atul K.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Previous studies have shown an increase in the prevalence of overweight and obesity among Canadian children from 23.3% to 34.7% during 1978–2004. We examined the most recent trends by applying current definitions of overweight and obesity based on World Health Organization (WHO) body mass index (BMI) thresholds and recently validated norms for waist circumference and waist:height ratio. Methods: We examined directly measured height and weight data from the Canadian Community Health Survey (2004–2005) and the Canadian Health Measures Survey (2009–2013). We calculated z scores for BMI, height and weight based on the 2014 WHO growth charts for Canada, including the new extension of weight-for-age beyond 10 years. To calculate z scores for waist circumference and waist:height ratios, we used new charts from the reference population in the US NHANES III (National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 1988–1994). Results: Data were available for 14 014 children aged 3–19 years for the period 2004–2013. We observed a decline in the prevalence of overweight or obesity, from 30.7% (95% confidence interval [CI] 29.7% to 31.6%) to 27.0% (95% CI 25.3% to 28.7%) (p < 0.001) and stabilization in the prevalence of obesity at about 13%. These trends persisted after we adjusted for age, sex and race/ethnicity. Although they declined, the median z scores for BMI, weight and height were positive and higher than those in the WHO reference population. The z scores for waist circumference and waist:height ratio were negative, which indicated that the Canadian children had less central adiposity than American children in historic or contemporary NHANES cohorts. Interpretation: After a period of dramatic growth, BMI z scores and the prevalence of overweight or obesity among Canadian children decreased from 2004 to 2013, which attests to progress against this important public health challenge. PMID:27160875

  17. School-Based Obesity Prevention Interventions for Chilean Children During the Past Decades: Lessons Learned12

    PubMed Central

    Kain, Juliana; Uauy, Ricardo; Concha, Fernando; Leyton, Bárbara; Bustos, Nelly; Salazar, Gabriela; Lobos, Luz; Vio, Fernando

    2012-01-01

    Obesity in Chilean children has increased markedly over the past decades. School-based obesity prevention interventions have been launched by the Ministry of Health and academic groups to tackle this condition. We summarize the main characteristics of the interventions that we have conducted and reflect on the lessons learned. Since 2002, we conducted 1 pilot study, a 2-y controlled intervention including 6- to 12–y-old children (Casablanca), another pilot study, and a 2-y controlled intervention including teachers and their 4- to 9–y-old students (Macul). Both interventions consisted of training teachers to deliver contents on healthy eating, increasing physical education classes, and, additionally in Macul, teachers participated in a wellness program. BMI Z-score and obesity prevalence were compared among children in intervention and control schools by year and among students of intervention and control teachers. In the Casablanca study, the impact was greatest on the younger children during the first school year when the study received the full funding that was required. In Macul, although intervention teachers exhibited improvements in anthropometry and blood measures, the impact on the children was not related to their results. The main lessons learned from these experiences are random allocation of schools, although methodologically desirable, is not always possible; participation of parents is very limited; obesity is not recognized as a problem; and increasing physical activity and implementing training programs for teachers is difficult due to an inflexible curriculum and lack of teachers’ time. Unless these barriers are overcome, obesity prevention programs will not produce positive and lasting outcomes. PMID:22798002

  18. Prevention of overweight and obesity in children and youth: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Fitzpatrick-Lewis, Donna; Morrison, Katherine; Ciliska, Donna; Kenny, Meghan; Usman Ali, Muhammad

    2015-01-01

    Background One-third of Canadian children are overweight or obese. This problem carries considerable concern for negative impacts on current and future health. Promoting healthy growth and development is critical. This review synthesized evidence on the effectiveness of behavioural interventions for preventing overweight and obesity in children and adolescents. Methods We updated the search of a previous Cochrane review. Five databases were searched up to August 2013. Randomized trials of primary care–relevant behavioural (diet, exercise and lifestyle) interventions for preventing overweight and obesity in healthy normal- or mixed-weight children or youth aged 0–18 years were included if 12-week postbaseline data were provided for body mass index (BMI), BMI z-score, or prevalence of overweight or obesity. Any study reporting harms was included. Meta-analyses were performed if possible. Features of interventions showing significant benefits were examined. Results Ninety studies were included, all with mixed-weight populations. Compared with controls, interventions showed a small but significant effect on BMI and BMI z-score (standardized mean difference –0.07, 95% confidence interval [CI] –0.10 to –0.03, I2 = 74%), a reduction in BMI (mean difference –0.09 kg/m2, 95% CI –0.16 to –0.03, I2 = 76%) and a reduced prevalence of overweight and obesity (risk ratio [RR]; RRintervention – RRcontrol 0.94, 95% CI 0.89 to 0.99, I2 = 0%; number needed to treat 51, 95% CI 29 to 289). Little evidence was available on harms. There was variability across efficacious interventions, although many of the interventions were short-term, involved school-aged children and were delivered in educational settings. Interpretation Behavioural prevention interventions are associated with small improvements in weight outcomes in mixed-weight populations of children and adolescents. No intervention strategy consistently produced benefits. Registration: PROSPERO no. CRD42012002754

  19. Obstructive Sleep Apnea in Obese Community-Dwelling Children: The NANOS Study

    PubMed Central

    Alonso-Álvarez, María Luz; Cordero-Guevara, José Aurelio; Terán-Santos, Joaquin; Gonzalez-Martinez, Mónica; Jurado-Luque, María José; Corral-Peñafiel, Jaime; Duran-Cantolla, Joaquin; Kheirandish-Gozal, Leila; Gozal, David

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Obesity in children is assumed to serve as a major risk factor in pediatric obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). However, the prevalence of OSAS in otherwise healthy obese children from the community is unknown. Aim: To determine the prevalence of OSAS in obese children identified and recruited from primary care centers. Methods: A cross-sectional, prospective, multicenter study. Spanish children ages 3–14 y with a body mass index (BMI) greater than or equal to the 95th percentile for age and sex were randomly selected, and underwent medical history, snoring, and Pediatric Sleep Questionnaire (PSQ) assessments, as well as physical examination, nasopharyngoscopy, and nocturnal polysomnography (NPSG) recordings. Results: Two hundred forty-eight children (54.4% males) with mean age of 10.8 ± 2.6 y were studied with a BMI of 28.0 ± 4.7 kg/m2 corresponding to 96.8 ± 0.6 percentile when adjusted for age and sex. The mean respiratory disturbance index (RDI), obstructive RDI (ORDI), and obstructive apnea-hypopnea index (OAHI) were 5.58 ± 9.90, 5.06 ± 9.57, and 3.39 ± 8.78/h total sleep time (TST), respectively. Using ≥ 3/h TST as the cutoff for the presence of OSAS, the prevalence of OSAS ranged from 21.5% to 39.5% depending on whether OAHI, ORDI, or RDI were used. Conclusions: The prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) in obese children from the general population is high. Obese children should be screened for the presence of OSAS. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01322763. Citation: Alonso-Álvarez ML, Cordero-Guevara JA, Terán-Santos J, Gonzalez-Martinez M, Jurado-Luque MJ, Corral-Peñafiel J, Duran-Cantolla J, Kheirandish-Gozal L, Gozal D, for the Spanish Sleep Network. Obstructive sleep apnea in obese community-dwelling children: the NANOS study. SLEEP 2014;37(5):943-949. PMID:24790273

  20. Overweight and Obesity among Children (10-13 years) in Bahrain:A comparison between Two International Standards

    PubMed Central

    O. Musaiger, Abdulrahman; Al-Mannai, Mariam; Al-Marzog, Qazi

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Obesity has become one of the main public health problems worldwide. Childhood obesity rate is growing very fast in both developed and developing countries. This paper aimed to explore the prevalence of overweight and obesity among school children aged 10-13 years in Bahrain, and to find out the difference in this prevalence when using two international standards. Methods: A multistage stratified sampling procedure was used to select 2146 students (1068 males, 1078 females) from public schools in Bahrain. Weight and height were measured and Body Mass Index for age and sex was calculated to determine the obesity levels. Both International Obesity Task Force (IOTF) and World Health Organization (WHO) references were used to determine the prevalence of overweight and obesity. Results: The findings revealed that the prevalence of overweight and obesity ranged from 15.7% to 28.9% among males and from 21.1% to 30.7% among females. The WHO reference standard provided higher prevalence of overweight and obesity than IOTF reference. Conclusion: The study confirmed that obesity is a problem of concern in Bahraini school children and calls for intervention programme to combat obesity in schools. However, the standard used to determine obesity levels should be carefully selected and interpreted. PMID:24948966

  1. The Relationship between Executive Function and Obesity in Children and Adolescents: A Systematic Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Reinert, Kaela R. S.; Po'e, Eli K.; Barkin, Shari L.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to examine the relationship between the development of executive function (EF) and obesity in children and adolescents. We reviewed 1,065 unique abstracts: 31 from PubMed, 87 from Google Scholar, 16 from Science Direct, and 931 from PsycINFO. Of those abstracts, 28 met inclusion criteria and were reviewed. From the articles reviewed, an additional 3 articles were added from article references (N = 31). Twenty-three studies pertained to EF (2 also studied the prefrontal and orbitofrontal cortices (OFCs); 6 also studied cognitive function), five studied the relationship between obesity and prefrontal and orbitofrontal cortices, and three evaluated cognitive function and obesity. Inhibitory control was most often studied in both childhood (76.9%) and adolescent (72.7%) studies, and obese children performed significantly worse (P < 0.05) than healthy weight controls on various tasks measuring this EF domain. Although 27.3% of adolescent studies measured mental flexibility, no childhood studies examined this EF domain. Adolescents with higher BMI had a strong association with neurostructural deficits evident in the OFC. Future research should be longitudinal and use a uniform method of EF measurement to better establish causality between EF and obesity and consequently direct future intervention strategies. PMID:23533726

  2. Obesity and Altered Sleep: A Pathway to Metabolic Derangements in Children?

    PubMed Central

    Hakim, Fahed; Kheirandish-Gozal, Leila; Gozal, David

    2015-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a frequent disorder in children and is primarily associated with adenotonsillar hypertrophy., The prominent increases in childhood overweight and obesity rates in the world even among youngest of children have translated into parallel increases in the prevalence of OSA, and such trends will undoubtedly be associated with deleterious global health outcomes and life expectancy. Even an obesity phenotype in childhood OSA, more close to the adult type, has been recently proposed. Reciprocal interactions between sleep in general, OSA, obesity, and disruptions of metabolic homeostasis have emerged in recent years. These associations have suggested the a priori involvement of complex sets of metabolic and inflammatory pathways all of which may underlie increased risk for increased orexigenic behaviors and dysfunctional satiety, hyperlipidemia, and insulin resistance that ultimately favor the emergence of metabolic syndrome. Here, we will review some of the critical evidence supporting the proposed associations between sleep disruption and the metabolism-obesity complex. In addition, we will describe the more recent evidence linking the potential interactive roles of OSA and obesity on metabolic phenotype. PMID:26072337

  3. Obesity and Altered Sleep: A Pathway to Metabolic Derangements in Children?

    PubMed

    Hakim, Fahed; Kheirandish-Gozal, Leila; Gozal, David

    2015-06-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a frequent disorder in children and is primarily associated with adenotonsillar hypertrophy. The prominent increases in childhood overweight and obesity rates in the world even among youngest of children have translated into parallel increases in the prevalence of OSA, and such trends are undoubtedly associated with deleterious global health outcomes and life expectancy. Even an obesity phenotype in childhood OSA, more close to the adult type, has been recently proposed. Reciprocal interactions between sleep in general, OSA, obesity, and disruptions of metabolic homeostasis have emerged in recent years. These associations have suggested the a priori involvement of complex sets of metabolic and inflammatory pathways, all of which may underlie an increased risk for increased orexigenic behaviors and dysfunctional satiety, hyperlipidemia, and insulin resistance that ultimately favor the emergence of metabolic syndrome. Here, we review some of the critical evidence supporting the proposed associations between sleep disruption and the metabolism-obesity complex. In addition, we describe the more recent evidence linking the potential interactive roles of OSA and obesity on metabolic phenotype. PMID:26072337

  4. A comparative study of prevalence of overweight and obesity in children in different provinces of Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    El-Hazmi, Mohsen A F; Warsy, Arjumand S

    2002-06-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of overweight and obesity in Saudi children from different provinces of the country and in different age groups. A total of 12,701 children (6,281 boys and 6,420 girls) with ages ranging from 1 to 18 years were enrolled during a household screening programme in different provinces of Saudi Arabia and height and weight were recorded. Body Mass Index (BMI) was calculated and applying age and sex specific cut-off points for BMI the children were grouped into overweight and obese. The overall prevalence of overweight was 10.68 and 12.7 per cent and that of obesity was 5.98 and 6.74 per cent in the boys and girls, respectively. In the different provinces the prevalence of overweight ranged from 8.8 to 27.4 per cent and from 9.3 to 27.6 per cent and obesity ranged from 4.7 to 10.4 per cent and from 4.3 to 13.8 per cent in the boys and girls, respectively. Prevalence of overweight and obesity was also calculated after grouping the children into 17 groups according to age. It is concluded that overweight and obesity occur in all provinces of Saudi Arabia although at a variable prevalence. In general, girls have a higher prevalence of both overweight and obesity compared with boys. Eastern province children have the highest prevalence and the Southern province children have the lowest prevalence of overweight and obesity. When grouped according to age, overweight and obesity tend to increase with age. Suggestions are made to prevent overweight and obesity development in Saudi children.

  5. Virtual reality and interactive gaming technology for obese and diabetic children: is military medical technology applicable?

    PubMed

    Talbot, Thomas Brett

    2011-03-01

    The Telemedicine and Advanced Technology Research Center has pursued a number of technologies that may have application to the problems of obesity and diabetes management in children. Children are getting fatter because of increased caloric intake and less physical activity. Furthermore, technology advances have failed to significantly improve metabolic control of type 1 diabetes. Behavioral strategies should target video games, mobile phones, and other popular items used by children and seen by them as necessities. Exergaming is considerably more active than traditional video gaming and can be equivalent to moderate-intensity exercise. Diabetes equipment such as continuous glucose monitors and insulin pumps lack integration and live connectivity and suffer from a poor user interface. In contrast, mobile phones offer wireless connectivity, an excellent voice-enabled interface, and cloud connectivity that could possibly serve as a motivational and compliance tool for diabetes patients through text messaging to the patient, parents, and physician. Mobile phones have the potential to motivate and educate obese children as well. Exergaming for obese children could also be integrated into award systems of game consoles and game play time. The key to successful implementation of these strategies depends on the ability to integrate and connect the various technologies.

  6. Restricting marketing to children: consensus on policy interventions to address obesity.

    PubMed

    Raine, Kim D; Lobstein, Tim; Landon, Jane; Kent, Monique Potvin; Pellerin, Suzie; Caulfield, Timothy; Finegood, Diane; Mongeau, Lyne; Neary, Neil; Spence, John C

    2013-05-01

    Obesity presents major challenges for public health and the evidence is strong. Lessons from tobacco control indicate a need for changing the policy and environments to make healthy choices easier and to create more opportunities for children to achieve healthy weights. In April 2011, the Alberta Policy Coalition for Chronic Disease Prevention convened a consensus conference on environmental determinants of obesity such as marketing of unhealthy foods and beverages to children. We examine the political environment, evidence, issues, and challenges of placing restrictions on marketing of unhealthy foods and beverages within Canada. We recommend a national regulatory system prohibiting commercial marketing of foods and beverages to children and suggest that effective regulations must set minimum standards, monitor compliance, and enact penalties for non-compliance.

  7. Restricting marketing to children: Consensus on policy interventions to address obesity

    PubMed Central

    Raine, Kim D; Lobstein, Tim; Landon, Jane; Kent, Monique Potvin; Pellerin, Suzie; Caulfield, Timothy; Finegood, Diane; Mongeau, Lyne; Neary, Neil; Spence, John C

    2013-01-01

    Obesity presents major challenges for public health and the evidence is strong. Lessons from tobacco control indicate a need for changing the policy and environments to make healthy choices easier and to create more opportunities for children to achieve healthy weights. In April 2011, the Alberta Policy Coalition for Chronic Disease Prevention convened a consensus conference on environmental determinants of obesity such as marketing of unhealthy foods and beverages to children. We examine the political environment, evidence, issues, and challenges of placing restrictions on marketing of unhealthy foods and beverages within Canada. We recommend a national regulatory system prohibiting commercial marketing of foods and beverages to children and suggest that effective regulations must set minimum standards, monitor compliance, and enact penalties for non-compliance. PMID:23447026

  8. Effects of an occupation-based obesity prevention program for children at risk.

    PubMed

    Lau, Cynthia; Stevens, Devan; Jia, Jasmine

    2013-04-01

    Since the prevalence of obesity-related medical conditions in children and adolescents has increased over the past several years obesity prevention has become a vital need for our society and a focus of our professional practice. The primary aim of this pilot study was to increase children's experiences with physical activity and healthy foods to promote self-efficacy related to a healthy lifestyle. Using a pre- and posttest design, the Healthy Choices for Me program was evaluated for its efficacy. Intervention consisted of a 12-week after-school program implemented by occupational therapy students. Elementary-aged children from two lower social economic schools in an urban area participated in the program. Results demonstrated positive changes in food behavior, food self-efficacy, and vegetable consumption for the participants.

  9. Exercise for prevention of obesity and diabetes in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    McCall, Anthony; Raj, Ramona

    2009-07-01

    As rates of obesity and type 2 diabetes continue to escalate, effective means of prevention become paramount in curbing the largest epidemic of our times. With adult obesity rates in the United States already at 34%, according to the most recent National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) data, preventing obesity in childhood is of increasing urgency. Exercise and lifestyle modification have been shown to be effective in adult trials for diabetes prevention, such as the Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP), Finnish Diabetes Study, and Da Qing Study. This article reviews randomized, controlled trials in children, using exercise and lifestyle modification in the prevention of insulin resistance and obesity. This review encompasses studies within the past decade from Planet Health in 1999 to the Beijing Obesity Intervention trial published in 2007 and covers both school-based and family-based approaches. A challenging task by any means, these trials have contributed valuable insight into the efficacy of various approaches toward preventing childhood obesity and insulin resistance, a pressing public health concern.

  10. Optimizing weight gain in pregnancy to prevent obesity in women and children.

    PubMed

    Herring, S J; Rose, M Z; Skouteris, H; Oken, E

    2012-03-01

    Pregnancy is now considered to be an important risk factor for new or persistent obesity among women during the childbearing years. High gestational weight gain is the strongest predictor of maternal overweight or obesity following pregnancy. A growing body of evidence also suggests that both high and low gestational weight gains are independently associated with an increased risk of childhood obesity, suggesting that influences occurring very early in life are contributing to obesity onset. In response to these data, the US Institute of Medicine (IOM) revised gestational weight gain guidelines in 2009 for the first time in nearly two decades. However, less than one third of pregnant women achieve guideline-recommended gains, with the majority gaining above IOM recommended levels. To date, interventions to optimize pregnancy weight gains have had mixed success. In this paper, we summarize the evidence from human and animal studies linking over-nutrition and under-nutrition in pregnancy to maternal and child obesity. In addition, we discuss published trials and ongoing interventions to achieve appropriate gestational weight gain as a strategy for obesity prevention in women and their children.

  11. Overweight and obesity among North American Indian infants, children, and youth.

    PubMed

    Schell, Lawrence M; Gallo, Mia V

    2012-01-01

    The frequency of overweight and obesity among North American Indian children and youth exceeds that of other ethnic groups in the United States. This observation is based on studies using body mass index as the primary measure of overweight and obesity. In the mid-20th century, there were regional differences among North American Indian groups in sub-adults' size and shape and only a few Southwestern groups were characterized by high rates of overweight and obesity. In most populations, the high prevalence of overweight and obesity developed in the last decades of the 20th century. Childhood obesity may begin early in life as many studies report higher birth weights and greater weight-for-height in the preschool years. Contributing factors include higher maternal weights, a nutritional transition from locally caught or raised foods to store bought items, psychosocial stress associated with threats to cultural identity and national sovereignty, and exposure to obesogenic pollutants, all associated to some degree with poverty. Obesity is part of the profile of poor health among Native Americans in the US and Canada, and contributes to woefully high rates of diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and early mortality. Interventions that are culturally appropriate are needed to reduce weights at all points in the lifespan.

  12. Overweight and Obesity Among North American Indian Infants, Children, and Youth

    PubMed Central

    SCHELL, LAWRENCE M.; GALLO, MIA V.

    2012-01-01

    The frequency of overweight and obesity among North American Indian children and youth exceeds that of other ethnic groups in the United States. This observation is based on studies using body mass index as the primary measure of overweight and obesity. In the mid-20th century, there were regional differences among North American Indian groups in sub-adults’ size and shape and only a few Southwestern groups were characterized by high rates of overweight and obesity. In most populations, the high prevalence of overweight and obesity developed in the last decades of the 20th century. Childhood obesity may begin early in life as many studies report higher birth weights and greater weight-for-height in the preschool years. Contributing factors include higher maternal weights, a nutritional transition from locally caught or raised foods to store bought items, psychosocial stress associated with threats to cultural identity and national sovereignty, and exposure to obesogenic pollutants, all associated to some degree with poverty. Obesity is part of the profile of poor health among Native Americans in the US and Canada, and contributes to woefully high rates of diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and early mortality. Interventions that are culturally appropriate are needed to reduce weights at all points in the lifespan. PMID:22378356

  13. Hypothalamic obesity in children: pathophysiology to clinical management.

    PubMed

    Haliloglu, Belma; Bereket, Abdullah

    2015-05-01

    Hypothalamic obesity (HyOb) is a complex neuroendocrine disorder caused by damage to the hypothalamus, which results in disruption of energy regulation. The key hypothalamic areas of energy regulation are the ARC (arcuate nucleus), the VMH (ventromedial hypothalamus), the PVN (paraventriculer nuclei) and the LHA (lateral hypothalamic area). These pathways can be disrupted mechanically by hypothalamic tumors, neurosurgery, inflammatory disorders, radiotherapy and trauma or functionally as such seen in genetic diseases. Rapid weight gain and severe obesity are the most striking features of HyOb and caused by hyperphagia, reduced basal metabolic rate (BMR) and decreased physical activity. HyOb is usually unresponsive to diet and exercise. Although, GLP-1 and its anologs seem to be a new agent, there is still no curative treatment. Thus, prevention is of prime importance and the clinicians should be alert and vigilant in patients at risk for development of HyOb.

  14. Etiologies of Obesity in Children: Nature and Nurture

    PubMed Central

    Skelton, Joseph A.; Irby, Megan B.; Grzywacz, Joseph; Miller, Gary

    2011-01-01

    Synopsis Childhood obesity is a profoundly complex problem and serves as an example of a biospychosocial issue. Scientific inquiry has provided incredible insight into the complex etiology of weight gain, but must be viewed as an interaction between a human’s propensity to conserve calories for survival in a world with an abundance of it. This chapter will provide a brief overview divided between biologic (Nature) and psychosocial and behavioral (Nurture) factors. PMID:22093854

  15. Etiologies of obesity in children: nature and nurture.

    PubMed

    Skelton, Joseph A; Irby, Megan B; Grzywacz, Joseph G; Miller, Gary

    2011-12-01

    Childhood obesity is a profoundly complex problem and serves as an example of a biospsychosocial issue. Scientific inquiry has provided incredible insight into the complex etiology of weight gain but must be viewed as an interaction between a human's propensity to conserve calories for survival in a world with an abundance of it. This article provides a brief overview divided between biological (nature) and psychosocial and behavioral (nurture) factors.

  16. A Community-Based Intervention to Prevent Obesity Beginning at Birth among American Indian Children: Study Design and Rationale for the PTOTS Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karanja, Njeri; Aickin, Mikel; Lutz, Tam; Mist, Scott; Jobe, Jared B.; Maupome, Gerardo; Ritenbaugh, Cheryl

    2012-01-01

    Eating and physical activity behaviors associated with adult obesity have early antecedents, yet few studies have focused on obesity prevention interventions targeting very young children. Efforts to prevent obesity beginning at birth seem particularly important in populations at risk for early-onset obesity. National estimates indicate that…

  17. Accuracy of Neck Circumference in Classifying Overweight and Obese US Children.

    PubMed

    Kim, Youngwon; Lee, Jung-Min; Laurson, Kelly; Bai, Yang; Gaesser, Glenn A; Welk, Gregory J

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate classification accuracy of NC and compare it with body mass index (BMI) in identifying overweight/obese US children. Methods. Data were collected from 92 children (boys: 61) aged 7 to 13 over a 2-year period. NC, BMI, and percent of body fat (BF%) were measured in each child and their corresponding cut-off values were applied to classify the children as being overweight/obese. Classification accuracy of NC and BMI was systematically investigated for boys and girls in relation to true overweight/obesity categorization as assessed with a criterion measure of BF% (i.e., Bod Pod). Results. For boys, Cohen's κ (0.25), sensitivity (38.1%), and specificity (85.0%) of NC were smaller in comparison with Cohen's κ (0.57), sensitivity (57.1%), and specificity (95.0%) of BMI in relation to BF% categorization. For girls, Cohen's κ (0.45), sensitivity (50.0%), and specificity (91.3%) of NC were smaller in comparison with Cohen's κ (0.52), sensitivity (50.0%), and specificity (95.7%) of BMI. Conclusion. NC measurement was not better than BMI in classifying childhood overweight/obesity and, for boys, NC was inferior to BMI. Pediatricians and/or pediatric researchers should be cautious or wary about incorporating NC measurements in their pediatric care and/or research.

  18. Accuracy of Neck Circumference in Classifying Overweight and Obese US Children

    PubMed Central

    Gaesser, Glenn A.; Welk, Gregory J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate classification accuracy of NC and compare it with body mass index (BMI) in identifying overweight/obese US children. Methods. Data were collected from 92 children (boys: 61) aged 7 to 13 over a 2-year period. NC, BMI, and percent of body fat (BF%) were measured in each child and their corresponding cut-off values were applied to classify the children as being overweight/obese. Classification accuracy of NC and BMI was systematically investigated for boys and girls in relation to true overweight/obesity categorization as assessed with a criterion measure of BF% (i.e., Bod Pod). Results. For boys, Cohen's κ (0.25), sensitivity (38.1%), and specificity (85.0%) of NC were smaller in comparison with Cohen's κ (0.57), sensitivity (57.1%), and specificity (95.0%) of BMI in relation to BF% categorization. For girls, Cohen's κ (0.45), sensitivity (50.0%), and specificity (91.3%) of NC were smaller in comparison with Cohen's κ (0.52), sensitivity (50.0%), and specificity (95.7%) of BMI. Conclusion. NC measurement was not better than BMI in classifying childhood overweight/obesity and, for boys, NC was inferior to BMI. Pediatricians and/or pediatric researchers should be cautious or wary about incorporating NC measurements in their pediatric care and/or research. PMID:24639913

  19. Feeding her children, but risking her health: the intersection of gender, household food insecurity and obesity.

    PubMed

    Martin, Molly A; Lippert, Adam M

    2012-06-01

    This paper investigates one explanation for the consistent observation of a strong, negative correlation in the United States between income and obesity among women, but not men. We argue that a key factor is the gendered expectation that mothers are responsible for feeding their children. When income is limited and households face food shortages, we predict that an enactment of these gendered norms places mothers at greater risk for obesity relative to child-free women and all men. We adopt an indirect approach to study these complex dynamics using data on men and women of childrearing age and who are household heads or partners in the 1999-2003 waves of the Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID). We find support for our prediction: Food insecure mothers are more likely than child-free men and women and food insecure fathers to be overweight or obese and to gain more weight over four years. The risks are greater for single mothers relative to mothers in married or cohabiting relationships. Supplemental models demonstrate that this pattern cannot be attributed to post-pregnancy biological changes that predispose mothers to weight gain or an evolutionary bias toward biological children. Further, results are unchanged with the inclusion of physical activity, smoking, drinking, receipt of food stamps, or Women, Infants and Children (WIC) nutritional program participation. Obesity, thus, offers a physical expression of the vulnerabilities that arise from the intersection of gendered childcare expectations and poverty. PMID:22245381

  20. Feeding her children, but risking her health: the intersection of gender, household food insecurity and obesity.

    PubMed

    Martin, Molly A; Lippert, Adam M

    2012-06-01

    This paper investigates one explanation for the consistent observation of a strong, negative correlation in the United States between income and obesity among women, but not men. We argue that a key factor is the gendered expectation that mothers are responsible for feeding their children. When income is limited and households face food shortages, we predict that an enactment of these gendered norms places mothers at greater risk for obesity relative to child-free women and all men. We adopt an indirect approach to study these complex dynamics using data on men and women of childrearing age and who are household heads or partners in the 1999-2003 waves of the Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID). We find support for our prediction: Food insecure mothers are more likely than child-free men and women and food insecure fathers to be overweight or obese and to gain more weight over four years. The risks are greater for single mothers relative to mothers in married or cohabiting relationships. Supplemental models demonstrate that this pattern cannot be attributed to post-pregnancy biological changes that predispose mothers to weight gain or an evolutionary bias toward biological children. Further, results are unchanged with the inclusion of physical activity, smoking, drinking, receipt of food stamps, or Women, Infants and Children (WIC) nutritional program participation. Obesity, thus, offers a physical expression of the vulnerabilities that arise from the intersection of gendered childcare expectations and poverty.

  1. Immigrant enclaves and obesity in preschool-aged children in Los Angeles County.

    PubMed

    Nobari, Tabashir Z; Wang, May-Choo; Chaparro, M Pia; Crespi, Catherine M; Koleilat, Maria; Whaley, Shannon E

    2013-09-01

    While neighborhood environments are increasingly recognized as important contributors to obesity risk, less has been reported on the socio-cultural aspects of neighborhoods that influence obesity development. This is especially true among immigrants, who may lack the necessary language skills to navigate their new living environments. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that young children of immigrants would be at lower obesity risk if they lived in neighborhoods where neighbors share the same language and culture. Using 2000 Census data and 2003-2009 data from the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children in Los Angeles County, we examined the relation between BMI z-scores in low-income children aged 2-5 years (N = 250,029) and the concentration of neighborhood residents who spoke the same language as the children's mothers. Using multi-level modeling and adjusting for child's gender and race/ethnicity, household education, neighborhood socioeconomic status, and year the child was examined, we found that percent of neighborhood residents who spoke the same language as the child's mother was negatively associated with BMI z-scores. This relation varied by child's race/ethnicity and mother's preferred language. The relation was linear and negative among children of English-speaking Hispanic mothers and Chinese-speaking mothers. However, for Hispanic children of Spanish-speaking mothers the relation was curvilinear, initially exhibiting a positive relation which reversed at higher neighborhood concentrations of Spanish-speaking residents. Our findings suggest that living in neighborhoods where residents share the same language may influence obesity-related behaviors (namely diet and physical activity) possibly through mechanisms involving social networks, support, and norms.

  2. Parental Perspectives of a 4-Week Family-Based Lifestyle Intervention for Children with Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Pearson, Erin S.; Irwin, Jennifer D.; Burke, Shauna M.; Shapiro, Sheree

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The childhood obesity epidemic is now recognized as one of the most serious public health challenges of the 21st century. Community-based behaviour modification treatment programs involving both children and their families are warranted. The purpose of this study was to explore the experiences of parents whose children participated in the Children's Health and Activity Modification Program (C.H.A.M.P.): a 4-week lifestyle program delivered as a day-camp for obese children at risk for type II diabetes and their families. Parents were required to attend four half-day education sessions during the intervention period. Methods: Seven focus groups were conducted immediately following the 4-week interventions offered in August 2008 and 2009. The perspectives of 38 parents representing 32 children aged 8-14 with obesity (i.e., body mass index > the 95th percentile) were shared. Results: Overall, parents were pleased with the impact of the program and proud of their children's accomplishments (e.g., increased physical activity levels, enhanced self-esteem, weight loss). Several facilitators to success (e.g., social support; a positive environment) and barriers to its maintenance (e.g., time management; unsupportive family members) were identified, and recommendations were made for future programs. Although parents found the half-day sessions valuable, post-programmatic bi-monthly booster session adherence declined over the one-year follow-up period. Conclusion: Delivered as a 4-week day-camp, C.H.A.M.P. represents a unique approach to the treatment of childhood obesity. Future family-based interventions should consider avenues for intensifying the parental program component whilst employing strategies to promote parental adherence in service of enhancing long-term sustainability of health behaviour changes. PMID:23445699

  3. [Influence of a program of physical activity in children and obese adolescents with sleep apnea; study protocol].

    PubMed

    Aguilar Cordero, M J; Sánchez López, A M; Mur Villar, N; Sánchez Marenco, A; Guisado Barrilao, R

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies show an alarming increase in the rate of overweight / obesity among the infant - juvenile population. Obesity in childhood is associated with a significant number of complications, such as sleep apnea syndrome, insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes, hypertension, cardiovascular disease and some cancers. It is estimated that the prevalence of sleep apnea in children is 2-3% in the general population, while in obese adolescents, varies between 13% and 66%, according to various studies. It is associated with impairment of neurocognitive function, behavior, cardiovascular system, metabolic disorders and growth. Sleep apnea is a serious public health problem that increases when children and adolescents are overweight or obese. We hypothesize that aerobic endurance exercise can be an effective treatment for obesity and apnea at the same time. The aim of this study was to determine the influence of physical activity in children and adolescents with overweight / obesity in sleep apnea. An observational, descriptive, prospective, longitudinal study will be carried out in children with sleep apnea and obesity. The universe will be made up of 60 children and adolescents aged between 10 and 18 years, attending the endocrinology service for suffering of obesity in the Hospital Clinico San Cecilio of Granada during the period September 2012-September 2013. The smple will consist of children and adolescents that meet these characteristics and to whom their parents/tutors have authorized through the informed consent. Sleep apnea in children wil be measured by polysomnography and sleep quality questionnaire. There will also be a nutritional assessment by a food frequency questionnaire and an anthropometric assessment. Among the expected results are the lower overweight and obesity in children through the physical activity program. To reduce apnea and to improve sleep quality.

  4. Children, youth, and parents: screening for obesity risk with the spectrum of physical activity.

    PubMed

    Gable, Sara; Tosh, Aneesh K

    2014-01-01

    The current article reviews several practical approaches to screening for obesity risk among children and youth, with an emphasis on the spectrum of physical activity. We encourage physicians to utilize evidence-based strategies (e.g., 5-2-1-0), implement motivational interviewing techniques, and focus on "crunch time" (i.e., the period of day after school and before bedtime) when gathering information about physical activity type and intensity. The insights gained are useful for evaluating obesity risk and establishing goals for lifestyle interventions. Characteristics of successful interventions with youth are also discussed and include goal-setting, self-monitoring, and pedometers.

  5. Policies to support obesity prevention for children: a focus on of early childhood policies.

    PubMed

    McPherson, Marianne E; Homer, Charles J

    2011-12-01

    Policies at many levels may help to shape environments that promote healthy weight and prevent obesity. We present policies to support obesity prevention for young children. We highlight policy Sand environmental systems change examples in the areas of promoting breastfeeding and providing healthy affordable food and information about food in community and child care settings and promoting physical activity in child care and the community. We address the role of the health care system and health care professionals to shape and advocate for policy and environmental systems change and provide resources for pediatric health care professionals to engage in community-based advocacy. PMID:22093867

  6. Disruption in the relationship between blood pressure and salty taste thresholds among overweight and obese children

    PubMed Central

    Bobowski, Nuala K.

    2015-01-01

    Background Prevalence of high blood pressure (BP) among American children has increased over the past two decades, due in part to increasing rates of obesity and excessive dietary salt intake. Objective We tested the hypotheses that the relationships among BP, salty taste sensitivity, and salt intake differ between normal-weight and overweight/obese children. Design In an observational study, sodium chloride (NaCl) and monosodium glutamate (MSG) taste detection thresholds were measured using the Monell two-alternative, forced-choice, paired-comparison tracking method. Weight and BP were measured, and salt intake was determined by 24-hour dietary recall. Participants/Setting Eight- to 14-year-olds (N=97; 52% overweight or obese) from the Philadelphia area completed anthropometrics and BP measurements; 97% completed one or both thresholds. Seventy-six percent provided valid dietary recall data. Testing was completed between December 2011 and August 2012. Main outcome measures NaCl and MSG detection thresholds, BP, and dietary salt intake. Statistical analyses Outcome measures were compared between normal-weight and overweight/obese children with t-tests. Relationships among outcome measures within groups were examined with Pearson correlations, and multiple regression analysis was used to examine the relationship between BP and thresholds, controlling for age, BMI-Z score, and dietary salt intake. Results Salt and MSG thresholds were positively correlated (r(71)=0.30, p=0.01) and did not differ between body-weight groups (p>0.20). Controlling for age, BMI-Z score, and salt intake, systolic BP was associated with NaCl thresholds among normal-weight children (p=0.01), but not among overweight/obese children. All children consumed excess salt (>8 g/day). Grain and meat products were the primary source of dietary sodium. Conclusions The apparent disruption in the relationship between salty taste response and BP among overweight/obese children suggests the relationship

  7. RISK FACTORS FOR ABDOMINAL OBESITY IN CHILDREN AND ADOLESCENTS FROM CRACOW, POLAND (1983-2000).

    PubMed

    Suder, Agnieszka; Chrzanowska, Maria

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to determine abdominal obesity risk factors in two successive cohorts of children and adolescents aged 4-18 from Cracow, Poland, examined during the years of political transformation. The influence of biological, socio-demographic and lifestyle factors on abdominal obesity was analysed by calculating odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals using logistic regression analysis. It was found that for girls obesity in both parents (OR=4.31; 95% CI 1.73-20.70) and high birth weight (OR=1.78; 95% CI 1.12-2.82) were significant risk factors for abdominal obesity in the 1983 cohort. In the 2000 cohort obesity in both parents for boys and girls (boys: OR=5.85; 95% CI 1.36-25.10; girls: OR=4.82; 95% CI 1.17-19.77), low level of parental education in girls (OR=2.06; 95% CI 1.15-3.69), having only one son (OR=1.96; 95% CI 1.36-3.40), parents' smoking habits in girls (OR=2.94; 95% CI 1.46-5.91) and lack of undertaking physical activity in sport clubs in boys (OR=6.11; 95% CI 1.46-25.47) were significant abdominal obesity risk factors. Higher number of hours of leisure time physical activity (OR=0.89; 95% CI 0.81-0.97) significantly lowered the risk of abdominal obesity in boys in the 2000 cohort. The greater differentiation of abdominal obesity risk factors in the 2000 cohort in comparison to the 1983 cohort may have resulted from the social and economic changes taking place in Poland at the end of the 20th century.

  8. Maternal gestational diabetes mellitus and overweight and obesity in offspring: a study in Chinese children.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Y L; Ma, R M; Lao, T T; Chen, Z; Du, M Y; Liang, K; Huang, Y K; Zhang, L; Yang, M H; Sun, Y H; Li, H; Ding, Z B

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of maternal gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) and breast feeding on childhood overweight and obesity in a mainland Chinese population. The incidence of and factors associated with overweight and obesity were compared between children of mothers with (n=1068) and without (n=1756) GDM. The independent roles of the associated factors were examined by multiple logistic regression analysis. The incidence of overweight was higher (16.6 v. 12.6%, P=0.002) in the GDM group, but that of obesity was not different (10.7 v. 12.0%, P=0.315). At age 1-2 and 2-5 years, no difference in overweight (11.0 v. 12.0%, P=0.917, and 15.7 v. 14.6%, P=0.693, respectively) was found, while obesity (8.0 v. 13.6%, P=0.019, and 8.4 v. 13.4%, P=0.014, respectively) was less frequent in the GDM offspring. At age 5-10 years, increased overweight (22.2 v. 12.1%, P<0.001) and obesity (15.9 v. 9.0%, P=0.001) were found in the GDM group, which was associated with maternal obesity, being born large-for-gestational age, male gender and formula feeding. After adjusting for confounding factors, GDM remained an independent determinant of offspring overweight and obesity (aOR 2.28, 95% CI 1.61-3.22), suggesting that the effects of GDM were independent of breast feeding, as well as of maternal obesity and birth size.

  9. Improved metabolic and cardiorespiratory fitness during a recreational training program in obese children.

    PubMed

    Calcaterra, Valeria; Larizza, Daniela; Codrons, Erwan; De Silvestri, Annalisa; Brambilla, Paola; Abela, Sebastiano; Arpesella, Marisa; Vandoni, Matteo

    2013-01-01

    Physical activity may protect from the adverse effects of obesity. In obese children, an increased adherence and a decreased drop-out rate during exercise could be achieved with adapted activities. We studied a recreational 12-week controlled training program for sedentary obese children, including interactive video games. We enrolled 22 obese subjects (13.23±1.76 years) in an exercise program, implemented twice a week for a 12-week period. The program consisted of a combination of circuit-based aerobics, strength and resistance exercises; specifically soccer, rugby, volleyball and basketball and interactive video game exercises. Outcome measurements included body composition, metabolic profile and cardiorespiratory fitness. During the 12-week training program there was a significant decrease in body mass index (BMI) (p=0.002), SDS-BMI (p=0.003), waist circumference (p=0.004), waist circumference/height ratio (p=0.001),% fat mass (p=0.001), blood glucose (p=0.001), homeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) (p=0.04), triglycerides (p=0.03) and systolic pressure (p=0.04) before and after exercise. Improvement in estimated maximum oxygen consumption (VO2max) (p<0.001) correlated with a decrease in fat mass (p=0.01), triglycerides (p=0.04) and insulin resistance (p=0.02). Exercise improved metabolic and cardiorespiratory fitness in obese children. Exercise training does not necessarily need to be vigorous, recreational programs are also effective and may encourage children to participate in physical activity and limit initial drop-out. PMID:23327787

  10. The Relationship Between Metabolic Syndrome and Left Ventricular Mass Index in Obese Children

    PubMed Central

    Atabek, Mehmet Emre; Akyüz, Esra; Çimen, Derya

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the relationships between metabolic syndrome (MS), other metabolic features and left ventricular mass index (LVMI) in a population of obese children and adolescents with MS. Methods: Two hundred and eight obese children and adolescents (119 females and 89 males, mean age: 11.9±2.7 years) and control subjects (24 females and 26 males, mean age: 11.4±2.9 years) were enrolled in the study. The insulin sensitivity index and LVMI were determined. The International Diabetes Federation criteria were used to diagnose MS. Results: The obese patients were divided into MS group (n=55) and non-MS (n=153) group. The values of LVMI in the MS group were significantly higher than those in the non-MS group (p=0.014). The present LVMI cut-off point of 33g/m2 for the diagnosis of MS yielded a sensitivity of 97% and a specificity of 98%. LVMI was found to be positively correlated in univariate analysis with height, weight, body mass index (BMI) SDS, fasting insulin level, homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) and fasting glucose to insulin ratio (FGIR) and negatively correlated with quantitative insulin sensitivity check index (QUICK-I). Conclusions: We suggest that our optimal LVMI cut-off value for identifying MS may be considered as a sensitive index in screening obese children and adolescents for pediatric MS. Assessment of LVMI in obese children and adolescents may be used as a tool in predicting the presence of MS and its associated cardiovascular risks. Conflict of interest:None declared. PMID:21911326

  11. Breastfeeding offers protection against obesity in children of recently immigrated Latina women.

    PubMed

    Verstraete, Sofia G; Heyman, Melvin B; Wojcicki, Janet M

    2014-06-01

    Breastfeeding has been found to have a protective effect on subsequent development of obesity in childhood, particularly in white, non-Hispanic populations. The protective effect of nursing for more than 12 months in children of Latina women is less clear, which may be due to differences in levels of acculturation in previously studied populations. We evaluated the association between breastfeeding for 12 months or more and risk for obesity in a cohort of children of recently immigrated relatively unacculturated Latina mothers. Maternal characteristics at birth, including length of stay in the United States, breastfeeding habits at 4-6 weeks of age, 6 months, and 1 year, and anthropometric measurements were obtained for a cohort of 196 children participating in a prospective study. At 1 year of age 39.0% of infants were being breastfed. Being breastfed at 1 year of age was associated with a decreased risk of obesity in both univariate (odds ratio (OR) 0.49, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.21-0.83) and multivariate models (OR 0.39, 95% CI 0.02-0.93) adjusting for maternal BMI, marital status, education level, country of origin, age, years of living in the United States, and child's birth weight at 3 years of age, regardless of mother's acculturation status using length of stay in the United States as a proxy for acculturation. The association with breastfeeding persisted at 4 years of age as a protective factor for obesity (OR 0.29, 95% CI 0.11-0.80). Breastfeeding for longer than 12 months provides a significant protective effect on the development of obesity in early childhood in a cohort of children of high-risk recently immigrated Latina women in San Francisco who were relatively unacculturated to the United States. PMID:24249439

  12. Improved metabolic and cardiorespiratory fitness during a recreational training program in obese children.

    PubMed

    Calcaterra, Valeria; Larizza, Daniela; Codrons, Erwan; De Silvestri, Annalisa; Brambilla, Paola; Abela, Sebastiano; Arpesella, Marisa; Vandoni, Matteo

    2013-01-01

    Physical activity may protect from the adverse effects of obesity. In obese children, an increased adherence and a decreased drop-out rate during exercise could be achieved with adapted activities. We studied a recreational 12-week controlled training program for sedentary obese children, including interactive video games. We enrolled 22 obese subjects (13.23±1.76 years) in an exercise program, implemented twice a week for a 12-week period. The program consisted of a combination of circuit-based aerobics, strength and resistance exercises; specifically soccer, rugby, volleyball and basketball and interactive video game exercises. Outcome measurements included body composition, metabolic profile and cardiorespiratory fitness. During the 12-week training program there was a significant decrease in body mass index (BMI) (p=0.002), SDS-BMI (p=0.003), waist circumference (p=0.004), waist circumference/height ratio (p=0.001),% fat mass (p=0.001), blood glucose (p=0.001), homeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) (p=0.04), triglycerides (p=0.03) and systolic pressure (p=0.04) before and after exercise. Improvement in estimated maximum oxygen consumption (VO2max) (p<0.001) correlated with a decrease in fat mass (p=0.01), triglycerides (p=0.04) and insulin resistance (p=0.02). Exercise improved metabolic and cardiorespiratory fitness in obese children. Exercise training does not necessarily need to be vigorous, recreational programs are also effective and may encourage children to participate in physical activity and limit initial drop-out.

  13. The potential role of vitamin D in the link between obesity and asthma severity/control in children.

    PubMed

    Vo, Phuong; Bair-Merritt, Megan; Camargo, Carlos A

    2015-06-01

    Childhood obesity and asthma are major public health problems. Obesity is not only associated with increased risk of incident asthma, but it may worsen asthma severity/control. Although the mechanisms linking obesity with asthma expression have not been completely elucidated, evidence suggests that increased frequency of acute respiratory infection (ARI) and decreased corticosteroid responsiveness may help to explain how obesity worsens asthma expression. In addition, obese individuals have low vitamin D status, and emerging evidence suggests vitamin D affects risk of ARI and corticosteroid responsiveness in individuals with asthma. In this review, we summarize the association between obesity and asthma severity/control in children and discuss ARI and corticosteroid responsiveness as potential mediators in the obesity-asthma pathway. We also discuss the potential role of vitamin D, including a brief summary of recent randomized controlled trials of vitamin D supplementation.

  14. Analysing the Peer Relationships of Obese and Normal-Weight Preschool Children Aged between Five and Six Years

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seçer, Zarife; Gülay Ogelman, Hülya; Önder, Alev

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study is to reveal whether the peer relationships of preschool children who are determined to be obese, based on their body mass index (BMI), differentiate or not. The study was conducted within the frame of a relational survey model. A total of 114 five- to six-year-old children (57 normal-weight children and 57 obese…

  15. Parent routines, child routines, and family demographics associated with obesity in parents and preschool-aged children.

    PubMed

    Jones, Blake L; Fiese, Barbara H

    2014-01-01

    Many daily routines and behaviors are related to the prevalence of obesity. This study investigated the association between routines and behaviors that act as protective factors related to lower prevalence of obesity in parents (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m(2)) and overweight in preschool children (BMI ≥ 85th percentile). Socio-demographic characteristics were assessed in relation to protective routines (PRs), and prevalence of obesity/overweight data from 337 preschool children and their parents. The two PRs assessed with parents included adequate sleep (≥7 h/night) and family mealtime routine (scoring higher than the median score). The four PRs assessed in children included adequate sleep (≥10 h/night), family mealtime routine, limiting screen-viewing time (≤2 h/day of TV, video, DVD), and not having a bedroom TV. Overall, 27.9% of parents were obese and 22.8% of children were overweight, and 39.8% of the parents had both parent PRs, and only 11.6% of children had all four child PRs. Results demonstrated that several demographic factors were significantly related to the use of PRs for parents and children. The lack of PRs was related to increased risk for overweight in children, but not for obesity in parents. However, in the adjusted models the overall cumulative benefits of using PRs was not significant in children either. In the multivariate adjusted logistic regression models, the only significant individual PR for children was adequate sleep. In a path analysis model, parent sleep was related to child sleep, which was in turn related to decreased obesity. Overall, findings suggest that parent and child PRs, especially sleep routines, within a family can be associated and may play an important role in the health outcomes of both parents and children. Understanding the mechanisms that influence how and when parents and children use these PRs may be promising for developing targeted family-based obesity-prevention efforts.

  16. Parent routines, child routines, and family demographics associated with obesity in parents and preschool-aged children.

    PubMed

    Jones, Blake L; Fiese, Barbara H

    2014-01-01

    Many daily routines and behaviors are related to the prevalence of obesity. This study investigated the association between routines and behaviors that act as protective factors related to lower prevalence of obesity in parents (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m(2)) and overweight in preschool children (BMI ≥ 85th percentile). Socio-demographic characteristics were assessed in relation to protective routines (PRs), and prevalence of obesity/overweight data from 337 preschool children and their parents. The two PRs assessed with parents included adequate sleep (≥7 h/night) and family mealtime routine (scoring higher than the median score). The four PRs assessed in children included adequate sleep (≥10 h/night), family mealtime routine, limiting screen-viewing time (≤2 h/day of TV, video, DVD), and not having a bedroom TV. Overall, 27.9% of parents were obese and 22.8% of children were overweight, and 39.8% of the parents had both parent PRs, and only 11.6% of children had all four child PRs. Results demonstrated that several demographic factors were significantly related to the use of PRs for parents and children. The lack of PRs was related to increased risk for overweight in children, but not for obesity in parents. However, in the adjusted models the overall cumulative benefits of using PRs was not significant in children either. In the multivariate adjusted logistic regression models, the only significant individual PR for children was adequate sleep. In a path analysis model, parent sleep was related to child sleep, which was in turn related to decreased obesity. Overall, findings suggest that parent and child PRs, especially sleep routines, within a family can be associated and may play an important role in the health outcomes of both parents and children. Understanding the mechanisms that influence how and when parents and children use these PRs may be promising for developing targeted family-based obesity-prevention efforts. PMID:24808883

  17. The Role of Ethnicity in School-Based Obesity Intervention for School-Aged Children: A Pilot Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karczewski, Sabrina A.; Carter, Jocelyn S.; DeCator, Draycen D.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Rates of obesity have risen disproportionately for ethnic minority youth in the United States. School-based programs may be the most comprehensive and cost-effective way to implement primary prevention in children. In this study we evaluated the effect of a school-based obesity prevention on the outcome of body mass index percentile…

  18. Physical Activity, Dietary Habits and Overall Health in Overweight and Obese Children and Youth with Intellectual Disability or Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinckson, Erica A.; Dickinson, Annette; Water, Tineke; Sands, Madeleine; Penman, Lara

    2013-01-01

    In children and youth with disability, the risk of obesity is higher and is associated with lower levels of physical activity, inappropriate eating behaviors, and chronic health conditions. We determined the effectiveness of a program in managing weight, through changes in physical activity and nutrition behaviors in overweight and obese New…

  19. Association of Dietary Sugars and Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Intake with Obesity in Korean Children and Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Ha, Kyungho; Chung, Sangwon; Lee, Haeng-Shin; Kim, Cho-il; Joung, Hyojee; Paik, Hee-Young; Song, YoonJu

    2016-01-08

    Few studies have examined the association between dietary sugar intake and obesity in Asian children and adolescents. We evaluated the association of dietary sugar intake and its food source with obesity in Korean children and adolescents. In this cross-sectional analysis, data were obtained from five studies conducted between 2002 and 2011. The study included 2599 children and adolescents who had completed more than three days of dietary records and had anthropometric data. Total sugar intake was higher in girls than in boys (54.3 g for girls and 46.6 g for boys, p < 0.0001). Sugar intake from milk and fruits was inversely associated with overweight or obesity in girls only (OR for overweight, 0.52; 95% CI, 0.32-0.84; p for trend = 0.0246 and OR for obesity, 0.42; 95% CI, 0.23-0.79; p for trend = 0.0113). Sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) consumption was not associated with obesity in girls, while boys had lower odds ratios for obesity (OR for obesity, 0.52; 95% CI, 0.26-1.05; p for trend = 0.0310). These results suggest that total sugars and SSB intake in Asian children and adolescents remains relatively low and sugar intake from milk and fruits is associated with a decreased risk of overweight or obesity, especially in girls.

  20. Prevalence of Overweight and Obesity among Primary School Children Aged 8–13 Years in Dar es Salaam City, Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Pangani, Ismail N.; Kiplamai, Festus K.; Kamau, Jane W.; Onywera, Vincent O.

    2016-01-01

    Background. The understanding of obesity as a growing health problem in Africa and Tanzania in particular is hampered by lack of data as well as sociocultural beliefs in which overweight and obesity are revered. This study sought to determine the prevalence of overweight and obesity among primary school children aged 8–13 years in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. Method. A cross-sectional analytical research design was used to study overweight and obesity in primary schools in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. The target population was 150,000 children aged 8–13 years. Stratified random sampling was used to select 1781 children. Weight and height were taken and WHO standards for children were used to determine weight status. Results. Findings showed that the prevalence of overweight and obesity was 15.9% and 6.7%, respectively (N = 1781). However, 6.2% of the children were underweight. There were significant differences in mean BMI between children in private and public schools (p = 0.021), between male and female (p < 0.001), and across age groups of 8–10 and 11–13 years (p < 0.001). Conclusion. The prevalence of overweight and obesity among primary school children is significant and requires management and prevention strategies. PMID:27403343

  1. Overview of noncommunicable diseases in Korean children and adolescents: focus on obesity and its effect on metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hye Ah; Park, Hyesook

    2013-07-01

    Obesity during childhood is a dominant risk factor for noncommunicable diseases (NCDs), and is itself considered a disease that needs to be treated. Recently, the growth in childhood obesity in Korea has become stagnant; however, two in every ten children are still overweight. In addition, 60% or more of overweight children have at least one metabolic syndrome risk factor. Thus, childhood obesity should be controlled through lifestyle modification. This paper reviews studies of the modifiable risk factors of obesity in Korean children. According to the life-course approach, preschool-aged children (<5 years) are influenced by their parents rather than individual habits because they are under mostly parental care. Elementary school-aged children (6 to 11 years) are affected by overlapping individual and parental effects. This may mean that the establishment of individual behavior patterns begins during this period. The conditions of poor eating habits such as skipping meals, eating out, and high fat intake, along with low physical activity, facilitate increased obesity among adolescents (12 to 18 years). Notably, adolescent girls show high rates of both underweight and obesity, which may lead to the development of NCDs in their offspring. Therefore, the problem of NCDs is no longer limited to adults, but is also prevalent among children. In addition, early intervention offers cost-effective opportunities for preventing NCDs. Thus, children need primary consideration, adequate monitoring, diagnosis, and treatment to reduce the burden of NCDs later in adulthood.

  2. Prevalence of Overweight and Obesity among Primary School Children Aged 8-13 Years in Dar es Salaam City, Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Pangani, Ismail N; Kiplamai, Festus K; Kamau, Jane W; Onywera, Vincent O

    2016-01-01

    Background. The understanding of obesity as a growing health problem in Africa and Tanzania in particular is hampered by lack of data as well as sociocultural beliefs in which overweight and obesity are revered. This study sought to determine the prevalence of overweight and obesity among primary school children aged 8-13 years in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. Method. A cross-sectional analytical research design was used to study overweight and obesity in primary schools in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. The target population was 150,000 children aged 8-13 years. Stratified random sampling was used to select 1781 children. Weight and height were taken and WHO standards for children were used to determine weight status. Results. Findings showed that the prevalence of overweight and obesity was 15.9% and 6.7%, respectively (N = 1781). However, 6.2% of the children were underweight. There were significant differences in mean BMI between children in private and public schools (p = 0.021), between male and female (p < 0.001), and across age groups of 8-10 and 11-13 years (p < 0.001). Conclusion. The prevalence of overweight and obesity among primary school children is significant and requires management and prevention strategies. PMID:27403343

  3. Promising insights into the health related quality of life for children with severe obesity

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Childhood obesity is a growing health concern known to adversely affect quality of life in children and adolescents. The Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) pediatric measures were developed to capture child self-reports across a variety of health conditions experienced by children and adolescents. The purpose of this study is to begin the process of validation of the PROMIS pediatric measures in children and adolescents affected by obesity. Methods The pediatric PROMIS instruments were administered to 138 children and adolescents in a cross-sectional study of patient reported outcomes in children aged 8–17 years with age-adjusted body mass index (BMI) greater than the 85th percentile in a design to establish known-group validity. The children completed the depressive symptoms, anxiety, anger, peer relationships, pain interference, fatigue, upper extremity, and mobility PROMIS domains utilizing a computer interface. PROMIS domains and individual items were administered in random order and included a total of 95 items. Patient responses were compared between patients with BMI 85 to < 99th percentile versus ≥ 99th percentile. Results 136 participants were recruited and had all necessary clinical data for analysis. Of the 136 participants, 5% ended the survey early resulting in missing domain scores at the end of survey administration. In multivariate analysis, patients with BMI ≥ 99th percentile had worse scores for depressive symptoms, anger, fatigue, and mobility (p < 0.05). Parent-reported exercise was associated with better scores for depressive symptoms, anxiety, and fatigue (p < 0.05). Conclusions Children and adolescents ranging from overweight to severely obese can complete multiple PROMIS pediatric measures using a computer interface in the outpatient setting. In the 5% with missing domain scores, the missing scores were consistently found in the domains administered last, suggesting the

  4. Energy expenditure, physical activity, and obesity in children.

    PubMed

    Goran, M I; Treuth, M S

    2001-08-01

    Although there are physiologic and genetic influences on the various components of energy metabolism and body weight regulation, and a major portion of individual differences in body weight can be explained by genetic differences, it seems unlikely that the increased global prevalence of obesity has been driven by a dramatic change in the gene pool. It is more likely and more reasonable that acute changes in behavior and environment have contributed to the rapid increase in obesity and that genetic factors may be important in the deferring individual susceptibilities to these changes. The most striking behavioral changes that have occurred have been an increased reliance on high-fat and energy-dense "fast foods," with larger portion sizes, coupled with an ever-increasing sedentary lifestyle. The more sedentary lifestyle is caused by an increased reliance on technology and labor-saving devices, which has reduced the need for physical exertion for everyday activities. Examples of energy-saving devices that have resulted in a secular decline in physical activity include: Increased use of automated transport rather than walking or biking Central heating and use of automated equipment, such as washing machines, in the household. Reduction in physical activity in the workplace because of computers, automated equipment, and electronic mail. Increased use of television and computers for entertainment and leisure activities. Use of elevators and escalators rather than stairs. Increased concern for crime, which has reduced the likelihood of outdoor playing. Poor urban planning that does not provide adequate biking paths or even sidewalks in some communities. Thus, the increasing prevalence, numerous health risks, and astounding economic costs of obesity clearly justify widespread efforts toward prevention efforts. These prevention efforts should begin in childhood because the behaviors are learned and continue through the lifetime.

  5. Oxidative/Antioxidative status in obese and sport trained children: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Matusik, Pawel; Prokopowicz, Zofia; Norek, Berenika; Olszanecka-Glinianowicz, Magdalena; Chudek, Jerzy; Malecka-Tendera, Ewa

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to compare oxidative/antioxidative status in obese and sport trained children and to correlate obtained redox markers with anthropometrical measurements, body composition parameters, and adipokines levels. 78 (44 males) obese (SG) and 80 (40 males) normal weight sport trained (CG) children matched for age and Tanner stage were recruited for the study. Body composition parameters and basal metabolic rate (BMR) were assessed by bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA). Oxidative/antioxidative status was evaluated in plasma by total oxidative status (PerOX), oxidized-LDL cholesterol (oxLDL), total antioxidative capacity (ImAnOx), and glutathione peroxidase activity (GPx). Leptin and adiponectin levels and adiponectin/leptin ratio (A/L) were also investigated. OxLDL was higher in SG versus CG (P < 0.05), but ImAnOx and GPx were reduced in SG versus CG (P < 0.01). Redox markers correlated significantly with BMI Z-score, WHR, WHtR, body composition parameters, leptin (in boys only), and A/L ratio (in boys only) in SG and in a whole studied population. PerOX significantly correlated with BMR in the CG. Antioxidative/oxidative status in obese children is significantly impaired and related adipose tissue excess and its hormonal activity. Oxidative status assessed by PerOx is also high in sport trained children but antioxidative defense is significantly more efficient with no overproduction of oxidized LDL. PMID:25918709

  6. Evidence-based recommendations for the development of obesity prevention programs targeted at preschool children.

    PubMed

    Summerbell, C D; Moore, H J; Vögele, C; Kreichauf, S; Wildgruber, A; Manios, Y; Douthwaite, W; Nixon, C A; Gibson, E L

    2012-03-01

    The ToyBox intervention was developed using an evidence-based approach, using the findings of four reviews. These reviews included three critical and narrative reviews of educational strategies and psychological approaches explaining young children's acquisition and formation of energy-balance related behaviours, and the management of these behaviours, and also a systematic review of behavioural models underpinning school-based interventions in preschool and school settings for the prevention of obesity in children aged 4-6 years. This paper summarises and translates the findings from these reviews into practical evidence based recommendations for researchers and policy-makers to consider when developing and implementing interventions for the prevention of overweight and obesity in young (aged 4-6 years) children. The recommendations focus on two behaviours, physical activity and sedentary behaviour, and healthy eating, and include general recommendations, intervention approaches, interventions content, and simple messages. The review also briefly examines the role that the commercial sector plays in hindering or facilitating attempts to create healthy food environments for children. This paper also recognises that childhood obesity is not an issue for the education sector alone; it needs to be tackled at a multi sectoral level, recognizing the particularly important role of local governments, nongovernment organizations and the media.

  7. Is There Any Association between TV Viewing and Obesity in Preschool Children in Japan?

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Ayako; Yorifuji, Takashi; Iwase, Toshihide; Komatsu, Hirokazu; Takao, Soshi; Doi, Hiroyuki

    2010-04-01

    Obesity in children is a serious public health problem, and TV viewing is considered a potential risk factor. Since, however, no relevant association studies have been conducted in Japan, we evaluated the association between TV viewing and obesity using a population-based study conducted in a Japanese town. All 616 preschool children in the town were enrolled in February 2008, and a self-administered questionnaire to collect children's and parents' characteristics was sent to the parents. We dichotomized the time spent TV viewing and evaluated associations by logistic regression using a "less than 2h" category as a reference. The questionnaire was collected from 476 participants (77.3%), of whom 449 were available for the final analyses. Among them, 26.9% of preschool children reported 2 or more hours of TV viewing per day and 8.2% were defined as obese. In logistic regression analyses, there was no positive association in unadjusted (odds ratio [OR] = 1.11, 95% confidence interval [95% CI]:0.50-2.49) or adjusted models for exclusively breastfed status, sleep duration, or maternal factors (OR = 1.11, 95% CI:0.50-2.51). We also found no positive association between TV viewing and overweight status, possibly owing to the influence of social environment, low statistical power, or misclassification.

  8. Change in Metabolic Profile after 1-Year Nutritional-Behavioral Intervention in Obese Children.

    PubMed

    Verduci, Elvira; Lassandro, Carlotta; Giacchero, Roberta; Miniello, Vito Leonardo; Banderali, Giuseppe; Radaelli, Giovanni

    2015-12-03

    Research findings are inconsistent about improvement of specific cardio-metabolic variables after lifestyle intervention in obese children. The aim of this trial was to evaluate the effect of a 1-year intervention, based on normocaloric diet and physical activity, on body mass index (BMI), blood lipid profile, glucose metabolism and metabolic syndrome. Eighty-five obese children aged ≥6 years were analyzed. The BMI z-score was calculated. Fasting blood samples were analyzed for lipids, insulin and glucose. The homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) was calculated and insulin resistance was defined as HOMA-IR >3.16. HOMA-β%, quantitative insulin sensitivity check index and triglyceride glucose index were calculated. The metabolic syndrome was defined in accordance with the International Diabetes Federation criteria. At the end of intervention children showed a reduction (mean (95% CI)) in BMI z-score (-0.58 (-0.66; -0.50)), triglycerides (-0.35 (-0.45; -0.25) mmol/L) and triglyceride glucose index (-0.29 (-0.37; -0.21)), and an increase in HDL cholesterol (0.06 (0.01; 0.11) mmol/L). Prevalence of insulin resistance declined from 51.8% to 36.5% and prevalence of metabolic syndrome from 17.1% to 4.9%. Nutritional-behavioral interventions can improve the blood lipid profile and insulin sensitivity in obese children, and possibly provide benefits in terms of metabolic syndrome.

  9. Evaluation of Nerve Conduction Studies in Obese Children With Insulin Resistance or Impaired Glucose Tolerance.

    PubMed

    Ince, Hülya; Taşdemir, Haydar Ali; Aydin, Murat; Ozyürek, Hamit; Tilki, Hacer Erdem

    2015-07-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate nerve conduction studies in terms of neuropathic characteristics in obese patients who were in prediabetes stage and also to determine the abnormal findings. The study included 69 obese adolescent patient