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Sample records for preschool child mortality

  1. Pre-School Child Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Northwest Territories Dept. of Education, Yellowknife.

    This activity kit was designed for parents to use with their preschool children and focuses on the development of skills through play. Sixty activities are described. Descriptions are accompanied by a photograph, a list of materials needed, directions, the purpose of the activity, and a statement of what the child will learn from it. Many of the…

  2. Child Development: Preschool Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chiam, Heng Keng, Ed.

    This book reports some of the results of an extensive study of the physical, cognitive, language, social, and emotional development of Malaysian children. Chapter 1 of the book describes the demographics of the sample. Subjects were 3,099 preschool children in the state of Selangor and the federal district of Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Data is…

  3. Child Development: Preschool Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chiam, Heng Keng, Ed.

    This book reports some of the results of an extensive study of the physical, cognitive, language, social, and emotional development of Malaysian children. Chapter 1 of the book describes the demographics of the sample. Subjects were 3,099 preschool children in the state of Selangor and the federal district of Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Data is…

  4. Child health and mortality.

    PubMed

    El Arifeen, Shams

    2008-09-01

    Bangladesh is currently one of the very few countries in the world, which is on target for achieving the Millennium Development Goal (MDG) 4 relating to child mortality. There have been very rapid reductions in mortality, especially in recent years and among children aged over one month. However, this rate of reduction may be difficult to sustain and may impede the achievement of MDG 4. Neonatal deaths now contribute substantially (57%) to overall mortality of children aged less than five years, and reductions in neonatal mortality are difficult to achieve and have been slow in Bangladesh. There are some interesting attributes of the mortality decline in Bangladesh. Mortality has declined faster among girls than among boys, but the poorest have not benefited from the reduction in mortality. There has also been a relative absence of a decline in mortality in urban areas. The age and cause of death pattern of under-five mortality indicate certain interventions that need to be scaled up rapidly and reach high coverage to achieve MDG 4 in Bangladesh. These include skilled attendance at delivery, postnatal care for the newborn, appropriate feeding of the young infant and child, and prevention and management of childhood infections. The latest (2007) Bangladesh Demographic and Health Survey shows that Bangladesh has made sustained and remarkable progress in many areas of child health. More than 80% of children are receiving all vaccines. The use of oral rehydration solution for diarrhoea is high, and the coverage of vitamin A among children aged 9-59 months has been consistently increasing. However, poor quality of care, misperceptions regarding the need for care, and other social barriers contribute to low levels of care-seeking for illnesses of the newborns and children. Improvements in the health system are essential for removing these barriers, as are effective strategies to reach families and communities with targeted messages and information. Finally, there are

  5. Child Health and Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Arifeen, Shams El

    2008-01-01

    Bangladesh is currently one of the very few countries in the world, which is on target for achieving the Millennium Development Goal (MDG) 4 relating to child mortality. There have been very rapid reductions in mortality, especially in recent years and among children aged over one month. However, this rate of reduction may be difficult to sustain and may impede the achievement of MDG 4. Neonatal deaths now contribute substantially (57%) to overall mortality of children aged less than five years, and reductions in neonatal mortality are difficult to achieve and have been slow in Bangladesh. There are some interesting attributes of the mortality decline in Bangladesh. Mortality has declined faster among girls than among boys, but the poorest have not benefited from the reduction in mortality. There has also been a relative absence of a decline in mortality in urban areas. The age and cause of death pattern of under-five mortality indicate certain interventions that need to be scaled up rapidly and reach high coverage to achieve MDG 4 in Bangladesh. These include skilled attendance at delivery, postnatal care for the newborn, appropriate feeding of the young infant and child, and prevention and management of childhood infections. The latest (2007) Bangladesh Demographic and Health Survey shows that Bangladesh has made sustained and remarkable progress in many areas of child health. More than 80% of children are receiving all vaccines. The use of oral rehydration solution for diarrhoea is high, and the coverage of vitamin A among children aged 9-59 months has been consistently increasing. However, poor quality of care, misperceptions regarding the need for care, and other social barriers contribute to low levels of care-seeking for illnesses of the newborns and children. Improvements in the health system are essential for removing these barriers, as are effective strategies to reach families and communities with targeted messages and information. Finally, there are

  6. Child Sexual Abuse at Preschools--A Research Review of a Complex Issue for Preschool Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergström, Helena; Eidevald, Christian; Westberg-Broström, Anna

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this research review is to synthesize research published between 2000 and 2015 regarding child sexual abuse, preschool and preschool teachers. The review identifies themes relevant for the preschool teacher profession: child sexual abuse at preschools, suspicions and consequences for the preschool sector, preventing techniques and…

  7. Child Sexual Abuse at Preschools--A Research Review of a Complex Issue for Preschool Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergström, Helena; Eidevald, Christian; Westberg-Broström, Anna

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this research review is to synthesize research published between 2000 and 2015 regarding child sexual abuse, preschool and preschool teachers. The review identifies themes relevant for the preschool teacher profession: child sexual abuse at preschools, suspicions and consequences for the preschool sector, preventing techniques and…

  8. Child Mortality: A Preventable Tragedy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seipel, Michael M. O.

    1996-01-01

    Worldwide data reveal that child mortality (ages 1-5) accounts for about 10-15% of all deaths in developing countries, and less than 1% of all deaths in developed countries. Strategies for reducing child mortality include improving health services, improving environmental conditions, enhancing the social conditions of children, and protecting and…

  9. Child mortality after Hurricane Katrina.

    PubMed

    Kanter, Robert K

    2010-03-01

    Age-specific pediatric health consequences of community disruption after Hurricane Katrina have not been analyzed. Post-Katrina vital statistics are unavailable. The objectives of this study were to validate an alternative method to estimate child mortality rates in the greater New Orleans area and compare pre-Katrina and post-Katrina mortality rates. Pre-Katrina 2004 child mortality was estimated from death reports in the local daily newspaper and validated by comparison with pre-Katrina data from the Louisiana Department of Health. Post-Katrina child mortality rates were analyzed as a measure of health consequences. Newspaper-derived estimates of mortality rates appear to be valid except for possible underreporting of neonatal rates. Pre-Katrina and post-Katrina mortality rates were similar for all age groups except infants. Post-Katrina, a 92% decline in mortality rate occurred for neonates (<28 days), and a 57% decline in mortality rate occurred for postneonatal infants (28 days-1 year). The post-Katrina decline in infant mortality rate exceeds the pre-Katrina discrepancy between newspaper-derived and Department of Health-reported rates. A declining infant mortality rate raises questions about persistent displacement of high-risk infants out of the region. Otherwise, there is no evidence of long-lasting post-Katrina excess child mortality. Further investigation of demographic changes would be of interest to local decision makers and planners for recovery after public health emergencies in other regions.

  10. Trends in child mortality in India.

    PubMed

    Behl, A S

    2013-01-08

    To assess Indias recent trends in child mortality rates and disparities and identify ways to reduce child mortality and wealth-related health disparities, we analyzed three years of data from Indias National Family Health Survey related to child mortality. Nationally, declines in average child mortality were statistically significant, but declines in inequality were not. Urban areas had lower child mortality rates than rural areas but higher inequalities. Interstate differences in child mortality rates were significant, with rates in the highest-mortality states four to six times higher than in the lowest-mortality states. However, child mortality in most states declined.

  11. [Mortality by avoidable causes in preschool children].

    PubMed

    Lurán, Albenia; López, Elizabeth; Pinilla, Consuelo; Sierra, Pedro

    2009-03-01

    The infant-mortality rate in children aged less than five is an indicator of the general state of health of a population and directly reflects the quality of life and the level of socio-economic development of a country. Avoidable mortality was assessed in preschool children as a reflection of Colombia quality of life and socio-economic development. Mortality trends were analyzed in preschool children aged less than five throughout Colombia during a 20-year period from 1985-2004, and focused on mortality causes that were considered avoidable. This was a descriptive, retrospective study; the sources of information were Departamento Administrativo Nacional de Estadística records of deaths and population projections 1985-2004. Mortality rate due to avoidable causes was the statistical indicator. In children aged less than one, the reducible mortality due to "early diagnosis and medical treatment" occupied the first place amongst causes for every year of the study period and accounted for more than 50% of recorded deaths. In children aged 1 to 4, the category "other important reducible causes" was associated with 40% of recorded deaths-deaths due mainly to respiratory diseases. Over the 20-year period, the avoidable mortality rate decreased by 34% in children aged less than one, in children 1-4, it decreased by 23%. Although the infant-mortality rate in preschool children was reduced, the decrease was small, from 80% to 77%. The situation requires more analysis with respect to strategies in public health, particularly concerning preventable diseases of the infancy.

  12. Parental perception of preschool child body weight.

    PubMed

    Garrett-Wright, Dawn

    2011-10-01

    Obesity in preschoolers has risen dramatically in the last decade. Although studies have demonstrated that parents of preschoolers have incorrect perceptions of their child's body weight, little is known about the factors that may be associated with these perceptions. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationships between parental perceptions of preschool child body weight and parental psychosocial factors. Quantitative analyses included descriptive statistics, correlations, and regression analyses. More than one third of the children in the sample were at risk for being overweight or were already overweight. However, less than 6% of parents felt that their child had an elevated body weight. Results from univariate logistic regression analyses demonstrated that the parent's health literacy level was a significant predictor of the accuracy of their perceptions regarding their child's body weight (p < .05). Parental concern regarding child weight and perceived level of efficacy did not significantly predict the accuracy of their perceptions. Results from this study indicate that assessing parental perceptions of preschool child body weight can help providers accurately understand how parents view their children and lead to tailored educational interventions. In addition, the results support previous research suggesting that parental health literacy is a key to providing high-quality family-centered care. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. The Pre-School Gifted Child

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gensley, Juliana

    1973-01-01

    Suggestions for parents of gifted preschool children include talking to the child as an individual, listening perceptively, finding ways to round out knowledge for development of true concepts, and providing a good learning environment with many things to handle, smell, taste, see, and hear. (MC)

  14. You and Your Preschool Child

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of Education, 2006

    2006-01-01

    Research shows that many things affect how well preschool children perform in school, including meeting their physical needs with a healthy diet, exercise and good medical care. Young children also need social and emotional help that will build their confidence, independence and cooperation skills. This booklet highlights needs of babies, toddlers…

  15. Maternal and Child Predictors of Preschool Children's Social Competence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diener, Marissa L.; Kim, Do-Yeong

    2004-01-01

    The present study examined child and maternal predictors of children's social competence in preschool. One hundred ten mothers and their preschool-aged children participated. Mothers completed parent reports of child temperament and self-regulation, and self-reports of maternal separation anxiety. Mothers' interactional style was coded from…

  16. Maternal and Child Predictors of Preschool Children's Social Competence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diener, Marissa L.; Kim, Do-Yeong

    2004-01-01

    The present study examined child and maternal predictors of children's social competence in preschool. One hundred ten mothers and their preschool-aged children participated. Mothers completed parent reports of child temperament and self-regulation, and self-reports of maternal separation anxiety. Mothers' interactional style was coded from…

  17. Preschool design and child behaviour.

    PubMed

    Neill, S R

    1982-07-01

    Twenty established children were observed in each of three nursery schools and two day nurseries. Two pairs of nursery schools and day nurseries were matched for building design. Twenty newly arrived children were also observed in each nursery school. Child behaviour was analysed in relation to building design; playroom openness appeared the most important building factor. Children in the more open units spent less time on school-oriented activities and received fewer staff contacts, but more time moving around, doing nothing, and in aggression and active play. Social interaction was little related to building design, but was affected by amount of nursery experience. The findings are discussed in relation to staff aims.

  18. Remediating Child Poverty via Preschool: Exploring Practitioners' Perspectives in England

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, Donald

    2013-01-01

    Within developed countries child poverty is a social problem with significant negative effects. With a backdrop of austerity, the UK's first child poverty strategy was released in 2011. Pervaded by neo-liberal ideology this strategy identifies preschool services as key to remediating the negative effects of child poverty on children and families…

  19. Remediating Child Poverty via Preschool: Exploring Practitioners' Perspectives in England

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, Donald

    2013-01-01

    Within developed countries child poverty is a social problem with significant negative effects. With a backdrop of austerity, the UK's first child poverty strategy was released in 2011. Pervaded by neo-liberal ideology this strategy identifies preschool services as key to remediating the negative effects of child poverty on children and families…

  20. Bilingual Learning for the Spanish Speaking Preschool Child.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nedler, Shari; Lindfors, Judith

    It is easier for non-English-speaking preschool children to learn new concepts if they are introduced in their own language. Once the child has mastered the concept, it can be introduced in the second language. The program described in this report is designed for Mexican-American preschool children. Content of the program is selected to relate…

  1. The Preschool Instructional Context and Child-Teacher Relationships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howes, Carollee; Fuligni, Allison Sidle; Hong, Sandra Soliday; Huang, Yiching D.; Lara-Cinisomo, Sandraluz

    2013-01-01

    Research Findings: The purpose of this article is to examine how dimensions of the preschool instructional context predict child-teacher relationship quality. A total of 118 low-income, predominantly Latino/a children and their teachers participated in this study. Children were observed in their 1st preschool classroom. Measures of instructional…

  2. Suspected Child Maltreatment: Preschool Staff in a Conflict of Loyalty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Svensson, Birgitta; Janson, Staffan

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the actions of Swedish preschool staff when suspecting the maltreatment of children in their domestic environment, and the staff's further experiences and relations to the family members. Methods: A questionnaire in 2005 to the staff of 189 child groups in community preschools, including 3,100 children. Results: A report…

  3. Effect of routine prophylactic supplementation with iron and folic acid on preschool child mortality in southern Nepal: community-based, cluster-randomised, placebo-controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Tielsch, James M; Khatry, Subarna K; Stoltzfus, Rebecca J; Katz, Joanne; LeClerq, Steven C; Adhikari, Ramesh; Mullany, Luke C; Shresta, Shardaram; Black, Robert E

    2008-01-01

    Summary Introduction Iron deficiency is widespread in the developing world and is especially common in young children who live on the Indian subcontinent. Supplementation with iron and folic acid alleviates severe anaemia and enhances neurodevelopment in deficient populations, but little is known about the risks of mortality and morbidity associated with supplementation. Methods We did a community-based, cluster-randomised, double-masked, placebo-controlled, 2• 2 factorial trial in children aged 1−36 months and residing in southern Nepal. We randomly assigned children daily oral supplementation to age 36 months with: iron (12·5 mg) and folic acid (50 • g; n=8337), zinc alone (10 mg), iron, folic acid, and zinc (n=9230), or placebo (n=8683); children aged 1−11 months received half the dose. Our primary outcome measure was all-cause mortality, and our secondary outcome measures included cause-specific mortality and incidence and severity of diarrhoea, dysentery, and acute respiratory illness. Analyses were by intention to treat. This study is registered at clinicaltrials.gov, number NCT00109551. Findings The iron and folic acid-containing groups of the study were stopped early in November, 2003, on the recommendation of the data and safety monitoring board; mortality in these groups did not differ from placebo and there was low power to detect positive or negative effects by the time enrolment was completed. We continued to enrol children to the placebo and zinc alone groups. 25 490 children participated and analyses are based on 29 097·3 person-years of follow-up. There was no difference in mortality between the groups who took iron and folic acid without or with zinc when compared with placebo (HR 1·03, 95% CI 0·78−1·37, and 1·00, 0·74−1·34, respectively). There were no significant differences in the attack rates for diarrhoea, dysentery, or respiratory infections between groups, although all the relative risks except one indicated modest, non

  4. Parental Incarceration and Child Mortality in Denmark

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Signe Hald; Lee, Hedwig; Karlson, Kristian Bernt

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. We used Danish registry data to examine the association between parental incarceration and child mortality risk. Methods. We used a sample of all Danish children born in 1991 linked with parental information. We conducted discrete-time survival analysis separately for boys (n = 30 146) and girls (n = 28 702) to estimate the association of paternal and maternal incarceration with child mortality, controlling for parental sociodemographic characteristics. We followed the children until age 20 years or death, whichever came first. Results. Results indicated a positive association between paternal and maternal imprisonment and male child mortality. Paternal imprisonment was associated with lower child mortality risks for girls. The relationship between maternal imprisonment and female child mortality changed directions depending on the model, suggesting no clear association. Conclusions. These results indicate that the incarceration of a parent may influence child mortality but that it is important to consider the gender of both the child and the incarcerated parent. PMID:24432916

  5. Infant mortality and child health in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Alves, Denisard; Belluzzo, Walter

    2004-12-01

    Child health is a central issue in the public policy agenda of developing countries. Several policies aimed at improving child health have been implemented over the years, with varying degrees of success. In Brazil, such policies have triggered a significant decline in infant mortality rates over the last 30 years. Despite this improvement, however, mortality rates are still high compared to international standards. Moreover, there is considerable imbalance across Brazilian municipalities suggesting that various policies should be adopted. We investigate the determinants of infant mortality at the municipal level and provide an analysis of the factors affecting child health at the individual level. To analyze the mortality rate, we estimate static and dynamic panel data models using four censuses covering the period from 1970 to 2000. The demand for child health, on the other hand, is addressed through a household decision model, estimated using anthropometric data from the 1996 Standard of Living Survey. The results obtained indicate that a rise in sanitation, education and per capita income contributed to the decline of infant mortality in Brazil, with stronger impacts in the long run than in the short run. The fixed effects associated with county characteristics explain the observed dispersion in child mortality rates. The results from the decision model are confirmed by the findings of the mortality model: education, sanitation and poverty are the most important causes of poor child health in Brazil.

  6. On hunger and child mortality in India.

    PubMed

    Gaiha, Raghav; Kulkarni, Vani S; Pandey, Manoj K; Imai, Katsushi S

    2012-01-01

    Despite accelerated growth there is pervasive hunger, child undernutrition and mortality in India. Our analysis focuses on their determinants. Raising living standards alone will not reduce hunger and undernutrition. Reduction of rural/urban disparities, income inequality, consumer price stabilization, and mothers’ literacy all have roles of varying importance in different nutrition indicators. Somewhat surprisingly, public distribution system (PDS) do not have a significant effect on any of them. Generally, child undernutrition and mortality rise with poverty. Our analysis confirms that media exposure triggers public action, and helps avert child undernutrition and mortality. Drastic reduction of economic inequality is in fact key to averting child mortality, conditional upon a drastic reordering of social and economic arrangements.

  7. Child and Parent Characteristics, Parental Expectations, and Child Behaviours Related to Preschool Children's Interest in Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baroody, Alison E.; Dobbs-Oates, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    The current study examined the relations between children's literacy interest and parent and child characteristics (i.e. parents' education level and child's gender), parental expectations of their child's school attainment and achievement and the child's positive and problem behaviours. Participants were 61 preschoolers from predominately…

  8. Child-Mother and Child-Father Play Interaction Patterns with Preschoolers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    John, Aesha; Halliburton, Amy; Humphrey, Jeremy

    2013-01-01

    The study focused on qualitative and quantitative differences between maternal and paternal play interaction behaviours with their preschool children. Home observations of 18 child-mother and child-father play interactions were qualitatively analysed to derive interaction themes. In addition, the quality of child-mother and child-father…

  9. Child and Parent Characteristics, Parental Expectations, and Child Behaviours Related to Preschool Children's Interest in Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baroody, Alison E.; Dobbs-Oates, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    The current study examined the relations between children's literacy interest and parent and child characteristics (i.e. parents' education level and child's gender), parental expectations of their child's school attainment and achievement and the child's positive and problem behaviours. Participants were 61 preschoolers from predominately…

  10. Parental Feeding Patterns and Child Weight Status for Latino Preschoolers

    PubMed Central

    Karp, Sharon M.; Barry, Kathleen M.; Gesell, Sabina B.; Po’e, Eli K.; Dietrich, Mary S.; Barkin, Shari L.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine the relationships between parental patterns regarding child feeding and child Body Mass Index (BMI) percentile in Latino parent-preschooler dyads participating in a clinical trial. Methods This secondary analysis examined data collected during a randomized clinical trial of a culturally tailored healthy lifestyle intervention focused on childhood obesity prevention, Salud Con La Familia. We analyzed 77 Latino parent-child dyads who completed baseline and 3-month follow-up data collection, assessing associations between preschool child BMI percentile and parental response to the Child Feeding Questionnaire (CFQ) over time. Results Higher child BMI was related to higher parental CFQ concern scores (r = 0.41, p <.001). A general inverse association between child BMI percentile and parental responsibility was also observed (r = −0.23, p = .040). Over the 3-month period, no statistically significant associations between changes in the CFQ subscale scores and changes in child BMI percentile were identified. Conclusions Child BMI percentile consistent with overweight/obese is associated with parental concern about child weight and child BMI percentile consistent with normal weight is associated with perceived responsibility for feeding. Emphasizing parental responsibility to help children to develop healthy eating habits could be an important aspect of interventions aimed at both preventing and reducing pediatric obesity for Latino preschoolers. PMID:24548581

  11. Preschool Child Care and Parents' Use of Physical Discipline

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magnuson, Katherine A.; Waldfogel, Jane

    2005-01-01

    Parenting practices, including the use of physical discipline, are shaped by multiple influences. Although much research focuses on how parent, child, and dyadic characteristics shape parenting practices, extra-familial resources may also play a role. This paper focuses on how children's experiences of child care during the preschool years may…

  12. Values and Values Education in Estonian Preschool Child Care Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ülavere, Pärje; Veisson, Marika

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the study was to provide an outline of the values that principals, teachers and parents of preschool child care institutions consider important to be taught to children, and which activities, in their estimation, should be used to implement values education in child care institutions. A total of 978 respondents from all 15…

  13. Preschool Child Care and Parents' Use of Physical Discipline

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magnuson, Katherine A.; Waldfogel, Jane

    2005-01-01

    Parenting practices, including the use of physical discipline, are shaped by multiple influences. Although much research focuses on how parent, child, and dyadic characteristics shape parenting practices, extra-familial resources may also play a role. This paper focuses on how children's experiences of child care during the preschool years may…

  14. Child Sustained Attention in Preschool-Age Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiCarlo, Cynthia F.; Baumgartner, Jennifer J.; Ota, Carrie; Geary, Kelly

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the mean duration of child attention across three teaching conditions (child choice, adult choice, or adult presentation) of 63 preschool-age children. A repeated-measures ANOVA was used to compare the means across the three teaching conditions, indicating a statistically significant difference between the teaching conditions.…

  15. Child Sustained Attention in Preschool-Age Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiCarlo, Cynthia F.; Baumgartner, Jennifer J.; Ota, Carrie; Geary, Kelly

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the mean duration of child attention across three teaching conditions (child choice, adult choice, or adult presentation) of 63 preschool-age children. A repeated-measures ANOVA was used to compare the means across the three teaching conditions, indicating a statistically significant difference between the teaching conditions.…

  16. Racial Inequality and Child Mortality in Brazil.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Charles H.; Lovell, Peggy A.

    1992-01-01

    In 1980 urban Brazil, race of mother significantly affected child mortality after controlling for region, income, and parent education, with a mortality gap of 6.7 years between the whites and Afro-Brazilians. Parent education, indoor plumbing, access to public health care, and presence of adult females significantly reduced the probability of…

  17. Female education and child mortality in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Mellington, N; Cameron, L

    1999-12-01

    This paper uses a sample of 6620 women from the 1994 Indonesian Demographic and Health Survey to examine the relationship between female education and child mortality in Indonesia. Female education is measured in terms of both years of education and literacy. Both primary education and secondary schooling significantly decrease the probability of child death, while literacy plays an insignificant role. When the sample is divided into urban and rural locations, primary and secondary education are significant in both areas in reducing the likelihood of a mother experiencing child mortality. The benefits of public and private infrastructure appear to differ in rural and urban areas. The results confirm that investment in female human capital lowers the probability of child mortality.

  18. Child Disinhibition, Parent Restriction, and Child Body Mass Index in Low-Income Preschool Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sparks, Martha A.; Radnitz, Cynthia L.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To examine both unique and interactive effects of parent restrictive feeding and child disinhibited eating behavior on child body mass index (BMI) in low-income Latino and African American preschoolers. Methods: The sample included 229 parent-child pairs, the majority of whom were low-income and Latino (57%) or African American (25%).…

  19. Child Disinhibition, Parent Restriction, and Child Body Mass Index in Low-Income Preschool Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sparks, Martha A.; Radnitz, Cynthia L.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To examine both unique and interactive effects of parent restrictive feeding and child disinhibited eating behavior on child body mass index (BMI) in low-income Latino and African American preschoolers. Methods: The sample included 229 parent-child pairs, the majority of whom were low-income and Latino (57%) or African American (25%).…

  20. Teacher-Child Relationships in Preschool Period: The Roles of Child Temperament and Language Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yoleri, Sibel

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine how children's temperament and language skills predict the effects of teacher-child relationships in preschool. Parents and preschool teachers completed three questionnaires: The Student-Teacher Relationship Scale, the Marmara Development Scale and the Short Temperament Scale for Children. The relational…

  1. Statistical Analysis of Factors Affecting Child Mortality in Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Zoya; Kamal, Asifa; Kamal, Asma

    2016-06-01

    Child mortality is a composite indicator reflecting economic, social, environmental, healthcare services, and their delivery situation in a country. Globally, Pakistan has the third highest burden of fetal, maternal, and child mortality. Factors affecting child mortality in Pakistan are investigated by using Binary Logistic Regression Analysis. Region, education of mother, birth order, preceding birth interval (the period between the previous child birth and the index child birth), size of child at birth, and breastfeeding and family size were found to be significantly important with child mortality in Pakistan. Child mortality decreased as level of mother's education, preceding birth interval, size of child at birth, and family size increased. Child mortality was found to be significantly higher in Balochistan as compared to other regions. Child mortality was low for low birth orders. Child survival was significantly higher for children who were breastfed as compared to those who were not.

  2. Maternal education and child mortality in Zimbabwe.

    PubMed

    Grépin, Karen A; Bharadwaj, Prashant

    2015-12-01

    In 1980, Zimbabwe rapidly expanded access to secondary schools, providing a natural experiment to estimate the impact of increased maternal secondary education on child mortality. Exploiting age specific exposure to these reforms, we find that children born to mothers most likely to have benefited from the policies were about 21% less likely to die than children born to slightly older mothers. We also find that increased education leads to delayed age at marriage, sexual debut, and first birth and that increased education leads to better economic opportunities for women. We find little evidence supporting other channels through which increased education might affect child mortality. Expanding access to secondary schools may greatly accelerate declines in child mortality in the developing world today.

  3. Infant mortality and child nutrition in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Dancer, Diane; Rammohan, Anu; Smith, Murray D

    2008-09-01

    The excess female infant mortality observed in South Asia has typically been attributed to gender discrimination in the intra-household allocation of food and medical care. However, studies on child nutrition find no evidence of gender differences. A natural explanation could be that in environments of high infant mortality of females, the surviving children are healthier, so that child nutrition cannot be studied independently of mortality. In this paper, we use data from the 2004 Bangladesh Demographic Health Survey to investigate if there are any gender differences in survival probabilities and whether this leads to differences in child nutrition. We argue the importance of establishing whether or not there exists a dependence relationship between the two random variables--infant mortality and child nutrition--and in order to detect this we employ a copula approach to model specification. The results suggest, for example, that while male children have a significantly lower likelihood of surviving their first year relative to female children, should they survive they have significantly better height-for-age Z-scores. From a policy perspective, household wealth and public health interventions such as vaccinations are found to be important predictors of better nutritional outcomes.

  4. Caring for Preschoolers. Staff Development Series, Military Child Care Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scavo, Marlene; And Others

    Ideas and experiences to assist in working with 3-, 4-, and 5-year-old children are provided in this staff development module for the caregiver or teacher in a military child care center. The module consists of several short discussions describing characteristics of preschoolers, ways they can be helped to feel secure, and the manner in which…

  5. Labor migration and child mortality in Mozambique

    PubMed Central

    Yabiku, Scott T.; Agadjanian, Victor; Cau, Boaventura

    2013-01-01

    Male labor migration is widespread in many parts of the world, yet its consequences for child outcomes and especially childhood mortality remain unclear. Male labor migration could bring benefits, in the form of remittances, to the families that remain behind and thus help child survival. Alternatively, the absence of a male adult could imperil the household's well-being and its ability to care for its members, increasing child mortality risks. In this analysis, we use longitudinal survey data from Mozambique collected in 2006 and 2009 to examine the association between male labor migration and under-five mortality in families that remain behind. Using a simple migrant/non-migrant dichotomy, we find no difference in mortality rates across migrant and non-migrant men's children. When we separated successful from unsuccessful migration based on the wife's perception, however, stark contrasts emerge: children of successful migrants have the lowest mortality, followed by children of non-migrant men, followed by the children of unsuccessful migrants. Our results illustrate the need to account for the diversity of men's labor migration experience in examining the effects of migration on left-behind households. PMID:23121856

  6. Labor migration and child mortality in Mozambique.

    PubMed

    Yabiku, Scott T; Agadjanian, Victor; Cau, Boaventura

    2012-12-01

    Male labor migration is widespread in many parts of the world, yet its consequences for child outcomes and especially childhood mortality remain unclear. Male labor migration could bring benefits, in the form of remittances, to the families that remain behind and thus help child survival. Alternatively, the absence of a male adult could imperil the household's well-being and its ability to care for its members, increasing child mortality risks. In this analysis, we use longitudinal survey data from Mozambique collected in 2006 and 2009 to examine the association between male labor migration and under-five mortality in families that remain behind. Using a simple migrant/non-migrant dichotomy, we find no difference in mortality rates across migrant and non-migrant men's children. When we separated successful from unsuccessful migration based on the wife's perception, however, stark contrasts emerge: children of successful migrants have the lowest mortality, followed by children of non-migrant men, followed by the children of unsuccessful migrants. Our results illustrate the need to account for the diversity of men's labor migration experience in examining the effects of migration on left-behind households. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. The decline in child mortality: a reappraisal.

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, O. B.; Lopez, A. D.; Inoue, M.

    2000-01-01

    The present paper examines, describes and documents country-specific trends in under-five mortality rates (i.e., mortality among children under five years of age) in the 1990s. Our analysis updates previous studies by UNICEF, the World Bank and the United Nations. It identifies countries and WHO regions where sustained improvement has occurred and those where setbacks are evident. A consistent series of estimates of under-five mortality rate is provided and an indication is given of historical trends during the period 1950-2000 for both developed and developing countries. It is estimated that 10.5 million children aged 0-4 years died in 1999, about 2.2 million or 17.5% fewer than a decade earlier. On average about 15% of newborn children in Africa are expected to die before reaching their fifth birthday. The corresponding figures for many other parts of the developing world are in the range 3-8% and that for Europe is under 2%. During the 1990s the decline in child mortality decelerated in all the WHO regions except the Western Pacific but there is no widespread evidence of rising child mortality rates. At the country level there are exceptions in southern Africa where the prevalence of HIV is extremely high and in Asia where a few countries are beset by economic difficulties. The slowdown in the rate of decline is of particular concern in Africa and South-East Asia because it is occurring at relatively high levels of mortality, and in countries experiencing severe economic dislocation. As the HIV/AIDS epidemic continues in Africa, particularly southern Africa, and in parts of Asia, further reductions in child mortality become increasingly unlikely until substantial progress in controlling the spread of HIV is achieved. PMID:11100613

  8. Preschool-aged children's television viewing in child care settings.

    PubMed

    Christakis, Dimitri A; Garrison, Michelle M

    2009-12-01

    The goal was to quantify television viewing in day care settings and to investigate the characteristics of programs that predict viewing. A telephone survey of licensed child care programs in Michigan, Washington, Florida, and Massachusetts was performed. The frequency and quantity of television viewing for infants, toddlers, and preschool-aged children were assessed. With the exception of infants, children in home-based child care programs were exposed to significantly more television on an average day than were children in center-based programs (infants: 0.2 vs 0 hours; toddlers: 1.6 vs 0.1 hours; preschool-aged children: 2.4 vs 0.4 hours). In a regression analysis of daily television time for preschool-aged children in child care, center-based programs were found to have an average of 1.84 fewer hours of television each day, controlling for the other covariates. Significant effect modification was found, in that the impact of home-based versus center-based child care programs differed somewhat depending on educational levels for staff members; having a 2- or 4-year college degree was associated with 1.41 fewer hours of television per day in home-based programs, but no impact of staff education on television use was observed in center-based programs. For many children, previous estimates of screen time significantly underestimated actual amounts. Pediatricians should council parents to minimize screen time in child care settings.

  9. Misleading Cues in the Diagnosis of Mental Retardation and Infantile Autism in the Preschool Child.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, Beverly A.

    1989-01-01

    Difficulties in the differential diagnosis of mental retardation and infantile autism in the preschool child are discussed, and essential components in the assessment of preschool children with behavioral, developmental, or cognitive deviations are identified. (Author/DB)

  10. Correlates of child-father and child-mother attachment in the preschool years.

    PubMed

    Bureau, Jean-François; Martin, Jodi; Yurkowski, Kim; Schmiedel, Sabrina; Quan, Jeffry; Moss, Ellen; Deneault, Audrey-Ann; Pallanca, Dominique

    2017-04-01

    The increase in fathers' involvement in childrearing, particularly beyond infancy, warrants research exploring factors influencing the quality of child-father attachment relationships, and the impact of these relationships on children's social development. The current investigation explored various correlates of preschoolers' child-father attachment security to both parents, including contextual factors (i.e., socioeconomic status, child temperament, parenting stress), parental play sensitivity, and child social adaptation. Participants included 107 preschool-aged children (59 girls; M = 46.67 months, SD = 8.57) and their fathers and mothers. Results revealed that both mothers' and fathers' play sensitivity were associated with child attachment security after controlling for different contextual factors. Furthermore, the magnitude of the association between child conduct problems and child-father attachment insecurity was stronger than the corresponding association with child-mother attachment insecurity. Findings provide important information on caregiving factors associated with child-father attachment security in the preschool years and the importance of this bond to children's social adaptation.

  11. Focus on Preschool Aquatics: Child Care Regulations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sayre, Nancy E.

    This paper proposes state regulations for the training of child care staff members in developmentally appropriate safe aquatic practices, outlines required features of any pools that children visit, and suggests safe practices for water-related activities at child care centers and swimming pools. The staff training regulation suggestions include…

  12. Teacher-Child Relationships, Behavior Regulation, and Language Gain among At-Risk Preschoolers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmitt, Mary Beth; Pentimonti, Jill M.; Justice, Laura M.

    2012-01-01

    Many preschoolers from low socioeconomic-status (SES) backgrounds demonstrate lags in their language development, and preschool participation is viewed as an important means for mitigating these lags. In this study, we investigated how teacher-child relationship quality and children's behavior regulation within preschool classrooms were associated…

  13. Comparing Results from the Clinical Assessment of Behavior and Child Behavior Checklist with Referred Preschoolers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, Carl L.

    2013-01-01

    Behavior rating scales are popular assessment tools but more research is needed on the preschool versions of the instruments, particularly with referred samples of preschoolers. This study examined the comparability of results from parent ratings on the preschool versions of the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL/1.5-5, Achenbach & Rescorla, 2000)…

  14. Comparing Results from the Clinical Assessment of Behavior and Child Behavior Checklist with Referred Preschoolers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, Carl L.

    2013-01-01

    Behavior rating scales are popular assessment tools but more research is needed on the preschool versions of the instruments, particularly with referred samples of preschoolers. This study examined the comparability of results from parent ratings on the preschool versions of the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL/1.5-5, Achenbach & Rescorla, 2000)…

  15. Teacher-Child Relationships, Behavior Regulation, and Language Gain among At-Risk Preschoolers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmitt, Mary Beth; Pentimonti, Jill M.; Justice, Laura M.

    2012-01-01

    Many preschoolers from low socioeconomic-status (SES) backgrounds demonstrate lags in their language development, and preschool participation is viewed as an important means for mitigating these lags. In this study, we investigated how teacher-child relationship quality and children's behavior regulation within preschool classrooms were associated…

  16. Creating Environments for Preschoolers. Child Environment Series, Military Child Care Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scavo, Marlene; And Others

    Guidelines for arranging environments appropriate for preschool-age children are provided in this staff development module, one of a series for child caregivers working in military day care centers. The document is divided into two parts. In part 1, discussion focuses on how environments affect children's feelings and behavior and on ways to…

  17. Peer Victimization in Korean Preschool Children: The Effects of Child Characteristics, Parenting Behaviours and Teacher-Child Relationships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shin, Yoolim; Kim, Hye Yeon

    2008-01-01

    This research investigated the influence of child characteristics, parenting behaviours and teacher-child relationships in order to ascertain peer victimization among 297 Korean preschool children. Peer victimization, child social behaviours and teacher-child relationships were assessed through teacher reports. Parents completed parenting…

  18. Preschool Success: Everything You Need to Know to Help Your Child Learn

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, Amy

    2006-01-01

    This Knowledge Essentials book shows parents how to enrich their child's first classroom experience and take an active role in preschool education. This book includes advice and offers information about: (1) What a child is learning at school and the educational standards to expect in preschool-level reading and writing readiness, math, science,…

  19. Child-Care and Family Predictors of Preschool Attachment and Stability from Infancy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    NICHD Early Child Care Research Network.

    2001-01-01

    Analyzed relationships between child-care experience and preschoolers' attachment. Found that maternal sensitivity was the strongest predictor of preschoolers' attachment. When maternal sensitivity was low, more hours per week in child care at 15 months somewhat increased the risk of the insecure-ambivalent classification at 36 months. Found…

  20. Preschool Success: Everything You Need to Know to Help Your Child Learn

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, Amy

    2006-01-01

    This Knowledge Essentials book shows parents how to enrich their child's first classroom experience and take an active role in preschool education. This book includes advice and offers information about: (1) What a child is learning at school and the educational standards to expect in preschool-level reading and writing readiness, math, science,…

  1. Using growth velocity to predict child mortality.

    PubMed

    Schwinger, Catherine; Fadnes, Lars T; Van den Broeck, Jan

    2016-03-01

    Growth assessment based on the WHO child growth velocity standards can potentially be used to predict adverse health outcomes. Nevertheless, there are very few studies on growth velocity to predict mortality. We aimed to determine the ability of various growth velocity measures to predict child death within 3 mo and to compare it with those of attained growth measures. Data from 5657 children <5 y old who were enrolled in a cohort study in the Democratic Republic of Congo were used. Children were measured up to 6 times in 3-mo intervals, and 246 (4.3%) children died during the study period. Generalized estimating equation (GEE) models informed the mortality risk within 3 mo for weight and length velocity z scores and 3-mo changes in midupper arm circumference (MUAC). We used receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves to present balance in sensitivity and specificity to predict child death. GEE models showed that children had an exponential increase in the risk of dying with decreasing growth velocity in all 4 indexes (1.2- to 2.4-fold for every unit decrease). A length and weight velocity z score of <-3 was associated with an 11.8- and a 7.9-fold increase, respectively, in the RR of death in the subsequent 3-mo period (95% CIs: 3.9, 35.5, and 3.9, 16.2, respectively). Weight and length velocity z scores had better predictive abilities [area under the ROC curves (AUCs) of 0.67 and 0.69] than did weight-for-age (AUC: 0.57) and length-for-age (AUC: 0.52) z scores. Among wasted children (weight-for-height z score <-2), the AUC of weight velocity z scores was 0.87. Absolute MUAC performed best among the attained indexes (AUC: 0.63), but longitudinal assessment of MUAC-based indexes did not increase the predictive value. Although repeated growth measures are slightly more complex to implement, their superiority in mortality-predictive abilities suggests that these could be used more for identifying children at increased risk of death.

  2. Can mass media interventions reduce child mortality?

    PubMed

    Head, Roy; Murray, Joanna; Sarrassat, Sophie; Snell, Will; Meda, Nicolas; Ouedraogo, Moctar; Deboise, Laurent; Cousens, Simon

    2015-07-04

    Many people recognise that mass media is important in promoting public health but there have been few attempts to measure how important. An ongoing trial in Burkina Faso (ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT01517230) is an attempt to bring together the very different worlds of mass media and epidemiology: to measure rigorously, using a cluster-randomised design, how many lives mass media can save in a low-income country, and at what cost. Application of the Lives Saved Tool predicts that saturation-based media campaigns could reduce child mortality by 10-20%, at a cost per disability-adjusted life-year that is as low as any existing health intervention. In this Viewpoint we explain the scientific reasoning behind the trial, while stressing the importance of the media methodology used. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Associations among Head Start Fathers' Involvement with Their Preschoolers and Child Language Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fagan, Jay; Iglesias, Aquiles; Kaufman, Rebecca

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the associations among child language competence during father-child play interactions, fathers' time spent volunteering in their preschool-age child's Head Start classroom over the course of one school year, amount of father play and reading to the child at home, and fathers' positive control during play. The sample of 68…

  4. Associations among Head Start Fathers' Involvement with Their Preschoolers and Child Language Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fagan, Jay; Iglesias, Aquiles; Kaufman, Rebecca

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the associations among child language competence during father-child play interactions, fathers' time spent volunteering in their preschool-age child's Head Start classroom over the course of one school year, amount of father play and reading to the child at home, and fathers' positive control during play. The sample of 68…

  5. Preschool-age problem behavior and teacher-child conflict in school: direct and moderation effects by preschool organization.

    PubMed

    Skalická, Věra; Belsky, Jay; Stenseng, Frode; Wichstrøm, Lars

    2015-01-01

    The hypothesis was tested that the new open-group Norwegian day-care centers would more than traditionally organized centers negatively affect (a) current and (b) future teacher-child relationships, and (c) the developmental legacy of preschool problem behavior. The focus was on eight hundred and fifty 4-year-olds from 153 centers who were followed up in first grade. Results of this natural quasi-experiment revealed that children from open-group centers (a) experienced less teacher-child closeness in preschool and (b) more teacher-child conflict in first grade, and (c) that high levels of preschool problem behavior forecast especially high levels of future teacher-child conflict, but only for children from open-group centers. Results highlight the importance of spatial and social organization of day care and their translational implications.

  6. Child Mortality in a Developing Country: A Statistical Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uddin, Md. Jamal; Hossain, Md. Zakir; Ullah, Mohammad Ohid

    2009-01-01

    This study uses data from the "Bangladesh Demographic and Health Survey (BDHS] 1999-2000" to investigate the predictors of child (age 1-4 years) mortality in a developing country like Bangladesh. The cross-tabulation and multiple logistic regression techniques have been used to estimate the predictors of child mortality. The…

  7. Behavior Disorders in the Pre-School Child

    PubMed Central

    De Coutere, I. A. A.

    1970-01-01

    The pre-school period is one in which behavior disorders may develop, especially if the child has certain constitutional faults and especially if the parents react unsuitably. Temperamental characteristics are discussed and the cluster of characteristics of the difficult child described in some detail to illustrate how trouble can be avoided if the parents can adapt healthily to the challenge of such a child. The concept of the emotionally disturbed child is examined. The specific syndromes are reviewed with emphasis on mental retardation, the hyperkinetic syndrome and childhood psychosis. Reactive behavior disorders, neurosis in childhood, special symptoms, excessive emotionality and depression are discussed. In management, the family doctor can fortunately be most effective, but only if he can spare the time and patience, concentrate on listening well, take a good history and give practical advice in which he believes. Medication is of secondary importance. If the community lacks facilities need to help these children further, then the physician can add a strong voice to those seeking them and can often provide the needed informed leadership. Some suggestions for further reading are made and are found in the footnotes. PMID:20468569

  8. Child mortality estimation: accelerated progress in reducing global child mortality, 1990-2010.

    PubMed

    Hill, Kenneth; You, Danzhen; Inoue, Mie; Oestergaard, Mikkel Z

    2012-01-01

    Monitoring development indicators has become a central interest of international agencies and countries for tracking progress towards the Millennium Development Goals. In this review, which also provides an introduction to a collection of articles, we describe the methodology used by the United Nations Inter-agency Group for Child Mortality Estimation to track country-specific changes in the key indicator for Millennium Development Goal 4 (MDG 4), the decline of the under-five mortality rate (the probability of dying between birth and age five, also denoted in the literature as U5MR and (5)q(0)). We review how relevant data from civil registration, sample registration, population censuses, and household surveys are compiled and assessed for United Nations member states, and how time series regression models are fitted to all points of acceptable quality to establish the trends in U5MR from which infant and neonatal mortality rates are generally derived. The application of this methodology indicates that, between 1990 and 2010, the global U5MR fell from 88 to 57 deaths per 1,000 live births, and the annual number of under-five deaths fell from 12.0 to 7.6 million. Although the annual rate of reduction in the U5MR accelerated from 1.9% for the period 1990-2000 to 2.5% for the period 2000-2010, it remains well below the 4.4% annual rate of reduction required to achieve the MDG 4 goal of a two-thirds reduction in U5MR from its 1990 value by 2015. Thus, despite progress in reducing child mortality worldwide, and an encouraging increase in the pace of decline over the last two decades, MDG 4 will not be met without greatly increasing efforts to reduce child deaths.

  9. Child and Parent Perceptions of Interparental Relationship Conflict Predict Preschool Children’s Adjustment

    PubMed Central

    Clements, Mari L.; Martin, Sarah E.; Randall, David W.; Kane, Karen L.

    2014-01-01

    Interparental relationship conflict has consistently been linked to child adjustment problems, with children’s perceptions of such conflict particularly predictive of their outcomes. Despite mounting evidence that preschool children can provide reliable and valid accounts of family functioning, little research has examined preschool children’s perceptions of interparental conflict. The present study employed a multi-informant design for both reports of interparental conflict (preschool children and their mothers and fathers) and reports of child adjustment (preschool children, their mothers and fathers, and their preschool teachers). Children completed pictorial measures of interparental conflict and of self-esteem that paralleled questionnaires completed by adult respondents. For both child behavior problems and child self-esteem, preschool children’s perceptions of interparental conflict predicted their adjustment. Preschool children’s reports of interparental conflict were significantly associated with their self-esteem and with both parents’ and teachers’ reports of child behavior problems, and this association remained significant when controlling for parents’ reports of interparental conflict. Further, the interaction between parents’ reports and children’s reports of interparental conflict added unique variance to the prediction of preschool teachers’ reports of children’s behavior problems. PMID:25574451

  10. Child and Parent Perceptions of Interparental Relationship Conflict Predict Preschool Children's Adjustment.

    PubMed

    Clements, Mari L; Martin, Sarah E; Randall, David W; Kane, Karen L

    2014-06-01

    Interparental relationship conflict has consistently been linked to child adjustment problems, with children's perceptions of such conflict particularly predictive of their outcomes. Despite mounting evidence that preschool children can provide reliable and valid accounts of family functioning, little research has examined preschool children's perceptions of interparental conflict. The present study employed a multi-informant design for both reports of interparental conflict (preschool children and their mothers and fathers) and reports of child adjustment (preschool children, their mothers and fathers, and their preschool teachers). Children completed pictorial measures of interparental conflict and of self-esteem that paralleled questionnaires completed by adult respondents. For both child behavior problems and child self-esteem, preschool children's perceptions of interparental conflict predicted their adjustment. Preschool children's reports of interparental conflict were significantly associated with their self-esteem and with both parents' and teachers' reports of child behavior problems, and this association remained significant when controlling for parents' reports of interparental conflict. Further, the interaction between parents' reports and children's reports of interparental conflict added unique variance to the prediction of preschool teachers' reports of children's behavior problems.

  11. Associations of Preschool Type and Teacher-Child Relational Quality with Young Children's Social-Emotional Competence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garner, Pamela W.; Mahatmya, Duhita; Moses, Laurence Kimberly; Bolt, Elizabeth N.

    2014-01-01

    Research Findings: This study examined associations of preschool type (i.e., urban and suburban Head Start and university-affiliated center) and teacher-child variables with positive and negative child outcomes among 145 preschoolers (74 boys). Differences emerged across preschools, with urban Head Start children scoring lowest on the emotional…

  12. Associations of Preschool Type and Teacher-Child Relational Quality with Young Children's Social-Emotional Competence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garner, Pamela W.; Mahatmya, Duhita; Moses, Laurence Kimberly; Bolt, Elizabeth N.

    2014-01-01

    Research Findings: This study examined associations of preschool type (i.e., urban and suburban Head Start and university-affiliated center) and teacher-child variables with positive and negative child outcomes among 145 preschoolers (74 boys). Differences emerged across preschools, with urban Head Start children scoring lowest on the emotional…

  13. [Political crises in Africa and infant and child mortality].

    PubMed

    Garenne, M

    1997-01-01

    Many African countries experienced severe political crises after independence, and in a number of cases the crises had significant demographic consequences, especially for child mortality. Data based on maternity histories allowed the reconstruction of child mortality trends over the past 20-30 years in Uganda, Ghana, Rwanda, Madagascar, and Mozambique. The indicator used was the child mortality quotient (number of deaths of under-5 children per 1000 births). Uganda's child mortality declined from 227/1000 in 1960 to 154/1000 in 1970, but the trend was reversed in 1971, when Idi Amin Dada came to power, and the rate reached 204/1000 in 1982 before beginning to decline again. The level of mortality remained high, however, and was still 160/1000 in 1988. Ghana suffered a political and economic crisis during 1979-84. Child mortality rose from 130/1000 in 1978 to 175/1000 in 1983. Mortality rates began a rapid decline after structural adjustment programs were begun, possibly due to improved management of health services. The child mortality rate in Rwanda increased from around 220/1000 in 1960 to 240/1000 in 1975, before beginning a decline in the late 1970s that reached 140/1000 by 1990. The period of political stability and relative prosperity during the 15-year reign of Juvenal Habyarimana was associated with the decline. Political crises marked by student and peasant uprisings were associated with Madagascar's child mortality rate increase from about 145/1000 in 1960 to 185/1000 in 1985. Mozambique was beset by civil war after independence, in which destruction of the health infrastructure was a strategy. The child mortality rate increased from 270/1000 to 470/1000 between 1975 and 1986, a peak war year. The factors by which political crises affect mortality so profoundly remain to be explained, but particular attention should be given to studying the health sector.

  14. Programming for Preschoolers with Special Needs: How Child Development Knowledge Can Help.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Honig, Alice Sterling

    Information provided in five major dimensions of the field of normal child development can be useful in increasing the understanding and effectiveness of those who work with preschool children with special needs. The especially relevant dimensions of the child development field are : (1) child development theories, including the theories of…

  15. Comparative Study of Child Assessment Practices in English and Korean Preschools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nah, Kwi-Ok

    2014-01-01

    Child assessment practices in English and Korean preschools were compared by analysing data from interviews with educators, examples of child assessment, and official documents from each country. Child assessment in England was systematically implemented and characterised by several methodological and procedural strengths, whereas assessment in…

  16. Promoting Peer Regard of an Autistic Child in a Mainstreamed Preschool Using Pre-Enrollment Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raab, Melinda M.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    In activities designed to educate them about similarities and differences between disabled and nondisabled, disabling conditions in general, and a particular autistic child, six preschool children were compared to 12 control children on incident reports to teachers about the autistic child and in sociometric ratings concerning the child.…

  17. Child Care in Rhode Island: Caring for Infants and Pre-School Children. Issue Brief.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrington, Ann-Marie, Ed.; Walsh, Catherine Boisvert, Ed.; Bryant, Elizabeth Burke, Ed.

    1997-01-01

    This report of the Rhode Island Kids Count organization details the state's infant and preschool child care, components of quality care, and state policies to increase the supply of quality care. The report begins with a discussion of the importance of providing good quality child care to enhance healthy child development, especially brain…

  18. The Imperceptibly Handicapped Preschool Child in the Classroom: An Approach to Knowledge, Awareness, and Understanding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Townsend-Moller, Darlene A.

    This paper discusses the preschool classroom needs of the imperceptibly handicapped child who has a medically-diagnosed physical condition which includes unpredictable episodes placing the child in a temporary state of dysfunction. (epilepsy, juvenile diabetes, and severe allergies are examples of such handicaps.) In most cases the child is…

  19. Comparative Study of Child Assessment Practices in English and Korean Preschools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nah, Kwi-Ok

    2014-01-01

    Child assessment practices in English and Korean preschools were compared by analysing data from interviews with educators, examples of child assessment, and official documents from each country. Child assessment in England was systematically implemented and characterised by several methodological and procedural strengths, whereas assessment in…

  20. Mourning Child Grief Support Group Curriculum: Preschool Edition. Denny the Duck Stories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lehmann, Linda; Jimerson, Shane R.; Gaasch, Ann

    The Mourning Child Preschool grief support curriculum is intended for use with preschool children who have experienced the death of someone special to them. It is designed for use by professionals who work in schools, hospitals, hospices, mental health agencies, or any setting that serves bereaved children. The curriculum contains lesson plans for…

  1. Circle of Security in Child Care: Putting Attachment Theory into Practice in Preschool Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Glen; Hoffman, Kent; Powell, Bert

    2017-01-01

    This article describes the Circle of Security-Classroom (COS-C) approach to applying attachment theory in preschool settings. Early childhood is an incubator for a wide range of development including the underpinnings of school readiness. Secure teacher-child relationships support this process. However, most preschool staff members lack guidance…

  2. Technology-Enhanced Storytelling Stimulating Parent-Child Interaction and Preschool Children's Vocabulary Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teepe, R. C.; Molenaar, I.; Verhoeven, L.

    2017-01-01

    Preschool children's vocabulary mainly develops verbal through interaction. Therefore, the technology-enhanced storytelling (TES) activity Jeffy's Journey is developed to support parent-child interaction and vocabulary in preschool children. TES entails shared verbal storytelling supported by a story structure and real-time visual, auditory and…

  3. Child-Centred Education: Preschool Teachers' Beliefs and Self-Reported Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sak, Ramazan; Erden, Feyza Tantekin; Morrison, George S.

    2016-01-01

    This study analyses the beliefs and self-reported practices of preschool teachers with regard to the concept of child-centred education, as well as the consistency between these beliefs and practices. Data were collected via interviews with 20 female teachers employed in public preschools in Ankara, Turkey. The results indicated that the…

  4. Child-Centred Education: Preschool Teachers' Beliefs and Self-Reported Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sak, Ramazan; Erden, Feyza Tantekin; Morrison, George S.

    2016-01-01

    This study analyses the beliefs and self-reported practices of preschool teachers with regard to the concept of child-centred education, as well as the consistency between these beliefs and practices. Data were collected via interviews with 20 female teachers employed in public preschools in Ankara, Turkey. The results indicated that the…

  5. Parent Attachment, Childrearing Behavior, and Child Attachment: Mediated Effects Predicting Preschoolers' Externalizing Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roskam, Isabelle; Meunier, Jean-Christophe; Stievenart, Marie

    2011-01-01

    Attachment theory provides an interesting background for thinking about externalizing behavior (EB) in early childhood and for understanding how parenting influences the child's outcomes. The study examined how attachment and parenting could be combined to explain preschoolers' EB. Data were collected from 117 preschoolers aged from 4 to 6…

  6. Mother-Child Dyadic Synchrony Is Associated with Better Functioning in Hyperactive/Inattentive Preschool Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Healey, Dione M.; Gopin, Chaya B.; Grossman, Bella R.; Campbell, Susan B.; Halperin, Jeffrey M.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Hyperactive/inattentive (HI) behaviors are common in preschoolers, but they result in functional impairment and attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) diagnoses in only some children. We examined whether the quality of mother-child interaction accounts for variance in level of functioning among preschool children with elevated…

  7. A Cross-Cultural Examination of Preschool Teacher Cognitions and Responses to Child Aggression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pochtar, Randi; Del Vecchio, Tamara

    2014-01-01

    The associations among preschool teachers' attributions about child responsibility, intentionality, knowledge, and the seriousness of hypothetical displays of children's aggressive behavior are examined in United States ("N"?=?82) and Vietnamese ("N"?=?91) preschool teachers. The results suggest cross-cultural differences as…

  8. Maternal Socialization and Child Temperament as Predictors of Emotion Regulation in Turkish Preschoolers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yagmurlu, Bilge; Altan, Ozge

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the role of maternal socialization and temperament in Turkish preschool children's emotion regulation. Participants consisted of 145 preschoolers (79 boys, 69 girls; M[subscript age]= 62 months), their mothers, and daycare teachers from middle-high socioeconomic suburbs of Istanbul. Maternal child-rearing practices and…

  9. Mourning Child Grief Support Group Curriculum: Preschool Edition. Denny the Duck Stories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lehmann, Linda; Jimerson, Shane R.; Gaasch, Ann

    The Mourning Child Preschool grief support curriculum is intended for use with preschool children who have experienced the death of someone special to them. It is designed for use by professionals who work in schools, hospitals, hospices, mental health agencies, or any setting that serves bereaved children. The curriculum contains lesson plans for…

  10. Parent Attachment, Childrearing Behavior, and Child Attachment: Mediated Effects Predicting Preschoolers' Externalizing Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roskam, Isabelle; Meunier, Jean-Christophe; Stievenart, Marie

    2011-01-01

    Attachment theory provides an interesting background for thinking about externalizing behavior (EB) in early childhood and for understanding how parenting influences the child's outcomes. The study examined how attachment and parenting could be combined to explain preschoolers' EB. Data were collected from 117 preschoolers aged from 4 to 6…

  11. Circle of Security in Child Care: Putting Attachment Theory into Practice in Preschool Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Glen; Hoffman, Kent; Powell, Bert

    2017-01-01

    This article describes the Circle of Security-Classroom (COS-C) approach to applying attachment theory in preschool settings. Early childhood is an incubator for a wide range of development including the underpinnings of school readiness. Secure teacher-child relationships support this process. However, most preschool staff members lack guidance…

  12. A Planning Guide to the Preschool Curriculum: The Child, the Process, the Day.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Findlay, Jane; And Others

    This guide to preschool curriculum planning presents a unit approach to preschool education and outlines 44 curriculum units. A discussion of methods and principles involved in the development of this curriculum stresses that it is the child, not the teacher, who determines curriculum. Four principles for good teaching are examined: preparing…

  13. A Cross-Cultural Examination of Preschool Teacher Cognitions and Responses to Child Aggression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pochtar, Randi; Del Vecchio, Tamara

    2014-01-01

    The associations among preschool teachers' attributions about child responsibility, intentionality, knowledge, and the seriousness of hypothetical displays of children's aggressive behavior are examined in United States ("N"?=?82) and Vietnamese ("N"?=?91) preschool teachers. The results suggest cross-cultural differences as…

  14. Reducing child mortality in India in the new millennium.

    PubMed Central

    Claeson, M.; Bos, E. R.; Mawji, T.; Pathmanathan, I.

    2000-01-01

    Globally, child mortality rates have been halved over the last few decades, a developmental success story. Nevertheless, progress has been uneven and in recent years mortality rates have increased in some countries. The present study documents the slowing decline in infant mortality rates in india; a departure from the longer-term trends. The major causes of childhood mortality are also reviewed and strategic options for the different states of India are proposed that take into account current mortality rates and the level of progress in individual states. The slowing decline in childhood mortality rates in India calls for new approaches that go beyond disease-, programme- and sector-specific approaches. PMID:11100614

  15. An investigation of preschool teachers' recognition of possible child abuse and neglect in Izmir, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Karadag, Sevinç Çırak; Sönmez, Sibel; Dereobalı, Nilay

    2015-03-01

    Child abuse and neglect have a potentially deleterious impact on children's physical, social, and psychological development. Preschool teachers may play a crucial role in the protection, early detection, and the intervention of child abuse and neglect, as they have the opportunity to establish a close contact with the families and to observe day-to-day changes in pupils' behavior. The main purpose of this study is to investigate preschool teachers' experiences and characteristics in relation to their awareness of possible child abuse and neglect signs. A questionnaire survey was designed and administered to 197 preschool teachers who work for the public preschools in the Izmir province of Turkey. In addition to the questionnaire items, a 34-item Likert-type scale measuring the level of familiarity with possible signs of child abuse and neglect was developed. This scale had an internal consistency of 0.94. The results revealed that 10.65% of preschool teachers had training regarding violence against children and 2.03% of them had training in child abuse and neglect. Overall, 35% of all teachers reported that they had prior experience with pupils who were exposed to child abuse and neglect. Moreover, statistical analyses indicated that being a parent and having training in child abuse and neglect, having experience with maltreated children, and having higher job status were significant factors in preschool teachers' ability to recognize the possible signs of child abuse and neglect. Our results support that teacher training in child abuse and neglect can play an important role in preschool teachers' awareness of the possible signs of child abuse and neglect.

  16. Modelling determinants of child mortality and poverty in the Comoros.

    PubMed

    Lachaud, Jean-Pierre

    2004-03-01

    Based on the Demographic and Health Survey of the Comoros of 1996, the analysis of the determinants of child mortality reaches three conclusions. Firstly, differentiated analytical options generate partially convergent results and provide different dimensions of child mortality. Secondly, the study shows that the low standard of living of households in terms of assets is associated with high child mortality. Thirdly, the determinants of infant and infanto-juvenile mortality are relatively comparable. On the one hand, some common factors to both analytical options affect negatively child health: (i) geographical location in rural zones and/or on the islands of Anjouan and Mohéli; (ii) the low standard of living of households in terms of assets; (iii) some community elements, in particular morbidity, the insufficiency of vaccination and the absence of childbirth assisted by qualified persons. On the other hand, characteristics of mothers and births have an impact on infant and infanto-juvenile survival.

  17. Child temperament and maternal predictors of preschool children's eating and body mass index. A prospective study.

    PubMed

    Bergmeier, Heidi; Skouteris, Helen; Horwood, Sharon; Hooley, Merrilyn; Richardson, Ben

    2014-03-01

    Research has previously identified relationships between child temperament and BMI during childhood. However, few studies have addressed the broader implications of child temperament on the development of obesogenic risk factors, such as maternal feeding, child eating and body mass index (BMI) of pre-schoolers. Hence, the current study evaluated cross-sectional and prospective associations between child temperament, maternal feeding, maternal parenting styles, mother-child interaction, preschoolers' eating behaviours and BMI. Child irritability, cooperation-manageability and easy-difficult temperaments, mother-child dysfunctional interaction, maternal pressure to eat and restriction were significantly cross-sectionally associated with child eating behaviours. Child enjoyment of food was significantly associated with child BMI. Child easy-difficult temperament and mother-child dysfunctional interaction predicted child eating behaviours longitudinally and baseline child BMI measures predicted child BMI longitudinally. Average maternal ratings of child temperament were relatively neutral, potentially explaining why most associations were not robust longitudinally. Future research should include a sample of greater socio-economic and BMI diversity as well as objective measures of child temperament, diet composition, maternal feeding practices, and mother-child interaction. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Proximate determinants of child mortality in Liberia.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, O B; Eberstein, I W; Sly, D F

    1991-07-01

    The study looks at the effects of maternal sociodemographic characteristics and the quality of the environment on child survival through two intervening variables, breast-feeding and prenatal care. A linear structural equation modelling approach was used to examine infant and child survival based on a weighted sample of 5180 Liberian children aged 0-5 years. The findings confirm previous studies, but also reveal complex relationships of the role of education, maternal age and breast-feeding in enhancing child survival.

  19. Family Planning and Child Survival: The Role of Reproductive Factors in Infant and Child Mortality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conly, Shanti R.

    This report summarizes the evidence that family planning can reduce deaths of children under 5 years of age at a reasonable cost. The report also: (1) identifies the major reproductive factors associated with child mortality; (2) estimates the approximate reduction in child mortality that could be achieved through improved childbearing patterns;…

  20. Evolution of infant and child mortality in Chile: a model.

    PubMed

    Hojman, D E

    1992-10-01

    The author contends that birth rate and infant and child mortality rates are jointly determined by demographic, economic, health care, and other influences. Working under this structural assumption, a multiequation model is developed, estimated, and simulated, in which real earnings, unemployment, midwife visits, access to cheap energy, public health expenditures, and degree of urbanization are determinant factors of declining infant and child mortality in Chile. Most notably, mortality declined during a period of increasing unemployment and falling living standards for at least part of the population. The study found all 3 rates to be jointly determined, but by different variables. Specifically, unemployment affected birth rate and child mortality rate, while declining infant mortality was based upon midwife visits, health expenditure, and access to cheap energy. At the policy level, trade-offs often result between infant and child mortality, especially where high birth rates prevail. Where movement along the Phillips curve is possible, higher earnings should be preferred over lower unemployment for the benefit of infant and child mortality. Preferred policy would week to provide a carefully balanced combination of better earnings and more midwife visits.

  1. Preschool-Age Problem Behavior and Teacher-Child Conflict in School: Direct and Moderation Effects by Preschool Organization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skalická, Vera; Belsky, Jay; Stenseng, Frode; Wichstrøm, Lars

    2015-01-01

    The hypothesis was tested that the new open-group Norwegian day-care centers would more than traditionally organized centers negatively affect (a) current and (b) future teacher-child relationships, and (c) the developmental legacy of preschool problem behavior. The focus was on eight hundred and fifty 4-year-olds from 153 centers who were…

  2. Preschool-Age Problem Behavior and Teacher-Child Conflict in School: Direct and Moderation Effects by Preschool Organization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skalická, Vera; Belsky, Jay; Stenseng, Frode; Wichstrøm, Lars

    2015-01-01

    The hypothesis was tested that the new open-group Norwegian day-care centers would more than traditionally organized centers negatively affect (a) current and (b) future teacher-child relationships, and (c) the developmental legacy of preschool problem behavior. The focus was on eight hundred and fifty 4-year-olds from 153 centers who were…

  3. Female circumcision and child mortality in urban Somalia.

    PubMed

    Mohamud, O A

    1991-01-01

    In Somalia, a demographer analyzed urban data obtained from the Family Health Survey to examine the effect female circumcision has on child mortality and the mechanism of that effect. Girls undergo female circumcision between 5-12 years old in Somalia. Since sunni circumcision (removal of the clitoral prepuce and tip of the clitoris) and clitoridectomy (removal of the entire clitoris) did not affect child mortality, he used them as the reference group. Infibulation (entire removal of the clitoris and of the labia minora and majora with the remains of the labia majora being sewn together allowing only a small opening for passage of urine) did affect child mortality. Female children who underwent infibulation and whose mothers most likely also underwent infibulation experienced higher mortality (13-72%) than those from other circumcised mothers. Female mortality exceeded male mortality indicating possible son preference. Mothers with clitoridectomy or infibulation had significantly higher infant mortality than those with sunni circumcision with the strongest effects during the neonatal period (95% and 42% higher mortality, respectively; p=.01). The effect of female circumcision on child mortality decreased with increased child's age. This higher than expected mortality among women with clitoridectomy may have been because women with infibulation had more stillbirths which were not counted as births. The exposed vagina of clitoridectomized women is more likely to be infected resulting in high risk of stillbirths and premature births than the closed vagina of infibulated women. The researcher suggested that the policies promoting education and consciousness raising may eventually eradicate female circumcision. This longterm campaign should use mass media, senior women of high status, and respected religious leaders. Legislation prohibiting this practice would only drive it underground under unsanitary conditions. Demographers should no longer ignore female circumcision

  4. Child mortality, commodity price volatility and the resource curse.

    PubMed

    Makhlouf, Yousef; Kellard, Neil M; Vinogradov, Dmitri

    2017-04-01

    Given many developing economies depend on primary commodities, the fluctuations of commodity prices may imply significant effects for the wellbeing of children. To investigate, this paper examines the relationship between child mortality and commodity price movements as reflected by country-specific commodity terms-of-trade. Employing a panel of 69 low and lower-middle income countries over the period 1970-2010, we show that commodity terms-of-trade volatility increases child mortality in highly commodity-dependent importers suggesting a type of 'scarce' resource curse. Strikingly however, good institutions appear able to mitigate the negative impact of volatility. The paper concludes by highlighting this tripartite relationship between child mortality, volatility and good institutions and posits that an effective approach to improving child wellbeing in low to lower-middle income countries will combine hedging, import diversification and improvement of institutional quality.

  5. Preventing Obesity among Preschool Children: How Can Child-Care Settings Promote Healthy Eating and Physical Activity? Research Synthesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larson, Nicole; Ward, Dianne; Neelon, Sara Benjamin; Story, Mary

    2011-01-01

    Child-care settings provide numerous opportunities to promote healthy eating and physical activity behaviors among preschool children. The majority of U.S. children are placed in some form of non-parental care during their preschool years. While approximately 15 percent of preschool children are primarily cared for by their relatives, most…

  6. Comprehensive Bibliography on Child Care and Preschool Design. Architecture for Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Gary T., Comp.

    Excellence in design of child care and other preschool facilities is an emerging issue in the architectural profession. This bibliography is intended to aid architects and other designers, child-care directors, policy makers, and researchers to locate the most up-to-date and best sources of design-relevant information. The bibliography is based on…

  7. The Child and Adult Care Food Program and the Nutrition of Preschoolers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Korenman, Sanders; Abner, Kristin S.; Kaestner, Robert; Gordon, Rachel A.

    2013-01-01

    Children spend a considerable amount of time in preschools and child care centers. As a result, these settings may have an influence on their diet, weight, and food security, and are potentially important contexts for interventions to address nutritional health. The Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP) is one such intervention. No national…

  8. Some Therapeutic Uses of Dramatic Play with the Aggressive Child in the Preschool Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ginnane, Patrick

    The primary purpose of this master's thesis is to describe some therapeutic uses of dramatic play with the mildly aggressive preschool child. The child for whom the suggested play interventions are considered appropriate is characterized by sociality and attachment to both peers and adults, and is not chronically aggressive. After the first…

  9. Volunteers as Teachers of Child Management to Parents of Behaviour-Disordered Preschoolers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seymour, Frederick W.; France, Karyn G.

    1984-01-01

    Ten women volunteers were trained as teachers of child management skills to parents of behavior-disordered preschoolers. Evaluation of the project's outcomes using a consumer satisfaction survey, parent ratings on a problem behavior checklist, and staff ratings of goal attainment, showed major changes in child behavior maintained at three-month…

  10. Experiences in the Bilingual Education of a Child of Pre-School Age.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zierer, Ernesto

    1978-01-01

    This article describes a plan to develop bilingualism carried out by the parents of a child of pre-school age who died of brain cancer at the age of five. The child learned German, the language of his father, and Spanish, the language of his mother, consecutively. (CFM)

  11. Designing Better Preschools: Improving Communication between Designers and Child Development Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beacham, Cindy V.

    2006-01-01

    This exploratory study examined communications between designers and child development professionals during the preschool design process. Qualitative interviews and focus groups were conducted to investigate the need for communication support between child development professionals, parents, and design professionals (n = 20) during the process of…

  12. The Child and Adult Care Food Program and the Nutrition of Preschoolers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Korenman, Sanders; Abner, Kristin S.; Kaestner, Robert; Gordon, Rachel A.

    2013-01-01

    Children spend a considerable amount of time in preschools and child care centers. As a result, these settings may have an influence on their diet, weight, and food security, and are potentially important contexts for interventions to address nutritional health. The Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP) is one such intervention. No national…

  13. Preschoolers' Emotion Regulation Strategy Understanding: Relations with Emotion Socialization and Child Self-Regulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cole, Pamela M.; Dennis, Tracy A.; Smith-Simon, Kristen E.; Cohen, Laura H.

    2009-01-01

    Preschool-age children's ability to verbally generate strategies for regulating anger and sadness, and to recognize purported effective strategies for these emotions, were examined in relation to child factors (child age, temperament, and language ability) and maternal emotion socialization (supportiveness and structuring in response to child…

  14. Preschools for Science: The Child Study Centre at the University of British Columbia, 1960-1997

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Penney; Gleason, Mona; Petrina, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    The development of the Child Study Centre (CSC) at University of British Columbia (UBC) provides a unique perspective on the complex and often contradictory relationship between child study and preschool education in postwar Canada. In this article, the authors detail the development and eventual closure of the CSC at UBC, focusing on the uneasy…

  15. Teacher-Child Interaction Training with an Urban Clinical Preschool Population

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaffner, Kristen F.; McGoey, Kara E.; Venesky, Lindsey

    2016-01-01

    The current study examined the impact of the relationship-enhancement phase of the Teacher-Child Interaction Training (TCIT) intervention on child behavior and teacher skill use within an urban therapeutic classroom milieu. Participants included four preschool children (mean age 4 years, 8 months) with clinical diagnoses attending a therapeutic…

  16. Teacher-Child Interactions and Preschool Children's Perceptions of Self and Peers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colwell, Malinda J.; Lindsey, Eric W.

    2003-01-01

    Examined qualitative characteristics of teacher-child interaction and how they are related to preschoolers' perceptions of self and peers. Found that girls spent more time interacting with teachers than boys, and had more cooperative and positive interactions with teachers than did boys. Found that the quality of teacher-child interaction was…

  17. The Children of LAUP: Executive Summary of the First 5 LA Universal Preschool Child Outcomes Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Love, John M.; Atkins-Burnett, Sally; Vogel, Cheri

    2009-01-01

    First 5 LA contracted with Mathematica Policy Research, Inc., (MPR) to conduct the First 5 LA/LAUP Universal Preschool Child Outcomes Study (UPCOS). After completing Phase 1 (spring 2007) in which the authors pilot tested the feasibility, reliability, and validity of selected child development measures for the culturally and linguistically diverse…

  18. Parent Physical Punishment and Child Aggression in a Singapore Chinese Preschool Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ngee Sim, Tick; Ping Ong, Lue

    2005-01-01

    We examine how parental physical punishment (caning and slapping) and child aggression are related, and possible moderation by authoritative control and rejection. A sample of 286 Singapore Chinese preschoolers ages 4-6 reported on rejection; their parents reported on control, caning, and slapping; and their teachers rated child aggression.…

  19. Designing Better Preschools: Improving Communication between Designers and Child Development Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beacham, Cindy V.

    2006-01-01

    This exploratory study examined communications between designers and child development professionals during the preschool design process. Qualitative interviews and focus groups were conducted to investigate the need for communication support between child development professionals, parents, and design professionals (n = 20) during the process of…

  20. The Education of the Gifted Pre-School Child in the Nuclear Family.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malan, J. A.

    The paper explores the role of parents and the nuclear family in optimal development of gifted preschool children. The family helps the child accomplish basic developmental tasks by adapting to the child's critical needs and interests in appropriate ways. While stimulating academic skills is important, affective education to aid the acquisition of…

  1. Parent Physical Punishment and Child Aggression in a Singapore Chinese Preschool Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ngee Sim, Tick; Ping Ong, Lue

    2005-01-01

    We examine how parental physical punishment (caning and slapping) and child aggression are related, and possible moderation by authoritative control and rejection. A sample of 286 Singapore Chinese preschoolers ages 4-6 reported on rejection; their parents reported on control, caning, and slapping; and their teachers rated child aggression.…

  2. Volunteers as Teachers of Child Management to Parents of Behaviour-Disordered Preschoolers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seymour, Frederick W.; France, Karyn G.

    1984-01-01

    Ten women volunteers were trained as teachers of child management skills to parents of behavior-disordered preschoolers. Evaluation of the project's outcomes using a consumer satisfaction survey, parent ratings on a problem behavior checklist, and staff ratings of goal attainment, showed major changes in child behavior maintained at three-month…

  3. Brazil Early Child Development: A Focus on the Impact of Preschools. Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    World Bank, Washington, DC. Latin America and the Caribbean Region.

    In spite of remarkable improvement over the past 20 years, there remain substantial deficits in Brazil's education levels and child health, as well as high levels of chronic grade repetition. This study examined the impact of Brazil's long established preschool as an early child development (ECD) intervention for improving the status of the…

  4. Preschoolers' Emotion Regulation Strategy Understanding: Relations with Emotion Socialization and Child Self-Regulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cole, Pamela M.; Dennis, Tracy A.; Smith-Simon, Kristen E.; Cohen, Laura H.

    2009-01-01

    Preschool-age children's ability to verbally generate strategies for regulating anger and sadness, and to recognize purported effective strategies for these emotions, were examined in relation to child factors (child age, temperament, and language ability) and maternal emotion socialization (supportiveness and structuring in response to child…

  5. Experiences in the Bilingual Education of a Child of Pre-School Age.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zierer, Ernesto

    1978-01-01

    This article describes a plan to develop bilingualism carried out by the parents of a child of pre-school age who died of brain cancer at the age of five. The child learned German, the language of his father, and Spanish, the language of his mother, consecutively. (CFM)

  6. Teaching Our Youngest: A Guide for Preschool Teachers, Child Care & Family Providers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armbruster, Bonnie; Lehr, Fran; Osborn, Jean

    Noting that everyone who interacts with a young child is a teacher, this booklet for preschool teachers and child care providers draws from scientifically based research about what they can do to help children develop their language abilities, increase their knowledge, become familiar with books and other printed materials, learn letters and…

  7. Determinants of child mortality in south-west Uganda.

    PubMed

    Vella, V; Tomkins, A; Nidku, J; Marshall, T

    1992-01-01

    Anthropometric and sociodemographic variables were taken from 4320 children in a baseline survey carried out in March-April 1988 in the district of Mbarara, south-west Uganda. After 12 months a follow-up survey assessed the mortality of the children during the preceding year. Lack of ownership of cattle, recent arrival in the village, using candles for lighting, being of birth order higher than 5 and having a father with less than 8 years of schooling were significantly associated with child mortality. The addition of mid-upper arm circumference significantly improved the logistic model of socioeconomic variables and mortality and did not diminish the predictive power of socioeconomic variables in relation to increased mortality. This suggests that nutritional status and specific socioeconomic factors are both, independently, important predictors of child mortality.

  8. Child mortality in a collapsing African society.

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, M. M.; Omar, H. M.; Persson, L. A.; Wall, S.

    1996-01-01

    A cohort study of mortality among under-5-year-olds was carried out in two Somali villages in 1987-89, a period of economic and political collapse in the rural parts of the country. Analysed was the relative importance of the social characteristics for under-5-year-old mortality against a background of deteriorating political and economic conditions. Mortality increased among under-5-year-olds from 1987 (211 per 1000) to 1988 (323 per 1000) to 1989 (414 per 1000). The mortality risk was more pronounced for boys than girls and was more so for infants than children aged 1-4 years. The major signs prior to death were respiratory infections, diarrhoeal diseases, fever/malaria and tetanus in the neonatal period. Over the 3-year study period mortality rates for diarrhoeal diseases increased significantly, while those for respiratory infections and diseases preventable by immunization increased more slowly. The increasing trend in under-5-year-old mortality was more pronounced in instances when the mother derived her major income from sources other than farming and in larger households. PMID:9002335

  9. The effects of malnutrition on child mortality in developing countries.

    PubMed Central

    Pelletier, D. L.; Frongillo, E. A.; Schroeder, D. G.; Habicht, J. P.

    1995-01-01

    Conventional methods of classifying causes of death suggest that about 70% of the deaths of children (aged 0-4 years) worldwide are due to diarrhoeal illness, acute respiratory infection, malaria, and immunizable diseases. The role of malnutrition in child mortality is not revealed by these conventional methods, despite the long-standing recognition of the synergism between malnutrition and infectious diseases. This paper describes a recently-developed epidemiological method to estimate the percentage of child deaths (aged 6-59 months) which could be attributed to the potentiating effects of malnutrition in infectious disease. The results from 53 developing countries with nationally representative data on child weight-for-age indicate that 56% of child deaths were attributable to malnutrition's potentiating effects, and 83% of these were attributable to mild-to-moderate as opposed to severe malnutrition. For individual countries, malnutrition's total potentiating effects on mortality ranged from 13% to 66%, with at least three-quarters of this arising from mild-to-moderate malnutrition in each case. These results show that malnutrition has a far more powerful impact on child mortality than is generally appreciated, and suggest that strategies involving only the screening and treatment of the severely malnourished will do little to address this impact. The methodology provided in this paper makes it possible to estimate the effects of malnutrition on child mortality in any population for which prevalence data exist. PMID:7554015

  10. Links Among Italian Preschoolers' Socio-Emotional Competence, Teacher-Child Relationship Quality and Peer Acceptance.

    PubMed

    Sette, Stefania; Spinrad, Tracy; Baumgartner, Emma

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the relations of teacher-child relationship quality (close, conflictive, and dependent), children's social behavior, and peer likability in a sample of Italian preschool-aged children (46 boys; 42 girls). Preschool teachers evaluated the quality of the teacher-child relationship and children's social behaviors (i.e., social competence, anger-aggression, and anxiety-withdrawal). Peer-rated likability was measured using a sociometric procedure. Results indicated that conflictual teacher-child relationships were related to high aggressive behavior, and dependent teacher-child relationships were positively associated with children's anxiety-withdrawal. Moreover, we found an indirect association between close teacher-child relationship quality and peer likability through children's social competence. The findings provide evidence that the teacher-child relationship is critical for children's social behaviors, and that social competence was uniquely related to peer likability.

  11. Health insurance and child mortality in Costa Rica.

    PubMed

    Dow, William H; Schmeer, Kammi K

    2003-09-01

    This study uses a natural experiment approach to evaluate the effect of health insurance on infant and child mortality. In the 1970s Costa Rica adopted national health insurance, which expanded children's insurance coverage from 42 percent in 1973 to 73 percent by 1984. Aggregate infant and child mortality rates dropped rapidly during this period, but this trend had begun prior to the insurance expansion, and may be related to other changes during this period. We use county-level vital statistics and census data to isolate the causal insurance effect on mortality using county fixed effects models. We find that insurance increases are strongly related to mortality decreases at the county level before controlling for other time-varying factors. However, after controlling for changes in other correlated maternal, household, and community characteristics, fixed effects models indicate that the insurance expansion could have explained only a small portion of the mortality change. These results question the proposition that health insurance can lead to large improvements in infant and child mortality, and that expanding insurance to the poor can substantially narrow socioeconomic differentials in mortality.

  12. Preschool center quality and school readiness: quality effects and variation by demographic and child characteristics.

    PubMed

    Keys, Tran D; Farkas, George; Burchinal, Margaret R; Duncan, Greg J; Vandell, Deborah L; Li, Weilin; Ruzek, Erik A; Howes, Carollee

    2013-01-01

    This article examines associations between observed quality in preschool center classrooms for approximately 6,250 three- to five-year-olds and their school readiness skills at kindergarten entry. Secondary analyses were conducted using data from four large-scale studies to estimate the effects of preschool center quality and interactions between quality and demographic characteristics and child entry skills and behaviors. Findings were summarized across studies using meta-analytic methods. Results indicate small, but statistically significant associations for preschool center quality main effects on language and mathematics outcomes with little evidence of moderation by demographic characteristics or child entry skills and behaviors. Preschool center quality was not reliably related to socioemotional outcomes. The authors discuss possible explanations for the small effect sizes and lack of differential effects.

  13. Preschool Center Quality and School Readiness: Quality Effects and Variation by Demographic and Child Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Keys, Tran D.; Farkas, George; Burchinal, Margaret R.; Duncan, Greg J.; Vandell, Deborah L.; Li, Weilin; Ruzek, Erik A.; Howes, Carollee

    2014-01-01

    This article examines associations between observed quality in preschool center classrooms for approximately 6,250 three- to five-year-olds and their school readiness skills at kindergarten entry. Secondary analyses were conducted using data from four large-scale studies to estimate the effects of preschool center quality and interactions between quality and demographic characteristics and child entry skills and behaviors. Findings were summarized across studies using meta-analytic methods. Results indicate small, but statistically significant associations for preschool center quality main effects on language and mathematics outcomes with little evidence of moderation by demographic characteristics or child entry skills and behaviors. Preschool center quality was not reliably related to socioemotional outcomes. The authors discuss possible explanations for the small effect sizes and lack of differential effects. PMID:23331043

  14. Parental bargaining, health inputs and child mortality in India.

    PubMed

    Maitra, Pushkar

    2004-03-01

    The primary objective of this paper is to examine the relationship between the status of women in the household, the use of health care (demand for prenatal care and hospital delivery) and child mortality in India. Parents care about the health of their children but cannot directly affect child health by their actions. Instead they can, through their actions, control the use of health inputs. I jointly estimate the decision to use prenatal care, the decision to deliver the baby in hospital and child mortality. The estimation methodology allows us to account for unobserved heterogeneity and self-selection in the use of health inputs. The estimation results show that: (1) a woman's education has a stronger effect on health care usage relative to that of her husband; (2) a woman's control over household resources (ability to keep money aside) has a significant effect on health care usage; (3) both prenatal care and hospital delivery significantly reduces the hazard of child mortality; and (4) not accounting for unobserved heterogeneity and self-selection in the use of health inputs results in under-estimation of the effect of health inputs on child mortality.

  15. Estimating child mortality and modelling its age pattern for India.

    PubMed

    Roy, S G

    1989-06-01

    "Using data [for India] on proportions of children dead...estimates of infant and child mortality are...obtained by Sullivan and Trussell modifications of [the] Brass basic method. The estimate of child survivorship function derived after logit smoothing appears to be more reliable than that obtained by the Census Actuary. The age pattern of childhood mortality is suitably modelled by [a] Weibull function defining the probability of surviving from birth to a specified age and involving two parameters of level and shape. A recently developed linearization procedure based on [a] graphical approach is adopted for estimating the parameters of the function."

  16. Effect of Child Centred Methods on Teaching and Learning of Science Activities in Pre-Schools in Kenya

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andiema, Nelly C.

    2016-01-01

    Despite many research studies showing the effectiveness of teacher application of child-centered learning in different educational settings, few studies have focused on teaching and learning activities in Pre-Schools. This research investigates the effect of child centered methods on teaching and learning of science activities in preschools in…

  17. Predictors of Children's Kindergarten Classroom Engagement: Preschool Adult-Child Relationships, Self-Concept, and Hyperactivity/Inattention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Searle, Amelia Kate; Miller-Lewis, Lauren R.; Sawyer, Michael G.; Baghurst, Peter A.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this prospective study was to identify preschool factors that are associated with children's classroom engagement during their 1st school year. The study was guided by a social-motivational process model that highlights the importance of parent-child and teacher-child relationships in promoting engagement. In preschool, parents and…

  18. Predictors of Children's Kindergarten Classroom Engagement: Preschool Adult-Child Relationships, Self-Concept, and Hyperactivity/Inattention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Searle, Amelia Kate; Miller-Lewis, Lauren R.; Sawyer, Michael G.; Baghurst, Peter A.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this prospective study was to identify preschool factors that are associated with children's classroom engagement during their 1st school year. The study was guided by a social-motivational process model that highlights the importance of parent-child and teacher-child relationships in promoting engagement. In preschool, parents and…

  19. A Comparison of Teacher-Rated Classroom Conduct, Social Skills, and Teacher-Child Relationship Quality between Preschool English Learners and Preschool English Speakers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luchtel, Molly; Hughes, Kere; Luze, Gayle; Bruna, Katherine Richardson; Peterson, Carla

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the differences between preschool English learners and preschool English speakers in the areas of classroom conduct, social skills, and teacher-child relationship quality, as rated by their teachers. Data were taken from the Early Head Start Research and Evaluation Project. Students who were English learners were rated…

  20. Teacher ratings of child behavior in preschool: A MIMIC investigation of the BESS TRS-P.

    PubMed

    DiStefano, Christine; Ene, Mihaela; Leighton, Elizabeth

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to conduct further investigations of the latent structure underlying the Behavioral and Emotional Screening System Teacher Rating Scale-Preschool (BESS TRS-P) by examining latent variable differences due to demographic factors of the preschool children being rated. A U.S. representative sample of teacher ratings of more than 1,200 preschoolers was used to examine the latent structure of the BESS TRS-P. A multiple indicator-multiple causes (MIMIC) model used with a bifactor model showed differences on selected latent factor means relative to a child's age and gender, but no relationship with child's race. Use of age and/or gender scoring norms may produce a more accurate estimate of a child's latent score. (PsycINFO Database Record

  1. Interrelationships of child appetite, weight and snacking among Hispanic preschoolers

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Snacking among US preschoolers has increased in recent decades, raising questions about whether snacking contributes to dietary excess. This research aimed to characterize snacking contributions to dietary excess and to evaluate associations with appetite and weight among preschool-aged children. Th...

  2. Serving the Preschool Gifted Child: "Programming and Resources"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cukierkorn, Jesse R.; Karnes, Frances A.; Manning, Sandra J.; Houston, Heather; Besnoy, Kevin

    2007-01-01

    Highlighting the unique educational needs of gifted and high ability preschoolers, this article guides the reader to consider the characteristics of young gifted children along with appropriate assessment practices in planning educational programming. A triarchic approach to programs and services for gifted preschoolers is outlined with major…

  3. Predicting Child Outcomes from Preschool Quality in Portugal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abreu-Lima, Isabel M. P.; Leal, Teresa B.; Cadima, Joana; Gamelas, Ana Madalena

    2013-01-01

    The main purpose of this study is to analyze whether quality of preschool classrooms relates to 4- and 5-year-old children developmental outcomes. The study was conducted in 60 classrooms in Porto Metropolitan Area, Portugal. Children (N = 215) were evaluated in the literacy, math, and behavior domains. Preschool quality was assessed through…

  4. Serving the Preschool Gifted Child: "Programming and Resources"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cukierkorn, Jesse R.; Karnes, Frances A.; Manning, Sandra J.; Houston, Heather; Besnoy, Kevin

    2007-01-01

    Highlighting the unique educational needs of gifted and high ability preschoolers, this article guides the reader to consider the characteristics of young gifted children along with appropriate assessment practices in planning educational programming. A triarchic approach to programs and services for gifted preschoolers is outlined with major…

  5. Predicting Child Outcomes from Preschool Quality in Portugal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abreu-Lima, Isabel M. P.; Leal, Teresa B.; Cadima, Joana; Gamelas, Ana Madalena

    2013-01-01

    The main purpose of this study is to analyze whether quality of preschool classrooms relates to 4- and 5-year-old children developmental outcomes. The study was conducted in 60 classrooms in Porto Metropolitan Area, Portugal. Children (N = 215) were evaluated in the literacy, math, and behavior domains. Preschool quality was assessed through…

  6. Infant and child mortality: the implications for fertility behaviour.

    PubMed

    Ruzicka, L T; Kane, P

    1988-01-01

    In developing countries, infant and child mortality affect fertility through biological or involuntary mechanisms operating through shortened breastfeeding, and more rapid return of ovulation following upon an infant death. Fertility is also affected through volitional responses of couples to perceived mortality levels in the community (insurance effect) or experience of earlier child loss (replacement effect) as well as through societal responses to high probability of child loss. In return, fertility affects infant and child mortality through birth to very young mothers, due to physiological immaturity of teenaged mothers and low birth-weight, as well as through birth to old mothers in high birth orders, due to maternal depletion syndrome. Trussel and Pebley estimated that the elimination of 4th and higher order births, along with the limitation of reproduction within the age of 20 to 34 years old, would reduce infant mortality by about 12%. A large number of studies show strong evidence that the timing and spacing of birth have a significant impact on both maternal and child health. According to Maine and McNamara (1985), who analysed data from 25 developing countries, if all children were born 2 years apart, 1/5 of infant deaths could be avoided. Mother's ill-health, maternal mortality, mother's malnutrition and its consequences in low quality breast milk and short breastfeeding, reduce sharply the new child's chances of survival. Many of these adverse biological and physiological conditions for childbearing can be compensated for by the provision of health care of high quality, including family planning, as well as education and good nutritional status of the mother and her children. Unfortunately, in many societies and for large segments of the population, such conditions are still a dream.

  7. Preschool Children with and without Developmental Delay: Risk, Parenting, and Child Demandingess.

    PubMed

    Brown, Mallory A; McIntyre, Laura Lee; Crnic, Keith A; Baker, Bruce L; Blacher, Jan

    2011-07-01

    Although past literature has established relations between early child risk factors, negative parenting, and problematic child behavior, the nature of these interrelations and pathways of influence over time remains largely unknown, especially in children with developmental delays or disabilities. In the current study data were drawn from the longitudinal Collaborative Family Study and included a sample of 260 families with preschool children with and without developmental delays. Child-related risk was assessed at child age 36 months, maternal intrusiveness and negative affect at 48 months, and child demandingness at 60 months. Results indicated significant relations between early risk, negative parenting, and subsequent child demandingness. Sickliness as an infant was the most salient predictive risk factor of later child demandingness. Developmental delay was the most significant predictor of subsequent negative parenting. Results are discussed as being more indicative of additive rather than mediational processes given that early child risk and negative maternal parenting both contributed uniquely to the subsequent development of child demandingness.

  8. Integrating nutrition and early child-development interventions among infants and preschoolers in rural India.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Rao, Sylvia; Hurley, Kristen M; Nair, Krishnapillai Madhavan; Balakrishna, Nagalla; Radhakrishna, Kankipati V; Ravinder, Punjal; Tilton, Nicholas; Harding, Kimberly B; Reinhart, Greg A; Black, Maureen M

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the development, design, and implementation of an integrated randomized double-masked placebo-controlled trial (Project Grow Smart) that examines how home/preschool fortification with multiple micronutrient powder (MNP) combined with an early child-development intervention affects child development, growth, and micronutrient status among infants and preschoolers in rural India. The 1-year trial has an infant phase (enrollment age: 6-12 months) and a preschool phase (enrollment age: 36-48 months). Infants are individually randomized into one of four groups: placebo, placebo plus early learning, MNP alone, and MNP plus early learning (integrated intervention), conducted through home visits. The preschool phase is a cluster-randomized trial conducted in Anganwadi centers (AWCs), government-run preschools sponsored by the Integrated Child Development System of India. AWCs are randomized into MNP or placebo, with the MNP or placebo mixed into the children's food. The evaluation examines whether the effects of the MNP intervention vary by the quality of the early learning opportunities and communication within the AWCs. Study outcomes include child development, growth, and micronutrient status. Lessons learned during the development, design, and implementation of the integrated trial can be used to guide large-scale policy and programs designed to promote the developmental, educational, and economic potential of children in developing countries. © 2013 New York Academy of Sciences.

  9. Social class differences in child mortality, Sweden 1981-1986.

    PubMed Central

    Ostberg, V

    1992-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVE--The aim was to analyse social class differences in mortality among Swedish children, 1-19 years old, during the period 1981-86. In order to study the development of these differences, mortality differences during the study period were compared with those 20 years earlier, ie, 1961-66. DESIGN--The study used data from two census linked death registries (CDR80 and CDR60). These were constructed by linkages between the 1980 and 1960 population censuses, respectively, and the corresponding national cause of death registries. Age specific and age standardised death rates, for total and cause specific mortality, were calculated for each social class and for the genders separately. To compare the death rates of social classes, relative risks with approximately 95% confidence limits were calculated. STUDY POPULATION--The study included children younger than 16 years at the time of the censuses and all deaths in the age range 1-19 years. The children were followed up for a period of six years after the censuses with respect to mortality. MAIN RESULTS--During the period 1981-86, children in families of both manual workers and self employed persons had a significantly higher mortality than children in families of non-manual workers. CONCLUSIONS--Although there has been a marked decrease in child mortality during the last decades the study shows that social class differences in child mortality still exist and show little tendency to disappear. PMID:1479315

  10. Child Mortality in the School Setting. Position Statement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergren, Martha Dewey

    2012-01-01

    It is the position of the National Association of School Nurses (NASN) that data on children's deaths in school should be recorded, analyzed and reported at the local, state and national level. The systematic review of data on child deaths is necessary to drive interventions and policies that will decrease mortality from injuries, violence, acute…

  11. Income Inequality and Child Mortality in Wealthy Nations.

    PubMed

    Collison, David

    2016-01-01

    This chapter presents evidence of a relationship between child mortality data and socio-economic factors in relatively wealthy nations. The original study on child mortality that is reported here, which first appeared in a UK medical journal, was undertaken in a school of business by academics with accounting and finance backgrounds. The rationale explaining why academics from such disciplines were drawn to investigate these issues is given in the first part of the chapter. The findings related to child mortality data were identified as a special case of a wide range of social and health indicators that are systematically related to the different organisational approaches of capitalist societies. In particular, the so-called Anglo-American countries show consistently poor outcomes over a number of indicators, including child mortality. Considerable evidence has been adduced in the literature to show the importance of income inequality as an explanation for such findings. An important part of the chapter is the overview of a relatively recent publication in the epidemiological literature entitled The Spirit Level: Why Equality Is Better for Everyone, which was written by Wilkinson and Pickett. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. Parent-Child Interaction Therapy Emotion Development: A Novel Treatment for Depression in Preschool Children

    PubMed Central

    Lenze, Shannon N.; Pautsch, Jennifer; Luby, Joan

    2010-01-01

    Background Psychotherapies with known efficacy in adolescent depression have been adapted for prepubertal children; however, none have been empirically validated for use with depressed very young children. Due to the centrality of the parent-child relationship to the emotional well being of the young child, with caregiver support shown to mediate the risk for depression severity, we created an Emotional Development (ED) module to address emotion development impairments identified in preschool onset depression. The new module was integrated with an established intervention for preschool disruptive disorders, Parent Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT). Preliminary findings of an open trial of this novel intervention, PCIT-ED, with depressed preschool children are reported. Methods PCIT was adapted for the treatment of preschool depression by incorporating a novel emotional development module focused on teaching the parent to facilitate the child’s emotional development and enhance emotion regulation. Eight parent-child dyads with depressed preschoolers participated in 14 sessions of treatment. Depression severity, internalizing and externalizing symptoms, functional impairment, and emotion recognition/discrimination were measured pre and post treatment. Results Depression severity scores significantly decreased with a large effect size (1.28). Internalizing and externalizing symptoms as well as functional impairment were also significantly decreased pre to post treatment. Conclusions PCIT-ED appears to be a promising treatment for preschoolers with depression and the large effect sizes observed in this open trial suggest early intervention may provide a window of opportunity for more effective treatment. A randomized controlled trial of PCIT-ED in preschool depression is currently underway. PMID:21284068

  13. Population density and spatial differentials in child mortality in Zimbabwe.

    PubMed

    Root, G

    1997-02-01

    Large regional variations in under-five mortality exist within many sub-Saharan countries. Population density as a potential explanatory factor for these regional variations has seldom been considered despite it being implicated as a determinant of mortality at other spatial scales. In Zimbabwe, the "Ndebele provinces"-Matabeleland North and South-have significantly lower levels of under-five mortality than the other ("Shona") provinces. This regional differential is explored using the Zimbabwe Demographic and Health Survey and census data. Factors other than population density that may contribute to the differential are examined. After controlling for the effects of potentially confounding socio-economic, demographic and environmental variables using Cox regression models children aged 1-4 yr living in the Ndebele provinces continued to have a level of mortality 45% lower than their counterparts in the Shona provinces. The possibility that regional variations in health care provision and/or cultural factors contribute to the mortality differential is also examined and rejected. Population densities in the Ndebele provinces are of a far lower order than in the Shona provinces. The main causes of child mortality in Zimbabwe in the time period under consideration were diarrhoea, ALRI, measles and malaria. How population density may affect the transmission of these infections and, hence, mortality is discussed. It is suggested that population density may provide an explanation for the spatial variation in child mortality in Zimbabwe. The implications of changing population densities for child health in urban and rural sub-Saharan Africa are briefly considered.

  14. Seasonal variation in child mortality in rural Guinea-Bissau.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Bibi Uhre; Byberg, Stine; Aaby, Peter; Rodrigues, Amabelia; Benn, Christine Stabell; Fisker, Ane Baerent

    2017-07-01

    In many African countries, child mortality is higher in the rainy season than in the dry season. We investigated the effect of season on child mortality by time periods, sex and age in rural Guinea-Bissau. Bandim health project follows children under-five in a health and demographic surveillance system in rural Guinea-Bissau. We compared the mortality in the rainy season (June to November) between 1990 and 2013 with the mortality in the dry season (December to May) in Cox proportional hazards models providing rainy vs. dry season mortality rate ratios (r/d-mrr). Seasonal effects were estimated in strata defined by time periods with different frequency of vaccination campaigns, sex and age (<1 month, 1-11 months, 12-59 months). Verbal autopsies were interpreted using InterVa-4 software. From 1990 to 2013, overall mortality was declined by almost two-thirds among 81 292 children (10 588 deaths). Mortality was 51% (95% ci: 45-58%) higher in the rainy season than in the dry season throughout the study period. The seasonal difference increased significantly with age, the r/d-mrr being 0.94 (0.86-1.03) among neonates, 1.57 (1.46-1.69) in post-neonatal infants and 1.83 (1.72-1.95) in under-five children (P for same effect <0.001). According to the InterVa, malaria deaths were the main reason for the seasonal mortality difference, causing 50% of all deaths in the rainy season, but only if the InterVa included season of death, making the argument self-confirmatory. The mortality declined throughout the study, yet rainy season continued to be associated with 51% higher overall mortality. © 2017 The Authors. Tropical Medicine & International Health Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Adult and child malaria mortality in India

    PubMed Central

    Dhingra, Neeraj; Jha, Prabhat; Sharma, Vinod P; Cohen, Alan A; Jotkar, Raju M; Rodriguez, Peter S; Bassani, Diego G; Suraweera, Wilson; Laxminaryan, Ramanan; Peto, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Summary Background Malaria, a non-fatal disease if detected promptly and treated properly, still causes many deaths in malaria-endemic countries with limited healthcare facilities. National malaria mortality rates are, however, particularly difficult to assess reliably in such countries, as any fevers reliably diagnosed as malaria are likely therefore to be cured. Hence, most malaria deaths are from undiagnosed malaria, which may be misattributed in retrospective enquiries to other febrile causes of death, or vice-versa. Aim To estimate plausible ranges of malaria mortality in India, the most populous country where it remains common. Methods Nationally representative retrospective study of 122,000 deaths during 2001-03 in 6671 areas. Full-time non-medical field workers interviewed families or other respondents about each death, obtaining a half-page narrative plus answers to specific questions about the severity and course of any fevers. Each field report was scanned and emailed to two of 130 trained physicians, who independently coded underlying causes, with discrepancies resolved either via anonymous reconciliation or, failing that, adjudication. Findings Of all coded deaths at ages 1 month to 70 years, 3.6% (2681/75,342) were attributed to malaria. Of these, 2419 (90%) were rural and 2311 (86%) were not in any healthcare facility. Malaria-attributed death rates correlated geographically with local malaria transmission rates derived independently from the Indian malaria control programme, and rose after the wet season began. The adjudicated results suggest 205,000 malaria deaths per year in India before age 70 (55,000 in early childhood, 30,000 at ages 5-14, 120,000 at ages 15-69); cumulative probability 1.8% of death from malaria before age 70. Plausible upper and lower bounds (based only on the initial coding) were 125,000 to 277,000. Interpretation Despite inevitable uncertainty as to which unattended febrile deaths are from malaria, even the lower bound

  16. Effectiveness of Teacher-Child Interaction Training (TCIT) in a preschool setting.

    PubMed

    Lyon, Aaron R; Gershenson, Rachel A; Farahmand, Farahnaz K; Thaxter, Peter J; Behling, Steven; Budd, Karen S

    2009-11-01

    This research addressed the need for trained child care staff to support optimal early social-emotional development in urban, low-income, ethnic minority children. We evaluated effectiveness of Teacher-Child Interaction Training (TCIT), an approach adapted from Eyberg's Parent-Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT). TCIT focuses on increasing preschool teachers' positive attention skills and consistent discipline in order to enhance children's psychosocial functioning and prevent mental health problems. A total of 12 teachers participated in small-group workshop sessions with in vivo coaching on their use of skills in the classroom. A multiple-baseline design across four classrooms (3 teachers each) evaluated effects of training on teacher behaviors during weekly classroom observations. Findings indicated systematic increases in trained skills during intervention, and consumer evaluations showed that the training was rated positively. Our results suggest that TCIT is a promising approach for enhancing positive teacher-child interactions in a preschool setting and should receive further investigation.

  17. Maternal height and child mortality in 42 developing countries.

    PubMed

    Monden, Christiaan W S; Smits, Jeroen

    2009-01-01

    Previous research reports mixed results about the association between maternal height and child mortality. Some studies suggest that the negative association might be stronger in contexts with fewer resources. This hypothesis has yet not been tested in a cross-nationally comparative design. We use data on 307,223 children born to 194,835 women in 444 districts of 42 developing countries to estimate the association between maternal height and child mortality and test whether this association is modified by indicators at the level of the household (like sex, age and twin status of the child and socio-economic characteristics of the mother and her partner), district (regional level of development, public health facilities and female occupational attainment) and country (GDP per capita). We find a robust negative effect of logged maternal height on child mortality. The effect of maternal health is strongest for women with least education and is more important in the first year after birth and for twin births. The indicators of development at the district and country level do not modify the effect of maternal height. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  18. [The health gap in Mexico, measured through child mortality].

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, Juan Pablo; Bertozzi, Stefano M

    2003-01-01

    To estimate the health gap in Mexico, as evidenced by the difference between the observed 1998 mortality rate and the estimated rate and the estimated rate for the same year according to social and economic indicators, with rates from other countries. An econometric model was developed, using the 1998 child mortality rate (CMR) as the dependent variable, and macro-social and economic indicators as independent variables. The model included 70 countries for which complete data were available. The proposed model explained over 90% of the variability in CMR among countries. The expected CMR for Mexico was 22% lower that the observed rate, which represented nearly 20,000 excess deaths. After adjusting for differences in productivity, distribution of wealth, and investment in human capital, the excess child mortality rate suggested efficiency problems in the Mexican health system, at least in relation to services intended to reduce child mortality. The English version of this paper is available at: http://www.insp.mx/salud/index.html.

  19. Preschool Teachers' Perceptions about and Experience with Child Abuse and Neglect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toros, Karmen; Tiirik, Riine

    2016-01-01

    This study reflects Estonian preschool teachers' perceptions about and experience related to children in need in the context of neglect and abuse. Using quantitative and qualitative data, it was determined that, in general, teachers understand the meaning of "child in need" and abuse, and they have had experience with such children in…

  20. Using Reinforcer Pairing and Fading to Increase the Milk Consumption of a Preschool Child

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tiger, Jeffrey H.; Hanley, Gregory P.

    2006-01-01

    The present study replicates and extends previous research on the treatment of food selectivity by implementing pairing and fading procedures to increase a child's milk consumption during regularly scheduled preschool meals. The treatment involved mixing a small amount of chocolate syrup into a glass of milk and gradually eliminating the…

  1. Preschool Teachers' Perceptions about and Experience with Child Abuse and Neglect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toros, Karmen; Tiirik, Riine

    2016-01-01

    This study reflects Estonian preschool teachers' perceptions about and experience related to children in need in the context of neglect and abuse. Using quantitative and qualitative data, it was determined that, in general, teachers understand the meaning of "child in need" and abuse, and they have had experience with such children in…

  2. The Development of Communicative and Narrative Skills among Preschoolers: Lessons from Forensic Interviews about Child Abuse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hershkowitz, Irit; Lamb, Michael E.; Orbach, Yael; Katz, Carmit; Horowitz, Dvora

    2012-01-01

    This study examined age differences in 299 preschoolers' responses to investigative interviewers' questions exploring the suspected occurrence of child abuse. Analyses focused on the children's tendencies to respond (a) at all, (b) appropriately to the issue raised by the investigator, and (c) informatively, providing previously undisclosed…

  3. The Relationship Between Black Father-Child Interactions and Self-Esteem in Preschool Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAdoo, John L.

    The present study examines the relationship between observed behaviors and attitudes of black fathers and the association of these paternal measures with the self-esteem of their preschool children. This research is a part of a larger on-going study of black parent-child interaction and their relationship to the development of social competence of…

  4. The Connections between Family Characteristics, Parent-Child Engagement, Interactive Reading Behaviors, and Preschoolers' Emergent Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moss, Katie Marie

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the relationship of family characteristics (i.e., SES and race), parent-child engagement, and interactive reading behaviors on preschooler's emergent literacy scores. This study used a structural equation model to examine variables that impact emergent literacy development by evaluating data from the Early Childhood…

  5. Influence of a Playful, Child-Directed Context on Preschool Children's Peer Cooperation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramani, Geetha B.

    2012-01-01

    Empirical and theoretical literature on cooperative problem solving in preschool children suggests that integrating features of play into structured, experimental settings should increase the benefits of joint peer interactions and task performance. Four- and five-year-old peer dyads completed a playful, flexible, and child-driven building task or…

  6. Teacher-Child Relationships and Social Competence: A Two-Year Longitudinal Study of Chinese Preschoolers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Xiao; Nurmi, Jari-Erik

    2012-01-01

    Based on a two-year and three-wave longitudinal sample of 118 Chinese preschoolers, the present study examined the cross-lagged associations between teacher-child relationships and social competence, and the cross-system generalization of social competence between home and school. At each of the three waves, teachers rated the children's…

  7. Investing in Our Children: A Plan to Expand Access to Preschool and Child Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Cynthia G.; Cooper, Donna; Herman, Juliana; Lazarín, Melissa; Linden, Michael; Post, Sasha; Tanden, Neera

    2013-01-01

    This issue brief presents a plan to expand educational opportunities and care for children ages 0-5 years old by investing significant federal dollars to: (1) Make high-quality preschool universally accessible to all 3- and 4-year-old children; and (2) Enable more lower-income families to afford child care for children ages 0-3 years old. These…

  8. Quantity of Group Child Care, Behavior Problems, and Prosocial Behaviors: A Study with Portuguese Preschoolers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torres, Nuno; Veríssimo, Manuela; Santos, António J.; Monteiro, Ligia; Figueiredo, Mafalda; Vaughn, Brian E.

    2015-01-01

    Research Findings: Data from a national sample of Portuguese preschool centers were used to examine the relationship between age of start and number of hours in child care and levels of externalizing and prosocial behaviors with peers. Participants were both parents and teachers of 543 children (mean age = 4.5 years, 50.6% girls). Children started…

  9. Quantity of Group Child Care, Behavior Problems, and Prosocial Behaviors: A Study with Portuguese Preschoolers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torres, Nuno; Veríssimo, Manuela; Santos, António J.; Monteiro, Ligia; Figueiredo, Mafalda; Vaughn, Brian E.

    2015-01-01

    Research Findings: Data from a national sample of Portuguese preschool centers were used to examine the relationship between age of start and number of hours in child care and levels of externalizing and prosocial behaviors with peers. Participants were both parents and teachers of 543 children (mean age = 4.5 years, 50.6% girls). Children started…

  10. Individual and Collective Rights Expressed in Educator and Child Interactions in Nordic Preschools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johansson, E.; Emilson, A.; Röthle, M.; Puroila, A.-M.; Broström, S.; Einarsdóttir, J.

    2016-01-01

    This study focuses on rights and gender in educator and child interactions in Nordic preschools. The research questions are as follows: What kinds of rights are communicated in the interactions and how? What kind of gender patterns can be identified? Rights refer to entitlements related to the early childhood education context, given or claimed by…

  11. Q-Sort Assessment of Child-Teacher Attachment Relationships and Social Competence in Preschool.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell-Copeland, Jennifer; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Observed 62 children in 10 preschools and day care centers, and their interactions with their mothers (at home) and with teachers and peers (at school). Teachers rated children's social competence; children rated one another's likability. Regression analysis suggested that quality of child-teacher attachment relationships relates to prosocial…

  12. Variation in Children's Classroom Engagement Throughout a Day in Preschool: Relations to Classroom and Child Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vitiello, Virginia E.; Booren, Leslie M.; Downer, Jason T.; Williford, Amanda P.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined sources of variability in preschool children's positive and negative engagement with teachers, peers, and tasks, and how that variability was related to both classroom activity settings (e.g., teacher-structured time, outdoor time, transitions) and child factors (age, gender). Participants were 283 socioeconomically and…

  13. Who Knows Best? Preschoolers Sometimes Prefer Child Informants over Adult Informants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    VanderBorght, Mieke; Jaswal, Vikram K.

    2009-01-01

    Do preschoolers think adults know more about everything than children? Or do they recognize that there are some things that children might know more about than adults? Three-, four-, and five-year olds (N = 65) were asked to decide whether an adult or child informant would better be able to answer a variety of questions about the nutritional value…

  14. Factors of Social Adjustment to School: Child's Personality, Family and Pre-School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zupancic, Maja; Kavcic, Tina

    2011-01-01

    The role of child's characteristics (gender, cognitive ability, mother-perceived personality traits), family environment (maternal education, self-reported parenting practices) and pre-school experience (at least three years vs. no experience) in social adjustment to school, reflected through teacher reports on social competence and internalising…

  15. Q-Sort Assessment of Child-Teacher Attachment Relationships and Social Competence in Preschool.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell-Copeland, Jennifer; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Observed 62 children in 10 preschools and day care centers, and their interactions with their mothers (at home) and with teachers and peers (at school). Teachers rated children's social competence; children rated one another's likability. Regression analysis suggested that quality of child-teacher attachment relationships relates to prosocial…

  16. The Relationship of Teacher-Child Play Interactions to Mathematics Learning in Preschool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trawick-Smith, Jeffrey; Swaminathan, Sudha; Liu, Xing

    2016-01-01

    Teacher-child interactions in preschool children's play may enhance mathematics learning in several ways. As teachers interact with children, they may promote more complex, independent, and symbolic play. Resulting increases in play abilities, in turn, can enhance intellectual growth, including mathematical thinking. Teachers may also facilitate…

  17. The Impact of Child Development Associate Training on the Beliefs and Practices of Preschool Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heisner, Mary Jane; Lederberg, Amy R.

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the impact of Child Development Associate (CDA) training on the beliefs and practices of early childhood teachers who did not have college degrees or early childhood college coursework. Preschool teachers who were enrolled in CDA classes (n = 76) and a comparison group of teachers (n = 50) completed two surveys of beliefs and…

  18. Variation in Children's Classroom Engagement Throughout a Day in Preschool: Relations to Classroom and Child Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vitiello, Virginia E.; Booren, Leslie M.; Downer, Jason T.; Williford, Amanda P.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined sources of variability in preschool children's positive and negative engagement with teachers, peers, and tasks, and how that variability was related to both classroom activity settings (e.g., teacher-structured time, outdoor time, transitions) and child factors (age, gender). Participants were 283 socioeconomically and…

  19. Naive Theory of Biology: The Pre-School Child's Explanation of Death

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vlok, Milandre; de Witt, Marike W.

    2012-01-01

    This article explains the naive theory of biology that the pre-school child uses to explain the cause of death. The empirical investigation showed that the young participants do use a naive theory of biology to explain function and do make reference to "vitalistic causality" in explaining organ function. Furthermore, most of these…

  20. Child-Centered Approach: How Is It Perceived by Preschool Educators in Mongolia?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myagmar, Ariuntuya

    2010-01-01

    This study is an attempt to grasp Mongolian preschool educators' perceptions on child-centered approach (CCA). CCA was externally introduced to Mongolia about 10 years ago as a diametrically different education from that of the socialist period. The study also aims to examine the differences that may exist among teachers in different types of…

  1. Factors of Social Adjustment to School: Child's Personality, Family and Pre-School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zupancic, Maja; Kavcic, Tina

    2011-01-01

    The role of child's characteristics (gender, cognitive ability, mother-perceived personality traits), family environment (maternal education, self-reported parenting practices) and pre-school experience (at least three years vs. no experience) in social adjustment to school, reflected through teacher reports on social competence and internalising…

  2. Temperament and Language Skills as Predictors of Teacher-Child Relationship Quality in Preschool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rudasill, Kathleen Moritz; Rimm-Kaufman, Sara E.; Justice, Laura M.; Pence, Khara

    2006-01-01

    Current educational policy emphasizes "school readiness" of young children with a premium placed on preschool interventions that facilitate academic and social readiness for children who have had limited learning experiences prior to kindergarten (Rouse, Brooks-Gunn, & McLanahan, 2005). The teacher-child relationship is viewed as a…

  3. Child and Family Factors Associated with the Use of Services for Preschoolers with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Irvin, Dwight W.; McBee, Matthew; Boyd, Brian A.; Hume, Kara; Odom, Samuel L.

    2012-01-01

    This study examines child and family characteristics thought to affect the dosage and type of common in-school and private services (i.e., speech language therapy (SLT), occupational therapy (OT) and applied behavior analysis (ABA)) received by children with ASD. Participants included 137 families and their preschool-aged children with ASD from…

  4. Naive Theory of Biology: The Pre-School Child's Explanation of Death

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vlok, Milandre; de Witt, Marike W.

    2012-01-01

    This article explains the naive theory of biology that the pre-school child uses to explain the cause of death. The empirical investigation showed that the young participants do use a naive theory of biology to explain function and do make reference to "vitalistic causality" in explaining organ function. Furthermore, most of these…

  5. Individual and Collective Rights Expressed in Educator and Child Interactions in Nordic Preschools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johansson, E.; Emilson, A.; Röthle, M.; Puroila, A.-M.; Broström, S.; Einarsdóttir, J.

    2016-01-01

    This study focuses on rights and gender in educator and child interactions in Nordic preschools. The research questions are as follows: What kinds of rights are communicated in the interactions and how? What kind of gender patterns can be identified? Rights refer to entitlements related to the early childhood education context, given or claimed by…

  6. Parent Perspectives on How a Child-Centered Preschool Experience Shapes Children's Navigation of Kindergarten

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Recchia, Susan; Bentley, Dana Frantz

    2013-01-01

    The authors used qualitative case study methodology to explore parents' perceptions of their children's readiness for kindergarten. The authors interviewed parents, focusing on their children's experiences during their transition from a child-centered, play-based preschool setting guided by an emergent curriculum into a range of diverse…

  7. Mothers of Preschoolers Report Using Less Pressure in Child Feeding Situations Following a Newsletter Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Essery, Eve V.; DiMarco, Nancy M.; Rich, Shannon S.; Nichols, David L.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To determine the impact of written intervention materials on child feeding practices of mothers and on physical activity behaviors of preschoolers. Design: Mothers were divided into 3 groups: newsletter (n = 30), booklet (n = 31), and control (n = 31). Questionnaires were completed before and after a 12-week intervention. Setting: Mail…

  8. Influence of a Playful, Child-Directed Context on Preschool Children's Peer Cooperation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramani, Geetha B.

    2012-01-01

    Empirical and theoretical literature on cooperative problem solving in preschool children suggests that integrating features of play into structured, experimental settings should increase the benefits of joint peer interactions and task performance. Four- and five-year-old peer dyads completed a playful, flexible, and child-driven building task or…

  9. Planning for health promotion in low-income preschool child care settings: focus groups of parents and child care providers.

    PubMed

    Taveras, Elsie M; LaPelle, Nancy; Gupta, Ruchi S; Finkelstein, Jonathan A

    2006-01-01

    To identify potentially successful strategies, barriers, and facilitators for health promotion in preschool child care settings. We conducted 6 focus groups including each of the following: parents of children attending child care centers and home-based family child care (2 in English, 1 in Spanish) and directors of child care centers and family child care providers (2 in English, 1 in Spanish). Systematic thematic analysis was conducted to generate themes to address study questions. A total of 24 parents and 45 child care providers, serving predominantly urban, low-income children in Boston, participated. Parents and child care providers agreed that in-person group discussions would be the most effective strategy for providing health education information to parents. Several barriers that could affect implementation emerged. First, some providers expressed frustration toward parents' attitudes about child safety and health. Second, there was diversity of opinion among providers on whether conducting health promotion activities was consistent with their training and role. In addition, literacy, language, and cultural barriers were identified as potential barriers to health promotion in child care. In order to be successful, health promotion strategies in child care settings will need to overcome tensions between providers and parents, allow professional growth of child care providers to serve in a health promotion role, and better integrate external health resources and personnel. Group sessions and peer learning opportunities that are culturally and linguistically sensitive are potentially successful strategies for implementation of health promotion interventions for many parents.

  10. Governance matters: an ecological association between governance and child mortality

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ro-Ting; Chien, Lung-Chang; Chen, Ya-Mei; Chan, Chang-Chuan

    2014-01-01

    Background Governance of a country may have widespread effects on the health of its population, yet little is known about the effect of governance on child mortality in a country that is undergoing urbanization, economic development, and disease control. Methods We obtained indicators of six dimensions of governance (perceptions of voice and accountability, political stability and absence of violence, government effectiveness, regulatory quality, rule of law, and control of corruption) and national under-5 mortality rates for 149 countries between 1996 and 2010. We applied a semi-parametric generalized additive mixed model to examine associations after controlling for the effects of development factors (urbanization level and economy), disease control factors (hygienic conditions and vaccination rates), health expenditures, air quality, and time. Results Governance, development, and disease control showed clear inverse relations with the under-5 mortality rate (p<0.001). Per unit increases in governance, development, and disease control factors, the child mortality rate had a 0.901-, 0.823-, and 0.922-fold decrease, respectively, at fixed levels of the other two factors. Conclusions In the effort to reduce the global under-5 mortality rate, addressing a country's need for better governance is as important as improvements in development and disease control. PMID:24711600

  11. Governance matters: an ecological association between governance and child mortality.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ro-Ting; Chien, Lung-Chang; Chen, Ya-Mei; Chan, Chang-Chuan

    2014-09-01

    Governance of a country may have widespread effects on the health of its population, yet little is known about the effect of governance on child mortality in a country that is undergoing urbanization, economic development, and disease control. We obtained indicators of six dimensions of governance (perceptions of voice and accountability, political stability and absence of violence, government effectiveness, regulatory quality, rule of law, and control of corruption) and national under-5 mortality rates for 149 countries between 1996 and 2010. We applied a semi-parametric generalized additive mixed model to examine associations after controlling for the effects of development factors (urbanization level and economy), disease control factors (hygienic conditions and vaccination rates), health expenditures, air quality, and time. Governance, development, and disease control showed clear inverse relations with the under-5 mortality rate (p<0.001). Per unit increases in governance, development, and disease control factors, the child mortality rate had a 0.901-, 0.823-, and 0.922-fold decrease, respectively, at fixed levels of the other two factors. In the effort to reduce the global under-5 mortality rate, addressing a country's need for better governance is as important as improvements in development and disease control. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  12. Success factors for reducing maternal and child mortality.

    PubMed

    Kuruvilla, Shyama; Schweitzer, Julian; Bishai, David; Chowdhury, Sadia; Caramani, Daniele; Frost, Laura; Cortez, Rafael; Daelmans, Bernadette; de Francisco, Andres; Adam, Taghreed; Cohen, Robert; Alfonso, Y Natalia; Franz-Vasdeki, Jennifer; Saadat, Seemeen; Pratt, Beth Anne; Eugster, Beatrice; Bandali, Sarah; Venkatachalam, Pritha; Hinton, Rachael; Murray, John; Arscott-Mills, Sharon; Axelson, Henrik; Maliqi, Blerta; Sarker, Intissar; Lakshminarayanan, Rama; Jacobs, Troy; Jack, Susan; Jacks, Susan; Mason, Elizabeth; Ghaffar, Abdul; Mays, Nicholas; Presern, Carole; Bustreo, Flavia

    2014-07-01

    Reducing maternal and child mortality is a priority in the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), and will likely remain so after 2015. Evidence exists on the investments, interventions and enabling policies required. Less is understood about why some countries achieve faster progress than other comparable countries. The Success Factors for Women's and Children's Health studies sought to address this knowledge gap using statistical and econometric analyses of data from 144 low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) over 20 years; Boolean, qualitative comparative analysis; a literature review; and country-specific reviews in 10 fast-track countries for MDGs 4 and 5a. There is no standard formula--fast-track countries deploy tailored strategies and adapt quickly to change. However, fast-track countries share some effective approaches in addressing three main areas to reduce maternal and child mortality. First, these countries engage multiple sectors to address crucial health determinants. Around half the reduction in child mortality in LMICs since 1990 is the result of health sector investments, the other half is attributed to investments made in sectors outside health. Second, these countries use strategies to mobilize partners across society, using timely, robust evidence for decision-making and accountability and a triple planning approach to consider immediate needs, long-term vision and adaptation to change. Third, the countries establish guiding principles that orient progress, align stakeholder action and achieve results over time. This evidence synthesis contributes to global learning on accelerating improvements in women's and children's health towards 2015 and beyond.

  13. Feeding the Preschool Child: Documents Issued by PAG Ad Hoc Working Group Meetings (1969-1975).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations Industrial Development Organization, Vienna (Austria).

    This document contains six papers prepared between 1969 and 1975 by the Protein-Calorie Advisory Group (PAG) of the United Nations on topics related to the feeding of preschool children in underdeveloped countries. Among the topics covered: (1) nutrition in utero; (2) nutritional aspects of breastfeeding; (3) infant mortality rates as indicators…

  14. Health insurance and child mortality in rural Burkina Faso.

    PubMed

    Schoeps, Anja; Lietz, Henrike; Sié, Ali; Savadogo, Germain; De Allegri, Manuela; Müller, Olaf; Sauerborn, Rainer; Becher, Heiko; Souares, Aurélia

    2015-01-01

    Micro health insurance schemes have been implemented across developing countries as a means of facilitating access to modern medical care, with the ultimate aim of improving health. This effect, however, has not been explored sufficiently. We investigated the effect of enrolment into community-based health insurance on mortality in children under 5 years of age in a health and demographic surveillance system in Nouna, Burkina Faso. We analysed the effect of health insurance enrolment on child mortality with a Cox regression model. We adjusted for variables that we found to be related to the enrolment in health insurance in a preceding analysis. Based on the analysis of 33,500 children, the risk of mortality was 46% lower in children enrolled in health insurance as compared to the non-enrolled children (HR=0.54, 95% CI 0.43-0.68) after adjustment for possible confounders. We identified socioeconomic status, father's education, distance to the health facility, year of birth, and insurance status of the mother at time of birth as the major determinants of health insurance enrolment. The strong effect of health insurance enrolment on child mortality may be explained by increased utilisation of health services by enrolled children; however, other non-observed factors cannot be excluded. Because malaria is a main cause of death in the study area, early consultation of health services in case of infection could prevent many deaths. Concerning the magnitude of the effect, implementation of health insurance could be a major driving factor of reduction in child mortality in the developing world.

  15. [Clinical Validation of the Caregiver-Child Socioemotional and Relationship Rating Scale (SIRS) for Child Behavior in a Preschool-Age Sample].

    PubMed

    Esins, Svenja; Müller, Jörg Michael; Romer, Georg; Wagner, Katharina; Achtergarde, Sandra

    2017-03-01

    Clinical Validation of the Caregiver-Child Socioemotional and Relationship Rating Scale (SIRS) for Child Behavior in a Preschool-Age Sample The description of child behavior in mother-child-interaction is important in early detection and treatment of psychiatric disorders in preschool children. The Caregiver-Child Socioemotional and Relationship Rating Scale (SIRS) may serve this diagnostic purpose. We aim to examine interrater-reliability of SIRS and concurrent, convergent, and discriminant validity to maternal behavior by Play-PAB, and a measure of mother-child-relationsship by Parent-Infant-Global-Assessment-Scale (PIRGAS). Five raters assessed 47 ten-minute video sequences of parent-child-interaction recorded at the Family Day Hospital for Preschool Children with SIRS, Play-PAB, and PIRGAS. We report psychometric properties of SIRS, and present the association with Play-PAB and PIRGAS. SIRS shows a satisfying interrater-reliability for all items. Positive child behavior e. g. the SIRS' "child responsiveness" shows negative correlation to Play-PAB-scales' parental "hostility" and "intrusiveness", but independence of parental "involvement", "positive emotionality", and "discipline". Child and parental behavior show expected associations with the global relationship measure PIRGAS. The assessment of child behavior in parent-child-interaction with SIRS can be quickly learned and reliably applied without extensive training. SIRS shows meaningful relations to parental behavior and a clinical global measure of the caregiver-child-relationship. We recommend SIRS for clinical diagnostics to describe child behavior in mother-child-interaction.

  16. The interplay among preschool child and family factors and the development of ODD symptoms.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Elizabeth A; Metcalfe, Lindsay A

    2012-01-01

    The present study examined (a) the interactions between early behavior, early parenting, and early family adversity in predicting later oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) symptoms, and (b) the reciprocal relations between parent functioning and ODD symptoms across the preschool years. Participants were 258 three-year-old children (138 boys, 120 girls) and their parents from diverse backgrounds who participated in a 4-year longitudinal study. Early child behavior, parenting, and family adversity did not significantly interact in the predicted direction. Reciprocal relations between ODD symptoms and parent functioning were observed for maternal and paternal depression, and maternal warmth. Paternal laxness at age 4 predicted ODD symptoms at age 5 and paternal laxness at age 5 predicted ODD symptoms at age 6, but child ODD did not significantly predict paternal laxness. Results suggest that ODD symptoms may develop through a transactional process between parent and child functioning across the preschool years.

  17. The impact of anemia on child mortality: an updated review.

    PubMed

    Scott, Samuel P; Chen-Edinboro, Lenis P; Caulfield, Laura E; Murray-Kolb, Laura E

    2014-12-22

    Iron deficiency anemia and child mortality are public health problems requiring urgent attention. However, the degree to which iron deficiency anemia contributes to child mortality is unknown. Here, we utilized an exhaustive article search and screening process to identify articles containing both anemia and mortality data for children aged 28 days to 12 years. We then estimated the reduction in risk of mortality associated with a 1-g/dL increase in hemoglobin (Hb). Our meta-analysis of nearly 12,000 children from six African countries revealed a combined odds ratio of 0.76 (0.62-0.93), indicating that for each 1-g/dL increase in Hb, the risk of death falls by 24%. The feasibility of a 1-g/dL increase in Hb has been demonstrated via simple iron supplementation strategies. Our finding suggests that ~1.8 million deaths in children aged 28 days to five years could be avoided each year by increasing Hb in these children by 1 g/dL.

  18. Success in reducing maternal and child mortality in Afghanistan.

    PubMed

    Rasooly, Mohammad Hafiz; Govindasamy, Pav; Aqil, Anwer; Rutstein, Shea; Arnold, Fred; Noormal, Bashiruddin; Way, Ann; Brock, Susan; Shadoul, Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    After the collapse of the Taliban regime in 2002, Afghanistan adopted a new development path and billions of dollars were invested in rebuilding the country's economy and health systems with the help of donors. These investments have led to substantial improvements in maternal and child health in recent years and ultimately to a decrease in maternal and child mortality. The 2010 Afghanistan Mortality Survey (AMS) provides important new information on the levels and trends in these indicators. The AMS estimated that there are 327 maternal deaths for every 100,000 live births (95% confidence interval = 260-394) and 97 deaths before the age of five years for every 1000 children born. Decreases in these mortality rates are consistent with changes in key determinants of mortality, including an increasing age at marriage, higher contraceptive use, lower fertility, better immunisation coverage, improvements in the percentage of women delivering in health facilities and receiving antenatal and postnatal care, involvement of community health workers and increasing access to the Basic Package of Health Services. Despite the impressive gains in these areas, many challenges remain. Further improvements in health services in Afghanistan will require sustained efforts on the part of both the Government of Afghanistan and international donors.

  19. Economic cycles and child mortality: A cross-national study of the least developed countries.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Moreno, Salvador; Blanco-Arana, María C; Bárcena-Martín, Elena

    2016-09-01

    This paper examines the effects of growth and recession periods on child mortality in the Least Developed Countries (LDCs) during the period 1990-2010. We provide empirical evidence of uneven effects of variations in Gross Domestic Product (GDP) per capita on the evolution of child mortality rate in periods of economic recession and expansion. A decrease in GDP per capita entails a significant rise in child mortality rates, whereas an increase does not affect child mortality significantly. In this context, official development assistance seems to play a crucial role in counteracting the increment in child mortality rates in recession periods, at least in those LDCs receiving greater aid.

  20. Teaching Vocabulary to Preschoolers with Disabilities Using Adult-Child Shared Bookreading: A Comparison of Traditional and Electronic Books

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhodehouse, Sara Bernice

    2013-01-01

    This study sought to validate adult-child shared storybook reading as a method for teaching target vocabulary words to preschool children with disabilities. The Vocabulary Learning through Books (VLTB) instructional procedure incorporates, adult-child book reading, questioning during reading requiring the child to answer with a target word, and…

  1. Teaching Vocabulary to Preschoolers with Disabilities Using Adult-Child Shared Bookreading: A Comparison of Traditional and Electronic Books

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhodehouse, Sara Bernice

    2013-01-01

    This study sought to validate adult-child shared storybook reading as a method for teaching target vocabulary words to preschool children with disabilities. The Vocabulary Learning through Books (VLTB) instructional procedure incorporates, adult-child book reading, questioning during reading requiring the child to answer with a target word, and…

  2. Parenting styles and child behavior in African American families of preschool children.

    PubMed

    Querido, Jane G; Warner, Tamara D; Eyberg, Sheila M

    2002-06-01

    Examined the relations between parenting styles and child behavior problems in African American preschool children. Participants were 108 African American female caregivers of 3- to 6-year-old children. Correlational analysis showed that parent-reported child behavior problems were associated with maternal education, family income, and parents' endorsement of authoritative parenting, authoritarian parenting, and permissive parenting. Hierarchical regression analysis showed that the authoritative parenting style was most predictive of fewer child behavior problems. These results are consistent with previous findings with European American families and provide strong support for the cross-cultural validity of the authoritative parenting style.

  3. Immersion and Identity: Experiences of an African American Preschool Child

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCullough, Ruanda Garth; Reyes, Sharon Adelman

    2010-01-01

    This article explores the benefits and challenges of a Spanish language immersion preschool from the perspective of a non-Spanish speaking African American family. Data explored include the decision to enroll, reactions from peers and family, home-school communication issues, language development, and family involvement. In addition,…

  4. Computer Microtechnology for a Severely Disabled Preschool Child.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Douglas, J.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    The case study describes microtechnological aids for a quadriplegic preschool aged boy dependent on a ventilator via a tracheostomy. Provision of a computer, a variety of specially designed switches and software, together with a self-driven powered wheelchair maximized expression of his developmental needs. (DB)

  5. Preschoolers' Search for Explanatory Information within Adult-Child Conversation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frazier, Brandy N.; Gelman, Susan A.; Wellman, Henry M.

    2009-01-01

    This research examined children's questions and the reactions to the answers they receive in conversations with adults. If children actively seek explanatory knowledge, they should react differently depending on whether they receive a causal explanation. Study 1 examined conversations following 6 preschoolers' (ages 2-4 years) causal questions in…

  6. EDUCATIONAL MEDIA (TV) FOR THE PRESCHOOL CHILD. FINAL REPORT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BECK, LESTER F.

    THE PHILOSOPHY AND CONTENT OF EIGHT EDUCATIONAL TV SERIES FOR PRESCHOOL CHILDREN WERE DESCRIBED BY THE PEOPLE WHO CREATED THEM. PHOTOGRAPHS ARE INCLUDED TO ILLUSTRATE THE USE OF EDUCATIONAL MEDIA - STILL PICTURES, FILMS, GRAPHIC AIDS, MODELS, PUPPETS, AND PICTURE BOOKS - IN ASSOCIATION WITH TELEVISION. THE PAPERS THAT MADE UP THIS REPORT INCLUDED…

  7. General Measures of Cognition for the Preschool Child

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lichtenberger, Elizabeth O.

    2005-01-01

    Preschool-age children who are experiencing delays in physical, cognitive, communication, social, emotional, or adaptive development are often referred for a comprehensive assessment to make diagnostic determinations and to help develop appropriate interventions. Typically cognitive assessment has a key role in a comprehensive evaluation of a…

  8. Prevention for Preschoolers at High Risk for Conduct Problems: Immediate Outcomes on Parenting Practices and Child Social Competence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brotman, Laurie Miller; Gouley, Kathleen Kiely; Chesir-Teran, Daniel; Dennis, Tracy; Klein, Rachel G.; Shrout, Patrick

    2005-01-01

    This study investigated the immediate impact of an 8-month center- and home-based prevention program for preschoolers at high risk for conduct problems. We report immediate program effects on observed and self-rated parenting practices and observed child behavior with peers. Ninety-nine preschool-age siblings of adjudicated youths and their…

  9. The Relationship between Shyness and Externalizing Problem in Chinese Preschoolers: The Moderating Effect of Teacher-Child Relationship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Han, Pi Guo; Wu, Yun Peng; Yu, Tian; Xia, Xu Min; Gao, Feng Qiang

    2016-01-01

    The current study explored the role of teacher-child relationship plays on the relationship between preschooler's shyness level and externalizing problem. The sample consisted of 463 children from 6 preschools of Shandong province in northern China. Mothers reported the shyness level, aggressive behavior, and attention problem of their children,…

  10. Inequalities in child mortality in ten major African cities

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The existence of socio-economic inequalities in child mortality is well documented. African cities grow faster than cities in most other regions of the world; and inequalities in African cities are thought to be particularly large. Revealing health-related inequalities is essential in order for governments to be able to act against them. This study aimed to systematically compare inequalities in child mortality across 10 major African cities (Cairo, Lagos, Kinshasa, Luanda, Abidjan, Dar es Salaam, Nairobi, Dakar, Addis Ababa, Accra), and to investigate trends in such inequalities over time. Methods Data from two rounds of demographic and health surveys (DHS) were used for this study (if available): one from around the year 2000 and one from between 2007 and 2011. Child mortality rates within cities were calculated by population wealth quintiles. Inequality in child mortality was assessed by computing two measures of relative inequality (the rate ratio and the concentration index) and two measures of absolute inequality (the difference and the Erreyger’s index). Results Mean child mortality rates ranged from about 39 deaths per 1,000 live births in Cairo (2008) to about 107 deaths per 1,000 live births in Dar es Salaam (2010). Significant inequalities were found in Kinshasa, Luanda, Abidjan, and Addis Ababa in the most recent survey. The difference between the poorest quintile and the richest quintile was as much as 108 deaths per 1,000 live births (95% confidence interval 55 to 166) in Abidjan in 2011–2012. When comparing inequalities across cities or over time, confidence intervals of all measures almost always overlap. Nevertheless, inequalities appear to have increased in Abidjan, while they appear to have decreased in Cairo, Lagos, Dar es Salaam, Nairobi and Dakar. Conclusions Considerable inequalities exist in almost all cities but the level of inequalities and their development over time appear to differ across cities. This implies that

  11. Effectiveness of a child's fable on the cognition of preschools when used to address childhood obesity.

    PubMed

    LaSala, Kathleen Bradshaw; Abbot Eng, CaSandra Rene'

    2014-01-01

    The study investigated the effectiveness of a child's fable on the cognition of preschoolers when used to address childhood obesity. A single group, pretest/posttest design was used with 57 preschool children. Analysis of variance compared pre-existing differences between the four classes with respect to pre-test scores. A repeated measures t-test analyzed changes in scores as a result of the intervention. Following the fable intervention, students showed a significant difference (0.5) between their pre- and post-test scores, indicating this method to an effective learning strategy in this setting and age population. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. The reciprocal relations between teachers' perceptions of children's behavior problems and teacher-child relationships in the first preschool year.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Xiao; Sun, Jin

    2011-01-01

    To examine the reciprocal relations between teacher-child relationships and children's behavior problems, the authors analyzed cross-lagged longitudinal data on teacher-child relationships and children's internalizing and externalizing problems using a structural equation modeling approach. The homeroom teachers of 105 first-year preschoolers aged 2-3 years filled in the Student-Teacher Relationship Scale and the Child Behavior Checklist/2-3, first at 3 months after the children's preschool entrance and then at the end of the first preschool year. Results showed significant cross-wave reciprocal relations between externalizing problems and teacher-child conflict and significant cross-wave relation from early internalizing problems to later teacher-child conflict. However, the cross-wave associations between internalizing and externalizing problems and teacher-child closeness were not significant.

  13. Child mortality presents major health problem in Haiti.

    PubMed

    1996-01-01

    This news brief summarizes some findings from the 1994-95 Survey on Mortality, Morbidity, and Utilization of Services in Haiti. Child mortality has declined in the last 15 years, but the under-five mortality rate is still the highest in the Western Hemisphere. The principal causes of neonatal mortality are low birth weight (24%), obstetrical problems (23%), and neonatal tetanus (15%). The principal causes of mortality among children aged 1-5 years are diarrhea (37%), undernutrition (32%), and acute respiratory infections (25%). Only 68% of mothers giving birth receive prenatal care. 46% of births are delivered with medical assistance. Only 30% of children aged 12-23 months are fully immunized; 75% have received their first doses of DPT and polio vaccines, but only 41% have received their third doses. One in three children aged under 5 years is stunted due to undernutrition. Knowledge of AIDS and sexual modes of transmission is nearly universal. However, only 69% of women and 74% of men believe themselves to be at risk of contracting AIDS. Among the population at risk, 43% of men and only 23% of women reported a change in their behavior to prevent AIDS transmission. Fertility has declined from 6.3 children/woman in 1987 to 4.8 children/woman in 1987. 46% of women with two children desire a stop to childbearing. Although there is a desire for smaller families, only 18% of married women are currently using a family planning method.

  14. The resource curse and child mortality, 1961-2011.

    PubMed

    Wigley, Simon

    2017-03-01

    There is now an extensive literature on the adverse effect of petroleum wealth on the political, economic and social well-being of a country. In this study we examine whether the so-called resource curse extends to the health of children, as measured by under-five mortality. We argue that the type of revenue available to governments in petroleum-rich countries reduces their incentive to improve child health. Whereas the type of revenue available to governments in petroleum-poor countries encourages policies designed to improve child health. In order to test that line of argument we employ a panel of 167 countries (all countries with populations above 250,000) for the years 1961-2011. We find robust evidence that petroleum-poor countries outperform petroleum-rich countries when it comes to reducing under-five mortality. This suggests that governments in oil abundant countries often fail to effectively use the resource windfall at their disposal to improve child health.

  15. Changing Teacher-Child Dyadic Interactions to Improve Preschool Children's Externalizing Behaviors.

    PubMed

    Williford, Amanda P; LoCasale-Crouch, Jennifer; Whittaker, Jessica Vick; DeCoster, Jamie; Hartz, Karyn A; Carter, Lauren M; Wolcott, Catherine Sanger; Hatfield, Bridget E

    2016-12-19

    A randomized controlled trial was used to examine the impact of an attachment-based, teacher-child, dyadic intervention (Banking Time) to improve children's externalizing behavior. Participants included 183 teachers and 470 preschool children (3-4 years of age). Classrooms were randomly assigned to Banking Time, child time, or business as usual (BAU). Sparse evidence was found for main effects on child behavior. Teachers in Banking Time demonstrated lower negativity and fewer positive interactions with children compared to BAU teachers at post assessment. The impacts of Banking Time and child time on reductions of parent- and teacher-reported externalizing behavior were greater when teachers evidenced higher-quality, classroom-level, teacher-child interactions at baseline. An opposite moderating effect was found for children's positive engagement with teachers.

  16. [Relationship between goodness-of-fit for mother-preschool child and parenting stress in mother].

    PubMed

    Jung, Hyang Mi; Ahn, Min Soon

    2009-02-01

    This study was done to identify the relationship between goodness-of-fit for mother-preschool child dyads and parenting stress experienced by the mother. Study participants were 500 mothers who had children aged 3 to 5 who attended one of ten kindergartens or infant schools in M City or B City. Descriptive statistics and Pearson's correlation coefficients were calculated using the SPSS program. Comparison of goodness-of-fit scores for mother-preschool child dyad according to the characteristics of the participants, showed a significant difference according to child's age, gender, and birth order, mother's education and occupation, father's age and education, family income, and the chief caregiver in the family. There was a positive correlation between goodness-of-fit scores for mother-child dyad and parenting stress scores for mothers. The findings of the study indicate a need to identify differences between children's behavioral problems and parenting styles according to the degree of discord in the mother-child temperaments. It is also necessary to develop and apply nursing programs to promote harmonizing of temperaments, programs in which the characteristics of the child and the mother are considered.

  17. Regional Infant and Child Mortality Review Committee 2014 Final Report.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Ann L; Sideras, Jim

    2015-10-01

    The Regional Infant and Child Mortality Review Committee serves 10 counties in southeastern South Dakota with the aim of using its reviews to prevent future loss of life during childhood. In 2014, the committee reviewed 25 deaths. Consistent with observations made in previous years, in 2014 all infants who died during sleep did so with risks present in the sleep environment. Concern persists about progress in decreasing these infant deaths during sleep in the region. The two teen suicides in 2014 marked a decrease in the number observed in 2013, but represent an ongoing concern. Four deaths involved auto crashes with three of these involving a teen driver. A child homicide did not occur in the region in 2014. The report provides the committee's recommendations for community action that could prevent future deaths of infants and children.

  18. Success factors for reducing maternal and child mortality

    PubMed Central

    Schweitzer, Julian; Bishai, David; Chowdhury, Sadia; Caramani, Daniele; Frost, Laura; Cortez, Rafael; Daelmans, Bernadette; de Francisco, Andres; Adam, Taghreed; Cohen, Robert; Alfonso, Y Natalia; Franz-Vasdeki, Jennifer; Saadat, Seemeen; Pratt, Beth Anne; Eugster, Beatrice; Bandali, Sarah; Venkatachalam, Pritha; Hinton, Rachael; Murray, John; Arscott-Mills, Sharon; Axelson, Henrik; Maliqi, Blerta; Sarker, Intissar; Lakshminarayanan, Rama; Jacobs, Troy; Jacks, Susan; Mason, Elizabeth; Ghaffar, Abdul; Mays, Nicholas; Presern, Carole; Bustreo, Flavia

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Reducing maternal and child mortality is a priority in the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), and will likely remain so after 2015. Evidence exists on the investments, interventions and enabling policies required. Less is understood about why some countries achieve faster progress than other comparable countries. The Success Factors for Women’s and Children’s Health studies sought to address this knowledge gap using statistical and econometric analyses of data from 144 low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) over 20 years; Boolean, qualitative comparative analysis; a literature review; and country-specific reviews in 10 fast-track countries for MDGs 4 and 5a. There is no standard formula – fast-track countries deploy tailored strategies and adapt quickly to change. However, fast-track countries share some effective approaches in addressing three main areas to reduce maternal and child mortality. First, these countries engage multiple sectors to address crucial health determinants. Around half the reduction in child mortality in LMICs since 1990 is the result of health sector investments, the other half is attributed to investments made in sectors outside health. Second, these countries use strategies to mobilize partners across society, using timely, robust evidence for decision-making and accountability and a triple planning approach to consider immediate needs, long-term vision and adaptation to change. Third, the countries establish guiding principles that orient progress, align stakeholder action and achieve results over time. This evidence synthesis contributes to global learning on accelerating improvements in women’s and children’s health towards 2015 and beyond. PMID:25110379

  19. Physical and personality traits of preschool children in Fuzhou, China: only child vs sibling.

    PubMed

    Wang, D; Kato, N; Inaba, Y; Tango, T; Yoshida, Y; Kusaka, Y; Deguchi, Y; Tomita, F; Zhang, Q

    2000-01-01

    Concern about the healthy growth and development of an only child has been voiced since the 1970s, when the Chinese government launched the only child policy. In this study, the physical and personality traits of rural Chinese preschool only-children (onlies) whose age ranged from 3 to 6 years old were evaluated. The sample included 197 onlies and 367 children with siblings who came from seven kindergartens in rural areas in Fuzhou, Fujian province. The results showed no statistically significant differences in height, mass or BMI between the onlies and siblings. Regarding the personality traits, the significant difference was that the onlies exhibited more somatic complaints, however, the data didn't indicate any other undesirable personality traits for the onlies. These results suggest that Chinese preschool children grow normally with or without siblings.

  20. A comparison of Child Health Programmes recommended for preschool children in selected high-income countries.

    PubMed

    Wood, Rachael; Blair, Mitch

    2014-09-01

    The UK Child Health Programme (CHP) aims to ensure that children attain their development and health potential. It comprises a series of proactive child health reviews incorporating growth and development surveillance and health promotion; routine immunizations; and certain screening tests, and is offered to all children. The evidence underpinning different elements of the CHP varies from robust to sparse, and consequently there is uncertainty about optimal programme design. This study aimed to compare the CHP currently recommended in the UK with that recommended in selected other high-income countries in order to inform ongoing CHP policy development. The CHP recommended for preschool children in the UK was compared with that in Australia; Canada; the USA; and Sweden using a combination of literature review, focused website searches, and consultation with experts in the countries studied. Delivery, content, and uptake of child health reviews, immunizations, and screening were considered. All the countries studied recommend CHP services including child health reviews, immunizations, and screening to their preschool populations. Despite this superficial uniformity, considerable variation exists between countries in the detail of CHP delivery and content. The UK programme is relatively narrow in scope, offering the fewest child health reviews, a relatively restricted immunization programme (although some expansion is planned), and limited newborn bloodspot screening. Internationally comparable data on the uptake/coverage of CHP services are patchy: the available information suggests substantial variation between and within countries in the uptake of child health reviews. In the absence of uncontested evidence on the 'ideal' CHP for preschool children, demonstrating variation between countries in recommended programmes provides valuable contextual information for policy makers. Further work looking at relationships between CHP services and children's outcomes would

  1. Nebulised sodium cromoglycate in the preschool wheezy child.

    PubMed Central

    Lenney, W; Milner, A D

    1978-01-01

    A double-blind controlled study of 14 preschool children with recurrent wheezing episodes was performed to show the effectiveness of nebulised sodium cromoglycate in inhibiting exercise-induced bronchoconstriction in this age group. All 14 children showed markedly less exercise-induced bronchoconstruction after nebulised sodium cromoglycate, 13 of them to a degree indistinguishable from results obtained in normal healthy children in the same age group. Nebulised water afforded protection from exercise-induced bronchoconstriction in some children. This study gives further evidence that sodium cromoglycate is an effective therapeutic agent in children under the age of 5 years. PMID:99089

  2. Eating Difficulties in the Toddler and Preschool Child

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, June; Talbot, Yves

    1984-01-01

    Parents frequently bring toddlers and preschool children with eating problems to the family physician. Eating problems are seldom caused by major, organic pathology. Eating is a cultural and social activity; children's nutritional history, their growth and development and the role of the family in defining, maintaining and/or resolving the problem are important components in the management of eating difficulties. The family doctor can help the family cope by giving information, specific suggestions, and support. Referral to a nutritionist may be necessary if the problem is complex or prolonged. PMID:21278972

  3. Child mortality estimation: estimating sex differences in childhood mortality since the 1970s.

    PubMed

    Sawyer, Cheryl Chriss

    2012-01-01

    Producing estimates of infant (under age 1 y), child (age 1-4 y), and under-five (under age 5 y) mortality rates disaggregated by sex is complicated by problems with data quality and availability. Interpretation of sex differences requires nuanced analysis: girls have a biological advantage against many causes of death that may be eroded if they are disadvantaged in access to resources. Earlier studies found that girls in some regions were not experiencing the survival advantage expected at given levels of mortality. In this paper I generate new estimates of sex differences for the 1970s to the 2000s. Simple fitting methods were applied to male-to-female ratios of infant and under-five mortality rates from vital registration, surveys, and censuses. The sex ratio estimates were used to disaggregate published series of both-sexes mortality rates that were based on a larger number of sources. In many developing countries, I found that sex ratios of mortality have changed in the same direction as historically occurred in developed countries, but typically had a lower degree of female advantage for a given level of mortality. Regional average sex ratios weighted by numbers of births were found to be highly influenced by China and India, the only countries where both infant mortality and overall under-five mortality were estimated to be higher for girls than for boys in the 2000s. For the less developed regions (comprising Africa, Asia excluding Japan, Latin America/Caribbean, and Oceania excluding Australia and New Zealand), on average, boys' under-five mortality in the 2000s was about 2% higher than girls'. A number of countries were found to still experience higher mortality for girls than boys in the 1-4-y age group, with concentrations in southern Asia, northern Africa/western Asia, and western Africa. In the more developed regions (comprising Europe, northern America, Japan, Australia, and New Zealand), I found that the sex ratio of infant mortality peaked in the

  4. Child Mortality Estimation: Estimating Sex Differences in Childhood Mortality since the 1970s

    PubMed Central

    Sawyer, Cheryl Chriss

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Producing estimates of infant (under age 1 y), child (age 1–4 y), and under-five (under age 5 y) mortality rates disaggregated by sex is complicated by problems with data quality and availability. Interpretation of sex differences requires nuanced analysis: girls have a biological advantage against many causes of death that may be eroded if they are disadvantaged in access to resources. Earlier studies found that girls in some regions were not experiencing the survival advantage expected at given levels of mortality. In this paper I generate new estimates of sex differences for the 1970s to the 2000s. Methods and Findings Simple fitting methods were applied to male-to-female ratios of infant and under-five mortality rates from vital registration, surveys, and censuses. The sex ratio estimates were used to disaggregate published series of both-sexes mortality rates that were based on a larger number of sources. In many developing countries, I found that sex ratios of mortality have changed in the same direction as historically occurred in developed countries, but typically had a lower degree of female advantage for a given level of mortality. Regional average sex ratios weighted by numbers of births were found to be highly influenced by China and India, the only countries where both infant mortality and overall under-five mortality were estimated to be higher for girls than for boys in the 2000s. For the less developed regions (comprising Africa, Asia excluding Japan, Latin America/Caribbean, and Oceania excluding Australia and New Zealand), on average, boys' under-five mortality in the 2000s was about 2% higher than girls'. A number of countries were found to still experience higher mortality for girls than boys in the 1–4-y age group, with concentrations in southern Asia, northern Africa/western Asia, and western Africa. In the more developed regions (comprising Europe, northern America, Japan, Australia, and New Zealand), I found that the sex

  5. Variation in children's classroom engagement throughout a day in preschool: Relations to classroom and child factors.

    PubMed

    Vitiello, Virginia E; Booren, Leslie M; Downer, Jason T; Williford, Amanda

    This study examined sources of variability in preschool children's positive and negative engagement with teachers, peers, and tasks, and how that variability was related to both classroom activity settings (e.g., teacher-structured time, outdoor time, transitions) and child factors (age, gender). Participants were 283 socioeconomically and linguistically diverse children drawn from 84 classrooms, 34 to 63 months old (M = 50.8, SD = 6.5). Each child's engagement was observed and rated multiple times within a single day. Results suggested that children's engagement varied significantly across the preschool day. Activity settings that provided children with a greater degree of choice (free choice and outdoor time) were associated with more positive engagement with peers and tasks, while teacher-structured activities were associated with more positive engagement with teachers. Transitions emerged as a difficult part of the day, associated with less positive engagement with teachers and tasks. Older children were rated higher on peer and task engagement. These findings, together with previous research, suggest that both characteristics of the classroom setting and child factors are associated with children's classroom engagement throughout a day in preschool.

  6. Evaluation of the Early Childhood Oral Health Impact Scale in an Australian preschool child population.

    PubMed

    Arrow, P; Klobas, E

    2015-09-01

    Early childhood caries has significant impacts on children and their families. The Early Childhood Oral Health Impact Scale (ECOHIS) is an instrument for capturing the complex dimensions of preschool children's oral health. This study aimed to evaluate the reliability and validity of the instrument among Australian preschool children. Parents/children dyads (n = 286) participating in a treatment trial on early childhood caries completed the scale at baseline, and 33 parents repeated the questionnaire 2-3 weeks later. The validity and reliability of the ECOHIS was determined using tests for convergent and discriminant validity, internal reliability of the instrument and test-retest reliability. Scale impacts were strongly correlated with global oral health ratings (Spearman's correlations; r = 0.51, total score; r = 0.43, child impact; and r = 0.49, family impact; p < 0.001). The scale was significantly associated with children's caries experience, p < 0.001. Cronbach's alpha values were 0.87, 0.89 and 0.74 for the total, the child and the family domains, respectively. Test-retest reliability was 0.92, 0.89 and 0.78 for the total, child and family domains, respectively. The scale demonstrated acceptable validity and reliability for assessing the impact of early childhood caries among Australian preschool children. © 2015 Australian Dental Association.

  7. Diverse Pathways in Early Childhood Professional Development: An Exploration of Early Educators in Public Preschools, Private Preschools, and Family Child Care Homes

    PubMed Central

    Fuligni, Allison Sidle; Howes, Carollee; Lara-Cinisomo, Sandraluz; Karoly, Lynn

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a naturalistic investigation of the patterns of formal education, early childhood education training, and mentoring of a diverse group of urban early childhood educators participating in the Los Angeles: Exploring Children's Early Learning Settings (LA ExCELS) study. A total of 103 preschool teachers and family child care providers serving primarily low-income 3- and 4-year-old children in Los Angeles County provided data on their education, training, and beliefs about teaching. This sample worked in public center based preschool programs including Head Start classrooms and State preschool classrooms (N=42), private non-profit preschools including community based organizations and faith-based preschools (N=42), and licensed family child care homes (N=19). This study uses a person-centered approach to explore patterns of teacher preparation, sources of support, supervision, and mentoring across these 3 types of education settings, and how these patterns are associated with early childhood educators' beliefs and practices. Findings suggest a set of linkages between type of early education setting, professional development, and supervision of teaching. Public preschools have the strongest mandates for formal professional development and typically less variation in levels of monitoring, whereas family child care providers on average have less formal education and more variability in their access to and use of other forms of training and mentorship. Four distinct patterns of formal education, child development training, and ongoing mentoring or support were identified among the educators in this study. Associations between professional development experiences and teachers' beliefs and practices suggested the importance of higher levels of formal training for enhancing the quality of teacher-child interactions. Implications of the findings for changing teacher behaviors are discussed with respect to considering the setting context. PMID:20072719

  8. Diverse Pathways in Early Childhood Professional Development: An Exploration of Early Educators in Public Preschools, Private Preschools, and Family Child Care Homes.

    PubMed

    Fuligni, Allison Sidle; Howes, Carollee; Lara-Cinisomo, Sandraluz; Karoly, Lynn

    2009-05-01

    This paper presents a naturalistic investigation of the patterns of formal education, early childhood education training, and mentoring of a diverse group of urban early childhood educators participating in the Los Angeles: Exploring Children's Early Learning Settings (LA ExCELS) study. A total of 103 preschool teachers and family child care providers serving primarily low-income 3- and 4-year-old children in Los Angeles County provided data on their education, training, and beliefs about teaching. This sample worked in public center based preschool programs including Head Start classrooms and State preschool classrooms (N=42), private non-profit preschools including community based organizations and faith-based preschools (N=42), and licensed family child care homes (N=19). This study uses a person-centered approach to explore patterns of teacher preparation, sources of support, supervision, and mentoring across these 3 types of education settings, and how these patterns are associated with early childhood educators' beliefs and practices. Findings suggest a set of linkages between type of early education setting, professional development, and supervision of teaching. Public preschools have the strongest mandates for formal professional development and typically less variation in levels of monitoring, whereas family child care providers on average have less formal education and more variability in their access to and use of other forms of training and mentorship. Four distinct patterns of formal education, child development training, and ongoing mentoring or support were identified among the educators in this study. Associations between professional development experiences and teachers' beliefs and practices suggested the importance of higher levels of formal training for enhancing the quality of teacher-child interactions. Implications of the findings for changing teacher behaviors are discussed with respect to considering the setting context.

  9. Child Mortality Estimation: A Global Overview of Infant and Child Mortality Age Patterns in Light of New Empirical Data

    PubMed Central

    Guillot, Michel; Gerland, Patrick; Pelletier, François; Saabneh, Ameed

    2012-01-01

    Background The under-five mortality rate (the probability of dying between birth and age 5 y, also denoted in the literature as U5MR and 5 q 0) is a key indicator of child health, but it conceals important information about how this mortality is distributed by age. One important distinction is what amount of the under-five mortality occurs below age 1 y (1 q 0) versus at age 1 y and above (4 q 1). However, in many country settings, this distinction is often difficult to establish because of various types of data errors. As a result, it is common practice to resort to model age patterns to estimate 1 q 0 and 4 q 1 on the basis of an observed value of 5 q 0. The most commonly used model age patterns for this purpose are the Coale and Demeny and the United Nations systems. Since the development of these models, many additional sources of data for under-five mortality have become available, making possible a general evaluation of age patterns of infant and child mortality. In this paper, we do a systematic comparison of empirical values of 1 q 0 and 4 q 1 against model age patterns, and discuss whether observed deviations are due to data errors, or whether they reflect true epidemiological patterns not addressed in existing model life tables. Methods and Findings We used vital registration data from the Human Mortality Database, sample survey data from the World Fertility Survey and Demographic and Health Surveys programs, and data from Demographic Surveillance Systems. For each of these data sources, we compared empirical combinations of 1 q 0 and 4 q 1 against combinations provided by Coale and Demeny and United Nations model age patterns. We found that, on the whole, empirical values fall relatively well within the range provided by these models, but we also found important exceptions. Sub-Saharan African countries have a tendency to exhibit high values of 4 q 1 relative to 1 q 0, a pattern that appears to arise for the most part from true epidemiological causes

  10. The Role of Preschool Teacher-Child Interactions in Academic Adjustment: An Intervention Study with Playing-2-Gether

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Craeyevelt, Sanne; Verschueren, Karine; Vancraeyveldt, Caroline; Wouters, Sofie; Colpin, Hilde

    2017-01-01

    Background: Social relationships can serve as important risk or protective factors for child development in general, and academic adjustment in particular. Aims: This study investigated the role of teacher-child interactions in academic adjustment among preschool boys at risk of externalizing behaviour, using a randomized controlled trial study…

  11. Individuating "Sparks" and "Flickers" of "A Life" in Dance Practices with Preschoolers: The "Monstrous Child" of Colebrook's Queer Vitalism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taguchi, Hillevi Lenz; Palmer, Anna; Gustafsson, Lovisa

    2016-01-01

    What are the dominant images of the Child in contemporary Western societies? In order to challenge some dominant images of the Child, this essay explores the possibilities of analyzing an experimental dance practice with preschoolers aged 1-2 years with Claire Colebrook's theorizing on "the war on norms". Colebrook suggests a "Queer…

  12. Acquisition and Generalization of Teaching and Child Management Behaviors in Parents of Preschool Handicapped Children: A Comparative Study. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyd, Richard D.; Stauber, Kathleen A.

    The document reports on a 3-year research project to measure the acquisition and generalization of teaching and child management behaviors by parents of preschool handicapped chiloren enrolled in the Portage Project. Initial chapters describe treatments (which utilize the parent as the child's primary teacher in a home-based program) and first,…

  13. Attributes of Child Care Centers and Outdoor Play Areas Associated with Preschoolers' Physical Activity and Sedentary Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sugiyama, Takemi; Okely, Anthony D.; Masters, Jane M.; Moore, Gary T.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined characteristics of child care centers associated with preschoolers' moderate-to-vigorous physical activity and sedentary behavior while in child care (MVPA-C, SB-C), and attributes of outdoor play areas associated with the same behaviors during outdoor time (MVPA-O, SB-O). Participants were 89 children (3 -5 years) recruited…

  14. Temperament and Teacher-Child Conflict in Preschool: The Moderating Roles of Classroom Instructional and Emotional Support

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rudasill, Kathleen Moritz; Hawley, Leslie; Molfese, Victoria J.; Tu, Xiaoqing; Prokasky, Amanda; Sirota, Kate

    2016-01-01

    Research Findings: This study is an examination of (a) links between preschool children's temperament (effortful control, shyness, and anger) and teacher-child conflict and (b) classroom instructional and emotional support as moderators of associations between temperament and teacher-child conflict. Children (N = 104) were enrolled in 23…

  15. Maternal Predictors of Preschool Child-Eating Behaviours, Food Intake and Body Mass Index: A Prospective Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McPhie, Skye; Skouteris, Helen; Fuller-Tyszkiewicz, Matthew; McCabe, Marita; Ricciardelli, Lina A.; Milgrom, Jeannette; Baur, Louise A.; Dell'Aquila, Daniela

    2012-01-01

    This study extends McPhie et al. (2011)'s [Maternal correlates of preschool child eating behaviours and body mass index: A cross-sectional study. "International Journal of Pediatric Obesity", Early Online, 1-5.] McPhie et al. (2011)'s cross-sectional research, by prospectively evaluating maternal child-feeding practices, parenting style and…

  16. Individuating "Sparks" and "Flickers" of "A Life" in Dance Practices with Preschoolers: The "Monstrous Child" of Colebrook's Queer Vitalism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taguchi, Hillevi Lenz; Palmer, Anna; Gustafsson, Lovisa

    2016-01-01

    What are the dominant images of the Child in contemporary Western societies? In order to challenge some dominant images of the Child, this essay explores the possibilities of analyzing an experimental dance practice with preschoolers aged 1-2 years with Claire Colebrook's theorizing on "the war on norms". Colebrook suggests a "Queer…

  17. Music Activities Guide for the Preschool Trainable Child. Mental Retardation Training Program Technical Report Series 71-2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardesty, Kay W.

    Intended for teachers of trainable mentally retarded (TMR) preschool children, the guide gives principles of teaching music to the TMR child and suggests appropriate materials. Listed are reasons for teaching music to the TMR child (such as language development), necessary music skills for the teacher (such as music reading), and basic teaching…

  18. Temperament and Teacher-Child Conflict in Preschool: The Moderating Roles of Classroom Instructional and Emotional Support

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rudasill, Kathleen Moritz; Hawley, Leslie; Molfese, Victoria J.; Tu, Xiaoqing; Prokasky, Amanda; Sirota, Kate

    2016-01-01

    Research Findings: This study is an examination of (a) links between preschool children's temperament (effortful control, shyness, and anger) and teacher-child conflict and (b) classroom instructional and emotional support as moderators of associations between temperament and teacher-child conflict. Children (N = 104) were enrolled in 23…

  19. Maternal Predictors of Preschool Child-Eating Behaviours, Food Intake and Body Mass Index: A Prospective Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McPhie, Skye; Skouteris, Helen; Fuller-Tyszkiewicz, Matthew; McCabe, Marita; Ricciardelli, Lina A.; Milgrom, Jeannette; Baur, Louise A.; Dell'Aquila, Daniela

    2012-01-01

    This study extends McPhie et al. (2011)'s [Maternal correlates of preschool child eating behaviours and body mass index: A cross-sectional study. "International Journal of Pediatric Obesity", Early Online, 1-5.] McPhie et al. (2011)'s cross-sectional research, by prospectively evaluating maternal child-feeding practices, parenting style and…

  20. Attributes of Child Care Centers and Outdoor Play Areas Associated with Preschoolers' Physical Activity and Sedentary Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sugiyama, Takemi; Okely, Anthony D.; Masters, Jane M.; Moore, Gary T.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined characteristics of child care centers associated with preschoolers' moderate-to-vigorous physical activity and sedentary behavior while in child care (MVPA-C, SB-C), and attributes of outdoor play areas associated with the same behaviors during outdoor time (MVPA-O, SB-O). Participants were 89 children (3 -5 years) recruited…

  1. Forced migration and child health and mortality in Angola.

    PubMed

    Avogo, Winfred Aweyire; Agadjanian, Victor

    2010-01-01

    This study investigates the effects of forced migration on child survival and health in Angola. Using survey data collected in Luanda, Angola, in 2004, just two years after the end of that country's prolonged civil war, we compare three groups: migrants who moved primarily due to war, migrants whose moves were not directly related to war, and non-migrants. First, we examine the differences among the three groups in under-five mortality. Using an event-history approach, we find that hazards of child death in any given year were higher in families that experienced war-related migration in the same year or in the previous year, net of other factors. To assess longer-term effects of forced migration, we examine hazards of death of children who were born in Luanda, i.e., after migrants had reached their destinations. We again observe a disadvantage of forced migrants, but this disadvantage is explained by other characteristics. When looking at the place of delivery, number of antenatal consultations, and age-adequate immunization of children born in Luanda, we again detect a disadvantage of forced migrants relative to non-migrants, but now this disadvantage also extends to migrants who came to Luanda for reasons other than war. Finally, no differences across the three groups in child morbidity and related health care seeking behavior in the two weeks preceding the survey are found. We interpret these results within the context of the literature on short- and long-term effects of forced migration on child health.

  2. Forced migration and child health and mortality in Angola

    PubMed Central

    Agadjanian, Victor

    2009-01-01

    This study investigates the effects of forced migration on child survival and health in Angola. Using survey data collected in Luanda, Angola, in 2004, just two years after the end of that country's prolonged civil war, we compare three groups: migrants who moved primarily due to war, migrants whose moves were not directly related to war, and non-migrants. First, we examine the differences among the three groups in under-five mortality. Using an event-history approach, we find that hazards of child death in any given year were higher in families that experienced war-related migration in the same year or in the previous year, net of other factors. To assess longer-term effects of forced migration, we examine hazards of death of children who were born in Luanda, i.e., after migrants had reached their destinations. We again observe a disadvantage of forced migrants, but this disadvantage is explained by other characteristics. When looking at the place of delivery, number of antenatal consultations, and age-adequate immunization of children born in Luanda, we again detect a disadvantage of forced migrants relative to non-migrants, but now this disadvantage also extends to migrants who came to Luanda for reasons other than war. Finally, no differences across the three groups in child morbidity and related healthcare seeking behavior in the two weeks preceding the survey are found. We interpret these results within the context of the literature on short- and long-term effects of forced migration on child health. PMID:19879027

  3. Linking Home-Based Child Care and State-Funded Preschool: The Community Connections Preschool Program (Illinois Action for Children). Evaluation Phase 1-Implementation Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forry, Nicole; Anderson, Rachel; Zaslow, Martha; Chrisler, Alison; Banghart, Patti; Kreader, J. Lee

    2011-01-01

    The Community Connections preschool program (herein referred to as Community Connections) was developed to help prepare children in home-based child care for success in school and in life. It has three goals: (1) to make state prekindergarten classroom experiences available to children in home-based care, (2) to extend classroom learning…

  4. Monitoring child mortality through community health worker reporting of births and deaths in Malawi: validation against a household mortality survey.

    PubMed

    Amouzou, Agbessi; Banda, Benjamin; Kachaka, Willie; Joos, Olga; Kanyuka, Mercy; Hill, Kenneth; Bryce, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    The rate of decline in child mortality is too slow in most African countries to achieve the Millennium Development Goal of reducing under-five mortality by two-thirds between 1990 and 2015. Effective strategies to monitor child mortality are needed where accurate vital registration data are lacking to help governments assess and report on progress in child survival. We present results from a test of a mortality monitoring approach based on recording of births and deaths by specially trained community health workers (CHWs) in Malawi. Government-employed community health workers in Malawi are responsible for maintaining a Village Health Register, in which they record births and deaths that occur in their catchment area. We expanded on this system to provide additional training, supervision and incentives. We tested the equivalence between child mortality rates obtained from data on births and deaths collected by 160 randomly-selected and trained CHWs over twenty months in two districts to those computed through a standard household mortality survey. CHW reports produced an under-five mortality rate that was 84% (95%CI: [0.71,1.00]) of the household survey mortality rate and statistically equivalent to it. However, CHW data consistently underestimated under-five mortality, with levels of under-estimation increasing over time. Under-five deaths were more likely to be missed than births. Neonatal and infant deaths were more likely to be missed than older deaths. This first test of the accuracy and completeness of vital events data reported by CHWs in Malawi as a strategy for monitoring child mortality shows promising results but underestimated child mortality and was not stable over the four periods assessed. Given the Malawi government's commitment to strengthen its vital registration system, we are working with the Ministry of Health to implement a revised version of the approach that provides increased support to CHWs.

  5. Child feeding practices, food habits, anthropometric indicators and cognitive performance among preschoolers in Peninsular Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Mohd Nasir, Mohd Taib; Norimah, Abdul Karim; Hazizi, Abu Saad; Nurliyana, Abdul Razak; Loh, Siow Hon; Suraya, Ibrahim

    2012-04-01

    This study aimed to determine the relationship between child feeding practices, food habits, and anthropometric indicators with cognitive performance of preschoolers aged 4-6 years in Peninsular Malaysia (n=1933). Parents were interviewed on socio-demographic background, nutrition knowledge, child feeding practices and food habits. Height and weight of the preschoolers were measured; BMI-for-age, weight-for-age and height-for-age were determined. Cognitive performance was assessed using Raven's Colored Progressive Matrices. The mean monthly household income was RM3610 and 59.6% of parents attained secondary education. Thirty-three percent of parents had good knowledge on nutrition, 39% satisfactory and 28% poor. For child feeding practices, perceived responsibility had the highest mean score (M=3.99, SD=0.72), while perceived child weight had the lowest (M=2.94, SD=0.38). The prevalence of possible risk of overweight, being overweight, and obesity were 3.9%, 7.9% and 8.1%, respectively, whereas the prevalence of underweight and stunting were 8.0% and 8.4%, respectively. Breakfast was the second most frequently skipped meal (16.8%) after dinner (18.1%). The mean cognitive score was 103.5 (SD=14.4). Height-for-age and consumption of dinner were found to contribute significantly towards cognitive performance after controlling for socio-demographic background and parent's nutrition knowledge.

  6. Language Development in the Pre-School Child.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lenskyj, Helen

    This brief overview of child language acquisition begins with a discussion of the affective and cognitive dimensions of the transition period from babbling to speech. Three theories of language acquisition--reinforcement theory, social learning theory, and "innate mechanism" theory--are reviewed. Several theories of the function of language,…

  7. Thymus development and infant and child mortality in rural Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Sophie E; Fulford, Anthony JC; Wagatsuma, Yukiko; Persson, Lars Å; Arifeen, Shams E; Prentice, Andrew M

    2014-01-01

    Background Data from West Africa indicate that a small thymus at birth and at 6 months of age is a strong and independent risk factor for infection-related mortality up to 24 and 36 months of age, respectively. We investigated the association between thymus size (thymic index, TI) in infancy and subsequent infant and child survival in a contemporary South Asian population. Methods The study focused on the follow-up of a randomized trial of prenatal nutritional interventions in rural Bangladesh (ISRCTN16581394), with TI measured longitudinally in infancy (at birth and weeks 8, 24 and 52 of age) and accurate recording of mortality up to 5 years of age. Results A total of 3267 infants were born into the Maternal and Infant Nutrition Interventions, Matlab study; data on TI were available for 1168 infants at birth, increasing to 2094 infants by 52 weeks of age. TI in relation to body size was largest at birth, decreasing through infancy. For infants with at least one measure of TI available, there were a total of 99 deaths up to the age of 5 years. No association was observed between TI and subsequent mortality when TI was measured at birth. However, an association with mortality was observed with TI at 8 weeks of age [odds ratio (OR) for change in mortality risk associated with 1 standard deviation change in TI: all deaths: OR = 0.64, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.41, 0.98; P = 0.038; and infection-related deaths only: OR = 0.32, 95% CI 0.14, 0.74; P = 0.008]. For TI when measured at 24 and 52 weeks of age, the numbers of infection-related deaths were too few (3 and 1, respectively) for any meaningful association to be observed. Conclusion These results confirm that thymus size in early infancy predicts subsequent survival in a lower mortality setting than West Africa. The absence of an effect at birth and its appearance at 8 weeks of age suggests early postnatal influences such as breast milk trophic factors. PMID:24366492

  8. Thymus development and infant and child mortality in rural Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Moore, Sophie E; Fulford, Anthony J C; Wagatsuma, Yukiko; Persson, Lars Å; Arifeen, Shams E; Prentice, Andrew M

    2014-02-01

    Data from West Africa indicate that a small thymus at birth and at 6 months of age is a strong and independent risk factor for infection-related mortality up to 24 and 36 months of age, respectively. We investigated the association between thymus size (thymic index, TI) in infancy and subsequent infant and child survival in a contemporary South Asian population. The study focused on the follow-up of a randomized trial of prenatal nutritional interventions in rural Bangladesh (ISRCTN16581394), with TI measured longitudinally in infancy (at birth and weeks 8, 24 and 52 of age) and accurate recording of mortality up to 5 years of age. A total of 3267 infants were born into the Maternal and Infant Nutrition Interventions, Matlab study; data on TI were available for 1168 infants at birth, increasing to 2094 infants by 52 weeks of age. TI in relation to body size was largest at birth, decreasing through infancy. For infants with at least one measure of TI available, there were a total of 99 deaths up to the age of 5 years. No association was observed between TI and subsequent mortality when TI was measured at birth. However, an association with mortality was observed with TI at 8 weeks of age [odds ratio (OR) for change in mortality risk associated with 1 standard deviation change in TI: all deaths: OR = 0.64, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.41, 0.98; P = 0.038; and infection-related deaths only: OR = 0.32, 95% CI 0.14, 0.74; P = 0.008]. For TI when measured at 24 and 52 weeks of age, the numbers of infection-related deaths were too few (3 and 1, respectively) for any meaningful association to be observed. These results confirm that thymus size in early infancy predicts subsequent survival in a lower mortality setting than West Africa. The absence of an effect at birth and its appearance at 8 weeks of age suggests early postnatal influences such as breast milk trophic factors.

  9. Child developmental outcomes in preschool children following antidepressant exposure in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Galbally, Megan; Lewis, Andrew J; Buist, Anne

    2015-07-01

    To examine child developmental outcomes in preschool-aged children exposed to antidepressant medication in pregnancy and compare their outcomes to children not exposed. A prospective case-controlled study of 20 children exposed to antidepressants in pregnancy and 21 unexposed controls was available from the Victorian Psychotropic Registry. Child development outcomes at 4 years of age were assessed using the Wechsler Preschool and Primary Scale of Intelligence, third edition; the Movement Assessment Battery for Children; Behaviour Rating Inventory of Executive Functioning-Preschool; and the Child Behavior Checklist (1.5-5 years). Maternal depression was assessed using the Beck Depression Inventory-II in pregnancy and at four time points across infancy and early childhood. Children exposed to antidepressants in pregnancy had no statistically significant differences compared to unexposed children on any of the measures of child development undertaken. There was a trend to slightly lower scores in motor development with a small effect size for two scales of the Movement Assessment Battery for Children: balance - Cohen's d=0.36; aiming and catching - Cohen's d=0.34. The finding of no effect on cognition and behaviour are consistent with other previous studies conducted with younger children. Likewise, the trend towards lower motor development is similar to earlier findings from this study and a number of other similar studies. Given this trend there is a need for future research that focuses on this area of development in older children using robust measures of motor development. © The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists 2015.

  10. Societal values and policies may curtail preschool children's physical activity in child care centers.

    PubMed

    Copeland, Kristen A; Sherman, Susan N; Kendeigh, Cassandra A; Kalkwarf, Heidi J; Saelens, Brian E

    2012-02-01

    Three-fourths of US preschool-age children are in child care centers. Children are primarily sedentary in these settings, and are not meeting recommended levels of physical activity. Our objective was to identify potential barriers to children's physical activity in child care centers. Nine focus groups with 49 child care providers (55% African American) were assembled from 34 centers (inner-city, suburban, Head Start, and Montessori) in Cincinnati, Ohio. Three coders independently analyzed verbatim transcripts for themes. Data analysis and interpretation of findings were verified through triangulation of methods. We identified 3 main barriers to children's physical activity in child care: (1) injury concerns, (2) financial, and (3) a focus on "academics." Stricter licensing codes intended to reduce children's injuries on playgrounds rendered playgrounds less physically challenging and interesting. In addition, some parents concerned about potential injury, requested staff to restrict playground participation for their children. Small operating margins of most child care centers limited their ability to install abundant playground equipment. Child care providers felt pressure from state mandates and parents to focus on academics at the expense of gross motor play. Because children spend long hours in care and many lack a safe place to play near their home, these barriers may limit children's only opportunity to engage in physical activity. Societal priorities for young children--safety and school readiness--may be hindering children's physical development. In designing environments that optimally promote children's health and development, child advocates should think holistically about potential unintended consequences of policies.

  11. Child and Informant Influences on Behavioral Ratings of Preschool Children

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Beth M.; Lonigan, Christopher J.

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated relations among teacher, parent, and observer behavioral ratings of 3- and 4-year-old children using intraclass correlations and ANOVA. Comparisons within and across children from middle- (N =166; Mean age 54.25 months, SD = 8.74) and low-income (N =199; Mean age 51.21 months, SD = 7.22) backgrounds revealed significant agreement between the raters but also considerable differences in both ranking and absolute scores between raters. Teachers and parents consistently rated children from low-income classrooms as having more behavioral problems and fewer prosocial behaviors. Results are conceptualized with respect to how differential expectations, comparison groups, and types of interaction with children can affect the evaluation of child behavior. Results point to the need for multiple sources of evaluation when assessing a child for behavioral difficulties, particularly in children from lower income backgrounds. PMID:25663717

  12. Is a specialised training of phonological awareness indicated in every preschool child?

    PubMed

    Keilmann, Annerose; Wintermeyer, Monika

    2008-01-01

    In a prospective study 218 preschool children were enrolled (stratified in 2 training programs, one specialized for phonologic awareness in order to prevent dyslexia, the other consisting in training of general perception) during the last year of kindergarten. After finishing the first grade 131 children were compared in their reading and writing abilities. In the whole group only a slight difference was found between both training modalities concerning their writing abilities. However, children with a history of hearing loss, actual hearing loss or pathologic middle ear findings profited most from the specialized training program compared to the control in their reading abilities. A specialized training program to improve phonologic awareness as a basis for reading and writing in every kindergarten and preschool child seems to be unnecessary. However, children with temporary hearing deficits benefit from such a program. For all other children general perception training may be sufficient. Copyright 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  13. Child sexual behavior inventory: a comparison between Latino and normative samples of preschoolers.

    PubMed

    Kenny, Maureen C; Wurtele, Sandy K

    2013-01-01

    There is a relative dearth of research examining normative sexual behavior in Latino preschool children, despite an increased presence of Latinos as a minority population in the United States. To meet this need, a sample of Latino mothers were asked to complete the Child Sexual Behavior Inventory (CSBI; Friedrich et al., 1992 ) on their preschool-aged children (3 to 5 years old; n = 188). When their children's scores were compared to CSBI normative data, significant differences emerged. Compared to the normative sample, Latino boys and girls scored significantly higher on the sexual abuse specific items subscale, and Latino girls scored significantly higher on the developmentally related sexual behavior subscale. Possible cultural explanations for these elevations are explored.

  14. Communicative actions, women's degree of social connectedness and child mortality in rural Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Gayen, K; Raeside, R

    2010-11-01

    Child deaths are decreasing throughout South East Asia, yet the rate remains high and is a cause of considerable anguish. In Bangladesh, there is also a great deal of variation in child mortality between different regions. Reported in this paper is the analysis of a survey of 613 Bangladeshi women who live in six rural villages and have reported on their experience of child death. Factors obtained from an interview based questionnaire were investigated to ascertain their association with child death. Multilevel Poison regression models were developed to relate these factors to the number and proportion of child deaths to children ever born while allowing for variation between the villages. It was found that communicative action, especially women's power as the degree of social connectedness, is important in reducing child mortality. Also important in reducing child mortality is the level of women's education. No evidence could be found of sex preference when comparing male and female child deaths. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  15. Through the eyes of a child: preschoolers' identification of emotional expressions from the child affective facial expression (CAFE) set.

    PubMed

    LoBue, Vanessa; Baker, Lewis; Thrasher, Cat

    2017-08-10

    Researchers have been interested in the perception of human emotional expressions for decades. Importantly, most empirical work in this domain has relied on controlled stimulus sets of adults posing for various emotional expressions. Recently, the Child Affective Facial Expression (CAFE) set was introduced to the scientific community, featuring a large validated set of photographs of preschool aged children posing for seven different emotional expressions. Although the CAFE set was extensively validated using adult participants, the set was designed for use with children. It is therefore necessary to verify that adult validation applies to child performance. In the current study, we examined 3- to 4-year-olds' identification of a subset of children's faces in the CAFE set, and compared it to adult ratings cited in previous research. Our results demonstrate an exceptionally strong relationship between adult ratings of the CAFE photos and children's ratings, suggesting that the adult validation of the set can be applied to preschool-aged participants. The results are discussed in terms of methodological implications for the use of the CAFE set with children, and theoretical implications for using the set to study the development of emotion perception in early childhood.

  16. Fertility and Child Mortality: Issues in the Demographic Transition of a Migrant Population.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ben-Porath, Yoram

    This paper reviews issues pertaining to the relationship between child mortality and fertility and examines the fertility-mortality relationship of women who emigrated to Israel from various countries in Asia, Africa, and Europe and continued child bearing in Israel. Data from the 1961 Israel census of population is used. Among issues addressed in…

  17. Fertility and Child Mortality: Issues in the Demographic Transition of a Migrant Population.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ben-Porath, Yoram

    This paper reviews issues pertaining to the relationship between child mortality and fertility and examines the fertility-mortality relationship of women who emigrated to Israel from various countries in Asia, Africa, and Europe and continued child bearing in Israel. Data from the 1961 Israel census of population is used. Among issues addressed in…

  18. Relationships between weight status and child, parent and community characteristics in preschool children.

    PubMed

    Jones, Rachel A; Okely, Anthony D; Gregory, Parriel; Cliff, Dylan P

    2009-01-01

    To examine, using an Ecological Systems Theoretical framework, relationships between weight status and child, parent and community characteristics and risk factors among preschool children. Cross-sectional data was collected from 140 children and their parents from 11 randomly selected preschools. Outcome variables included: motor development; perceived competence; objectively measured physical activity; time spent in active and quiet play; location and number of televisions; parental rules around physical activity and time spent watching television; availability of sport and physical activity programs; and parks and open spaces and access to footpaths. Overweight children spent more time in quiet play and watching television and less time in active play and physical activity. Perceived competence and motor development were similar for both overweight and non-overweight children. Associations between weight status and several parent and community characteristics were not evident, except for access to footpaths. Overweight children had greater access to footpaths compared with non-overweight children (p=0.046). The results reported here showed little difference between overweight and non-overweight children in relation to a variety of child, parent and community variables. However, for some characteristics, differences in older children have been reported. Longitudinal studies are required to confirm when these characteristics begin to differ, what effects these differences have on behaviour and weight-status, and therefore when targeted treatment should be provided during a child's development.

  19. Preschool-Age Chinese Children's Weight Status: WHO Classification, Parent Ratings, Child/Family Characteristics.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guang Heng; Tan, Tony Xing; Cheah, Charissa S L

    We aimed to compare preschool-age Chinese children's weight status based on the WHO guidelines with parental ratings on their children's body type, and child/family demographic characteristics. The sample included 171 preschool-age children (M=60.5months, SD=6.7; boys: 46.8%) randomly selected from 23 classrooms. Based on BMIs from their height and weight from physical examinations, the children were divided into three groups using the 2006 WHO guidelines: underweight (n=46), normal weight (n=65), and overweight (n=60). Data on the parental ratings of children's current body type, ideal body type and child/family demographic characteristics were collected with surveys. Parents' accurately classified 91.1% of the underweight children, 52.3% of the normal weight children, and 61.7% of the overweight children. In terms of ideal body shape for their children, parents typically wanted their children to have normal weight or to remain underweight. Most of the child and family demographic characteristics were not different across children who were underweight, had normal weight, and were overweight. Because parents tended to underestimate their children's weight status, it is important to increase Chinese parents' knowledge on what constitutes healthy weight, as well as the potential harm of overweight status for children's development. Training healthcare providers in kindergartens and pediatric clinics to work with parents to recognize unhealthy weight status in children is valuable. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Changes in the Preschool Child As a Function of Change in the Parent-Child Relationship.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heinicke, Christoph M.

    This paper describes a project which examined the impact of various forms of social work intervention with parents on the functioning of the parents and their preschool children. Subjects were 105 children attending one of two day care centers and their welfare families. Effects of three intervention and two nonintervention conditions were…

  1. Child-Child Interactions and Positive Social Focus among Preschool Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naerland, Terje; Martinsen, Harald

    2011-01-01

    This study is based on video-recorded observations of 64 children during free play at their nursery. A measure of "social focus" in the preschool, regarded as an indicator of social status, was constructed from the amount of positive and neutral contacts children received from their peers. Only six children often received positive or…

  2. Child-Child Interactions and Positive Social Focus among Preschool Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naerland, Terje; Martinsen, Harald

    2011-01-01

    This study is based on video-recorded observations of 64 children during free play at their nursery. A measure of "social focus" in the preschool, regarded as an indicator of social status, was constructed from the amount of positive and neutral contacts children received from their peers. Only six children often received positive or…

  3. Combining child social skills training with a parent early intervention program for inhibited preschool children.

    PubMed

    Lau, Elizabeth X; Rapee, Ronald M; Coplan, Robert J

    2017-10-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated the efficacy of early intervention for anxiety in preschoolers through parent-education. The current study evaluated a six-session early intervention program for preschoolers at high risk of anxiety disorders in which a standard educational program for parents was supplemented by direct training of social skills to the children. Seventy-two children aged 3-5 years were selected based on high behavioural inhibition levels and concurrently having a parent with high emotional distress. Families were randomly assigned to either the intervention group, which consisted of six parent-education group sessions and six child social skills training sessions, or waitlist. After six months, families on waitlist were offered treatment consisting of parent-education only. Relative to waitlist, children in the combined condition showed significantly fewer clinician-rated anxiety disorders and diagnostic severity and maternal (but not paternal) reported anxiety symptoms and life interference at six months. Mothers also reported less overprotection. These gains were maintained at 12-month follow-up. Parent only education following waitlist produced similar improvements among children. Quasi-experimental comparison between combined and parent-only interventions indicated greater reductions from combined intervention according to clinician reports, but no significant differences on maternal reports. Results suggest that this brief early intervention program for preschoolers with both parent and child components significantly reduces risk and disorder in vulnerable children. The inclusion of a child component might have the potential to increase effects over parent-only intervention. However, future support for this conclusion through long-term, randomised controlled trials is needed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Child-targeted TV advertising and preschoolers' consumption of high-sugar breakfast cereals.

    PubMed

    Longacre, Meghan R; Drake, Keith M; Titus, Linda J; Harris, Jennifer; Cleveland, Lauren P; Langeloh, Gail; Hendricks, Kristy; Dalton, Madeline A

    2017-01-01

    Breakfast cereals represent the most highly advertised packaged food on child-targeted television, and most ads are for cereals high in sugar. This study examined whether children's TV exposure to child-targeted, high-sugar breakfast cereal (SBC) ads was associated with their consumption of those SBC brands. Parents of 3- to 5-year-old children were recruited from pediatric and Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) clinics in Southern New Hampshire, USA, and completed a cross-sectional survey between April-December 2013. Parents reported their child's consumption of SBC brands; whether their child had watched any of 11 kids' channels in the past week; their child's TV viewing time; and socio-demographics. Children's exposure to child-targeted SBC TV ads was calculated by combining TV channel and viewing time with advertising data for SBC ads aired on kids' TV channels during the same timeframe. Five hundred forty-eight parents completed surveys; 52.7% had an annual household income of $50,000 or less. Children's mean age was 4.4 years, 51.6% were female, and 72.5% were non-Hispanic white. In the past week, 56.9% (N = 312) of children ate SBCs advertised on kids' channels. Overall, 40.6% of children were exposed to child-targeted SBC TV ads in the past week. In fully adjusted analyses, the number of SBC brands children consumed was positively associated with their exposure to child-targeted SBC ads. Children consumed 14% (RR = 1.14, 95% CI: 1.02, 1.27) more SBC brands for every 10 SBC ads seen in the past 7 days. Exposure to child-targeted SBC TV advertising is positively associated with SBC brand consumption among preschool-aged children. These findings support recommendations to limit the marketing of high-sugar foods to young children. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Social and health behavioural determinants of maternal child-feeding patterns in preschool-aged children.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Isabel; Severo, Milton; Oliveira, Andreia; Durão, Catarina; Moreira, Pedro; Barros, Henrique; Lopes, Carla

    2016-04-01

    Parental child-feeding attitudes and practices may compromise the development of healthy eating habits and adequate weight status in children. This study aimed to identify maternal child-feeding patterns in preschool-aged children and to evaluate their association with maternal social and health behavioural characteristics. Trained interviewers evaluated 4724 dyads of mothers and their 4-5-year-old child from the Generation XXI cohort. Maternal child-feeding attitudes and practices were assessed through the Child Feeding Questionnaire and the Overt/Covert Control scale. Associations were estimated using linear regression [adjusted for maternal education, body mass index (BMI), fruit and vegetables (F&V) intake and child's BMI z-score]. Principal component analysis defined a three-factor structure explaining 58% of the total variance of maternal child-feeding patterns: perceived monitoring - representing mothers with higher levels of monitoring, perceived responsibility and overt control; restriction - characterizing mothers with higher covert control, restriction and concerns about child's weight; pressure to eat - identifying mothers with higher levels of pressure to eat and overt control. Lower socioeconomic status, better health perception, higher F&V intake and offspring cohabitation were associated with more 'perceived monitoring' mothers. Higher maternal F&V intake and depression were associated with more 'restrictive' mothers. Younger mothers, less educated, with poorer health perception and offspring cohabiting, were associated with higher use of 'pressure to eat'. Maternal socioeconomic indicators and family environment were more associated with perceived monitoring and pressure to eat, whereas maternal health behavioural characteristics were mainly associated with restriction. These findings will be helpful in future research and public health programmes on child-feeding patterns. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Maternal and child mortality indicators across 187 countries of the world: converging or diverging.

    PubMed

    Goli, Srinivas; Arokiasamy, Perianayagam

    2014-01-01

    This study reassessed the progress achieved since 1990 in maternal and child mortality indicators to test whether the progress is converging or diverging across countries worldwide. The convergence process is examined using standard parametric and non-parametric econometric models of convergence. The results of absolute convergence estimates reveal that progress in maternal and child mortality indicators is diverging for the entire period of 1990-2010 [maternal mortality ratio (MMR) - β = .00033, p < .574; neonatal mortality rate (NNMR) - β = .04367, p < .000; post-neonatal mortality rate (PNMR) - β = .02677, p < .000; under-five mortality rate (U5MR) - β = .00828, p < .000)]. In the recent period, such divergence is replaced with convergence for MMR but diverged for all the child mortality indicators. The results of Kernel density estimate reveal considerable reduction in divergence of MMR for the recent period; however, the Kernel density distribution plots show more than one 'peak' which indicates the emergence of convergence clubs based on their mortality levels. For child mortality indicators, the Kernel estimates suggest that divergence is in progress across the countries worldwide but tended to converge for countries with low mortality levels. A mere progress in global averages of maternal and child mortality indicators among a global cross-section of countries does not warranty convergence unless there is a considerable reduction in variance, skewness and range of change.

  7. Ethical issues in child psychopharmacology research and practice: emphasis on preschoolers.

    PubMed

    Spetie, Lacramioara; Arnold, L Eugene

    2007-03-01

    Psychoactive drug prescription for preschoolers has increased over the past decade and has been a controversial topic for those who prescribe, regulate, and research the use of psychotropics in this population. Children and adolescents are deemed vulnerable populations, at risk of being harmed by unethical or suboptimal practice and research and are in need of special protection. Historically, preschoolers have been therapeutic and research "orphans," excluded from pharmacological studies so that the evidence base for their treatment has to be extrapolated from other ages. Within the past few decades, several ethical principles guiding pediatric psychopharmacological research have been developed. The same principles could effectively guide the treatment of these patients. Further studies are needed to elucidate the safety and effectiveness of psychotropics, and sound ethical guidelines for their involvement in psychiatric research are needed. This article reviews some challenges facing mental health care providers involved in prescribing or researching the use of psychoactive drugs in preschoolers. Some of these challenges are general to medical treatment and research with children, and others are particular to child psychopharmacological treatment and research.

  8. Decreasing child mortality, spatial clustering and decreasing disparity in North-Western Burkina Faso.

    PubMed

    Becher, Heiko; Müller, Olaf; Dambach, Peter; Gabrysch, Sabine; Niamba, Louis; Sankoh, Osman; Simboro, Seraphin; Schoeps, Anja; Stieglbauer, Gabriele; Yé, Yazoume; Sié, Ali

    2016-04-01

    Within relatively small areas, there exist high spatial variations of mortality between villages. In rural Burkina Faso, with data from 1993 to 1998, clusters of particularly high child mortality were identified in the population of the Nouna Health and Demographic Surveillance System (HDSS), a member of the INDEPTH Network. In this paper, we report child mortality with respect to temporal trends, spatial clustering and disparity in this HDSS from 1993 to 2012. Poisson regression was used to describe village-specific child mortality rates and time trends in mortality. The spatial scan statistic was used to identify villages or village clusters with higher child mortality. Clustering of mortality in the area is still present, but not as strong as before. The disparity of child mortality between villages has decreased. The decrease occurred in the context of an overall halving of child mortality in the rural area of Nouna HDSS between 1993 and 2012. Extrapolated to the Millennium Development Goals target period 1990-2015, this yields an estimated reduction of 54%, which is not too far off the aim of a two-thirds reduction.

  9. Regional Infant and Child Mortality Review Committee 2010 final report.

    PubMed

    Randall, Brad; Wilson, Ann

    2011-12-01

    The 2010 annual report of the Regional Infant and Child Mortality Review Committee (RICMRC) is presented. Since 1997, RICMRC has sought to achieve its mission to "review infant and child deaths so that information can be transformed into action to protect young lives." For the year 2010, the Committee reviewed 15 deaths from Minnehaha, Turner, Lincoln, Moody, Lake, McCook, Union, Hanson, Miner and Brookings counties that met the following criteria: Children under age 18 dying subsequent to hospital discharge following delivery. Children who either died in these counties from causes sustained in them, or residents who died elsewhere from causes sustained in the 10-county region. The acronym SUID (Sudden Unexpected Infant Death) is being increasingly used by investigators of infant deaths. SUID is an intentionally broad category used for any sudden infant death when the cause of death is unapparent or multifactorial. Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) is a subset of SUID, which in addition to SIDS includes sudden unexpected infant deaths of any cause. One death categorized as SIDS occurred in 2010. The committee has observed a stable decline in the number of deaths due to SIDS for the last several years with the exception of two SIDS deaths that occurred in 2008. The national SIDS rate of 0.57 per 1000 live births' would suggest that our region should have one SIDS death per year. It would appear that on average, our region's SIDS incidence is close to that number. Many investigators believe that a "diagnostic drift" is occurring in the SIDS determination. These investigators believe that some deaths certified as SIDS in earlier years may now be classified as "undetermined," or in the new terminology, SUID. Overall the number of SUID deaths has remained relatively stable over the last decade. In those years when there were spikes of infant deaths, the increases were largely due to an increase in the number of "undetermined" deaths. The majority of our "undetermined

  10. The Child and Adult Care Food Program and the Nutrition of Preschoolers.

    PubMed

    Korenman, Sanders; Abner, Kristin S; Kaestner, Robert; Gordon, Rachel A

    2013-01-01

    Children spend a considerable amount of time in preschools and child care centers. As a result, these settings may have an influence on their diet, weight, and food security, and are potentially important contexts for interventions to address nutritional health. The Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP) is one such intervention. No national study has compared nutrition-related outcomes of children in CACFP-participating centers to those of similar children in non-participating centers. We use a sample of four-year old children drawn from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, Birth Cohort to obtain estimates of associations between CACFP program participation and consumption of milk, fruits, vegetables, fast food, and sweets, and indicators of overweight, underweight status and food insecurity. We find that, among low-income children, CACFP participation moderately increases consumption of milk and vegetables, and may also reduce the prevalence of overweight and underweight. Effects on other outcomes are generally small and not statistically significant.

  11. Relative or absolute standards for child poverty: a state-level analysis of infant and child mortality.

    PubMed

    Hillemeier, Marianne M; Lynch, John; Harper, Sam; Raghunathan, Trivellore; Kaplan, George A

    2003-04-01

    The purpose of the present study was to compare the associations of state-referenced and federal poverty measures with states' infant and child mortality rates. Compressed mortality and Current Population Survey data were used to examine relationships between mortality and (1) state-referenced poverty (percentage of children below half the state median income) and (2) percentage of children below the federal poverty line. State-referenced poverty was not associated with mortality among infants or children, whereas poverty as defined by national standards was strongly related to mortality. Infant and child mortality is more closely tied to families' capacity for meeting basic needs than to relative position within a state's economic hierarchy.

  12. Relative or Absolute Standards for Child Poverty: A State-Level Analysis of Infant and Child Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Hillemeier, Marianne M.; Lynch, John; Harper, Sam; Raghunathan, Trivellore; Kaplan, George A.

    2003-01-01

    Objectives. The purpose of the present study was to compare the associations of state-referenced and federal poverty measures with states’ infant and child mortality rates. Methods. Compressed mortality and Current Population Survey data were used to examine relationships between mortality and (1) state-referenced poverty (percentage of children below half the state median income) and (2) percentage of children below the federal poverty line. Results. State-referenced poverty was not associated with mortality among infants or children, whereas poverty as defined by national standards was strongly related to mortality. Conclusions. Infant and child mortality is more closely tied to families’ capacity for meeting basic needs than to relative position within a state’s economic hierarchy. PMID:12660213

  13. Religious Affiliation, Ethnicity, and Child Mortality in Chiapas, México

    PubMed Central

    Valle, Eunice D. Vargas; Potter, Joseph E.; Fernández, Leticia

    2015-01-01

    We investigate whether there is a relationship between religious affiliation and child mortality among indigenous and nonindigenous groups in Chiapas, México. Our analysis relies on Brass-type estimates of child mortality by ethnicity and religious affiliation and multivariate analyses that adjust for various socioeconomic and demographic factors. The data are from the 2000 Mexican Census 10 percent sample. Among indigenous people, Presbyterians have lower rates of child mortality than Catholics. However, no significant differentials are found in child mortality by religious affiliation among nonindigenous people. The indigenous health ministry of the Presbyterian Church and the social and cultural transformations that tend to accompany religious conversion may have an impact on child survival among disadvantaged populations such as the indigenous people in Chiapas. PMID:26146411

  14. Latino Parents' Insight on Optimal Sleep for Their Preschool-Age Child: Does Context Matter?

    PubMed

    Martinez, Suzanna M; Thompson-Lastad, Ariana

    2015-01-01

    Insufficient sleep is a risk factor for pediatric obesity. Latino children are among those groups in which both short sleep duration and obesity are prevalent. Therefore, this study sought to explore Latino parents' views about ideal sleep duration and sleep-related practices for their preschool-age children in an urban setting. Between October 2013 and January 2014, Latino parents of 2- to 5-year-old children were interviewed at 3 pediatric clinics (San Francisco, Calif). Using a semistructured interview guide, parents were asked to describe bedtime routines and sleep practices of their preschool-age children, including behavioral, parental, social, and contextual factors that may affect children's sleep. Interviews were conducted in Spanish and English. Parents also completed a brief survey on demographic information. Interviews were analyzed on the basis of a priori and emergent themes. Latino parents (n = 18) were mostly female, with a mean age of 31 years; most were foreign born; and more than half had a monthly household income of $2000 or less. The following themes emerged: parents' ideas about optimal sleep duration for their preschool-age child, consistent bedtime routines, room sharing and bed sharing, parent work and child school schedules that affect children's sleep, and crowded housing and neighborhood noise that disrupt children's sleep. These findings increase our understanding of the factors related to achieving optimal sleep duration among Latino children living in urban and often crowded housing. Findings could be used to inform future research on how to increase parental knowledge of healthy sleep practices and adequate sleep among Latino parents of young children. Copyright © 2015 Academic Pediatric Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Societal Values and Policies May Curtail Preschool Children’s Physical Activity in Child Care Centers

    PubMed Central

    Sherman, Susan N.; Kendeigh, Cassandra A.; Kalkwarf, Heidi J.; Saelens, Brian E.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Three-fourths of US preschool-age children are in child care centers. Children are primarily sedentary in these settings, and are not meeting recommended levels of physical activity. Our objective was to identify potential barriers to children’s physical activity in child care centers. METHODS: Nine focus groups with 49 child care providers (55% African American) were assembled from 34 centers (inner-city, suburban, Head Start, and Montessori) in Cincinnati, Ohio. Three coders independently analyzed verbatim transcripts for themes. Data analysis and interpretation of findings were verified through triangulation of methods. RESULTS: We identified 3 main barriers to children’s physical activity in child care: (1) injury concerns, (2) financial, and (3) a focus on “academics.” Stricter licensing codes intended to reduce children's injuries on playgrounds rendered playgrounds less physically challenging and interesting. In addition, some parents concerned about potential injury, requested staff to restrict playground participation for their children. Small operating margins of most child care centers limited their ability to install abundant playground equipment. Child care providers felt pressure from state mandates and parents to focus on academics at the expense of gross motor play. Because children spend long hours in care and many lack a safe place to play near their home, these barriers may limit children's only opportunity to engage in physical activity. CONCLUSIONS: Societal priorities for young children—safety and school readiness—may be hindering children’s physical development. In designing environments that optimally promote children’s health and development, child advocates should think holistically about potential unintended consequences of policies. PMID:22218842

  16. Effects of economic downturns on child mortality: a global economic analysis, 1981-2010.

    PubMed

    Maruthappu, Mahiben; Watson, Robert A; Watkins, Johnathan; Zeltner, Thomas; Raine, Rosalind; Atun, Rifat

    2017-03-01

    To analyse how economic downturns affect child mortality both globally and among subgroups of countries of variable income levels. Retrospective observational study using economic data from the World Bank's Development Indicators and Global Development Finance (2013 edition). Child mortality data were sourced from the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation. Global. 204 countries between 1981 and 2010. Child mortality, controlling for country-specific differences in political, healthcare, cultural, structural, educational and economic factors. 197 countries experienced at least 1 economic downturn between 1981 and 2010, with a mean of 7.97 downturns per country (range 0-21; SD 0.45). At the global level, downturns were associated with significant (p<0.0001) deteriorations in each child mortality measure, in comparison with non-downturn years: neonatal (coefficient: 1.11, 95% CI 0.855 to 1.37), postneonatal (2.00, 95% CI 1.61 to 2.38), child (2.93, 95% CI 2.26 to 3.60) and under 5 years of age (5.44, 95% CI 4.31 to 6.58) mortality rates. Stronger (larger falls in the growth rate of gross domestic product/capita) and longer (lasting 2 years rather than 1) downturns were associated with larger significant deteriorations (p<0.001). During economic downturns, countries in the poorest quartile experienced ∼1½ times greater deterioration in neonatal mortality, compared with their own baseline; a 3-fold deterioration in postneonatal mortality; a 9-fold deterioration in child mortality and a 3-fold deterioration in under-5 mortality, than countries in the wealthiest quartile (p<0.0005). For 1-5 years after downturns ended, each mortality measure continued to display significant deteriorations (p<0.0001). Economic downturns occur frequently and are associated with significant deteriorations in child mortality, with worse declines in lower income countries.

  17. The Practical Side of Working with Parent-Child Interaction Therapy with Preschool Children with Language Impairments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klatte, Inge S.; Roulstone, Sue

    2016-01-01

    A common early intervention approach for preschool children with language problems is parent-child interaction therapy (PCIT). PCIT has positive effects for children with expressive language problems. It appears that speech and language therapists (SLTs) conduct this therapy in many different ways. This might be because of the variety of…

  18. The Unfair Search for Child Care: Working Moms, Poverty, and the Unequal Supply of Preschools across America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuller, Bruce; Liang, Xiaoyan

    This paper reports on the sharp disparities in the supply of preschools across the 100 counties and 36 states included in this study. Three sets of factors help explain these inequities in child-care supply: (1) local patterns of wealth, poverty, and maternal employment; (2) the structure of families; and (3) government subsidy levels. Among the…

  19. The Education of Preschool Exceptional Children. A Guide for School Administrative Units and Child Development Services Coordination Sites.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kierstead, John T.; Donovan, Susan

    This paper describes service delivery to Maine's preschool exceptional children (ages 3 to 5) in the context of a public school setting, and examines the relationship among Maine's Department of Education, Department of Human Services, Department of Mental Health/Mental Retardation, School Administrative Units, Child Development Services (CDS),…

  20. Shyness and School Adjustment among Chinese Preschool Children: Examining the Moderating Effect of Gender and Teacher-Child Relationship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, YunPeng; Wu, JianFen; Chen, YingMin; Han, Lei; Han, PiGuo; Wang, Peng; Gao, Fengqiang

    2015-01-01

    Research Findings: The current study examined the moderating effects of gender and teacher-child relationship on the association between shyness and school adjustment (school liking and avoidance, cooperative and independent participation). The sample consisted of 524 preschool students from 3 cities of Shandong province in northern China. Mothers…

  1. Shyness, Child-Teacher Relationships, and Socio-Emotional Adjustment in a Sample of Italian Preschool-Aged Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sette, Stefania; Baumgartner, Emma; Schneider, Barry H.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the moderating role of child-teacher relationship quality (i.e., closeness, conflict, and dependence) in the association between children's shyness and indices of socio-emotional adjustment and maladjustment. The participants were Italian preschool children (63 boys; 66 girls) and two lead teachers…

  2. Associations among Child Care, Family, and Behavior Outcomes in a Nation-Wide Sample of Preschool-Aged Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Romano, Elisa; Kohen, Dafna; Findlay, Leanne C.

    2010-01-01

    Canadian data based on maternal reports for a nationally representative sample of 4,521 4-5-year-olds were used to examine associations among child care, family factors, and behaviors in preschool-aged children. Linear regressions testing for direct and moderated associations indicated that regulated home-based care was associated with less…

  3. Mother-Child Affect and Emotion Socialization Processes across the Late Preschool Period: Predictions of Emerging Behaviour Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newland, Rebecca P.; Crnic, Keith A.

    2011-01-01

    The current study examined concurrent and longitudinal relations between maternal negative affective behaviour and child negative emotional expression in preschool age children with (n=96) or without (n=126) an early developmental risk, as well as the predictions of later behaviour problems. Maternal negative affective behaviour, child…

  4. Adult-Child Co-Viewing of Educational Television: Enhancing Preschoolers' Understanding of Mathematics Shown on "Sesame Street"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgenlander, Melissa

    2010-01-01

    Can adults help children to understand the content in preschool educational television by watching shows with them? Research indicates that co-viewing occurs rarely and has mixed benefits for learning. This study investigates the idea that a special kind of adult-child co-viewing, namely "dialogic viewing," in which adults ask open-ended questions…

  5. A child-centered scale of informal social control for Latino parents of preschool-age children: Development and validation

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Perceived neighborhood informal social control may determine whether parents allow their young children to be physically active in the neighborhood. We developed and validated a scale of neighborhood child-centered informal social control appropriate for Latino parents of preschool-age children. The...

  6. Mother-Child Affect and Emotion Socialization Processes across the Late Preschool Period: Predictions of Emerging Behaviour Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newland, Rebecca P.; Crnic, Keith A.

    2011-01-01

    The current study examined concurrent and longitudinal relations between maternal negative affective behaviour and child negative emotional expression in preschool age children with (n=96) or without (n=126) an early developmental risk, as well as the predictions of later behaviour problems. Maternal negative affective behaviour, child…

  7. Adult-Child Co-Viewing of Educational Television: Enhancing Preschoolers' Understanding of Mathematics Shown on "Sesame Street"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgenlander, Melissa

    2010-01-01

    Can adults help children to understand the content in preschool educational television by watching shows with them? Research indicates that co-viewing occurs rarely and has mixed benefits for learning. This study investigates the idea that a special kind of adult-child co-viewing, namely "dialogic viewing," in which adults ask open-ended questions…

  8. Shyness and School Adjustment among Chinese Preschool Children: Examining the Moderating Effect of Gender and Teacher-Child Relationship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, YunPeng; Wu, JianFen; Chen, YingMin; Han, Lei; Han, PiGuo; Wang, Peng; Gao, Fengqiang

    2015-01-01

    Research Findings: The current study examined the moderating effects of gender and teacher-child relationship on the association between shyness and school adjustment (school liking and avoidance, cooperative and independent participation). The sample consisted of 524 preschool students from 3 cities of Shandong province in northern China. Mothers…

  9. The Age of Entry into High-Quality Preschool, Child and Family Factors, and Developmental Outcomes in Early Childhood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zupancic, Maja; Kavcic, Tina

    2006-01-01

    Three blocks of factors were considered as predictors of four year old children's (N = 286) personality, non-verbal intelligence and social behaviour in preschool: (a) personality characteristics at time 1 (T1) when the participants were three years old; (b) parental education and parenting practices measured at T1; and (c) age of child's entry to…

  10. Characterizing Preschool Children's Attention Regulation in Parent-Child Interactions: The Roles of Effortful Control and Motivation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Ruby C.; Robinson, Julia B.; Chang, Florence; Burns, Barbara M.

    2007-01-01

    This study examined relations among effortful control, motivation, and attention regulation in preschoolers within the context of parent-child interactions. Sixty-one low-income children and their mothers participated in a puzzle-matching task. One week later, the children completed a puzzle-matching task independently. Hierarchical regression…

  11. Associations among Child Care, Family, and Behavior Outcomes in a Nation-Wide Sample of Preschool-Aged Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Romano, Elisa; Kohen, Dafna; Findlay, Leanne C.

    2010-01-01

    Canadian data based on maternal reports for a nationally representative sample of 4,521 4-5-year-olds were used to examine associations among child care, family factors, and behaviors in preschool-aged children. Linear regressions testing for direct and moderated associations indicated that regulated home-based care was associated with less…

  12. The Age of Entry into High-Quality Preschool, Child and Family Factors, and Developmental Outcomes in Early Childhood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zupancic, Maja; Kavcic, Tina

    2006-01-01

    Three blocks of factors were considered as predictors of four year old children's (N = 286) personality, non-verbal intelligence and social behaviour in preschool: (a) personality characteristics at time 1 (T1) when the participants were three years old; (b) parental education and parenting practices measured at T1; and (c) age of child's entry to…

  13. Paths of Effects from Preschool to Adult Well-Being: A Confirmatory Analysis of the Child-Parent Center Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reynolds, Arthur J.; Ou, Suh-Ruu

    2011-01-01

    The current study investigated the contribution of 5 hypotheses to the estimated effects of preschool in the Child-Parent Centers on occupational prestige, felony arrest, and depressive symptoms in adulthood in the Chicago Longitudinal Study. An alternative-intervention, quasi-experimental design included over 1,400 low-income participants (93% of…

  14. Defense of the Child's-Play Method for Teaching the Place Value Notation Concept to Elementary and Preschool Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bentley, Prudence A.

    The objective of this paper is to explain the need for and defend the sufficiency of the child's-play method of teaching the place value notation concept to preschool and elementary school children. Discussion first illustrates error patterns of school children in the use and interpretation of place value notation, arguing that the errors reflect…

  15. Teacher-Child Interactions and the Development of Executive Function in Preschool-Age Children Attending Head Start

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choi, Ji Young; Castle, Sherri; Williamson, Amy C.; Young, Emisha; Worley, Lauren; Long, Melissa; Horm, Diane M.

    2016-01-01

    Research Findings: The purpose of this study was to examine the potential contribution of teacher-child interactions to residualized Inhibitory Control (IC) gains over approximately a six-month period for preschoolers from predominantly low-income households. The study also explored whether the association between quality of teacher-child…

  16. The Daily Curriculum Guide, Year II, Weeks 21-34. A Preschool Program for the Spanish-Speaking Child.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dissemination and Assessment Center for Bilingual Education, Austin, TX.

    Daily lesson plans for weeks 21 through 34 are provided in this guide, the third and last in the Year II sequence of the Daily Curriculum Guide preschool program for the Spanish-speaking child. The program is based on a language maintenance model in which Spanish is used as a means to develop basic concepts, skills and attitudes. Written in both…

  17. The Practical Side of Working with Parent-Child Interaction Therapy with Preschool Children with Language Impairments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klatte, Inge S.; Roulstone, Sue

    2016-01-01

    A common early intervention approach for preschool children with language problems is parent-child interaction therapy (PCIT). PCIT has positive effects for children with expressive language problems. It appears that speech and language therapists (SLTs) conduct this therapy in many different ways. This might be because of the variety of…

  18. The Child Behavior Checklist Dysregulation Profile in Preschool Children: A Broad Dysregulation Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Geeraerts, Sanne Barbara; Deutz, Marike Hester Francisca; Deković, Maja; Bunte, Tessa; Schoemaker, Kim; Espy, Kimberly Andrews; Prinzie, Peter; van Baar, Anneloes; Matthys, Walter

    2015-07-01

    Children with concurrent impairments in regulating affect, behavior, and cognition can be identified with the Anxious/Depressed, Aggressive Behavior, and Attention Problems scales (or AAA scales) of the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL). Jointly, these scales form the Dysregulation Profile (DP). Despite persuasive evidence that DP is a marker for severe developmental problems, no consensus exists on the preferred conceptualization and operationalization of DP in preschool years. We addressed this concern by testing and validating the factor structure of DP in a group of predominantly clinically referred preschool children. Participants were 247 children (195 boys and 52 girls), aged 3.5 to 5.5 years. Children were assessed at baseline and 18 months later, using parent and teacher reports, a clinical interview with parents, behavioral observations, and neuropsychological tasks. Confirmatory factor analysis showed that a bifactor model, with a general DP factor and 3 specific factors representing the AAA scales, fitted the data better than a second-order model and a one-factor model for both parent-reported and teacher-reported child problem behavior. Criterion validity analyses showed that the DP factor was concurrently and longitudinally associated with markers of dysregulation and clinically relevant criteria, whereas the specific factors representing the AAA scales were more differentially related to those criteria. DP is best conceptualized as a broad syndrome of dysregulation that exists in addition to the specific syndromes as represented by the AAA scales. Implications for researchers and clinicians are discussed. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Change in Misperception of Child's Body Weight among Parents of American Preschool Children.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Dustin T; Hansen, Andrew R; Wang, Wei; Yan, Fei; Zhang, Jian

    2015-08-01

    Little is known about parental recognition of their child's overweight status over time. The aim of this study was to examine the prevalence of parental misperceptions related to preschool children's weight in the last two decades. Data come from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey from 1988 to 1994 (early survey; n=3839) and 2007 to 2012 (recent survey; n=3153). Parents were asked whether they considered their child, ages 2-5 years, to be overweight, underweight, or just about the right weight. We estimated the probability ratio (PR) between the two surveys for parents perceiving their overweight child as overweight. Percentages of parents who inappropriately perceived their overweight child as just about the right weight was 96.6% and 94.9% for the early and recent survey, respectively. As high as 78.4% of parents perceived their obese child as just about the right weight in the recent survey. The probability of overweight/obese children being perceived as overweight in the early survey was 0.18 (95% confidence interval [CI]=0.14-0.22) and further lowered to 0.14 (95% CI=0.11-0.17) in the recent survey. After adjustment for sociodemographics and BMI z-scores of directly measured body weight, probability of being appropriately perceived by the parents declined by 30% between surveys (PR=0.70 [0.63, 0.78]). There was a declining tendency among parents to perceive overweight children appropriately. Strategies are needed to explore how to encourage clinician discussions with parents about appropriate weight for their child and strengthen capacity for childhood obesity prevention.

  20. Child mortality estimation: methods used to adjust for bias due to AIDS in estimating trends in under-five mortality.

    PubMed

    Walker, Neff; Hill, Kenneth; Zhao, Fengmin

    2012-01-01

    In most low- and middle-income countries, child mortality is estimated from data provided by mothers concerning the survival of their children using methods that assume no correlation between the mortality risks of the mothers and those of their children. This assumption is not valid for populations with generalized HIV epidemics, however, and in this review, we show how the United Nations Inter-agency Group for Child Mortality Estimation (UN IGME) uses a cohort component projection model to correct for AIDS-related biases in the data used to estimate trends in under-five mortality. In this model, births in a given year are identified as occurring to HIV-positive or HIV-negative mothers, the lives of the infants and mothers are projected forward using survivorship probabilities to estimate survivors at the time of a given survey, and the extent to which excess mortality of children goes unreported because of the deaths of HIV-infected mothers prior to the survey is calculated. Estimates from the survey for past periods can then be adjusted for the estimated bias. The extent of the AIDS-related bias depends crucially on the dynamics of the HIV epidemic, on the length of time before the survey that the estimates are made for, and on the underlying non-AIDS child mortality. This simple methodology (which does not take into account the use of effective antiretroviral interventions) gives results qualitatively similar to those of other studies.

  1. Prioritizing child health interventions in Ethiopia: modeling impact on child mortality, life expectancy and inequality in age at death.

    PubMed

    Onarheim, Kristine Husøy; Tessema, Solomon; Johansson, Kjell Arne; Eide, Kristiane Tislevoll; Norheim, Ole Frithjof; Miljeteig, Ingrid

    2012-01-01

    The fourth Millennium Development Goal calls for a two-thirds reduction in under-5 mortality between 1990 and 2015. Under-5 mortality rate is declining, but many countries are still far from achieving the goal. Effective child health interventions that could reduce child mortality exist, but national decision-makers lack contextual information for priority setting in their respective resource-constrained settings. We estimate the potential health impact of increasing coverage of 14 selected health interventions on child mortality in Ethiopia (2011-2015). We also explore the impact on life expectancy and inequality in the age of death (Gini(health)). We used the Lives Saved Tool to estimate potential impact of scaling-up 14 health interventions in Ethiopia (2011-2015). Interventions are scaled-up to 1) government target levels, 2) 90% coverage and 3) 90% coverage of the five interventions with the highest impact. Under-5 mortality rate, neonatal mortality rate and deaths averted are primary outcome measures. We used modified life tables to estimate impact on life expectancy at birth and inequality in the age of death (Gini(health)). Under-5 mortality rate declines from 101.0 in 2011 to 68.8, 42.1 and 56.7 per 1000 live births under these three scenarios. Prioritizing child health would also increase life expectancy at birth from expected 60.5 years in 2015 to 62.5, 64.2 and 63.4 years and reduce inequality in age of death (Gini(health)) substantially from 0.24 to 0.21, 0.18 and 0.19. The Millennium Development Goal for child health is reachable in Ethiopia. Prioritizing child health would also increase total life expectancy at birth and reduce inequality in age of death substantially (Gini(health)).

  2. Maternal reading skills and child mortality in Nigeria: a reassessment of why education matters.

    PubMed

    Smith-Greenaway, Emily

    2013-10-01

    Mother's formal schooling-even at the primary level-is associated with lower risk of child mortality, although the reasons why remain unclear. This study examines whether mother's reading skills help to explain the association in Nigeria. Using data from the Demographic and Health Survey, the analysis demonstrates that women's reading skills increase linearly with years of primary school; however, many women with several years of formal school are unable to read at all. The results further show that mother's reading skills help to explain the relationship between mother's formal schooling and child mortality, and that mother's reading skills are highly associated with child mortality. The study highlights the need for more data on literacy and for more research on whether and how mother's reading skills lower child mortality in other contexts.

  3. War, famine and excess child mortality in Africa: the role of parental education.

    PubMed

    Kiros, G E; Hogan, D P

    2001-06-01

    Civilian-targeted warfare and famine constitute two of the greatest public health challenges of our time. Both have devastated many countries in Africa. Social services, and in particular, health services, have been destroyed. Dictatorial and military governments have used the withholding of food as a political weapon to exacerbate human suffering. Under such circumstances, war and famine are expected to have catastrophic impacts on child survival. This study examines the role of parental education in reducing excess child mortality in Africa by considering Tigrai-Ethiopia, which was severely affected by famine and civil war during 1973--1991. This study uses data from the 1994 Housing and Population Census of Ethiopia and on communities' vulnerability to food crises. Child mortality levels and trends by various subgroups are estimated using indirect methods of mortality estimation techniques. A Poisson regression model is used to examine the relationship between number of children dead and parental education. Although child mortality is excessively high (about 200 deaths per 1000 births), our results show enormous variations in child mortality by parental education. Child mortality is highest among children born to illiterate mothers and illiterate fathers. Our results also show that the role of parental education in reducing child mortality is great during famine periods. In the communities devastated by war, however, its impact was significant only when the father has above primary education. CONCLUSIONS Our findings suggest that both mother's and father's education are significantly and negatively associated with child mortality, although this effect diminishes over time if the crisis is severe and prolonged. The policy implications of our study include, obviously, reducing armed conflict, addressing food security in a timely manner, and expansion of educational opportunities.

  4. Community variations in infant and child mortality in Peru.

    PubMed Central

    Edmonston, B; Andes, N

    1983-01-01

    Data from the national Peru Fertility Survey are used to estimate infant and childhood mortality ratios, 1968--77, for 124 Peruvian communities, ranging from small Indian hamlets in the Andes to larger cities on the Pacific coast. Significant mortality variations are found: mortality is inversely related to community population size and is higher in the mountains than in the jungle or coast. Multivariate analysis is then used to assess the influence of community population size, average female education, medical facilities, and altitude on community mortality. Finally, this study concludes that large-scale sample surveys, which include maternal birth history, add useful data for epidemiological studies of childhood mortality. PMID:6886581

  5. The family needs of parents of preschool children with cerebral palsy: the impact of child's gross motor and communications functions.

    PubMed

    Bertule, Dace; Vetra, Anita

    2014-01-01

    An understanding of the needs of families of preschool children with cerebral palsy (CP) is of essential importance if efficient and cost-effective services are to be provided to them. The aims of this study were to identify the most frequently expressed needs of families with preschool children with CP; differences in the amount and types of family needs based on the child's gross motor function and communication function level; and the impact of the child's gross motor function and communication function level on the type and amount of family needs. A total of 227 parents of preschool children with CP completed a modified version of the Family Needs Survey and a demographic questionnaire. Children's gross motor function level and communication function level was classified using the Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS) and the Communication Function Classification System (CFCS), respectively. The total number of family needs differed based on GMFCS and CFCS levels. Children's GMFCS and CFCS level were not significant predictors of overall family needs (adjusted R(2)=0.163). In this model the GMFCS level of children did not account for the total number of family needs, while the CFCS level did. Child's limitations in terms of communication and gross motor functions must be taken into consideration when planning services for families with preschool children with CP. Copyright © 2014 Lithuanian University of Health Sciences. Production and hosting by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  6. Finding an Appropriate Preschool for Your Child with Special Needs = Como Encontrar un Programa Pre-escolar para su nino con desabilidades.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernstein, Sandra; Wonderlick, Mary; Madden, Drina

    This booklet, with English and Spanish versions, provides a step-by-step procedure to help families find an appropriate preschool program in the community for their child with disabilities. The booklet lists six steps for locating a program: (1) decide what kind of program is wanted for the child; (2) complete included form outlining child's needs…

  7. Finding an Appropriate Preschool for Your Child with Special Needs = Como Encontrar un Programa Pre-escolar para su nino con desabilidades.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernstein, Sandra; Wonderlick, Mary; Madden, Drina

    This booklet, with English and Spanish versions, provides a step-by-step procedure to help families find an appropriate preschool program in the community for their child with disabilities. The booklet lists six steps for locating a program: (1) decide what kind of program is wanted for the child; (2) complete included form outlining child's needs…

  8. Teacher-and Child-Managed Academic Activities in Preschool and Kindergarten and Their Influence on Children's Gains in Emergent Academic Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Haan, Annika K. E.; Elbers, Ed; Leseman, Paul P. M.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess whether children's development benefited from teacher-and child-managed academic activities in the preschool and kindergarten classroom. Extensive systematic observations during four half-days in preschool ("n"?=?8) and kindergarten ("n"?=?8) classrooms revealed that classrooms differed in…

  9. The Debate over the Young "Disadvantaged Child": Preschool Intervention, Developmental Psychology, and Compensatory Education in the 1960s and Early 1970s

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beatty, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    I focus on the role of preschool intervention and developmental psychology researchers in defining the concept of the "disadvantaged child" and in designing and evaluating remedies to alleviate educational "disadvantages" in young children. I argue that preschool interventions concentrated especially on compensating for…

  10. The Debate over the Young "Disadvantaged Child": Preschool Intervention, Developmental Psychology, and Compensatory Education in the 1960s and Early 1970s

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beatty, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    I focus on the role of preschool intervention and developmental psychology researchers in defining the concept of the "disadvantaged child" and in designing and evaluating remedies to alleviate educational "disadvantages" in young children. I argue that preschool interventions concentrated especially on compensating for…

  11. Parent-child mealtime interactions in racially/ethnically diverse families with preschool-age children.

    PubMed

    Kong, Angela; Jones, Blake L; Fiese, Barbara H; Schiffer, Linda A; Odoms-Young, Angela; Kim, Yoonsang; Bailey, Lauren; Fitzgibbon, Marian L

    2013-12-01

    Family meals may improve diet and weight outcomes in children; however, results from nationally representative samples suggest that these relationships vary by race/ethnicity. Observing parent-child mealtime interactions may lend insight to why racial/ethnic differences exist. In this pilot study, a multi-ethnic sample of low-income families (n = 30) with a preschool-age child was videotaped during a dinner in their home. A global coding scheme was used to assess the following: 'Action' (behaviors that divert attention from eating), 'Behavior Control' (behaviors intended to modify another person's behavior), and 'Communication' (i.e., meal-oriented, interpersonal, and critical). All families spent a significant amount of time in 'action' oriented behaviors that diverted their attention from eating. We also observed racial/ethnic differences in communication (i.e. critical) and behavior patterns (i.e. behavior control). This study demonstrated that this approach for observing parent-child mealtime interactions in a naturalistic setting among a diverse study sample was feasible; however, future studies should address how these patterns relate to dietary intake and weight status. © 2013.

  12. Assessment of Preschooler's Scientific Reasoning in Adult-Child Interactions: What Is the Optimal Context?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meindertsma, Heidi B.; van Dijk, Marijn W. G.; Steenbeek, Henderien W.; van Geert, Paul L. C.

    2014-04-01

    In educational settings, continuous assessment of the child's level of understanding is necessary to effectively utilize the principles of scaffolding and to create contexts that can advance the scientific reasoning of the child. In this article, we argue that a child's performance is a dynamic notion that is created by all elements in an interaction, including the task. Therefore, we studied preschoolers' levels of scientific reasoning varying different properties of the assessment context. Young children were interviewed about four scientific tasks using one out of four different protocols (varying in the degree of flexibility and adaptiveness) by an adult. In the first study, different task contents resulted in different performance levels. The second study indicated that the most structured protocol elicited the highest maximum level of reasoning in children and the highest percentage of correct predictions. The third study showed differences between the protocols in the adult's verbal behavior. Adaptation in verbal behavior to different children by the adult did not result in higher scientific understanding by the children, whereas a higher degree of task structure did. Combined, the studies emphasize the importance of context, which has implications for assessment and teaching situations.

  13. Parent Cultural Adaptation and Child Functioning in Culturally Diverse, Urban Families of Preschoolers

    PubMed Central

    Calzada, Esther J.; Brotman, Laurie Miller; Huang, Keng-Yen; Bat-Chava, Yael; Kingston, Sharon

    2010-01-01

    Parent cultural adaptation and preschool behavioral and socioemotional functioning were examined in a community sample of urban families from diverse cultural backgrounds. Participants were 130 families of children (mean age = 4.1 years) attending eight public Pre-Kindergarten programs in urban communities. Parents completed a measure of cultural adaptation that taps into acculturation and enculturation, and teachers reported on children’s externalizing problems, internalizing problems and adaptive behavior in the classroom. Parents’ ethnic identity was a significant predictor of children’s functioning. The retention of parents’ culture of origin and specific aspects of acculturation are related to positive outcomes in a sample of culturally diverse families of preschoolers living in urban communities. Bicultural parents (those with high ethnic and US American identity) had children with lower levels of internalizing problems and higher levels of adaptive behavior relative to parents who were not bicultural. Implications for enhancing positive child outcomes through the promotion of parental ethnic identity are discussed. PMID:20559417

  14. MOTHER, CHILD, AND FAMILY FACTORS RELATED TO EMPLOYMENT OF SINGLE MOTHERS WITH LBW PRESCHOOLERS.

    PubMed

    Youngblut, Joanne M; Singer, Lynn T; Madigan, Elizabeth A; Swegart, Leslie A; Rodgers, Willard L

    1997-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify maternal, child, and family factors related to the employment status and employment history of single mothers of low-birth-weight (LBW) and full-term preschoolers. A sample of 121 female-headed, single-parent families with 3-, 4-, and 5- year-old LBW and full-term children was recruited through admission records to three Level III neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) and birth records of two normal newborn nurseries. Results show that the birth of an LBW infant was not related to employment status, number of hours employed per week, or employment history for single mothers. Employed mothers had significantly more education and more positive attitudes toward employment. Controlling for other factors, never being married, and having more children, more federal income, and less positive employment attitudes were predictive of nonemployment. Both employed and nonemployed women expressed preference for employment.

  15. Evaluation of Millennium Development Goals in Reduction of Maternal and Child Mortality in Narok County, Kenya

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koini, Stellah Malaso

    2017-01-01

    Background: Millennium Development Goals are the 21st Century worlds' concern to improve human way of life by 2015. In Kenya the Millennium Development Goals for reduction of maternal and child mortality has been recently powered by the beyond zero initiative which started in the year 2014 with the aim of reducing mortality as well as contributing…

  16. Birth weight and other determinants of infant and child mortality in three provinces of China.

    PubMed

    Dankert, G; van Ginneken, J

    1991-10-01

    Information on levels, trends and determinants of infant and child mortality was available from the 1985 In-depth Fertility Survey which was conducted in three provinces of China. Mortality of children below age 5 varied from 49 per 1000 live births in Shaanxi to 20 in Shanghai in 1980-85 and has declined substantially since 1960, from 206 in Shaanxi and 66 in Shanghai. Male mortality was considerably higher than female mortality in the neonatal and post-neonatal period, and at ages 1-5 years. Birth weight, place of residence and mother's education were found to be important determinants of mortality; age of mother and parity were less important.

  17. Reduction in child mortality in Ethiopia: analysis of data from demographic and health surveys

    PubMed Central

    Doherty, Tanya; Rohde, Sarah; Besada, Donela; Kerber, Kate; Manda, Samuel; Loveday, Marian; Nsibande, Duduzile; Daviaud, Emmanuelle; Kinney, Mary; Zembe, Wanga; Leon, Natalie; Rudan, Igor; Degefie, Tedbabe; Sanders, David

    2016-01-01

    Background To examine changes in under–5 mortality, coverage of child survival interventions and nutritional status of children in Ethiopia between 2000 and 2011. Using the Lives Saved Tool, the impact of changes in coverage of child survival interventions on under–5 lives saved was estimated. Methods Estimates of child mortality were generated using three Ethiopia Demographic and Health Surveys undertaken between 2000 and 2011. Coverage indicators for high impact child health interventions were calculated and the Lives Saved Tool (LiST) was used to estimate child lives saved in 2011. Results The mortality rate in children younger than 5 years decreased rapidly from 218 child deaths per 1000 live births (95% confidence interval 183 to 252) in the period 1987–1991 to 88 child deaths per 1000 live births in the period 2007–2011 (78 to 98). The prevalence of moderate or severe stunting in children aged 6–35 months also declined significantly. Improvements in the coverage of interventions relevant to child survival in rural areas of Ethiopia between 2000 and 2011 were found for tetanus toxoid, DPT3 and measles vaccination, oral rehydration solution (ORS) and care–seeking for suspected pneumonia. The LiST analysis estimates that there were 60 700 child deaths averted in 2011, primarily attributable to decreases in wasting rates (18%), stunting rates (13%) and water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) interventions (13%). Conclusions Improvements in the nutritional status of children and increases in coverage of high impact interventions most notably WASH and ORS have contributed to the decline in under–5 mortality in Ethiopia. These proximal determinants however do not fully explain the mortality reduction which is plausibly also due to the synergistic effect of major child health and nutrition policies and delivery strategies. PMID:27175280

  18. Paternal Smoking and Increased Risk of Infant and Under-5 Child Mortality in Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    de Pee, Saskia; Sun, Kai; Best, Cora M.; Sari, Mayang; Bloem, Martin W.

    2008-01-01

    We examined the relationship between paternal smoking and child mortality. Among 361 021 rural and urban families in Indonesia, paternal smoking was associated with increased infant mortality (rural, odds ratio [OR] = 1.30; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.24, 1.35; urban, OR = 1.10; 95% CI = 1.01, 1.20), and under-5 child mortality (rural, OR = 1.32; 95% CI = 1.26, 1.37; urban, OR = 1.14; 95% CI = 1.05, 1.23). Paternal smoking diverts money from basic necessities to cigarettes and adversely affects child health; tobacco control should therefore be considered among strategies to improve child survival. PMID:18309124

  19. Family stress moderates relations between physiological and behavioral synchrony and child self-regulation in mother-preschooler dyads.

    PubMed

    Suveg, Cynthia; Shaffer, Anne; Davis, Molly

    2016-01-01

    From a bio-behavioral framework, the relations between physiological synchrony, positive behavioral synchrony, and child self-regulation under varying levels of risk were examined among 93 mother- (M age = 30.44 years, SD = 5.98 years) preschooler (M age = 3.47 years, SD =.52 years, 58.70% male) dyads. Physiological synchrony was examined using interbeat interval (IBI) data and measures of positive behavioral synchrony and self-regulation were based on observations of a mother-child interaction task. Results supported the phenomenon of physiological synchrony among mother-preschooler dyads during an interaction, but not a baseline, task. Moderation analyses indicated that under conditions of high family risk, positive behavioral synchrony and child self-regulation were greater when physiological synchrony was low. Positive behavioral synchrony was positively associated with child self-regulation, regardless of risk status. The results document physiological synchrony among mothers and their preschool-aged children and the complex ways that physiological attunement relates to important developmental processes. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Family Stress Moderates Relations between Physiological and Behavioral Synchrony and Child Self-Regulation in Mother-Preschooler Dyads

    PubMed Central

    Suveg, Cynthia; Shaffer, Anne; Davis, Molly

    2016-01-01

    From a bio-behavioral framework, the relations between physiological synchrony, positive behavioral synchrony, and child self-regulation under varying levels of risk were examined among 93 mother-(M age = 30.44 years, SD = 5.98 years) preschooler (M age = 3.47 years, SD = .52 years, 58.70% male) dyads. Physiological synchrony was examined using Interbeat Interval (IBI) data and measures of positive behavioral synchrony and self-regulation were based on observations of a mother-child interaction task. Results supported the phenomenon of physiological synchrony among mother-preschooler dyads during an interaction, but not a baseline, task. Moderation analyses indicated that under conditions of high family risk, positive behavioral synchrony and child self-regulation were greater when physiological synchrony was low. Positive behavioral synchrony was positively associated with child self-regulation, regardless of risk status. The results document physiological synchrony among mothers and their preschool-aged children and the complex ways that physiological attunement relates to important developmental processes. PMID:26376933

  1. The effect of women's status on infant and child mortality in four rural areas of Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Mian B; Phillips, James F; Pence, Brian

    2007-05-01

    In South Asia women are often the primary decision-makers regarding child health care, family health and nutrition. This paper examines the proposition that constraints on women's status adversely affect the survival of their children. Survey data are used to construct indices of women's household autonomy and authority, which are then linked to longitudinal data on survival of their children. Proportional hazard models indicate that enhanced autonomy significantly decreases post-neonatal mortality. Enhanced household authority significantly decreases child mortality. A simulation based on estimated effects of eliminating gender inequality suggests that achieving complete gender equality could reduce child mortality by nearly fifty per cent and post-neonatal mortality by one-third.

  2. Trends in infant and child mortality in Mozambique during and after a period of conflict.

    PubMed

    Macassa, Gloria; Ghilagaber, Gebrenegus; Bernhardt, Eva; Burström, Bo

    2003-07-01

    This study describes urban and rural trends of infant, child and under-five mortality in Mozambique (1973-1997) by mother's place of residence. A direct method of estimation was applied to the 1997 Mozambican Demographic and Health Survey data. The levels of infant, child and under-five mortality were considerably higher in rural than in urban areas. The difference in mortality between urban and rural areas increased over time until 1988-1992 and thereafter diminished. Possible causes of the different trends (e.g. the impact of civil war, drought, migration, adjustment programme and HIV/AIDS) are discussed. The increase in mortality in urban areas during the last few years before the survey may have been related to the immigration to urban areas of mothers whose children had high levels of mortality. Higher levels of infant, child and under-five mortality still prevail, particularly in rural areas. Further studies are needed to investigate the differentials of infant and child mortality by mother's place of residence.

  3. Abolishing inequity, a necessity for poverty reduction and the realisation of child mortality targets.

    PubMed

    Målqvist, Mats

    2015-02-01

    The first Millennium Development Goal (MDG 1) due in 2015 concerns poverty reduction. It has been claimed to be fulfilled on a global level, but still more than 1 billion people are living in abject poverty. There is a strong link between the economy and child survival, and only a minority of countries will have reached the MDG target for child mortality reduction by 2015. This paper discusses the relationship between poverty and child survival. It argues that a focus on equity is necessary to further reduce child mortality, through poverty reduction in absolute terms and also through targeting interventions for increased child survival to disadvantaged populations. The political will to actually achieve real change for those in greatest need is crucial but not to be taken for granted, and the distribution rather than the generation of wealth needs to be made a priority in the post-MDG era.

  4. Declining Child Mortality and Continuing Racial Disparities in the Era of the Medicaid and SCHIP Insurance Coverage Expansions

    PubMed Central

    Decker, Sandy; Hogan, Sara; Yemane, Alshadye; Foster, Jonay

    2010-01-01

    Objectives. We investigated trends in national childhood mortality, racial disparities in child mortality, and the effect of Medicaid and State Children's Health Insurance Program (SCHIP) eligibility expansions on child mortality. Methods. We analyzed child mortality by state, race, and age using the National Center for Health Statistics’ multiple cause of death files over 20 years, from 1985 to 2004. Results. Child mortality continued to decline in the United States, but racial disparities in mortality remained. Declines in child mortality (ages 1–17 years) were substantial for both natural (disease-related) and external (injuries, homicide, and suicide) causes for children of all races/ethnicities, although Black–White mortality ratios remained unchanged during the study period. Expanded Medicaid and SCHIP eligibility was significantly related to the decline in external-cause mortality; the relationship between natural-cause mortality and Medicaid or SCHIP eligibility remains unclear. Eligibility expansions did not affect relative racial disparities in child mortality. Conclusions. Although the study provides some evidence that public insurance expansions reduce child mortality, future research is needed on the effect of new health insurance on child health and on factors causing relative racial disparities. PMID:21068421

  5. The Child and Adult Care Food Program and the Nutrition of Preschoolers

    PubMed Central

    Korenman, Sanders; Abner, Kristin S.; Kaestner, Robert; Gordon, Rachel A.

    2012-01-01

    Children spend a considerable amount of time in preschools and child care centers. As a result, these settings may have an influence on their diet, weight, and food security, and are potentially important contexts for interventions to address nutritional health. The Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP) is one such intervention. No national study has compared nutrition-related outcomes of children in CACFP-participating centers to those of similar children in non-participating centers. We use a sample of four-year old children drawn from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, Birth Cohort to obtain estimates of associations between CACFP program participation and consumption of milk, fruits, vegetables, fast food, and sweets, and indicators of overweight, underweight status and food insecurity. We find that, among low-income children, CACFP participation moderately increases consumption of milk and vegetables, and may also reduce the prevalence of overweight and underweight. Effects on other outcomes are generally small and not statistically significant. PMID:23687405

  6. Confirmatory factor analysis of the Child Feeding Questionnaire among low-income African American families of preschool children.

    PubMed

    Boles, Richard E; Nelson, Timothy D; Chamberlin, Leigh A; Valenzuela, Jessica M; Sherman, Susan N; Johnson, Susan L; Powers, Scott W

    2010-04-01

    This study examined the factor structure for three of the Child Feeding Questionnaire (CFQ) subscales, a widely used measure of parental feeding practices, among 296 low-income parents of African American preschool children. Confirmatory factor analysis showed an overall poor fit among CFQ subscales; Restriction, Pressure to Eat, and Concern about Child Weight, (chi(2), (df=87=300.249, CFI=1.00, NNFI=1.07, RMSEA=.091). Additionally, Cronbach's Alpha coefficients for 2 of the three subscales were below acceptable recommendations (Restriction=0.69; Pressure to Eat=0.58). These results suggest further psychometric clarification is needed to understand commonly reported feeding practice constructs among low-income African American mothers of preschool aged children.

  7. Effects of food price inflation on infant and child mortality in developing countries.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyun-Hoon; Lee, Suejin A; Lim, Jae-Young; Park, Cyn-Young

    2016-06-01

    After a historic low level in the early 2000s, global food prices surged upwards to bring about the global food crisis of 2008. High and increasing food prices can generate an immediate threat to the security of a household's food supply, thereby undermining population health. This paper aims to assess the precise effects of food price inflation on child health in developing countries. This paper employs a panel dataset covering 95 developing countries for the period 2001-2011 to make a comprehensive assessment of the effects of food price inflation on child health as measured in terms of infant mortality rate and child mortality rate. Focusing on any departure of health indicators from their respective trends, we find that rising food prices have a significant detrimental effect on nourishment and consequently lead to higher levels of both infant and child mortality in developing countries, and especially in least developed countries (LDCs). High food price inflation rates are also found to cause an increase in undernourishment only in LDCs and thus leading to an increase in infant and child mortality in these poorest countries. This result is consistent with the observation that, in lower-income countries, food has a higher share in household expenditures and LDCs are likely to be net food importing countries. Hence, there should be increased efforts by both LDC governments and the international community to alleviate the detrimental link between food price inflation and undernourishment and also the link between undernourishment and infant mortality.

  8. REGIONAL VARIATIONS IN INFANT AND CHILD MORTALITY IN NIGERIA: A MULTILEVEL ANALYSIS.

    PubMed

    Adedini, Sunday A; Odimegwu, Clifford; Imasiku, Eunice N S; Ononokpono, Dorothy N; Ibisomi, Latifat

    2015-03-01

    There are substantial regional disparities in under-five mortality in Nigeria, and evidence suggests that both individual- and community-level characteristics have an influence on health outcomes. Using 2008 Nigeria Demographic and Health Survey data, this study (1) examines the effects of individual- and community-level characteristics on infant/child mortality in Nigeria and (2) determines the extent to which characteristics at these levels influence regional variations in infant/child mortality in the country. Multilevel Cox proportional hazard analysis was performed on a nationally representative sample of 28,647 children nested within 18,028 mothers of reproductive age, who were also nested within 886 communities. The results indicate that community-level variables (such as region, place of residence, community infrastructure, community hospital delivery and community poverty level) and individual-level factors (including child's sex, birth order, birth interval, maternal education, maternal age and wealth index) are important determinants of infant/child mortality in Nigeria. For instance, the results show a lower risk of death in infancy for children of mothers residing in communities with a high proportion of hospital delivery (HR: 0.70, p < 0.05) and for children whose mothers had secondary or higher education (HR: 0.84, p < 0.05). Although community factors appear to influence the association between individual-level factors and death during infancy and childhood, the findings consistently indicate that community-level characteristics are more important in explaining regional variations in child mortality, while individual-level factors are more important for regional variations in infant mortality. The results of this study underscore the need to look beyond the influence of individual-level factors in addressing regional variations in infant and child mortality in Nigeria.

  9. Child mortality patterns in rural Tanzania: an observational study on the impact of malaria control interventions

    PubMed Central

    Alba, Sandra; Nathan, Rose; Schulze, Alexander; Mshinda, Hassan; Lengeler, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Background Between 1997 and 2009, a number of key malaria control interventions were implemented in the Kilombero and Ulanga Districts in south central Tanzania to increase insecticide-treated nets (ITN) coverage and improve access to effective malaria treatment. In this study we estimated the contribution of these interventions to observed decreases in child mortality. Methods The local Health and Demographic Surveillance Site (HDSS) provided monthly estimates of child mortality rates (age 1 to 5 years) expressed as cases per 1000 person-years (c/1000py) between 1997 and 2009. We conducted a time series analysis of child mortality rates and explored the contribution of rainfall and household food security. We used Poisson regression with linear and segmented effects to explore the impact of malaria control interventions on mortality. Results Child mortality rates decreased by 42.5% from 14.6 c/1000py in 1997 to 8.4 c/1000py in 2009. Analyses revealed the complexity of child mortality patterns and a strong association with rainfall and food security. All malaria control interventions were associated with decreases in child mortality, accounting for the effect of rainfall and food security. Conclusions Reaching the fourth Millenium Development Goal will require the contribution of many health interventions, as well as more general improvements in socio-environmental and nutritional conditions. Distinguishing between the effects of these multiple factors is difficult and represents a major challenge in assessing the effect of routine interventions. However, this study suggests that credible estimates can be obtained when high-quality data on the most important factors are available over a sufficiently long time period. PMID:24355745

  10. Effects of economic downturns on child mortality: a global economic analysis, 1981–2010

    PubMed Central

    Maruthappu, Mahiben; Watson, Robert A; Watkins, Johnathan; Zeltner, Thomas; Raine, Rosalind; Atun, Rifat

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To analyse how economic downturns affect child mortality both globally and among subgroups of countries of variable income levels. Design Retrospective observational study using economic data from the World Bank's Development Indicators and Global Development Finance (2013 edition). Child mortality data were sourced from the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation. Setting Global. Participants 204 countries between 1981 and 2010. Main outcome measures Child mortality, controlling for country-specific differences in political, healthcare, cultural, structural, educational and economic factors. Results 197 countries experienced at least 1 economic downturn between 1981 and 2010, with a mean of 7.97 downturns per country (range 0–21; SD 0.45). At the global level, downturns were associated with significant (p<0.0001) deteriorations in each child mortality measure, in comparison with non-downturn years: neonatal (coefficient: 1.11, 95% CI 0.855 to 1.37), postneonatal (2.00, 95% CI 1.61 to 2.38), child (2.93, 95% CI 2.26 to 3.60) and under 5 years of age (5.44, 95% CI 4.31 to 6.58) mortality rates. Stronger (larger falls in the growth rate of gross domestic product/capita) and longer (lasting 2 years rather than 1) downturns were associated with larger significant deteriorations (p<0.001). During economic downturns, countries in the poorest quartile experienced ∼1½ times greater deterioration in neonatal mortality, compared with their own baseline; a 3-fold deterioration in postneonatal mortality; a 9-fold deterioration in child mortality and a 3-fold deterioration in under-5 mortality, than countries in the wealthiest quartile (p<0.0005). For 1–5 years after downturns ended, each mortality measure continued to display significant deteriorations (p<0.0001). Conclusions Economic downturns occur frequently and are associated with significant deteriorations in child mortality, with worse declines in lower income countries. PMID:28589010

  11. Child mortality levels and trends by HIV status in Blantyre, Malawi: 1989-2009.

    PubMed

    Taha, Taha E; Dadabhai, Sufia S; Sun, Jin; Rahman, M Hafizur; Kumwenda, Johnstone; Kumwenda, Newton

    2012-10-01

    Continuous evaluation of child survival is needed in sub-Saharan Africa where HIV prevalence among women of reproductive age continues to be high. We examined mortality levels and trends over a period of ∼20 years among HIV-unexposed and -exposed children in Blantyre, Malawi. Data from 5 prospective cohort studies conducted at a single research site from 1989 to 2009 were analyzed. In these studies, children born to HIV-infected and -uninfected mothers were enrolled at birth and followed longitudinally for at least 2 years. Information on sociodemographic, HIV infection status, survival, and associated risk factors was collected in all studies. Mortality rates were estimated using birth-cohort analyses stratified by maternal and infant HIV status. Multivariate Cox regression models were used to determine risk factors associated with mortality. The analysis included 8286 children. From 1989 to 1995, overall mortality rates (per 100 person-years) in these clinic-based cohorts remained comparable among HIV-uninfected children born to HIV-uninfected mothers (range 3.3-6.9) or to HIV-infected mothers (range 2.5-7.5). From 1989 to 2009, overall mortality remained high among all children born to HIV-infected mothers (range 6.3-19.3) and among children who themselves became infected (range 15.6-57.4, 1994-2009). Only lower birth weight was consistently and significantly (P < 0.05) associated with higher child mortality. HIV infection among mothers and children contributed to high levels of child mortality in the African setting in the pretreatment era. In addition to services that prevent mother-to-child transmission of HIV, other programs are needed to improve child survival by lowering HIV-unrelated mortality through innovative interventions that strengthen health infrastructure.

  12. Socioeconomic inequalities in child mortality: comparisons across nine developing countries.

    PubMed Central

    Wagstaff, A.

    2000-01-01

    This paper generates and analyses survey data on inequalities in mortality among infants and children aged under five years by consumption in Brazil, Côte d'Ivoire, Ghana, Nepal, Nicaragua, Pakistan, the Philippines, South Africa, and Viet Nam. The data were obtained from the Living Standards Measurement Study and the Cebu Longitudinal Health and Nutrition Survey. Mortality rates were estimated directly where complete fertility histories were available and indirectly otherwise. Mortality distributions were compared between countries by means of concentration curves and concentration indices: dominance checks were carried out for all pairwise intercountry comparisons; standard errors were calculated for the concentration indices; and tests of intercountry differences in inequality were performed. PMID:10686730

  13. Preschool Science Environment: What Is Available in a Preschool Classroom?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tu, Tsunghui

    2006-01-01

    This study investigated preschool science environments in 20 preschool classrooms (N=20) in 13 midwestern child care centers. By operationalizing Neuman's concept of "sciencing," this study used The Preschool Classroom Science Materials/Equipment Checklist, the Preschool Classroom Science Activities Checklist, and the Preschool Teacher…

  14. Disparities in Under-Five Child Injury Mortality between Developing and Developed Countries: 1990–2013

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yun; Wu, Yue; Schwebel, David C.; Zhou, Liang; Hu, Guoqing

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Using estimates from the 2013 Global Burden of Disease (GBD) study, we update evidence on disparities in under-five child injury mortality between developing and developed countries from 1990 to 2013. Methods: Mortality rates were accessed through the online visualization tool by the GBD study 2013 group. We calculated percent change in child injury mortality rates between 1990 and 2013. Data analysis was conducted separately for <1 year and 1–4 years to specify age differences in rate changes. Results: Between 1990 and 2013, over 3-fold mortality gaps were observed between developing countries and developed countries for both age groups in the study time period. Similar decreases in injury rates were observed for developed and developing countries (<1 year: −50% vs. −50% respectively; 1–4 years: −56% vs. −58%). Differences in injury mortality changes during 1990–2013 between developing and developed nations varied with injury cause. There were greater reductions in mortality from transport injury, falls, poisoning, adverse effects of medical treatment, exposure to forces of nature, and collective violence and legal intervention in developed countries, whereas there were larger decreases in mortality from drowning, exposure to mechanical forces, and animal contact in developing countries. Country-specific analysis showed large variations across countries for both injury mortality and changes in injury mortality between 1990 and 2013. Conclusions: Sustained higher child injury mortality during 1990–2013 for developing countries merits the attention of the global injury prevention community. Countries that have high injury mortality can benefit from the success of other countries. PMID:27399740

  15. Potential confounding in the association between short birth intervals and increased neonatal, infant, and child mortality.

    PubMed

    Perin, Jamie; Walker, Neff

    2015-01-01

    Recent steep declines in child mortality have been attributed in part to increased use of contraceptives and the resulting change in fertility behaviour, including an increase in the time between births. Previous observational studies have documented strong associations between short birth spacing and an increase in the risk of neonatal, infant, and under-five mortality, compared to births with longer preceding birth intervals. In this analysis, we compare two methods to estimate the association between short birth intervals and mortality risk to better inform modelling efforts linking family planning and mortality in children. Our goal was to estimate the mortality risk for neonates, infants, and young children by preceding birth space using household survey data, controlling for mother-level factors and to compare the results to those from previous analyses with survey data. We assessed the potential for confounding when estimating the relative mortality risk by preceding birth interval and estimated mortality risk by birth interval in four categories: less than 18 months, 18-23 months, 24-35 months, and 36 months or longer. We estimated the relative risks among women who were 35 and older at the time of the survey with two methods: in a Cox proportional hazards regression adjusting for potential confounders and also by stratifying Cox regression by mother, to control for all factors that remain constant over a woman's childbearing years. We estimated the overall effects for birth spacing in a meta-analysis with random survey effects. We identified several factors known for their associations with neonatal, infant, and child mortality that are also associated with preceding birth interval. When estimating the effect of birth spacing on mortality, we found that regression adjustment for these factors does not substantially change the risk ratio for short birth intervals compared to an unadjusted mortality ratio. For birth intervals less than 18 months, standard

  16. Levels, trends & predictors of infant & child mortality among Scheduled Tribes in rural India

    PubMed Central

    Sahu, Damodar; Nair, Saritha; Singh, Lucky; Gulati, B.K.; Pandey, Arvind

    2015-01-01

    Background & objectives: The level of infant and child mortality is high among Scheduled Tribes particularly those living in rural areas. This study examines levels, trends and socio-demographic factors associated with infant and child mortality among Scheduled Tribes in rural areas. Methods: Data from the three rounds of the National Family Health Survey (NFHS) of India from 1992 to 2006 were analysed to assess the levels and trends of infant and child mortality. Univariate and multivariate Cox proportional hazard model were used to understand the socio-economic and demographic factors associated with mortality during 1992–2006. Results: Significant change was observed in infant and child mortality over the time period from 1992-2006 among Scheduled Tribes in rural areas. After controlling for other factors, birth interval, household wealth, and region were found to be significantly associated with infant and child mortality. Hazard of infant mortality was highest among births to mothers aged 30 yr or more (HR=1.3, 95% CI=1.1-1.7) as compared with births to the mother's aged 20-29 yr. Hazard of under-five mortality was 42 per cent (95% CI=1.3-1.6) higher among four or more birth order compared with the first birth order. The risk of infant dying was higher among male children (HR = 1.2, 95% CI=1.1-1.4) than among female children while male children were at 30 per cent (HR=0.7, 95% CI=0.6-0.7) less hazard of child mortality than female children. Literate women were at 40 per cent (HR=0.6, 95% CI=0.50-0.76) less hazard of child death than illiterate women. Interpretation & conclusions: Mortality differentials by socio-demographic and economic factors were observed over the time period (1992-2006) among Scheduled Tribes (STs) in rural India. Findings support the need to focus on age at first birth and spacing between two births. PMID:26139791

  17. Inequality in child mortality across different states of India: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    De, Partha; Dhar, Arpita

    2013-12-01

    The burden of social inequality falls disproportionately on child health and survival. This inequality raises the question of how wide this gap is, or what its relation is with the level of child mortality. Whether these disparities are increasing or declining with the development and how they differ from region to region or from state to state within the country needs to be looked into. As a measure of inequality and to compare the disparities between different states of India, concentration curves and indices are constructed from infant and under five mortality data classified under different quintiles of wealth index from the National Family Health Survey (NFHS-3) data of India. Inequality measures indicate that inequality in child mortality is more concentrated in the comparatively developed states than the poorer states in India.

  18. Country-level economic disparity and child mortality related to housing and injuries: a study in 26 European countries.

    PubMed

    Sengoelge, Mathilde; Elling, Berty; Laflamme, Lucie; Hasselberg, Marie

    2013-10-01

    Adverse living standards are associated with poorer child health and safety. This study investigates whether adverse housing and neighbourhood conditions contribute to explain country-level associations between a country's economic level and income inequality and child mortality, specifically injury mortality. Ecological, cross-sectional study. Twenty-six European countries were grouped according to two country-level economic measures from Eurostat: gross domestic product (GDP) and income inequality. Adverse country-level housing and neighbourhood conditions were assessed using data from the 2006 European Union Income Social Inclusion and Living Conditions Database (n=203 000). Child mortality incidence rates were derived for children aged 1-14 years for all causes, all injuries, road traffic injuries and unintentional injuries excluding road traffic. Linear regression analysis was applied to measure whether housing or neighbourhood conditions have a significant association with child mortality and whether a strain modified the association between GDP/income inequality and mortality. Country-level income inequality and GDP demonstrated a significant association with child mortality for all outcomes. A significant association was also found between housing strain and all child mortality outcomes, but not for neighbourhood strain. Housing strain partially modified the relationship between income inequality and GDP and all child mortality outcomes, with the exception of income inequality and road traffic injury mortality showing full mediation by housing strain. Adverse housing conditions are a likely pathway in the country-level association between income inequality and economic GDP and child injury mortality.

  19. Adult education and child mortality in India: the influence of caste, household wealth, and urbanization

    PubMed Central

    Singh-Manoux, Archana; Dugravot, Aline; Smith, George Davey; Subramanyam, Malavika; Subramanian, S. V.

    2008-01-01

    Objective To examine the association between adult education and child mortality, and to explore the influence of other socioeconomic markers - caste, household wealth and urbanization - on this association. Methods Data were drawn from the 1998–1999 Indian National Family Health Survey from 26 states on 66367 children aged 5 or under. Adult education, head of household and spouse, was categorized into 0, 1–8, and 9 or more years of schooling. Logistic regression was used to estimate associations between measures of education and child mortality in analysis adjusted for other socioeconomic markers. Effect modification by caste, household wealth and urbanization was assessed by fitting an interaction term with education. Results Compared to those with no education, 9 or more years of education for the head of household (OR=0.54: 95% CI=0.48–0.62) and the spouse (OR=0.44: 95% CI=0.36–0.54) was associated with lower child mortality in analyses adjusted for age, sex and state of residence. Further adjustments for caste and urbanization attenuated these associations slightly and substantially when adjustments were made for household wealth. Nevertheless, in fully adjusted models, nine or more years of education for the head of household (OR=0.81: 95% CI=0.70–0.93) and the spouse (OR=0.75: 95% CI=0.60–0.94) remained associated with child mortality. There was no effect modification by caste, household wealth and urbanization of the association between adult education and child mortality. Conclusion Our results suggest that adult education has a protective association with child mortality in India. Caste, household wealth and urbanization do not modify or completely attenuate this association. PMID:18300716

  20. Housing, income inequality and child injury mortality in Europe: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Sengoelge, M; Hasselberg, M; Ormandy, D; Laflamme, L

    2014-03-01

    Child poverty rates are compared throughout Europe to monitor how countries are caring for their children. Child poverty reduction measures need to consider the importance of safe living environments for all children. In this study we investigate how European country-level economic disparity and housing conditions relate to one another, and whether they differentially correlate with child injury mortality. We used an ecological, cross-sectional study design of 26 European countries of which 20 high-income and 6 upper-middle-income. Compositional characteristics of the home and its surroundings were extracted from the 2006 European Union Income Social Inclusion and Living Conditions Database (n = 203,000). Mortality data of children aged 1-14 years were derived from the World Health Organization Mortality Database. The main outcome measure was age standardized cause-specific injury mortality rates analysed by income inequality and housing and neighbourhood conditions. Nine measures of housing and neighbourhood conditions highly differentiating European households at country level were clustered into three dimensions, labelled respectively housing, neighbourhood and economic household strain. Income inequality significantly and positively correlated with housing strain (r = 0.62, P = 0.001) and household economic strain (r = 0.42, P = 0.009) but not significantly with neighbourhood strain (r = 0.34, P = 0.087). Child injury mortality rates correlated strongly with both country-level income inequality and housing strain, with very small age-specific differences. In the European context housing, neighbourhood and household economic strains worsened with increasing levels of income inequality. Child injury mortality rates are strongly and positively associated with both income inequality and housing strain, suggesting that housing material conditions could play a role in the association between income inequality and child health. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. MOTHER AND BLIND CHILD, THE INFLUENCE OF CHILD-REARING PRACTICES ON THE BEHAVIOR OF PRESCHOOL BLIND CHILDREN.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    IMAMURA, SADAKO

    THE BEHAVIOR OF PRESCHOOL BLIND AND PRESCHOOL SIGHTED CHILDREN AND THE RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN THE BEHAVIOR OF MOTHERS AND CHILDREN WERE STUDIED. SUBJECTS WERE 10 BLIND AND 12 SIGHTED CHILDREN FROM THREE TO SIX YEARS OF AGE AND FROM NONIMMIGRANT, UNBROKEN CAUCASIAN FAMILIES OF AVERAGE SOCIOECONOMIC STATUS AND CHRISTIAN BACKGROUND. A SYSTEMATIC…

  2. Child and maternal mortality during a period of conflict in Beira City, Mozambique.

    PubMed

    Cutts, F T; Dos Santos, C; Novoa, A; David, P; Macassa, G; Soares, A C

    1996-04-01

    Child mortality rates have been declining in most developing countries. We studied child and maternal mortality risk factors for child mortality in Beira city in July 1993, after a decade of conflict in Mozambique. A community-based cluster sample survey of 4609 women of childbearing age was conducted. Indirect techniques were used to estimate child mortality ('children ever born' method and Preceding Birth Techniques (PBT) and maternal mortality (sisterhood method). Deaths among the most recent born child, born since July 1990, were classified as cases (n = 106), and two controls, matched by age and cluster, were selected per case. Indirect estimates of the probability of dying from birth to age 5 (deaths before age 5 years, (5)q(0) per 1000) decreased from 246 in 1977/8 to 212 in 1988/9. The PBT estimate of 1990/91 was 154 (95 percent confidence interval [CI]: 124-184), but recent deaths may have been underreported. Lack of beds in the household (odds ratio [OR] = 2.0, 95 percent CI: 1.1-3.8), absence of the father (OR = 2.4, 95 percent CI : 1.2-4.8), low paternal educational level (OR = 2.1, 95 percent CI: 0.8-5.4), young maternal age (OR = 2.0, 95 percent CI: 1.0-3.7), self-reported maternal illness (OR = 2.4, 95 percent CI : 1.2-4.9), and home delivery of the child (OR = 2.3, 95 percent CI : 1.2-4.5) were associated with increased mortality, but the sensitivity of risk factors was low. Estimated maternal mortality was 410/100 000 live births with a reference date of 1982. Child mortality decreased slowly over the 1980s in Beira despite poor living conditions caused by the indirect effects of the war. Coverage of health services increased over this period. The appropriateness of a risk approach to maternal-child-health care needs further evaluation.

  3. Comments on "Differentials on Child Mortality and Health Care in Pakistan".

    PubMed

    Manzoor, K

    1992-01-01

    Critical comments are provided on M. Framurz Kiani's examination of differentials in child mortality by parents' education, urban/rural status, work status, availability of maternal and child health services, immunization status, and diarrheal treatment and age of the mother. The findings emphasize the importance of literacy, particularly maternal education, as a major influence in child survival. There were 5 areas of discussion. The first pertained to the absence of factors for fertility, which had been shown to be interactive with mortality. Higher fertility was associated with higher mortality, and higher mortality was associated with higher fertility, and both were influenced by poverty and literacy. The second comment pertained to the lack of control variables for income and socioeconomic status in order to separate out the effects of educational status. It may well be that educational status was capturing the affordability and accessibility of health care, and increased consciousness due to education, even in an urban setting. Work status of the mother, rather than mothers working in a family business of working as housewives, may be representing women's mobility. Salaried fathers may enjoy lower mortality because of full or partial medical benefits that are included in their salary package, that those in agriculture would not have. The third point focused on the lack of specification of what "clinic" referred to, in the findings that urban and rural mothers with postnatal care had lower child mortality. The fourth point noted that the findings (maternal education was important in maternal and child health care and paternal education was important in immunization) reflected women's lack of decision making. Other findings were that education differences influenced child survival, but child immunization was not a significant factor. The policy implications are that health services and outreach are needed in rural areas in order to increase the level of

  4. Effect of democratic reforms on child mortality: a synthetic control analysis.

    PubMed

    Pieters, Hannah; Curzi, Daniele; Olper, Alessandro; Swinnen, Johan

    2016-09-01

    The effects of political regimes on health are unclear because empirical evidence is neither strong nor robust. Traditional econometric tools do not allow the direction of causality to be established clearly. We used a new method to investigate whether political transition into democracy affected child mortality. We used a synthetic control method to assess the effects of democratisation on child mortality as a proxy of health in countries that underwent transition from autocracy to democracy that lasted for at least 10 years between 1960 and 2010. Democracy was indicated by a score greater than 0 in the Polity2 index. We constructed synthetic controls (counterfactuals) based on weighted averages for factors such as child mortality, economic development, openess to trade, conflict, rural population, and female education from a pool of countries that remained autocracies during the study period. Of 60 countries that underwent democratic transition in the study period, 33 met our inclusion criteria. We were able to construct good counterfactuals for 24 of these. On average, democratisation reduced child mortality, and the effect increased over time. Significant reductions in child mortality were seen in nine (38%) countries, with the average reduction 10 years after democratisation being 13%. In the other 15 countries the effects were not significant. At the country level yhe effects were heterogeneous, but the differences did not correlate with geographic, economic, or political indicators. The effect of democratisation, however, was stronger in countries with above average child mortality before transition than in countries with below average child mortality. Our results are consistent with the interpretation that democratic reforms have the greatest effects when child mortality is a direct concern for a large part of the population. Future research could focus on identifying the precise mechanism through which the effects emerge. European Union 7th Framework

  5. Consequences of intimate partner violence against women on under-five child mortality in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Md Akhtar; Sumi, Nahid Sultana; Haque, M Ershadul; Bari, Wasimul

    2014-05-01

    It is well established that intimate partner violence (IPV) against women adversely affects maternal morbidity and mortality. But a limited number of studies were found in the literature regarding the association between IPV and under-five child mortality. In this article, using Bangladesh Demographic and Health Survey (BDHS) 2007 data, we examined the effect of IPV on under-five child mortality. A product-limit approach was used for bivariate survival analysis, and Cox proportional hazard multiple regression models were used to investigate the effect of IPV controlling potential confounders. In bivariate analysis, the variables exposure to IPV, mother's age at birth, mother's education, residence type, division, number of children, wealth index, occupation, access to media, and decision autonomy were found to be potential risk factors for child mortality. Results indicated that women exposed to IPV were more likely to experience under-five child mortality compared with women not exposed. The unadjusted hazard ratio for IPV was 1.21 (95% confidence interval [CI] = [1.09, 1.35]) with p value < .01, whereas it was 1.16 (95% CI = [1.04, 1.29]) with p value < .01 and 1.13 (95% CI = [1.01, 1.26]) with p value < .05 in two adjusted models. These results implied that IPV against women is a problem not only for women but also for their children's survival.

  6. Entrenched Geographical and Socioeconomic Disparities in Child Mortality: Trends in Absolute and Relative Inequalities in Cambodia

    PubMed Central

    Jimenez-Soto, Eliana; Durham, Jo; Hodge, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Background Cambodia has made considerable improvements in mortality rates for children under the age of five and neonates. These improvements may, however, mask considerable disparities between subnational populations. In this paper, we examine the extent of the country's child mortality inequalities. Methods Mortality rates for children under-five and neonates were directly estimated using the 2000, 2005 and 2010 waves of the Cambodian Demographic Health Survey. Disparities were measured on both absolute and relative scales using rate differences and ratios, and where applicable, slope and relative indices of inequality by levels of rural/urban location, regions and household wealth. Findings Since 2000, considerable reductions in under-five and to a lesser extent in neonatal mortality rates have been observed. This mortality decline has, however, been accompanied by an increase in relative inequality in both rates of child mortality for geography-related stratifying markers. For absolute inequality amongst regions, most trends are increasing, particularly for neonatal mortality, but are not statistically significant. The only exception to this general pattern is the statistically significant positive trend in absolute inequality for under-five mortality in the Coastal region. For wealth, some evidence for increases in both relative and absolute inequality for neonates is observed. Conclusion Despite considerable gains in reducing under-five and neonatal mortality at a national level, entrenched and increased geographical and wealth-based inequality in mortality, at least on a relative scale, remain. As expected, national progress seems to be associated with the period of political and macroeconomic stability that started in the early 2000s. However, issues of quality of care and potential non-inclusive economic growth might explain remaining disparities, particularly across wealth and geography markers. A focus on further addressing key supply and demand side

  7. Entrenched geographical and socioeconomic disparities in child mortality: trends in absolute and relative inequalities in Cambodia.

    PubMed

    Jimenez-Soto, Eliana; Durham, Jo; Hodge, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Cambodia has made considerable improvements in mortality rates for children under the age of five and neonates. These improvements may, however, mask considerable disparities between subnational populations. In this paper, we examine the extent of the country's child mortality inequalities. Mortality rates for children under-five and neonates were directly estimated using the 2000, 2005 and 2010 waves of the Cambodian Demographic Health Survey. Disparities were measured on both absolute and relative scales using rate differences and ratios, and where applicable, slope and relative indices of inequality by levels of rural/urban location, regions and household wealth. Since 2000, considerable reductions in under-five and to a lesser extent in neonatal mortality rates have been observed. This mortality decline has, however, been accompanied by an increase in relative inequality in both rates of child mortality for geography-related stratifying markers. For absolute inequality amongst regions, most trends are increasing, particularly for neonatal mortality, but are not statistically significant. The only exception to this general pattern is the statistically significant positive trend in absolute inequality for under-five mortality in the Coastal region. For wealth, some evidence for increases in both relative and absolute inequality for neonates is observed. Despite considerable gains in reducing under-five and neonatal mortality at a national level, entrenched and increased geographical and wealth-based inequality in mortality, at least on a relative scale, remain. As expected, national progress seems to be associated with the period of political and macroeconomic stability that started in the early 2000s. However, issues of quality of care and potential non-inclusive economic growth might explain remaining disparities, particularly across wealth and geography markers. A focus on further addressing key supply and demand side barriers to accessing maternal and child

  8. Kin and birth order effects on male child mortality: three East Asian populations, 1716-1945().

    PubMed

    Dong, Hao; Manfredini, Matteo; Kurosu, Satomi; Yang, Wenshan; Lee, James Z

    2017-03-01

    Human child survival depends on adult investment, typically from parents. However, in spite of recent research advances on kin influence and birth order effects on human infant and child mortality, studies that directly examine the interaction of kin context and birth order on sibling differences in child mortality are still rare. Our study supplements this literature with new findings from large-scale individual-level panel data for three East Asian historical populations from northeast China (1789-1909), northeast Japan (1716-1870), and north Taiwan (1906-1945), where preference for sons and first-borns is common. We examine and compare male child mortality risks by presence/absence of co-resident parents, grandparents, and other kin, as well as their interaction effects with birth order. We apply discrete-time event-history analysis on over 172,000 observations of 69,125 boys aged 1-9 years old. We find that in all three populations, while the presence of parents is important for child survival, it is more beneficial to first/early-borns than to later-borns. Effects of other co-resident kin are however null or inconsistent between populations. Our findings underscore the importance of birth order in understanding how differential parental investment may produce child survival differentials between siblings.

  9. Determinants of Child Outcomes in a Cohort of Children in the Free Pre-School Year in Ireland, 2012/2013

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKeown, Kieran; Haase, Trutz; Pratschke, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    The study analyses determinants of child outcomes in a cohort of children who participated in the Free Pre-School Year. Child outcomes are measured through a before-and-after assessment of children using the Early Development Instrument. The sample comprises 448 children in 70 early years centres. There are three main findings. First, children…

  10. Child Effortful Control as a Mediator of Parenting Practices on Externalizing Behavior: Evidence for a Sex-Differentiated Pathway across the Transition from Preschool to School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Hyein; Olson, Sheryl L.; Sameroff, Arnold J.; Sexton, Holly R.

    2011-01-01

    An explanatory model for children's development of disruptive behavior across the transition from preschool to school was tested. It was hypothesized that child effortful control would mediate the effects of parenting on children's externalizing behavior and that child sex would moderate these relations. Participants were 241 children (123 boys)…

  11. Determinants of Child Outcomes in a Cohort of Children in the Free Pre-School Year in Ireland, 2012/2013

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKeown, Kieran; Haase, Trutz; Pratschke, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    The study analyses determinants of child outcomes in a cohort of children who participated in the Free Pre-School Year. Child outcomes are measured through a before-and-after assessment of children using the Early Development Instrument. The sample comprises 448 children in 70 early years centres. There are three main findings. First, children…

  12. Child Effortful Control as a Mediator of Parenting Practices on Externalizing Behavior: Evidence for a Sex-Differentiated Pathway across the Transition from Preschool to School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Hyein; Olson, Sheryl L.; Sameroff, Arnold J.; Sexton, Holly R.

    2011-01-01

    An explanatory model for children's development of disruptive behavior across the transition from preschool to school was tested. It was hypothesized that child effortful control would mediate the effects of parenting on children's externalizing behavior and that child sex would moderate these relations. Participants were 241 children (123 boys)…

  13. Heterogeneity in Maltreated and Non-Maltreated Preschool Children's Inhibitory Control: The Interplay between Parenting Quality and Child Temperament

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cipriano-Essel, Elizabeth; Skowron, Elizabeth A.; Stifter, Cynthia A.; Teti, Douglas M.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the contribution of child temperament, parenting, and their interaction on inhibitory control development in a sample of maltreated and non-maltreated preschool children. One hundred and eighteen mother-child dyads were drawn from predominantly low-income, rural communities. Dyads participated in a laboratory session in which…

  14. Maternal depression and personality traits in association with child neuropsychological and behavioral development in preschool years: Mother-child cohort (Rhea Study) in Crete, Greece.

    PubMed

    Koutra, Katerina; Roumeliotaki, Theano; Kyriklaki, Andriani; Kampouri, Mariza; Sarri, Katerina; Vassilaki, Maria; Bitsios, Panos; Kogevinas, Manolis; Chatzi, Leda

    2017-08-01

    Poor perinatal maternal mental health has been linked with negative outcomes on early child development; however, the importance of maternal personality has been neglected thus far. We aimed to examine the effects of antenatal and postnatal maternal mental health, including assessment of maternal personality characteristics, on child neuropsychological and behavioral development at preschool years in a population based mother-child cohort (Rhea Study) in Crete, Greece. Self-reported measures of maternal depression (EPDS), trait anxiety (STAI-Trait) and personality traits (EPQ-R) were assessed in a sample of 288 women at 28-32 weeks of gestation. A larger sample of 642 mothers completed the EPDS scale at 8 weeks postpartum. Children's neuropsychological (MSCA) and behavioral (ADHDT and SDQ) development were assessed at 4 years of age. Linear regression analyses were used to estimate the associations between the exposures and outcomes of interest after adjustment for potential confounders. Regarding child neuropsychological development, increased postnatal depressive symptoms were associated with child's perceptual performance, whereas increased maternal psychoticism was linked with child's motor ability at 4 years of age. Furthermore, elevated levels of maternal depression during pregnancy and postpartum, and the predisposing personality characteristics of trait anxiety and neuroticism, were associated with children's behavioral difficulties. A clinical diagnostic instrument for maternal mental health was not used and assessment of children's behavior was based on maternal report. These findings suggest that poor perinatal maternal mental health and an adverse personality profile may be associated with impaired child neuropsychological and behavioral development at preschool years. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. [Child mortality in Nepal: an analysis of its socioeconomic determinants and a comparison with other developing countries].

    PubMed

    Lutz, W

    1986-01-01

    The author studies child mortality in Nepal in this section of a large comparative project involving 15 developing countries. "Employing a method suggested by Trussell and Preston (1982) a child mortality index is computed for every woman by relating actual number of child deaths to the expected number of child deaths implied by marital duration, fertility, and the national mortality level. Based on the Nepal Fertility Survey of 1976 bi-, tri-, and multivariate analysis showed significant child mortality differentials according to mothers' and fathers' education, religion, and ecological region. The population of Nepal is still extremely homogeneous in that 96% of all ever-married women aged 15-49 can neither read or write, 95% live in rural areas, and 90% are Hindus. For women deviating from this pattern child mortality is in most cases substantially lower." (SUMMARY IN ENG) excerpt

  16. The relation of preschool child-care quality to children's cognitive and social developmental trajectories through second grade.

    PubMed

    Peisner-Feinberg, E S; Burchinal, M R; Clifford, R M; Culkin, M L; Howes, C; Kagan, S L; Yazejian, N

    2001-01-01

    The cognitive and socioemotional development of 733 children was examined longitudinally from ages 4 to 8 years as a function of the quality of their preschool experiences in community child-care centers, after adjusting for family selection factors related to child-care quality and development. These results provide evidence that child-care quality has a modest long-term effect on children's patterns of cognitive and socioemotional development at least through kindergarten, and in some cases, through second grade. Differential effects on children's development were found for two aspects of child-care quality. Observed classroom practices were related to children's language and academic skills, whereas the closeness of the teacher-child relationship was related to both cognitive and social skills, with the strongest effects for the latter. Moderating influences of family characteristics were observed for some outcomes, indicating stronger positive effects of child-care quality for children from more at-risk backgrounds. These findings contribute further evidence of the long-term influences of the quality of child-care environments on children's cognitive and social skills through the elementary school years and are consistent with a bioecological model of development that considers the multiple environmental contexts that the child experiences.

  17. Maternal stress and family quality of life in response to raising a child with autism: from preschool to adolescence.

    PubMed

    McStay, Rebecca L; Trembath, David; Dissanayake, Cheryl

    2014-11-01

    While the impact of raising a child with an Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) is well documented, with mothers reporting higher levels of stress than mothers of children with other disabilities, positive maternal outcomes have also been identified. What remains unclear, however, is the role of child age on maternal outcomes. We sought to clarify the role of child age in maternal stress and family quality of life (FQoL) in mothers raising a child with ASD. Participants included 140 mothers of children aged 3-16 years grouped to represent four key stages of childhood (preschool, early school years, middle school, early high school). Using a cross-sectional design, mothers completed questionnaires assessing potential risk (e.g., child problem behaviour, symptom severity) and protective (e.g., family characteristics) factors attributed to maternal outcomes. The results revealed significant age related group differences in child internalising behaviour and ASD symptomatology between the early and middle school years. Lower levels of adaptive social behaviour in older age groups were also found. Although mothers of older children reported significantly less support from professionals than mothers of younger children, no significant age effects were found to contribute to maternal reports of stress or FQoL. The current findings support the view that mothers appear to demonstrate stable levels of stress and FQoL despite fluctuations in key child variables and a reduction in supports, across age, highlighting the ongoing nature of maternal needs and heightened levels of child symptomatology during adolescence.

  18. Infant and Child Mortality in India in the Last Two Decades: A Geospatial Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Abhishek; Pathak, Praveen Kumar; Chauhan, Rajesh Kumar; Pan, William

    2011-01-01

    Background Studies examining the intricate interplay between poverty, female literacy, child malnutrition, and child mortality are rare in demographic literature. Given the recent focus on Millennium Development Goals 4 (child survival) and 5 (maternal health), we explored whether the geographic regions that were underprivileged in terms of wealth, female literacy, child nutrition, or safe delivery were also grappling with the elevated risk of child mortality; whether there were any spatial outliers; whether these relationships have undergone any significant change over historical time periods. Methodology The present paper attempted to investigate these critical questions using data from household surveys like NFHS 1992–1993, NFHS 1998–1999 and DLHS 2002–2004. For the first time, we employed geo-spatial techniques like Moran's-I, univariate LISA, bivariate LISA, spatial error regression, and spatiotemporal regression to address the research problem. For carrying out the geospatial analysis, we classified India into 76 natural regions based on the agro-climatic scheme proposed by Bhat and Zavier (1999) following the Census of India Study and all estimates were generated for each of the geographic regions. Result/Conclusions This study brings out the stark intra-state and inter-regional disparities in infant and under-five mortality in India over the past two decades. It further reveals, for the first time, that geographic regions that were underprivileged in child nutrition or wealth or female literacy were also likely to be disadvantaged in terms of infant and child survival irrespective of the state to which they belong. While the role of economic status in explaining child malnutrition and child survival has weakened, the effect of mother's education has actually become stronger over time. PMID:22073208

  19. Parent–child interaction therapy for preschool children with disruptive behaviour problems in the Netherlands

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Persistent high levels of aggressive, oppositional and impulsive behaviours, in the early lives of children, are significant risk factors for adolescent and adult antisocial behaviour and criminal activity. If the disruptive behavioural problems of young children could be prevented or significantly reduced at an early age, the trajectory of these behavioural problems leading to adolescent delinquency and adult antisocial behaviour could be corrected. Parent–Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT) is a short-term, evidence-based, training intervention for parents dealing with preschool children, who exhibit behavioural problems. Recently, PCIT was implemented in a Dutch community mental health setting. This present study aims to examine the short-term effects of PCIT on reducing the frequency of disruptive behaviour in young children. Methods This study is based on the data of 37 referred families. Whereby the results of which are derived from an analysis of parent reports of the Eyberg Child Behavior Inventory (ECBI), obtained during each therapeutic session. Furthermore, demographic information, extracted from client files, was also utilized. However, it must be noted that eleven families (27.5%) dropped out of treatment before the treatment protocol was completed. To investigate the development of disruptive behaviour, a non-clinical comparison group was recruited from primary schools (N = 59). Results The results of this study indicate that PCIT significantly reduces disruptive behaviour in children. Large effect sizes were found for both fathers and mothers reported problems (d = 1.88, d = 1.99, respectively), which is similar to American outcome studies. At post treatment, no differences were found concerning the frequency of behavioural problems of children who completed treatment and those who participated in the non-clinical comparison group. Conclusion The findings of this study suggest that PCIT is potentially an effective intervention

  20. Mother-child reminiscing and autobiographical memory specificity among preschool-age children.

    PubMed

    Valentino, Kristin; Nuttall, Amy K; Comas, Michelle; McDonnell, Christina G; Piper, Brianna; Thomas, Taylor E; Fanuele, Suzanne

    2014-04-01

    Overgeneral memory (OGM) refers to difficulty in retrieving specific autobiographical memories. The tendency to be overgeneral in autobiographical memory recall is more commonly observed among individuals with emotional disorders compared with those without. Despite significant advances in theory and identification of mechanisms that underlie the etiology of OGM, there has been little integration between normative research on the development of autobiographical memory and research on OGM. Informed by a developmental psychopathology perspective and drawing on normative developmental research on the social construction of autobiographical memory, the current investigation examined whether the elaborative quantity and elaborative quality of maternal reminiscing are predictive of preschool-age children's autobiographical memory specificity. Additionally, this investigation tested whether children's positive self-representations may explain these hypothesized associations. Participants consisted of 95 mother-child dyads. Children's ages ranged between 3.5 and 6 years, and the sample was predominantly low income and of minority race/ethnicity. Dyads participated in a joint reminiscing task about 4 past events, and children participated in assessments of autobiographical memory specificity and self-representations. Results indicated that the elaborative quality, defined by maternal-sensitive guidance and emotional narrative coherence, but not the elaborative quantity, of maternal reminiscing style was significantly associated with children's autobiographical memory specificity. Additionally, there was support for an indirect pathway between maternal reminiscing quality and child memory specificity through children's positive self-representations. Directions for future research are discussed, and potential clinical implications are addressed. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved.

  1. Paths of Effects from Preschool to Adult Well-Being: A Confirmatory Analysis of the Child-Parent Center Program

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Arthur J.; Ou, Suh-Ruu

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the contribution of five hypotheses to the estimated effects of preschool in the Child-Parent Centers on occupational prestige, felony arrest, and depressive symptoms in adulthood in the Chicago Longitudinal Study. An alternative-intervention, quasi-experimental design included over 1,400 low-income participants (93% of whom were black) who attended preschool for 1–2 years or the usual early educational intervention and were traced to age 24. LISREL analysis of five hypotheses (cognitive advantage, family support, school support, motivational advantage, and social adjustment) indicated that while each individually accounted for part of the estimated direct effect of preschool on adult well-being, the best-fitting model across outcomes included indicators of all five hypotheses. The full model completely accounted for the direct effect of preschool on occupational prestige and official felony arrest, and 79% on depression symptoms. Key mediators included cognitive skills at school entry, school quality in the elementary grades, juvenile arrest, and school completion. The identified processes may help establish, strengthen, and sustain effects in other programs and settings. PMID:21410923

  2. The global problems of child malnutrition and mortality in different world regions.

    PubMed

    El-Ghannam, Ashraf Ragab

    2003-01-01

    The study of child mortality occupies a special place in the field of demographic research, since it represents the negative component of population growth. Also, the world food problem has become a familiar topic since the end of the World War II. The idea that population growth will sometime in the future outrun food supplies and universal starvation occurs. This study deals with what happened in global and regional variations regarding the child malnutrition and mortality rates. The main objective of the study is to explain and to explore the effect of the social, demographic, economic and health factors on child malnutrition and mortality rates among different regions in the globe. The study includes ten regions of the whole world compared to other studies that covered only one or two regions. Data were collected from various sources. The sample involved 191 countries. These countries divided by regions of world as following. East Southern Africa, West Africa, East Asia and Pacific, South Asia, Eastern Europe and Central Asia, Europe, Middle East, North Africa, North America, and South America. The results of descriptive analysis show that the highest mean rate of child malnutrition was found in South Asia region (57 children per 100), while the smallest mean rate was found in Europe region (just 1 child per 100). In West Africa region, the average of child mortality rate per 1000, 172 children, was the highest among all regions in the world, while in Europe was found to be 14 children per 1000. The results of correlation coefficients reveal that there were positive associations between illiteracy rate, unemployment, poverty, fertility rate, family size, food consumption, maternal mortality rate, population per physician, and child malnutrition and mortality in the whole world regions. Some regions have strong significant associations, such as Sub-Saharan Africa, Asia, and Americas, and other were non-significant association, such as Europe, Middle East, and

  3. Relations of mother's sense of coherence and childrearing style with child's social skills in preschoolers.

    PubMed

    Hosokawa, Rikuya; Katsura, Toshiki; Shizawa, Miho

    2017-01-01

    We examined the relationships between mothers' sense of coherence (SOC) and their child's social skills development among preschool children, and how this relationship is mediated by mother's childrearing style. Mothers of 1341 Japanese children, aged 4-5 years, completed a self-report questionnaire on their SOC and childrearing style. The children's teachers evaluated their social skills using the social skills scale (SSS), which comprises three factors: cooperation, self-control, and assertion. Path analyses revealed that the mother's childrearing mediated the positive relationship between mother's SOC and the cooperation, self-control, and assertiveness aspects of children's social skills. Additionally, there was a significant direct path from mother's SOC to the self-control component of social skills. These findings suggest that mother's SOC may directly as well as indirectly influence children's social skills development through the mediating effect of childrearing. The results offer preliminary evidence that focusing on support to improve mothers' SOC may be an efficient and effective strategy for improving children's social skills development.

  4. Preschool and School Phases of Postmaxillectomy Prosthetic Rehabilitation in a Child: A Clinical Report.

    PubMed

    Elbashti, Mahmoud E; Sumita, Yuka I; Aswehlee, Amel M; Haraguchi, Mihoko; Otomaru, Takafumi; Hattori, Mariko; Taniguchi, Hisashi

    2016-10-03

    This report describes the postmaxillectomy prosthetic rehabilitation of a child with maxillary chondrosarcoma over an 8-year period. Specifically, it (1) describes the planning and rehabilitation procedures carried out during the period from before the operation to the time when the patient started elementary school and (2) reports the results of evaluations of the patient's oral and psychosocial function conducted during the school phase. The prosthetic treatment plan was separated into two phases (the preschool and school phases) and was started prior to surgery, when an immediate surgical obturator was designed by the surgeons. After the operation, it was considered important to provide the patient and her mother with training regarding how the defect should be cleaned, trismus prevention, and how the prosthesis should be fitted. In addition, esthetic improvements and the ability to speak clearly were also targeted during treatment planning. After surgery, obturators were fabricated in a conventional manner and fitted at the ages of 2, 4, 6, 8, and 10 years. The patient's oral function during the use of the obturators was evaluated objectively. Marked improvements in oral function were seen during both treatment phases. The patient's ability to perform psychosocial functions at school also improved during the use of the obturators. © 2016 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  5. Relation between increased numbers of safe playing areas and decreased vehicle related child mortality rates in Japan from 1970 to 1985: a trend analysis

    PubMed Central

    Nakahara, S.; Nakamura, Y.; Ichikawa, M.; Wakai, S.

    2004-01-01

    Objectives: To examine vehicle related mortality trends of children in Japan; and to investigate how environmental modifications such as the installation of public parks and pavements are associated with these trends. Design: Poisson regression was used for trend analysis, and multiple regression modelling was used to investigate the associations between trends in environmental modifications and trends in motor vehicle related child mortality rates. Setting: Mortality data of Japan from 1970 to 1994, defined as E-code 810–23 from 1970 to 1978 and E810–25 from 1979 to 1994, were obtained from vital statistics. Multiple regression modelling was confined to the 1970–1985 data. Data concerning public parks and other facilities were obtained from the Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, and Transport. Subjects: Children aged 0–14 years old were examined in this study and divided into two groups: 0–4 and 5–14 years. Main results: An increased number of public parks was associated with decreased vehicle related mortality rates among children aged 0–4 years, but not among children aged 5–14. In contrast, there was no association between trends in pavements and mortality rates. Conclusions: An increased number of public parks might reduce vehicle related preschooler deaths, in particular those involving pedestrians. Safe play areas in residential areas might reduce the risk of vehicle related child death by lessening the journey both to and from such areas as well as reducing the number of children playing on the street. However, such measures might not be effective in reducing the vehicle related mortalities of school age children who have an expanded range of activities and walk longer distances. PMID:15547055

  6. Variation in children’s classroom engagement throughout a day in preschool: Relations to classroom and child factors

    PubMed Central

    Vitiello, Virginia E.; Booren, Leslie M.; Downer, Jason T.; Williford, Amanda

    2014-01-01

    This study examined sources of variability in preschool children’s positive and negative engagement with teachers, peers, and tasks, and how that variability was related to both classroom activity settings (e.g., teacher-structured time, outdoor time, transitions) and child factors (age, gender). Participants were 283 socioeconomically and linguistically diverse children drawn from 84 classrooms, 34 to 63 months old (M = 50.8, SD = 6.5). Each child’s engagement was observed and rated multiple times within a single day. Results suggested that children’s engagement varied significantly across the preschool day. Activity settings that provided children with a greater degree of choice (free choice and outdoor time) were associated with more positive engagement with peers and tasks, while teacher-structured activities were associated with more positive engagement with teachers. Transitions emerged as a difficult part of the day, associated with less positive engagement with teachers and tasks. Older children were rated higher on peer and task engagement. These findings, together with previous research, suggest that both characteristics of the classroom setting and child factors are associated with children’s classroom engagement throughout a day in preschool. PMID:25717218

  7. Teaching mothers to read: evidence from Colombia on the key role of maternal education in preschool child nutritional health.

    PubMed

    Lomperis, A M

    1991-10-01

    The determinants of the severity of childhood malnutrition among a low income population in Cali, Colombia in 1974-76 were examined. Sections are devoted to the welfare maximization and household production model and methodology, the data set, the empirical results, the policy implications, and conclusions. The nutritional health of each preschooler is produced within the household with goods and time inputs (food, environmental sanitation, medical care, time invested in child care, and breastfeeding), and is conditioned by the state of household production technology (mother's literacy as a dummy variable -- version 1, and mother's level of schooling -- version 2) as well as by each child's sex, birth order, age, household size, and sociocultural setting. Constraints are total available income and time available (dummy variable). Reinhardt's version of the translog function is used to represent the production process. Household survey data were made available from a pilot study of a maternal and child health program (PRIMOPS) and includes 421 preschool children and 280 households, and food expenditure data for 197 children and 123 households. The main finding is that teaching Third World mothers to read holds the greatest promise of permanently improving the nutritional status of preschool children. The linear regression results show that the determinants of short-term nutritional status as reflected in weight for age (w/a) are the duration of breastfeeding, literacy, 1-3 years of schooling, and the available food in the household. The levels of significance are higher for version 2, but significance is achieved only with the lower levels of schooling. Birth order is statistically significant but weak and negative; i.e., higher birth orders are at higher risk of malnutrition. Long-term nutritional status is statistically significantly influenced by educational level, birth order, and food available, where older preschoolers are likely to experience stunting but

  8. The role of preschool teacher-child interactions in academic adjustment: An intervention study with Playing-2-gether.

    PubMed

    Van Craeyevelt, Sanne; Verschueren, Karine; Vancraeyveldt, Caroline; Wouters, Sofie; Colpin, Hilde

    2017-09-01

    Social relationships can serve as important risk or protective factors for child development in general, and academic adjustment in particular. This study investigated the role of teacher-child interactions in academic adjustment among preschool boys at risk of externalizing behaviour, using a randomized controlled trial study with Playing-2-gether (P2G), a 12-week indicated two-component intervention aimed at improving the affective quality of the teacher-child relationship and teacher behaviour management. In a sample of 175 preschool boys showing signs of externalizing behaviour (Mage  = 4 years, 9 months, SDage  = 7 months) and their teachers, we investigated P2G effects on academic engagement as well as on language achievement. Academic engagement was rated by teachers at three occasions within one school year (T1 = pretest, T3 = post-test, and T2 = in-between intervention components). Language achievement was assessed by researchers at pre- and post-test, using a standardized test. Cross-lagged path analyses revealed a direct intervention effect of P2G on academic engagement at Time 2. In addition, a significant indirect intervention effect was found on academic engagement at Time 3 through academic engagement at Time 2. Finally, academic engagement at Time 2 was found to predict language achievement at post-test. A marginally significant indirect intervention effect was found on language achievement at Time 3, through academic engagement at Time 2. This intervention study suggests that teacher-child interactions predict academic engagement over time, which in turn improves language achievement among preschool boys at risk of externalizing behaviour. © 2017 The British Psychological Society.

  9. Equitable child health interventions: the impact of improved water and sanitation on inequalities in child mortality in Stockholm, 1878 to 1925.

    PubMed

    Burström, Bo; Macassa, Gloria; Oberg, Lisa; Bernhardt, Eva; Smedman, Lars

    2005-02-01

    Today, many of the 10 million childhood deaths each year are caused by diseases of poverty--diarrhea and pneumonia, for example, which were previously major causes of childhood death in many European countries. Specific analyses of the historical decline of child mortality may shed light on the potential equity impact of interventions to reduce child mortality. In our study of the impact of improved water and sanitation in Stockholm from 1878 to 1925, we examined the decline in overall and diarrhea mortality among children, both in general and by socioeconomic group. We report a decline in overall mortality and of diarrhea mortality and a leveling out of socioeconomic differences in child mortality due to diarrheal diseases, but not of overall mortality. The contribution of general and targeted policies is discussed.

  10. Child mortality inequalities and linkage with sanitation facilities in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Halder, Amal K; Kabir, M

    2008-03-01

    Principal component analysis (PCA) was applied to assets and other household data, collected as part of the Bangladesh Demographic and Health Survey (BDHS) in 2004, to rank individuals according to a household socioeconomic index and to investigate whether this predicts access to the sanitation system or outcomes. PCA was used for determining wealth indices for 11,440 women in 10,500 households in Bangladesh. The index was based on the presence or absence of items from a list of 13 specific household assets and three housing characteristics. PCA revealed 35 components, of which the first component accounted for 18% of the total variance. Ownership of assets and housing features contributed almost equally to the variance in the first component. In this study, ownership of latrines was examined as an example of sanitation-intervention access, and rates of mortality of neonates, infant, and children aged less than five years (under-five mortality) as examples of health outcomes. The analysis demonstrated significant gradients in both access and outcome measures across the wealth quintiles. The findings call for more attention to approaches for reducing health inequalities. These could include reforms in the health sector to provide more equitable allocation of resources, improvement in the quality of health services offered to the poor, and redesigning interventions and their delivery to ensure that they are more pro-poor.

  11. Parental child abuse potential and subsequent coping competence in disadvantaged preschool children: moderating effects of sex and ethnicity.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Cristina M; Begle, Angela Moreland; Dumas, Jean E; de Arellano, Michael A

    2012-03-01

    This study evaluated the effects of abuse potential in parents on subsequent coping competence domains in their children, using a model empirically supported in a high-risk community sample by Moreland and Dumas (2007). Data from an ethnically diverse sample of 579 parents enrolled in the PACE (Parenting Our Children to Excellence) program was used to evaluate whether parental child abuse potential assessed at pre-intervention negatively contributed to child affective, achievement, and social coping competence in preschoolers one year later, and whether these associations were moderated by sex or ethnicity. Cross-sectional results indicated that parental child abuse potential was negatively related to child affective and achievement coping competence, after accounting for variance associated with child behavior problems. However, child abuse potential was not predictive of subsequent coping competence in any domain after controlling for previous levels of child coping competence. No moderating effects were found for sex and ethnicity, but results showed main effects of sex and ethnicity in cross-sectional analyses. Clinical implications and future directions are discussed.

  12. Water for Life: The Impact of the Privatization of Water Services on Child Mortality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galiani, Sebastian; Gertler, Paul; Schargrodsky, Ernesto

    2005-01-01

    While most countries are committed to increasing access to safe water and thereby reducing child mortality, there is little consensus on how to actually improve water services. One important proposal under discussion is whether to privatize water provision. In the 1990s Argentina embarked on one of the largest privatization campaigns in the world,…

  13. Family Structure and Child Mortality in Sub-Saharan Africa: Cross-National Effects of Polygyny

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Omariba, D. Walter Rasugu; Boyle, Michael H.

    2007-01-01

    This study applies multilevel logistic regression to Demographic and Health Survey data from 22 sub-Saharan African countries to examine whether the relationship between child mortality and family structure, with a specific emphasis on polygyny, varies cross-nationally and over time. Hypotheses were developed on the basis of competing theories on…

  14. Association of Selected Risk Factors with Variation in Child and Adolescent Firearm Mortality by State

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murnan, Judy; Dake, Joseph A.; Price, James H.

    2004-01-01

    This study examined relationships between variation in child and adolescent firearm mortality by state and the following variables: childhood poverty rate, percent single parent families, percent population that is African American, percent population that is Hispanic. percent students carrying a gun, percent students carrying a weapon, percent…

  15. Association of Selected Risk Factors with Variation in Child and Adolescent Firearm Mortality by State

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murnan, Judy; Dake, Joseph A.; Price, James H.

    2004-01-01

    This study examined relationships between variation in child and adolescent firearm mortality by state and the following variables: childhood poverty rate, percent single parent families, percent population that is African American, percent population that is Hispanic. percent students carrying a gun, percent students carrying a weapon, percent…

  16. Water for Life: The Impact of the Privatization of Water Services on Child Mortality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galiani, Sebastian; Gertler, Paul; Schargrodsky, Ernesto

    2005-01-01

    While most countries are committed to increasing access to safe water and thereby reducing child mortality, there is little consensus on how to actually improve water services. One important proposal under discussion is whether to privatize water provision. In the 1990s Argentina embarked on one of the largest privatization campaigns in the world,…

  17. Family Structure and Child Mortality in Sub-Saharan Africa: Cross-National Effects of Polygyny

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Omariba, D. Walter Rasugu; Boyle, Michael H.

    2007-01-01

    This study applies multilevel logistic regression to Demographic and Health Survey data from 22 sub-Saharan African countries to examine whether the relationship between child mortality and family structure, with a specific emphasis on polygyny, varies cross-nationally and over time. Hypotheses were developed on the basis of competing theories on…

  18. Multinational Corporations, Democracy and Child Mortality: A Quantitative, Cross-National Analysis of Developing Countries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shandra, John M.; Nobles, Jenna E.; London, Bruce; Williamson, John B.

    2005-01-01

    This study presents quantitative, sociological models designed to account for cross-national variation in child mortality. We consider variables linked to five different theoretical perspectives that include the economic modernization, social modernization, political modernization, ecological-evolutionary, and dependency perspectives. The study is…

  19. Experimental impacts of a teacher professional development program in Chile on preschool classroom quality and child outcomes.

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, Hirokazu; Leyva, Diana; Snow, Catherine E; Treviño, Ernesto; Barata, M Clara; Weiland, Christina; Gomez, Celia J; Moreno, Lorenzo; Rolla, Andrea; D'Sa, Nikhit; Arbour, Mary Catherine

    2015-03-01

    We assessed impacts on classroom quality and on 5 child language and behavioral outcomes of a 2-year teacher professional-development program for publicly funded prekindergarten and kindergarten in Chile. This cluster-randomized trial included 64 schools (child N = 1,876). The program incorporated workshops and in-classroom coaching. We found moderate to large positive impacts on observed emotional and instructional support as well as classroom organization in prekindergarten classrooms after 1 year of the program. After 2 years of the program, moderate positive impacts were observed on emotional support and classroom organization. No significant program impacts on child outcomes were detected at posttest (1 marginal effect, an increase in a composite of self-regulation and low problem behaviors, was observed). Professional development for preschool teachers in Chile can improve classroom quality. More intensive curricular approaches are needed for these improvements to translate into effects on children. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  20. Did the Millennium Development Goals Change Trends in Child Mortality?

    PubMed

    French, Declan

    2016-10-01

    There has been little assessment of the role the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) have had in progressing international development. There has been a 41% reduction in the under-five mortality rate worldwide from 1990 to 2011 and an acceleration in the rate of reduction since 2000. This paper explores why this has occurred, and results for all developing countries indicate that it is not due to more healthcare or public health interventions but is driven by a coincidental burst of economic growth. Although the MDGs are considered to have played an important part in securing progress against poverty, hunger and disease, there is very little evidence to back this viewpoint up. A thorough analysis of the successes and failures of the MDGs is therefore necessary before embarking on a new round of global goals. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. [Child victims of house fires in France. Mortality, morbidity, prevention].

    PubMed

    Leveque, B; Lareng, L; Julien, H; Lavaud, J; Wassermann, D; Latarjet, J

    1993-10-01

    Children injuries by house fires in France are the cause of a severe mortality (sixty deaths in average each year) and of a morbidity for the survival due to smoke toxicity (oxygen deprivation and inhalation of toxic gases--CO and HCN) and to thermal burns. Epidemiological studies show that young children (0 to 4) are specially concerned by this threat and that the deaths occurred more often in some part of France (Nord-Pas-de-Calais Region). A special strategy for this prevention should be applied in France, the same available in USA, Sweden and UK, including information on the behavior one should have with children: never leave them alone and escape with them as soon as possible out of the smoke. The usefulness of smoke detectors should be confirmed by French administration and recommended to the public, since they have had effective results in other countries.

  2. Poverty and child mortality in different contexts: can Mozambique learn from the decline in mortality at the turn of the 19th century in Stockholm?

    PubMed

    Macassa, Gloria; Burström, Bo

    2005-01-01

    Child mortality has declined in many low-income countries. However, in Sub-Saharan Africa, childhood mortality is still a major public health problem, which is worsening with some countries experiencing new increases in mortality due to HIV /AIDS. This lack of success in reducing child mortality is not only due to HIV /AIDS, but also to high numbers of deaths in other causes of death such as diarrhoea, pneumonia and neonatal causes, for which there are effective curative and preventative interventions. One problem seems to be in the access, coverage and implementation of these interventions, particularly among the poorer sections of the population. A related problem is the interventions that sometimes, when implemented, take place in environments in which they can only be expected to have limited effects. On the other hand in many developed countries infant and child mortality declined as social and economic changes of modernisation took place. However, the mechanisms that did bring about the decline are still not well understood. This paper discuss whether analyses of the historical decline of mortality in industrialised countries could contribute to knowledge in reducing the high child mortality in poor countries today, based on studies of child mortality in different social contexts in Mozambique 1973-1997 and Stockholm 1878-1925.

  3. Child health and parental stress in school-age children with a preschool diagnosis of developmental delay.

    PubMed

    Webster, Richard I; Majnemer, Annette; Platt, Robert W; Shevell, Michael I

    2008-01-01

    Chronic disorders are known to have a wide-ranging impact on overall health and family dynamics. The objective of this study was to assess child health and well-being and parental stress in a cohort of school-age children diagnosed before school entry with either global developmental delay or developmental language impairment. In total, 65 children with preschool developmental delay were assessed at school age (mean +/- SD age: 7.3 +/- 0.7 years) with the Child Health Questionnaire and Parenting Stress Index, with a mean interval between assessment of 3.9 years. Almost all children who completed testing (60/62) continued to show developmental impairments across domains. On the Child Health Questionnaire, children showed the greatest impairment on the mental health scale (median z score: -0.9). The median Child Health Questionnaire psychosocial health score (40.7) was almost 1 SD below established normative values ( P < .001). More than 40% of parents had a Parenting Stress Index above the 85th percentile (clinically significant parenting stress). Using multiple linear regression analysis, high levels of parenting stress were best predicted by a child's Child Health Questionnaire psychosocial health score (r2 = 0.49, P < .001). Thus, 4 years after a preschool-age diagnosis of developmental delay, poor psychosocial health was a common comorbidity. Almost half the parents showed clinically significant levels of parenting stress. There is a need to both recognize and provide ongoing social and emotional support for young children diagnosed with developmental disability and their families.

  4. Is exposure to media intended for preschool children associated with less parent-child shared reading aloud and teaching activities?

    PubMed

    Tomopoulos, Suzy; Valdez, Purnima T; Dreyer, Benard P; Fierman, Arthur H; Berkule, Samantha B; Kuhn, Maggie; Mendelsohn, Alan L

    2007-01-01

    To determine whether electronic media exposure is associated with decreased parental reading and teaching activities in the homes of preschool children. A convenience sample presenting for well-child care to an urban hospital pediatric clinic was enrolled. Inclusion criteria were: child's age 3 to 5 years and not yet in kindergarten. Electronic media exposure (TV, movies/video, computer/video games) was assessed with a 24-hour recall diary and characterized on the basis of industry ratings. Reading aloud and teaching activities were assessed with the StimQ-Preschool READ and PIDA (Parental Involvement in Developmental Advance) subscales, respectively. A total of 77 families were assessed. Children were exposed to a mean (SD) of 200.8 (128.9) minutes per day of media, including 78.2 (63.7) minutes of educational young child-oriented, 62.0 (65.6) minutes of noneducational young child-oriented, 14.8 (41.4) minutes of school age/teen-oriented, and 29.2 (56.6) minutes of adult-oriented media, as well as to 16.6 (47.5) minutes of media of unknown type. A total of 79.2% watched 2 or more hours per day. Noneducational young child-oriented exposure was associated with fewer reading (semipartial correlation coefficient [SR] = -0.24, P = .02) and teaching (SR = -0.27, P = .01) activities; similar relationships were not found for other media categories. Children exposed to 2 or more hours of total electronic media per day had 1.6 (95% confidence interval, 0.4-2.9) fewer days per week of reading than children exposed to less than 2 hours (SR = -0.27, P = .01). This study found an association between increased exposure to noneducational young child-oriented media and decreased teaching and reading activities in the home. This association represents a mechanism by which media exposure could adversely affect development.

  5. Population attributable risks of patient, child and organizational risk factors for perinatal mortality in hospital births.

    PubMed

    Poeran, Jashvant; Borsboom, Gerard J J M; de Graaf, Johanna P; Birnie, Erwin; Steegers, Eric A P; Bonsel, Gouke J

    2015-04-01

    The main objective of this study was to estimate the contributing role of maternal, child, and organizational risk factors in perinatal mortality by calculating their population attributable risks (PAR). The primary dataset comprised 1,020,749 singleton hospital births from ≥22 weeks' gestation (The Netherlands Perinatal Registry 2000-2008). PARs for single and grouped risk factors were estimated in four stages: (1) creating a duplicate dataset for each PAR analysis in which risk factors of interest were set to the most favorable value (e.g., all women assigned 'Western' for PAR calculation of ethnicity); (2) in the primary dataset an elaborate multilevel logistic regression model was fitted from which (3) the obtained coefficients were used to predict perinatal mortality in each duplicate dataset; (4) PARs were then estimated as the proportional change of predicted- compared to observed perinatal mortality. Additionally, PARs for grouped risk factors were estimated by using sequential values in two orders: after PAR estimation of grouped maternal risk factors, the resulting PARs for grouped child, and grouped organizational factors were estimated, and vice versa. The combined PAR of maternal, child and organizational factors is 94.4 %, i.e., when all factors are set to the most favorable value perinatal mortality is expected to be reduced with 94.4 %. Depending on the order of analysis, the PAR of maternal risk factors varies from 1.4 to 13.1 %, and for child- and organizational factors 58.7-74.0 and 7.3-34.3 %, respectively. In conclusion, the PAR of maternal-, child- and organizational factors combined is 94.4 %. Optimization of organizational factors may achieve a 34.3 % decrease in perinatal mortality.

  6. Child mortality, hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis activity and cellular aging in mothers.

    PubMed

    Barha, Cindy K; Salvante, Katrina G; Hanna, Courtney W; Wilson, Samantha L; Robinson, Wendy P; Altman, Rachel M; Nepomnaschy, Pablo A

    2017-01-01

    Psychological challenges, including traumatic events, have been hypothesized to increase the age-related pace of biological aging. Here we test the hypothesis that psychological challenges can affect the pace of telomere attrition, a marker of cellular aging, using data from an ongoing longitudinal-cohort study of Kaqchikel Mayan women living in a population with a high frequency of child mortality, a traumatic life event. Specifically, we evaluate the associations between child mortality, maternal telomere length and the mothers' hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis (HPAA), or stress axis, activity. Child mortality data were collected in 2000 and 2013. HPAA activity was assessed by quantifying cortisol levels in first morning urinary specimens collected every other day for seven weeks in 2013. Telomere length (TL) was quantified using qPCR in 55 women from buccal specimens collected in 2013. Shorter TL with increasing age was only observed in women who experienced child mortality (p = 0.015). Women with higher average basal cortisol (p = 0.007) and greater within-individual variation (standard deviation) in basal cortisol (p = 0.053) presented shorter TL. Non-parametric bootstrapping to estimate mediation effects suggests that HPAA activity mediates the effect of child mortality on TL. Our results are, thus, consistent with the hypothesis that traumatic events can influence cellular aging and that HPAA activity may play a mediatory role. Future large-scale longitudinal studies are necessary to confirm our results and further explore the role of the HPAA in cellular aging, as well as to advance our understanding of the underlying mechanisms involved.

  7. Child mortality, hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis activity and cellular aging in mothers

    PubMed Central

    Barha, Cindy K.; Salvante, Katrina G.; Hanna, Courtney W.; Wilson, Samantha L.; Robinson, Wendy P.; Altman, Rachel M.

    2017-01-01

    Psychological challenges, including traumatic events, have been hypothesized to increase the age-related pace of biological aging. Here we test the hypothesis that psychological challenges can affect the pace of telomere attrition, a marker of cellular aging, using data from an ongoing longitudinal-cohort study of Kaqchikel Mayan women living in a population with a high frequency of child mortality, a traumatic life event. Specifically, we evaluate the associations between child mortality, maternal telomere length and the mothers’ hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis (HPAA), or stress axis, activity. Child mortality data were collected in 2000 and 2013. HPAA activity was assessed by quantifying cortisol levels in first morning urinary specimens collected every other day for seven weeks in 2013. Telomere length (TL) was quantified using qPCR in 55 women from buccal specimens collected in 2013. Results: Shorter TL with increasing age was only observed in women who experienced child mortality (p = 0.015). Women with higher average basal cortisol (p = 0.007) and greater within-individual variation (standard deviation) in basal cortisol (p = 0.053) presented shorter TL. Non-parametric bootstrapping to estimate mediation effects suggests that HPAA activity mediates the effect of child mortality on TL. Our results are, thus, consistent with the hypothesis that traumatic events can influence cellular aging and that HPAA activity may play a mediatory role. Future large-scale longitudinal studies are necessary to confirm our results and further explore the role of the HPAA in cellular aging, as well as to advance our understanding of the underlying mechanisms involved. PMID:28542264

  8. New malaria control policies and child mortality in Senegal: reaching Millennium Development Goal 4

    PubMed Central

    Trape, Jean-François; Sauvage, Claire; Ndiaye, Ousmane; Douillot, Laëtitia; Marra, Adama; Diallo, Aldiouma; Cisse, Badara; Greenwood, Brian; Milligan, Paul; Sokhna, Cheikh; Molez, Jean-François

    2013-01-01

    Background The Demographic Surveillance System established in 1962 in Niakhar, Senegal, is the oldest in Africa. Here we analyze trends in overall child mortality, malaria and other causes of death in Niakhar from the beginning of data collection up to 2010. Methods Following an initial census, demographic data have been updated yearly from 1963 to 2010. From 1984, causes of death were determined by the verbal autopsy technique. Results During the period 1963-2010, infant and under-5 mortality rates declined from 223‰ to 18‰ and from 485‰ to 41‰, respectively. The decrease was progressive during the whole observation period except during the years 1990 to 2000 when a plateau and then an increase was observed. Malaria attributable mortality in under-5 children dropped from 13.5‰ during the 1992-1999 period to 2.2‰ in 2010. During this period, all-cause mortality in under-5 children declined by 80%. Interpretation Inadequate treatment for chloroquine-resistant malaria and an epidemic of meningitis in the 1990s were the two factors that interrupted a continuous decrease in child mortality. Direct and indirect effects of new malaria control policies, introduced in 2003 and completed in 2006/2008, are likely to have been key cause of the recent dramatic decrease in childhood mortality. PMID:22238469

  9. Child Development in the Context of Multicultural Pre-School Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Umek, Ljubica Marjanovic; Kranjc, Simona; Fekonja, Urska

    This study examined the impact of a multicultural preschool curriculum in Slovenia on preschool children's sensitization to cultural differences and understanding of themselves, others, and different cultures. The curriculum was implemented for a 1-month period for 6.6- to 7-year-olds. Multicultural enrichment was evident in wall decorations, toys…

  10. Links between Preschoolers' Behavioral Regulation and School Readiness Skills: The Role of Child Gender

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Son, Seung-Hee; Lee, Kangyi; Sung, Miyoung

    2013-01-01

    Research Findings: We examined relations among preschoolers' behavioral regulation, gender, and school readiness outcomes in preacademic and classroom skills using a sample of South Korean preschoolers aged 3-5 ("N" = 229). Behavioral regulation was assessed using a direct measure, the Head-Toes-Knees-Shoulders task, which requires…

  11. Links between Preschoolers' Behavioral Regulation and School Readiness Skills: The Role of Child Gender

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Son, Seung-Hee; Lee, Kangyi; Sung, Miyoung

    2013-01-01

    Research Findings: We examined relations among preschoolers' behavioral regulation, gender, and school readiness outcomes in preacademic and classroom skills using a sample of South Korean preschoolers aged 3-5 ("N" = 229). Behavioral regulation was assessed using a direct measure, the Head-Toes-Knees-Shoulders task, which requires…

  12. Interacting with the Child in Preschool: A Crossroad in Early Childhood Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindahl, Ingrid

    2015-01-01

    How can preschool teachers approach multiplicity and complexity in the preschool? The aim of this article is to discuss two approaches to education, one based on design and the other on open reflection, and to propose "situational sensitivity" as a concept connected within the latter approach. Special attention is paid to the ethical…

  13. Interacting with the Child in Preschool: A Crossroad in Early Childhood Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindahl, Ingrid

    2015-01-01

    How can preschool teachers approach multiplicity and complexity in the preschool? The aim of this article is to discuss two approaches to education, one based on design and the other on open reflection, and to propose "situational sensitivity" as a concept connected within the latter approach. Special attention is paid to the ethical…

  14. Educational Process Quality in Preschools at the Individual Child Level: Findings from a German Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smidt, Wilfried; Rossbach, Hans-Günther

    2016-01-01

    A large body of research has examined the quality of educational processes in preschools, but it has usually been studied at the group level. Thus, there is a lack of research on the quality of educational processes as experienced by individual children. Therefore, this study investigated the quality of educational processes in preschools at the…

  15. The Neuromotor Examination of the Preschool Child and Its Prognostic Significance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hadders-Algra, Mijna

    2005-01-01

    The present paper reviews the methods available for neurological or neuromotor evaluation at preschool age. General textbooks on pediatric neurology describe the neurological examination at preschool age in terms of the assessment of the evaluation of cranial nerves, muscle tone, muscle power, reflexes, and the presence of abnormal movements. They…

  16. Educational Process Quality in Preschools at the Individual Child Level: Findings from a German Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smidt, Wilfried; Rossbach, Hans-Günther

    2016-01-01

    A large body of research has examined the quality of educational processes in preschools, but it has usually been studied at the group level. Thus, there is a lack of research on the quality of educational processes as experienced by individual children. Therefore, this study investigated the quality of educational processes in preschools at the…

  17. Preschool Center Quality and Socioemotional Readiness for School: Variation by Demographic and Child Characteristics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keys, Tran D.; Farkas, George; Burchinal, Margaret R.; Duncan, Greg J.; Vandell, Deborah L.; Li, Weilin; Ruzek, Erik A.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to address two research questions related to the policy goal of having all children ready to learn at kindergarten entry. First, to what extent are children's socioemotional skills and behavior higher when they experience higher quality preschools? Second, are the effects of preschool center quality on these school…

  18. Math in a Child's World: Policy and Practical Challenges for Preschool Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freedberg, Louis

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, compelling research has found that mastery of early math concepts at a preschool level is a better predictor of later academic outcomes than literacy. Partly driven by these findings, increasing attention is being focused on improving math pedagogy at the preschool level. The issue has assumed added urgency as a result of…

  19. The Pre-School Child's Image of the American Indian. NATAM IX.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Carolyn L.

    The document reports on a survey of books, nursery rhymes, coloring books, clothing, television programs, records, and toys which tend to stereotype American Indians in the minds of preschool children. Also included are interviews with parents of preschool children and with nursery school teachers, the results of which indicate that the preschool…

  20. Preschool Center Quality and School Readiness: Quality Effects and Variation by Demographic and Child Characteristics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keys, Tran D.; Farkas, George; Burchinal, Margaret R.; Duncan, Greg J.; Vandell, Deborah L.; Li, Weilin; Ruzek, Erik A.; Howes, Carollee

    2013-01-01

    This article examines associations between observed quality in preschool center classrooms for approximately 6,250 three- to five-year-olds and their school readiness skills at kindergarten entry. Secondary analyses were conducted using data from four large-scale studies to estimate the effects of preschool center quality and interactions between…

  1. The Neuromotor Examination of the Preschool Child and Its Prognostic Significance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hadders-Algra, Mijna

    2005-01-01

    The present paper reviews the methods available for neurological or neuromotor evaluation at preschool age. General textbooks on pediatric neurology describe the neurological examination at preschool age in terms of the assessment of the evaluation of cranial nerves, muscle tone, muscle power, reflexes, and the presence of abnormal movements. They…

  2. Public health care funding modifies the effect of out-of-pocket spending on maternal, infant, and child mortality.

    PubMed

    Noel, Jonathan K

    2017-03-01

    Increased out-of-pocket (OOP) health care spending has been associated with increased maternal, infant, and child mortality, but the effect of public health care spending on mortality has not been studied. I identified a statistically significant interaction between public health care expenditure and OOP health care spending for maternal, infant, and child mortality. Generally, increases in public expenditure coincide with decreased rates of mortality, regardless of OOP spending levels. Specifically, higher levels of public expenditure with moderate levels of OOP spending may result in the lowest mortality rates. Increased public health care spending may improve health outcomes better than efforts to reduce OOP expenditure alone.

  3. Tackling Health Inequities in Chile: Maternal, Newborn, Infant, and Child Mortality Between 1990 and 2004

    PubMed Central

    Requejo, Jennifer Harris; Nien, Jyh Kae; Merialdi, Mario; Bustreo, Flavia; Betran, Ana Pilar

    2009-01-01

    Objectives. We analyzed trends in maternal, newborn, and child mortality in Chile between 1990 and 2004, after the introduction of national interventions and reforms, and examined associations between trends and interventions. Methods. Data were provided by the Chilean Ministry of Health on all pregnancies between 1990 and 2004 (approximately 4 000 000). We calculated yearly maternal mortality ratios, stillbirth rates, and mortality rates for neonates, infants (aged > 28 days and < 1 year), and children aged 1 to 4 years. We also calculated these statistics by 5-year intervals for Chile's poorest to richest district quintiles. Results. During the study period, the maternal mortality ratio decreased from 42.1 to 18.5 per 100 000 live births. The mortality rate for neonates decreased from 9.0 to 5.7 per 1000 births, for infants from 7.8 to 3.1 per 1000 births, and for young children from 3.1 to 1.7 per 1000 live births. The stillbirth rate declined from 6.0 to 5.0 per 1000 births. Disparities in these mortality statistics between the poorest and richest district quintiles also decreased, with the largest mortality reductions in the poorest quintile. Conclusions. During a period of socioeconomic development and health sector reforms, Chile experienced significant mortality and inequity reductions. PMID:19443831

  4. The Role of Child Gender and Ethnicity in Teacher-Child Relationship Quality and Children's Behavioral Adjustment in Preschool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ewing, Allison R.; Taylor, Angela R.

    2009-01-01

    The present study examined the role of child gender, child ethnicity, and teacher-child ethnic match in moderating the association between teacher-child relationship quality and children's classroom behavioral adjustment. The study was conducted using data from an ethnically diverse sample of 301 Head Start children and their teachers.…

  5. Temporal trends (1977-2007) and ethnic inequity in child mortality in rural villages of southern Guinea Bissau

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Guinea Bissau is one of the poorest countries in the world, with one of the highest under-5 mortality rate. Despite its importance for policy planning, data on child mortality are often not available or of poor quality in low-income countries like Guinea Bissau. Our aim in this study was to use the baseline survey to estimate child mortality in rural villages in southern Guinea Bissau for a 30 years period prior to a planned cluster randomised intervention. We aimed to investigate temporal trends with emphasis on historical events and the effect of ethnicity, polygyny and distance to the health centre on child mortality. Methods A baseline survey was conducted prior to a planned cluster randomised intervention to estimate child mortality in 241 rural villages in southern Guinea Bissau between 1977 and 2007. Crude child mortality rates were estimated by Kaplan-Meier method from birth history of 7854 women. Cox regression models were used to investigate the effects of birth periods with emphasis on historical events, ethnicity, polygyny and distance to the health centre on child mortality. Results High levels of child mortality were found at all ages under five with a significant reduction in child mortality over the time periods of birth except for 1997-2001. That period comprises the 1998/99 civil war interval, when child mortality was 1.5% higher than in the previous period. Children of Balanta ethnic group had higher hazard of dying under five years of age than children from other groups until 2001. Between 2002 and 2007, Fula children showed the highest mortality. Increasing walking distance to the nearest health centre increased the hazard, though not substantially, and polygyny had a negligible and statistically not significant effect on the hazard. Conclusion Child mortality is strongly associated with ethnicity and it should be considered in health policy planning. Child mortality, though considerably decreased during the past 30 years, remains

  6. A long-Segmental Vascular Malformation in the Small Bowel Presenting With Gastrointestinal Bleeding in a Preschool-Aged Child

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yeoun Joo; Hwang, Jae-Yeon; Cho, Yong Hoon; Kim, Yong-Woo; Kim, Tae Un; Shin, Dong Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding in pediatric patients has several causes. Vascular malformation of the small bowel is a rare disease leading to pediatric GI bleeding. To our knowledge, few reports describe ultrasound and computed tomography findings of venous malformations involving the small bowel. We present a case of long-segmental and circumferential vascular malformation that led to GI bleeding in a pre-school aged child, focusing on the radiologic findings. Although vascular malformation including of the GI tract is rare in children, it should be considered when GI bleeding occurs in pediatric patients. PMID:27110342

  7. Exploring Child Mortality Risks Associated with Diverse Patterns of Maternal Migration in Haiti.

    PubMed

    Smith-Greenaway, Emily; Thomas, Kevin

    2014-12-01

    Internal migration is a salient dimension of adulthood in Haiti, particularly among women. Despite the prevalence of migration in Haiti, it remains unknown whether Haitian women's diverse patterns of migration influence their children's health and survival. In this paper, we introduce the concept of lateral (i.e., rural-to-rural, urban-to-urban) versus nonlateral (i.e., rural-to-urban, urban-to-rural) migration to describe how some patterns of mothers' internal migration may be associated with particularly high mortality among children. We use the 2006 Haitian Demographic and Health Survey to estimate a series of discrete-time hazard models among 7,409 rural children and 3,864 urban children. We find that, compared with their peers with nonmigrant mothers, children born to lateral migrants generally experience lower mortality whereas those born to nonlateral migrants generally experience higher mortality. Although there are important distinctions across Haiti's rural and urban contexts, these associations remain net of socioeconomic factors, suggesting they are not entirely attributable to migrant selection. Considering the timing of maternal migration uncovers even more variation in the child health implications of maternal migration; however, the results counter the standard disruption and adaptation perspective. Although future work is needed to identify the processes underlying the differential risk of child mortality across lateral versus nonlateral migrants, the study demonstrates that looking beyond rural-to-urban migration and considering the timing of maternal migration can provide a fuller, more complex understanding of migration's association with child health.

  8. Impact of the economic crisis and increase in food prices on child mortality: exploring nutritional pathways.

    PubMed

    Christian, Parul

    2010-01-01

    The current economic crisis and food price increase may have a widespread impact on the nutritional and health status of populations, especially in the developing world. Gains in child survival over the past few decades are likely to be threatened and millennium development goals will be harder to achieve. Beyond starvation, which is one of the causes of death in famine situations, there are numerous nutritional pathways by which childhood mortality can increase. These include increases in childhood wasting and stunting, intrauterine growth restriction, and micronutrient deficiencies such as that of vitamin A, iron, and zinc when faced with a food crisis and decreased food availability. These pathways are elucidated and described. Although estimates of the impact of the current crisis on child mortality are yet to be made, data from previous economic crises provide evidence of an increase in childhood mortality that we review. The current situation also emphasizes that there are vast segments of the world's population living in a situation of chronic food insecurity that are likely to be disproportionately affected by an economic crisis. Nutritional and health surveillance data are urgently needed in such populations to monitor both the impacts of a crisis and of interventions. Addressing the nutritional needs of children and women in response to the present crisis is urgent. But, ensuring that vulnerable populations are also targeted with known nutritional interventions at all times is likely to have a substantial impact on child mortality.

  9. Tracking progress towards the Millennium Development Goals: reaching consensus on child mortality levels and trends.

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    The increased attention to tracking progress towards the Millennium Development Goals (MDG), including Goal 4 of reducing child mortality, has drawn attention to a number of interrelated technical, operational and political challenges and to the underlying weaknesses of country health information systems upon which reliable monitoring depends. Assessments of child mortality published in 2005, for almost all low-income countries, are based on an extrapolation of the trends observed during the 1990s, rather than on the empirical data for more recent years. The validity of the extrapolation depends on the quality and quantity of the data used, and many countries lack suitable data. In the long run, it is hoped that vital registration or sample registration systems will be established to monitor vital events in a sustainable way. However, in the short run, tracking child mortality in high-mortality countries will continue to rely on household surveys and extrapolations of historical trends. This will require more collaborative efforts both to collect data through initiatives to strengthen health information systems at the country level, and to harmonize the estimation process. The latter objective requires the continued activity of a coordinating group of international agencies and academics that aims to produce transparent estimates -- through the consistent application of an agreed-upon methodology --for monitoring at the international level. PMID:16583082

  10. Associations between prenatal arsenic exposure with adverse pregnancy outcome and child mortality.

    PubMed

    Shih, Yu-Hsuan; Islam, Tariqul; Hore, Samar Kumar; Sarwar, Golam; Shahriar, Mohammad Hasan; Yunus, Mohammad; Graziano, Joseph H; Harjes, Judith; Baron, John A; Parvez, Faruque; Ahsan, Habibul; Argos, Maria

    2017-10-01

    Chronic arsenic exposure is a public health concern in many parts of the world, with elevated concentrations in groundwater posing a threat to millions of people. Arsenic is associated with various cancers and an array of chronic diseases; however, the relationship with adverse pregnancy outcomes and child mortality is less established. We evaluated associations between individual-level prenatal arsenic exposure with adverse pregnancy outcomes and child mortality in a pregnancy study among 498 women nested in a larger population-based cohort in rural Bangladesh. Creatinine-adjusted urinary total arsenic concentration, a comprehensive measure of exposure from water, food, and air sources, reflective of the prenatal period was available for participants. Self-reported pregnancy outcomes (livebirth, stillbirth, spontaneous/elective abortion) were ascertained. Generalized estimating equations, accounting for multiple pregnancies of participants, were used to estimate odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals in relation to adverse pregnancy outcomes. Vital status of livebirths was subsequently ascertained through November 2015. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals in relation to child mortality. We observed a significant association between prenatal arsenic exposure and the risk of stillbirth (greater than median; adjusted OR = 2.50; 95% CI = 1.04, 6.01). We also observed elevated risk of child mortality (greater than median; adjusted HR = 1.92; 95% CI = 0.78, 4.68) in relation to prenatal arsenic exposure. Prospective studies should continue to evaluate prenatal and early life health effects of arsenic exposure and arsenic remediation strategies for women of child-bearing age. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Parental mortality rates in a western country after the death of a child: assessment of the role of the child's sex.

    PubMed

    Werthmann, Jessica; Smits, Luc J M; Li, Jiong

    2010-02-01

    Loss of a child has been associated with elevated mortality rates in parents. Studies that focus on the influence of the child's sex on parental mortality are sparse. The main objective of the present study was to reevaluate the combined impact of the parents' and child's sex within a larger sample and focus on adverse health effects as an objective measure of possible long-term effects of maladaptive grief reactions. For the time period between 1980 and 1996, all children in Denmark who died before 18 years of age were identified. Parents who had lost a child were identified as the bereaved (exposed) group. Mortality rates of parents within the same-sex parent-child dyad were compared with mortality rates of parents within the opposite-sex parent-child dyad. Separate analyses were performed for bereaved fathers and for bereaved mothers, and additional analyses were conducted to examine the sole effect of the child's sex, irrespective of parental gender. A Cox proportional hazards regression model was used to estimate the hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% CIs. The study population consisted of 21,062 parents (mean age at entry, 32 years; 11,221 mothers, 9841 fathers). Bereaved parents who had lost a child of the same sex had similar overall mortality as bereaved parents who had lost a child of the opposite sex (HR = 1.02; 95% CI, 0.85-1.22). Similar findings were observed for mortality due to natural death (HR = 0.96; 95% CI, 0.78-1.18) or mortality due to unnatural death (HR = 1.22; 95% CI, 0.84-1.77). Bereaved fathers who had lost a son had similar mortality as those bereaved by the death of a daughter (HR = 1.10; 95% CI, 0.86-1.40). Bereaved mothers who had lost a daughter had similar mortality as those bereaved by the death of a son (HR = 0.93; 95% CI, 0.70-1.22). Bereaved parents who had lost a son had mortality rates similar to those who had lost a daughter (HR = 1.09; 95% CI, 0.91-1.31). The interactions between grouping variable and sex of parents were not

  12. Sex differences in child and adolescent mortality by parental education in the Nordic countries.

    PubMed

    Gissler, Mika; Rahkonen, Ossi; Mortensen, Laust; Arntzen, Annett; Cnattingius, Sven; Nybo Andersen, Anne-Marie; Hemminki, Elina

    2012-01-01

    Socioeconomic position inequalities in infant mortality are well known, but there is less information on how child mortality is socially patterned by sex and age. To assess maternal and paternal socioeconomic inequalities in mortality by sex, whether these differences vary by age and country, and how much of the sex differences can be explained by external causes of death. Data on all live-born children were received from national birth registries for 1981-2000 (Denmark: n=1,184,926; Norway: n=1,090,127; and Sweden n=1,961,911) and for 1987-2000 (Finland: n=841,470). Data on the highest level of education in 2000 were obtained from national education registers, and data on mortality and causes of death were received from the national cause-of-death registers until the end of follow-up (20 years or 2003). Boys had a higher child and adolescent mortality than girls. The children of mothers and fathers who had had the shortest education time had the highest mortality for both sexes and for all ages and countries. The differences between the groups with longer than basic education were smaller, particularly among older children and girls. The gradient in mortality was mostly similar for boys and girls. Among 1-19-year-olds, 32% of boys' deaths and 27% of girls' deaths were due to external causes. Boys' excess mortality was only partly explained by educational inequalities or by deaths from external causes. A more detailed analysis is needed to study whether the share of avoidable deaths is higher among children whose parents have had a shorter education time.

  13. Physical activity, sedentary behaviour and energy balance in the preschool child: opportunities for early obesity prevention.

    PubMed

    Reilly, John J

    2008-08-01

    Prevalence of obesity in preschool children has increased dramatically in recent years. The preschool years (age 3-6 years) have been regarded as critical for the programming of energy balance, via the concept of early 'adiposity rebound'. Children who undergo early adiposity rebound are at increased risk of later obesity. Recent evidence suggests that associations between timing of adiposity rebound and later obesity may not reflect programming, but might denote that 'obesogenic' growth trajectories are often established by the preschool period. Studies of objectively-measured physical activity and sedentary behaviour in preschool children show that levels of physical activity are typically low and sedentary behaviour high. The review of evidence presented here is supportive of the hypothesis that physical activity is protective against obesity in the preschool period, and that sedentary behaviour, particularly television viewing, is obesogenic. Definitive evidence on dose-response relationships between physical activity, sedentary behaviour and obesity remain unclear. Dose-response evidence could be obtained fairly readily by intervention and longitudinal observational studies that use accelerometry in preschool children. The generalisability of much of the evidence base is limited and there is a need for research on the influence of physical activity and sedentary behaviour in the preschool years in the aetiology of obesity in the developing world.

  14. How is this child feeling? Preschool-aged children’s ability to recognize emotion in faces and body poses

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Alison E.; Mathis, Erin T.; Kupersmidt, Janis B.

    2016-01-01

    The study examined children’s recognition of emotion from faces and body poses, as well as gender differences in these recognition abilities. Preschool-aged children (N = 55) and their parents and teachers participated in the study. Preschool-aged children completed a web-based measure of emotion recognition skills, which included five tasks (three with faces and two with bodies). Parents and teachers reported on children’s aggressive behaviors and social skills. Children’s emotion accuracy on two of the three facial tasks and one of the body tasks was related to teacher reports of social skills. Some of these relations were moderated by child gender. In particular, the relationships between emotion recognition accuracy and reports of children’s behavior were stronger for boys than girls. Identifying preschool-aged children’s strengths and weaknesses in identification of emotion from faces and body poses may be helpful in guiding interventions with children who have problems with social and behavioral functioning that may be due, in part, to emotional knowledge deficits. Further developmental implications of these findings are discussed. PMID:27057129

  15. Inequality of child mortality among ethnic groups in sub-Saharan Africa.

    PubMed Central

    Brockerhoff, M.; Hewett, P.

    2000-01-01

    Accounts by journalists of wars in several countries of sub-Saharan Africa in the 1990s have raised concern that ethnic cleavages and overlapping religious and racial affiliations may widen the inequalities in health and survival among ethnic groups throughout the region, particularly among children. Paradoxically, there has been no systematic examination of ethnic inequality in child survival chances across countries in the region. This paper uses survey data collected in the 1990s in 11 countries (Central African Republic, Côte d'Ivoire, Ghana, Kenya, Mali, Namibia, Niger, Rwanda, Senegal, Uganda, and Zambia) to examine whether ethnic inequality in child mortality has been present and spreading in sub-Saharan Africa since the 1980s. The focus was on one or two groups in each country which may have experienced distinct child health and survival chances, compared to the rest of the national population, as a result of their geographical location. The factors examined to explain potential child survival inequalities among ethnic groups included residence in the largest city, household economic conditions, educational attainment and nutritional status of the mothers, use of modern maternal and child health services including immunization, and patterns of fertility and migration. The results show remarkable consistency. In all 11 countries there were significant differentials between ethnic groups in the odds of dying during infancy or before the age of 5 years. Multivariate analysis shows that ethnic child mortality differences are closely linked with economic inequality in many countries, and perhaps with differential use of child health services in countries of the Sahel region. Strong and consistent results in this study support placing the notion of ethnicity at the forefront of theories and analyses of child mortality in Africa which incorporate social, and not purely epidemiological, considerations. Moreover, the typical advantage of relatively small, clearly

  16. Maltreatment prevention through early childhood intervention: A confirmatory evaluation of the Chicago Child-Parent Center preschool program.

    PubMed

    Mersky, Joshua P; Topitzes, James D; Reynolds, Arthur J

    2011-08-01

    Increased recognition of the consequences associated with child maltreatment has led to greater emphasis on its prevention. Promising maltreatment prevention strategies have been identified, but research continues to suffer from methodological limitations and a narrow focus on select prevention models. This investigation uses data from the Chicago Longitudinal Study to examine mediating mechanisms that link the Chicago Child-Parent Center preschool program to a reduction in overall child maltreatment and, more specifically, child neglect. We use structural equation modeling to test child, family, and school measures hypothesized to mediate the effects of CPC participation on maltreatment and neglect. Results indicate that a substantial proportion of the program's impacts can be accounted for by family support processes, including increased parent involvement in school and maternal educational attainment as well as decreased family problems. The CPC program's association with reduced school mobility and increased attendance in higher-quality schools also significantly mediated its effects on maltreatment and neglect. Further, a decrease in troublemaking behavior contributed modestly to mediating the program's association with maltreatment but not neglect. We discuss the implications of these results for the field of maltreatment prevention.

  17. Mortality after cardiac surgery in patients with liver cirrhosis classified by the Child-Pugh score.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Kirolos A; Hjortnaes, Jesper; Kranenburg, Guido; de Heer, Frederiek; Kluin, Jolanda

    2015-04-01

    Liver cirrhosis is a known risk factor for postoperative mortality in patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Clinical assessment of liver cirrhosis using the widely accepted Child-Pugh (CP) score is thus vital for evaluation of surgical options and perioperative care. However, detailed mortality rates as a consequence of liver cirrhosis are unclear. This review aimed to stratify the risk of short-term (<30 days) and overall (up to 10 years) mortality after cardiac surgery in patients with liver cirrhosis, classified by the CP score. Thus, PubMed, Embase, CINAHL and the Cochrane Library were systematically reviewed by two independent investigators for studies published up to February 2014, in which mortality in cirrhotic patients, classified by the CP classification, undergoing cardiac surgery was evaluated postoperatively. A total of 993 articles were identified. After critical appraisal of 21 articles, 19 were selected for final analysis. Weighted short-term mortality of cirrhotic patients undergoing cardiac surgery was 19.3% [95% confidence interval (CI): 16.4-22.5%]. Across the different CP groups, short-term mortality appeared to be 9.0% (95% CI: 6.6-12.2%), 37.7% (95% CI: 30.8-44.3%) and 52.0% (95% CI: 33.5-70.0%) in Groups A, B and C, respectively. Weighted overall mortality within 1 year was 42.0% (95% CI: 36.0-48.3%) in all cirrhotic patients. Subdivided in groups, overall mortality within that 1 year was 27.2% (95% CI: 20.9-34.7%), 66.2% (95% CI: 54.3-76.3%) and 78.9% (95% CI: 56.1-92.1%) in Groups A, B and C, respectively. In conclusion, short-term mortality is considerably increased in patients with liver cirrhosis CP class B and C. Overall mortality is significantly high in all classes of liver cirrhosis.

  18. Gender-Based Disparities in Infant and Child Mortality Based on Maternal Exposure to Spousal Violence

    PubMed Central

    Silverman, Jay G.; Decker, Michele R.; Cheng, Debbie M.; Wirth, Kathleen; Saggurti, Niranjan; McCauley, Heather L.; Falb, Kathryn L.; Donta, Balaiah; Raj, Anita

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To examine associations between intimate partner violence (IPV) against Indian women and risk of death among their infants and children, as well as related gender-based disparities. Design Analyses of nationally representative data to estimate adjusted hazard ratios (aHRs) and attributable risks for infant and child mortality based on child gender and on IPV against mothers. Setting India. Participants Women aged 15 to 49 years (n=59 467) across all 29 Indian states participating in the Indian National Family Health Survey 3 provided information about 158 439 births and about infant and child mortality occurring during the 20 years before the survey. Main Outcome Measures Maternal IPV and infant and child (<5 years) mortality among boy vs girl children. Results Infant mortality was greater among infants whose mothers experienced IPV (79.2 of 1000 births) vs those whose mothers did not experience IPV (59.1 of 1000 births) (aHR, 1.09; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.03–1.15); this effect was significant only for girls (1.15; 1.07–1.24; for boys, 1.04; 0.97–1.11). Child mortality was also greater among children whose mothers experienced IPV (103.6 of 1000 births) vs those whose mothers did not experience IPV (74.8 per 1000 births) (aHR, 1.10; 95% CI, 1.05–1.15); again, this effect was significant only for girls (1.14; 1.07–1.21; for boys, 1.05; 0.99–1.12). An estimated 58 021 infant girl deaths and 89 264 girl child deaths were related to spousal violence against wives annually, or approximately 1.2 million female infant deaths and 1.8 million girl deaths in India between December 1985 and August 2005. Conclusion Intimate partner violence against women should be considered an urgent priority within programs and policies aimed at maximizing survival of children in India, particularly those attempting to increase the survival of girls 5 years and younger. PMID:21199976

  19. Nutritional Understanding of Preschool Children Taught in the Home or a Child Development Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Thomas R.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    This report concludes that preschool children are capable of learning basic concepts of nutrition, including nutritive value, nutrient function, and the impact of nutrition on health in both a laboratory setting and home environment. (JB)

  20. Increased mortality in parents bereaved in the first year of their child's life.

    PubMed

    Harper, Mairi; O'Connor, Rory C; O'Carroll, Ronan E

    2011-12-01

    To identify the relative risk (RR) of mortality in bereaved parents compared with non-bereaved counterparts. Retrospective data linkage study. United Kingdom, 1971-2006. A random sample from death registrations (5%) of parents who had a live birth where the infant lived beyond its first year of life (non-bereaved parents) and parents who had experienced a stillbirth or the death of a child in its first year of life (bereaved parents) between 1971 and 2006. Death or widowhood of the parent. Bereaved parents in Scotland (n=738) were more than twice as likely to die in the first 15 years after their child's death than non-bereaved parents (n=50 132), p<0.005. Bereaved mothers in England and Wales (n=481) were more than four times as likely to die in the first 15 years after their child's birth than non-bereaved parents (n=30 956), p<0.001. The mortality risk for bereaved mothers compared with non-bereaved mothers, followed up for 25 years after death, was 1.5 (bereaved n=745, non-bereaved n=36 434), p<0.005. When followed up for 35 years, the risk of mortality for bereaved mothers (n=1120) was 1.2 times that of non-bereaved mothers (n=36 062), p<0.005. Bereaved parents who experience stillbirth or infant death have markedly increased mortality compared with non-bereaved parents, up to 25 years (mean) after the death of their child. However, the RR reduces over time.

  1. Swedish Preschool Teachers' Ideas of the Ideal Preschool Group

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pramling Samuelsson, Ingrid; Williams, Pia; Sheridan, Sonja; Hellman, Annette

    2016-01-01

    In Sweden, preschool has been noted as being of a high quality compared to many other countries. However, dramatic changes in the preschool sector are taking place. A recent law states that it is a child's right to get a preschool place within a few months. As a consequence, the number of children in preschool has increased, which could influence…

  2. Swedish Preschool Teachers' Ideas of the Ideal Preschool Group

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pramling Samuelsson, Ingrid; Williams, Pia; Sheridan, Sonja; Hellman, Annette

    2016-01-01

    In Sweden, preschool has been noted as being of a high quality compared to many other countries. However, dramatic changes in the preschool sector are taking place. A recent law states that it is a child's right to get a preschool place within a few months. As a consequence, the number of children in preschool has increased, which could influence…

  3. One Year of Preschool or Two – Is It Important for Adult Outcomes? Results from the Chicago Longitudinal Study of the Child-Parent Centers

    PubMed Central

    Arteaga, Irma; Humpage, Sarah; Reynolds, Arthur J.; Temple, Judy A.

    2015-01-01

    Until the last year, public funding for preschool education had been growing rapidly over a decade with most state programs providing one year of preschool for four year olds. Fewer three year olds are enrolled in preschool. To investigate the importance of enrollment duration, this study is the first to estimate long-term dosage effects of years of preschool. We use data from a cohort of 1,500 students in the Chicago Longitudinal Study who enrolled in the Chicago Public Schools in the mid-1980s. Many of these students participated in a high-quality preschool program called Child-Parent Centers (CPC) for one or two years. To address selection with multiple treatments, we employ inverse propensity score weighting. Relative to children who attended one year of CPC preschool, the two-year group is significantly less likely to receive special education or be abused or neglected or to commit crimes. The findings provide support for the long-term benefits of greater exposure to preschool. PMID:26823640

  4. One Year of Preschool or Two - Is It Important for Adult Outcomes? Results from the Chicago Longitudinal Study of the Child-Parent Centers.

    PubMed

    Arteaga, Irma; Humpage, Sarah; Reynolds, Arthur J; Temple, Judy A

    2014-05-01

    Until the last year, public funding for preschool education had been growing rapidly over a decade with most state programs providing one year of preschool for four year olds. Fewer three year olds are enrolled in preschool. To investigate the importance of enrollment duration, this study is the first to estimate long-term dosage effects of years of preschool. We use data from a cohort of 1,500 students in the Chicago Longitudinal Study who enrolled in the Chicago Public Schools in the mid-1980s. Many of these students participated in a high-quality preschool program called Child-Parent Centers (CPC) for one or two years. To address selection with multiple treatments, we employ inverse propensity score weighting. Relative to children who attended one year of CPC preschool, the two-year group is significantly less likely to receive special education or be abused or neglected or to commit crimes. The findings provide support for the long-term benefits of greater exposure to preschool.

  5. Dental caries experience in preschool children: is it related to a child's place of residence and family income?

    PubMed

    Sufia, Shamta; Chaudhry, Saima; Izhar, Faisal; Syed, Ayma; Mirza, Bilal Abdul; Khan, Ayyaz Ali

    2011-01-01

    To assess the caries prevalence in 3- to 5-year-old children and determine whether urbanisation and income are associated with the dental decay status of these preschool children residing in the district of Lahore, Pakistan. Multistage random sampling was done to collect the sample of children from urban and rural areas. A list of children 3 to 5 years of age was prepared, and every 2nd child on the list was randomly selected until a total of 700 children were enrolled in the study. Lady Health Workers (LHWs) were trained to conduct this survey after permission from the pertinent authorities. The data of the children and their mothers regarding their age, gender, socioeconomic status (SES) and area of residence were collected. The caries status of children was recorded using the dmft index as per WHO criteria. The prevalence of dental caries in preschool children of Lahore was found to be 40.5%. Within this group, caries prevalence was 33.3% in 3-year-old children, 47.6% in 4-year-old children and 75% in the 5-year-old children. The mean dmft score for the entire child population was 1.85 ± 3.26. A significant association was found between caries prevalence, low socioeconomic status, female gender and rural residence. Preschool children in Lahore, Pakistan have average dmft scores of 1.85 (± 3.26), which are mostly related to untreated carious lesions. Lower caries experience was found to be associated with rural residence and low family income.

  6. Childhood overweight and obesity among Kenyan pre-school children: association with maternal and early child nutritional factors.

    PubMed

    Gewa, Constance A

    2010-04-01

    To report on the prevalence of overweight and obesity among pre-school children in Kenya and examine the associations between childhood overweight and selected maternal and child-related factors. Demographic Health Survey data, multistage stratified cluster sampling methodology. Rural and urban areas of Kenya. A total of 1495 children between the ages of 3 and 5 years in Kenya. Over 30 % of the children were stunted, approximately 16 % were underweight, 4 % were wasted, approximately 18 % were overweight and 4 % were obese; 8 % were both overweight/obese and stunted. Maternal overweight and obesity, higher levels of maternal education, being a large or very large child at birth, and being stunted were each associated with higher odds of overweight and obesity among Kenyan children. Older children and large household size were each associated with lower odds of overweight and obesity among Kenyan children. The analysis demonstrates the presence of under- and overnutrition among Kenyan pre-school children and the importance of focusing on expanding efforts to prevent and treat malnutrition within this population. It also identifies some of the modifiable factors that can be targeted in these efforts.

  7. Exposure to secondhand tobacco smoke and child behaviour - results from a cross-sectional study among preschool children in Bavaria.

    PubMed

    Twardella, D; Bolte, G; Fromme, H; Wildner, M; von Kries, R

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the association of postnatal exposure to secondhand tobacco smoke on childhood behavioural problems after taking maternal smoking during pregnancy into account. In a cross-sectional survey of preschool children in Bavaria, exposure to secondhand tobacco smoke in the child's home was assessed via a parent questionnaire. The Strength and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ) was applied to assess child's behaviour. The association with secondhand tobacco smoke exposure was assessed for 'probable' outcomes of the problem subscales and of prosocial behaviour. Among 5494 children (48% female), the SDQ indicated behavioural problems in up to 11%. After adjustment for socioeconomic factors, low birth weight and maternal smoking before and during pregnancy, a dose-response relationship with exposure to secondhand tobacco smoke was observed regarding hyperactivity/inattention (odds ratio compared to 'none' was 1.35 for 'low/medium' and 2.39 for 'high' exposure, 95% confidence intervals 1.02-1.78 and 1.62-3.53, respectively) as well as for conduct problems (OR 1.68 (1.37-2.06) and 1.93 (1.39-2.68)). Secondhand tobacco smoke exposure at home appears to be associated with an increased risk of behavioural problems among preschool children. Prevention of behavioural problems may be a further reason to target secondhand tobacco smoke exposure in children.

  8. Comparison of the estimated cost-effectiveness of preventive and therapeutic zinc supplementation strategies for reducing child morbidity and mortality in sub-Saharan Africa.

    PubMed

    Brown, Kenneth H; Hess, Sonja Y; Vosti, Stephen A; Baker, Shawn K

    2013-06-01

    Zinc supplementation of young children in lower-income countries reduces morbidity from diarrhea and pneumonia and all-cause mortality, but the most cost-effective approach for distributing zinc supplements is unknown. To examine the potential impact of four possible strategies for delivering zinc supplements on disease prevention and deaths averted among children 6 to 59 months of age in sub-Saharan Africa. We analyzed different zinc supplementation strategies to assess their likely impact on morbidity and mortality of preschool children in sub-Saharan Africa and to estimate their possible costs. Preventive zinc supplementation reduces diarrhea incidence by 27% among children 12 to 59 months of age, pneumonia incidence by 21% among children 6 to 59 months of age, and all-cause mortality by 18% among children 12 to 59 months of age. The likely average total program costs of zinc supplementation programs were estimated from the outlays of existing service delivery platforms, such as child health days, community-based nutrition programs, and clinic-based treatment of diarrhea, assuming different levels of coverage and target age ranges of children. We found that the average total costs per life saved ranged from approximately US$462 to US$3,111, and the most cost-effective interventions were weekly or intermittent preventive zinc supplementation, because of the possibility of high coverage and fewer supplements required. Empirical data from zinc supplementation programs will be needed to confirm these estimates.

  9. Space-Time Smoothing of Complex Survey Data: Small Area Estimation for Child Mortality.

    PubMed

    Mercer, Laina D; Wakefield, Jon; Pantazis, Athena; Lutambi, Angelina M; Masanja, Honorati; Clark, Samuel

    2015-12-01

    Many people living in low and middle-income countries are not covered by civil registration and vital statistics systems. Consequently, a wide variety of other types of data including many household sample surveys are used to estimate health and population indicators. In this paper we combine data from sample surveys and demographic surveillance systems to produce small area estimates of child mortality through time. Small area estimates are necessary to understand geographical heterogeneity in health indicators when full-coverage vital statistics are not available. For this endeavor spatio-temporal smoothing is beneficial to alleviate problems of data sparsity. The use of conventional hierarchical models requires careful thought since the survey weights may need to be considered to alleviate bias due to non-random sampling and non-response. The application that motivated this work is estimation of child mortality rates in five-year time intervals in regions of Tanzania. Data come from Demographic and Health Surveys conducted over the period 1991-2010 and two demographic surveillance system sites. We derive a variance estimator of under five years child mortality that accounts for the complex survey weighting. For our application, the hierarchical models we consider include random effects for area, time and survey and we compare models using a variety of measures including the conditional predictive ordinate (CPO). The method we propose is implemented via the fast and accurate integrated nested Laplace approximation (INLA).

  10. Mortality and fertility: how large is the direct child replacement effect in China?

    PubMed

    Zhang, J

    1990-01-01

    "The direct child replacement effect, that is the extent to which parents will have a child to replace one that died, was estime d by Olsen's method in China, using microdata from a sample survey of 4785 ever-married women in Hebei province taken in 1985. Olsen's method corrects for bias in the ordinary least squares estimate and uses mortality rates as an instrumental variable. Data for all age groups were pooled. Estimates of the direct replacement effect before and after correction for bias were 0.836 and 0.556, showing that over half of child deaths were replaced. The instrumental variable estimate produced a result of 0.614, similar to 0.613, computed by considering p1 to be random. A computation without instrumental variables yielded 0.774. The results showed that this method for calculating the direct replacement effect works well with these data because several of the alternative methods gave close estimates. There appears to be little family specific variation in child mortality rates, pointing out the effectiveness of Chinese primary health care. The direct replacement effect of about 0.6 is, however about 3 times that found by Olsen in Colombia and Malaysia, and close to the theoretical maximum. The reason for such a high value may be the small family size in China, where death of a child is more likely to provoke a response. Or it might suggest that severe government policy causes couples to attempt to have another child. Policy implications in this setting are that rather than make more contraceptives available, or improve infant survival, Chinese policymakers should make a small family size attractive, e.g., by improving education or pensions. excerpt

  11. Increased Waking Salivary Cortisol and Depression Risk in Preschoolers: The Role of Maternal History of Melancholic Depression and Early Child Temperament

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dougherty, Lea R.; Klein, Daniel N.; Olino, Thomas M.; Dyson, Margaret; Rose, Suzanne

    2009-01-01

    Background: Elevated morning cortisol is a prospective predictor of major depression and may serve as a vulnerability marker. We examined the relation between morning cortisol and two prominent risk factors for depression in preschool-aged children: maternal depression and child temperament. We also explored whether maternal depression during the…

  12. THE COGNITIVE ENVIRONMENTS OF URBAN PRE-SCHOOL CHILDREN. MANUAL FOR CODING MOTHER-CHILD INTERACTION ON THE EIGHT-BLOCK SORTING TASK.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    HESS, ROBERT D.; AND OTHERS

    THIS MANUAL DESCRIBES MEASURES USED IN "THE COGNITIVE ENVIRONMENTS OF URBAN PRE-SCHOOL CHILDREN" PROJECT AT THE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO. THE SAMPLE FOR THE STUDY CONSISTED OF 163 NEGRO MOTHER-CHILD PAIRS SELECTED FROM 3 SOCIOECONOMIC CLASSES BASED ON THE FATHER'S OCCUPATION AND THE PARENTS' EDUCATION. A FOURTH GROUP INCLUDED FATHER-ABSENT…

  13. Parent weight change predicts child weight change in family-based weight control program for pre-school children (Buffalo healthy tots)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Title: PARENT WEIGHT CHANGE PREDICTS CHILD WEIGHT CHANGE IN FAMILY-BASED WEIGHT CONTROL PROGRAM FOR PRE-SCHOOL CHILDREN (BUFFALO HEALTHY TOTS), Teresa Quattrin, MOl, James N Roemmich, PhDI, Rocco Paluch, MAl, Jihnhee Yu, PhD2, Leonard H Epstein, PhDI and Michelle A Ecker, RD, CDEI . lpediatrics, Uni...

  14. I Have Something to Tell You: A Child with a Cochlear Implant's Struggles and Determination to Engage with Peers in an Inclusive Preschool Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindeman, Karen Wise

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated how a child with early cochlear implantation interacted with peers in his inclusive preschool setting. A qualitative case-study framed in a socio-linguistic framework guided the data collection and analysis. Data collection included detailed field notes, classroom free play observations, informal student interviews, teacher…

  15. Acquisition and Generalization of Activity Schedules and Their Effects on Task Engagement in a Young Child with Autism in an Inclusive Pre-School Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Massey, N. Gayle; Wheeler, John J.

    2000-01-01

    Individualized activity schedules were successfully used with a 4- year-old child with autism who attended an integrated public pre-school classroom. Graduated physical guidance and a system of most-to-least prompts were used during skill acquisition stages with teacher proximity and level of prompts being eventually faded. (Contains nine…

  16. Increased Waking Salivary Cortisol and Depression Risk in Preschoolers: The Role of Maternal History of Melancholic Depression and Early Child Temperament

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dougherty, Lea R.; Klein, Daniel N.; Olino, Thomas M.; Dyson, Margaret; Rose, Suzanne

    2009-01-01

    Background: Elevated morning cortisol is a prospective predictor of major depression and may serve as a vulnerability marker. We examined the relation between morning cortisol and two prominent risk factors for depression in preschool-aged children: maternal depression and child temperament. We also explored whether maternal depression during the…

  17. Global, regional, and national causes of child mortality in 2008: a systematic analysis.

    PubMed

    Black, Robert E; Cousens, Simon; Johnson, Hope L; Lawn, Joy E; Rudan, Igor; Bassani, Diego G; Jha, Prabhat; Campbell, Harry; Walker, Christa Fischer; Cibulskis, Richard; Eisele, Thomas; Liu, Li; Mathers, Colin

    2010-06-05

    Up-to-date information on the causes of child deaths is crucial to guide global efforts to improve child survival. We report new estimates for 2008 of the major causes of death in children younger than 5 years. We used multicause proportionate mortality models to estimate deaths in neonates aged 0-27 days and children aged 1-59 months, and selected single-cause disease models and analysis of vital registration data when available to estimate causes of child deaths. New data from China and India permitted national data to be used for these countries instead of predictions based on global statistical models, as was done previously. We estimated proportional causes of death for 193 countries, and by application of these proportions to the country-specific mortality rates in children younger than 5 years and birth rates, the numbers of deaths by cause were calculated for countries, regions, and the world. Of the estimated 8.795 million deaths in children younger than 5 years worldwide in 2008, infectious diseases caused 68% (5.970 million), with the largest percentages due to pneumonia (18%, 1.575 million, uncertainty range [UR] 1.046 million-1.874 million), diarrhoea (15%, 1.336 million, 0.822 million-2.004 million), and malaria (8%, 0.732 million, 0.601 million-0.851 million). 41% (3.575 million) of deaths occurred in neonates, and the most important single causes were preterm birth complications (12%, 1.033 million, UR 0.717 million-1.216 million), birth asphyxia (9%, 0.814 million, 0.563 million-0.997 million), sepsis (6%, 0.521 million, 0.356 million-0.735 million), and pneumonia (4%, 0.386 million, 0.264 million-0.545 million). 49% (4.294 million) of child deaths occurred in five countries: India, Nigeria, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Pakistan, and China. These country-specific estimates of the major causes of child deaths should help to focus national programmes and donor assistance. Achievement of Millennium Development Goal 4, to reduce child mortality by

  18. Parent routines, child routines, and family demographics associated with obesity in parents and preschool-aged children.

    PubMed

    Jones, Blake L; Fiese, Barbara H

    2014-01-01

    Many daily routines and behaviors are related to the prevalence of obesity. This study investigated the association between routines and behaviors that act as protective factors related to lower prevalence of obesity in parents (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m(2)) and overweight in preschool children (BMI ≥ 85th percentile). Socio-demographic characteristics were assessed in relation to protective routines (PRs), and prevalence of obesity/overweight data from 337 preschool children and their parents. The two PRs assessed with parents included adequate sleep (≥7 h/night) and family mealtime routine (scoring higher than the median score). The four PRs assessed in children included adequate sleep (≥10 h/night), family mealtime routine, limiting screen-viewing time (≤2 h/day of TV, video, DVD), and not having a bedroom TV. Overall, 27.9% of parents were obese and 22.8% of children were overweight, and 39.8% of the parents had both parent PRs, and only 11.6% of children had all four child PRs. Results demonstrated that several demographic factors were significantly related to the use of PRs for parents and children. The lack of PRs was related to increased risk for overweight in children, but not for obesity in parents. However, in the adjusted models the overall cumulative benefits of using PRs was not significant in children either. In the multivariate adjusted logistic regression models, the only significant individual PR for children was adequate sleep. In a path analysis model, parent sleep was related to child sleep, which was in turn related to decreased obesity. Overall, findings suggest that parent and child PRs, especially sleep routines, within a family can be associated and may play an important role in the health outcomes of both parents and children. Understanding the mechanisms that influence how and when parents and children use these PRs may be promising for developing targeted family-based obesity-prevention efforts.

  19. Reductions in child mortality levels and inequalities in Thailand: analysis of two censuses.

    PubMed

    Vapattanawong, Patama; Hogan, Margaret C; Hanvoravongchai, Piya; Gakidou, Emmanuela; Vos, Theo; Lopez, Alan D; Lim, Stephen S

    2007-03-10

    Thailand's progress in reducing the under-five mortality rate (U5MR) puts the country on track to achieve the fourth Millennium Development Goal (MDG). Whether this success has been accompanied by a widening or narrowing of the child mortality gap between the poorest and richest populations is unknown. We aimed to measure changes in child-mortality inequalities by household-level socioeconomic strata of the Thai population between 1990 and 2000. We measured changes in the distribution of the U5MR by economic strata using data from the 1990 and 2000 censuses. Economic status was measured using household assets and characteristics. The U5MR was estimated using the Trussell version of the Brass indirect method. Average household economic status improved and inequalities declined between the two censuses. There were substantially larger reductions in U5MR in the poorer segments of the population. Excess child mortality risk between the poorest and richest quintile decreased by 55% (95% CI 39% to 68%). The concentration index, measured using percentiles of economic status, in 1990 was -0.20 (-0.23 to -0.18), whereas in 2000 it had dropped to -0.12 (-0.15 to -0.08), a 43% (22% to 63%) reduction. These findings draw attention to the feasibility of incorporating equity measurement into census data. Thailand has achieved both an impressive average decrease in U5MR and substantial reductions in U5MR inequality over a 10 year period. Contributing factors include overall economic growth and poverty reduction, improved insurance coverage, and a scaling-up and more equitable distribution of primary health-care infrastructure and intervention coverage. Understanding the factors that have led to Thailand's success could help inform countries struggling to meet the fourth MDG and reduce inequality.

  20. Fine and Gray competing risk regression model to study the cause-specific under-five child mortality in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Mohammad, Khandoker Akib; Fatima-Tuz-Zahura, Most; Bari, Wasimul

    2017-01-28

    The cause-specific under-five mortality of Bangladesh has been studied by fitting cumulative incidence function (CIF) based Fine and Gray competing risk regression model (1999). For the purpose of analysis, Bangladesh Demographic and Health Survey (BDHS), 2011 data set was used. Three types of mode of mortality for the under-five children are considered. These are disease, non-disease and other causes. Product-Limit survival probabilities for the under-five child mortality with log-rank test were used to select a set of covariates for the regression model. The covariates found to have significant association in bivariate analysis were only considered in the regression analysis. Potential determinants of under-five child mortality due to disease is size of child at birth, while gender of child, NGO (non-government organization) membership of mother, mother's education level, and size of child at birth are due to non-disease and age of mother at birth, NGO membership of mother, and mother's education level are for the mortality due to other causes. Female participation in the education programs needs to be increased because of the improvement of child health and government should arrange family and social awareness programs as well as health related programs for women so that they are aware of their child health.

  1. Decomposing Educational Inequalities in Child Mortality: A Temporal Trend Analysis of Access to Water and Sanitation in Peru.

    PubMed

    Bohra, Tasneem; Benmarhnia, Tarik; McKinnon, Britt; Kaufman, Jay S

    2017-01-11

    Previous studies of inequality in health and mortality have largely focused on income-based inequality. Maternal education plays an important role in determining access to water and sanitation, and inequalities in child mortality arising due to differential access, especially in low- and middle-income countries such as Peru. This article aims to explain education-related inequalities in child mortality in Peru using a regression-based decomposition of the concentration index of child mortality. The analysis combines a concentration index created along a cumulative distribution of the Demographic and Health Surveys sample ranked according to maternal education, and decomposition measures the contribution of water and sanitation to educational inequalities in child mortality. We observed a large education-related inequality in child mortality and access to water and sanitation. There is a need for programs and policies in child health to focus on ensuring equity and to consider the educational stratification of the population to target the most disadvantaged segments of the population. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  2. The impact of violence against women on reproductive health and child mortality in Timor-Leste.

    PubMed

    Taft, Angela J; Powell, Rhonda L; Watson, Lyndsey F

    2015-04-01

    To determine differences in reproductive health and infant and child mortality and health between abused and non-abused ever-married women in Timor-Leste. Secondary data analysis of Timor-Leste Demographic Health Survey (1,959 ever-married women aged 15-49 years). Associations with violence estimated using multinomial logistic regression adjusted for sociodemographic variables and age of first intercourse. Overall, 45% of ever-married women experienced violence: 34% reported physical only and 11% reported combined physical, sexual and/or emotional violence. Compared to non-abused women, women reporting physical violence only were more likely to use traditional contraception (AdjOR 2.35, 95%CI 1.05-5.26) or report: a sexually transmitted infection (AdjOR 4.46, 95%CI 3.27-6.08); a pregnancy termination (AdjOR 1.42, 95%CI 1.03-1.96); a child who had died (AdjOR 1.30, 95%CI 1.05-1.60), a low birth weight infant (AdjOR 2.08, 95%CI 1.64-2.64); and partially vaccinated children (AdjOR 1.35, 95%CI 1.05-1.74). Women who reported combined abuse were more likely to report: a sexually transmitted infection (AdjOR 3.51, 95%CI 2.26-5.44); a pregnancy termination (AdjOR 1.95, 95%CI 1.27-3.01); few antenatal visits (AdjOR 1.76 95%CI 1.21-2.55); and a child who had died (AdjOR 1.45, 95%CI 1.06-2.00). Violence exposes women to poor reproductive health, infant and child mortality and poor infant and child health. Preventing and reducing violence against women should improve women and children's health outcomes in Timor-Leste. © 2015 Public Health Association of Australia.

  3. Parental perception of child weight in the first two years-of-life: a potential link between infant feeding and preschoolers' diet.

    PubMed

    Musaad, Salma M A; Donovan, Sharon M; Fiese, Barbara H

    2015-08-01

    Approximately 23% of preschoolers are overweight or obese. Establishing a healthy dietary lifestyle at an early age can improve later child diet and body weight. This study examined the determinants of past infant feeding practices that do not follow standard feeding recommendations (breastfeeding for less than 6 months duration, cow's milk prior to the first year of age and solid foods at or before 4 months of age). It also examined the role of parental perception of child weight in the first 2 years-of-life on past infant feeding practices as well as current child diet and body weight. Families of 497 preschoolers aged 22-63 months (39.0 ± 8.2) were recruited from 30 child care centers in East-Central Illinois. Main findings indicate that past infant feeding practices were common and varied by socio-demographic factors including race/ethnicity, parental education and child gender. Children perceived as overweight in the first 2 years-of-life tended to breastfeed for lesser duration. Additionally, the majority (79.8%) of preschoolers who were classified as overweight using BMI percentile were perceived as non-overweight by the parent in the first 2 years-of-life. Mean daily total fatty/sugary food intake was higher among those perceived to be non-overweight in the first 2 years-of-life. These findings have identified parental perception of child weight in the first 2 years-of-life as a modifiable risk factor for unhealthy child diet and obesity among preschoolers.

  4. Extremes of maternal age and child mortality: analysis between 2000 and 2009☆

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Fanciele Dinis; Ferrari, Rosângela Aparecida Pimenta; Sant'Anna, Flávia Lopes; Dalmas, José Carlos; Girotto, Edmarlon

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To analyze the characteristics of infant mortality at the extremes of maternal age. METHOD: Retrospective, cross-sectional quantitative study using data from Live Birth Certificates, Death Certificates and from Child Death Investigation records in Londrina, Paraná, in the years of 2000-2009. RESULTS: During the 10-year study period , there were 176 infant deaths among mothers up to 19 years of age, and 113 deaths among mothers aged 35 years or more. The infant mortality rate among young mothers was 14.4 deaths per thousand births, compared to 12.9 deaths in the other age group. For adolescent mothers, the following conditions prevailed: lack of a stable partner (p<0.001), lack of a paid job (p<0.001), late start of prenatal care in the second trimester of pregnancy (p<0.001), fewer prenatal visits (p<0.001) and urinary tract infections (p<0.001). On the other hand, women aged 35 or more had a higher occurrence of hypertension during pregnancy (p<0.001), and of surgical delivery (p<0.001). Regarding the underlying cause of infant death, congenital anomalies prevailed in the group of older mothers (p=0.002), and external causes were predominant in the group of young mothers (p=0.019). CONCLUSION: Both age groups deserve the attention of social services for maternal and child health, especially adolescent mothers, who presented a higher combination of factors deemed hazardous to the child's health. PMID:25511003

  5. Overcoming Stagnation in the Levels and Distribution of Child Mortality: The Case of the Philippines

    PubMed Central

    Bermejo, Raoul; Firth, Sonja; Hodge, Andrew; Jimenez-Soto, Eliana; Zeck, Willibald

    2015-01-01

    Background Health-related within-country inequalities continue to be a matter of great interest and concern to both policy makers and researchers. This study aims to assess the level and the distribution of child mortality outcomes in the Philippines across geographical and socioeconomic indicators. Methodology Data on 159,130 children ever borne were analysed from five waves of the Philippine Demographic and Health Survey. Direct estimation was used to construct under-five and neonatal mortality rates for the period 1980–2013. Rate differences and ratios, and where possible, slope and relative indices of inequality were calculated to measure disparities on absolute and relative scales. Stratification was undertaken by levels of rural/urban location, island groups and household wealth. Findings National under-five and neonatal mortality rates have shown considerable albeit differential reductions since 1980. Recently released data suggests that neonatal mortality has declined following a period of stagnation. Declines in under-five mortality have been accompanied by decreases in wealth and geography-related absolute inequalities. However, relative inequalities for the same markers have remained stable over time. For neonates, mixed evidence suggests that absolute and relative inequalities have remained stable or may have risen. Conclusion In addition to continued reductions in under-five mortality, new data suggests that the Philippines have achieved success in addressing the commonly observed stagnated trend in neonatal mortality. This success has been driven by economic improvement since 2006 as well as efforts to implement a nationwide universal health care campaign. Yet, such patterns, nonetheless, accorded with persistent inequalities, particularly on a relative scale. A continued focus on addressing universal coverage, the influence of decentralisation and armed conflict, and issues along the continuum of care is advocated. PMID:26431409

  6. Association between gender inequality index and child mortality rates: a cross-national study of 138 countries.

    PubMed

    Brinda, Ethel Mary; Rajkumar, Anto P; Enemark, Ulrika

    2015-03-09

    Gender inequality weakens maternal health and harms children through many direct and indirect pathways. Allied biological disadvantage and psychosocial adversities challenge the survival of children of both genders. United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) has recently developed a Gender Inequality Index to measure the multidimensional nature of gender inequality. The global impact of Gender Inequality Index on the child mortality rates remains uncertain. We employed an ecological study to investigate the association between child mortality rates and Gender Inequality Indices of 138 countries for which UNDP has published the Gender Inequality Index. Data on child mortality rates and on potential confounders, such as, per capita gross domestic product and immunization coverage, were obtained from the official World Health Organization and World Bank sources. We employed multivariate non-parametric robust regression models to study the relationship between these variables. Women in low and middle income countries (LMICs) suffer significantly more gender inequality (p < 0.001). Gender Inequality Index (GII) was positively associated with neonatal (β = 53.85; 95% CI 41.61-64.09), infant (β = 70.28; 95% CI 51.93-88.64) and under five mortality rates (β = 68.14; 95% CI 49.71-86.58), after adjusting for the effects of potential confounders (p < 0.001). We have documented statistically significant positive associations between GII and child mortality rates. Our results suggest that the initiatives to curtail child mortality rates should extend beyond medical interventions and should prioritize women's rights and autonomy. We discuss major pathways connecting gender inequality and child mortality. We present the socio-economic problems, which sustain higher gender inequality and child mortality in LMICs. We further discuss the potential solutions pertinent to LMICs. Dissipating gender barriers and focusing on social well-being of women may augment the survival of

  7. Remaining missed opportunities of child survival in Peru: modelling mortality impact of universal and equitable coverage of proven interventions.

    PubMed

    Tam, Yvonne; Huicho, Luis; Huayanay-Espinoza, Carlos A; Restrepo-Méndez, María Clara

    2016-10-04

    Peru has made great improvements in reducing stunting and child mortality in the past decade, and has reached the Millennium Development Goals 1 and 4. The remaining challenges or missed opportunities for child survival needs to be identified and quantified, in order to guide the next steps to further improve child survival in Peru. We used the Lives Saved Tool (LiST) to project the mortality impact of proven interventions reaching every women and child in need, and the mortality impact of eliminating inequalities in coverage distribution between wealth quintiles and urban-rural residence. Our analyses quantified the remaining missed opportunities in Peru, where prioritizing scale-up of facility-based case management for all small and sick babies will be most effective in mortality reduction, compared to other evidenced-based interventions that prevent maternal and child deaths. Eliminating coverage disparities between the poorest quintiles and the richest will reduce under-five and neonatal mortality by 22.0 and 40.6 %, while eliminating coverage disparities between those living in rural and urban areas will reduce under-five and neonatal mortality by 29.3 and 45.2 %. This projected neonatal mortality reduction achieved by eliminating coverage disparities is almost comparable to that already achieved by Peru over the past decade. Although Peru has made great strides in improving child survival, further improvement in child health, especially in newborn health can be achieved if there is universal and equitable coverage of proven, quality health facility-based interventions. The magnitude of reduction in mortality will be similar to what has been achieved in the past decade. Strengthening health system to identify, understand, and direct resources to the poor and rural areas will ensure that Peru achieve the Sustainable Development Goals by 2030.

  8. Case study: videogame distraction reduces behavioral distress in a preschool-aged child undergoing repeated burn dressing changes: a single-subject design.

    PubMed

    Sil, Soumitri; Dahlquist, Lynnda M; Burns, Andrew J

    2013-04-01

    This single-subject design study evaluated the feasibility and efficacy of passive and interactive videogame distraction on behavioral distress for a preschool-aged child receiving repeated burn dressing changes. A 4-year-old girl underwent 3 baseline and 10 videogame distraction sessions (5 passive and 5 interactive) using a restricted alternating treatments design. Observed behavioral distress was coded, and parents and nurses rated the child's distress and cooperative behavior. Relative to baseline, behavioral distress decreased and cooperative behavior increased immediately after the onset of videogame distraction. Single Case Randomization Tests revealed significantly lower behavioral distress and greater cooperation during interactive videogame distraction relative to passive videogame distraction. Interactive videogame distraction appears to be a feasible and effective pain management strategy for a preschool-aged child undergoing repeated painful medical procedures.

  9. Assessment of Child Problem Behaviors by Multiple Informants: A Longitudinal Study from Preschool to School Entry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerr, David C. R.; Lunkenheimer, Erika S.; Olson, Sheryl L.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Children's early problem behavior that manifests in multiple contexts is often more serious and stable. The concurrent and predictive validity of ratings of externalizing and internalizing by four informants was examined at preschool and early school age in an at-risk sample. Methods: Two hundred forty children were assessed by mothers…

  10. Fostering Supportive Teacher-Child Relationships: Intervention Implementation in a State-Funded Preschool Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Driscoll, Katherine C.; Wang, Lijuan; Mashburn, Andrew J.; Pianta, Robert C.

    2011-01-01

    Research Findings: Banking Time is a set of techniques designed to promote positive, supportive relationships through 1-on-1 interactions between teachers and children. Web-based training resources were made available to 252 preschool teachers who received different levels of support as a component of a professional development intervention, and…

  11. Parenting and Preschool Child Development: Examination of Three Low-Income U.S. Cultural Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whiteside-Mansell, Leanne; Bradley, Robert H.; McKelvey, Lorraine

    2009-01-01

    We examined the impact of parenting behaviors on preschool children's social development in low-income families from three cultural groups: European American (n = 286), African American (n = 399), and Hispanic American (n = 164) using Spanish as the primary language in the home. Observed parenting behaviors of stimulation, responsivity, and…

  12. The Interplay among Preschool Child and Family Factors and the Development of ODD Symptoms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harvey, Elizabeth A.; Metcalfe, Lindsay A.

    2012-01-01

    The present study examined (a) the interactions between early behavior, early parenting, and early family adversity in predicting later oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) symptoms, and (b) the reciprocal relations between parent functioning and ODD symptoms across the preschool years. Participants were 258 three-year-old children (138 boys, 120…

  13. Feasibility and Benefit of Parent Participation in a Program Emphasizing Preschool Child Language Development while Homeless

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Neil-Pirozzi, Therese M.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: This exploratory study examined the feasibility of homeless parents' participation in an intervention to increase use of facilitating language strategies during interactions with their preschool children while residing in family homeless shelters. This study also examined the intervention's impact on the parents' use of facilitating…

  14. A Description of Teacher and Child Language in Two Preschool Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawton, Joseph T.; Fowell, Nancy

    This descriptive study compared language used by teachers and children in Ausubelian and Piagetian preschool programs during small group instruction and related learning activities. Instruction in the Ausubelian program (AP) was based on Ausubel's subsumption theory of learning while that in the Piagetian program (PP) was based on Piaget's theory…

  15. The Interplay among Preschool Child and Family Factors and the Development of ODD Symptoms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harvey, Elizabeth A.; Metcalfe, Lindsay A.

    2012-01-01

    The present study examined (a) the interactions between early behavior, early parenting, and early family adversity in predicting later oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) symptoms, and (b) the reciprocal relations between parent functioning and ODD symptoms across the preschool years. Participants were 258 three-year-old children (138 boys, 120…

  16. Relations among Home Literacy Environment, Child Characteristics and Print Knowledge for Preschool Children with Language Impairment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sawyer, Brook E.; Justice, Laura M.; Guo, Ying; Logan, Jessica A. R.; Petrill, Stephen A.; Glenn-Applegate, Katherine; Kaderavek, Joan N.; Pentimonti, Jill M.

    2014-01-01

    To contribute to the modest body of work examining the home literacy environment (HLE) and emergent literacy outcomes for children with disabilities, this study addressed two aims: (a) to determine the unique contributions of the HLE on print knowledge of preschool children with language impairment and (b) to identify whether specific child…

  17. Preschoolers' Social Interest toward a Child with ASD and Their Theory of Mind Abilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zakai-Mashiach, Mati; Ziv, Margalit; Dromi, Esther

    2017-01-01

    This study examined the Theory of Mind (ToM) abilities of typically developing preschoolers in three age groups: three- to four-, four- to five- and five- to six-years-old (n = 110), who differed in their spontaneous social interest toward included children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Social interest was assessed by administering a…

  18. A Description of Teacher and Child Language in Two Preschool Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawton, Joseph T.; Fowell, Nancy

    This descriptive study compared language used by teachers and children in Ausubelian and Piagetian preschool programs during small group instruction and related learning activities. Instruction in the Ausubelian program (AP) was based on Ausubel's subsumption theory of learning while that in the Piagetian program (PP) was based on Piaget's theory…

  19. The Pre-School Child Near Environment: Variable Manipulation and Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartholomew, Robert; And Others

    A study of the relationship between the behavior of preschool children (3-5-year age group) and the physical near environment has been initiated at Cornell. The illumination and sound levels, color, equipment, and spatial configurations in a nursery school room are to be varied, and systematic observational records will be kept of the level of…

  20. Pots and Pans Activities for Parent and Child: Activities for Preschool Multiple Handicapped Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Tassel, Jean

    Intended for parents and teachers of multiply handicapped preschool children, the booklet provides lesson plans in three major areas--basic concepts, motor activities, and language activities. Each lesson plan is broken down into four parts: purpose (a descriptive statement of what the lesson hopes to accomplish), materials (list of materials…

  1. Child Nutrition: A Focus on Preschool. Guidance for Early Care and Education Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connecticut State Dept. of Education, Hartford.

    Because the development of healthy eating and physical activity habits during early childhood can prevent disease and support a lifetime of good health, nutrition services are a critical component of early childhood programs. This publication provides guidance to preschool programs to help them meet the Connecticut state goal of practicing…

  2. Income Disparities in Preschool Outcomes and the Role of Family, Child, and Parenting Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kohen, Dafna; Guèvremont, Anne

    2014-01-01

    The current study examined income disparities in a comprehensive set of preschoolers' outcomes (verbal ability, developmental skills, number knowledge, and hyperactivity) and the factors that could reduce differences in outcomes between children in the lowest and highest household income quartiles. Findings using Cycle 6 data from the Canadian…

  3. Searching, Experimenting and the Heuristic Structure of a Preschool Child's Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poddiakov, Nikolay

    2011-01-01

    This article is about experimentation in both practical and mental activity and uses data from a series of studies with preschool children. The article focuses on personal experimentation, which is aimed at discovering relations, rather than the more utilitarian experimentation that is aimed at solving practical tasks. Personal experimentation…

  4. Organinzing the Curriculum Storage in a Preschool/Child Care Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cutler, Kay M.

    2000-01-01

    A preschool staff project was undertaken to develop and implement a more efficient curriculum organization plan and curriculum rotation system. The aim of the project was to provide a healthier working environment by improving communication among the teaching team, organizing curriculum storage outside the classroom, designing curriculum rotation…

  5. Searching, Experimenting and the Heuristic Structure of a Preschool Child's Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poddiakov, Nikolay

    2011-01-01

    This article is about experimentation in both practical and mental activity and uses data from a series of studies with preschool children. The article focuses on personal experimentation, which is aimed at discovering relations, rather than the more utilitarian experimentation that is aimed at solving practical tasks. Personal experimentation…

  6. Teacher and Parental Involvement in the Treatment of a Preschool Antisocial Child.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coalson, Freda; Chu, Lily

    When children experience serious problems with peer relationships there is increasing evidence that these children are at risk for a variety of adjustment problems later in life. This study utilized a variety of interventions to decrease negative behaviors in an active 4-year-old in a preschool setting referred by his teacher for noncompliant,…

  7. Parenting and Preschool Child Development: Examination of Three Low-Income U.S. Cultural Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whiteside-Mansell, Leanne; Bradley, Robert H.; McKelvey, Lorraine

    2009-01-01

    We examined the impact of parenting behaviors on preschool children's social development in low-income families from three cultural groups: European American (n = 286), African American (n = 399), and Hispanic American (n = 164) using Spanish as the primary language in the home. Observed parenting behaviors of stimulation, responsivity, and…

  8. Child Nutrition: A Focus on Preschool. Guidance for Early Care and Education Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connecticut State Dept. of Education, Hartford.

    Because the development of healthy eating and physical activity habits during early childhood can prevent disease and support a lifetime of good health, nutrition services are a critical component of early childhood programs. This publication provides guidance to preschool programs to help them meet the Connecticut state goal of practicing…

  9. Is the Maternal Q-Set a Valid Measure of Preschool Child Attachment Behavior?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moss, Ellen; Bureau, Jean-Francois; Cyr, Chantal; Dubois-Comtois, Karine

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this study is to examine preschool-age correlates of the maternal version of the Attachment Q-Set (AQS) (Waters & Deane, 1985) in order to provide validity data. Concurrent associations between the Attachment Q-Set and measures of separation-reunion attachment classifications (Cassidy & Marvin, 1992), quality of mother-child…

  10. Equilibration and Sensory Overload in the Pre-School Child: Some Effects of Children's Television Programming.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Thomas W.

    This paper reports an attempt to research sensory overstimulation in a variety of children's television programs by rating the level of visual sensory stimulation, auditory sensory stimulation, verbal response patterns and nonverbal response patterns in 45 television programs designed for pre-school children. The Television Rating Inventory (TVRI)…

  11. Factors that Limit and Enable Preschool-Aged Children's Physical Activity on Child Care Centre Playgrounds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coleman, Bianca; Dyment, Janet E.

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of childhood obesity amongst preschool-aged children has increased dramatically in recent years and can be attributed, in part, to a lack of physical activity amongst children in this age group. This study explores the social factors that stand to limit and/or enable children's physical activity opportunities in outdoor settings in…

  12. Relations among Home Literacy Environment, Child Characteristics and Print Knowledge for Preschool Children with Language Impairment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sawyer, Brook E.; Justice, Laura M.; Guo, Ying; Logan, Jessica A. R.; Petrill, Stephen A.; Glenn-Applegate, Katherine; Kaderavek, Joan N.; Pentimonti, Jill M.

    2014-01-01

    To contribute to the modest body of work examining the home literacy environment (HLE) and emergent literacy outcomes for children with disabilities, this study addressed two aims: (a) to determine the unique contributions of the HLE on print knowledge of preschool children with language impairment and (b) to identify whether specific child…

  13. The Impact of Reading Children's Literature on Language Development in the Preschool Child.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Umek, Ljubica Marjanovi; Fekonja, Urska; Kranjc, Simona; Musek, Petra Lesnik

    2003-01-01

    Explored the impact of regular reading of selected children's books in Slovenian preschools on the development of language competencies among 4- to 6-year-olds. Found significant differences in receptive language, expressive language, and storytelling between children exposed to 2 selected books per week over 2 months and those exposed only to the…

  14. Independence and Interplay between Maternal and Child Risk Factors for Preschool Problem Behaviors?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, Claire; Ensor, Rosie

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the independence and interplay between cognitive risk factors (poor executive function/emotion understanding) and maternal risk factors (low education/high depression) for preschool problem behaviors, indexed by multi-measure, multi-informant (mother/teacher/ researcher) ratings. A socio-economically diverse sample of 235…

  15. How to Talk to a Preschool Child about a Suicide Attempt in Your Family

    MedlinePlus

    ... be more frightening than the situation itself. Because preschool children do not have the vocabulary to express all their thoughts and feelings, they may act out at times. Small children, when stressed, may exhibit changes in behavior, such as temper tantrums. They may also have ...

  16. Addressing Parenting and Child Stress: Three Workshops for Parents of Preschool Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tone, Danielle M.; McBride, Dawn Lorraine

    2013-01-01

    The intent of this manuscript is to inform others about stress, parental stress, and highlight the negative consequences of stress on children by directly providing information to parents of infant and preschool children in the form of a psychoeducational workshop. Given that the early years of life have many critical periods of development and…

  17. Income Disparities in Preschool Outcomes and the Role of Family, Child, and Parenting Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kohen, Dafna; Guèvremont, Anne

    2014-01-01

    The current study examined income disparities in a comprehensive set of preschoolers' outcomes (verbal ability, developmental skills, number knowledge, and hyperactivity) and the factors that could reduce differences in outcomes between children in the lowest and highest household income quartiles. Findings using Cycle 6 data from the Canadian…

  18. Factors that Limit and Enable Preschool-Aged Children's Physical Activity on Child Care Centre Playgrounds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coleman, Bianca; Dyment, Janet E.

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of childhood obesity amongst preschool-aged children has increased dramatically in recent years and can be attributed, in part, to a lack of physical activity amongst children in this age group. This study explores the social factors that stand to limit and/or enable children's physical activity opportunities in outdoor settings in…

  19. The Application of the Preschool Child Behavior Checklist and the Caregiver-Teacher Report Form to Mainland Chinese Children: Syndrome Structure, Gender Differences, Country Effects, and Inter-Informant Agreement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Jianghong; Cheng, Halina; Leung, Patrick W. L.

    2011-01-01

    Preschool children have long been a neglected population in the study of psychopathology. The Achenbach System of Empirically Based Assessment (ASEBA), which includes the Child Behavior Checklist/1.5-5 (CBCL/1.5-5) and the Caregiver-Teacher Report Form (C-TRF), constitutes the few available measures to assess preschoolers with an empirically…

  20. Patterns of Child Care Use for Preschoolers in Los Angeles County. Technical Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chyu, Laura; Pebley, Anne R.; Lara-Cinisomo, Sandraluz

    2005-01-01

    This report examines patterns of child care use in 2000-2001 for children ages 0-5 who were not yet enrolled in kindergarten or first grade. Specifically, the report examines whether or not non-parental child care was used, the primary type of child care used, the amount of child care used per week, the number of arrangements, the cost of care,…

  1. Patterns of Child Care Use for Preschoolers in Los Angeles County. Technical Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chyu, Laura; Pebley, Anne R.; Lara-Cinisomo, Sandraluz

    2005-01-01

    This report examines patterns of child care use in 2000-2001 for children ages 0-5 who were not yet enrolled in kindergarten or first grade. Specifically, the report examines whether or not non-parental child care was used, the primary type of child care used, the amount of child care used per week, the number of arrangements, the cost of care,…

  2. Increasing access to dental care for medicaid preschool children: the Access to Baby and Child Dentistry (ABCD) program.

    PubMed Central

    Grembowski, D; Milgrom, P M

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Washington State's Access to Baby and Child Dent stry (ABCD) Program, first implemented in Spokane County in 1995, offers extended dental benefits to participating Medicaid-enrolled children and higher fees for certified providers. This study aimed to determine the program's effect on children's dental utilization and dental fear, and on parent satisfaction and knowledge. METHODS: The study used a posttest-only comparison group design. Trained interviewers conducted telephone interviews with 465 parents of chi dren ages 13 to 36 months (49% ABCD, 51% Medicaid-enrolled children not in ABCD). One year later, 282 of 465 parents completed a follow-up survey. Utilization and expenditures were calculated from Medicaid claims. RESULTS: Forty-three percent of children in the ABCD Program visited a dentist in the follow-up year, compared with 12% of Medicaid-enrolled children not in the ABCD Program. An ABCD child was 5.3 times as likely to have had at least one dental visit as a child not in the program. ABCD children were 4 to 13 times as likely to have used specific dental services. Parents of ABCD children were more likely to report having ever tried to make a dental appointment, less likely to report that their children were fearful of the dentist, and were more satisfied, compared to parents of non-ABCD children. CONCLUSION: The authors conclude that the ABCD Program was effective in increasing access for preschool children enrolled in Medicaid, reducing dental fear, and increasing parent satisfaction. PMID:11236017

  3. Residual confounding explains the association between high parity and child mortality

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background This study used data from recent Demographic and Health Surveys (DHS) to examine the impact of high parity on under-five and neonatal mortality. The analyses used various techniques to attempt eliminating selection issues, including stratification of analyses by mothers’ completed fertility. Methods We analyzed DHS datasets from 47 low- and middle-income countries. We only used data from women who were age 35 or older at the time of survey to have a measure of their completed fertility. We ran log-binominal regression by country to calculate relative risk between parity and both under-five and neonatal mortality, controlled for wealth quintile, maternal education, urban versus rural residence, maternal age at first birth, calendar year (to control for possible time trends), and birth interval. We then controlled for maternal background characteristics even further by using mothers’ completed fertility as a proxy measure. Results We found a statistically significant association between high parity and child mortality. However, this association is most likely not physiological, and can be largely attributed to the difference in background characteristics of mothers who complete reproduction with high fertility versus low fertility. Children of high completed fertility mothers have statistically significantly increased risk of death compared to children of low completed fertility mothers at every birth order, even after controlling for available confounders (i.e. among children of birth order 1, adjusted RR of under-five mortality 1.58, 95% CI: 1.42, 1.76). There appears to be residual confounders that put children of high completed fertility mothers at higher risk, regardless of birth order. When we examined the association between parity and under-five mortality among mothers with high completed fertility, it remained statistically significant, but negligible in magnitude (i.e. adjusted RR of under-five mortality 1.03, 95% CI: 1.02-1.05). Conclusions

  4. NGO-promoted women's credit program, immunization coverage, and child mortality in rural Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Amin, R; Li, Y

    1997-01-01

    A growing number of non-governmental organizations (NGOs) are adopting the collateral-free credit programs by anchoring them with their social development programs aimed at improved program effectiveness and sustainability. Drawing upon a sample of 3,564 targeted poor households covered by five small NGOs in rural Bangladesh, this study finds that the NGO credit-members as well as those who reside in the NGO program area are higher adopters of child immunization than those in the non-program area. Similarly, the study found that infant and child mortality is lower among the NGO credit members than among the non-members and that under five-year deaths of children progressively decline with the increase in the doses of vaccines. Implications of these findings are discussed in the study.

  5. Preventing infant and child morbidity and mortality due to maternal depression.

    PubMed

    Surkan, Pamela J; Patel, Shivani A; Rahman, Atif

    2016-10-01

    This review provides an overview of perinatal depression and its impacts on the health of mothers, their newborns, and young children in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). We define and describe the urgency and scope of the problem of perinatal depression for mothers, while highlighting some specific issues such as suicidal ideation and decreased likelihood to seek health care. Pathways through which stress may link maternal depression to childhood growth and development (e.g., the hypo-pituitary axis) are discussed, followed by a summary of the adverse effects of depression on birth outcomes, parenting practices, and child growth and development. Although preliminary studies on the association between maternal depressive symptoms and maternal and child mortality exist, more research on these topics is needed. We describe the available interventions and suggest strategies to reduce maternal depressive symptoms in LMICs, including integration of services with existing primary health-care systems.

  6. Child Negative Emotionality and Parenting from Infancy to Preschool: A Meta-Analytic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paulussen-Hoogeboom, Marja C.; Stams, Geert Jan J. M.; Hermanns, Jo M. A.; Peetsma, Thea T. D.

    2007-01-01

    This meta-analytic review (k = 62 studies; N = 7,613 mother-child dyads) shows that effect sizes for the association between child negative emotionality and parenting were generally small and were moderated by sample and measurement characteristics. The association between more child negative emotionality and less supportive parenting was…

  7. Teacher-Child Interaction Therapy: Efficacy with a Clinical Preschool Population

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaffner, Kristen Friedrich

    2013-01-01

    Teacher-Child Interaction Therapy (TCIT), which is an adaptation of the empirically-based treatment of Parent-Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT), addresses the needs of children and teachers through increasing positive teacher-child interactions while educating teachers on effective discipline techniques. The theoretical and empirical basis for PCIT…

  8. Teacher-Child Interaction Therapy: Efficacy with a Clinical Preschool Population

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaffner, Kristen Friedrich

    2013-01-01

    Teacher-Child Interaction Therapy (TCIT), which is an adaptation of the empirically-based treatment of Parent-Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT), addresses the needs of children and teachers through increasing positive teacher-child interactions while educating teachers on effective discipline techniques. The theoretical and empirical basis for PCIT…

  9. Who's Minding Preschool Children? Trends in the Utilization of Child Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neugebauer, Roger

    2012-01-01

    Center-based child care and family child care are now part of the fabric of life in the United States. This trend report will review the available demographic information on the types of child care arrangements that parents are utilizing, the expenses related to these forms of care, and the structural characteristics of center-based care. Most of…

  10. Who's Minding Preschool Children? Trends in the Utilization of Child Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neugebauer, Roger

    2012-01-01

    Center-based child care and family child care are now part of the fabric of life in the United States. This trend report will review the available demographic information on the types of child care arrangements that parents are utilizing, the expenses related to these forms of care, and the structural characteristics of center-based care. Most of…

  11. Mortality in parents following the death of a child: a nationwide follow-up study from Sweden.

    PubMed

    Rostila, Mikael; Saarela, Jan; Kawachi, Ichiro

    2012-10-01

    The death of a young child is so devastating that it can increase the risk of mortality in the grieving parent. Little is known about the impact of an adult child's death on the health of parents. The authors conducted a follow-up study between 1980 and 2002 based on a linked-registers database that contains the total Swedish population. The authors examined mortality from all causes, natural causes and unnatural causes among parents following the death of children aged 10-49 years. An increased mortality risk (RR 1.31, 95% CI 1.02 to 1.68) in mothers following the death of a minor child (10-17 years) was found and especially following unnatural deaths (primarily accidents and suicides). Mothers also experienced elevated mortality following the death of an adult child aged 18-25 years (RR 1.15, 95% CI 1.03 to 1.29). Bereavement effects among fathers were more attenuated and chiefly found after >8 years of follow-up. From a short-term perspective (1-3 years), the death of an adult child (>25 years) was somewhat protective for parents. However, over longer follow-up periods, it approached (4-8 years) and exceeded (>8 years) the death risk of the general population. These findings corroborate and extend earlier findings suggesting elevated mortality risks also following the death of an adult child.

  12. Estimating the net effect of HIV on child mortality in African populations affected by generalized HIV epidemics.

    PubMed

    Marston, Milly; Zaba, Basia; Salomon, Joshua A; Brahmbhatt, Heena; Bagenda, Danstan

    2005-02-01

    For a given prevalence, HIV has a relatively higher impact on child mortality when mortality from other causes is low. To project the effect of the epidemic on child mortality, it is necessary to estimate a realistic schedule of "net" age-specific mortality rates that would operate if HIV were the only cause of child death observable. We assume that this net pattern would be independent of mortality from other causes. We used African studies that measured the survival of HIV-infected children (direct data) or survival of children of HIV-infected mothers (indirect data). We developed a mathematic procedure to estimate the mortality of infected children from indirect data sources and obtained net HIV mortality patterns for each study population. The net age-specific HIV mortality pattern for infected children can be described by a double Weibull curve fitted to empiric data; this gives a functional representation of age-specific mortality rates that decline after infancy and rise in the preteens. The fitted curve that we would expect if HIV were the only effective cause of death shows 67% net survival at 1 year and 39% at 5 years. The curve also predicts 13% net survival at 10 years using constraints based on survival of infected adults.

  13. [Relashionship between the mother's educational level and child feeding in a series of preschool children in Bacau Town].

    PubMed

    Marcu, Dana Maria; Albu, Adriana; Gavăt, Viorica; Indrei, L L

    2012-01-01

    Child growth and development are decisively influensed by feeding. This depends on parent's financial resources and food habits, most often tradition-related. To determine how important mother's educational level is in this respect. The study was carried out on a series of 153 preschool children from two kindergartens in Bacău town. Their parents filled out a questionnaire on the frequency of weekly food consumption. 64.5% of the mothers of the children included in this study had a higher education. Most children had milk 4-7 times a week, cheese 2-3 times a week, eggs and chicken 2-3 times a week, and fruits 4-7 times a week. The diffrences in feeding provided by mothers with higher education and those less educated were statistically insignificant, food habits being quite similar. A good knowledge of food habits in a poplation is essential for developing programs aimed at changing the unhealthy ones.

  14. Association Between Maternal Stress, Work Status, Concern About Child Weight, and Restrictive Feeding Practices in Preschool Children.

    PubMed

    Swyden, Katheryn; Sisson, Susan B; Morris, Amanda S; Lora, Karina; Weedn, Ashley E; Copeland, Kristen A; DeGrace, Beth

    2017-06-01

    Objectives To examine the relationship between maternal stress, work status, concern about child weight, and the use of restrictive feeding practices among mothers of preschool children. Methods 285 mothers of 2-to-5-year-old children completed an on-line survey. Questions included demographics, items from the Depression Anxiety Stress Scale, and the Child Feeding Questionnaire. Linear regression and ANOVA examined the relationship between maternal stress, work hours, concern about child weight, and the use of restrictive practices for one 2-to-5-year-old child living within the home. Results Mothers were 32.6 ± 5.2 years of age and spent 39.7 ± 12.0 h/week at work. Seventy-one percent worked full time. Children were 3.4 ± 1.0 years of age and 51% male. Stress (3.41 ± 0.77, p ≤ 0.001) and concern about child weight (3.41 ± 0.77, p ≤ 0.00) were associated with the use of restrictive feeding practices. Mothers with severe/extremely severe stress used restriction more than mothers with normal stress, respectively (3.63 ± 0.80, 3.30 ± 0.81, p = 0.03). No difference was found among mothers with mild/moderate stress (3.50 ± 0.63, p = 0.06). There was no association between work hours (p = 0.50) or work status (p = 0.91) and the use of restrictive feeding practices. Conclusions Maternal stress and concern about child weight were associated with the use of restrictive feeding practices. Considering the current rates of childhood obesity in the United States, understanding factors that influence a child's food environment is advantageous and can help improve maternal and child health.

  15. Causes of child mortality (1 to 4 years of age) from 1983 to 2012 in the Republic of Korea: national vital data.

    PubMed

    Choe, Seung Ah; Cho, Sung-Il

    2014-11-01

    Child mortality remains a critical problem even in developed countries due to low fertility. To plan effective interventions, investigation into the trends and causes of child mortality is necessary. Therefore, we analyzed these trends and causes of child deaths over the last 30 years in Korea. Causes of death data were obtained from a nationwide vital registration managed by the Korean Statistical Information Service. The mortality rate among all children aged between one and four years and the causes of deaths were reviewed. Data from 1983-2012 and 1993-2012 were analyzed separately because the proportion of unspecified causes of death during 1983-1992 varied substantially from that during 1993-2012. The child (1-4 years) mortality rates substantially decreased during the past three decades. The trend analysis revealed that all the five major causes of death (infectious, neoplastic, neurologic, congenital, and external origins) have decreased significantly. However, the sex ratio of child mortality (boys to girls) slightly increased during the last 30 years. External causes of death remain the most frequent origin of child mortality, and the proportion of mortality due to child assault has significantly increased (from 1.02 in 1983 to 1.38 in 2012). In Korea, the major causes and rate of child mortality have changed and the sex ratio of child mortality has slightly increased since the early 1980s. Child mortality, especially due to preventable causes, requires public health intervention.

  16. Preschool child care participation and obesity at the start of kindergarten.

    PubMed

    Maher, Erin J; Li, Guanghui; Carter, Louise; Johnson, Donna B

    2008-08-01

    We examined the association between type of child care, participation in different types of child care in the year before kindergarten and the likelihood of obesity at the start of kindergarten. Using a nationally representative sample of 15 691 first-time kindergartners from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study-Kindergarten Cohort, we used logistic regression to estimate the relationship between type of primary child care arrangement and children's likelihood of being obese at the start of kindergarten. Our models controlled for family and child characteristics associated with obesity and choice of child care. To examine differential effects of child care participation for groups at high risk for obesity, we tested interactions between children's ethnicity and income with primary type of child care. At the start of kindergarten, 12% of the children were obese. Without controlling for other characteristics of children and families, children not in child care were significantly less likely and children in family, friend, and neighbor care were significantly more likely to be obese than children in other primary child care arrangements. White children were significantly less likely and Latino children more likely to be obese than children of other ethnic groups. After controlling for relevant child and family characteristics, children in family, friend, and neighbor care and non-Latino children in Head Start were more likely to be obese than children not in child care. For Latino children, however, participation in some types of nonparental child care had protective effects on their likelihood of being obese. Primary type of child care is associated with children's obesity. For Latino children, who are at a greater risk of being obese, participation in nonparental child care seems to have a protective effect. These results suggest that child care settings may be an important site for policy intervention during a crucial developmental period. Efforts to help family

  17. Fewer out-of-sequence vaccinations and reduction of child mortality in Northern Ghana.

    PubMed

    Welaga, Paul; Oduro, Abraham; Debpuur, Cornelius; Aaby, Peter; Ravn, Henrik; Andersen, Andreas; Binka, Fred; Hodgson, Abraham

    2017-04-25

    Studies suggest that diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis (DTP) vaccine administered simultaneously with measles vaccine (MV) or DTP administered after MV are associated with higher child mortality than having MV-after-DTP3 as most recent vaccination. We tested this in Northern Ghana where the prevalence of such out-of-sequence vaccinations has declined. Using annual cohort data of children aged 12-23months from 1996 to 2012 and Cox proportional hazards models, we assessed survival in relation to the most recent vaccination status within the next 12months and until five years of age. We assessed whether mortality in children aged 12-59months was higher when the most recent vaccine was non-live (DTP) rather than live (MV or OPV). Out-of-sequence vaccinations with DTP-containing vaccines and MV declined from 86% in 1989 to 24% in 1996 and 0.7% in 2012. Between 1996 and 2012, 38 070 children had their vaccinations status assessed: the adjusted hazard ratio (HR) for out-of-sequence vaccinations (DTP>=MV) compared with the recommended sequence of MV-after-DTP3 was 1.42(1.06-1.90) during the first 12months after assessment of vaccination status and 1.29(1.03-1.60) with follow-up to five years of age; the HR was 2.58(1.14-5.84) before OPV or MV campaigns and 1.37(1.02-1.85) after the campaigns. Out-of-sequence vaccinations with DTP and MV are associated with higher mortality than MV as most recent vaccination; the effect is unlikely to be due to confounding. Hence, the reduction in out-of-sequence vaccinations may have lowered child mortality. It is recommended not to give DTP with MV or DTP after MV. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. The effect of maternal and child health and family planning services on mortality: is prevention enough?

    PubMed Central

    Fauveau, V; Wojtyniak, B; Chakraborty, J; Sarder, A M; Briend, A

    1990-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To examine the impact on mortality of a child survival strategy, mostly based on preventive interventions. DESIGN--Cross sectional comparison of cause specific mortality in two communities differing in the type, coverage, and quality of maternal and child health and family planning services. In the intervention area the services were mainly preventive, community based, and home delivered. SUBJECTS--Neonates, infants, children, and mothers in two contiguous areas of rural Bangladesh. INTERVENTIONS--In the intervention area community health workers provided advice on contraception and on feeding and weaning babies; distributed oral rehydration solution, vitamin A tablets for children under 5, and ferrous fumarate and folic acid during pregnancy; immunised children; trained birth attendants in safe delivery and when to refer; treated minor ailments; and referred seriously ill people and malnourished children to a central clinic. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Overall and age and cause specific death rates, obtained by a multiple step "verbal autopsy" process. RESULTS--During the two years covered by the study overall mortality was 17% lower among neonates, 9% lower among infants aged 1-5 months, 30% lower among children aged 6-35 months, and 19% lower among women living in the study area than in those living in the control area. These differences were mainly due to fewer deaths from neonatal tetanus, measles, persistent diarrhoea with severe malnutrition among children, and fewer abortions among women. CONCLUSIONS--The programme was effective in preventing some deaths. In addition to preventive components such as tetanus and measles immunisation, health and nutrition education, and family planning, curative services are needed to reduce mortality further. PMID:2390566

  19. Air pollution and child mortality: a time-series study in São Paulo, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Conceição, G M; Miraglia, S G; Kishi, H S; Saldiva, P H; Singer, J M

    2001-06-01

    Although most available evidence relating air pollution and mortality was obtained for adults, pollution has been also associated with increased mortality in children, but in a significantly smaller number of studies. This study was designed to evaluate the association between child mortality and air pollution in the city of São Paulo, Brazil, from 1994 to 1997. Daily records of mortality due to respiratory diseases for children under 5 years of age were obtained from the municipal mortality information improvement program. Daily concentrations of sulfur dioxide (SO(2)), carbon monoxide (CO), inhalable particulate matter less than 10 microm in diameter (PM(10)), and ozone were obtained from the state air pollution controlling agency. Information on minimum daily temperature and on relative humidity were obtained from the Institute of Astronomy and Geophysics of the University of São Paulo. Statistical analysis was performed through generalized additive models considering a Poisson response distribution and a log link. Explanatory variables were time, temperature, humidity, and pollutant concentrations. The loess smoother was applied to time (in order to model seasonality) and temperature. Significant associations between mortality and concentrations of CO, SO(2), and PM(10) were detected. The coefficients (and standard errors) of these three pollutants were 0.0306 (0.0076), 0.0055 (0.0016), and 0.0014 (0.0006), respectively. The observed associations were dose dependent and quite evident after a short period of exposure (2 days). According to the proposed model and considering the mean of the pollutant concentration during the period of the study, the estimated proportions of respiratory deaths attributed to CO, SO(2), and PM(10), when considered individually, are around 15, 13, and 7%, respectively.

  20. Why do child mortality rates fall? An analysis of the Nicaraguan experience.

    PubMed Central

    Sandiford, P; Morales, P; Gorter, A; Coyle, E; Smith, G D

    1991-01-01

    A comprehensive review of available sources of mortality data was undertaken to document the changes that have occurred in infant mortality in Nicaragua over the last three decades. It was found that a rapid fall in infant mortality commenced in the early 1970s and has continued steadily since. Trends in several different factors which might have led to this breakthrough were examined including: income, nutrition, breastfeeding practices, maternal education, immunizations, access to health services, provision of water supplies and sanitation, and anti-malarial programs. Of these, improved access to health services appears to have been the most important factor. At a time when the number of hospital beds per capita was dropping, increasing numbers of health care professionals, particularly nurses, were becoming available to staff primary health care facilities built in the 1960s. These were provided at least partly in response to the growing political turmoil enveloping the nation at that time. Certain Nicaraguan cultural attributes may have added to the impact of the reforms. Efforts in the field of public health made since the 1979 insurrection appear to have maintained the decline in child mortality. PMID:1983913