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Sample records for presenilin-dependent regulated intramembrane

  1. Allosteric regulation of rhomboid intramembrane proteolysis

    PubMed Central

    Arutyunova, Elena; Panwar, Pankaj; Skiba, Pauline M; Gale, Nicola; Mak, Michelle W; Lemieux, M Joanne

    2014-01-01

    Proteolysis within the lipid bilayer is poorly understood, in particular the regulation of substrate cleavage. Rhomboids are a family of ubiquitous intramembrane serine proteases that harbour a buried active site and are known to cleave transmembrane substrates with broad specificity. In vitro gel and Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based kinetic assays were developed to analyse cleavage of the transmembrane substrate psTatA (TatA from Providencia stuartii). We demonstrate significant differences in catalytic efficiency (kcat/K0.5) values for transmembrane substrate psTatA (TatA from Providencia stuartii) cleavage for three rhomboids: AarA from P. stuartii, ecGlpG from Escherichia coli and hiGlpG from Haemophilus influenzae demonstrating that rhomboids specifically recognize this substrate. Furthermore, binding of psTatA occurs with positive cooperativity. Competitive binding studies reveal an exosite-mediated mode of substrate binding, indicating allostery plays a role in substrate catalysis. We reveal that exosite formation is dependent on the oligomeric state of rhomboids, and when dimers are dissociated, allosteric substrate activation is not observed. We present a novel mechanism for specific substrate cleavage involving several dynamic processes including positive cooperativity and homotropic allostery for this interesting class of intramembrane proteases. PMID:25009246

  2. Regulation of amniotic fluid volume: mathematical model based on intramembranous transport mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Debra F.; Cheung, Cecilia Y.

    2014-01-01

    Experimentation in late-gestation fetal sheep has suggested that regulation of amniotic fluid (AF) volume occurs primarily by modulating the rate of intramembranous transport of water and solutes across the amnion into underlying fetal blood vessels. In order to gain insight into intramembranous transport mechanisms, we developed a computer model that allows simulation of experimentally measured changes in AF volume and composition over time. The model included fetal urine excretion and lung liquid secretion as inflows into the amniotic compartment plus fetal swallowing and intramembranous absorption as outflows. By using experimental flows and solute concentrations for urine, lung liquid, and swallowed fluid in combination with the passive and active transport mechanisms of the intramembranous pathway, we simulated AF responses to basal conditions, intra-amniotic fluid infusions, fetal intravascular infusions, urine replacement, and tracheoesophageal occlusion. The experimental data are consistent with four intramembranous transport mechanisms acting in concert: 1) an active unidirectional bulk transport of AF with all dissolved solutes out of AF into fetal blood presumably by vesicles; 2) passive bidirectional diffusion of solutes, such as sodium and chloride, between fetal blood and AF; 3) passive bidirectional water movement between AF and fetal blood; and 4) unidirectional transport of lactate into the AF. Further, only unidirectional bulk transport is dynamically regulated. The simulations also identified areas for future study: 1) identifying intramembranous stimulators and inhibitors, 2) determining the semipermeability characteristics of the intramembranous pathway, and 3) characterizing the vesicles that are the primary mediators of intramembranous transport. PMID:25186112

  3. Regulation of amniotic fluid volume: mathematical model based on intramembranous transport mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Brace, Robert A; Anderson, Debra F; Cheung, Cecilia Y

    2014-11-15

    Experimentation in late-gestation fetal sheep has suggested that regulation of amniotic fluid (AF) volume occurs primarily by modulating the rate of intramembranous transport of water and solutes across the amnion into underlying fetal blood vessels. In order to gain insight into intramembranous transport mechanisms, we developed a computer model that allows simulation of experimentally measured changes in AF volume and composition over time. The model included fetal urine excretion and lung liquid secretion as inflows into the amniotic compartment plus fetal swallowing and intramembranous absorption as outflows. By using experimental flows and solute concentrations for urine, lung liquid, and swallowed fluid in combination with the passive and active transport mechanisms of the intramembranous pathway, we simulated AF responses to basal conditions, intra-amniotic fluid infusions, fetal intravascular infusions, urine replacement, and tracheoesophageal occlusion. The experimental data are consistent with four intramembranous transport mechanisms acting in concert: 1) an active unidirectional bulk transport of AF with all dissolved solutes out of AF into fetal blood presumably by vesicles; 2) passive bidirectional diffusion of solutes, such as sodium and chloride, between fetal blood and AF; 3) passive bidirectional water movement between AF and fetal blood; and 4) unidirectional transport of lactate into the AF. Further, only unidirectional bulk transport is dynamically regulated. The simulations also identified areas for future study: 1) identifying intramembranous stimulators and inhibitors, 2) determining the semipermeability characteristics of the intramembranous pathway, and 3) characterizing the vesicles that are the primary mediators of intramembranous transport.

  4. Regulation of intramembranous absorption and amniotic fluid volume by constituents in fetal sheep urine.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Debra F; Jonker, Sonnet S; Louey, Samantha; Cheung, Cecilia Y; Brace, Robert A

    2013-09-01

    Our objective was to test the hypothesis that fetal urine contains a substance(s) that regulates amniotic fluid volume by altering the rate of intramembranous absorption of amniotic fluid. In late gestation ovine fetuses, amniotic fluid volumes, urine, and lung liquid production rates, swallowed volumes and intramembranous volume and solute absorption rates were measured over 2-day periods under control conditions and when urine was removed and continuously replaced at an equal rate with exogenous fluid. Intramembranous volume absorption rate decreased by 40% when urine was replaced with lactated Ringer solution or lactated Ringer solution diluted 50% with water. Amniotic fluid volume doubled under both conditions. Analysis of the intramembranous sodium and chloride fluxes suggests that the active but not passive component of intramembranous volume absorption was altered by urine replacement, whereas both active and passive components of solute fluxes were altered. We conclude that fetal urine contains an unidentified substance(s) that stimulates active intramembranous transport of amniotic fluid across the amnion into the underlying fetal vasculature and thereby functions as a regulator of amniotic fluid volume.

  5. MBTPS2 mutations cause defective regulated intramembrane proteolysis in X-linked osteogenesis imperfecta

    PubMed Central

    Lindert, Uschi; Cabral, Wayne A.; Ausavarat, Surasawadee; Tongkobpetch, Siraprapa; Ludin, Katja; Barnes, Aileen M.; Yeetong, Patra; Weis, Maryann; Krabichler, Birgit; Srichomthong, Chalurmpon; Makareeva, Elena N.; Janecke, Andreas R.; Leikin, Sergey; Röthlisberger, Benno; Rohrbach, Marianne; Kennerknecht, Ingo; Eyre, David R.; Suphapeetiporn, Kanya; Giunta, Cecilia; Marini, Joan C.; Shotelersuk, Vorasuk

    2016-01-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a collagen-related bone dysplasia. We identified an X-linked recessive form of OI caused by defects in MBTPS2, which encodes site-2 metalloprotease (S2P). MBTPS2 missense mutations in two independent kindreds with moderate/severe OI cause substitutions at highly conserved S2P residues. Mutant S2P has normal stability, but impaired functioning in regulated intramembrane proteolysis (RIP) of OASIS, ATF6 and SREBP transcription factors, consistent with decreased proband secretion of type I collagen. Further, hydroxylation of the collagen lysine residue (K87) critical for crosslinking is reduced in proband bone tissue, consistent with decreased lysyl hydroxylase 1 in proband osteoblasts. Reduced collagen crosslinks presumptively undermine bone strength. Also, proband osteoblasts have broadly defective differentiation. These mutations provide evidence that RIP plays a fundamental role in normal bone development. PMID:27380894

  6. Plastid intramembrane proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Adam, Zach

    2015-09-01

    Progress in the field of regulated intramembrane proteolysis (RIP) in recent years has not surpassed plant biology. Nevertheless, reports on RIP in plants, and especially in chloroplasts, are still scarce. Of the four different families of intramembrane proteases, only two have been linked to chloroplasts so far, rhomboids and site-2 proteases (S2Ps). The lack of chloroplast-located rhomboid proteases was associated with reduced fertility and aberrations in flower morphology, probably due to perturbations in jasmonic acid biosynthesis, which occurs in chloroplasts. Mutations in homologues of S2P resulted in chlorophyll deficiency and impaired chloroplast development, through a yet unknown mechanism. To date, the only known substrate of RIP in chloroplasts is a PHD transcription factor, located in the envelope. Upon proteolytic cleavage by an unknown protease, the soluble N-terminal domain of this protein is released from the membrane and relocates to the nucleus, where it activates the transcription of the ABA response gene ABI4. Continuing studies on these proteases and substrates, as well as identification of the genes responsible for different chloroplast mutant phenotypes, are expected to shed more light on the roles of intramembrane proteases in chloroplast biology.

  7. Prostaglandin E2 regulation of amnion cell vascular endothelial growth factor expression: relationship with intramembranous absorption rate in fetal sheep.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Cecilia Y; Beardall, Michael K; Anderson, Debra F; Brace, Robert A

    2014-08-01

    We hypothesized that prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) stimulates amniotic fluid transport across the amnion by upregulating vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression in amnion cells and that amniotic PGE2 concentration correlates positively with intramembranous (IM) absorption rate in fetal sheep. The effects of PGE2 at a range of concentrations on VEGF 164 and caveolin-1 gene expressions were analyzed in cultured ovine amnion cells. IM absorption rate, amniotic fluid (AF) volume, and PGE2 concentration in AF were determined in late-gestation fetal sheep during control conditions, isovolumic fetal urine replacement (low IM absorption rate), or intra-amniotic fluid infusion (high IM absorption rate). In ovine amnion cells, PGE2 induced dose- and time-dependent increases in VEGF 164 mRNA levels and reduced caveolin-1 mRNA and protein levels. VEGF receptor blockade abolished the caveolin-1 response, while minimally affecting the VEGF response to PGE2. In sheep fetuses, urine replacement reduced amniotic PGE2 concentration by 58%, decreased IM absorption rate by half, and doubled AF volume (P < 0.01). Intra-amniotic fluid infusion increased IM absorption rate and AF volume (P < 0.01), while amniotic PGE2 concentration was unchanged. Neither IM absorption rate nor AF volume correlated with amniotic PGE2 concentration under each experimental condition. Although PGE2 at micromolar concentrations induced dose-dependent responses in VEGF and caveolin-1 gene expression in cultured amnion cells consistent with a role of PGE2 in activating VEGF to mediate AF transport across the amnion, amniotic PGE2 at physiological nanomolar concentrations does not appear to regulate IM absorption rate or AF volume.

  8. Type IV pilins regulate their own expression via direct intramembrane interactions with the sensor kinase PilS.

    PubMed

    Kilmury, Sara L N; Burrows, Lori L

    2016-05-24

    Type IV pili are important virulence factors for many pathogens, including Pseudomonas aeruginosa Transcription of the major pilin gene-pilA-is controlled by the PilS-PilR two-component system in response to unknown signals. The absence of a periplasmic sensing domain suggested that PilS may sense an intramembrane signal, possibly PilA. We suggest that direct interactions between PilA and PilS in the inner membrane reduce pilA transcription when PilA levels are high. Overexpression in trans of PilA proteins with diverse and/or truncated C termini decreased native pilA transcription, suggesting that the highly conserved N terminus of PilA was the regulatory signal. Point mutations in PilA or PilS that disrupted their interaction prevented autoregulation of pilA transcription. A subset of PilA point mutants retained the ability to interact with PilS but could no longer decrease pilA transcription, suggesting that interaction between the pilin and sensor kinase is necessary but not sufficient for pilA autoregulation. Furthermore, PilS's phosphatase motif was required for the autoregulation of pilA transcription, suggesting that under conditions where PilA is abundant, the PilA-PilS interaction promotes PilR dephosphorylation and thus down-regulation of further pilA transcription. These data reveal a clever bacterial inventory control strategy in which the major subunit of an important P. aeruginosa virulence factor controls its own expression. PMID:27162347

  9. Yap/Taz transcriptional activity in endothelial cells promotes intramembranous ossification via the BMP pathway

    PubMed Central

    Uemura, Mami; Nagasawa, Ayumi; Terai, Kenta

    2016-01-01

    Osteogenesis is categorized into two groups based on developmental histology, intramembranous and endochondral ossification. The role of blood vessels during endochondral ossification is well known, while their role in intramembranous ossification, especially the intertissue pathway, is poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate endothelial Yap/Taz is a novel regulator of intramembranous ossification in zebrafish. Appropriate blood flow is required for Yap/Taz transcriptional activation in endothelial cells and intramembranous ossification. Additionally, Yap/Taz transcriptional activity in endothelial cells specifically promotes intramembranous ossification. BMP expression by Yap/Taz transactivation in endothelial cells is also identified as a bridging factor between blood vessels and intramembranous ossification. Furthermore, the expression of Runx2 in pre-osteoblast cells is a downstream target of Yap/Taz transcriptional activity in endothelial cells. Our results provide novel insight into the relationship between blood flow and ossification by demonstrating intertissue regulation. PMID:27273480

  10. Inhibitor of intramembranous absorption in ovine amniotic fluid.

    PubMed

    Brace, Robert A; Cheung, Cecilia Y; Anderson, Debra F

    2014-02-01

    Intramembranous absorption increases during intra-amniotic infusion of physiological saline solutions. The increase may be due partly to the concomitant elevation in fetal urine production as fetal urine contains a stimulator of intramembranous absorption. In this study, we hypothesized that the increase in intramembranous absorption during intra-amniotic infusion is due, in part, to dilution of a nonrenal inhibitor of intramembranous absorption that is present in amniotic fluid. In late-gestation fetal sheep, amniotic fluid volume and the four primary amniotic inflows and outflows were determined over 2-day intervals under three conditions: 1) control conditions when fetal urine entered the amniotic sac, 2) during intra-amniotic infusion of 2 l/day of lactated Ringer solution when urine entered the amniotic sac, and 3) during the same intra-amniotic infusion when fetal urine was continuously replaced with lactated Ringer solution. Amniotic fluid volume, fetal urine production, swallowed volume, and intramembranous absorption rate increased during the infusions independent of fetal urine entry into the amniotic sac or its replacement. Lung liquid secretion rate was unchanged during infusion. Because fetal membrane stretch has been shown not to be involved and because urine replacement did not alter the response, we conclude that the increase in intramembranous absorption that occurs during intra-amniotic infusions is due primarily to dilution of a nonrenal inhibitor of intramembranous absorption that is normally present in amniotic fluid. This result combined with our previous study suggests that a nonrenal inhibitor(s) together with a renal stimulator(s) interact to regulate intramembranous absorption rate and, hence, amniotic fluid volume.

  11. Inhibitor of intramembranous absorption in ovine amniotic fluid

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Cecilia Y.; Anderson, Debra F.

    2013-01-01

    Intramembranous absorption increases during intra-amniotic infusion of physiological saline solutions. The increase may be due partly to the concomitant elevation in fetal urine production as fetal urine contains a stimulator of intramembranous absorption. In this study, we hypothesized that the increase in intramembranous absorption during intra-amniotic infusion is due, in part, to dilution of a nonrenal inhibitor of intramembranous absorption that is present in amniotic fluid. In late-gestation fetal sheep, amniotic fluid volume and the four primary amniotic inflows and outflows were determined over 2-day intervals under three conditions: 1) control conditions when fetal urine entered the amniotic sac, 2) during intra-amniotic infusion of 2 l/day of lactated Ringer solution when urine entered the amniotic sac, and 3) during the same intra-amniotic infusion when fetal urine was continuously replaced with lactated Ringer solution. Amniotic fluid volume, fetal urine production, swallowed volume, and intramembranous absorption rate increased during the infusions independent of fetal urine entry into the amniotic sac or its replacement. Lung liquid secretion rate was unchanged during infusion. Because fetal membrane stretch has been shown not to be involved and because urine replacement did not alter the response, we conclude that the increase in intramembranous absorption that occurs during intra-amniotic infusions is due primarily to dilution of a nonrenal inhibitor of intramembranous absorption that is normally present in amniotic fluid. This result combined with our previous study suggests that a nonrenal inhibitor(s) together with a renal stimulator(s) interact to regulate intramembranous absorption rate and, hence, amniotic fluid volume. PMID:24381178

  12. Regulated intramembrane proteolysis of the virulence activator TcpP in Vibrio cholerae is initiated by the tail-specific protease (Tsp).

    PubMed

    Teoh, Wei Ping; Matson, Jyl S; DiRita, Victor J

    2015-09-01

    Vibrio cholerae uses a multiprotein transcriptional regulatory cascade to control expression of virulence factors cholera toxin and toxin-co-regulated pilus. Two proteins in this cascade are ToxR and TcpP - unusual membrane-localized transcription factors with relatively undefined periplasmic domains and transcription activator cytoplasmic domains. TcpP and ToxR function with each other and two other membrane-localized proteins, TcpH and ToxS, to activate transcription of toxT, encoding the direct activator of toxin and pilus genes. Under some conditions, TcpP is degraded in a two-step proteolytic pathway known as regulated intramembrane proteolysis (RIP), thereby inactivating the cascade. The second step in this proteolytic pathway involves the zinc metalloprotease YaeL; V. cholerae cells lacking YaeL accumulate a truncated yet active form of TcpP termed TcpP*. We hypothesized that a protease acting prior to YaeL degrades TcpP to TcpP*, which is the substrate of YaeL. In this study, we demonstrate that a C-terminal protease called Tsp degrades TcpP to form TcpP*, which is then acted upon by YaeL. We present evidence that TcpH and Tsp serve to protect full-length TcpP from spurious proteolysis by YaeL. Cleavage by Tsp occurs in the periplasmic domain of TcpP and requires residues TcpPA172 and TcpPI174 for wild-type activity.

  13. Apoptosis during intramembranous ossification

    PubMed Central

    Palumbo, Carla; Ferretti, Marzia; De Pol, Anto

    2003-01-01

    This paper concerns the role of apoptosis during the onset of bone histogenesis. Previous investigations by us performed on intramembranous ossification revealed the existence of two types of osteogenesis: static (SBF) and dynamic bone formation (DBF). During SBF, the first to occur, stationary osteoblasts transform into osteocytes in the same location where they differentiated, forming the primary spongiosa. DBF takes place later, when movable osteoblastic laminae differentiate along the surface of the primary trabeculae. The main distinctive feature between SBF and DBF is that the latter involves the invasion of pre-existing adjacent tissue, whereas the former does not. To ascertain whether programmed cell death during the invasive DBF process determines the fate of surrounding pre-existing mesenchyme differently from that occurring during the non-invasive SBF process, we studied apoptosis in ossification centres of tibial diaphysis in chick embryos and newborn rabbits with TUNEL and TEM. It emerged that, in both SBF and DBF, apoptosis affects mesenchymal cells located between the forming trabeculae and capillaries. However, apoptotic cells were observed more frequently during DBF than during SBF. This suggests that, during bone histogenesis, apoptosis, which is mostly associated with the invasive process of DBF, is probably dedicated to making space for advancing bone growth. PMID:14686694

  14. Emerging roles for diverse intramembrane proteases in plant biology.

    PubMed

    Adam, Zach

    2013-12-01

    Progress in the field of regulated intramembrane proteolysis (RIP) in recent years has made its impact on plant biology as well. Although this field within plant research is still in its infancy, some interesting observations have started to emerge. Gene encoding orthologs of rhomboid proteases, site-2 proteases (S2P), presenilin/γ-secretases, and signal peptide peptidases are found in plant genomes and some of these gene products were identified in different plant cell membranes. The lack of chloroplast-located rhomboid proteases was associated with reduced fertility and aberrations in flower morphology. Mutations in homologues of S2P resulted in chlorophyll deficiency and impaired chloroplast development. An S2P was also implicated in the response to ER stress through cleavage of ER-membrane bZIP transcription factors, allowing their migration to the nucleus and activation of the transcription of BiP chaperones. Other membrane-bound transcription factors of the NAC and PHD families were also demonstrated to undergo RIP and relocalization to the nucleus. These and other new data are expected to shed more light on the roles of intramembrane proteases in plant biology in the future. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Intramembrane Proteases.

  15. Peroxisomes in Different Skeletal Cell Types during Intramembranous and Endochondral Ossification and Their Regulation during Osteoblast Differentiation by Distinct Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptors.

    PubMed

    Qian, Guofeng; Fan, Wei; Ahlemeyer, Barbara; Karnati, Srikanth; Baumgart-Vogt, Eveline

    2015-01-01

    Ossification defects leading to craniofacial dysmorphism or rhizomelia are typical phenotypes in patients and corresponding knockout mouse models with distinct peroxisomal disorders. Despite these obvious skeletal pathologies, to date no careful analysis exists on the distribution and function of peroxisomes in skeletal tissues and their alterations during ossification. Therefore, we analyzed the peroxisomal compartment in different cell types of mouse cartilage and bone as well as in primary cultures of calvarial osteoblasts. The peroxisome number and metabolism strongly increased in chondrocytes during endochondral ossification from the reserve to the hypertrophic zone, whereas in bone, metabolically active osteoblasts contained a higher numerical abundance of this organelle than osteocytes. The high abundance of peroxisomes in these skeletal cell types is reflected by high levels of Pex11β gene expression. During culture, calvarial pre-osteoblasts differentiated into secretory osteoblasts accompanied by peroxisome proliferation and increased levels of peroxisomal genes and proteins. Since many peroxisomal genes contain a PPAR-responsive element, we analyzed the gene expression of PPARɑ/ß/ɣ in calvarial osteoblasts and MC3T3-E1 cells, revealing higher levels for PPARß than for PPARɑ and PPARɣ. Treatment with different PPAR agonists and antagonists not only changed the peroxisomal compartment and associated gene expression, but also induced complex alterations of the gene expression patterns of the other PPAR family members. Studies in M3CT3-E1 cells showed that the PPARß agonist GW0742 activated the PPRE-mediated luciferase expression and up-regulated peroxisomal gene transcription (Pex11, Pex13, Pex14, Acox1 and Cat), whereas the PPARß antagonist GSK0660 led to repression of the PPRE and a decrease of the corresponding mRNA levels. In the same way, treatment of calvarial osteoblasts with GW0742 increased in peroxisome number and related gene expression

  16. Peroxisomes in Different Skeletal Cell Types during Intramembranous and Endochondral Ossification and Their Regulation during Osteoblast Differentiation by Distinct Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Guofeng; Karnati, Srikanth; Baumgart-Vogt, Eveline

    2015-01-01

    Ossification defects leading to craniofacial dysmorphism or rhizomelia are typical phenotypes in patients and corresponding knockout mouse models with distinct peroxisomal disorders. Despite these obvious skeletal pathologies, to date no careful analysis exists on the distribution and function of peroxisomes in skeletal tissues and their alterations during ossification. Therefore, we analyzed the peroxisomal compartment in different cell types of mouse cartilage and bone as well as in primary cultures of calvarial osteoblasts. The peroxisome number and metabolism strongly increased in chondrocytes during endochondral ossification from the reserve to the hypertrophic zone, whereas in bone, metabolically active osteoblasts contained a higher numerical abundance of this organelle than osteocytes. The high abundance of peroxisomes in these skeletal cell types is reflected by high levels of Pex11β gene expression. During culture, calvarial pre-osteoblasts differentiated into secretory osteoblasts accompanied by peroxisome proliferation and increased levels of peroxisomal genes and proteins. Since many peroxisomal genes contain a PPAR-responsive element, we analyzed the gene expression of PPARɑ/ß/ɣ in calvarial osteoblasts and MC3T3-E1 cells, revealing higher levels for PPARß than for PPARɑ and PPARɣ. Treatment with different PPAR agonists and antagonists not only changed the peroxisomal compartment and associated gene expression, but also induced complex alterations of the gene expression patterns of the other PPAR family members. Studies in M3CT3-E1 cells showed that the PPARß agonist GW0742 activated the PPRE-mediated luciferase expression and up-regulated peroxisomal gene transcription (Pex11, Pex13, Pex14, Acox1 and Cat), whereas the PPARß antagonist GSK0660 led to repression of the PPRE and a decrease of the corresponding mRNA levels. In the same way, treatment of calvarial osteoblasts with GW0742 increased in peroxisome number and related gene expression

  17. Hdac-Mediated Control of Endochondral and Intramembranous Ossification

    PubMed Central

    Bradley, Elizabeth W.; McGee-Lawrence, Meghan E.; Westendorf, Jennifer J.

    2011-01-01

    Histone deacetylases (Hdacs) remove acetyl groups (CH3CO-) from ε-amino groups in lysine residues within histones and other proteins. This post-translational (de) modification alters protein stability, protein-protein interactions, and chromatin structure. Hdac activity plays important roles in the development of all organs and tissues, including the mineralized skeleton. Bone is a dynamic tissue that forms and regenerates by two processes: endochondral and intramembranous ossification. Chondrocytes and osteoblasts are responsible for producing the extracellular matrices of skeletal tissues. Several Hdacs contribute to the molecular pathways and chromatin changes that regulate tissue-specific gene expression during chondrocyte and osteoblast specification, maturation and terminal differentiation. In this review, we summarize the roles of class I and class II Hdacs in chondrocytes and osteoblasts. The effects of small molecule Hdac inhibitors on the skeleton are also discussed. PMID:22077150

  18. M. tuberculosis intramembrane protease Rip1 controls transcription through three anti-sigma factor substrates.

    PubMed

    Sklar, Joseph G; Makinoshima, Hideki; Schneider, Jessica S; Glickman, Michael S

    2010-08-01

    Regulated intramembrane proteolysis (RIP) is a mechanism of transmembrane signal transduction that functions through intramembrane proteolysis of substrates. We previously reported that the RIP metalloprotease Rv2869c (Rip1) is a determinant of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) cell envelope composition and virulence, but the substrates of Rip1 were undefined. Here we show that Rip1 cleaves three transmembrane anti-sigma factors: anti-SigK, anti-SigL and anti-SigM, negative regulators of Sigma K, L and M. We show that transcriptional activation of katG in response to phenanthroline requires activation of SigK and SigL by Rip1 cleavage of anti-SigK and anti-SigL. We also demonstrate a Rip1-dependent pathway that activates the genes for the mycolic acid biosynthetic enzyme KasA and the resuscitation promoting factor RpfC, but represses the bacterioferritin encoding gene bfrB. Regulation of these three genes by Rip1 is not reproduced by deletion of Sigma K, L or M, either indicating a requirement for multiple Rip1 substrates or additional arms of the Rip1 pathway. These results identify a branched proteolytic signal transduction system in which a single intramembrane protease cleaves three anti-sigma factor substrates to control multiple downstream pathways involved in lipid biosynthesis and defence against oxidative stress. PMID:20545848

  19. Intramembrane electrostatic interactions destabilize lipid vesicles.

    PubMed Central

    Shoemaker, Scott D; Vanderlick, T Kyle

    2002-01-01

    Membrane stability is of central concern in many biology and biotechnology processes. It has been suggested that intramembrane electrostatic interactions play a key role in membrane stability. However, due primarily to a lack of supporting experimental evidence, they are not commonly considered in mechanical analyses of lipid membranes. In this paper, we use the micropipette aspiration technique to characterize the elastic moduli and critical tensions of lipid vesicles with varying surface charge. Charge was induced by doping neutral phosphatidylcholine vesicles with anionic lipids phosphatidylglycerol and phosphatidic acid. Measurements were taken in potassium chloride (moderate ion-lipid binding) and tetramethylammonium chloride (low ion-lipid binding) solutions. We show that inclusion of anionic lipid does not appreciably alter the areal dilation elasticity of lipid vesicles. However, the tension required for vesicle rupture decreases with increasing anionic lipid fraction and is a function of electrolyte composition. Using vesicles with 30% charged (i.e., unbound) anionic lipid, we measured critical tension reductions of 75%, demonstrating the important role of electrostatic interactions in membrane stability. PMID:12324419

  20. Specificity of Intramembrane Protein–Lipid Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Contreras, Francesc-Xabier; Ernst, Andreas Max; Wieland, Felix; Brügger, Britta

    2011-01-01

    Our concept of biological membranes has markedly changed, from the fluid mosaic model to the current model that lipids and proteins have the ability to separate into microdomains, differing in their protein and lipid compositions. Since the breakthrough in crystallizing membrane proteins, the most powerful method to define lipid-binding sites on proteins has been X-ray and electron crystallography. More recently, chemical biology approaches have been developed to analyze protein–lipid interactions. Such methods have the advantage of providing highly specific cellular probes. With the advent of novel tools to study functions of individual lipid species in membranes together with structural analysis and simulations at the atomistic resolution, a growing number of specific protein–lipid complexes are defined and their functions explored. In the present article, we discuss the various modes of intramembrane protein–lipid interactions in cellular membranes, including examples for both annular and nonannular bound lipids. Furthermore, we will discuss possible functional roles of such specific protein–lipid interactions as well as roles of lipids as chaperones in protein folding and transport. PMID:21536707

  1. A biochemical strategy for simulation of endochondral and intramembranous ossification.

    PubMed

    Garzón-Alvarado, Diego A

    2014-01-01

    Following the assumption that parathyroid hormone related protein and Indian hedgehog form a biochemical regulatory loop for the endochondral process and bone morphogenetic protein 2 and Noggin in the intramembranous process, this paper implements these regulatory mechanisms. For this purpose, we use a set of reaction-diffusion equations that are widely used in morphogenesis, in which biochemical factors are assumed to be secreted by precursor cells, mesenchymal cells and chondrocytes, in endochondral and intramembranous ossification, respectively. The solution leads to the so-called Turing patterns, which represent these processes of ossification in a very approximate way.

  2. Features of Pro-σK Important for Cleavage by SpoIVFB, an Intramembrane Metalloprotease

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kangming; Xiang, Xianling; Gu, Liping

    2013-01-01

    Intramembrane proteases regulate diverse processes by cleaving substrates within a transmembrane segment or near the membrane surface. Bacillus subtilis SpoIVFB is an intramembrane metalloprotease that cleaves Pro-σK during sporulation. To elucidate features of Pro-σK important for cleavage by SpoIVFB, coexpression of the two proteins in Escherichia coli was used along with cell fractionation. In the absence of SpoIVFB, a portion of the Pro-σK was peripherally membrane associated. This portion was not observed in the presence of SpoIVFB, suggesting that it serves as the substrate. Deletion of Pro-σK residues 2 to 8, addition of residues at its N terminus, or certain single-residue substitutions near the cleavage site impaired cleavage. Certain multiresidue substitutions near the cleavage site changed the position of cleavage, revealing preferences for a small residue preceding the cleavage site N-terminally (i.e., at the P1 position) and a hydrophobic residue at the second position following the cleavage site C-terminally (i.e., P2′). These features appear to be conserved among Pro-σK orthologs. SpoIVFB did not tolerate an aromatic residue at P1 or P2′ of Pro-σK. A Lys residue at P3′ of Pro-σK could not be replaced with Ala unless a Lys was provided farther C-terminally (e.g., at P9′). α-Helix-destabilizing residues near the cleavage site were not crucial for SpoIVFB to cleave Pro-σK. The preferences and tolerances of SpoIVFB are somewhat different from those of other intramembrane metalloproteases, perhaps reflecting differences in the interaction of the substrate with the membrane and the enzyme. PMID:23585539

  3. The roles of intramembrane proteases in protozoan parasites.

    PubMed

    Sibley, L David

    2013-12-01

    Intramembrane proteolysis is widely conserved throughout different forms of life, with three major types of proteases being known for their ability to cleave peptide bonds directly within the transmembrane domains of their substrates. Although intramembrane proteases have been extensively studied in humans and model organisms, they have only more recently been investigated in protozoan parasites, where they turn out to play important and sometimes unexpected roles. Signal peptide peptidases are involved in endoplasmic reticulum (ER) quality control and signal peptide degradation from exported proteins. Recent studies suggest that repurposing inhibitors developed for blocking presenilins may be useful for inhibiting the growth of Plasmodium, and possibly other protozoan parasites, by blocking signal peptide peptidases. Rhomboid proteases, originally described in the fly, are also widespread in parasites, and are especially expanded in apicomplexans. Their study in parasites has revealed novel roles that expand our understanding of how these proteases function. Within this diverse group of parasites, rhomboid proteases contribute to processing of adhesins involved in attachment, invasion, intracellular replication, phagocytosis, and immune evasion, placing them at the vertex of host-parasite interactions. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Intramembrane Proteases.

  4. Proteolytic Processing of Neuregulin 1 Type III by Three Intramembrane-cleaving Proteases.

    PubMed

    Fleck, Daniel; Voss, Matthias; Brankatschk, Ben; Giudici, Camilla; Hampel, Heike; Schwenk, Benjamin; Edbauer, Dieter; Fukumori, Akio; Steiner, Harald; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Haug-Kröper, Martina; Rossner, Moritz J; Fluhrer, Regina; Willem, Michael; Haass, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Numerous membrane-bound proteins undergo regulated intramembrane proteolysis. Regulated intramembrane proteolysis is initiated by shedding, and the remaining stubs are further processed by intramembrane-cleaving proteases (I-CLiPs). Neuregulin 1 type III (NRG1 type III) is a major physiological substrate of β-secretase (β-site amyloid precursor protein-cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1)). BACE1-mediated cleavage is required to allow signaling of NRG1 type III. Because of the hairpin nature of NRG1 type III, two membrane-bound stubs with a type 1 and a type 2 orientation are generated by proteolytic processing. We demonstrate that these stubs are substrates for three I-CLiPs. The type 1-oriented stub is further cleaved by γ-secretase at an ϵ-like site five amino acids N-terminal to the C-terminal membrane anchor and at a γ-like site in the middle of the transmembrane domain. The ϵ-cleavage site is only one amino acid N-terminal to a Val/Leu substitution associated with schizophrenia. The mutation reduces generation of the NRG1 type III β-peptide as well as reverses signaling. Moreover, it affects the cleavage precision of γ-secretase at the γ-site similar to certain Alzheimer disease-associated mutations within the amyloid precursor protein. The type 2-oriented membrane-retained stub of NRG1 type III is further processed by signal peptide peptidase-like proteases SPPL2a and SPPL2b. Expression of catalytically inactive aspartate mutations as well as treatment with 2,2'-(2-oxo-1,3-propanediyl)bis[(phenylmethoxy)carbonyl]-l-leucyl-l-leucinamide ketone inhibits formation of N-terminal intracellular domains and the corresponding secreted C-peptide. Thus, NRG1 type III is the first protein substrate that is not only cleaved by multiple sheddases but is also processed by three different I-CLiPs. PMID:26574544

  5. Intramembranous ossification of scleral ossicles in Chelydra serpentina.

    PubMed

    Franz-Odendaal, Tamara A

    2006-01-01

    Scleral ossicles are present in many reptiles, including turtles and birds. In both groups the sclerotic ring situated in the eye is composed of a number of imbricating scleral ossicles or plates. Despite this gross morphological similarity, Andrews (1996. An endochondral rather than a dermal origin for scleral ossicles in Cryptodiran turtles. J. Herpetol. 30, 257-260) reported that the scleral ossicles of turtles develop endochondrally unlike those in birds, which develop intramembranously after a complex epithelial-mesenchymal inductive event. This study re-explores one of the species examined by Andrews in order to determine the mode of ossification of scleral ossicles in turtles. A growth series of Chelydra serpentina embryos, including the stages examined by Andrews, were examined by staining separately for cartilage and bone. Results clearly contradict Andrews (1996) and show that the scleral ossicles of Chelydra serpentina develop similarly to those in birds. That is, they develop intramembranously without a cartilage precursor and are likely induced by transient scleral papillae. The sequence of scleral papillae development is broadly similar, but the papillae themselves are not as distinct as those seen in chicken embryos. This study has important consequences for understanding the homology of scleral ossicles among tetrapods. PMID:16377163

  6. Intramembrane particles and the organization of lymphocyte membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Kuby, J M; Wofsy, L

    1981-03-01

    An experimental system was developed in which the majority of all lymphocyte cell-surface proteins, regardless of antigenic specificity, could be cross-linked and redistributed in the membrane to determine whether this would induce a corresponding redistribution of intramembrane particles (IMP). Mouse spleen cells were treated with P-diazoniumphenyl- beta-D-lactoside (lac) to modify all exposed cell-surface proteins. Extensive azo- coupling was achieved without significantly reducing cell viability or compromising cellular function in mitogen- or antigen-stimulated cultures. When the lac-modified cell- surface proteins were capped with a sandwich of rabbit antilactoside antibody and fluorescein-goat anti-rabbit Ig, freeze-fracture preparations obtained from these cells revealed no obvious redistribution of IMP on the majority of fracture faces. However, detailed analysis showed a statistically significant 35 percent decrease (P less than 0.01) in average IMP density in the E face of the lac-capped spleen cells compared with control cells, whereas a few E-face micrographs showed intense IMP aggregation. In contrast, there was no significant alteration of P-face IMP densities or distribution. Apparently, the majority of E-face IMP and virtually all P-face IMP densities or distribution. Apparently, the majority of E-face IMP and virtually all P-face IMP do not present accessible antigenic sites on the lymphocyte surface and do not associate in a stable manner with surface protein antigens. This finding suggests that IMP, as observed in freeze-fracture analysis, may not comprise a representative reflection of lymphocyte transmembrane protein molecules and complexes because other evidence establishes: (a) that at least some common lymphocyte surface antigens are indeed exposed portions of transmembrane proteins and (b) that the aggregation of molecules of any surface antigen results in altered organization of contractile proteins at the cytoplasmic face of the membrane.

  7. Rhomboid intramembrane protease RHBDL4 triggers ER-export and non-canonical secretion of membrane-anchored TGFα

    PubMed Central

    Wunderle, Lina; Knopf, Julia D.; Kühnle, Nathalie; Morlé, Aymeric; Hehn, Beate; Adrain, Colin; Strisovsky, Kvido; Freeman, Matthew; Lemberg, Marius K.

    2016-01-01

    Rhomboid intramembrane proteases are the enzymes that release active epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) ligands in Drosophila and C. elegans, but little is known about their functions in mammals. Here we show that the mammalian rhomboid protease RHBDL4 (also known as Rhbdd1) promotes trafficking of several membrane proteins, including the EGFR ligand TGFα, from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to the Golgi apparatus, thereby triggering their secretion by extracellular microvesicles. Our data also demonstrate that RHBDL4-dependent trafficking control is regulated by G-protein coupled receptors, suggesting a role for this rhomboid protease in pathological conditions, including EGFR signaling. We propose that RHBDL4 reorganizes trafficking events within the early secretory pathway in response to GPCR signaling. Our work identifies RHBDL4 as a rheostat that tunes secretion dynamics and abundance of specific membrane protein cargoes. PMID:27264103

  8. Aquaporins in ovine amnion: responses to altered amniotic fluid volumes and intramembranous absorption rates.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Cecilia Y; Anderson, Debra F; Brace, Robert A

    2016-07-01

    Aquaporins (AQPs) are transmembrane channel proteins that facilitate rapid water movement across cell membranes. In amniotic membrane, the AQP-facilitated transfer of water across amnion cells has been proposed as a mechanism for amniotic fluid volume (AFV) regulation. To investigate whether AQPs modulate AFV by altering intramembranous absorption (IMA) rate, we tested the hypothesis that AQP gene expression in the amnion is positively correlated with IMA rate during experimental conditions when IMA rate and AFV are modified over a wide range. The relative abundances of AQP1, AQP3, AQP8, AQP9, and AQP11 mRNA and protein were determined in the amnion of 16 late-gestation ovine fetuses subjected to 2 days of control conditions, urine drainage, urine replacement, or intraamniotic fluid infusion. AQP mRNA levels were determined by RT-qPCR and proteins by western immunoblot. Under control conditions, mRNA levels among the five AQPs differed more than 20-fold. During experimental treatments, mean IMA rate in the experimental groups ranged from 100 ± 120 mL/day to 1370 ± 270 mL/day. The mRNA levels of the five AQPs did not change from control and were not correlated with IMA rates. The protein levels of AQP1 were positively correlated with IMA rates (r(2) = 38%, P = 0.01) while the remaining four AQPs were not. These findings demonstrate that five AQPs are differentially expressed in ovine amnion. Our study supports the hypothesis that AQP1 may play a positive role in regulating the rate of fluid transfer across the amnion, thereby participating in the dynamic regulation of AFV.

  9. Aquaporins in ovine amnion: responses to altered amniotic fluid volumes and intramembranous absorption rates.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Cecilia Y; Anderson, Debra F; Brace, Robert A

    2016-07-01

    Aquaporins (AQPs) are transmembrane channel proteins that facilitate rapid water movement across cell membranes. In amniotic membrane, the AQP-facilitated transfer of water across amnion cells has been proposed as a mechanism for amniotic fluid volume (AFV) regulation. To investigate whether AQPs modulate AFV by altering intramembranous absorption (IMA) rate, we tested the hypothesis that AQP gene expression in the amnion is positively correlated with IMA rate during experimental conditions when IMA rate and AFV are modified over a wide range. The relative abundances of AQP1, AQP3, AQP8, AQP9, and AQP11 mRNA and protein were determined in the amnion of 16 late-gestation ovine fetuses subjected to 2 days of control conditions, urine drainage, urine replacement, or intraamniotic fluid infusion. AQP mRNA levels were determined by RT-qPCR and proteins by western immunoblot. Under control conditions, mRNA levels among the five AQPs differed more than 20-fold. During experimental treatments, mean IMA rate in the experimental groups ranged from 100 ± 120 mL/day to 1370 ± 270 mL/day. The mRNA levels of the five AQPs did not change from control and were not correlated with IMA rates. The protein levels of AQP1 were positively correlated with IMA rates (r(2) = 38%, P = 0.01) while the remaining four AQPs were not. These findings demonstrate that five AQPs are differentially expressed in ovine amnion. Our study supports the hypothesis that AQP1 may play a positive role in regulating the rate of fluid transfer across the amnion, thereby participating in the dynamic regulation of AFV. PMID:27440743

  10. Intramembrane proteolysis promotes trafficking of hepatitis C virus core protein to lipid droplets.

    PubMed

    McLauchlan, John; Lemberg, Marius K; Hope, Graham; Martoglio, Bruno

    2002-08-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is the major causative pathogen associated with liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. The virus has a positive-sense RNA genome encoding a single polyprotein with the virion components located in the N-terminal portion. During biosynthesis of the polyprotein, an internal signal sequence between the core protein and the envelope protein E1 targets the nascent polypeptide to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane for translocation of E1 into the ER. Following membrane insertion, the signal sequence is cleaved from E1 by signal peptidase. Here we provide evidence that after cleavage by signal peptidase, the signal peptide is further processed by the intramembrane-cleaving protease SPP that promotes the release of core protein from the ER membrane. Core protein is then free for subsequent trafficking to lipid droplets. This study represents an example of a potential role for intramembrane proteolysis in the maturation of a viral protein. PMID:12145199

  11. Intramembrane Cavitation as a Predictive Bio-Piezoelectric Mechanism for Ultrasonic Brain Stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plaksin, Michael; Shoham, Shy; Kimmel, Eitan

    2014-01-01

    Low-intensity ultrasonic waves can remotely and nondestructively excite central nervous system (CNS) neurons. While diverse applications for this effect are already emerging, the biophysical transduction mechanism underlying this excitation remains unclear. Recently, we suggested that ultrasound-induced intramembrane cavitation within the bilayer membrane could underlie the biomechanics of a range of observed acoustic bioeffects. In this paper, we show that, in CNS neurons, ultrasound-induced cavitation of these nanometric bilayer sonophores can induce a complex mechanoelectrical interplay leading to excitation, primarily through the effect of currents induced by membrane capacitance changes. Our model explains the basic features of CNS acoustostimulation and predicts how the experimentally observed efficacy of mouse motor cortical ultrasonic stimulation depends on stimulation parameters. These results support the hypothesis that neuronal intramembrane piezoelectricity underlies ultrasound-induced neurostimulation, and suggest that other interactions between the nervous system and pressure waves or perturbations could be explained by this new mode of biological piezoelectric transduction.

  12. Rate of lateral diffusion of intramembrane particles: measurement by electrophoretic displacement and rerandomization.

    PubMed Central

    Sowers, A E; Hackenbrock, C R

    1981-01-01

    A method combining electrophoresis and freeze-fracture electron microscopy is described; the method was used to determine the lateral diffusion coefficient of intramembrane particles (integral proteins) in the mitochondrial inner membrane. An electric current was passed through microsuspensions of purified, spherical inner membranes at pH 7.4, which caused an electrophoretic migration of intramembrane particles in the membrane plane into a single, crowded patch facing the positive electrode. The membrane microsuspensions were quick-frozen at specified times after the packed particles were released from the electrophoretic force and while the particles were diffusing back to a random distribution. Observed concentration gradients of intramembrane particles during this time were quantitatively compared with and found to follow a mathematical model for Fickian diffusion of particles on a spherical membrane. The results determine the kinetics of free diffusion of integral proteins at the resolution of individual proteins. The diffusion coefficient of the integral proteins in the mitochondrial inner membrane was determined to be 8.3 X 10(-10) cm2/sec at 20 degrees C, from which a root-mean-square displacement of 57 nm in 10 msec is predicted. Images PMID:6947228

  13. Neural crest-specific loss of Prkar1a causes perinatal lethality resulting from defects in intramembranous ossification.

    PubMed

    Jones, Georgette N; Pringle, Daphne R; Yin, Zhirong; Carlton, Michelle M; Powell, Kimerly A; Weinstein, Michael B; Toribio, Ramiro E; La Perle, Krista M D; Kirschner, Lawrence S

    2010-08-01

    The cranial neural crest (CNC) undergoes complex molecular and morphological changes during embryogenesis in order to form the vertebrate skull, and nearly three quarters of all birth defects result from defects in craniofacial development. The molecular events leading to CNC differentiation have been extensively studied; however, the role of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase [protein kinase A (PKA)] during craniofacial development has only been described in palate formation. Here, we provide evidence that strict PKA regulation in postmigratory CNC cells is essential during craniofacial bone development. Selective inactivation of Prkar1a, a regulatory subunit of the PKA holoenzyme, in the CNC results in perinatal lethality caused by dysmorphic craniofacial development and subsequent asphyxiation. Additionally, aberrant differentiation of CNC mesenchymal cells results in anomalous intramembranous ossification characterized by formation of cartilaginous islands in some areas and osteolysis of bony trabeculae with fibrous connective tissue stabilization in others. Genetic interaction studies revealed that genetic reduction of the PKA catalytic subunit C(alpha) was able to rescue the phenotype, whereas reduction in Cbeta had no effect. Overall, these observations provide evidence of the essential role of proper regulation of PKA during the ossification of the bones of the skull. This knowledge may have implications for the understanding and treatment of craniofacial birth defects. PMID:20534695

  14. Intra-membrane molecular interactions of K+ channel proteins :

    SciTech Connect

    Moczydlowski, Edward G.

    2013-07-01

    Ion channel proteins regulate complex patterns of cellular electrical activity and ionic signaling. Certain K+ channels play an important role in immunological biodefense mechanisms of adaptive and innate immunity. Most ion channel proteins are oligomeric complexes with the conductive pore located at the central subunit interface. The long-term activity of many K+ channel proteins is dependent on the concentration of extracellular K+; however, the mechanism is unclear. Thus, this project focused on mechanisms underlying structural stability of tetrameric K+ channels. Using KcsA of Streptomyces lividans as a model K+ channel of known structure, the molecular basis of tetramer stability was investigated by: 1. Bioinformatic analysis of the tetramer interface. 2. Effect of two local anesthetics (lidocaine, tetracaine) on tetramer stability. 3. Molecular simulation of drug docking to the ion conduction pore. The results provide new insights regarding the structural stability of K+ channels and its possible role in cell physiology.

  15. Cell-Type-Selective Effects of Intramembrane Cavitation as a Unifying Theoretical Framework for Ultrasonic Neuromodulation.

    PubMed

    Plaksin, Michael; Kimmel, Eitan; Shoham, Shy

    2016-01-01

    Diverse translational and research applications could benefit from the noninvasive ability to reversibly modulate (excite or suppress) CNS activity using ultrasound pulses, however, without clarifying the underlying mechanism, advanced design-based ultrasonic neuromodulation remains elusive. Recently, intramembrane cavitation within the bilayer membrane was proposed to underlie both the biomechanics and the biophysics of acoustic bio-effects, potentially explaining cortical stimulation results through a neuronal intramembrane cavitation excitation (NICE) model. Here, NICE theory is shown to provide a detailed predictive explanation for the ability of ultrasonic (US) pulses to also suppress neural circuits through cell-type-selective mechanisms: according to the predicted mechanism T-type calcium channels boost charge accumulation between short US pulses selectively in low threshold spiking interneurons, promoting net cortical network inhibition. The theoretical results fit and clarify a wide array of earlier empirical observations in both the cortex and thalamus regarding the dependence of ultrasonic neuromodulation outcomes (excitation-suppression) on stimulation and network parameters. These results further support a unifying hypothesis for ultrasonic neuromodulation, highlighting the potential of advanced waveform design for obtaining cell-type-selective network control.

  16. Cell-Type-Selective Effects of Intramembrane Cavitation as a Unifying Theoretical Framework for Ultrasonic Neuromodulation.

    PubMed

    Plaksin, Michael; Kimmel, Eitan; Shoham, Shy

    2016-01-01

    Diverse translational and research applications could benefit from the noninvasive ability to reversibly modulate (excite or suppress) CNS activity using ultrasound pulses, however, without clarifying the underlying mechanism, advanced design-based ultrasonic neuromodulation remains elusive. Recently, intramembrane cavitation within the bilayer membrane was proposed to underlie both the biomechanics and the biophysics of acoustic bio-effects, potentially explaining cortical stimulation results through a neuronal intramembrane cavitation excitation (NICE) model. Here, NICE theory is shown to provide a detailed predictive explanation for the ability of ultrasonic (US) pulses to also suppress neural circuits through cell-type-selective mechanisms: according to the predicted mechanism T-type calcium channels boost charge accumulation between short US pulses selectively in low threshold spiking interneurons, promoting net cortical network inhibition. The theoretical results fit and clarify a wide array of earlier empirical observations in both the cortex and thalamus regarding the dependence of ultrasonic neuromodulation outcomes (excitation-suppression) on stimulation and network parameters. These results further support a unifying hypothesis for ultrasonic neuromodulation, highlighting the potential of advanced waveform design for obtaining cell-type-selective network control. PMID:27390775

  17. NK Cell Maturation and Cytotoxicity Are Controlled by the Intramembrane Aspartyl Protease SPPL3.

    PubMed

    Hamblet, Corinne E; Makowski, Stefanie L; Tritapoe, Julia M; Pomerantz, Joel L

    2016-03-15

    NK cell maturation is critical for normal effector function and the innate immune response to tumors and pathogens. However, the molecular pathways that control NK cell maturation remain largely undefined. In this article, we investigate the role of SPPL3, an intramembrane aspartyl protease, in murine NK cell biology. We find that deletion of SPPL3 in the hematopoietic system reduces numbers of peripheral NK cells, clearance of MHC class I-deficient tumors in vivo, and cytotoxicity against tumor cells in vitro. This phenotype is concomitant with reduced numbers of CD27(+)CD11b(+) and CD27(-)CD11b(+) NK cells, indicating a requirement for SPPL3 in efficient NK cell maturation. NK cell-specific deletion of SPPL3 results in the same deficiencies, revealing a cell-autonomous role for SPPL3 in these processes. CRISPR/Cas9 genomic editing in murine zygotes was used to generate knockin mice with a catalytically compromised SPPL3 D271A allele. Mice engineered to express only SPPL3 D271A in NK cells phenocopy mice deleted for SPPL3, indicating a requirement for SPPL3 protease activity in NK cell biology. Our results identify SPPL3 as a cell-autonomous molecular determinant of NK cell maturation and expand the role of intramembrane aspartyl proteases in innate immunity. PMID:26851218

  18. Intramembranous bone regeneration and implant placement using mechanical femoral marrow ablation: rodent models.

    PubMed

    Moran, Meghan M; Sena, Kotaro; McNulty, Margaret A; Sumner, D R; Virdi, Amarjit S

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we provide a detailed protocol for a model of long bone mechanical marrow ablation in the rodent, including surgical procedure, anesthesia, and pre- and post-operative care. In addition, frequently used experimental end points are briefly discussed. This model was developed to study intramembranous bone regeneration following surgical disruption of the marrow contents of long bones. In this model, the timing of the appearance of bone formation and remodeling is well-characterized and therefore the model is well-suited to evaluate the in vivo effects of various agents which influence these processes. When biomaterials such as tissue engineering scaffolds or metal implants are placed in the medullary cavity after marrow ablation, end points relevant to tissue engineering and implant fixation can also be analyzed. By sharing a detailed protocol, we hope to improve inter-laboratory reproducibility. PMID:27648259

  19. Bringing Bioactive Compounds into Membranes: The UbiA Superfamily of Intramembrane Aromatic Prenyltransferases.

    PubMed

    Li, Weikai

    2016-04-01

    The UbiA superfamily of intramembrane prenyltransferases catalyzes a key biosynthetic step in the production of ubiquinones, menaquinones, plastoquinones, hemes, chlorophylls, vitamin E, and structural lipids. These lipophilic compounds serve as electron and proton carriers for cellular respiration and photosynthesis, as antioxidants to reduce cell damage, and as structural components of microbial cell walls and membranes. This article reviews the biological functions and enzymatic activities of representative members of the superfamily, focusing on the remarkable recent research progress revealing that the UbiA superfamily is centrally implicated in several important physiological processes and human diseases. Because prenyltransferases in this superfamily have distinctive substrate preferences, two recent crystal structures are compared to illuminate the general mechanism for substrate recognition. PMID:26922674

  20. Steric trapping reveals a cooperativity network in the intramembrane protease GlpG

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhongyu; Kim, Miyeon; Sungsuwan, Suttipun; Huang, Xuefei; Hubbell, Wayne L.; Hong, Heedeok

    2016-01-01

    Membrane proteins are assembled through balanced interactions among protein, lipids and water. Studying their folding while maintaining the native lipid environment is necessary but challenging. Here we present methods for analyzing key elements in membrane protein folding including thermodynamic stability, compactness of the unfolded state and folding cooperativity under native conditions. The methods are based on steric trapping which couples unfolding of a doubly-biotinylated protein to binding of monovalent streptavidin (mSA). We further advanced this technology for general application by developing versatile biotin probes possessing spectroscopic reporters that are sensitized by mSA binding or protein unfolding. By applying these methods to an intramembrane protease GlpG of Escherichia coli, we elucidated a widely unraveled unfolded state, subglobal unfolding of the region encompassing the active site, and a network of cooperative and localized interactions to maintain the stability. These findings provide crucial insights into the folding energy landscape of membrane proteins. PMID:26999782

  1. Bringing Bioactive Compounds into Membranes: The UbiA Superfamily of Intramembrane Aromatic Prenyltransferases.

    PubMed

    Li, Weikai

    2016-04-01

    The UbiA superfamily of intramembrane prenyltransferases catalyzes a key biosynthetic step in the production of ubiquinones, menaquinones, plastoquinones, hemes, chlorophylls, vitamin E, and structural lipids. These lipophilic compounds serve as electron and proton carriers for cellular respiration and photosynthesis, as antioxidants to reduce cell damage, and as structural components of microbial cell walls and membranes. This article reviews the biological functions and enzymatic activities of representative members of the superfamily, focusing on the remarkable recent research progress revealing that the UbiA superfamily is centrally implicated in several important physiological processes and human diseases. Because prenyltransferases in this superfamily have distinctive substrate preferences, two recent crystal structures are compared to illuminate the general mechanism for substrate recognition.

  2. Skeletal dysplasia in perinatal lethal osteogenesis imperfecta. A complex disorder of endochondral and intramembranous ossification.

    PubMed

    Marion, M J; Gannon, F H; Fallon, M D; Mennuti, M T; Lodato, R F; Kaplan, F S

    1993-08-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) Type II is a rare heritable disorder of bone matrix that results in catastrophic congenital skeletal dysplasia. Two cases of OI Type II had symmetric rhizomelic skeletal dysplasia apparent on ultrasound at 16 and 20 weeks' gestation. Histologic and histochemical studies performed on skeletal tissue from fetal autopsies showed the following: (1) abnormal growth plate tissue characterized by failure of formation of primary bony spongiosa; (2) persistence of calcified cartilage bars in the diaphysis; (3) metaphyseal microfractures; (4) abundant cartilaginous fracture callus; (5) absence of bony callus; (6) failure of formation of intramembranous cortical diaphyseal bone; (7) angulation of long bones in portions of the metadiaphyses bordered by fracture callus; and (8) mechanical failure of the perichondral ring of LaCroix with a normal fibrous ossification groove of Ranvier. These findings suggest that skeletal dysplasia in OI Type II results from the action of muscular forces on a skeleton weakened by a complex disorder of endochondral and intramembranous ossification. The paucity of primary metaphyseal trabeculae and subperiosteal cortical bone leads to pathologic fractures of the immature fiber bone and an imperfect attempt at fracture repair. Angulation and shortening of long bones occurs between numerous sites of focal endochondral fracture callus. Mechanical failure of the fibrous perichondral ring leads to further collapse and shortening without obvious functional impairment of the fibrous ossification groove. Perinatal lethal OI provides insight into how a molecular disorder predominantly of Type I collagen metabolism results in pathology of numerous tissues, leading to severe skeletal dysplasia without primarily affecting chondrogenesis. PMID:8339500

  3. Site-2 protease regulated intramembrane proteolysis: sequence homologs suggest an ancient signaling cascade.

    PubMed

    Kinch, Lisa N; Ginalski, Krzysztof; Grishin, Nick V

    2006-01-01

    Site-2 proteases (S2Ps) form a large family of membrane-embedded metalloproteases that participate in cellular signaling pathways through sequential cleavage of membrane-tethered substrates. Using sequence similarity searches, we extend the S2P family to include remote homologs that help define a conserved structural core consisting of three predicted transmembrane helices with traditional metalloprotease functional motifs and a previously unrecognized motif (GxxxN/S/G). S2P relatives were identified in genomes from Bacteria, Archaea, and Eukaryota including protists, plants, fungi, and animals. The diverse S2P homologs divide into several groups that differ in various inserted domains and transmembrane helices. Mammalian S2P proteases belong to the major ubiquitous group and contain a PDZ domain. Sequence and structural analysis of the PDZ domain support its mediating the sequential cleavage of membrane-tethered substrates. Finally, conserved genomic neighborhoods of S2P homologs allow functional predictions for PDZ-containing transmembrane proteases in extra-cytoplasmic stress response and lipid metabolism.

  4. Responses of intramembranous bone and sutures upon in vivo cyclic tensile and compressive loading.

    PubMed

    Peptan, Alexandra I; Lopez, Aurora; Kopher, Ross A; Mao, Jeremy J

    2008-02-01

    Cranial vault and facial sutures interpose between mineralized bones of the skull, and may function analogously to appendicular and cranial base growth plates. However, unlike growth plates that are composed of chondrocyte lineage, cranial and facial sutures possess heterogeneous cell lineages such as mesenchymal cells, fibroblasts, and osteoblasts, in addition to vascular-derived cells. Despite recently intensified effort, the biological responses of intramembranous bone and sutures to mechanical loading are not well understood. This study was designed to investigate whether brief doses of tensile or compressive forces induce modeling and growth responses of intramembranous bone and sutures. In different groups of growing rabbits in vivo, cyclic tensile or compressive forces at 1 N and 8 Hz were applied to the maxilla for 20 min/day over 12 consecutive days. Computerized histomorphometric analyses revealed that the average sutural widths of both the premaxillomaxillary suture (PMS) and nasofrontal suture (NFS) loaded in either tension or compression were significantly higher than age- and sex-matched sham controls (P<0.01). The average cell densities of tension- or compression-loaded PMS and NFS were significantly higher than sham controls (P<0.01). The average osteoblast occupied sutural bone surface loaded under tension was significantly higher than that of sham control (P<0.05). Interestingly, tensile loading significantly reduced the average osteoclast surface, in comparison to sham control (P<0.05). For the NFS, tensile loading significantly increased the average osteoblast occupied sutural bone surface, in comparison with that of sham control (P<0.05). Also for the NFS suture, compression significantly reduced the average sutural osteoclast surface in comparison with sham control (P<0.05). Taken together, the present data suggest that high-frequency cyclic forces in either tension or compression induce modeling and growth changes in cranial sutures. Due to

  5. Effects of gallopamil on calcium release and intramembrane charge movements in frog skeletal muscle fibres.

    PubMed

    Feldmeyer, D; Melzer, W; Pohl, B

    1990-02-01

    1. Intramembrane charge movements and changes in intracellular Ca2+ concentration were studied in voltage clamp experiments on cut twitch muscle fibres of the frog. The restoration from inactivation caused by steady depolarization and its modification by the phenylalkylamine Ca2+ channel antagonist gallopamil (D600, 10-30 microM) were investigated. 2. D600 prevented the restoration from inactivation of Ca2+ release which normally occurred at -80 mV. In D600 Ca2+ release recovered from inactivation at -120 mV. 3. D600 did not alter the characteristics of intramembrane charge movements in the depolarized fibre (charge 2) but the increase in the amount of mobile charge in the test voltage range above -60 mV, which normally occurs after changing the holding potential to -80 mV, was suppressed. The charge movement characteristics of D600-paralysed fibres, which were held at -80 mV, equalled those of normal depolarized and inactivated fibres. 4. Control records for the charge movement analysis were always obtained by voltage steps above 0 mV. Using the 'conventional' control in the potential range between -80 and -160 mV led to an underestimation and a kinetic deformation of charge movements in D600-treated fibres, which was due to various amounts of nonlinear charge in the control. 5. Like the restoration of Ca2+ release at -80 mV in normal fibres the recovery from paralysis at -120 mV in D600-treated fibres was accompanied by a significant increase in mobile charge in the potential range positive of -60 mV. Both Ca2+ release and charge movement at test potentials above -60 mV recovered with almost identical time course. 6. Restoration of Ca2+ release at a holding potential of -80 mV in normal fibres or at -120 mV in D600-treated fibres could not be clearly correlated to charge movement changes in the voltage range negative of -60 mV (charge 2). 7. Our results are consistent with a voltage-dependent inhibitory effect of D600 on the charge displacement that controls Ca2

  6. Dynamic study of intramembranous particles in human fresh erythrocytes using an "in vitro cryotechnique".

    PubMed

    Terada, Nobuo; Ohno, Nobuhiko; Fujii, Yasuhisa; Baba, Takeshi; Ohno, Shinichi

    2006-04-01

    For analyses of dynamic ultrastructures of erythrocyte intramembranous particles (IMPs) in situ, a quick-freezing method was used to stabilize the flow behavior of erythrocytes embedded in vitreous ice. Fresh human blood was jetted at various pressures through artificial tubes, in which the flowing erythrocytes were elongated from biconcave discoid shapes to elliptical ones, and quickly frozen in liquid isopentane-propane cryogen (-193 degrees C). They were freeze-fractured using a scalpel in liquid nitrogen, and routinely prepared for replica membranes. Many IMPs were observed on the protoplasmic freeze-fracture face (P-face) of the erythrocyte membranes. Some control erythrocytes under nonflowing or stationary conditions showed IMPs with their random distribution. However, other jetted erythrocytes under flowing conditions showed variously sized IMPs with much closer distribution. They were also arranged into parallel rows in some parts, and aggregated together. This quick-freezing method enabled for the first time the visualization of time-dependent topology and the molecular alteration of IMPs in dynamically flowing erythrocytes. PMID:16586489

  7. Substrate binding and specificity of rhomboid intramembrane protease revealed by substrate–peptide complex structures

    PubMed Central

    Zoll, Sebastian; Stanchev, Stancho; Began, Jakub; Škerle, Jan; Lepšík, Martin; Peclinovská, Lucie; Majer, Pavel; Strisovsky, Kvido

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms of intramembrane proteases are incompletely understood due to the lack of structural data on substrate complexes. To gain insight into substrate binding by rhomboid proteases, we have synthesised a series of novel peptidyl-chloromethylketone (CMK) inhibitors and analysed their interactions with Escherichia coli rhomboid GlpG enzymologically and structurally. We show that peptidyl-CMKs derived from the natural rhomboid substrate TatA from bacterium Providencia stuartii bind GlpG in a substrate-like manner, and their co-crystal structures with GlpG reveal the S1 to S4 subsites of the protease. The S1 subsite is prominent and merges into the ‘water retention site’, suggesting intimate interplay between substrate binding, specificity and catalysis. Unexpectedly, the S4 subsite is plastically formed by residues of the L1 loop, an important but hitherto enigmatic feature of the rhomboid fold. We propose that the homologous region of members of the wider rhomboid-like protein superfamily may have similar substrate or client-protein binding function. Finally, using molecular dynamics, we generate a model of the Michaelis complex of the substrate bound in the active site of GlpG. PMID:25216680

  8. Mice Lacking Pten in Osteoblasts Have Improved Intramembranous and Late Endochondral Fracture Healing

    PubMed Central

    Burgers, Travis A.; Hoffmann, Martin F.; Collins, Caitlyn J.; Zahatnansky, Juraj; Alvarado, Martin A.; Morris, Michael R.; Sietsema, Debra L.; Mason, James J.; Jones, Clifford B.; Ploeg, Heidi L.; Williams, Bart O.

    2013-01-01

    The failure of an osseous fracture to heal (development of a non-union) is a common and debilitating clinical problem. Mice lacking the tumor suppressor Pten in osteoblasts have dramatic and progressive increases in bone volume and density throughout life. Since fracture healing is a recapitulation of bone development, we investigated the process of fracture healing in mice lacking Pten in osteoblasts (Ocn-cretg/+;Ptenflox/flox). Mid-diaphyseal femoral fractures induced in wild-type and Ocn-cretg/+;Ptenflox/flox mice were studied via micro-computed tomography (µCT) scans, biomechanical testing, histological and histomorphometric analysis, and protein expression analysis. Ocn-cretg/+;Ptenflox/flox mice had significantly stiffer and stronger intact bones relative to controls in all cohorts. They also had significantly stiffer healing bones at day 28 post-fracture (PF) and significantly stronger healing bones at days 14, 21, and 28 PF. At day 7 PF, the proximal and distal ends of the Pten mutant calluses were more ossified. By day 28 PF, Pten mutants had larger and more mineralized calluses. Pten mutants had improved intramembranous bone formation during healing originating from the periosteum. They also had improved endochondral bone formation later in the healing process, after mature osteoblasts are present in the callus. Our results indicate that the inhibition of Pten can improve fracture healing and that the local or short-term use of commercially available Pten-inhibiting agents may have clinical application for enhancing fracture healing. PMID:23675511

  9. The yeast ERAD-C ubiquitin ligase Doa10 recognizes an intramembrane degron

    PubMed Central

    Habeck, Gregor; Ebner, Felix A.; Shimada-Kreft, Hiroko

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant endoplasmic reticulum (ER) proteins are eliminated by ER-associated degradation (ERAD). This process involves protein retrotranslocation into the cytosol, ubiquitylation, and proteasomal degradation. ERAD substrates are classified into three categories based on the location of their degradation signal/degron: ERAD-L (lumen), ERAD-M (membrane), and ERAD-C (cytosol) substrates. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the membrane proteins Hrd1 and Doa10 are the predominant ERAD ubiquitin-protein ligases (E3s). The current notion is that ERAD-L and ERAD-M substrates are exclusively handled by Hrd1, whereas ERAD-C substrates are recognized by Doa10. In this paper, we identify the transmembrane (TM) protein Sec61 β-subunit homologue 2 (Sbh2) as a Doa10 substrate. Sbh2 is part of the trimeric Ssh1 complex involved in protein translocation. Unassembled Sbh2 is rapidly degraded in a Doa10-dependent manner. Intriguingly, the degron maps to the Sbh2 TM region. Thus, in contrast to the prevailing view, Doa10 (and presumably its human orthologue) has the capacity for recognizing intramembrane degrons, expanding its spectrum of substrates. PMID:25918226

  10. Intramembrane charge movement in frog skeletal muscle fibres. Properties of charge 2.

    PubMed Central

    Brum, G; Rios, E

    1987-01-01

    1. Membrane currents were measured in cut skeletal muscle fibres voltage-clamped in a double Vaseline gap in solutions that had impermeant ions substituted for Na+, K+ and Cl-. The fibres were maintained at a holding potential of 0 mV. Pulses to positive voltages elicited outward currents that were proportional to voltage at all times; these were used to estimate linear capacitive currents, which in turn were used in the construction of non-linear current transients. 2. Large negative-going pulses elicited proportionally larger inward currents that decayed during the pulse with voltage-dependent kinetics. A portion of the non-linear current could be eliminated by solutions containing EGTA, as well as by large negative conditioning pulses of 200 ms or more. This portion was probably an inward Ca2+ current. 3. The non-linear current remaining in EGTA-containing solutions had characteristics of intramembrane charge movement ('charge 2'). This charge depended on voltage according to a two-state Boltzmann function of average parameters Qmax = 47.7 nC/microF, V = -115 mV, K = 21.5 mV (seven fibres). 4. The charge movement current transients were single-exponential decays (after a short rising phase) with time constants (tau) that depended on voltage (V). A single-barrier Eyring rate model described well the dependence of time constant on voltage. This fit permitted an independent estimate of a transition voltage, V, and a slope parameter K related to apparent valence of the mobile particle. The values of V and K that best fitted the kinetic data were close to the corresponding values estimated from the charge vs. voltage distribution. 5. Effective capacitance was measured by the transfer of capacitive charge by a small pulse superimposed on a variable pre-pulse. The capacitance was found to depend on pre-pulse voltage. The voltage dependence of the capacitance was as expected from the properties of charge 2 measured independently in the same fibres. 6. The presence of

  11. Cell-Type-Selective Effects of Intramembrane Cavitation as a Unifying Theoretical Framework for Ultrasonic Neuromodulation123

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Diverse translational and research applications could benefit from the noninvasive ability to reversibly modulate (excite or suppress) CNS activity using ultrasound pulses, however, without clarifying the underlying mechanism, advanced design-based ultrasonic neuromodulation remains elusive. Recently, intramembrane cavitation within the bilayer membrane was proposed to underlie both the biomechanics and the biophysics of acoustic bio-effects, potentially explaining cortical stimulation results through a neuronal intramembrane cavitation excitation (NICE) model. Here, NICE theory is shown to provide a detailed predictive explanation for the ability of ultrasonic (US) pulses to also suppress neural circuits through cell-type-selective mechanisms: according to the predicted mechanism T-type calcium channels boost charge accumulation between short US pulses selectively in low threshold spiking interneurons, promoting net cortical network inhibition. The theoretical results fit and clarify a wide array of earlier empirical observations in both the cortex and thalamus regarding the dependence of ultrasonic neuromodulation outcomes (excitation-suppression) on stimulation and network parameters. These results further support a unifying hypothesis for ultrasonic neuromodulation, highlighting the potential of advanced waveform design for obtaining cell-type-selective network control. PMID:27390775

  12. Rhomboid family pseudoproteases use the ER quality control machinery to regulate intercellular signaling.

    PubMed

    Zettl, Markus; Adrain, Colin; Strisovsky, Kvido; Lastun, Viorica; Freeman, Matthew

    2011-04-01

    Intramembrane proteolysis governs many cellular control processes, but little is known about how intramembrane proteases are regulated. iRhoms are a conserved subfamily of proteins related to rhomboid intramembrane serine proteases that lack key catalytic residues. We have used a combination of genetics and cell biology to determine that these "pseudoproteases" inhibit rhomboid-dependent signaling by the epidermal growth factor receptor pathway in Drosophila, thereby regulating sleep. iRhoms prevent the cleavage of potential rhomboid substrates by promoting their destabilization by endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-associated degradation; this mechanism has been conserved in mammalian cells. The exploitation of the intrinsic quality control machinery of the ER represents a new mode of regulation of intercellular signaling. Inactive cognates of enzymes are common, but their functions are mostly unclear; our data indicate that pseudoenzymes can readily evolve into regulatory proteins, suggesting that this may be a significant evolutionary mechanism.

  13. Intramembranous Bone Healing Process Subsequent to Tooth Extraction in Mice: Micro-Computed Tomography, Histomorphometric and Molecular Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Andreia Espindola; Repeke, Carlos Eduardo; Ferreira Junior, Samuel de Barros; Colavite, Priscila Maria; Biguetti, Claudia Cristina; Oliveira, Rodrigo Cardoso; Assis, Gerson Francisco; Taga, Rumio; Trombone, Ana Paula Favaro; Garlet, Gustavo Pompermaier

    2015-01-01

    Bone tissue has a significant potential for healing, which involves a significant the interplay between bone and immune cells. While fracture healing represents a useful model to investigate endochondral bone healing, intramembranous bone healing models are yet to be developed and characterized. In this study, a micro-computed tomography, histomorphometric and molecular (RealTimePCRarray) characterization of post tooth-extraction alveolar bone healing was performed on C57Bl/6 WT mice. After the initial clot dominance (0h), the development of a provisional immature granulation tissue is evident (7d), characterized by marked cell proliferation, angiogenesis and inflammatory cells infiltration; associated with peaks of growth factors (BMP-2-4-7,TGFβ1,VEGFa), cytokines (TNFα, IL-10), chemokines & receptors (CXCL12, CCL25, CCR5, CXCR4), matrix (Col1a1-2, ITGA4, VTN, MMP1a) and MSCs (CD105, CD106, OCT4, NANOG, CD34, CD146) markers expression. Granulation tissue is sequentially replaced by more mature connective tissue (14d), characterized by inflammatory infiltrate reduction along the increased bone formation, marked expression of matrix remodeling enzymes (MMP-2-9), bone formation/maturation (RUNX2, ALP, DMP1, PHEX, SOST) markers, and chemokines & receptors associated with healing (CCL2, CCL17, CCR2). No evidences of cartilage cells or tissue were observed, strengthening the intramembranous nature of bone healing. Bone microarchitecture analysis supports the evolving healing, with total tissue and bone volumes as trabecular number and thickness showing a progressive increase over time. The extraction socket healing process is considered complete (21d) when the dental socket is filled by trabeculae bone with well-defined medullary canals; it being the expression of mature bone markers prevalent at this period. Our data confirms the intramembranous bone healing nature of the model used, revealing parallels between the gene expression profile and the histomorphometric

  14. Changes in the distribution of intramembranous particles in hen erythrocytes during cell fusion induced by the bivalent-cation ionophore A23187.

    PubMed Central

    Vos, J; Ahkong, Q F; Botham, G M; Quirk, S J; Lucy, J A

    1976-01-01

    Incubation of hen erythrocytes with Ca2+ and the bivalent-cation ionophore A23187 induced slight cell fusion in 1 h at 37 degrees C, and extensive fusion during a subsequent 15 min at 47 degrees C. Redistributions of intramembranous particles were observed, possibly involving interactions between Ca2+ and phospholipids, which are discussed in relation to molecular mechanimss of cell fusion. Images PLATE 1 PLATE 2 PMID:791273

  15. An intramembranous ossification model for the in silico analysis of bone tissue formation in tooth extraction sites.

    PubMed

    Corredor-Gómez, Jennifer Paola; Rueda-Ramírez, Andrés Mauricio; Gamboa-Márquez, Miguel Alejandro; Torres-Rodríguez, Carolina; Cortés-Rodríguez, Carlos Julio

    2016-07-21

    The accurate modeling of biological processes allows us to predict the spatiotemporal behavior of living tissues by computer-aided (in silico) testing, a useful tool for the development of medical strategies, avoiding the expenses and potential ethical implications of in vivo experimentation. A model for bone healing in mouth would be useful for selecting proper surgical techniques in dental procedures. In this paper, the formulation and implementation of a model for Intramembranous Ossification is presented aiming to describe the complex process of bone tissue formation in tooth extraction sites. The model consists in a mathematical description of the mechanisms in which different types of cells interact, synthesize and degrade extracellular matrices under the influence of biochemical factors. Special attention is given to angiogenesis, oxygen-dependent effects and growth factor-induced apoptosis of fibroblasts. Furthermore, considering the depth-dependent vascularization of mandibular bone and its influence on bone healing, a functional description of the cell distribution on the severed periodontal ligament (PDL) is proposed. The developed model was implemented using the finite element method (FEM) and successfully validated by simulating an animal in vivo experiment on dogs reported in the literature. A good fit between model outcome and experimental data was obtained with a mean absolute error of 3.04%. The mathematical framework presented here may represent an important tool for the design of future in vitro and in vivo tests, as well as a precedent for future in silico studies on osseointegration and mechanobiology. PMID:27113783

  16. Mechanical tension induces lateral movement of intramembrane components of the tight junction: studies on mouse mammary cells in culture

    PubMed Central

    1983-01-01

    Occluding junctions of mammary epithelial cells in nonproliferating primary culture occasionally display an atypical pattern of intramembrane strands oriented predominantly perpendicular, instead of roughly parallel, to the apical border of the junction. To test whether the orienting influence was a centripetal cytoskeletal tension often observed in epithelial sheets on fixed substrates, we seeded cells at low density; this allows them to spread maximally while forming a barely confluent pavement. The result was a fourfold increase in the percentage of junctions with the strongly aligned, atypical pattern. Closely similar configurations were observed as the earliest detectable effect of chelation of extracellular Ca++, which induced pronounced centripetal contraction of the cell body. Externally imposed tension, applied so as to stretch cells in one direction only, affected the positions of strands in stretched junctions as might be predicted, by flattening their undulations, increasing their alignment parallel to the apical border. Thus mechanical tension alone, whether inherent in the cytoskeleton or imposed on the cell surface by exogenous force, can cause coordinate lateral displacement of macromolecular assemblies within the membranes of both joined cells. PMID:6682108

  17. Role of intramembrane charged residues in the quality control of unassembled T-cell receptor α-chains at the endoplasmic reticulum

    PubMed Central

    Soetandyo, Nia; Wang, Qiuyan; Ye, Yihong; Li, Lianyun

    2010-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-associated degradation (ERAD) of unassembled T-cell receptor α-chain (TCRα) is reliant on the presence of two basic residues in the transmembrane (TM) segment of TCRα. The precise role of these residues in ER quality control is unclear. Here, we show that a TCRα mutant lacking these intramembrane charged residues has a tendency to form homooligomers through an interchain disulfide bond that involves a specific pair of cysteine residues. Covalent oligomerization of TCRα appears to stabilize it at the ER membrane. The presence of a single lysine residue at specific positions within the TCRα TM domain abolishes its oligomerization and causes its rapid degradation. Conversely, when TCRα oligomerization is induced by a bivalent compound, the degradation of TCRα is inhibited. Together, these results suggest that the intramembrane charged residues in TCRα do not function as a signal for substrate recognition in ERAD. Instead, their primary role is to reduce TCRα oligomerization, maintaining it in a retrotranslocation-competent state. Our results also suggest that the ERAD machinery is inefficient when coping with oligomerized substrates, indicating a requirement for chaperone-mediated protein disassembly in the ER lumen prior to retrotranslocation. PMID:20332119

  18. Intramembrane organization of specialized contacts in the outer plexiform layer of the retina. A freeze-fracture study in monkeys and rabbits

    PubMed Central

    1975-01-01

    Freeze-fracture analysis of the neural connections in the outer plexiform layer of the retina of primates (Macaca mulatta and Macaca arctoides) demonstrates a remarkable diversity in the internal structure of the synaptic membranes. In the invaginating synapses of cone pedicles, the plasma membrane of the photoreceptor ending contains an aggregate of A-face particles, a hexagonal array of synaptic vesicle sites, and rows of coated vesicle sites, which are deployed in sequence from apex to base of the synaptic ridge. The horizontal cell dendrites lack vesicle sites and have two aggregates of intramembrane A-face particles, one at the interface with the apex of the synaptic ridge, the other opposite the tip of the invaginating midget bipolar dendrite. Furthermore, the horizontal cell dendrites are interconnected by a novel type of specialized junction, characterized by: (a) enlarged intercellular cleft, bisected by a dense plate and traversed by uniformly spaced crossbars; (b) symmetrical arrays of B-face particles arranged in parallel rows within the junctional membranes; and (c) a layer of dense material on the cytoplasmic surface of the membranes. The plasmalemma of the invaginating midget bipolar dendrite is unspecialized. At the contact region between the basal surface of cone pedicles and the dendrites of the flat midget and diffuse cone bipolar cells, the pedicle membrane has moderately clustered A-face particles, but no vesicle sites, whereas the adjoining membrane of the bipolar dendrites contains an aggregate of B-face particles. The invaginating synapse of rod spherules differs from that of cone pedicles, because the membrane of the axonal endings of the horizontal cells only has an A-face particle aggregate opposite the apex of the synaptic ridge. Specialized junctions between horizontal cell processes, characterized by symmetrical arrays of intramembrane B-face particles, are also present in the neuropil underlying the photoreceptor endings. Small gap

  19. Expression of osteoblastic and osteoclastic genes during spontaneous regeneration and autotransplantation of goldfish scale: a new tool to study intramembranous bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Thamamongood, Thiparpa Aime; Furuya, Ryo; Fukuba, Shunsuke; Nakamura, Masahisa; Suzuki, Nobuo; Hattori, Atsuhiko

    2012-06-01

    and grew at the trimmed/perforated part of each transplant, while scale resorption occurred apparently only around the trimmed/perforated area. In contrast, no scale resorption or regeneration was detected in sham transplantations. Our finding suggests that loss of correct cell-to-cell contact between the scale-pocket lining cells and the scale cortex cells is the key to switch on the onset of scale resorption and regeneration. Overall, the present study shows that goldfish scale regeneration shares similarities in gene expression with intramembranous bone regeneration. Improved understanding of goldfish scale regeneration will help elucidate the process of intramembranous bone regeneration and make goldfish scale a possible new tool to study bone regeneration.

  20. Intra-membrane Signaling Between the Voltage-Gated Ca2+-Channel and Cysteine Residues of Syntaxin 1A Coordinates Synchronous Release

    PubMed Central

    Bachnoff, Niv; Cohen-Kutner, Moshe; Trus, Michael; Atlas, Daphne

    2013-01-01

    The interaction of syntaxin 1A (Sx1A) with voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCC) is required for depolarization-evoked release. However, it is unclear how the signal is transferred from the channel to the exocytotic machinery and whether assembly of Sx1A and the calcium channel is conformationally linked to triggering synchronous release. Here we demonstrate that depolarization-evoked catecholamine release was decreased in chromaffin cells infected with semliki forest viral vectors encoding Sx1A mutants, Sx1AC271V, or Sx1AC272V, or by direct oxidation of these Sx1A transmembrane (TM) cysteine residues. Mutating or oxidizing these highly conserved Sx1A Cys271 and Cys272 equally disrupted the Sx1A interaction with the channel. The results highlight the functional link between the VGCC and the exocytotic machinery, and attribute the redox sensitivity of the release process to the Sx1A TM C271 and C272. This unique intra-membrane signal-transduction pathway enables fast signaling, and triggers synchronous release by conformational-coupling of the channel with Sx1A. PMID:23567899

  1. Yeast membrane proteomics using leucine metabolic labelling: Bioinformatic data processing and exemplary application to the ER-intramembrane protease Ypf1.

    PubMed

    Nilse, Lars; Avci, Dönem; Heisterkamp, Patrick; Serang, Oliver; Lemberg, Marius K; Schilling, Oliver

    2016-10-01

    We describe in detail the usage of leucine metabolic labelling in yeast in order to monitor quantitative proteome alterations, e.g. upon removal of a protease. Since laboratory yeast strains are typically leucine auxotroph, metabolic labelling with trideuterated leucine (d3-leucine) is a straightforward, cost-effective, and ubiquitously applicable strategy for quantitative proteomic studies, similar to the widely used arginine/lysine metabolic labelling method for mammalian cells. We showcase the usage of advanced peptide quantification using the FeatureFinderMultiplex algorithm (part of the OpenMS software package) for robust and reliable quantification. Furthermore, we present an OpenMS bioinformatics data analysis workflow that combines accurate quantification with high proteome coverage. In order to enable visualization, peptide-mapping, and sharing of quantitative proteomic data, especially for membrane-spanning and cell-surface proteins, we further developed the web-application Proteator (http://proteator.appspot.com). Due to its simplicity and robustness, we expect metabolic leucine labelling in yeast to be of great interest to the research community. As an exemplary application, we show the identification of the copper transporter Ctr1 as a putative substrate of the ER-intramembrane protease Ypf1 by yeast membrane proteomics using d3-leucine isotopic labelling.

  2. Effect of intra-membrane C60 fullerenes on the modulus of elasticity and the mechanical resistance of gel and fluid lipid bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jihan; Liang, Dehai; Contera, Sonia

    2015-10-01

    Penetration and partition of C60 to the lipid bilayer core are both relevant to C60 toxicity, and useful to realise C60 biomedical potential. A key aspect is the effect of C60 on bilayer mechanical properties. Here, we present an experimental study on the mechanical effect of the incorporation of C60 into the hydrophobic core of fluid and gel phase zwitterionic phosphatidylcholine (PC) lipid bilayers. We demonstrate its incorporation inside the hydrophobic lipid core and the effect on the packing of the lipids and the vesicle size using a combination of infrared (IR) spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM) and laser light scattering. Using AFM we measured the Young's modulus of elasticity (E) of 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC), 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC) and 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DSPC) in the absence (presence) of intra-membranous C60 at 24.5 °C. E of fluid phase supported bilayers is not altered by C60, but E increases with incorporation of C60 in gel phase bilayers. The increase is higher for longer hydrocarbon chains: 1.6 times for DPPC and 2 times for DSPC. However the mechanical resistance of gel phase bilayers of curved bilayered structures decreases with the incorporation of C60. Our combined results indicate that C60 causes a decrease in gel phase lipid mobility, i.e. an increase in membrane viscosity.

  3. Yeast membrane proteomics using leucine metabolic labelling: Bioinformatic data processing and exemplary application to the ER-intramembrane protease Ypf1.

    PubMed

    Nilse, Lars; Avci, Dönem; Heisterkamp, Patrick; Serang, Oliver; Lemberg, Marius K; Schilling, Oliver

    2016-10-01

    We describe in detail the usage of leucine metabolic labelling in yeast in order to monitor quantitative proteome alterations, e.g. upon removal of a protease. Since laboratory yeast strains are typically leucine auxotroph, metabolic labelling with trideuterated leucine (d3-leucine) is a straightforward, cost-effective, and ubiquitously applicable strategy for quantitative proteomic studies, similar to the widely used arginine/lysine metabolic labelling method for mammalian cells. We showcase the usage of advanced peptide quantification using the FeatureFinderMultiplex algorithm (part of the OpenMS software package) for robust and reliable quantification. Furthermore, we present an OpenMS bioinformatics data analysis workflow that combines accurate quantification with high proteome coverage. In order to enable visualization, peptide-mapping, and sharing of quantitative proteomic data, especially for membrane-spanning and cell-surface proteins, we further developed the web-application Proteator (http://proteator.appspot.com). Due to its simplicity and robustness, we expect metabolic leucine labelling in yeast to be of great interest to the research community. As an exemplary application, we show the identification of the copper transporter Ctr1 as a putative substrate of the ER-intramembrane protease Ypf1 by yeast membrane proteomics using d3-leucine isotopic labelling. PMID:27426920

  4. Mutational analysis of the intramembranous H10 loop of yeast Nhx1 reveals a critical role in ion homoeostasis and vesicle trafficking.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Sanchita; Kallay, Laura; Brett, Christopher L; Rao, Rajini

    2006-08-15

    Yeast Nhx1 [Na+(K+)/H+ exchanger 1] is an intracellular Na+(K+)/H+ exchanger, localizing to the late endosome where it is important for ion homoeostasis and vesicle trafficking. Phylogenetic analysis of NHE (Na+/H+ exchanger) sequences has identified orthologous proteins, including HsNHE6 (human NHE6), HsNHE7 and HsNHE9 of unknown physiological role. These appear distinct from well-studied mammalian plasma membrane isoforms (NHE1-NHE5). To explore the differences between plasma membrane and intracellular NHEs and understand the link between ion homoeostasis and vesicle trafficking, we examined the consequence of replacing residues in the intramembranous H10 loop of Nhx1 between transmembrane segments 9 and 10. The critical role for the carboxy group of Glu355 in ion transport is consistent with the invariance of this residue in all NHEs. Surprisingly, residues specifically conserved in the intracellular isoforms (such as Phe357 and Tyr361) could not be replaced with closely similar residues (leucine and phenylalanine) found in the plasma membrane isoforms without loss of function, revealing unexpected side chain specificity. The trafficking phenotypes of all Nhx1 mutants, including hygromycin-sensitivity and missorting of carboxypeptidase Y, were found to directly correlate with pH homoeostasis defects and could be proportionately corrected by titration with weak base. The present study demonstrates the importance of the H10 loop of the NHE family, highlights the differences between plasma membrane and intracellular isoforms and shows that trafficking defects are tightly coupled with pH homoeostasis.

  5. Cytosolic extensions directly regulate a rhomboid protease by modulating substrate gating.

    PubMed

    Baker, Rosanna P; Urban, Siniša

    2015-07-01

    Intramembrane proteases catalyse the signal-generating step of various cell signalling pathways, and continue to be implicated in diseases ranging from malaria infection to Parkinsonian neurodegeneration. Despite playing such decisive roles, it remains unclear whether or how these membrane-immersed enzymes might be regulated directly. To address this limitation, here we focus on intramembrane proteases containing domains known to exert regulatory functions in other contexts, and characterize a rhomboid protease that harbours calcium-binding EF-hands. We find calcium potently stimulates proteolysis by endogenous rhomboid-4 in Drosophila cells, and, remarkably, when rhomboid-4 is purified and reconstituted in liposomes. Interestingly, deleting the amino-terminal EF-hands activates proteolysis prematurely, while residues in cytoplasmic loops connecting distal transmembrane segments mediate calcium stimulation. Rhomboid regulation is not orchestrated by either dimerization or substrate interactions. Instead, calcium increases catalytic rate by promoting substrate gating. Substrates with cleavage sites outside the membrane can be cleaved but lose the capacity to be regulated. These observations indicate substrate gating is not an essential step in catalysis, but instead evolved as a mechanism for regulating proteolysis inside the membrane. Moreover, these insights provide new approaches for studying rhomboid functions by investigating upstream inputs that trigger proteolysis.

  6. Regulation of gamma-Secretase in Alzheimer's Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Shuxia; Zhou, Hua; Walian, Peter; Jap, Bing

    2007-02-07

    The {gamma}-secretase complex is an intramembrane aspartyl protease that cleaves its substrates along their transmembrane regions. Sequential proteolytic processing of amyloid precursor protein by {beta}- and {gamma}-secretase produces amyloid {beta}-peptides, which are the major components of amyloid plaques in the brains of Alzheimer's disease patients. The {gamma}-secretase complex is therefore believed to be critical in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. Here we review the range of factors found to affect the nature and degree of {gamma}-secretase complex activity; these include {gamma}-secretase complex assembly and activation, the integral regulatory subunit CD147, transient or weak binding partners, the levels of cholesterol and sphingolipids in cell membranes, and inflammatory cytokines. Integrated knowledge of the molecular mechanisms supporting the actions of these factors is expected to lead to a comprehensive understanding of the functional regulation of the {gamma}-secretase complex, and this, in turn, should facilitate the development of novel therapeutic strategies for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease.

  7. Presenilin/γ-secretase regulates neurexin processing at synapses.

    PubMed

    Saura, Carlos A; Servián-Morilla, Emilia; Scholl, Francisco G

    2011-04-29

    Neurexins are a large family of neuronal plasma membrane proteins, which function as trans-synaptic receptors during synaptic differentiation. The binding of presynaptic neurexins to postsynaptic partners, such as neuroligins, has been proposed to participate in a signaling pathway that regulates synapse formation/stabilization. The identification of mutations in neurexin genes associated with autism and mental retardation suggests that dysfunction of neurexins may underlie synaptic defects associated with brain disorders. However, the mechanisms that regulate neurexin function at synapses are still unclear. Here, we show that neurexins are proteolytically processed by presenilins (PS), the catalytic components of the γ-secretase complex that mediates the intramembraneous cleavage of several type I membrane proteins. Inhibition of PS/γ-secretase by using pharmacological and genetic approaches induces a drastic accumulation of neurexin C-terminal fragments (CTFs) in cultured rat hippocampal neurons and mouse brain. Neurexin-CTFs accumulate mainly at the presynaptic terminals of PS conditional double knockout (PS cDKO) mice lacking both PS genes in glutamatergic neurons of the forebrain. The fact that loss of PS function enhances neurexin accumulation at glutamatergic terminals mediated by neuroligin-1 suggests that PS regulate the processing of neurexins at glutamatergic synapses. Interestingly, presenilin 1 (PS1) is recruited to glutamatergic terminals mediated by neuroligin-1, thus concentrating PS1 at terminals containing β-neurexins. Furthermore, familial Alzheimer's disease (FAD)-linked PS1 mutations differentially affect β-neurexin-1 processing. Expression of PS1 M146L and PS1 H163R mutants in PS-/- cells rescues the processing of β-neurexin-1, whereas PS1 C410Y and PS1 ΔE9 fail to rescue the processing defect. These results suggest that PS regulate the synaptic function and processing of neurexins at glutamatergic synapses, and that impaired neurexin

  8. Bone morphogenetic protein 2 stimulates endochondral ossification by regulating periosteal cell fate during bone repair

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yan Yiu; Lieu, Shirley; Lu, Chuanyong; Colnot, Céline

    2010-01-01

    Bone repair depends on the coordinated action of numerous growth factors and cytokines to stimulate new skeletal tissue formation. Among all the growth factors involved in bone repair, Bone Morphogenetic Proteins (BMPs) are the only molecules now used therapeutically to enhance healing. Although BMPs are known as strong bone inducers, their role in initiating skeletal repair is not entirely elucidated. The aim of this study was to define the role of BMP2 during the early stages of bone regeneration and more specifically in regulating the fate of skeletal progenitors. During healing of non-stabilized fractures via endochondral ossification, exogenous BMP2 increased the deposition and resorption of cartilage and bone, which was correlated with a stimulation of osteoclastogenesis but not angiogenesis in the early phase of repair. During healing of stabilized fractures, which normally occurs via intramembranous ossification, exogenous BMP2 induced cartilage formation suggesting a role in regulating cell fate decisions. Specifically, the periosteum was found to be a target of exogenous BMP2 as shown by activation of the BMP pathway in this tissue. Using cell lineage analyses, we further show that BMP2 can direct cell differentiation towards the chondrogenic lineage within the periosteum but not the endosteum, indicating that skeletal progenitors within periosteum and endosteum respond differently to BMP signals. In conclusion, BMP2 plays an important role in the early stages of repair by recruiting local sources of skeletal progenitors within periosteum and endosteum and by determining their differentiation towards the chondrogenic and osteogenic lineages. PMID:20348041

  9. Role of ToxS in the proteolytic cascade of virulence regulator ToxR in Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed

    Almagro-Moreno, Salvador; Root, Michael Z; Taylor, Ronald K

    2015-12-01

    Two of the primary virulence regulators of Vibrio cholerae, ToxR and TcpP, function together with cognate effector proteins. ToxR undergoes regulated intramembrane proteolysis (RIP) during late stationary phase in response to nutrient limitation at alkaline pH; however, the specific function of its cognate ToxS remains unresolved. In this work, we found that ToxR rapidly becomes undetectable in a ΔtoxS mutant when cultures are exposed to either starvation conditions or after alkaline pH shock individually. A ΔtoxS mutant enters into a dormant state associated with the proteolysis of ToxR at a faster rate than wild-type, closely resembling a ΔtoxR mutant. Using a mutant with a periplasmic substitution in ToxS, we found that the proteases DegS and DegP function additively with VesC and a novel protease, TapA, to degrade ToxR in the mutant. Overall, the results shown here reveal a role for ToxS in the stabilization of ToxR by protecting the virulence regulator from premature proteolysis.

  10. Gating, Regulation, and Structure in K2P K+ Channels: In Varietate Concordia?

    PubMed

    Niemeyer, María Isabel; Cid, L Pablo; González, Wendy; Sepúlveda, Francisco V

    2016-09-01

    K2P K(+) channels with two pore domains in tandem associate as dimers to produce so-called background conductances that are regulated by a variety of stimuli. Whereas gating in K2P channels has been poorly understood, recent developments have provided important clues regarding the gating mechanism for this family of proteins. Two modes of gating present in other K(+) channels have been considered. The first is the so-called activation gating that occurs by bundle crossing and the splaying apart of pore-lining helices commanding ion passage. The second mode involves a change in conformation at the selectivity filter (SF), which impedes ion flow at this narrow portion of the conduction pathway and accounts for extracellular pH modulation of several K2P channels. Although some evidence supports the existence of an activation gate in K2P channels, recent results suggest that perhaps all stimuli, even those sensed at a distant location in the protein, are also mediated by SF gating. Recently resolved crystal structures of K2P channels in conductive and nonconductive conformations revealed that the nonconductive state is reached by blockade by a lipid acyl chain that gains access to the channel cavity through intramembrane fenestrations. Here we discuss whether this novel type of gating, proposed so far only for membrane tension gating, might mediate gating in response to other stimuli or whether SF gating is the only type of opening/closing mechanism present in K2P channels. PMID:27268784

  11. A novel non-canonical Notch signaling regulates expression of synaptic vesicle proteins in excitatory neurons

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Yukari; Nishimune, Hiroshi; Hozumi, Katsuto; Saga, Yumiko; Harada, Akihiro; Yuzaki, Michisuke; Iwatsubo, Takeshi; Kopan, Raphael; Tomita, Taisuke

    2016-01-01

    Notch signaling plays crucial roles for cellular differentiation during development through γ-secretase-dependent intramembrane proteolysis followed by transcription of target genes. Although recent studies implicate that Notch regulates synaptic plasticity or cognitive performance, the molecular mechanism how Notch works in mature neurons remains uncertain. Here we demonstrate that a novel Notch signaling is involved in expression of synaptic proteins in postmitotic neurons. Levels of several synaptic vesicle proteins including synaptophysin 1 and VGLUT1 were increased when neurons were cocultured with Notch ligands-expressing NIH3T3 cells. Neuron-specific deletion of Notch genes decreased these proteins, suggesting that Notch signaling maintains the expression of synaptic vesicle proteins in a cell-autonomous manner. Unexpectedly, cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG) inhibitor, but not γ-secretase inhibitor, abolished the elevation of synaptic vesicle proteins, suggesting that generation of Notch intracellular domain is dispensable for this function. These data uncover a ligand-dependent, but γ-secretase-independent, non-canonical Notch signaling involved in presynaptic protein expression in postmitotic neurons. PMID:27040987

  12. Polycomb PRC2 complex mediates epigenetic silencing of a critical osteogenic master regulator in the hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Aguilar, Rodrigo; Bustos, Fernando J; Saez, Mauricio; Rojas, Adriana; Allende, Miguel L; van Wijnen, Andre J; van Zundert, Brigitte; Montecino, Martin

    2016-08-01

    During hippocampal neuron differentiation, the expression of critical inducers of non-neuronal cell lineages must be efficiently silenced. Runx2 transcription factor is the master regulator of mesenchymal cells responsible for intramembranous osteoblast differentiation and formation of the craniofacial bone tissue that surrounds and protects the central nervous system (CNS) in mammalian embryos. The molecular mechanisms that mediate silencing of the Runx2 gene and its downstream target osteogenic-related genes in neuronal cells have not been explored. Here, we assess the epigenetic mechanisms that mediate silencing of osteoblast-specific genes in CNS neurons. In particular, we address the contribution of histone epigenetic marks and histone modifiers on the silencing of the Runx2/p57 bone-related isoform in rat hippocampal tissues at embryonic to adult stages. Our results indicate enrichment of repressive chromatin histone marks and of the Polycomb PRC2 complex at the Runx2/p57 promoter region. Knockdown of PRC2 H3K27-methyltransferases Ezh2 and Ezh1, or forced expression of the Trithorax/COMPASS subunit Wdr5 activates Runx2/p57 mRNA expression in both immature and mature hippocampal cells. Together these results indicate that complementary epigenetic mechanisms progressively and efficiently silence critical osteoblastic genes during hippocampal neuron differentiation. PMID:27216774

  13. CtpB assembles a gated protease tunnel regulating cell-cell signaling during spore formation in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Mastny, Markus; Heuck, Alexander; Kurzbauer, Robert; Heiduk, Anja; Boisguerin, Prisca; Volkmer, Rudolf; Ehrmann, Michael; Rodrigues, Christopher D A; Rudner, David Z; Clausen, Tim

    2013-10-24

    Spore formation in Bacillus subtilis relies on a regulated intramembrane proteolysis (RIP) pathway that synchronizes mother-cell and forespore development. To address the molecular basis of this SpoIV transmembrane signaling, we carried out a structure-function analysis of the activating protease CtpB. Crystal structures reflecting distinct functional states show that CtpB constitutes a ring-like protein scaffold penetrated by two narrow tunnels. Access to the proteolytic sites sequestered within these tunnels is controlled by PDZ domains that rearrange upon substrate binding. Accordingly, CtpB resembles a minimal version of a self-compartmentalizing protease regulated by a unique allosteric mechanism. Moreover, biochemical analysis of the PDZ-gated channel combined with sporulation assays reveal that activation of the SpoIV RIP pathway is induced by the concerted activity of CtpB and a second signaling protease, SpoIVB. This proteolytic mechanism is of broad relevance for cell-cell communication, illustrating how distinct signaling pathways can be integrated into a single RIP module.

  14. Profound regulation of Na/K pump activity by transient elevations of cytoplasmic calcium in murine cardiac myocytes

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Fang-Min; Deisl, Christine; Hilgemann, Donald W

    2016-01-01

    Small changes of Na/K pump activity regulate internal Ca release in cardiac myocytes via Na/Ca exchange. We now show conversely that transient elevations of cytoplasmic Ca strongly regulate cardiac Na/K pumps. When cytoplasmic Na is submaximal, Na/K pump currents decay rapidly during extracellular K application and multiple results suggest that an inactivation mechanism is involved. Brief activation of Ca influx by reverse Na/Ca exchange enhances pump currents and attenuates current decay, while repeated Ca elevations suppress pump currents. Pump current enhancement reverses over 3 min, and results are similar in myocytes lacking the regulatory protein, phospholemman. Classical signaling mechanisms, including Ca-activated protein kinases and reactive oxygen, are evidently not involved. Electrogenic signals mediated by intramembrane movement of hydrophobic ions, such as hexyltriphenylphosphonium (C6TPP), increase and decrease in parallel with pump currents. Thus, transient Ca elevation and Na/K pump inactivation cause opposing sarcolemma changes that may affect diverse membrane processes. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.19267.001 PMID:27627745

  15. CtpB assembles a gated protease tunnel regulating cell-cell signaling during spore formation in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Mastny, Markus; Heuck, Alexander; Kurzbauer, Robert; Heiduk, Anja; Boisguerin, Prisca; Volkmer, Rudolf; Ehrmann, Michael; Rodrigues, Christopher D A; Rudner, David Z; Clausen, Tim

    2013-10-24

    Spore formation in Bacillus subtilis relies on a regulated intramembrane proteolysis (RIP) pathway that synchronizes mother-cell and forespore development. To address the molecular basis of this SpoIV transmembrane signaling, we carried out a structure-function analysis of the activating protease CtpB. Crystal structures reflecting distinct functional states show that CtpB constitutes a ring-like protein scaffold penetrated by two narrow tunnels. Access to the proteolytic sites sequestered within these tunnels is controlled by PDZ domains that rearrange upon substrate binding. Accordingly, CtpB resembles a minimal version of a self-compartmentalizing protease regulated by a unique allosteric mechanism. Moreover, biochemical analysis of the PDZ-gated channel combined with sporulation assays reveal that activation of the SpoIV RIP pathway is induced by the concerted activity of CtpB and a second signaling protease, SpoIVB. This proteolytic mechanism is of broad relevance for cell-cell communication, illustrating how distinct signaling pathways can be integrated into a single RIP module. PMID:24243021

  16. VOLTAGE REGULATOR

    DOEpatents

    Von Eschen, R.L.; Scheele, P.F.

    1962-04-24

    A transistorized voltage regulator which provides very close voitage regulation up to about 180 deg F is described. A diode in the positive line provides a constant voltage drop from the input to a regulating transistor emitter. An amplifier is coupled to the positive line through a resistor and is connected between a difference circuit and the regulating transistor base which is negative due to the difference in voltage drop across thc diode and the resistor so that a change in the regulator output causes the amplifier to increase or decrease the base voltage and current and incrcase or decrease the transistor impedance to return the regulator output to normal. (AEC)

  17. Intramembrane congestion effects on lysenin channel voltage-induced gating

    PubMed Central

    Krueger, Eric; Bryant, Sheenah; Shrestha, Nisha; Clark, Tyler; Hanna, Charles; Pink, David; Fologea, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    All cell membranes are packed with proteins. The ability to investigate the regulatory mechanisms of protein channels in experimental conditions mimicking their congested native environment is crucial for understanding the environmental physicochemical cues that may fundamentally contribute to their functionality in natural membranes. Here we report on investigations of the voltage-induced gating of lysenin channels in congested conditions experimentally achieved by increasing the number of channels inserted into planar lipid membranes. Typical electrophysiology measurements reveal congestion-induced changes to the voltage-induced gating, manifested as a significant reduction of the response to external voltage stimuli. Furthermore, we demonstrate a similar diminished voltage sensitivity for smaller populations of channels by reducing the amount of sphingomyelin in the membrane. Given lysenin’s preference for targeting lipid rafts, this result indicates the potential role of the heterogeneous organization of the membrane in modulating channel functionality. Our work indicates that local congestion within membranes may alter the energy landscape and the kinetics of conformational changes of lysenin channels in response to voltage stimuli. This level of understanding may be extended to better characterize the role of the specific membrane environment in modulating the biological functionality of protein channels in health and disease. PMID:26695013

  18. Proteolysis of Virulence Regulator ToxR Is Associated with Entry of Vibrio cholerae into a Dormant State

    PubMed Central

    Almagro-Moreno, Salvador; Kim, Tae K.; Skorupski, Karen; Taylor, Ronald K.

    2015-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae O1 is a natural inhabitant of aquatic environments and causes the diarrheal disease, cholera. Two of its primary virulence regulators, TcpP and ToxR, are localized in the inner membrane. TcpP is encoded on the Vibrio Pathogenicity Island (VPI), a horizontally acquired mobile genetic element, and functions primarily in virulence gene regulation. TcpP has been shown to undergo regulated intramembrane proteolysis (RIP) in response to environmental conditions that are unfavorable for virulence gene expression. ToxR is encoded in the ancestral genome and is present in non-pathogenic strains of V. cholerae, indicating it has roles outside of the human host. In this study, we show that ToxR undergoes RIP in V. cholerae in response to nutrient limitation at alkaline pH, a condition that occurs during the stationary phase of growth. This process involves the site-2 protease RseP (YaeL), and is dependent upon the RpoE-mediated periplasmic stress response, as deletion mutants for the genes encoding these two proteins cannot proteolyze ToxR under nutrient limitation at alkaline pH. We determined that the loss of ToxR, genetically or by proteolysis, is associated with entry of V. cholerae into a dormant state in which the bacterium is normally found in the aquatic environment called viable but nonculturable (VBNC). Strains that can proteolyze ToxR, or do not encode it, lose culturability, experience a change in morphology associated with cells in VBNC, yet remain viable under nutrient limitation at alkaline pH. On the other hand, mutant strains that cannot proteolyze ToxR remain culturable and maintain the morphology of cells in an active state of growth. Overall, our findings provide a link between the proteolysis of a virulence regulator and the entry of a pathogen into an environmentally persistent state. PMID:25849031

  19. NORM regulations

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, P.

    1997-02-01

    The author reviews the question of regulation for naturally occuring radioactive material (NORM), and the factors that have made this a more prominent concern today. Past practices have been very relaxed, and have often involved very poor records, the involvment of contractors, and the disposition of contaminated equipment back into commercial service. The rationale behind the establishment of regulations is to provide worker protection, to exempt low risk materials, to aid in scrap recycling, to provide direction for remediation and to examine disposal options. The author reviews existing regulations at federal and state levels, impending legislation, and touches on the issue of site remediation and potential liabilities affecting the release of sites contaminated by NORM.

  20. New insights into the roles of megalin/LRP2 and the regulation of its functional expression.

    PubMed

    Marzolo, María-Paz; Farfán, Pamela

    2011-01-01

    Since the discovery of the low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) and its association with familial hypercholesterolemia in the early 1980s, a family of structurally related proteins has been discovered that has apolipoprotein E as a common ligand, and the broad functions of its members have been described. LRP2, or megalin, is a member of the LDLR family and was initially called gp330. Megalin is an endocytic receptor expressed on the apical surface of several epithelial cells that internalizes a variety of ligands including nutrients, hormones and their carrier proteins, signaling molecules, morphogens, and extracellular matrix proteins. Once internalized, these ligands are directed to the lysosomal degradation pathway or transported by transcytosis from one side of the cell to the opposite membrane. The availability of megalin at the cell surface is controlled by several regulatory mechanisms, including the phosphorylation of its cytoplasmic domain by GSK3, the proteolysis of the extracellular domain at the cell surface (shedding), the subsequent intramembrane proteolysis of the transmembrane domain by the gamma-secretase complex, and exosome secretion. Based on the important roles of its ligands and its tissue expression pattern, megalin has been recognized as an important component of many pathological conditions, including diabetic nephropathy, Lowe syndrome, Dent disease, Alzheimer's disease (AD) and gallstone disease. In addition, the expression of megalin and some of its ligands in the central and peripheral nervous system suggests a role for this receptor in neural regeneration processes. Despite its obvious importance, the regulation of megalin expression is poorly understood. In this review, we describe the functions of megalin and its association with certain pathological conditions as well as the current understanding of the mechanisms that underlie the control of megalin expression.

  1. Charge regulation circuit

    DOEpatents

    Ball, Don G.

    1992-01-01

    A charge regulation circuit provides regulation of an unregulated voltage supply in the range of 0.01%. The charge regulation circuit is utilized in a preferred embodiment in providing regulated voltage for controlling the operation of a laser.

  2. Vitamin B12 deficiency reduces proliferation and promotes differentiation of neuroblastoma cells and up-regulates PP2A, proNGF, and TACE

    PubMed Central

    Battaglia-Hsu, Shyue-fang; Akchiche, Nassila; Noel, Nicole; Alberto, Jean-Marc; Jeannesson, Elise; Orozco-Barrios, Carlos Enrique; Martinez-Fong, Daniel; Daval, Jean-Luc; Guéant, Jean-Louis

    2009-01-01

    Vitamin B12 (cobalamin, Cbl) is indispensable for proper brain development and functioning, suggesting that it has neurotrophic effects beside its well-known importance in metabolism. The molecular basis of these effects remains hypothetical, one of the reasons being that no efficient cell model has been made available for investigating the consequences of B12 cellular deficiency in neuronal cells. Here, we designed an approach by stable transfection of NIE115 neuroblastoma cells to impose the anchorage of a chimeric B12-binding protein, transcobalamin-oleosin (TO) to the intracellular membrane. This model produced an intracellular sequestration of B12 evidenced by decreased methyl-Cbl and S-adenosylmethionine and increased homocysteine and methylmalonic acid concentrations. B12 deficiency affected the proliferation of NIE115 cells through an overall increase in catalytic protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A), despite its demethylation. It promoted cellular differentiation by improving initial outgrowth of neurites and, at the molecular level, by augmenting the levels of proNGF and p75NTR. The up-regulation of PP2A and pro-nerve growth factor (NGF) triggered changes in ERK1/2 and Akt, two signaling pathways that influence the balance between proliferation and neurite outgrowth. Compared with control cells, a 2-fold increase of p75NTR-regulated intramembraneous proteolysis (RIP) was observed in proliferating TO cells (P < 0.0001) that was associated with an increased expression of two tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α converting enzyme (TACE) secretase enzymes, Adam 10 and Adam 17. In conclusion, our data show that B12 cellular deficiency produces a slower proliferation and a speedier differentiation of neuroblastoma cells through interacting signaling pathways that are related with increased expression of PP2A, proNGF, and TACE. PMID:19959661

  3. Acid-induced off-response of PKD2L1 channel in Xenopus oocytes and its regulation by Ca(2.).

    PubMed

    Hussein, Shaimaa; Zheng, Wang; Dyte, Chris; Wang, Qian; Yang, JungWoo; Zhang, Fan; Tang, Jingfeng; Cao, Ying; Chen, Xing-Zhen

    2015-01-01

    Polycystic kidney disease (PKD) protein 2 Like 1 (PKD2L1), also called transient receptor potential polycystin-3 (TRPP3), regulates Ca(2+)-dependent hedgehog signalling in primary cilia, intestinal development and sour tasting but with an unclear mechanism. PKD2L1 is a Ca(2+)-permeable cation channel that is activated by extracellular Ca(2+) (on-response) in Xenopus oocytes. PKD2L1 co-expressed with PKD protein 1 Like 3 (PKD1L3) exhibits extracellular acid-induced activation (off-response, i.e., activation following acid removal) but whether PKD1L3 participates in acid sensing remains unclear. Here we used the two-microelectrode voltage-clamp, site directed mutagenesis, Western blotting, reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and immunofluorescence, and showed that PKD2L1 expressed in oocytes exhibits sustained off-response currents in the absence of PKD1L3. PKD1L3 co-expression augmented the PKD2L1 plasma membrane localization but did not alter the observed properties of the off-response. PKD2L1 off-response was inhibited by an increase in intracellular Ca(2+). We also identified two intra-membrane residues aspartic acid 349 (D349) and glutamic acid 356 (E356) in the third transmembrane domain that are critical for PKD2L1 channel function. Our study suggests that PKD2L1 may itself sense acids and defines off-response properties in the absence of PKD1L3. PMID:26502994

  4. Cytokines and growth factors which regulate bone cell function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seino, Yoshiki

    Everybody knows that growth factors are most important in making bone. Hormones enhance bone formation from a long distance. Growth factors promote bone formation as an autocrine or paracrine factor in nearby bone. BMP-2 through BMP-8 are in the TGF-β family. BMP makes bone by enchondral ossification. In bone, IGF-II is most abundant, second, TGF-β, and third IGF-I. TGF-β enhances bone formation mainly by intramembranous ossification in vivo. TGF-β affects both cell proliferation and differentiation, however, TGF-β mainly enhances bone formation by intramembranous ossification. Interestingly, TGF-β is increased by estrogen(E 2), androgen, vitamin D, TGF-β and FGF. IGF-I and IGF-II also enhance bone formation. At present it remains unclear why IGF-I is more active in bone formation than IGF-II, although IGF-II is more abundant in bone compared to IGF-I. However, if only type I receptor signal transduction promotes bone formation, the strong activity of IGF-I in bone formation is understandable. GH, PTH and E 2 promotes IGF-I production. Recent data suggest that hormones containing vitamin D or E 2 enhance bone formation through growth factors. Therefore, growth factors are the key to clarifying the mechanism of bone formation.

  5. Load regulating expansion fixture

    DOEpatents

    Wagner, L.M.; Strum, M.J.

    1998-12-15

    A free standing self contained device for bonding ultra thin metallic films, such as 0.001 inch beryllium foils is disclosed. The device will regulate to a predetermined load for solid state bonding when heated to a bonding temperature. The device includes a load regulating feature, whereby the expansion stresses generated for bonding are regulated and self adjusting. The load regulator comprises a pair of friction isolators with a plurality of annealed copper members located therebetween. The device, with the load regulator, will adjust to and maintain a stress level needed to successfully and economically complete a leak tight bond without damaging thin foils or other delicate components. 1 fig.

  6. Load regulating expansion fixture

    DOEpatents

    Wagner, Lawrence M.; Strum, Michael J.

    1998-01-01

    A free standing self contained device for bonding ultra thin metallic films, such as 0.001 inch beryllium foils. The device will regulate to a predetermined load for solid state bonding when heated to a bonding temperature. The device includes a load regulating feature, whereby the expansion stresses generated for bonding are regulated and self adjusting. The load regulator comprises a pair of friction isolators with a plurality of annealed copper members located therebetween. The device, with the load regulator, will adjust to and maintain a stress level needed to successfully and economically complete a leak tight bond without damaging thin foils or other delicate components.

  7. Pressure reducing regulator

    DOEpatents

    Whitehead, J.C.; Dilgard, L.W.

    1995-10-10

    A pressure reducing regulator that controls its downstream or outlet pressure to a fixed fraction of its upstream or inlet pressure is disclosed. The regulator includes a housing which may be of a titanium alloy, within which is located a seal or gasket at the outlet end which may be made of annealed copper, a rod, and piston, each of which may be made of high density graphite. The regulator is insensitive to temperature by virtue of being without a spring or gas sealed behind a diaphragm, and provides a reference for a system in which it is being used. The rod and piston of the regulator are constructed, for example, to have a 1/20 ratio such that when the downstream pressure is less than 1/20 of the upstream pressure the regulator opens and when the downstream pressure exceeds 1/20 of the upstream pressure the regulator closes. 10 figs.

  8. Pressure reducing regulator

    DOEpatents

    Whitehead, John C.; Dilgard, Lemoyne W.

    1995-01-01

    A pressure reducing regulator that controls its downstream or outlet pressure to a fixed fraction of its upstream or inlet pressure. The regulator includes a housing which may be of a titanium alloy, within which is located a seal or gasket at the outlet end which may be made of annealed copper, a rod, and piston, each of which may be made of high density graphite. The regulator is insensitive to temperature by virtue of being without a spring or gas sealed behind a diaphragm, and provides a reference for a system in which it is being used. The rod and piston of the regulator are constructed, for example, to have a 1/20 ratio such that when the downstream pressure is less than 1/20 of the upstream pressure the regulator opens and when the downstream pressure exceeds 1/20 of the upstream pressure the regulator closes.

  9. TOWARD MORE EFFECTIVE REGULATION

    SciTech Connect

    J. GRAF

    2000-06-01

    This paper proposes a model relationship between the operator engaged in a hazardous activity, the regulator of that activity, and the general public. The roles and responsibilities of each entity are described in a way that allows effective communication flow. The role of the regulator is developed using the steam boiler as an example of a hazard subject to regulation; however, the model applies to any regulated activity. In this model the safety analyst has the extremely important role of communicating sometimes difficult technical information to the regulator in a way that the regulator can provide credible assurance to the general public as to the adequacy of the control of the hazardous activity. The conclusion asserts that acceptance of the model, understanding of the roles and responsibilities and definition of who communicates what information to whom will mitigate frustration on the part of each of the three entities.

  10. [Epigenetic regulation in spermatogenesis].

    PubMed

    Xu, Chen; Song, Ning

    2014-05-01

    Spermatogenesis is a process consisting of spermatogonial proliferation, spermatocytic meiosis, and spermiogenesis, and is also considered to be a process in which heterochromatins gradually aggregate and finally reach a highly condensed formation in the sperm head. Recent studies show that epigenetic regulation plays a key role in spermatogenesis. This review discusses the mechanisms of epigenetic regulation in spermatogenesis in three aspects, DNA methylation, histone modification, and noncoding RNAs. These factors are essential for spermatogenesis, fertilization, and embryogenesis by mutual regulation as well as by gene expression regulation, transposon activation, sex chromosome inactivation, and genome imprinting. PMID:24908726

  11. Plant Growth Regulators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nickell, Louis G.

    1978-01-01

    Describes the effect of "plant growth regulators" on plants, such as controlling the flowering, fruit development, plant size, and increasing crop yields. Provides a list of plant growth regulators which includes their chemical, common, and trade names, as well as their different use(s). (GA)

  12. Regulation of University Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindblom-Ylanne, Sari; Nevgi, Anne; Trigwell, Keith

    2011-01-01

    The aims of the present study are twofold: firstly, to explore dimensions in the regulation of teaching in a multidisciplinary sample of university teachers, and secondly, to analyse factors related to the regulation of university teaching. Seventy-three university teachers representing several disciplines participated in the study. These teachers…

  13. Intramembrane charge movement in guinea-pig and rat ventricular myocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Hadley, R W; Lederer, W J

    1989-01-01

    1. Non-linear capacitative current (charge movement) was studied in isolated guinea-pig and rat ventricular myocytes. Linear capacitance was subtracted using standard procedures. Most of the experiments were done with guinea-pig myocytes, while rat myocytes were used for comparison. 2. When a myocyte was held at -100 mV, depolarizing clamp steps produced a rapid outward current transient, which was followed by an inward current transient upon repolarization. This current was identified as the movement of charged particles in the cell membrane, rather than ionic movement across the membrane, for the following reasons: (1) the current saturated at membrane potentials positive to +20 mV; (2) the current was capacitative in nature, having no reversal potential; (3) in general, the charge moved during depolarization (Qon) approximated the charge moved during repolarization (Qoff). 3. Qoff was significantly less than Qon for a depolarization from -100 mV to 0 mV. However, the Qoff/Qon ratio approached unity if the cell was instead repolarized to -140 mV. This was interpreted as being due to the immobilization of a fraction of the charge during the depolarization, which recovered rapidly enough to be measured at -140 mV, but recovered too slowly at -100 mV. 4. Charge movement in these cells had a sigmoidal dependence on the membrane potential, which could be empirically described by the two-state Boltzmann equation Q = Qmax/(1 + exp[-(V-V*)/kappa]), where Q is the charge movement at potential V, Qmax is the maximum charge, V* is the membrane potential at Q = Qmax/2, and kappa is a slope factor. Qmax was 11.7 nC/microF, V* was -18 mV and kappa was 16 mV in guinea-pig myocytes held at -100 mV, while the values in rat myocytes were 10.9 nC/microF, -32 mV and 13 mV. 5. The charge movement could be partially immobilized by a prior depolarization. This effect developed over a broad voltage range, from -120 to +20 mV. The fraction of charge that could be immobilized by a 10 s pre-pulse to +20 mV was 59%. 6. The time course of decay of both Qon and Qoff could basically be described as a single-exponential process. The time constant was largest at -40 mV and decreased at both more positive and negative test potentials. A second, slower Qoff time constant, possibly representing remobilization of immobilized charge, could be seen under some conditions. 7. The temperature dependence of charge movement was studied between 11 and 35 degrees C.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:2484211

  14. Intramembrane Proton Binding Site Linked to Activation of Bacterial Pentameric Ion Channel*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hai-Long; Cheng, Xiaolin; Sine, Steven M.

    2012-01-01

    Prokaryotic orthologs of eukaryotic Cys-loop receptor channels recently emerged as structural and mechanistic surrogates to investigate this superfamily of intercellular signaling proteins. Here, we examine proton activation of the prokaryotic ortholog GLIC using patch clamp electrophysiology, mutagenesis, and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Whole-cell current recordings from human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells expressing GLIC show half-maximal activation at pH 6, close to the pKa of histidine, implicating the three native His residues in proton sensing linked to activation. The mutation H235F abolishes proton activation, H277Y is without effect, and all nine mutations of His-127 prevent expression on the cell surface. In the GLIC crystal structure, His-235 on transmembrane (TM) α-helix 2, hydrogen bonds to the main chain carbonyl oxygen of Ile-259 on TM α-helix 3. MD simulations show that when His-235 is protonated, the hydrogen bond persists, and the channel remains in the open conformation, whereas when His-235 is deprotonated, the hydrogen bond dissociates, and the channel closes. Mutations of the proximal Tyr-263, which also links TM α-helices 2 and 3 via a hydrogen bond, alter proton sensitivity over a 1.5 pH unit range. MD simulations show that mutations of Tyr-263 alter the hydrogen bonding capacity of His-235. The overall findings show that His-235 in the TM region of GLIC is a novel proton binding site linked to channel activation. PMID:22084238

  15. Intramembrane aromatic interactions influence the lipid sensitivities of pentameric ligand-gated ion channels.

    PubMed

    Carswell, Casey L; Sun, Jiayin; Baenziger, John E

    2015-01-23

    Although the Torpedo nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) reconstituted into phosphatidylcholine (PC) membranes lacking cholesterol and anionic lipids adopts a conformation where agonist binding is uncoupled from channel gating, the underlying mechanism remains to be defined. Here, we examine the mechanism behind lipid-dependent uncoupling by comparing the propensities of two prokaryotic homologs, Gloebacter and Erwinia ligand-gated ion channel (GLIC and ELIC, respectively), to adopt a similar uncoupled conformation. Membrane-reconstituted GLIC and ELIC both exhibit folded structures in the minimal PC membranes that stabilize an uncoupled nAChR. GLIC, with a large number of aromatic interactions at the interface between the outermost transmembrane α-helix, M4, and the adjacent transmembrane α-helices, M1 and M3, retains the ability to flux cations in this uncoupling PC membrane environment. In contrast, ELIC, with a level of aromatic interactions intermediate between that of the nAChR and GLIC, does not undergo agonist-induced channel gating, although it does not exhibit the expected biophysical characteristics of the uncoupled state. Engineering new aromatic interactions at the M4-M1/M3 interface to promote effective M4 interactions with M1/M3, however, increases the stability of the transmembrane domain to restore channel function. Our data provide direct evidence that M4 interactions with M1/M3 are modulated during lipid sensing. Aromatic residues strengthen M4 interactions with M1/M3 to reduce the sensitivities of pentameric ligand-gated ion channels to their surrounding membrane environment. PMID:25519904

  16. Expression and Purification of Haemophilus influenzae Rhomboid Intramembrane Protease GlpG for Structural Studies.

    PubMed

    Panwar, Pankaj; Lemieux, M Joanne

    2014-01-01

    Rhomboid proteases are membrane-embedded proteases that cleave peptide bonds of transmembrane proteins. They play a variety of roles in cell signaling events. The rhomboid protease GlpG from Haemophilus influenzae (hiGlpG) is a canonical form of rhomboid protease having six transmembrane segments. In this unit, detailed protocols are presented for optimization of hiGlpG expression using the araBAD promotor system in the pBAD vector. The parameters for optimization include concentration of inducing agent, induction temperature, and time. Optimization of these key factors led to the development of a protocol yielding 1.6 to 2.5 mg/liter protein purified after ion metal affinity chromatography (IMAC). Further purification can include size exclusion chromatography (SEC). PMID:24692018

  17. Defining the intramembrane binding mechanism of sarcolipin to calcium ATPase using solution NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Buffy, Jarrod J; Buck-Koehntop, Bethany A; Porcelli, Fernando; Traaseth, Nathaniel J; Thomas, David D; Veglia, Gianluigi

    2006-04-28

    Sarcolipin (SLN) is an integral membrane protein that is expressed in both skeletal and cardiac muscle, where it inhibits SERCA (calcium ATPase) by lowering its apparent Ca2+ affinity in a manner similar to that of its homologue phospholamban (PLN). We use solution NMR to map the structural changes occurring within SLN upon interaction with the regulatory target, SERCA, co-reconstituting the two proteins in dodecylphosphocholine (DPC) detergent micelles, a system that preserves the native structure of SLN and the activity of SERCA, with the goal of comparing these interactions with those of the previously studied PLN-SERCA complex. Our analysis of the structural dynamics of SLN in DPC micelles shows this polypeptide to be partitioned into four subdomains: a short unstructured N terminus (residues 1-6), a short dynamic helix (residues 7-14), a more rigid helix (residues 15-26), and an unstructured C terminus (residues 27-31). Upon addition of SERCA, the different domains behave according to their dynamics, molding onto the surface of the enzyme. Remarkably, each domain of SLN behaves in a manner similar to that of the corresponding domains in PLN, supporting the hypothesis that both SLN and PLN bind SERCA in the same groove and with similar mechanisms.

  18. Folding and Intramembraneous BRICHOS Binding of the Prosurfactant Protein C Transmembrane Segment*

    PubMed Central

    Sáenz, Alejandra; Presto, Jenny; Lara, Patricia; Akinyi-Oloo, Laura; García-Fojeda, Belén; Nilsson, IngMarie; Johansson, Jan; Casals, Cristina

    2015-01-01

    Surfactant protein C (SP-C) is a novel amyloid protein found in the lung tissue of patients suffering from interstitial lung disease (ILD) due to mutations in the gene of the precursor protein pro-SP-C. SP-C is a small α-helical hydrophobic protein with an unusually high content of valine residues. SP-C is prone to convert into β-sheet aggregates, forming amyloid fibrils. Nature's way of solving this folding problem is to include a BRICHOS domain in pro-SP-C, which functions as a chaperone for SP-C during biosynthesis. Mutations in the pro-SP-C BRICHOS domain or linker region lead to amyloid formation of the SP-C protein and ILD. In this study, we used an in vitro transcription/translation system to study translocon-mediated folding of the WT pro-SP-C poly-Val and a designed poly-Leu transmembrane (TM) segment in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane. Furthermore, to understand how the pro-SP-C BRICHOS domain present in the ER lumen can interact with the TM segment of pro-SP-C, we studied the membrane insertion properties of the recombinant form of the pro-SP-C BRICHOS domain and two ILD-associated mutants. The results show that the co-translational folding of the WT pro-SP-C TM segment is inefficient, that the BRICHOS domain inserts into superficial parts of fluid membranes, and that BRICHOS membrane insertion is promoted by poly-Val peptides present in the membrane. In contrast, one BRICHOS and one non-BRICHOS ILD-associated mutant could not insert into membranes. These findings support a chaperone function of the BRICHOS domain, possibly together with the linker region, during pro-SP-C biosynthesis in the ER. PMID:26041777

  19. Phosphoinositides regulate ion channels

    PubMed Central

    Hille, Bertil; Dickson, Eamonn J.; Kruse, Martin; Vivas, Oscar; Suh, Byung-Chang

    2014-01-01

    Phosphoinositides serve as signature motifs for different cellular membranes and often are required for the function of membrane proteins. Here, we summarize clear evidence supporting the concept that many ion channels are regulated by membrane phosphoinositides. We describe tools used to test their dependence on phosphoinositides, especially phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate, and consider mechanisms and biological meanings of phosphoinositide regulation of ion channels. This lipid regulation can underlie changes of channel activity and electrical excitability in response to receptors. Since different intracellular membranes have different lipid compositions, the activity of ion channels still in transit towards their final destination membrane may be suppressed until they reach an optimal lipid environment. PMID:25241941

  20. HIGH PRESSURE GAS REGULATOR

    DOEpatents

    Ramage, R.W.

    1962-05-01

    A gas regulator operating on the piston and feedback principle is described. The device is particularly suitable for the delicate regulation of high pressure, i.e., 10,000 psi and above, gas sources, as well as being perfectly adaptable for use on gas supplies as low as 50 psi. The piston is adjustably connected to a needle valve and the movement of the piston regulates the flow of gas from the needle valve. The gas output is obtained from the needle valve. Output pressure is sampled by a piston feedback means which, in turn, regulates the movement of the main piston. When the output is other than the desired value, the feedback system initiates movement of the main piston to allow the output pressure to be corrected or to remain constant. (AEC)

  1. Stable hydraulic pressure regulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gold, H.

    1979-01-01

    Neither sensing line restrictors nor frictional dampers are required for stability. Analysis presents method by which stability margin, response, and droop magnitude can be incorporated during design of direct-acting hydraulic pressure regulators.

  2. Proposed EEOC Regulations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farrell, Michael

    1978-01-01

    This article explains how proposed Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) regulations attempt to circumvent the case of Weber vs Kaiser Aluminum Corp. by providing employers with backpay immunity in reverse discrimination suits. (Author)

  3. The Hippo pathway: regulators and regulations

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Fa-Xing; Guan, Kun-Liang

    2013-01-01

    Control of cell number is crucial in animal development and tissue homeostasis, and its dysregulation may result in tumor formation or organ degeneration. The Hippo pathway in both Drosophila and mammals regulates cell number by modulating cell proliferation, cell death, and cell differentiation. Recently, numerous upstream components involved in the Hippo pathway have been identified, such as cell polarity, mechanotransduction, and G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling. Actin cytoskeleton or cellular tension appears to be the master mediator that integrates and transmits upstream signals to the core Hippo signaling cascade. Here, we review regulatory mechanisms of the Hippo pathway and discuss potential implications involved in different physiological and pathological conditions. PMID:23431053

  4. Neuroendocrine Regulation of Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Cornejo, M P; Hentges, S T; Maliqueo, M; Coirini, H; Becu-Villalobos, D; Elias, C F

    2016-07-01

    Given the current environment in most developed countries, it is a challenge to maintain a good balance between calories consumed and calories burned, although maintenance of metabolic balance is key to good health. Therefore, understanding how metabolic regulation is achieved and how the dysregulation of metabolism affects health is an area of intense research. Most studies focus on the hypothalamus, which is a brain area that acts as a key regulator of metabolism. Among the nuclei that comprise the hypothalamus, the arcuate nucleus is one of the major mediators in the regulation of food intake. The regulation of energy balance is also a key factor ensuring the maintenance of any species as a result of the dependence of reproduction on energy stores. Adequate levels of energy reserves are necessary for the proper functioning of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. This review discusses valuable data presented in the 2015 edition of the International Workshop of Neuroendocrinology concerning the fundamental nature of the hormonal regulation of the hypothalamus and the impact on energy balance and reproduction.

  5. Worldwide regulations for mycotoxins.

    PubMed

    van Egmond, Hans P

    2002-01-01

    Since the discovery of the aflatoxins in the 1960s, regulations have been established in many countries to protect the consumer from the harmful effects of mycotoxins that may contaminate foodstuffs. Various factors play a role in the decision-making process of setting limits for mycotoxins. These include scientific factors such as the availability of toxicological data, survey data, knowledge about the distribution of mycotoxins in commodities, and analytical methodology. Economical and political factors such as commercial interests and sufficiency of food supply have their impact as well. International enquiry's on existing mycotoxin legislation in foodstuffs and animal feedstuffs have been carried out several times in the 1980s and 1990s and details about tolerances, legal basis, responsible authorities, official protocols of analysis and sampling have been published. Recently a comprehensive update on worldwide regulations was published as FAO Food and Nutrition Paper 64. It appeared that at least 77 countries now have specific regulations for mycotoxins, 13 countries are known to have no specific regulations, whereas no data are available for about 50 countries, many of them in Africa. Over the years, a large diversity in tolerance levels for mycotoxins has remained. Some free trade zones (EU, MERCOSUR) are in the process of harmonizing the limits and regulations for mycotoxins in their respective member states, but it is not likely that worldwide harmonized limits for mycotoxins will soon be within reach.

  6. Androgen receptor genomic regulation

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Hong-Jian; Kim, Jung

    2013-01-01

    The transcriptional activity of the androgen receptor (AR) is not only critical for the normal development and function of the prostate but also pivotal to the onset and progression of prostate cancer (PCa). The studies of AR transcriptional regulation were previously limited to a handful of AR-target genes. Owing to the development of various high-throughput genomic technologies, significant advances have been made in recent years. Here we discuss the discoveries of genome-wide androgen-regulated genes in PCa cell lines, animal models and tissues using expression microarray and sequencing, the mapping of genomic landscapes of AR using Combining Chromatin Immunoprecipitation (ChIP)-on-chip and ChIP-seq assays, the interplay of transcriptional cofactors in defining AR binding profiles, and the genomic regulation and AR reprogramming in advanced PCa. PMID:25237629

  7. Environmentally regulated aerospace coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Virginia L.

    1995-01-01

    Aerospace coatings represent a complex technology which must meet stringent performance requirements in the protection of aerospace vehicles. Topcoats and primers are used, primarily, to protect the structural elements of the air vehicle from exposure to and subsequent degradation by environmental elements. There are also many coatings which perform special functions, i.e., chafing resistance, rain erosion resistance, radiation and electric effects, fuel tank coatings, maskants, wire and fastener coatings. The scheduled promulgation of federal environmental regulations for aerospace manufacture and rework materials and processes will regulate the emissions of photochemically reactive precursors to smog and air toxics. Aerospace organizations will be required to identify, qualify and implement less polluting materials. The elimination of ozone depleting chemicals (ODC's) and implementation of pollution prevention requirements are added constraints which must be addressed concurrently. The broad categories of operations affected are the manufacture, operation, maintenance, and repair of military, commercial, general aviation, and space vehicles. The federal aerospace regulations were developed around the precept that technology had to be available to support the reduction of organic and air toxic emissions, i.e., the regulations cannot be technology forcing. In many cases, the regulations which are currently in effect in the South Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD), located in Southern California, were used as the baseline for the federal regulations. This paper addresses strategies used by Southern California aerospace organizations to cope with these regulatory impacts on aerospace productions programs. All of these regulatory changes are scheduled for implementation in 1993 and 1994, with varying compliance dates established.

  8. Nuclear regulation and safety

    SciTech Connect

    Hendrie, J.M.

    1982-01-01

    Nuclear regulation and safety are discussed from the standpoint of a hypothetical country that is in the process of introducing a nuclear power industry and setting up a regulatory system. The national policy is assumed to be in favor of nuclear power. The regulators will have responsibility for economic, reliable electric production as well as for safety. Reactor safety is divided into three parts: shut it down, keep it covered, take out the afterheat. Emergency plans also have to be provided. Ways of keeping the core covered with water are discussed. (DLC)

  9. Other-Regulation in Collaborative Groups: Implications for Regulation Quality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogat, Toni Kempler; Adams-Wiggins, Karlyn R.

    2014-01-01

    The current study examines variation in other-regulation, conceptualized as efforts by one student to regulate their group's work. This study extends research which has conceptualized other-regulation as temporarily guiding others' conceptual understanding and skill development by broadening the spectrum of other-regulation to include…

  10. The Impact of Regulating Social Science Research with Biomedical Regulations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Durosinmi, Brenda Braxton

    2011-01-01

    The Impact of Regulating Social Science Research with Biomedical Regulations Since 1974 Federal regulations have governed the use of human subjects in biomedical and social science research. The regulations are known as the Federal Policy for the Protection of Human Subjects, and often referred to as the "Common Rule" because 18 Federal…

  11. Focus on PTEN Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Bermúdez Brito, Miriam; Goulielmaki, Evangelia; Papakonstanti, Evangelia A.

    2015-01-01

    The role of phosphatase and tensin homolog on chromosome 10 (PTEN) as a tumor suppressor has been for a long time attributed to its lipid phosphatase activity against PI(3,4,5)P3, the phospholipid product of the class I PI3Ks. Besides its traditional role as a lipid phosphatase at the plasma membrane, a wealth of data has shown that PTEN can function independently of its phosphatase activity and that PTEN also exists and plays a role in the nucleus, in cytoplasmic organelles, and extracellularly. Accumulating evidence has shed light on diverse physiological functions of PTEN, which are accompanied by a complex regulation of its expression and activity. PTEN levels and function are regulated transcriptionally, post-transcriptionally, and post-translationally. PTEN is also sensitive to regulation by its interacting proteins and its localization. Herein, we summarize the current knowledge on mechanisms that regulate the expression and enzymatic activity of PTEN and its role in human diseases. PMID:26284192

  12. REGULATIONS FOR COMMUNITY COLLEGES.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pennsylvania State Board of Education, Harrisburg.

    THE COMMUNITY COLLEGE LAW AND PROCEDURES ESTABLISHED BY THE DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION ARE THE BASIS FOR ADMINISTRATION OF COMMUNITY COLLEGES IN PENNSYLVANIA. REGULATIONS PROVIDE FOR ADMINISTRATIVE ORGANIZATION, CURRICULUM, TUITION, AND STANDARDS FOR GRADING, RECORD KEEPING, FACULTY AND STAFF RATIOS. ALSO DESCRIBED ARE PROCEDURES FOR…

  13. Metabolic regulation of yeast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiechter, A.

    1982-12-01

    Metabolic regulation which is based on endogeneous and exogeneous process variables which may act constantly or time dependently on the living cell is discussed. The observed phenomena of the regulation are the result of physical, chemical, and biological parameters. These parameters are identified. Ethanol is accumulated as an intermediate product and the synthesis of biomass is reduced. This regulatory effect of glucose is used for the aerobic production of ethanol. Very high production rates are thereby obtained. Understanding of the regulation mechanism of the glucose effect has improved. In addition to catabolite repression, several other mechanisms of enzyme regulation have been described, that are mostly governed by exogeneous factors. Glucose also affects the control of respiration in a third class of yeasts which are unable to make use of ethanol as a substrate for growth. This is due to the lack of any anaplerotic activity. As a consequence, diauxic growth behavior is reduced to a one-stage growth with a drastically reduced cell yield. The pulse chemostat technique, a systematic approach for medium design is developed and medium supplements that are essential for metabolic control are identified.

  14. Regulated Gene Therapy.

    PubMed

    Breger, Ludivine; Wettergren, Erika Elgstrand; Quintino, Luis; Lundberg, Cecilia

    2016-01-01

    Gene therapy represents a promising approach for the treatment of monogenic and multifactorial neurological disorders. It can be used to replace a missing gene and mutated gene or downregulate a causal gene. Despite the versatility of gene therapy, one of the main limitations lies in the irreversibility of the process: once delivered to target cells, the gene of interest is constitutively expressed and cannot be removed. Therefore, efficient, safe and long-term gene modification requires a system allowing fine control of transgene expression.Different systems have been developed over the past decades to regulate transgene expression after in vivo delivery, either at transcriptional or post-translational levels. The purpose of this chapter is to give an overview on current regulatory system used in the context of gene therapy for neurological disorders. Systems using external regulation of transgenes using antibiotics are commonly used to control either gene expression using tetracycline-controlled transcription or protein levels using destabilizing domain technology. Alternatively, specific promoters of genes that are regulated by disease mechanisms, increasing expression as the disease progresses or decreasing expression as disease regresses, are also examined. Overall, this chapter discusses advantages and drawbacks of current molecular methods for regulated gene therapy in the central nervous system.

  15. Regulating the New Governance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cope, Stephen; Goodship, Jo; Holloway, David

    2003-01-01

    This article arises out of a research project that sought to assess the development of regulation within the public sector. It examines the forms and impact of the regulatory systems that now operate within the public sector focusing on the further education sector. The research project developed out of an awareness that the increase in various…

  16. Mitochondrial regulation of apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Bernd; Oberbauer, Rainer

    2003-06-01

    Mitochondria play a central part in cellular survival and apoptotic death. These processes are highly regulated by pro- and antiapoptotic Bcl-2 superfamily members. A key feature within apoptosis cascades is disruption of mitochondrial transmembrane potential and apoptogenic protein release, caused by opening of the permeability transition pore (PT). New data, however, indicate that mitochondrial apoptosis may occur without PT involvement.

  17. Regulation and Markets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, Margaret; Wells, Julie

    2007-01-01

    There has been much critical comment in recent years about the tensions between the regulation imposed on public universities and the flexibility needed to compete effectively in international and national markets for students and funding. In the partisan world of politics each side points the finger at the other as the author of "too much"…

  18. Lightweight Regulated Power Supply

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclyman, C. W.

    1985-01-01

    Power-supply circuit regulates output voltage by adjusting frequency of chopper circuit according to variations. Currently installed in battery charger for electric wheelchair, circuit is well suited to other uses in which light weight is important - for example, in portable computers, radios, and test instruments.

  19. Lysosomal Trafficking Regulator (LYST).

    PubMed

    Ji, Xiaojie; Chang, Bo; Naggert, Jürgen K; Nishina, Patsy M

    2016-01-01

    Regulation of vesicle trafficking to lysosomes and lysosome-related organelles (LROs) as well as regulation of the size of these organelles are critical to maintain their functions. Disruption of the lysosomal trafficking regulator (LYST) results in Chediak-Higashi syndrome (CHS), a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by oculocutaneous albinism, prolonged bleeding, severe immunodeficiency, recurrent bacterial infection, neurologic dysfunction and hemophagocytic lympohistiocytosis (HLH). The classic diagnostic feature of the syndrome is enlarged LROs in all cell types, including lysosomes, melanosomes, cytolytic granules and platelet dense bodies. The most striking CHS ocular pathology observed is an enlargement of melanosomes in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), which leads to aberrant distribution of eye pigmentation, and results in photophobia and decreased visual acuity. Understanding the molecular function of LYST and identification of its interacting partners may provide therapeutic targets for CHS and other diseases associated with the regulation of LRO size and/or vesicle trafficking, such as asthma, urticaria and Leishmania amazonensis infections. PMID:26427484

  20. Regulation of serum phosphate

    PubMed Central

    Lederer, Eleanor

    2014-01-01

    The regulation of serum phosphate, an acknowledged risk factor for chronic kidney disease and cardiovascular mortality, is poorly understood. The discovery of fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) as a key regulator of renal phosphate handling and activation of vitamin D has revolutionized our comprehension of phosphate homeostasis. Through as yet undetermined mechanisms, circulating and dietary phosphate appear to have a direct effect on FGF23 release by bone cells that, in turn, causes renal phosphate excretion and decreases intestinal phosphate absorption through a decrease in vitamin D production. Thus, the two major phosphaturic hormones, PTH and FGF23, have opposing effects on vitamin D production, placing vitamin D at the nexus of phosphate homeostasis. While our understanding of phosphate homeostasis has advanced, the factors determining regulation of serum phosphate level remain enigmatic. Diet, time of day, season, gender, age and genetics have all been identified as significant contributors to serum phosphate level. The effects of these factors on serum phosphate have major implications for what is understood as ‘normal’ and for studies of phosphate homeostasis and metabolism. Moreover, other hormonal mediators such as dopamine, insulin-like growth factor, and angiotensin II also affect renal handling of phosphate. How the major hormone effects on phosphate handling are regulated and how the effect of these other factors are integrated to yield the measurable serum phosphate are only now beginning to be studied. PMID:24973411

  1. ELECTRON EMISSION REGULATING MEANS

    DOEpatents

    Brenholdt, I.R.

    1957-11-19

    >An electronic regulating system is described for controlling the electron emission of a cathode, for example, the cathode in a mass spectrometer. The system incorporates a transformer having a first secondary winding for the above-mentioned cathode and a second secondary winding for the above-mentioned cathode and a second secondary winding load by grid controlled vacuum tubes. A portion of the electron current emitted by the cathode is passed through a network which develops a feedback signal. The system arrangement is completed by using the feedback signal to control the vacuum tubes in the second secondary winding through a regulator tube. When a change in cathode emission occurs, the feedback signal acts to correct this change by adjusting the load on the transformer.

  2. European Union Regulations.

    PubMed

    Fürst, Peter

    2011-01-01

    The European Union (EU) has been a leader in the development of both guidance and regulations to ensure food safety throughout the member states. Because of the free movement of food commodities among the countries that belong to the European Union, there is a great need to assure high quality monitoring of both imported food and member state products. The procedures and methods required need to be practical, state-of-the art, and harmonised. The European Commission has developed a network of laboratories and scientific studies to meet this goal. This chapter describes the current Regulations, Directives and Decisions of the European Commission that protect the food supply throughout Europe. Because imported food needs to comply with the EU requirements, and the need to have common compliance throughout the member states, the developed system could be a worldwide template for monitoring the food supply. In addition, the integral role of chromatography hyphenated to mass spectrometry is described.

  3. Regulation of Meiotic Recombination

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory p. Copenhaver

    2011-11-09

    Meiotic recombination results in the heritable rearrangement of DNA, primarily through reciprocal exchange between homologous chromosome or gene conversion. In plants these events are critical for ensuring proper chromosome segregation, facilitating DNA repair and providing a basis for genetic diversity. Understanding this fundamental biological mechanism will directly facilitate trait mapping, conventional plant breeding, and development of genetic engineering techniques that will help support the responsible production and conversion of renewable resources for fuels, chemicals, and the conservation of energy (1-3). Substantial progress has been made in understanding the basal recombination machinery, much of which is conserved in organisms as diverse as yeast, plants and mammals (4, 5). Significantly less is known about the factors that regulate how often and where that basal machinery acts on higher eukaryotic chromosomes. One important mechanism for regulating the frequency and distribution of meiotic recombination is crossover interference - or the ability of one recombination event to influence nearby events. The MUS81 gene is thought to play an important role in regulating the influence of interference on crossing over. The immediate goals of this project are to use reverse genetics to identify mutants in two putative MUS81 homologs in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, characterize those mutants and initiate a novel forward genetic screen for additional regulators of meiotic recombination. The long-term goal of the project is to understand how meiotic recombination is regulated in higher eukaryotes with an emphasis on the molecular basis of crossover interference. The ability to monitor recombination in all four meiotic products (tetrad analysis) has been a powerful tool in the arsenal of yeast geneticists. Previously, the qrt mutant of Arabidopsis, which causes the four pollen products of male meiosis to remain attached, was developed as a facile system

  4. Redox regulated peroxisome homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaofeng; Li, Shuo; Liu, Yu; Ma, Changle

    2015-01-01

    Peroxisomes are ubiquitous organelles present in nearly all eukaryotic cells. Conserved functions of peroxisomes encompass beta-oxidation of fatty acids and scavenging of reactive oxygen species generated from diverse peroxisomal metabolic pathways. Peroxisome content, number, and size can change quickly in response to environmental and/or developmental cues. To achieve efficient peroxisome homeostasis, peroxisome biogenesis and degradation must be orchestrated. We review the current knowledge on redox regulated peroxisome biogenesis and degradation with an emphasis on yeasts and plants.

  5. Redox regulated peroxisome homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaofeng; Li, Shuo; Liu, Yu; Ma, Changle

    2015-01-01

    Peroxisomes are ubiquitous organelles present in nearly all eukaryotic cells. Conserved functions of peroxisomes encompass beta-oxidation of fatty acids and scavenging of reactive oxygen species generated from diverse peroxisomal metabolic pathways. Peroxisome content, number, and size can change quickly in response to environmental and/or developmental cues. To achieve efficient peroxisome homeostasis, peroxisome biogenesis and degradation must be orchestrated. We review the current knowledge on redox regulated peroxisome biogenesis and degradation with an emphasis on yeasts and plants. PMID:25545794

  6. Taiwan Regulation of Biobanks.

    PubMed

    Fan, Chien-Te; Hung, Tzu-Hsun; Yeh, Chan-Kun

    2015-01-01

    This paper introduces legal framework and governance structure in relation to the management and development of biobanks in Taiwan. At first, we briefly describe Taiwan's population, political system and health care system. Secondly, this research introduces biobanking framework of Taiwan including 25 biobanks established with the approval of the Ministry of Health and Welfare. In those biobanks, "Taiwan Biobank" is the first and the largest government-supported biobank which comprises population-based cohort study and disease- oriented study. Since the collection of information, data, and biological specimen of biobanks often involve highly sensitive personal information, in the legal framework of Taiwan, there is a specific regulation, "Human Biobank Management Act" (HBMA), which plays an important role in regulating biobanks in Taiwan. HBMA, the Personal Information Act and other regulations constitute a comprehensive legal and regulatory privacy framework of biobanks. Through the introduction and analysis of the current legal framework applicable to biobanks, we found that there are several challenges that need to be solved appropriately that involve duplicate review systems, the obstacles in the international collaboration, and data sharing between biobanks in Taiwan.

  7. Flow compensating pressure regulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baehr, E. F. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    An apparatus for regulating pressure of treatment fluid during ophthalmic procedures is described. Flow sensing and pressure regulating diaphragms are used to modulate a flow control valve. The pressure regulating diaphragm is connected to the flow control valve to urge the valve to an open position due to pressure being applied to the diaphragm by bias means such as a spring. The flow sensing diaphragm is mechanically connected to the flow control valve and urges it to an opened position because of the differential pressure on the diaphragm generated by a flow of incoming treatment fluid through an orifice in the diaphragm. A bypass connection with a variable restriction is connected in parallel relationship to the orifice to provide for adjusting the sensitivity of the flow sensing diaphragm. A multiple lever linkage system is utilized between the center of the second diaphragm and the flow control valve to multiply the force applied to the valve by the other diaphragm and reverse the direction of the force.

  8. Regulation reform slows down

    SciTech Connect

    1995-03-29

    Regulatory reformers in Congress are easing off the accelerator as they recognize that some of their more far-reaching proposals lack sufficient support to win passage. Last week the proposed one-year moratorium on new regulations was set back in the Senate by it main sponsor, Sen. Non Nickles (R., OK), who now seeks to replace it with a more moderate bill. Nickel`s substitute bill would give Congress 45 days after a regulation is issued to decide whether to reject it. It also retroactively allows for review of 80 regulations issued since last November 9, 1994. Asked how his new proposal is superior to a moratorium, which is sharply opposed by the Clinton Administration, Nickles says he thinks it is better because its permanent. The Chemical Manufacturer`s Association (CMA) has not publicly made a regulatory moratorium a top priority, but has quietly supported it by joining with other industry groups lobbying on the issue. A moratorium would halt EPA expansion of the Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) and alloys the delisting of several TRI chemicals.

  9. Ensembl regulation resources.

    PubMed

    Zerbino, Daniel R; Johnson, Nathan; Juetteman, Thomas; Sheppard, Dan; Wilder, Steven P; Lavidas, Ilias; Nuhn, Michael; Perry, Emily; Raffaillac-Desfosses, Quentin; Sobral, Daniel; Keefe, Damian; Gräf, Stefan; Ahmed, Ikhlak; Kinsella, Rhoda; Pritchard, Bethan; Brent, Simon; Amode, Ridwan; Parker, Anne; Trevanion, Steven; Birney, Ewan; Dunham, Ian; Flicek, Paul

    2016-01-01

    New experimental techniques in epigenomics allow researchers to assay a diversity of highly dynamic features such as histone marks, DNA modifications or chromatin structure. The study of their fluctuations should provide insights into gene expression regulation, cell differentiation and disease. The Ensembl project collects and maintains the Ensembl regulation data resources on epigenetic marks, transcription factor binding and DNA methylation for human and mouse, as well as microarray probe mappings and annotations for a variety of chordate genomes. From this data, we produce a functional annotation of the regulatory elements along the human and mouse genomes with plans to expand to other species as data becomes available. Starting from well-studied cell lines, we will progressively expand our library of measurements to a greater variety of samples. Ensembl's regulation resources provide a central and easy-to-query repository for reference epigenomes. As with all Ensembl data, it is freely available at http://www.ensembl.org, from the Perl and REST APIs and from the public Ensembl MySQL database server at ensembldb.ensembl.org. Database URL: http://www.ensembl.org. PMID:26888907

  10. Taiwan Regulation of Biobanks.

    PubMed

    Fan, Chien-Te; Hung, Tzu-Hsun; Yeh, Chan-Kun

    2015-01-01

    This paper introduces legal framework and governance structure in relation to the management and development of biobanks in Taiwan. At first, we briefly describe Taiwan's population, political system and health care system. Secondly, this research introduces biobanking framework of Taiwan including 25 biobanks established with the approval of the Ministry of Health and Welfare. In those biobanks, "Taiwan Biobank" is the first and the largest government-supported biobank which comprises population-based cohort study and disease- oriented study. Since the collection of information, data, and biological specimen of biobanks often involve highly sensitive personal information, in the legal framework of Taiwan, there is a specific regulation, "Human Biobank Management Act" (HBMA), which plays an important role in regulating biobanks in Taiwan. HBMA, the Personal Information Act and other regulations constitute a comprehensive legal and regulatory privacy framework of biobanks. Through the introduction and analysis of the current legal framework applicable to biobanks, we found that there are several challenges that need to be solved appropriately that involve duplicate review systems, the obstacles in the international collaboration, and data sharing between biobanks in Taiwan. PMID:26711420

  11. Epigenetic regulation in obesity.

    PubMed

    Lavebratt, C; Almgren, M; Ekström, T J

    2012-06-01

    The availability to the DNA strand and the activity of the transcription machinery is crucial for the cell to use the information in the DNA. The epigenetic mechanisms DNA methylation, modification of histone tails, other chromatin-modifying processes and interference by small RNAs regulate the cell-type-specific DNA expression. Epigenetic marks can be more or less plastic perpetuating responses to various molecular signals and environmental stimuli, but in addition apparently stochastic epigenetic marks have been found. There is substantial evidence from animal and man demonstrating that both transient and more long-term epigenetic mechanisms have a role in the regulation of the molecular events governing adipogenesis and glucose homeostasis. Intrauterine exposure such as poor maternal nutrition has consistently been demonstrated to contribute to a particular epigenotype and thereby developmental metabolic priming of the exposed offspring in animal and man. Epigenetic modifications can be passed not only from one cell generation to the next, but metabolic disease-related epigenotypes have been proposed to also be transmitted germ-line. Future more comprehensive knowledge on epigenetic regulation will complement genome sequence data for the understanding of the complex etiology of obesity and related disorder.

  12. Regulation of adipocyte lipolysis.

    PubMed

    Frühbeck, Gema; Méndez-Giménez, Leire; Fernández-Formoso, José-Antonio; Fernández, Secundino; Rodríguez, Amaia

    2014-06-01

    In adipocytes the hydrolysis of TAG to produce fatty acids and glycerol under fasting conditions or times of elevated energy demands is tightly regulated by neuroendocrine signals, resulting in the activation of lipolytic enzymes. Among the classic regulators of lipolysis, adrenergic stimulation and the insulin-mediated control of lipid mobilisation are the best known. Initially, hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) was thought to be the rate-limiting enzyme of the first lipolytic step, while we now know that adipocyte TAG lipase is the key enzyme for lipolysis initiation. Pivotal, previously unsuspected components have also been identified at the protective interface of the lipid droplet surface and in the signalling pathways that control lipolysis. Perilipin, comparative gene identification-58 (CGI-58) and other proteins of the lipid droplet surface are currently known to be key regulators of the lipolytic machinery, protecting or exposing the TAG core of the droplet to lipases. The neuroendocrine control of lipolysis is prototypically exerted by catecholaminergic stimulation and insulin-induced suppression, both of which affect cyclic AMP levels and hence the protein kinase A-mediated phosphorylation of HSL and perilipin. Interestingly, in recent decades adipose tissue has been shown to secrete a large number of adipokines, which exert direct effects on lipolysis, while adipocytes reportedly express a wide range of receptors for signals involved in lipid mobilisation. Recently recognised mediators of lipolysis include some adipokines, structural membrane proteins, atrial natriuretic peptides, AMP-activated protein kinase and mitogen-activated protein kinase. Lipolysis needs to be reanalysed from the broader perspective of its specific physiological or pathological context since basal or stimulated lipolytic rates occur under diverse conditions and by different mechanisms.

  13. Regulation of adipocyte lipolysis.

    PubMed

    Frühbeck, Gema; Méndez-Giménez, Leire; Fernández-Formoso, José-Antonio; Fernández, Secundino; Rodríguez, Amaia

    2014-06-01

    In adipocytes the hydrolysis of TAG to produce fatty acids and glycerol under fasting conditions or times of elevated energy demands is tightly regulated by neuroendocrine signals, resulting in the activation of lipolytic enzymes. Among the classic regulators of lipolysis, adrenergic stimulation and the insulin-mediated control of lipid mobilisation are the best known. Initially, hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) was thought to be the rate-limiting enzyme of the first lipolytic step, while we now know that adipocyte TAG lipase is the key enzyme for lipolysis initiation. Pivotal, previously unsuspected components have also been identified at the protective interface of the lipid droplet surface and in the signalling pathways that control lipolysis. Perilipin, comparative gene identification-58 (CGI-58) and other proteins of the lipid droplet surface are currently known to be key regulators of the lipolytic machinery, protecting or exposing the TAG core of the droplet to lipases. The neuroendocrine control of lipolysis is prototypically exerted by catecholaminergic stimulation and insulin-induced suppression, both of which affect cyclic AMP levels and hence the protein kinase A-mediated phosphorylation of HSL and perilipin. Interestingly, in recent decades adipose tissue has been shown to secrete a large number of adipokines, which exert direct effects on lipolysis, while adipocytes reportedly express a wide range of receptors for signals involved in lipid mobilisation. Recently recognised mediators of lipolysis include some adipokines, structural membrane proteins, atrial natriuretic peptides, AMP-activated protein kinase and mitogen-activated protein kinase. Lipolysis needs to be reanalysed from the broader perspective of its specific physiological or pathological context since basal or stimulated lipolytic rates occur under diverse conditions and by different mechanisms. PMID:24872083

  14. Bifunctional gas-flow regulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koch, E. F.

    1979-01-01

    Simple modification converts conventional high-pressure regulator to combination pressure-regulator/shutoff valve. Modification entails adding second diaphragm and pressure compartment. Modified valve is switched between its two functions by external two-position low-pressure valve.

  15. REGULATION OF VASCULOGENESIS AND ANGIOGENESIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Regulation of vasculogenesis and angiogenesis.
    B.D. Abbott
    Reproductive Toxicology Division, Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina, USA
    Vasculogenesis and angiogenesis are regulated by a complex, interactive family of receptors and lig...

  16. 77 FR 13155 - Waste Regulation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-05

    ... received under the Antarctic Conservation Act of 1978, Public Law 95-541. SUMMARY: The National Science... regulated under the Antarctic Conservation Act of 1978 (Pub. L. 95-541; Code of Federal Regulations Title...

  17. Genes and gene regulation

    SciTech Connect

    MacLean, N.

    1988-01-01

    Genetics has long been a central topic for biologists, and recent progress has captured the public imagination as well. This book addresses questions that are at the leading edge of this continually advancing discipline. In tune with the increasing emphasis on molecular biology and genetic engineering, this text emphasizes the molecular aspects of gene expression, and the evolution of gene sequence organization and control. It reviews the genetic material of viruses, bacteria, and of higher organisms. Cells and organisms are compared in terms of gene numbers, their arrangements within a cell, and the control mechanisms which regulate the activity of genes.

  18. [Regulation of terpene metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Croteau, R.

    1992-01-01

    This report describes accomplishments over the past year on understanding of terpene synthesis in mint plants and sage. Specifically reported are the fractionation of 4-S-limonene synthetase, the enzyme responsible for the first committed step to monoterpene synthesis, along with isolation of the corresponding RNA and DNA cloning of its gene; the localization of the enzyme within the oil glands, regulation of transcription and translation of the synthetase, the pathway to camphor biosynthesis,a nd studies on the early stages and branch points of the isoprenoid pathway.

  19. Self-regulating valve

    DOEpatents

    Humphreys, D.A.

    1982-07-20

    A variable, self-regulating valve having a hydraulic loss coefficient proportional to a positive exponential power of the flow rate. The device includes two objects in a flow channel and structure which assures that the distance between the two objects is an increasing function of the flow rate. The range of spacing between the objects is such that the hydraulic resistance of the valve is an increasing function of the distance between the two objects so that the desired hydraulic loss coefficient as a function of flow rate is obtained without variation in the flow area.

  20. Circadian regulation of chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Atkins, Kelly A; Dodd, Antony N

    2014-10-01

    Circadian rhythms produce a biological measure of time that increases plant performance. The mechanisms that underlie this increase in productivity require investigation to provide information that will underpin future crop improvement. There is a growing body of evidence that a sophisticated signalling network interconnects the circadian oscillator and chloroplasts. We consider this in the context of circadian signalling to chloroplasts and the relationship between retrograde signalling and circadian regulation. We place circadian signalling to chloroplasts by sigma factors within an evolutionary context. We describe selected recent developments in the integration of light and circadian signals that control chloroplast gene expression.

  1. Variable orifice flow regulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christianson, Rollin C. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A flow regulator for high-pressure fluids at elevated temperatures includes a body having a flow passage extending between inlet and outlet openings. First and second orifice members are arranged in the flow passage so at least one of the orifice members can be moved transversely in relation to the flow passage between one operating position where the two orifice openings are aligned for establishing a maximum flow rate of fluids flowing through the flow passage and at least one other operating position in which the two openings are moderately misaligned with one another for establishing a predetermined reduced flow rate of fluids flowing through the flow passage.

  2. Growth regulation by macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Wharton, W.; Walker, E.; Stewart, C.C.

    1982-01-01

    The evidence reviewed here indicates that macrophages, either acting alone or in concert with other cells, influence the proliferation of multiple types of cells. Most of the data indicate that these effects are mediated by soluble macrophage-elaborated products (probably proteins) although the role of direct cell-to-cell contacts cannot be ruled out in all cases. A degree of success has been achieved on the biochemical characterization of these factors, due mainly to their low specific activity in conditioned medium and the lack of rapid, specific assays. Understanding the growth-regulating potential of macrophages is an important and needed area of research.

  3. Industry perspective on regulation issues

    SciTech Connect

    Myrick, C.

    1994-12-31

    Current industry estimates indicate that regulatory compliance costs for retail crop protection chemical and fertilizer dealers will on average increase 300% from 1990 to 1997. Even though recent studies show that most dealers are willing to proactively comply with environmental and worker safety regulations, the impact of over-regulation could be substantial. The agrichemical industry must begin to develop and implement a strategy to increase compliance with needed regulations and prohibit duplicative or unnecessary regulations.

  4. Temperature controlled high voltage regulator

    DOEpatents

    Chiaro, Jr., Peter J.; Schulze, Gerald K.

    2004-04-20

    A temperature controlled high voltage regulator for automatically adjusting the high voltage applied to a radiation detector is described. The regulator is a solid state device that is independent of the attached radiation detector, enabling the regulator to be used by various models of radiation detectors, such as gas flow proportional radiation detectors.

  5. Effective doses, guidelines & regulations.

    PubMed

    Burch, Michael D

    2008-01-01

    A number of countries have developed regulations or guidelines for cyanotoxins and cyanobacteria in drinking water, and in some cases in water used for recreational activity and agriculture. The main focus internationally has been upon microcystin toxins, produced predominantly by Microcystis aeruginosa. This is because microcystins are widely regarded as the most significant potential source of human injury from cyanobacteria on a world-wide scale. Many international guidelines have taken their lead from the World Health Organization's (WHO) provisional guideline of 1 microg L(-1) for microcystin-LR in drinking-water released in 1998 (WHO 2004). The WHO guideline value is stated as being 'provisional', because it covers only microcystin-LR, for reasons that the toxicology is limited and new data for toxicity of cyanobacterial toxins are being generated. The derivation of this guideline is based upon data that there is reported human injury related to consumption of drinking water containing cyanobacteria, or from limited work with experimental animals. It was also recognised that at present the human evidence for microcystin tumor promotion is inadequate and animal evidence is limited. As a result the guideline is based upon the model of deriving a Tolerable Daily intake (TDI) from an animal study No Observed Adverse Effects Level (NOAEL), with the application of appropriate safety or uncertainty factors. The resultant WHO guideline by definition is the concentration of a toxin that does not result in any significant risk to health of the consumer over a lifetime of consumption. Following the release of this WHO provisional guideline many countries have either adopted it directly (e.g., Czech Republic, France, Japan, Korea, New Zealand, Norway, Poland, Brazil and Spain), or have adopted the same animal studies, TDI and derivation convention to arrive at slight variants based upon local requirements (e.g., Australia, Canada). Brazil currently has the most

  6. Environmental regulations on chlorofluorocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, J.S.; Wells, J.B. )

    1989-05-01

    In August 1988, the US Environmental Protection Agency issued final regulations that implement the Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer. The regulations require a 50% reduction in consumption of fully halogenated chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) within 10 years and a freeze on consumption of halons within 4 years. The Montreal Protocol provisions were designed in September 1987 based on the results of a 2-year international series of scientific, technical, and economic workshops. As would be expected, scientific investigations continued during this period. While these investigations suggested that significant global depletion had already occurred, these preliminary findings were not taken into account during negotiations or rulemaking. In March 1988, however, the international Ozone Trends Panel confirmed the findings. Depletion greater than that projected under the Montreal Protocol has already occurred. An early reassessment of the Protocol provisions appears to be inevitable. Restrictions on CFCs will affect the refrigeration and air-conditioning industries. Emerging alternatives to CFCs include newly developed refrigerants, innovative designs, and engineering controls. Key issues in evaluating these alternatives include energy efficiency, capital costs, service to consumers, and compatibility with existing designs.

  7. [Regulation of terpene metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Croteau, R.

    1991-01-01

    During the last grant period, we have completed studies on the key pathways of monoterpene biosynthesis and catabolism in sage and peppermint, and have, by several lines of evidence, deciphered the rate-limiting step of each pathway. We have at least partially purified and characterized the relevant enzymes of each pathway. We have made a strong case, based on analytical, in vivo, and in vitro studies, that terpene accumulation depends upon the balance between biosynthesis and catabolism, and provided supporting evidence that these processes are developmentally-regulated and very closely associated with senescence of the oil glands. Oil gland ontogeny has been characterized at the ultrastructural level. We have exploited foliar-applied bioregulators to delay gland senescence, and have developed tissue explant and cell culture systems to study several elusive aspects of catabolism. We have isolated pure gland cell clusters and localized monoterpene biosynthesis and catabolism within these structures, and have used these preparations as starting materials for the purification to homogeneity of target regulatory'' enzymes. We have thus developed the necessary background knowledge, based on a firm understanding of enzymology, as well as the necessary experimental tools for studying the regulation of monoterpene metabolism at the molecular level. Furthermore, we are now in a position to extend our systematic approach to other terpenoid classes (C[sub 15]-C[sub 30]) produced by oil glands.

  8. Regulation of testicular descent.

    PubMed

    Hutson, John M; Li, Ruili; Southwell, Bridget R; Newgreen, Don; Cousinery, Mary

    2015-04-01

    Testicular descent occurs in two morphologically distinct phases, each under different hormonal control from the testis itself. The first phase occurs between 8 and 15 weeks when insulin-like hormone 3 (Insl3) from the Leydig cells stimulates the gubernaculum to swell, thereby anchoring the testis near the future inguinal canal as the foetus grows. Testosterone causes regression of the cranial suspensory ligament to augment the transabdominal phase. The second, or inguinoscrotal phase, occurs between 25 and 35 weeks, when the gubernaculum bulges out of the external ring and migrates to the scrotum, all under control of testosterone. However, androgen acts mostly indirectly via the genitofemoral nerve (GFN), which produces calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) to control the direction of migration. In animal models the androgen receptors are in the inguinoscrotal fat pad, which probably produces a neurotrophin to masculinise the GFN sensory fibres that regulate gubernacular migration. There is little direct evidence that this same process occurs in humans, but CGRP can regulate closure of the processus vaginalis in inguinal hernia, confirming that the GFN probably mediates human testicular descent by a similar mechanism as seen in rodent models. Despite increased understanding about normal testicular descent, the common causes of cryptorchidism remain elusive.

  9. Regulation of brain aquaporins.

    PubMed

    Zelenina, Marina

    2010-11-01

    Three aquaporins are expressed in the brain. AQP4, the predominant brain water channel, is expressed in astrocyte endfeet facing brain capillaries, perisynaptic spaces, and nodes of Ranvier. It is implicated in brain edema formation and resolution. It is also believed to assist clearance of K(+) released during neuronal activity. AQP1 is expressed in epithelial cells of choroid plexus and is implicated in cerebrospinal fluid formation. AQP9, which has been reported to be present in astrocytes and in subpopulations of neurons, is implicated in the brain energy metabolism. All three brain AQPs are strongly upregulated in brain tumors and in injured brain tissue. Water and solute transport via AQPs depends on concentration gradients across the membrane, but the magnitude of the transport is to a large extent determined by the single channel permeability of AQPs and by their abundance in the cell membrane. The future therapies will have to address not only the forces driving the water and solute transport (e.g. as mannitol infusion does in the treatment of brain edema), but also the regulation of AQPs, which provide the means for water entry to the brain, for water exit from the brain, and for redistribution of water and solutes within the brain compartments. This review summarizes the data concerning structure, permeability, role in the brain, short-term and long-term regulation of the three AQPs.

  10. Federal energy regulation

    SciTech Connect

    McKie, J.W.

    1984-01-01

    Federal energy policy since World War II has developed into a vast and multidirectional program of controls, incentives, restraints, and promotions. This development accelerated greatly during the critical decade after 1973, and has become a pervasive and sometimes controlling influence in the energy economy. Its purposes, responding to a multitude of interests and aims in the economy, have frequently been inconsistent, if not obscure, and the results have often been confusing or disappointing. This contribution considers the development and purposes of federal energy regulation during the last twenty years, especially since the ''''energy crisis'' of the early 1970s, and offers an appraisal of the successes and failures of several major federal regulatory programs. Whatever the motives and purposes that have actually guided the federal government in its intervention in the energy economy, economists and other critics may evaluate its programs according to whether or not they promote various ends that are deemed to be in the ''public interest.'' Regulation is often rationalized as an attempt to correct or compensate for a failure of the free, unregulated market to achieve some goal thought to be essential for good economic performance, or to fulfill other necessary public purposes.

  11. Bidirectional Pressure-Regulator System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, Kenneth; Miller, John R.

    2008-01-01

    A bidirectional pressure-regulator system has been devised for use in a regenerative fuel cell system. The bidirectional pressure-regulator acts as a back-pressure regulator as gas flows through the bidirectional pressure-regulator in one direction. Later, the flow of gas goes through the regulator in the opposite direction and the bidirectional pressure-regulator operates as a pressure- reducing pressure regulator. In the regenerative fuel cell system, there are two such bidirectional regulators, one for the hydrogen gas and another for the oxygen gas. The flow of gases goes from the regenerative fuel cell system to the gas storage tanks when energy is being stored, and reverses direction, flowing from the storage tanks to the regenerative fuel cell system when the stored energy is being withdrawn from the regenerative fuel cell system. Having a single bidirectional regulator replaces two unidirectional regulators, plumbing, and multiple valves needed to reverse the flow direction. The term "bidirectional" refers to both the bidirectional nature of the gas flows and capability of each pressure regulator to control the pressure on either its upstream or downstream side, regardless of the direction of flow.

  12. Emotion Regulation and Anxiety Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Cisler, Josh M.; Olatunji, Bunmi O.

    2013-01-01

    A growing body of research suggests that the construct of emotion regulation is important for understanding the onset, maintenance, and treatment of anxiety disorders. In this review, we provide a selective overview of this emerging field and highlight the major sources of evidence. First, evidence suggests that the construct of emotion regulation can be differentiated from the construct of emotion. Second, there is a large and consistent body of research demonstrating that emotion regulation strategies can modulate emotional responding, and this finding is observed in both behavioral and neuroimaging studies. Third, measures of emotion regulation explain incremental variance in measures of anxiety disorder symptoms not accounted for by measures of negative affect. Although the research implicating emotion regulation in the anxiety disorders is promising, future research will be necessary to further clarify causal mechanisms explaining how emotion regulation confers vulnerability for anxiety disorders and to improve the clarity and consistency of definitions of emotion regulation. PMID:22392595

  13. Regulation of Potassium Homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Biff F

    2015-06-01

    Potassium is the most abundant cation in the intracellular fluid, and maintaining the proper distribution of potassium across the cell membrane is critical for normal cell function. Long-term maintenance of potassium homeostasis is achieved by alterations in renal excretion of potassium in response to variations in intake. Understanding the mechanism and regulatory influences governing the internal distribution and renal clearance of potassium under normal circumstances can provide a framework for approaching disorders of potassium commonly encountered in clinical practice. This paper reviews key aspects of the normal regulation of potassium metabolism and is designed to serve as a readily accessible review for the well informed clinician as well as a resource for teaching trainees and medical students.

  14. Magnetostrictive Pressure Regulating System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richard, James A. (Inventor); Pickens, Herman L. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A magnetostrictive pressure regulating system includes a magnetostrictive valve that incorporates a magnetostrictive actuator with at least one current-carrying coil disposed thereabout. A pressure force sensor, in fluid communication with the fluid exiting the valve, includes (i) a magnetostrictive material, (ii) a magnetic field generator in proximity to the magnetostrictive material for inducing a magnetic field in and surrounding the magnetostrictive material wherein lines of magnetic flux passing through the magnetostrictive material are defined, and (iii) a sensor positioned adjacent to the magnetostrictive material and in the magnetic field for measuring changes in at least one of flux angle and flux density when the magnetostrictive material experiences an applied force that is aligned with the lines of magnetic flux. The pressure of the fluid exiting the valve causes the applied force. A controller coupled to the sensor and to the current-carrying coil adjusts a current supplied to the current-carrying coil based on the changes so-measured.

  15. Regulation of Terpene Metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Rodney Croteau

    2004-03-14

    OAK-B135 Research over the last four years has progressed fairly closely along the lines initially proposed, with progress-driven expansion of Objectives 1, 2 and 3. Recent advances have developed from three research thrusts: 1. Random sequencing of an enriched peppermint oil gland cDNA library has given access to a large number of potential pathway and regulatory genes for test of function; 2. The availability of new DNA probes and antibodies has permitted investigation of developmental regulation and organization of terpenoid metabolism; and 3. The development of a transformation system for peppermint by colleagues at Purdue University has allowed direct transgenic testing of gene function and added a biotechnological component to the project. The current status of each of the original research objectives is outlined below.

  16. Pubertal development and regulation.

    PubMed

    Abreu, Ana Paula; Kaiser, Ursula B

    2016-03-01

    Puberty marks the end of childhood and is a period when individuals undergo physiological and psychological changes to achieve sexual maturation and fertility. The hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis controls puberty and reproduction and is tightly regulated by a complex network of excitatory and inhibitory factors. This axis is active in the embryonic and early postnatal stages of life and is subsequently restrained during childhood, and its reactivation culminates in puberty initiation. The mechanisms underlying this reactivation are not completely known. The age of puberty onset varies between individuals and the timing of puberty initiation is associated with several health outcomes in adult life. In this Series paper, we discuss pubertal markers, epidemiological trends of puberty initiation over time, and the mechanisms whereby genetic, metabolic, and other factors control secretion of gonadotropin-releasing hormone to determine initiation of puberty.

  17. [Regulation of terpene metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Croteau, R.

    1989-11-09

    Terpenoid oils, resins, and waxes from plants are important renewable resources. The objective of this project is to understand the regulation of terpenoid metabolism using the monoterpenes (C[sub 10]) as a model. The pathways of monoterpene biosynthesis and catabolism have been established, and the relevant enzymes characterized. Developmental studies relating enzyme levels to terpene accumulation within the oil gland sites of synthesis, and work with bioregulators, indicate that monoterpene production is controlled by terpene cyclases, the enzymes catalyzing the first step of the monoterpene pathway. As the leaf oil glands mature, cyclase levels decline and monoterpene biosynthesis ceases. Yield then decreases as the monoterpenes undergo catabolism by a process involving conversion to a glycoside and transport from the leaf glands to the root. At this site, the terpenoid is oxidatively degraded to acetate that is recycled into other lipid metabolites. During the transition from terpene biosynthesis to catabolism, the oil glands undergo dramatic ultrastructural modification. Degradation of the producing cells results in mixing of previously compartmentized monoterpenes with the catabolic enzymes, ultimately leading to yield decline. This regulatory model is being applied to the formation of other terpenoid classes (C[sub 15] C[sub 20], C[sub 30], C[sub 40]) within the oil glands. Preliminary investigations on the formation of sesquiterpenes (C[sub 15]) suggest that the corresponding cyclases may play a lesser role in determining yield of these products, but that compartmentation effects are important. From these studies, a comprehensive scheme for the regulation of terpene metabolism is being constructed. Results from this project wail have important consequences for the yield and composition of terpenoid natural products that can be made available for industrial exploitation.

  18. Regulation of melanopsin expression.

    PubMed

    Hannibal, Jens

    2006-01-01

    Circadian rhythms in mammals are adjusted daily to the environmental day/night cycle by photic input via the retinohypothalamic tract (RHT). Retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) of the RHT constitute a separate light-detecting system in the mammalian retina used for irradiance detection and for transmission to the circadian system and other non-imaging forming processes in the brain. The RGCs of the RHT are intrinsically photosensitive due to the expression of melanopsin, an opsin-like photopigment. This notion is based on anatomical and functional data and on studies of mice lacking melanopsin. Furthermore, heterologous expression of melanopsin in non-neuronal mammalian cell lines was found sufficient to render these cells photosensitive. Even though solid evidence regarding the function of melanopsin exists, little is known about the regulation of melanopsin gene expression. Studies in albino Wistar rats showed that the expression of melanopsin is diurnal at both the mRNA and protein levels. The diurnal changes in melanopsin expression seem, however, to be overridden by prolonged exposure to light or darkness. Significant increase in melanopsin expression was observed from the first day in constant darkness and the expression continued to increase during prolonged exposure in constant darkness. Prolonged exposure to constant light, on the other hand, decreased melanopsin expression to an almost undetectable level after 5 days of constant light. The induction of melanopsin by darkness was even more pronounced if darkness was preceded by light suppression for 5 days. These observations show that dual mechanisms regulate melanopsin gene expression and that the intrinsic light-responsive RGCs in the albino Wistar rat adapt their expression of melanopsin to environmental light and darkness.

  19. TFEB regulates lysosomal proteostasis.

    PubMed

    Song, Wensi; Wang, Fan; Savini, Marzia; Ake, Ashley; di Ronza, Alberto; Sardiello, Marco; Segatori, Laura

    2013-05-15

    Loss-of-function diseases are often caused by destabilizing mutations that lead to protein misfolding and degradation. Modulating the innate protein homeostasis (proteostasis) capacity may lead to rescue of native folding of the mutated variants, thereby ameliorating the disease phenotype. In lysosomal storage disorders (LSDs), a number of highly prevalent alleles have missense mutations that do not impair the enzyme's catalytic activity but destabilize its native structure, resulting in the degradation of the misfolded protein. Enhancing the cellular folding capacity enables rescuing the native, biologically functional structure of these unstable mutated enzymes. However, proteostasis modulators specific for the lysosomal system are currently unknown. Here, we investigate the role of the transcription factor EB (TFEB), a master regulator of lysosomal biogenesis and function, in modulating lysosomal proteostasis in LSDs. We show that TFEB activation results in enhanced folding, trafficking and lysosomal activity of a severely destabilized glucocerebrosidase (GC) variant associated with the development of Gaucher disease (GD), the most common LSD. TFEB specifically induces the expression of GC and of key genes involved in folding and lysosomal trafficking, thereby enhancing both the pool of mutated enzyme and its processing through the secretory pathway. TFEB activation also rescues the activity of a β-hexosaminidase mutant associated with the development of another LSD, Tay-Sachs disease, thus suggesting general applicability of TFEB-mediated proteostasis modulation to rescue destabilizing mutations in LSDs. In summary, our findings identify TFEB as a specific regulator of lysosomal proteostasis and suggest that TFEB may be used as a therapeutic target to rescue enzyme homeostasis in LSDs. PMID:23393155

  20. Endocannabinoids in cerebrovascular regulation.

    PubMed

    Benyó, Zoltán; Ruisanchez, Éva; Leszl-Ishiguro, Miriam; Sándor, Péter; Pacher, Pál

    2016-04-01

    The cerebral blood flow is tightly regulated by myogenic, endothelial, metabolic, and neural mechanisms under physiological conditions, and a large body of recent evidence indicates that inflammatory pathways have a major influence on the cerebral blood perfusion in certain central nervous system disorders, like hemorrhagic and ischemic stroke, traumatic brain injury, and vascular dementia. All major cell types involved in cerebrovascular control pathways (i.e., smooth muscle, endothelium, neurons, astrocytes, pericytes, microglia, and leukocytes) are capable of synthesizing endocannabinoids and/or express some or several of their target proteins [i.e., the cannabinoid 1 and 2 (CB1 and CB2) receptors and the transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 ion channel]. Therefore, the endocannabinoid system may importantly modulate the regulation of cerebral circulation under physiological and pathophysiological conditions in a very complex manner. Experimental data accumulated since the late 1990s indicate that the direct effect of cannabinoids on cerebral vessels is vasodilation mediated, at least in part, by CB1 receptors. Cannabinoid-induced cerebrovascular relaxation involves both a direct inhibition of smooth muscle contractility and a release of vasodilator mediator(s) from the endothelium. However, under stress conditions (e.g., in conscious restrained animals or during hypoxia and hypercapnia), cannabinoid receptor activation was shown to induce a reduction of the cerebral blood flow, probably via inhibition of the electrical and/or metabolic activity of neurons. Finally, in certain cerebrovascular pathologies (e.g., subarachnoid hemorrhage, as well as traumatic and ischemic brain injury), activation of CB2 (and probably yet unidentified non-CB1/non-CB2) receptors appear to improve the blood perfusion of the brain via attenuating vascular inflammation. PMID:26825517

  1. Alcadein Cleavages by Amyloid β-Precursor Protein (APP) α- and γ-Secretases Generate Small Peptides, p3-Alcs, Indicating Alzheimer Disease-related γ-Secretase Dysfunction*

    PubMed Central

    Hata, Saori; Fujishige, Sayaka; Araki, Yoichi; Kato, Naoko; Araseki, Masahiko; Nishimura, Masaki; Hartmann, Dieter; Saftig, Paul; Fahrenholz, Falk; Taniguchi, Miyako; Urakami, Katsuya; Akatsu, Hiroyasu; Martins, Ralph N.; Yamamoto, Kazuo; Maeda, Masahiro; Yamamoto, Tohru; Nakaya, Tadashi; Gandy, Sam; Suzuki, Toshiharu

    2009-01-01

    Alcadeins (Alcs) constitute a family of neuronal type I membrane proteins, designated Alcα, Alcβ, and Alcγ. The Alcs express in neurons dominantly and largely colocalize with the Alzheimer amyloid precursor protein (APP) in the brain. Alcs and APP show an identical function as a cargo receptor of kinesin-1. Moreover, proteolytic processing of Alc proteins appears highly similar to that of APP. We found that APP α-secretases ADAM 10 and ADAM 17 primarily cleave Alc proteins and trigger the subsequent secondary intramembranous cleavage of Alc C-terminal fragments by a presenilin-dependent γ-secretase complex, thereby generating “APP p3-like” and non-aggregative Alc peptides (p3-Alcs). We determined the complete amino acid sequence of p3-Alcα, p3-Alcβ, and p3-Alcγ, whose major species comprise 35, 37, and 31 amino acids, respectively, in human cerebrospinal fluid. We demonstrate here that variant p3-Alc C termini are modulated by FAD-linked presenilin 1 mutations increasing minor β-amyloid species Aβ42, and these mutations alter the level of minor p3-Alc species. However, the magnitudes of C-terminal alteration of p3-Alcα, p3-Alcβ, and p3-Alcγ were not equivalent, suggesting that one type of γ-secretase dysfunction does not appear in the phenotype equivalently in the cleavage of type I membrane proteins. Because these C-terminal alterations are detectable in human cerebrospinal fluid, the use of a substrate panel, including Alcs and APP, may be effective to detect γ-secretase dysfunction in the prepathogenic state of Alzheimer disease subjects. PMID:19864413

  2. Branded prescription drug fee. Final regulations, temporary regulations, and removal of temporary regulations.

    PubMed

    2014-07-28

    This document contains final regulations that provide guidance on the annual fee imposed on covered entities engaged in the business of manufacturing or importing branded prescription drugs. This fee was enacted by section 9008 of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, as amended by section 1404 of the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010. This document also withdraws the Branded Prescription Drug Fee temporary regulations and contains new temporary regulations regarding the definition of controlled group that apply beginning on January 1, 2015. The final regulations and the new temporary regulations affect persons engaged in the business of manufacturing or importing certain branded prescription drugs. The text of the temporary regulations in this document also serves as the text of proposed regulations set forth in a notice of proposed rulemaking (REG-123286-14) on this subject in the Proposed Rules section in this issue of the Federal Register.

  3. Sustainable regulation of construction.

    PubMed

    2000-11-01

    The seminar examined the role building codes and regulations can have in promoting a more sustainable approach to construction, particularly through their application to non-industrial building materials. A range of building materials such as straw, bamboo, rammed earth, adobe, and cob (a mixture of clay and chopped straw) were described and illustrated by slides to show their building potential. The current codes have a prime concern to protect the health and safety of people from the built environment. They have been developed almost exclusively for mainstream industrial materials and methods of construction, which makes them difficult to use with alternative, indigenous, or non-industrial building materials, even though those materials may be considered more sustainable. The argument was put forward that with only one-third of the world population living in modern industrial buildings today, it is not sustainable to re-house the remaining rapidly expanding population in high technology dwellings. Many of the low technology building materials and methods now used by the majority of people in the world need only incremental improvement to be equal or superior to many of their industrial replacements. Since these can be more sustainable methods of building, there needs to be an acceptance of the use of alternative materials, particularly in the developing parts of the world, where they are being rejected for less sustainable industrial methods. However, many codes make it difficult to use non-industrial materials; indeed, many of the industrial materials would not meet the demands that must be now met if they were now being introduced as new materials. Consequently, there is a need to develop codes to facilitate the use of a wider range of materials than in current use, and research is needed to assist this development. Sustainable regulation should take into account the full range of real impacts that materials and systems have in areas such as resource use and

  4. Regulation of sphingomyelin metabolism.

    PubMed

    Bienias, Kamil; Fiedorowicz, Anna; Sadowska, Anna; Prokopiuk, Sławomir; Car, Halina

    2016-06-01

    Sphingolipids (SFs) represent a large class of lipids playing diverse functions in a vast number of physiological and pathological processes. Sphingomyelin (SM) is the most abundant SF in the cell, with ubiquitous distribution within mammalian tissues, and particularly high levels in the Central Nervous System (CNS). SM is an essential element of plasma membrane (PM) and its levels are crucial for the cell function. SM content in a cell is strictly regulated by the enzymes of SM metabolic pathways, which activities create a balance between SM synthesis and degradation. The de novo synthesis via SM synthases (SMSs) in the last step of the multi-stage process is the most important pathway of SM formation in a cell. The SM hydrolysis by sphingomyelinases (SMases) increases the concentration of ceramide (Cer), a bioactive molecule, which is involved in cellular proliferation, growth and apoptosis. By controlling the levels of SM and Cer, SMSs and SMases maintain cellular homeostasis. Enzymes of SM cycle exhibit unique properties and diverse tissue distribution. Disturbances in their activities were observed in many CNS pathologies. This review characterizes the physiological roles of SM and enzymes controlling SM levels as well as their involvement in selected pathologies of the Central Nervous System, such as ischemia/hypoxia, Alzheimer disease (AD), Parkinson disease (PD), depression, schizophrenia and Niemann Pick disease (NPD). PMID:26940196

  5. Redox regulation in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Das, Ila; Chandhok, Des

    2010-01-01

    Oxidative stress, implicated in the etiology of cancer, results from an imbalance in the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and cell’s own antioxidant defenses. ROS deregulate the redox homeostasis and promote tumor formation by initiating an aberrant induction of signaling networks that cause tumorigenesis. Ultraviolet (UV) exposures, γ-radiation and other environmental carcinogens generate ROS in the cells, which can exert apoptosis in the tumors, thereby killing the malignant cells or induce the progression of the cancer growth by blocking cellular defense system. Cancer stem cells take the advantage of the aberrant redox system and spontaneously proliferate. Oxidative stress and gene-environment interactions play a significant role in the development of breast, prostate, pancreatic and colon cancer. Prolonged lifetime exposure to estrogen is associated with several kinds of DNA damage. Oxidative stress and estrogen receptor-associated proliferative changes are suggested to play important roles in estrogen-induced breast carcinogenesis. BRCA1, a tumor suppressor against hormone responsive cancers such as breast and prostate cancer, plays a significant role in inhibiting ROS and estrogen mediated DNA damage; thereby regulate the redox homeostasis of the cells. Several transcription factors and tumor suppressors are involved during stress response such as Nrf2, NFκB and BRCA1. A promising strategy for targeting redox status of the cells is to use readily available natural substances from vegetables, fruits, herbs and spices. Many of the phytochemicals have already been identified to have chemopreventive potential, capable of intervening in carcinogenesis. PMID:20716925

  6. Regulation of ovarian hyperluteinization.

    PubMed

    Ivanisevic-Milovanovic, O K; Demajo, M A; Karakasevic, A M; Pantic, V R

    1998-01-01

    Adult female rats with neonatally damaged posterior hypothalamus, made by a transversal cut, were investigated. Plasma levels of prolactin (PRL), gonadotropic hormones (GTH) and female gonadal steroids (GS) were determined by radioimmunoassay. The animals were sacrificed, at the ages of 4 and 6 months and their hypothalamus, pituitary gland, ovary and uterus were examined using light microscopy. The results can be summarized as follows: body mass of animals, with damaged posterior hypothalamus, was significantly reduced. Masses of luteinized ovaries were increased and uterine tissues decreased. Serum levels of PRL were significantly increased and luteinizing hormone (LH) decreased. Ultrastructural changes in the corpora lutea (CL), previously described, showed clear signs of their reduced capacities to produce GS, both estradiol (Oe) and progesterone (Pg) per total ovarian mass. However, prostaglandin 2 alfa (PGF2alpha) known as a luteolytic factor, was also diminished in the evidently retarded endometrium. As a result of decreased plasma values of LH, Pg and PGF2 alpha, luteolysis of CL in hyperluteinized ovaries did not occur, and their new generations were accumulated during subsequent cycles. The character of interruption and recovery of aminergic and peptidergic neurons, involved in regulation of hypothalamic-pituitary gonadal axis and feed-back effects of steroid hormones, require further studies.

  7. Load regulating latch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Appleberry, W. T. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A load regulating mechanical latch is described that has a pivotally mounted latch element having a hook-shaped end with a strike roller-engaging laterally open hook for engaging a stationary strike roller. The latch element or hook is pivotally mounted in a clevis end of an elongated latch stem that is adapted for axial movement through an opening in a support plate or bracket mounted to a structural member. A coil spring is disposed over and around the extending latch stem and the lower end of the coil spring engages the support bracket. A thrust washer is removably attached to the other end of the latch stem and engages the other end of the coil spring and compresses the coil spring thereby preloading the spring and the latch element carried by the latch stem. The hook-shaped latch element has a limited degree of axial travel for loading caused by structural distortion which may change the relative positions of the latch element hook and the strike roller. Means are also provided to permit limited tilt of the latch element due to loading of the hook.

  8. Metabolic regulation via enzyme filamentation

    PubMed Central

    Aughey, Gabriel N.; Liu, Ji-Long

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Determining the mechanisms of enzymatic regulation is central to the study of cellular metabolism. Regulation of enzyme activity via polymerization-mediated strategies has been shown to be widespread, and plays a vital role in mediating cellular homeostasis. In this review, we begin with an overview of the filamentation of CTP synthase, which forms filamentous structures termed cytoophidia. We then highlight other important examples of the phenomenon. Moreover, we discuss recent data relating to the regulation of enzyme activity by compartmentalization into cytoophidia. Finally, we hypothesize potential roles for enzyme filament formation in the regulation of metabolism, development and disease. PMID:27098510

  9. Glucocorticoid Regulation of Reproduction.

    PubMed

    Geraghty, Anna C; Kaufer, Daniela

    2015-01-01

    It is well accepted that stress, measured by increased glucocorticoid secretion, leads to profound reproductive dysfunction. In times of stress, glucocorticoids activate many parts of the fight or flight response, mobilizing energy and enhancing survival, while inhibiting metabolic processes that are not necessary for survival in the moment. This includes reproduction, an energetically costly procedure that is very finely regulated. In the short term, this is meant to be beneficial, so that the organism does not waste precious energy needed for survival. However, long-term inhibition can lead to persistent reproductive dysfunction, even if no longer stressed. This response is mediated by the increased levels of circulating glucocorticoids, which orchestrate complex inhibition of the entire reproductive axis. Stress and glucocorticoids exhibits both central and peripheral inhibition of the reproductive hormonal axis. While this has long been recognized as an issue, understanding the complex signaling mechanism behind this inhibition remains somewhat of a mystery. What makes this especially difficult is attempting to differentiate the many parts of both of these hormonal axes, and new neuropeptide discoveries in the last decade in the reproductive field have added even more complexity to an already complicated system. Glucocorticoids (GCs) and other hormones within the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis (as well as contributors in the sympathetic system) can modulate the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis at all levels-GCs can inhibit release of GnRH from the hypothalamus, inhibit gonadotropin synthesis and release in the pituitary, and inhibit testosterone synthesis and release from the gonads, while also influencing gametogenesis and sexual behavior. This chapter is not an exhaustive review of all the known literature, however is aimed at giving a brief look at both the central and peripheral effects of glucocorticoids on the reproductive function.

  10. Team Regulation, Regulation of Social Activities or Co-Regulation: Different Labels for Effective Regulation of Learning in CSCL

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saab, Nadira

    2012-01-01

    Computer-supported collaborative learning (CSCL) is an approach to learning in which learners can actively and collaboratively construct knowledge by means of interaction and joint problem solving. Regulation of learning is especially important in the domain of CSCL. Next to the regulation of task performance, the interaction between learners who…

  11. Deceptive Business Practices: Federal Regulations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rohrer, Daniel Morgan

    Federal regulations to prevent deceptive advertising seek to balance the advertiser's freedom of speech with protection of the consumer. This paper discusses what the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) has done to regulate advertising and evaluates the adequacy of its controls. The commission uses cease-and-desist orders, affirmative disclosure,…

  12. Design for pressure regulating components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wichmann, H.

    1973-01-01

    The design development for Pressure Regulating Components included a regulator component trade-off study with analog computer performance verification to arrive at a final optimized regulator configuration for the Space Storable Propulsion Module, under development for a Jupiter Orbiter mission. This application requires the pressure regulator to be capable of long-term fluorine exposure. In addition, individual but basically identical (for purposes of commonality) units are required for separate oxidizer and fuel pressurization. The need for dual units requires improvement in the regulation accuracy over present designs. An advanced regulator concept was prepared featuring redundant bellows, all metallic/ceramic construction, friction-free guidance of moving parts, gas damping, and the elimination of coil springs normally used for reference forces. The activities included testing of actual size seat/poppet components to determine actual discharge coefficients and flow forces. The resulting data was inserted into the computer model of the regulator. Computer simulation of the propulsion module performance over two mission profiles indicated satisfactory minimization of propellant residual requirements imposed by regulator performance uncertainties.

  13. Gravity and body mass regulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warren, L. E.; Horwitz, B. A.; Fuller, C. A.

    1997-01-01

    The effects of altered gravity on body mass, food intake, energy expenditure, and body composition are examined. Metabolic adjustments are reviewed in maintenance of energy balance, neural regulation, and humoral regulation are discussed. Experiments with rats indicate that genetically obese rats respond differently to hypergravity than lean rats.

  14. Affect and Self-Regulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malmivuori, Marja-Liisa

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents affect as an essential aspect of students' self-reflection and self-regulation. The introduced concepts of self-system and self-system process stress the importance of self-appraisals of personal competence and agency in affective responses and self-regulation in problem solving. Students are viewed as agents who constantly…

  15. Technological Change in Regulated Industries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Capron, William M., Ed.

    The articles in this volume discuss how well industries operating under government regulation respond to technical innovation: do the effects of regulations vary among industries, and if so, does this result from variations in the regulatory approach, the organization of the firms, or the nature of the technology? Industries considered include…

  16. Regulating Pornography: A Public Dilemma.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Margaret E.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Examines attitudes toward sex and pornography by means of a telephone survey of Dane County, Wisconsin, adults. Describes survey questions about sexual attitudes, perceived effects of pornography, and pornography regulation. Concludes that adults who feel more strongly that pornography has negative effects are more opposed to its regulation. (SG)

  17. The Universities and Federal Regulation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crowley, John C.

    The impact of increasing federal regulation on American universities is discussed based on an informal survey of senior academic and administrative officials in 13 public and private universities. As government regulation is becoming more intensive and compliance more resource- and time-consuming, government is perceived as having little…

  18. Street sweeping and stormwater regulations

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-10-01

    This article examines the role of street sweeping in meeting the requirements of the Clean Water Act stormwater regulations. The article identifies those industrial and municipal activities which are covered by the regulations and cites frequent sweeping of site surfaces for industry and street sweeping for municipalities as an integral part of compliance plans.

  19. Regulation of GMOs in China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yinliang

    2008-12-01

    Genetically modified organisms (GMOs) are created by biotechnology to serve people with much benefit while may impose risks to ecological environment and human health and therefore need careful regulation. During the past two decades, GMOs have been well developed in China and so has their corresponding regulation. This paper reviews and comments the multiple aspects of mainly the agricultural GMOs, including their safety assessment, control measures, trade activities, import, labels, and GM food, which have been prescribed by the corresponding laws, regulations and administrative measures. It is held that till present a framework for regulation of agricultural GMOs and GM food has been established basically in China, while a more comprehensive system for regulation of all kinds of GMOs and all kinds of related activities is still needed at present and in the future.

  20. RNA-guided transcriptional regulation

    DOEpatents

    Church, George M.; Mali, Prashant G.; Esvelt, Kevin M.

    2016-02-23

    Methods of modulating expression of a target nucleic acid in a cell are provided including introducing into the cell a first foreign nucleic acid encoding one or more RNAs complementary to DNA, wherein the DNA includes the target nucleic acid, introducing into the cell a second foreign nucleic acid encoding a nuclease-null Cas9 protein that binds to the DNA and is guided by the one or more RNAs, introducing into the cell a third foreign nucleic acid encoding a transcriptional regulator protein or domain, wherein the one or more RNAs, the nuclease-null Cas9 protein, and the transcriptional regulator protein or domain are expressed, wherein the one or more RNAs, the nuclease-null Cas9 protein and the transcriptional regulator protein or domain co-localize to the DNA and wherein the transcriptional regulator protein or domain regulates expression of the target nucleic acid.

  1. REGULATION OF AUTOSENSITIZATION

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Irun R.; Wekerle, Hartmut

    1973-01-01

    lymphocytes to self-antigens can be regulated by serum factors which act on the lymphocytes. The immunospecificity of the inhibitory effect suggests that these factors may be soluble self-antigens in a tolerogenic form. PMID:4539845

  2. Regulating chemicals: law, science, and the unbearable burdens of regulation.

    PubMed

    Silbergeld, Ellen K; Mandrioli, Daniele; Cranor, Carl F

    2015-03-18

    The challenges of regulating industrial chemicals remain unresolved in the United States. The Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) of 1976 was the first legislation to extend coverage to the regulation of industrial chemicals, both existing and newly registered. However, decisions related to both law and science that were made in passing this law inevitably rendered it ineffectual. Attempts to fix these shortcomings have not been successful. In light of the European Union's passage of innovative principles and requirements for chemical regulation, it is no longer possible to deny the opportunity and need for reform in US law and practice. PMID:25785889

  3. Regulating chemicals: law, science, and the unbearable burdens of regulation.

    PubMed

    Silbergeld, Ellen K; Mandrioli, Daniele; Cranor, Carl F

    2015-03-18

    The challenges of regulating industrial chemicals remain unresolved in the United States. The Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) of 1976 was the first legislation to extend coverage to the regulation of industrial chemicals, both existing and newly registered. However, decisions related to both law and science that were made in passing this law inevitably rendered it ineffectual. Attempts to fix these shortcomings have not been successful. In light of the European Union's passage of innovative principles and requirements for chemical regulation, it is no longer possible to deny the opportunity and need for reform in US law and practice.

  4. Mental fatigue impairs emotion regulation.

    PubMed

    Grillon, Christian; Quispe-Escudero, David; Mathur, Ambika; Ernst, Monique

    2015-06-01

    Because healthy physical and mental functioning depends on the ability to regulate emotions, it is important to identify moderators of such regulations. Whether mental fatigue, subsequent to the depletion of cognitive resources, impairs explicit emotion regulation to negative stimuli is currently unknown. This study explored this possibility. In a within-subject design over 2 separate sessions, healthy individuals performed easy (control session) or difficult (depletion session) cognitive tasks. Subsequently, they were presented with neutral and negative pictures, with instructions to either maintain or regulate (i.e., reduce) the emotions evoked by the pictures. Emotional reactivity was probed with the startle reflex. The negative pictures evoked a similar aversive state in the control and depletion sessions as measured by startle potentiation. However, subjects were able to down-regulate their aversive state only in the control session, not in the depletion session. These results indicate that mental fatigue following performance of cognitive tasks impairs emotion regulation without affecting emotional reactivity. These findings suggest that mental fatigue needs to be incorporated into models of emotion regulation.

  5. Precipitated silica as flow regulator.

    PubMed

    Müller, Anne-Kathrin; Ruppel, Joanna; Drexel, Claus-Peter; Zimmermann, Ingfried

    2008-08-01

    Flow regulators are added to solid pharmaceutical formulations to improve the flow properties of the powder mixtures. The primary particles of the flow regulators exist in the form of huge agglomerates which are broken down into smaller aggregates during the blending process. These smaller aggregates adsorb at the surface of the solid's grains and thus diminish attractive Van-der-Waals-forces by increasing the roughness of the host's surface. In most cases amorphous silica is used as flow additive but material properties like particle size or bond strength influence the desagglomeration tendency of the agglomerates and thus the flow regulating potency of each silica. For some silica types we will show that the differences in their flow regulating potency are due to the rate and extent by which they are able to cover the surface of the host particles. Binary powder mixtures consisting of a pharmaceutical excipient and an added flow regulator were blended in a Turbula mixer for a defined period of time. As pharmaceutical excipient corn starch was used. The flow regulators were represented by a selection of amorphous silicon dioxide types like a commercial fumed silica and various types of SIPERNAT precipitated silica provided by Evonik-Degussa GmbH, Hanau, Germany. Flowability parameters of the mixtures were characterized by means of a tensile strength tester. The reduction of tensile strength with the blending time can be correlated with an increase in fragmentation of the flow regulator. PMID:18595668

  6. Regulation and selection of patients.

    PubMed

    Leenen, H J

    1985-01-01

    During the past decades health legislation and regulation have been on the increase in most industrialized countries. The growing role of government in the provision and financing of health care, the need to correct given aspects of health care and the mandate to protect the underprivileged have been some of the many reasons for increased regulation. Different regulatory approaches and their respective advantages and disadvantages are reviewed in this paper. Particular attention is given to the crucial issue of how to regulate the access to scarce resources and how to cope within a legislative approach with the resulting patient selection. PMID:10270736

  7. Wolf population regulation revisited: again

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McRoberts, Ronald E.; Mech, L. David

    2014-01-01

    The long-accepted conclusion that wolf density is regulated by nutrition was recently challenged, and the conclusion was reached that, at greater levels of prey biomass, social factors such as intraspecific strife and territoriality tend to regulate wolf density. We reanalyzed the data used in that study for 2 reasons: 1) we disputed the use of 2 data points, and 2) because of recognized heteroscedasticity, we used weighted-regression analysis instead of the unweighted regressions used in the original study. We concluded that the data do not support the hypothesis that wolf densities are regulated by social factors.

  8. Voltage Regulators for Photovoltaic Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delombard, R.

    1986-01-01

    Two simple circuits developed to provide voltage regulation for highvoltage (i.e., is greater than 75 volts) and low-voltage (i.e., is less than 36 volts) photovoltaic/battery power systems. Use of these circuits results in voltage regulator small, low-cost, and reliable, with very low power dissipation. Simple oscillator circuit controls photovoltaic-array current to regulate system voltage and control battery charging. Circuit senses battery (and system) voltage and adjusts array current to keep battery voltage from exceeding maximum voltage.

  9. Flow-compensating pressure regulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baehr, E. F.

    1979-01-01

    Pressure regulator developed for use with cataract-surgery instrument controls intraocular pressure during substantial variations in flow rate of infusion fluid. Device may be applicable to variety of eye-surgery instruments.

  10. Lipid Regulation of Sodium Channels.

    PubMed

    D'Avanzo, N

    2016-01-01

    The lipid landscapes of cellular membranes are complex and dynamic, are tissue dependent, and can change with the age and the development of a variety of diseases. Researchers are now gaining new appreciation for the regulation of ion channel proteins by the membrane lipids in which they are embedded. Thus, as membrane lipids change, for example, during the development of disease, it is likely that the ionic currents that conduct through the ion channels embedded in these membranes will also be altered. This chapter provides an overview of the complex regulation of prokaryotic and eukaryotic voltage-dependent sodium (Nav) channels by fatty acids, sterols, glycerophospholipids, sphingolipids, and cannabinoids. The impact of lipid regulation on channel gating kinetics, voltage-dependence, trafficking, toxin binding, and structure are explored for Nav channels that have been examined in heterologous expression systems, native tissue, and reconstituted into artificial membranes. Putative mechanisms for Nav regulation by lipids are also discussed. PMID:27586290

  11. State Regulation of Private Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lines, Patricia M.

    1982-01-01

    Examines state laws and the actions of various courts on home instruction and unauthorized educational programs. Suggests reforming the regulation of private education through legislative action that requires periodic testing as an alternative to compulsory school attendance. (Author/MLF)

  12. Transistorized converter provides nondissipative regulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1964-01-01

    A transistorized regulator converter efficiently converts fluctuating input voltages to a constant output voltage, avoiding the use of saturable reactors. It is nondissipative in operation and functions in an open loop through variable duty cycles.

  13. Turgor regulation in hyphal organisms.

    PubMed

    Lew, Roger R; Levina, Natalia N; Walker, Sophie K; Garrill, Ashley

    2004-11-01

    Turgor regulation in two saprophytic hyphal organisms was examined directly with the pressure probe technique. The ascomycete Neurospora crassa, a terrestrial fungi, regulates turgor after hyperosmotic treatments when growing in a minimal medium containing K(+), Mg(2+), Ca(2+), Cl(-), and sucrose. Turgor recovery by N. crassa after hyperosmotic treatment is concurrent with changes in ion transport: hyperpolarization of the plasma membrane potential and a decline in transmembrane ion conductance. In contrast the oomycete Achlya bisexualis, a freshwater hyphal organism, does not regulate turgor after hyperosmotic treatment, although small transient increases in turgor were occasionally observed. We also monitored turgor in both organisms during hypoosmotic treatment and did not observe a turgor increase, possibly due to turgor regulation. Both hyphal organisms grow with similar morphologies, cellular expansion rates and turgor (0.4-0.7 MPa), yet respond differently to osmotic stress. The results do not support the assumption of a universal mechanism of tip growth driven by cell turgor.

  14. APPARATUS FOR REGULATING HIGH VOLTAGE

    DOEpatents

    Morrison, K.G.

    1951-03-20

    This patent describes a high-voltage regulator of the r-f type wherein the modulation of the r-f voltage is accomplished at a high level, resulting in good stabilization over a large range of load conditions.

  15. Epigenetic regulation of persistent pain

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Guang; Ren, Ke; Dubner, Ronald

    2014-01-01

    Persistent or chronic pain is tightly associated with various environmental changes and linked to abnormal gene expression within cells processing nociceptive signaling. Epigenetic regulation governs gene expression in response to environmental cues. Recent animal model and clinical studies indicate that epigenetic regulation plays an important role in the development/maintenance of persistent pain and, possibly the transition of acute pain to chronic pain, thus shedding light in a direction for development of new therapeutics for persistent pain. PMID:24948399

  16. Importance of intramembrane carboxylic acids for occlusion of K+ ions at equilibrium in renal Na,K-ATPase.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, J M; Pedersen, P A; Karlish, S J; Jorgensen, P L

    1998-02-17

    Site-directed mutagenesis and assay of Rb+ and Tl+ occlusion in recombinant Na,K-ATPase from yeast were combined to establish structure-function relationships of amino acid side chains involved in high-affinity occlusion of K+ in the E2[2K] form. The wild-type yeast enzyme was capable of occluding 2 Rb+ or Tl+ ions/ouabain binding site or alpha 1 beta 1 unit with high apparent affinity (Kd(Tl+) = 7 +/- 2 microM), like the purified Na,K-ATPase from pig kidney. Mutations of Glu327(Gln,Asp), Asp804(Asn, Glu), Asp808(Asn, Glu) and Glu779(Asp) abolished high-affinity occlusion of Rb+ or Tl+ ions. The substitution of Glu779 for Gln reduced the occlusion capacity to 1 Tl+ ion/alpha 1 beta 1-unit with a 3-fold decrease of the apparent affinity for the ion (Kd(Tl+) = 24 +/- 8 microM). These effects on occlusion were closely correlated to effects of the mutations on K0.5(K+) for K+ displacement of ATP binding. Each of the four carboxylate residues Glu327, Glu779, and Asp804 or Asp808 in transmembrane segments 4, 5, and 6 is therefore essential for high-affinity occlusion of K+ in the E2[2K] form. These residues either may engage directly in cation coordination or they may be important for formation or stability of the occlusion cavity.

  17. Intramembrane Water Associated with TOAC Spin-Labeled Alamethicin: Electron Spin-Echo Envelope Modulation by D2O

    PubMed Central

    Bartucci, R.; Guzzi, R.; Sportelli, L.; Marsh, D.

    2009-01-01

    Alamethicin is a 20-residue, hydrophobic, helical peptide, which forms voltage-sensitive ion channels in lipid membranes. The helicogenic, nitroxyl amino acid TOAC was substituted isosterically for Aib at residue positions 1, 8, or 16 in a F50/5 alamethicin analog to enable EPR studies. Electron spin-echo envelope modulation (ESEEM) spectroscopy was used to investigate the water exposure of TOAC-alamethicin introduced into membranes of saturated or unsaturated diacyl phosphatidylcholines that were dispersed in D2O. Echo-detected EPR spectra were used to assess the degree of assembly of the peptide in the membrane, via the instantaneous diffusion from intermolecular spin-spin interactions. The profile of residue exposure to water differs between membranes of saturated and unsaturated lipids. In monounsaturated dioleoyl phosphatidylcholine, D2O-ESEEM intensities decrease from TOAC1 to TOAC8 and TOAC16 but not uniformly. This is consistent with a transmembrane orientation for the protoassembled state, in which TOAC16 is located in the bilayer leaflet opposite to that of TOAC1 and TOAC8. Relative to the monomer in fluid bilayers, assembled alamethicin is disposed asymmetrically about the bilayer midplane. In saturated dimyristoyl phosphatidylcholine, the D2O-ESEEM intensity is greatest for TOAC8, indicating a more superficial location for alamethicin, which correlates with the difference in orientation between gel- and fluid-phase membranes found by conventional EPR of TOAC-alamethicin in aligned phosphatidylcholine bilayers. Increasing alamethicin/lipid ratio in saturated phosphatidylcholine shifts the profile of water exposure toward that with unsaturated lipid, consistent with proposals of a critical concentration for switching between the two different membrane-associated states. PMID:19186137

  18. Voltage-sensor conformation shapes the intra-membrane drug binding site that determines gambierol affinity in Kv channels.

    PubMed

    Kopljar, Ivan; Grottesi, Alessandro; de Block, Tessa; Rainier, Jon D; Tytgat, Jan; Labro, Alain J; Snyders, Dirk J

    2016-08-01

    Marine ladder-shaped polyether toxins are implicated in neurological symptoms of fish-borne food poisonings. The toxin gambierol, produced by the marine dinoflagellate Gambierdiscus toxicus, belongs to the group of ladder-shaped polyether toxins and inhibits Kv3.1 channels with nanomolar affinity through a mechanism of gating modification. Binding determinants for gambierol localize at the lipid-exposed interface of the pore forming S5 and S6 segments, suggesting that gambierol binds outside of the permeation pathway. To explore a possible involvement of the voltage-sensing domain (VSD), we made different chimeric channels between Kv3.1 and Kv2.1, exchanging distinct parts of the gating machinery. Our results showed that neither the electro-mechanical coupling nor the S1-S3a region of the VSD affect gambierol sensitivity. In contrast, the S3b-S4 part of the VSD (paddle motif) decreased gambierol sensitivity in Kv3.1 more than 100-fold. Structure determination by homology modeling indicated that the position of the S3b-S4 paddle and its primary structure defines the shape and∖or the accessibility of the binding site for gambierol, explaining the observed differences in gambierol affinity between the channel chimeras. Furthermore, these findings explain the observed difference in gambierol affinity for the closed and open channel configurations of Kv3.1, opening new possibilities for exploring the VSDs as selectivity determinants in drug design. PMID:26956727

  19. YCRD: Yeast Combinatorial Regulation Database

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Wei-Sheng; Hsieh, Yen-Chen; Lai, Fu-Jou

    2016-01-01

    In eukaryotes, the precise transcriptional control of gene expression is typically achieved through combinatorial regulation using cooperative transcription factors (TFs). Therefore, a database which provides regulatory associations between cooperative TFs and their target genes is helpful for biologists to study the molecular mechanisms of transcriptional regulation of gene expression. Because there is no such kind of databases in the public domain, this prompts us to construct a database, called Yeast Combinatorial Regulation Database (YCRD), which deposits 434,197 regulatory associations between 2535 cooperative TF pairs and 6243 genes. The comprehensive collection of more than 2500 cooperative TF pairs was retrieved from 17 existing algorithms in the literature. The target genes of a cooperative TF pair (e.g. TF1-TF2) are defined as the common target genes of TF1 and TF2, where a TF’s experimentally validated target genes were downloaded from YEASTRACT database. In YCRD, users can (i) search the target genes of a cooperative TF pair of interest, (ii) search the cooperative TF pairs which regulate a gene of interest and (iii) identify important cooperative TF pairs which regulate a given set of genes. We believe that YCRD will be a valuable resource for yeast biologists to study combinatorial regulation of gene expression. YCRD is available at http://cosbi.ee.ncku.edu.tw/YCRD/ or http://cosbi2.ee.ncku.edu.tw/YCRD/. PMID:27392072

  20. YCRD: Yeast Combinatorial Regulation Database.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wei-Sheng; Hsieh, Yen-Chen; Lai, Fu-Jou

    2016-01-01

    In eukaryotes, the precise transcriptional control of gene expression is typically achieved through combinatorial regulation using cooperative transcription factors (TFs). Therefore, a database which provides regulatory associations between cooperative TFs and their target genes is helpful for biologists to study the molecular mechanisms of transcriptional regulation of gene expression. Because there is no such kind of databases in the public domain, this prompts us to construct a database, called Yeast Combinatorial Regulation Database (YCRD), which deposits 434,197 regulatory associations between 2535 cooperative TF pairs and 6243 genes. The comprehensive collection of more than 2500 cooperative TF pairs was retrieved from 17 existing algorithms in the literature. The target genes of a cooperative TF pair (e.g. TF1-TF2) are defined as the common target genes of TF1 and TF2, where a TF's experimentally validated target genes were downloaded from YEASTRACT database. In YCRD, users can (i) search the target genes of a cooperative TF pair of interest, (ii) search the cooperative TF pairs which regulate a gene of interest and (iii) identify important cooperative TF pairs which regulate a given set of genes. We believe that YCRD will be a valuable resource for yeast biologists to study combinatorial regulation of gene expression. YCRD is available at http://cosbi.ee.ncku.edu.tw/YCRD/ or http://cosbi2.ee.ncku.edu.tw/YCRD/. PMID:27392072

  1. 7 CFR 29.29 - Regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Regulations. 29.29 Section 29.29 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... INSPECTION Regulations Definitions § 29.29 Regulations. Rules and regulations of the Secretary under the Act....

  2. 7 CFR 987.48 - Container regulation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Container regulation. 987.48 Section 987.48... IN RIVERSIDE COUNTY, CALIFORNIA Order Regulating Handling Container Regulation § 987.48 Container regulation. Whenever the Committee deems it advisable to establish a container regulation for any variety...

  3. 50 CFR 20.153 - Regulations committee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Regulations committee. 20.153 Section 20... Regulations § 20.153 Regulations committee. (a) Notice of meetings. Notice of each meeting of the Regulations... meeting of the Regulations Committee for which notice is published pursuant to paragraph (a) of...

  4. 50 CFR 20.153 - Regulations committee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Regulations committee. 20.153 Section 20... Regulations § 20.153 Regulations committee. (a) Notice of meetings. Notice of each meeting of the Regulations... meeting of the Regulations Committee for which notice is published pursuant to paragraph (a) of...

  5. 7 CFR 993.49 - Incoming regulation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Incoming regulation. 993.49 Section 993.49 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS... Order Regulating Handling Grade and Size Regulations § 993.49 Incoming regulation. (a) No handler...

  6. 7 CFR 993.50 - Outgoing regulation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Outgoing regulation. 993.50 Section 993.50 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS... Order Regulating Handling Grade and Size Regulations § 993.50 Outgoing regulation. (a) Except...

  7. 50 CFR 20.153 - Regulations committee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Regulations committee. 20.153 Section 20... Regulations § 20.153 Regulations committee. (a) Notice of meetings. Notice of each meeting of the Regulations... meeting of the Regulations Committee for which notice is published pursuant to paragraph (a) of...

  8. 50 CFR 20.153 - Regulations committee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 8 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Regulations committee. 20.153 Section 20... Regulations § 20.153 Regulations committee. (a) Notice of meetings. Notice of each meeting of the Regulations... meeting of the Regulations Committee for which notice is published pursuant to paragraph (a) of...

  9. Precision Adjustable Liquid Regulator (ALR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meinhold, R.; Parker, M.

    2004-10-01

    A passive mechanical regulator has been developed for the control of fuel or oxidizer flow to a 450N class bipropellant engine for use on commercial and interplanetary spacecraft. There are several potential benefits to the propulsion system, depending on mission requirements and spacecraft design. This system design enables more precise control of main engine mixture ratio and inlet pressure, and simplifies the pressurization system by transferring the function of main engine flow rate control from the pressurization/propellant tank assemblies, to a single component, the ALR. This design can also reduce the thermal control requirements on the propellant tanks, avoid costly Qualification testing of biprop engines for missions with more stringent requirements, and reduce the overall propulsion system mass and power usage. In order to realize these benefits, the ALR must meet stringent design requirements. The main advantage of this regulator over other units available in the market is that it can regulate about its nominal set point to within +/-0.85%, and change its regulation set point in flight +/-4% about that nominal point. The set point change is handled actively via a stepper motor driven actuator, which converts rotary into linear motion to affect the spring preload acting on the regulator. Once adjusted to a particular set point, the actuator remains in its final position unpowered, and the regulator passively maintains outlet pressure. The very precise outlet regulation pressure is possible due to new technology developed by Moog, Inc. which reduces typical regulator mechanical hysteresis to near zero. The ALR requirements specified an outlet pressure set point range from 225 to 255 psi, and equivalent water flow rates required were in the 0.17 lb/sec range. The regulation output pressure is maintained at +/-2 psi about the set point from a P (delta or differential pressure) of 20 to over 100 psid. Maximum upstream system pressure was specified at 320 psi

  10. Thyroid hormone regulation of metabolism.

    PubMed

    Mullur, Rashmi; Liu, Yan-Yun; Brent, Gregory A

    2014-04-01

    Thyroid hormone (TH) is required for normal development as well as regulating metabolism in the adult. The thyroid hormone receptor (TR) isoforms, α and β, are differentially expressed in tissues and have distinct roles in TH signaling. Local activation of thyroxine (T4), to the active form, triiodothyronine (T3), by 5'-deiodinase type 2 (D2) is a key mechanism of TH regulation of metabolism. D2 is expressed in the hypothalamus, white fat, brown adipose tissue (BAT), and skeletal muscle and is required for adaptive thermogenesis. The thyroid gland is regulated by thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH) and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH). In addition to TRH/TSH regulation by TH feedback, there is central modulation by nutritional signals, such as leptin, as well as peptides regulating appetite. The nutrient status of the cell provides feedback on TH signaling pathways through epigentic modification of histones. Integration of TH signaling with the adrenergic nervous system occurs peripherally, in liver, white fat, and BAT, but also centrally, in the hypothalamus. TR regulates cholesterol and carbohydrate metabolism through direct actions on gene expression as well as cross-talk with other nuclear receptors, including peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR), liver X receptor (LXR), and bile acid signaling pathways. TH modulates hepatic insulin sensitivity, especially important for the suppression of hepatic gluconeogenesis. The role of TH in regulating metabolic pathways has led to several new therapeutic targets for metabolic disorders. Understanding the mechanisms and interactions of the various TH signaling pathways in metabolism will improve our likelihood of identifying effective and selective targets.

  11. To Regulate or Not to Regulate? Views on Electronic Cigarette Regulations and Beliefs about the Reasons for and against Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Sanders-Jackson, Ashley; Tan, Andy S. L.; Bigman, Cabral A.; Mello, Susan; Niederdeppe, Jeff

    2016-01-01

    Background Policies designed to restrict marketing, access to, and public use of electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) are increasingly under debate in various jurisdictions in the US. Little is known about public perceptions of these policies and factors that predict their support or opposition. Methods Using a sample of US adults from Amazon Mechanical Turk in May 2015, this paper identifies beliefs about the benefits and costs of regulating e-cigarettes and identifies which of these beliefs predict support for e-cigarette restricting policies. Results A higher proportion of respondents agreed with 8 different reasons to regulate e-cigarettes (48.5% to 83.3% agreement) versus 7 reasons not to regulate e-cigarettes (11.5% to 18.9%). The majority of participants agreed with 7 out of 8 reasons for regulation. When all reasons to regulate or not were included in a final multivariable model, beliefs about protecting people from secondhand vapor and protecting youth from trying e-cigarettes significantly predicted stronger support for e-cigarette restricting policies, whereas concern about government intrusion into individual choices was associated with reduced support. Discussion This research identifies key beliefs that may underlie public support or opposition to policies designed to regulate the marketing and use of e-cigarettes. Advocates on both sides of the issue may find this research valuable in developing strategic campaigns related to the issue. Implications Specific beliefs of potential benefits and costs of e-cigarette regulation (protecting youth, preventing exposure to secondhand vapor, and government intrusion into individual choices) may be effectively deployed by policy makers or health advocates in communicating with the public. PMID:27517716

  12. Post regulation circuit with energy storage

    DOEpatents

    Ball, Don G.; Birx, Daniel L.; Cook, Edward G.

    1992-01-01

    A charge regulation circuit provides regulation of an unregulated voltage supply and provides energy storage. The charge regulation circuit according to the present invention provides energy storage without unnecessary dissipation of energy through a resistor as in prior art approaches.

  13. Cosmetic Regulations: A Comparative Study.

    PubMed

    Suhag, Jyoti; Dureja, Harish

    2015-01-01

    The regulatory framework, compliance requirement, efficacy, safety, and marketing of cosmetic products are considered the most important factors for growth of the cosmetic industry. There are different regulatory bodies across the globe that have their own insights for regulation; moreover, governments such as the United States, European Union, and Japan follow a stringent regulatory framework, whereas cosmetics are not so much strictly regulated in countries such as India, Brazil, and China. The alignment of a regulatory framework will play a significant role in the removal of barriers to trade, growth of market at an international level, innovation in the development and presentation of new products, and most importantly safety and efficacy of the marketed products. The present contribution gives insight into the important cosmetic regulations in areas of premarket approval, ingredient control, and labeling and warnings, with a special focus on the cosmetic regulatory environments in the United States, European Union, Japan, and India. Most importantly, the authors highlight the dark side of cosmetics associated with allergic reactions and even skin cancer. The importance of cosmetic regulations has been highlighted by dint of which the society can be healthier, accomplished by more stringent and harmonized regulations. PMID:26380505

  14. Neuronal regulation of tendon homoeostasis.

    PubMed

    Ackermann, Paul W

    2013-08-01

    The regulation of tendon homoeostasis, including adaptation to loading, is still not fully understood. Accumulating data, however, demonstrates that in addition to afferent (sensory) functions, the nervous system, via efferent pathways which are associated with through specific neuronal mediators plays an active role in regulating pain, inflammation and tendon homeostasis. This neuronal regulation of intact-, healing- and tendinopathic tendons has been shown to be mediated by three major groups of molecules including opioid, autonomic and excitatory glutamatergic neuroregulators. In intact healthy tendons the neuromediators are found in the surrounding structures: paratenon, endotenon and epitenon, whereas the proper tendon itself is practically devoid of neurovascular supply. This neuroanatomy reflects that normal tendon homoeostasis is regulated from the tendon surroundings. After injury and during tendon repair, however, there is extensive nerve ingrowth into the tendon proper, followed by a time-dependent emergence of sensory, autonomic and glutamatergic mediators, which amplify and fine-tune inflammation and regulate tendon regeneration. In tendinopathic condition, excessive and protracted presence of sensory and glutamatergic neuromediators has been identified, suggesting involvement in inflammatory, nociceptive and hypertrophic (degenerative) tissue responses. Under experimental and clinical conditions of impaired (e.g. diabetes) as well as excessive (e.g. tendinopathy) neuromediator release, dysfunctional tendon homoeostasis develops resulting in chronic pain and gradual degeneration. Thus there is a prospect that in the future pharmacotherapy and tissue engineering approaches targeting neuronal mediators and their receptors may prove to be effective therapies for painful, degenerative and traumatic tendon disorders.

  15. Progress toward risk informed regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, K.C.

    1997-01-01

    For the last several years, the NRC, with encouragement from the industry, has been moving in the direction of risk informed regulation. This is consistent with the regulatory principle of efficiency, formally adopted by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission in 1991, which requires that regulatory activities be consistent with the degree of risk reduction they achieve. Probabilistic risk analysis has become the tool of choice for selecting the best of several alternatives. Closely related to risk informed regulation is the development of performance based rules. Such rules focus on the end result to be achieved. They do not specify the process, but instead establish the goals to be reached and how the achievement of those goals is to be judged. The inspection and enforcement activity is based on whether or not the goals have been met. The author goes on to offer comments on the history of the development of this process and its probable development in the future. He also addresses some issues which must be resolved or at least acknowledged. The success of risk informed regulation ultimately depends on having sufficiently reliable data to allow quantification of regulatory alternatives in terms of relative risk. Perhaps the area of human reliability and organizational performance has the greatest potential for improvement in reactor safety. The ability to model human performance is significantly less developed that the ability to model mechanical or electrical systems. The move toward risk informed, performance based regulation provides an unusual, perhaps unique, opportunity to establish a more rational, more effective basis for regulation.

  16. How Europe regulates its genes

    SciTech Connect

    Balter, M.

    1991-06-07

    As Europe moves toward unification in 1992, more than two dozen regulations and directives that will affect biotech are working their way through the complex European legislative system. The result could mean tough scrutiny for genetically engineered products. One reason is that the European Community (EC) has chosen to examine genetically engineered products as a special category - an approach the FDA has rejected. Another is that the EC is considering enacting regulations that would mandate consideration of the socioeconomic effects of biotech products in addition to their safety. In addition, some - particularly in industry - fear a nightmare of overlapping and contradictory regulations. It's too soon to tell how well the European system will work, or how stifling the regulations might be. In all likelihood the regulations emerging in Europe won't be demonstrably superior - or inferior - to the American ones, just different, with different strengths and weaknesses. But since many US biotech companies are looking to the huge market that a unified Europe represents, the specifics of those strengths and weaknesses will ultimately be of more than passing interest.

  17. Law and regulation of benzene.

    PubMed Central

    Feitshans, I L

    1989-01-01

    OSHA has created final benzene regulations after extensive rulemakings on two occasions, 1978 and 1987. These standards have been the subject of extensive litigation for nearly 20 years. This article examines in detail the conceptual underpinnings of the Benzene Case, (which was decided by the U.S. Supreme Court in 1980) in light of U.S. administrative law precedents that have set limits upon administrative discretion under the test for "substantial evidence" and the "hard look doctrine." This article also addresses recent developments in the wake of the Benzene Case and their implications for benzene regulations following the "significant risk" doctrine in that case. This article briefly describes other national, regional, and international laws governing the use of benzene. This article concludes that the revisions of the benzene regulation and subsequent rulemaking provide substantial evidence of scientific underpinnings for regulatory action and that laws from other nations reflect an international consensus that occupational exposure to benzene is a proper subject of regulation. Such regulations and policies are therefore likely to withstand scrutiny and remain enforceable as widely accepted norms. PMID:2792048

  18. Cosmetic Regulations: A Comparative Study.

    PubMed

    Suhag, Jyoti; Dureja, Harish

    2015-01-01

    The regulatory framework, compliance requirement, efficacy, safety, and marketing of cosmetic products are considered the most important factors for growth of the cosmetic industry. There are different regulatory bodies across the globe that have their own insights for regulation; moreover, governments such as the United States, European Union, and Japan follow a stringent regulatory framework, whereas cosmetics are not so much strictly regulated in countries such as India, Brazil, and China. The alignment of a regulatory framework will play a significant role in the removal of barriers to trade, growth of market at an international level, innovation in the development and presentation of new products, and most importantly safety and efficacy of the marketed products. The present contribution gives insight into the important cosmetic regulations in areas of premarket approval, ingredient control, and labeling and warnings, with a special focus on the cosmetic regulatory environments in the United States, European Union, Japan, and India. Most importantly, the authors highlight the dark side of cosmetics associated with allergic reactions and even skin cancer. The importance of cosmetic regulations has been highlighted by dint of which the society can be healthier, accomplished by more stringent and harmonized regulations.

  19. Neuronal regulation of tendon homoeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Ackermann, Paul W

    2013-01-01

    The regulation of tendon homoeostasis, including adaptation to loading, is still not fully understood. Accumulating data, however, demonstrates that in addition to afferent (sensory) functions, the nervous system, via efferent pathways which are associated with through specific neuronal mediators plays an active role in regulating pain, inflammation and tendon homeostasis. This neuronal regulation of intact-, healing- and tendinopathic tendons has been shown to be mediated by three major groups of molecules including opioid, autonomic and excitatory glutamatergic neuroregulators. In intact healthy tendons the neuromediators are found in the surrounding structures: paratenon, endotenon and epitenon, whereas the proper tendon itself is practically devoid of neurovascular supply. This neuroanatomy reflects that normal tendon homoeostasis is regulated from the tendon surroundings. After injury and during tendon repair, however, there is extensive nerve ingrowth into the tendon proper, followed by a time-dependent emergence of sensory, autonomic and glutamatergic mediators, which amplify and fine-tune inflammation and regulate tendon regeneration. In tendinopathic condition, excessive and protracted presence of sensory and glutamatergic neuromediators has been identified, suggesting involvement in inflammatory, nociceptive and hypertrophic (degenerative) tissue responses. Under experimental and clinical conditions of impaired (e.g. diabetes) as well as excessive (e.g. tendinopathy) neuromediator release, dysfunctional tendon homoeostasis develops resulting in chronic pain and gradual degeneration. Thus there is a prospect that in the future pharmacotherapy and tissue engineering approaches targeting neuronal mediators and their receptors may prove to be effective therapies for painful, degenerative and traumatic tendon disorders. PMID:23718724

  20. 50 CFR 402.04 - Counterpart regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE); ENDANGERED SPECIES COMMITTEE REGULATIONS SUBCHAPTER A INTERAGENCY COOPERATION-ENDANGERED SPECIES ACT OF 1973, AS AMENDED General § 402.04 Counterpart regulations....

  1. 50 CFR 402.04 - Counterpart regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE); ENDANGERED SPECIES COMMITTEE REGULATIONS SUBCHAPTER A INTERAGENCY COOPERATION-ENDANGERED SPECIES ACT OF 1973, AS AMENDED General § 402.04 Counterpart regulations....

  2. 50 CFR 402.04 - Counterpart regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE); ENDANGERED SPECIES COMMITTEE REGULATIONS SUBCHAPTER A INTERAGENCY COOPERATION-ENDANGERED SPECIES ACT OF 1973, AS AMENDED General § 402.04 Counterpart regulations....

  3. 50 CFR 402.04 - Counterpart regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE); ENDANGERED SPECIES COMMITTEE REGULATIONS SUBCHAPTER A INTERAGENCY COOPERATION-ENDANGERED SPECIES ACT OF 1973, AS AMENDED General § 402.04 Counterpart regulations....

  4. 50 CFR 402.04 - Counterpart regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE); ENDANGERED SPECIES COMMITTEE REGULATIONS SUBCHAPTER A INTERAGENCY COOPERATION-ENDANGERED SPECIES ACT OF 1973, AS AMENDED General § 402.04 Counterpart regulations....

  5. Chloroplast retrograde signal regulates flowering.

    PubMed

    Feng, Peiqiang; Guo, Hailong; Chi, Wei; Chai, Xin; Sun, Xuwu; Xu, Xiumei; Ma, Jinfang; Rochaix, Jean-David; Leister, Dario; Wang, Haiyang; Lu, Congming; Zhang, Lixin

    2016-09-20

    Light is a major environmental factor regulating flowering time, thus ensuring reproductive success of higher plants. In contrast to our detailed understanding of light quality and photoperiod mechanisms involved, the molecular basis underlying high light-promoted flowering remains elusive. Here we show that, in Arabidopsis, a chloroplast-derived signal is critical for high light-regulated flowering mediated by the FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC). We also demonstrate that PTM, a PHD transcription factor involved in chloroplast retrograde signaling, perceives such a signal and mediates transcriptional repression of FLC through recruitment of FVE, a component of the histone deacetylase complex. Thus, our data suggest that chloroplasts function as essential sensors of high light to regulate flowering and adaptive responses by triggering nuclear transcriptional changes at the chromatin level. PMID:27601637

  6. Developmental regulators in Aspergillus fumigatus.

    PubMed

    Park, Hee-Soo; Yu, Jae-Hyuk

    2016-03-01

    The filamentous fungus Aspergillus fumigatus is the most prevalent airborne fungal pathogen causing severe and usually fatal invasive aspergillosis in immunocompromised patients. This fungus produces a large number of small hydrophobic asexual spores called conidia as the primary means of reproduction, cell survival, propagation, and infectivity. The initiation, progression, and completion of asexual development (conidiation) is controlled by various regulators that govern expression of thousands of genes associated with formation of the asexual developmental structure conidiophore, and biogenesis of conidia. In this review, we summarize key regulators that directly or indirectly govern conidiation in this important pathogenic fungus. Better understanding these developmental regulators may provide insights into the improvement in controlling both beneficial and detrimental aspects of various Aspergillus species.

  7. Transcriptional Regulation of Hepatic Lipogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuhui; Viscarra, Jose; Kim, Sun-Joong; Sul, Hei Sook

    2016-01-01

    Fatty acid and fat synthesis in liver is a highly regulated metabolic pathway critical for energy distribution. Having common features at their promoter regions, lipogenic genes are coordinately regulated at the transcription level. Transcription factors, such as USF, SREBP-1c, LXR and ChREBP play critical roles in this process. Recently, insights have been gained into how various signaling pathways regulate these transcription factors. After feeding, high blood glucose and insulin induce lipogenic genes through several pathways, including DNA-PK, aPKC and Akt-mTOR. Various transcription factors and coregulators undergo specific modifications, such as phosphorylation, acetylation, or ubiquitination, which affect their function, stability, or localization. Dysregulation of lipogenesis can contribute to hepatosteatosis, which is associated with obesity and insulin resistance. PMID:26490400

  8. Neuroendocrine regulation of maternal behavior.

    PubMed

    Bridges, Robert S

    2015-01-01

    The expression of maternal behavior in mammals is regulated by the developmental and experiential events over a female's lifetime. In this review the relationships between the endocrine and neural systems that play key roles in these developmental and experiential processes that affect both the establishment and maintenance of maternal care are presented. The involvement of the hormones estrogen, progesterone, and lactogens are discussed in the context of ligand, receptor, and gene activity in rodents and to a lesser extent in higher mammals. The roles of neuroendocrine factors, including oxytocin, vasopressin, classical neurotransmitters, and other neural gene products that regulate aspects of maternal care are set forth, and the interactions of hormones with central nervous system mediators of maternal behavior are discussed. The impact of prior developmental factors, including epigenetic events, and maternal experience on subsequent maternal care are assessed over the course of the female's lifespan. It is proposed that common neuroendocrine mechanisms underlie the regulation of maternal care in mammals.

  9. Girls, aggression, and emotion regulation.

    PubMed

    Conway, Anne M

    2005-04-01

    Many studies have demonstrated that boys are more aggressive than girls (see J. D. Coie & K. Dodge, 1997, for a review) and that emotion regulation difficulties are associated with problematic behaviors (N. Eisenberg & R. A. Fabes, 1999; M. Gilliom, D. S. Shaw, J. E. Beck, M. A. Schonberg, & J. L. Lukon, 2002). However, recent findings indicate that gender differences in aggressive behaviors disappear when assessments are broadened to include relational aggression--behaviors designed to harm the relationship goals of others by spreading rumors, gossiping, and eliciting peer rejection of others. Moreover, although difficulties regulating emotions have been reported for physically aggressive children, little research has examined these processes in relationally aggressive children. This article argues that investigation into the associations between emotion regulation and relational aggression is a critical direction for future research on the etiology and prevention of mental health problems in girls. PMID:15839769

  10. Developmental regulators in Aspergillus fumigatus.

    PubMed

    Park, Hee-Soo; Yu, Jae-Hyuk

    2016-03-01

    The filamentous fungus Aspergillus fumigatus is the most prevalent airborne fungal pathogen causing severe and usually fatal invasive aspergillosis in immunocompromised patients. This fungus produces a large number of small hydrophobic asexual spores called conidia as the primary means of reproduction, cell survival, propagation, and infectivity. The initiation, progression, and completion of asexual development (conidiation) is controlled by various regulators that govern expression of thousands of genes associated with formation of the asexual developmental structure conidiophore, and biogenesis of conidia. In this review, we summarize key regulators that directly or indirectly govern conidiation in this important pathogenic fungus. Better understanding these developmental regulators may provide insights into the improvement in controlling both beneficial and detrimental aspects of various Aspergillus species. PMID:26920882

  11. Phosphoinositide regulation of TRP channels

    PubMed Central

    Rohacs, Tibor

    2015-01-01

    Transient Receptor Potential (TRP) channels are activated by stimuli as diverse as heat, cold, noxious chemicals, mechanical forces, hormones, neurotransmitters, spices, and voltage. Besides their presumably similar general architecture, probably the only common factor regulating them is phosphoinositides. The regulation of TRP channels by phosphoinositides is complex. There is a large number of TRP channels where phosphatidylinositol 4,5 bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2 or PIP2], acts as a positive cofactor, similarly to many other ion channels. In several cases however, PI(4,5)P2 inhibits TRP channel activity, sometimes even concurrently with the activating effect. This review will provide a comprehensive overview of the literature on regulation of TRP channels by membrane phosphoinositides. PMID:24961984

  12. Circadian Regulation of Macronutrient Absorption.

    PubMed

    Hussain, M Mahmood; Pan, Xiaoyue

    2015-12-01

    Various intestinal functions exhibit circadian rhythmicity. Disruptions in these rhythms as in shift workers and transcontinental travelers are associated with intestinal discomfort. Circadian rhythms are controlled at the molecular level by core clock and clock-controlled genes. These clock genes are expressed in intestinal cells, suggesting that they might participate in the circadian regulation of intestinal functions. A major function of the intestine is nutrient absorption. Here, we will review absorption of proteins, carbohydrates, and lipids and circadian regulation of various transporters involved in their absorption. A better understanding of circadian regulation of intestinal absorption might help control several metabolic disorders and attenuate intestinal discomfort associated with disruptions in sleep-wake cycles.

  13. ISOs: The new antitrust regulators?

    SciTech Connect

    Raskin, D.B.

    1998-04-01

    Fear of seller market power in emerging electricity markets has led regulators to sanction use of independent system operators as private market police. A more restrained approach is likely to yield better results without the chilling effects of private regulation. This new industry regulatory paradigm has received little critical attention to date. This is unfortunate because ISO antitrust regulation raises serious legal and policy concerns. The California and New England Power Pool (NEPOOL) plans are quite intrusive. They require the ISO to make difficult distinctions between acceptable and unacceptable market behavior. They create considerable risk that desirable competitive behavior will be chilled and that market participants will incur significant explicit and implicit costs to meet regulatory requirements.

  14. PTEN regulates cilia through Dishevelled

    PubMed Central

    Shnitsar, Iryna; Bashkurov, Mikhail; Masson, Glenn R.; Ogunjimi, Abiodun A.; Mosessian, Sherly; Cabeza, Eduardo Aguiar; Hirsch, Calley L.; Trcka, Daniel; Gish, Gerald; Jiao, Jing; Wu, Hong; Winklbauer, Rudolf; Williams, Roger L.; Pelletier, Laurence; Wrana, Jeffrey L.; Barrios-Rodiles, Miriam

    2015-01-01

    Cilia are hair-like cellular protrusions important in many aspects of eukaryotic biology. For instance, motile cilia enable fluid movement over epithelial surfaces, while primary (sensory) cilia play roles in cellular signalling. The molecular events underlying cilia dynamics, and particularly their disassembly, are not well understood. Phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN) is an extensively studied tumour suppressor, thought to primarily act by antagonizing PI3-kinase signalling. Here we demonstrate that PTEN plays an important role in multicilia formation and cilia disassembly by controlling the phosphorylation of Dishevelled (DVL), another ciliogenesis regulator. DVL is a central component of WNT signalling that plays a role during convergent extension movements, which we show here are also regulated by PTEN. Our studies identify a novel protein substrate for PTEN that couples PTEN to regulation of cilia dynamics and WNT signalling, thus advancing our understanding of potential underlying molecular etiologies of PTEN-related pathologies. PMID:26399523

  15. Cellular regulation by protein phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Edmond H

    2013-01-11

    A historical account of the discovery of reversible protein phosphorylation is presented. This process was uncovered in the mid 1950s in a study undertaken with Edwin G. Krebs to elucidate the complex hormonal regulation of skeletal muscle glycogen phosphorylase. Contrary to the known activation of this enzyme by AMP which serves as an allosteric effector, its hormonal regulation results from a phosphorylation of the protein by phosphorylase kinase following the activation of the latter by Ca(2+) and ATP. The study led to the establishment of the first hormonal cascade of successive enzymatic reactions, kinases acting on kinases, initiated by cAMP discovered by Earl Sutherland. It also showed how two different physiological processes, carbohydrate metabolism and muscle contraction, could be regulated in concert.

  16. Updating the International Health Regulations.

    PubMed

    Tucker, Jonathan B

    2005-01-01

    First adopted in 1951, the International Health Regulations (IHR) provide the international legal framework for efforts to prevent and control the cross-border spread of communicable diseases. In 1995, after outbreaks of emerging infections had rendered the IHR increasingly obsolete, the 192 member states of the World Health Organization (WHO) requested a major updating of the regulations to adapt them to the highly mobile, globalized world of the 21st century. After negotiations in 2004 and 2005, the revised IHR text was adopted unanimously by the World Health Assembly, WHO's highest policymaking body. This article reviews the 2005 regulations and discusses their implications for the international response to natural epidemics and to incidents involving the accidental or deliberate release of biological or chemical agents or radiological materials. PMID:16366843

  17. 75 FR 68217 - Acquisition Regulation: Agency Supplementary Regulations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-05

    ... (65 FR 13735). DOE has examined today's rule and has determined that it does not preempt State law and... Acquisition Regulation (DEAR) on DOE Management and Operating Contracts to make changes to conform to the... does not alter substantive rights or obligations under current law. DATES: Effective Date: December...

  18. 75 FR 32719 - Acquisition Regulation: Agency Supplementary Regulations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-09

    ... ``significant regulatory action'' under Executive Order 12866, ``Regulatory Planning and Review,'' (58 FR 51735... new regulations, section 3(a) of Executive Order 12988, ``Civil Justice Reform,'' 61 FR 4729 (February... 13132 Executive Order 13132, 64 FR 43255 (August 4, 1999), imposes certain requirements on...

  19. Autoimmune regulator, Aire, is a novel regulator of chondrocyte differentiation.

    PubMed

    Si, Yuan; Inoue, Kazuki; Igarashi, Katsuhide; Kanno, Jun; Imai, Yuuki

    2013-08-01

    Chondrocyte differentiation is controlled by various regulators, such as Sox9 and Runx2, but the process is complex. To further understand the precise underlying molecular mechanisms of chondrocyte differentiation, we aimed to identify a novel regulatory factor of chondrocyte differentiation using gene expression profiles of micromass-cultured chondrocytes at different differentiation stages. From the results of microarray analysis, the autoimmune regulator, Aire, was identified as a novel regulator. Aire stable knockdown cells, and primary cultured chondrocytes obtained from Aire(-/-) mice, showed reduced mRNA expression levels of chondrocyte-related genes. Over-expression of Aire induced the early stages of chondrocyte differentiation by facilitating expression of Bmp2. A ChIP assay revealed that Aire was recruited on an Airebinding site (T box) in the Bmp2 promoter region in the early stages of chondrocyte differentiation and histone methylation was modified. These results suggest that Aire can facilitate early chondrocyte differentiation by expression of Bmp2 through altering the histone modification status of the promoter region of Bmp2. Taken together, Aire might play a role as an active regulator of chondrocyte differentiation, which leads to new insights into the regulatory mechanisms of chondrocyte differentiation.

  20. Positively regulated bacterial expression systems

    PubMed Central

    Brautaset, Trygve; Lale, Rahmi; Valla, Svein

    2009-01-01

    Summary Regulated promoters are useful tools for many aspects related to recombinant gene expression in bacteria, including for high‐level expression of heterologous proteins and for expression at physiological levels in metabolic engineering applications. In general, it is common to express the genes of interest from an inducible promoter controlled either by a positive regulator or by a repressor protein. In this review, we discuss established and potentially useful positively regulated bacterial promoter systems, with a particular emphasis on those that are controlled by the AraC‐XylS family of transcriptional activators. The systems function in a wide range of microorganisms, including enterobacteria, soil bacteria, lactic bacteria and streptomycetes. The available systems that have been applied to express heterologous genes are regulated either by sugars (l‐arabinose, l‐rhamnose, xylose and sucrose), substituted benzenes, cyclohexanone‐related compounds, ε‐caprolactam, propionate, thiostrepton, alkanes or peptides. It is of applied interest that some of the inducers require the presence of transport systems, some are more prone than others to become metabolized by the host and some have been applied mainly in one or a limited number of species. Based on bioinformatics analyses, the AraC‐XylS family of regulators contains a large number of different members (currently over 300), but only a small fraction of these, the XylS/Pm, AraC/PBAD, RhaR‐RhaS/rhaBAD, NitR/PnitA and ChnR/Pb regulator/promoter systems, have so far been explored for biotechnological applications. PMID:21261879

  1. Positively regulated bacterial expression systems.

    PubMed

    Brautaset, Trygve; Lale, Rahmi; Valla, Svein

    2009-01-01

    Regulated promoters are useful tools for many aspects related to recombinant gene expression in bacteria, including for high-level expression of heterologous proteins and for expression at physiological levels in metabolic engineering applications. In general, it is common to express the genes of interest from an inducible promoter controlled either by a positive regulator or by a repressor protein. In this review, we discuss established and potentially useful positively regulated bacterial promoter systems, with a particular emphasis on those that are controlled by the AraC-XylS family of transcriptional activators. The systems function in a wide range of microorganisms, including enterobacteria, soil bacteria, lactic bacteria and streptomycetes. The available systems that have been applied to express heterologous genes are regulated either by sugars (L-arabinose, L-rhamnose, xylose and sucrose), substituted benzenes, cyclohexanone-related compounds, ε-caprolactam, propionate, thiostrepton, alkanes or peptides. It is of applied interest that some of the inducers require the presence of transport systems, some are more prone than others to become metabolized by the host and some have been applied mainly in one or a limited number of species. Based on bioinformatics analyses, the AraC-XylS family of regulators contains a large number of different members (currently over 300), but only a small fraction of these, the XylS/Pm, AraC/P(BAD), RhaR-RhaS/rhaBAD, NitR/PnitA and ChnR/Pb regulator/promoter systems, have so far been explored for biotechnological applications.

  2. Medical device regulation for manufacturers.

    PubMed

    McAllister, P; Jeswiet, J

    2003-01-01

    Manufacturers of medical devices are held to a higher standard than manufacturers of many other products due to the potential severity of the consequences of introducing inferior or unsafe products to the market-place. In Canada, the medical device industry is regulated by Health Canada under the Medical Device Regulations of the Food and Drug Act. The Medical Device Regulations define requirements of medical device design, development and manufacture to ensure that products reaching the public are safe and effective. Health Canada also requires that medical device manufacturers maintain distribution records to ensure that devices can be traced to the source and consumers can be contacted successfully in the event that a device is recalled. Medical devices exported from Canada must be compliant with the regulations of the country of import. The Canadian Medical Device Regulations were based on the Medical Device Directives of the European Union thus facilitating approval of Canadian devices for the European market. The United States Food and Drug Administration has separate and distinct requirements for safety and quality of medical devices. While effort has been made to facilitate approval and trade of Canadian medical devices in the United States and the European Union, obtaining approval from multiple regulatory bodies can result in increased device development time and cost. The Global Harmonization Task Force is an organization composed of members from Japanese, Australian, European, Canadian and American medical device regulatory bodies. This organization was formed with the objective of harmonizing medical device regulations in an effort to facilitate international trade and standardize the quality of medical devices available to all countries. This paper discusses the requirements that must be met by manufacturers when designing and manufacturing medical devices.

  3. Regulations against the human nature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elizondo-Garza, Fernando J.

    2001-05-01

    The discussion around the concept of the addiction to noise has evidenced the importance of noise for the human being and explains why in some cases the regulations fail to control the noise in cities. In this presentation the different uses, consciously or unconsciously, of the noise will be analyzed, uses that go from habits to maybe addictions. Also discussed are the implications of establishing regulations against the human nature as well as the importance of education to manage the noise and design acoustically instead of trying to ban the noise in some social circumstances.

  4. The role of food intake regulating peptides in cardiovascular regulation.

    PubMed

    Mikulášková, B; Maletínská, L; Zicha, J; Kuneš, J

    2016-11-15

    Obesity is a risk factor that worsens cardiovascular events leading to higher morbidity and mortality. However, the exact mechanisms of relation between obesity and cardiovascular events are unclear. Nevertheless, it has been demonstrated that pharmacological therapy for obesity has great potential to improve some cardiovascular problems. Therefore, it is important to determine the common mechanisms regulating both food intake and blood pressure. Several hormones produced by peripheral tissues work together with neuropeptides involved in the regulation of both food intake and blood pressure. Anorexigenic (food intake lowering) hormones such as leptin, glucagon-like peptide-1 and cholecystokinin cooperate with α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone, cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated peptide as well as prolactin-releasing peptide. Curiously their collective actions result in increased sympathetic activity, especially in the kidney, which could be one of the factors responsible for the blood pressure increases seen in obesity. On the other hand, orexigenic (food intake enhancing) peptides, especially ghrelin released from the stomach and acting in the brain, cooperates with orexins, neuropeptide Y, melanin-concentrating hormone and galanin, which leads to decreased sympathetic activity and blood pressure. This paradox should be intensively studied in the future. Moreover, it is important to know that the hypothalamus together with the brainstem seem to be major structures in the regulation of food intake and blood pressure. Thus, the above mentioned regions might be essential brain components in the transmission of peripheral signals to the central effects. In this short review, we summarize the current information on cardiovascular effects of food intake regulating peptides. PMID:27450151

  5. The role of food intake regulating peptides in cardiovascular regulation.

    PubMed

    Mikulášková, B; Maletínská, L; Zicha, J; Kuneš, J

    2016-11-15

    Obesity is a risk factor that worsens cardiovascular events leading to higher morbidity and mortality. However, the exact mechanisms of relation between obesity and cardiovascular events are unclear. Nevertheless, it has been demonstrated that pharmacological therapy for obesity has great potential to improve some cardiovascular problems. Therefore, it is important to determine the common mechanisms regulating both food intake and blood pressure. Several hormones produced by peripheral tissues work together with neuropeptides involved in the regulation of both food intake and blood pressure. Anorexigenic (food intake lowering) hormones such as leptin, glucagon-like peptide-1 and cholecystokinin cooperate with α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone, cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated peptide as well as prolactin-releasing peptide. Curiously their collective actions result in increased sympathetic activity, especially in the kidney, which could be one of the factors responsible for the blood pressure increases seen in obesity. On the other hand, orexigenic (food intake enhancing) peptides, especially ghrelin released from the stomach and acting in the brain, cooperates with orexins, neuropeptide Y, melanin-concentrating hormone and galanin, which leads to decreased sympathetic activity and blood pressure. This paradox should be intensively studied in the future. Moreover, it is important to know that the hypothalamus together with the brainstem seem to be major structures in the regulation of food intake and blood pressure. Thus, the above mentioned regions might be essential brain components in the transmission of peripheral signals to the central effects. In this short review, we summarize the current information on cardiovascular effects of food intake regulating peptides.

  6. Hormonal regulation of female reproduction.

    PubMed

    Christensen, A; Bentley, G E; Cabrera, R; Ortega, H H; Perfito, N; Wu, T J; Micevych, P

    2012-07-01

    Reproduction is an event that requires the coordination of peripheral organs with the nervous system to ensure that the internal and external environments are optimal for successful procreation of the species. This is accomplished by the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis that coordinates reproductive behavior with ovulation. The primary signal from the central nervous system is gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH), which modulates the activity of anterior pituitary gonadotropes regulating follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH) release. As ovarian follicles develop they release estradiol, which negatively regulates further release of GnRH and FSH. As estradiol concentrations peak they trigger the surge release of GnRH, which leads to LH release inducing ovulation. Release of GnRH within the central nervous system helps modulate reproductive behaviors providing a node at which control of reproduction is regulated. To address these issues, this review focuses on several critical questions. How is the HPG axis regulated in species with different reproductive strategies? What internal and external conditions modulate the synthesis and release of GnRH? How does GnRH modulate reproductive behavior within the hypothalamus? How does disease shift the activity of the HPG axis?

  7. Student Travel: Policies - Regulations - Exhibits.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trujillo, Lorenzo A.; And Others

    The Jefferson County (Colorado) Public Schools' regulations and policies concerning student travel covers these forms of travel: student activity travel, extended student travel, district sponsored student travel, district authorized student travel, student exchange, and bonus learning trips. Issues and items addressed include: (1) authorization…

  8. Deceptive Business Practices: State Regulations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rohrer, Daniel Morgan

    Although much has been done at the federal level to control deceptive advertising practices, many states have no criminal laws designed to regulate advertising, and several states recently repealed such laws. This paper examines states' efforts to balance the advertiser's freedom of speech with the consumer's need for information about products by…

  9. Regulation of International Information Flows.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maisonrouge, J. G.

    1981-01-01

    Describes the current status of developments concerning the regulation of information flow across national borders. Similarities and trends in various privacy laws from European countries are discussed, as are the business position on data protection and efforts to harmonize national laws. (SW)

  10. The Regulation of Carcinogenic Hazards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gori, Gio Batta

    1980-01-01

    It is suggested that a system of relative standards be formulated which would compare utility of substances to their relative risk as carcinogens. This would define a range of use restrictions. Substances intended for specific uses would then be regulated according to these standards. (Author/RE)

  11. Endolysosomal proteolysis and its regulation.

    PubMed Central

    Pillay, Ché S; Elliott, Edith; Dennison, Clive

    2002-01-01

    The endolysosomal system comprises a unique environment for proteolysis, which is regulated in a manner that apparently does not involve protease inhibitors. The system comprises a series of membrane-bound intracellular compartments, within which endocytosed material and redundant cellular components are hydrolysed. Endocytosed material tends to flow vectorially through the system, proceeding through the early endosome, the endosome carrier vesicle, the late endosome and the lysosome. Phagocytosis and autophagy provide alternative entry points into the system. Late endosomes, lysosome/late endosome hybrid organelles, phagosomes and autophagosomes are the principal sites for proteolysis. In each case, hydrolytic competence is due to components of the endolysosomal system, i.e. proteases, lysosome-associated membrane proteins, H(+)-ATPases and possibly cysteine transporters. The view is emerging that lysosomes are organelles for the storage of hydrolases, perhaps in an inactivated form. Once a substrate has entered a proteolytically competent environment, the rate-limiting proteolytic steps are probably effected by cysteine endoproteinases. As these are affected by pH and possibly redox potential, they may be regulated by the organelle luminal environment. Regulation is probably also affected, among other factors, by organelle fusion reactions, whereby the meeting of enzyme and substrate may be controlled. Such systems would permit simultaneous regulation of a number of unrelated hydrolases. PMID:11964142

  12. Mechanisms of Hsp90 regulation

    PubMed Central

    Prodromou, Chrisostomos

    2016-01-01

    Heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) is a molecular chaperone that is involved in the activation of disparate client proteins. This implicates Hsp90 in diverse biological processes that require a variety of co-ordinated regulatory mechanisms to control its activity. Perhaps the most important regulator is heat shock factor 1 (HSF1), which is primarily responsible for upregulating Hsp90 by binding heat shock elements (HSEs) within Hsp90 promoters. HSF1 is itself subject to a variety of regulatory processes and can directly respond to stress. HSF1 also interacts with a variety of transcriptional factors that help integrate biological signals, which in turn regulate Hsp90 appropriately. Because of the diverse clientele of Hsp90 a whole variety of co-chaperones also regulate its activity and some are directly responsible for delivery of client protein. Consequently, co-chaperones themselves, like Hsp90, are also subject to regulatory mechanisms such as post translational modification. This review, looks at the many different levels by which Hsp90 activity is ultimately regulated. PMID:27515256

  13. Temperature: Human Regulating, Ants Conforming

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clopton, Joe R.

    2007-01-01

    Biological processes speed up as temperature rises. Procedures for demonstrating this with ants traveling on trails, and data gathered by students on the Argentine ant ("Linepithema humile") are presented. The concepts of temperature regulation and conformity are detailed with a focus on the processes rather than on terms that label the organisms.

  14. Wood stove air flow regulating

    SciTech Connect

    Brefka, P.E.

    1983-10-04

    A wood stove has primary and secondary air regulator doors at the bottom and top, respectively, of the stove door each rotating about the axis of a tightening knob in the center of the door opposite a baffle plate that defines with the door inside an air channel open at the top and bottom.

  15. Adrenocortical Activity and Emotion Regulation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stansbury, Kathy; Gunnar, Megan R.

    1994-01-01

    This essay argues that the activity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) system does not appear to be related to emotion regulation processes in children, although individual differences in emotion processes related to negative emotion temperaments appear to be associated with individual differences in HPA reactivity among normally…

  16. Nutritional regulation of epigenetic changes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The "Nutritional Regulation of Epigenetic Changes" Symposium was held in San Diego on April 25 in conjunction with the 2012 Annual Meetings of the American Society of Nutrition. The symposium was co-chaired by Drs. Romagnoo and Ziegler. In his opening remarks, Dr. Zeigler highlighted salient aspec...

  17. 77 FR 14571 - Waste Regulation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-12

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION Waste Regulation AGENCY: National Science Foundation. ACTION: Correction to notice of permit modification request received under the Antarctic Conservation Act of 1978, Public Law 95-541. SUMMARY:...

  18. Regulating Collaboration in Teacher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dobber, Marjolein; Akkerman, Sanne F.; Verloop, Nico; Vermunt, Jan D.

    2014-01-01

    Collaboration in teacher education can be seen as a way to prepare student teachers for future social practices at school. When people collaborate with each other, they have to regulate their collaboration. In the Dutch teacher education programme that was investigated, student teachers were members of different types of groups, each of which had…

  19. Regulated Childhood: Equivalence with Variation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vallberg Roth, Ann-Christine; Mansson, Annika

    2009-01-01

    The overriding aim of this article is to make a contribution to the discussion on individual development plans (IDPs) in Sweden as an expression of a regulated childhood and institutional practice. Individual development plans are seen as a phenomenon linked to the emergence of an auditing society. In sum, children are studied as subjects in…

  20. 27 CFR 25.4 - Related regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS BEER Scope of Regulations § 25.4 Related regulations. Regulations relating to this part are listed below: 27 CFR Part 7—Labeling and Advertising of Malt Beverages. 27 CFR Part 28—Exportation of Alcohol. 27 CFR Part 29—Stills and Miscellaneous Regulations. 31 CFR Part 225—Acceptance...

  1. 27 CFR 25.4 - Related regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL BEER Scope of Regulations § 25.4 Related regulations. Regulations relating to this part are listed below: 27 CFR Part 7—Labeling and Advertising of Malt Beverages. 27 CFR Part 28—Exportation of Alcohol. 27 CFR Part 29—Stills and Miscellaneous Regulations. 31 CFR Part 225—Acceptance...

  2. 27 CFR 25.4 - Related regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS BEER Scope of Regulations § 25.4 Related regulations. Regulations relating to this part are listed below: 27 CFR Part 7—Labeling and Advertising of Malt Beverages. 27 CFR Part 28—Exportation of Alcohol. 27 CFR Part 29—Stills and Miscellaneous Regulations. 31 CFR Part 225—Acceptance...

  3. 27 CFR 25.4 - Related regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL BEER Scope of Regulations § 25.4 Related regulations. Regulations relating to this part are listed below: 27 CFR Part 7—Labeling and Advertising of Malt Beverages. 27 CFR Part 28—Exportation of Alcohol. 27 CFR Part 29—Stills and Miscellaneous Regulations. 31 CFR Part 225—Acceptance...

  4. 18 CFR 415.30 - Regulations generally.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Regulations generally. 415.30 Section 415.30 Conservation of Power and Water Resources DELAWARE RIVER BASIN COMMISSION ADMINISTRATIVE MANUAL BASIN REGULATIONS-FLOOD PLAIN REGULATIONS Standards § 415.30 Regulations generally....

  5. 27 CFR 25.4 - Related regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS BEER Scope of Regulations § 25.4 Related regulations. Regulations relating to this part are listed below: 27 CFR Part 7—Labeling and Advertising of Malt Beverages. 27 CFR Part 28—Exportation of Alcohol. 27 CFR Part 29—Stills and Miscellaneous Regulations. 31 CFR Part 225—Acceptance...

  6. 76 FR 35740 - North Korea Sanctions Regulations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-20

    ... Office of Foreign Assets Control 31 CFR Part 510 North Korea Sanctions Regulations AGENCY: Office of... Foreign Assets Control (``OFAC'') is amending the North Korea Sanctions Regulations to implement Executive... Control published the North Korea Sanctions Regulations, 31 CFR part 510 (the ``Regulations''),...

  7. 31 CFR 316.3 - Governing regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ....3 Governing regulations. (a) The regulations in 31 CFR part 315 apply to definitive Series E bonds that have not been converted to book-entry bonds. (b) The regulations in 31 CFR part 363 apply to... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Governing regulations. 316.3...

  8. 31 CFR 316.3 - Governing regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ....3 Governing regulations. (a) The regulations in 31 CFR part 315 apply to definitive Series E bonds that have not been converted to book-entry bonds. (b) The regulations in 31 CFR part 363 apply to... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Governing regulations. 316.3...

  9. 31 CFR 316.3 - Governing regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ....3 Governing regulations. (a) The regulations in 31 CFR part 315 apply to definitive Series E bonds that have not been converted to book-entry bonds. (b) The regulations in 31 CFR part 363 apply to... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Governing regulations. 316.3...

  10. 31 CFR 316.3 - Governing regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... § 316.3 Governing regulations. (a) The regulations in 31 CFR part 315 apply to definitive Series E bonds that have not been converted to book-entry bonds. (b) The regulations in 31 CFR part 363 apply to... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Governing regulations. 316.3...

  11. 31 CFR 316.3 - Governing regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ....3 Governing regulations. (a) The regulations in 31 CFR part 315 apply to definitive Series E bonds that have not been converted to book-entry bonds. (b) The regulations in 31 CFR part 363 apply to... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Governing regulations. 316.3...

  12. 8 CFR 100.5 - Regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Regulations. 100.5 Section 100.5 Aliens and Nationality DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY IMMIGRATION REGULATIONS STATEMENT OF ORGANIZATION § 100.5 Regulations. The regulations of the Department of Homeland Security, published as chapter I of title 8 of...

  13. 33 CFR 165.13 - General regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false General regulations. 165.13... Areas § 165.13 General regulations. (a) The master of a vessel in a regulated navigation area shall operate the vessel in accordance with the regulations contained in Subpart F. (b) No person may cause...

  14. 50 CFR 216.86 - Local regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 10 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Local regulations. 216.86 Section 216.86..., DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE MARINE MAMMALS REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE TAKING AND IMPORTING OF MARINE MAMMALS Pribilof Islands Administration § 216.86 Local regulations. Local regulations will be published from...

  15. 7 CFR 3.87 - Agency regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Agency regulations. 3.87 Section 3.87 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture DEBT MANAGEMENT Federal Salary Offset § 3.87 Agency regulations. USDA agencies may issue regulations or policies not inconsistent with OPM regulations (5 CFR part...

  16. 25 CFR 275.4 - Implementing regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Implementing regulations. 275.4 Section 275.4 Indians... ACT PROGRAM STAFFING § 275.4 Implementing regulations. Regulations to implement section 105 of the Act will be issued by the Civil Service Commission. The regulations will cover the situations described...

  17. 8 CFR 100.5 - Regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Regulations. 100.5 Section 100.5 Aliens and Nationality DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY IMMIGRATION REGULATIONS STATEMENT OF ORGANIZATION § 100.5 Regulations. The regulations of the Department of Homeland Security, published as chapter I of title 8 of...

  18. 50 CFR 35.3 - General regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false General regulations. 35.3 Section 35.3... regulations. Rules and regulations governing administration of the National Wildlife Refuge System will apply to wilderness units where said rules and regulations do not conflict with provisions of...

  19. 50 CFR 35.14 - Special regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Special regulations. 35.14 Section 35.14... regulations. (a) Special regulations will be issued by the Director for individual wilderness units within the National Wildlife Refuge System as established by Public Law. These special regulations will supplement...

  20. 5 CFR 610.306 - Supplemental regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Supplemental regulations. 610.306 Section 610.306 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS HOURS OF... regulations. Each agency is authorized to issue supplemental regulations not inconsistent with this subpart....

  1. 7 CFR 993.48 - Regulation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Regulation. 993.48 Section 993.48 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS... Order Regulating Handling Prohibition on Handling § 993.48 Regulation. No handler shall handle...

  2. 7 CFR 3.87 - Agency regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Agency regulations. 3.87 Section 3.87 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture DEBT MANAGEMENT Federal Salary Offset § 3.87 Agency regulations. USDA agencies may issue regulations or policies not inconsistent with OPM regulations (5 CFR part...

  3. 5 CFR 610.306 - Supplemental regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Supplemental regulations. 610.306 Section 610.306 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS HOURS OF... regulations. Each agency is authorized to issue supplemental regulations not inconsistent with this subpart....

  4. 15 CFR 922.44 - Emergency regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Emergency regulations. 922.44 Section 922.44 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade (Continued... MANAGEMENT NATIONAL MARINE SANCTUARY PROGRAM REGULATIONS Regulations of General Applicability §...

  5. 5 CFR 610.306 - Supplemental regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Supplemental regulations. 610.306 Section 610.306 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS HOURS OF... regulations. Each agency is authorized to issue supplemental regulations not inconsistent with this subpart....

  6. 28 CFR 42.403 - Agency regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Agency regulations. 42.403 Section 42.403... regulations. (a) Any federal agency subject to title VI which has not issued a regulation implementing title... submit a proposed regulation to the Assistant Attorney General pursuant to paragraph (c) of this...

  7. 7 CFR 987.48 - Container regulation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Container regulation. 987.48 Section 987.48 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING... IN RIVERSIDE COUNTY, CALIFORNIA Order Regulating Handling Container Regulation § 987.48...

  8. 7 CFR 993.48 - Regulation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Regulation. 993.48 Section 993.48 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements... Order Regulating Handling Prohibition on Handling § 993.48 Regulation. No handler shall handle...

  9. 7 CFR 993.48 - Regulation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Regulation. 993.48 Section 993.48 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements... Order Regulating Handling Prohibition on Handling § 993.48 Regulation. No handler shall handle...

  10. 50 CFR 35.3 - General regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 8 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false General regulations. 35.3 Section 35.3... regulations. Rules and regulations governing administration of the National Wildlife Refuge System will apply to wilderness units where said rules and regulations do not conflict with provisions of...

  11. 25 CFR 275.4 - Implementing regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Implementing regulations. 275.4 Section 275.4 Indians... ACT PROGRAM STAFFING § 275.4 Implementing regulations. Regulations to implement section 105 of the Act will be issued by the Civil Service Commission. The regulations will cover the situations described...

  12. 25 CFR 275.4 - Implementing regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true Implementing regulations. 275.4 Section 275.4 Indians... ACT PROGRAM STAFFING § 275.4 Implementing regulations. Regulations to implement section 105 of the Act will be issued by the Civil Service Commission. The regulations will cover the situations described...

  13. 5 CFR 610.306 - Supplemental regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Supplemental regulations. 610.306 Section 610.306 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS HOURS OF... regulations. Each agency is authorized to issue supplemental regulations not inconsistent with this subpart....

  14. 28 CFR 14.11 - Supplementing regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Supplementing regulations. 14.11 Section... ACT § 14.11 Supplementing regulations. Each agency is authorized to issue regulations and establish procedures consistent with the regulations in this part....

  15. 7 CFR 983.51 - Quality regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Quality regulations. 983.51 Section 983.51 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements..., ARIZONA, AND NEW MEXICO Regulations § 983.51 Quality regulations. For any production year, the...

  16. 28 CFR 14.11 - Supplementing regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Supplementing regulations. 14.11 Section... ACT § 14.11 Supplementing regulations. Each agency is authorized to issue regulations and establish procedures consistent with the regulations in this part....

  17. 36 CFR 34.5 - Applicable regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Applicable regulations. 34.5... PORTAL ADMINISTRATIVE SITE REGULATIONS § 34.5 Applicable regulations. The following sections and... incorporated and made a part of this part except as modified by the regulations in this part: (a)...

  18. 33 CFR 165.13 - General regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false General regulations. 165.13... Areas § 165.13 General regulations. (a) The master of a vessel in a regulated navigation area shall operate the vessel in accordance with the regulations contained in Subpart F. (b) No person may cause...

  19. 7 CFR 993.48 - Regulation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Regulation. 993.48 Section 993.48 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS... Order Regulating Handling Prohibition on Handling § 993.48 Regulation. No handler shall handle...

  20. 50 CFR 35.14 - Special regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 8 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Special regulations. 35.14 Section 35.14... regulations. (a) Special regulations will be issued by the Director for individual wilderness units within the National Wildlife Refuge System as established by Public Law. These special regulations will supplement...

  1. 50 CFR 35.3 - General regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false General regulations. 35.3 Section 35.3... regulations. Rules and regulations governing administration of the National Wildlife Refuge System will apply to wilderness units where said rules and regulations do not conflict with provisions of...

  2. 7 CFR 927.316 - Handling regulation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Handling regulation. 927.316 Section 927.316 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing... WASHINGTON Rules and Regulations Assessment Rate § 927.316 Handling regulation. During the period August...

  3. 15 CFR 922.44 - Emergency regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Emergency regulations. 922.44 Section 922.44 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade (Continued... MANAGEMENT NATIONAL MARINE SANCTUARY PROGRAM REGULATIONS Regulations of General Applicability §...

  4. 15 CFR 922.44 - Emergency regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Emergency regulations. 922.44 Section 922.44 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade (Continued... MANAGEMENT NATIONAL MARINE SANCTUARY PROGRAM REGULATIONS Regulations of General Applicability §...

  5. 5 CFR 610.306 - Supplemental regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Supplemental regulations. 610.306 Section 610.306 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS HOURS OF... regulations. Each agency is authorized to issue supplemental regulations not inconsistent with this subpart....

  6. 8 CFR 100.5 - Regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Regulations. 100.5 Section 100.5 Aliens and Nationality DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY IMMIGRATION REGULATIONS STATEMENT OF ORGANIZATION § 100.5 Regulations. The regulations of the Department of Homeland Security, published as chapter I of title 8 of...

  7. 50 CFR 35.14 - Special regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Special regulations. 35.14 Section 35.14... regulations. (a) Special regulations will be issued by the Director for individual wilderness units within the National Wildlife Refuge System as established by Public Law. These special regulations will supplement...

  8. 8 CFR 100.5 - Regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Regulations. 100.5 Section 100.5 Aliens and Nationality DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY IMMIGRATION REGULATIONS STATEMENT OF ORGANIZATION § 100.5 Regulations. The regulations of the Department of Homeland Security, published as chapter I of title 8 of...

  9. 25 CFR 275.4 - Implementing regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Implementing regulations. 275.4 Section 275.4 Indians... ACT PROGRAM STAFFING § 275.4 Implementing regulations. Regulations to implement section 105 of the Act will be issued by the Civil Service Commission. The regulations will cover the situations described...

  10. 15 CFR 922.44 - Emergency regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Emergency regulations. 922.44 Section 922.44 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade (Continued... MANAGEMENT NATIONAL MARINE SANCTUARY PROGRAM REGULATIONS Regulations of General Applicability §...

  11. 7 CFR 983.51 - Quality regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Quality regulations. 983.51 Section 983.51 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS..., ARIZONA, AND NEW MEXICO Regulations § 983.51 Quality regulations. For any production year, the...

  12. 7 CFR 927.316 - Handling regulation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Handling regulation. 927.316 Section 927.316 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING... WASHINGTON Rules and Regulations Assessment Rate § 927.316 Handling regulation. During the period August...

  13. 8 CFR 100.5 - Regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Regulations. 100.5 Section 100.5 Aliens and Nationality DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY IMMIGRATION REGULATIONS STATEMENT OF ORGANIZATION § 100.5 Regulations. The regulations of the Department of Homeland Security, published as chapter I of title 8 of...

  14. 28 CFR 14.11 - Supplementing regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Supplementing regulations. 14.11 Section... ACT § 14.11 Supplementing regulations. Each agency is authorized to issue regulations and establish procedures consistent with the regulations in this part....

  15. 7 CFR 927.316 - Handling regulation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Handling regulation. 927.316 Section 927.316 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING... WASHINGTON Rules and Regulations Assessment Rate § 927.316 Handling regulation. During the period August...

  16. 28 CFR 14.11 - Supplementing regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Supplementing regulations. 14.11 Section... ACT § 14.11 Supplementing regulations. Each agency is authorized to issue regulations and establish procedures consistent with the regulations in this part....

  17. 28 CFR 42.403 - Agency regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Agency regulations. 42.403 Section 42.403... regulations. (a) Any federal agency subject to title VI which has not issued a regulation implementing title... submit a proposed regulation to the Assistant Attorney General pursuant to paragraph (c) of this...

  18. 7 CFR 993.48 - Regulation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Regulation. 993.48 Section 993.48 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements... Order Regulating Handling Prohibition on Handling § 993.48 Regulation. No handler shall handle...

  19. 7 CFR 987.48 - Container regulation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Container regulation. 987.48 Section 987.48 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing... IN RIVERSIDE COUNTY, CALIFORNIA Order Regulating Handling Container Regulation § 987.48...

  20. 7 CFR 3.87 - Agency regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Agency regulations. 3.87 Section 3.87 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture DEBT MANAGEMENT Federal Salary Offset § 3.87 Agency regulations. USDA agencies may issue regulations or policies not inconsistent with OPM regulations (5 CFR part...

  1. 25 CFR 167.2 - General regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true General regulations. 167.2 Section 167.2 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER NAVAJO GRAZING REGULATIONS § 167.2 General regulations. Part 166 of this subchapter authorizes the Commissioner of Indian Affairs to regulate the...

  2. 50 CFR 35.3 - General regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false General regulations. 35.3 Section 35.3... regulations. Rules and regulations governing administration of the National Wildlife Refuge System will apply to wilderness units where said rules and regulations do not conflict with provisions of...

  3. 7 CFR 3.87 - Agency regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Agency regulations. 3.87 Section 3.87 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture DEBT MANAGEMENT Federal Salary Offset § 3.87 Agency regulations. USDA agencies may issue regulations or policies not inconsistent with OPM regulations (5 CFR part...

  4. 36 CFR 34.5 - Applicable regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Applicable regulations. 34.5... PORTAL ADMINISTRATIVE SITE REGULATIONS § 34.5 Applicable regulations. The following sections and... incorporated and made a part of this part except as modified by the regulations in this part: (a)...

  5. 28 CFR 42.403 - Agency regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Agency regulations. 42.403 Section 42.403... regulations. (a) Any federal agency subject to title VI which has not issued a regulation implementing title... submit a proposed regulation to the Assistant Attorney General pursuant to paragraph (c) of this...

  6. 28 CFR 42.403 - Agency regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Agency regulations. 42.403 Section 42.403... regulations. (a) Any federal agency subject to title VI which has not issued a regulation implementing title... submit a proposed regulation to the Assistant Attorney General pursuant to paragraph (c) of this...

  7. 50 CFR 35.14 - Special regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Special regulations. 35.14 Section 35.14... regulations. (a) Special regulations will be issued by the Director for individual wilderness units within the National Wildlife Refuge System as established by Public Law. These special regulations will supplement...

  8. 18 CFR 415.30 - Regulations generally.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Regulations generally. 415.30 Section 415.30 Conservation of Power and Water Resources DELAWARE RIVER BASIN COMMISSION ADMINISTRATIVE MANUAL BASIN REGULATIONS-FLOOD PLAIN REGULATIONS Standards § 415.30 Regulations generally....

  9. Regulation of the fungal secretome.

    PubMed

    McCotter, Sean W; Horianopoulos, Linda C; Kronstad, James W

    2016-08-01

    The ability of countless representatives of the Kingdom Fungi to adapt to and proliferate in diverse environments is facilitated by regulation of their secretomes to respond to changes in environmental conditions and to mediate interactions with other organisms. Secretome changes often fulfill common functions of nutrient acquisition, facilitation of host/symbiont interactions, cell wall modification, and optimization of the enzyme suite to adapt to new environmental resources. In this review, we expand on our recent work on signaling and the secretome in the pathogenic fungus Cryptococcus neoformans to consider a range of selected examples of regulation of fungal secretomes. These examples include the impact of carbon source and aspects of the response to plant and animal hosts. Additionally, the influence of key protein kinases (e.g., Pka1, Snf1) and transcription factors (e.g., Rim101/PacC) is highlighted to illustrate some underlying regulatory factors influencing the secretome. Although there is a wealth of information about fungal secretomes from both experimentation and genome sequence mining, there are also major gaps in our knowledge about the complete composition of fungal secretomes and mechanisms of dynamic change. For example, a more comprehensive understanding of the composition and regulation of the secretome will require consideration of the emerging roles of unconventional secretion and extracellular vesicles in delivering proteins outside the cell. Overall, changes in the secretome are well documented in diverse fungi and the underlying mechanisms are currently under investigation; however, there remain unknown steps in the regulation of secretory pathways and gaps in understanding the regulation of unconventional secretion, which warrant further research. PMID:26879194

  10. Calcium regulation of mitochondrial carriers.

    PubMed

    Del Arco, Araceli; Contreras, Laura; Pardo, Beatriz; Satrustegui, Jorgina

    2016-10-01

    Mitochondrial function is regulated by calcium. In addition to the long known effects of matrix Ca(2+), regulation of metabolite transport by extramitochondrial Ca(2+) represents an alternative Ca(2+)-dependent mechanism to regulate mitochondrial function. The Ca(2+) regulated mitochondrial transporters (CaMCs) are well suited for that role, as they contain long N-terminal extensions harboring EF-hand Ca(2+) binding domains facing the intermembrane space. They fall in two groups, the aspartate/glutamate exchangers, AGCs, major components of the NADH malate aspartate shuttle (MAS) and urea cycle, and the ATP-Mg(2+)/Pi exchangers or short CaMCs (APCs or SCaMCs). The AGCs are activated by relatively low Ca(2+) levels only slightly higher than resting Ca(2+), whereas all SCaMCs studied so far require strong Ca(2+) signals, above micromolar, for activation. In addition, AGCs are not strictly Ca(2+) dependent, being active even in Ca(2+)-free conditions. Thus, AGCs are well suited to respond to small Ca(2+) signals and that do not reach mitochondria. In contrast, ATP-Mg(2+)/Pi carriers are inactive in Ca(2+) free conditions and activation requires Ca(2+) signals that will also activate the calcium uniporter (MCU). By changing the net content of adenine nucleotides of the matrix upon activation, SCaMCs regulate the activity of the permeability transition pore, and the Ca(2+) retention capacity of mitochondria (CRC), two functions synergizing with those of the MCU. The different Ca(2+) activation properties of the two CaMCs are discussed in relation to their newly obtained structures. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Mitochondrial Channels edited by Pierre Sonveaux, Pierre Maechler and Jean-Claude Martinou. PMID:27033520

  11. Essential infrastructure: national nuclear regulation.

    PubMed

    Paperiello, Carl J

    2011-01-01

    In order for nuclear power to expand to many countries that do not currently have it, it will be essential for these countries to have laws, regulations, guidance and organizations that can license or permit nuclear power plants and support nuclear facilities, ensure compliance by inspection, and enforce nuclear regulations. The viability of nuclear power worldwide depends on an extremely high level of safety everywhere, and compliance with a number of international treaties is required before supplier nations will provide the material, both hardware and software, to build and operate nuclear power plants. While infrastructure support can be obtained from the IAEA and other countries, an essential core of expertise must exist in the country seeking to establish domestic nuclear power generation. While some reliance can be placed on the safety reviews of standard reactor designs by the nuclear regulators in supplier nations, the certification of fuel design, the quality of instruments, and the matching of a new reactor to a proposed site in the importing nation will require site-specific reviews. National arrangements are also needed for emergency preparedness, environmental protection, fuel transportation and the storage, transportation and disposal of radioactive waste. If foreign contractors and consultants are engaged to perform much of the technical work for the regulatory body(s) that has to be performed by the importing nation, that nation must have a core cadre of technically knowledgeable regulators and an organization to provide management and oversight of the contractors and consultants. Consistency in national nuclear regulations, the deployment of standardized nuclear power plant designs and standardized supporting material infrastructure can promote the safe and secure worldwide growth in nuclear power.

  12. Essential infrastructure: national nuclear regulation.

    PubMed

    Paperiello, Carl J

    2011-01-01

    In order for nuclear power to expand to many countries that do not currently have it, it will be essential for these countries to have laws, regulations, guidance and organizations that can license or permit nuclear power plants and support nuclear facilities, ensure compliance by inspection, and enforce nuclear regulations. The viability of nuclear power worldwide depends on an extremely high level of safety everywhere, and compliance with a number of international treaties is required before supplier nations will provide the material, both hardware and software, to build and operate nuclear power plants. While infrastructure support can be obtained from the IAEA and other countries, an essential core of expertise must exist in the country seeking to establish domestic nuclear power generation. While some reliance can be placed on the safety reviews of standard reactor designs by the nuclear regulators in supplier nations, the certification of fuel design, the quality of instruments, and the matching of a new reactor to a proposed site in the importing nation will require site-specific reviews. National arrangements are also needed for emergency preparedness, environmental protection, fuel transportation and the storage, transportation and disposal of radioactive waste. If foreign contractors and consultants are engaged to perform much of the technical work for the regulatory body(s) that has to be performed by the importing nation, that nation must have a core cadre of technically knowledgeable regulators and an organization to provide management and oversight of the contractors and consultants. Consistency in national nuclear regulations, the deployment of standardized nuclear power plant designs and standardized supporting material infrastructure can promote the safe and secure worldwide growth in nuclear power. PMID:21399415

  13. Calcium regulation of mitochondrial carriers.

    PubMed

    Del Arco, Araceli; Contreras, Laura; Pardo, Beatriz; Satrustegui, Jorgina

    2016-10-01

    Mitochondrial function is regulated by calcium. In addition to the long known effects of matrix Ca(2+), regulation of metabolite transport by extramitochondrial Ca(2+) represents an alternative Ca(2+)-dependent mechanism to regulate mitochondrial function. The Ca(2+) regulated mitochondrial transporters (CaMCs) are well suited for that role, as they contain long N-terminal extensions harboring EF-hand Ca(2+) binding domains facing the intermembrane space. They fall in two groups, the aspartate/glutamate exchangers, AGCs, major components of the NADH malate aspartate shuttle (MAS) and urea cycle, and the ATP-Mg(2+)/Pi exchangers or short CaMCs (APCs or SCaMCs). The AGCs are activated by relatively low Ca(2+) levels only slightly higher than resting Ca(2+), whereas all SCaMCs studied so far require strong Ca(2+) signals, above micromolar, for activation. In addition, AGCs are not strictly Ca(2+) dependent, being active even in Ca(2+)-free conditions. Thus, AGCs are well suited to respond to small Ca(2+) signals and that do not reach mitochondria. In contrast, ATP-Mg(2+)/Pi carriers are inactive in Ca(2+) free conditions and activation requires Ca(2+) signals that will also activate the calcium uniporter (MCU). By changing the net content of adenine nucleotides of the matrix upon activation, SCaMCs regulate the activity of the permeability transition pore, and the Ca(2+) retention capacity of mitochondria (CRC), two functions synergizing with those of the MCU. The different Ca(2+) activation properties of the two CaMCs are discussed in relation to their newly obtained structures. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Mitochondrial Channels edited by Pierre Sonveaux, Pierre Maechler and Jean-Claude Martinou.

  14. Vasopressin and the Regulation of Aquaporin-2

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Justin L.L.; Miranda, Carlos A.; Knepper, Mark A.

    2013-01-01

    Water excretion is regulated in large part through the regulation of the osmotic water permeability of the renal collecting duct epithelium. The water permeability is controlled by vasopressin through regulation of the water channel, aquaporin-2 (AQP2). Two processes contribute: 1) regulation of AQP2 trafficking to the apical plasma membrane; and 2) regulation of the total amount of the AQP2 protein in the cells. Regulation of AQP2 abundance is defective in several water balance disorders including many polyuric disorders and the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuresis (SIADH). Here we review vasopressin signaling in the renal collecting duct that is relevant to the two modes of water permeability regulation. PMID:23584881

  15. Nongenomic Mechanisms of PTEN Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Fata, Jimmie E.; Debnath, Shawon; Jenkins, Edmund C.; Fournier, Marcia V.

    2012-01-01

    A large amount of data supports the view that PTEN is a bona fide tumor suppressor gene. However, recent evidence suggests that derailment of cellular localization and expression levels of functional nonmutated PTEN is a determining force in inducing abnormal cellular and tissue outcomes. As the cellular mechanisms that regulate normal PTEN enzymatic activity resolve, it is evident that deregulation of these mechanisms can alter cellular processes and tissue architecture and ultimately lead to oncogenic transformation. Here we discuss PTEN ubiquitination, PTEN complex formation with components of the adherens junction, PTEN nuclear localization, and microRNA regulation of PTEN as essential regulatory mechanisms that determine PTEN function independent of gene mutations and epigenetic events. PMID:22536248

  16. Regulation of an Actin Spring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tam, Barney; Shin, Jennifer; Brau, Ricardo; Lang, Matthew; Mahadevan, L.; Matsudaira, Paul

    2006-03-01

    To produce motion, cells rely on the conversion of potential energy into mechanical work. One such example is the dramatic process involving the acrosome reaction of Limulus sperm, whereby a 60 μm-long bundle of actin filaments straightens from a coiled conformation to extend out of the cell in five seconds. This cellular engine and the motion it produces represent a third type of actin-based motility fundamentally different from polymerization or myosin-driven processes. The motive force for this extension originates from stored elastic energy in the overtwisted, pre-formed coil---much like a compressed mechanical spring. When the actin bundle untwists, this energy is converted to mechanical work powering the extension. We report on experiments probing the regulation of this actin spring by extracellular calcium. We find that extracellular calcium needs to be present for the spring to activate, and that calcium regulates the velocity of the extension.

  17. Various Themes of Myosin Regulation.

    PubMed

    Heissler, Sarah M; Sellers, James R

    2016-05-01

    Members of the myosin superfamily are actin-based molecular motors that are indispensable for cellular homeostasis. The vast functional and structural diversity of myosins accounts for the variety and complexity of the underlying allosteric regulatory mechanisms that determine the activation or inhibition of myosin motor activity and enable precise timing and spatial aspects of myosin function at the cellular level. This review focuses on the molecular basis of posttranslational regulation of eukaryotic myosins from different classes across species by allosteric intrinsic and extrinsic effectors. First, we highlight the impact of heavy and light chain phosphorylation. Second, we outline intramolecular regulatory mechanisms such as autoinhibition and subsequent activation. Third, we discuss diverse extramolecular allosteric mechanisms ranging from actin-linked regulatory mechanisms to myosin:cargo interactions. At last, we briefly outline the allosteric regulation of myosins with synthetic compounds.

  18. Cardiac myofilaments: mechanics and regulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    de Tombe, Pieter P.; Bers, D. M. (Principal Investigator)

    2003-01-01

    The mechanical properties of the cardiac myofilament are an important determinant of pump function of the heart. This report is focused on the regulation of myofilament function in cardiac muscle. Calcium ions form the trigger that induces activation of the thin filament which, in turn, allows for cross-bridge formation, ATP hydrolysis, and force development. The structure and protein-protein interactions of the cardiac sarcomere that are responsible for these processes will be reviewed. The molecular mechanism that underlies myofilament activation is incompletely understood. Recent experimental approaches have been employed to unravel the mechanism and regulation of myofilament mechanics and energetics by activator calcium and sarcomere length, as well as contractile protein phosphorylation mediated by protein kinase A. Central to these studies is the question whether such factors impact on muscle function simply by altering thin filament activation state, or whether modulation of cross-bridge cycling also plays a part in the responses of muscle to these stimuli.

  19. Biosimilar regulation in the EU.

    PubMed

    Kurki, Pekka; Ekman, Niklas

    2015-01-01

    In the EU, the EMA has been working with biosimilars since 1998. This experience is crystallized in the extensive set of guidelines, which range from basic principles to details of clinical trials. While the guidance may appear complicated, it has enabled the development of biosimilars, of which 21 have managed to get marketing authorization. Currently marketed biosimilars in the EU have a good track record in safety and traceability. No biosimilars have been withdrawn from the market because of safety concerns. The most controversial issues with biosimilars are immunogenicity and extrapolation of therapeutic indications. The available data for these topics do not raise concerns among EU regulators. Interchangeability and substitution are regulated by individual EU member states. PMID:26294076

  20. Gene regulation by mechanical forces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oluwole, B. O.; Du, W.; Mills, I.; Sumpio, B. E.

    1997-01-01

    Endothelial cells are subjected to various mechanical forces in vivo from the flow of blood across the luminal surface of the blood vessel. The purpose of this review was to examine the data available on how these mechanical forces, in particular cyclic strain, affect the expression and regulation of endothelial cell function. Studies from various investigators using models of cyclic strain in vitro have shown that various vasoactive mediators such as nitric oxide and prostacyclin are induced by the effect of mechanical deformation, and that the expression of these mediators may be regulated at the transcription level by mechanical forces. There also seems to be emerging evidence that endothelial cells may also act as mechanotransducers, whereby the transmission of external forces induces various cytoskeletal changes and second messenger cascades. Furthermore, it seems these forces may act on specific response elements of promoter genes.

  1. Renewable energy and utility regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-04-10

    This report summarizes the results of a joint project on renewable energy of the National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners (NARUC) and the US DOE. NARUC'S Task Force on Renewable Energy conducted a review of the current state of renewable energy technologies to evaluate their potential and extract key policy lessons from experience already gained in deployment of these technologies in numerous states. The main focus of this effort has been to clarify how utility regulators affect the development of renewable energy resources. The goal of the project was twofold: (1) identify the factors that have led to success or failure or renewable energy technologies in various energy markets, and (2) to develop an agenda on renewable energy and utility regulation for NARUC and the DOE. This report consists of three sections: renewable energy contributions, costs and potential; factors affecting development of renewable energy resources; and a renewable energy agenda for NARUC.

  2. Renewable energy and utility regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-04-10

    This report summarizes the results of a joint project on renewable energy of the National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners (NARUC) and the US DOE. NARUC`S Task Force on Renewable Energy conducted a review of the current state of renewable energy technologies to evaluate their potential and extract key policy lessons from experience already gained in deployment of these technologies in numerous states. The main focus of this effort has been to clarify how utility regulators affect the development of renewable energy resources. The goal of the project was twofold: (1) identify the factors that have led to success or failure or renewable energy technologies in various energy markets, and (2) to develop an agenda on renewable energy and utility regulation for NARUC and the DOE. This report consists of three sections: renewable energy contributions, costs and potential; factors affecting development of renewable energy resources; and a renewable energy agenda for NARUC.

  3. Astrocytes: Key Regulators of Neuroinflammation.

    PubMed

    Colombo, Emanuela; Farina, Cinthia

    2016-09-01

    Astrocytes are crucial regulators of innate and adaptive immune responses in the injured central nervous system. Depending on timing and context, astrocyte activity may exacerbate inflammatory reactions and tissue damage, or promote immunosuppression and tissue repair. Recent literature has unveiled key factors and intracellular signaling pathways that govern astrocyte behavior during neuroinflammation. Here we have re-visited in vivo studies on astrocyte signaling in neuroinflammatory models focusing on evidences obtained from the analysis of transgenic mice where distinct genes involved in ligand binding, transcriptional regulation and cell communication have been manipulated in astrocytes. The integration of in vivo observations with in vitro data clarifies precise signaling steps, highlights the crosstalk among pathways and identifies shared effector mechanisms in neuroinflammation.

  4. Genetic Regulation of Prostate Development

    PubMed Central

    Meeks, Joshua; Schaeffer, Edward M

    2011-01-01

    Prostatic development is a dynamic process in which basic mechanisms of epithelial outgrowth and epithelial-mesenchymal interaction are initiated by androgens and androgen receptor signaling. Even in adulthood, the prostate's function remains tightly regulated by androgens--without them, pathologic diseases including hyperplastic and malignant growth which together plague nearly 50% of aging males does not occur. Unraveling the etiology of these pathologic processes is a complex and important goal. In fact, many insights into these processes have come from an intimate understanding of the complex signaling networks that regulate physiologic prostatic growth in development. This review aims to highlight important key molecules such as Nkx3.1, sonic hedgehog and Sox9 as well as key signaling pathways including the Fibroblast growth factor and Wnt pathways. These molecules and pathways are critical for prostate development with both know and postulated roles in prostatic pathology. PMID:20930191

  5. Regulation by light in Fusarium.

    PubMed

    Avalos, Javier; Estrada, Alejandro F

    2010-11-01

    The genus Fusarium stands out as research model for pathogenesis and secondary metabolism. Light stimulates the production of some Fusarium metabolites, such as the carotenoids, and in many species it influences the production of asexual spores and sexual fruiting bodies. As found in other fungi with well-known photoresponses, the Fusarium genomes contain several genes for photoreceptors, among them a set of White Collar (WC) proteins, a cryptochrome, a photolyase, a phytochrome and two presumably photoactive opsins. The mutation of the opsin genes produced no apparent phenotypic alterations, but the loss of the only WC-1 orthologous protein eliminated the photoinduced expression of the photolyase and opsin genes. In contrast to other carotenogenic species, lack of the WC photoreceptor did not impede the light-induced accumulation of carotenoids, but produced alterations in conidiation, animal pathogenicity and nitrogen-regulated secondary metabolism. The regulation and functional role of other Fusarium photoreceptors is currently under investigation.

  6. Regulation of inflammasomes by autophagy.

    PubMed

    Saitoh, Tatsuya; Akira, Shizuo

    2016-07-01

    Inflammasomes detect pathogen-associated molecular patterns to induce inflammatory innate immune responses and play a key role in host defense against infectious agents. However, inflammasomes are often wrongly activated by metabolites, amyloids, and environmental irritants. This induces massive inflammation, causing severe tissue damage, and results in the development of inflammatory diseases. Hence cellular machineries regulating both "activation" and "inactivation" of inflammasomes are definitely important. Recent studies have shown that autophagy, an intracellular degradation system associated with maintenance of cellular homeostasis, plays a key role in inflammasome inactivation. Notably, autophagy deficiency caused by gene mutation disrupts organelle elimination and thus induces aberrant activation of inflammasomes, leading to severe tissue damage. Here we review recent findings regarding the involvement of autophagy in the regulation of inflammasome activation and development of inflammatory disorders. PMID:27373323

  7. Lipid Regulation of Acrosome Exocytosis.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Roy; Mukai, Chinatsu; Travis, Alexander J

    2016-01-01

    Lipids are critical regulators of mammalian sperm function, first helping prevent premature acrosome exocytosis, then enabling sperm to become competent to fertilize at the right place/time through the process of capacitation, and ultimately triggering acrosome exocytosis. Yet because they do not fit neatly into the "DNA--RNA-protein" synthetic pathway, they are understudied and poorly understood. Here, we focus on three lipids or lipid classes-cholesterol, phospholipids, and the ganglioside G(M1)--in context of the modern paradigm of acrosome exocytosis. We describe how these various- species are precisely segregated into membrane macrodomains and microdomains, simultaneously preventing premature exocytosis while acting as foci for organizing regulatory and effector molecules that will enable exocytosis. Although the mechanisms responsible for these domains are poorly defined, there is substantial evidence for their composition and functions. We present diverse ways that lipids and lipid modifications regulate capacitation and acrosome exocytosis, describing in more detail how removal of cholesterol plays a master regulatory role in enabling exocytosis through at least two complementary pathways. First, cholesterol efflux leads to proteolytic activation of phospholipase B, which cleaves both phospholipid tails. The resultant changes in membrane curvature provide a mechanism for the point fusions now known to occur far before a sperm physically interacts with the zona pellucida. Cholesterol efflux also enables G(M1) to regulate the voltage-dependent cation channel, Ca(V)2.3, triggering focal calcium transients required for acrosome exocytosis in response to subsequent whole-cell calcium rises. We close with a model integrating functions for lipids in regulating acrosome exocytosis. PMID:27194352

  8. Frequency regulator for synchronous generators

    DOEpatents

    Karlicek, R.F.

    1982-08-10

    The present invention is directed to a novel frequency regulator which controls a generator output frequency for variations in both the input power to the generator and the power supplied to an uncontrolled external load. The present invention further includes over current and current balance protection devices which are relatively inexpensive to manufacture, which may be encapsulated to provide protection from the operating environment and which respond more quickly than previously known electromechanical devices. 11 figs.

  9. Photomultiplier tube gain regulating system

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, Wayne F.

    1976-01-01

    This invention relates to an improved system for regulating the gain of a photomultiplier tube, and was designed for use with the photomultiplier tubes of a GeMSAEC fast analyzers. It has the following advantages over the prior system: noise is virtually eliminated; sample analysis can begin after 3 to 4 revolutions of the rotor; fluorescent and light scattering solutions can be used as a reference; and the reference solution can be in any cuvette on the rotor.

  10. Frequency regulator for synchronous generators

    DOEpatents

    Karlicek, Robert F.

    1982-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a novel frequency regulator which controls a generator output frequency for variations in both the input power to the generator and the power supplied to an uncontrolled external load. The present invention further includes over current and current balance protection devices which are relatively inexpensive to manufacture, which may be encapsulated to provide protection from the operating environment and which respond more quickly than previously known electromechanical devices.

  11. 9 CFR 83.4 - VHS-regulated fish and VHS-regulated areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false VHS-regulated fish and VHS-regulated... HEMORRHAGIC SEPTICEMIA § 83.4 VHS-regulated fish and VHS-regulated areas. (a)(1) APHIS will list as a VHS-regulated fish any fish species found in freshwater to be susceptible to the North American (type IV)...

  12. 9 CFR 83.4 - VHS-regulated fish and VHS-regulated areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false VHS-regulated fish and VHS-regulated... HEMORRHAGIC SEPTICEMIA § 83.4 VHS-regulated fish and VHS-regulated areas. (a)(1) APHIS will list as a VHS-regulated fish any fish species found in freshwater to be susceptible to the North American (type IV)...

  13. 9 CFR 83.4 - VHS-regulated fish and VHS-regulated areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false VHS-regulated fish and VHS-regulated... HEMORRHAGIC SEPTICEMIA § 83.4 VHS-regulated fish and VHS-regulated areas. (a)(1) APHIS will list as a VHS-regulated fish any fish species found in freshwater to be susceptible to the North American (type IV)...

  14. 9 CFR 83.4 - VHS-regulated fish and VHS-regulated areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false VHS-regulated fish and VHS-regulated... HEMORRHAGIC SEPTICEMIA § 83.4 VHS-regulated fish and VHS-regulated areas. (a)(1) APHIS will list as a VHS-regulated fish any fish species found in freshwater to be susceptible to the North American (type IV)...

  15. Negative regulators of cell proliferation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, T. C.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1994-01-01

    Cell proliferation is governed by the influence of both mitogens and inhibitors. Although cell contact has long been thought to play a fundamental role in cell cycling regulation, and negative regulators have long been suspected to exist, their isolation and purification has been complicated by a variety of technical difficulties. Nevertheless, over recent years an ever-expanding list of putative negative regulators have emerged. In many cases, their biological inhibitory activities are consistent with density-dependent growth inhibition. Most likely their interactions with mitogenic agents, at an intracellular level, are responsible for either mitotic arrest or continued cell cycling. A review of naturally occurring cell growth inhibitors is presented with an emphasis on those factors shown to be residents of the cell surface membrane. Particular attention is focused on a cell surface sialoglycopeptide, isolated from intact bovine cerebral cortex cells, which has been shown to inhibit the proliferation of an unusually wide range of target cells. The glycopeptide arrest cells obtained from diverse species, both fibroblasts and epithelial cells, and a broad variety of transformed cells. Signal transduction events and a limited spectrum of cells that are refractory to the sialoglycopeptide have provided insight into the molecular events mediated by this cell surface inhibitor.

  16. Detecting aquaporin function and regulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madeira, Ana; Moura, Teresa; Soveral, Graça

    2016-02-01

    Water is the major component of cells and tissues throughout all forms of life. Fluxes of water and solutes through cell membranes and epithelia are essential for osmoregulation and energy homeostasis. Aquaporins are membrane channels expressed in almost every organism and involved in the bidirectional transfer of water and small solutes across cell membranes. Aquaporins have important biological roles and have been implicated in several pathophysiological conditions suggesting a great translational potential in aquaporin-based diagnostic and therapeutics. Detecting aquaporin function is critical for assessing regulation and screening for new activity modulators that can prompt the development of efficient medicines. Appropriate methods for functional analysis comprising suitable cell models and techniques to accurately evaluate water and solute membrane permeability are essential to validate aquaporin function and assess short-term regulation. The present review describes established assays commonly used to assess aquaporin function in cells and tissues, as well as the experimental biophysical strategies required to reveal functional regulation and identify modulators, the first step for aquaporin drug discovery.

  17. Epigenetic regulation in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Labbé, Catherine; Lorenzo-Betancor, Oswaldo; Ross, Owen A

    2016-10-01

    Recent efforts have shed new light on the epigenetic mechanisms driving gene expression alterations associated with Parkinson's disease (PD) pathogenesis. Changes in gene expression are a well-established cause of PD, and epigenetic mechanisms likely play a pivotal role in regulation. Studies in families with PD harboring duplications and triplications of the SNCA gene have demonstrated that gene dosage is associated with increased expression of both SNCA mRNA and protein, and correlates with a fulminant disease course. Furthermore, it is postulated that even subtle changes in SNCA expression caused by common variation is associated with disease risk. Of note, genome-wide association studies have identified over 30 loci associated with PD with most signals located in non-coding regions of the genome, thus likely influencing transcript expression levels. In health, epigenetic mechanisms tightly regulate gene expression, turning genes on and off to balance homeostasis and this, in part, explains why two cells with the same DNA sequence will have different RNA expression profiles. Understanding this phenomenon will be crucial to our interpretation of the selective vulnerability observed in neurodegeneration and specifically dopaminergic neurons in the PD brain. In this review, we discuss epigenetic mechanisms, such as DNA methylation and histone modifications, involved in regulating the expression of genes relevant to PD, RNA-based mechanisms, as well as the effect of toxins and potential epigenetic-based treatments for PD.

  18. Blue light regulated shade avoidance.

    PubMed

    Keuskamp, Diederik H; Keller, Mercedes M; Ballaré, Carlos L; Pierik, Ronald

    2012-04-01

    Most plants grow in dense vegetation with the risk of being out-competed by neighboring plants. These neighbors can be detected not only through the depletion in light quantity that they cause, but also through the change in light quality, which plants perceive using specific photoreceptors. Both the reduction of the red:far-red ratio and the depletion of blue light are signals that induce a set of phenotypic traits, such as shoot elongation and leaf hyponasty, which increase the likelihood of light capture in dense plant stands. This set of phenotypic responses are part of the so called shade avoidance syndrome (SAS). This addendum discusses recent findings on the regulation of the SAS of Arabidopsis thaliana upon blue light depletion. Keller et al. and Keuskamp et al. show that the low blue light attenuation induced shade avoidance response of seedling and rosette-stage A. thaliana plants differ in their hormonal regulation. These studies also show there is a regulatory overlap with the R:FR-regulated SAS.

  19. Detecting Aquaporin Function and Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Madeira, Ana; Moura, Teresa F.; Soveral, Graça

    2016-01-01

    Water is the major component of cells and tissues throughout all forms of life. Fluxes of water and solutes through cell membranes and epithelia are essential for osmoregulation and energy homeostasis. Aquaporins are membrane channels expressed in almost every organism and involved in the bidirectional transfer of water and small solutes across cell membranes. Aquaporins have important biological roles and have been implicated in several pathophysiological conditions suggesting a great translational potential in aquaporin-based diagnostics and therapeutics. Detecting aquaporin function is critical for assessing regulation and screening for new activity modulators that can prompt the development of efficient medicines. Appropriate methods for functional analysis comprising suitable cell models and techniques to accurately evaluate water and solute membrane permeability are essential to validate aquaporin function and assess short-term regulation. The present review describes established assays commonly used to assess aquaporin function in cells and tissues, as well as the experimental biophysical strategies required to reveal functional regulation and identify modulators, the first step for aquaporin drug discovery. PMID:26870725

  20. Auricular Acupuncture and Vagal Regulation

    PubMed Central

    He, Wei; Wang, Xiaoyu; Shi, Hong; Shang, Hongyan; Li, Liang; Jing, Xianghong; Zhu, Bing

    2012-01-01

    Auricular acupuncture has been utilized in the treatment of diseases for thousands of years. Dr. Paul Nogier firstly originated the concept of an inverted fetus map on the external ear. In the present study, the relationship between the auricular acupuncture and the vagal regulation has been reviewed. It has been shown that auricular acupuncture plays a role in vagal activity of autonomic functions of cardiovascular, respiratory, and gastrointestinal systems. Mechanism studies suggested that afferent projections from especially the auricular branch of the vagus nerve (ABVN) to the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) form the anatomical basis for the vagal regulation of auricular acupuncture. Therefore, we proposed the “auriculovagal afferent pathway” (AVAP): both the autonomic and the central nervous system could be modified by auricular vagal stimulation via projections from the ABVN to the NTS. Auricular acupuncture is also proposed to prevent neurodegenerative diseases via vagal regulation. There is a controversy on the specificity and the efficacy of auricular acupoints for treating diseases. More clinical RCT trials on auricular acupuncture and experimental studies on the mechanism of auricular acupuncture should be further investigated. PMID:23304215

  1. Regulation of the centrosome cycle

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Hiroki; Yoshino, Yuki; Chiba, Natsuko

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The centrosome, consisting of mother and daughter centrioles surrounded by the pericentriolar matrix (PCM), functions primarily as a microtubule organizing center (MTOC) in most animal cells. In dividing cells the centrosome duplicates once per cell cycle and its number and structure are highly regulated during each cell cycle to organize an effective bipolar spindle in the mitotic phase. Defects in the regulation of centrosome duplication lead to a variety of human diseases, including cancer, through abnormal cell division and inappropriate chromosome segregation. At the end of mitosis the daughter centriole disengages from the mother centriole. This centriole disengagement is an important licensing step for centrosome duplication. In S phase, one new daughter centriole forms perpendicular to each centriole. The centrosome recruits further PCM proteins in the late G2 phase and the two centrosomes separate at mitotic entry to form a bipolar spindle. Here, we summarize research findings in the field of centrosome biology, focusing on the mechanisms of regulation of the centrosome cycle in human cells. PMID:27308597

  2. NRC - regulator of nuclear safety

    SciTech Connect

    1997-05-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) was formed in 1975 to regulate the various commercial and institutional uses of nuclear energy, including nuclear power plants. The agency succeeded the Atomic Energy Commission, which previously had responsibility for both developing and regulating nuclear activities. Federal research and development work for all energy sources, as well as nuclear weapons production, is now conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy. Under its responsibility to protect public health and safety, the NRC has three principal regulatory functions: (1) establish standards and regulations, (2) issue licenses for nuclear facilities and users of nuclear materials, and (3) inspect facilities and users of nuclear materials to ensure compliance with the requirements. These regulatory functions relate to both nuclear power plants and to other uses of nuclear materials - like nuclear medicine programs at hospitals, academic activities at educational institutions, research work, and such industrial applications as gauges and testing equipment. The NRC places a high priority on keeping the public informed of its work. The agency recognizes the interest of citizens in what it does through such activities as maintaining public document rooms across the country and holding public hearings, public meetings in local areas, and discussions with individuals and organizations.

  3. Redox Regulation of Protein Kinases

    PubMed Central

    Truong, Thu H.; Carroll, Kate S.

    2015-01-01

    Protein kinases represent one of the largest families of genes found in eukaryotes. Kinases mediate distinct cellular processes ranging from proliferation, differentiation, survival, and apoptosis. Ligand-mediated activation of receptor kinases can lead to the production of endogenous H2O2 by membrane-bound NADPH oxidases. In turn, H2O2 can be utilized as a secondary messenger in signal transduction pathways. This review presents an overview of the molecular mechanisms involved in redox regulation of protein kinases and its effects on signaling cascades. In the first half, we will focus primarily on receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs), whereas the latter will concentrate on downstream non-receptor kinases involved in relaying stimulant response. Select examples from the literature are used to highlight the functional role of H2O2 regarding kinase activity, as well as the components involved in H2O2 production and regulation during cellular signaling. In addition, studies demonstrating direct modulation of protein kinases by H2O2 through cysteine oxidation will be emphasized. Identification of these redox-sensitive residues may help uncover signaling mechanisms conserved within kinase subfamilies. In some cases, these residues can even be exploited as targets for the development of new therapeutics. Continued efforts in this field will further basic understanding of kinase redox regulation, and delineate the mechanisms involved in physiologic and pathological H2O2 responses. PMID:23639002

  4. Detecting Aquaporin Function and Regulation.

    PubMed

    Madeira, Ana; Moura, Teresa F; Soveral, Graça

    2016-01-01

    Water is the major component of cells and tissues throughout all forms of life. Fluxes of water and solutes through cell membranes and epithelia are essential for osmoregulation and energy homeostasis. Aquaporins are membrane channels expressed in almost every organism and involved in the bidirectional transfer of water and small solutes across cell membranes. Aquaporins have important biological roles and have been implicated in several pathophysiological conditions suggesting a great translational potential in aquaporin-based diagnostics and therapeutics. Detecting aquaporin function is critical for assessing regulation and screening for new activity modulators that can prompt the development of efficient medicines. Appropriate methods for functional analysis comprising suitable cell models and techniques to accurately evaluate water and solute membrane permeability are essential to validate aquaporin function and assess short-term regulation. The present review describes established assays commonly used to assess aquaporin function in cells and tissues, as well as the experimental biophysical strategies required to reveal functional regulation and identify modulators, the first step for aquaporin drug discovery. PMID:26870725

  5. Epigenetic regulation and heart failure.

    PubMed

    Cao, Dian J

    2014-09-01

    Heart failure has become a huge public health problem. The treatment options for heart failure, however, are considerably limited. The significant disparity between the scope of a prominent health problem and the restricted means of therapy propagates heart failure epidemics. Delineating novel mechanisms of heart failure is imperative. Emerging evidence suggests that epigenetic regulation may take part in the pathogenesis of heart failure. Epigenetic regulation involves DNA and histone modifications that lead to changes in DNA-based transcriptional programs without altering the DNA sequence. Although more and more mechanisms are being discovered, the best understood epigenetic modifications are achieved through covalent biochemical reactions including histone acetylation, histone methylation and DNA methylation. Connecting environmental stimuli with genomic programs, epigenetic regulation remains important in maintaining homeostases and the pathogeneses of diseases. This review summarizes the most recent developments regarding individual epigenetic modifications and their implications in the pathogenesis of heart failure. Understanding this strategically important mechanism is potentially the key for developing powerful interventions in the future.

  6. Regulation of the centrosome cycle.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Hiroki; Yoshino, Yuki; Chiba, Natsuko

    2016-03-01

    The centrosome, consisting of mother and daughter centrioles surrounded by the pericentriolar matrix (PCM), functions primarily as a microtubule organizing center (MTOC) in most animal cells. In dividing cells the centrosome duplicates once per cell cycle and its number and structure are highly regulated during each cell cycle to organize an effective bipolar spindle in the mitotic phase. Defects in the regulation of centrosome duplication lead to a variety of human diseases, including cancer, through abnormal cell division and inappropriate chromosome segregation. At the end of mitosis the daughter centriole disengages from the mother centriole. This centriole disengagement is an important licensing step for centrosome duplication. In S phase, one new daughter centriole forms perpendicular to each centriole. The centrosome recruits further PCM proteins in the late G2 phase and the two centrosomes separate at mitotic entry to form a bipolar spindle. Here, we summarize research findings in the field of centrosome biology, focusing on the mechanisms of regulation of the centrosome cycle in human cells. PMID:27308597

  7. Rethinking regulations for disposal criticality

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, M.; Doering, T.

    1997-08-01

    This paper provides the basis for the position that the current U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) criticality regulation is in need of revision to address problems in implementing it for the postclosure period in a geologic high-level waste repository. The authors believe that the applicant for such a facility should be able to demonstrate that postulated postclosure criticality events will not cause unacceptable risk of deleterious effects on public health and safety. In addition, the applicant should be expected to take practical and feasible measures to reduce the probability of a criticality occurring, even if (as expected) the consequences of such a criticality for repository performance and public health and safety would be negligible. This approach, while recognizing the probabilistic nature of analyses of events and conditions in the distant future, is also arguably consistent with the defense in depth concept that has been successfully applied to nuclear reactor regulation. The authors believe regulations for postclosure criticality control should support this dual approach, rather than require a deterministic prohibition of criticality as does the current rule. The existing rule seems appropriate for the preclosure period, as long as it is clearly specified to apply only to that period.

  8. Endocannabinoid Regulation of Neuroendocrine Systems.

    PubMed

    Tasker, Jeffrey G; Chen, Chun; Fisher, Marc O; Fu, Xin; Rainville, Jennifer R; Weiss, Grant L

    2015-01-01

    The hypothalamus is a part of the brain that is critical for sustaining life through its homeostatic control and integrative regulation of the autonomic nervous system and neuroendocrine systems. Neuroendocrine function in mammals is mediated mainly through the control of pituitary hormone secretion by diverse neuroendocrine cell groups in the hypothalamus. Cannabinoid receptors are expressed throughout the hypothalamus, and endocannabinoids have been found to exert pronounced regulatory effects on neuroendocrine function via modulation of the outputs of several neuroendocrine systems. Here, we review the physiological regulation of neuroendocrine function by endocannabinoids, focusing on the role of endocannabinoids in the neuroendocrine regulation of the stress response, food intake, fluid homeostasis, and reproductive function. Cannabis sativa (marijuana) has a long history of recreational and/or medicinal use dating back to ancient times. It was used as an analgesic, anesthetic, and antianxiety herb as early as 2600 B.C. The hedonic, anxiolytic, and mood-elevating properties of cannabis have also been cited in ancient records from different cultures. However, it was not until 1964 that the psychoactive constituent of cannabis, Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol, was isolated and its chemical structure determined (Gaoni & Mechoulam, 1964). PMID:26638767

  9. Self-regulation: the need to succeed

    SciTech Connect

    Sorenson, G.C.

    1985-11-01

    The nuclear industry has long complained that it is over-regulated. Others - including the regulator - are now beginning to accept this complaint and acknowledge that perhaps the industry is over regulated and something should be done to provide relief. It is clear that regulation will not simply go away. The industry is perceived by some as one that cannot be trusted and must be closely regulated or serious health and safety consequences will result. Headlines claiming coverup of design deficiencies, allegations concerning construction problems, cheating on exams, mismanagement, intimidation of QA/QC personnel, etc., do little to dispel these concerns for the layman. This paper looks at two areas that must be considered in attempting to decrease the amount of regulator-imposed activities and increase self-regulation: 1) establish greater trust and confidence in the industry's ability to do a good job and be responsible for self-regulation; and 2) establish industry initiatives to regulate itself.

  10. Future of Radiation Protection Regulations.

    PubMed

    Doss, Mohan

    2016-03-01

    THERE IS considerable disagreement in the scientific community regarding the carcinogenicity of low-dose radiation (LDR), with publications supporting opposing points of view. However, major flaws have been identified in many of the publications claiming increased cancer risk from LDR. The data generally recognized as the most important for assessing radiation effects in humans, the atomic bomb survivor data, are often cited to raise LDR cancer concerns. However, these data no longer support the linear no-threshold (LNT) model after the 2012 update but are consistent with radiation hormesis. Thus, a resolution of the controversy regarding the carcinogenicity of LDR appears to be imminent, with the rejection of the LNT model and acceptance of radiation hormesis. Hence, for setting radiation protection regulations, an alternative approach to the present one based on the LNT model is needed. One approach would be to determine the threshold dose for the carcinogenic effect of radiation from existing data and establish regulations to ensure radiation doses are kept well below the threshold dose. This can be done by setting dose guidelines specifying safe levels of radiation doses, with the requirement that these safe levels, referred to as guidance levels, not be exceeded significantly. Using this approach, a dose guidance level of 10 cGy for acute radiation exposures and 10 cGy y for exposures over extended periods of time are recommended. The concept of keeping doses as low as reasonably achievable, known as ALARA, would no longer be required for low-level radiation exposures not expected to exceed the dose guidance levels significantly. These regulations would facilitate studies using LDR for prevention and treatment of diseases. Results from such studies would be helpful in refining dose guidance levels. The dose guidance levels would be the same for the public and radiation workers to ensure everyone's safety.

  11. [Hunan announces planned parenthood regulations].

    PubMed

    1979-06-26

    The Hunan Provincial Revolutionary Committee has promulgated trial regulations on several questions relating to planned parenthood in order to ensure that population growth corresponds to the development of the national economy and to speed up socialist modernization. The regulations propose that each couple of reproductive age ideally produces only 1 child and not more than 2 children. Couples who marry late and produce only 1 child will be commended and rewarded. The country and muncipal planned parenthood offices will issue a "1 child certificate." Cadres and workers in units under ownership by the whole people or by the collective will receive an annual bonus of 30-40 yuan, and rural peasants will receive an annual bonus of 400 work points. These bonuses will be issued until their child is 14 years old. A single child for whom a certificate has been issued will receive priority in admission to the nursery and kindergarten as well as in hospital treatment. Such a child will also receive priority in personnel recruitment. These couples will receive priority in urban housing, and rural couples will receive private plots and housing areas of a 2 child standard. When retiring because of old age, cadres and workers will receive an extra retirement allowance of 5% for both husband and wife. If a couple has a 2nd child after receiving the rewards and bonuses, the bonuses and bonus work points must be returned along with their 1 child certificate. The regulations point out that every Chinese citizen has the right and duty to practice and publicize planned parenthood and that economic sanctions are to be levied against couples of reproductive age who refuse to practice planned parenthood and produce many children. This also applies to cadres and workers who produce a 3rd child.

  12. Redox Regulation of Plant Development

    PubMed Central

    Considine, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: We provide a conceptual framework for the interactions between the cellular redox signaling hub and the phytohormone signaling network that controls plant growth and development to maximize plant productivity under stress-free situations, while limiting growth and altering development on exposure to stress. Recent Advances: Enhanced cellular oxidation plays a key role in the regulation of plant growth and stress responses. Oxidative signals or cycles of oxidation and reduction are crucial for the alleviation of dormancy and quiescence, activating the cell cycle and triggering genetic and epigenetic control that underpin growth and differentiation responses to changing environmental conditions. Critical Issues: The redox signaling hub interfaces directly with the phytohormone network in the synergistic control of growth and its modulation in response to environmental stress, but a few components have been identified. Accumulating evidence points to a complex interplay of phytohormone and redox controls that operate at multiple levels. For simplicity, we focus here on redox-dependent processes that control root growth and development and bud burst. Future Directions: The multiple roles of reactive oxygen species in the control of plant growth and development have been identified, but increasing emphasis should now be placed on the functions of redox-regulated proteins, along with the central roles of reductants such as NAD(P)H, thioredoxins, glutathione, glutaredoxins, peroxiredoxins, ascorbate, and reduced ferredoxin in the regulation of the genetic and epigenetic factors that modulate the growth and vigor of crop plants, particularly within an agricultural context. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 21, 1305–1326. PMID:24180689

  13. Future of Radiation Protection Regulations.

    PubMed

    Doss, Mohan

    2016-03-01

    THERE IS considerable disagreement in the scientific community regarding the carcinogenicity of low-dose radiation (LDR), with publications supporting opposing points of view. However, major flaws have been identified in many of the publications claiming increased cancer risk from LDR. The data generally recognized as the most important for assessing radiation effects in humans, the atomic bomb survivor data, are often cited to raise LDR cancer concerns. However, these data no longer support the linear no-threshold (LNT) model after the 2012 update but are consistent with radiation hormesis. Thus, a resolution of the controversy regarding the carcinogenicity of LDR appears to be imminent, with the rejection of the LNT model and acceptance of radiation hormesis. Hence, for setting radiation protection regulations, an alternative approach to the present one based on the LNT model is needed. One approach would be to determine the threshold dose for the carcinogenic effect of radiation from existing data and establish regulations to ensure radiation doses are kept well below the threshold dose. This can be done by setting dose guidelines specifying safe levels of radiation doses, with the requirement that these safe levels, referred to as guidance levels, not be exceeded significantly. Using this approach, a dose guidance level of 10 cGy for acute radiation exposures and 10 cGy y for exposures over extended periods of time are recommended. The concept of keeping doses as low as reasonably achievable, known as ALARA, would no longer be required for low-level radiation exposures not expected to exceed the dose guidance levels significantly. These regulations would facilitate studies using LDR for prevention and treatment of diseases. Results from such studies would be helpful in refining dose guidance levels. The dose guidance levels would be the same for the public and radiation workers to ensure everyone's safety. PMID:26808881

  14. Feedback regulation between autophagy and PKA

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Quiroz, Francisco; Filteau, Marie; Landry, Christian R

    2015-01-01

    Protein kinase A (PKA) controls diverse cellular processes and homeostasis in eukaryotic cells. Many processes and substrates of PKA have been described and among them are direct regulators of autophagy. The mechanisms of PKA regulation and how they relate to autophagy remain to be fully understood. We constructed a reporter of PKA activity in yeast to identify genes affecting PKA regulation. The assay systematically measures relative protein-protein interactions between the regulatory and catalytic subunits of the PKA complex in a systematic set of genetic backgrounds. The candidate PKA regulators we identified span multiple processes and molecular functions (autophagy, methionine biosynthesis, TORC signaling, protein acetylation, and DNA repair), which themselves include processes regulated by PKA. These observations suggest the presence of many feedback loops acting through this key regulator. Many of the candidate regulators include genes involved in autophagy, suggesting that not only does PKA regulate autophagy but that autophagy also sends signals back to PKA. PMID:26046386

  15. Feedback regulation between autophagy and PKA.

    PubMed

    Torres-Quiroz, Francisco; Filteau, Marie; Landry, Christian R

    2015-01-01

    Protein kinase A (PKA) controls diverse cellular processes and homeostasis in eukaryotic cells. Many processes and substrates of PKA have been described and among them are direct regulators of autophagy. The mechanisms of PKA regulation and how they relate to autophagy remain to be fully understood. We constructed a reporter of PKA activity in yeast to identify genes affecting PKA regulation. The assay systematically measures relative protein-protein interactions between the regulatory and catalytic subunits of the PKA complex in a systematic set of genetic backgrounds. The candidate PKA regulators we identified span multiple processes and molecular functions (autophagy, methionine biosynthesis, TORC signaling, protein acetylation, and DNA repair), which themselves include processes regulated by PKA. These observations suggest the presence of many feedback loops acting through this key regulator. Many of the candidate regulators include genes involved in autophagy, suggesting that not only does PKA regulate autophagy but that autophagy also sends signals back to PKA.

  16. Penal Institutions, Environmental Health Regulations and Inspections

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sampson, W. W.

    1974-01-01

    The need for better regulations concerning environmental health standards for jails is emphasized. Areas that should be covered by regulations are specified. The form and frequency of inspections, and qualifications of the inspecting personnel, are discussed. (DT)

  17. Regulation of Compound Leaf Development

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuan; Chen, Rujin

    2013-01-01

    Leaf morphology is one of the most variable, yet inheritable, traits in the plant kingdom. How plants develop a variety of forms and shapes is a major biological question. Here, we discuss some recent progress in understanding the development of compound or dissected leaves in model species, such as tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), Cardamine hirsuta and Medicago truncatula, with an emphasis on recent discoveries in legumes. We also discuss progress in gene regulations and hormonal actions in compound leaf development. These studies facilitate our understanding of the underlying regulatory mechanisms and put forward a prospective in compound leaf studies. PMID:27135488

  18. Neurobiology of Circadian Rhythm Regulation.

    PubMed

    Rosenwasser, Alan M; Turek, Fred W

    2015-12-01

    Over the past few decades, multilevel research has elucidated the basic neuroanatomy, neurochemistry, and molecular neurobiology of the master circadian pacemaker located in the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). The circadian timing system is composed of a large number of cellular oscillators located in the SCN, in non-SCN brain structures, and throughout the body. Cellular-level oscillations are generated by a molecular feedback loop in which circadian clock genes rhythmically regulate their own transcription, as well as that of hundreds of clock-controlled genes. The maintenance of proper coordination within this network of cellular- and tissue-level clocks is essential for health and well-being. PMID:26568118

  19. Doing justice to allosteric regulation.

    PubMed

    Keller, Evelyn Fox

    2015-06-01

    Jacques Monod gave us not only our first regulatory system, but also our first smart molecules - i.e., he gave us allosteric proteins. But both of these contributions hung in a certain tension with his primary commitments. In particular, I focus here on the ways in which his ontological commitments constrained his thinking about the power of allostery. Although he wrote that "so far as regulation through allosteric interaction is concerned, everything is possible", for him, not everything was conceivable. In particular, what was not conceivable was a challenge to the primacy of DNA.

  20. Neurobiology of Circadian Rhythm Regulation.

    PubMed

    Rosenwasser, Alan M; Turek, Fred W

    2015-12-01

    Over the past few decades, multilevel research has elucidated the basic neuroanatomy, neurochemistry, and molecular neurobiology of the master circadian pacemaker located in the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). The circadian timing system is composed of a large number of cellular oscillators located in the SCN, in non-SCN brain structures, and throughout the body. Cellular-level oscillations are generated by a molecular feedback loop in which circadian clock genes rhythmically regulate their own transcription, as well as that of hundreds of clock-controlled genes. The maintenance of proper coordination within this network of cellular- and tissue-level clocks is essential for health and well-being.

  1. QB1 - Stochastic Gene Regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Munsky, Brian

    2012-07-23

    Summaries of this presentation are: (1) Stochastic fluctuations or 'noise' is present in the cell - Random motion and competition between reactants, Low copy, quantization of reactants, Upstream processes; (2) Fluctuations may be very important - Cell-to-cell variability, Cell fate decisions (switches), Signal amplification or damping, stochastic resonances; and (3) Some tools are available to mode these - Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations (SSA and variants), Moment approximation methods, Finite State Projection. We will see how modeling these reactions can tell us more about the underlying processes of gene regulation.

  2. Oxygen, homeostasis, and metabolic regulation.

    PubMed

    Hochachka, P W

    2000-01-01

    Even a cursory review of the literature today indicates that two views dominate experimental approaches to metabolic regulation. Model I assumes that cell behavior is quite similar to that expected for a bag of enzymes. Model II assumes that 3-D order and structure constrain metabolite behavior and that metabolic regulation theory has to incorporate structure to ever come close to describing reality. The phosphagen system may be used to illustrate that both approaches lead to very productive experimentation and significant advances are being made within both theoretical frameworks. However, communication between the two approaches or the two 'groups' is essentially nonexistent and in many cases (our own for example) some experiments are done in one framework and some in the other (implying some potential schizophrenia in the field). In our view, the primary paradox and problem which no one has solved so far is that essentially all metabolite concentrations are remarkably stable (are homeostatic) over large changes in pathway fluxes. For muscle cells O2 is one of the most perfectly homeostatic of all even though O2 delivery and metabolic rate usually correlate in a 1:1 fashion. Four explanations for this behavior are given by traditional metabolic regulation models. Additionally, there is some evidence for universal O2 sensors which could help to get us out of the paradox. In contrast, proponents of an ultrastructurally dominated view of the cell assume intracellular perfusion or convection as the main means for accelerating enzyme-substrate encounter and as a way to account for the data which have been most perplexing so far: the striking lack of correlation between changes in pathway reaction rates and changes in concentrations of pathway substrates and intermediates, including oxygen. The polarization illustrated by these two views of living cells extends throughout the metabolic regulation field (and has caused the field to progress along two surprisingly

  3. Returning common sense to regulations

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, M.R.

    1995-10-01

    While these sessions of the November 1995 meeting of the American Nuclear Society are being devoted to the Linear Theory of harm from radiation, it must be realized that the low-level radiation issue, as important as it may be, is but a subset of an entire body of environmental issues running afoul of common sense. Cellular phones, electromagnetic fields, asbestos, dioxin, acid rain, and others especially in their public portrayals, some in their regulatory treatment, are based upon exaggerated or misunderstood risks. One must recognize that what lies ahead is an immense effort to revisit the underlying science of the existing regulations of radiation exposures. New evidence has been published, and most importantly, it is now recognized that many of these regulations--promulgated with the best of intentions--have been extraordinarily harmful to the public. In many cases, the harm has been exaggerated, and has created in the public policy arena the notion that the public is at great risk from the smallest sources of radiation. The national cost of compliance with these regulations has been enormous. To the extent that existing environmental regulations are not being moderated, they pose major economic threats to present and future industries involving nuclear materials and technology. These would include the pharmaceutical industries as well as those seeking U.S. isotope markets in separations, purification, labeling, and manufacturing of new radiopharmaceuticals for cancer therapy, diagnosis, pain mitigation, treatment of arthritis, and other new applications. For those who are not aware of the results of recent advances in radiopharmaceuticals, clinical trials have demonstrated an 80% remission rate in the treatment of b-cell lymphoma and leukemia. New isotopes and new isotope technology promise greater effectiveness in the treatment of cancer and other diseases. The regulatory problems and their enormous costs exist at all stages in nuclear medicine, from the

  4. Regulation of aquaporin-2 trafficking.

    PubMed

    Nedvetsky, Pavel I; Tamma, Grazia; Beulshausen, Sven; Valenti, Giovanna; Rosenthal, Walter; Klussmann, Enno

    2009-01-01

    Principal cells lining renal collecting ducts control the fine-tuning of body water homeostasis by regulating water reabsorption through the water channels aquaporin-2 (AQP2), aquaporin-3 (AQP3), and aquaporin-4 (AQP4). While the localization of AQP2 is subject to regulation by arginine-vasopressin (AVP), AQP3 and AQP4 are constitutively expressed in the basolateral plasma membrane. AVP adjusts the amount of AQP2 in the plasma membrane by triggering its redistribution from intracellular vesicles into the plasma membrane. This permits water entry into the cells and water exit through AQP3 and AQP4. The translocation of AQP2 is initiated by an increase in cAMP following V2R activation through AVP. The AVP-induced rise in cAMP activates protein kinase A (PKA), which in turn phosphorylates AQP2, and thereby triggers the redistribution of AQP2. Several proteins participating in the control of cAMP-dependent AQP2 trafficking have been identified; for example, A kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs) tethering PKA to cellular compartments; phosphodiesterases (PDEs) regulating the local cAMP level; cytoskeletal components such as F-actin and microtubules; small GTPases of the Rho family controlling cytoskeletal dynamics; motor proteins transporting AQP2-bearing vesicles to and from the plasma membrane for exocytic insertion and endocytic retrieval; SNAREs inducing membrane fusions, hsc70, a chaperone, important for endocytic retrieval. In addition, cAMP-independent mechanisms of translocation mainly involving the F-actin cytoskeleton have been uncovered. Defects of AQP2 trafficking cause diseases such as nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI), a disorder characterized by a massive loss of hypoosmotic urine.This review summarizes recent data elucidating molecular mechanisms underlying the trafficking of AQP2. In particular, we focus on proteins involved in the regulation of trafficking, and physiological and pathophysiological stimuli determining the cellular localization of AQP2

  5. Doing justice to allosteric regulation.

    PubMed

    Keller, Evelyn Fox

    2015-06-01

    Jacques Monod gave us not only our first regulatory system, but also our first smart molecules - i.e., he gave us allosteric proteins. But both of these contributions hung in a certain tension with his primary commitments. In particular, I focus here on the ways in which his ontological commitments constrained his thinking about the power of allostery. Although he wrote that "so far as regulation through allosteric interaction is concerned, everything is possible", for him, not everything was conceivable. In particular, what was not conceivable was a challenge to the primacy of DNA. PMID:25908117

  6. Mathematical Models of Gene Regulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackey, Michael C.

    2004-03-01

    This talk will focus on examples of mathematical models for the regulation of repressible operons (e.g. the tryptophan operon), inducible operons (e.g. the lactose operon), and the lysis/lysogeny switch in phage λ. These ``simple" gene regulatory elements can display characteristics experimentally of rapid response to perturbations and bistability, and biologically accurate mathematical models capture these aspects of the dynamics. The models, if realistic, are always nonlinear and contain significant time delays due to transcriptional and translational delays that pose substantial problems for the analysis of the possible ranges of dynamics.

  7. Transglutaminase Regulation of Cell Function

    PubMed Central

    Kaartinen, Mari T.; Nurminskaya, Maria; Belkin, Alexey M.; Colak, Gozde; Johnson, Gail V. W.; Mehta, Kapil

    2014-01-01

    Transglutaminases (TGs) are multifunctional proteins having enzymatic and scaffolding functions that participate in regulation of cell fate in a wide range of cellular systems and are implicated to have roles in development of disease. This review highlights the mechanism of action of these proteins with respect to their structure, impact on cell differentiation and survival, role in cancer development and progression, and function in signal transduction. We also discuss the mechanisms whereby TG level is controlled and how TGs control downstream targets. The studies described herein begin to clarify the physiological roles of TGs in both normal biology and disease states. PMID:24692352

  8. Environmental justice regulations draw fire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    Advocates of “environmental justice” say that proposed U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulations are necessary to ensure that an unfair share of industrial facilities and waste plants are not sited in poor and minority communities, as they claim has occurred in the past.However, a number of state and local government agencies, business groups, and Democratic and Republican politicians argue that EPA guidelines—written to put some teeth into the Title VI clause of the Civil Rights Act that prohibits discrimination in all federally funded programs and activities—are unworkable and need to be overhauled.

  9. Environmental justice regulations draw fire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    Advocates of "environmental justice" say that proposed U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulations are necessary to ensure that an unfair share of industrial facilities and waste plants are not sited in poor and minority communities, as they claim has occurred in the past.However, a number of state and local government agencies, business groups, and Democratic and Republican politicians argue that EPA guidelines—written to put some teeth into the Title VI clause of the Civil Rights Act that prohibits discrimination in all federally funded programs and activities—are unworkable and need to be overhauled.

  10. 21 CFR 868.2700 - Pressure regulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Pressure regulator. 868.2700 Section 868.2700 Food... DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2700 Pressure regulator. (a) Identification. A pressure regulator is a device, often called a pressure-reducing valve, that is intended for...

  11. 21 CFR 868.2700 - Pressure regulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Pressure regulator. 868.2700 Section 868.2700 Food... DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2700 Pressure regulator. (a) Identification. A pressure regulator is a device, often called a pressure-reducing valve, that is intended for...

  12. 21 CFR 868.2700 - Pressure regulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Pressure regulator. 868.2700 Section 868.2700 Food... DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2700 Pressure regulator. (a) Identification. A pressure regulator is a device, often called a pressure-reducing valve, that is intended for...

  13. 21 CFR 868.2700 - Pressure regulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Pressure regulator. 868.2700 Section 868.2700 Food... DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2700 Pressure regulator. (a) Identification. A pressure regulator is a device, often called a pressure-reducing valve, that is intended for...

  14. 21 CFR 868.2700 - Pressure regulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Pressure regulator. 868.2700 Section 868.2700 Food... DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2700 Pressure regulator. (a) Identification. A pressure regulator is a device, often called a pressure-reducing valve, that is intended for...

  15. Becoming an Engaged, Self-Regulated Reader.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horner, Sherri L.; Shwery, Craig S.

    2002-01-01

    Explains how students self-regulate while reading, describing students' personal beliefs of self-efficacy, task value, and motivation and how these beliefs influence their self- regulated reading; discussing the processes of self-regulated reading (goal setting; selection, use, and monitoring of reading strategies; and self-evaluation); and…

  16. Self Regulated Learning of High Achievers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rathod, Ami

    2010-01-01

    The study was conducted on high achievers of Senior Secondary school. Main objectives were to identify the self regulated learners among the high achievers, to find out dominant components and characteristics operative in self regulated learners and to compare self regulated learning of learners with respect to their subject (science and non…

  17. 36 CFR 34.5 - Applicable regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Applicable regulations. 34.5 Section 34.5 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR EL PORTAL ADMINISTRATIVE SITE REGULATIONS § 34.5 Applicable regulations. The following sections and paragraphs of this chapter, as amended from time...

  18. 7 CFR 983.50 - Aflatoxin regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Aflatoxin regulations. 983.50 Section 983.50..., ARIZONA, AND NEW MEXICO Regulations § 983.50 Aflatoxin regulations. The committee shall establish, with the approval of the Secretary, such aflatoxin sampling, analysis, and inspection...

  19. 7 CFR 983.150 - Aflatoxin regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Aflatoxin regulations. 983.150 Section 983.150..., ARIZONA, AND NEW MEXICO Rules and Regulations § 983.150 Aflatoxin regulations. (a) Maximum level. No handler shall ship for domestic human consumption, pistachios that exceed an aflatoxin level of 15...

  20. 7 CFR 983.150 - Aflatoxin regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Aflatoxin regulations. 983.150 Section 983.150..., ARIZONA, AND NEW MEXICO Rules and Regulations § 983.150 Aflatoxin regulations. (a) Maximum level. No handler shall ship for domestic human consumption, pistachios that exceed an aflatoxin level of 15...

  1. 7 CFR 983.50 - Aflatoxin regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Aflatoxin regulations. 983.50 Section 983.50..., ARIZONA, AND NEW MEXICO Regulations § 983.50 Aflatoxin regulations. The committee shall establish, with the approval of the Secretary, such aflatoxin sampling, analysis, and inspection...

  2. 7 CFR 983.50 - Aflatoxin regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Aflatoxin regulations. 983.50 Section 983.50..., ARIZONA, AND NEW MEXICO Regulations § 983.50 Aflatoxin regulations. The committee shall establish, with the approval of the Secretary, such aflatoxin sampling, analysis, and inspection...

  3. 7 CFR 983.150 - Aflatoxin regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Aflatoxin regulations. 983.150 Section 983.150..., ARIZONA, AND NEW MEXICO Rules and Regulations § 983.150 Aflatoxin regulations. (a) Maximum level. No handler shall ship for domestic human consumption, pistachios that exceed an aflatoxin level of 15...

  4. 7 CFR 983.150 - Aflatoxin regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Aflatoxin regulations. 983.150 Section 983.150..., ARIZONA, AND NEW MEXICO Rules and Regulations § 983.150 Aflatoxin regulations. (a) Maximum level. No handler shall ship for domestic human consumption, pistachios that exceed an aflatoxin level of 15...

  5. 7 CFR 983.50 - Aflatoxin regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Aflatoxin regulations. 983.50 Section 983.50..., ARIZONA, AND NEW MEXICO Regulations § 983.50 Aflatoxin regulations. The committee shall establish, with the approval of the Secretary, such aflatoxin sampling, analysis, and inspection...

  6. Bureaucrats and Brainpower: Government Regulation of Universities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seabury, Paul, Ed.

    The exploration of the growth and cost benefit effectiveness of governmental regulation of higher education is examined in this book. An introductory article by Robert Hatfield examines university regulation from a businessman's perspective. Hatfield concludes that business and higher education must work together to curb the stream of regulation.…

  7. 7 CFR 983.51 - Quality regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Quality regulations. 983.51 Section 983.51 Agriculture..., ARIZONA, AND NEW MEXICO Regulations § 983.51 Quality regulations. For any production year, the committee may establish, with the approval of the Secretary, such quality and inspection requirements...

  8. International Radio Regulations Resulting from WARC 1979.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berrada, Abderrazak

    The main features of international regulations on radio communications of the International Telecommunication Union are summarized and the possible effects on these regulations of the World Administrative Radio Conference of 1979 (WARC-79) are discussed in this paper. It is noted that while the international radio regulations are regarded as…

  9. 43 CFR 424.1 - Regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... applicable Federal, state and local laws, rules and regulations pertaining to water quality standards and... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Regulations. 424.1 Section 424.1 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands BUREAU OF RECLAMATION, DEPARTMENT OF THE...

  10. 43 CFR 424.1 - Regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... applicable Federal, state and local laws, rules and regulations pertaining to water quality standards and... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Regulations. 424.1 Section 424.1 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands BUREAU OF RECLAMATION, DEPARTMENT OF THE...

  11. 43 CFR 424.1 - Regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... applicable Federal, state and local laws, rules and regulations pertaining to water quality standards and... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Regulations. 424.1 Section 424.1 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands BUREAU OF RECLAMATION, DEPARTMENT OF THE...

  12. 43 CFR 424.1 - Regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... applicable Federal, state and local laws, rules and regulations pertaining to water quality standards and... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2012-10-01 2011-10-01 true Regulations. 424.1 Section 424.1 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands BUREAU OF RECLAMATION, DEPARTMENT OF THE...

  13. 15 CFR 922.185 - Emergency regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Emergency regulations. 922.185 Section... Sanctuary § 922.185 Emergency regulations. Where necessary to prevent or minimize the destruction of, loss... relevant Federal agency and the Governor of the State of Hawaii. Emergency regulations shall not...

  14. 15 CFR 922.165 - Emergency regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Emergency regulations. 922.165 Section... Emergency regulations. Where necessary to prevent or minimize the destruction of, loss of, or injury to a... all activities are subject to immediate temporary regulation, including prohibition....

  15. 15 CFR 922.44 - Emergency regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Emergency regulations. 922.44 Section... Emergency regulations. Where necessary to prevent or minimize the destruction of, loss of, or injury to a..., respectively, for the authority to issue emergency regulations with respect to those sanctuaries....

  16. 50 CFR 229.9 - Emergency regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Emergency regulations. 229.9 Section 229.9... PROTECTION ACT OF 1972 General Provisions § 229.9 Emergency regulations. (a) If the Assistant Administrator... effect— (i) Prescribe emergency regulations that, consistent with such plan to the maximum...

  17. 78 FR 2319 - Relocation of Regulations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-11

    ...The Federal Housing Finance Agency (FHFA) is relocating six Federal Housing Finance Board (Finance Board) regulations to new locations within the FHFA chapter of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR). The regulations relate to: Community Investment Cash Advance Programs (CICA); Federal Home Loan Bank (Bank) collection, settlement, and processing of payment instruments; miscellaneous Bank......

  18. Regulation of Motivation: Contextual and Social Aspects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolters, Christopher A.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Models of self-regulated learning have been used extensively as a way of understanding how students understand, monitor, and manage their own academic functioning. The regulation of motivation is a facet of self-regulated learning that describes students' efforts to control their own motivation or motivational processing. The…

  19. 25 CFR 167.2 - General regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false General regulations. 167.2 Section 167.2 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER NAVAJO GRAZING REGULATIONS § 167.2 General regulations. Part 166 of this subchapter authorizes the Commissioner of Indian Affairs to...

  20. 31 CFR 332.3 - Governing regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., H, J and K, contained in 31 CFR part 315, also published as Department of the Treasury Circular No... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Governing regulations. 332.3 Section....3 Governing regulations. Series H bonds are subject to the regulations of the Department of...

  1. 31 CFR 342.8 - Governing regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Governing regulations. Savings notes are subject to the regulations of the Department of the Treasury, now or hereafter prescribed, governing United States Savings Bonds, contained in 31 CFR part 315, also... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Governing regulations. 342.8...

  2. 31 CFR 332.3 - Governing regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., H, J and K, contained in 31 CFR part 315, also published as Department of the Treasury Circular No... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Governing regulations. 332.3 Section... § 332.3 Governing regulations. Series H bonds are subject to the regulations of the Department of...

  3. 31 CFR 342.8 - Governing regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Governing regulations. Savings notes are subject to the regulations of the Department of the Treasury, now or hereafter prescribed, governing United States Savings Bonds, contained in 31 CFR part 315, also... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Governing regulations. 342.8...

  4. 31 CFR 352.1 - Governing regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... in Department of the Treasury Circular, Public Debt Series No. 3-80, as amended (31 CFR part 353... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Governing regulations. 352.1 Section....1 Governing regulations. Series HH bonds are subject to the regulations of the Department of...

  5. 31 CFR 352.1 - Governing regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... in Department of the Treasury Circular, Public Debt Series No. 3-80, as amended (31 CFR part 353... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Governing regulations. 352.1 Section....1 Governing regulations. Series HH bonds are subject to the regulations of the Department of...

  6. 31 CFR 352.1 - Governing regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... in Department of the Treasury Circular, Public Debt Series No. 3-80, as amended (31 CFR part 353... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Governing regulations. 352.1 Section....1 Governing regulations. Series HH bonds are subject to the regulations of the Department of...

  7. 31 CFR 339.5 - Governing regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Governing regulations. 339.5 Section 339.5 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) FISCAL SERVICE... H § 339.5 Governing regulations. All Series H bonds issued under this circular are subject to...

  8. 31 CFR 342.8 - Governing regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Governing regulations. Savings notes are subject to the regulations of the Department of the Treasury, now or hereafter prescribed, governing United States Savings Bonds, contained in 31 CFR part 315, also... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Governing regulations. 342.8...

  9. 31 CFR 339.5 - Governing regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Governing regulations. 339.5 Section 339.5 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) FISCAL SERVICE... H § 339.5 Governing regulations. All Series H bonds issued under this circular are subject to...

  10. 31 CFR 352.1 - Governing regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... in Department of the Treasury Circular, Public Debt Series No. 3-80, as amended (31 CFR part 353... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Governing regulations. 352.1 Section....1 Governing regulations. Series HH bonds are subject to the regulations of the Department of...

  11. 31 CFR 332.3 - Governing regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., H, J and K, contained in 31 CFR part 315, also published as Department of the Treasury Circular No... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Governing regulations. 332.3 Section....3 Governing regulations. Series H bonds are subject to the regulations of the Department of...

  12. 31 CFR 342.8 - Governing regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Governing regulations. Savings notes are subject to the regulations of the Department of the Treasury, now or hereafter prescribed, governing United States Savings Bonds, contained in 31 CFR part 315, also... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Governing regulations. 342.8...

  13. 31 CFR 339.5 - Governing regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Governing regulations. 339.5 Section 339.5 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) FISCAL SERVICE..., SERIES H § 339.5 Governing regulations. All Series H bonds issued under this circular are subject to...

  14. 31 CFR 332.3 - Governing regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., H, J and K, contained in 31 CFR part 315, also published as Department of the Treasury Circular No... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Governing regulations. 332.3 Section....3 Governing regulations. Series H bonds are subject to the regulations of the Department of...

  15. 31 CFR 352.1 - Governing regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... in Department of the Treasury Circular, Fiscal Service Series No. 3-80, as amended (31 CFR part 353... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Governing regulations. 352.1 Section... § 352.1 Governing regulations. Series HH bonds are subject to the regulations of the Department of...

  16. 31 CFR 339.5 - Governing regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Governing regulations. 339.5 Section 339.5 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) FISCAL SERVICE... H § 339.5 Governing regulations. All Series H bonds issued under this circular are subject to...

  17. 31 CFR 339.5 - Governing regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Governing regulations. 339.5 Section 339.5 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) FISCAL SERVICE... H § 339.5 Governing regulations. All Series H bonds issued under this circular are subject to...

  18. 31 CFR 342.8 - Governing regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Governing regulations. Savings notes are subject to the regulations of the Department of the Treasury, now or hereafter prescribed, governing United States Savings Bonds, contained in 31 CFR part 315, also... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Governing regulations. 342.8...

  19. 31 CFR 332.3 - Governing regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., H, J and K, contained in 31 CFR part 315, also published as Department of the Treasury Circular No... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Governing regulations. 332.3 Section....3 Governing regulations. Series H bonds are subject to the regulations of the Department of...

  20. Emotion Regulation and Depressive Symptoms in Preadolescence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siener, Shannon; Kerns, Kathryn A.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined associations among several measures of emotion regulation, and their links to depressive symptoms, in a sample of children ages 10-12 years old (N = 87). Both temporal features of emotion regulation and regulation processes involved in the evaluation, monitoring, and modification of emotion were assessed through parent and…

  1. 34 CFR 300.716 - Applicable regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2011-07-01 2010-07-01 true Applicable regulations. 300.716 Section 300.716 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION... Secretary of the Interior § 300.716 Applicable regulations. The Secretary of the Interior must comply...

  2. 50 CFR 216.105 - Specific regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Specific regulations. 216.105 Section 216... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE MARINE MAMMALS REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE TAKING AND IMPORTING OF MARINE MAMMALS General Regulations Governing Small Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified...

  3. 50 CFR 216.105 - Specific regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 10 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Specific regulations. 216.105 Section 216... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE MARINE MAMMALS REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE TAKING AND IMPORTING OF MARINE MAMMALS General Regulations Governing Small Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified...

  4. 28 CFR 0.128b - Regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... the United States are published in 45 CFR chapter V. ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Regulations. 0.128b Section 0.128b... Settlement Commission § 0.128b Regulations. All rules of practice and regulations applicable to...

  5. 50 CFR 216.105 - Specific regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 10 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Specific regulations. 216.105 Section 216... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE MARINE MAMMALS REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE TAKING AND IMPORTING OF MARINE MAMMALS General Regulations Governing Small Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified...

  6. 46 CFR 310.67 - Academy regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Academy regulations. 310.67 Section 310.67 Shipping... Training of Midshipmen at the United States Merchant Marine Academy § 310.67 Academy regulations. The Superintendent of the Academy is delegated authority to issue all regulations necessary for the accomplishment...

  7. 33 CFR 165.33 - General regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false General regulations. 165.33 Section 165.33 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED... General regulations. Unless otherwise provided in the special regulations in Subpart F of this part:...

  8. 27 CFR 20.3 - Related regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... regulations. Regulations related to this part are listed below: 16 CFR Chapter I—Federal Trade Commission. 16 CFR Chapter II—Consumer Product Safety Commission. 21 CFR Chapter I—Food and Drug Administration... Regulations. 27 CFR Part 71—Rules of Practice in Permit Proceedings....

  9. 28 CFR 0.128b - Regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... the United States are published in 45 CFR chapter V. ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Regulations. 0.128b Section 0.128b... Settlement Commission § 0.128b Regulations. All rules of practice and regulations applicable to...

  10. 34 CFR 361.4 - Applicable regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Administrative Regulations (EDGAR) as follows: (1) 34 CFR part 74 (Administration of Grants and Agreements with...-Administered Programs). (3) 34 CFR part 77 (Definitions that Apply to Department Regulations). (4) 34 CFR part... Alcohol Abuse Prevention). (b) The regulations in this part 361. (c) 20 CFR part 662 (Description of...

  11. 15 CFR 2.7 - Supplementary regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Supplementary regulations. 2.7 Section... SETTLEMENT OF CLAIMS UNDER THE FEDERAL TORT CLAIMS ACT § 2.7 Supplementary regulations. (a) The Assistant General Counsel for Finance and Litigation may from time to time issue such supplementary regulations...

  12. 44 CFR 1.7 - Regulations agendas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Regulations agendas. 1.7... HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL RULEMAKING; POLICY AND PROCEDURES General § 1.7 Regulations agendas. (a) The FEMA... Regulations published in April and October of each year. (b) In accordance with 5 U.S.C. 605, the...

  13. 25 CFR 167.2 - General regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false General regulations. 167.2 Section 167.2 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER NAVAJO GRAZING REGULATIONS § 167.2 General regulations. Part 166 of this subchapter authorizes the Commissioner of Indian Affairs to...

  14. 31 CFR 29.102 - Related regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Related regulations. 29.102 Section... UNDER CERTAIN DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA RETIREMENT PROGRAMS General Provisions § 29.102 Related regulations... (Subpart E). (b) Part 581 of Title 5, Code of Federal Regulations, contains information about...

  15. 10 CFR 50.81 - Creditor regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Creditor regulations. 50.81 Section 50.81 Energy NUCLEAR...-Creditors' Rights-Surrender of Licenses § 50.81 Creditor regulations. (a) Pursuant to section 184 of the Act... Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended, and regulations issued by the Commission pursuant to said Act;...

  16. 23 CFR 750.110 - State regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false State regulations. 750.110 Section 750.110 Highways... BEAUTIFICATION National Standards for Regulation by States of Outdoor Advertising Adjacent to the Interstate System Under the 1958 Bonus Program § 750.110 State regulations. A State may elect to prohibit...

  17. 44 CFR 1.7 - Regulations agendas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Regulations agendas. 1.7... HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL RULEMAKING; POLICY AND PROCEDURES General § 1.7 Regulations agendas. (a) The FEMA... Regulations published in April and October of each year. (b) In accordance with 5 U.S.C. 605, the...

  18. 12 CFR 618.8300 - General regulation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false General regulation. 618.8300 Section 618.8300... § 618.8300 General regulation. Except as necessary in performing official duties or as authorized in the... their place, the words “as authorized by Farm Credit Administration regulations (§§ 618.8300 through...

  19. 31 CFR 308.4 - Applicable regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Applicable regulations. 308.4 Section 308.4 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) FISCAL SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY BUREAU OF THE PUBLIC DEBT GENERAL REGULATIONS GOVERNING FULL-PAID...

  20. 15 CFR 922.196 - Emergency regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Emergency regulations. 922.196 Section 922.196 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade (Continued... MANAGEMENT NATIONAL MARINE SANCTUARY PROGRAM REGULATIONS Thunder Bay National Marine Sanctuary and...

  1. 50 CFR 229.9 - Emergency regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 11 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Emergency regulations. 229.9 Section 229... MAMMAL PROTECTION ACT OF 1972 General Provisions § 229.9 Emergency regulations. (a) If the Assistant... plan is in effect— (i) Prescribe emergency regulations that, consistent with such plan to the...

  2. 15 CFR 922.185 - Emergency regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Emergency regulations. 922.185 Section 922.185 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade (Continued... MANAGEMENT NATIONAL MARINE SANCTUARY PROGRAM REGULATIONS Hawaiian Islands Humpback Whale National...

  3. 75 FR 79388 - Service Regulations Committee Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-20

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Service Regulations Committee Meeting AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service... 2011-12 migratory bird hunting regulations. DATES: The meeting will be held February 2, 2011. ADDRESSES: The Service Regulations Committee will meet at the Embassy Suites Hotel, Denver--International...

  4. 15 CFR 2.7 - Supplementary regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Supplementary regulations. 2.7 Section... SETTLEMENT OF CLAIMS UNDER THE FEDERAL TORT CLAIMS ACT § 2.7 Supplementary regulations. (a) The Assistant General Counsel for Finance and Litigation may from time to time issue such supplementary regulations...

  5. 43 CFR 431.9 - Future regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Future regulations. 431.9 Section 431.9 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands BUREAU OF RECLAMATION, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR GENERAL REGULATIONS FOR POWER GENERATION, OPERATION, MAINTENANCE, AND REPLACEMENT AT THE...

  6. 15 CFR 922.165 - Emergency regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Emergency regulations. 922.165 Section 922.165 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade (Continued... MANAGEMENT NATIONAL MARINE SANCTUARY PROGRAM REGULATIONS Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary §...

  7. Self-Regulation in Online Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cho, Moon-Heum; Shen, Demei

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the role of goal orientation and academic self-efficacy in student achievement mediated by effort regulation, metacognitive regulation, and interaction regulation in an online course. The results show that intrinsic goal orientation and academic self-efficacy predicted students' metacognitive…

  8. 31 CFR 29.102 - Related regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Related regulations. 29.102 Section... UNDER CERTAIN DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA RETIREMENT PROGRAMS General Provisions § 29.102 Related regulations... (Subpart E). (b) Part 581 of Title 5, Code of Federal Regulations, contains information about...

  9. 20 CFR 375.7 - Operating regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2013-04-01 2012-04-01 true Operating regulations. 375.7 Section 375.7 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD EMERGENCY REGULATIONS PLAN OF OPERATION DURING A NATIONAL EMERGENCY § 375.7 Operating regulations. (a) Retirement claims. (1) In a national emergency as defined...

  10. 15 CFR 2.7 - Supplementary regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Supplementary regulations. 2.7 Section... SETTLEMENT OF CLAIMS UNDER THE FEDERAL TORT CLAIMS ACT § 2.7 Supplementary regulations. (a) The Assistant General Counsel for Finance and Litigation may from time to time issue such supplementary regulations...

  11. 49 CFR 221.11 - State regulation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false State regulation. 221.11 Section 221.11 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... State regulation. Notwithstanding the provisions of this part, a State may continue in force any...

  12. 23 CFR 750.110 - State regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false State regulations. 750.110 Section 750.110 Highways... BEAUTIFICATION National Standards for Regulation by States of Outdoor Advertising Adjacent to the Interstate System Under the 1958 Bonus Program § 750.110 State regulations. A State may elect to prohibit...

  13. 10 CFR 50.81 - Creditor regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Creditor regulations. 50.81 Section 50.81 Energy NUCLEAR...-Creditors' Rights-Surrender of Licenses § 50.81 Creditor regulations. (a) Pursuant to section 184 of the Act... Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended, and regulations issued by the Commission pursuant to said Act;...

  14. 7 CFR 29.29 - Regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Regulations. 29.29 Section 29.29 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE COMMODITY STANDARDS AND STANDARD CONTAINER REGULATIONS...

  15. 7 CFR 29.29 - Regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Regulations. 29.29 Section 29.29 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE COMMODITY STANDARDS AND STANDARD CONTAINER REGULATIONS...

  16. 31 CFR 29.102 - Related regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Related regulations. 29.102 Section... UNDER CERTAIN DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA RETIREMENT PROGRAMS General Provisions § 29.102 Related regulations... (Subpart E). (b) Part 581 of Title 5, Code of Federal Regulations, contains information about...

  17. 10 CFR 50.81 - Creditor regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Creditor regulations. 50.81 Section 50.81 Energy NUCLEAR...-Creditors' Rights-Surrender of Licenses § 50.81 Creditor regulations. (a) Pursuant to section 184 of the Act... Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended, and regulations issued by the Commission pursuant to said Act;...

  18. 28 CFR 0.128b - Regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... the United States are published in 45 CFR chapter V. ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Regulations. 0.128b Section 0.128b... Settlement Commission § 0.128b Regulations. All rules of practice and regulations applicable to...

  19. 15 CFR 922.165 - Emergency regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Emergency regulations. 922.165 Section 922.165 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade (Continued... MANAGEMENT NATIONAL MARINE SANCTUARY PROGRAM REGULATIONS Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary §...

  20. 49 CFR 221.11 - State regulation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false State regulation. 221.11 Section 221.11 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... State regulation. Notwithstanding the provisions of this part, a State may continue in force any...

  1. 27 CFR 20.3 - Related regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... regulations. Regulations related to this part are listed below: 16 CFR Chapter I—Federal Trade Commission. 16 CFR Chapter II—Consumer Product Safety Commission. 21 CFR Chapter I—Food and Drug Administration... Regulations. 27 CFR Part 71—Rules of Practice in Permit Proceedings....

  2. 27 CFR 20.3 - Related regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... regulations. Regulations related to this part are listed below: 16 CFR Chapter I—Federal Trade Commission. 16 CFR Chapter II—Consumer Product Safety Commission. 21 CFR Chapter I—Food and Drug Administration... Regulations. 27 CFR Part 71—Rules of Practice in Permit Proceedings....

  3. 10 CFR 70.44 - Creditor regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Creditor regulations. 70.44 Section 70.44 Energy NUCLEAR... Transfer of Special Nuclear Material, Creditors' Rights § 70.44 Creditor regulations. (a) Pursuant to... to the provisions of the license, the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended, and regulations...

  4. 49 CFR 221.11 - State regulation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false State regulation. 221.11 Section 221.11 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... State regulation. Notwithstanding the provisions of this part, a State may continue in force any...

  5. 10 CFR 70.44 - Creditor regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Creditor regulations. 70.44 Section 70.44 Energy NUCLEAR... Transfer of Special Nuclear Material, Creditors' Rights § 70.44 Creditor regulations. (a) Pursuant to... to the provisions of the license, the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended, and regulations...

  6. 19 CFR 132.21 - Regulations applicable.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Regulations applicable. 132.21 Section 132.21... TREASURY QUOTAS Mail Importation of Absolute Quota Merchandise § 132.21 Regulations applicable. In addition to the regulations applicable to all mail importations (see part 145 of this chapter),...

  7. 23 CFR 750.110 - State regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false State regulations. 750.110 Section 750.110 Highways... BEAUTIFICATION National Standards for Regulation by States of Outdoor Advertising Adjacent to the Interstate System Under the 1958 Bonus Program § 750.110 State regulations. A State may elect to prohibit...

  8. 32 CFR 9.7 - Regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Regulations. 9.7 Section 9.7 National Defense... MILITARY COMMISSIONS OF CERTAIN NON-UNITED STATES CITIZENS IN THE WAR AGAINST TERRORISM § 9.7 Regulations. (a) Supplementary regulations and instructions. The Appointing Authority shall, subject to...

  9. 15 CFR 2.7 - Supplementary regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Supplementary regulations. 2.7 Section... SETTLEMENT OF CLAIMS UNDER THE FEDERAL TORT CLAIMS ACT § 2.7 Supplementary regulations. (a) The Assistant General Counsel for Finance and Litigation may from time to time issue such supplementary regulations...

  10. 20 CFR 375.7 - Operating regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Operating regulations. 375.7 Section 375.7 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD EMERGENCY REGULATIONS PLAN OF OPERATION DURING A NATIONAL EMERGENCY § 375.7 Operating regulations. (a) Retirement claims. (1) In a national emergency as defined...

  11. 34 CFR 361.4 - Applicable regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Administrative Regulations (EDGAR) as follows: (1) 34 CFR part 74 (Administration of Grants and Agreements with...-Administered Programs). (3) 34 CFR part 77 (Definitions that Apply to Department Regulations). (4) 34 CFR part... Alcohol Abuse Prevention). (b) The regulations in this part 361. (c) 20 CFR part 662 (Description of...

  12. 34 CFR 361.4 - Applicable regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Administrative Regulations (EDGAR) as follows: (1) 34 CFR part 74 (Administration of Grants and Agreements with...-Administered Programs). (3) 34 CFR part 77 (Definitions that Apply to Department Regulations). (4) 34 CFR part... Alcohol Abuse Prevention). (b) The regulations in this part 361. (c) 20 CFR part 662 (Description of...

  13. 34 CFR 300.716 - Applicable regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Applicable regulations. 300.716 Section 300.716 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION... Secretary of the Interior § 300.716 Applicable regulations. The Secretary of the Interior must comply...

  14. 44 CFR 1.7 - Regulations agendas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2012-10-01 2011-10-01 true Regulations agendas. 1.7... HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL RULEMAKING; POLICY AND PROCEDURES General § 1.7 Regulations agendas. (a) The FEMA... Regulations published in April and October of each year. (b) In accordance with 5 U.S.C. 605, the...

  15. 28 CFR 0.128b - Regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... the United States are published in 45 CFR chapter V. ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Regulations. 0.128b Section 0.128b... Settlement Commission § 0.128b Regulations. All rules of practice and regulations applicable to...

  16. 50 CFR 26.33 - Special regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 8 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Special regulations. 26.33 Section 26.33... NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE SYSTEM PUBLIC ENTRY AND USE Public Use and Recreation § 26.33 Special regulations. (a) Special regulations shall be issued for public use, access, and recreation within...

  17. 33 CFR 165.33 - General regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false General regulations. 165.33 Section 165.33 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED... General regulations. Unless otherwise provided in the special regulations in Subpart F of this part:...

  18. 34 CFR 300.716 - Applicable regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Applicable regulations. 300.716 Section 300.716 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION... Secretary of the Interior § 300.716 Applicable regulations. The Secretary of the Interior must comply...

  19. 43 CFR 431.9 - Future regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2012-10-01 2011-10-01 true Future regulations. 431.9 Section 431.9 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands BUREAU OF RECLAMATION, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR GENERAL REGULATIONS FOR POWER GENERATION, OPERATION, MAINTENANCE, AND REPLACEMENT AT THE...

  20. 10 CFR 50.81 - Creditor regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Creditor regulations. 50.81 Section 50.81 Energy NUCLEAR...-Creditors' Rights-Surrender of Licenses § 50.81 Creditor regulations. (a) Pursuant to section 184 of the Act... Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended, and regulations issued by the Commission pursuant to said Act;...