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Sample records for pressed ceramic tiles

  1. 37. PRESSING TILES FROM PLASTER MOLDS, USING A HAND PRESS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    37. PRESSING TILES FROM PLASTER MOLDS, USING A HAND PRESS CONSTRUCTED IN 1986. - Moravian Pottery & Tile Works, Southwest side of State Route 313 (Swamp Road), Northwest of East Court Street, Doylestown, Bucks County, PA

  2. Ceramic tile expansion engine housing

    DOEpatents

    Myers, B.

    1995-04-11

    An expandable ceramic tile housing for a high temperature engine is disclosed wherein each tile is independently supported in place in an interlocking matrix by retention mechanisms which mechanically couple the individual ceramic tiles to an outer metal support housing while maintaining thermal isolation of the metal housing from the ceramic tiles. The ceramic tiles are formed with either an octagonal front face portion and a square shank portion or a square front face portion with an octagonal shank portion. The length of the sides of the octagonal front face portion on one tile is equal to the length of the sides of the square front face portion of adjoining tiles to permit formation of an interlocking matrix. Fibrous ceramic sealing material may be placed between radial and tangential facing surfaces of adjacent tiles to limit radial gas flow there between. Labyrinth-sealed pressure-controlled compartments may be established between the tile housing and the outer metal support housing to control radial gas flow. 8 figures.

  3. Ceramic tile expansion engine housing

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, Blake

    1995-01-01

    An expandable ceramic tile housing for a high temperature engine is disclosed wherein each tile is independently supported in place in an interlocking matrix by retention mechanisms which mechanically couple the individual ceramic tiles to an outer metal support housing while maintaining thermal isolation of the metal housing from the ceramic tiles. The ceramic tiles are formed with either an octagonal front face portion and a square shank portion or a square front face portion with an octagonal shank portion. The length of the sides of the octagonal front face portion on one tile is equal to the length of the sides of the square front face portion of adjoining tiles to permit formation of an interlocking matrix. Fibrous ceramic sealing material may be placed between radial and tangential facing surfaces of adjacent tiles to limit radial gas flow therebetween. Labyrinth-sealed pressure-controlled compartments may be established between the tile housing and the outer metal support housing to control radial gas flow.

  4. Interlocking wettable ceramic tiles

    SciTech Connect

    Tabereaux, Jr., Alton T.; Fredrickson, Guy L.; Groat, Eric; Mroz, Thomas; Ulicny, Alan; Walker, Mark F.

    2005-03-08

    An electrolytic cell for the reduction of aluminum having a layer of interlocking cathode tiles positioned on a cathode block. Each tile includes a main body and a vertical restraining member to prevent movement of the tiles away from the cathode block during operation of the cell. The anode of the electrolytic cell may be positioned about 1 inch from the interlocking cathode tiles.

  5. Repairing ceramic insulating tiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunn, B. R.; Laymance, E. L.

    1980-01-01

    Fused-silica tiles containing large voids or gauges are repaired without adhesives by plug insertion method. Tiles are useful in conduits for high-temperature gases, in furnaces, and in other applications involving heat insulation.

  6. Dry pressing technical ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, W.A. Jr.

    1996-04-01

    Dry pressing of technical ceramics is a fundamental method of producing high-quality ceramic components. The goals of dry pressing technical ceramics are uniform compact size and green density, consistent part-to-part green density and defect-free compact. Dry pressing is the axial compaction of loosely granulated dry ceramic powders (< 3% free moisture) within a die/punch arrangement. The powder, under pressure, conforms to the specific shape of the punch faces and die. Powder compaction occurs within a rigid-walled die and usually between a top and bottom punch. Press configurations include anvil, rotary, multiple-punch and multiple-action.

  7. Production Process for Strong, Light Ceramic Tiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmquist, G. R.; Cordia, E. R.; Tomer, R. S.

    1985-01-01

    Proportions of ingredients and sintering time/temperature schedule changed. Production process for lightweight, high-strength ceramic insulating tiles for Space Shuttle more than just scaled-up version of laboratory process for making small tiles. Boron in aluminum borosilicate fibers allows fusion at points where fibers contact each other during sintering, thereby greatly strengthening tiles structure.

  8. Production Process for Strong, Light Ceramic Tiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmquist, G. R.; Cordia, E. R.; Tomer, R. S.

    1985-01-01

    Proportions of ingredients and sintering time/temperature schedule changed. Production process for lightweight, high-strength ceramic insulating tiles for Space Shuttle more than just scaled-up version of laboratory process for making small tiles. Boron in aluminum borosilicate fibers allows fusion at points where fibers contact each other during sintering, thereby greatly strengthening tiles structure.

  9. Fly ash of mineral coal as ceramic tiles raw material.

    PubMed

    Zimmer, A; Bergmann, C P

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the use of mineral coal fly ash as a raw material in the production of ceramic tiles. The samples of fly ash came from Capivari de Baixo, a city situated in the Brazilian Federal State of Santa Catarina. The fly ash and the raw materials were characterized regarding their physical chemical properties, and, based on these results; batches containing fly ash and typical raw materials for ceramic tiles were prepared. The fly ash content in the batches varied between 20 and 80 wt%. Specimens were molded using a uniaxial hydraulic press and were fired. All batches containing ash up to 60 wt% present adequate properties to be classified as several kinds of products in the ISO 13006 standard () regarding its different absorption groups (pressed). The results obtained indicate that fly ash, when mixed with traditional raw materials, has the necessary requirements to be used as a raw material for production of ceramic tiles.

  10. Composite treatment of ceramic tile armor

    DOEpatents

    Hansen, James G. R. [Oak Ridge, TN; Frame, Barbara J [Oak Ridge, TN

    2010-12-14

    An improved ceramic tile armor has a core of boron nitride and a polymer matrix composite (PMC) facing of carbon fibers fused directly to the impact face of the tile. A polyethylene fiber composite backing and spall cover are preferred. The carbon fiber layers are cured directly onto the tile, not adhered using a separate adhesive so that they are integral with the tile, not a separate layer.

  11. Composite treatment of ceramic tile armor

    DOEpatents

    Hansen, James G. R. [Oak Ridge, TN; Frame, Barbara J [Oak Ridge, TN

    2012-01-02

    An improved ceramic tile armor has a core of boron nitride and a polymer matrix composite (PMC) facing of carbon fibers fused directly to the impact face of the tile. A polyethylene fiber composite backing and spall cover are preferred. The carbon fiber layers are cured directly onto the tile, not adhered using a separate adhesive so that they are integral with the tile, not a separate layer.

  12. Fibrous-Ceramic/Aerogel Composite Insulating Tiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Susan M.; Rasky, Daniel J.

    2004-01-01

    Fibrous-ceramic/aerogel composite tiles have been invented to afford combinations of thermal-insulation and mechanical properties superior to those attainable by making tiles of fibrous ceramics alone or aerogels alone. These lightweight tiles can be tailored to a variety of applications that range from insulating cryogenic tanks to protecting spacecraft against re-entry heating. The advantages and disadvantages of fibrous ceramics and aerogels can be summarized as follows: Tiles made of ceramic fibers are known for mechanical strength, toughness, and machinability. Fibrous ceramic tiles are highly effective as thermal insulators in a vacuum. However, undesirably, the porosity of these materials makes them permeable by gases, so that in the presence of air or other gases, convection and gas-phase conduction contribute to the effective thermal conductivity of the tiles. Other disadvantages of the porosity and permeability of fibrous ceramic tiles arise because gases (e.g., water vapor or cryogenic gases) can condense in pores. This condensation contributes to weight, and in the case of cryogenic systems, the heat of condensation undesirably adds to the heat flowing to the objects that one seeks to keep cold. Moreover, there is a risk of explosion associated with vaporization of previously condensed gas upon reheating. Aerogels offer low permeability, low density, and low thermal conductivity, but are mechanically fragile. The basic idea of the present invention is to exploit the best features of fibrous ceramic tiles and aerogels. In a composite tile according to the invention, the fibrous ceramic serves as a matrix that mechanically supports the aerogel, while the aerogel serves as a low-conductivity, low-permeability filling that closes what would otherwise be the open pores of the fibrous ceramic. Because the aerogel eliminates or at least suppresses permeation by gas, gas-phase conduction, and convection, the thermal conductivity of such a composite even at

  13. Manufacture of ceramic tiles from fly ash

    DOEpatents

    Hnat, James G.; Mathur, Akshay; Simpson, James C.

    1999-01-01

    The present invention relates to a process for forming glass-ceramic tiles. Fly ash containing organic material, metal contaminants, and glass forming materials is oxidized under conditions effective to combust the organic material and partially oxidize the metallic contaminants and the glass forming materials. The oxidized glass forming materials are vitrified to form a glass melt. This glass melt is then formed into tiles containing metallic contaminants.

  14. Manufacture of ceramic tiles from fly ash

    DOEpatents

    Hnat, J.G.; Mathur, A.; Simpson, J.C.

    1999-08-10

    The present invention relates to a process for forming glass-ceramic tiles. Fly ash containing organic material, metal contaminants, and glass forming materials is oxidized under conditions effective to combust the organic material and partially oxidize the metallic contaminants and the glass forming materials. The oxidized glass forming materials are vitrified to form a glass melt. This glass melt is then formed into tiles containing metallic contaminants. 6 figs.

  15. Cutting Symmetrical Recesses In Soft Ceramic Tiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nesotas, Tony C.; Tyler, Brent

    1989-01-01

    Simple tool cuts hemispherical recesses in soft ceramic tiles. Designed to expose wires of thermocouples embedded in tiles without damaging leads. Creates neat, precise holes around wires. End mill includes axial hole to accommodate thermocouple wires embedded in material to be cut. Wires pass into hole without being bent or broken. Dimensions in inches. Used in place of such tools as dental picks, tweezers, spatulas, and putty knives.

  16. Cutting Symmetrical Recesses In Soft Ceramic Tiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nesotas, Tony C.; Tyler, Brent

    1989-01-01

    Simple tool cuts hemispherical recesses in soft ceramic tiles. Designed to expose wires of thermocouples embedded in tiles without damaging leads. Creates neat, precise holes around wires. End mill includes axial hole to accommodate thermocouple wires embedded in material to be cut. Wires pass into hole without being bent or broken. Dimensions in inches. Used in place of such tools as dental picks, tweezers, spatulas, and putty knives.

  17. 55. QUARRY TILE CUTTERS, SECOND FLOOR, NORTH WING. WORKERS PRESSED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    55. QUARRY TILE CUTTERS, SECOND FLOOR, NORTH WING. WORKERS PRESSED THE CUTTERS INTO SLABS OF CLAY, LIFTED THEM ONTO DRYING BOARDS AND PRESSED THE PLUNGERS TO RELEASE THE CUT TILES. REPRODUCTIONS CUTTERS ARE NOT USED IN PRODUCTION. WOODEN FORMS FOR PRODUCING CLAY SLABS WITH ROLLING PINS REST AGAINST THE WALL. - Moravian Pottery & Tile Works, Southwest side of State Route 313 (Swamp Road), Northwest of East Court Street, Doylestown, Bucks County, PA

  18. Solar-energy treatment of ceramic tiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, J. N.; Clayton, M. E.

    1981-12-01

    The 400 kW Advanced Components Test Facility was used to provide a concentrated source of solar energy for firing ceramic wall tile. A domed top cylindrical cavity with a white refractory fiber lining provided diffuse reflection of the concentrated solar beam directly onto the upper surface of the unfired wall tile. The tile were placed directly on the cavity floor in a circular pattern, centered at 450 intervals so that eight tile could be fired at one time. The tile and cavity walls were instrumented with thermocouples, and pyrometric cones were used to determine temperature distribution within the cavity. The glazed and unglazed solar fired titles were tested for flatness, modulus of rupture, water absorption, porosity, bulk density, apparent specific gravity, percent linear thermal expansion and crystalline phases present in the fired bodies. The major problems encountered are: cracking by thermal shock, and uneven shrinkage and glaze maturity across individual tile. The cavity failed to provide even heating at all eight tile positions.

  19. Radioactivity level in Chinese building ceramic tile.

    PubMed

    Xinwei, L

    2004-01-01

    The activity concentrations of (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K have been determined by gamma ray spectrometry. The concentrations of (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K range from 158.3 to 1087.6, 91.7 to 1218.4, and 473.8 to 1031.3 Bq kg(-1) for glaze, and from 63.5 to 131.4, 55.4 to 106.5, and 386.7 to 866.8 Bq kg(-1) for ceramic tile, respectively. The measured activity concentrations for these radionuclides were compared with the reported data of other countries and with the typical world values. The radium equivalent activities (Ra(eq)), external hazard index (H(ex)) and internal hazard index (H(in)) associated with the radionuclides were calculated. The Ra(eq) values of all ceramic tiles are lower than the limit of 370 Bq kg(-1). The values of H(ex) and H(in) calculated according to the Chinese criterion for ceramic tiles are less than unity. The Ra(eq) value for the glaze of glazed tile collected from some areas are >370 Bq kg(-1).

  20. 57. ORIGINAL TILE PRESS AND EXPERIMENTAL DENTAL KILN, SECOND FLOOR, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    57. ORIGINAL TILE PRESS AND EXPERIMENTAL DENTAL KILN, SECOND FLOOR, NORTH WING, HENRY MERCER USED THE KILN FOR HIS EARLIEST GLAZE TESTS. THE PRESS WAS DESIGNED TO BE USED WITH METAL CASED MOLDS. SINCE ONLY THE EARLIEST TILE DESIGNS ARE IN METAL CASES. THIS TECHNIQUE WAS PROBABLY DISCONTINUED. THIS PRESS WAS, THEREFORE, PROBABLY NOT USED EXTENSIVELY AT THIS SITE. THE UPPER PART OF GLAZE KILN No. 2 IS AT THE LEFT REAR. - Moravian Pottery & Tile Works, Southwest side of State Route 313 (Swamp Road), Northwest of East Court Street, Doylestown, Bucks County, PA

  1. Wedge edge ceramic combustor tile

    DOEpatents

    Shaffer, J.E.; Holsapple, A.C.

    1997-06-10

    A multipiece combustor has a portion thereof being made of a plurality of ceramic segments. Each of the plurality of ceramic segments have an outer surface and an inner surface. Each of the plurality of ceramic segments have a generally cylindrical configuration and including a plurality of joints. The joints define joint portions, a first portion defining a surface being skewed to the outer surface and the inner surface. The joint portions have a second portion defining a surface being skewed to the outer surface and the inner surface. The joint portions further include a shoulder formed intermediate the first portion and the second portion. The joints provide a sealing interlocking joint between corresponding ones of the plurality of ceramic segments. Thus, the multipiece combustor having the plurality of ceramic segment with the plurality of joints reduces the physical size of the individual components and the degradation of the surface of the ceramic components in a tensile stress zone is generally eliminated reducing the possibility of catastrophic failures. 7 figs.

  2. Wedge edge ceramic combustor tile

    DOEpatents

    Shaffer, James E.; Holsapple, Allan C.

    1997-01-01

    A multipiece combustor has a portion thereof being made of a plurality of ceramic segments. Each of the plurality of ceramic segments have an outer surface and an inner surface. Each of the plurality of ceramic segments have a generally cylindrical configuration and including a plurality of joints. The joints define joint portions, a first portion defining a surface being skewed to the outer surface and the inner surface. The joint portions have a second portion defining a surface being skewed to the outer surface and the inner surface. The joint portions further include a shoulder formed intermediate the first portion and the second portion. The joints provide a sealing interlocking joint between corresponding ones of the plurality of ceramic segments. Thus, the multipiece combustor having the plurality of ceramic segment with the plurality of joints reduces the physical size of the individual components and the degradation of the surface of the ceramic components in a tensile stress zone is generally eliminated reducing the possibility of catastrophic failures.

  3. Chemical Composition of Ceramic Tile Glazes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anufrik, S. S.; Kurian, N. N.; Zhukova, I. I.; Znosko, K. F.; Belkov, M. V.

    2016-11-01

    We have carried out laser emission and x-ray fluorescence spectral analysis of glaze before and after its application to ceramic tile produced by Keramin JSC (Belarus). We have studied the internal microstructure of the ceramic samples. It was established that on the surface and within the bulk interior of all the samples, there are micropores of sizes ranging from a few micrometers to tens of micrometers and microcracks as long as several hundred micrometers. The presence of micropores on the surface of the ceramic tile leads to an increase in the water absorption level and a decrease in frost resistance. It was found that a decrease in the surface tension of ceramic tile coatings is promoted by substitution of sodium by potassium, silica by boric anhydride, magnesium and barium by calcium, CaO by sodium oxide, and SiO2 by chromium oxide. We carried out a comparative analysis of the chemical composition of glaze samples using S4 Pioneer and ElvaX x-ray fluorescence spectrometers and also an LIBS laser emission analyzer.

  4. Firing ceramic tiles in solar energy equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Pasichnyi, V.V.; Berezhetskaya, V.Ya.; Chop, Yu.I.; Kashket, G.I.

    1987-03-01

    In the interest of satisfying the growing demand for glazed ceramic tiles and conserving the natural gas ordinarily used to fire them, the authors assess the feasibility of using a solar kiln for the process. Their design incorporates a parabolic reflector and a tracking system to continuously focus radiant solar energy on the tile. Their energy analysis includes such factors as solar thermal input, radiant heat transfer, and heat flow, the relationship between the firing time and the heat flow density, and the surface quality of the glaze and colorizer. Their results indicate that when the heat flow density rises above a level at which the specific expenditure of heat is no longer dependent on the color of the pigment, this expenditure or input comes to a quarter of what is currently needed using existing technologies and fuels.

  5. Two Views of Islam: Ceramic Tile Design and Miniatures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macaulay, Sara Grove

    2001-01-01

    Describes an art project focusing on Islamic art that consists of two parts: (1) ceramic tile design; and (2) Islamic miniatures. Provides background information on Islamic art and step-by-step instructions for designing the Islamic tile and miniature. Includes learning objectives and resources on Islamic tile miniatures. (CMK)

  6. Two Views of Islam: Ceramic Tile Design and Miniatures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macaulay, Sara Grove

    2001-01-01

    Describes an art project focusing on Islamic art that consists of two parts: (1) ceramic tile design; and (2) Islamic miniatures. Provides background information on Islamic art and step-by-step instructions for designing the Islamic tile and miniature. Includes learning objectives and resources on Islamic tile miniatures. (CMK)

  7. Solar-energy treatment of ceramic tile. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, J.N.; Clayton, M.E.

    1981-12-01

    The 400 kW Advanced Components Test Facility was used to provide a concentrated source of solar energy for firing ceramic wall tile. A domed top cylindrical cavity with a white refractory fiber lining provided diffuse reflection of the concentrated solar beam directly onto the upper surface of the unfired wall tile. The tile were placed directly on the cavity floor in a circular pattern, centered at 45/sup 0/ intervals so that eight tile could be fired at one time. The tile and cavity walls were instrumented with thermocouples, and pyrometric cones were used to determine temperature distribution within the cavity. The glazed and unglazed solar fired tiles were subjected to standard ceramic testing procedures to determine: flatness, modulus of rupture, water absorption, porosity, bulk density, apparent specific gravity, percent linear thermal expansion and crystalline phases present in the fired bodies. These data were compared with the same data for commercial fired tiles from the same batch of raw materials. The glazed tile surfaces were compared with commercially fired tile for reflectance and color match. The major problems encountered were: cracking by thermal shock, and uneven shrinkage and glaze maturity across individual tile. The cavity also failed to provide even heating at all eight tile positions. An alternate air heat exchanger system is recommended to fire the tile by convection rather than direct radiation.

  8. Ceramic-ceramic shell tile thermal protection system and method thereof

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riccitiello, Salvatore R. (Inventor); Smith, Marnell (Inventor); Goldstein, Howard E. (Inventor); Zimmerman, Norman B. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    A ceramic reusable, externally applied composite thermal protection system (TPS) is proposed. The system functions by utilizing a ceramic/ceramic upper shell structure which effectively separates its primary functions as a thermal insulator and as a load carrier to transmit loads to the cold structure. The composite tile system also prevents impact damage to the atmospheric entry vehicle thermal protection system. The composite tile comprises a structurally strong upper ceramic/ceramic shell manufactured from ceramic fibers and ceramic matrix meeting the thermal and structural requirements of a tile used on a re-entry aerospace vehicle. In addition, a lightweight high temperature ceramic lower temperature base tile is used. The upper shell and lower tile are attached by means effective to withstand the extreme temperatures (3000 to 3200F) and stress conditions. The composite tile may include one or more layers of variable density rigid or flexible thermal insulation. The assembly of the overall tile is facilitated by two or more locking mechanisms on opposing sides of the overall tile assembly. The assembly may occur subsequent to the installation of the lower shell tile on the spacecraft structural skin.

  9. Ceramic tile grout removal & sealing using high power lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence, J.; Li, L.; Spencer, J.T.

    1996-12-31

    Work has been conducted using a Nd:YAG laser, a CO{sub 2} laser and a high power diode laser (HPDL) in order to determine the feasibility of removing contaminated tile grout from the void between adjoining vitrified ceramic tiles, and to seal the void permanently with a material having an impermeable surface glaze. Reported on in the paper are; the basic process phenomena, the process effectiveness, suitable vitrifiable material development, a heat affect study and a morphological and compositional analysis.

  10. Modelling the viscoelasticity of ceramic tiles by finite element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlovic, Ana; Fragassa, Cristiano

    2016-05-01

    This research details a numerical method aiming at investigating the viscoelastic behaviour of a specific family of ceramic material, the Grès Porcelain, during an uncommon transformation, known as pyroplasticity, which occurs when a ceramic tile bends under a combination of thermal stress and own weight. In general, the theory of viscoelasticity can be considered extremely large and precise, but its application on real cases is particularly delicate. A time-depending problem, as viscoelasticity naturally is, has to be merged with a temperature-depending situation. This paper investigates how the viscoelastic response of bending ceramic materials can be modelled by commercial Finite Elements codes.

  11. Characterization of ceramic roof tile wastes as pozzolanic admixture.

    PubMed

    Lavat, Araceli E; Trezza, Monica A; Poggi, Mónica

    2009-05-01

    The aim of this work is to study the recycling of tile wastes in the manufacture of blended cements. Cracked or broken ceramic bodies are not accepted as commercial products and, therefore, the unsold waste of the ceramic industry becomes an environment problem. The use of powdered roof tile in cement production, as pozzolanic addition, is reported. The wastes were classified as nonglazed, natural and black glazed tiles. The mineralogy of the powders was controlled by SEM-EDX microscopy, XRD analysis and FTIR spectroscopy. Particle size was checked by laser granulometry. Once the materials were fully characterized, pozzolanic lime consumption tests and Fratini tests were carried out. Different formulations of cement-tile blends were prepared by incorporation of up to 30% weight ratios of recycled waste. The compressive strength of the resulting specimens was measured. The evolution of hydration of the cement-tile blends was analyzed by XRD and FTIR techniques. Vibrational spectroscopy presented accurate evidence of pozzolanic activity. The results of the investigation confirmed the potential use of these waste materials to produce pozzolanic cement.

  12. Analysis of Thick Sandwich Shells with Embedded Ceramic Tiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davila, Carlos G.; Smith, C.; Lumban-Tobing, F.

    1996-01-01

    The Composite Armored Vehicle (CAV) is an advanced technology demonstrator of an all-composite ground combat vehicle. The CAV upper hull is made of a tough light-weight S2-glass/epoxy laminate with embedded ceramic tiles that serve as armor. The tiles are bonded to a rubber mat with a carefully selected, highly viscoelastic adhesive. The integration of armor and structure offers an efficient combination of ballistic protection and structural performance. The analysis of this anisotropic construction, with its inherent discontinuous and periodic nature, however, poses several challenges. The present paper describes a shell-based 'element-layering' technique that properly accounts for these effects and for the concentrated transverse shear flexibility in the rubber mat. One of the most important advantages of the element-layering technique over advanced higher-order elements is that it is based on conventional elements. This advantage allows the models to be portable to other structural analysis codes, a prerequisite in a program that involves the computational facilities of several manufacturers and government laboratories. The element-layering technique was implemented into an auto-layering program that automatically transforms a conventional shell model into a multi-layered model. The effects of tile layer homogenization, tile placement patterns, and tile gap size on the analysis results are described.

  13. Air quality comparison between two European ceramic tile clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minguillón, M. C.; Monfort, E.; Escrig, A.; Celades, I.; Guerra, L.; Busani, G.; Sterni, A.; Querol, X.

    2013-08-01

    The European ceramic tile industry is mostly concentrated in two clusters, one in Castelló (Spain) and another one in Modena (Italy). Industrial clusters may have problems to accomplish the EU air quality regulations because of the concentration of some specific pollutants and, hence, the feasibility of the industrial clusters can be jeopardised. The present work assesses the air quality in these ceramic clusters in 2008, when the new EU emission regulations where put into force. PM10 samples were collected at two sampling sites in the Modena ceramic cluster and one sampling site in the Castelló ceramic cluster. PM10 annual average concentrations were 12-14 μg m-3 higher in Modena than in Castelló, and were close to or exceeded the European limit. Air quality in Modena was mainly influenced by road traffic and, in a lower degree, the metalmechanical industry, as evidenced by the high concentrations of Mn, Cu, Zn, Sn and Sb registered. The stagnant weather conditions from Modena hindering dispersion of pollutants also contributed to the relatively high pollution levels. In Castelló, the influence of the ceramic industry is evidenced by the high concentrations of Ti, Se, Tl and Pb, whereas this influence is not seen in Modena. The difference in the impact of the ceramic industry on the air quality in the two areas was attributed to: better abatement systems in the spray-drier facilities in Modena, higher coverage of the areas for storage and handling of dusty raw materials in Modena, presence of two open air quarries in the Castelló region, low degree of abatement systems in the ceramic tile kilns in Castelló, and abundance of ceramic frit, glaze and pigment manufacture in Castelló as opposed to scarce manufacture of these products in Modena. The necessity of additional measures to fulfil the EU air quality requirements in the Modena region is evidenced, despite the high degree of environmental measures implemented in the ceramic industry. The Principal

  14. Effects of body formulation and firing temperature to properties of ceramic tile incorporated with electric arc furnace (EAF) slag waste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharif, Nurulakmal Mohd; Lim, Chi Yang; Teo, Pao Ter; Seman, Anasyida Abu

    2017-07-01

    Significant quantities of sludge and slag are generated as waste materials or by-products from steel industries. One of the by-products is Electric Arc Furnace (EAF) steel slag which consists of oxides such as CaO, Al2O3 and FeO. This makes it possible for slag to partially replace the raw materials in ceramic tile production. In our preliminary assessment of incorporating the EAF slag into ceramic tile, it was revealed that at fixed firing temperature of 1150°C, the tile of composition 40 wt.% EAF slag - 60 wt.% ball clay has comparable properties with commercial ceramic tile. Thus, this current study would focus on effects of body formulation (different weight percentages of K-feldspar and silica) and different firing temperatures to properties of EAF slag added ceramic tile. EAF slag from Southern Steel Berhad (SSB) was crushed into micron size (EAF slag content was 40 wt.%) and milled with ball clay, K-feldspar and silica before compacted and fired at 1125°C and 1150°C. The EAF slag added tile was characterized in terms of water absorption, apparent porosity, bulk density, modulus of rupture (MOR) and phase analysis via X-ray diffraction (XRD). The composition of 40 wt.% EAF slag - 30 wt.% ball clay - 10 wt.% K-feldspar - 20 wt.% silica (10F_20S), fired at 1150°C showed the lowest water absorption, apparent porosity and highest bulk density due to enhancement of densification process during firing. However, the same composition of ceramic tile (10F_20S) had the highest MOR at lower firing temperature of 1125°C, contributed by presence of the highest total amount of anorthite and wollastonite reinforcement crystalline phases (78.40 wt.%) in the tile. Overall, both the water absorption and MOR of all ceramic tiles surpassed the requirement regulated by MS ISO 13006:2014 Standard (Annex G: Dry-pressed ceramic tile with low water absorption, Eb ≤ 0.50 % and minimum MOR of 35 MPa).

  15. Study on use of MSWI fly ash in ceramic tile.

    PubMed

    Haiying, Zhang; Youcai, Zhao; Jingyu, Qi

    2007-03-06

    In this work, MSWI (municipal solid waste incineration) fly ash is used as a blending in production of ceramic tile by taking advantage of its high contents of SiO(2), Al(2)O(3) and CaO. Besides, macro-performance and microstructure of the product as well as its leaching toxicity in practical application were studied by means of XRD, IR and SEM analysis, and leaching toxicity and sequential chemical extraction analysis of the product. It is found that when 20% fly ash is added, the product registers a high compressive strength of 18.6MPa/cm(2) and a low water absorption of 7.4% after being sintered at 960 degrees C. It is found that the glazed tile shows excellent resistance against leaching, in accordance with HVEP stand, of heavy metals with Cd<0.0002ppm, Pb<0.0113ppm and Zn<0.0749ppm, and Hg below the low detection limit. These results show that heavy metals are cemented among the solid lattice in the product and can hardly be extracted. Leaching toxicity of heavy metals in the product, especially Hg, Pb, Zn and Cd, is substantially reduced to less than one-tenth of that in fly ash. In addition, specifications of Hg, Pb, Zn and Cd are largely changed and only a small portion of these heavy metals exists in soluble phases. These results as a whole suggest that the use of MSWI fly ash in ceramic tile constitutes a potential means of adding value.

  16. Parametric Weight Comparison of Advanced Metallic, Ceramic Tile, and Ceramic Blanket Thermal Protection Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, David E.; Martin, Carl J.; Blosser, Max L.

    2000-01-01

    A parametric weight assessment of advanced metallic panel, ceramic blanket, and ceramic tile thermal protection systems (TPS) was conducted using an implicit, one-dimensional (I-D) finite element sizing code. This sizing code contained models to account for coatings fasteners, adhesives, and strain isolation pads. Atmospheric entry heating profiles for two vehicles, the Access to Space (ATS) vehicle and a proposed Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV), were used to ensure that the trends were not unique to a certain trajectory. Ten TPS concepts were compared for a range of applied heat loads and substructural heat capacities to identify general trends. This study found the blanket TPS concepts have the lightest weights over the majority of their applicable ranges, and current technology ceramic tiles and metallic TPS concepts have similar weights. A proposed, state-of-the-art metallic system which uses a higher temperature alloy and efficient multilayer insulation was predicted to be significantly lighter than the ceramic tile stems and approaches blanket TPS weights for higher integrated heat loads.

  17. Computational modeling of thin ceramic tiles backed by thin substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, J.D.; Anderson, C.E. Jr.; Cox, P.A.

    1995-12-31

    Building on the work of Wilkins, Eulerian hydrocode calculations were performed with ceramic models to examine the behavior of thin ceramic tiles backed by a thin substrate. In order to match ballistic limit data it was necessary to include a pressure dependent flow stress for failed ceramic. Reasonable agreement is found between the modified model and ballistic limit data for a simulated armor piercing round impacting an AD-85 alumina/6061T6 aluminum laminate. Based upon this success, the modified model was used to examine the performance of a SiC/6061T6 aluminum laminate when impacted by an M80 ball round (7.62 mm) at muzzle velocity. The projectile undergoes large deformation, as does the aluminum backing sheet. The computational results indicate, for the M80 projectile impacting at muzzle velocity, that the ballistic limit thickness for the SiC/aluminum laminate should weigh 10% less than the ballistic limit thickness for steel. The talk will include a video tape of calculations.

  18. Porosity detection in ceramic armor tiles via ultrasonic time-of-flight

    SciTech Connect

    Margetan, Frank J.; Richter, Nathaniel; Jensen, Terrence

    2011-06-23

    Some multilayer armor panels contain ceramic tiles as one constituent, and porosity in the tiles can affect armor performance. It is well known that porosity in ceramic materials leads to a decrease in ultrasonic velocity. We report on a feasibility study exploring the use of ultrasonic time-of-flight (TOF) to locate and characterize porous regions in armor tiles. The tiles in question typically have well-controlled thickness, thus simplifying the translation of TOF data into velocity data. By combining UT velocity measurements and X-ray absorption measurements on selected specimens, one can construct a calibration curve relating velocity to porosity. That relationship can then be used to translate typical ultrasonic C-scans of TOF-versus-position into C-scans of porosity-versus-position. This procedure is demonstrated for pulse/echo, focused-transducer inspections of silicon carbide (SiC) ceramic tiles.

  19. High-Strength, Low-Shrinkage Ceramic Tiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, W. H.; Creedon, J. F.

    1986-01-01

    Addition of refractory fibers and whiskers to insulating tiles composed primarily of fibrous silica, such as those used on the skin of Space Shuttle orbiter, greatly improves properties. New composition suitable for lightweight, thermally-stable mirror blanks and as furnace and kiln insulation. Improved tiles made with current tile-fabrication processes. For given density, tiles containing silicon carbide and boron additives stronger in flexure than tiles made from silica alone. In addition, tiles with additives nearly immune to heat distortion, whereas pure-silica tiles shrink and become severely distorted.

  20. Thermal insulation attaching means. [adhesive bonding of felt vibration insulators under ceramic tiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leger, L. J. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    An improved isolation system is provided for attaching ceramic tiles of insulating material to the surface of a structure to be protected against extreme temperatures of the nature expected to be encountered by the space shuttle orbiter. This system isolates the fragile ceramic tiles from thermally and mechanically induced vehicle structural strains. The insulating tiles are affixed to a felt isolation pad formed of closely arranged and randomly oriented fibers by means of a flexible adhesive and in turn the felt pad is affixed to the metallic vehicle structure by an additional layer of flexible adhesive.

  1. Microwave energy versus convected hot air for rapidly drying ceramic tile

    SciTech Connect

    Earl, D.A.

    1995-12-31

    The purpose of this study was to determine if microwave energy could provide advantages over the conventional hot air method currently used for rapidly drying ceramic tile. Tiles consisting of a typical fast-fire body formula were dried to 0.5% moisture using a 2.45 GHz, 950W microwave oven and a natural gas-fired roller dryer. Statistical methods were employed to develop equations for predicting microwave energy consumption, tile % moisture and surface temperature given drying time, tile volume and % relative humidity. Microwave drying was found to require 36% less energy than hot air drying. Moisture was removed and surface temperature elevated at faster rates using microwave energy.

  2. Sewage sludge ash characteristics and potential for use in bricks, tiles and glass ceramics.

    PubMed

    Lynn, Ciarán J; Dhir, Ravindra K; Ghataora, Gurmel S

    2016-01-01

    The characteristics of sewage sludge ash (SSA) and its use in ceramic applications pertaining to bricks, tiles and glass ceramics have been assessed using the globally published literature in the English medium. It is shown that SSA possesses similar chemical characteristics to established ceramic materials and under heat treatment achieves the targeted densification, strength increases and absorption reductions. In brick and tile applications, technical requirements relating to strength, absorption and durability are achievable, with merely manageable performance reductions with SSA as a partial clay replacement. Fluxing properties of SSA facilitate lower firing temperatures during ceramics production, although reductions in mix plasticity leads to higher forming water requirements. SSA glass ceramics attained strengths in excess of natural materials such as granite and marble and displayed strong durability properties. The thermal treatment and nature of ceramic products also effectively restricted heavy metal leaching to low levels. Case studies, predominantly in bricks applications, reinforce confidence in the material with suitable technical performances achieved in practical conditions.

  3. Possible production of ceramic tiles from marine dredging spoils alone and mixed with other waste materials.

    PubMed

    Baruzzo, Daniela; Minichelli, Dino; Bruckner, Sergio; Fedrizzi, Lorenzo; Bachiorrini, Alessandro; Maschio, Stefano

    2006-06-30

    Dredging spoils, due to their composition could be considered a new potential source for the production of monolithic ceramics. Nevertheless, abundance of coloured oxides in these materials preclude the possibility of obtaining white products, but not that of producing ceramics with a good mechanical behaviour. As goal of the present research we have produced and studied samples using not only dredging spoils alone, but also mixtures with other waste materials such as bottom ashes from an incinerator of municipal solid waste, incinerated seawage sludge from a municipal seawage treatment plant and steelworks slag. Blending of different components was done by attrition milling. Powders were pressed into specimens which were air sintered in a muffle furnace and their shrinkage on firing was determined. Water absorption, density, strength, hardness, fracture toughness, thermal expansion coefficient of the fired bodies were measured; XRD and SEM images were also examined. The fired samples were finally tested in acidic environment in order to evaluate their elution behaviour and consequently their environmental compatibility. It is observed that, although the shrinkage on firing is too high for the production of tiles, in all the compositions studied the sintering procedure leads to fine microstructures, good mechanical properties and to a limitation of the release of many of the most hazardous metals contained in the starting powders.

  4. Recycling of Malaysia's electric arc furnace (EAF) slag waste into heavy-duty green ceramic tile.

    PubMed

    Teo, Pao-Ter; Anasyida, Abu Seman; Basu, Projjal; Nurulakmal, Mohd Sharif

    2014-12-01

    Recently, various solid wastes from industry such as glass waste, fly ash, sewage sludge and slag have been recycled into various value-added products such as ceramic tile. The conventional solutions of dumping the wastes in landfills or incineration, including in Malaysia are getting obsolete as the annual huge amount of the solid wastes would boost-up disposal cost and may cause permanent damage to the flora and fauna. This recent waste recycling approach is much better and greener as it can resolve problems associated with over-limit storage of industrial wastes and reduce exploration of natural resources for ceramic tile to continuously sustain the nature. Therefore, in this project, an attempt was made to recycle electric arc furnace (EAF) slag waste, obtained from Malaysia's steel making industry, into ceramic tile via conventional powder compaction method. The research work was divided into two stages. The first stage was to evaluate the suitability of EAF slag in ceramic tile by varying weight percentage of EAF slag (40 wt.%, 50 wt.% and 60 wt.%) and ball clay (40 wt.%, 50 wt.% and 60 wt.%), with no addition of silica and potash feldspar. In the second stage, the weight percentage of EAF slag was fixed at 40 wt.% and the percentage of ball clay (30 wt.% and 40 wt.%), feldspar (10 wt.% and 20 wt.%) and silica (10 wt.% and 20 wt.%) added was varied accordingly. Results obtained show that as weight percentage of EAF slag increased up to 60 wt.%, the percentage of apparent porosity and water absorption also rose, with a reduction in tile flexural strength and increased porosity. On the other hand, limiting the weight percentage of EAF slag to 40 wt.% while increasing the weight percentage of ball clay led to a higher total percentage of anorthite and wollastonite minerals, resulting in higher flexural strength. It was found that introduction of silica and feldspar further improved the flexural strength due to optimization of densification process. The highest

  5. Contact pressure distribution during the polishing process of ceramic tiles: A laboratory investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sani, A. S. A.; Sousa, F. J. P.; Hamedon, Z.; Azhari, A.

    2016-02-01

    During the polishing process of porcelain tiles the difference in scratching speed between innermost and peripheral abrasives leads to pressure gradients linearly distributed along the radial direction of the abrasive tool. The aim of this paper is to investigate such pressure gradient in laboratory scale. For this purpose polishing tests were performed on ceramic tiles according to the industrial practices using a custom-made CNC tribometer. Gradual wear on both abrasives and machined surface of the floor tile were measured. The experimental results suggested that the pressure gradient tends to cause an inclination of the abraded surfaces, which becomes stable after a given polishing period. In addition to the wear depth of the machined surface, the highest value of gloss and finest surface finish were observed at the lowest point of the worn out surface of the ceramic floor tile corresponding to the point of highest pressure and lowest scratching speed.

  6. Electrospun SiO2 "necklaces" on unglazed ceramic tiles: a planarizing strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Mauro, Alessandro; Fragalà, Maria Elena

    2015-05-01

    Silica based nanofibres have been deposited on unglazed ceramic tiles by combining electrospinning and sol-gel processes. Poly(vinyl pyrrolidone) (PVP) alcoholic solutions and commercial spin on glass (Accuglass) mixtures have been used to obtain composite fibrous non-woven mats totally converted, after thermal annealing at 600 °C, to SiO2 microsphere "necklaces". The possibility to get an uniform fibres coverage onto the tile surface confirms the validity of electrospinning (easily scalable to large surface samples) as coating strategy to cover the macroscopic defects typical of the polished unglazed tile surface and improve surface planarization.

  7. Mechanical and tribological behavior of red clay ceramic tiles coated with fly ash powders by thermal spraying technique.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peña-Rodríguez, G.; Dulce-Moreno, H.; Daza-Ramírez, J.; Orozco-Hernández, S.; Vargas-Galvis, F.

    2017-01-01

    The mechanical and tribological performance of red clay ceramic tiles uncoated and coated by oxy-fuel thermal spraying process from fly ash powders was evaluated. The ceramic tile substrates were manufactured by uniaxial pressing at 26.17 bar pressure, and sintered at 1100 °C. The coating thickness was determined based on the number of projection-cycles oxyacetylene flame over substrate. Coal fly ash coatings were deposited, with average thickness of 56.18±12.18 μm, 180.42±20.32 μm, and 258.26±25.88μm. The mechanical resistance to bending and wear by abrasion deep, were studied using ISO 10545-4 standards and ISO 10545-6 respectively; adhesion was measured using Elcometer equipment Type III according to ASTM D-4541-02 and the average roughness (Ra) was found according to ASTM standard D7127-13, using the profilometer Mitutoyo SJ 201. The surface morphology presented the heterogeneous molten or semi molten splats with average size of 35.262±3.48 micrometers with good adhesion, justifying increased mechanical resistance to bending by 5%, as well as wear by abrasion deep. These results contribute to the development of ceramic products with added value, to be used in various technological applications.

  8. Hydrothermally prepared inorganic siliceous wastes: Hydrothermal reaction of calcareous and steatite ceramic tile wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Maenami, Hiroki; Yamamoto, Takeyuki; Ishida, Hideki

    1996-12-31

    Possibility of solidification of various ceramic wastes by hydrothermal processing was investigated. The starting materials were feldspathic porcelain tile waste, steatite ceramic tile waste, and calcareous ceramic tile waste. These were mixed with CaO so as to obtain a Ca/Si molar ratio of 0.5. After forming, they were cured for 2 to 20 h under the saturated steam pressure at 200{degrees}C. Although the SiO{sub 2} content of these ceramic wastes was about 70 mass% and they contain various alkaline ions and alkaline earth ions, solidified specimens with flexural strength up to 35MPa were obtained. This is within the range of strengths when quartz or fused silica is used as pure SiO{sub 2} sources. Formation of tobermorite, which was detected in all systems after 2 h of curing, was considered to affect the increase of the strength. It was found that there is a possibility of aluminum and alkali ions being included in the structure of the formed tobermorite. In the case of using steatite ceramic tile waste containing Mg, magnesium silicate hydrates were also formed. The modal pore diameter shifted to 0.01 {mu} m with the formation of these hydrates and there was correlation between the flexural strength and the pore size distribution.

  9. Joining of ceramics of different biofunction by hot isostatic pressing

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Jianguo . Center for Dental Technology and Biomaterials); Harmansson, L. ); Soeremark, R. . Dept. of Prosthodontics)

    1993-10-01

    Monolithic zirconia (Z) and zirconia-hydroxyapatite (Z/HA) composites were joined by cold isostatic pressing (CIP at 300 MPa) and subsequently by glass-encapsulated hot isostatic pressing (HIP at 1225 C, 1 h and 200 MPa). The physical and mechanical properties of the materials were measured. The fracture surface was studied using a light microscope. The results indicate a strength level of the joint similar to that of the corresponding composite material (Z/HA), 845 and 860 MPa, respectively. Similar experiments with monolithic alumina (A) and alumina-hydroxyapatite (A/HA) were carried out without success. Cracking occurred in the joint area during the cold isostatic pressing process. It seems that ceramics with high green strength and similar green density are essential when joining ceramics by combined CIP and HIP processes.

  10. Characterization of low-temperature cofired ceramic tiles as platforms for gas chromatographic separations.

    PubMed

    Darko, Ernest; Thurbide, Kevin B; Gerhardt, Geoff C; Michienzi, Joseph

    2013-06-04

    A gas chromatography (GC) column is fabricated within a low-temperature cofired ceramic (LTCC) tile, and its analytical properties are characterized. By using a dual-spiral design, a 100 μm wide square channel up to 15 m in length is produced within an 11 cm × 5.5 cm LTCC tile. The channel is dynamically coated with an OV-101 stationary phase that is cross-linked with dicumyl peroxide. While the uncoated LTCC tiles were able to separate a mixture of n-alkanes, the peak shapes were broad (base width of ~2 min) and tailing. In contrast to this, the coated LTCC tiles produced sharp (base width of ~8-10 s), symmetrical, well-resolved peaks for the same analytes. By using a 7.5 m long channel, about 15,000 plates were obtained for a dodecane test analyte. Further, the coated LTCC tiles were found to produce plate heights that were about 3-fold smaller than those obtained from a conventional capillary GC column of similar length, dimension, and coating operated under the same conditions. As a result, test analyte separations were slightly improved in the LTCC tiles, and their overall performance fared well. In terms of temperature programming, it was found that a series of n-alkanes separated on the LTCC tile provided a cumulative peak capacity of around 54 peaks when using C₈ to C₁₃ as analyte markers. Results indicate that LTCC tiles provide a viable and useful alternative platform for performing good quality GC separations.

  11. Laser Treatment of Nanoparticulated Metal Thin Films for Ceramic Tile Decoration.

    PubMed

    Rico, V J; Lahoz, R; Rey-García, F; Yubero, F; Espinós, J P; de la Fuente, G F; González-Elipe, A R

    2016-09-21

    This paper presents a new method for the fabrication of metal-like decorative layers on glazed ceramic tiles. It consists of the laser treatment of Cu thin films prepared by electron-beam evaporation at glancing angles. A thin film of discontinuous Cu nanoparticles was electron-beam-evaporated in an oblique angle configuration onto ceramic tiles and an ample palette of colors obtained by laser treatment both in air and in vacuum. Scanning electron microscopy along with UV-vis-near-IR spectroscopy and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry analysis were used to characterize the differently colored layers. On the basis of these analyses, color development has been accounted for by a simple model considering surface melting phenomena and different microstructural and chemical transformations of the outmost surface layers of the samples.

  12. Detection of ionizing radiations by studying ceramic tiles materials using thermoluminescence technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandavia, H. C.; Murthy, K. V. R.; Purohit, R. U.

    2017-05-01

    Natural background radiation comes from two primary sources: cosmic radiation and terrestrial sources. Our natural environment has both livings and non-livings like - Sun, Moon, Sky, Air, Water, Soil, Rivers, Mountains, Forests, besides plants and animals. The worldwide average background dose for a human being is about 2.4 millisievert (mSv) per year. This exposure is mostly from cosmic radiation and natural radionuclides in the environment. The Earth, and all living things on it, are constantly bombarded by radiation from outer space. This radiation primarily consists of positively charged ions from protons to iron and larger nuclei derived sources outside our solar system. This radiation interacts with atoms in the atmosphere to create secondary radiation, including X-rays, muons, protons, alpha particles, pions, electrons, and neutrons. The present study discusses the utility of ceramic tiles as radiation dosimeters in case of nuclear fallout. Many flooring materials most of them are in natural form are used to manufacture floor tiles for household flooring purpose. Many natural minerals are used as the raw materials required for the manufacturing ceramic ware. The following minerals are used to manufacturing the ceramic tiles i.e. Quartz, Feldspar, Zircon, Talc, Grog, Alumina oxide, etc. Most of the minerals are from Indian mines of Gujarat and Rajasthan states, some of are imported from Russian subcontinent. The present paper reports the thermoluminescence dosimetry Study of Feldspar and Quartz minerals collected from the ceramic tiles manufacturing unit, Morbi. The main basis in the Thermoluminescence Dosimetry (TLD) is that TL output is directly proportional to the radiation dose received by the phosphor and hence provides the means of estimating unknown radiations from environment.

  13. Kaolin processing waste applied in the manufacturing of ceramic tiles and mullite bodies.

    PubMed

    Menezes, Romualdo R; Farias, Felipe F; Oliveira, Maurício F; Santana, Lisiane N L; Neves, Gelmires A; Lira, Helio L; Ferreira, Heber C

    2009-02-01

    In the last few years, mineral extraction and processing industries have been identified as sources of environmental contamination and pollution. The kaolin processing industry around the world generates large amounts of waste materials. The present study evaluated the suitability of kaolin processing waste as an alternative source of ceramic raw material for the production of ceramic tiles and dense mullite bodies. Several formulations were prepared and sintered at different temperatures. The sintered samples were characterized to determine their porosity, water absorption, firing shrinkage and mechanical strength. The fired samples were microstructurally analysed by X-ray diffraction. The results indicated that ceramic tile formulations containing up to 60% of waste could be used for the production of tiles with low water absorption (approximately 0.5%) and low sintering temperature (1150 degrees C). Mullite formulations with more than 40% of kaolin waste could be used in the production of bodies with high strength, of about 75 MPa, which can be used as refractory materials.

  14. Relationship between meanings, emotions, product preferences and personal values. Application to ceramic tile floorings.

    PubMed

    Agost, María-Jesús; Vergara, Margarita

    2014-07-01

    This work aims to validate a conceptual framework which establishes the main relationships between subjective elements in human-product interaction, such as meanings, emotions, product preferences, and personal values. The study analyzes the relationships between meanings and emotions, and between these and preferences, as well as the influence of personal values on such relationships. The study was applied to ceramic tile floorings. A questionnaire with images of a neutral room with different ceramic tile floorings was designed and distributed via the web. Results from the study suggest that both meanings and emotions must be taken into account in the generation of product preferences. The meanings given to the product can cause the generation of emotions, and both types of subjective impressions give rise to product preferences. Personal reference values influence these relationships between subjective impressions and product preferences. As a consequence, not only target customers' demographic data but specifically their values and criteria must be taken into account from the beginning of the development process. The specific results of this paper can be used directly by ceramic tile designers, who can better adjust product design (and the subjective impressions elicited) to the target market. Consequently, the chance of product success is reinforced.

  15. Fracture toughness of heat-pressed and layered ceramics.

    PubMed

    Ansong, Richard; Flinn, Brian; Chung, Kwok-Hung; Mancl, Lloyd; Ishibe, Motoaki; Raigrodski, Ariel J

    2013-04-01

    Veneering ceramic materials designed to be used with high noble alloy and zirconia-based restorations have been reported to be susceptible to chipping in vivo. The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the fracture toughness of heat-pressed and layered ceramics intended for zirconia and high-noble alloy substrates. Bar specimens were fabricated from 8 different ceramics (Ivoclar-Vivadent [I] and Noritake [N]) intended for pressing (P) and layering (L) to high noble alloy (M) and zirconia (Z) substrates, following the ISO 6872 protocol. The single edge notch beam test method was used to create a notch in the center of each specimen, which was then tested with a universal testing machine (n=6, cross-head speed=0.5 mm/min) and the fracture force values recorded. These values were used to calculate the fracture toughness (K1c) for each specimen. Fracture surfaces were examined with a scanning electron microscope, and the basic components of the tested ceramics were determined by using energy dispersive x-ray (EDX) spectroscopy. Data were analyzed with 3-way ANOVA, followed by multiple comparisons using the Holm method (α=.05). The mean (SD) of the calculated fracture toughness values obtained ranged from 1.20 (0.04) MPa·m(1/2) (group NZL) to 1.74 (0.04) MPa·m(1/2) (group IZL). Fracture toughness was significantly higher in group IZL (1.74) than group IZP (1.41), but lower in group NZL (1.20) than group NZP (1.36) (P<.001). Fracture toughness was somewhat lower in group IML (1.36) than group IMP (1.47) (P=.018), and no significant difference was found between group NML and group NMP (P=.14). Veneering ceramics used with a metal substrate showed a crystalline structure mixed with a glassy phase pattern on the fracture surface. The results of EDX analysis on the fracture surfaces indicated that the tested ceramics were composed of Si, Al, K, Na, Mg, and oxygen elements. Ceramics used for veneering zirconia substrate may have various fracture toughness

  16. Radon exhalation rates and gamma doses from ceramic tiles.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, R S; Aral, H; Peggie, J R

    1998-12-01

    This study was carried out to assess the possible radiological hazard resulting from the use of zircon in glaze applied to tiles used in buildings. The 226Ra content of various stains and glazing compounds was measured using gamma spectroscopy and the 222Rn exhalation rates for these materials were measured using adsorption on activated charcoal. The radon exhalation rates were found to be close to or less than the minimum detectable values for the equipment used. This limit was much lower than the estimated exhalation rates, which were calculated assuming that the parameters controlling the emanation and diffusion of 222Rn in the materials studied were similar to those of soil. This implied that the 222Rn emanation coefficients and/or diffusion coefficients for most of the materials studied were very much lower than expected. Measurements on zircon powders showed that the 222Rn emanation coefficient for zircon was much lower than that for soil, indicating that only a small fraction of the 222Rn produced by the decay of 226Ra was able to escape from the zircon grains. The estimated increase in radon concentration in room air and the estimated external gamma radiation dose resulting from the use of zircon glaze are both much lower than the relevant action level and dose limit.

  17. Laser ultrasonics for bulk-density distribution measurement on green ceramic tiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revel, G. M.; Cavuto, A.; Pandarese, G.

    2016-10-01

    In this paper a Laser Ultrasonics (LUT) system is developed and applied to measure bulk density distribution of green ceramic tiles, which are porous materials with low heat conductivity. Bulk density of green ceramic bodies is a fundamental parameter to be kept under control in the industrial production of ceramic tiles. The LUT system proposed is based on a Nd:YAG pulsed laser for excitation and an air-coupled electro-capacitive transducer for detection. The paper reports experimental apparent bulk-density measurements on white ceramic bodies after a calibration procedures. The performances observed are better than those previously achieved by authors using air-coupled ultrasonic probes for both emission and detection, allowing to reduce average uncertainty down to about ±6 kg/m3 (±0.3%), thanks to the increase in excitation efficiency and lateral resolution, while maintaining potential flexibility for on-line application. The laser ultrasonic procedure proposed is available for both on-line and off-line application. In this last case it is possible to obtain bulk density maps with high spatial resolution by a 2D scan without interrupting the production process.

  18. Laser ultrasonics for bulk-density distribution measurement on green ceramic tiles.

    PubMed

    Revel, G M; Cavuto, A; Pandarese, G

    2016-10-01

    In this paper a Laser Ultrasonics (LUT) system is developed and applied to measure bulk density distribution of green ceramic tiles, which are porous materials with low heat conductivity. Bulk density of green ceramic bodies is a fundamental parameter to be kept under control in the industrial production of ceramic tiles. The LUT system proposed is based on a Nd:YAG pulsed laser for excitation and an air-coupled electro-capacitive transducer for detection. The paper reports experimental apparent bulk-density measurements on white ceramic bodies after a calibration procedures. The performances observed are better than those previously achieved by authors using air-coupled ultrasonic probes for both emission and detection, allowing to reduce average uncertainty down to about ±6 kg/m(3) (±0.3%), thanks to the increase in excitation efficiency and lateral resolution, while maintaining potential flexibility for on-line application. The laser ultrasonic procedure proposed is available for both on-line and off-line application. In this last case it is possible to obtain bulk density maps with high spatial resolution by a 2D scan without interrupting the production process.

  19. Influence of ceramic surface texture on the wear of gold alloy and heat-pressed ceramics.

    PubMed

    Saiki, Osamu; Koizumi, Hiroyasu; Nogawa, Hiroshi; Hiraba, Haruto; Akazawa, Nobutaka; Matsumura, Hideo

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of ceramic surface texture on the wear of rounded rod specimens. Plate specimens were fabricated from zirconia (ZrO2), feldspathic porcelain, and lithium disilicate glass ceramics (LDG ceramics). Plate surfaces were either ground or polished. Rounded rod specimens with a 2.0-mm-diameter were fabricated from type 4 gold alloy and heat-pressed ceramics (HP ceramics). Wear testing was performed by means of a wear testing apparatus under 5,000 reciprocal strokes of the rod specimen with 5.9 N vertical loading. The results were statistically analyzed with a non-parametric procedure. The gold alloy showed the maximal height loss (90.0 µm) when the rod specimen was abraded with ground porcelain, whereas the HP ceramics exhibited maximal height loss (49.8 µm) when the rod specimen was abraded with ground zirconia. There was a strong correlation between height loss of the rod and surface roughness of the underlying plates, for both the gold alloy and HP ceramics.

  20. Process-generated nanoparticles from ceramic tile sintering: Emissions, exposure and environmental release.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, A S; Maragkidou, A; Viana, M; Querol, X; Hämeri, K; de Francisco, I; Estepa, C; Borrell, C; Lennikov, V; de la Fuente, G F

    2016-09-15

    The ceramic industry is an industrial sector in need of significant process changes, which may benefit from innovative technologies such as laser sintering of ceramic tiles. Such innovations result in a considerable research gap within exposure assessment studies for process-generated ultrafine and nanoparticles. This study addresses this issue aiming to characterise particle formation, release mechanisms and their impact on personal exposure during a tile sintering activity in an industrial-scale pilot plant, as a follow-up of a previous study in a laboratory-scale plant. In addition, possible particle transformations in the exhaust system, the potential for particle release to the outdoor environment, and the effectiveness of the filtration system were also assessed. For this purpose, a tiered measurement strategy was conducted. The main findings evidence that nanoparticle emission patterns were strongly linked to temperature and tile chemical composition, and mainly independent of the laser treatment. Also, new particle formation (from gaseous precursors) events were detected, with nanoparticles <30nm in diameter being formed during the thermal treatment. In addition, ultrafine and nano-sized airborne particles were generated and emitted into workplace air during sintering process on a statistically significant level. These results evidence the risk of occupational exposure to ultrafine and nanoparticles during tile sintering activity since workers would be exposed to concentrations above the nano reference value (NRV; 4×10(4)cm(-3)), with 8-hour time weighted average concentrations in the range of 1.4×10(5)cm(-3) and 5.3×10(5)cm(-3). A potential risk for nanoparticle and ultrafine particle release to the environment was also identified, despite the fact that the efficiency of the filtration system was successfully tested and evidenced a >87% efficiency in particle number concentrations removal. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All

  1. Effect of biological treatment of the ceramic mass on the drying and firing of facing tiles

    SciTech Connect

    Baranov, V.V.; Sidorova, V.A.; Skripnik, V.P.; Solnyshkina, T.N.; Vainberg, S.N.; Vlasov, A.S.; Yashchenko, O.I.

    1985-12-01

    The authors studied the ceramic masses of the Minsk Building Materials Production complex (MZSM) and the Kishinev FinishingMaterials Plant (KZOM) having the following compositions: MZSM--48% Vesejovsk VGP clay, 22% nepheline concentrate, 17% quartz sand, 8% dolomite, 5% title scrap, and above 100% 3% bentonite, 0.1% soda ash, and 0.28% liquid glass; KZOM-48% Veselovsk VGP clay, 28% nepheline-syenite, 8% limestone filings (scrap), 16% title scrap, and, above 100%, 1% bentonite and 3% sodium tripolyphosphate. Improving the quality of ceramic tiles and reducing the mineral and fuel-energy consumption in their production are among the practical industrial problems. This paper discusses a method of solving them by improving the drying and firing processes of the products.

  2. Optimal Non-Invasive Fault Classification Model for Packaged Ceramic Tile Quality Monitoring Using MMW Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwal, Smriti; Singh, Dharmendra

    2016-04-01

    Millimeter wave (MMW) frequency has emerged as an efficient tool for different stand-off imaging applications. In this paper, we have dealt with a novel MMW imaging application, i.e., non-invasive packaged goods quality estimation for industrial quality monitoring applications. An active MMW imaging radar operating at 60 GHz has been ingeniously designed for concealed fault estimation. Ceramic tiles covered with commonly used packaging cardboard were used as concealed targets for undercover fault classification. A comparison of computer vision-based state-of-the-art feature extraction techniques, viz, discrete Fourier transform (DFT), wavelet transform (WT), principal component analysis (PCA), gray level co-occurrence texture (GLCM), and histogram of oriented gradient (HOG) has been done with respect to their efficient and differentiable feature vector generation capability for undercover target fault classification. An extensive number of experiments were performed with different ceramic tile fault configurations, viz., vertical crack, horizontal crack, random crack, diagonal crack along with the non-faulty tiles. Further, an independent algorithm validation was done demonstrating classification accuracy: 80, 86.67, 73.33, and 93.33 % for DFT, WT, PCA, GLCM, and HOG feature-based artificial neural network (ANN) classifier models, respectively. Classification results show good capability for HOG feature extraction technique towards non-destructive quality inspection with appreciably low false alarm as compared to other techniques. Thereby, a robust and optimal image feature-based neural network classification model has been proposed for non-invasive, automatic fault monitoring for a financially and commercially competent industrial growth.

  3. Study of dynamic structure and heat and mass transfer of a vertical ceramic tiles dryer using CFD simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kriaa, Wassim; Bejaoui, Salma; Mhiri, Hatem; Le Palec, Georges; Bournot, Philippe

    2014-02-01

    In this study, we developed a two-dimensional Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model to simulate dynamic structure and heat and mass transfer of a vertical ceramic tiles dryer (EVA 702). The carrier's motion imposed the choice of a dynamic mesh based on two methods: "spring based smoothing" and "local remeshing". The dryer airflow is considered as turbulent ( Re = 1.09 × 105 at the dryer inlet), therefore the Re-Normalization Group model with Enhanced Wall Treatment was used as a turbulence model. The resolution of the governing equation was performed with Fluent 6.3 whose capacities do not allow the direct resolution of drying problems. Thus, a user defined scalar equation was inserted in the CFD code to model moisture content diffusion into tiles. User-defined functions were implemented to define carriers' motion, thermo-physical properties… etc. We adopted also a "two-step" simulation method: in the first step, we follow the heat transfer coefficient evolution (Hc). In the second step, we determine the mass transfer coefficient (Hm) and the features fields of drying air and ceramic tiles. The found results in mixed convection mode (Fr = 5.39 at the dryer inlet) were used to describe dynamic and thermal fields of airflow and heat and mass transfer close to the ceramic tiles. The response of ceramic tiles to heat and mass transfer was studied based on Biot numbers. The evolutions of averages temperature and moisture content of ceramic tiles were analyzed. Lastly, comparison between experimental and numerical results showed a good agreement.

  4. [Lead exposure in the ceramic tile industry: time trends and current exposure levels].

    PubMed

    Candela, S; Ferri, F; Olmi, M

    1998-01-01

    There is a high density of industries for the production of ceramic tiles in the District of Scandiano (province of Reggio Emilia, Emilia Romagna region). In this area, since the beginning of 1970s, the time trend of Pb exposure in ceramic tile plants has been evaluated by means of biological monitoring (BM) data collected at the Service of Prevention and Safety in the Work Environment and its associated Toxicology Laboratory. From these data, a clear decreasing time trend of exposure levels is documented, the reduction being more evident during the seventies and in 1985-88. During the seventies BM was introduced systematically in all ceramic tile plants with the determination of delta-aminolevulinic acid in urine (ALA-U). As a consequence of the BM programme, hygienic measures for the abatement of pollution inside the plants were implemented, and a reduction, from 20.6% to 2%, of ALA-U values exceeding 10 mg/l, was observed. In 1985, the determination of lead in blood (PbB) replaced that of ALA-U in the BM programmes and highlighted the persistence of high level of exposure to Pb, which could not be outlined by means of ALA-U because of its lower sensitivity. PbB levels were 36.1 micrograms/100 ml and 25.7 micrograms/100 ml in male and female workers, respectively. These results required the implementation, within the plants, of additional hygienic measures and a significant reduction of PbB was obtained in the following three years. In 1988 PbB levels were 26.0 +/- 10.7 and 21.6 +/- 10.3 micrograms/100 ml in male and female workers, respectively. In 1993-95 Pb levels were obtained from 1328 male and 771 female workers of 56 plants, accounting for about 40% of the total number of workers in the ceramic industry, in the zones of Sassuolo and Scandiano. Exposure levels are not different from those observed in the preceding years, with PbB levels of 25.3 +/- 11.1 and 19.1 +/- 9.2 micrograms/100 ml in male and female workers, respectively.

  5. The effects of repeated heat-pressing on properties of pressable glass-ceramics.

    PubMed

    Chung, K-H; Liao, J-H; Duh, J-G; Chan, D C-N

    2009-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the properties of four heat-pressed glass-ceramic materials after repeated heat-pressing. Two commercially available heat-pressed glass-ceramic systems [Optimal pressable glass-ceramics (OPC and 3G) and Empress pressable glass-ceramics (Empress and Empress2)] were selected. Disc samples (14 mm x 1.4 mm) of each tested material were heat-pressed and used as controls. Sprue and button parts of the pressed groups were retrieved and used for repeated heat-pressing to construct specimens of re-pressed group. All the heat-pressed casting procedures were performed according to the manufacturers' instructions. A biaxial flexural strength (BFS) test (ISO 6872) was performed to determine the strength of pressed and re-pressed glass-ceramic disc specimens (n = 10) at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm min(-1). Ions eluted from etching procedure were collected and examined using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer. Surface characteristics were examined with electron probe microanalysis, X-ray diffraction and secondary electron imaging (SEI). The data were analysed statistically (ANOVA + Tukey's HSD post hoc test, P < 0.05). The BFS values obtained ranged from 123.5 +/- 18.5 to 365.9 +/- 35.5 MPa. The re-pressed Empress2 group had a statistically significant higher BFS mean than the pressed control group (P < 0.05). The SEI micrographs of the lithium disilicate-reinforced glass-ceramic material (Empress2) showed a densely packed, interlocking microstructure and an increase in size with preferred orientation of the lithium disilicate crystals after repeated heat-pressing. Repeated heat-pressing treatment produced a statistically significant increase in the flexural strength of Empress2 glass-ceramic material.

  6. Survival of Staphylococcus aureus exposed to UV radiation on the surface of ceramic tiles coated with TiO2.

    PubMed

    Szczawiński, J; Tomaszewski, H; Jackowska-Tracz, A; Szczawińska, M E

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine and compare the antimicrobial activity of UV radiation of wavelength 253.7 nm (used in typical germicidal lamps) against Staphylococcus aureus on the surfaces of conventionally produced white ceramic wall tiles (matt and shiny) and the same tiles coated with TiO2 using three different methods: RF diode sputtering, atmospheric pressure chemical vapour deposition (APCVD) and spray pyrolysis deposition (SPD). Results clearly indicate that the bactericidal action of UV radiation is much stronger on the surfaces of tiles coated with TiO2 than on the tiles uncovered. The strongest bactericidal effect of UV radiation was found for film prepared by APCVD. Results of experiments for shiny and matt tiles did not differ statistically. The use of ceramic wall tiles coated with TiO2 films in hospitals, veterinary clinics, laboratories, food processing plants and other places where UV radiation is applied for disinfection should greatly improve the efficiency of this treatment.

  7. Comparison of slime-producing coagulase-negative Staphylococcus colonization rates on vinyl and ceramic tile flooring materials.

    PubMed

    Yazgi, H; Uyanik, M H; Ayyildiz, A

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the colonization of slime-producing coagulase-negative Staphylococcus (CoNS) in 80 patient wards in Turkey (40 vinyl and 40 ceramic tile floors). A total of 480 samples that included 557 CoNS isolates were obtained. Slime production was investigated with the Christensen method and methicillin-susceptibility was tested by the disk-diffusion method. There was a significant difference in the percentage of slime-producing CoNS isolates on vinyl (12.4%) versus ceramic tile flooring (4.4%). From vinyl flooring, the percentage of slime producing methicillin-resistant CoNS (MRCoNS) (8.9%) was significantly higher than for methicillin-sensitive CoNS (MSCoNS) (3.6%), whereas there was no difference from ceramic tile flooring (2.5% MRCoNS versus 1.8% MSCoNS). The most commonly isolated slime-producing CoNS species was S. epidermidis on both types of flooring. It is concluded that vinyl flooring seems to be a more suitable colonization surface for slime-producing CoNS than ceramic tile floors. Further studies are needed to investigate bacterial strains colonized on flooring materials, which are potential pathogens for nosocomial infections.

  8. Micro-XRF for characterization of Moroccan glazed ceramics and Portuguese tiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guilherme, A.; Manso, M.; Pessanha, S.; Zegzouti, A.; Elaatmani, M.; Bendaoud, R.; Coroado, J.; dos Santos, J. M. F.; Carvalho, M. L.

    2013-02-01

    A set of enamelled terracotta samples (Zellij) collected from five different monuments in Morocco were object of study. With the aim of characterizing these typically Moroccan artistic objects, X-ray spectroscopic techniques were used as analytical tool to provide elemental and compound information. A lack of information about these types of artistic ceramics is found by the research through international scientific journals, so this investigation is an opportunity to fulfill this gap. For this purpose, micro-Energy Dispersive X-ray Fluorescence (μ-EDXRF), and wavelength dispersive X-ray Fluorescence (WDXRF) and X-ray Diffraction (XRD) were the chosen methods. As complementary information, a comparison with other sort of artistic pottery objects is given, more precisely with Portuguese glazed wall tiles (Azulejos), based in the Islamic pottery traditions. Differences between these two types of decorative pottery were found and presented in this manuscript.

  9. Modelling runoff on ceramic tile roofs using the kinematic wave equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silveira, Alexandre; Abrantes, João; de Lima, João; Lira, Lincoln

    2016-04-01

    Rainwater harvesting is a water saving alternative strategy that presents many advantages and can provide solutions to address major water resources problems, such as fresh water scarcity, urban stream degradation and flooding. In recent years, these problems have become global challenges, due to climatic change, population growth and increasing urbanisation. Generally, roofs are the first to come into contact with rainwater; thus, they are the best candidates for rainwater harvesting. In this context, the correct evaluation of roof runoff quantity and quality is essential to effectively design rainwater harvesting systems. Despite this, many studies usually focus on the qualitative aspects in detriment of the quantitative aspects. Laboratory studies using rainfall simulators have been widely used to investigate rainfall-runoff processes. These studies enabled a detailed exploration and systematic replication of a large range of hydrologic conditions, such as rainfall spatial and temporal characteristics, providing for a fast way to obtain precise and consistent data that can be used to calibrate and validate numerical models. This study aims to evaluate the performance of a kinematic wave based numerical model in simulating runoff on sloping roofs, by comparing the numerical results with the ones obtained from laboratory rainfall simulations on a real-scale ceramic tile roof (Lusa tiles). For all studied slopes, simulated discharge hydrographs had a good adjust to observed ones. Coefficient of determination and Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency values were close to 1.0. Particularly, peak discharges, times to peak and peak durations were very well simulated.

  10. Removal of glass adhered to sintered ceramics in hot isostatic pressing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    In the hot isostatic pressing of ceramic materials in molten glass using an inert gas as a pressing medium, glass adhered to the sintered ceramics is heated to convert it to a porous glass and removed. Thus, Si3N4 powder was compacted at 5000 kg/sq cm, coated with a 0.5 mm thick BN, embedded in Pyrex glass in a graphite crucible, put inside a hot isostatic press containing Argon, hot pressed at 1750 C and 100 kg/sq cm; cooled, taken out from the crucible, heated at 1100 C for 30 minutes, cooled, and then glass adhered to the sintered body was removed.

  11. Use of thin film transistor liquid crystal display (TFT-LCD) waste glass in the production of ceramic tiles.

    PubMed

    Lin, Kae-Long

    2007-09-05

    In this study, we employ the following operating conditions: varied pressure (25 kgf/cm(2)), sintering temperature (900-1200 degrees C), sintering time (6h), percentage of thin film transistor liquid crystal display (TFT-LCD) waste glass by weight (0-50%) and temperature rising at a rate of 5 degrees C/min, to fabricate clay tiles. The sintering characteristics of the clay blended with TFT-LCD waste glass tiles are examined to evaluate the feasibility of the reuse of TFT-LCD waste glass. TFT-LCD waste glass contains large amounts of glass. The TCLP leaching concentrations all met the ROC EPAs current regulatory thresholds. The addition of TFT-LCD waste glass to the mixture, increased the apparent weight loss. The incorporation of 50% TFT-LCD waste glass resulted in a significant increase in the porosity ratio of the specimens compared to the porosity ratio of the ceramic tile containing TFT-LCD waste glass. The main constituent in both the clay tile and the clay with TFT-LCD waste glass samples is quartz. Increasing the temperature resulted in an increase in the flexural strength and resistance to abrasion in the tiles. The porosity ratio decreases as shrinkage increases. The relation between the porosity ratio and the hardness of the tiles used in the study is also shown.

  12. Investigation by laser induced breakdown spectroscopy, X-ray fluorescence and X-ray powder diffraction of the chemical composition of white clay ceramic tiles from Veliki Preslav

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blagoev, K.; Grozeva, M.; Malcheva, G.; Neykova, S.

    2013-01-01

    The paper presents the results of the application of laser induced breakdown spectroscopy, X-ray fluorescence spectrometry, and X-ray powder diffraction in assessing the chemical and phase composition of white clay decorative ceramic tiles from the medieval archaeological site of Veliki Preslav, a Bulgarian capital in the period 893-972 AC, well-known for its original ceramic production. Numerous white clay ceramic tiles with highly varied decoration, produced for wall decoration of city's churches and palaces, were found during the archaeological excavations in the old capital. The examination of fourteen ceramic tiles discovered in one of the city's monasteries is aimed at characterization of the chemical profile of the white-clay decorative ceramics produced in Veliki Preslav. Combining different methods and comparing the obtained results provides complementary information regarding the white-clay ceramic production in Veliki Preslav and complete chemical characterization of the examined artefacts.

  13. Compressive Strength and Water Absorption of Pervious Concrete that Using the Fragments of Ceramics and Roof Tiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prahara, E.; Meilani

    2014-03-01

    Pervious concrete was introduced in America in 2003, popularized by Dan Brown and used as a rigid pavement in the open parking lot. Rigid pavement using pervious concrete can absorb water in the surface to go straight through the concrete to the ground below.This water flow is one of the benefit of using the pervious concrete. Using of wastes such as broken roof and ceramics tiles are not commonly used in Indonesia. Utilization these kind of wastes is predicted lower the compressive strength of pervious concrete as they are used as a substitute for coarse aggregate.In this research, pervious concrete is made using a mixture of the fragment of ceramics and roof tiles.This research using broken ceramics and roof tiles with a grain size that loose from 38 mm sieve, retained on 19 mm sieve and the coarse aggregate from crushed stone that loose 12.5 mm sieve, retained on 9.5 mm sieve. The water cement ratio is 0.3 and to assist the mixing process, the addition of addictive in pervious concrete is used.The size of coarse aggregate used in the mixture affects the strength of pervious concrete. The larger the size of aggregate, the obtained compressive strength becomes smaller. It also affects the density of pervious concrete. The using of mixture of ceramics and roof tiles only reduce 2 MPa of pervious concrete compressive strength so this mixture can be used as a substitute for coarse aggregate with a maximum portion of 30 %. The high porosity of the specimens causes the reduction of pervious concrete density that affect the compressive strength. This high level of porosity can be seen from the high level of water absorption that exceed the required limit of water infiltration.

  14. Program-technical complex for sorting ceramic tiles with the method of artificial intellect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aliyev, Namik; Aliyev, Elchin

    2001-08-01

    Development of areas of automated systems of management of technological processes and systems of local automation requires the resolving of a set of questions on identification of production operations, working out industrial methods of measuring and control. Program-technical complex containing the systems of artificial vision, integrating device and dynamic expert systems of ready-product quality control in the example of decorative tile are examined at this work. The problem of identification of image can not be fully formalized and solved with the usage of strict algorithmic procedures and mathematical methods. Due to the mentioned fact, the development of intellectual programming methods- expert systems of image identification should provide effectiveness of mathematical methods of processing and heuristic programming with the expert knowledge of characteristics in analyzed systems. Implementation of the proposed complex, spares the specialist from routine job, allows timely spotting of technological process, solves the problem of sorting of ceramic materials in real time frame. In the meantime, the implementation of the system in dialog mode gives suggestions and recommendations.

  15. Floor tile glass-ceramic glaze for improvement of the resistance to surface abrasion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gajek, M.; Lis, J.; Partyka, J.; Wójczyk, M.

    2011-10-01

    The results of research aimed at the study on frits and glass-ceramic glazes for floor tiles, based on compositions located in the primary field of cordierite crystallization within the system MgO-Al2O3-SiO2, have been presented. The results comprise investigations on the frits crystallization abilities, stability of the crystallizing phase under conditions of single-stage a fast firing cycle (time below 60 minutes) depending on their chemical composition and the influence of the nucleation agents. The influence of the nucleating agents namely TiO2, ZrO2, V2O5 on phase composition of obtained crystalline glazes, mechanical parameters and microstructure, has been examined. The strength tests proved increased mechanical resistance of crystalline glazes. Obtained glazes are characterized by high microhardness in range 6~8 GPa, as well as the increased wear resistance measured by the loss of weight below 100 mg / 55 cm2 (PN-EN ISO 10545-7). Significant increase of these parameters as compared with non-crystalline glazes, where micro-hardness values range between 5~6 GPa and the wear resistance values range from 120 to 200 mg, has been proved. Starting glasses (frits) and glazes of the ternary system MgO-SiO2-Al2O3, were examined with use of DTA, XRD and SEM methods.

  16. A two-stage ceramic tile grout sealing process using a high power diode laser—II. Mechanical, chemical and physical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawrence, J.; Li, L.; Spencer, J. T.

    1998-04-01

    Ceramic tiles sealed using a portable 60 Wcw high power diode laser (HPDL) and a specially developed grout material having an impermeable enamel surface glaze have been tested in order to determine the mechanical, chemical and physical characteristics of the seals. The work showed that the generation of the enamel surface glaze resulted in a seal with improved mechanical and chemical properties over conventional epoxy tile grouts. Both epoxy tile grout and laser generated enamel seals were tested for compressive strength, surface roughness, wear, water permeability and acid/alkali resistance. The enamel seal showed clear improvements in strength, roughness and wear, whilst being impermeable to water, and resistant (up to 80% concentration) to nitric acid, sodium hydroxide and detergent acids. The bond strength and the rupture strength of the enamel seal were also investigated, revealing that the enamel adhered to the new grout and the ceramic tiles with an average bond strength of 45-60 MPa, whilst the rupture strength was comparable with the ceramic tiles themselves. The average surface roughness of the seals and the tiles was 0.36 and 0.06 μm, respectively, whilst for the conventional epoxy grout the average surface roughness when polished was 3.83 μm and in excess of 30 μm without polishing. Life assessment testing revealed that the enamel seals had an increase in actual wear life of 2.9 to 30.4 times over conventional epoxy tile grout, depending upon the corrosive environment.

  17. Preparation and characterization of novel glass-ceramic tile with microwave absorption properties from iron ore tailings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Rui; Liao, SongYi; Dai, ChangLu; Liu, YuChen; Chen, XiaoYu; Zheng, Feng

    2015-03-01

    A novel glass-ceramic tile consisting of one glass-ceramic layer (GC) attaining microwave absorption properties atop ceramic substrate was prepared through quench-heat treatment route derived from iron ore tailings (IOTs) and commercial raw materials (purity range 73-99%). X-ray diffraction (XRD), SEM, Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), Physical property measurement system (PPMS) and Vector network analyzer (VNA) measurements were carried out to investigate phase, microstructure, magnetic and microwave absorption aspects of the glass-ceramic layer. Roughly 80.6±1.7 wt% borosilicate glass and 19.4±1.7 wt% spinel ferrite with chemical formula of (Zn2+0.17Fe3+0.83)[Fe3+1.17Fe2+0.06Ni2+0.77]O4 were found among the tested samples. Absorption of Electromagnetic wave by 3 mm thick glass-ceramic layer at frequency of 2-18 GHz reached peak reflection loss (RL) of -17.61 dB (98.27% microwave absorption) at 10.31 GHz. Altering the thickness of the glass-ceramic layer can meet the requirements of different level of microwave absorption.

  18. Thermo Physical Characteristics of Vitrified Tile Polishing Waste for Use in Traditional Ceramics-An Initiative of Cgcri, Naroda Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misra, S. N.; Machhoya, B. B.; Savsani, R. M.

    This paper reports the thermo physical characteristics of Vitrified tile polishing waste materials. As such growing production of vitrified tiles in the country generate large volume of this waste obtained during processing, polishing and cutting of the vitrified tiles to the tune of nearly 10-15 tonnes per day from each plant. The characteristic features of these materials are being studied and investigated to develop suitable technology for finding its gainful use especially in the traditional ceramics. It is known that ceramic as such building materials industry could be a large raw materials consumer and being heterogeneous and thus could utilize this vast quantity as the raw materials. However, the main problem would be it's firing nature as it showed thermal deformation after a particular temperature. Interestingly, the production process of most of the traditional ceramics follows a similar pattern starting from the raw materials processing up to a level of firing. Hence, to suggest suitable utility in the traditional ceramics as raw materials, it was the prime requisite that these waste must be thoroughly studied w. r. t various thermo physical characteristics to make use in this sectors. Hence, the present paper interestingly gone up to various study such as raw materials nature, particle size distribution, chemistry, XRD and DTA study for understanding typical physico chemical properties, and finally thermal properties to make it suitable for use in traditional ceramic industries. The higher fineness of the waste materials indicates its usefulness without extra grinding. The chemistry of typical sludge shows contamination from abrasive particles, sorrel cement bonding materials etc. originated from the polishing wheel and needs special precaution while suggesting use in the ceramic sectors. The firing characteristics of the sludge materials produces a foamy and spongy shapes and this could be the main guiding parameters in selecting the end use of the

  19. Influence of hot isostatic pressing on ZrO2-CaO dental ceramics properties.

    PubMed

    Gionea, Alin; Andronescu, Ecaterina; Voicu, Georgeta; Bleotu, Coralia; Surdu, Vasile-Adrian

    2016-08-30

    Different hot isostatic pressing conditions were used to obtain zirconia ceramics, in order to assess the influence of HIP on phase transformation, compressive strength, Young's modulus and density. First, CaO stabilized zirconia powder was synthesized through sol-gel method, using zirconium propoxide, calcium isopropoxide and 2-metoxiethanol as precursors, then HIP treatment was applied to obtain final dense ceramics. Ceramics were morphologically and structurally characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Density measurements, compressive strength and Young's modulus tests were also performed in order to evaluate the effect of HIP treatment. The zirconia powders heat treated at 500°C for 2h showed a pure cubic phase with average particle dimension about 70nm. The samples that were hot isostatic pressed presented a mixture of monoclinic-tetragonal or monoclinic-cubic phases, while for pre-sintered samples, cubic zirconia was the single crystalline form. Final dense ceramics were obtained after HIP treatment, with relative density values higher than 94%. ZrO2-CaO ceramics presented high compressive strength, with values in the range of 500-708.9MPa and elastic behavior with Young's modulus between 1739MPa and 4372MPa. Finally zirconia ceramics were tested for biocompatibility allowing the normal development of MG63 cells in vitro.

  20. Application of exopolysaccharides to improve the performance of ceramic bodies in the unidirectional dry pressing process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caneira, Inês; Machado-Moreira, Bernardino; Dionísio, Amélia; Godinho, Vasco; Neves, Orquídia; Dias, Diamantino; Saiz-Jimenez, Cesareo; Miller, Ana Z.

    2015-04-01

    Ceramic industry represents an important sector of economic activity in the European countries and involves complex and numerous manufacturing processes. The unidirectional dry pressing process includes milling and stirring of raw materials (mainly clay and talc minerals) in aqueous suspensions, followed by spray drying to remove excess water obtaining spray-dried powders further subjected to dry pressing process (conformation). However, spray-dried ceramic powders exhibit an important variability in their performance when subjected to the dry pressing process, particularly in the adhesion to the mold and mechanical strength, affecting the quality of the final conformed ceramic products. Therefore, several synthetic additives (deflocculants, antifoams, binders, lubricants and plasticizers) are introduced in the ceramic slips to achieve uniform and homogeneous pastes, conditioning their rheological properties. However, an important variability associated with the performance of the conformed products is still reported. Exopolysaccharides or Extracellular Polymeric Substances (EPS) are polymers excreted by living organisms, such as bacteria, fungi and algae, which may confer unique and potentially interesting properties with potential industrial uses, such as viscosity control, gelation, and flocculation. Polysaccharides, such as pullulan, gellan, carrageenan and xanthan have found a wide range of applications in food, pharmaceutical, petroleum, and in other industries. The aim of this study was the assessment of exopolysaccharides as natural additives to optimize the performance of spray-dried ceramic powders during the unidirectional dry pressing process, replacing the synthetic additives used in the ceramic production process. Six exopolysaccharides, namely pullulan, gellan, xanthan gum, κappa- and iota-carrageenan, and guar gum were tested in steatite-based spray-dried ceramic powders at different concentrations. Subsequently, these ceramic powders were

  1. Yb:Y2O3 transparent ceramics processed with hot isostatic pressing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jun; Ma, Jie; Zhang, Jian; Liu, Peng; Luo, Dewei; Yin, Danlei; Tang, Dingyuan; Kong, Ling Bing

    2017-09-01

    Highly transparent 5 at.% Yb:Y2O3 ceramics were fabricated by using a combination method of vacuum sintering and hot isostatic pressing (HIP). Co-precipitated Yb:Y2O3 powders, with 1 at.% ZrO2 as the sintering aid, were used as the starting material. The Yb:Y2O3 ceramics, vacuum sintered at 1700 °C for 2 h and HIPed at 1775 °C for 4 h, exhibited small grain size of 1.9 μm and highly dense microstructure. In-line optical transmittance of the ceramics reached 83.4% and 78.9% at 2000 and 600 nm, respectively. As the ceramic slab was pumped by a fiber-coupled laser diode at about 940 nm, a maximum output power of 0.77 W at 1076 nm was achieved, with a corresponding slope efficiency of 10.6%.

  2. Ceramic tiles with black pigment made from stainless steel plant dust: Physical properties and long-term leaching behavior of heavy metals.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Renbo; Ma, Guojun; Cai, Yongsheng; Chen, Yuxiang; Yang, Tong; Duan, Boyu; Xue, Zhengliang

    2016-04-01

    Stainless steel plant dust is a hazardous by-product of the stainless steelmaking industry. It contains large amounts of Fe, Cr, and Ni, and can be potentially recycled as a raw material of inorganic black pigment in the ceramic industry to reduce environmental contamination and produce value-added products. In this paper, ceramic tiles prepared with black pigment through recycling of stainless steel plant dust were characterized in terms of physical properties, such as bulk density, water absorption, apparent porosity, and volume shrinkage ratio, as well as the long-term leaching behavior of heavy metals (Cr, Ni, Pb, Cd, and Zn). The results show that good physical properties of ceramic tiles can be obtained with 8% pigments addition, sample preparation pressure of 25 MPa, and sintering at 1200 ºC for 30 min. The major controlling leaching mechanism for Cr and Pb from the ceramic tiles is initial surface wash-off, while the leaching behavior of Cd, Ni, and Zn from the stabilized product is mainly controlled by matrix diffusion. The reutilization process is safe and effective to immobilize the heavy metals in the stainless steel plant dust. Stainless steel plant dust is considered as a hazardous material, and it can be potentially recycled for black pigment preparation in the ceramic industry. This paper provides the characteristics of the ceramic tiles with black pigment through recycling stainless steel plant dust, and the long-term leaching behavior and controlling leaching mechanisms of heavy metals from the ceramic tile. The effectiveness of the treatment process is also evaluated.

  3. Quality and seasonal variation of rainwater harvested from concrete, asphalt, ceramic tile and green roofs in Chongqing, China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qianqian; Wang, Xiaoke; Hou, Peiqiang; Wan, Wuxing; Li, Ruida; Ren, Yufen; Ouyang, Zhiyun

    2014-01-01

    There is an urgent requirement to examine the quality of harvested rainwater for potable and non-potable purposes, based on the type of roofing material. In this study, we examined the effect on the quality of harvested rainwater of conventional roofing materials (concrete, asphalt and ceramic tile roofs) compared with alternative roofing materials (green roof). The results showed that the ceramic tile roof was the most suitable for rainwater-harvesting applications because of the lower concentrations of leachable pollutants. However, in this study, the green roof was not suitable for rainwater harvesting applications. In addition, seasonal trends in water quality parameters showed that pollutants in roof runoff in summer and autumn were lower than those in winter and spring. This study revealed that the quality of harvested rainwater was significantly affected by the roofing material; therefore, local government and urban planners should develop stricter testing programs and produce more weathering resistant roofing materials to allow the harvesting of rainwater for domestic and public uses. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Evaluation of shear bond strength between zirconia core and ceramic veneers fabricated by pressing and layering techniques: In vitro study.

    PubMed

    Subash, M; Vijitha, D; Deb, Saikat; Satish, A; Mahendirakumar, N

    2015-08-01

    Although ceramic veneered on to zirconia core have been in use for quite some time, information regarding the comparative evaluation of the Shear bond strength of Pressable & Layered ceramic veneered on to zirconia core is limited. To evaluate the shear bond strength of zirconia core and ceramic veneer fabricated by two different techniques, Layering (Noritake CZR) and Pressing (Noritake, CZR Press). 20 samples of zirconia blocks were fabricated and the samples were divided into group A & B. Group A - Ceramic Veneered over zirconia core by pressing using Noritake CZR Press. Group B - Ceramic Veneered over zirconia core by layering using Noritake CZR. The veneered specimens were mounted on to the center of a PVC tube using self-cure acrylic resin leaving 3 mm of the veneered surface exposed as cantilever. Using a Universal testing machine the blocks were loaded up to failure. The results were tabulated by using independent samples t-test. The mean shear bond strength for Pressed specimens was 12.458 ± 1.63(S.D) MPa and for layered specimens was 8.458 ± 0.845(S.D) MPa. Pressed specimens performed significantly better than the layered specimen with a P value 0.001. Clinicians and dental laboratory technicians should consider the use of pressed ceramics as an alternative to traditional layering procedures to reduce the chances of chipping or de-lamination of ceramics.

  5. Evaluation of shear bond strength between zirconia core and ceramic veneers fabricated by pressing and layering techniques: In vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Subash, M.; Vijitha, D.; Deb, Saikat; Satish, A.; Mahendirakumar, N.

    2015-01-01

    Statement of Problem: Although ceramic veneered on to zirconia core have been in use for quite some time, information regarding the comparative evaluation of the Shear bond strength of Pressable & Layered ceramic veneered on to zirconia core is limited. Purpose of study: To evaluate the shear bond strength of zirconia core and ceramic veneer fabricated by two different techniques, Layering (Noritake CZR) and Pressing (Noritake, CZR Press). Materials and Method: 20 samples of zirconia blocks were fabricated and the samples were divided into group A & B. Group A - Ceramic Veneered over zirconia core by pressing using Noritake CZR Press. Group B - Ceramic Veneered over zirconia core by layering using Noritake CZR. The veneered specimens were mounted on to the center of a PVC tube using self-cure acrylic resin leaving 3 mm of the veneered surface exposed as cantilever. Using a Universal testing machine the blocks were loaded up to failure. Result: The results were tabulated by using independent samples t-test. The mean shear bond strength for Pressed specimens was 12.458 ± 1.63(S.D) MPa and for layered specimens was 8.458 ± 0.845(S.D) MPa. Conclusion: Pressed specimens performed significantly better than the layered specimen with a P value 0.001. Clinicians and dental laboratory technicians should consider the use of pressed ceramics as an alternative to traditional layering procedures to reduce the chances of chipping or de-lamination of ceramics PMID:26538929

  6. [Effect of ceramic thickness and resin cement shades on final color of heat-pressed ceramic veneers].

    PubMed

    Ren, D F; Zhan, K R; Chen, X D; Xing, W Z

    2017-02-09

    Objective: To analyze the effect of ceramic materials thickness and resin cement shades on the final color of ceramic veneers in the discolored teeth, and to investigate the color agreement of try-in pastes to the corresponding resin cements. Methods: Sixty artificial maxillary central incisor teeth (C2 shade) were used to simulate the natural discolored teeth and prepared according to veneer tooth preparation protocol. Veneers of different thickness in the body region (0.50 and 0.75 mm) were fabricated using ceramic materials (LT A2 shade, IPS e.max Press). The ceramic veneer specimens were bonded to the artificial teeth using the 6 shades of resin cements (Variolink Veneer: shades of LV-3, LV-2, HV+3; RelyX™ Veneer: shades of TR, A3, WO) (n=5). A clinical spectrophotometer was used to measure the color parameters of ceramic veneers at the cervical, body and incisal regions. Color changes of veneers before and after cementation were calculated and registered as ΔE1, and the changes between try-in paste and the corresponding resin cements were registered as ΔE2. Results: Three-way ANOVA indicated that ΔE1 and ΔE2 values were significantly affected by the ceramic thickness, resin cement shades and measuring regions (P<0.05). The ΔE1 values of six shades ranged from 0.59-8.27. The ΔE1 values were more than 2.72 when the ceramic veneers were cemented with resin cements in shades of HV+3 and WO. The ΔE2 values of six shades ranged from 0.60-2.56. The shades of HV+3, WO and A3 resin cements were more than 1.60. Conclusions: Different thickness of ceramic materials, resin cement shades and measuring regions could affect the final color of ceramic veneers. The color differences of some resin cements and corresponding try-in pastes might be observed in clinical practice.

  7. Weibull analysis and flexural strength of hot-pressed core and veneered ceramic structures.

    PubMed

    Bona, Alvaro Della; Anusavice, Kenneth J; DeHoff, Paul H

    2003-11-01

    To test the hypothesis that the Weibull moduli of single- and multilayer ceramics are controlled primarily by the structural reliability of the core ceramic.Methods. Seven groups of 20 bar specimens (25 x 4 x 1.2 mm) were made from the following materials: (1) IPS Empress--a hot-pressed (HP) leucite-based core ceramic; (2) IPS Empress2--a HP lithia-based core ceramic; (3 and 7) Evision--a HP lithia-based core ceramic (ES); (4) IPS Empress2 body--a glass veneer; (5) ES (1.1 mm thick) plus a glaze layer (0.1 mm); and (6) ES (0.8 mm thick) plus veneer (0.3 mm) and glaze (0.1 mm). Each specimen was subjected to four-point flexure loading at a cross-head speed of 0.5 mm/min while immersed in distilled water at 37 degrees C, except for Group 7 that was tested in a dry environment. Failure loads were recorded and the fracture surfaces were examined using SEM. ANOVA and Duncan's multiple range test were used for statistical analysis. No significant differences were found between the mean flexural strength values of Groups 2, 3, 5, and 6 or between Groups 1 and 4 (p>0.05). However, significant differences were found for dry (Group 7) and wet (Groups 1-6) conditions. Glazing had no significant effect on the flexural strength or Weibull modulus. The strength and Weibull modulus of the ES ceramic were similar to those of Groups 5 and 6. The structural reliability of veneered core ceramic is controlled primarily by that of the core ceramic.

  8. Fracture toughness (K(IC) of a hot-pressed core ceramic based on fractographic analysis of fractured ceramic FPDs.

    PubMed

    Oh, Won-Suck; Park, Ju-Mi; Anusavice, Kenneth

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that there is no significant difference between the fracture toughness (K(IC)) of an experimental hot-pressed core ceramic measured by fractographic analysis of failed ceramic prostheses and the values determined by other standard methods. Four groups were subjected to one of four test methods: group 1 = indentation strength technique (standard numerical calculation); group 2 = indentation strength technique (fractographic analysis); group 3 = flexure test of precracked specimens (fractographic analysis); and group 4 = fractographic analysis of failed three-unit fixed partial dentures (FPD). For groups 1 to 3, 20 ceramic bar specimens were subjected to three-point flexure at a cross-head speed of 0.5 mm/min until fracture occurred. For group 4, 10 failed FPDs were collected from a previous study. Stress values at failure were calculated from either a flexure stress equation (groups 1 to 3) or from finite element analyses (group 4). K(IC) values were calculated from an equation and fractographic measurement data. Mean fracture toughness ranged from 3.1 MPa x m1/2 (SD 0.2) (group 1) to 3.4 MPa x m1/2 (SD 0.2) (group 4). The mean K(IC) value for group 1 was significantly different from that of group 4; however, no significant differences were found between groups 1, 2, and 3, or between groups 2, 3, and 4. Fracture toughness for an experimental hot-pressed core ceramic measured by fractographic analysis in combination with finite element analysis was comparable with the values determined with other standard fractographic methods.

  9. Effect of surface treatment on roughness and bond strength of a heat-pressed ceramic.

    PubMed

    Ayad, Mohamed F; Fahmy, Nadia Z; Rosenstiel, Stephen F

    2008-02-01

    Bonding ceramic restorations to tooth structure relies on treatment of the ceramic intaglio surface, selection of a suitable resin luting agent, and appropriate treatment of prepared tooth structure. Various ceramic surface treatments have been advocated which produce different topographies and bond strengths, but little information is available to identify the interaction between the resulting surface topography and bond strength. The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of surface treatments on surface roughness and bond strength to dentin and enamel of a commercially available heat-pressed dental ceramic (IPS Empress). One hundred heat-pressed ceramic disks were fabricated according to the manufacturer's recommendations. Specimens were divided into 5 groups (n=20) and treated with 1 of the following: (1) etching with 9.5% hydrofluoric acid, (2) 50%, or (3) 60% orthophosphoric acid and airborne-particle abrasion with (4) 50-microm, or (5) 250-microm alumina for 10 seconds. Morphological changes obtained with the surface treatments were investigated with a surface texture analyzer on half of the treated specimens. Two additional specimens from each group were treated and prepared for scanning electron microscopy. The specimens were then used for a bond strength test. The treated specimens were silanated and luted with a composite resin luting agent (Nexus 2) to enamel (n=50) and dentin (n=50) surfaces with 10 specimens for each treatment group. The luted specimens were loaded to failure in a universal testing machine in the shear mode with a crosshead speed of 0.05 mm/min. The data were analyzed with 1-way ANOVA followed by the Ryan-Einot-Gabriel-Welsch Multiple Range Test (alpha=.05). Surface treatments resulted in significant differences for surface topography and shear bond strength (P<.001). Mean surface roughness (Ra) (SD) was (2.54 (0.21) microm) for ceramic surfaces treated with 50-microm aluminum powder. Treatment of ceramic specimens

  10. Radiophase development in hot-pressed alkoxide-derived titanate ceramics for nuclear waste stabilization

    SciTech Connect

    Dickson, F.J. ); Mitamura, H. ); White, T.J. )

    1989-06-01

    This paper reports phase development as a function of hot-pressing temperature studied in alkoxide-derived titanate-based ceramics doped with a 10 wt% loading of a sodium-rich (NAR) and a sodium-poor (NAP) simulated high-level waste. Pyrochlore was found to be the most abundant phase in both calcine powders. A pseudobrookite phase existed metastably at hot-pressing temperatures between 890{degrees} and 920{degrees} C. After hot-pressing at 1100{degrees} C, the final phase assemblage for the NAP material consisted of zirconolite, hollandite-type, perovskite, alloy, and reduced rutile (Magneli phases). In addition, NAR samples contained hibonite, freudenbergite, and loveringite. Phase development was driven to completion over a very narrow temperature range ({le}50{degrees} C), beginning at 870{degrees} and 850{degrees} C for NAP and NAR, respectively, although full densification was not achieved below 1100{degrees} C. Both waste forms exhibited comparable microstructure and aqueous durability.

  11. Large Area Active Brazing of Multi-tile Ceramic-Metal Structures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-05-01

    fabricating a combination of lightweight ceramics and metals is complicated by the need to bond these very dissimilar materials together. For severe... steels ) and form strong, metallurgical bonds. However, the high processing temperatures result in large strain (stress) build-up from the inherent... dissimilar materials together. For severe applications, a strong bond between the ceramic and metal is required. One option for achieving this strong

  12. Properties of Clay for Ceramics with Rock Waste for Production Structural Block by Pressing and Firing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerqueira, N. A.; Choe, D.; Alexandre, J.; Azevedo, A. R. G.; Xavier, C. G.; Souza, V. B.

    Building work requires optimization of materials and labor, so that the execution of its subsystems contribute to the quality, reduce costs, decrease waste in buildings, productivity, practicality and especially agility. Thus, the fitting blocks can contribute in this direction. This work therefore consists of physical characterization (determination of fitness levels, grain size and bulk density), chemical (EDX) and thermal (DTA and TGA) sample clay Campos dos Goytacazes-RJ and waste rock ornamental Cachoeiro de Itapemirim-ES, to verify potential for producing red ceramic blocks, pressed and burned, male and female type. The output of block will be with different pe rcentages of incorporation of residues of ornamental rocks (0%, 5% and 10%). With the results obtained, it was found that the raw materials under consideration has the potential for application in the production of ceramic articles.

  13. Low-vacuum SEM analyses of ceramic tiles with emphasis on glaze defects characterisation

    SciTech Connect

    Kopar, Tinkara Ducman, Vilma

    2007-11-15

    The behaviour of glazed building ceramics exposed to different environment (weathering, chemicals, etc.) is determined by microstructural features; in many cases structural and surface defects at the micro- or nanometre scale are crucial for the functional properties of products. Many testing methods for materials characterization of a variety of ceramic products, physical and chemical methods, are time-consuming, large quantities of samples are needed, and are usually destructive. This paper illustrates the use of low-vacuum scanning electron microscopy (LV-SEM) as fast and almost non-destructive, as only a small amount of sample is needed. Examples are given of various surface and structural properties of building ceramics, for the identification of the material deterioration process as a result of environmental impact.

  14. Evaluation of Bond Strength of Pressed and Layered Veneering Ceramics to Nickel-Chromium Alloy

    PubMed Central

    Farzin, Mitra; Khaledi, Amir Alireza; Malekpour, Behnam; Naseri, Mohammad Hassan

    2015-01-01

    Statement of the Problem The success of metal- ceramic- restorations (MCR) depends on the presence of strong bond between porcelain and metal substructure. Purpose The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of hot pressing technique on the bond strength of a metal-porcelain composite in comparison to layering technique. Materials and Method Thirty Nickel-Chromium specimens were produced by two methods; conventional porcelain layering on metal and hot pressing (n=15). Bond strengths of all specimens were assessed by the means of three–point bending test according to ISO 9693: 1999 (E) instructions. The data were analyzed using Students t-test (p< 0.001). Results The mean ± SD bond strength of conventional and hot pressing technique was 48.29 ± 6.02 and 56.52 ± 4.97, respectively. Therefore, the conventional layering technique yielded significantly lower mean bond strength values than hot pressing technique (p< 0.001). Conclusion This study showed that it is possible to improve metal–porcelain bond strength significantly by applying an overpressure during porcelain firing. PMID:26535402

  15. Large enhancement of the electrocaloric effect in PLZT ceramics prepared by hot-pressing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Guangzu; Chen, Zhibiao; Fan, Baoyan; Liu, Jianguo; Chen, Mo; Shen, Meng; Liu, Pin; Zeng, Yike; Jiang, Shenglin; Wang, Qing

    2016-06-01

    In this contribution, we demonstrate the optimization of the microstructures of the Pb0.85La0.1(Zr0.65Ti0.35)O3 (PLZT) relaxor ferroelectric ceramics and subsequent enhancements in their polarization and electrical resistivity by using a hot-pressing process. The resulting superior breakdown strength of hot-pressed PLZT enables the application of high electric field to induce a giant electrocaloric effect, in which the adiabatic change of temperature (ΔT) and the isothermal change of entropy (ΔS) are around 2 times greater than those of the samples prepared by the conventional sintering approach using muffle furnace. Moreover, the addition of extra PbO to make up the loss of Pb in the high-temperature sintering leads to the further improvements in the phase composition and electrical properties of PLZT, due to inhibition of the pyrochlore phase formation. The relationship among the sintering conditions, the content of excess PbO, and the microstructure as well as the electrical characteristics of PLZT have been investigated in a systematic manner. This work provides a facile approach to enhanced electrocaloric effect in bulk ceramics.

  16. A randomized controlled clinical trial of 3-unit posterior zirconia-ceramic fixed dental prostheses (FDP) with layered or pressed veneering ceramics: 3-year results.

    PubMed

    Naenni, Nadja; Bindl, Andreas; Sax, Caroline; Hämmerle, Christoph; Sailer, Irena

    2015-11-01

    The aim of the present pilot study was to test whether or not posterior zirconia-ceramic fixed dental prostheses (FDPs) with pressed veneering ceramic exhibit less chipping than FDPs with layered veneering ceramics. Forty patients (13 female, 27 male; mean age 54 years (range 26.1-80.7 years) in need of one maxillary or mandibular three-unit FDP in the second premolar or molar region were recruited and treated at two separate centers at the University of Zurich according to the same study protocol. The frameworks were made out of zirconia using a CAD/CAM system (Cerec Sirona, Bensheim, Germany). The patients were randomly assigned to either the test group (zirconia frameworks veneered with pressed ceramic; IPS e.max ZirPress, Ivoclar Vivadent AG, Schaan, Liechtenstein; n=20) or the control group (layered veneering ceramic; IPS e.max Ceram, Ivoclar Vivadent AG, Schaan, Liechtenstein; n=20). All FDPs were adhesively cemented and evaluated at baseline (i.e., cementation), at 6 months and at 1 and 3 years of clinical service. The survival of the reconstruction was recorded. The technical outcome was assessed using modified United States Public Health Services (USPHS) criteria. The biologic parameters analyzed at abutment teeth and analogous non-restored teeth included probing pocket depth (PPD), plaque control record (PCR), bleeding on probing (BOP), and tooth vitality (CO2). Data was descriptively analyzed and survival was calculated using Kaplan-Meier statistics. 36 patients (25 female, 11 male; mean age 52.3 years) with 18 test and 18 control FDPs were examined after a mean follow-up of 36 months (95% CI: 32.6-39.1 months). Comparison of groups was done by Crosstabulation showing even distribution of the respective restored teeth amidst the groups. Survival rate was 100% for both test and control FDPs. Chipping of the veneering ceramic tended to occur more frequently in test (n=8; 40%) than in control (n=4; 20%) FDPs, albeit not significantly (p=0.3). No further

  17. Post-fatigue fracture resistance of metal core crowns: press-on metal ceramic versus a conventional veneering system

    PubMed Central

    Agustín-Panadero, Rubén; Campos-Estellés, Carlos; Labaig-Rueda, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of this in vitro study was to compare the mechanical failure behavior and to analyze fracture characteristics of metal ceramic crowns with two veneering systems – press-on metal (PoM) ceramic versus a conventional veneering system – subjected to static compressive loading. Material and Methods Forty-six crowns were constructed and divided into two groups according to porcelain veneer manufacture. Group A: 23 metal copings with porcelain IPS-InLine veneering (conventional metal ceramic). Group B: 23 metal copings with IPS-InLine PoM veneering porcelain. After 120,000 fatigue cycles, the crowns were axially loaded to the moment of fracture with a universal testing machine. The fractured specimens were examined under optical stereomicroscopy and scanning electron microscope. Results Fracture resistance values showed statistically significant differences (Student’s t-test) regarding the type of ceramic veneering technique (p=0.001): Group A (conventional metal ceramics) obtained a mean fracture resistance of 1933.17 N, and Group B 1325.74N (Press-on metal ceramics). The most common type of fracture was adhesive failure (with metal exposure) (p=0.000). Veneer porcelain fractured on the occlusal surface following a radial pattern. Conclusions Metal ceramic crowns made of IPS InLine or IPS InLine PoM ceramics with different laboratory techniques all achieved above-average values for clinical survival in the oral environment according to ISO 6872. Crowns made with IPS InLine by conventional technique resisted fracture an average of 45% more than IPS InLine PoM fabricated with the press-on technique. Key words:Mechanical failure, conventional feldspathic, pressable ceramic, chewing simulator, thermocycling, compressive testing, fracture types, scanning electron microscope. PMID:26155346

  18. Studies on Various Functional Properties of Titania Thin Film Developed on Glazed Ceramic Wall Tiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anil, Asha; Darshana R, Bangoria; Misra, S. N.

    A sol-gel based TiO2 thin film was applied on glazed wall tiles for studying its various functional properties. Thin film was deposited by spin coating on the substrate and subjected to curing at different temperatures such as 600°C, 650, 700°C, 750°C and 800°C with 10 minutes soaking. The gel powder was characterized by FTIR, DTA/TG and XRD. Microstructure of thin film was analyzed by FESEM and EDX. Surface properties of the coatings such as gloss, colour difference, stain resistance, mineral hardness and wettability were extensively studied. The antibacterial activity of the surface of coated substrate against E. coli was also examined. The durability of the coated substrate in comparison to the uncoated was tested against alkali in accordance with ISO: 10545 (Part 13):1995 standard. FESEM images showed that thin films are dense and homogeneous. Coated substrates after firing results in lustre with high gloss, which increased from 330 to 420 GU as the curing temperature increases compared to that of uncoated one (72 GU). Coated substrate cured at 800°C shows higher mineral hardness (5 Mohs’) compared to uncoated one (4 Mohs’) and films cured at all temperatures showed stain resistance. The experimental results showed that the resistance towards alkali attack increase with increase in curing temperature and alkali resistance of sample cured at 800 °C was found to be superior compared to uncoated substrate. Contact angle of water on coated surface of substrates decreased with increase in temperature. Bacterial reduction percentages of the coated surface was 97% for sample cured at 700°C and it decreased from 97% to 87% as the curing temperature increased to 800 °C when treated with E. coli bacteria.

  19. Effects of pressure and temperature on hot pressing a sialon. [Si-Al-O-N ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeh, H. C.; Waters, W. J.

    1977-01-01

    The combined effects of temperature and pressure on the resulting density of a sialon (i.e., a ceramic composed of Si, Al, O, and N) are evaluated. Pressures in the 3.5-27.5 MPa range and temperatures in the 1550-1750 C range are considered. It is found that: (1) fully dense sialon bodies may be produced at lower temperatures than those usually used in the field, (2) the phase equilibrium reaction is increased by increased pressure, (3) the iso-density contour may be used to help design the desired microstructure, (4) phase changes occurring in the sample during hot pressing influenced sialon densification to a large extent, and (5) microstructures exceeding 98% theoretical density suggest that plastic deformation has contributed to densification.

  20. High-strength zirconium diboride-based ceramic composites consolidated by low-temperature hot pressing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Shuqi; Kagawa, Yutaka

    2012-08-01

    Two compositions of ZrB2-based ceramic composites containing Si3N4, Al2O3 and Y2O3 have been hot-pressed at different temperatures between 1673 and 1773 K for 60 min in vacuum. The densification behavior of the composites was examined during the sintering process. The microstructures of the composites were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, and the crystalline phases were identified by x-ray diffraction. The effects of Al2O3 and Y2O3 additives on the densification behavior and flexural strength were assessed. A relative density of ˜95% was obtained after sintering at 1723 K or higher temperatures. The microstructures of the composites consisted of (Zr,Y)B2, α-Si3N4 and Y3(Al,Si)5O12 phases. The room-temperature flexural strength increased with the amount of additives and approached 1 GPa.

  1. Effects of pressure and temperature on hot pressing a sialon. [Si-Al-O-N ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeh, H. C.; Waters, W. J.

    1977-01-01

    The combined effects of temperature and pressure on the resulting density of a sialon (i.e., a ceramic composed of Si, Al, O, and N) are evaluated. Pressures in the 3.5-27.5 MPa range and temperatures in the 1550-1750 C range are considered. It is found that: (1) fully dense sialon bodies may be produced at lower temperatures than those usually used in the field, (2) the phase equilibrium reaction is increased by increased pressure, (3) the iso-density contour may be used to help design the desired microstructure, (4) phase changes occurring in the sample during hot pressing influenced sialon densification to a large extent, and (5) microstructures exceeding 98% theoretical density suggest that plastic deformation has contributed to densification.

  2. A two-stage ceramic tile grout sealing process using a high power diode laser—Grout development and materials characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawrence, J.; Li, L.; Spencer, J. T.

    1998-04-01

    Work has been conducted using a 60 Wcw high power diode laser (HPDL) in order to determine the feasibility and characteristics of sealing the void between adjoining ceramic tiles with a specially developed grout material having an impermeable enamel surface glaze. A two-stage process has been developed using a new grout material which consists of two distinct components: an amalgamated compound substrate and a glazed enamel surface; the amalgamated compound seal providing a tough, heat resistant bulk substrate, whilst the enamel provides an impervious surface. HPDL processing has resulted in crack free seals produced in normal atmospheric conditions. The basic process phenomena are investigated and the laser effects in terms of seal morphology, composition and microstructure are presented. Also, the resultant heat affects are analysed and described, as well as the effects of the shield gases, O 2 and Ar, during laser processing. Tiles were successfully sealed with power densities as low as 500 W/cm 2 and at rates up to 600 mm/min. Contact angle measurements revealed that due to the wettability characteristics of the amalgamated oxide compound grout (AOCG), laser surface treatment was necessary in order to alter the surface from a polycrystalline to a semi-amorphous structure, thus allowing the enamel to adhere. Bonding of the enamel to the AOCG and the ceramic tiles was identified as being principally due to van der Waals forces, and on a very small scale, some of the base AOCG material dissolving into the glaze.

  3. Shear bond strengths of pressed and layered veneering ceramics to high-noble alloy and zirconia cores.

    PubMed

    Ishibe, Motoaki; Raigrodski, Ariel J; Flinn, Brian D; Chung, Kwok-Hung; Spiekerman, Charles; Winter, Robert R

    2011-07-01

    Heat-pressed ceramics to metal alloys and zirconia have been available for some time. However, information regarding their shear bond strengths is limited. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strengths of heat-pressed and layered ceramics with regard to their corresponding high-noble alloy and zirconia cores. Forty cylinders (approx. 5 mm in diameter) of high-noble alloy (Olympia) were cast and divided into 4 groups (n=10). Metal cylinders were veneered with ceramics to produce shear test specimens: Group PMI with IPS InLine POM; Group LMI with IPS InLine; Group PMC with Pulse press-to-metal; and Group LMC with Authentic Pulse Metal ceramic. Forty cylinders (approx. 5 mm in diameter) of zirconia (Lava) were obtained and divided into 4 groups (n=10). These cylinders were veneered with ceramics to produce shear test specimens: Group PZI with IPS e.max ZirPress; Group LZI with IPS e.max. Ceram; Group PZV with VITA PM9; and Group LZV with VITA VM9. The veneering ceramics, 3 mm in thickness, were either pressed or layered to their corresponding cylinders. Thermal cycling was performed at 5°C and 55°C for 20,000 cycles with a 20 second dwell time. Shear bond strength testing was conducted in a universal testing machine, and the failure strengths were recorded. Fracture surfaces were characterized visually, under a stereomicroscope, and with a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Data were analyzed using rank-based Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests with Bonferroni correction to adjust for multiple comparisons (α=.05). For metal ceramic specimens, the mean (SD) shear bond strengths ranged from 37.8 (20.6) MPa to 66.4 (22.1) MPa. There were significant differences between Groups PMI and PMC and between Groups LMI and PMC, in which Groups PMI and LMI had significantly higher strength values than Group PMC (P=.041). For zirconia ceramic specimens, the mean (SD) shear bond strengths ranged from 30.03 (9.49) MPa to 47.2 (13.0) MPa, with Group LZV

  4. Microwave versus conventional sintering of silicon carbide tiles

    SciTech Connect

    Kass, M.D.; Caughman, J.B.O.; Forrester, S.C.; Akerman, A.

    1997-05-07

    Silicon carbide is being evaluated as an armor material because of its lightweight, high-hardness, and excellent armor efficiency. However, one of the problems associated with silicon carbide is the high cost associated with achieving fully dense tiles. Full density requires either hot pressing and sintering or reaction bonding. Past efforts have shown that hot pressed tiles have a higher armor efficiency than those produced by reaction bonded sintering. An earlier stuy showed that the acoustic properties of fully-dense silicon carbide tiles were enhanced through the use of post-sintered microwave heat treatments. One of the least expensive forming techniques is to isostatically press-and-sinter. In this study, the authors have used microwave energy to densify silicon carbide green bodies. Microwave sintering has been demonstrated to be a very quick way to sinter ceramics such as alumina to exceptionally high densities. Previous work has shown that microwave post treatment of fully-dense reaction bonded silicon carbide tiles significantly improves the acoustic properties of the tiles. These properties include Poisson`s ratio, Young`s modulus, shear modulus, and bulk modulus.

  5. Portfolio: Ceramics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardy, Jane; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Describes eight art activities using ceramics. Elementary students created ceramic tiles to depict ancient Egyptian and medieval European art, made ceramic cookie stamps, traced bisque plates on sketch paper, constructed clay room-tableaus, and designed clay relief masks. Secondary students pit-fired ceramic pots and designed ceramic Victorian…

  6. Portfolio: Ceramics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardy, Jane; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Describes eight art activities using ceramics. Elementary students created ceramic tiles to depict ancient Egyptian and medieval European art, made ceramic cookie stamps, traced bisque plates on sketch paper, constructed clay room-tableaus, and designed clay relief masks. Secondary students pit-fired ceramic pots and designed ceramic Victorian…

  7. The effects of the temperature and pressure on ZrO2-doped transparent yttria ceramics fabricated by a hot-pressing method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, Lin; Park, Young-Jo; Kim, Haneul; Kim, Jin-Myung; Ko, Jae-Woong; Lee, Jae-Wook

    2017-09-01

    Previously, we briefly reported the fabrication of highly transparent yttria ceramics with fine microstructures by a facile hot-pressing method. In this article, we systematically studied the hot-pressing sintering of transparent yttria ceramics in which the effects of the ZrO2 doping concentration, sintering temperature, and mechanical pressure on the transparency as well as the microstructures of the ceramic samples were investigated in detail. It was found that the optimal ZrO2 doping concentration for the hot-pressed transparent yttria ceramics is 1 at.%, which is much lower than that of transparent yttria ceramics fabricated by pressureless sintering routes. An increase in both the hot-pressing temperature and the mechanical pressure effectively promoted the densification and the optical transparency of the samples doped with 3 at.% ZrO2. However, when the mechanical pressure is too high, a substantial reduction of yttria occurs, which deteriorates the transparency of the samples.

  8. Microtensile Bond Strength of Cad-Cam and Pressed-Ceramic Inlays to Dentin

    PubMed Central

    Öztürk, A. Nilgün; İnan, Özgür; İnan, Erkan; Öztürk, Bora

    2007-01-01

    Objectives CAD-CAM system is popular because of high esthetic and short fabrication time. But, there is limited information available about the microtensile bonding of luting cements to CAD-CAM inlays and to dentin. The aim of this study was to examine the bond strength of CAD-CAM (Cerec 3) and pressed-ceramic (IPS Empress 2) inlays to dentin surface by microtensile testing using two luting cements. Materials and Methods Standardized mesio-occlusal cavities were made in forty extracted molar teeth. An occlusal reduction of 2 mm was made; the bucco-lingual width of the proximal boxes was 4 mm, the occlusal width 3 mm and the depth of the pulpal and axial walls 2 mm. The proximal boxes were extended 1 mm below the cemento-enamel junction. Teeth were randomly assigned to 2 groups to evaluate the bonding of 2 ceramic systems, Cerec 3 (Group I) and IPS Empress 2 (Group II), to dentin. Each of the 2 groups were further divided into 2 luting cement groups, Panavia F (Group A) and Variolink II (Group B). After cementation, the teeth were sectioned into two 1.2x1.2 mm wide ‘I’ shape sections. The specimens were then subjected to microtensile testing at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. Two-way ANOVA and Tukey HSD tests were used to evaluate the results. Results The mean microtensile bond strengths of Cerec 3 and IPS Empress 2 bonding to dentin with luting agents in MPa were Panavia F (13.98±3.44), Variolink II (14.19±3.12) and Panavia F (15.12±3.15), Variolink II (15.45±3.08) respectively. No significant differences were found among the 2 ceramic systems (P>.05) and 2 luting cements with regard to dentin bond strengths (P>.05). Conlusions There was no difference found between the dentin bond strength of the Cerec 3 and IPS Empress 2 inlays cemented with two luting cements. PMID:19212483

  9. Effect of Workplace Noise on Hearing Ability in Tile and Ceramic Industry Workers in Iran: A 2-Year Follow-Up Study

    PubMed Central

    Mirmohammadi, Seyyed Jalil; Mehrparvar, Amir Houshang; Mollasadeghi, Abolfazl

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Noise as a common physical hazard may lead to noise-induced hearing loss, an irreversible but preventable disorder. Annual audiometric evaluations help detect changes in hearing status before clinically significant hearing loss develops. This study was designed to track hearing threshold changes during 2-year follow-up among tile and ceramic workers. Methods. This follow-up study was conducted on 555 workers (totally 1110 ears). Subjects were divided into four groups according to the level of noise exposure. Hearing threshold in conventional audiometric frequencies was measured and standard threshold shift was calculated for each ear. Results. Hearing threshold was increased during 2 years of follow-up. Increased hearing threshold was most frequently observed at 4000, 6000, and 3000 Hz. Standard threshold shift was observed in 13 (2.34%), 49 (8.83%), 22 (3.96%), and 63 (11.35%) subjects in the first and second years of follow-up in the right and left ears, respectively. Conclusions. This study has documented a high incidence of noise-induced hearing loss in tile and ceramic workers that would put stress on the importance of using hearing protection devices. PMID:24453922

  10. Detecting Filler Spaces Under Tiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mende, Paul; Shinkevich, David; Scheuer, John

    1991-01-01

    Eddy-current probe nondestructively and indirectly indicates whether screed present under ceramic tile on aluminum substrate. Transducer coil excites eddy currents in aluminum substrate material. Response appears on oscilloscope or meter. Changes in response indicate spatially abrupt changes in substrate. Intended for use on insulating tiles on Space Shuttle, potential terrestrial applications in nondestructive testing.

  11. Prospective clinical split-mouth study of pressed and CAD/CAM all-ceramic partial-coverage restorations: 7-year results.

    PubMed

    Guess, Petra C; Selz, Christian F; Steinhart, Yann-Niclas; Stampf, Susanne; Strub, Joerg R

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this prospective clinical split-mouth study was to investigate the longterm performance of pressed and computer-aided design/computer-assisted manufacture (CAD/CAM) all-ceramic partial-coverage restorations (PCRs). Twentyfive patients were restored with 40 lithium disilicate pressed PCRs (IPS e.max-Press, Ivoclar Vivadent) and 40 leucite-reinforced glass-ceramic CAD/CAM PCRs (ProCAD, Ivoclar Vivadent). All restorations were placed in vital first or second molars. The 7-year Kaplan-Meier survival rate was 100% for pressed PCRs and 97% for CAD/ CAM PCRs. Both systems showed significant deterioration over time in all modified United States Public Health Service criteria. Increased surface roughness and impaired color match were significantly more prevalent with pressed PCRs. Based on the 7-year data, both all-ceramic systems can be considered reliable treatment options for posterior PCRs.

  12. MEASUREMENTS OF TRANSFERRABLE RESIDUE FROM CERAMIC TILE, VINYL TILE, HARDWOOD FLOORING, AND CARPET USING A PRESS SAMPLER AND C18, PUF, AND COTTON SAMPLING DISKS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Unintentional and avoidable human exposure is a consequence of pesticide use indoors. Pesticides on household surfaces are a source of exposure to children. Therefore, concern has been raised regarding the potential for contamination of foods in homes where pesticides have been...

  13. MEASUREMENTS OF TRANSFERRABLE RESIDUE FROM CERAMIC TILE, VINYL TILE, HARDWOOD FLOORING, AND CARPET USING A PRESS SAMPLER AND C18, PUF, AND COTTON SAMPLING DISKS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Unintentional and avoidable human exposure is a consequence of pesticide use indoors. Pesticides on household surfaces are a source of exposure to children. Therefore, concern has been raised regarding the potential for contamination of foods in homes where pesticides have been...

  14. Measuring Fracture Times Of Ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shlichta, Paul J.; Bister, Leo; Bickler, Donald G.

    1989-01-01

    Electrical measurements complement or replace fast cinematography. Electronic system measures microsecond time intervals between impacts of projectiles on ceramic tiles and fracture tiles. Used in research on ceramics and ceramic-based composite materials such as armor. Hardness and low density of ceramics enable them to disintegrate projectiles more efficiently than metals. Projectile approaches ceramic tile specimen. Penetrating foil squares of triggering device activate display and recording instruments. As ceramic and resistive film break oscilloscope plots increase in electrical resistance of film.

  15. Measuring Fracture Times Of Ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shlichta, Paul J.; Bister, Leo; Bickler, Donald G.

    1989-01-01

    Electrical measurements complement or replace fast cinematography. Electronic system measures microsecond time intervals between impacts of projectiles on ceramic tiles and fracture tiles. Used in research on ceramics and ceramic-based composite materials such as armor. Hardness and low density of ceramics enable them to disintegrate projectiles more efficiently than metals. Projectile approaches ceramic tile specimen. Penetrating foil squares of triggering device activate display and recording instruments. As ceramic and resistive film break oscilloscope plots increase in electrical resistance of film.

  16. An accelerated technique for a ceramic-pressed-to-metal restoration with CAD/CAM technology.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ju-Hyoung

    2014-11-01

    The conventional fabrication of metal ceramic restorations depends on an experienced dental technician and requires a long processing time. However, complete-contour digital waxing and digital cutback with computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) technology can overcome these disadvantages and provide a correct metal framework design and space for the ceramic material.

  17. Marginal fit of heat-pressed vs. CAD/CAM processed all-ceramic onlays using a milling unit prototype.

    PubMed

    Reich, Sven; Gozdowski, Stephan; Trentzsch, Lars; Frankenberger, Roland; Lohbauer, Ulrich

    2008-01-01

    The composite luting gap between ceramic and dental hard tissue can be termed an "Achilles heel". Therefore, one major goal of luting ceramics focuses on minimizing the inter-marginal gap area. This study evaluated the marginal accuracy of two all-ceramic systems. The null hypothesis was that there is no statistical difference between the marginal accuracy of the IPS Empress and Cerec 3D all-ceramic systems. On 16 casts, representing different clinical situations, the left first mandibular molar was prepared to receive large onlays (MOD and replacement of the distobuccal and distal cusps). For each cavity, one laboratory heat-pressed (IPS Empress) and one chairside CAD/CAM restoration (Cerec 3D) were manufactured. A newly developed milling unit was used for CAM processing. The restorations were placed in their respective cavities and die replicas were taken and examined under SEM for quantitative gap measurement. The gap width was measured at 11 defined landmarks by two different examiners. An overall gap width of 56 microm (+/- 31 microm) was measured for IPS Empress, compared to the significantly increased value of 70 pm (+/- 32 microm) for Cerec 3D. From a clinical viewpoint, the statistically significant difference between the two systems is not relevant, since both systems still exhibit a clinically acceptable gap width of less than 100 microm.

  18. INTERIOR VIEW OF BATHROOM 1. SHOWING ORIGINAL MOSAIC PATTERN TILE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR VIEW OF BATHROOM 1. SHOWING ORIGINAL MOSAIC PATTERN TILE FLOOR, TILE WAINSCOT AND SHOWER SURROUND, AND CERAMIC ACCESSORIES. VIEW FACING EAST. - Hickam Field, Officers' Housing Type J, 701 Beard Street, Honolulu, Honolulu County, HI

  19. Flexural strength and the probability of failure of cold isostatic pressed zirconia core ceramics.

    PubMed

    Siarampi, Eleni; Kontonasaki, Eleana; Papadopoulou, Lambrini; Kantiranis, Nikolaos; Zorba, Triantafillia; Paraskevopoulos, Konstantinos M; Koidis, Petros

    2012-08-01

    The flexural strength of zirconia core ceramics must predictably withstand the high stresses developed during oral function. The in-depth interpretation of strength parameters and the probability of failure during clinical performance could assist the clinician in selecting the optimum materials while planning treatment. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the flexural strength based on survival probability and Weibull statistical analysis of 2 zirconia cores for ceramic restorations. Twenty bar-shaped specimens were milled from 2 core ceramics, IPS e.max ZirCAD and Wieland ZENO Zr, and were loaded until fracture according to ISO 6872 (3-point bending test). An independent samples t test was used to assess significant differences of fracture strength (α=.05). Weibull statistical analysis of the flexural strength data provided 2 parameter estimates: Weibull modulus (m) and characteristic strength (σ(0)). The fractured surfaces of the specimens were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). The investigation of the crystallographic state of the materials was performed with x-ray diffraction analysis (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Higher mean flexural strength (P<.001) and σ(0) were recorded for WZ ceramics. However IZ ceramics presented a higher m value and a microstructure with fewer voids and pores. The fractured surfaces presented similar fractographic properties (mirror regions followed by hackle lines zones). Both groups primarily sustained the tetragonal phase of zirconia and a negligible amount of the monoclinic phase. Although both zirconia ceramics presented similar fractographic and crystallographic properties, the higher flexural strength of WZ ceramics was associated with a lower m and more voids in their microstructure. These findings suggest a greater scattering of strength values and a flaw distribution that are expected to increase failure probability. Copyright

  20. Prototype Development of Remote Operated Hot Uniaxial Press (ROHUP) to Fabricate Advanced Tc-99 Bearing Ceramic Waste Forms - 13381

    SciTech Connect

    Alaniz, Ariana J.; Delgado, Luc R.; Werbick, Brett M.; Hartmann, Thomas

    2013-07-01

    The objective of this senior student project is to design and build a prototype construction of a machine that simultaneously provides the proper pressure and temperature parameters to sinter ceramic powders in-situ to create pellets of rather high densities of above 90% (theoretical). This ROHUP (Remote Operated Hot Uniaxial Press) device is designed specifically to fabricate advanced ceramic Tc-99 bearing waste forms and therefore radiological barriers have been included in the system. The HUP features electronic control and feedback systems to set and monitor pressure, load, and temperature parameters. This device operates wirelessly via portable computer using Bluetooth{sup R} technology. The HUP device is designed to fit in a standard atmosphere controlled glove box to further allow sintering under inert conditions (e.g. under Ar, He, N{sub 2}). This will further allow utilizing this HUP for other potential applications, including radioactive samples, novel ceramic waste forms, advanced oxide fuels, air-sensitive samples, metallic systems, advanced powder metallurgy, diffusion experiments and more. (authors)

  1. Prospective clinical study of press-ceramic overlap and full veneer restorations: 7-year results.

    PubMed

    Guess, Petra C; Selz, Christian F; Voulgarakis, Apostolos; Stampf, Susanne; Stappert, Christian F J

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this prospective clinical study was to investigate the long-term performance of all-ceramic veneers with overlap (OV) and full veneer (FV) preparation designs. Twenty-five patients were restored using 42 OV restorations (incisal/palatal butt-joint margin) and 24 FV restorations (palatal rounded shoulder margin). All restorations were leucite-reinforced glass-ceramic anterior veneers. The 7-year Kaplan-Meier survival rate was 100% for FV restorations and 97.6% for OV restorations. The all-ceramic veneers revealed significant deterioration over time according to United States Public Health Service criteria, irrespective of the preparation design. Based on the 7-year results of this study, both preparation designs can be considered reliable treatment options for anterior teeth with extended deficits.

  2. Effect of Heat-Pressing Temperature and Holding Time on the Microstructure and Flexural Strength of Lithium Disilicate Glass-Ceramics

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Jing; Wang, Hui; Chen, Jihua

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the influence of various heat-pressing procedures (different holding time and heat pressing temperature) on the microstructure and flexural strength of lithium disilicate glass ceramic. An experimental lithium silicate glass ceramic (ELDC) was prepared from the SiO2-Li2O-K2O-Al2O3-ZrO2-P2O5 system and heat-pressed following different procedures by varying temperature and holding time. The flexural strength was tested and microstructure was analyzed. The relationships between the microstructure, mechanical properties and heat-pressing procedures were discussed in-depth. Results verified the feasibility of the application of dental heat-pressing technique in processing the experimental lithium disilicate glass ceramic. Different heat-pressing procedures showed significant influence on microstructure and flexural strength. ELDC heat-pressed at 950℃ with holding time of 15 min achieved an almost pore-free microstructure and the highest flexural strength, which was suitable for dental restorative application. PMID:25985206

  3. High Temperature Filler for Tile Gaps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holt, J. W.; Wang, D. S.

    1983-01-01

    Gaps between ceramic tiles filled with ceramic-coated fabric that withstands temperatures as high as 2,000 degrees F (1,300 degrees C). Reusable high-temperature gap filler is made of fabric coated with ceramic slurry and bonded in place with room-temperature-vulcanized adhesive. Procedure used in kilns and furnaces.

  4. The effect of hydrothermal hot-pressing parameters on the fabrication of porous ceramics using waste glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matamoros-Veloza, Z.; Yanagisawa, K.; Rendón-Angeles, J. C.; Oishi, S.

    2004-04-01

    The effect of varying hydrothermal hot-pressing (HHP) parameters on the expansion of waste glass powder was investigated by conventional heat treatment. Glass ceramic porous materials were prepared by hydrothermal hot pressing under standard conditions at 200 °C, for 2 h at a constant uniaxial pressure of 20 MPa, while varying experimental variables such as glass particle size, water content, reaction interval, temperature and heating rate. SEM investigation showed the presence of a new glass phase, which incorporated water in its structure. The degree of reactivity attainable between glass particles and water seems to control the expansion process during heating of HHP glass compacts. It was found that the expansion process is independent of experimental parameters such as reaction time, temperature and heating rate, but does depend on the particle size and water content. During the heat treatment, the glass foaming process was preceded by decomposition of the new glass phase in the HHP compacts. A minimum apparent density of 0.40 g cm-3 was obtained on specimens prepared with low water content (5 wt%) and medium particle size (39-45 µm). X-ray diffraction patterns of the expanded glasses revealed the formation of SiO2 (agr-cristobalite and quartz) and CaSiO3 (wollastonite).

  5. Wind-Resistant Filler for Tile Gaps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bellavia, J.; Quigley, I. A.; Callahan, T. S.

    1982-01-01

    Filler developed for gaps between insulating tiles on Space Shuttle finds application in industries that use tiles for thermal or environmental protection. Filler consists of tight-fitting ceramic tubes and fibrous alumina. Combination resists high wind loads while providing requisite heat protection. Quartz-thread stitching holds envelope together.

  6. The Sad Case of the Columbine Tiles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dowling-Sendor, Benjamin

    2003-01-01

    Analyzes free-speech challenge to school district's guidelines for acceptable expressions on ceramic tiles painted by Columbine High School students to express their feelings about the massacre. Tenth Circuit found that tile painting constituted school-sponsored speech and thus district had the constitutional authority under "Hazelwood School…

  7. The Sad Case of the Columbine Tiles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dowling-Sendor, Benjamin

    2003-01-01

    Analyzes free-speech challenge to school district's guidelines for acceptable expressions on ceramic tiles painted by Columbine High School students to express their feelings about the massacre. Tenth Circuit found that tile painting constituted school-sponsored speech and thus district had the constitutional authority under "Hazelwood School…

  8. Magnetic and magneto elastic properties of cobalt ferrite ceramic compacted through cold isostatic pressing

    SciTech Connect

    Indla, Srinivas; Das, Dibakar; Chelvane, Arout

    2016-05-06

    Nano crystalline CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} powder was prepared by combustion synthesis method. As synthesized powder was calcined at an appropriate condition to remove the impurities and to promote phase formation. Phase pure CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} powder was pressed into cylindrical rod at an applied pressure of 200 MPa using a cold isostatic pressing. Sintering of the green compact at 1350°c for 12 hrs resulted in sintered cylindrical rod with ~85% of the theoretical density. Single phase cubic spinel structure was observed in the powder x-ray diffraction pattern of the sintered pellet. Scanning electron micrographs (SEM) of the as sintered pellet revealed the microstructure to be composed of ferrite grains of average size ~4 µm. Saturation magnetization of 72 emu/g and coercivity of 355 Oe were observed for cobalt ferrite sample. The magnetostriction was measured on a circular disc (12 mm diameter and 12 mm length) with the strain gauge (350 Ω) mounted on the flat surface of the circular disc. Magnetostriciton of 180 ppm and strain derivative of 1 × 10{sup −9} m/A were observed for the sintered CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} sample.

  9. Deformation, recrystallization, strength, and fracture of press-forged ceramic crystals.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, R. W.

    1972-01-01

    Sapphire and ruby were very difficult to press-forge because they deformed without cracking only in a limited temperature range before they melted. Spinel crystals were somewhat easier and MgO, CaO, and TiC crystals much easier to forge. The degree of recrystallization that occurred during forging (which was related to the ease and type of slip intersections) varied from essentially zero in Al2O3 to complete (i.e., random polycrystalline bodies were produced) in CaO. Forging of bi- and polycrystalline bodies produced incoherent bodies as a result of grain-boundary sliding. Strengths of the forged crystals were comparable to those of dense polycrystalline bodies of similar grain size. However, forged and recrystallized CaO crystals were ductile at lower temperatures than dense hot-pressed CaO. This behavior is attributed to reduced grain-boundary impurities and porosity. Fracture origins could be located, indicating that fracture in the CaO occurs internally as a result of surface work hardening caused by machining.-

  10. Deformation, recrystallization, strength, and fracture of press-forged ceramic crystals.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, R. W.

    1972-01-01

    Sapphire and ruby were very difficult to press-forge because they deformed without cracking only in a limited temperature range before they melted. Spinel crystals were somewhat easier and MgO, CaO, and TiC crystals much easier to forge. The degree of recrystallization that occurred during forging (which was related to the ease and type of slip intersections) varied from essentially zero in Al2O3 to complete (i.e., random polycrystalline bodies were produced) in CaO. Forging of bi- and polycrystalline bodies produced incoherent bodies as a result of grain-boundary sliding. Strengths of the forged crystals were comparable to those of dense polycrystalline bodies of similar grain size. However, forged and recrystallized CaO crystals were ductile at lower temperatures than dense hot-pressed CaO. This behavior is attributed to reduced grain-boundary impurities and porosity. Fracture origins could be located, indicating that fracture in the CaO occurs internally as a result of surface work hardening caused by machining.-

  11. Marginal and internal adaptation of ceramic crown restorations fabricated with CAD/CAM technology and the heat-press technique.

    PubMed

    Mously, Hisham A; Finkelman, Matthew; Zandparsa, Roya; Hirayama, Hiroshi

    2014-08-01

    The accuracy of chairside computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) restorations is questionable, and the effect of the die spacer settings is not well stated in the literature. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the marginal and internal adaptation of E4D crowns fabricated with different spacer thicknesses and to compare these crowns with those fabricated with the heat-press technique. The E4D system was used to fabricate 30 crowns for the first 3 groups, with different spacer thickness settings: 30 μm, 60 μm, and 100 μm. In the fourth group, 10 lithium disilicate crowns were fabricated with the heat-press technique. The occlusal gap, axial gap, vertical marginal gap, and absolute marginal discrepancy were evaluated by x-ray microtomography. Statistical significance was assessed with the Kruskal-Wallis test (α=.05). For post hoc analyses, the Mann-Whitney U test was used alongside the Bonferroni correction for multiple comparisons (α=.008). Within the CAD/CAM groups, the 30-μm spacer thickness resulted in the lowest median axial gap (90.04 μm), whereas the 60-μm spacer thickness resulted in the lowest median occlusal gap (152.39 μm). The median marginal gap values of the CAD/CAM-60 group (49.35 μm) and CAD/CAM-100 group (46.65 μm) were lower than those of the CAD/CAM-30 group (55.18 μm). No significant differences among the CAD/CAM groups were observed for absolute marginal discrepancy. The heat-press group had significantly different values than those of the CAD/CAM groups. The spacer thickness and fabrication technique affected the adaptation of ceramic crowns. The heat-press group yielded the best marginal and internal crown adaptation results. The 30- or 60-μm spacer settings are recommended for the E4D CAD/CAM system. Copyright © 2014 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Fabrication and characterization of Si3N4 ceramics without additives by high pressure hot pressing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shimada, M.; Tanaka, A.; Yamada, T.; Koizumi, M.

    1984-01-01

    High pressure hot-pressing of Si3N4 without additives was performed using various kinds of Si3N4 powder as starting materials, and the relation between densification and alpha-beta phase transformation was studied. The temperature dependences of Vickers microhardness and fracture toughness were also examined. Densification of Si3N4 was divided into three stages, and it was found that densification and phase transformation of Si3N4 under pressure were closely associated. The results of the temperature dependence of Vickers microhardness indicated that the high-temperature hardness was strongly influenced not only by the density and microstructure of sintered body but also by the purity of starting powder. The fracture toughness values of Si3N4 bodies without additives were 3.29-4.39 MN/m to the 3/2 power and independent of temperature up to 1400 C.

  13. Strength and toughness of ceramic-metal composites prepared by reactive hot pressing

    SciTech Connect

    ELLERBY,DONALD T.; LOEHMAN,RONALD E.; FAHRENHOLTZ,WILLIAM G.

    2000-03-10

    Metal-reinforced Al{sub 2}0{sub 3}-matrix composites were prepared using reactive hot pressing. The volume fraction of the reinforcing phase was controlled by the stoichiometry of the particular displacement reaction used. Dense Al{sub 2}0{sub 3}-Ni and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-Nb composites were fabricated using this technique. The best combination of strength, 610 MPa, and toughness, 12 MPam{sup 1/2}, was found for the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-Ni composites. Indentation cracks and fracture surfaces showed evidence of ductile deformation of the Ni phase. The Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-Nb composites had high strength, but the toughness was lower than expected due to the poor bonding between the Nb and A1{sub 2}0{sub 3}phases.

  14. Oxidation Characterization of Hafnium-Based Ceramics Fabricated by Hot Pressing and Electric Field-Assisted Sintering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gasch, Matt; Johnson, Sylvia; Marschall, Jochen

    2010-01-01

    Ceramic borides, such as hafnium diboride (HfB2) and zirconium diboride (ZrB2), are members of a family of materials with extremely high melting temperatures referred to as Ultra High Temperature Ceramics (UHTCs). UHTCs constitute a class of promising materials for use in high temperature applications, such as sharp leading edges on future-generation hypersonic flight vehicles, because of their high melting points. The controlled development of microstructure has become important to the processing of UHTCs, with the prospect of improving their mechanical and thermal properties. The improved oxidation resistance of HfB2 has also become important if this material is to be successfully used at temperatures above 2000 C. Furthermore, the use of UHTCs on the leading edges of vehicles traveling at hypersonic speeds will mean exposure to a mixed oxidation environment comprised of both molecular and atomic oxygen. The current study has investigated the high-temperature oxidation behavior of HfB2-based materials in a pure O2 environment, as well as in environments containing different levels of dissociated oxygen (O/O2). Materials were processed by two techniques: conventional hot pressing (HP) and electric field-assisted sintering (FAS). Their oxidation behavior was evaluated in both a tube furnace at 1250 C for 3 hours and in a simulated re-entry environment in the Advanced Heating Facility (AHF) arcjet at NASA Ames Research Center, during a 10-minute exposure to a cold wall heat flux of 250W/sq cm and stagnation pressure of 0.1-0.2 atm. The microstructure of the different materials was characterized before and after oxidation using scanning electron microscopy (SEM).

  15. Preparation of high-density YBa2Cu3O(x) ceramics with improved superconducting properties by hot pressing under controlled atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuwabara, M.; Shimooka, H.

    1990-12-01

    High-density YBa2Cu3O(x) (relative sintered density 97 percent or greater as hot pressed) ceramics with Tc of 95 K and Jc of 700 A/sq cm at 77 K, 0 T have successfully been produced by using hot pressing under a carefully controlled ambient gas system, followed by an appropriate oxygenation process. In the oxygenation process, the phase transition from the tetragonal phase (nonsuperconducting) to orthorhombic I phase (Tc = 90 K or greater) occurs much easier than from orthorhombic II phase (Tc = about 60 K) to orthorhombic I phase.

  16. Marginal and internal fit of heat pressed versus CAD/CAM fabricated all-ceramic onlays after exposure to thermo-mechanical fatigue

    PubMed Central

    Guess, Petra C.; Vagopoulou, Thaleia; Zhang, Yu; Wolkewitz, Martin; Strub, Joerg R.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The aim of the study was to evaluate the marginal and internal fit of heat-pressed and CAD/CAM fabricated all-ceramic onlays before and after luting as well as after thermo-mechanical fatigue. Materials and Methods Seventy-two caries-free, extracted human mandibular molars were randomly divided into three groups (n=24/group). All teeth received an onlay preparation with a mesio-occlusal-distal inlay cavity and an occlusal reduction of all cusps. Teeth were restored with heat-pressed IPS-e.max-Press* (IP, *Ivoclar-Vivadent) and Vita-PM9 (VP, Vita-Zahnfabrik) as well as CAD/CAM fabricated IPS-e.max-CAD* (IC, Cerec 3D/InLab/Sirona) all-ceramic materials. After cementation with a dual-polymerizing resin cement (VariolinkII*), all restorations were subjected to mouth-motion fatigue (98N, 1.2 million cycles; 5°C/55°C). Marginal fit discrepancies were examined on epoxy replicas before and after luting as well as after fatigue at 200x magnification. Internal fit was evaluated by multiple sectioning technique. For the statistical analysis, a linear model was fitted with accounting for repeated measurements. Results Adhesive cementation of onlays resulted in significantly increased marginal gap values in all groups, whereas thermo-mechanical fatigue had no effect. Marginal gap values of all test groups were equal after fatigue exposure. Internal discrepancies of CAD/CAM fabricated restorations were significantly higher than both press manufactured onlays. Conclusions Mean marginal gap values of the investigated onlays before and after luting as well as after fatigue were within the clinically acceptable range. Marginal fit was not affected by the investigated heat-press versus CAD/CAM fabrication technique. Press fabrication resulted in a superior internal fit of onlays as compared to the CAD/CAM technique. Clinical Relevance Clinical requirements of 100 μm for marginal fit were fulfilled by the heat-press as well as by the CAD/CAM fabricated all-ceramic onlays

  17. Marginal and internal fit of heat pressed versus CAD/CAM fabricated all-ceramic onlays after exposure to thermo-mechanical fatigue.

    PubMed

    Guess, Petra C; Vagkopoulou, Thaleia; Zhang, Yu; Wolkewitz, Martin; Strub, Joerg R

    2014-02-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the marginal and internal fit of heat-pressed and CAD/CAM fabricated all-ceramic onlays before and after luting as well as after thermo-mechanical fatigue. Seventy-two caries-free, extracted human mandibular molars were randomly divided into three groups (n=24/group). All teeth received an onlay preparation with a mesio-occlusal-distal inlay cavity and an occlusal reduction of all cusps. Teeth were restored with heat-pressed IPS-e.max-Press* (IP, *Ivoclar-Vivadent) and Vita-PM9 (VP, Vita-Zahnfabrik) as well as CAD/CAM fabricated IPS-e.max-CAD* (IC, Cerec 3D/InLab/Sirona) all-ceramic materials. After cementation with a dual-polymerising resin cement (VariolinkII*), all restorations were subjected to mouth-motion fatigue (98 N, 1.2 million cycles; 5°C/55°C). Marginal fit discrepancies were examined on epoxy replicas before and after luting as well as after fatigue at 200× magnification. Internal fit was evaluated by multiple sectioning technique. For the statistical analysis, a linear model was fitted with accounting for repeated measurements. Adhesive cementation of onlays resulted in significantly increased marginal gap values in all groups, whereas thermo-mechanical fatigue had no effect. Marginal gap values of all test groups were equal after fatigue exposure. Internal discrepancies of CAD/CAM fabricated restorations were significantly higher than both press manufactured onlays. Mean marginal gap values of the investigated onlays before and after luting as well as after fatigue were within the clinically acceptable range. Marginal fit was not affected by the investigated heat-press versus CAD/CAM fabrication technique. Press fabrication resulted in a superior internal fit of onlays as compared to the CAD/CAM technique. Clinical requirements of 100 μm for marginal fit were fulfilled by the heat-press as well as by the CAD/CAM fabricated all-ceramic onlays. Superior internal fit was observed with the heat-press manufacturing

  18. Internal fit of pressed and computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing ceramic crowns made from digital and conventional impressions.

    PubMed

    Anadioti, Evanthia; Aquilino, Steven A; Gratton, David G; Holloway, Julie A; Denry, Isabelle L; Thomas, Geb W; Qian, Fang

    2015-04-01

    No studies have evaluated the internal adaptation of pressed and milled ceramic crowns made from digital impressions. The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the internal fit of pressed and milled ceramic crowns made from digital and conventional impressions. Thirty polyvinyl siloxane (PVS) impressions and 30 Lava COS impressions made of a prepared dentoform tooth (master die) were fabricated. Thirty crowns were pressed in lithium disilicate (IPS e.max Press), and 30 crowns were milled from lithium disilicate blocks (IPS e.max CAD) (15/impression technique) with the E4D scanner and milling engine. The master die and the intaglio of the crowns were digitized with a 3-dimensional laser coordinate measurement machine. The digital master die and intaglio of each crown were merged. The distance between the die and the intaglio surface of the crown was measured at 3 standardized points. One-way ANOVA was used for statistical analysis (α=.05). One-way ANOVA revealed that the internal gap obtained from the Lava/press group (0.211 mm, ±SD 0.041) was significantly greater than that obtained from the other groups (P<.001), while no significant differences were found among PVS/press (0.111 mm ±SD 0.047), PVS/CAD/CAM (0.116 mm ±SD 0.02), and Lava/CAD/CAM (0.145 mm ±SD 0.024). The combination of the digital impression and pressed crown produced the least accurate internal fit. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Marginal gap, internal fit, and fracture load of leucite-reinforced ceramic inlays fabricated by CEREC inLab and hot-pressed techniques.

    PubMed

    Keshvad, Alireza; Hooshmand, Tabassom; Asefzadeh, Farokh; Khalilinejad, Foroogh; Alihemmati, Mohammad; Van Noort, Richard

    2011-10-01

    This in vitro study was designed to evaluate and compare the marginal gap, internal fit, and fracture load of resin-bonded, leucite-reinforced glass ceramic mesio-occlusal-distal (MOD) inlays fabricated by computer-aided design/manufacturing (CAD/CAM) or hot pressing. Fifty caries-free extracted human molars were prepared for standardized MOD inlays. Impressions of each specimen were made and poured using type IV dental stone. Dies were randomly divided into two equal groups. Twenty-five ceramic inlays were fabricated by the hot-pressed technique using IPS Empress leucite-reinforced glass ceramics, and the other 25 ceramic inlays were produced by CAD/CAM technology using ProCAD leucite-reinforced ceramic blocks and CEREC inLab facilities. Inlays were bonded to the teeth using a dual-cured resin cement. The specimens were stored in distilled water at 37°C for 24 hours and then thermocycled for 5000 cycles. The marginal gap measurements were taken with a stereomicroscope. Specimens in each group of inlay systems were randomly divided into two subgroups of 10 and 15 specimens each. Ten specimens in each subgroup were sectioned mesiodistally for evaluation of the internal fit. The fracture load of specimens in the second subgroup (n = 15) of the two inlay systems was determined under compressive load in a universal testing machine. Data were analyzed using Student's t-test at a significance level of p < 0.05. The mean marginal and internal gap size in both IPS Empress and ProCAD inlays were less than 100 μm; however, the marginal gap for the IPS Empress restorations was significantly higher than that of ProCAD restorations (p < 0.05). There was no significant difference in the mean internal fit or the fracture load between the two glass ceramic inlays (p > 0.05). The leucite-reinforced glass ceramic inlay restorations fabricated by CEREC inLab (CAD/CAM) and the hot-pressed technique provided clinically acceptable marginal and internal fit with comparable fracture

  20. Processing ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moritoki, M.; Fujikawa, T.; Miyanaga, J.

    1984-01-01

    A method of hot hydrostatic pressing of ceramics is described. A detailed description of the invention is given. The invention is explained through an example, and a figure illustrates the temperature and pressure during the hot hydrostatic pressing treatment.

  1. Manufacture and cytotoxicity of a lead-free piezoelectric ceramic as a bone substitute-consolidation of porous lithium sodium potassium niobate by cold isostatic pressing.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qi; Yang, Jun; Zhang, Wu; Khoie, Roxanne; Li, Yi-Ming; Zhu, Jian-Guo; Chen, Zhi-Qing

    2009-06-01

    The piezoelectric properties and cytotoxicity of a porous lead-free piezoelectric ceramic for use as a direct bone substitute were investigated. Cold isostatic pressing (CIP) was applied to fabricate porous lithium sodium potassium niobate (Li0.06Na0.5K0.44) NbO3 specimens using a pore-forming method. The morphologies of the CIP-processed specimens were characterized and compared to those of specimens made by from conventional pressing procedures. The effects of the ceramic on the attachment and proliferation of osteoblasts isolated from the cranium of 1-day-old Sprague-Dawley rats were examined by a scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and methylthiazol tetrazolium (MTT) assay. The results showed that CIP enhanced piezoelectricity and biological performance of the niobate specimen, and also promoted an extracellular matrix-like topography of it. In vitro studies showed that the CIP-enhanced material had positive effects on the attachment and proliferation of osteoblasts. Niobate ceramic generated by CIP shows a promise for being a piezoelectric composite bone substitute.

  2. Manufacture and Cytotoxicity of a Lead-free Piezoelectric Ceramic as a Bone Substitute—Consolidation of Porous Lithium Sodium Potassium Niobate by Cold Isostatic Pressing

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qi; Yang, Jun; Zhang, Wu; Khoie, Roxanne; Li, Yi-ming; Zhu, Jian-guo; Chen, Zhi-qing

    2009-01-01

    Aim The piezoelectric properties and cytotoxicity of a porous lead-free piezoelectric ceramic for use as a direct bone substitute were investigated. Methodology Cold isostatic pressing (CIP) was applied to fabricate porous lithium sodium potassium niobate (Li0.06Na0.5K0.44) NbO3 specimens using a pore-forming method. The morphologies of the CIP-processed specimens were characterized and compared to those of specimens made by from conventional pressing procedures. The effects of the ceramic on the attachment and proliferation of osteoblasts isolated from the cranium of 1-day-old Sprague-Dawley rats were examined by a scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and methylthiazol tetrazolium (MTT) assay. Results The results showed that CIP enhanced piezoelectricity and biological performance of the niobate specimen, and also promoted an extracellular matrix-like topography of it. In vitro studies showed that the CIP-enhanced material had positive effects on the attachment and proliferation of osteoblasts. Conclusion Niobate ceramic generated by CIP shows a promise for being a piezoelectric composite bone substitute. PMID:20687302

  3. Effect of Repeated Firings on Microtensile Bond Strength of Bi-layered Lithium Disilicate Ceramics (e.max CAD and e.max Press).

    PubMed

    Jalali, Hamid; Bahrani, Zeinab; Zeighami, Somayeh

    2016-07-01

    To achieve acceptable contour, color, esthetics, and occlusal relations, the porcelain may be subjected to several firing cycles. This study sought to assess the effect of multiple firing cycles on the microtensile bond strength (MTBS) of lithium disilicate-based ceramics (e.max Press, e.max CAD). IPS e.max computer aided design (CAD) cores were fabricated using CAD/(Computer Aided Manufacturing (CAM)) technology, and IPS e.max Press cores were fabricated using the heat-pressing technique (12 × 12 × 4 mm(3)). Cores in each group were divided into three subgroups based on the number of firing cycles (three, five, and seven cycles). After porcelain application, the samples were sectioned into microbars and a total of 20 sound microbars in each group were subjected to tensile load in a microtensile tester at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/minute. Microtensile bond strength of the core to the veneering porcelain was analyzed using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA). Pairwise comparisons were made using the Tukey's test (p < 0.05). In the e.max CAD, the mean MTBS values were 22.07 ± 6.63, 34.68 ± 7.07, and 26.05 ± 10.29 MPa following three, five, and seven firing cycles respectively. These values for the e.max Press were 34.46 ± 9.28, 23.09 ± 5.02, and 31.26 ± 12.25 MPa respectively. There was significant difference in bond strength of e.max CAD (p < 0.003) and e.max Press (p < 0.002) based on the number of firing cycles. Increasing the number of porcelain firing cycles decreased the bond strength of the core to the veneering porcelain in both ceramics. It is better to decrease the number of firing cycle as much as possible.

  4. Influence of immediate dentin sealing on the shear bond strength of pressed ceramic luted to dentin with self-etch resin cement.

    PubMed

    Dalby, Robert; Ellakwa, Ayman; Millar, Brian; Martin, F Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. To examine the effect of immediate dentin sealing (IDS), with dentin bonding agents (DBAs) applied to freshly cut dentin, on the shear bond strength of etched pressed ceramic luted to dentin with RelyX Unicem (RXU) cement. Method. Eighty extracted noncarious third molars were ground flat to expose the occlusal dentin surfaces. The teeth were randomly allocated to five groups (A to E) of sixteen teeth each. Groups A to D were allocated a dentin bonding agent (Optibond FL, One Coat Bond, Single Bond, or Go!) that was applied to the dentin surface to mimic the clinical procedure of IDS. These specimen groups then had etched glass ceramic discs (Authentic) luted to the sealed dentin surface using RXU. Group E (control) had etched glass ceramic discs luted to the dentin surface (without a dentin bonding agent) using RXU following the manufacturer's instructions. All specimens were stored for one week in distilled water at room temperature and then shear stressed at a constant cross-head speed of 1 mm per minute until failure. Statistical analysis was performed by ANOVA followed by post hoc Tukey HSD method (P < 0.05) applied for multiple paired comparisons. Results. The shear bond strength results for group A to E ranged from 6.94 ± 1.53 to 10.03 ± 3.50 MPa. One-way ANOVA demonstrated a difference (P < 0.05) between the groups tested and the Tukey HSD demonstrated a significant (P < 0.05) difference between the shear bond strength (SBS) of Optibond FL (Group A) and Go! (Group D). There was no statistical difference (P > 0.05) in the SBS between the test groups (A-D) or the control (group E). Conclusion. IDS using the dentin bonding agents tested does not statistically (P > 0.05) affect the shear bond strength of etched pressed ceramic luted to dentin with RXU when compared to the control.

  5. Aerogel: Tile Composites Toughen a Brittle Superinsulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Susan; Rasky, Daniel; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Pure aerogels, though familiar in the laboratory for decades as exotic lightweight insulators with unusual physical properties, have had limited industrial applications due to their low strength and high brittleness. Composites formed of aerogels and the ceramic fiber matrices like those used as space shuttle tiles bypass the fragility of pure aerogels and can enhance the performance of space shuttle tiles in their harsh operating environment. Using a layer of aerogel embedded in a tile may open up a wide range of applications where thermal insulation, gas convection control and mechanical strength matter.

  6. Structural ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Wachtman, J.B. Jr.

    1989-01-01

    The present work discusses opportunities for application of structural ceramics in heat engines, industrial-wear parts, prosthetics and bearings; conceptual and detailed design principles for structural ceramics; the processing, consolidation, and properties of members of the SiC family of structural ceramics; and the silicon nitride and sialon families of hot-pressed, sintered, and reaction-bonded, structural ceramics. Also discussed are partially-stabilized zirconia and zirconia-toughened ceramics for structural applications, the processing methods and mechanisms of fiber-reinforcement in ceramic-matrix fiber-reinforced composites, and the tribological properties of structural ceramics.

  7. The effect of pre-treatment parameters on the quality of glass-ceramic wasteforms for plutonium immobilisation, consolidated by hot isostatic pressing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thornber, Stephanie M.; Heath, Paul G.; Da Costa, Gabriel P.; Stennett, Martin C.; Hyatt, Neil C.

    2017-03-01

    Glass-ceramics with high glass fractions (70 wt%) were fabricated in stainless steel canisters by hot isostatic pressing (HIP), at laboratory scale. High (600 °C) and low (300 °C) temperature pre-treatments were investigated to reduce the canister evacuation time and to understand the effect on the phase assemblage and microstructure of the hot isostatically pressed product. Characterisation of the HIPed materials was performed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), coupled with energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX) and powder X-ray diffraction (XRD). This analysis showed the microstructure and phase assemblage was independent of the variation in pre-treatment parameters. It was demonstrated that a high temperature pre-treatment of batch reagents, prior to the HIP cycle, is beneficial when using oxide precursors, in order to remove volatiles and achieve high quality dense materials. Sample throughput can be increased significantly by utilising a high temperature ex-situ calcination prior to the HIP cycle. Investigation of glass-ceramic wasteform processing utilising a glass frit precursor, produced a phase assemblage and microstructure comparable to that obtained using oxide precursors. The use of a glass frit precursor should allow optimised throughput of waste packages in a production facility, avoiding the need for a calcination pre-treatment required to remove volatiles from oxide precursors.

  8. In Vitro Comparison of Marginal and Internal Fit of Press-on-Metal Ceramic (PoM) Restorations with Zirconium-Supported and Conventional Metal Ceramic Fixed Partial Dentures Before and After Veneering.

    PubMed

    Varol, Seda; Kulak-Özkan, Yasemin

    2015-07-01

    To compare marginal and internal fit between 3- and 4-unit press-on-metal (PoM) ceramic, zirconia-supported, and conventional metal ceramic fixed partial dentures (FPDs) before and after veneering. Ten pieces for each 3- and 4-unit MC, IPS InLine PoM, and IPS e.max ZirCAD/Zir Press FPDs were produced. Cross-sections from silicone replicas were examined and measured with a light microscope. Occlusal, axial, intermarginal, and marginal mean adaptation scores of cross-sectioned replicas and means of measurements obtained from 4 sites were calculated independently. Mean values for molars were 78.44 ± 32.01 μm (MC), 89.84 ± 29.20 μm (PoM), and 85.17 ± 28.49 μm (Zir). Premolar values were 76.08 ± 27.92 μm (MC), 89.94 ± 23.49 μm (PoM), and 87.18 ± 28.25 μm (Zir). No difference existed between the means of 3- and 4-unit FPDs except the molar-intermarginal region. The mean value of 4-unit FPDs (93.88 ± 25.41 μm) was less than the 3-unit FPDs (103.68 ± 24.55 μm) at the molar-inter marginal region. A gap increase was observed in all sites except the molar-axio-occlusal region after veneering. According to the mean difference, gap increases at the molar-marginal, molar-intermarginal, and premolar-intermarginal regions were statistically significant. A statistical difference was found at the molar-marginal region for 4-unit MCR (p = 0.041) and 4-unit PoM FPDs (p = 0.042) before and after veneering. Gap increase after veneering of 4-unit metal ceramics at molar-intermarginal, premolar-marginal, and premolar-intermarginal regions (p = 0.020; p = 0.015; p = 0.004) was significant. The gap measurements of the IPS InLine PoM and IPS e.max ZirCAD/Zir Press groups were all clinically acceptable. No studies on marginal and internal fit in the IPS InLine PoM system have been published to date. This study should be supported with future studies. No significant increase was observed after press-veneering the IPS e.max ZirCAD frameworks with an IPS e.max ZirPress material

  9. Remotely replaceable tokamak plasma limiter tiles

    DOEpatents

    Gallix, R.

    1987-12-09

    U-shaped tiles placed end-to-end over a pair of parallel runners have two rods which engage L-shaped slots. A sliding bar between the runners has grooves with clips to retain the rods pressed into receiving legs of the L-shaped slots in the runners. Sliding the bar in the direction of retaining legs of the L-shaped slots latches the tiles in place over the wall. Resilient contact strips under the parallel sides of the U-shaped tile assure thermal and electrical contact with the wall. 6 figs.

  10. Characterization of hot-pressed short ZrO{sub 2} fiber toughened ZrB{sub 2}-based ultra-high temperature ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Jia; Huang, Yu; Zhang, Houan; Jin, Hua

    2014-09-15

    Two different ZrB{sub 2}-based ultra-high temperature ceramics were produced by hot pressing: ZrB{sub 2} + 20 vol.% SiC particle + 15 vol.% ZrO{sub 2} fiber and ZrB{sub 2} + 20 vol.% SiC whisker + 15 vol.% ZrO{sub 2} fiber. The microstructures were analyzed by using transmission electron microscopy and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. It was shown that a clean interface without any impurities was identified in ZrB{sub 2}-based hybrid ceramics with SiC whiskers and ZrO{sub 2} fibers, which would significantly improve the toughening mechanism. The results of high-resolution transmission electron microscopy showed that stacking faults in SiC whiskers resulted from an insertion of a (111) layer, which would be one of the main reasons for material anisotropy. However, the interface between the SiC particle and ZrO{sub 2} fiber was found to be ambiguous in ZrB{sub 2}-based hybrid ceramics with SiC particles and ZrO{sub 2} fibers due to the slight reaction. The orientation relationship between t-ZrO{sub 2} and m-ZrO{sub 2} phases obeyed the classical correspondence: (100){sub m}//(100){sub t} and [001]{sub m}//〈001〉{sub t}, which further verified the feasibility of phase transformation toughening mechanism. - Highlights: • ZrB{sub 2}-based ceramics toughened by short ZrO{sub 2} fiber are characterized by TEM and HRTEM. • The orientation relationship of t- and m-ZrO{sub 2} are (100){sub m}//(100){sub t}, [001]{sub m}//〈001〉{sub t} • The clean interface without any impurities leads to improve the toughening mechanism.

  11. Preassembly Of Insulating Tiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Izu, Y. D.; Yoshioka, E. N.; Rosario, T.

    1988-01-01

    Concept for preassembling high-temperature insulating tiles speeds and simplifies installation and repair and reduces damage from handling. Preassembly concept facilitates placement of tiles on gently contoured surfaces as well as on flat ones. Tiles bonded to nylon mesh with room-temperature-vulcanizing silicon rubber. Spacing between tiles is 0.03 in. Applications include boilers, kilns, and furnaces.

  12. Micro-CT Evaluation of Ceramic Inlays: Comparison of the Marginal and Internal Fit of Five and Three Axis CAM Systems with a Heat Press Technique.

    PubMed

    Alajaji, Norah K; Bardwell, David; Finkelman, Matthew; Ali, Ala

    2017-02-01

    To evaluate the marginal and internal adaptation of CAD/CAM lithium-disilicate inlay restorations fabricated by two milling systems (Five and Three-axis), and a traditional heat-press technique. Fifteen premolar teeth with an MOD cavity preparation were fabricated. Lithium-disilicate inlay restorations were obtained by three fabrication techniques and fitted to their dies (n = 15/gp) as follows: Group-1, three-axis milling system, Group-2, five-axis milling system, Group-3, conventional heat-press technique. Gaps were evaluated by X-ray microtomography. Marginal gap (MG), occlusal-marginal gap (OMG), proximal-marginal gap (PMG), gingival-marginal gap (GMG), absolute marginal discrepancy (AMD), axial-internal gap (AIG), and occlusal-internal gap (OIG) were evaluated at 120 different points per inlay. Data were analyzed using repeated measures ANOVA. Pairwise comparisons were conducted for post-hoc testes and the Bonferroni correction was used to adjust for multiple comparisons (α = 0.007). The heat-press group demonstrated significantly smaller mean-values amongst all outcomes compared with CAD/CAM groups except for GMG, where there was no statistically significant difference between groups in the ANOVA (p = 0.042). Within the CAD/CAM groups, the five-axis group showed significantly lower OMG mean-value compared with the three-axis group p < 0.001, and lower AIG mean-value compared with the three-axis group p < 0.001. There was no significant difference between the five-axis and the three-axis groups' AMD, MG, PMG, and OIG locations. Different fabrication techniques affected the marginal and internal adaptation of ceramic inlay restorations. The heat-press group showed the best marginal and internal adaptation results; however, in every group, all samples were within the clinically acceptable MG limit (100 μm). The marginal fit and internal adaptation of inlay ceramic restorations fabricated by a five-axis milling system have not been tested or

  13. Tantalum-Based Ceramics for Refractory Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, David A.; Leiser, Daniel; DiFiore, Robert; Kalvala, Victor

    2006-01-01

    A family of tantalum-based ceramics has been invented as ingredients of high-temperature composite insulating tiles. These materials are suitable for coating and/or permeating the outer layers of rigid porous (foam-like or fibrous) ceramic substrates to (1) render the resulting composite ceramic tiles impervious to hot gases and (2) enable the tiles to survive high heat fluxes at temperatures that can exceed 3,000 F ( 1,600 C).

  14. Fibrous ceramic insulation

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, H.E.

    1982-11-01

    Some of the reusable heat shielding materials used to protect the Space Shuttles, their manufacturing processes, properties, and applications are discussed. Emphasis is upon ceramic materials. Space Shuttle Orbiter tiles are discussed.

  15. Ceramic Processing

    SciTech Connect

    EWSUK,KEVIN G.

    1999-11-24

    Ceramics represent a unique class of materials that are distinguished from common metals and plastics by their: (1) high hardness, stiffness, and good wear properties (i.e., abrasion resistance); (2) ability to withstand high temperatures (i.e., refractoriness); (3) chemical durability; and (4) electrical properties that allow them to be electrical insulators, semiconductors, or ionic conductors. Ceramics can be broken down into two general categories, traditional and advanced ceramics. Traditional ceramics include common household products such as clay pots, tiles, pipe, and bricks, porcelain china, sinks, and electrical insulators, and thermally insulating refractory bricks for ovens and fireplaces. Advanced ceramics, also referred to as ''high-tech'' ceramics, include products such as spark plug bodies, piston rings, catalyst supports, and water pump seals for automobiles, thermally insulating tiles for the space shuttle, sodium vapor lamp tubes in streetlights, and the capacitors, resistors, transducers, and varistors in the solid-state electronics we use daily. The major differences between traditional and advanced ceramics are in the processing tolerances and cost. Traditional ceramics are manufactured with inexpensive raw materials, are relatively tolerant of minor process deviations, and are relatively inexpensive. Advanced ceramics are typically made with more refined raw materials and processing to optimize a given property or combination of properties (e.g., mechanical, electrical, dielectric, optical, thermal, physical, and/or magnetic) for a given application. Advanced ceramics generally have improved performance and reliability over traditional ceramics, but are typically more expensive. Additionally, advanced ceramics are typically more sensitive to the chemical and physical defects present in the starting raw materials, or those that are introduced during manufacturing.

  16. Fabrication and properties of (TbxY1-x)3Al5O12 transparent ceramics by hot isostatic pressing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Pingping; Liu, Peng; Xu, Xiaodong; Wang, Wei; Wan, Zhong; Zhang, Shouyi; Wang, Yinzhen; Zhang, Jian

    2017-10-01

    (TbxY1-x)3Al5O12 (x = 0.2, 0.5, 0.8) transparent ceramics were synthesized by a solid-state reaction and HIP. All the samples were pre-sintered at 1650 °C for 4 h in a muffle and later HIPed at 1650 °C for 3 h. (Tb0.2Y0.8)3Al5O12 transparent ceramics exhibit best microstructure with an average grain size of approximately 5.22 μm and optical transmittance of over 65% in the region of 500-1600 nm. Additionally, average grain sizes of all the samples are less than 10 μm. XRD scanning patterns indicate that only the (Tb0.8Y0.2)3Al5O12 samples have little secondary phases.

  17. Fracture load and failure analysis of zirconia single crowns veneered with pressed and layered ceramics after chewing simulation.

    PubMed

    Stawarczyk, Bogna; Ozcan, Mutlu; Roos, Malgorzata; Trottmann, Albert; Hämmerle, Christoph H F

    2011-01-01

    This study determined the fracture load of zirconia crowns veneered with four overpressed and four layered ceramics after chewing simulation. The veneered zirconia crowns were cemented and subjected to chewing cycling. Subsequently, the specimens were loaded at an angle of 45° in a Universal Testing Machine to determine the fracture load. One-way ANOVA, followed by a post-hoc Scheffé test, t-test and Weibull statistic were performed. Overpressed crowns showed significantly lower fracture load (543-577 N) compared to layered ones (805-1067 N). No statistical difference was found between the fracture loads within the overpressed group. Within the layered groups, LV (1067 N) presented significantly higher results compared to LC (805 N). The mean values of all other groups were not significantly different. Single zirconia crowns veneered with overpressed ceramics exhibited lower fracture load than those of the layered ones after chewing simulation.

  18. Damage Mechanisms and Controlled Crack Propagation in a Hot Pressed Silicon Nitride Ceramic. Ph.D. Thesis - Northwestern Univ., 1993

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calomino, Anthony Martin

    1994-01-01

    The subcritical growth of cracks from pre-existing flaws in ceramics can severely affect the structural reliability of a material. The ability to directly observe subcritical crack growth and rigorously analyze its influence on fracture behavior is important for an accurate assessment of material performance. A Mode I fracture specimen and loading method has been developed which permits the observation of stable, subcritical crack extension in monolithic and toughened ceramics. The test specimen and procedure has demonstrated its ability to generate and stably propagate sharp, through-thickness cracks in brittle high modulus materials. Crack growth for an aluminum oxide ceramic was observed to be continuously stable throughout testing. Conversely, the fracture behavior of a silicon nitride ceramic exhibited crack growth as a series of subcritical extensions which are interrupted by dynamic propagation. Dynamic initiation and arrest fracture resistance measurements for the silicon nitride averaged 67 and 48 J/sq m, respectively. The dynamic initiation event was observed to be sudden and explosive. Increments of subcritical crack growth contributed to a 40 percent increase in fracture resistance before dynamic initiation. Subcritical crack growth visibly marked the fracture surface with an increase in surface roughness. Increments of subcritical crack growth loosen ceramic material near the fracture surface and the fracture debris is easily removed by a replication technique. Fracture debris is viewed as evidence that both crack bridging and subsurface microcracking may be some of the mechanisms contributing to the increase in fracture resistance. A Statistical Fracture Mechanics model specifically developed to address subcritical crack growth and fracture reliability is used together with a damaged zone of material at the crack tip to model experimental results. A Monte Carlo simulation of the actual experiments was used to establish a set of modeling input

  19. Geopolymers as potential repair material in tiles conservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geraldes, Catarina F. M.; Lima, Augusta M.; Delgado-Rodrigues, José; Mimoso, João Manuel; Pereira, Sílvia R. M.

    2016-03-01

    The restoration materials currently used to fill gaps in historical architectural tiles (e.g. lime or organic resin pastes) usually show serious drawbacks in terms of compatibility, effectiveness or durability. The existing solutions do not fully protect Portuguese faïence tiles ( azulejos) in outdoor conditions and frequently result in further deterioration. Geopolymers can be a potential solution for tile lacunae infill, given the chemical-mineralogical similitude to the ceramic body, and also the durability and versatile range of physical properties that can be obtained through the manipulation of their formulation and curing conditions. This work presents and discusses the viability of the use of geopolymeric pastes to fill lacunae in tiles or to act as "cold" cast ceramic tile surrogates reproducing missing tile fragments. The formulation of geopolymers, namely the type of activators, the alumino-silicate source, the quantity of water required for adequate workability and curing conditions, was studied. The need for post-curing desalination was also considered envisaging their application in the restoration of outdoor historical architectural tiles frequently exposed to adverse environmental conditions. The possible advantages and disadvantages of the use of geopolymers in the conservation of tiles are also discussed. The results obtained reveal that geopolymers pastes are a promising material for the restoration of tiles, when compared to other solutions currently in use.

  20. Thermal Characterization of TPS Tiles

    SciTech Connect

    Kacmar, C. J.; LaCivita, K. J.; Jata, K. V.; Sathish, S.

    2006-03-06

    The Thermal Protection System (TPS) used on space shuttles protects the metallic structure from the large amounts of heat created during travel through the atmosphere, both on takeoff and reentry. The shuttle experiences high thermo-acoustic loading and impact damage from micro-meteorites, which can cause disbonds, delaminations, chips, cracks, and other defects to the TPS system. To enhance durability and damage tolerance, new TPS tiles with an added protective ceramic-matrix-composite layer are being developed. This paper explores the use of pulsed thermography as a quick, diverse, non-destructive technique, to characterize the TPS system. The pulsed thermography images obtained are presented and analyzed.

  1. Fracture Mechanism Maps for Advanced Structural Ceramics. Part 1. Methodology and Hot-Pressed Silicon Nitride Results

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-02-01

    Alternative loading sequences, or preoxidizing treatments, can have significant affect upon strengths and lifetimes. Oxidation of magnesia -doped HPSN...dominant. The static fatigue resistance of a hot-pressed silicon nitride with magnesia sintering aid is limited by slow crack growth or creep fracture...different rates through the specimen thickness 28 󈧡 are com- plicating factors . Creep microcracking will alter the specimen compliance 30 and

  2. Task 4 supporting technology. Part 1: Detailed test plan for leading edge tile development. Leading edge material development and testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hogenson, P. A.; Staszak, Paul; Hinkle, Karrie

    1995-01-01

    This task develops two alternative candidate tile materials for leading edge applications: coated alumina enhanced thermal barrier (AETB) tile and silicone impregnated reusable ceramic ablator (SIRCA) tile. Upon reentry of the X-33/RLV space vehicle, the leading edges experience the highest heating rates and temperatures. The wing leading edge and nose cap experience peak temperatures in the range 2000 to 2700 F. Replacing reinforced carbon-carbon (RCC) with tile-based thermal protection system (TPS) materials is the primary objective. Weight, complexity, coating impact damage, and repairability are among the problems that this tile technology development addresses. The following subtasks will be performed in this development effort: tile coating development; SIRCA tile development; robustness testing of tiles; tile repair development; tile operations/processing; tile leading edge configuration; and life cycle testing.

  3. Esthetic treatment of a diffuse amelogenesis imperfecta using pressed lithium disilicate and feldspathic ceramic restorations: 5-year follow up.

    PubMed

    Savi, Andrea; Turillazzi, Oliviero; Crescini, Aldo; Manfredi, Maddalena

    2014-01-01

    The treatment of a diffuse and severe case of amelogenesis imperfecta represents a challenge for the dental team and in particular for the dentist who perform the prosthetic restorations. The enamel alterations, which are characteristic of the disease, determine different problems that need to be carefully planned and solved before the beginning of the treatment, with particular regard to the materials used to perform the restorations. In order to create the best conditions to perform the prosthetic restoration, the treatment plan should be multidisciplinary. In addition, the young age of the patients usually affected by the disease imposes a very conservative and cautious approach. The main goals of the therapy are represented by the need to protect the occlusal dental surfaces from the abrasion and provide a satisfactory esthetic result. In particular, dental abrasions if not treated may determine the loss of the vertical dimension as well as a diffuse and marked dentinal hypersensitivity. A correct treatment plan and the use of the new adhesive ceramic materials made it possible to obtain good results both from a functional and esthetic point of view with a much more conservative approach compared with the traditional one. This clinical report describes the prosthetic rehabilitation of an adult female patient with a diffuse amelogenesis imperfecta using feldspathic ceramics for the esthetic regions and monolithic lithium disilicate material for the posterior areas. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Utilization of by-products from western (US) coal combustion in the manufacture of mineral wool and other ceramic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Manz, O.E.

    1984-07-01

    The ash by-products from combustion or gasification of western US coals have chemical and mineralogical characteristics that lend themselves to utilisation in ceramic materials. Laboratory and pilot-scale fabrication of four such materials has been studied. Cyclone slag from four lignite-fired power plants and a dry scrubber ash has been fabricated into mineral wool insulation in a pilot-scale cupola. Extended and fired mixtures of fly ash, clay and ground glass have produced ceramics with very high flexural strength. Ceramic glazed wall tiles utilising fly ash in place of clay have been prepared and shown to meet most specifications for fired clay tile. Both fired and unfired dry-pressed brick containing 100% western fly ash have met ASTM specifications for fired clay brick.

  5. Light-weight ceramic insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, Ming-Ta S. (Inventor); Chen, Timothy S. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    Ultra-high temperature, light-weight, ceramic insulation such as ceramic tile is obtained by pyrolyzing a siloxane gel derived from the reaction of at least one organo dialkoxy silane and at least one tetralkoxy silane in an acid or base liquid medium. The reaction mixture of the tetra- and dialkoxy silanes may contain also an effective amount of a mono- or trialkoxy silane to obtain the siloxane gel. The siloxane gel is dried at ambient pressures to form a siloxane ceramic precursor without significant shrinkage. The siloxane ceramic precursor is subsequently pyrolyzed, in an inert atmosphere, to form the black ceramic insulation comprising atoms of silicon, carbon and oxygen. The ceramic insulation, can be characterized as a porous, uniform ceramic tile resistant to oxidation at temperatures ranging as high as 1700.degree. C. and is particularly useful as lightweight tiles for spacecraft and other high-temperature insulation applications.

  6. Handmade Tile Mosaics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keeler, Rusty

    2007-01-01

    Just like the classroom, children's outdoor environments should be filled with artistic creations that add sparkle and imagination to the space. One of the author's favorite ways to add art to the outdoors is by installing a mosaic mural of child-made tiles. The process of making the tiles is fun for all; each tile is a charming work of art in…

  7. Thermoplastic Extrusion for Ceramic Bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clemens, Frank

    Originally for the extrusion of ceramic bricks and tiles, clay and water were used to endow ceramic particle mixtures with sufficient plastic behaviour to permit practical shaping of the ceramic bodies. High-performance ceramics, however, often require the elimination of clay from extrusion formulations because the chemistry of the clay is incompatible with that of the desired ceramic materials. Therefore organic materials are frequently used in ceramic extrusion to provide plastic flow. Not only plastic behaviour is important for the extrusion of ceramic bodies. There are many other characteristics that can be tailored by the suitable addition of organics in a ceramic extrusion paste, or feedstock.

  8. Effects of Pressure and Reaction Time on Bonding of Hydroxyapatite Ceramics and Titanium by Hydrothermal Hot-pressing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Masa-aki; Onoki, Takamasa; Hosoi, Kazuyuki; Hashida, Toshiyuki

    2006-05-01

    Solidification of hydroxyapatite (HA) and its bonding with titanium (Ti) was achieved simultaneously by using a hydrothermal hot-pressing (HHP) method at the low temperature as low as 150 °C. A mixture of calcium hydrogen phosphate dihydrate(DCPD) and calcium hydroxide was used as a starting powder material for solidifying HA. 3-point bending tests were conducted to obtain an estimate of the fracture toughness for the HA/Ti interface. Application of pressures greater than 20MPa was necessary for bonding, and the interface strength increased with the increasing applied pressure. However, the degree of HA formation was lower when the pressure was increased. Excessively long term HHP treatment was shown to be ineffective for the bonding and there was an optimal treatment time. The optimal pressure and treatment time for bonding were estimated to be 40MPa and 12hrs, respectively.

  9. Effects of Pressure and Reaction Time on Bonding of Hydroxyapatite Ceramics and Titanium by Hydrothermal Hot-pressing

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Masa-aki; Onoki, Takamasa; Hashida, Toshiyuki; Hosoi, Kazuyuki

    2006-05-15

    Solidification of hydroxyapatite (HA) and its bonding with titanium (Ti) was achieved simultaneously by using a hydrothermal hot-pressing (HHP) method at the low temperature as low as 150 deg. C. A mixture of calcium hydrogen phosphate dihydrate(DCPD) and calcium hydroxide was used as a starting powder material for solidifying HA. 3-point bending tests were conducted to obtain an estimate of the fracture toughness for the HA/Ti interface. Application of pressures greater than 20MPa was necessary for bonding, and the interface strength increased with the increasing applied pressure. However, the degree of HA formation was lower when the pressure was increased. Excessively long term HHP treatment was shown to be ineffective for the bonding and there was an optimal treatment time. The optimal pressure and treatment time for bonding were estimated to be 40MPa and 12hrs, respectively.

  10. Comparative evaluation of electrical conductivity of hydroxyapatite ceramics densified through ramp and hold, spark plasma and post sinter Hot Isostatic Pressing routes.

    PubMed

    Buchi Suresh, M; Biswas, P; Mahender, V; Johnson, Roy

    2017-01-01

    Hydroxyapatite ceramics synthesized through sonochemical route were processed and densified through ramp & hold (R&H) and Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS) routes. The effect of processing route on the relative density and electrical conductivity were studied. Further, the samples were Hot Isostatically Pressed (HIP) under argon pressure at elevated temperature to further densify the sample. All these samples processed under different conditions were characterized by X-ray diffraction, Scanning Electron Microscopy and AC Conductivity. The samples have exhibited hydroxyapatite phase; however, microstructures exhibited distinctly different grain morphologies and grain sizes. AC impedance spectroscopic measurement was carried out on hydroxyapatite samples processed through different routes and the corresponding spectra were analyzed by the analogy to equivalent circuit involving resistors and capacitors. SPS sintered sample after HIPing has exhibited the highest conductivity. This can be attributed to the higher density in combination with finer grain sizes. Activation energy based on Arrhenius equation is calculated and the prominent conduction mechanism is proposed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Generalized quasiperiodic Rauzy tilings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidal, Julien; Mosseri, Rémy

    2001-05-01

    We present a geometrical description of new canonical d-dimensional codimension one quasiperiodic tilings based on generalized Fibonacci sequences. These tilings are made up of rhombi in 2d and rhombohedra in 3d as the usual Penrose and icosahedral tilings. Thanks to a natural indexing of the sites according to their local environment, we easily write down, for any approximant, the sites coordinates, the connectivity matrix and we compute the structure factor.

  12. 39. West tile gauge on south pier. Each square tile ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    39. West tile gauge on south pier. Each square tile is 4' in size. Bottom left hand corner of west tile - Duluth Ship Canal, South Pier, North end of Minnesota Point & Canal Park, Duluth, St. Louis County, MN

  13. 40. West tile gauge on south pier. Each square tile ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    40. West tile gauge on south pier. Each square tile is 4' in size. Bottom right hand corner of west tile - Duluth Ship Canal, South Pier, North end of Minnesota Point & Canal Park, Duluth, St. Louis County, MN

  14. Remotely replaceable tokamak plasma limiter tiles

    DOEpatents

    Tsuo, Simon , Langford, Alison A.

    1989-01-01

    U-shaped limiter tiles placed end-to-end over a pair of parallel runners secured to a wall have two rods which engage L-shaped slots in the runners. The short receiving legs of the L-shaped slots are perpendicular to the wall and open away from the wall, while long retaining legs are parallel to and adjacent the wall. A sliding bar between the runners has grooves with clips to retain the rods pressed into receiving legs of the L-shaped slots in the runners. Sliding the bar in the direction of retaining legs of the L-shaped slots latches the tiles in place over the runners. Resilient contact strips between the parallel arms of the U-shaped tiles and the wall assure thermal and electrical contact with the wall.

  15. Rewaterproofing Silica Tiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lleger, L. J.; Wade, D. C.

    1983-01-01

    Waterproofing agent, vaporized in bubbler transported by gas flowing in system and deposits in pores of tiles. Vapor carried through hole of approximately 1/16 inch (1.6.mm) diameter made in tile coating. Technique used to waterproof buildups (concrete and brick) and possibly fabrics.

  16. Rewaterproofing Silica Tiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lleger, L. J.; Wade, D. C.

    1983-01-01

    Waterproofing agent, vaporized in bubbler transported by gas flowing in system and deposits in pores of tiles. Vapor carried through hole of approximately 1/16 inch (1.6.mm) diameter made in tile coating. Technique used to waterproof buildups (concrete and brick) and possibly fabrics.

  17. Hot isostatically-pressed aluminosilicate glass-ceramic with natural crystalline analogues for immobilizing the calcined high-level nuclear waste at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Raman, S.

    1993-12-01

    The additives Si, Al, MgO, P{sub 2}O{sub 5} were mechanically blended with fluorinelsodium calcine in varying proportions. The batches were vacuum sealed in stainless steel canisters and hot isostatically pressed at 20,000 PSI and 1000 C for 4 hours. The resulting suite of glass-ceramic waste forms parallels the natural rocks in microstructural and compositional heterogeneity. Several crystalline phases ar analogous in composition and structure to naturally occurring minerals. Additional crystalline phases are zirconia and Ca-Mg borate. The glasses are enriched in silica and alumina. Approximately 7% calcine elements occur dissolved in this glass and the total glass content in the waste forms averages 20 wt%. The remainder of the calcine elements are partitioned into crystalline phases at 75 wt% calcine waste loading. The waste forms were tested for chemical durability in accordance with the MCC1-test procedure. The leach rates are a function of the relative proportions of additives and calcine, which in turn influence the composition and abundances of the glass and crystalline phases. The DOE leach rate criterion of less than 1 g/m{sup 2}-day is met by all the elements B, Cs and Na are increased by lowering the melt viscosity. This is related to increased crystallization or devitrification with increases in MgO addition. This exploratory work has shown that the increases in waste loading occur by preferred partitioning of the calcine components among crystalline and glass phases. The determination of optimum processing parameters in the form of additive concentration levels, homogeneous blending among the components, and pressure-temperature stabilities of phases must be continued to eliminate undesirable effects of chemical composition, microstructure and glass devitrification.

  18. Chemically-bonded brick production based on burned clay by means of semidry pressing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voroshilov, Ivan; Endzhievskaya, Irina; Vasilovskaya, Nina

    2016-01-01

    We presented a study on the possibility of using the burnt rocks of the Krasnoyarsk Territory for production of chemically-bonded materials in the form of bricks which are so widely used in multistory housing and private house construction. The radiographic analysis of the composition of burnt rock was conducted and a modifier to adjust the composition uniformity was identified. The mixing moisture content was identified and optimal amount at 13-15% was determined. The method of semidry pressing has been chosen. The process of obtaining moldings has been theoretically proved; the advantages of chemically-bonded wall materials compared to ceramic brick were shown. The production of efficient artificial stone based on material burnt rocks, which is comparable with conventionally effective ceramic materials or effective with cell tile was proved, the density of the burned clay-based cell tile makes up to 1630-1785 kg m3, with compressive strength of 13.6-20.0 MPa depending on the compression ratio and cement consumption, frost resistance index is F50, and the thermal conductivity in the masonry is λ = 0,459-0,546 W m * °C. The clear geometric dimensions of pressed products allow the use of the chemically-bonded brick based on burnt clay as a facing brick.

  19. Chemically-bonded brick production based on burned clay by means of semidry pressing

    SciTech Connect

    Voroshilov, Ivan Endzhievskaya, Irina Vasilovskaya, Nina

    2016-01-15

    We presented a study on the possibility of using the burnt rocks of the Krasnoyarsk Territory for production of chemically-bonded materials in the form of bricks which are so widely used in multistory housing and private house construction. The radiographic analysis of the composition of burnt rock was conducted and a modifier to adjust the composition uniformity was identified. The mixing moisture content was identified and optimal amount at 13-15% was determined. The method of semidry pressing has been chosen. The process of obtaining moldings has been theoretically proved; the advantages of chemically-bonded wall materials compared to ceramic brick were shown. The production of efficient artificial stone based on material burnt rocks, which is comparable with conventionally effective ceramic materials or effective with cell tile was proved, the density of the burned clay-based cell tile makes up to 1630-1785 kg \\ m{sup 3}, with compressive strength of 13.6-20.0 MPa depending on the compression ratio and cement consumption, frost resistance index is F50, and the thermal conductivity in the masonry is λ = 0,459-0,546 W \\ m {sup *} °C. The clear geometric dimensions of pressed products allow the use of the chemically-bonded brick based on burnt clay as a facing brick.

  20. Masking properties of ceramics for veneer restorations.

    PubMed

    Skyllouriotis, Andreas L; Yamamoto, Hideo L; Nathanson, Dan

    2017-10-01

    The translucency and opacity of ceramics play a significant role in emulating the natural color of teeth, but studies of the masking properties and limitations of dental ceramics when used as monolayer restorations are lacking. The purpose of this in vitro study was to determine the translucency of 6 materials used for veneer restorations by assessing their translucency parameters (TPs), contrast ratios (CRs), and potential to mask dark tooth colors. Ten square- or disk-shaped specimens (0.5-mm thickness, shade A2) were fabricated from Vitablocks Mark II (VMII; Vita Zahnfabrik), IPS e.max CAD LT (EMXC LT; Ivoclar Vivadent AG), IPS e.max CAD HT (EMXC HT; Ivoclar Vivadent AG), IPS Empress CAD LT (EMP LT; Ivoclar Vivadent AG), IPS e.max Press LT (EMXP LT; Ivoclar Vivadent AG), and CZR (CZR; Kuraray Noritake Dental Inc). Their luminance (Y) values over black and over white tiles were measured, followed by their color (CIELab) over black tiles and white tiles and shaded A2 (control group), A3.5, A4, and B4 acrylic resin blocks. All measurements were performed using a spectrophotometer in 2 different areas on each specimen. Then CRs, TPs, and color differences (over shaded backgrounds) were determined. Data were subjected to 1-way and 2-way ANOVA (α=.05) for analysis. Mean CR values of EMXP LT were significantly higher than those of the other tested materials, whereas VMII and EMXC HT had the lowest values (P<.001). Mean TP values over black and over white backgrounds of VMII and EMXC HT were significantly higher than those of the other tested materials, while EMXP LT and EMXC LT revealed the lowest values (P<.001). Background shade A4 displayed the highest mean effect (expressed in ΔE* values) on the color of the ceramic materials, whereas shade B4 demonstrated the lowest mean background effect (P<.001). Significant differences in translucency among the tested ceramics were revealed (P<.001). The EMXC LT and EMXP LT groups were the least translucent under the

  1. Energy Saving Method of Manufacturing Ceramic Products from Fiber Glass Waste

    SciTech Connect

    Michael J. Haun

    2005-07-15

    The U.S. fiber glass industry disposes of more than 260,000 tons of industrial fiber glass waste in landfills annually. New technology is needed to reprocess this industrial waste into useful products. A low-cost energy-saving method of manufacturing ceramic tile from fiber glass waste was developed. The technology is based on sintering fiber glass waste at 700-900 degrees C to produce products which traditionally require firing temperatures of >1200 degrees C, or glass-melting temperatures >1500 degrees C. The process also eliminates other energy intensive processing steps, including mining and transportation of raw materials, spray-drying to produce granulated powder, drying pressed tile, and glazing. The technology completely transforms fiber glass waste into a dense ceramic product, so that all future environmental problems in the handling and disposal of the fibers is eliminated. The processing steps were developed and optimized to produce glossy and matte surface finishes for wall and floor tile applications. High-quality prototype tile samples were processed for demonstration and tile standards testing. A Market Assessment confirmed the market potential for tile products produced by the technology. Manufacturing equipment trials were successfully conducted for each step of the process. An industrial demonstration plant was designed, including equipment and operating cost analysis. A fiber glass manufacturer was selected as an industrial partner to commercialize the technology. A technology development and licensing agreement was completed with the industrial partner. Haun labs will continue working to transfer the technology and assist the industrial partner with commercialization beyond the DOE project.

  2. Increasing the frost resistance of facade glazed tiles

    SciTech Connect

    Egerev, V.M.; Zotov, S.N.; Romanova, G.P.

    1986-09-01

    The authors investigate the protective properties of a coating of boron oxides and zirconium oxides applied as a glaze to ceramic tiles by conducting a series of tests to determine the frost resistance, the propensity to absorb water, the moisture expansion coefficient, the fracture behavior, and the effect of thermal cycling on the oxides. Results are graphed and tabulated.

  3. A comparison of impulse drying to double felted pressing on pilot- scale shoe presses and roll presses

    SciTech Connect

    Orloff, D.I.

    1992-08-01

    Pilot-scale shoe press and roll press experiments have been conducted to compare impulse drying and double felted pressing. Both ceramic coated and Beloit Type C press rolls have been evaluated. The experiments show that impulse drying can provide significantly higher outgoing solids than double felled pressing at the same impulse. For example, at an impulse of 0.234 MPa seconds (34 psi seconds), sheets at an ingoing solids of 52% were impulse dried (using the Beloit Type C press roll) to 68% solids while optimized double felled pressing could only yield press dryness of, at most, 60%.

  4. Comparison of marginal and internal fit of press-on-metal and conventional ceramic systems for three- and four-unit implant-supported partial fixed dental prostheses: An in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Bayramoğlu, Emre; Özkan, Yasemin Kulak; Yildiz, Coşkun

    2015-07-01

    Adaptation is an important factor in the long-term clinical success of implant supported ceramic restorations. Ceramic firings may affect the adaptation of the restoration. The purpose of this study was to compare the marginal and internal adaptation of 3 different restorative materials and the effect of veneering/pressing on the material used for 3- and 4-unit implant supported fixed dental prostheses. One mandibular epoxy cast was prepared for 3-unit restorations and one for 4-unit restorations. Impressions of the casts were made and 60 stone die casts (30 3-unit, 30 4-unit) produced. The casts were divided into 3 subgroups: group MCR, conventional metal ceramic restorations; group POM, press-on-metal restorations; group ZIR, computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing CAD/CAM) zirconia restorations. A replica technique was used to examine the marginal and internal gap values. A total of 2400 measurements were made by making 40 measurements of each restoration. The data were evaluated statistically using analysis of variance and the least significant difference post hoc test (α=.05). The lowest marginal gaps were found in group POM (81.58 μm) and the highest in group MCR (103.82 μm). The differences in marginal adaptation measurements were found to be statistically significant. The highest values for internal adaptation were found at the occlusal surface in all groups. Although veneering metal ceramic restorations increased the misfit of the restoration, the marginal discrepancy of the materials (81 to 120 μm) can be considered clinically acceptable. Copyright © 2015 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. FY16 Annual Accomplishments - Waste Form Development and Performance: Evaluation Of Ceramic Waste Forms - Comparison Of Hot Isostatic Pressed And Melt Processed Fabrication Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Amoroso, J.; Dandeneau, C.

    2016-10-13

    FY16 efforts were focused on direct comparison of multi-phase ceramic waste forms produced via melt processing and HIP methods. Based on promising waste form compositions previously devised at SRNL, simulant material was prepared at SRNL and a portion was sent to the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization (ANSTO) for HIP treatments, while the remainder of the material was melt processed at SRNL. The microstructure, phase formation, elemental speciation, and leach behavior, and radiation stability of the fabricated ceramics was performed. In addition, melt-processed ceramics designed with different fractions of hollandite, zirconolite, perovskite, and pyrochlore phases were investigated. for performance and properties.

  6. Tiled Multicore Processors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Michael B.; Lee, Walter; Miller, Jason E.; Wentzlaff, David; Bratt, Ian; Greenwald, Ben; Hoffmann, Henry; Johnson, Paul R.; Kim, Jason S.; Psota, James; Saraf, Arvind; Shnidman, Nathan; Strumpen, Volker; Frank, Matthew I.; Amarasinghe, Saman; Agarwal, Anant

    For the last few decades Moore’s Law has continually provided exponential growth in the number of transistors on a single chip. This chapter describes a class of architectures, called tiled multicore architectures, that are designed to exploit massive quantities of on-chip resources in an efficient, scalable manner. Tiled multicore architectures combine each processor core with a switch to create a modular element called a tile. Tiles are replicated on a chip as needed to create multicores with any number of tiles. The Raw processor, a pioneering example of a tiled multicore processor, is examined in detail to explain the philosophy, design, and strengths of such architectures. Raw addresses the challenge of building a general-purpose architecture that performs well on a larger class of stream and embedded computing applications than existing microprocessors, while still running existing ILP-based sequential programs with reasonable performance. Central to achieving this goal is Raw’s ability to exploit all forms of parallelism, including ILP, DLP, TLP, and Stream parallelism. Raw approaches this challenge by implementing plenty of on-chip resources - including logic, wires, and pins - in a tiled arrangement, and exposing them through a new ISA, so that the software can take advantage of these resources for parallel applications. Compared to a traditional superscalar processor, Raw performs within a factor of 2x for sequential applications with a very low degree of ILP, about 2x-9x better for higher levels of ILP, and 10x-100x better when highly parallel applications are coded in a stream language or optimized by hand.

  7. Tiling motion patches.

    PubMed

    Hyun, Kyunglyul; Kim, Manmyung; Hwang, Youngseok; Lee, Jehee

    2013-11-01

    Simulating multiple character interaction is challenging because character actions must be carefully coordinated to align their spatial locations and synchronized with each other. We present an algorithm to create a dense crowd of virtual characters interacting with each other. The interaction may involve physical contacts, such as hand shaking, hugging, and carrying a heavy object collaboratively. We address the problem by collecting deformable motion patches, each of which describes an episode of multiple interacting characters, and tiling them spatially and temporally. The tiling of motion patches generates a seamless simulation of virtual characters interacting with each other in a nontrivial manner. Our tiling algorithm uses a combination of stochastic sampling and deterministic search to address the discrete and continuous aspects of the tiling problem. Our tiling algorithm made it possible to automatically generate highly complex animation of multiple interacting characters. We achieve the level of interaction complexity far beyond the current state of the art that animation techniques could generate, in terms of the diversity of human behaviors and the spatial/temporal density of interpersonal interactions.

  8. Tiling Motion Patches.

    PubMed

    Hyun, Kyunglyul; Kim, Manmyung; Hwang, Youngseok; Lee, Jehee

    2013-05-08

    Simulating multiple character interaction is challenging because character actions must be carefully coordinated to align their spatial locations and synchronized with each other. We present an algorithm to create a dense crowd of virtual characters interacting with each other. The interaction may involve physical contacts, such as hand shaking, hugging, and carrying a heavy object collaboratively. We address the problem by collecting deformable motion patches, each of which describes an episode of multiple interacting characters, and tiling them spatially and temporally. The tiling of motion patches generates a seamless simulation of virtual characters interacting with each other in a non-trivial manner. Our tiling algorithm uses a combination of stochastic sampling and deterministic search to address the discrete and continuous aspects of the tiling problem. Our tiling algorithm made it possible to automatically generate highly-complex animation of multiple interacting characters. We achieved the level of complexity far beyond the current state-of-the-art animation techniques could generate, in terms of the diversity of human behaviors and the spatial/temporal density of interpersonal interactions.

  9. Seamless tiled display system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dubin, Matthew B. (Inventor); Larson, Brent D. (Inventor); Kolosowsky, Aleksandra (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A modular and scalable seamless tiled display apparatus includes multiple display devices, a screen, and multiple lens assemblies. Each display device is subdivided into multiple sections, and each section is configured to display a sectional image. One of the lens assemblies is optically coupled to each of the sections of each of the display devices to project the sectional image displayed on that section onto the screen. The multiple lens assemblies are configured to merge the projected sectional images to form a single tiled image. The projected sectional images may be merged on the screen by magnifying and shifting the images in an appropriate manner. The magnification and shifting of these images eliminates any visual effect on the tiled display that may result from dead-band regions defined between each pair of adjacent sections on each display device, and due to gaps between multiple display devices.

  10. The ATLAS Tile Calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Henriques, A.

    2015-07-01

    TileCal is the Hadronic calorimeter covering the most central region of the ATLAS experiment at the LHC. It uses iron plates as absorber and plastic scintillating tiles as the active material. Scintillation light produced in the tiles is transmitted by wavelength shifting fibres to photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). The resulting electronic signals from the approximately 10000 PMTs are measured and digitised every 25 ns before being transferred to off-detector data-acquisition systems. This contribution will review in a first part the performances of the calorimeter during run 1, obtained from calibration data, and from studies of the response of particles from collisions. In a second part it will present the solutions being investigated for the ongoing and future upgrades of the calorimeter electronics. (authors)

  11. [Effect of core: dentin thickness ratio on the flexure strength of IPS Empress II heat-pressed all-ceramic restorative material].

    PubMed

    Liu, Yi-hong; Feng, Hai-lan; Bao, Yi-wang; Qiu, Yan

    2007-02-18

    To evaluate the effect of core:dentin thickness ratio on the flexure strength, fracture mode and origin of bilayered IPS Empress II ceramic composite specimens. IPS Empress II core ceramic, dentin porcelain and bilayered composite specimens with core:dentin thickness ratio of 2:1 and 1:1 were tested in three-point flexure strength. Mean strengths and standard deviations were determined. The optical microscopy was employed for identification of the fracture mode and origin. The flexure strength of dentin porcelain was the smallest(62.7 MPa), and the strength of bilayered composite specimens was smaller than single-layered core ceramic(190.2 MPa). The core: dentin ratio did not influence the strength of bilayered composite specimens. The frequency of occurrence of bilayered specimen delaminations was higher in the group of core: dentin thickness ratio of 1:1 than in the group of 2:1. IPS Empress II core ceramic was significantly stronger than veneering dentin porcelain. Core:dentin thickness ratio could significantly influence the fracture mode and origin, and bilayered IPS Empress II ceramic composite specimens showed little influence in the fracture strength.

  12. Filler bar heating due to stepped tiles in the shuttle orbiter thermal protection system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petley, D. H.; Smith, D. M.; Edwards, C. L. W.; Patten, A. B.; Hamilton, H. H., II

    1983-01-01

    An analytical study was performed to investigate the excessive heating in the tile to tile gaps of the Shuttle Orbiter Thermal Protection System due to stepped tiles. The excessive heating was evidence by visible discoloration and charring of the filler bar and strain isolation pad that is used in the attachment of tiles to the aluminum substrate. Two tile locations on the Shuttle orbiter were considered, one on the lower surface of the fuselage and one on the lower surface of the wing. The gap heating analysis involved the calculation of external and internal gas pressures and temperatures, internal mass flow rates, and the transient thermal response of the thermal protection system. The results of the analysis are presented for the fuselage and wing location for several step heights. The results of a study to determine the effectiveness of a half height ceramic fiber gap filler in preventing hot gas flow in the tile gaps are also presented.

  13. Photovoltaic roofing tile systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melchior, B.

    The integration of photovoltaic (PV) systems in architecture is discussed. A PV-solar roofing tile system with polymer concrete base; PV-roofing tile with elastomer frame profiles and aluminum profile frames; contact technique; and solar cell modules measuring technique are described. Field tests at several places were conducted on the solar generator, electric current behavior, battery station, electric installation, power conditioner, solar measuring system with magnetic bubble memory technique, data transmission via telephone modems, and data processing system. The very favorable response to the PV-compact system proves the commercial possibilities of photovoltaic integration in architecture.

  14. Refractory Oxidative-Resistant Ceramic Carbon Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leiser, Daniel B. (Inventor); Hsu, Ming-Ta S. (Inventor); Chen, Timothy S. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    High-temperature, lightweight, ceramic carbon insulation is prepared by coating or impregnating a porous carbon substrate with a siloxane gel derived from the reaction of an organodialkoxy silane and an organotrialkoxy silane in an acid or base medium in the presence of the carbon substrate. The siloxane gel is subsequently dried on the carbon substrate to form a ceramic carbon precursor. The carbon precursor is pyrolyzed, in an inert atmosphere, to form the ceramic insulation containing carbon, silicon, and oxygen. The carbon insulation is characterized as a porous, fibrous, carbon ceramic tile which is particularly useful as lightweight tiles for spacecraft.

  15. Characterization of color texture: color texture based sorting of tiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourada, Y.; Lafon, Dominique; Eterradossi, O.

    1998-09-01

    Many materials used by the building industry show a color texture which affects the product commercial value. This texture can be seen as the spatial arrangement of regions of acceptable color differences. This work describes an appearance based automated sorting via color texture analysis, using ceramic tiles as example. Textural analysis of the tiles digital images expressed in CIEL*a*b* color system is performed through the analysis of intrinsic features of each region and relationships between regions. Results obtained through the automated process are compared to a visual sorting which leads to calculation of application dependant color and texture tolerances.

  16. The effect of manufacturing variables on radiation doses from porcelain tiles.

    PubMed

    Selby, J H; Strydom, R

    2008-06-01

    Previous studies have focused on the radiological properties of glazed ceramic tiles. This study was conducted to describe the radiological properties of porcelain tiles and how they were affected by variations in the manufacturing parameters. The data showed that the majority of the uranium in the tiles was attributable to the addition of zircon while less than half of the thorium in the tile was attributable to the added zircon, and the remainder came from other minerals in the formulation. The effects of firing temperatures and compressive strengths of the tiles are presented and show that higher firing temperatures increase radon emanation, while higher compressive strengths reduce radon emanation. The study also described how the addition of zircon to the tile formulation affected the radiological exposures that could be received by a member of the public from the use of such porcelain tiles. A dose assessment was conducted based on 23 different types of tile formulation. Screening procedures for building materials have been described in European Commission documents, and these limit the addition of zircon in a porcelain tile to approximately 9% by mass. The dose assessment reported in this study showed that 20% zircon could be added to a porcelain tile without exceeding the prescribed dose limits.

  17. Drill Presses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engelbrecht, Nancy; And Others

    These instructional materials provide an orientation to the drill press for use at the postsecondary level. The first of seven sections lists seven types of drill presses. The second section identifies 14 drill press parts. The third section lists 21 rules for safe use of drilling machines. The fourth section identifies the six procedures for…

  18. Phase change material in floor tiles for thermal energy storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Amy Sarah

    Traditional passive solar systems have relied on sensible heat storage for energy savings. Recent research has investigated taking advantage of latent heat storage for additional energy savings. This is accomplished by the incorporation of phase change material into building materials used in traditional passive applications. Trombe walls, ceilings and floors can all be enhanced with phase change materials. This research introduces a new flooring material that incorporates a phase change material ready for commercial manufacture. An agglomerate floor tile containing 20% by mass of encapsulated octadecane has been manufactured. Flexural and compressive strength of 7.4 MPa and 24.5 MPa respectively, were measured for the tile. Peak melting transition temperature was determined to be 27.2°C with a latent heat of 33.9 J/g of tile. Structural and thermal performance of the tile surpassed that of a typical ceramic tile. Each tile was composed of quartz, resin and phase change material. Statistical modeling was performed to analyze the response of flexural and compressive strength on varying amounts of quartz, resin and phase change material. Resulting polynomials described the effect of adding phase change material into the tile. With as little as 10% by mass of phase change material, the strength was reduced to less than 50% of tile without phase change material. It was determined that the maximum phase change material content to attain structural integrity greater than ceramic tile was 20% by mass. The statistical analysis used for this research was based on mixture experiments. A procedure was developed to simplify the selection of data points used in the fit of the polynomials to describe the response of flexural and compressive strengths. Analysis of energy savings using this floor tile containing 20% by mass of phase change material was performed as an addendum to this research. A known static simulation method, SLR (solar load ratio), was adapted to include

  19. Planar tilings by polyominoes, polyhexes, and polyiamonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhoads, Glenn C.

    2005-02-01

    Using computer programs, we enumerate and classify the tiling behavior of small polyominoes (n[less-than-or-equals, slant]9), polyhexes (n[less-than-or-equals, slant]7), and polyiamonds (n[less-than-or-equals, slant]10). For tiles that tile the Euclidean plane, we give diagrams illustrating how they tile. We also show several larger tiles whose minimal fundamental domain in any admitted (periodic) tiling is significantly larger than for any previously known tile.

  20. Reuse of sugarcane bagasse ash (SCBA) to produce ceramic materials.

    PubMed

    Souza, A E; Teixeira, S R; Santos, G T A; Costa, F B; Longo, E

    2011-10-01

    Sugarcane bagasse ash (SCBA) is a residue resulting from the burning of bagasse in boilers in the sugarcane/alcohol industry. SCBA has a very high silica concentration and contains aluminum, iron, alkalis and alkaline earth oxides in smaller amounts. In this work, the properties of sintered ceramic bodies were evaluated based on the concentration of SCBA, which replaced non-plastic material. The ash was mixed (up to 60 wt%) with a clayed raw material that is used to produce roof tiles. Prismatic probes were pressed and sintered at different temperatures (up to 1200 °C). Technological tests of ceramic probes showed that the addition of ash has little influence on the ceramic properties up to 1000 °C. X-ray diffraction and thermal analysis data showed that, above this temperature the ash participates in the sintering process and in the formation of new important phases. The results reported show that the reuse of SCBA in the ceramic industry is feasible.

  1. Producing superhydrophobic roof tiles.

    PubMed

    Carrascosa, Luis A M; Facio, Dario S; Mosquera, Maria J

    2016-03-04

    Superhydrophobic materials can find promising applications in the field of building. However, their application has been very limited because the synthesis routes involve tedious processes, preventing large-scale application. A second drawback is related to their short-term life under outdoor conditions. A simple and low-cost synthesis route for producing superhydrophobic surfaces on building materials is developed and their effectiveness and their durability on clay roof tiles are evaluated. Specifically, an organic-inorganic hybrid gel containing silica nanoparticles is produced. The nanoparticles create a densely packed coating on the roof tile surface in which air is trapped. This roughness produces a Cassie-Baxter regime, promoting superhydrophobicity. A surfactant, n-octylamine, was also added to the starting sol to catalyze the sol-gel process and to coarsen the pore structure of the gel network, preventing cracking. The application of ultrasound obviates the need to use volatile organic compounds in the synthesis, thereby making a 'green' product. It was also demonstrated that a co-condensation process effective between the organic and inorganic species is crucial to obtain durable and effective coatings. After an aging test, high hydrophobicity was maintained and water absorption was completely prevented for the roof tile samples under study. However, a transition from a Cassie-Baxter to a Wenzel state regime was observed as a consequence of the increase in the distance between the roughness pitches produced by the aging of the coating.

  2. Producing superhydrophobic roof tiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrascosa, Luis A. M.; Facio, Dario S.; Mosquera, Maria J.

    2016-03-01

    Superhydrophobic materials can find promising applications in the field of building. However, their application has been very limited because the synthesis routes involve tedious processes, preventing large-scale application. A second drawback is related to their short-term life under outdoor conditions. A simple and low-cost synthesis route for producing superhydrophobic surfaces on building materials is developed and their effectiveness and their durability on clay roof tiles are evaluated. Specifically, an organic-inorganic hybrid gel containing silica nanoparticles is produced. The nanoparticles create a densely packed coating on the roof tile surface in which air is trapped. This roughness produces a Cassie-Baxter regime, promoting superhydrophobicity. A surfactant, n-octylamine, was also added to the starting sol to catalyze the sol-gel process and to coarsen the pore structure of the gel network, preventing cracking. The application of ultrasound obviates the need to use volatile organic compounds in the synthesis, thereby making a ‘green’ product. It was also demonstrated that a co-condensation process effective between the organic and inorganic species is crucial to obtain durable and effective coatings. After an aging test, high hydrophobicity was maintained and water absorption was completely prevented for the roof tile samples under study. However, a transition from a Cassie-Baxter to a Wenzel state regime was observed as a consequence of the increase in the distance between the roughness pitches produced by the aging of the coating.

  3. Effect of heat treatment and in vitro aging on the microstructure and mechanical properties of cold isostatic-pressed zirconia ceramics for dental restorations.

    PubMed

    Vatali, Anna; Kontonasaki, Eleana; Kavouras, Panagiotis; Kantiranis, Nikolaos; Papadopoulou, Lambrini; Paraskevopoulos, Konstantinos K M; Koidis, Petros

    2014-10-01

    The temperature variations during the veneering firing cycles of a zirconia dental ceramic can negatively affect its mechanical properties. A possible synergistic effect of both heat-treatment and aging while exposed to the oral environment could result to catastrophic failure. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of heat treatment followed during veneering and in vitro aging on the mechanical and microstructural properties of zirconia dental ceramics. Three specimens from each of two zirconia blocks (Ivoclar IPS e.max ZirCAD (IV) and Wieland ZENO Zr (WI)) were cut by CAD/CAM technology, fully sintered and polished. Each one was cut in four equal parts. One part was used as control (C), one was heat-treated (H), one was aged (A) (134°C, 2bar, 10h) and one was heat-treated and subsequently aged (HA). The mechanical properties (nano-hardness (H) and elastic modulus (E*)) were investigated by nano-indentation tests while the surface characterization was carried out with XRD, FTIR and SEM. Different treatments on IV and WI samples resulted in a reduction of both H and E* values, however the differences were not statistically significant (p>0.05). The combination of treatments imposes an overall effect (p<0.001), enhancing the influence on both H and E* values. This reduction in mechanical properties was followed by an increase of monoclinic content. Greater variations in both H and E* values were recorded for WI samples. The clinical performance of zirconia dental ceramics may be affected during firing and aging resulting in increased probability of failure. Copyright © 2014 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Arithmetic theory of brick tilings

    SciTech Connect

    Egorov, A V; Prikhod'ko, A A

    1998-12-31

    A new, 'arithmetic', approach to the algebraic theory of brick tilings is developed. This approach enables one to construct a simple classification of brick tilings in Z{sup d} and to find new proofs of several classical results on brick packing and tilings in Z{sup d}. In addition, possible generalizations of results on integer brick packing to the Euclidean plane R{sup 2} are investigated.

  5. ICSU press

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The International Council of Scientific Unions (ICSU) has established a publishing arm called ICSU Press. The Press is intended to complement the publishing activities of its member scientific unions in several ways: initiate special publications of research findings and new journals of reviews or research; advise, or act as publishers for, members requesting such service; and engage in copublishing ventures with international bodies outside of ICSU whose goals are consistent with ICSU's.Plans for ICSU Press also include preparation of television programs in cooperation with BBC-2 in Britain and PBS and ABC in the United States.

  6. Covering the Plane with Rep-Tiles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fosnaugh, Linda S.; Harrell, Marvin E.

    1996-01-01

    Presents an activity in which students use geometric figures, rep-tiles, to design a tile floor. Rep-tiles are geometric figures of which copies can fit together to form a larger similar figure. Includes reproducible student worksheet. (MKR)

  7. All-ceramic crowns.

    PubMed

    Lehner, C R; Schärer, P

    1992-06-01

    Despite the good appearance and biocompatibility of dental porcelains, failures are still of considerable concern because of some limited properties common to all-ceramic crown systems. As in the years before, pertinent scientific articles published between November 1990 and December 1991 focused on strengthening mechanisms and compared fracture toughness for different ceramic systems by using various test methods. Some evaluated the clinical implications thereon for seating and loading crowns and measured wear against different ceramic surface conditions. Recently introduced with pleasing aesthetic qualities, IPS-Empress (Ivoclar, Schaan, Liechtenstein), a new European leucite-reinforced glass-ceramic, has finally drawn attention in some journals and has been reviewed with promising in vitro test results. Using a simple press-molding technique, well-fitting crowns, inlays, and veneers can be fabricated without an additional ceramming procedure. Again, only long-term clinical trials will validate achievements compared with other all-ceramic systems and with well-established metal ceramics.

  8. A comparison of impulse drying to double felted pressing on pilot- scale shoe presses and roll presses. Progress report, No. 6

    SciTech Connect

    Orloff, D.I.

    1992-08-01

    Pilot-scale shoe press and roll press experiments have been conducted to compare impulse drying and double felted pressing. Both ceramic coated and Beloit Type C press rolls have been evaluated. The experiments show that impulse drying can provide significantly higher outgoing solids than double felled pressing at the same impulse. For example, at an impulse of 0.234 MPa seconds (34 psi seconds), sheets at an ingoing solids of 52% were impulse dried (using the Beloit Type C press roll) to 68% solids while optimized double felled pressing could only yield press dryness of, at most, 60%.

  9. Kinetics of DNA tile dimerization.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Shuoxing; Yan, Hao; Liu, Yan

    2014-06-24

    Investigating how individual molecular components interact with one another within DNA nanoarchitectures, both in terms of their spatial and temporal interactions, is fundamentally important for a better understanding of their physical behaviors. This will provide researchers with valuable insight for designing more complex higher-order structures that can be assembled more efficiently. In this report, we examined several spatial factors that affect the kinetics of bivalent, double-helical (DH) tile dimerization, including the orientation and number of sticky ends (SEs), the flexibility of the double helical domains, and the size of the tiles. The rate constants we obtained confirm our hypothesis that increased nucleation opportunities and well-aligned SEs accelerate tile-tile dimerization. Increased flexibility in the tiles causes slower dimerization rates, an effect that can be reversed by introducing restrictions to the tile flexibility. The higher dimerization rates of more rigid tiles results from the opposing effects of higher activation energies and higher pre-exponential factors from the Arrhenius equation, where the pre-exponential factor dominates. We believe that the results presented here will assist in improved implementation of DNA tile based algorithmic self-assembly, DNA based molecular robotics, and other specific nucleic acid systems, and will provide guidance to design and assembly processes to improve overall yield and efficiency.

  10. Evaluation of fracture resistance of endodontically treated maxillary premolars, restored with ceromer or heat-pressed ceramic inlays and fixed with dual-resin cements.

    PubMed

    Ortega, V L; Pegoraro, L F; Conti, P C R; do Valle, A L; Bonfante, G

    2004-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the fracture resistance of endodontically maxillary premolars restored with mesio-occlusal-distal (MOD) inlays made with ceramic (IPS-Empress 2) and ceromer (Targis) and luted with three different dual-cured resin cements (Enforce, Variolink II, Panavia F). Sixty maxillary premolars were randomly distributed into six groups, according to their mesio-distal and facio-lingual dimensions. The teeth were endodontically treated and MOD cavities prepared. After the restorations were cemented, the samples were thermocycled and submitted to an axial compressive load by the action of a rounded end steel cylinder contacting the incline planes of occlusal surfaces of the teeth. The mode of fracture was analysed with a microscope. The best results were found with the combinations (cement/restorative material) Enforce/Targis (107.57 kgf) and Enforce/Empress (90.21 kgf) followed by Variolink II/Targis (86.44 kgf)-Variolink II/Empress (84.07 kgf) and Panavia F/Targis (82.43 kgf)-Panavia F/Empress (76.73 kgf). Analysis of variance (P < 0.05) showed a significant difference between Enforce and Panavia cements regardless of the restorative material. Considering the same luting agent there was no statistically significant difference between the restorative materials. Fracture of lingual cusps occurred in 55 of the 60 teeth and most of them were of the cohesive type.

  11. Organic materials for ceramic molding processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saito, K.

    1984-01-01

    Ceramic molding processes are examined. Binders, wetting agents, lubricants, plasticizers, surface active agents, dispersants, etc., for pressing, rubber pressing, sip casting, injection casting, taping, extrusion, etc., are described, together with forming machines.

  12. Residual micro-stress distributions in heat-pressed ceramic on zirconia and porcelain-fused to metal systems: Analysis by FIB-DIC ring-core method and correlation with fracture toughness.

    PubMed

    Sebastiani, M; Massimi, F; Merlati, G; Bemporad, E

    2015-11-01

    The production of fixed partial dentures (FPDs) induces complex residual stress profiles, due to both the thermal expansion coefficient mismatch between the veneering ceramic and the framework and to the thermal gradients occurring during the final cooling. Detailed knowledge of residual stress distributions in the veneering ceramics is important to understand the interface phenomena with the framework and the consequences of the different firing systems. The first objective of this study was to analyse the residual stress distribution in heat-pressed ceramic on zirconia core with micrometer spatial resolution, with also a focus on the stress at the interface versus porcelain-fused-to-metal samples. The second purpose was to correlate the residual stress with the fracture toughness. The micron-scale focused ion beam (FIB) ring-core method was used to map the residual stress over the cross-sections of the veneering ceramics. The methodology is based on FIB micro-milling of annular trenches, combined with high-resolution in situ scanning electron microscope (SEM) imaging, a full field strain analysis by digital image correlation (DIC) and numerical models for residual stress calculation. Fracture toughness was evaluated by using high load Vickers indentation and hardness/modulus were measured by nanoindentation testing also across the interfaces. Both prosthetic systems showed a compressive stress at the ceramic surface on a micron-scale. The stress profile for porcelain fused to metal (PFM) showed a transition to tensile stress at the half of the layer, whilst the stress in proximity of the interface was more compressive in both the cases. Residual stress on a micron scale are higher in magnitude than the corresponding macro-scale values reported in the literature, due to the stress relaxation given, at larger scales, by micro-voids and cracks. The stress field was directly correlated with the indentation fracture toughness, which was higher in those areas where the

  13. Kinetics of DNA Tile Dimerization

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Investigating how individual molecular components interact with one another within DNA nanoarchitectures, both in terms of their spatial and temporal interactions, is fundamentally important for a better understanding of their physical behaviors. This will provide researchers with valuable insight for designing more complex higher-order structures that can be assembled more efficiently. In this report, we examined several spatial factors that affect the kinetics of bivalent, double-helical (DH) tile dimerization, including the orientation and number of sticky ends (SEs), the flexibility of the double helical domains, and the size of the tiles. The rate constants we obtained confirm our hypothesis that increased nucleation opportunities and well-aligned SEs accelerate tile–tile dimerization. Increased flexibility in the tiles causes slower dimerization rates, an effect that can be reversed by introducing restrictions to the tile flexibility. The higher dimerization rates of more rigid tiles results from the opposing effects of higher activation energies and higher pre-exponential factors from the Arrhenius equation, where the pre-exponential factor dominates. We believe that the results presented here will assist in improved implementation of DNA tile based algorithmic self-assembly, DNA based molecular robotics, and other specific nucleic acid systems, and will provide guidance to design and assembly processes to improve overall yield and efficiency. PMID:24794259

  14. High temperature ceramics for automobile gas turbines. Part 2: Development of ceramic components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walzer, P.; Koehler, M.; Rottenkolber, P.

    1978-01-01

    The development of ceramic components for automobile gas turbine engines is described with attention given to the steady and unsteady thermal conditions the ceramics will experience, and their anti-corrosion and strain-resistant properties. The ceramics considered for use in the automobile turbines include hot-pressed Si3N4, reaction-sintered, isostatically pressed Si3N4, hot-pressed SiC, reaction-bonded SiC, and glass ceramics. Attention is given to the stress analysis of ceramic structures and the state of the art of ceramic structural technology is reviewed, emphasizing the use of ceramics for combustion chambers and ceramic shrouded turbomachinery (a fully ceramic impeller).

  15. Secondary polymer layered impregnated tile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tran, Huy K. (Inventor); Rasky, Daniel J. (Inventor); Szalai, Christine E. (Inventor); Carroll, Joseph A. (Inventor); Hsu, Ming-ta S. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A low density organic polymer impregnated preformed fibrous ceramic article includes a plurality of layers. A front layer includes ceramic fibers or carbon fibers or combinations of ceramic fibers and carbon fibers, and is impregnated with an effective amount of at least one organic polymer. A middle layer includes polymer impregnated ceramic fibers. A back layer includes ceramic fibers or carbon fibers or combinations of ceramic fibers and carbon fibers, and is impregnated with an effective amount of at least one low temperature pyrolyzing organic polymer capable of decomposing without depositing residues.

  16. Secondary polymer layered impregnated tile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tran, Huy K. (Inventor); Rasky, Daniel J. (Inventor); Szalai, Christine E. (Inventor); Carroll, Joseph A. (Inventor); Hsu, Ming-ta S. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A low density organic polymer impregnated preformed fibrous ceramic article includes a plurality of layers. A front layer includes ceramic fibers or carbon fibers or combinations of ceramic fibers and carbon fibers, and is impregnated with an effective amount of at least one organic polymer. A middle layer includes polymer impregnated ceramic fibers. A back layer includes ceramic fibers or carbon fibers or combinations of ceramic fibers and carbon fibers, and is impregnated with an effective amount of at least one low temperature pyrolyzing organic polymer capable of decomposing without depositing residues.

  17. Reuse of solid petroleum waste in the manufacture of porcelain stoneware tile.

    PubMed

    Pinheiro, B C A; Holanda, J N F

    2013-03-30

    This study investigates the incorporation of solid petroleum waste as raw material into a porcelain stoneware tile body, in replacement to natural kaolin material by up to 5 wt.%. Tile formulations containing solid petroleum waste were pressed and fired at 1240 °C by using a fast-firing cycle. The tile pieces were tested to determine their properties (linear shrinkage, water absorption, apparent density, and flexural strength), sintered microstructure, and leaching toxicity. The results therefore indicated that the growing addition of solid petroleum waste into tile formulations leads to a decrease of linear shrinkage, apparent density, and flexural strength, and to an increase of water absorption of the produced tile materials. It was also found that the replacement of kaolin with solid petroleum waste, in the range up to 2.5 wt.%, allows the production of porcelain stoneware tile (group BIa, ISO 13006 standard). All concentrations of Ag, As, Ba, Cd, Cr (total), Hg, and Pb of the fired porcelain stoneware tile pieces in the leachate comply with the current regulatory limits. These results indicate that the solid petroleum waste could be used for high-quality porcelain stoneware tile production, thus giving rise to a new possibility for an environmentally friendly management of this abundant waste. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. A hadronic tile calorimeter report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boca, Gianluigi; Gourlay, S.; Chung, Yeon Sei; Lee, Kyoung-Beom; Malvezzi, S.; Sala, A.; Arena, V.; Bonomi, G.; Gianini, G.; Merlo, M.; Ratti, S.; Riccardi, C.; Viola, L.; Vitulo, P.

    1998-02-01

    The design and first performances of a new hadronic calorimeter for the experiment Focus (E831) at Fermilab are presented. It is a sampling calorimeter, with 28 iron (passive) and scintillator (active) planes. The active planes are composed of tiles read out by WaveLength Shifter fibers spliced to clear fibers. This is the first tile calorimeter actually used (1997)in a running experiment.

  19. Orion Tile Fitting

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-10-24

    Tile blocks have been prefitted around the heat shield for the Orion crew module inside the Neil Armstrong Operations and Checkout Building high bay at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The heat shield is one of the most critical elements of Orion and protects it and the future astronauts inside from searing temperatures experienced during reentry through Earth’s atmosphere when they return home. For Exploration Mission-1, the top layer of Orion’s heat shield that is primarily responsible for helping the crew module endure reentry heat will be composed of approximately 180 blocks, which are made of an ablative material called Avcoat designed to wear away as it heats up. Orion is being prepared for its flight on the agency’s Space Launch System for Exploration Mission-1 in late 2018. Orion is the exploration spacecraft designed to carry astronauts to destinations not yet explored by humans, including an asteroid and NASA’s Journey to Mars. It will have emergency abort capability, sustain the crew during space travel and provide safe re-entry from deep space return velocities. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/orion.

  20. Effects of waste glass and waste foundry sand additions on reclaimed tiles containing sewage sludge ash.

    PubMed

    Lin, Deng-Fong; Luo, Huan-Lin; Lin, Kuo-Liang; Liu, Zhe-Kun

    2017-07-01

    Applying sewage sludge ash (SSA) to produce reclaimed tiles is a promising recycling technology in resolving the increasing sludge wastes from wastewater treatment. However, performance of such reclaimed tiles is inferior to that of original ceramic tiles. Many researchers have therefore tried adding various industrial by-products to improve reclaimed tile properties. In this study, multiple materials including waste glass and waste foundry sand (WFS) were added in an attempt to improve physical and mechanical properties of reclaimed tiles with SSA. Samples with various combinations of clay, WFS, waste glass and SSA were made with three kiln temperatures of 1000°C, 1050°C, and 1100°C. A series of tests on the samples were next conducted. Test results showed that waste glass had positive effects on bending strength, water absorption and weight loss on ignition, while WFS contributed the most in reducing shrinkage, but could decrease the tile bending strength when large amount was added at a high kiln temperature. This study suggested that a combination of WFS from 10% to 15%, waste glass from 15% to 20%, SSA at 10% at a kiln temperature between 1000°C and 1050°C could result in quality reclaimed tiles with a balanced performance.

  1. STS-114 Flight Directors Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2005-08-02

    JSC2005-E-31523 (2 August 2005) --- Astronaut David A. Wolf points to a simulated piece of protruding fiber on a set-up of thermal tiles to demonstrate for a press conference audience possible techniques to extract the gap filler material on the underside of the Space Shuttle Discovery. The STS-114 crew will conduct a spacewalk on August 3 to remove two such pieces.

  2. Fluorescence of ceramic color standards

    SciTech Connect

    Koo, Annette; Clare, John F.; Nield, Kathryn M.; Deadman, Andrew; Usadi, Eric

    2010-04-20

    Fluorescence has been found in color standards available for use in calibration and verification of color measuring instruments. The fluorescence is excited at wavelengths below about 600 nm and emitted above 700 nm, within the response range of silicon photodiodes, but at the edge of the response of most photomultipliers and outside the range commonly scanned in commercial colorimeters. The degree of fluorescence on two of a set of 12 glossy ceramic tiles is enough to introduce significant error when those tiles have been calibrated in one mode of measurement and are used in another. We report the nature of the fluorescence and the implications for color measurement.

  3. Fluorescence of ceramic color standards.

    PubMed

    Koo, Annette; Clare, John F; Nield, Kathryn M; Deadman, Andrew; Usadi, Eric

    2010-04-20

    Fluorescence has been found in color standards available for use in calibration and verification of color measuring instruments. The fluorescence is excited at wavelengths below about 600?nm and emitted above 700?nm, within the response range of silicon photodiodes, but at the edge of the response of most photomultipliers and outside the range commonly scanned in commercial colorimeters. The degree of fluorescence on two of a set of 12 glossy ceramic tiles is enough to introduce significant error when those tiles have been calibrated in one mode of measurement and are used in another. We report the nature of the fluorescence and the implications for color measurement.

  4. Process for making a ceramic composition for immobilization of actinides

    DOEpatents

    Ebbinghaus, Bartley B.; Van Konynenburg, Richard A.; Vance, Eric R.; Stewart, Martin W.; Walls, Philip A.; Brummond, William Allen; Armantrout, Guy A.; Herman, Connie Cicero; Hobson, Beverly F.; Herman, David Thomas; Curtis, Paul G.; Farmer, Joseph

    2001-01-01

    Disclosed is a process for making a ceramic composition for the immobilization of actinides, particularly uranium and plutonium. The ceramic is a titanate material comprising pyrochlore, brannerite and rutile. The process comprises oxidizing the actinides, milling the oxides to a powder, blending them with ceramic precursors, cold pressing the blend and sintering the pressed material.

  5. Process for Making a Ceramic Composition for Immobilization of Actinides

    SciTech Connect

    Ebbinghaus, Bartley B.; Van Konynenburg, Richard A.; Vance, Eric R.; Stewart, Martin W.; Walls, Philip A.; Brummond, William Allen; Armantrout, Guy A.; Curtis, Paul G.; Hobson, Beverly F.; Farmer, Joseph; Herman, Connie Cicero; Herman, David Thomas

    1999-06-22

    Disclosed is a process for making a ceramic composition for the immobilization of actinides, particularly uranium and plutonium. The ceramic is a titanate material comprising pyrochlore, brannerite and rutile. The process comprises oxidizing the actinides, milling the oxides to a powder, blending them with ceramic precursors, cold pressing the blend and sintering the pressed material.

  6. TileMap: create chromosomal map of tiling array hybridizations.

    PubMed

    Ji, Hongkai; Wong, Wing Hung

    2005-09-15

    Tiling array is a new type of microarray that can be used to survey genomic transcriptional activities and transcription factor binding sites at high resolution. The goal of this paper is to develop effective statistical tools to identify genomic loci that show transcriptional or protein binding patterns of interest. A two-step approach is proposed and is implemented in TileMap. In the first step, a test-statistic is computed for each probe based on a hierarchical empirical Bayes model. In the second step, the test-statistics of probes within a genomic region are used to infer whether the region is of interest or not. Hierarchical empirical Bayes model shrinks variance estimates and increases sensitivity of the analysis. It allows complex multiple sample comparisons that are essential for the study of temporal and spatial patterns of hybridization across different experimental conditions. Neighboring probes are combined through a moving average method (MA) or a hidden Markov model (HMM). Unbalanced mixture subtraction is proposed to provide approximate estimates of false discovery rate for MA and model parameters for HMM. TileMap is freely available at http://biogibbs.stanford.edu/~jihk/TileMap/index.htm. http://biogibbs.stanford.edu/~jihk/TileMap/index.htm (includes coloured versions of all figures).

  7. Light-weight black ceramic insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, Ming-Ta S. (Inventor); Chen, Timothy S. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    Ultra-high temperature, light-weight, black ceramic insulation having a density ranging from about 0.12 g/cc. to 0.6 g/cc. such as ceramic tile is obtained by pyrolyzing siloxane gels derived from the reaction of at least one organo dialkoxy silane and at least one tetralkoxy silane in an acid or base liquid medium. The reaction mixture of the tetra- and dialkoxy silanes also may contain an effective amount of a mono- or trialkoxy silane to obtain the siloxane gels. The siloxane gels are dried at ambient temperatures and pressures to form siloxane ceramic precursors without significant shrinkage. The siloxane ceramic precursors are subsequently pyrolyzed, in an inert atmosphere, to form the black ceramic insulation comprising atoms of silicon, carbon and oxygen. The ceramic insulation can be characterized as a porous, uniform ceramic tile resistant to oxidation at temperatures ranging as high as 1700.degree. C., and particularly useful as lightweight tiles for spacecraft and other high-temperature insulation applications.

  8. Microwave sintering of ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Snyder, W.B.

    1989-01-01

    Successful adaptation of microwave heating to the densification of ceramic materials require a marriage of microwave and materials technologies. Using an interdisciplinary team of microwave and materials engineers, we have successfully demonstrated the ability to density ceramic materials over a wide range of temperatures. Microstructural evolution during microwave sintering has been found to be significantly different from that observed in conventional sintering. Our results and those of others indicate that microwave sintering has the potential to fabricate components to near net shape with mechanical properties equivalent to hot pressed or hot isostatically pressed material. 6 refs., 11 figs.

  9. Ceramic materials for solar collectors. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Ankeny, A.E.

    1982-09-29

    The purpose of this project was to identify ceramic materials which exhibit solar absorption properties which are appropriate for flat plate solar collectors. To accomplish this, various glaze formulations and clay combinations were produced and evaluated for their potential as solar absorbers. For purposes of comparison a black coated copper sheet was also tested concurrently with the ceramic materials. Thirty-five different coatings were prepared on fifty-six tiles. Two different clays, a porcelain and a stoneware clay, were used to make the tiles. From the tiles prepared, thirty of the most promising coatings were chosen for evaluation. The test apparatus consisted of a wooden frame which enclosed four mini-collectors. Each mini-collector was a rectangular ceramic heat exchanger on which a test tile could be mounted. The working fluid, water, was circulated into the collector, passed under the test tile where it gained heat, and then was discharged out of the collector. Thermometers were installed in the inlet and discharge areas to indicate the temperature increase of the water. The quantity of heat absorbed was determined by measuring the water flow (pounds per minute) and multiplying it by the temperature increase (/sup 0/F). The control sample, a copper wheet painted flat black, provided a base by which to compare the performance of the test tiles installed in the other three mini-collectors. Testing was conducted on various days during August and September, 1982. The test results indicate that coatings with very satisfactory solar absorbing properties can be made with ceramic materials. The results suggest that an economically viable ceramic solar collector could be constructed if engineered to minimize the effects of relatively low thermal conductivity of clay.

  10. Tiling spaces are inverse limits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadun, Lorenzo

    2003-11-01

    Let M be an arbitrary Riemannian homogeneous space, and let Ω be a space of tilings of M, with finite local complexity (relative to some symmetry group Γ) and closed in the natural topology. Then Ω is the inverse limit of a sequence of compact finite-dimensional branched manifolds. The branched manifolds are (finite) unions of cells, constructed from the tiles themselves and the group Γ. This result extends previous results of Anderson and Putnam, of Ormes, Radin, and Sadun, of Bellissard, Benedetti, and Gambaudo, and of Gähler. In particular, the construction in this paper is a natural generalization of Gähler's.

  11. Ceramic colorant from untreated iron ore residue.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Oscar Costa; Bernardin, Adriano Michael

    2012-09-30

    This work deals with the development of a ceramic colorant for glazes from an untreated iron ore residue. 6 mass% of the residue was added in suspensions (1.80 g/cm(3) density and 30s viscosity) of white, transparent and matte glazes, which were applied as thin layers (0.5mm) on engobeb and not fired ceramic tiles. The tiles were fired in laboratory roller kiln in a cycle of 35 min and maximum temperatures between 1050 and 1180°C. The residue and glazes were characterized by chemical (XRF) and thermal (DTA and optical dilatometry) analyses, and the glazed tiles by colorimetric and XRD analyses. The results showed that the colorant embedded in the transparent glaze results in a reddish glaze (like pine nut) suitable for the ceramic roof tile industry. For the matte and white glazes, the residue has changed the color of the tiles with temperature. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Hot Isostatic Pressing of Superconducting Ceramics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-10-01

    MONITORING AGENCY NAME & ADDRESS Ifffer’ from Contr/.ng Offe) 115 SECURITY CLASS ., ,r’ni Unclassified ISa. DECLASSIFICATION/DOWNGRADING SCHEDULE 16...Jr., ii. M.. GAL iAGIi IE;R. 1’. K.. Si N:RWOOD. R. C., and JIN. S. warer Interaction with thec superconducting YIia2CuiOi Phbase. Appi. i’hys. Il

  13. Reusable Surface Insulation Tile Thermal Protection Materials: Past, Present and the Future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leiser, Daniel B.; Stewart, David A.; Venkatapathy, Ethiras (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Silica (LI-900) Reusable Surface Insulation (RSI) tile have been used on the majority of the Shuttle since its initial flight. Its overall performance with Reaction Cured Glass (RCG) coating applied will be reviewed. Improvements in insulations, Fibrous Refractory Composite Insulation (FRCI-12) and Alumina Enhanced Thermal Barrier (AETB-8) and coatings/surface treatments such as Toughened Uni-Piece Fibrous Insulation (TUFI) have been developed and successfully applied. The performance of these enhancements on the Shuttle Orbiters over the past few years along with the next version of tile materials, High Efficiency Tantalum-based Ceramic (HETC) with even broader applicability will also be discussed.

  14. 42. PRESSING A SLAB OF CLAY ONTO A MOSAIC MOLD. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    42. PRESSING A SLAB OF CLAY ONTO A MOSAIC MOLD. THE MOLD, WHICH HAS A RAISED DESIGN, LEAVES AND OUTLINE IN THE SLAB, THE PIECES THUS DEFINED, ARE THEN CUT APART TO BE FIRED SEPARATELY AND REASSEMBLED. - Moravian Pottery & Tile Works, Southwest side of State Route 313 (Swamp Road), Northwest of East Court Street, Doylestown, Bucks County, PA

  15. Kiln for hot-pressing compacts in a continuous manner

    DOEpatents

    Reynolds, Jr., Carl D.

    1985-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a hot pressing furnace or kiln which is capable of preheating, hot pressing, and cooling a plurality of articles in a sequential and continuous manner. The hot pressing furnace of the present invention comprises an elongated, horizontally disposed furnace capable of holding a plurality of displaceable pusher plates each supporting a die body loaded with refractory or ceramic material to be hot pressed. Each of these plates and the die body supported thereby is sequentially pushed through the preheating zone, a temperature stabilizing and a hot pressing zone, and a cooling zone so as to provide a continuous hot-pressing operation of a plurality of articles.

  16. Kiln for hot-pressing compacts in a continuous manner

    DOEpatents

    Reynolds, C.D Jr.

    1983-08-08

    The invention is directed to a hot pressing furnace or kiln which is capable of preheating, hot pressing, and cooling a plurality of articles in a sequential and continuous manner. The hot pressing furnace of the present invention comprises an elongated, horizontally disposed furnace capable of holding a plurality of displaceable pusher plates each supporting a die body loaded with refractory or ceramic material to be hot pressed. Each of these plates and the die body supported thereby is sequentially pushed through the preheating zone, a temperature stabilizing and a hot pressing zone, and a cooling zone so as to provide a continuous hot-pressing operation of a plurality of articles.

  17. Structural clay tile component behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Columber, Christopher Eugene

    1994-12-18

    The basic properties of structural clay tile walls were determined through component and composite testing of structural clay tile and mortar. The fundamental material parameters and strengths of clay tile coupons were determined through compression, tension, modulus of rupture and absorption tests. Mortar cylinders were tested in both compression and split cylinder fashion. Stress-strain curves for mortar under compression were determined. Four miniature prisms were tested in compression. These prisms were made from two 8 inches x 12 inches x 12 inches structural clay tiles, using a stack bond with a 3/4 inches mortar joint. Stress strain curves as well as material property values were obtained. These results were compared with previous tests on larger (2 feet x 4 feet) prisms. Twenty five bond wrench samples were tested. Two series of bond wrench samples were run. The first series (six tests) were fitted with LVDTs so that load deflection curves as well as flexural strengths could be obtained. A shifting of the neutral axis towards the compression face was observed. The second series were made with different mortar types: type N masonry cement mortar, type S masonry cement mortar, type N portland cement lime (PCL) mortar, and type S PCL mortar. Type S mortar and portland cement lime mortar were found to improve the bond strength.

  18. Press Start

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harteveld, Casper

    This level sets the stage for the design philosophy called “Triadic Game Design” (TGD). This design philosophy can be summarized with the following sentence: it takes two to tango, but it takes three to design a meaningful game or a game with a purpose. Before the philosophy is further explained, this level will first delve into what is meant by a meaningful game or a game with a purpose. Many terms and definitions have seen the light and in this book I will specifically orient at digital games that aim to have an effect beyond the context of the game itself. Subsequently, a historical overview is given of the usage of games with a serious purpose which starts from the moment we human beings started to walk on our feet till our contemporary society. It turns out that we have been using games for all kinds of non-entertainment purposes for already quite a long time. With this introductory material in the back of our minds, I will explain the concept of TGD by means of a puzzle. After that, the protagonist of this book, the game Levee Patroller, is introduced. Based on the development of this game, the idea of TGD, which stresses to balance three different worlds, the worlds of Reality, Meaning, and Play, came into being. Interested? Then I suggest to quickly “press start!”

  19. Ceramic Fabric Coated With Silicon Carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riccitiello, S. R.; Smith, M.; Goldstein, H.; Zimmerman, N.

    1988-01-01

    Material used as high-temperature shell. Ceramic fabric coated with silicon carbide (SiC) serves as tough, heat-resistant covering for other refractory materials. Developed to protect reusable insulating tiles on advanced space transportation systems. New covering makes protective glaze unnecessary. Used on furnace bricks or on insulation for engines.

  20. Nondestructive evaluation of Shuttle Columbia tiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Richard M.; Moslehy, Faissal A.; Clarke, Margaret M.; Mauceri, A. J.

    1992-01-01

    The NDE of Orbiter Vehicle-102 tile bonds, performed in August 1991, is described. The evaluation was carried out in order to help NASA develop fast, reliable methods to diagnose problems in tile bonding other than the present 'pull' and 'wiggle' tests. The NDE did not find any indication of bond problems, and all bonds were classified as 'nominal'. The feasibility of using NDE techniques in a dynamic, real-world environment without interfering with Shuttle rework schedules is shown. The data will be useful in verifying analytical models of tile behavior developed at the University of Central Florida. The need for a tile test bed containing known tile misbonds is suggested.

  1. Impacts of Space Shuttle thermal protection system tile on F-15 aircraft vertical tile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, W. L.

    1985-01-01

    Impacts of the space shuttle thermal protection system (TPS) tile on the leading edge and the side of the vertical tail of the F-15 aircraft were analyzed under different TPS tile orientations. The TPS tile-breaking tests were conducted to simulate the TPS tile impacts. It was found that the predicted tile impact forces compare fairly well with the tile-breaking forces, and the impact forces exerted on the F-15 aircraft vertical tail were relatively low because a very small fraction of the tile kinetic energy was dissipated in the impact, penetration, and fracture of the tile. It was also found that the oblique impact of the tile on the side of the F-15 aircraft vertical tail was unlikely to dent the tail surface.

  2. The Level-1 Tile-Muon Trigger in the Tile Calorimeter upgrade program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryzhov, A.

    2016-12-01

    The Tile Calorimeter (TileCal) is the central hadronic calorimeter of the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). TileCal provides highly-segmented energy measurements for incident particles. Information from TileCal's outermost radial layer can assist in muon tagging in the Level-1 Muon Trigger by rejecting fake muon triggers due to slow charged particles (typically protons) without degrading the efficiency of the trigger. The main activity of the Tile-Muon Trigger in the ATLAS Phase-0 upgrade program was to install and to activate the TileCal signal processor module for providing trigger inputs to the Level-1 Muon Trigger. This report describes the Tile-Muon Trigger, focusing on the new detector electronics such as the Tile Muon Digitizer Board (TMDB) that receives, digitizes and then provides the signal from eight TileCal modules to three Level-1 muon endcap Sector-Logic Boards.

  3. Programmable DNA tile self-assembly using a hierarchical sub-tile strategy.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xiaolong; Lu, Wei; Wang, Zhiyu; Pan, Linqiang; Cui, Guangzhao; Xu, Jin; LaBean, Thomas H

    2014-02-21

    DNA tile based self-assembly provides a bottom-up approach to construct desired nanostructures. DNA tiles have been directly constructed from ssDNA and readily self-assembled into 2D lattices and 3D superstructures. However, for more complex lattice designs including algorithmic assemblies requiring larger tile sets, a more modular approach could prove useful. This paper reports a new DNA 'sub-tile' strategy to easily create whole families of programmable tiles. Here, we demonstrate the stability and flexibility of our sub-tile structures by constructing 3-, 4- and 6-arm DNA tiles that are subsequently assembled into 2D lattices and 3D nanotubes according to a hierarchical design. Assembly of sub-tiles, tiles, and superstructures was analyzed using polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and atomic force microscopy. DNA tile self-assembly methods provide a bottom-up approach to create desired nanostructures; the sub-tile strategy adds a useful new layer to this technique. Complex units can be made from simple parts. The sub-tile approach enables the rapid redesign and prototyping of complex DNA tile sets and tiles with asymmetric designs.

  4. Developing tiled projection display systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hereld, M.; Judson, I. R.; Paris, J.; Stevens, R. L.

    2000-06-08

    Tiled displays are an emerging technology for constructing high-resolution semi-immersive visualization environments capable of presenting high-resolution images from scientific simulation [EVL, PowerWall]. In this way, they complement other technologies such as the CAVE [Cruz-Niera92] or ImmersaDesk, [Czernuszenko97], which by design give up pure resolution in favor of width of view and stereo. However, the largest impact may well be in using large-format tiled displays as one of possibly multiple displays in building ''information'' or ''active'' spaces that surround the user with diverse ways of interacting with data and multimedia information flows [IPSI, Childers00, Raskar98, ROME, Stanford, UNC]. These environments may prove to be the ultimate successor of the desktop metaphor for information technology work.

  5. Manufacture of high-density ceramic sinters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hibata, Y.

    1986-01-01

    High density ceramic sinters are manufactured by coating premolded or presintered porous ceramics with a sealing material of high SiO2 porous glass or nitride glass and then sintering by hot isostatic pressing. The ceramics have excellent abrasion and corrosion resistances. Thus LC-10 (Si3N2 powder) and Y2O3-Al2O3 type sintering were mixed and molded to give a premolded porous ceramic (porosity 37%, relative bulk density 63%). The ceramic was dipped in a slurry containing high SiO2 porous glass and an alcohol solution of cellulose acetate and dried. The coated ceramic was treated in a nitrogen atmosphere and then sintered by hot isostatic pressing to give a dense ceramic sinter.

  6. Production of pyroxene ceramics from the fine fraction of incinerator bottom ash.

    PubMed

    Bourtsalas, A; Vandeperre, L J; Grimes, S M; Themelis, N; Cheeseman, C R

    2015-11-01

    Incinerator bottom ash (IBA) is normally processed to extract metals and the coarse mineral fraction is used as secondary aggregate. This leaves significant quantities of fine material, typically less than 4mm, that is problematic as reuse options are limited. This work demonstrates that fine IBA can be mixed with glass and transformed by milling, calcining, pressing and sintering into high density ceramics. The addition of glass aids liquid phase sintering, milling increases sintering reactivity and calcining reduces volatile loss during firing. Calcining also changes the crystalline phases present from quartz (SiO2), calcite (CaCO3), gehlenite (Ca2Al2SiO7) and hematite (Fe2O3) to diopside (CaMgSi2O6), clinoenstatite (MgSiO3) and andradite (Ca3Fe2Si3O12). Calcined powders fired at 1080°C have high green density, low shrinkage (<7%) and produce dense (2.78 g/cm(3)) ceramics that have negligible water absorption. The transformation of the problematic fraction of IBA into a raw material suitable for the manufacture of ceramic tiles for use in urban paving and other applications is demonstrated. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Properties of ceramics prepared using dry discharged waste to energy bottom ash dust.

    PubMed

    Bourtsalas, Athanasios; Vandeperre, Luc; Grimes, Sue; Themelis, Nicolas; Koralewska, Ralf; Cheeseman, Chris

    2015-09-01

    The fine dust of incinerator bottom ash generated from dry discharge systems can be transformed into an inert material suitable for the production of hard, dense ceramics. Processing involves the addition of glass, ball milling and calcining to remove volatile components from the incinerator bottom ash. This transforms the major crystalline phases present in fine incinerator bottom ash dust from quartz (SiO(2)), calcite (CaCO(3)), gehlenite (Ca(2)Al(2)SiO(7)) and hematite (Fe(2)O(3)), to the pyroxene group minerals diopside (CaMgSi(2)O(6)), clinoenstatite (MgSi(2)O(6)), wollastonite (CaSiO(3)) together with some albite (NaAlSi(3)O(8)) and andradite (Ca(3)Fe(2)Si(3)O(12)). Processed powders show minimal leaching and can be pressed and sintered to form dense (>2.5 g cm(-3)), hard ceramics that exhibit low firing shrinkage (<7%) and zero water absorption. The research demonstrates the potential to beneficially up-cycle the fine incinerator bottom ash dust from dry discharge technology into a raw material suitable for the production of ceramic tiles that have potential for use in a range of industrial applications. © The Author(s) 2015.

  8. Shuttle Upgrade Program: Tile TPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leiser, Daniel B.; Stewart, David A.; DiFiore, Robert; Irby, Ed; Arnold, James (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    One of the areas where the thermal protection system on the Space Shuttle Orbiter could be improved is the RSI (Reusable Surface Insulation) tile. The improvement would be in damage resistance that would reduce the resultant maintenance and inspection required. It has performed very well in every other aspect. Improving the system's damage resistance has been the subject of much research over the past several years. One of the results of that research was a new system developed for damage prone areas on the orbiter (i.e., base heat shield). That system, designated as TUFI, Toughened Uni-Piece Fibrous Insulation, was successfully demonstrated as an experiment on the Orbiter and is now baselined for the base heat shield. This paper describes the results of a current research program to further improve the TUFI tile system, thus making it applicable to more areas on the orbiter. The way to remove the current limitations of the TUFI system (i.e., weight or thermal conductivity differences between it and the baseline tile (LI-900)) is to improve the characteristics of LI-900 or AETB-8. Specifically this paper describes the results of two efforts. The first shows performance data of an improved LI-900 system involving the application of TUFI and the second describes data that shows a reduced difference in thermal conductivity between the advanced TUFI substrate (AETB-8) now used on the orbiter and LI-900.

  9. Shuttle Upgrade Program: Tile TPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leiser, Daniel B.; Stewart, David A.; DiFiore, Robert; Irby, Ed; Arnold, James (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    One of the areas where the thermal protection system on the Space Shuttle Orbiter could be improved is the RSI (Reusable Surface Insulation) tile. The improvement would be in damage resistance that would reduce the resultant maintenance and inspection required. It has performed very well in every other aspect. Improving the system's damage resistance has been the subject of much research over the past several years. One of the results of that research was a new system developed for damage prone areas on the orbiter (i.e., base heat shield). That system, designated as TUFI, Toughened Uni-Piece Fibrous Insulation, was successfully demonstrated as an experiment on the Orbiter and is now baselined for the base heat shield. This paper describes the results of a current research program to further improve the TUFI tile system, thus making it applicable to more areas on the orbiter. The way to remove the current limitations of the TUFI system (i.e., weight or thermal conductivity differences between it and the baseline tile (LI-900)) is to improve the characteristics of LI-900 or AETB-8. Specifically this paper describes the results of two efforts. The first shows performance data of an improved LI-900 system involving the application of TUFI and the second describes data that shows a reduced difference in thermal conductivity between the advanced TUFI substrate (AETB-8) now used on the orbiter and LI-900.

  10. STS-114 Mission Support - Photograph EVA Tile Repair Procedures for Contingency

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2005-07-31

    JSC2005-E-30917 (31 July 2005) --- Astronaut Joe Tanner joins other astronauts and engineers at the Johnson Space Center to practice techniques to eliminate or trim protruding gap fillers that Astronauts Noguchi and Robinson will use during their spacewalk. The ceramic coated-fabric gap fillers are used to protect against hot gas from seeping into gaps between the Shuttle’s protective tiles. Photo Credit: NASA/James Blair

  11. STS-114 Mission Support - Photograph EVA Tile Repair Procedures for Contingency

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2005-07-31

    JSC2005-E-30915 (31 July 2005) --- NASA astronaut Joe Tanner (foreground) joins other astronauts and engineers at the Johnson Space Center to practice techniques to eliminate or trim protruding gap fillers that Astronauts Noguchi and Robinson will use during their spacewalk. The ceramic coated-fabric gap fillers are used to protect against hot gas from seeping into gaps between the Shuttle’s protective tiles. Photo credit: NASA/James Blair

  12. Analysis of gap heating due to stepped tiles in the shuttle thermal protection system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petley, D. H.; Smith, D. M.; Edwards, C. L. W.; Carlson, A. B.

    1983-01-01

    Analytical methods used to investigate entry gap heating in the Shuttle orbiter thermal protection system are described. Analytical results are given for a fuselage lower-surface location and a wing lower-surface location. These are locations where excessive gap heating occurred on the first flight of the Shuttle. The results of a study to determine the effectiveness of a half-height ceramic fiber gap filler in preventing hot-gas flow in the tile gaps are also given.

  13. Incorporation of Waste Ceramic Blocks in Structural Ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Oliveira, Orley Magalhães; das Graças da Silva-Valenzuela, Maria; Andrade, Christiano Gianesi Bastos; Junior, Antonio Hortêncio Munhoz; Valenzuela-Díaz, Francisco Rolando

    In Brazil, Ceramics Industries produce bricks and ceramic tiles in practically all the country. In the southwestern region of Bahia are located some of these industries. A considerable proportion of the material produced do not pass the quality control for not having a uniform visual appearance or have cracks. These burned pieces are generally discarded, resulting in a big quantity of waste. The objective of this work is the characterization of this industrial waste and thus consign them to other industrial applications. Our results demonstrate that the burned waste have potential to be used for incorporation in common clay for structural ceramics, thereby avoiding its disposal in nature and reducing this environmental liability. Experimental bodies were tested with different quantities of waste. The common clay and the burned waste were characterized by XRD, TG/DTA, and SEM. The burned specimens were tested for mechanical strength, water absorption, bulk density, and apparent porosity. An incorporation of 10% of waste furnished the best results.

  14. Global Swath and Gridded Data Tiling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Charles K.

    2012-01-01

    This software generates cylindrically projected tiles of swath-based or gridded satellite data for the purpose of dynamically generating high-resolution global images covering various time periods, scaling ranges, and colors called "tiles." It reconstructs a global image given a set of tiles covering a particular time range, scaling values, and a color table. The program is configurable in terms of tile size, spatial resolution, format of input data, location of input data (local or distributed), number of processes run in parallel, and data conditioning.

  15. Tetromino tilings and the Tutte polynomial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lykke Jacobsen, Jesper

    2007-02-01

    We consider tiling rectangles of size 4m × 4n by T-shaped tetrominoes. Each tile is assigned a weight that depends on its orientation and position on the lattice. For a particular choice of the weights, the generating function of tilings is shown to be the evaluation of the multivariate Tutte polynomial ZG(Q, v) (known also to physicists as the partition function of the Q-state Potts model) on an (m - 1) × (n - 1) rectangle G, where the parameter Q and the edge weights v can take arbitrary values depending on the tile weights.

  16. Multilayer Impregnated Fibrous Thermal Insulation Tiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tran, Huy K.; Rasky, Daniel J.; Szalai, Christine e.; Hsu, Ming-ta; Carroll, Joseph A.

    2007-01-01

    The term "secondary polymer layered impregnated tile" ("SPLIT") denotes a type of ablative composite-material thermal- insulation tiles having engineered, spatially non-uniform compositions. The term "secondary" refers to the fact that each tile contains at least two polymer layers wherein endothermic reactions absorb considerable amounts of heat, thereby helping to prevent overheating of an underlying structure. These tiles were invented to afford lighter-weight alternatives to the reusable thermal-insulation materials heretofore variously used or considered for use in protecting the space shuttles and other spacecraft from intense atmospheric-entry heating.

  17. Liquid scintillator tiles for calorimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amouzegar, M.; Belloni, A.; Bilki, B.; Calderon, J.; De Barbaro, P.; Eno, S. C.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hirschauer, J.; Jeng, G. Y.; Pastika, N. J.; Pedro, K.; Rumerio, Paolo; Samuel, J.; Sharp, E.; Shin, Y. H.; Tiras, E.; Vishnevskiy, D.; Wetzel, J.; Yang, Z.; Yao, Y.; Youn, S. W.

    2016-11-01

    Future experiments in high energy and nuclear physics may require large, inexpensive calorimeters that can continue to operate after receiving doses of 50 Mrad or more. The light output of liquid scintillators suffers little degradation under irradiation. However, many challenges exist before liquids can be used in sampling calorimetry, especially regarding developing a packaging that has sufficient efficiency and uniformity of light collection, as well as suitable mechanical properties. We present the results of a study of a scintillator tile based on the EJ-309 liquid scintillator using cosmic rays and test beam on the light collection efficiency and uniformity, and some preliminary results on radiation hardness.

  18. Liquid scintillator tiles for calorimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Amouzegar, M.; Belloni, A.; Bilki, B.; Calderon, J.; Barbaro, P. De; Eno, S. C.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hirschauer, J.; Jeng, G. Y.; Pastika, N. J.; Pedro, K.; Rumerio, Paolo; Samuel, J.; Sharp, E.; Shin, Y. H.; Tiras, E.; Vishnevskiy, D.; Wetzel, J.; Yang, Z.; Yao, Y.; Youn, S. W.

    2016-11-28

    Future experiments in high energy and nuclear physics may require large, inexpensive calorimeters that can continue to operate after receiving doses of 50 Mrad or more. Also, the light output of liquid scintillators suffers little degradation under irradiation. However, many challenges exist before liquids can be used in sampling calorimetry, especially regarding developing a packaging that has sufficient efficiency and uniformity of light collection, as well as suitable mechanical properties. We present the results of a study of a scintillator tile based on the EJ-309 liquid scintillator using cosmic rays and test beam on the light collection efficiency and uniformity, and some preliminary results on radiation hardness.

  19. Parametric Multi-Level Tiling of Imperfectly Nested Loops

    SciTech Connect

    Hartono, Albert; Baskaran, Muthu M.; Bastoul, Cedric; Cohen, Albert; Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; Norris, Boyana; Ramanujam, J.; Sadayappan, Ponnuswamy

    2009-05-18

    Tiling is a critical loop transformation for generating high-performance code on modern architectures. Efficient generation of multilevel tiled code is essential to exploit several levels of parallelism and/or to maximize data reuse in deep memory hierarchies. Tiled loops with parameterized tile sizes (not compile time constants) facilitate runtime feedback and dynamic optimizations used in iterative compilation and automatic tuning. The existing parametric multilevel tiling approach has focused on transformation for perfectly nested loops, where all assignment statements are contained inside the innermost loop of a loop nest. Previous solutions to tiling for imperfect loop nests are limited to the case where tile sizes are fixed. In this paper, we present an approach to parameterized multilevel tiling for imperfectly nested loops. Our tiling algorithm generates loops that iterate over full rectangular tiles that are amenable for potential compiler optimizations such as register tiling. Experimental results using a number of computational benchmarks demonstrate the effectiveness of our tiling approach.

  20. TRANSFER EFFICIENCES OF PESTICIDES FROM HOUSEHOLD CERAMIC TILE TO FOODS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Traditional assessments of pesticide exposure through diet have focused on contamination during production (e.g., pesticides in agriculture). However, recent residential monitoring studies have demonstrated that a significant portion of total exposure to infants and children ...

  1. 61 FR 64192 - Crystallinity of Ceramic Floor and Wall Tile

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    1996-12-03

    ... 69 the issue must be addressed for Customs purposes. Issue 2: X-ray diffraction (XRD) is currently... clearly discernable by x-ray diffraction or other analytical methodology that is generally accepted by...

  2. TRANSFER EFFICIENCES OF PESTICIDES FROM HOUSEHOLD CERAMIC TILE TO FOODS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Traditional assessments of pesticide exposure through diet have focused on contamination during production (e.g., pesticides in agriculture). However, recent residential monitoring studies have demonstrated that a significant portion of total exposure to infants and children ...

  3. Ceramic applications in the advanced Stirling automotive engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tomazic, W. A.; Cairelli, J. E.

    1978-01-01

    The requirements of the ideal Stirling cycle, as well as basic types of practical engines are described. Advantages, disadvantages, and problem areas of these Stirling engines are discussed. The potential for ceramic components is also considered. Currently ceramics are used in only two areas, the air preheater and insulating tiles between the burner and the heater head. For the advanced Stirling engine to achieve high efficiency and low cost, the principal components are expected to be made from ceramic materials, including the heater head, air preheater, regenerator, the burner and the power piston. Supporting research and technology programs for ceramic component development are briefly described.

  4. Fibonacci words, hyperbolic tilings and grossone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margenstern, Maurice

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, we study the contribution of the theory of grossone to the study of infinite Fibonacci words, combining this tool with the help of a particular tiling of the hyperbolic plane: the tiling { 7, 3 } , called the heptagrid. With the help of the numeral system based on grossone, we obtain a richer family of infinite Fibonacci words compared with the traditional approach.

  5. Bonding Heat-Resistant Fabric to Tile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holt, J. W.; Smiser, L. W.

    1985-01-01

    Acid etching, densification, and silica cement ensure strong bond. Key step in preparation for bonding to glazed tile is etching quartz fabric and tile with acid. This increases adhesion of silica cement used to form bond. Procedures use high-temperature materials exclusively and therefore suitable for securing flexible seals and heat barriers around doors and viewing ports in furnaces and kilns.

  6. Fast linear transformation for tiled images.

    PubMed

    Rao, A; Perens, B

    1996-01-01

    This work describes an efficient algorithm for linear coordinate transformation developed specifically for a tiled image processing system. A detailed description of the algorithm is presented, and its performance is compared with that of other techniques. The effect of image size on relative performance is analyzed and correlated with the tile-based storage technique.

  7. Performance of the Tile PreProcessor Demonstrator for the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter Phase II Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrió, F.; Moreno, P.; Valero, A.

    2016-03-01

    The Tile Calorimeter PreProcessor demonstrator is a high performance double AMC board based on FPGA resources and QSFP modules. This board has been designed in the framework of the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter Demonstrator project for the Phase II Upgrade as the first stage of the back-end electronics. The TilePPr demonstrator has been conceived to receive and process the data coming from the front-end electronics of the TileCal Demonstrator module, as well as to configure it. Moreover, the TilePPr demonstrator handles the communication with the Detector Control System to monitor and control the front-end electronics. The TilePPr demonstrator represents 1/8 of the final TilePPr that will be designed and installed into the detector for the ATLAS Phase II Upgrade.

  8. Tough Ceramic Mimics Mother of Pearl

    ScienceCinema

    Ritchie, Robert

    2016-07-12

    Berkeley Lab scientists have mimicked the structure of mother of pearl to create what may well be the toughest ceramic ever produced. http://newscenter.lbl.gov/press-releases/2008/12/05/scientists-create-tough-ceramic-that-mimics-mother-of-pearl/

  9. Tough Ceramic Mimics Mother of Pearl

    SciTech Connect

    Ritchie, Robert

    2009-01-01

    Berkeley Lab scientists have mimicked the structure of mother of pearl to create what may well be the toughest ceramic ever produced. http://newscenter.lbl.gov/press-releases/2008/12/05/scientists-create-tough-ceramic-that-mimics-mother-of-pearl/

  10. Ceramic fiber reinforced glass-ceramic matrix composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam P. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A slurry of BSAS glass powders is cast into tapes which are cut to predetermined sizes. Mats of continuous chemical vapor deposition (CVD)-SiC fibers are alternately stacked with these matrix tapes. This tape-mat stack is warm-pressed to produce a 'green' composite which is heated to burn out organic constituents. The remaining interim material is then hot-pressed to form a BSAS glass-ceramic fiber-reinforced composite.

  11. Lightweight Ceramic Composition of Carbon Silicon Oxygen and Boron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leiser, Daniel B. (Inventor); Hsu, Ming-Ta (Inventor); Chen, Timothy S. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    Lightweight, monolithic ceramics resistant to oxidation in air at high temperatures are made by impregnating a porous carbon preform with a sol which contains a mixture of tetraethoxysilane, dimethyldiethoxysilane and trimethyl borate. The sol is gelled and dried on the carbon preform to form a ceramic precursor. The precursor is pyrolyzed in an inert atmosphere to form the ceramic which is made of carbon, silicon, oxygen and boron. The carbon of the preform reacts with the dried gel during the pyrolysis to form a component of the resulting ceramic. The ceramic is of the same size, shape and form as the carbon precursor. Thus, using a porous, fibrous carbon precursor, such as a carbon felt, results in a porous, fibrous ceramic. Ceramics of the invention are useful as lightweight tiles for a reentry spacecraft.

  12. Robotic end-effector for rewaterproofing shuttle tiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manouchehri, Davoud; Hansen, Joseph M.; Wu, Cheng M.; Yamamoto, Brian S.; Graham, Todd

    1992-11-01

    This paper summarizes work by Rockwell International's Space Systems Division's Robotics Group at Downey, California. The work is part of a NASA-led team effort to automate Space Shuttle rewaterproofing in the Orbiter Processing Facility at the Kennedy Space Center and the ferry facility at the Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility. Rockwell's effort focuses on the rewaterproofing end-effector, whose function is to inject hazardous dimethylethyloxysilane into thousands of ceramic tiles on the underside of the orbiter after each flight. The paper has five sections. First, it presents background on the present manual process. Second, end-effector requirements are presented, including safety and interface control. Third, a design is presented for the five end-effector systems: positioning, delivery, containment, data management, and command and control. Fourth, end-effector testing and integrating to the total system are described. Lastly, future applications for this technology are discussed.

  13. Robotic end-effector for rewaterproofing shuttle tiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manouchehri, Davoud; Hansen, Joseph M.; Wu, Cheng M.; Yamamoto, Brian S.; Graham, Todd

    1992-01-01

    This paper summarizes work by Rockwell International's Space Systems Division's Robotics Group at Downey, California. The work is part of a NASA-led team effort to automate Space Shuttle rewaterproofing in the Orbiter Processing Facility at the Kennedy Space Center and the ferry facility at the Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility. Rockwell's effort focuses on the rewaterproofing end-effector, whose function is to inject hazardous dimethylethyloxysilane into thousands of ceramic tiles on the underside of the orbiter after each flight. The paper has five sections. First, it presents background on the present manual process. Second, end-effector requirements are presented, including safety and interface control. Third, a design is presented for the five end-effector systems: positioning, delivery, containment, data management, and command and control. Fourth, end-effector testing and integrating to the total system are described. Lastly, future applications for this technology are discussed.

  14. Optimising the bioreceptivity of porous glass tiles based on colonization by the alga Chlorella vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Ferrándiz-Mas, V; Bond, T; Zhang, Z; Melchiorri, J; Cheeseman, C R

    2016-09-01

    Green façades on buildings can mitigate greenhouse gas emissions. An option to obtain green facades is through the natural colonisation of construction materials. This can be achieved by engineering bioreceptive materials. Bioreceptivity is the susceptibility of a material to be colonised by living organisms. The aim of this research was to develop tiles made by sintering granular waste glass that were optimised for bioreceptivity of organisms capable of photosynthesis. Tiles were produced by pressing recycled soda-lime glass with a controlled particle size distribution and sintering compacted samples at temperatures between 680 and 740°C. The primary bioreceptivity of the tiles was evaluated by quantifying colonisation by the algae Chlorella vulgaris (C. vulgaris), which was selected as a model photosynthetic micro-organism. Concentrations of C. vulgaris were measured using chlorophyll-a extraction. Relationships between bioreceptivity and the properties of the porous glass tile, including porosity, sorptivity, translucency and pH are reported. Capillary porosity and water sorptivity were the key factors influencing the bioreceptivity of porous glass. Maximum C. vulgaris growth and colonisation was obtained for tiles sintered at 700°C, with chlorophyll-a concentrations reaching up to 11.1±0.4μg/cm(2) of tile. Bioreceptivity was positively correlated with sorptivity and porosity and negatively correlated with light transmittance. The research demonstrates that the microstructure of porous glass, determined by the processing conditions, significantly influences bioreceptivity. Porous glass tiles with high bioreceptivity that are colonised by photosynthetic algae have the potential to form carbon-negative façades for buildings and green infrastructure.

  15. Design of self-cleaning TiO2 coating on clay roofing tiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadnadjev, Milica; Ranogajec, Jonjaua; Petrovic, Snezana; Markov, Sinisa; Ducman, Vilma; Marinkovic-Neducin, Radmila

    2010-07-01

    The phenomenon of heterogeneous photocatalysis takes place in the degradation process of many organic contaminants on solid surfaces. Photocatalysis is based on the excitation of the semiconductor by irradiation with supraband gap photons and the migration of electron-hole pairs to the surface of the photocatalysts, leading to the reaction of the holes with adsorbed H2O and OH- to form hydroxyl radicals. Due to the stability and photosensitivity of TiO2 semiconductors, this system is well studied and is of great interest from an ecological and industrial point of view for use in the field of building materials. Clay roofing tiles, due to their long-term exploitation, are subject to physical, chemical and biological degradation that leads to deterioration. Ceramic systems have a high percentage of total porosity and considering their non-tolerance of organic coating, the use of surface active materials (SAM) that induce porosity in TiO2 coatings is of vital significance. Photocatalytic coatings applied on clay roofing tiles under industrial conditions were designed by varying the quantity of TiO2 (mass/cm2) on the tile surface (thin and thick TiO2 layer). The positive changes in specific surface area and mesopore structure of the designed coatings were made by the addition of PEG 600 as a surface active material. It was shown that a thin photocatalytic layer (0.399 mg suspension/cm2 tile surface), applied onto ceramic tiles under industrial conditions, had better photocatalytic activity in methylene blue decomposition, hydrophilicity and antimicrobial activity than a thick photocatalytic coating (0.885 mg suspension/cm2).

  16. Using mixture design of experiments to assess the environmental impact of clay-based structural ceramics containing foundry wastes.

    PubMed

    Coronado, M; Segadães, A M; Andrés, A

    2015-12-15

    This work describes the leaching behavior of potentially hazardous metals from three different clay-based industrial ceramic products (wall bricks, roof tiles, and face bricks) containing foundry sand dust and Waelz slag as alternative raw materials. For each product, ten mixtures were defined by mixture design of experiments and the leaching of As, Ba, Cd, Cr, Cu, Mo, Ni, Pb, and Zn was evaluated in pressed specimens fired simulating the three industrial ceramic processes. The results showed that, despite the chemical, mineralogical and processing differences, only chrome and molybdenum were not fully immobilized during ceramic processing. Their leaching was modeled as polynomial equations, functions of the raw materials contents, and plotted as response surfaces. This brought to evidence that Cr and Mo leaching from the fired products is not only dependent on the corresponding contents and the basicity of the initial mixtures, but is also clearly related with the mineralogical composition of the fired products, namely the amount of the glassy phase, which depends on both the major oxides contents and the firing temperature.

  17. Microbial deterioration of artistic tiles from the façade of the Grande Albergo Ausonia & Hungaria (Venice, Italy).

    PubMed

    Giacomucci, Lucia; Bertoncello, Renzo; Salvadori, Ornella; Martini, Ilaria; Favaro, Monica; Villa, Federica; Sorlini, Claudia; Cappitelli, Francesca

    2011-08-01

    The Grande Albergo Ausonia & Hungaria (Venice Lido, Italy) has an Art Nouveau polychrome ceramic coating on its façade, which was restored in 2007. Soon after the conservation treatment, many tiles of the façade decoration showed coloured alterations putatively attributed to the presence of microbial communities. To confirm the presence of the biological deposit and the stratigraphy of the Hungaria tiles, stereomicroscope, optical and environmental scanning electron microscope observations were made. The characterisation of the microbial community was performed using a PCR-DGGE approach. This study reported the first use of a culture-independent approach to identify the total community present in biodeteriorated artistic tiles. The case study examined here reveals that the coloured alterations on the tiles were mainly due to the presence of cryptoendolithic cyanobacteria. In addition, we proved that the microflora present on the tiles was generally greatly influenced by the environment of the Hungaria hotel. We found several microorganisms related to the alkaline environment, which is in the range of the tile pH, and related to the aquatic environment, the presence of the acrylic resin Paraloid B72® used during the 2007 treatment and the pollutants of the Venice lagoon.

  18. Fundamental ultrasonic wave propagation studies in a model thermal protection system (porous tiles bonded to aluminum bulkhead)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundu, Tribikram; Reibel, Richard; Jata, Kumar V.

    2006-03-01

    A model thermal protection system (TPS) was designed by bonding ceramic porous tiles to 2.2 and 3.5 mm thick 2124-T351 aluminum alloy plates. One of the goals of the present work was to investigate the potential of detecting simulated defects using guided waves. Simulated defects consisted of cracks, voids and delaminations at the tile-substrate interface. Cracks and voids were introduced into the porous tiles during the fabrication of the TPS. Delamination was created by cutting the gluing tape between the tile and the aluminum substrate. Guided wave propagation studies were conducted using the pitch-catch approach, while changing the angle of strike and the frequency of the transducer excitation to generate the appropriate guided wave mode. The receiver was placed at a distance so that only the guided waves were received during the immersion experiment. The delamination defect could be conclusively detected, however the presence of the imperfect bond between the tiles and the substrate interfered with the detection of the simulated cracks and voids in the porous tiles.

  19. Liquid scintillator tiles for calorimetry

    DOE PAGES

    Amouzegar, M.; Belloni, A.; Bilki, B.; ...

    2016-11-28

    Future experiments in high energy and nuclear physics may require large, inexpensive calorimeters that can continue to operate after receiving doses of 50 Mrad or more. Also, the light output of liquid scintillators suffers little degradation under irradiation. However, many challenges exist before liquids can be used in sampling calorimetry, especially regarding developing a packaging that has sufficient efficiency and uniformity of light collection, as well as suitable mechanical properties. We present the results of a study of a scintillator tile based on the EJ-309 liquid scintillator using cosmic rays and test beam on the light collection efficiency and uniformity,more » and some preliminary results on radiation hardness.« less

  20. Damage to JET beryllium tiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deksnis, E.; Cheetham, A.; Hwang, A.; Lomas, P.; Pick, M.; Summers, D. D. R.

    1990-12-01

    JET has operated with beryllium limiters such that up to 180 MJ could be coupled to the plasma. Approximately 2-4% of the surface of the limiter has been melted near the plasma contact point. Another 10-15% of the surface shows evidence of edge heating. Some 5% of tiles have been subjected to abnormal loads at points distant from the contact area. Damage shows strong correlation of localised heating of the limiter with toroidal field ripple. Edge heating rates of 260 Mw/m 2 have not caused gross mechanical failure of the limiter. The mechanical damage comprises fatigue cracks analogous to those due to sustained loading at low power levels.

  1. Evaluation of Ceramic Honeycomb Core Compression Behavior at Room Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bird, Richard K.; Lapointe, Thomas S.

    2013-01-01

    Room temperature flatwise compression tests were conducted on two varieties of ceramic honeycomb core specimens that have potential for high-temperature structural applications. One set of specimens was fabricated using strips of a commercially-available thin-gage "ceramic paper" sheet molded into a hexagonal core configuration. The other set was fabricated by machining honeycomb core directly from a commercially available rigid insulation tile material. This paper summarizes the results from these tests.

  2. Method of making multilayered titanium ceramic composites

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, George T., II; Hansen; Jeffrey S.; Oden; Laurance L.; Turner; Paul C.; Ochs; Thomas L.

    1998-08-25

    A method making a titanium ceramic composite involves forming a hot pressed powder body having a microstructure comprising at least one titanium metal or alloy layer and at least one ceramic particulate reinforced titanium metal or alloy layer and hot forging the hot pressed body follwed by hot rolling to substantially reduce a thickness dimension and substantially increase a lateral dimension thereof to form a composite plate or sheet that retains in the microstructure at least one titanium based layer and at least one ceramic reinforced titanium based layer in the thickness direction of the composite plate or sheet.

  3. Method of making multilayered titanium ceramic composites

    DOEpatents

    Fisher, G.T. II; Hansen, J.S.; Oden, L.L.; Turner, P.C.; Ochs, T.L.

    1998-08-25

    A method making a titanium ceramic composite involves forming a hot pressed powder body having a microstructure comprising at least one titanium metal or alloy layer and at least one ceramic particulate reinforced titanium metal or alloy layer and hot forging the hot pressed body followed by hot rolling to substantially reduce a thickness dimension and substantially increase a lateral dimension thereof to form a composite plate or sheet that retains in the microstructure at least one titanium based layer and at least one ceramic reinforced titanium based layer in the thickness direction of the composite plate or sheet. 3 figs.

  4. Method of making multilayered titanium ceramic composites

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, II, George T.; Hansen, Jeffrey S.; Oden, Laurance L.; Turner, Paul C.; Ochs, Thomas L.

    1998-01-01

    A method making a titanium ceramic composite involves forming a hot pressed powder body having a microstructure comprising at least one titanium metal or alloy layer and at least one ceramic particulate reinforced titanium metal or alloy layer and hot forging the hot pressed body follwed by hot rolling to substantially reduce a thickness dimension and substantially increase a lateral dimension thereof to form a composite plate or sheet that retains in the microstructure at least one titanium based layer and at least one ceramic reinforced titanium based layer in the thickness direction of the composite plate or sheet.

  5. Method of making multilayered titanium ceramic composites

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, G.T. II; Hansen, J.S.; Oden, L.L.; Turner, P.C.; Ochs, T.L.

    1998-08-25

    A method making a titanium ceramic composite involves forming a hot pressed powder body having a microstructure comprising at least one titanium metal or alloy layer and at least one ceramic particulate reinforced titanium metal or alloy layer and hot forging the hot pressed body followed by hot rolling to substantially reduce a thickness dimension and substantially increase a lateral dimension thereof to form a composite plate or sheet that retains in the microstructure at least one titanium based layer and at least one ceramic reinforced titanium based layer in the thickness direction of the composite plate or sheet. 3 figs.

  6. Distributed graph visualization on tiled displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chae, Sangwon

    2013-03-01

    In this paper, we propose a distributed force-directed layout algorithm in order to handle large graph data on tiled display that consists of multiple computing machines and multiple displays connected to each computing machine through Ethernet. The distributed tiled display makes one big screen using multiple displays in order to discern data obviously. Besides, multiple computing devices on tiled displays share the parts of an entire dataset. Therefore, it can dramatically reduce the processing time to visualize data on screen compared with the processing time on a single machine.

  7. The TileCal Laser Calibration System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giangiobbe, Vincent; ATLAS Tile Calorimeter Group

    TileCal is the central hadronic calorimeter of the ATLAS detector operating at LHC. It is a sampling calorimeter whose active material is made of scintillating plastic tiles. Scintillation light is read by photomultipliers. A Laser system is used to monitor their gain stability. During dedicated calibration runs the Laser system sends via long optical fibers, a monitored amount of light simultaneously to all the ≈10000 photomultipliers of TileCal. This note describes two complementary methods to measure the stability of the photomultipliers gain using the Laser calibration runs. The results of validation tests are presented for both methods and theirrespective performances and limitations are discussed.

  8. Triangulations (tilings) and certain block triangular matrices

    SciTech Connect

    Dantzig, G.B.; Hoffman, A.J.; Hu, T.C.

    1983-09-01

    The problem is to find a tiling (triangularization) of a convex n polytope (or combinatorially an n-gon) such that the partition uses the minimum number of tiles. We show that a certain linear program can be formulated whose optimal solution is always in integers and corresponds to a tiling. Moreover the system is in the form of a block-triangular Leontief-Substitution System that is readily solved by a O(n/sup 3/) algorithm consisting of a single forward and backward pass through data.

  9. The challenging scales of the bird: Shuttle tile structural integrity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, W. C.; Miller, G. J.

    1985-01-01

    The principal design issues, tests, and analyses required to solve the tile integrity problem on the space shuttle orbiters are addressed. Proof testing of installed tiles is discussed along with an airflow test of special tiles. Orbiter windshield tiles are considered in terms of changes necessary to ensure acceptable margins of safety for flight.

  10. Mechanical and thermophysical properties of hot-pressed SYNROC B

    SciTech Connect

    Hoenig, C.L.; Newkirk, H.W.; Otto, R.A.; Brady, R.L.; Brown, A.E.; Ulrich, A.R.; Lum, R.C.

    1981-05-06

    The optimal SYNROC compositons for use with commercial waste are reviewed. Large amounts of powder (about 2.5 kg) were prepared by convention al ceramic operations to test the SYNROC concept on a processing scale. Samples, 15.2 cm in diameter, were hot pressed in graphite, and representative samples were cut for microstructural evaluations. Measured mechanical and thermophysical properties did not vary significantly as a function of sample location and were typical of titanate ceramic materials.

  11. The Global University Press

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dougherty, Peter J.

    2012-01-01

    The modern world's understanding of American university press has long been shaped by university-press books. American university-press books are good international advertisements for the universities whose logos grace their spines. The growth of transnational scholarship and the expansion of digital communications networks are converging in ways…

  12. Reciprocating pellet press

    DOEpatents

    Jones, Charles W.

    1981-04-07

    A machine for pressing loose powder into pellets using a series of reciprocating motions has an interchangeable punch and die as its only accurately machines parts. The machine reciprocates horizontally between powder receiving and pressing positions. It reciprocates vertically to press, strip and release a pellet.

  13. The Global University Press

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dougherty, Peter J.

    2012-01-01

    The modern world's understanding of American university press has long been shaped by university-press books. American university-press books are good international advertisements for the universities whose logos grace their spines. The growth of transnational scholarship and the expansion of digital communications networks are converging in ways…

  14. Structural tests on a tile/strain isolation pad thermal protection system. [space shuttles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, J. G.

    1980-01-01

    The aluminum skin of the space shuttle is covered by a thermal protection system (TPS) consisting of a low density ceramic tile bonded to a matted-felt material called strain insulation pad (SIP). The structural characteristics of the TPS were studied experimentally under selected extreme load conditions. Three basic types of loads were imposed: tension, eccentrically applied tension, and combined in-plane force and transverse pressure. For some tests, transverse pressure was applied rapidly to simulate a transient shock wave passing over the tile. The failure mode for all specimens involved separation of the tile from the SIP at the silicone rubber bond interface. An eccentrically applied tension load caused the tile to separate from the SIP at loads lower than experienced at failure for pure tension loading. Moderate in-plane as well as shock loading did not cause a measurable reduction in the TPS ultimate failure strength. A strong coupling, however, was exhibited between in-plane and transverse loads and displacements.

  15. Relevance of magnetic properties for the characterisation of burnt clays and archaeological tiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beatrice, C.; Coïsson, M.; Ferrara, E.; Olivetti, E. S.

    The archaeomagnetism of pottery, bricks and tiles is typically employed for dating inferences, yet the magnetic properties of ancient ceramics can also be convenient for their characterisation, to evaluate the technological conditions applied for their production (temperature, atmosphere, and duration of firing), as well as to distinguish groups of sherds having different provenance. In this work, the measurement of hysteresis loops has been applied and combined with colour survey to characterise the magnetic properties of burnt clays and archaeological tiles. Four calcareous and non-calcareous clays, along with seventeen tile fragments excavated from the sites of the ancient Roman towns of Pompeii and Gravina di Puglia, in Southern Italy, are examined. The ferrimagnetic character of the clays, in general, enhances with increasing firing temperatures until vitrification processes occur (900-1000 °C) dissolving iron oxides and dispersing the colour and magnetic properties they provide. High values of saturation magnetization are observed in clays with relevant calcareous content after firing above 900 °C, which results in the formation of Ca-silicates able to delay the onset of the vitrification processes. Magnetic properties of the tiles have been evaluated in terms of the high coercivity (i.e. mainly ferrimagnetic) or low coercivity behaviour (i.e. including relevant paramagnetic and superparamagnetic contributions). Enhanced ferrimagnetic character, mostly depending on the growth in number and volume of iron oxide particles, is associated with the development of an intense reddish hue.

  16. [Raman spectroscopic study of Ming Dynasty bar-tile from Heijing of Lufeng].

    PubMed

    Yi-lin, Wang; Qun, Yang; Li, Chao-zhen

    2004-07-01

    Ming dynasty bar-tile from the archaeological site of Heijing (Lufeng of Yunnan Province, China) was analyzed by Raman microscopy, X-ray diffraction and electron probe microscopy (EPMA). It was found that the major components of the tile are SiO2, besides moonstone(KAlSi3O8 var. of K-orthoclase), Na-orthoclase(NaAlSi3 O8 )and an unknown mineral (Al, Fe)3(PO4,VO4)2(OH)3.8H2O etc. The studies revealed that the agglomerant temperature of the bar-tile reached up to 1500 degrees C, indicating that the agglomerant technology of ceramics of Yunnan in the Ming dynasty (before 17 century) already attained a high level. Raman microscopyproves especially excellent in studing antiques. The results show that the facility and reliability of Raman spectroscopy, as anon-destructive unique technique, are suitable for the discrimination between moonstone and K-orthoclase within tile. No other technique tried was successful in its identification. This research demonstrates that only by combining several complementary techniques is possible to conduct comprehensive research on antiques.

  17. Direct molding of pavement tiles made of ground tire rubber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quadrini, Fabrizio; Gagliardi, Donatella; Tedde, Giovanni Matteo; Santo, Loredana; Musacchi, Ettore

    2016-10-01

    Large rubber products can be molded by using only ground tire rubber (GTR) without any additive or binder due to a new technology called "direct molding". Rubber granules and powders from tire recycling are compression molded at elevated temperatures and pressures. The feasibility of this process was clearly shown in laboratory but the step to the industrial scale was missing. Thanks to an European Project (SMART "Sustainable Molding of Articles from Recycled Tires") this step has been made and some results are reported in this study. The press used for compression molding is described. Some tests were made to measure the energy consumption so as to evaluate costs for production in comparison with conventional technologies for GTR molding (by using binders). Results show that 1 m2 tiles can be easily molded with several thicknesses in a reasonable low time. Energy consumption is higher than conventional technologies but it is lower than the cost for binders.

  18. Use of ceramics in engine components. (Latest citations from ceramic abstracts database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-01-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning manufacturing processes, testing, design, and stress analysis of ceramic engine parts and coatings. Topics include slip casting, reaction sintering, hot isostatic pressing, injection molding, and plasma spraying processes. The citations also consider advantages of using ceramic engine components in automotive, military, and aircraft applications. (Contains a minimum of 116 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  19. Use of ceramics in engine components. (Latest citations from Ceramic Abstracts database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-12-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning manufacturing processes, testing, design, and stress analysis of ceramic engine parts and coatings. Topics include slip casting, reaction sintering, hot isostatic pressing, injection molding, and plasma spraying processes. The citations also consider advantages of using ceramic engine components in automotive, military, and aircraft applications. (Contains a minimum of 116 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  20. A comprehensive survey of brane tilings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franco, Sebastián; He, Yang-Hui; Sun, Chuang; Xiao, Yan

    2017-08-01

    An infinite class of 4d 𝒩 = 1 gauge theories can be engineered on the worldvolume of D3-branes probing toric Calabi-Yau 3-folds. This kind of setup has multiple applications, ranging from the gauge/gravity correspondence to local model building in string phenomenology. Brane tilings fully encode the gauge theories on the D3-branes and have substantially simplified their connection to the probed geometries. The purpose of this paper is to push the boundaries of computation and to produce as comprehensive a database of brane tilings as possible. We develop efficient implementations of brane tiling tools particularly suited for this search. We present the first complete classification of toric Calabi-Yau 3-folds with toric diagrams up to area 8 and the corresponding brane tilings. This classification is of interest to both physicists and mathematicians alike.

  1. Notch sensitivity of space shuttle tile materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J. C., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Tests were conducted at room temperature to determine the notch sensitivity of the thermal protection tile for the space shuttle. Two types of RSI tile were studied: LI-900 and LI-2200. Three point bend specimens were cut from discarded tiles in the in-plane (ip) and through-the-thickness (ttt) directions. They were tested with or without a sharp notch. The LI-900 (ip and ttt) specimens were not very notch sensitive, but the LI-2200 (ip and ttt) specimens were. The LI-2200 material showed about a 35 percent reduction in strength due to the presence of the notch. This reduction in strength should be considered in the design of mechanically fastened tile concepts.

  2. VB Platinum Tile & Carpet, Inc. Information Sheet

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    VB Platinum Tile & Carpet, Inc. (the Company) is located in Bristow, Virginia. The settlement involves renovation activities conducted at a property constructed prior to 1978, located in Washington, DC.

  3. Synthesis of crystalline ceramics for actinide immobilisation

    SciTech Connect

    Burakov, B.; Gribova, V.; Kitsay, A.; Ojovan, M.; Hyatt, N.C.; Stennett, M.C.

    2007-07-01

    Methods for the synthesis of ceramic wasteforms for the immobilization of actinides are common to those for non-radioactive ceramics: hot uniaxial pressing (HUP); hot isostatic pressing (HIP); cold pressing followed by sintering; melting (for some specific ceramics, such as garnet/perovskite composites). Synthesis of ceramics doped with radionuclides is characterized with some important considerations: all the radionuclides should be incorporated into crystalline structure of durable host-phases in the form of solid solutions and no separate phases of radionuclides should be present in the matrix of final ceramic wasteform; all procedures of starting precursor preparation and ceramic synthesis should follow safety requirements of nuclear industry. Synthesis methods that avoid the use of very high temperatures and pressures and are easily accomplished within the environment of a glove-box or hot cell are preferable. Knowledge transfer between the V. G. Khlopin Radium Institute (KRI, Russia) and Immobilisation Science Laboratory (ISL, UK) was facilitated in the framework of a joint project supported by UK Royal Society. In order to introduce methods of precursor preparation and ceramic synthesis we selected well-known procedures readily deployable in radiochemical processing plants. We accounted that training should include main types of ceramic wasteforms which are currently discussed for industrial applications. (authors)

  4. On Ceramics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Arts, 1982

    1982-01-01

    Presents four ceramics activities for secondary-level art classes. Included are directions for primitive kiln construction and glaze making. Two ceramics design activities are described in which students make bizarrely-shaped lidded jars, feet, and footwear. (AM)

  5. On Ceramics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Arts, 1982

    1982-01-01

    Presents four ceramics activities for secondary-level art classes. Included are directions for primitive kiln construction and glaze making. Two ceramics design activities are described in which students make bizarrely-shaped lidded jars, feet, and footwear. (AM)

  6. 2. Peavey Duluth Terminal Elevator, 1908 Duluth main workhouse, ceramic ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Peavey Duluth Terminal Elevator, 1908 Duluth main workhouse, ceramic tile and brick dryer building between workhouse and annex, south wall shipping side. - Peavey Duluth Terminal Elevator, Workhouse, South side of first slip, north from outer end of Rice's Point, east of Garfield Avenue, Duluth, St. Louis County, MN

  7. High impact resistant ceramic composite

    SciTech Connect

    Derkacy, James A.

    1991-07-16

    A ceramic material and a method of forming a ceramic material which possesses a high impact resistance. The material comprises: (a) a first continuous phase of .beta.-SiC; and (b) a second phase of about 25-40 vol % TiB.sub.2. Al.sub.2 O.sub.3 is preferably used as a densification aid. The material is formed by hot-pressing the mixture at a temperature from greater than about 1800.degree. C. to less than the transition temperature of .beta.-SiC to .alpha.-SiC. The hot-pressing is performed at a pressure of about 2000 psi to about 4000 psi in an inert atmosphere for several hours and results in the formation of a two phase sintered ceramic composite material.

  8. High impact resistant ceramic composite

    DOEpatents

    Derkacy, J.A.

    1991-07-16

    A ceramic material and a method of forming a ceramic material which possesses a high impact resistance are disclosed. The material comprises: (a) a first continuous phase of [beta]-SiC; and (b) a second phase of about 25-40 vol % TiB[sub 2]. Al[sub 2]O[sub 3] is preferably used as a densification aid. The material is formed by hot-pressing the mixture at a temperature from greater than about 1800 C to less than the transition temperature of [beta]-SiC to [alpha]-SiC. The hot-pressing is performed at a pressure of about 2000 psi to about 4000 psi in an inert atmosphere for several hours and results in the formation of a two phase sintered ceramic composite material. 6 figures.

  9. Radioactivity in zircon and building tiles

    SciTech Connect

    Wen Deng; Kaizhen Tian; Daifu Chen; Yiyun Zhang

    1997-08-01

    Zircon (ZrSiO{sub 4}) is commonly used in The manufacture of glazed tiles. In this study we found high concentrations of the radionuclides {sup 226}Ra, {sup 232}tH, {sup 40}k in zircon sand. The average radium equivalent (A{sub Ra} + 1.26 A{sub Th} + 0.086 A{sub k}) in zircon sand is 17,500 Bq kg{sup -1}, which is 106 times as much as that in ordinary building materials. The external radiation ({gamma} + {beta}) dose rates from 1.1 to 4.9 x 10{sup -2} mGy h{sup -1} with an average of 2.1 x 10{sup -2} mGy h{sup -1}. Although no elevated {gamma}-ray radiation or radon exhalation rate was detected in rooms decorated with glazed tiles, which is characteristic of combined {alpha}, {beta} and {gamma} emitting thin materials, the average {gamma} radiation dose rate at the surface of the tile stacks in shops is 1.5 times as much as the indoor background level. The average area density of total {beta} emitting radionuclides in glazed floor tiles and glazed wall tiles is 0.30 Bq cm{sup -2} and 0.28 Bq cm{sup -2}, respectively. It was estimated that the average {beta} dose rates in tissue at a depth 7 mg cm{sup -2} with a distance 20-100 cm from the floor tiles were 3.2 to 0.9 x 10{sup -7} Gy h{sup -1}. The study indicates that the {beta}-rays from glazed tiles might be one of the main factors leading to an increase in ionizing radiation received by the general public. Workers in glazed tile manufacturing factories and in tile shops or stores may be exposed to elevated levels of both {beta}-rays and {gamma}-rays from zircon sand or glazed tile stacks. No elevated radiation from unglazed tiles was detected. 10 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  10. Radioactivity in zircon and building tiles.

    PubMed

    Deng, W; Tian, K; Zhang, Y; Chen, D

    1997-08-01

    Zircon (ZrSiO4) is commonly used in the manufacture of glazed tiles. In this study we found high concentrations of the radionuclides 226Ra, 232Th, 40K in zircon sand. The average radium equivalent (A(Ra) + 1.26 A(Th) + 0.086 A(k)) in zircon sand is 17,500 Bq kg(-1), which is 106 times as much as that in ordinary building materials. The external radiation (gamma + beta) dose rates in air at 5 cm from the surface of piles of zircon sand sacks range from 1.1 to 4.9 x 10(-2) mGy h(-1) with an average of 2.1 x 10(-2) mGy h(-1). Although no elevated gamma-ray radiation or radon exhalation rate was detected in rooms decorated with glazed tiles, which is characteristic of combined alpha, beta and gamma emitting thin materials, the average gamma-ray radiation dose rate at the surface of the tile stacks in shops is 1.5 times as much as the indoor background level. The average area density of total beta emitting radionuclides in glazed floor tiles and glazed wall tiles is 0.30 Bq cm(-2) and 0.28 Bq cm(-2), respectively. It was estimated that the average beta dose rates in tissue at a depth 7 mg cm(-2) with a distance 20-100 cm from the floor tiles were 3.2 to 0.9 x 10(-7) Gy h(-1). The study indicates that the beta-rays from glazed tiles might be one of the main factors leading to an increase in ionizing radiation received by the general public. Workers in glazed tile manufacturing factories and in tile shops or stores may be exposed to elevated levels of both beta-rays and gamma-rays from zircon sand or glazed tile stacks. No elevated radiation from unglazed tiles was detected.

  11. Laser Scanner for Tile-Cavity Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoshino, Stanley Y.; Wykes, Donald H.; Hagen, George R.; Lotgering, Gene E.; Gaynor, Michael B.; Westerlund, Paul G.; Baal, Thomas A.

    1987-01-01

    Irregular surfaces mapped and digitized for numerical-control machinery. Fast, accurate laser scanning system measures size and shape of cavity without making any physical contact with cavity and walls. Measurements processed into control signals for numerically controlled machining of tile or block to fit cavity. System generates map of grid points representing cavity and portion of outer surface surrounding cavity. Map data used to control milling machine, which cuts tile or block to fit in cavity.

  12. Laser Scanner for Tile-Cavity Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoshino, Stanley Y.; Wykes, Donald H.; Hagen, George R.; Lotgering, Gene E.; Gaynor, Michael B.; Westerlund, Paul G.; Baal, Thomas A.

    1987-01-01

    Irregular surfaces mapped and digitized for numerical-control machinery. Fast, accurate laser scanning system measures size and shape of cavity without making any physical contact with cavity and walls. Measurements processed into control signals for numerically controlled machining of tile or block to fit cavity. System generates map of grid points representing cavity and portion of outer surface surrounding cavity. Map data used to control milling machine, which cuts tile or block to fit in cavity.

  13. Ceramic Material.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-05-02

    A ceramic material which is (1) ceramics based on monoclinic BaO.Al2O3.2SiO2; (2) ceramics based on monoclinic SrO.Al2O3.2SiO2; or (3) ceramics based on monoclinic solid solution of BaO.Al2O3.2SiO2 and SrO.Al2O3.2SiO2.

  14. Lessons learned from the development and manufacture of ceramic reusable surface insulation materials for the space shuttle orbiters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banas, R. P.; Elgin, D. R.; Cordia, E. R.; Nickel, K. N.; Gzowski, E. R.; Aguiler, L.

    1983-01-01

    Three ceramic, reusable surface insulation materials and two borosilicate glass coatings were used in the fabrication of tiles for the Space Shuttle orbiters. Approximately 77,000 tiles were made from these materials for the first three orbiters, Columbia, Challenger, and Discovery. Lessons learned in the development, scale up to production and manufacturing phases of these materials will benefit future production of ceramic reusable surface insulation materials. Processing of raw materials into tile blanks and coating slurries; programming and machining of tiles using numerical controlled milling machines; preparing and spraying tiles with the two coatings; and controlling material shrinkage during the high temperature (2100-2275 F) coating glazing cycles are among the topics discussed.

  15. Performance of the TFTR moveable limiter tiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulrickson, M.; Cecchi, J. L.; Doyle, B. L.; Dylla, H. F.; Medley, S. S.; Owens, D. K.; Trester, P.

    1985-08-01

    The movable limiter for the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) is composed of an Inconel X-750 backing plate covered with titanium carbide coated graphite tiles. It has been used for ohmic heating discharges at input powers up to about 2 MW for durations up to 3 s. Even though these levels were well within the design requirements, discharges showed high levels (up to 1%) of titanium contamination. It was observed that certain tiles were showing substantial coating removal which became progressively worse as more discharges were made. After about 800 discharges the tiles were removed. A few of the tiles were examined in the Sandia external beam facility. This analysis showed that the TiC coating was completely removed over large areas. There was also evidence of plasma deposited material on the tiles. The thickness of the remaining coating from this beam analysis agreed with the thickness determined from sectioning control coupons from the production runs. There was a weak correlation between damage and coating thickness. The correlation was such that there was a higher probability of coating failure as the coating thickness increased from 15 μm to 40 μm. Test were done using the ASTM-C-633 procedure for measuring coating bond strength. The adhesion strength agreed well with the behavior observed in TFTR. The coating has been removed, and the tiles reinstalled.

  16. Quasicrystalline tilings with nematic colloidal platelets.

    PubMed

    Dontabhaktuni, Jayasri; Ravnik, Miha; Žumer, Slobodan

    2014-02-18

    Complex nematic fluids have the remarkable capability for self-assembling regular colloidal structures of various symmetries and dimensionality according to their micromolecular orientational order. Colloidal chains, clusters, and crystals were demonstrated recently, exhibiting soft-matter functionalities of robust binding, spontaneous chiral symmetry breaking, entanglement, shape-driven and topological driven assembly, and even memory imprinting. However, no quasicrystalline structures were found. Here, we show with numerical modeling that quasicrystalline colloidal lattices can be achieved in the form of original Penrose P1 tiling by using pentagonal colloidal platelets in layers of nematic liquid crystals. The tilings are energetically stabilized with binding energies up to 2500 kBT for micrometer-sized platelets and further allow for hierarchical substitution tiling, i.e., hierarchical pentagulation. Quasicrystalline structures are constructed bottom-up by assembling the boat, rhombus, and star maximum density clusters, thus avoiding other (nonquasicrystalline) stable or metastable configurations of platelets. Central to our design of the quasicrystalline tilings is the symmetry breaking imposed by the platelet shape and the surface anchoring conditions at the colloidal platelets, which are misaligning and asymmetric over two perpendicular mirror planes. Finally, the design of the quasicrystalline tilings as platelets in nematic liquid crystals is inherently capable of a continuous variety of length scales of the tiling, ranging over three orders of magnitude in the typical length (from ~ 10 nm to ~ 10 μm), which could allow for the design of quasicrystalline photonics at multiple frequency ranges.

  17. Quasicrystalline tilings with nematic colloidal platelets

    PubMed Central

    Dontabhaktuni, Jayasri; Ravnik, Miha; Žumer, Slobodan

    2014-01-01

    Complex nematic fluids have the remarkable capability for self-assembling regular colloidal structures of various symmetries and dimensionality according to their micromolecular orientational order. Colloidal chains, clusters, and crystals were demonstrated recently, exhibiting soft-matter functionalities of robust binding, spontaneous chiral symmetry breaking, entanglement, shape-driven and topological driven assembly, and even memory imprinting. However, no quasicrystalline structures were found. Here, we show with numerical modeling that quasicrystalline colloidal lattices can be achieved in the form of original Penrose P1 tiling by using pentagonal colloidal platelets in layers of nematic liquid crystals. The tilings are energetically stabilized with binding energies up to 2500 kBT for micrometer-sized platelets and further allow for hierarchical substitution tiling, i.e., hierarchical pentagulation. Quasicrystalline structures are constructed bottom-up by assembling the boat, rhombus, and star maximum density clusters, thus avoiding other (nonquasicrystalline) stable or metastable configurations of platelets. Central to our design of the quasicrystalline tilings is the symmetry breaking imposed by the platelet shape and the surface anchoring conditions at the colloidal platelets, which are misaligning and asymmetric over two perpendicular mirror planes. Finally, the design of the quasicrystalline tilings as platelets in nematic liquid crystals is inherently capable of a continuous variety of length scales of the tiling, ranging over three orders of magnitude in the typical length (from to ), which could allow for the design of quasicrystalline photonics at multiple frequency ranges. PMID:24550269

  18. Structural Ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    This publication is a compilation of abstracts and slides of papers presented at the NASA Lewis Structural Ceramics Workshop. Collectively, these papers depict the scope of NASA Lewis' structural ceramics program. The technical areas include monolithic SiC and Si3N4 development, ceramic matrix composites, tribology, design methodology, nondestructive evaluation (NDE), fracture mechanics, and corrosion.

  19. Low-loss binder for hot pressing boron nitride

    DOEpatents

    Maya, Leon

    1991-01-01

    Borazine derivatives used as low-loss binders and precursors for making ceramic boron nitride structures. The derivative forms the same composition as the boron nitride starting material, thereby filling the voids with the same boron nitride material upon forming and hot pressing. The derivatives have a further advantage of being low in carbon thus resulting in less volatile byproduct that can result in bubble formation during pressing.

  20. Recycling of porcelain tile polishing residue in portland cement: hydration efficiency.

    PubMed

    Pelisser, Fernando; Steiner, Luiz Renato; Bernardin, Adriano Michael

    2012-02-21

    Ceramic tiles are widely used by the construction industry, and the manufacturing process of ceramic tiles generates as a major residue mud derived from the polishing step. This residue is too impure to be reused in the ceramic process and is usually discarded as waste in landfills. But the analysis of the particle size and concentration of silica of this residue shows a potential use in the manufacture of building materials based on portland cement. Tests were conducted on cement pastes and mortars using the addition of 10% and 20% (mass) of the residue. The results of compressive strength in mortars made up to 56 days showed a significant increase in compressive strength greater than 50%. The result of thermogravimetry shows that portlandite is consumed by the cement formed by the silica present in the residue in order to form calcium silicate hydrate and featuring a pozzolanic reaction. This effect improves the performance of cement, contributes to research and application of supplementary cementitious materials, and optimizes the use of portland cement, reducing the environmental impacts of carbon dioxide emissions from its production.

  1. Tile drainage as karst: Conduit flow and diffuse flow in a tile-drained watershed

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schilling, K.E.; Helmers, M.

    2008-01-01

    The similarity of tiled-drained watersheds to karst drainage basins can be used to improve understanding of watershed-scale nutrient losses from subsurface tile drainage networks. In this study, short-term variations in discharge and chemistry were examined from a tile outlet collecting subsurface tile flow from a 963 ha agricultural watershed. Study objectives were to apply analytical techniques from karst springs to tile discharge to evaluate water sources and estimate the loads of agricultural pollutants discharged from the tile with conduit, intermediate and diffuse flow regimes. A two-member mixing model using nitrate, chloride and specific conductance was used to distinguish rainwater versus groundwater inputs. Results indicated that groundwater comprised 75% of the discharge for a three-day storm period and rainwater was primarily concentrated during the hydrograph peak. A contrasting pattern of solute concentrations and export loads was observed in tile flow. During base flow periods, tile flow consisted of diffuse flow from groundwater sources and contained elevated levels of nitrate, chloride and specific conductance. During storm events, suspended solids and pollutants adhered to soil surfaces (phosphorus, ammonium and organic nitrogen) were concentrated and discharged during the rapid, conduit flow portion of the hydrograph. During a three-day period, conduit flow occurred for 5.6% of the time but accounted for 16.5% of the total flow. Nitrate and chloride were delivered primarily with diffuse flow (more than 70%), whereas 80-94% of total suspended sediment, phosphorus and ammonium were exported with conduit and intermediate flow regimes. Understanding the water sources contributing to tile drainage and the manner by which pollutant discharge occurs from these systems (conduit, intermediate or diffuse flow) may be useful for designing, implementing and evaluating non-point source reduction strategies in tile-drained landscapes. ?? 2007 Elsevier B.V. All

  2. In-flight investigation of shuttle tile pressure orifice installations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moes, Timothy R.; Meyer, Robert R., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    To determine shuttle orbiter wing loads during ascent, wing load instrumentation was added to Columbia (OV-102). This instrumentation included strain gages and pressure orifices on the wing. The loads derived from wing pressure measurements taken during STS 61-C did not agree with those derived from strain gage measurements or with the loads predicted from the aerodynamic database. Anomalies in the surface immediately surrounding the pressure orifices in the thermal protection system (TPS) tiles were one possible cause of errors in the loads derived from wing pressure measurements. These surface anomalies were caused by a ceramic filler material which was installed around the pressure tubing. The filler material allowed slight movement of the TPS tile and pressure tube as the airframe flexed and bent under aerodynamic loads during ascent and descent. Postflight inspection revealed that this filler material had protruded from or receeded beneath the surface, causing the orifice to lose its flushness. Flight tests were conducted at NASA Ames Research Center Dryden Flight Research Facility to determine the effects of any anomaly in surface flushness of the orifice installation on the measured pressures at Mach numbers between 0.6 and 1.4. An F-104 aircraft with a flight test fixture mounted beneath the fuselage was used for these flights. Surface flushness anomalies typical of those on the orbiter after flight (STA 61-C) were tested. Also, cases with excessive protrusion and recession of the filler material were tested. This report shows that the anomalies in STS 61-C orifice installations adversely affected the pressure measurements. But the magnitude of the affect was not great enough to account for the discrepancies with the strain gage measurements and the aerodynamic predictions.

  3. Symmetry groups associated with tilings on a flat torus.

    PubMed

    Loyola, Mark L; De Las Peñas, Ma Louise Antonette N; Estrada, Grace M; Santoso, Eko Budi

    2015-01-01

    This work investigates symmetry and color symmetry properties of Kepler, Heesch and Laves tilings embedded on a flat torus and their geometric realizations as tilings on a round torus in Euclidean 3-space. The symmetry group of the tiling on the round torus is determined by analyzing relevant symmetries of the planar tiling that are transformed to axial symmetries of the three-dimensional tiling. The focus on studying tilings on a round torus is motivated by applications in the geometric modeling of nanotori and the determination of their symmetry groups.

  4. Dynamic Moire methods for detection of loosened space shuttle tiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snow, W. L.; Burner, A. W.; Goad, W. K.

    1981-09-01

    Moire fringe methods for detecting loose space shuttle tiles were investigated with a test panel consisting of a loose tile surrounded by four securely bonded tiles. The test panel was excited from 20 to 150 Hz with in-plane sinusoidal acceleration of 2 g (peak). If the shuttle orbiter can be subjected to periodic excitation of 1 to 2 g (peak) and rigid-body periodic displacements do not mask the change in the Moire pattern due to tile looseness, then the use of projected Moire fringes to detect out-of-plane rockin appears to be the most viable indicator of tile looseness since no modifications to the tiles are required.

  5. University Presses: Problems and Prospects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meeker, Robert B.

    Historical information on university presses and their problems are considered. University presses in the United States have their roots in 15th century England when the Oxford University Press was established in 1478. The first U.S. press to use the term "university press" was Cornell University; the press operated from 1869 until it…

  6. Tiled WMS/KML Server V2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plesea, Lucian

    2012-01-01

    This software is a higher-performance implementation of tiled WMS, with integral support for KML and time-varying data. This software is compliant with the Open Geospatial WMS standard, and supports KML natively as a WMS return type, including support for the time attribute. Regionated KML wrappers are generated that match the existing tiled WMS dataset. Ping and JPG formats are supported, and the software is implemented as an Apache 2.0 module that supports a threading execution model that is capable of supporting very high request rates. The module intercepts and responds to WMS requests that match certain patterns and returns the existing tiles. If a KML format that matches an existing pyramid and tile dataset is requested, regionated KML is generated and returned to the requesting application. In addition, KML requests that do not match the existing tile datasets generate a KML response that includes the corresponding JPG WMS request, effectively adding KML support to a backing WMS server.

  7. Performance of the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hrynevich, A.

    2017-06-01

    The Tile Calorimeter (TileCal) is the central scintillator-steel sampling hadronic calorimeter of the ATLAS experiment at the LHC . Jointly with other calorimeters it is designed for energy reconstruction of hadrons, jets, tau-particles and missing transverse energy. The scintillation light produced in the scintillator tiles is transmitted by wavelength shifting fibers to photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). The analog signals from the PMTs are amplified, shaped and digitized by sampling the signal every 25 ns. The TileCal frontend electronics reads out the signals produced by about 10000 channels measuring energies ranging from ~30 MeV to ~2 TeV . Each stage of the signal production from scintillation light to the signal reconstruction is monitored and calibrated. The performance of the calorimeter has been established with cosmic ray muons and the large sample of the proton-proton collisions. The response of high momentum isolated muons is used to study the energy response at the electromagnetic scale, isolated hadrons are used as a probe of the hadronic response and its modelling by the Monte Carlo simulations. The calorimeter time resolution is studied with multijet events. Results on the calorimeter operation and performance are presented, including the calibration, stability, absolute energy scale, uniformity and time resolution. These results show that the TileCal performance is within the design requirements and has given essential contribution to reconstructed objects and physics results.

  8. Superplastic forging nitride ceramics

    DOEpatents

    Panda, P.C.; Seydel, E.R.; Raj, R.

    1988-03-22

    A process is disclosed for preparing silicon nitride ceramic parts which are relatively flaw free and which need little or no machining, said process comprising the steps of: (a) preparing a starting powder by wet or dry mixing ingredients comprising by weight from about 70% to about 99% silicon nitride, from about 1% to about 30% of liquid phase forming additive and from 1% to about 7% free silicon; (b) cold pressing to obtain a preform of green density ranging from about 30% to about 75% of theoretical density; (c) sintering at atmospheric pressure in a nitrogen atmosphere at a temperature ranging from about 1,400 C to about 2,200 C to obtain a density which ranges from about 50% to about 100% of theoretical density and which is higher than said preform green density, and (d) press forging workpiece resulting from step (c) by isothermally uniaxially pressing said workpiece in an open die without initial contact between said workpiece and die wall perpendicular to the direction of pressing and so that pressed workpiece does not contact die wall perpendicular to the direction of pressing, to substantially final shape in a nitrogen atmosphere utilizing a temperature within the range of from about 1,400 C to essentially 1,750 C and strain rate within the range of about 10[sup [minus]7] to about 10[sup [minus]1] seconds[sup [minus]1], the temperature and strain rate being such that surface cracks do not occur, said pressing being carried out to obtain a shear deformation greater than 30% whereby superplastic forging is effected.

  9. High School Press Pressures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Luella P.

    History shows that the high school press suffers through cycles that reflect economic factors and cultural climates within communities, states, and the nation. The direction of that cycle in the 1960s and early 1970s was toward more open, free-flowing information by a vigorous student press, but those economic and cultural signs now are pointing…

  10. The Greenwood School Press.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamb, Jane

    1984-01-01

    A turn-of-the-century printing press motivates elementary students to write. Children write, edit, and print their own stories on the Greenwood School Press. This self-supporting enterprise introduces children to various aspects of writing and producing literature. (DF)

  11. Press Councils in Canada.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reddick, David B.

    Established in the early 1970s to respond to complaints about and from the media, the four press councils in Canada (the Alberta, Ontario, Quebec, and Windsor Press Councils) have been accepted, but not overwhelmingly so by either newspapers or the public. The success and acceptability of the councils seems to be related to the kinds of complaints…

  12. Lyndon Johnson's Press Conferences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Stephen

    Because President Lyndon Johnson understood well the publicity value of the American news media, he sought to exploit them. He saw reporters as "torch bearers" for his programs and policies and used the presidential press conference chiefly for promotional purposes. Although he met with reporters often, his press conferences were usually…

  13. High School Press Pressures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Luella P.

    History shows that the high school press suffers through cycles that reflect economic factors and cultural climates within communities, states, and the nation. The direction of that cycle in the 1960s and early 1970s was toward more open, free-flowing information by a vigorous student press, but those economic and cultural signs now are pointing…

  14. Constellation Program Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-06-04

    Dean Acosta, NASA Deputy Assistant Administrator and Press Secretary, moderates a press conference with NASA Administrator Michael Griffin Scott Horowitz, NASA Associate Administrator for Exploration Systems and Jeff Hanley, Constellation Program Manager, outlining specific center responsibilities associated with the Constellation Program for robotic and human Moon and Mars exploration, Monday, June 5, 2006, at NASA Headquarters in Washington. Photo Credit (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  15. Press Relations: Carter's Example.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kindsvatter, Peter S.

    Although different philosophies may motivate presidential-press relations, causing frequent friction or adversity, there is nevertheless a strong degree of cooperation and collaboration between the press and a president of the United States. This interdependence has been particularly evident in recent administrations, and it progresses…

  16. The Greenwood School Press.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamb, Jane

    1984-01-01

    A turn-of-the-century printing press motivates elementary students to write. Children write, edit, and print their own stories on the Greenwood School Press. This self-supporting enterprise introduces children to various aspects of writing and producing literature. (DF)

  17. Crosslinking in viral capsids via tiling theory.

    PubMed

    Twarock, R; Hendrix, R W

    2006-06-07

    A vital part of a virus is its protein shell, called the viral capsid, that encapsulates and hence protects the viral genome. It has been shown in Twarock [2004. A tiling approach to vius capsids assembly explaining a structural puzzle in virology. J. Theor. Biol. 226, 477-482] that the surface structures of viruses with icosahedrally symmetric capsids can be modelled in terms of tilings that encode the locations of the protein subunits. This theory is extended here to multi-level tilings in order to model crosslinking structures. The new framework is demonstrated for the case of bacteriophage HK97, and it is shown, how the theory can be used in general to decide if crosslinking, and what type of crosslinking, is compatible from a mathematical point of view with the geometrical surface structure of a virus.

  18. Adjusting dental ceramics: An in vitro evaluation of the ability of various ceramic polishing kits to mimic glazed dental ceramic surface.

    PubMed

    Steiner, René; Beier, Ulrike S; Heiss-Kisielewsky, Irene; Engelmeier, Robert; Dumfahrt, Herbert; Dhima, Matilda

    2015-06-01

    During the insertion appointment, the practitioner is often faced with the need to adjust ceramic surfaces to fit a restoration to the adjacent or opposing dentition and soft tissues. The purpose of this study was to assess the ceramic surface smoothness achieved with various commercially available ceramic polishing kits on different commonly used ceramic systems. The reliability of the cost of a polishing kit as an indicator of improved surface smoothness was assessed. A total of 350 ceramic surfaces representing 5 commonly available ceramic systems (IPS Empress Esthetic, IPS e.max Press, Cergo Kiss, Vita PM 9, Imagine PressX) were treated with 5 types of ceramic polishing systems (Cerapreshine, 94006C, Ceramiste, Optrafine, Zenostar) by following the manufacturers' guidelines. The surface roughness was measured with a profilometer (Taylor Hobson; Precision Taylor Hobson Ltd). The effects of ceramic systems and polishing kits of interest on surface roughness were analyzed by 2-way ANOVA, paired t test, and Bonferroni corrected significance level. The ceramic systems and polishing kits statistically affected surface roughness (P<.001).The polishing kit Zenostar on IPS e.max Press created the smoothest ceramic surface. No correlation could be established between the high cost of the polishing kit and low surface roughness. None of the commonly used ceramic polishing kits could create a surface smoother than that of glazed ceramic (P<.001). The inclusion of a diamond polishing paste step is recommended to improve surface smoothness (P<.001). The cost of ceramic polishing kits is not recommended as a reliable indicator of better performance of ceramic polishing kits (P>.30). Copyright © 2015 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Ceramic joining

    SciTech Connect

    Loehman, R.E.

    1996-04-01

    This paper describes the relation between reactions at ceramic-metal interfaces and the development of strong interfacial bonds in ceramic joining. Studies on a number of systems are described, including silicon nitrides, aluminium nitrides, mullite, and aluminium oxides. Joints can be weakened by stresses such as thermal expansion mismatch. Ceramic joining is used in a variety of applications such as solid oxide fuel cells.

  20. Ceramic filters

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, B.L.; Janney, M.A.

    1995-12-31

    Filters were formed from ceramic fibers, organic fibers, and a ceramic bond phase using a papermaking technique. The distribution of particulate ceramic bond phase was determined using a model silicon carbide system. As the ceramic fiber increased in length and diameter the distance between particles decreased. The calculated number of particles per area showed good agreement with the observed value. After firing, the papers were characterized using a biaxial load test. The strength of papers was proportional to the amount of bond phase included in the paper. All samples exhibited strain-tolerant behavior.

  1. Degenerate polygonal tilings in simple animal tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziherl, Primoz; Hocevar, Ana

    2009-03-01

    We study 2D polygonal tilings as models of the en-face structure of single-layer biological tissues. Using numerical simulations, we explore the phase diagram of equilibrium tilings of equal-area, equal-perimeter convex polygons whose energy is independent of their shape. We identify 3 distinct phases, which are all observed in simple epithelial tissues: The disordered phase of polygons with 4-9 sides, the hexatic phase, and the hexagonal phase with perfect 6-fold coordination. We quantify their structure using Edwards' statistical mechanics of cellular systems.

  2. Translucency of dental ceramics with different thicknesses.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fu; Takahashi, Hidekazu; Iwasaki, Naohiko

    2013-07-01

    The increased use of esthetic restorations requires an improved understanding of the translucent characteristics of ceramic materials. Ceramic translucency has been considered to be dependent on composition and thickness, but less information is available about the translucent characteristics of these materials, especially at different thicknesses. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between translucency and the thickness of different dental ceramics. Six disk-shaped specimens of 8 glass ceramics (IPS e.max Press HO, MO, LT, HT, IPS e.max CAD LT, MO, AvanteZ Dentin, and Trans) and 5 specimens of 5 zirconia ceramics (Cercon Base, Zenotec Zr Bridge, Lava Standard, Lava Standard FS3, and Lava Plus High Translucency) were prepared following the manufacturers' instructions and ground to a predetermined thickness with a grinding machine. A spectrophotometer was used to measure the translucency parameters (TP) of the glass ceramics, which ranged from 2.0 to 0.6 mm, and of the zirconia ceramics, which ranged from 1.0 to 0.4 mm. The relationship between the thickness and TP of each material was evaluated using a regression analysis (α=.05). The TP values of the glass ceramics ranged from 2.2 to 25.3 and the zirconia ceramics from 5.5 to 15.1. There was an increase in the TP with a decrease in thickness, but the amount of change was material dependent. An exponential relationship with statistical significance (P<.05) between the TP and thickness was found for both glass ceramics and zirconia ceramics. The translucency of dental ceramics was significantly influenced by both material and thickness. The translucency of all materials increased exponentially as the thickness decreased. All of the zirconia ceramics evaluated in the present study showed some degree of translucency, which was less sensitive to thickness compared to that of the glass ceramics. Copyright © 2013 The Editorial Council of the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Mosby

  3. Improvement of PVC floor tiles by gamma radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    du Plessis, T. A.; Badenhorst, F.

    Gamma radiation presents a unique method of transforming highly plasticized PVC floor tiles, manufactured at high speed through injection moulding, into a high quality floor covering at a cost at least 30% less than similarly rated rubber tiles. A specially formulated PVC compound was developed in collaboration with a leading manufacturer of floor tiles. These tiles are gamma crosslinked in its shipping cartons to form a dimensionally stable product which is highly fire resistant and inert to most chemicals and solvents. The crosslinked tiles are more flexible than the highly filled conventional PVC floor tiles, scratch resistant and have a longer lifespan and increased colour fastness. These tiles are also less expensive to install than conventional rubber tiles.

  4. 2. MORAVIAN POTTERY AND TILE WORKS, VIEW FROM THE SOUTHWEST. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. MORAVIAN POTTERY AND TILE WORKS, VIEW FROM THE SOUTHWEST. INDIAN HOUSE WING AT THE LEFT. - Moravian Pottery & Tile Works, Southwest side of State Route 313 (Swamp Road), Northwest of East Court Street, Doylestown, Bucks County, PA

  5. Effect of hot pressing additives on the leachability of hot pressed sodium hydrous titanium oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Valentine, T.M.; Sambell, R.A.J.

    1980-01-01

    Sodium hydrous titanium oxide is an ion exchange resin which can be used for immobilizing medium level waste (MLW) liquors. When hot pressed, it undergoes conversion to a ceramic. Three low melting point materials (borax, bismuth trioxide, and a mixture of PbO/CuO) were added to the (Na)HTiO and the effect that each of these had on aiding densification was assessed. Hot pressing temperature, applied pressure, and percentage addition of hot pressing aid were varied. Percentage open porosity, flexural strength, and leachability were measured. There was a linear relationship between the percentage open porosity and the logarithm of the leach rate for a constant percentage addition of each additive.

  6. Ceramic technology for solar thermal receivers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kudirka, A. A.; Smoak, R. H.

    1981-01-01

    The high-temperature capability, resistance to corrosive environments and non-strategic nature of ceramics have prompted applications in the solar thermal field whose advantages over metallic devices of comparable performance may begin to be assessed. It is shown by a survey of point-focusing receiver designs employing a variety of ceramic compositions and fabrication methods that the state-of-the-art in structural ceramics is not sufficiently advanced to fully realize the promised benefits of higher temperature capabilities at lower cost than metallic alternatives. The ceramics considered include alumina, berylia, magnesia, stabilized zirconia, fused silica, silicon nitride, silicon carbide, mullite and cordierite, processed by such methods as isostatic pressing, dry pressing, slip casting, extrusion, calendaring and injection molding.

  7. Ceramic technology for solar thermal receivers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kudirka, A. A.; Smoak, R. H.

    1981-01-01

    The high-temperature capability, resistance to corrosive environments and non-strategic nature of ceramics have prompted applications in the solar thermal field whose advantages over metallic devices of comparable performance may begin to be assessed. It is shown by a survey of point-focusing receiver designs employing a variety of ceramic compositions and fabrication methods that the state-of-the-art in structural ceramics is not sufficiently advanced to fully realize the promised benefits of higher temperature capabilities at lower cost than metallic alternatives. The ceramics considered include alumina, berylia, magnesia, stabilized zirconia, fused silica, silicon nitride, silicon carbide, mullite and cordierite, processed by such methods as isostatic pressing, dry pressing, slip casting, extrusion, calendaring and injection molding.

  8. Nondestructive characterization of as-fabricated composite ceramic panels

    SciTech Connect

    Green, W. H.; Brennan, R. E.

    2011-06-23

    Decreasing the weight of protective systems, while minimizing the decrease in ballistic performance, is an ongoing goal of the Army. Ceramic materials are currently combined with other materials in these types of structures in order to decrease weight without losing ballistic performance. This includes structures in which the ceramic material is confined in some way and in which the ceramic material is completely encapsulated. Confinement or encapsulation of ceramic material within a structure generally adds complexity and cost. Relatively simple panel specimens fabricated with ceramic tiles on aluminum backings and side confinement using steel were evaluated using nondestructive methods, including x-ray computed tomography and ultrasonic testing. The nondestructive evaluation results will be discussed and compared, including the detectability and mapping of fabrication features.

  9. Glass-ceramic frits from fly ash in terracotta production.

    PubMed

    Karamanova, Emilia; Karamanov, Alexander

    2009-02-01

    Preliminary results of an investigation into the possible use of glass-ceramic frits from fly ash and glass cullet in terracotta (stoneware) tile manufacture are reported. Two new ceramics were studied and compared with a plant composition, containing 45 wt.% sodium feldspar. In the first ceramic batch 20% of the feldspar was substituted by frits and in the second the whole amount of feldspar was eliminated and replaced by 35% frits and 10% refractory waste. It was found that the addition of low viscous glass-ceramic frits decreased the sintering temperature by 50-100 degrees C. At the same time, due to formation of an additional crystal phase (i.e. pyroxene or anorthite) the new ceramics showed an improvement of 25-50% in bending strength.

  10. Nondestructive Characterization of As-Fabricated Composite Ceramic Panels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, W. H.; Brennan, R. E.

    2011-06-01

    Decreasing the weight of protective systems, while minimizing the decrease in ballistic performance, is an ongoing goal of the Army. Ceramic materials are currently combined with other materials in these types of structures in order to decrease weight without losing ballistic performance. This includes structures in which the ceramic material is confined in some way and in which the ceramic material is completely encapsulated. Confinement or encapsulation of ceramic material within a structure generally adds complexity and cost. Relatively simple panel specimens fabricated with ceramic tiles on aluminum backings and side confinement using steel were evaluated using nondestructive methods, including x-ray computed tomography and ultrasonic testing. The nondestructive evaluation results will be discussed and compared, including the detectability and mapping of fabrication features.

  11. Impact-resistant silicon-carbide-based ceramic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perevislov, S. N.; Bespalov, I. A.

    2017-08-01

    The bullet resistance is determined by an indirect method, by evaluation of time of delay of penetration by bullet of the silicon-carbide-based ceramics obtained by reactive sintering, liquid-phase sintering, and hot pressing.

  12. 90. TILES OF THE NEW WORLD PANEL, NORTH WALL OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    90. TILES OF THE NEW WORLD PANEL, NORTH WALL OF THE INDIAN HOUSE. THE RELIEF BROCADE TILES ILLUSTRATE SCENES OF NATIVE AMERICAN HISTORY AND CULTURE, AND THE EARLY EUROPEAN EXPLORATION OF THE NEW WORLD. SAME VIEW AS PA-107-21. - Moravian Pottery & Tile Works, Southwest side of State Route 313 (Swamp Road), Northwest of East Court Street, Doylestown, Bucks County, PA

  13. 21. TILES OF THE NEW WORLD PANEL, NORTH WALL OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    21. TILES OF THE NEW WORLD PANEL, NORTH WALL OF THE INDIAN HOUSE. THE RELIEF BROCADE TILES ILLUSTRATE SCENES OF NATIVE AMERICAN HISTORY AND CULTURE, AND THE EARLY EUROPEAN EXPLORATION OF THE NEW WORLD. - Moravian Pottery & Tile Works, Southwest side of State Route 313 (Swamp Road), Northwest of East Court Street, Doylestown, Bucks County, PA

  14. On the Penrose and Taylor–Socolar hexagonal tilings

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jeong-Yup; Moody, Robert V.

    2017-01-01

    The intimate relationship between the Penrose and the Taylor–Socolar tilings is studied, within both the context of double hexagon tiles and the algebraic context of hierarchical inverse sequences of triangular lattices. This unified approach produces both types of tilings together, clarifies their relationship and offers straightforward proofs of their basic properties. PMID:28447596

  15. Production and characterization of glazed tiles containing incinerated sewage sludge.

    PubMed

    Lin, D F; Chang, W C; Yuan, C; Luo, H L

    2008-01-01

    In this article, glaze with different colorants was applied to tile specimens manufactured by incinerated sewage sludge ash (ISSA) and clay. Improvements using different amounts of colorants, and glaze components and concentrations on tile bodies were investigated. Four different proportions of clay (by weight ratio) were replaced by ISSA. Tiles of size 12 cm x 6 cm x 1 cm were made and left in an electric furnace to make biscuit tiles at 800 degrees C. Afterwards, four colorants, Fe2O3 (red), V2O5 (yellow), CoCO3 (blue), and MnO2 (purple), and four different glaze concentrations were applied on biscuit tile specimens. These specimens were later sintered into glazed tiles at 1050 degrees C. The study shows that replacement of clay by sludge ash had adverse effects on properties of tiles. Water absorption increased and bending strength reduced with increased amounts of ash. However, both water absorption and bending strength improved for glazed ash tiles. Abrasion of grazed tiles reduced noticeably from 0.001 to 0.002 g. This implies glaze can enhance abrasion resistance of tiles. Effects like lightfastness and acid-alkali resistance improved as different glazes were applied on tiles. In general, red glazed tiles showed the most stable performance, followed by blue, yellow, and purple.

  16. CFD-Predicted Tile Heating Bump Factors Due to Tile Overlay Repairs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lessard, Victor R.

    2006-01-01

    A Computational Fluid Dynamics investigation of the Orbiter's Tile Overlay Repair (TOR) is performed to assess the aeroheating Damage Assessment Team's (DAT) existing heating correlation method for protuberance interference heating on the surrounding thermal protection system. Aerothermodynamic heating analyses are performed for TORs at the design reference damage locations body points 1800 and 1075 for a Mach 17.9 and a=39deg STS-107 flight trajectory point with laminar flow. Six different cases are considered. The computed peak heating bump factor on the surrounding tiles are below the DAT's heating bump factor values for smooth tile cases. However, for the uneven tiles cases the peak interference heating is shown to be considerably higher than the existing correlation prediction.

  17. Jagged Tiling for Intra-tile Parallelism and Fine-Grain Multithreading

    SciTech Connect

    Shrestha, Sunil; Manzano Franco, Joseph B.; Marquez, Andres; Feo, John T.; Gao, Guang R.

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, we have developed a novel methodology that takes into consideration multithreaded many-core designs to better utilize memory/processing resources and improve memory residence on tileable applications. It takes advantage of polyhedral analysis and transformation in the form of PLUTO, combined with a highly optimized finegrain tile runtime to exploit parallelism at all levels. The main contributions of this paper include the introduction of multi-hierarchical tiling techniques that increases intra tile parallelism; and a data-flow inspired runtime library that allows the expression of parallel tiles with an efficient synchronization registry. Our current implementation shows performance improvements on an Intel Xeon Phi board up to 32.25% against instances produced by state-of-the-art compiler frameworks for selected stencil applications.

  18. [Ceramic posts].

    PubMed

    Mainjot, Amélie; Legros, Caroline; Vanheusden, Alain

    2006-01-01

    As a result of ceramics and all-ceram technologies development esthetic inlay core and abutments flooded the market. Their tooth-colored appearance enhances restoration biomimetism principally on the marginal gingiva area. This article reviews indications and types of cores designed for natural teeth and implants.

  19. Performance of the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heelan, Louise; ATLAS Collaboration

    2015-06-01

    The ATLAS Tile hadronic calorimeter (TileCal) provides highly-segmented energy measurements of incoming particles. It is a key detector for the measurement of hadrons, jets, tau leptons and missing transverse energy. It is also useful for identification and reconstruction of muons due to good signal to noise ratio. The calorimeter consists of thin steel plates and 460,000 scintillating tiles configured into 5000 cells, each viewed by two photomultipliers. The calorimeter response and its readout electronics is monitored to better than 1% using radioactive source, laser and charge injection systems. The calibration and performance of the calorimeter have been established through test beam measurements, cosmic ray muons and the large sample of proton-proton collisions acquired in 2011 and 2012. Results on the calorimeter performance are presented, including the absolute energy scale, timing, noise and associated stabilities. The results demonstrate that the Tile Calorimeter has performed well within the design requirements and it has given essential contribution to reconstructed objects and physics results. In addition, the data quality procedures used during the LHC data-taking are described and the outcome of the detector consolidation in the maintenance period is also presented.

  20. The ATLAS Tile Calorimeter performance at LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molander, Simon

    2014-05-01

    This paper gives an overview of the performance of the Tile Calorimeter of the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. Detector performances with respect to electronic noise and cell response are presented. In addition, an overview of the partially overlapping calibration systems is given.

  1. L-Tromino Tiling of Multilated Chessboards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, Martin

    2009-01-01

    An "n" x "n" chessboard is called deficient if one square is missing from any spot on the board. Can all deficient boards with a number of cells divisible by 3 be tiled by bent (or L-shaped) trominoes? The answer is yes, with exception of the order-5 board. This paper deals with the general problem plus numerous related puzzles and proofs…

  2. Tile survey seen during EVA 3

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2005-08-03

    S114-E-6396 (3 August 2005) --- Space Shuttle Discovery’s underside thermal protection tiles are featured in this image photographed by astronaut Stephen K. Robinson, STS-114 mission specialist, during the mission’s third session of extravehicular activities (EVA). Lake Nasser along the Nile River, Egypt is visible near Discovery’s starboard wing.

  3. L-Tromino Tiling of Multilated Chessboards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, Martin

    2009-01-01

    An "n" x "n" chessboard is called deficient if one square is missing from any spot on the board. Can all deficient boards with a number of cells divisible by 3 be tiled by bent (or L-shaped) trominoes? The answer is yes, with exception of the order-5 board. This paper deals with the general problem plus numerous related puzzles and proofs…

  4. TILE at Iowa: Adoption and Adaptation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florman, Jean C.

    2014-01-01

    This chapter introduces a University of Iowa effort to enhance and support active learning pedagogies in technology-enhanced (TILE) classrooms and three elements that proved essential to the campus-wide adoption of those pedagogies. It then describes the impact of those professional development efforts on the curricula and cultures of three…

  5. Lozenge Tilings, Glauber Dynamics and Macroscopic Shape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laslier, Benoît; Toninelli, Fabio Lucio

    2015-09-01

    We study the Glauber dynamics on the set of tilings of a finite domain of the plane with lozenges of side 1/ L. Under the invariant measure of the process (the uniform measure over all tilings), it is well known (Cohn et al. J Am Math Soc 14:297-346, 2001) that the random height function associated to the tiling converges in probability, in the scaling limit , to a non-trivial macroscopic shape minimizing a certain surface tension functional. According to the boundary conditions, the macroscopic shape can be either analytic or contain "frozen regions" (Arctic Circle phenomenon Cohn et al. N Y J Math 4:137-165, 1998; Jockusch et al. Random domino tilings and the arctic circle theorem, arXiv:math/9801068, 1998). It is widely conjectured, on the basis of theoretical considerations (Henley J Statist Phys 89:483-507, 1997; Spohn J Stat Phys 71:1081-1132, 1993), partial mathematical results (Caputo et al. Commun Math Phys 311:157-189, 2012; Wilson Ann Appl Probab 14:274-325, 2004) and numerical simulations for similar models (Destainville Phys Rev Lett 88:030601, 2002; cf. also the bibliography in Henley (J Statist Phys 89:483-507, 1997) and Wilson (Ann Appl Probab 14:274-325, 2004), that the Glauber dynamics approaches the equilibrium macroscopic shape in a time of order L 2+ o(1). In this work we prove this conjecture, under the assumption that the macroscopic equilibrium shape contains no "frozen region".

  6. Expedition 52 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-07-10

    Expedition 52 flight engineer Randy Bresnik of NASA answers a reporter's question during a crew press conference at the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center (GCTC), Monday, July 10, 2017 in Star City, Russia. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  7. STS-135 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-06-30

    JSC2011-E-060448 (30 June 2011) --- NASA astronaut Rex Walheim, STS-135 mission specialist, fields a question from a reporter during a preflight press conference at NASA's Johnson Space Center. Photo credit: NASA

  8. Expedition 52 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-07-10

    Expedition 52 flight engineer Sergey Ryazanskiy of Roscosmos answers a reporter's question during a crew press conference at the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center (GCTC), Monday, July 10, 2017 in Star City, Russia. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  9. STS-135 Press Briefings

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-06-30

    JSC2011-E-060720 (30 June 2011) -- STS-135 lead flight director Kwatsi Alibaruho responds to a question from a reporter during a mission overview press conference at NASA's Johnson Space Center. Photo credit: NASA

  10. STS-135 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-06-30

    JSC2011-E-060450 (30 June 2011) --- NASA astronaut Rex Walheim, STS-135 mission specialist, responds to a question from a reporter during a preflight press conference at NASA's Johnson Space Center. Photo credit: NASA

  11. Expedition 32 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-07-13

    Quarantined Expedition 32 Canadian backup crewmember Chris Hadfield answers reporters questions from behind glass during a prelaunch press conference held at the Cosmonaut Hotel on Friday, July 13, 2012 in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. Photo Credit (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  12. STS-134 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-03-24

    JSC2011-E-028493 (24 March 2011) --- NASA astronaut Mark Kelly, STS-134 commander, responds to a question from a reporter during a preflight press conference at NASA's Johnson Space Center. Photo credit: NASA or National Aeronautics and Space Administration

  13. STS-135 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-06-30

    JSC2011-E-060415 (30 June 2011) --- NASA astronaut Sandy Magnus, STS-135 mission specialist, responds to a question from a reporter during a preflight press conference at NASA's Johnson Space Center. Photo credit: NASA

  14. STS-135 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-06-30

    JSC2011-E-060445 (30 June 2011) --- NASA astronaut Sandy Magnus, STS-135 mission specialist, responds to a question from a reporter during a preflight press conference at NASA's Johnson Space Center. Photo credit: NASA

  15. Expedition 52 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-07-10

    Expedition 52 flight engineer Paolo Nespoli of ESA answers a reporter's question during a crew press conference at the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center (GCTC), Monday, July 10, 2017 in Star City, Russia. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  16. STS-134 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-03-24

    JSC2011-E-028492 (24 March 2011) --- NASA astronaut Greg Chamitoff, STS-134 mission specialist, fields a question from a reporter during a preflight press conference at NASA's Johnson Space Center. Photo credit: NASA or National Aeronautics and Space Administration

  17. STS-135 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-06-30

    JSC2011-E-060413 (30 June 2011) --- NASA astronaut Chris Ferguson, STS-135 commander, responds to a question from a reporter during a preflight press conference at NASA's Johnson Space Center. Photo credit: NASA

  18. Expedition 6 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-05-05

    Expedition 6 Commander Ken Bowersox, left and NASA International Space Station Science Officer Don Pettit speak during a press conference at the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center in Star City, Russia, Thursday, May 6, 2003. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  19. Expedition 6 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-05-05

    Expedition 6 International Space Station Science Officer Don Pettit speaks during a press conference at the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center in Star City, Russia, Thursday, May 6, 2003. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  20. STS-132 press conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-05-03

    JSC2010-E-063790 (3 May 2010) --- NASA astronaut Garrett Reisman, STS-132 mission specialist, fields a question from a reporter during an STS-132 preflight press conference at NASA's Johnson Space Center.

  1. STS-132 press conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-05-03

    JSC2010-E-063807 (3 May 2010) --- NASA astronaut Mike Good, STS-132 mission specialist, responds to a question from a reporter during an STS-132 preflight press conference at NASA's Johnson Space Center.

  2. STS-131 press conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-03-09

    JSC2010-E-038795 (9 March 2010) --- NASA astronaut Stephanie Wilson, STS-131 mission specialist, fields a question from a reporter during an STS-131 preflight press conference at NASA's Johnson Space Center.

  3. STS-132 press conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-05-03

    JSC2010-E-063799 (3 May 2010) --- NASA astronaut Steve Bowen, STS-132 mission specialist, fields a question from a reporter during an STS-132 preflight press conference at NASA's Johnson Space Center.

  4. STS-132 press conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-05-03

    JSC2010-E-063808 (3 May 2010) --- NASA astronaut Garrett Reisman, STS-132 mission specialist, responds to a question from a reporter during an STS-132 preflight press conference at NASA's Johnson Space Center.

  5. STS-131 press conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-03-09

    JSC2010-E-038797 (9 March 2010) --- NASA astronaut Rick Mastracchio, STS-131 mission specialist, responds to a question from a reporter during an STS-131 preflight press conference at NASA's Johnson Space Center.

  6. STS-132 press conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-05-03

    JSC2010-E-063797 (3 May 2010) --- NASA astronaut Steve Bowen, STS-132 mission specialist, fields a question from a reporter during an STS-132 preflight press conference at NASA's Johnson Space Center.

  7. STS-131 press conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-03-09

    JSC2010-E-038794 (9 March 2010) --- NASA astronaut Alan Poindexter, STS-131 commander, responds to a question from a reporter during an STS-131 preflight press conference at NASA's Johnson Space Center.

  8. STS-135 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-06-30

    JSC2011-E-060439 (30 June 2011) --- NASA astronaut Chris Ferguson, STS-135 commander, responds to a question from a reporter during a preflight press conference at NASA's Johnson Space Center. Photo credit: NASA

  9. STS-125 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-04-23

    JSC2009-E-087199 (23 April 2009) --- Astronaut Michael Good, STS-125 mission specialist, responds to a question from a reporter during a STS-125 preflight press briefing at NASA's Johnson Space Center.

  10. STS-131 press conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-03-09

    JSC2010-E-038799 (9 March 2010) --- NASA astronaut Clayton Anderson, STS-131 mission specialist, responds to a question from a reporter during an STS-131 preflight press conference at NASA's Johnson Space Center.

  11. Expedition 19 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-03-24

    Expedition 19 Flight Engineer Michael R. Barratt smiles at his family from a quarantined glass room after a press conference on Wednesday, March 25, 2009 at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  12. Wear characteristics of polished and glazed lithium disilicate ceramics opposed to three ceramic materials.

    PubMed

    Saiki, Osamu; Koizumi, Hiroyasu; Akazawa, Nobutaka; Kodaira, Akihisa; Okamura, Kentaro; Matsumura, Hideo

    2016-01-01

    This study compared the wear characteristics of a heat-pressed lithium disilicate ceramic material opposed to feldspathic porcelain, a lithium disilicate glass ceramic, and zirconia materials. Ceramic plate specimens were prepared from feldspathic porcelain (EX-3 nA1B), lithium disilicate glass ceramics (e.max CAD MO1/C14), and zirconia (Katana KT 10) and then ground or polished. Rounded rod specimens were fabricated from heat-pressed lithium disilicate glass ceramic (e.max press LT A3) and then glazed or polished. A sliding wear testing apparatus was used for wear testing. Wear of glazed rods was greater than that of polished rods when they were abraded with ground zirconia, ground porcelain, polished porcelain, or polished lithium disilicate ceramics. For both glazed and polished rods, wear was greater when the rods were abraded with ground plates. The findings indicate that application of a polished surface rather than a glazed surface is recommended for single restorations made of heat-pressed lithium disilicate material. In addition, care must be taken when polishing opposing materials, especially those used in occlusal contact areas. (J Oral Sci 58, 117-123, 2016).

  13. EPOXI Mission Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-11-18

    Michael A'Hearn, EPOXI Principal Investigator, University of Maryland, holds a plastic bottle containing ice to illustrate a point during a press conference, Thursday, Nov. 18, 2010, at NASA Headquarters in Washington. The press conference was held to discuss the Nov. 4 successful flyby of Comet Hartley 2 by NASA's EPOXI Mission Spacecraft. Images from the flyby provided scientists the most extensive observations of a comet in history. Photo Credit: (NASA/Paul E. Alers)

  14. EPOXI Mission Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-11-18

    Dr. James Green, Director of Planetary Science, NASA Headquarters, at podium, speaks during a press conference, Thursday, Nov. 18, 2010, at NASA Headquarters in Washington. The press conference was held to discuss the Nov. 4 successful flyby of Comet Hartley 2 by NASA's EPOXI Mission Spacecraft. Images from the flyby provided scientists the most extensive observations of a comet in history. Photo Credit: (NASA/Paul E. Alers)

  15. Constellation Program Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-06-04

    NASA Administrator Michael Griffin, seated left, Scott Horowitz, NASA Associate Administrator for Exploration Systems and Jeff Hanley, Constellation Program Manager, right, are seen during a press conference outlining specific center responsibilities associated with the Constellation Program for robotic and human moon and Mars exploration, Monday, June 5, 2006, at NASA Headquarters in Washington. Dean Acosta, NASA Deputy Assistant Administrator and Press Secretary, far left, moderates the program. Photo Credit (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  16. MAVEN Press Briefing

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-10-28

    Dwayne Brown, NASA Public Affairs Officer, takes a question from a member of the press on theupcoming launch of the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution (MAVEN) mission, at a press conference at NASA Headquarters in Washington on Monday, Oct. 28th, 2013. MAVEN is the agency's next mission to Mars and the first devoted to understanding the upper atmosphere of the Red Planet. (Photo credit: NASA/Jay Westcott)

  17. Lacunae infills for in situ treatment of historic glazed tiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendes, Marta T.; Esteves, Lurdes; Ferreira, Teresa A.; Candeias, António; Tennent, Norman H.; Rodrigues, José Delgado; Pereira, Sílvia R. M.

    2016-05-01

    Knowledge of current conservation materials and methods together with those adopted in the past is essential to aid research and improve or develop better conservation options. The infill and painting of tile lacunae are subjected to special requirements mainly when used in outdoor settings. A selection of the most commonly used materials was undertaken and performed based on inquiries to practitioners working in the field. The infill pastes comprised organic (epoxy, polyester), inorganic (slaked lime, hydraulic lime and zinc hydroxychloride) and mixed organic-inorganic (slaked lime mixed with a vinylic resin) binders. The selected aggregates were those most commonly used or those already present in the commercially formulated products. The infill pastes were characterised by SEM, MIP, open porosity, water absorption by capillarity, water vapour permeability, thermal and hydric expansibilities and adhesion to the ceramic body. Their performance was assessed after curing, artificial ageing (salt ageing and UV-Temp-RH cycles) and natural ageing. The results were interpreted in terms of their significance as indicators of effectiveness, compatibility and durability.

  18. Comparative study for the nondestructive testing of advanced ceramic materials by infrared thermography and holographic interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sfarra, S.; Ibarra-Castanedo, C.; Bendada, A.; Maldague, X.; Ambrosini, D.; Paoletti, D.

    2010-05-01

    Advanced ceramic materials are increasingly employed in varied and new applications where improved electrical, mechanical and/or thermal properties are sought. For instance, in a manner similar to carbon or glass fiber reinforced plastics, ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) are designed to improve the naturally brittle characteristics of monolithic ceramics thanks to the inclusion of fibers. Among the main interests for advanced ceramics are the increase in the operation temperature of components, the elimination of the use of cooling fluids, and weight savings. In this paper, the capabilities of infrared thermography and holographic interferometry are investigated and compared for the nondestructive assessment of advanced ceramic materials using three experimental specimens: (1) a monolithic green ceramic tile with fabricated defects, (2) a CMC specimen (from production reject) with a porous alumina matrix reinforced with glass fibers, and (3) a sandwich structure consisting on a carbon fiber honeycomb core with a ceramic plate bonded in one side.

  19. Tile-based Level of Detail for the Parallel Age

    SciTech Connect

    Niski, K; Cohen, J D

    2007-08-15

    Today's PCs incorporate multiple CPUs and GPUs and are easily arranged in clusters for high-performance, interactive graphics. We present an approach based on hierarchical, screen-space tiles to parallelizing rendering with level of detail. Adapt tiles, render tiles, and machine tiles are associated with CPUs, GPUs, and PCs, respectively, to efficiently parallelize the workload with good resource utilization. Adaptive tile sizes provide load balancing while our level of detail system allows total and independent management of the load on CPUs and GPUs. We demonstrate our approach on parallel configurations consisting of both single PCs and a cluster of PCs.

  20. Pressurized heat treatment of glass ceramic

    DOEpatents

    Kramer, D.P.

    1984-04-19

    A method of producing a glass-ceramic having a specified thermal expansion value is disclosed. The method includes the step of pressurizing the parent glass material to a predetermined pressure during heat treatment so that the glass-ceramic produced has a specified thermal expansion value. Preferably, the glass-ceramic material is isostatically pressed. A method for forming a strong glass-ceramic to metal seal is also disclosed in which the glass-ceramic is fabricated to have a thermal expansion value equal to that of the metal. The determination of the thermal expansion value of a parent glass material placed in a high-temperature environment is also used to determine the pressure in the environment.

  1. Ceramic dentures manufactured with ultrashort laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werelius, Kristian; Weigl, Paul

    2004-06-01

    Conventional manufacturing of individual ceramic dental prosthesis implies a handmade metallic framework, which is then veneered with ceramic layers. In order to manufacture all-ceramic dental prosthesis a CAD/CAM system is necessary due to the three dimensional shaping of high strength ceramics. Most CAD/CAM systems presently grind blocks of ceramic after the construction process in order to create the prosthesis. Using high-strength ceramics, such as Hot Isostatic Pressed (HIP)-zirconia, this is limited to copings. Anatomically shaped fixed dentures have a sculptured surface with small details, which can't be created by existing grinding tools. This procedure is also time consuming and subject to significant loss in mechanical strength and thus reduced survival rate once inserted. Ultra-short laser pulses offer a possibility in machining highly complex sculptured surfaces out of high-strength ceramic with negligible damage to the surface and bulk of the ceramic. In order to determine efficiency, quality and damage, several laser ablation parameters such as pulse duration, pulse energy and ablation strategies were studied. The maximum ablation rate was found using 400 fs at high pulse energies. High pulse energies such as 200μJ were used with low damage in mechanical strength compared to grinding. Due to the limitation of available laser systems in pulse repetition rates and power, the use of special ablation strategies provide a possibility to manufacture fully ceramic dental prosthesis efficiently.

  2. Beautiful Math, Part 5: Colorful Archimedean Tilings from Dynamical Systems.

    PubMed

    Ouyang, Peichang; Zhao, Weiguo; Huang, Xuan

    2015-01-01

    The art of tiling originated very early in the history of civilization. Almost every known human society has made use of tilings in some form or another. In particular, tilings using only regular polygons have great visual appeal. Decorated regular tilings with continuous and symmetrical patterns were widely used in decoration field, such as mosaics, pavements, and brick walls. In science, these tilings provide inspiration for synthetic organic chemistry. Building on previous CG&A “Beautiful Math” articles, the authors propose an invariant mapping method to create colorful patterns on Archimedean tilings (1-uniform tilings). The resulting patterns simultaneously have global crystallographic symmetry and local cyclic or dihedral symmetry.

  3. Ceramic Powders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    In developing its product line of specialty ceramic powders and related products for government and industrial customers, including companies in the oil, automotive, electronics and nuclear industries, Advanced Refractory Technologies sought technical assistance from NERAC, Inc. in specific areas of ceramic materials and silicon technology, and for assistance in identifying possible applications of these materials in government programs and in the automotive and electronics industry. NERAC conducted a computerized search of several data bases and provided extensive information in the subject areas requested. NERAC's assistance resulted in transfer of technologies that helped ART staff develop a unique method for manufacture of ceramic materials to precise customer specifications.

  4. An efficient pseudomedian filter for tiling microrrays

    PubMed Central

    Royce, Thomas E; Carriero, Nicholas J; Gerstein, Mark B

    2007-01-01

    Background Tiling microarrays are becoming an essential technology in the functional genomics toolbox. They have been applied to the tasks of novel transcript identification, elucidation of transcription factor binding sites, detection of methylated DNA and several other applications in several model organisms. These experiments are being conducted at increasingly finer resolutions as the microarray technology enjoys increasingly greater feature densities. The increased densities naturally lead to increased data analysis requirements. Specifically, the most widely employed algorithm for tiling array analysis involves smoothing observed signals by computing pseudomedians within sliding windows, a O(n2logn) calculation in each window. This poor time complexity is an issue for tiling array analysis and could prove to be a real bottleneck as tiling microarray experiments become grander in scope and finer in resolution. Results We therefore implemented Monahan's HLQEST algorithm that reduces the runtime complexity for computing the pseudomedian of n numbers to O(nlogn) from O(n2logn). For a representative tiling microarray dataset, this modification reduced the smoothing procedure's runtime by nearly 90%. We then leveraged the fact that elements within sliding windows remain largely unchanged in overlapping windows (as one slides across genomic space) to further reduce computation by an additional 43%. This was achieved by the application of skip lists to maintaining a sorted list of values from window to window. This sorted list could be maintained with simple O(log n) inserts and deletes. We illustrate the favorable scaling properties of our algorithms with both time complexity analysis and benchmarking on synthetic datasets. Conclusion Tiling microarray analyses that rely upon a sliding window pseudomedian calculation can require many hours of computation. We have eased this requirement significantly by implementing efficient algorithms that scale well with genomic

  5. Boeing's High Voltage Solar Tile Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, Brian J.; Harden, David E.; Ferguson, Dale C.; Snyder, David B.

    2002-01-01

    Real concerns of spacecraft charging and experience with solar array augmented electrostatic discharge arcs on spacecraft have minimized the use of high voltages on large solar arrays despite numerous vehicle system mass and efficiency advantages. Boeing's solar tile (patent pending) allows high voltage to be generated at the array without the mass and efficiency losses of electronic conversion. Direct drive electric propulsion and higher power payloads (lower spacecraft weight) will benefit from this design. As future power demand grows, spacecraft designers must use higher voltage to minimize transmission loss and power cable mass for very large area arrays. This paper will describe the design and discuss the successful test of Boeing's 500-Volt Solar Tile in NASA Glenn's Tenney chamber in the Space Plasma Interaction Facility. The work was sponsored by NASA's Space Solar Power Exploratory Research and Technology (SERT) Program and will result in updated high voltage solar array design guidelines being published.

  6. Anosov Diffeomorphisms and {γ}-Tilings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almeida, João P.; Pinto, Alberto A.

    2016-07-01

    We consider a toral Anosov automorphism {G_γ:{mathbb{T}}_γto{mathbb{T}}_γ} given by {G_γ(x,y)=(ax+y,x)} in the { < v,w > } base, where {ainmathbb{N} backslash\\{1\\}}, {γ=1/(a+1/(a+1/ldots))}, {v=(γ,1)} and {w=(-1,γ)} in the canonical base of {{mathbb{R}}^2} and {{mathbb{T}}_γ={mathbb{R}}^2/(v{mathbb{Z}} × w{mathbb{Z}})}. We introduce the notion of {γ}-tilings to prove the existence of a one-to-one correspondence between (i) marked smooth conjugacy classes of Anosov diffeomorphisms, with invariant measures absolutely continuous with respect to the Lebesgue measure, that are in the isotopy class of {G_γ}; (ii) affine classes of {γ}-tilings; and (iii) {γ}-solenoid functions. Solenoid functions provide a parametrization of the infinite dimensional space of the mathematical objects described in these equivalences.

  7. Degenerate polygonal tilings in simple animal tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hočevar, A.; Ziherl, P.

    2009-07-01

    The salient feature of one-cell-thick epithelia is their en face view, which reveals the polygonal cross section of the close-packed prismatic cells. The physical mechanisms that shape these tissues were hitherto explored using theories based on cell proliferation, which were either entirely topological or included certain morphogenetic forces. But mitosis itself may not be instrumental in molding the tissue. We show that the structure of simple epithelia can be explained by an equilibrium model where energy-degenerate polygons in an entropy-maximizing tiling are described by a single geometric parameter encoding their inflatedness. The two types of tilings found numerically—ordered and disordered—closely reproduce the patterns observed in Drosophila, Hydra, and Xenopus and they generalize earlier theoretical results. Free of a specific cell self-energy, cell-cell interaction, and cell division kinetics, our model provides an insight into the universality of living and inanimate two-dimensional cellular structures.

  8. Structural ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craig, Douglas F.

    1992-01-01

    This presentation gives a brief history of the field of materials sciences and goes on to expound the advantages of the fastest growing area in that field, namely ceramics. Since ceramics are moving to fill the demand for lighter, stronger, more corrosion resistant materials, advancements will rely more on processing and modeling from the atomic scale up which is made possible by advanced analytical, computer, and processing techniques. All information is presented in viewgraph format.

  9. Mapping Signal Processing Kernels to Tiled Architectures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    attractive alternatives to monolithic computer architecture designs because they allow a larger design to be built from smaller modules and limit the...Computer Architectures. ACM Transactions on Computer Systems, 2(4):289–308, November 1984. [12] Steven Swanson, Ken Michelson , Andrew Schwerin, and...Program MIT Lincoln LaboratoryHPEC 2004-3 JML 28 Sep 2004 Tiled Architectures • Monolithic single-chip architectures are becoming rare in the industry

  10. NASA TileWorld Simulator Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Philips, Andrew; Bresina, John; Drummond, Mark

    1993-01-01

    NASA TileWorld (NTW) computer program formulated to further research on planning, scheduling, and control problems. Designed to focus on three particular attributes of real-world problems: exogenous events, uncertain outcomes of actions, and metric time. Written specifically for use by NASA, NTW modified easily to act as software base for other simulated environments. Written in Allegro Common Lisp for Sun-3-(TM) and Sun-4-series(TM) computers running SunOS(TM).

  11. Upgrade of the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter Electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrió, F.; Tile Calorimeter System, ATLAS

    2015-02-01

    The Tile Calorimeter (TileCal) is the hadronic calorimeter covering the central region of the ATLAS experiment at LHC. The TileCal readout consists of about 10000 channels. The bulk of its upgrade will occur for the High Luminosity LHC phase (Phase-II) where the peak luminosity will increase 5 times compared to the design luminosity (1034 cm-2s-1) but with maintained energy (i.e. 7+7 TeV). An additional increase of the average luminosity with a factor of 2 can be achieved by luminosity levelling. This upgrade is expected to happen around 2024. The TileCal upgrade aims at replacing the majority of the on- and off- detector electronics to the extent that all calorimeter signals will be digitized and sent to the off-detector electronics in the counting room. To achieve the required reliability, redundancy has been introduced at different levels. Three different options are presently being investigated for the front-end electronic upgrade. Extensive test beam studies will determine which option will be selected. 10 Gbps optical links are used to read out all digitized data to the counting room while 5 Gbps down-links are used for synchronization, configuration and detector control. For the off-detector electronics a pre-processor (sROD) is being developed, which takes care of the initial trigger processing while temporarily storing the main data flow in pipeline and derandomizer memories. One demonstrator prototype module with the new calorimeter module electronics, but still compatible with the present system, is planned to be inserted in ATLAS this year.

  12. Use of ceramics in engine components. (Latest citations from Ceramic abstracts database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    1996-08-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning manufacturing processes, testing, design, and stress analysis of ceramic engine parts and coatings. Topics include slip casting, reaction sintering, hot isostatic pressing, injection molding, and plasma spraying processes. The citations also consider advantages of using ceramic engine components in automotive, military, and aircraft applications. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  13. Laser printing of enamels on tiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-Pradas, J. M.; Restrepo, J. W.; Gómez, M. A.; Serra, P.; Morenza, J. L.

    2007-07-01

    A Nd:YAG laser beam is used as a tool to print patterns of coloured enamels on tile substrates. For this, the laser beam is scanned over a layer of raw enamel previously sprayed on the tile surface. The possibility to focus the laser energy to heat a small zone without affecting the rest of the piece presents some advantages in front of traditional furnace techniques in which the whole piece has to be heated; among them, energy saving and the possibility to apply enamels with higher melting temperatures than those of the substrate. In this work, we study the effects of laser irradiation of a green enamel, based in chromium oxide pigment and lead frit, deposited on a white tile substrate. Lines obtained with different combinations of laser beam power and scan speeds were investigated with the aim to optimize the process from the point of view of the quality of the patterns. For this purpose, the morphology of the lines and their cross-sections is studied. The results show that lines with good visual properties can be printed with the laser. The characteristics of the marked lines were found to be directly related with the accumulated energy density delivered. Moreover, there is a linear relationship between the accumulated energy density and the volume of melted material. A minimum accumulated energy density is required to melt a shallow zone of the glazed substrate to allow the adhesion of the enamelled lines.

  14. Foam-on-Tile Damage Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koharchik, Michael; Murphy, Lindsay; Parker, Paul

    2012-01-01

    An impact model was developed to predict how three specific foam types would damage the Space Shuttle Orbiter insulating tiles. The inputs needed for the model are the foam type, the foam mass, the foam impact velocity, the foam impact incident angle, the type being impacted, and whether the tile is new or aged (has flown at least one mission). The model will determine if the foam impact will cause damage to the tile. If it can cause damage, the model will output the damage cavity dimensions (length, depth, entry angle, exit angle, and sidewall angles). It makes the calculations as soon as the inputs are entered (less than 1 second). The model allows for the rapid calculation of numerous scenarios in a short time. The model was developed from engineering principles coupled with significant impact testing (over 800 foam impact tests). This model is applicable to masses ranging from 0.0002 up to 0.4 pound (0.09 up to 181 g). A prior tool performed a similar function, but was limited to the assessment of a small range of masses and did not have the large test database for verification. In addition, the prior model did not provide outputs of the cavity damage length, entry angle, exit angle, or sidewall angles.

  15. Performance of the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, Stephe

    2013-04-01

    The Tile Calorimeter is the central section (0 < |η| < 1.7) of the ATLAS hadronic calorimeter. It is a key detector for the measurement of hadrons, jets, tau leptons decaying hadronically, and missing transverse energy. Because of its very good signal to noise ratio it is also useful for the identification and reconstruction of muons. The calorimeter consists of thin steel plates and 460,000 scintillating tiles configured into 4900 cells, each viewed by two photomultipliers. The calorimeter response is monitored to better than 1% using radioactive source, laser, and electronic charge injection systems. The calibration and performance of the calorimeter have been established through test beam measurements, cosmic ray muons and the large sample of pp collisions acquired during 2011 and 2012. Results on the calorimeter performance will be presented, including the absolute energy scale, time resolution, and associated stabilities. These results demonstrate that the Tile Calorimeter is performing well within the design requirements and is giving essential input to the physics results.

  16. A Guide to Press Relations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fibre Box Association, Chicago, IL.

    Stressing that a positive press-relations program can be extremely helpful to businesses, this publication offers suggestions for establishing press contacts, preparing press releases, holding press conferences, illustrating a story, preparing materials for use in radio and television broadcasts, and developing policies to be followed in emergency…

  17. The effect of colouring agent on the physical properties of glass ceramic produced from waste glass for antimicrobial coating deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juoi, J. M.; Ayoob, N. F.; Rosli, Z. M.; Rosli, N. R.; Husain, K.

    2016-07-01

    Domestic waste glass is utilized as raw material for the production of glass ceramic material (GCM) via sinter crystallisation route. The glass ceramic material in a form of tiles is to be utilized for the deposition of Ag-TiO2 antimicrobial coating. Two types of soda lime glass (SLG) that are non-coloured and green SLG are utilised as main raw materials during the batch formulation in order to study the effect of colouring agent (Fe2O3) on the physical and mechanical properties of glass ceramic produced. Glass powder were prepared by crushing bottles using hammer milled with milling machine and sieved until they passed through 75 µm sieve. The process continues by mixing glass powder with ball clay with ratio of 95:5 wt. %, 90:10 wt. % and 85:15 wt. %. Each batch mixture was then uniaxial pressed and sintered at 800°C, 825 °C and 850 °C. The physical and mechanical properties were then determined and compared between those produced from non-coloured and green coloured SLG in order to evaluate the effect of colouring agent (Fe2O3) on the GCM produced. The optimum properties of non-coloured SLG is produced with smaller ball clay content (10 wt. %) compared to green SLG (15 wt. %). The physical properties (determined thru ASTM C373) of the optimized GCM produced from non-coloured SLG and green SLG are 0.69 % of porosity, 1.92 g/cm3 of bulk density, 0.36 % of water absorption; and 1.96 % of porosity, 2.69 g/cm3 of bulk density, 0.73 % of water absorption; respectively. Results also indicate that the most suitable temperature in producing GCM from both glasses with optimized physical and mechanical properties is at 850 °C.

  18. Fabrication, characterization, and fluorine-plasma exposure behavior of dense yttrium oxyfluoride ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsunoura, Toru; Yoshida, Katsumi; Yano, Toyohiko; Kishi, Yukio

    2017-06-01

    Yttrium oxyfluoride (YOF) ceramics are expected to be one of the attractive plasma-resistant materials for semiconductor production equipment. In this study, dense YOF ceramics were fabricated by hot pressing using YOF powder, and their physical, mechanical, and thermal properties were characterized. Moreover, behavior against fluorine-plasma exposure was investigated. The results suggest that the YOF ceramics showed excellent mechanical and thermal properties, and superior resistance for fluorine-plasma exposure to Y2O3 ceramics.

  19. Post Launch Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-12-05

    In the Kennedy Space Center’s Press Site auditorium, agency leaders spoke to members of the news media about the successful Orion Flight Test. From left are: Rachel Kraft, of NASA Public Affairs, Bill Gerstenmaier, NASA associate administrator for Human Exploration and Operations, Mark Geyer, Orion program manager, Mike Hawes, Lockheed Martin Orion Program manager, and NASA astronaut Rex Walheim.

  20. MAVEN Press Briefing

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-10-28

    Kelly Fast, MAVEN program scientist, NASA Headquarters, discusses the upcoming launch of the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution (MAVEN) mission, at a press conference at NASA Headquarters in Washington on Monday, Oct. 28th, 2013. MAVEN is the agency's next mission to Mars and the first devoted to understanding the upper atmosphere of the Red Planet. (Photo credit: NASA/Jay Westcott)

  1. Press Conference - Skylab 3

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1972-08-14

    S72-46699 (19 Jan. 1972) --- Prime crew members of the scheduled second Skylab mission are introduced to the media during a press conference in January 1972 at the Manned Spacecraft Center (MSC). From left to right are astronauts Jack R. Lousma, pilot; Owen K. Garriott, science pilot, and Alan L. Bean, commander. Photo credit: NASA

  2. Defining the University Press

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fletcher, Janet

    1978-01-01

    Reports discussion at the annual meeting of the Association of American University Presses (AAUP) on such topics as overproduction, government support, "on demand" publishing, profitability, library photocopying, and selection in library acquisitions, as they relate to the roles of librarians and publishers. (JPF)

  3. STS-134 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-03-24

    JSC2011-E-028491 (24 March 2011) --- European Space Agency astronaut Roberto Vittori, STS-134 mission specialist, fields a question from a reporter during a preflight press conference at NASA's Johnson Space Center. Photo credit: NASA or National Aeronautics and Space Administration

  4. STS-134 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-03-24

    JSC2011-E-028498 (24 March 2011) --- European Space Agency astronaut Roberto Vittori, STS-134 mission specialist, responds to a question from a reporter during a preflight press conference at NASA's Johnson Space Center. Photo credit: NASA or National Aeronautics and Space Administration

  5. Expedition 34 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-12-18

    Russian backup crew member Fyodor Yurchikin, right, answers a reporter's question at a press conference held at the Cosmonaut Hotel, on Tuesday, Dec. 18, 2012, in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. Seen next to him are NASA backup crew member Karen Nyberg and Expedition 34/35 Canadian Space Agency astronaut Chris Hadfield. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  6. STS-134 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-03-24

    JSC2011-E-028488 (24 March 2011) --- NASA astronaut Greg H. Johnson, STS-134 pilot, responds to a question from a reporter during a preflight press conference at NASA's Johnson Space Center. Photo credit: NASA or National Aeronautics and Space Administration

  7. STS-134 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-03-24

    JSC2011-E-028490 (24 March 2011) --- NASA astronaut Michael Fincke, STS-134 mission specialist, responds to a question from a reporter during a preflight press conference at NASA's Johnson Space Center. Photo credit: NASA or National Aeronautics and Space Administration

  8. STS-134 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-03-24

    JSC2011-E-028496 (24 March 2011) --- NASA astronaut Andrew Feustel, STS-134 mission specialist, responds to a question from a reporter during a preflight press conference at NASA's Johnson Space Center. Photo credit: NASA or National Aeronautics and Space Administration

  9. Expedition 28 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-06-06

    Expedition 28 NASA Flight Engineer Mike Fossum, left, and Soyuz Commander Sergei Volkov of Russia share a laugh during a press conference, Monday, June 6, 2011, at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. The mission is set to launch on Tuesday, June 8, from the Baikonur Cosmodrome. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  10. Expedition 29 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-11-12

    Expedition 29 Soyuz Commander Anton Shkaplerov answers a reporter’s question during a press conference held at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan on Saturday, Nov. 12, 2011. The mission is set to launch November 14 from the Baikonur Cosmodrome. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  11. Expedition 28 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-06-06

    Expedition 28 NASA Flight Engineer Mike Fossum, speaks during a press conference, Monday, June 6, 2011, at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. The mission is set to launch on Tuesday, June 8, from the Baikonur Cosmodrome. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  12. Expedition 28 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-06-06

    Expedition 28 NASA Flight Engineer Mike Fossum speaks during a press conference, Monday, June 6, 2011, at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. The mission is set to launch on Tuesday, June 8, from the Baikonur Cosmodrome. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  13. Expedition 28 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-06-06

    Expedition 28 NASA Flight Engineer Mike Fossum, left, and Soyuz Commander Sergei Volkov of Russia are seen during a press conference, Monday, June 6, 2011, at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. The mission is set to launch on Tuesday, June 8, from the Baikonur Cosmodrome. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  14. Expedition 29 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-11-12

    Expedition 29 backup crew members NASA Flight Engineer Joseph Acaba, far left, Russian Soyuz Commander Gennady Padalka, center, and Russian Flight Engineer Sergei Revin are seen at a press conference held at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan on Saturday, Nov. 12, 2011. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  15. Expedition 29 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-11-12

    Expedition 29 NASA Flight Engineer Dan Burbank answers a reporter’s question during a press conference held at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan on Saturday, Nov. 12, 2011. The launch of the Soyuz spacecraft with Expedition 29 NASA Flight Engineer Dan Burbank, Soyuz Commander Anton Shkaplerov and Flight Engineer Anatoly Ivanishin is scheduled for November 14. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  16. Expedition 28 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-06-06

    Expedition 28 NASA backup Flight Engineer Don Pettit looks on during a press conference, Monday, June 6, 2011, at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. The mission is set to launch on Tuesday, June 8, from the Baikonur Cosmodrome. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  17. Expedition 28 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-06-06

    Expedition 28 Soyuz Commander Sergei Volkov of Russia speaks during a press conference, Monday, June 6, 2011, at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. The mission is set to launch on Tuesday, June 7, from the Baikonur Cosmodrome. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  18. Expedition 29 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-11-12

    Expedition 29 NASA backup crew member Joe Acaba is seen at a press conference held at the Cosmonaut Hotel, Saturday, Nov. 12, 2011 at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. The mission is set to launch November 14 from the Baikonur Cosmodrome. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  19. Expedition 28 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-06-06

    NASA backup Flight Engineer Don Pettit speaks during a press conference, Monday, June 6, 2011, at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. The mission is set to launch on Tuesday, June 8, from the Baikonur Cosmodrome. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  20. Expedition 28 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-06-06

    Expedition 28 Soyuz Commander Sergei Volkov speaks during a press conference, Monday, June 6, 2011, at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. The mission is set to launch on Tuesday, June 8, from the Baikonur Cosmodrome. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  1. Expedition 39 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-03-24

    Expedition 39 flight engineer Steve Swanson of NASA is seen in quarantine, behind glass, during the final press conference be Monday, March 24, 2014, at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. The mission to the International Space Station is set to launch March 26 from the Baikonur Cosmodrome. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  2. Expedition 28 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-06-06

    Russian backup Flight Engineer Oleg Kononenko speaks during a press conference, Monday, June 6, 2011, at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. The mission is set to launch on Tuesday, June 8, from the Baikonur Cosmodrome. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  3. Expedition 29 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-11-12

    Expedition 29 backup crew members Joseph Acaba, left, and Russian Flight Engineer Gennady Padalka share a few words during a press conference held at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan on Saturday, Nov. 12, 2011. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  4. Expedition 29 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-11-12

    Expedition 29 Flight Engineer Anatoly Ivanishin is seen at a press conference held at the Cosmonaut Hotel, Saturday, Nov. 12, 2011 at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. The mission is set to launch November 14 from the Baikonur Cosmodrome. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  5. Expedition 40 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-05-27

    A man taking a picture with a cell phone is seen reflected in the glass separating the quarantined crew during a press conference on Tuesday, May 27, 2014, at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. The mission to the International Space Station is set to launch May 29 from the Baikonur Cosmodrome. Photo Credit: (NASA/Joel Kowsky)

  6. Expedition 29 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-11-12

    Expedition 29 Russian Flight Engineer Anatoly Ivanishin answers a reporter’s question during a press conference held at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan on Saturday, Nov. 12, 2011. The launch of the Soyuz spacecraft with Ivanishin, Soyuz Commander Anton Shkaplerov and NASA Flight Engineer Dan Burbank is scheduled for November 14. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  7. Expedition 28 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-06-06

    Expedition 28 NASA Flight Engineer Mike Fossum, left, looks on as Soyuz Commander Sergei Volkov speaks during a press conference, Monday, June 6, 2011, at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. The mission is set to launch on Tuesday, June 8, from the Baikonur Cosmodrome. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  8. Expedition 41 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-09-24

    NASA Expedition 41 backup crew member Flight Engineer Mikhail Kornienko of the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos) answers a question during a press conference Wednesday, Sept. 24, 2014 at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. The prime crew is set to launch Sept. 26 from the Baikonur Cosmodrome. Photo Credit: (NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)

  9. Meet the Press

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quick, Brian L.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To field questions from a room of students simulating a press conference. Type of speech: Impromptu. Point value: 10 participation points. To receive all 10 points, students must (1) address three questions from the lectern and ask three questions from their seat (3 points), (2) respond thoroughly to each question by providing a…

  10. Expedition 6 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-05-05

    Expedition 6 Flight Engineer Nikolai Budarin, left, Commander Ken Bowersox and International Space Station Science Officer Don Pettit, right, pose for photos at a press conference at the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center in Star City, Russia, Thursday, May 6, 2003. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  11. Expedition 6 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-05-05

    Expedition 6 Flight Engineer Nikolai Budarin, left, Commander Ken Bowersox and NASA International Space Station Science Officer Don Pettit, right, answer questions during a press conference at the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center in Star City, Russia, Thursday, May 6, 2003. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  12. Constellation Program Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-06-04

    NASA Administrator Michael Griffin, left, Scott Horowitz, NASA Associate Administrator for Exploration Systems and Jeff Hanley, Constellation Program Manager, right, are seen during a press conference outlining specific center responsibilities associated with the Constellation Program for robotic and human Moon and Mars exploration, Monday, June 5, 2006, at NASA Headquarters in Washington. Photo Credit (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  13. Constellation Program Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-06-04

    Scott Horowitz, NASA Associate Administrator for Exploration Systems, center, speaks as Jeff Hanley, Constellation Program Manager, right, looks on during a press conference outlining specific center responsibilities associated with the Constellation Program for robotic and human Moon and Mars exploration, Monday, June 5, 2006, at NASA Headquarters in Washington. Photo Credit (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  14. Google Moon Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-07-19

    Andrew Chaikin, author of "A Man on the Moon" speaks during a press conference, Monday, July 20, 2009, announcing the launch of Moon in Google Earth, an immersive 3D atlas of the Moon, accessible within Google Earth 5.0, Monday, July 20, 2009, at the Newseum in Washington. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  15. Google Moon Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-07-19

    Buzz Aldrin, the second man to walk on the moon, speaks during a press conference, Monday, July 20, 2009, announcing the launch of Moon in Google Earth, an immersive 3D atlas of the Moon, accessible within Google Earth 5.0, Monday, July 20, 2009, at the Newseum in Washington. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  16. Google Moon Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-07-19

    Apollo 11 astronaut Buzz Aldrin, the second man to walk on the Moon, speaks during a press conference, Monday, July 20, 2009, announcing the launch of Moon in Google Earth, an immersive 3D atlas of the Moon, accessible within Google Earth 5.0, Monday, July 20, 2009, at the Newseum in Washington. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  17. Google Moon Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-07-19

    NASA Deputy Administrator Lori Garver, speaks during a press conference, Monday, July 20, 2009, announcing the launch of Moon in Google Earth, an immersive 3D atlas of the Moon, accessible within Google Earth 5.0, Monday, July 20, 2009, at the Newseum in Washington. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  18. Google Moon Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-07-19

    Tiffany Montague, Technical Program Manager for NASA and Google Lunar X PRIZE, Google, Inc., speaks during a press conference, Monday, July 20, 2009, announcing the launch of Moon in Google Earth, an immersive 3D atlas of the Moon, accessible within Google Earth 5.0, Monday, July 20, 2009, at the Newseum in Washington. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  19. Google Moon Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-07-19

    Brian McLendon, VP of Engineering, Google, Inc., speaks during a press conference, Monday, July 20, 2009, announcing the launch of Moon in Google Earth, an immersive 3D atlas of the Moon, accessible within Google Earth 5.0, Monday, July 20, 2009, at the Newseum in Washington. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  20. Google Moon Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-07-19

    Yoshinori Yoshimura, a respresentative from the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), speaks during a press conference, Monday, July 20, 2009, announcing the launch of Moon in Google Earth, an immersive 3D atlas of the Moon, accessible within Google Earth 5.0, Monday, July 20, 2009, at the Newseum in Washington. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  1. Google Moon Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-07-19

    Michael Weiss-Malik, Product Manager for Moon in Google Earth, Google, Inc., speaks during a press conference, Monday, July 20, 2009, announcing the launch of Moon in Google Earth, an immersive 3D atlas of the Moon, accessible within Google Earth 5.0, Monday, July 20, 2009, at the Newseum in Washington. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  2. Google Moon Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-07-19

    Miles O'Brien, former chief science and tech correspondent for CNN, speaks during a press conference, Monday, July 20, 2009, announcing the launch of Moon in Google Earth, an immersive 3D atlas of the Moon, accessible within Google Earth 5.0, Monday, July 20, 2009, at the Newseum in Washington. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  3. Meet the Press

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quick, Brian L.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To field questions from a room of students simulating a press conference. Type of speech: Impromptu. Point value: 10 participation points. To receive all 10 points, students must (1) address three questions from the lectern and ask three questions from their seat (3 points), (2) respond thoroughly to each question by providing a…

  4. Expedition 52 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-07-10

    Expedition 52 flight engineers Paolo Nespoli of ESA, left, Sergey Ryazanskiy of Roscosmos, center, and Expedition 52 flight engineer Randy Bresnik of NASA pose for group photograph at the conclusion of their crew press conference at the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center (GCTC), Monday, July 10, 2017 in Star City, Russia. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  5. Expedition 50 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-10-26

    Expedition 50 NASA astronaut Peggy Whitson, left, Russian cosmonaut Oleg Novitskiy of Roscosmos, center, and ESA astronaut Thomas Pesquet pose for a group photograph at the conclusion of a press conference, Wednesday, Oct. 26, 2016, at the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center (GCTC) in Star City, Russia. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  6. MAVEN Press Briefing

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-10-28

    A model of the MAVEN spacecraft is pictured during a press conference for the upcoming launch of the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution (MAVEN) mission, at NASA Headquarters in Washington on Monday, Oct. 28th, 2013. MAVEN is the agency's next mission to Mars and the first devoted to understanding the upper atmosphere of the Red Planet. (Photo credit: NASA/Jay Westcott)

  7. MAVEN Press Briefing

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-10-28

    Jim Green, director, Planetary Science Division, NASA Headquarters, discusses the upcoming launch of the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution (MAVEN) mission, at a press conference at NASA Headquarters in Washington on Monday, Oct. 28th, 2013. MAVEN is the agency's next mission to Mars and the first devoted to understanding the upper atmosphere of the Red Planet. (Photo credit: NASA/Jay Westcott)

  8. Expedition 52 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-07-10

    A painting of Yuri Gagarin is seen in the lobby of the building where the Expedition 52 prime and backup crews held a crew press conference on the grounds of the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center (GCTC), Monday, July 10, 2017 in Star City, Russia. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  9. Constellation Program Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-06-04

    Jeff Hanley, Constellation Program Manager, speaks during a press conference outlining specific center responsibilities associated with the Constellation Program for robotic and human Moon and Mars exploration, Monday, June 5, 2006, at NASA Headquarters in Washington. Photo Credit (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  10. Constellation Program Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-06-04

    Scott Horowitz, NASA Associate Administrator for Exploration Systems, left, looks on as Jeff Hanley, Constellation Program Manager, speaks during a press conference outlining specific center responsibilities associated with the Constellation Program for robotic and human Moon and Mars exploration, Monday, June 5, 2006, at NASA Headquarters in Washington. Photo Credit (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  11. Constellation Program Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-06-04

    NASA Administrator Michael Griffin, left, looks on as Scott Horowitz, NASA Associate Administrator for Exploration Systems speaks during a press conference outlining specific center responsibilities associated with the Constellation Program for robotic and human Moon and Mars exploration, Monday, June 5, 2006, at NASA Headquarters in Washington. Photo Credit (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  12. Constellation Program Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-06-04

    Members of the media listen during a press conference with NASA Administrator Michael Griffin, Scott Horowitz, NASA Associate Administrator for Exploration Systems and Jeff Hanley, Constellation Program Manager, outlining specific center responsibilities associated with the Constellation Program for robotic and human Moon and Mars exploration, Monday, June 5, 2006, at NASA Headquarters in Washington. Photo Credit (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  13. Constellation Program Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-06-04

    NASA Administrator Michael Griffin, speaks during a press conference outlining specific center responsibilities associated with the Constellation Program for robotic and human Moon and Mars exploration, Monday, June 5, 2006, at NASA Headquarters in Washington. Photo Credit (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  14. Constellation Program Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-06-04

    Scott Horowitz, NASA Associate Administrator for Exploration Systems, left, and Jeff Hanley, Constellation Program Manager, are seen during a press conference outlining specific center responsibilities associated with the Constellation Program for robotic and human Moon and Mars exploration, Monday, June 5, 2006, at NASA Headquarters in Washington. Photo Credit (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  15. Optically Aligned Drill Press

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adderholdt, Bruce M.

    1994-01-01

    Precise drill press equipped with rotary-indexing microscope. Microscope and drill exchange places when turret rotated. Microscope axis first aligned over future hole, then rotated out of way so drill axis assumes its precise position. New procedure takes less time to locate drilling positions and produces more accurate results. Apparatus adapted to such other machine tools as milling and measuring machines.

  16. Optically Aligned Drill Press

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adderholdt, Bruce M.

    1994-01-01

    Precise drill press equipped with rotary-indexing microscope. Microscope and drill exchange places when turret rotated. Microscope axis first aligned over future hole, then rotated out of way so drill axis assumes its precise position. New procedure takes less time to locate drilling positions and produces more accurate results. Apparatus adapted to such other machine tools as milling and measuring machines.

  17. America's Enduring Ethnic Press.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marzolf, Marion

    Studies of the history of newspapers in the United States have virtually ignored the ethnically oriented, foreign language press. This gap in journalistic investigation should be filled by considering the two conflicting roles which ethnic newspapers fill: assimilation of the ethnic group into the mainstream of American culture and maintenance and…

  18. Drill Press Work Sample.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shawsheen Valley Regional Vocational-Technical High School, Billerica, MA.

    This manual contains a work sample intended to assess a handicapped student's interest in and to screen interested students into a training program in basic machine shop I. (The course is based on the entry level of the drill press operator.) Section 1 describes the assessment, correlates the work performed and worker traits required for…

  19. Google Moon Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-07-19

    Alan Eustace, Senior VP of Engineering and Research, Google, Inc., speaks during a press conference, Monday, July 20, 2009, announcing the launch of Moon in Google Earth, an immersive 3D atlas of the Moon, accessible within Google Earth 5.0, Monday, July 20, 2009, at the Newseum in Washington. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  20. Structural Ceramics Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 30 NIST Structural Ceramics Database (Web, free access)   The NIST Structural Ceramics Database (WebSCD) provides evaluated materials property data for a wide range of advanced ceramics known variously as structural ceramics, engineering ceramics, and fine ceramics.

  1. Transient liquid phase ceramic bonding

    DOEpatents

    Glaeser, Andreas M.

    1994-01-01

    Ceramics are joined to themselves or to metals using a transient liquid phase method employing three layers, one of which is a refractory metal, ceramic or alloy. The refractory layer is placed between two metal layers, each of which has a lower melting point than the refractory layer. The three layers are pressed between the two articles to be bonded to form an assembly. The assembly is heated to a bonding temperature at which the refractory layer remains solid, but the two metal layers melt to form a liquid. The refractory layer reacts with the surrounding liquid and a single solid bonding layer is eventually formed. The layers may be designed to react completely with each other and form refractory intermetallic bonding layers. Impurities incorporated into the refractory metal may react with the metal layers to form refractory compounds. Another method for joining ceramic articles employs a ceramic interlayer sandwiched between two metal layers. In alternative embodiments, the metal layers may include sublayers. A method is also provided for joining two ceramic articles using a single interlayer. An alternate bonding method provides a refractory-metal oxide interlayer placed adjacent to a strong oxide former. Aluminum or aluminum alloys are joined together using metal interlayers.

  2. Primary ceramic-on-ceramic total hip arthroplasty using a 32-mm ceramic head with a titanium-alloy sleeve.

    PubMed

    Lim, Seung-Jae; Jang, Seung-Pil; Kim, Dong-Wook; Moon, Young-Wan; Park, Youn-Soo

    2015-12-01

    Modern ceramic-on-ceramic bearings have become attractive alternatives to conventional polyethylene in total hip arthroplasty (THA) as a result of their low wear and minimal particle production. However, 28-mm heads in ceramic-on-ceramic bearing couples have been associated with ceramic fracture. To address these issues, 32-mm and larger ceramic heads with a titanium-alloy sleeve have been introduced, although limited data are available on their durability and clinical outcomes. We determined (1) the survivorship of the primary ceramic-on-ceramic THA using a 32-mm ceramic head with a titanium-alloy sleeve at a minimum followup of 5 years; (2) Harris hip scores; (3) the incidence of ceramic fracture and noisy hip; and (4) the proportion of hips showing radiographic evidence of osteolysis. From November 2005 to August 2009, we performed 301 ceramic-on-ceramic THAs using a 32-mm ceramic head with a titanium-alloy sleeve in 270 patients. Of these, 12 patients (12 hips [4%]) died from problems unrelated to surgery and 13 patients (15 hips [5%]) were lost during followup before a minimum of 5 years had been reached, leaving 245 patients who had 274 THAs with a minimum followup of 5 years (mean, 6.5 years; range, 5-9 years) in this retrospective analysis. During the study period, 30% (301 of 997 hips) were performed with this articulation based on the operating surgeon's discretion. The mean patient age at the time of surgery was 55 years (range, 16-82 years). All operations were performed at a single center. All of the ceramic implants were hot isostatic-pressed, laser-marked, proof-tested third-generation alumina. We determined the implant survival, Harris hip scores, incidence of ceramic fracture or noisy hips (based on a questionnaire), and presence of osteolysis. The survival rate of ceramic-on-ceramic bearings in primary THA using a 32-mm ceramic head with a titanium-alloy sleeve was 98% (95% confidence interval, 96%-100%) at 9 years. The Harris hip score improved

  3. Interference Lattice-based Loop Nest Tilings for Stencil Computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanderWijngaart, Rob F.; Frumkin, Michael

    2000-01-01

    A common method for improving performance of stencil operations on structured multi-dimensional discretization grids is loop tiling. Tile shapes and sizes are usually determined heuristically, based on the size of the primary data cache. We provide a lower bound on the numbers of cache misses that must be incurred by any tiling, and a close achievable bound using a particular tiling based on the grid interference lattice. The latter tiling is used to derive highly efficient loop orderings. The total number of cache misses of a code is the sum of (necessary) cold misses and misses caused by elements being dropped from the cache between successive loads (replacement misses). Maximizing temporal locality is equivalent to minimizing replacement misses. Temporal locality of loop nests implementing stencil operations is optimized by tilings that avoid data conflicts. We divide the loop nest iteration space into conflict-free tiles, derived from the cache miss equation. The tiling involves the definition of the grid interference lattice an equivalence class of grid points whose images in main memory map to the same location in the cache-and the construction of a special basis for the lattice. Conflicts only occur on the boundaries of the tiles, unless the tiles are too thin. We show that the surface area of the tiles is bounded for grids of any dimensionality, and for caches of any associativity, provided the eccentricity of the fundamental parallelepiped (the tile spanned by the basis) of the lattice is bounded. Eccentricity is determined by two factors, aspect ratio and skewness. The aspect ratio of the parallelepiped can be bounded by appropriate array padding. The skewness can be bounded by the choice of a proper basis. Combining these two strategies ensures that pathologically thin tiles are avoided. They do not, however, minimize replacement misses per se. The reason is that tile visitation order influences the number of data conflicts on the tile boundaries. If two

  4. Modeling and Simulation of Ceramic Arrays to Improve Ballaistic Performance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-05-01

    DISTRIBUTION / AVAILABILITY STATEMENT Approved for Public Release; distribution is Unlimited. 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT 2D AutoDyn ...4340 is used for the projectile and AutoDyn SiC material properties are used for the ceramic tile Mesh sensitivity analysis is performed using four...used to study the fracture behavior with 0.20-mm mesh size We will develop 3D FEMs for further AutoDyn analyses An undergraduate student is working

  5. Modeling and Simulation of Ceramic Arrays to Improve Ballistic Performance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-17

    30cal AP M2 Projectile, 762x39 PS Projectile, SPH, Aluminum 5083, SiC, DoP Expeminets, AutoDyn Simulations, Tile Gap 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION...configurations. 1. Establish a baseline of materials properties and projectile characteristics for modeling. a. Models are developed in AUTODYN and...model. Modeling and simulation of ceramic composite systems will be performed using explicit dynamic hydrocode LS-DYNA and AUTODYN . Computational

  6. Growth and optical properties of partially transparent Eu doped CaF{sub 2} ceramic

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Manoranjan Sen, Shashwati Pitale, S. S. Goutam, U. K. Shinde, Seema Patra, G. D. Gadkari, S. C.

    2014-04-24

    Partially transparent ceramic of 2 at.% Eu doped CaF{sub 2} have been grown preferentially towards [111] direction. For this purpose, Eu doped CaF{sub 2} nanoparticles (size∼12 nm) obtained by a low temperature solution growth method has been pressed at 1000°C under vacuum. The preferentially grown ceramic shows 15% transparency within the visible range of spectrum. As confirmed by the X-ray diffraction result, the hot pressed ceramic exhibits reduced lattice volume than the nanopowder. It indicates Eu{sup 3+} as the dominant substituting ions at the Ca{sup 2+} sites of CaF{sub 2} lattice in the hot pressed ceramic material. It is corroborated by the photoluminescence results of hot pressed ceramic which shows strong red emission corresponding to Eu{sup 3+} sites. However, photoluminescence of nanopowder exhibits intense peak in the blue region of the spectrum which is characteristics of Eu2+ sites.

  7. Design optimization methods for genomic DNA tiling arrays

    PubMed Central

    Bertone, Paul; Trifonov, Valery; Rozowsky, Joel S.; Schubert, Falk; Emanuelsson, Olof; Karro, John; Kao, Ming-Yang; Snyder, Michael; Gerstein, Mark

    2006-01-01

    A recent development in microarray research entails the unbiased coverage, or tiling, of genomic DNA for the large-scale identification of transcribed sequences and regulatory elements. A central issue in designing tiling arrays is that of arriving at a single-copy tile path, as significant sequence cross-hybridization can result from the presence of non-unique probes on the array. Due to the fragmentation of genomic DNA caused by the widespread distribution of repetitive elements, the problem of obtaining adequate sequence coverage increases with the sizes of subsequence tiles that are to be included in the design. This becomes increasingly problematic when considering complex eukaryotic genomes that contain many thousands of interspersed repeats. The general problem of sequence tiling can be framed as finding an optimal partitioning of non-repetitive subsequences over a prescribed range of tile sizes, on a DNA sequence comprising repetitive and non-repetitive regions. Exact solutions to the tiling problem become computationally infeasible when applied to large genomes, but successive optimizations are developed that allow their practical implementation. These include an efficient method for determining the degree of similarity of many oligonucleotide sequences over large genomes, and two algorithms for finding an optimal tile path composed of longer sequence tiles. The first algorithm, a dynamic programming approach, finds an optimal tiling in linear time and space; the second applies a heuristic search to reduce the space complexity to a constant requirement. A Web resource has also been developed, accessible at http://tiling.gersteinlab.org, to generate optimal tile paths from user-provided DNA sequences. PMID:16365382

  8. The influence of clay fineness upon sludge recycling in a ceramic matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szőke, A. M.; Muntean, M.; Sándor, M.; Brotea, L.

    2016-04-01

    The feasibility of sludge recycling in the ceramic manufacture was evaluated through laboratory testing. Such residues have similar chemical and mineralogical composition with the raw mixture of the green ceramic body used in construction. Several ceramic masses with clay and various proportion of sludge have been synthesized and then characterized by their physical-mechanical properties. The fineness of the clay, the main component of the green ceramic body, has been considered for every raw mixture. The proportion of the sludge waste addition depends on the clay fineness and the sintering capacity also, increases with the clay fineness. The ceramic properties, particularly, the open porosity, and mechanical properties, in presence of small sludge proportion (7, 20%) shows small modification. The introduction of such waste into building ceramic matrix (bricks, tiles, and plates) has a very good perspective.

  9. 40 CFR 63.8535 - Am I subject to this subpart?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Clay Ceramics Manufacturing What This Subpart... clay ceramics manufacturing facility that is, is located at, or is part of a major source of HAP... manufacturing facility is a plant site that manufactures pressed floor tile, pressed wall tile, other pressed...

  10. NASA TileWorld manual (system version 2.2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Philips, Andrew B.; Bresina, John L.

    1991-01-01

    The commands are documented of the NASA TileWorld simulator, as well as providing information about how to run it and extend it. The simulator, implemented in Common Lisp with Common Windows, encodes a particular range in a spectrum of domains, for controllable research experiments. TileWorld consists of a two dimensional grid of cells, a set of polygonal tiles, and a single agent which can grasp and move tiles. In addition to agent executable actions, there is an external event over which the agent has not control; this event correspond to a 'gust of wind'.

  11. View of Chapel mosaic tile ceiling featuring "doves of heaven" ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of Chapel mosaic tile ceiling featuring "doves of heaven" motifs on a stepped concrete shell. - Flanders Field American Cemetery & Memorial, Chapel, Wortegemseweg 117, Waregem, West Flanders (Belgium)

  12. STEREO Press Briefing

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-08-17

    Craig DeForest, a staff scientist at the Southwest Research Institute in Boulder, Colo., speaks during a press briefing, Thursday, Aug. 18, 2011, at NASA Headquarters in Washington. The briefing was held to discusses new details about the structure of solar storms and the impact they have on Earth. The new information comes from NASA's Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory, or STEREO, spacecraft and other NASA probes. Photo Credit: (NASA/GSFC/Rebecca Roth)

  13. STEREO Press Briefing

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-08-17

    Madhulika Guhathakurta, seated left, STEREO program scientist, speaks during a press briefing, Thursday, Aug. 18, 2011, at NASA Headquarters in Washington as Craig DeForest, David Webb and Alysha Reinard, look on. The briefing was held to discusses new details about the structure of solar storms and the impact they have on Earth. The new information comes from NASA's Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory, or STEREO, spacecraft and other NASA probes. Photo Credit: (NASA/GSFC/Rebecca Roth)

  14. STEREO Press Briefing

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-08-17

    Craig DeForest, second from left, speaks during a press briefing, Thursday, Aug. 18, 2011, at NASA Headquarters in Washington as Madhulika Guhathakurta, left, David Webb and Alysha Reinard look on. The briefing was held to discusses new details about the structure of solar storms and the impact they have on Earth. The new information comes from NASA's Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory, or STEREO, spacecraft and other NASA probes. Photo Credit: (NASA/GSFC/Rebecca Roth)

  15. STEREO Press Briefing

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-08-17

    Madhulika Guhathakurta, seated left, STEREO program scientist, speaks during a press briefing, Thursday, Aug. 18, 2011, at NASA Headquarters in Washington as Craig DeForest, David Webb and Alysha Reinard, look on. The briefing was held to discusses new details about the structure of solar storms and the impact they have on Earth. The new information comes from NASA's Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory, or STEREO, spacecraft and other NASA probes. Photo Credit: (NASA/GSFC/Rebecca Roth).

  16. STEREO Press Briefing

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-08-17

    David Webb, a research physicist from the Institute for Scientific Research at Boston College speaks during a press briefing, Thursday, Aug. 18, 2011, at NASA Headquarters in Washington. The briefing was held to discuss new details about the structure of solar storms and the impact they have on Earth. The new information comes from NASA's Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory, or STEREO, spacecraft and other NASA probes. Photo Credit: (NASA/GSFC/Rebecca Roth)

  17. Expedition 41 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-09-24

    Expedition 41 Soyuz Commander Alexander Samokutyaev of the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos) and Flight Engineer Elena Serova of Roscosmos hold up tiger toys that will be carried with them to the International Space Station to commemorate International Tiger Day at a press conference held at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan on Wednesday, Sept. 24, 2014. The mission is set to launch Sept. 26 from the Baikonur Cosmodrome. Photo Credit: (NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)

  18. Expedition 32 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-07-13

    Quarantined Expedition 32 JAXA (Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency) Flight Engineer Akihiko Hoshide answers reporters questions from behind glass during a prelaunch press conference held at the Cosmonaut Hotel on Friday, July 13, 2012 in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. The launch of the Soyuz spacecraft with Hoshide, Soyuz Commander Yuri Malenchenko, and NASA Flight Engineer Sunita Williams is scheduled for 8:40 a.m. local time on Sunday, July 15. Photo Credit (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  19. Expedition 34 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-12-18

    Expedition 34/35 NASA Flight Engineer Tom Marshburn answers a reporter's question at a press conference held at the Cosmonaut Hotel, on Tuesday, Dec. 18, 2012, in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. Launch of the Soyuz rocket is scheduled for December 19 and will send Marshburn, Roman Romanenko of ROSCOSMOS and Chris Hadfield of the Canadian Space Agency on a five-month mission aboard the International Space Station. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  20. Expedition 32 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-07-13

    Quarantined Expedition 32 JAXA (Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency) Flight Engineer Akihiko Hoshide, left, answers reporters questions from behind glass during a prelaunch press conference held at the Cosmonaut Hotel on Friday, July 13, 2012 in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. Seated next to him is Soyuz Commander Yuri Malenchenko. The launch of the Soyuz spacecraft with Hoshide, Malenchenko, and NASA Flight Engineer Sunita Williams is scheduled for 8:40 a.m. local time on Sunday, July 15. Photo Credit (NASA/Carla Cioffi)