Science.gov

Sample records for pressure balancing trade-offs

  1. FAST Conformational Searches by Balancing Exploration/Exploitation Trade-Offs.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, Maxwell I; Bowman, Gregory R

    2015-12-08

    Molecular dynamics simulations are a powerful means of understanding conformational changes. However, it is still difficult to simulate biologically relevant time scales without the use of specialized supercomputers. Here, we introduce a goal-oriented sampling method, called fluctuation amplification of specific traits (FAST), for extending the capabilities of commodity hardware. This algorithm rapidly searches conformational space for structures with desired properties by balancing trade-offs between focused searches around promising solutions (exploitation) and trying novel solutions (exploration). FAST was inspired by the hypothesis that many physical properties have an overall gradient in conformational space, akin to the energetic gradients that are known to guide proteins to their folded states. For example, we expect that transitioning from a conformation with a small solvent-accessible surface area to one with a large surface area will require passing through a series of conformations with steadily increasing surface areas. We demonstrate that such gradients are common through retrospective analysis of existing Markov state models (MSMs). Then we design the FAST algorithm to exploit these gradients to find structures with desired properties by (1) recognizing and amplifying structural fluctuations along gradients that optimize a selected physical property whenever possible, (2) overcoming barriers that interrupt these overall gradients, and (3) rerouting to discover alternative paths when faced with insurmountable barriers. To test FAST, we compare its performance to other methods for three common types of problems: (1) identifying unexpected binding pockets, (2) discovering the preferred paths between specific structures, and (3) folding proteins. Our conservative estimate is that FAST outperforms conventional simulations and an adaptive sampling algorithm by at least an order of magnitude. Furthermore, FAST yields both the proper thermodynamics and

  2. Considering the balance: development of a scale to assess patient views on trade-offs in competing health outcomes.

    PubMed

    Case, Siobhan M; Towle, Virginia R; Fried, Terri R

    2013-08-01

    To describe the development of a scale assessing participant attitudes regarding two commonly encountered trade-offs: quality versus quantity of life and present versus future health. Observational cohort study. Community. Three hundred and fifty-seven community-dwelling adults aged 65 and older. An initial set of 20 items rated on a 5-point Likert scale of agreement was reduced using principal components analysis. Construct validity was evaluated through comparison of the scale with other tools addressing the same trade-offs and analysis of participant characteristics associated with attitudes favoring quality over quantity of life and present over future health. Internal consistency was assessed using Cronbach alpha. Test-retest reliability was assessed using intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs). The scale consists of two subscales, each addressing one trade-off, with a total of 10 items. All factor loadings were 0.5 and greater, and subscale scores were significantly different (P ≤ .05) in the expected directions when comparing with other tools and with participant race, education, and religious identity. Internal consistency was good (Cronbach α 0.85 and 0.84), and test-retest reliability was fair (ICCs 0.63 and 0.47). Subscale score medians fell near the middle of each scale, with narrow interquartile ranges, but more than 15% of the sample scored at an extreme of each subscale. This new scale captures views on two common trade-offs in health care. Although test-retest reliability was modest, its high validity suggests that this tool can be used to familiarize people with common trade-offs and further explore influences on attitudes. Published 2013. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  3. The trade-off characteristics of acoustic and pressure sensors for the NASP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winkler, Martin; Bush, Chuck

    1992-01-01

    Results of a trade study for the development of pressure and acoustic sensors for use on the National Aerospace Plane (NASP) are summarized. Pressure sensors are needed to operate to 100 psia; acoustic sensors are needed that can give meaningful information about a 200 dB sound pressure level (SPL) environment. Both sensors will have to operate from a high temperature of 2000 F down to absolute zero. The main conclusions of the study are the following: (1) Diaphragm materials limit minimum size and maximum frequency response attainable. (2) No transduction is available to meet all the NASP requirements with existing technology. (3) Capacitive sensors are large relative to the requirement, have limited resolution and frequency response due to noise, and cable length is limited to approximately 20 feet. (4) Eddy current sensors are large relative to the requirement and have limited cable lengths. (5) Fiber optic sensors provide the possibility for a small sensor, even though present developments do not exhibit that characteristic. The need to use sapphire at high temperature complicates the design. Present high temperature research sensors suffer from poor resolution. A significant development effort will be required to realize the potential of fiber optics. (6) Short-term development seems to favor eddy current techniques with the penalty of larger size and reduced dynamic range for acoustic sensors. (7) Long-term development may favor fiber optics with the penalties of cost, schedule, and uncertainty.

  4. Balancing competing motives: adaptive trade-offs are necessary to satisfy disease avoidance and interpersonal affiliation goals.

    PubMed

    Sacco, Donald F; Young, Steven G; Hugenberg, Kurt

    2014-12-01

    The current research provides novel evidence for motivational trade-offs between the two fundamental human goals of pursuing social affiliation and avoiding disease. In Study 1, participants completed a writing prime that manipulated inclusionary status and found that socially excluded participants indicated lower feelings of current disease susceptibility compared with control and socially included participants. In Study 2, participants were included or excluded via Cyberball and then indicated their preferences for symmetrical versus asymmetrical faces. Socially excluded participants displayed lower preferences for symmetrical faces--a cue associated with greater disease resistance. Finally, in Study 3, participants were primed with either disease threat or a general negative affective state and then indicated their current affiliation interest. Activated disease concerns uniquely led participants to display less interest in social affiliation. Taken together, affiliation needs result in disease avoidance down-regulation to aid reaffiliation, whereas disease concerns result in affiliation down-regulation to facilitate pathogen avoidance.

  5. Behavioral Timing without Clockwork: Photoperiod-Dependent Trade-Off between Predation Hazard and Energy Balance in an Arctic Ungulate.

    PubMed

    Tyler, Nicholas J C; Gregorini, Pablo; Forchhammer, Mads C; Stokkan, Karl-Arne; van Oort, Bob E H; Hazlerigg, David G

    2016-10-01

    Occurrence of 24-h rhythms in species apparently lacking functional molecular clockwork indicates that strong circadian mechanisms are not essential prerequisites of robust timing, and that rhythmical patterns may arise instead as passive responses to periodically changing environmental stimuli. Thus, in a new synthesis of grazing in a ruminant (MINDY), crepuscular peaks of activity emerge from interactions between internal and external stimuli that influence motivation to feed, and the influence of the light/dark cycle is mediated through the effect of low nocturnal levels of food intake on gastric function. Drawing on risk allocation theory, we hypothesized that the timing of behavior in ruminants is influenced by the independent effects of light on motivation to feed and perceived risk of predation. We predicted that the antithetical relationship between these 2 drivers would vary with photoperiod, resulting in a systematic shift in the phase of activity relative to the solar cycle across the year. This prediction was formalized in a model in which phase of activity emerges from a photoperiod-dependent trade-off between food and safety. We tested this model using data on the temporal pattern of activity in reindeer/caribou Rangifer tarandus free-living at natural mountain pasture in sub-Arctic Norway. The resulting nonlinear relationship between the phasing of crepuscular activity and photoperiod, consistent with the model, suggests a mechanism for behavioral timing that is independent of the core circadian system. We anticipate that such timing depends on integration of metabolic feedback from the digestive system and the activity of the glucocorticoid axis which modulates the behavioral responses of the animal to environmental hazard. The hypothalamus is the obvious neural substrate to achieve this integration.

  6. Balancing ecosystem services with energy and food security - Assessing trade-offs from reservoir operation and irrigation investments in Kenya's Tana Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurford, A. P.; Harou, J. J.

    2014-08-01

    Competition for water between key economic sectors and the environment means agreeing allocations is challenging. Managing releases from the three major dams in Kenya's Tana River basin with its 4.4 million inhabitants, 567 MW of installed hydropower capacity, 33 000 ha of irrigation and ecologically important wetlands and forests is a pertinent example. This research seeks firstly to identify and help decision-makers visualise reservoir management strategies which result in the best possible (Pareto-optimal) allocation of benefits between sectors. Secondly, it seeks to show how trade-offs between achievable benefits shift with the implementation of proposed new rice, cotton and biofuel irrigation projects. To approximate the Pareto-optimal trade-offs we link a water resources management simulation model to a multi-criteria search algorithm. The decisions or "levers" of the management problem are volume-dependent release rules for the three major dams and extent of investment in new irrigation schemes. These decisions are optimised for eight objectives covering the provision of water supply and irrigation, energy generation and maintenance of ecosystem services. Trade-off plots allow decision-makers to assess multi-reservoir rule-sets and irrigation investment options by visualising their impacts on different beneficiaries. Results quantify how economic gains from proposed irrigation schemes trade-off against the disturbance of ecosystems and local livelihoods that depend on them. Full implementation of the proposed schemes is shown to come at a high environmental and social cost. The clarity and comprehensiveness of "best-case" trade-off analysis is a useful vantage point from which to tackle the interdependence and complexity of "water-energy-food nexus" resource security issues.

  7. Balancing ecosystem services with energy and food security - assessing trade-offs for reservoir operation and irrigation investment in Kenya's Tana basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurford, A. P.; Harou, J. J.

    2014-01-01

    Competition for water between key economic sectors and the environment means agreeing on allocation is challenging. Managing releases from the three major dams in Kenya's Tana River basin with its 4.4 million inhabitants, 567 MW of installed hydropower capacity, 33 000 ha of irrigation and ecologically important wetlands and forests is a pertinent example. This research seeks to identify and help decision-makers visualise reservoir management strategies which result in the best possible (Pareto-optimal) allocation of benefits between sectors. Secondly we seek to show how trade-offs between achievable benefits shift with the implementation of new proposed rice, cotton and biofuel irrigation projects. To identify the Pareto-optimal trade-offs we link a water resources management model to a multi-criteria search algorithm. The decisions or "levers" of the management problem are volume dependent release rules for the three major dams and extent of investment in new irrigation schemes. These decisions are optimised for objectives covering provision of water supply and irrigation, energy generation and maintenance of ecosystem services which underpin tourism and local livelihoods. Visual analytic plots allow decision makers to assess multi-reservoir rule-sets by understanding their impacts on different beneficiaries. Results quantify how economic gains from proposed irrigation schemes trade-off against disturbance of the flow regime which supports ecosystem services. Full implementation of the proposed schemes is shown to be Pareto-optimal, but at high environmental and social cost. The clarity and comprehensiveness of "best-case" trade-off analysis is a useful vantage point from which to tackle the interdependence and complexity of water-energy-food "nexus" challenges.

  8. Evaluating taboo trade-offs in ecosystems services and human well-being

    PubMed Central

    Coulthard, Sarah; Cheung, William W. L.; Brown, Katrina; Abunge, Caroline; Galafassi, Diego; Peterson, Garry D.; McClanahan, Tim R.; Omukoto, Johnstone O.; Munyi, Lydiah

    2015-01-01

    Managing ecosystems for multiple ecosystem services and balancing the well-being of diverse stakeholders involves different kinds of trade-offs. Often trade-offs involve noneconomic and difficult-to-evaluate values, such as cultural identity, employment, the well-being of poor people, or particular species or ecosystem structures. Although trade-offs need to be considered for successful environmental management, they are often overlooked in favor of win-wins. Management and policy decisions demand approaches that can explicitly acknowledge and evaluate diverse trade-offs. We identified a diversity of apparent trade-offs in a small-scale tropical fishery when ecological simulations were integrated with participatory assessments of social–ecological system structure and stakeholders’ well-being. Despite an apparent win-win between conservation and profitability at the aggregate scale, food production, employment, and well-being of marginalized stakeholders were differentially influenced by management decisions leading to trade-offs. Some of these trade-offs were suggested to be “taboo” trade-offs between morally incommensurable values, such as between profits and the well-being of marginalized women. These were not previously recognized as management issues. Stakeholders explored and deliberated over trade-offs supported by an interactive “toy model” representing key system trade-offs, alongside qualitative narrative scenarios of the future. The concept of taboo trade-offs suggests that psychological bias and social sensitivity may exclude key issues from decision making, which can result in policies that are difficult to implement. Our participatory modeling and scenarios approach has the potential to increase awareness of such trade-offs, promote discussion of what is acceptable, and potentially identify and reduce obstacles to management compliance. PMID:26038547

  9. Evaluating taboo trade-offs in ecosystems services and human well-being.

    PubMed

    Daw, Tim M; Coulthard, Sarah; Cheung, William W L; Brown, Katrina; Abunge, Caroline; Galafassi, Diego; Peterson, Garry D; McClanahan, Tim R; Omukoto, Johnstone O; Munyi, Lydiah

    2015-06-02

    Managing ecosystems for multiple ecosystem services and balancing the well-being of diverse stakeholders involves different kinds of trade-offs. Often trade-offs involve noneconomic and difficult-to-evaluate values, such as cultural identity, employment, the well-being of poor people, or particular species or ecosystem structures. Although trade-offs need to be considered for successful environmental management, they are often overlooked in favor of win-wins. Management and policy decisions demand approaches that can explicitly acknowledge and evaluate diverse trade-offs. We identified a diversity of apparent trade-offs in a small-scale tropical fishery when ecological simulations were integrated with participatory assessments of social-ecological system structure and stakeholders' well-being. Despite an apparent win-win between conservation and profitability at the aggregate scale, food production, employment, and well-being of marginalized stakeholders were differentially influenced by management decisions leading to trade-offs. Some of these trade-offs were suggested to be "taboo" trade-offs between morally incommensurable values, such as between profits and the well-being of marginalized women. These were not previously recognized as management issues. Stakeholders explored and deliberated over trade-offs supported by an interactive "toy model" representing key system trade-offs, alongside qualitative narrative scenarios of the future. The concept of taboo trade-offs suggests that psychological bias and social sensitivity may exclude key issues from decision making, which can result in policies that are difficult to implement. Our participatory modeling and scenarios approach has the potential to increase awareness of such trade-offs, promote discussion of what is acceptable, and potentially identify and reduce obstacles to management compliance.

  10. Immune function trade-offs in response to parasite threats.

    PubMed

    Kirschman, Lucas J; Quade, Adam H; Zera, Anthony J; Warne, Robin W

    2017-04-01

    Immune function is often involved in physiological trade-offs because of the energetic costs of maintaining constitutive immunity and mounting responses to infection. However, immune function is a collection of discrete immunity factors and animals should allocate towards factors that combat the parasite threat with the highest fitness cost. For example, animals on dispersal fronts of expanding population may be released from density-dependent diseases. The costs of immunity, however, and life history trade-offs in general, are often context dependent. Trade-offs are often most apparent under conditions of unusually limited resources or when animals are particularly stressed, because the stress response can shift priorities. In this study we tested how humoral and cellular immune factors vary between phenotypes of a wing dimorphic cricket and how physiological stress influences these immune factors. We measured constitutive lysozyme activity, a humoral immune factor, and encapsulation response, a cellular immune factor. We also stressed the crickets with a sham predator in a full factorial design. We found that immune strategy could be explained by the selective pressures encountered by each morph and that stress decreased encapsulation, but not lysozyme activity. These results suggest a possible trade-off between humoral and cellular immunity. Given limited resources and the expense of immune factors, parasite pressures could play a key factor in maintaining insect polyphenism via disruptive selection.

  11. Trade-offs in miniature quadrupole designs.

    PubMed

    Boumsellek, S; Ferran, R J

    2001-06-01

    Pressing needs for miniature mass spectrometers became apparent during the last decade in process monitoring and control, space exploration, and environmental screening. Besides the small footprint, common requirements include low cost, low power consumption, field portability, reliability, autonomy, and ease-of-use. Design concepts and construction technologies of miniaturized quadrupole sensors were guided by cost reduction requirements without sacrifice of performance. The first miniature and complete quadrupole mass spectrometer system was introduced as the Micropole sensor. The concept featured a novel technique to assemble and operate multiple miniature quadrupoles in parallel. The short analyzer length offers a significant advantage by enabling direct mass filtering at pressures up in the 10(-2) torr range. High voltages at higher frequencies (10-20 MHz) are required for acceptable mass resolving powers. Additional trade-offs were uncovered in miniature sensors leading to designs optimized for each class of applications. Real time ray tracing of ions injected and filtered in the quadrupole field is used early in the design stage to predict the performance and reliability of the device.

  12. Trade-off between growth and immunity: role of brassinosteroids.

    PubMed

    Lozano-Durán, Rosa; Zipfel, Cyril

    2015-01-01

    A balance between growth and immunity exists in plants. Recently, the growth-promoting hormones brassinosteroids (BR) have emerged as crucial regulators of the growth-immunity trade-off, although the molecular mechanisms underlying this role remained unclear. New evidence obtained from the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana points at an indirect crosstalk between BR signaling and immunity, mediated by the transcription factors BZR1 and HBI1, which suppress immunity upon BR perception. The core transcriptional cascade formed by BZR1 and HBI1 seems to act as a regulatory hub on which multiple signaling inputs impinge, ensuring effective fine-tuning of the trade-off between growth and immunity in a timely and cost-efficient manner. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Trade-offs between the accuracy and integrity of autobiographical narrative in memory reconsolidation.

    PubMed

    Montemayor, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Lane et al. propose an integrative model for the reconsolidation of traces in their timely and impressive article. This commentary draws attention to trade-offs between accuracy and self-narrative integrity in the model. The trade-offs concern the sense of agency in memory and its role in both implicit and explicit memory reconsolidation, rather than balances concerning degrees of emotional arousal.

  14. Effects of parasite pressure on parasite mortality and reproductive output in a rodent-flea system: inferring host defense trade-offs.

    PubMed

    Warburton, Elizabeth M; Kam, Michael; Bar-Shira, Enav; Friedman, Aharon; Khokhlova, Irina S; Koren, Lee; Asfur, Mustafa; Geffen, Eli; Kiefer, Daniel; Krasnov, Boris R; Degen, A Allan

    2016-09-01

    Evaluating host resistance via parasite fitness helps place host-parasite relationships within evolutionary and ecological contexts; however, few studies consider both these processes simultaneously. We investigated how different levels of parasite pressure affect parasite mortality and reproductive success in relationship to host defense efforts, using the rodent Gerbillus nanus and the flea Xenopsylla conformis as a host-parasite system. Fifteen immune-naïve male rodents were infested with 20, 50, or 100 fleas for four weeks. During this time number of new imagoes produced per adult flea (our flea reproductive output metric), flea mortality, and change in circulating anti-flea immunoglobulin G (our measure of adaptive immune defense) were monitored. Three hypotheses guided this work: (1) increasing parasite pressure would heighten host defenses; (2) parasite mortality would increase and parasite reproductive output would decrease with increasing investment in host defense; and (3) hosts under high parasite pressure could invest in behavioral and/or immune responses. We predicted that at high infestation levels (a) parasite mortality would increase; (b) flea reproductive output per individual would decrease; and (c) host circulating anti-flea antibody levels would increase. The hypotheses were partially supported. Flea mortality significantly increased and flea reproductive output significantly decreased as flea pressure increased. Host adaptive immune defense did not significantly change with increasing flea pressure. Therefore, we inferred that investment in host behavioral defense, either alone or in combination with density-dependent effects, may be more efficient at increasing flea mortality and decreasing flea reproductive output than antibody production during initial infestation in this system.

  15. Trade-offs in Our Energy Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canipe, Stephen L.

    The purpose of this activity is to make students aware that there is no free energy source for the present or the future and that all technologies are potential threats to the environment. The activity consists of a short reading (discussing basic trade-offs, issues, and decisions related to petroleum, coal, and nuclear energy sources) and student…

  16. Trade-offs in Our Energy Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canipe, Stephen L.

    The purpose of this activity is to make students aware that there is no free energy source for the present or the future and that all technologies are potential threats to the environment. The activity consists of a short reading (discussing basic trade-offs, issues, and decisions related to petroleum, coal, and nuclear energy sources) and student…

  17. Trade-offs between growth and maturation: the cost of reproduction for surviving environmental extremes.

    PubMed

    Luhring, Thomas M; Holdo, Ricardo M

    2015-07-01

    Life-history trade-offs and the costs of reproduction are central concepts in evolution and ecology. Episodic climatic events such as drought and extreme temperatures provide strong selective pressures that can change the balance of these costs and trade-offs. We used size-structured matrix models parameterized from field and laboratory studies to examine the effect of periodic drought on two species of aquatic salamanders (greater siren, Siren lacertina; lesser siren, Siren intermedia) that differ in size at reproduction and maximum body size. Post-drought body size distributions of the larger species (S. lacertina) are consistent with size-dependent mortality. Smaller individuals were extirpated from the population during each drought while large animals persisted, a pattern that contrasted with that seen in several ectotherms. This appears to be largely explained by estivation proficiency and a positive relationship between body size and estivation potential. Increased body size, however, may come at the cost of fecundity and maturation rate compared to a closely related congener. The cost of somatic allocation in this case may manifest itself via reduced per-capita competitive ability, which (at least in simulation studies) allows the smaller, fast-maturing species to outcompete the larger, slow-maturing species when drought is minimal or nonexistent.

  18. Violations of robustness trade-offs

    PubMed Central

    Kitano, Hiroaki

    2010-01-01

    Biological robustness is a principle that may shed light on system-level characteristics of biological systems. One intriguing aspect of the concept of biological robustness is the possible existence of intrinsic trade-offs among robustness, fragility, performance, and so on. At the same time, whether such trade-offs hold regardless of the situation or hold only under specific conditions warrants careful investigation. In this paper, we reassess this concept and argue that biological robustness may hold only when a system is sufficiently optimized and that it may not be conserved when there is room for optimization in its design. Several testable predictions and implications for cell culture experiments are presented. PMID:20571533

  19. Temporal trade-offs in psychophysics.

    PubMed

    Barack, David L; Gold, Joshua I

    2016-04-01

    Psychophysical techniques typically assume straightforward relationships between manipulations of real-world events, their effects on the brain, and behavioral reports of those effects. However, these relationships can be influenced by many complex, strategic factors that contribute to task performance. Here we discuss several of these factors that share two key features. First, they involve subjects making flexible use of time to process information. Second, this flexibility can reflect the rational regulation of information-processing trade-offs that can play prominent roles in particular temporal epochs: sensitivity to stability versus change for past information, speed versus accuracy for current information, and exploitation versus exploration for future goals. Understanding how subjects manage these trade-offs can be used to help design and interpret psychophysical studies.

  20. Design trade-offs for homing missiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spencer, Allen; Moore, William

    1992-05-01

    Major design considerations, trade-offs and technology issues for future hypervelocity, anti-missile interceptors are presented in an overview format. Two classes of interceptors are considered: a low altitude interceptor using an active radar seeker for defense against tactical ballistic missiles (TBMs) and a higher altitude interceptor using a passive infra-red seeker for defense against ICBMs. Considerations are presented in the areas of mission requirements, seeker selection, aerodynamic and aerothermal environments, control systems, and guidance performance.

  1. Dual shell pressure balanced vessel

    DOEpatents

    Fassbender, Alexander G.

    1992-01-01

    A dual-wall pressure balanced vessel for processing high viscosity slurries at high temperatures and pressures having an outer pressure vessel and an inner vessel with an annular space between the vessels pressurized at a pressure slightly less than or equivalent to the pressure within the inner vessel.

  2. Daily modulation of the speed-accuracy trade-off.

    PubMed

    Gueugneau, Nicolas; Pozzo, Thierry; Darlot, Christian; Papaxanthis, Charalambos

    2017-07-25

    Goal-oriented arm movements are characterized by a balance between speed and accuracy. The relation between speed and accuracy has been formalized by Fitts' law and predicts a linear increase in movement duration with task constraints. Up to now this relation has been investigated on a short-time scale only, that is during a single experimental session, although chronobiological studies report that the motor system is shaped by circadian rhythms. Here, we examine whether the speed-accuracy trade-off could vary during the day. Healthy adults carried out arm-pointing movements as accurately and fast as possible toward targets of different sizes at various hours of the day, and variations in Fitts' law parameters were scrutinized. To investigate whether the potential modulation of the speed-accuracy trade-off has peripheral and/or central origins, a motor imagery paradigm was used as well. Results indicated a daily (circadian-like) variation for the durations of both executed and mentally simulated movements, in strictly controlled accuracy conditions. While Fitts' law was held for the whole sessions of the day, the slope of the relation between movement duration and task difficulty expressed a clear modulation, with the lowest values in the afternoon. This variation of the speed-accuracy trade-off in executed and mental movements suggests that, beyond execution parameters, motor planning mechanisms are modulated during the day. Daily update of forward models is discussed as a potential mechanism. Copyright © 2017 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Cancer: A disease at the crossroads of trade-offs.

    PubMed

    Jacqueline, Camille; Biro, Peter A; Beckmann, Christa; Moller, Anders Pape; Renaud, François; Sorci, Gabriele; Tasiemski, Aurélie; Ujvari, Beata; Thomas, Frédéric

    2017-03-01

    Central to evolutionary theory is the idea that living organisms face phenotypic and/or genetic trade-offs when allocating resources to competing life-history demands, such as growth, survival, and reproduction. These trade-offs are increasingly considered to be crucial to further our understanding of cancer. First, evidences suggest that neoplastic cells, as any living entities subject to natural selection, are governed by trade-offs such as between survival and proliferation. Second, selection might also have shaped trade-offs at the organismal level, especially regarding protective mechanisms against cancer. Cancer can also emerge as a consequence of additional trade-offs in organisms (e.g., eco-immunological trade-offs). Here, we review the wide range of trade-offs that occur at different scales and their relevance for understanding cancer dynamics. We also discuss how acknowledging these phenomena, in light of human evolutionary history, may suggest new guidelines for preventive and therapeutic strategies.

  4. Guidance Trade-off for Aerocapture Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vernis, P.; Gelly, G.; Ferreira, E.; da Costa, R.; Ortega, G.

    In the very late 90's, EADS-ST began home funded studies on aerocapture problems. The objectives of these studies were at that time to prepare a possible cooperation within the NASA/Cnes MSR-Orbiter program by investigating this new orbital insertion technique studying different algorithmic solutions from a guidance point of view. According to these preliminary studies, EADS-ST was retained in 2002 by ESA to study insertion techniques such as aerocapture, aero-gravity assist or aerobraking techniques within the frame of Technological Research Program able to bring solutions to Aurora program. In the frame of the ATPE (Aeroassist Technologies for Planetary Exploration) TRP program, EADS-ST, led by Astrium-Gmbh (now part of EADS-ST), developed and implemented an efficient and simple guidance scheme able to cope with mission requirements for aerocapture on Mars, Venus or the Earth: the Feedback Trajectory Control, or FTC. The development of this guidance scheme was made according to a preliminary trade-off analysis using different guidance schemes. Among those ones was an original predictor-corrector guidance scheme, already analyzed within the frame of the MSR-O mission. But, the FTC algoritm was prefered because of its good results and high simplicity. This paper presents an upgrade of the original Apoapsis Predictor, or AP, with the improvement of its robustness woth respect to off-nomonal flight conditions and its process simplification. A new trade-off analysis is then detailed on a Mars Sample return mission.

  5. When are multiobjective calibration trade-offs in hydrologic models meaningful?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kollat, J. B.; Reed, P. M.; Wagener, T.

    2012-03-01

    This paper applies a four-objective calibration strategy focusing on peak flows, low flows, water balance, and flashiness to 392 model parameter estimation experiment (MOPEX) watersheds across the United States. Our analysis explores the influence of model structure by analyzing how the multiobjective calibration trade-offs for two conceptual hydrologic models, the Hydrology Model (HYMOD) and the Hydrologiska Byråns Vattenbalansavdelning (HBV) model, compare for each of the 392 catchments. Our results demonstrate that for modern multiobjective calibration frameworks to identify any meaningful measure of model structural failure, users must be able to carefully control the precision by which they evaluate their trade-offs. Our study demonstrates that the concept of epsilon-dominance provides an effective means of attaining bounded and meaningful hydrologic model calibration trade-offs. When analyzed at an appropriate precision, we found that meaningful multiobjective trade-offs are far less frequent than prior literature has suggested. However, when trade-offs do exist at a meaningful precision, they have significant value for supporting hydrologic model selection, distinguishing core model deficiencies, and identifying hydroclimatic regions where hydrologic model prediction is highly challenging.

  6. Land management influences trade-offs and the total supply of ecosystem services in alpine grassland in Tibet, China.

    PubMed

    Wu, Junxi; Zhao, Yan; Yu, Chengqun; Luo, Liming; Pan, Ying

    2017-05-15

    Developing sustainable use patterns for alpine grassland in Tibet is the primary challenge related to conserving these vulnerable ecosystems of the 'world's third pole' and guaranteeing the well-being of local inhabitants. This challenge requires researchers to think beyond the methods of most current studies that are limited to a single aspect of conservation or productivity, and focus on balancing various needs. An analysis of trade-offs involving ecosystem services provides a framework that can be used to quantify the type of balancing needed. In this study, we measured variations in four types of ecosystem services under five types of grassland management including grazing exclusion, sowing, combined plowing and grazing exclusion, combined plowing and sowing, and natural grassland, from 2013 to 2015. In addition, we accessed the existence and changing patterns of ecosystem service trade-offs using Spearman coefficients and a trade-off index. The results revealed the existence of trade-offs among provisioning and regulating services. Plowing and sowing could convert the trade-off relationships into synergies immediately. Grazing exclusion reduced the level of trade-offs gradually over time. Thus, the combined plowing and sowing treatment promoted the total supply of multiple ecosystem services when compared with natural grassland. We argue that the variations in dry matter allocation to above- and belowground serve as one cause of the variation in trade-off relationships. Another cause for variation in trade-offs is the varied species competition between selection effects and niche complementarity. Our study provides empirical evidence that the effects of trade-offs among ecosystem services could be reduced and even converted into synergies by optimizing management techniques. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Doppler lidar power, aperture diameter, and FFT size trade-off study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chester, David B.; Budge, Scott E.

    2017-05-01

    In the design or selection of a Doppler lidar instrument for a spacecraft landing system, it is important to evaluate the balance between performance requirements and cost, weight, and power consumption. Leveraging the capability of LadarSIM, a trade-off study was performed to evaluate the interaction between the laser transmission power, aperture diameter, and FFT size in a Doppler lidar system. For this study the probabilities of detection and false alarm were calculated using LadarSIM to simulate FMCW lidar systems with varying power, aperture diameter, and FFT size. This paper reports the results of this trade-off study.

  8. The evolution of life history trade-offs in viruses.

    PubMed

    Goldhill, Daniel H; Turner, Paul E

    2014-10-01

    Viruses can suffer 'life-history' trade-offs that prevent simultaneous improvement in fitness traits, such as improved intrahost reproduction at the expense of reduced extrahost survival. Here we examine reproduction-survival trade-offs and other trait compromises, highlighting that experimental evolution can reveal trade-offs and their associated mechanisms. Whereas 'curse of the pharaoh' (high virulence with extreme stability) may generally apply for viruses of eukaryotes, we suggest phages are instead likely to suffer virulence/stability trade-offs. We examine how survival/reproduction trade-offs in viruses are affected by environmental stressors, proteins governing viral host range, and organization of the virus genome. Future studies incorporating comparative biology, experimental evolution, and structural biology, could thoroughly determine how viral trade-offs evolve, and whether they transiently or permanently constrain virus adaptation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Oxidative Stress: A Master Regulator of Plant Trade-Offs?

    PubMed

    Morales, Melanie; Munné-Bosch, Sergi

    2016-12-01

    Trade-offs between growth, reproduction, and defence have been documented. Oxidative stress is one of the physiological mechanisms that underlie trade-offs at the cellular and organ levels. The diversity of plant life forms and the complexity of scaling up limit our knowledge of oxidative stress as a universal mediator of life-history trade-offs at the organism level. Joint efforts by plant physiologists and ecologists will undoubtedly provide novel insights into this topic in the near future.

  10. Global agriculture and carbon trade-offs

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Justin Andrew; Runge, Carlisle Ford; Senauer, Benjamin; Foley, Jonathan; Polasky, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Feeding a growing and increasingly affluent world will require expanded agricultural production, which may require converting grasslands and forests into cropland. Such conversions can reduce carbon storage, habitat provision, and other ecosystem services, presenting difficult societal trade-offs. In this paper, we use spatially explicit data on agricultural productivity and carbon storage in a global analysis to find where agricultural extensification should occur to meet growing demand while minimizing carbon emissions from land use change. Selective extensification saves ∼6 billion metric tons of carbon compared with a business-as-usual approach, with a value of approximately $1 trillion (2012 US dollars) using recent estimates of the social cost of carbon. This type of spatially explicit geospatial analysis can be expanded to include other ecosystem services and other industries to analyze how to minimize conflicts between economic development and environmental sustainability. PMID:25114254

  11. DARWIN mission and configuration trade-off

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallner, Oswald; Ergenzinger, Klaus; Flatscher, Reinhold; Johann, Ulrich

    2006-06-01

    The European DARWIN mission aims at detection and characterization of Earth-like exo-planets as well as at aperture synthesis imaging. The method to be applied is nulling interferometry in the mid-infrared wavelength regime. The DARWIN instrument consists of a flotilla of free-flying spacecraft, one spacecraft carrying the optics for beam recombination and three or more spacecraft carrying the large collector telescopes. We provide a trade-off of different configuration, payload, and mission concepts. We discuss various two and three-dimensional aperture configurations with three or four telescopes, beam routing schemes, phase modulation methods, and beam recombination and detection schemes as well as different launch vehicle configurations, launch scenarios, and orbits. We trade the different DARWIN concepts by assessing the performance in terms of science return, development risk, and planning.

  12. Global agriculture and carbon trade-offs.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Justin Andrew; Runge, Carlisle Ford; Senauer, Benjamin; Foley, Jonathan; Polasky, Stephen

    2014-08-26

    Feeding a growing and increasingly affluent world will require expanded agricultural production, which may require converting grasslands and forests into cropland. Such conversions can reduce carbon storage, habitat provision, and other ecosystem services, presenting difficult societal trade-offs. In this paper, we use spatially explicit data on agricultural productivity and carbon storage in a global analysis to find where agricultural extensification should occur to meet growing demand while minimizing carbon emissions from land use change. Selective extensification saves ∼ 6 billion metric tons of carbon compared with a business-as-usual approach, with a value of approximately $1 trillion (2012 US dollars) using recent estimates of the social cost of carbon. This type of spatially explicit geospatial analysis can be expanded to include other ecosystem services and other industries to analyze how to minimize conflicts between economic development and environmental sustainability.

  13. Trade-offs and Opportunities in the Nexus of Energy and Water-for-Food

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosegrant, M. W.

    2015-12-01

    The world economy is under pressure for greater, more efficient and more sustainable use of natural resources to meet complementary and competing objectives in the energy, water, and food sectors. Increasing national, regional, and seasonal water scarcities in much of the world pose severe challenges for national governments, the international development community, and ultimately, for individual water users. This presentation assesses the nexus between energy and water, with an emphasis on the interactions and trade-offs between energy and water for food production. It examines the impact of biofuel production on water quantity and quality, and the potential for hydropower potential to meet energy challenges while expanding irrigation water supplies and food production potential, thereby enhancing global food security. Biofuel production affects both water quantity and quality. Expanding production of biofuels—through either crop-based production systems or direct biomass production—can significantly increase demand for water as more acreage is planted or the crop mix begins to favor thirstier crops; water demand for bio-refineries creates additional competition with agricultural water use. Water quality can also be adversely affected by increased acreage for fertilizer-intensive crops, such as maize or sugarcane, which can result in increased nitrate run-off and soil erosion. Hydropower has become a relatively forgotten part of the energy-water security picture that deserves renewed attention. Unlike biofuels, hydropower does not normally compete with agricultural water. Instead, development of hydropower could complement food production by developing dam structures and power that also provide irrigation water and support its distribution for growing food crops. But balanced hydropower policies require consideration of potential trade-offs with environmental and social impacts.

  14. Fluid pressure balanced seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsh, H. W. (Inventor)

    1966-01-01

    A seal which increases in effectiveness with increasing pressure is presented. The seal's functional capability throughout both static and dynamic operation makes it particularly useful for sealing ball valve ports. Other features of the seal include the ability to seal two opposed surfaces simultaneously, tolerance of small misalignments, tolerance of wide temperature ranges, ability to maintain positive sealing contact under conditions of internal or external pressurization, and ability to conform to slight irregularities in seal or surface contours.

  15. Stability-maneuverability trade-offs during lateral steps.

    PubMed

    Acasio, Julian; Wu, Mengnan/Mary; Fey, Nicholas P; Gordon, Keith E

    2017-02-01

    Selecting a specific foot placement strategy to perform walking maneuvers requires the management of several competing factors, including: maintaining stability, positioning oneself to actively generate impulses, and minimizing mechanical energy requirements. These requirements are unlikely to be independent. Our purpose was to determine the impact of lateral foot placement on stability, maneuverability, and energetics during walking maneuvers. Ten able-bodied adults performed laterally-directed walking maneuvers. Mediolateral placement of the "Push-off" foot during the maneuvers was varied, ranging from a cross-over step to a side-step. We hypothesized that as mediolateral foot placement became wider, passive stability in the direction of the maneuver, the lateral impulse generated to create the maneuver, and mechanical energy cost would all increase. We also hypothesized that subjects would prefer an intermediate step width reflective of trade-offs between stability vs. both maneuverability and energy. In support of our first hypothesis, we found that as Push-off step width increased, lateral margin of stability, peak lateral impulse, and total joint work all increased. In support of our second hypothesis, we found that when subjects had no restrictions on their mediolateral foot placement, they chose a foot placement between the two extreme positions. We found a significant relationship (p<0.05) between lateral margin of stability and peak lateral impulse (r=0.773), indicating a trade-off between passive stability and the force input required to maneuver. These findings suggest that during anticipated maneuvers people select foot placement strategies that balance competing costs to maintain stability, actively generate impulses, and minimize mechanical energy costs. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Conceptualising and managing trade-offs in sustainability assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison-Saunders, Angus; Pope, Jenny

    2013-01-15

    One of the defining characteristics of sustainability assessment as a form of impact assessment is that it provides a forum for the explicit consideration of the trade-offs that are inherent in complex decision-making processes. Few sustainability assessments have achieved this goal though, and none has considered trade-offs in a holistic fashion throughout the process. Recent contributions such as the Gibson trade-off rules have significantly progressed thinking in this area by suggesting appropriate acceptability criteria for evaluating substantive trade-offs arising from proposed development, as well as process rules for how evaluations of acceptability should occur. However, there has been negligible uptake of these rules in practice. Overall, we argue that there is inadequate consideration of trade-offs, both process and substantive, throughout the sustainability assessment process, and insufficient considerations of how process decisions and compromises influence substantive outcomes. This paper presents a framework for understanding and managing both process and substantive trade-offs within each step of a typical sustainability assessment process. The framework draws together previously published literature and offers case studies that illustrate aspects of the practical application of the framework. The framing and design of sustainability assessment are vitally important, as process compromises or trade-offs can have substantive consequences in terms of sustainability outcomes delivered, with the choice of alternatives considered being a particularly significant determinant of substantive outcomes. The demarcation of acceptable from unacceptable impacts is a key aspect of managing trade-offs. Offsets can be considered as a form of trade-off within a category of sustainability that are utilised to enhance preferred alternatives once conditions of impact acceptability have been met. In this way they may enable net gains to be delivered; another imperative

  17. Reproduction–Immunity Trade-Offs in Insects

    PubMed Central

    Schwenke, Robin A.; Lazzaro, Brian P.; Wolfner, Mariana F.

    2017-01-01

    Immune defense and reproduction are physiologically and energetically demanding processes and have been observed to trade off in a diversity of female insects. Increased reproductive effort results in reduced immunity, and reciprocally, infection and activation of the immune system reduce reproductive output. This trade-off can manifest at the physiological level (within an individual) and at the evolutionary level (genetic distinction among individuals in a population). The resource allocation model posits that the trade-off arises because of competition for one or more limiting resources, and we hypothesize that pleiotropic signaling mechanisms regulate allocation of that resource between reproductive and immune processes. We examine the role of juvenile hormone, 20-hydroxyecdysone, and insulin/insulin-like growth factor-like signaling in regulating both oogenesis and immune system activity, and propose a signaling network that may mechanistically regulate the trade-off. Finally, we discuss implications of the trade-off in an ecological and evolutionary context. PMID:26667271

  18. Reproduction-Immunity Trade-Offs in Insects.

    PubMed

    Schwenke, Robin A; Lazzaro, Brian P; Wolfner, Mariana F

    2016-01-01

    Immune defense and reproduction are physiologically and energetically demanding processes and have been observed to trade off in a diversity of female insects. Increased reproductive effort results in reduced immunity, and reciprocally, infection and activation of the immune system reduce reproductive output. This trade-off can manifest at the physiological level (within an individual) and at the evolutionary level (genetic distinction among individuals in a population). The resource allocation model posits that the trade-off arises because of competition for one or more limiting resources, and we hypothesize that pleiotropic signaling mechanisms regulate allocation of that resource between reproductive and immune processes. We examine the role of juvenile hormone, 20-hydroxyecdysone, and insulin/insulin-like growth factor-like signaling in regulating both oogenesis and immune system activity, and propose a signaling network that may mechanistically regulate the trade-off. Finally, we discuss implications of the trade-off in an ecological and evolutionary context.

  19. Synergies and trade-offs in achieving global biodiversity targets.

    PubMed

    Di Marco, Moreno; Butchart, Stuart H M; Visconti, Piero; Buchanan, Graeme M; Ficetola, Gentile F; Rondinini, Carlo

    2016-02-01

    species (Target 12). Synergies between targets must be identified and secured soon and trade-offs must be minimized before the options for co-benefits are reduced by human pressures.

  20. Quantifying ecosystem service trade-offs: the case of an urban floodplain in Vienna, Austria.

    PubMed

    Sanon, Samai; Hein, Thomas; Douven, Wim; Winkler, Peter

    2012-11-30

    Wetland ecosystems provide multiple functions and services for the well-being of humans. In urban environments, planning and decision making about wetland restoration inevitably involves conflicting objectives, trade-offs, uncertainties and conflicting value judgments. This study applied trade-off and multi criteria decision analysis to analyze and quantify the explicit trade-offs between the stakeholder's objectives related to management options for the restoration of an urban floodplain, the Lobau, in Vienna, Austria. The Lobau has been disconnected from the main channel of the Danube River through flood protection schemes 130 years ago that have reduced the hydraulic exchange processes. Urban expansion has also changed the adjacent areas and led to increased numbers of visitors, which hampers the maximum potential for ecosystem development and exerts additional pressure on the sensitive habitats in the national park area. The study showed that increased hydraulic connectivity would benefit several stakeholders that preferred the ecological development of the floodplain habitats. However, multiple uses including fishery, agriculture and recreation, exploring the maximum potential in line with national park regulations, were also possible under the increased hydraulic connectivity options. The largest trade-offs were quantified to be at 0.50 score between the ecological condition of the aquatic habitats and the drinking water production and 0.49 score between the ecological condition of the terrestrial habitats and the drinking water production. At this point, the drinking water production was traded-off with 0.40 score, while the ecological condition of the aquatic habitats and the ecological condition of the terrestrial habitats were traded off with 0.30 and 0.23 score, respectively. The majority of the stakeholders involved preferred the management options that increased the hydraulic connectivity compared with the current situation which was not preferred by

  1. Balanced pressure gerotor fuel pump

    DOEpatents

    Raney, Michael Raymond; Maier, Eugen

    2004-08-03

    A gerotor pump for pressurizing gasoline fuel is capable of developing pressures up to 2.0 MPa with good mechanical and volumetric efficiency and satisfying the durability requirements for an automotive fuel pump. The pump has been designed with optimized clearances and by including features that promote the formation of lubricating films of pressurized fuel. Features of the improved pump include the use of a shadow port in the side plate opposite the outlet port to promote balancing of high fuel pressures on the opposite sides of the rotors. Inner and outer rotors have predetermined side clearances with the clearances of the outer rotor being greater than those of the inner rotor in order to promote fuel pressure balance on the sides of the outer rotor. Support of the inner rotor and a drive shaft on a single bushing with bearing sleeves maintains concentricity. Additional features are disclosed.

  2. Mechanistic links between cellular trade-offs, gene expression, and growth

    PubMed Central

    Oyarzún, Diego A.; Danos, Vincent; Swain, Peter S.

    2015-01-01

    Intracellular processes rarely work in isolation but continually interact with the rest of the cell. In microbes, for example, we now know that gene expression across the whole genome typically changes with growth rate. The mechanisms driving such global regulation, however, are not well understood. Here we consider three trade-offs that, because of limitations in levels of cellular energy, free ribosomes, and proteins, are faced by all living cells and we construct a mechanistic model that comprises these trade-offs. Our model couples gene expression with growth rate and growth rate with a growing population of cells. We show that the model recovers Monod’s law for the growth of microbes and two other empirical relationships connecting growth rate to the mass fraction of ribosomes. Further, we can explain growth-related effects in dosage compensation by paralogs and predict host–circuit interactions in synthetic biology. Simulating competitions between strains, we find that the regulation of metabolic pathways may have evolved not to match expression of enzymes to levels of extracellular substrates in changing environments but rather to balance a trade-off between exploiting one type of nutrient over another. Although coarse-grained, the trade-offs that the model embodies are fundamental, and, as such, our modeling framework has potentially wide application, including in both biotechnology and medicine. PMID:25695966

  3. Reproduction-longevity trade-offs reflect diet, not adaptation.

    PubMed

    Attisano, A; Moore, A J; Moore, P J

    2012-05-01

    A tenet of life history evolution is that allocation of limited resources results in trade-offs, such as that between reproduction and lifespan. Reproduction and lifespan are also influenced proximately by differences in the availability of specific nutrients. What is unknown is how the evolution of the ability to use a nutritionally novel diet is reflected in this fundamental trade-off. Does the evolution of the ability to use a nutritionally novel food maintain the trade-off in reproduction and longevity, or do the proximate effects of nutrition alter the adapted trade-off? We tested this by measuring trade-offs in male milkweed bugs, Oncopeltus fasciatus, fed either an adapted diet of sunflower or the ancestral diet of milkweed. Sunflower-fed males lived longer but invested less in reproduction, both in mating and fertility. Milkweed-fed males invested in both mating and fertility at the expense of survival. The evolution of an expanded diet was not constrained by the existing trade-off, but instead was accompanied by a different trade-off between reproduction and longevity. We suggest that this occurs because diets differ in promoting germ line development or longevity.

  4. The Grayscale/Spatial Resolution Trade-Off and Its Impact on Display System Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gille, Jennifer; Larimer, Jim; Martin, Russel; Statler, Irving C. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    We examine technology trade-offs related to the grayscale/spatial resolution trade-off for AMLCD-based display systems. We present new empirical results from our study of the human grayscale/spatial resolution trade-off.

  5. Environmental trade-offs of tunnels vs cut-and-cover subways

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walton, M.

    1978-01-01

    Heavy construction projects in cities entail two kinds of cost - internal cost, which can be defined in terms of payments from one set of parties to another, and external cost, which is the cost borne by the community at large as the result of disutilities entailed in construction and operation. Environmental trade-offs involve external costs, which are commonly difficult to measure. Cut-and-cover subway construction probably entails higher external and internal cost than deep tunnel construction in many urban geological environments, but uncertainty concerning the costs and environmental trade-offs of tunneling leads to limited and timid use of tunneling by American designers. Thus uncertainty becomes a major trade-off which works against tunneling. The reverse is true in Sweden after nearly 30 years of subway construction. Econometric methods for measuring external costs exist in principle, but are limited in application. Economic theory based on market pressure does not address the real problem of urban environmental trade-offs. Nevertheless, the problem of uncertainty can be addressed by comparative studies of estimated and as-built costs of cut-and-cover vs tunnel projects and a review of environmental issues associated with such construction. Such a study would benefit the underground construction industry and the design of transportation systems. It would also help solve an aspect of the urban problem. ?? 1978.

  6. Trade-Offs Between Plant Growth and Defense Against Insect Herbivory: An Emerging Mechanistic Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Züst, Tobias; Agrawal, Anurag A

    2017-04-28

    Costs of defense are central to our understanding of interactions between organisms and their environment, and defensive phenotypes of plants have long been considered to be constrained by trade-offs that reflect the allocation of limiting resources. Recent advances in uncovering signal transduction networks have revealed that defense trade-offs are often the result of regulatory "decisions" by the plant, enabling it to fine-tune its phenotype in response to diverse environmental challenges. We place these results in the context of classic studies in ecology and evolutionary biology, and propose a unifying framework for growth-defense trade-offs as a means to study the plant's allocation of limiting resources. Pervasive physiological costs constrain the upper limit to growth and defense traits, but the diversity of selective pressures on plants often favors negative correlations at intermediate trait levels. Despite the ubiquity of underlying costs of defense, the current challenge is using physiological and molecular approaches to predict the conditions where they manifest as detectable trade-offs.

  7. Trade-offs between predation risk and forage differ between migrant strategies in a migratory ungulate.

    PubMed

    Hebblewhite, Mark; Merrill, Evelyn H

    2009-12-01

    Trade-offs between predation risk and forage fundamentally drive resource selection by animals. Among migratory ungulates, trade-offs can occur at large spatial scales through migration, which allows an "escape" from predation, but trade-offs can also occur at finer spatial scales. Previous authors suggest that ungulates will avoid predation risk at the largest scale, although few studies have examined multi-scale trade-offs to test for the relative benefits of risk avoidance across scales. Building on previously developed spatial models of forage and wolf predation risk, we tested for trade-offs at the broad landscape scale and at a finer, within-home-range scale for migratory and non-migratory resident elk (Cervus elaphus) during summer in the Canadian Rockies in Banff National Park (BNP) and adjacent Alberta, Canada. Migration reduced exposure to wolf predation risk by 70% relative to residents at the landscape scale; at the fine scale, migrants used areas that were, on average, 6% higher in forage digestibility. In contrast, by forgoing migration, resident elk were exposed to higher predation risk, but they reduced predation risk at fine scales to only 15% higher than migrants by using areas close to human activity, which wolves avoided. Thus, residents paid for trying to avoid predation risk with lower forage quality. Residents may have been able to compensate, however, by using areas of abundant forage close to human activity where they may have been able to forage more selectively while avoiding predation risk. Human activity effectively decoupled the positive correlation between high forage quality and wolf predation, providing an effective alternate strategy for residents, similar to recent findings in other systems. Although ungulates appear capable of balancing risk and forage at different spatial scales, risk avoidance at large landscape scales may be more effective in the absence of human-caused refugia from predation.

  8. Trade-off Mechanisms Shaping the Diversity of Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Ferenci, Thomas

    2016-03-01

    Strain-to-strain variations in bacterial biofilm formation, metabolism, motility, virulence, evolvability, DNA repair and resistance (to phage, antibiotics, or environmental stresses) each contribute to bacterial diversity. Microbiologists should be aware that all of these traits are subject to constraints imposed by trade-offs, so adaptations improving one trait may be at the cost of another. A deeper appreciation of trade-offs is thus crucial for assessing the mechanistic limits on important bacterial characteristics. Studies of the negative correlations between various traits have revealed three molecular mechanisms, namely, trade-offs involving resource allocation, design constraint, and information processing. This review further discusses why these trade-off mechanisms are important in the establishment of models capable of predicting bacterial competition, coexistence, and sources of diversity.

  9. The patient who falls: "It's always a trade-off".

    PubMed

    Tinetti, Mary E; Kumar, Chandrika

    2010-01-20

    Falls are common health events that cause discomfort and disability for older adults and stress for caregivers. Using the case of an older man who has experienced multiple falls and a hip fracture, this article, which focuses on community-living older adults, addresses the consequences and etiology of falls; summarizes the evidence on predisposing factors and effective interventions; and discusses how to translate this evidence into patient care. Previous falls; strength, gait, and balance impairments; and medications are the strongest risk factors for falling. Effective single interventions include exercise and physical therapy, cataract surgery, and medication reduction. Evidence suggests that the most effective strategy for reducing the rate of falling in community-living older adults may be intervening on multiple risk factors. Vitamin D has the strongest clinical trial evidence of benefit for preventing fractures among older men at risk. Issues involved in incorporating these evidence-based fall prevention interventions into outpatient practice are discussed, as are the trade-offs inherent in managing older patients at risk of falling. While challenges and barriers exist, fall prevention strategies can be incorporated into clinical practice.

  10. Trade-offs across space, time, and ecosystem services

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rodriguez, J.P.; Beard, T.D.; Bennett, E.M.; Cumming, Graeme S.; Cork, S.J.; Agard, J.; Dobson, A.P.; Peterson, G.D.

    2006-01-01

    Ecosystem service (ES) trade-offs arise from management choices made by humans, which can change the type, magnitude, and relative mix of services provided by ecosystems. Trade-offs occur when the provision of one ES is reduced as a consequence of increased use of another ES. In some cases, a trade-off may be an explicit choice; but in others, trade-offs arise without premeditation or even awareness that they are taking place. Trade-offs in ES can be classified along three axes: spatial scale, temporal scale, and reversibility. Spatial scale refers to whether the effects of the trade-off are felt locally or at a distant location. Temporal scale refers to whether the effects take place relatively rapidly or slowly. Reversibility expresses the likelihood that the perturbed ES may return to its original state if the perturbation ceases. Across all four Millennium Ecosystem Assessment scenarios and selected case study examples, trade-off decisions show a preference for provisioning, regulating, or cultural services (in that order). Supporting services are more likely to be "taken for granted." Cultural ES are almost entirely unquantified in scenario modeling; therefore, the calculated model results do not fully capture losses of these services that occur in the scenarios. The quantitative scenario models primarily capture the services that are perceived by society as more important - provisioning and regulating ecosystem services - and thus do not fully capture trade-offs of cultural and supporting services. Successful management policies will be those that incorporate lessons learned from prior decisions into future management actions. Managers should complement their actions with monitoring programs that, in addition to monitoring the short-term provisions of services, also monitor the long-term evolution of slowly changing variables. Policies can then be developed to take into account ES trade-offs at multiple spatial and temporal scales. Successful strategies will

  11. Acknowledging conservation trade-offs and embracing complexity.

    PubMed

    Hirsch, Paul D; Adams, William M; Brosius, J Peter; Zia, Asim; Bariola, Nino; Dammert, Juan Luis

    2011-04-01

    There is a growing recognition that conservation often entails trade-offs. A focus on trade-offs can open the way to more complete consideration of the variety of positive and negative effects associated with conservation initiatives. In analyzing and working through conservation trade-offs, however, it is important to embrace the complexities inherent in the social context of conservation. In particular, it is important to recognize that the consequences of conservation activities are experienced, perceived, and understood differently from different perspectives, and that these perspectives are embedded in social systems and preexisting power relations. We illustrate the role of trade-offs in conservation and the complexities involved in understanding them with recent debates surrounding REDD (Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Degradation), a global conservation policy designed to create incentives to reduce tropical deforestation. Often portrayed in terms of the multiple benefits it may provide: poverty alleviation, biodiversity conservation, and climate-change mitigation; REDD may involve substantial trade-offs. The gains of REDD may be associated with a reduction in incentives for industrialized countries to decrease carbon emissions; relocation of deforestation to places unaffected by REDD; increased inequality in places where people who make their livelihood from forests have insecure land tenure; loss of biological and cultural diversity that does not directly align with REDD measurement schemes; and erosion of community-based means of protecting forests. We believe it is important to acknowledge the potential trade-offs involved in conservation initiatives such as REDD and to examine these trade-offs in an open and integrative way that includes a variety of tools, methods, and points of view. ©2010 Society for Conservation Biology.

  12. A Trade-Off Study Revealing Nested Timescales of Constraint

    PubMed Central

    Wijnants, M. L.; Cox, R. F. A.; Hasselman, F.; Bosman, A. M. T.; Van Orden, G.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates human performance in a cyclic Fitts task at three different scales of observation, either in the presence (difficult condition) or in the absence (easy condition) of a speed–accuracy trade-off. At the fastest scale, the harmonicity of the back and forth movements, which reflects the dissipation of mechanical energy, was measured within the timeframe of single trials. At an intermediate scale, speed and accuracy measures were determined over a trial. The slowest scale pertains to the temporal structure of movement variability, which evolves over multiple trials. In the difficult condition, reliable correlations across each of the measures corroborated a coupling of nested scales of performance. Participants who predominantly emphasized the speed-side of the trade-off (despite the instruction to be both fast and accurate) produced more harmonic movements and clearer 1/f scaling in the produced movement time series, but were less accurate and produced more random variability in the produced movement amplitudes (vice versa for more accurate participants). This implied that speed–accuracy trade-off was accompanied by a trade-off between temporal and spatial streams of 1/f scaling, as confirmed by entropy measures. In the easy condition, however, no trade-offs nor couplings among scales of performance were observed. Together, these results suggest that 1/f scaling is more than just a byproduct of cognition. These findings rather support the claim that interaction-dominant dynamics constitute a coordinative basis for goal-directed behavior. PMID:22654760

  13. Generalist–specialist trade-off during thermal acclimation

    PubMed Central

    Seebacher, Frank; Ducret, Varlérie; Little, Alexander G.; Adriaenssens, Bart

    2015-01-01

    The shape of performance curves and their plasticity define how individuals and populations respond to environmental variability. In theory, maximum performance decreases with an increase in performance breadth. However, reversible acclimation may counteract this generalist–specialist trade-off, because performance optima track environmental conditions so that there is no benefit of generalist phenotypes. We tested this hypothesis by acclimating individual mosquitofish (Gambusia holbrooki) to cool and warm temperatures consecutively and measuring performance curves of swimming performance after each acclimation treatment. Individuals from the same population differed significantly in performance maxima, performance breadth and the capacity for acclimation. As predicted, acclimation resulted in a shift of the temperature at which maximal performance occurred. Within acclimation treatments, there was a significant generalist–specialist trade-off in responses to acute temperature change. Surprisingly, however, there was also a trade-off across acclimation treatments, and animals with greater capacity for cold acclimation had lower performance maxima under warm conditions. Hence, cold acclimation may be viewed as a generalist strategy that extends performance breadth at the colder seasons, but comes at the cost of reduced performance at the warmer time of year. Acclimation therefore does not counteract a generalist–specialist trade-off and, at least in mosquitofish, the trade-off seems to be a system property that persists despite phenotypic plasticity. PMID:26064581

  14. Quantum trade-off coding for bosonic communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilde, Mark M.; Hayden, Patrick; Guha, Saikat

    2012-12-01

    The trade-off capacity region of a quantum channel characterizes the optimal net rates at which a sender can communicate classical, quantum, and entangled bits to a receiver by exploiting many independent uses of the channel, along with the help of the same resources. Similarly, one can consider a trade-off capacity region when the noiseless resources are public, private, and secret-key bits. We identified [see Wilde, Hayden, and Guha, Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.108.140501 108, 140501 (2012)] these trade-off rate regions for the pure-loss bosonic channel and proved that they are optimal provided that a long-standing minimum-output entropy conjecture is true. Additionally, we showed that the performance gains of a trade-off coding strategy when compared to a time-sharing strategy can be quite significant. In this paper, we provide detailed derivations of the results announced there, and we extend the application of these ideas to thermal-noise and amplifying bosonic channels. We also derive a “rule of thumb” for trade-off coding, which determines how to allocate photons in a coding strategy if a large mean photon number is available at the channel input. Our results on the amplifying bosonic channel also apply to the “Unruh channel” considered in the context of relativistic quantum information theory.

  15. Constraints, Trade-offs and the Currency of Fitness.

    PubMed

    Acerenza, Luis

    2016-03-01

    Understanding evolutionary trajectories remains a difficult task. This is because natural evolutionary processes are simultaneously affected by various types of constraints acting at the different levels of biological organization. Of particular importance are constraints where correlated changes occur in opposite directions, called trade-offs. Here we review and classify the main evolutionary constraints and trade-offs, operating at all levels of trait hierarchy. Special attention is given to life history trade-offs and the conflict between the survival and reproduction components of fitness. Cellular mechanisms underlying fitness trade-offs are described. At the metabolic level, a linear trade-off between growth and flux variability was found, employing bacterial genome-scale metabolic reconstructions. Its analysis indicates that flux variability can be considered as the currency of fitness. This currency is used for fitness transfer between fitness components during adaptations. Finally, a discussion is made regarding the constraints which limit the increase in the amount of fitness currency during evolution, suggesting that occupancy constraints are probably the main restrictions.

  16. Atomic Layer Etching of Silicon to Solve ARDE-Selectivity-Profile-Uniformity Trade-Offs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Mingmei; Ranjan, Alok; Ventzek, Peter; Koshiishi, Akira

    2014-10-01

    With shrinking critical dimensions, dry etch faces more and more challenges. Minimizing each of aspect ratio dependent etching (ARDE), bowing, undercut, selectivity, and within die uniformly across a wafer are met by trading off one requirement against another. At the root of the problem is that roles radical flux, ion flux and ion energy play may be both good and bad. Increasing one parameter helps meeting one requirement but hinders meeting the other. Self-limiting processes like atomic layer etching (ALE) promise a way to escape the problem of balancing trade-offs. ALE was realized in the mid-1990s but the industrial implementation has been slow. In recent years interest in ALE has revived. We present how ARDE, bowing/selectivity trade-offs may be overcome by varying radical/ion ratio, byproduct re-deposition. We overcome many of the practical implementation issues associated with ALE by precise passivation process control. The Monte Carlo Feature Profile Model (MCFPM) is used to illustrate realistic scenarios built around an Ar/Cl2 chemistry driven etch of Si masked by SiO2. We demonstrate that ALE can achieve zero ARDE and infinite selectivity. Profile control depends on careful management of the ion energies and angles. For ALE to be realized in production environment, tight control of IAD is a necessary. Experimental results are compared with simulation results to provide context to the work.

  17. Metabolic Trade-offs in Yeast are Caused by F1F0-ATP synthase

    PubMed Central

    Nilsson, Avlant; Nielsen, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Intermediary metabolism provides living cells with free energy and precursor metabolites required for synthesizing proteins, lipids, RNA and other cellular constituents, and it is highly conserved among living species. Only a fraction of cellular protein can, however, be allocated to enzymes of intermediary metabolism and consequently metabolic trade-offs may take place. One such trade-off, aerobic fermentation, occurs in both yeast (the Crabtree effect) and cancer cells (the Warburg effect) and has been a scientific challenge for decades. Here we show, using flux balance analysis combined with in vitro measured enzyme specific activities, that fermentation is more catalytically efficient than respiration, i.e. it produces more ATP per protein mass. And that the switch to fermentation at high growth rates therefore is a consequence of a high ATP production rate, provided by a limited pool of enzymes. The catalytic efficiency is also higher for cells grown on glucose compared to galactose and ethanol, which may explain the observed differences in their growth rates. The enzyme F1F0-ATP synthase (Complex V) was found to have flux control over respiration in the model, and since it is evolutionary conserved, we expect the trade-off to occur in organisms from all kingdoms of life. PMID:26928598

  18. Analysis of self-overlap reveals trade-offs in plankton swimming trajectories.

    PubMed

    Bianco, Giuseppe; Mariani, Patrizio; Visser, Andre W; Mazzocchi, Maria Grazia; Pigolotti, Simone

    2014-07-06

    Movement is a fundamental behaviour of organisms that not only brings about beneficial encounters with resources and mates, but also at the same time exposes the organism to dangerous encounters with predators. The movement patterns adopted by organisms should reflect a balance between these contrasting processes. This trade-off can be hypothesized as being evident in the behaviour of plankton, which inhabit a dilute three-dimensional environment with few refuges or orienting landmarks. We present an analysis of the swimming path geometries based on a volumetric Monte Carlo sampling approach, which is particularly adept at revealing such trade-offs by measuring the self-overlap of the trajectories. Application of this method to experimentally measured trajectories reveals that swimming patterns in copepods are shaped to efficiently explore volumes at small scales, while achieving a large overlap at larger scales. Regularities in the observed trajectories make the transition between these two regimes always sharper than in randomized trajectories or as predicted by random walk theory. Thus, real trajectories present a stronger separation between exploration for food and exposure to predators. The specific scale and features of this transition depend on species, gender and local environmental conditions, pointing at adaptation to state and stage-dependent evolutionary trade-offs.

  19. Expectant parents' preferences for mode of delivery and trade-offs of outcomes for breech presentation.

    PubMed

    Kok, Marjolein; Gravendeel, Lonneke; Opmeer, Brent C; van der Post, Joris A M; Mol, Ben W J

    2008-08-01

    To assess patients' preferences and trade-offs for mode of delivery in case of breech presentation at term. Eighty women (40 with a foetus in breech presentation and 40 with a foetus in cephalic presentation) with a gestational age from 36 weeks onwards were offered scenarios of vaginal and caesarean breech delivery in which 1-month and 2-year neonatal and maternal complication rates were varied; expectant fathers (when present) were interviewed separately. Thresholds for complication rates where patients switch preferences were visualised graphically in trade-off curves. Differences in preference thresholds were tested using the Wilcoxon signed ranks test. Caesarean delivery was the preferred mode of delivery for breech presentation in 65% of the patients interviewed. The trade-off questions showed that the 2-year neonatal outcome after breech delivery was the most important outcome for the mothers, whereas the fathers were more influenced by the maternal outcome. When realistic assumptions for complications are made, most women prefer a caesarean delivery over vaginal delivery for at term breech presentation. In the balance of pros and cons, 2-year neonatal outcome is the most important factor in the decision between caesarean and vaginal delivery. The results of this study can be used by the clinician to help patients weigh risk, benefit, and potential harm with regard to breech delivery.

  20. Faster reproductive rates trade off against offspring growth in wild chimpanzees

    PubMed Central

    Emery Thompson, Melissa; Muller, Martin N.; Sabbi, Kris; Machanda, Zarin P.; Otali, Emily; Wrangham, Richard W.

    2016-01-01

    Life history theory predicts a trade-off between offspring quality and quantity. Among large-bodied mammals, prolonged lactation and infant dependence suggest particularly strong potential for a quality–quantity trade-off to exist. Humans are one of the only such species to have been examined, providing mixed evidence under a peculiar set of circumstances, including extensive nutritional provisioning by nonmothers and extrasomatic wealth transmission. Here, we examine trade-offs between reproductive rate and one aspect of offspring quality (body size) in wild chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes schweinfurthii), a species with long periods of infant dependence and little direct provisioning. Juvenile lean body mass, estimated using urinary creatinine excretion, was positively associated with the interval to the next sibling’s birth. These effects persisted into adolescence and were not moderated by maternal identity. Maternal depletion could not explain poor offspring growth, as older mothers had larger offspring, and low maternal energy balance during lactation predicted larger, not smaller, juvenile size. Instead, our data suggest that offspring growth suffers when mothers wean early to invest in new reproductive efforts. These findings indicate that chimpanzee mothers with the resources to do so prioritize production of new offspring over prolonged investment in current offspring. PMID:27354523

  1. Uncertainty analysis of trade-offs between multiple responses using hypervolume

    DOE PAGES

    Cao, Yongtao; Lu, Lu; Anderson-Cook, Christine M.

    2017-08-04

    When multiple responses are considered in process optimization, the degree to which they can be simultaneously optimized depends on the optimization objectives and the amount of trade-offs between the responses. The normalized hypervolume of the Pareto front is a useful summary to quantify the amount of trade-offs required to balance performance across the multiple responses. In order to quantify the impact of uncertainty of the estimated response surfaces and add realism to what future data to expect, 2 versions of the scaled normalized hypervolume of the Pareto front are presented. To demonstrate the variation of the hypervolume distributions, we exploremore » a case study for a chemical process involving 3 responses, each with a different type of optimization goal. Our results show that the global normalized hypervolume characterizes the proximity to the ideal results possible, while the instance-specific summary considers the richness of the front and the severity of trade-offs between alternatives. Furthermore, the 2 scaling schemes complement each other and highlight different features of the Pareto front and hence are useful to quantify what solutions are possible for simultaneous optimization of multiple responses.« less

  2. Feather bacterial load shapes the trade-off between preening and immunity in pigeons.

    PubMed

    Leclaire, Sarah; Czirják, Gábor Árpád; Hammouda, Abdessalem; Gasparini, Julien

    2015-04-07

    Complex communities of bacteria inhabit the feathers of all birds. Under normal conditions, individuals maintain a healthy state by defending themselves against these potential invaders by preening. The immune system is only triggered when bacteria gain access into the body. Preening is, however, costly and may trade-off with investment in the immune system. To shed light on how birds balance the trade-off between immunity and preen secretions when facing high or low feather bacterial load, we experimentally manipulated feather bacteria load of feral pigeons (Columba livia), and investigated the effects on immune defenses. Birds facing high feather bacterial load had lower immune response to PHA skin-swelling test (a measure of induced pro-inflammatory capacity) than controls, while birds facing low feather bacterial load had higher blood bacterial killing ability (a measure of the capacity to eliminate bacterial pathogens) than controls. No other components of the immune system (i.e., hemagglutination and hemolysis capacity of plasma, primary and secondary responses to KLH and quantity of blood parasites) were found to be affected by feather bacterial load. Pigeons had previously been shown to adjust preening to feather bacterial load. The decrease in the energetically costly inflammatory response of birds experiencing high bacterial load suggests a trade-off between investment in preen secretion and immunity and reinforces the idea that feather microbiota may have a strong impact on the ecology and evolution of the avian host.

  3. Analysis of self-overlap reveals trade-offs in plankton swimming trajectories

    PubMed Central

    Bianco, Giuseppe; Mariani, Patrizio; Visser, Andre W.; Mazzocchi, Maria Grazia; Pigolotti, Simone

    2014-01-01

    Movement is a fundamental behaviour of organisms that not only brings about beneficial encounters with resources and mates, but also at the same time exposes the organism to dangerous encounters with predators. The movement patterns adopted by organisms should reflect a balance between these contrasting processes. This trade-off can be hypothesized as being evident in the behaviour of plankton, which inhabit a dilute three-dimensional environment with few refuges or orienting landmarks. We present an analysis of the swimming path geometries based on a volumetric Monte Carlo sampling approach, which is particularly adept at revealing such trade-offs by measuring the self-overlap of the trajectories. Application of this method to experimentally measured trajectories reveals that swimming patterns in copepods are shaped to efficiently explore volumes at small scales, while achieving a large overlap at larger scales. Regularities in the observed trajectories make the transition between these two regimes always sharper than in randomized trajectories or as predicted by random walk theory. Thus, real trajectories present a stronger separation between exploration for food and exposure to predators. The specific scale and features of this transition depend on species, gender and local environmental conditions, pointing at adaptation to state and stage-dependent evolutionary trade-offs. PMID:24789560

  4. Size evolution in microorganisms masks trade-offs predicted by the growth rate hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Gounand, Isabelle; Daufresne, Tanguy; Gravel, Dominique; Bouvier, Corinne; Bouvier, Thierry; Combe, Marine; Gougat-Barbera, Claire; Poly, Franck; Torres-Barceló, Clara; Mouquet, Nicolas

    2016-12-28

    Adaptation to local resource availability depends on responses in growth rate and nutrient acquisition. The growth rate hypothesis (GRH) suggests that growing fast should impair competitive abilities for phosphorus and nitrogen due to high demand for biosynthesis. However, in microorganisms, size influences both growth and uptake rates, which may mask trade-offs and instead generate a positive relationship between these traits (size hypothesis, SH). Here, we evolved a gradient of maximum growth rate (μmax) from a single bacterium ancestor to test the relationship among μmax, competitive ability for nutrients and cell size, while controlling for evolutionary history. We found a strong positive correlation between μmax and competitive ability for phosphorus, associated with a trade-off between μmax and cell size: strains selected for high μmax were smaller and better competitors for phosphorus. Our results strongly support the SH, while the trade-offs expected under GRH were not apparent. Beyond plasticity, unicellular populations can respond rapidly to selection pressure through joint evolution of their size and maximum growth rate. Our study stresses that physiological links between these traits tightly shape the evolution of competitive strategies.

  5. Thermal performance trade-offs for point focusing solar collectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wen, L.

    1978-01-01

    Solar thermal conversion performance is assessed in this paper for representative point focusing distributed systems. Trade-off comparisons are made in terms of concentrator quality, solar receiver operating temperature, and power conversion efficiency. Normalized system performance is presented on a unit concentrator area basis for integrated annual electric energy production.

  6. Information trade-offs for optical quantum communication.

    PubMed

    Wilde, Mark M; Hayden, Patrick; Guha, Saikat

    2012-04-06

    Recent work has precisely characterized the achievable trade-offs between three key information processing tasks-classical communication (generation or consumption), quantum communication (generation or consumption), and shared entanglement (distribution or consumption), measured in bits, qubits, and ebits per channel use, respectively. Slices and corner points of this three-dimensional region reduce to well-known protocols for quantum channels. A trade-off coding technique can attain any point in the region and can outperform time sharing between the best-known protocols for accomplishing each information processing task by itself. Previously, the benefits of trade-off coding that had been found were too small to be of practical value (viz., for the dephasing and the universal cloning machine channels). In this Letter, we demonstrate that the associated performance gains are in fact remarkably high for several physically relevant bosonic channels that model free-space or fiber-optic links, thermal-noise channels, and amplifiers. We show that significant performance gains from trade-off coding also apply when trading photon-number resources between transmitting public and private classical information simultaneously over secret-key-assisted bosonic channels.

  7. Information Trade-Offs for Optical Quantum Communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilde, Mark M.; Hayden, Patrick; Guha, Saikat

    2012-04-01

    Recent work has precisely characterized the achievable trade-offs between three key information processing tasks—classical communication (generation or consumption), quantum communication (generation or consumption), and shared entanglement (distribution or consumption), measured in bits, qubits, and ebits per channel use, respectively. Slices and corner points of this three-dimensional region reduce to well-known protocols for quantum channels. A trade-off coding technique can attain any point in the region and can outperform time sharing between the best-known protocols for accomplishing each information processing task by itself. Previously, the benefits of trade-off coding that had been found were too small to be of practical value (viz., for the dephasing and the universal cloning machine channels). In this Letter, we demonstrate that the associated performance gains are in fact remarkably high for several physically relevant bosonic channels that model free-space or fiber-optic links, thermal-noise channels, and amplifiers. We show that significant performance gains from trade-off coding also apply when trading photon-number resources between transmitting public and private classical information simultaneously over secret-key-assisted bosonic channels.

  8. Managing trade-offs in landscape restoration and revegetation projects.

    PubMed

    Maron, Martine; Cockfield, Geoff

    2008-12-01

    Landscape restoration projects often have multiple and disparate conservation, resource enhancement, and sometimes economic objectives, since projects that seek to meet more than one objective tend to be viewed more positively by funding agencies and the community. The degree to which there are trade-offs among desired objectives is an important variable for decision makers, yet this is rarely explicitly considered. In particular, the existence of ecological thresholds has important implications for decision-making at both the project level and the regional level. We develop a model of the possibilities and choices for an agency seeking to achieve two environmental objectives in a region through revegetation of a number of sites. A graphical model of the production possibilities sets for a single revegetation project is developed, and different trade-off relationships are discussed and illustrated. Then the model is used to demonstrate the possibilities for managing all such projects within a region. We show that, where there are thresholds in the trade-off relationship between two objectives, specialization (single- or dominant-objective projects) should be considered. This is illustrated using a case study in which revegetation is used to meet avian biodiversity and salinity mitigation objectives. We conclude that where there are sufficient scientific data, explicit consideration of different types of trade-offs can assist in making decisions about the most efficient mix and type of projects to better achieve a range of objectives within a region.

  9. Unintended consequences and trade-offs of fish passage

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    8. McLaughlin, Robert L.; Smyth, Eric R.; Castro-Santos, Theodore; Jones, Michael L.; Koops, Marten A.; Pratt, Thomas C.; Vélez-Espino, Luis-Antonio

    2012-01-01

    We synthesized evidence for unintended consequences and trade-offs associated with the passage of fishes. Provisioning of fish passageways at dams and dam removals are being carried out increasingly as resource managers seek ways to reduce fragmentation of migratory fish populations and restore biodiversity and nature-like ecosystem services in tributaries altered by dams. The benefits of provisioning upstream passage are highlighted widely. Possible unwanted consequences and trade-offs of upstream passage are coming to light, but remain poorly examined and underappreciated. Unintended consequences arise when passage of native and desirable introduced fishes is delayed, undone (fallback), results in patterns of movement and habitat use that reduce Darwinian fitness (e.g. ecological traps), or is highly selective taxonomically and numerically. Trade-offs arise when passage decisions intended to benefit native species interfere with management decisions intended to control the unwanted spread of non-native fishes and aquatic invertebrates, or genes, diseases and contaminants carried by hatchery and wild fishes. These consequences and trade-offs will vary in importance from system to system and can result in large economic and environmental costs. For some river systems, decisions about how to manage fish passage involve substantial risks and could benefit from use of a formal, structured process that allows transparent, objective and, where possible, quantitative evaluation of these risks. Such a process can also facilitate the design of an adaptive framework that provides valuable insights into future decisions.

  10. Corporate Library Impact, Part II: Methodological Trade-Offs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edgar, William

    2004-01-01

    This article and its accompanying one address the corporate library's contribution to its parent firm. Part I reviews the literature on determining this contribution, revealing the need for a more theoretical approach to this problem. It then presents this approach. This article, Part II, reviews methodological trade-offs in pursuing this new…

  11. A Human Trade-off for Word Processing Specialists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrison, James L.

    1974-01-01

    Business educators must make students aware of the pitfalls in the current move toward office specialization in the word processing movement. The adoption of technological methodology can cause a human trade-off in which people become mere agents of machines. Business educators must begin to emphasize the needs of individuals. (SC)

  12. Equity-efficiency trade-offs in health technology assessment.

    PubMed

    Williams, Alan H; Cookson, Richard A

    2006-01-01

    Health technology assessment (HTA) currently focuses on efficiency, rather than equity, on the basis that its primary objective is to maximize population health. Yet a strict cost-effectiveness approach sometimes conflicts with important equity concerns, such as the reduction of socioeconomic health inequalities. Managing such equity-efficiency trade-offs on the basis of intuition is unsatisfactory in a democracy, as it arouses suspicions of special pleading and favoritism toward vested interests. Over the next few decades, therefore, decision making may progress through up to three further stages of development observed historically in other areas of resource allocation. Stage two involves case law, limited to principles distilled from precedent. Stage three involves codification, seeking to generalize these principles without specifying their relative weights. Finally, at stage four, quantitative trade-offs are incorporated into a formula. At stage four, deliberation centers on adjustments to the formula, which would then be applied impartially, transparently, and fair-mindedly to all future decisions. Methods already exist for valuing equity-efficiency trade-offs, based on established methodological principles for valuing trade-offs between different dimensions of health. Early findings indicate that the general public thinks that social class inequalities are more inequitable than those by smoking status, with inequalities between the sexes somewhere in between. Relative weights can be calculated from these data, although the data are not yet comprehensive enough to do this credibly for current policy purposes. In the mean time, the equity-efficiency trade-offs suggested by current decisions can be estimated using standard cost-effectiveness analysis. This is because every departure from a strict cost-effectiveness approach has an opportunity cost. The size of that opportunity cost is a test of how much weight a particular equity concern is deemed to merit.

  13. Exploration–exploitation trade-off features a saltatory search behaviour

    PubMed Central

    Volchenkov, Dimitri; Helbach, Jonathan; Tscherepanow, Marko; Kühnel, Sina

    2013-01-01

    Searching experiments conducted in different virtual environments over a gender-balanced group of people revealed a gender irrelevant scale-free spread of searching activity on large spatio-temporal scales. We have suggested and solved analytically a simple statistical model of the coherent-noise type describing the exploration–exploitation trade-off in humans (‘should I stay’ or ‘should I go’). The model exhibits a variety of saltatory behaviours, ranging from Lévy flights occurring under uncertainty to Brownian walks performed by a treasure hunter confident of the eventual success. PMID:23782535

  14. Design for manufacturability and optical performance trade-offs using precision glass molded aspheric lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Symmons, Alan; Huddleston, Jeremy; Knowles, Dennis

    2016-09-01

    Precision glass molding (PGM) enables high-performance, low-cost lens designs through aspheric shapes and a broad array of moldable glass types. While these benefits bring a high potential value, the design of PGM lenses must be skillfully approached to balance manufacturability and cost considerations. Different types of mold tooling and processes used by PGM suppliers can also lead to confusion regarding the manufacturing parameters and design rules that should be considered. The authors discuss the various factors that can affect manufacturability and cost of lenses made to PGM standards, and present a case study to demonstrate the trade-offs in performance.

  15. Trade-offs in host choice of an herbivorous insect based on parasitism and larval performance.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Shannon M; Loewy, Katrina J

    2015-11-01

    Herbivore diet breadth is predicted to evolve in response to both bottom-up and top-down selective pressures, including host plant abundance, quality and natural enemy pressure. As the relative importance and strength of interactions change over an herbivore's geographic range, local patterns of host plant use should change in response, altering local diet breadths. Fall webworm (Hyphantria cunea) is a widespread, polyphagous moth species that feeds on hundreds of plant species worldwide. Populations of fall webworm in Colorado remain polyphagous, but their diet breadth is restricted compared to other populations and thus present an ideal opportunity to test the ecological drivers of host use by a polyphagous herbivore. We investigated how host abundance, larval performance, and parasitism affect host use for fall webworm to test how these selective pressures may act individually or in concert, as well as the role of any trade-offs among fitness components, to explain diet breadth and host use. We found that host abundance was a significant predictor of host use, which suggests a selective pressure to reduce search time for oviposition sites by adult females. We also detected an important trade-off between bottom-up and top-down selective pressures: higher quality host plants also had a greater proportion of larval mortality due to parasitism. Local patterns of host plant abundance appear to narrow the set of hosts used by fall webworms in Colorado, while the trade-off between host quality and risk of parasitism helps explain the maintenance of a generalized feeding strategy within this restricted set of hosts.

  16. A Reference-Dependent Regret Model for Deterministic Trade-off Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Kujawski, Edouard

    2005-02-25

    Today's typical multi-criteria decision analysis is based on classical expected utility theory that assumes a mythical ''Rational Individual'' immune to psychological influences such as anticipated regret. It is therefore in conflict with rational individuals who trade-off some benefits and forgo the alternative with the highest total classical utility for a more balanced alternative in order to reduce their levels of anticipated regret. This paper focuses on decision making under certainty. It presents a reference-dependent regret model (RDRM) in which the level of regret that an individual experiences depends on the absolute values rather than the differences of the utilities of the chosen and forgone alternatives. The RDRM best choice may differ from the conventional linear additive utility model, the analytic hierarchy process, and the regret theory of Bell and Loomes and Sugden. Examples are presented that indicate that RDRM is the better predictive descriptor for decision making under certainty. RDRM satisfies transitivity of the alternatives under pairwise comparisons and models rank reversal consistent with observed reasonable choices under dynamic or distinct situations. Like regret theory, the RDRM utilities of all the alternatives under consideration are interrelated. For complex trade-off studies regret is incorporated as an element of a cost-utility-regret analysis that characterizes each alternative in terms of its monetary cost, an aggregate performance utility, and a regret value. This provides decision makers adequate information to compare the alternatives and depending on their values they may trade-off some performance and/or cost to avoid high levels of regret. The result is a well-balanced alternative often preferred by reasonable decision makers to the optimal choice of classical multi-attribute utility analysis. The model can readily be extended to incorporate rejoicing to suit decision makers who seek it. The approach is illustrated using a

  17. Why equalising trade-offs aren't always neutral.

    PubMed

    Turnbull, Lindsay A; Rees, Mark; Purves, Drew W

    2008-10-01

    Equalising trade-offs, such as seed mass vs. number, have been invoked to reconcile neutral theory with observed differences between species. This is an appealing explanation for the dramatic seed size variation seen within guilds of otherwise similar plants: under size-symmetric competition, where resource capture is proportional to mass, the outcome of competition should be insensitive to whether species produce many small seeds or few large ones. However, under this assumption, stochastic variation in seed rain leads to exclusion of all but the smallest-seeded species. Thus stochasticity in seed arrivals, a process that was previously thought to generate drift, instead results in deterministic competitive exclusion. A neutral outcome is possible under one special case of a more general equalising framework, where seed mass affects survival but not competition. Further exploration of the feasibility of neutral trade-offs is needed to understand the respective roles of neutrality and niche structure in community dynamics.

  18. Dosimetric trade-offs in breast treatment with VMAT technique.

    PubMed

    Fogliata, Antonella; Seppälä, Jan; Reggiori, Giacomo; Lobefalo, Francesca; Palumbo, Valentina; De Rose, Fiorenza; Franceschini, Davide; Scorsetti, Marta; Cozzi, Luca

    2017-02-01

    Breast planning with volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) has been explored, especially for left-sided breast treatments, with the primary intent of lowering the heart dose and improving target dose homogeneity. As a trade-off, larger healthy tissue volumes would receive low dose levels, with the potential risk of increasing late toxicities and secondary cancer induction, although no clinical data are available today to confirm the risk level. The scope of this work is to explore the dosimetric trade-offs using two different VMAT plans. Two planning strategies for dual-partial-arc VMAT, RA_avoid and RA_full, with and without avoidance sectors, were explored in a cohort of 20 patients, for whole left breast irradiation for 40.05 Gy to the mean target dose in 15 fractions. Common dose objectives included a stringent dose homogeneity, mean dose to the heart <5 Gy, ipsilateral lung (Ilung) <8 Gy, contralateral lung (Clung) <2 Gy and contralateral breast (Cbreast) <3 Gy. RA_full showed a better dose conformity, lower high-dose spillage in the healthy tissue and lower skin dose. RA_avoid presented a reduction of the mean doses for all critical structures: 51% to the heart, 12% to the Ilung, 81% to the Clung and 73% to the Cbreast. All differences were significant with p < 0.0001. The adaptation of VMAT options to planning objectives reduced significantly the healthy tissue dose levels at the price of some high-dose spillage. Evaluation of the trade-offs for application to the different critical structures should drive in improving the usage of the VMAT technique for breast cancer treatment. Advances in knowledge: Different planning strategies in the same VMAT technique could give significant variations in dose distributions. The choice of the trade-offs would affect the possible future late toxicity and secondary cancer induction risk.

  19. Trade-off analysis for environmental projects: An annotated bibliography

    SciTech Connect

    Feather, T.D.; Harrington, K.W.; Capan, D.T.

    1995-08-01

    This is a report with an attached annotated bibliography. This study explores the literature for analytical techniques that can support the complex decision-making process associated with Corps of Engineers environmental projects. The literature review focuses on opportunities for using trade-off methodologies and group processes in environmental plan formulation and evaluation. The work was conducted under the Evaluation Framework Work Unit within the Evaluation of Environmental Investments Research Program.

  20. Speed and Endurance Do Not Trade Off in Phrynosomatid Lizards.

    PubMed

    de Albuquerque, Ralph Lacerda; Bonine, Kevin E; Garland, Theodore

    2015-01-01

    Trade-offs are a common focus of study in evolutionary biology and in studies of locomotor physiology and biomechanics. A previous comparative study of 12 species of European lacertid lizards found a statistically significant negative correlation between residual locomotor speed and stamina (controlling for variation in body size), consistent with ideas about trade-offs in performance based on variation in muscle fiber type composition and other subordinate traits. To begin examining the generality of this finding in other groups of squamates, we measured maximal sprint running speed on a high-speed treadmill and endurance at 1.0 km/h (0.28 m/s) in 14 species of North American phrynosomatid lizards, plus a sample of nine additional species to encompass some of the broadscale diversity of lizards. We used both conventional and phylogenetically informed regression analyses to control for some known causes of performance variation (body size, stockiness, body temperature) and then computed residual performance values. We found no evidence for a trade-off between speed and endurance among the 14 phrynosomatids or among the 23 species in the extended data set. Possible explanations for the apparent difference between lacertids and phrynosomatids are discussed.

  1. Reservoir Computing Beyond Memory-Nonlinearity Trade-off.

    PubMed

    Inubushi, Masanobu; Yoshimura, Kazuyuki

    2017-08-31

    Reservoir computing is a brain-inspired machine learning framework that employs a signal-driven dynamical system, in particular harnessing common-signal-induced synchronization which is a widely observed nonlinear phenomenon. Basic understanding of a working principle in reservoir computing can be expected to shed light on how information is stored and processed in nonlinear dynamical systems, potentially leading to progress in a broad range of nonlinear sciences. As a first step toward this goal, from the viewpoint of nonlinear physics and information theory, we study the memory-nonlinearity trade-off uncovered by Dambre et al. (2012). Focusing on a variational equation, we clarify a dynamical mechanism behind the trade-off, which illustrates why nonlinear dynamics degrades memory stored in dynamical system in general. Moreover, based on the trade-off, we propose a mixture reservoir endowed with both linear and nonlinear dynamics and show that it improves the performance of information processing. Interestingly, for some tasks, significant improvements are observed by adding a few linear dynamics to the nonlinear dynamical system. By employing the echo state network model, the effect of the mixture reservoir is numerically verified for a simple function approximation task and for more complex tasks.

  2. Evolutionary trade-offs in kidney injury and repair.

    PubMed

    Lei, Yutian; Anders, Hans-Joachim

    2017-11-01

    Evolutionary medicine has proven helpful to understand the origin of human disease, e.g. in identifying causal roles of recent environmental changes impacting on human physiology (environment-phenotype mismatch). In contrast, diseases affecting only a limited number of members of a species often originate from evolutionary trade-offs for usually physiologic adaptations assuring reproductive success in the context of extrinsic threats. For example, the G1 and G2 variants of the APOL1 gene supporting control of Trypanosoma infection come with the trade-off that they promote the progression of kidney disease. In this review we extend the concept of evolutionary nephrology by discussing how the physiologic adaptations (danger responses) to tissue injury create evolutionary trade-offs that drive histopathological changes underlying acute and chronic kidney diseases. The evolution of multicellular organisms positively selected a number of danger response programs for their overwhelming benefits in assuring survival such as clotting, inflammation, epithelial healing and mesenchymal healing, i.e. fibrosis and sclerosis. Upon kidney injury these danger programs often present as pathomechanisms driving persistent nephron loss and renal failure. We explore how classic kidney disease entities involve insufficient or overshooting activation of these danger response programs for which the underlying genetic basis remains largely to be defined. Dissecting the causative and hierarchical relationships between danger programs should help to identify molecular targets to control kidney injury and to improve disease outcomes.

  3. Sensory trade-offs predict signal divergence in Surfperch.

    PubMed

    Cummings, Molly E

    2007-03-01

    Unidirectional elaboration of male trait evolution (e.g., larger, brighter males) has been predicted by receiver bias models of sexual selection and empirically tested in a number of different taxa. This study identifies a bidirectional pattern of male trait evolution and suggests that a sensory constraint is driving this divergence. In this system, the inherent trade-off in dichromatic visual detection places limits on the direction that sensory biases may take and thus provides a quantitative test of the sensory drive model. Here I show that sensory systems with trade-offs in detection abilities produce bidirectional biases and that signal design properties match these biases. I combine species-specific measurements and ancestral estimates with visual detection modeling to examine biases in sensory and signaling traits across five fish species occupying optically diverse habitats in the Californian kelp forest. Species-specific divergence in visual pigments correlates with changes in environment and produces different sensory biases--favoring luminance (brightness) detection for some species and chromatic (color) detection for others. Divergence in male signals (spectral reflectance of orange, blue, and silver color elements) is predicted by each species' sensory bias: color divergence favors chromatic detection for species with chromatically biased visual systems, whereas species with luminance sensory biases have signals favoring luminance detection. This quantitative example of coevolution of communication traits varying in a bidirectional pattern governed by the environment is the first demonstration of sensory trade-offs driving signal evolution.

  4. Trade-offs in the design of experiments.

    PubMed

    Wiley, R Haven

    2009-11-01

    This comment supplements and clarifies issues raised by J. C. Schank and T. J. Koehnle (2009) in their critique of experimental design. First, the pervasiveness of trade-offs in the design of experiments is emphasized (Wiley, 2003). Particularly germane to Schank and Koehnle's discussion are the inevitable trade-offs in any decisions to include blocking or to standardize conditions in experiments. Second, the interpretation of multiple tests of a hypothesis is clarified. Only when interest focuses on any, rather than each, of N possible responses is it appropriate to adjust criteria for statistical significance of the results. Finally, a misunderstanding is corrected about a disadvantage of large experiments (Wiley, 2003). Experiments with large samples raise the possibility of small, but statistically significant, biases even after randomization of treatments. Because these small biases are difficult for experimenters and readers to notice, large experiments demonstrating small effects require special scrutiny. Such experiments are justified only when they involve minimal human intervention and maximal standardization. Justifications for the inevitable trade-offs in experimental design require careful attention when reporting any experiment.

  5. Hormesis results in trade-offs with immunity.

    PubMed

    McClure, Colin D; Zhong, Weihao; Hunt, Vicky L; Chapman, Fiona M; Hill, Fiona V; Priest, Nicholas K

    2014-08-01

    Many have argued that we may be able to extend life and improve human health through hormesis, the beneficial effects of low-level toxins and other stressors. But, studies of hormesis in model systems have not yet established whether stress-induced benefits are cost free, artifacts of inbreeding, or come with deleterious side effects. Here, we provide evidence that hormesis results in trade-offs with immunity. We find that a single topical dose of dead spores of the entomopathogenic fungus, Metarhizium robertsii, increases the longevity of the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, without significant decreases in fecundity. We find that hormetic benefits of pathogen challenge are greater in lines that lack key components of antifungal immunity (Dif and Turandot M). And, in outbred fly lines, we find that topical pathogen challenge enhances both survival and fecundity, but reduces ability to fight off live infections. The results provide evidence that hormesis is manifested by stress-induced trade-offs with immunity, not cost-free benefits or artifacts of inbreeding. Our findings illuminate mechanisms underlying pathogen-induced life-history trade-offs, and indicate that reduced immune function may be an ironic side effect of the "elixirs of life."

  6. HORMESIS RESULTS IN TRADE-OFFS WITH IMMUNITY

    PubMed Central

    McClure, Colin D; Zhong, Weihao; Hunt, Vicky L; Chapman, Fiona M; Hill, Fiona V; Priest, Nicholas K

    2014-01-01

    Many have argued that we may be able to extend life and improve human health through hormesis, the beneficial effects of low-level toxins and other stressors. But, studies of hormesis in model systems have not yet established whether stress-induced benefits are cost free, artifacts of inbreeding, or come with deleterious side effects. Here, we provide evidence that hormesis results in trade-offs with immunity. We find that a single topical dose of dead spores of the entomopathogenic fungus, Metarhizium robertsii, increases the longevity of the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, without significant decreases in fecundity. We find that hormetic benefits of pathogen challenge are greater in lines that lack key components of antifungal immunity (Dif and Turandot M). And, in outbred fly lines, we find that topical pathogen challenge enhances both survival and fecundity, but reduces ability to fight off live infections. The results provide evidence that hormesis is manifested by stress-induced trade-offs with immunity, not cost-free benefits or artifacts of inbreeding. Our findings illuminate mechanisms underlying pathogen-induced life-history trade-offs, and indicate that reduced immune function may be an ironic side effect of the “elixirs of life.” PMID:24862588

  7. Speed and stamina trade-off in lacertid lizards.

    PubMed

    Vanhooydonck, B; Van Damme, R; Aerts, P

    2001-05-01

    Morphological and physiological considerations suggest that sprinting ability and endurance capacity put conflicting demands on the design of an animal's locomotor apparatus and therefore cannot be maximized simultaneously. To test this hypothesis, we correlated size-corrected maximal sprint speed and stamina of 12 species of lacertid lizards. Phylogenetically independent contrasts of sprint speed and stamina showed a significant negative relationship, giving support to the idea of an evolutionary trade-off between the two performance measures. To test the hypothesis that the trade-off is mediated by a conflict in morphological requirements, we correlated both performance traits with snout-vent length, size-corrected estimates of body mass and limb length, and relative hindlimb length (the residuals of the relationship between hind- and forelimb length). Fast-running species had hindlimbs that were long compared to their forelimbs. None of the other size or shape variables showed a significant relationship with speed or endurance. We conclude that the evolution of sprint capacity may be constrained by the need for endurance capacity and vice versa, but the design conflict underlying this trade-off has yet to be identified.

  8. The energy trade-off between growth and longevity.

    PubMed

    Hou, Chen

    2013-09-01

    Understanding the trade-offs between organisms' life history traits has been a major goal of physiology, ecology and evolution. In the last few decades, two types of intra-specific studies have highlighted the trade-off between growth and longevity. First, diet restriction (DR), as an environmental intervention, has been shown to suppress growth and extend the lifespan of a broad range of animals. Second, genetic studies have also shown that mice, whose growth hormone function is genetically modified (GM), grow slower and live longer than their wild-type siblings. Despite a wealth of empirical data, still largely missing is a theoretical framework that specifies and makes quantitative predictions on this trade-off. Here, I present a mechanistic model based on the principles of energy conservation. The model quantifies explicitly how DR and GM alter the animal's energy budget, and channel metabolic energy to somatic maintenance by suppressing growth, thereby extending lifespan. Data from a diverse set of empirical studies on small rodents supports the predictions of the model. More importantly, the model reveals that although DR and GM are two different methods to extend lifespan, i.e., environmental vs. genetic, the underlying mechanisms of them are the same from the energetic viewpoint.

  9. Effects of Emotion on Memory Specificity: Memory Trade-Offs Elicited by Negative Visually Arousing Stimuli

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kensinger, Elizabeth A.; Garoff-Eaton, Rachel J.; Schacter, Daniel L.

    2007-01-01

    Two different types of trade-offs have been discussed with regard to memory for emotional information: A trade-off in the ability to remember the gist versus the visual detail of emotional information, and a trade-off in the ability to remember the central emotional elements of an event versus the nonemotional (peripheral) elements of that same…

  10. Effects of Emotion on Memory Specificity: Memory Trade-Offs Elicited by Negative Visually Arousing Stimuli

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kensinger, Elizabeth A.; Garoff-Eaton, Rachel J.; Schacter, Daniel L.

    2007-01-01

    Two different types of trade-offs have been discussed with regard to memory for emotional information: A trade-off in the ability to remember the gist versus the visual detail of emotional information, and a trade-off in the ability to remember the central emotional elements of an event versus the nonemotional (peripheral) elements of that same…

  11. Army ants dynamically adjust living bridges in response to a cost–benefit trade-off

    PubMed Central

    Reid, Chris R.; Lutz, Matthew J.; Powell, Scott; Kao, Albert B.; Couzin, Iain D.; Garnier, Simon

    2015-01-01

    The ability of individual animals to create functional structures by joining together is rare and confined to the social insects. Army ants (Eciton) form collective assemblages out of their own bodies to perform a variety of functions that benefit the entire colony. Here we examine ‟bridges” of linked individuals that are constructed to span gaps in the colony’s foraging trail. How these living structures adjust themselves to varied and changing conditions remains poorly understood. Our field experiments show that the ants continuously modify their bridges, such that these structures lengthen, widen, and change position in response to traffic levels and environmental geometry. Ants initiate bridges where their path deviates from their incoming direction and move the bridges over time to create shortcuts over large gaps. The final position of the structure depended on the intensity of the traffic and the extent of path deviation and was influenced by a cost–benefit trade-off at the colony level, where the benefit of increased foraging trail efficiency was balanced by the cost of removing workers from the foraging pool to form the structure. To examine this trade-off, we quantified the geometric relationship between costs and benefits revealed by our experiments. We then constructed a model to determine the bridge location that maximized foraging rate, which qualitatively matched the observed movement of bridges. Our results highlight how animal self-assemblages can be dynamically modified in response to a group-level cost–benefit trade-off, without any individual unit’s having information on global benefits or costs. PMID:26598673

  12. Assessing social--ecological trade-offs to advance ecosystem-based fisheries management.

    PubMed

    Voss, Rudi; Quaas, Martin F; Schmidt, Jörn O; Tahvonen, Olli; Lindegren, Martin; Möllmann, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Modern resource management faces trade-offs in the provision of various ecosystem goods and services to humanity. For fisheries management to develop into an ecosystem-based approach, the goal is not only to maximize economic profits, but to consider equally important conservation and social equity goals. We introduce such a triple-bottom line approach to the management of multi-species fisheries using the Baltic Sea as a case study. We apply a coupled ecological-economic optimization model to address the actual fisheries management challenge of trading-off the recovery of collapsed cod stocks versus the health of ecologically important forage fish populations. Management strategies based on profit maximization would rebuild the cod stock to high levels but may cause the risk of stock collapse for forage species with low market value, such as Baltic sprat (Fig. 1A). Economically efficient conservation efforts to protect sprat would be borne almost exclusively by the forage fishery as sprat fishing effort and profits would strongly be reduced. Unless compensation is paid, this would challenge equity between fishing sectors (Fig. 1B). Optimizing equity while respecting sprat biomass precautionary levels would reduce potential profits of the overall Baltic fishery, but may offer an acceptable balance between overall profits, species conservation and social equity (Fig. 1C). Our case study shows a practical example of how an ecosystem-based fisheries management will be able to offer society options to solve common conflicts between different resource uses. Adding equity considerations to the traditional trade-off between economy and ecology will greatly enhance credibility and hence compliance to management decisions, a further footstep towards healthy fish stocks and sustainable fisheries in the world ocean.

  13. Army ants dynamically adjust living bridges in response to a cost-benefit trade-off.

    PubMed

    Reid, Chris R; Lutz, Matthew J; Powell, Scott; Kao, Albert B; Couzin, Iain D; Garnier, Simon

    2015-12-08

    The ability of individual animals to create functional structures by joining together is rare and confined to the social insects. Army ants (Eciton) form collective assemblages out of their own bodies to perform a variety of functions that benefit the entire colony. Here we examine ‟bridges" of linked individuals that are constructed to span gaps in the colony's foraging trail. How these living structures adjust themselves to varied and changing conditions remains poorly understood. Our field experiments show that the ants continuously modify their bridges, such that these structures lengthen, widen, and change position in response to traffic levels and environmental geometry. Ants initiate bridges where their path deviates from their incoming direction and move the bridges over time to create shortcuts over large gaps. The final position of the structure depended on the intensity of the traffic and the extent of path deviation and was influenced by a cost-benefit trade-off at the colony level, where the benefit of increased foraging trail efficiency was balanced by the cost of removing workers from the foraging pool to form the structure. To examine this trade-off, we quantified the geometric relationship between costs and benefits revealed by our experiments. We then constructed a model to determine the bridge location that maximized foraging rate, which qualitatively matched the observed movement of bridges. Our results highlight how animal self-assemblages can be dynamically modified in response to a group-level cost-benefit trade-off, without any individual unit's having information on global benefits or costs.

  14. Assessing Social – Ecological Trade-Offs to Advance Ecosystem-Based Fisheries Management

    PubMed Central

    Voss, Rudi; Quaas, Martin F.; Schmidt, Jörn O.; Tahvonen, Olli; Lindegren, Martin; Möllmann, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Modern resource management faces trade-offs in the provision of various ecosystem goods and services to humanity. For fisheries management to develop into an ecosystem-based approach, the goal is not only to maximize economic profits, but to consider equally important conservation and social equity goals. We introduce such a triple-bottom line approach to the management of multi-species fisheries using the Baltic Sea as a case study. We apply a coupled ecological-economic optimization model to address the actual fisheries management challenge of trading-off the recovery of collapsed cod stocks versus the health of ecologically important forage fish populations. Management strategies based on profit maximization would rebuild the cod stock to high levels but may cause the risk of stock collapse for forage species with low market value, such as Baltic sprat (Fig. 1A). Economically efficient conservation efforts to protect sprat would be borne almost exclusively by the forage fishery as sprat fishing effort and profits would strongly be reduced. Unless compensation is paid, this would challenge equity between fishing sectors (Fig. 1B). Optimizing equity while respecting sprat biomass precautionary levels would reduce potential profits of the overall Baltic fishery, but may offer an acceptable balance between overall profits, species conservation and social equity (Fig. 1C). Our case study shows a practical example of how an ecosystem-based fisheries management will be able to offer society options to solve common conflicts between different resource uses. Adding equity considerations to the traditional trade-off between economy and ecology will greatly enhance credibility and hence compliance to management decisions, a further footstep towards healthy fish stocks and sustainable fisheries in the world ocean. PMID:25268117

  15. Functional Trade-Offs in Promiscuous Enzymes Cannot Be Explained by Intrinsic Mutational Robustness of the Native Activity

    PubMed Central

    Kaltenbach, Miriam; Emond, Stephane; Tokuriki, Nobuhiko

    2016-01-01

    The extent to which an emerging new function trades off with the original function is a key characteristic of the dynamics of enzyme evolution. Various cases of laboratory evolution have unveiled a characteristic trend; a large increase in a new, promiscuous activity is often accompanied by only a mild reduction of the native, original activity. A model that associates weak trade-offs with “evolvability” was put forward, which proposed that enzymes possess mutational robustness in the native activity and plasticity in promiscuous activities. This would enable the acquisition of a new function without compromising the original one, reducing the benefit of early gene duplication and therefore the selection pressure thereon. Yet, to date, no experimental study has examined this hypothesis directly. Here, we investigate the causes of weak trade-offs by systematically characterizing adaptive mutations that occurred in two cases of evolutionary transitions in enzyme function: (1) from phosphotriesterase to arylesterase, and (2) from atrazine chlorohydrolase to melamine deaminase. Mutational analyses in various genetic backgrounds revealed that, in contrast to the prevailing model, the native activity is less robust to mutations than the promiscuous activity. For example, in phosphotriesterase, the deleterious effect of individual mutations on the native phosphotriesterase activity is much larger than their positive effect on the promiscuous arylesterase activity. Our observations suggest a revision of the established model: weak trade-offs are not caused by an intrinsic robustness of the native activity and plasticity of the promiscuous activity. We propose that upon strong adaptive pressure for the new activity without selection against the original one, selected mutations will lead to the largest possible increases in the new function, but whether and to what extent they decrease the old function is irrelevant, creating a bias towards initially weak trade-offs and

  16. Visualising Pareto-optimal trade-offs helps move beyond monetary-only criteria for water management decisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurford, Anthony; Harou, Julien

    2014-05-01

    Water related eco-system services are important to the livelihoods of the poorest sectors of society in developing countries. Degradation or loss of these services can increase the vulnerability of people decreasing their capacity to support themselves. New approaches to help guide water resources management decisions are needed which account for the non-market value of ecosystem goods and services. In case studies from Brazil and Kenya we demonstrate the capability of many objective Pareto-optimal trade-off analysis to help decision makers balance economic and non-market benefits from the management of existing multi-reservoir systems. A multi-criteria search algorithm is coupled to a water resources management simulator of each basin to generate a set of Pareto-approximate trade-offs representing the best case management decisions. In both cases, volume dependent reservoir release rules are the management decisions being optimised. In the Kenyan case we further assess the impacts of proposed irrigation investments, and how the possibility of new investments impacts the system's trade-offs. During the multi-criteria search (optimisation), performance of different sets of management decisions (policies) is assessed against case-specific objective functions representing provision of water supply and irrigation, hydropower generation and maintenance of ecosystem services. Results are visualised as trade-off surfaces to help decision makers understand the impacts of different policies on a broad range of stakeholders and to assist in decision-making. These case studies show how the approach can reveal unexpected opportunities for win-win solutions, and quantify the trade-offs between investing to increase agricultural revenue and negative impacts on protected ecosystems which support rural livelihoods.

  17. Trade-offs between xylem hydraulic properties, wood anatomy and yield in Populus.

    PubMed

    Hajek, Peter; Leuschner, Christoph; Hertel, Dietrich; Delzon, Sylvain; Schuldt, Bernhard

    2014-07-01

    Trees face the dilemma that achieving high plant productivity is accompanied by a risk of drought-induced hydraulic failure due to a trade-off in the trees' vascular system between hydraulic efficiency and safety. By investigating the xylem anatomy of branches and coarse roots, and measuring branch axial hydraulic conductivity and vulnerability to cavitation in 4-year-old field-grown aspen plants of five demes (Populus tremula L. and Populus tremuloides Michx.) differing in growth rate, we tested the hypotheses that (i) demes differ in wood anatomical and hydraulic properties, (ii) hydraulic efficiency and safety are related to xylem anatomical traits, and (iii) aboveground productivity and hydraulic efficiency are negatively correlated to cavitation resistance. Significant deme differences existed in seven of the nine investigated branch-related anatomical and hydraulic traits but only in one of the four coarse-root-related anatomical traits; this likely is a consequence of high intra-plant variation in root morphology and the occurrence of a few 'high-conductivity roots'. Growth rate was positively related to branch hydraulic efficiency (xylem-specific conductivity) but not to cavitation resistance; this indicates that no marked trade-off exists between cavitation resistance and growth. Both branch hydraulic safety and hydraulic efficiency significantly depended on vessel size and were related to the genetic distance between the demes, while the xylem pressure causing 88% loss of hydraulic conductivity (P88 value) was more closely related to hydraulic efficiency than the commonly used P50 value. Deme-specific variation in the pit membrane structure may explain why vessel size was not directly linked to growth rate. We conclude that branch hydraulic efficiency is an important growth-influencing trait in aspen, while the assumed trade-off between productivity and hydraulic safety is weak. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved

  18. Fitness Trade-Offs Lead to Suppressor Tolerance in Yeast.

    PubMed

    Hou, Jing; Schacherer, Joseph

    2017-01-01

    Genetic variation among individuals within a population provides the raw material for phenotypic diversity upon which natural selection operates. Some given variants can act on multiple standing genomic variations simultaneously and release previously inaccessible phenotypes, leading to increased adaptive potential upon challenging environments. Previously, we identified such a variant related to a tRNA nonsense suppressor in yeast. When introduced into other genetic backgrounds, the suppressor led to an increased population phenotypic variance on various culture conditions, conferring background and environment specific selective advantages. Nonetheless, most isolates are intolerant to the suppressor on rich media due to a severe fitness cost. Here, we found that the tolerance to suppressor is related to a surprising level of fitness outburst, showing a trade-off effect to accommodate the cost of carrying the suppressor. To dissect the genetic basis of such trade-offs, we crossed strains with contrasting tolerance levels on rich media, and analyzed the fitness distribution patterns in the offspring. Combining quantitative tetrad analysis and bulk segregant analysis, we identified two genes, namely MKT1 and RGA1, involved in suppressor tolerance. We showed that alleles from the tolerant parent for both genes conferred a significant gain of fitness, which increased the suppressor tolerance. Our results present a detailed dissection of suppressor tolerance in yeast and provide insights into the molecular basis of trade-offs between fitness and evolutionary potential. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Ant Colonies Do Not Trade-Off Reproduction against Maintenance.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Boris H; Schrempf, Alexandra; Scheuerlein, Alexander; Heinze, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    The question on how individuals allocate resources into maintenance and reproduction is one of the central questions in life history theory. Yet, resource allocation into maintenance on the organismic level can only be measured indirectly. This is different in a social insect colony, a "superorganism" where workers represent the soma and the queen the germ line of the colony. Here, we investigate whether trade-offs exist between maintenance and reproduction on two levels of biological organization, queens and colonies, by following single-queen colonies of the ant Cardiocondyla obscurior throughout the entire lifespan of the queen. Our results show that maintenance and reproduction are positively correlated on the colony level, and we confirm results of an earlier study that found no trade-off on the individual (queen) level. We attribute this unexpected outcome to the existence of a positive feedback loop where investment into maintenance (workers) increases the rate of resource acquisition under laboratory conditions. Even though food was provided ad libitum, variation in productivity among the colonies suggests that resources can only be utilized and invested into additional maintenance and reproduction by the colony if enough workers are available. The resulting relationship between per-capita and colony productivity in our study fits well with other studies conducted in the field, where decreasing per-capita productivity and the leveling off of colony productivity have been linked to density dependent effects due to competition among colonies. This suggests that the absence of trade-offs in our laboratory study might also be prevalent under natural conditions, leading to a positive association of maintenance, (= growth) and reproduction. In this respect, insect colonies resemble indeterminate growing organisms.

  20. A study of design trade (OFFS) using a computer model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coughlin, S.

    1975-01-01

    The interaction between the efficiency of the structural design and the cost of the structure used was studied. It is shown that future effort is best directed at producing a low cost structure of medium efficiency, but with the ability to withstand normal service wear. The trade-off between aerodynamic drag and structure weight in selecting a length to diameter ratio for the hull is evaluated along with the implications of power plan type and fuel cost on the economics of the airship. The choice of lifting gas is considered.

  1. An internet graph model based on trade-off optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez-Hamelin, J. I.; Schabanel, N.

    2004-03-01

    This paper presents a new model for the Internet graph (AS graph) based on the concept of heuristic trade-off optimization, introduced by Fabrikant, Koutsoupias and Papadimitriou in[CITE] to grow a random tree with a heavily tailed degree distribution. We propose here a generalization of this approach to generate a general graph, as a candidate for modeling the Internet. We present the results of our simulations and an analysis of the standard parameters measured in our model, compared with measurements from the physical Internet graph.

  2. Network Implementation Trade-Offs in Existing Homes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keiser, Gerd

    2013-03-01

    The ever-increasing demand for networking of high-bandwidth services in existing homes has resulted in several options for implementing an in-home network. Among the options are power-line communication techniques, twisted-pair copper wires, wireless links, and plastic or glass optical fibers. Whereas it is easy to install high-bandwidth optical fibers during the construction of new living units, retrofitting of existing homes with networking capabilities requires some technology innovations. This article addresses some trade-offs that need to be made on what transmission media can be retrofitted most effectively in existing homes.

  3. Laser space rendevous and docking trade-off

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    A spaceborne LADAR sensor, which will meet the requirements for rendezvous and docking with a cooperative object in synchronous orbit is presented. The sensor is being configured around a pulsed CO2 laser which can be constructed and deployed using technology which presently exists or is being developed, and which appears to lend itself very well to the envisioned family of space missions. In order to determine the applicability of the type of sensor being considered, the performance of a family of candidate sensors is being traded off as a function of size, weight, and power consumption. The maximum ranges being considered are 50, 100, 200, and 300 nautical miles.

  4. Metabolic Trade-Offs Promote Diversity in a Model Ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Posfai, Anna; Taillefumier, Thibaud; Wingreen, Ned S.

    2017-01-01

    In nature, a large number of species can coexist on a small number of shared resources; however, resource-competition models predict that the number of species in steady coexistence cannot exceed the number of resources. Motivated by recent studies of phytoplankton, we introduce trade-offs into a resource-competition model and find that an unlimited number of species can coexist. Our model spontaneously reproduces several notable features of natural ecosystems, including keystone species and population dynamics and abundances characteristic of neutral theory, despite an underlying non-neutral competition for resources.

  5. Predicting Cost/Performance Trade-Offs for Whitney: A Commodity Computing Cluster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, Jeffrey C.; Nitzberg, Bill; VanderWijngaart, Rob F.; Kutler, Paul (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Recent advances in low-end processor and network technology have made it possible to build a "supercomputer" out of commodity components. We develop simple models of the NAS Parallel Benchmarks version 2 (NPB 2) to explore the cost/performance trade-offs involved in building a balanced parallel computer supporting a scientific workload. We develop closed form expressions detailing the number and size of messages sent by each benchmark. Coupling these with measured single processor performance, network latency, and network bandwidth, our models predict benchmark performance to within 30%. A comparison based on total system cost reveals that current commodity technology (200 MHz Pentium Pros with 100baseT Ethernet) is well balanced for the NPBs up to a total system cost of around $1,000,000.

  6. Predicting Cost/Performance Trade-offs For Whitney: A Commodity Computing Cluster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, Jeffrey C.; Nitzberg, Bill; VanDerWijngaart, Rob F.; Tweten, Dave (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Recent advances in low-end processor and network technology have made it possible to build a "supercomputer" out of commodity components. We develop simple models of the NAS Parallel Benchmarks version 2 (NPB 2) to explore the cost/performance trade-offs involved in building a balanced parallel computer supporting a scientific workload. By measuring single processor benchmark performance, network latency, and network bandwidth, and using closed form expressions detailing the number and size of messages sent by each benchmark, our models predict benchmark performance to within 30%. A comparison based on total system cost reveals that current commodity technology (200 MHz Pentium Pros with 100baseT Ethernet) is well balanced for the NPBs up to a total system cost of around $ 1,000,000.

  7. Sensing and communication trade-offs in picosatellite formation flying missions.

    PubMed

    Arnon, Shlomi; Kedar, Debbie

    2009-10-01

    One of the primary challenges in all small satellite design is the attainment of adequate sensing and communication capabilities within the stringent spatial limitations. These can be defined in terms of surface area expenditure for the different payloads. There is an inevitable trade-off between enhancing the sensing capacity at the expense of reducing communication capabilities on the one hand and, on the other hand, increasing the communication capacity to the detriment of the sensing ability. Careful balancing of the conflicting demands is necessary to achieve acceptable performance levels. In this paper we study two intersatellite optical wireless communication scenarios: (i) a direct link between two satellites and (ii) a folded path link between a master satellite and a picosatellite equipped with a modulatable retroreflector. In the latter case the picosatellite does not have a laser transmitter and the data carrier is the retroreflected beam from the master satellite. The data rate, which is bounded by the sensing payload resolution, is derived using diffraction theory and Shannon capacity considerations. We develop a mathematical model to describe the interrelations between sensing and communication facilities in a picosatellite flight formation using optical technologies and demonstrate system performance trade-offs with a numerical example.

  8. Power and Performance Trade-offs for Space Time Adaptive Processing

    SciTech Connect

    Gawande, Nitin A.; Manzano Franco, Joseph B.; Tumeo, Antonino; Tallent, Nathan R.; Kerbyson, Darren J.; Hoisie, Adolfy

    2015-07-27

    Computational efficiency – performance relative to power or energy – is one of the most important concerns when designing RADAR processing systems. This paper analyzes power and performance trade-offs for a typical Space Time Adaptive Processing (STAP) application. We study STAP implementations for CUDA and OpenMP on two computationally efficient architectures, Intel Haswell Core I7-4770TE and NVIDIA Kayla with a GK208 GPU. We analyze the power and performance of STAP’s computationally intensive kernels across the two hardware testbeds. We also show the impact and trade-offs of GPU optimization techniques. We show that data parallelism can be exploited for efficient implementation on the Haswell CPU architecture. The GPU architecture is able to process large size data sets without increase in power requirement. The use of shared memory has a significant impact on the power requirement for the GPU. A balance between the use of shared memory and main memory access leads to an improved performance in a typical STAP application.

  9. Gastrointestinal helminths may affect host susceptibility to anthrax through seasonal immune trade-offs.

    PubMed

    Cizauskas, Carrie A; Turner, Wendy C; Wagner, Bettina; Küsters, Martina; Vance, Russell E; Getz, Wayne M

    2014-11-12

    Most vertebrates experience coinfections, and many pathogen-pathogen interactions occur indirectly through the host immune system. These interactions are particularly strong in mixed micro-macroparasite infections because of immunomodulatory effects of helminth parasites. While these trade-offs have been examined extensively in laboratory animals, few studies have examined them in natural systems. Additionally, many wildlife pathogens fluctuate seasonally, at least partly due to seasonal host immune changes. We therefore examined seasonality of immune resource allocation, pathogen abundance and exposure, and interactions between infections and immunity in plains zebra (Equus quagga) in Etosha National Park (ENP), Namibia, a system with strongly seasonal patterns of gastrointestinal (GI) helminth infection intensity and concurrent anthrax outbreaks. Both pathogens are environmentally transmitted, and helminth seasonality is driven by environmental pressures on free living life stages. The reasons behind anthrax seasonality are currently not understood, though anthrax is less likely directly driven by environmental factors. We measured a complex, interacting set of variables and found evidence that GI helminth infection intensities, eosinophil counts, IgE and IgGb antibody titers, and possibly IL-4 cytokine signaling were increased in wetter seasons, and that ectoparasite infestations and possibly IFN-γ cytokine signaling were increased in drier seasons. Monocyte counts and anti-anthrax antibody titers were negatively associated with wet season eosinophilia, and monocytes were negatively correlated with IgGb and IgE titers. Taken together, this supports the hypothesis that ENP wet seasons are characterized by immune resource allocation toward Th-2 type responses, while Th1-type immunity may prevail in drier seasons, and that hosts may experience Th1-Th2 trade-offs. We found evidence that this Th2-type resource allocation is likely driven by GI parasite infections

  10. DISTRIBUTED PROCESSING TRADE-OFF MODEL FOR ELECTRIC UTILITY OPERATION

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klein, S. A.

    1994-01-01

    The Distributed processing Trade-off Model for Electric Utility Operation is based upon a study performed for the California Institute of Technology's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. This study presented a technique that addresses the question of trade-offs between expanding a communications network or expanding the capacity of distributed computers in an electric utility Energy Management System (EMS). The technique resulted in the development of a quantitative assessment model that is presented in a Lotus 1-2-3 worksheet environment. The model gives EMS planners a macroscopic tool for evaluating distributed processing architectures and the major technical and economic tradeoffs as well as interactions within these architectures. The model inputs (which may be varied according to application and need) include geographic parameters, data flow and processing workload parameters, operator staffing parameters, and technology/economic parameters. The model's outputs are total cost in various categories, a number of intermediate cost and technical calculation results, as well as graphical presentation of Costs vs. Percent Distribution for various parameters. The model has been implemented on an IBM PC using the LOTUS 1-2-3 spreadsheet environment and was developed in 1986. Also included with the spreadsheet model are a number of representative but hypothetical utility system examples.

  11. IXO/XMS Detector Trade-Off Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kilbourne, Caroline Anne; deKorte, P.; Smith, S.; Hoevers, H.; vdKuur, J.; Ezoe, Y.; Ullom, J.

    2010-01-01

    This document presents the outcome of the detector trade-off for the XMS instrument on IXO. This trade-off is part of the Cryogenic instrument Phase-A study as proposed to ESA in the Declaration of Interest SRONXMS-PL-2009-003 dated June 6, 2009. The detector consists of two components: a core array for the highest spectral resolution and an outer array to increase the field of view substantially with modest increase in the number of read-out channels. Degraded resolution of the outer array in comparison with the core array is accepted in order to make this scheme possible. The two detector components may be a single unit or separate units. These arrays comprise pixels and the components that allow them to be arrayed. Each pixel comprises a thermometer, an absorber, and the thermal links between them and to the rest of the array. These links may be interfaces or distinct components. The array infrastructure comprises the mechanical structure of the array, the arrangement of the leads, and features added to improve the integrated thermal properties of the array in the focal-plane assembly.

  12. DISTRIBUTED PROCESSING TRADE-OFF MODEL FOR ELECTRIC UTILITY OPERATION

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klein, S. A.

    1994-01-01

    The Distributed processing Trade-off Model for Electric Utility Operation is based upon a study performed for the California Institute of Technology's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. This study presented a technique that addresses the question of trade-offs between expanding a communications network or expanding the capacity of distributed computers in an electric utility Energy Management System (EMS). The technique resulted in the development of a quantitative assessment model that is presented in a Lotus 1-2-3 worksheet environment. The model gives EMS planners a macroscopic tool for evaluating distributed processing architectures and the major technical and economic tradeoffs as well as interactions within these architectures. The model inputs (which may be varied according to application and need) include geographic parameters, data flow and processing workload parameters, operator staffing parameters, and technology/economic parameters. The model's outputs are total cost in various categories, a number of intermediate cost and technical calculation results, as well as graphical presentation of Costs vs. Percent Distribution for various parameters. The model has been implemented on an IBM PC using the LOTUS 1-2-3 spreadsheet environment and was developed in 1986. Also included with the spreadsheet model are a number of representative but hypothetical utility system examples.

  13. Trade-offs in prenatal detection of Down syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Serra-Prat, M; Gallo, P; Jovell, A J; Aymerich, M; Estrada, M D

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This paper presents the results of different screening policies for prenatal detection of Down syndrome that would allow decision makers to make informed choices. METHODS: A decision analysis model was built to compare 8 screening policies with regard to a selected set of outcome measures. Probabilities used in the analysis were obtained from official administrative data reports in Spain and Catalonia and from data published in the medical literature. Sensitivity analyses were carried out to test the robustness of screening policies' results to changes in uptake rates, diagnostic accuracy, and resources consumed. RESULTS: Selected screening policies posed major trades-offs regarding detection rates, false-positive results, fetal loss, and costs of the programs. All outcome measures considered were found quite robust to changes in uptake rates. Sensitivity and specificity rates of screening tests were shown to be the most influential factors in the outcome measures considered. CONCLUSIONS: The disclosed trade-offs emphasize the need to comprehensively inform decision makers about both positive and negative consequences of adopting one screening policy or another. PMID:9550991

  14. Opportunities and trade-offs of biomass based negative emissions within planetary boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heck, Vera; Gerten, Dieter; Lucht, Wolfgang

    2017-04-01

    The Paris Agreement requires "a balance between anthropogenic emissions by sources and removals by sinks of greenhouse gases in the second half of the century" (UNFCCC, 2015). Without a full decarbonization of the energy and land use sector until the second half of this century, negative emission technologies (NETs) are required to achieve net zero greenhouse gas emissions. Integrated assessment studies indicate that bioenergy with carbon capture and storage (BECCS), a land based NET, has the potential to contribute substantially to balancing anthropogenic fossil fuel emissions. However, significant negative emission potentials from BECCS require substantial biomass potentials, which can only be achieved by intensively managed (fertilized and irrigated) large-scale biomass plantations. Additional to direct trade-offs of land and water availability, the implementation of large-scale biomass plantations implies major restructuring of the land surface on top of existing land use and would be accompanied by indirect trade-offs such as changes in moisture and energy fluxes. In the context of the planetary boundaries framework as proposed by Rockström et al. (2009), BECCS might contribute to reduce the transgression of the planetary boundary (PB) for climate change, but would most likely steer the Earth system closer to the PB for freshwater use and lead to further transgression of the PBs for land system change, biosphere integrity and biogeochemical flows. This presentation will investigate the opportunities of second generation biomass potentials within the safe operating space for humanity and highlight the multidimensional trade-offs between biomass potentials for BECCS in relation to the PBs. Scenarios of land availability for biomass plantations and land based carbon sequestration were developed with a spatially explicit multi-criterial optimization framework, considering the precautionary need to stay within the safe operating space vis-à-vis the need to

  15. Trade-offs in water and carbon ecosystem services with land-use changes in grasslands.

    PubMed

    Kim, John H; Jobbágy, Esteban G; Jackson, Robert B

    2016-09-01

    Increasing pressures for food, fiber, and fuel continue to drive global land-use changes. Efforts to optimize ecosystem services under alternative land uses are often hampered by the complex interactions and trade-offs among them. We examined the effects of land-use changes on ecosystem carbon storage and groundwater recharge in grasslands of Argentina and the United States to (1) understand the relationships between both services, (2) predict their responses to vegetation shifts across environmental gradients, and (3) explore how market or policy incentives for ecosystem services could affect land-use changes. A trade-off of ecosystem services was evident in most cases, with woody encroachment increasing carbon storage (+29 Mg C/ha) but decreasing groundwater recharge (-7.3 mm/yr) and conversions to rain-fed cultivation driving opposite changes (-32 Mg C/ha vs. +13 mm/yr). In contrast, crops irrigated with ground water tended to reduce both services compared to the natural grasslands they replaced. Combining economic values of the agricultural products together with the services, we highlight potentials for relatively modest financial incentives for ecosystem services to abate land-use changes and for incentives for carbon to drive land-use decisions over those of water. Our findings also identify key opportunities and caveats for some win-win and lose-lose land-use changes for more integrative and sustainable strategies for land management. © 2016 by the Ecological Society of America.

  16. The Trade-Off between Female Fertility and Longevity during the Epidemiological Transition in the Netherlands

    PubMed Central

    Kaptijn, Ralf; Thomese, Fleur; Liefbroer, Aart C.; Van Poppel, Frans; Van Bodegom, David; Westendorp, Rudi G. J.

    2015-01-01

    Several hypotheses have been put forward to explain the relationship between women’s fertility and their post-reproductive longevity. In this study, we focus on the disposable soma theory, which posits that a negative relationship between women’s fertility and longevity can be understood as an evolutionary trade-off between reproduction and survival. We examine the relationship between fertility and longevity during the epidemiological transition in the Netherlands. This period of rapid decline in mortality from infectious diseases offers a good opportunity to study the relationship between fertility and longevity, using registry data from 6,359 women born in The Netherlands between 1850 and 1910. We hypothesize that an initially negative relationship between women’s fertility and their longevity gradually turns less negative during the epidemiological transition, because of decreasing costs of higher parities. An initially inversed U-shaped association between fertility and longevity changes to zero during the epidemiological transition. This does suggest a diminishing environmental pressure on fertility. However, we find no evidence of an initial linear trade-off between fertility and post-reproductive survival. PMID:26680211

  17. The Trade-Off between Female Fertility and Longevity during the Epidemiological Transition in the Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Kaptijn, Ralf; Thomese, Fleur; Liefbroer, Aart C; Van Poppel, Frans; Van Bodegom, David; Westendorp, Rudi G J

    2015-01-01

    Several hypotheses have been put forward to explain the relationship between women's fertility and their post-reproductive longevity. In this study, we focus on the disposable soma theory, which posits that a negative relationship between women's fertility and longevity can be understood as an evolutionary trade-off between reproduction and survival. We examine the relationship between fertility and longevity during the epidemiological transition in the Netherlands. This period of rapid decline in mortality from infectious diseases offers a good opportunity to study the relationship between fertility and longevity, using registry data from 6,359 women born in The Netherlands between 1850 and 1910. We hypothesize that an initially negative relationship between women's fertility and their longevity gradually turns less negative during the epidemiological transition, because of decreasing costs of higher parities. An initially inversed U-shaped association between fertility and longevity changes to zero during the epidemiological transition. This does suggest a diminishing environmental pressure on fertility. However, we find no evidence of an initial linear trade-off between fertility and post-reproductive survival.

  18. Sentinel-1 EPS Architecture And Power Conversion Trade-Off

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catalano, Toni Fabio; Costanitini, Stefano; Daparati, Giorgio

    2011-10-01

    The paper will present the selected EPS (Electrical Power System) Architecture for the Sentinel-1 mission. After a brief survey of Sentinel-1 mission, the EPS design will be illustrated, with particular focus on the architecture adopted for SAW (Solar Array Wing) power conversion and relevant trade-off. In the early phase of the project, various trade-offs have been carried out in order to define the suitable Sentinel- 1 EPS architecture. Mainly the following subjects have been exploited: -BTA (Battery) technology and topology identification; -SAW rotation strategy and relevant mechanism selection; -primary power bus voltage selection; - distribution and protection philosophy; -SAW power conditioning strategy. All those, and many minor ones, have been evaluated singly to assess the best solution for the individual problem and all together to evaluate the consequences of the interactions at subsystem level to be finally reflected in system budget and architecture sizing. As the choice of the most appropriate conditioning architecture is directly influenced by chosen EPS architecture and has direct impact on S/C (Spacecraft) capability to sustain required operational profile, specially considering the long mission lifetime plus mission extension, dedicated analysis and simulations have been carried out. This paper focuses on SAW conditioning trade-off analysis results along with a brief description of the in- house developed simulator used during this study. Basing on project inputs such as mission operational scenarios, system requirement and HW constraints, a direct comparison of the performances achievable with the different accounted conditioning systems, S3R, MPPT buck and MPPT boost, is given. Finally, the outcomes of simulations run lead to a substantial equivalence of the three architecture topologies if no specific BTA configuration is accounted (ideal configuration). When considering different BTA topologies (s-p or p-s) and related possible failures, a

  19. Time-size trade-offs in responses of cycads to male cone herbivory.

    PubMed

    Marler, Thomas E

    2010-11-01

    Plant-arthropod pollination mutualisms based on adults as pollinators and juveniles as predators of reproductive structures are understood to be successful by balancing the benefits of pollination with the antagonisms of herbivory. In a recent paper, I showed that Cycas micronesica male cone herbivory by larvae of the pollinator moth Anatrachyntis species hastened the plant's subsequent reproductive event. In this mutualism, both pollination and predation elicit distinct increases in plant fitness. The results support a resource tradeoff within an optimal-allocation model whereby cone disposal by the pollinator juveniles reduces reproductive costs. Many cycad species exhibit an annual coning season that is fixed by the environment, and in those cases the trade-off may be expressed as plasticity in cone size or cone number. Conservation plans would benefit from understanding the consequences of the lack of natural cone herbivory in ex situ germplasm management.

  20. Evaluating Trade-Offs of Human Involvement in Self-Adaptive Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-05-14

    Evaluating Trade -Offs of Human Involvement in Self-Adaptive Systems Javier Cámara∗, David Garlan∗, Gabriel A. Moreno+, and Bradley Schmerl...adaptive systems should trade -off whether to involve operators, taking these aspects into consideration along with other business qualities it is...involve opera- tors in this way, which involved choosing suitable human models and integrating them into the existing utility trade -off decision models

  1. Fundamental trade-offs generating the worldwide leaf economics spectrum.

    PubMed

    Shipley, Bill; Lechowicz, Martin J; Wright, Ian; Reich, Peter B

    2006-03-01

    Recent work has identified a worldwide "economic" spectrum of correlated leaf traits that affects global patterns of nutrient cycling and primary productivity and that is used to calibrate vegetation-climate models. The correlation patterns are displayed by species from the arctic to the tropics and are largely independent of growth form or phylogeny. This generality suggests that unidentified fundamental constraints control the return of photosynthates on investments of nutrients and dry mass in leaves. Using novel graph theoretic methods and structural equation modeling, we show that the relationships among these variables can best be explained by assuming (1) a necessary trade-off between allocation to structural tissues versus liquid phase processes and (2) an evolutionary tradeoff between leaf photosynthetic rates, construction costs, and leaf longevity.

  2. Propulsion system design trade-offs for space stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Jeffrey D.; Zimmermann, Frank S.; France, Cory P.

    1993-06-01

    The primary function of the propulsion system of a space station in LEO is to provide altitude maintenance to compensate for the effects of atmospheric drag. The paper investigates the trade-offs in the propulsion system design as a function of the propulsion system performance measured in terms of the on-orbit resources available to the propulsion system. Five low-thrust propulsion systems were analyzed, ranging from those that can use on-board waste products to state-of-the-art high-performance electric propulsion systems (mixed waste gas resistojet, water resistojet, hydrogen oxygen thruster, hydrazine arc-jet, and plasma thruster). The results of the analysis indicate that the average optimal altitude strategy decreases with increasing specific impulse of the propulsion system and increases with increasing costs of propellant resupply.

  3. Trade-off study of data storage technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kadyszewski, R. V.

    1977-01-01

    The need to store and retrieve large quantities of data at modest cost has generated the need for an economical, compact, archival mass storage system. Very significant improvements in the state-of-the-art of mass storage systems have been accomplished through the development of a number of magnetic, electro-optical, and other related devices. This study was conducted in order to do a trade-off between these data storage devices and the related technologies in order to determine an optimum approach for an archival mass data storage system based upon a comparison of the projected capabilities and characteristics of these devices to yield operational systems in the early 1980's.

  4. Propulsion system design trade-offs for space stations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jeffrey D.; Zimmermann, Frank S.; France, Cory P.

    1993-01-01

    The primary function of the propulsion system of a space station in LEO is to provide altitude maintenance to compensate for the effects of atmospheric drag. The paper investigates the trade-offs in the propulsion system design as a function of the propulsion system performance measured in terms of the on-orbit resources available to the propulsion system. Five low-thrust propulsion systems were analyzed, ranging from those that can use on-board waste products to state-of-the-art high-performance electric propulsion systems (mixed waste gas resistojet, water resistojet, hydrogen oxygen thruster, hydrazine arc-jet, and plasma thruster). The results of the analysis indicate that the average optimal altitude strategy decreases with increasing specific impulse of the propulsion system and increases with increasing costs of propellant resupply.

  5. Trade-offs in osmoregulation and parallel shifts in molecular function follow ecological transitions to freshwater in the Alewife

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Velotta, Jonathan P.; McCormick, Stephen; Schultz, Eric T.

    2015-01-01

    Adaptation to freshwater may be expected to reduce performance in seawater because these environments represent opposing selective regimes. We tested for such a trade-off in populations of the Alewife (Alosa pseudoharengus). Alewives are ancestrally anadromous, and multiple populations have been independently restricted to freshwater (landlocked). We conducted salinity challenge experiments, whereby juvenile Alewives from one anadromous and multiple landlocked populations were exposed to freshwater and seawater on acute and acclimation timescales. In response to acute salinity challenge trials, independently derived landlocked populations varied in the degree to which seawater tolerance has been lost. In laboratory-acclimation experiments, landlocked Alewives exhibited improved freshwater tolerance, which was correlated with reductions in seawater tolerance and hypo-osmotic balance, suggesting that trade-offs in osmoregulation may be associated with local adaptation to freshwater. We detected differentiation between life-history forms in the expression of an ion-uptake gene (NHE3), and in gill Na+/K+-ATPase activity. Trade-offs in osmoregulation, therefore, may be mediated by differentiation in ion-uptake and salt-secreting pathways.

  6. Trade-offs in an ant-plant-fungus mutualism.

    PubMed

    Orivel, Jérôme; Malé, Pierre-Jean; Lauth, Jérémie; Roux, Olivier; Petitclerc, Frédéric; Dejean, Alain; Leroy, Céline

    2017-03-15

    Species engaged in multiple, simultaneous mutualisms are subject to trade-offs in their mutualistic investment if the traits involved in each interaction are overlapping, which can lead to conflicts and affect the longevity of these associations. We investigate this issue via a tripartite mutualism involving an ant plant, two competing ant species and a fungus the ants cultivate to build galleries under the stems of their host plant to capture insect prey. The use of the galleries represents an innovative prey capture strategy compared with the more typical strategy of foraging on leaves. However, because of a limited worker force in their colonies, the prey capture behaviour of the ants results in a trade-off between plant protection (i.e. the ants patrol the foliage and attack intruders including herbivores) and ambushing prey in the galleries, which has a cascading effect on the fitness of all of the partners. The quantification of partners' traits and effects showed that the two ant species differed in their mutualistic investment. Less investment in the galleries (i.e. in fungal cultivation) translated into more benefits for the plant in terms of less herbivory and higher growth rates and vice versa. However, the greater vegetative growth of the plants did not produce a positive fitness effect for the better mutualistic ant species in terms of colony size and production of sexuals nor was the mutualist compensated by the wider dispersal of its queens. As a consequence, although the better ant mutualist is the one that provides more benefits to its host plant, its lower host-plant exploitation does not give this ant species a competitive advantage. The local coexistence of the ant species is thus fleeting and should eventually lead to the exclusion of the less competitive species.

  7. Performance trade-offs in in situ chemostat NMR.

    PubMed

    Castro, C D; Koretsky, A P; Domach, M M

    1999-01-01

    Investigating cell cultures with NMR requires high cell densities to provide adequate signal-to-noise, or scans must be summed over long time periods and short-term events are lost. The mixing within a chemostat can be used to shorten the time required to acquire informative in situ NMR spectra from cell cultures. However, performance trade-offs can occur between net signal, spectral resolution, and oxygenation due to sampling volume, conductivity, gas bubble, and fluid flow effects. These trade-offs and the effect of different mixing regimes were theoretically analyzed to quantify how device design decisions impact performance. The results were found to concur with data from cell-free NMR experiments performed in 18 mS/cm conductivity medium. The results also guided the redesign of an NMR bioreactor in terms of relative radio frequency (rf) coil and sample dimensions and other factors. The design, which entails using chemostat mixing to shunt sample through a rf coil in ca. 0.4 s, provides adequate oxygenation for the 4-16% (v/v) cell suspensions examined. Gains realized include lower conductive losses, better magnetic field homogeneity, and the exclusion of gas bubbles from the sampling zone. These gains enable the acquistion of spectra from dilute (3-4% v/v) Saccharomyces cerevisiae chemostat cultures in 6.9 min with high resolution in both the orthophosphate and the beta-NTP regions. Samples with 16% (v/v) cells also yield useful spectra within 0.5-1.0 min.

  8. Pressure-balanced stab connection

    SciTech Connect

    Best, M.J.A.; Jones, R.H.; Hynes, J.H.; Pond, R.J.; Gordon, C.R.

    1987-09-22

    This patent describes an apparatus for sealingly connecting a flow bore of a wellhead to a flowline. It consists of: a stab member including a stab body. The stab body has a stab body bore. One end of the stab body bore exiting from the stab body and being in fluid communication with the flow bore and the other end of the stab body bore exiting from a side of the stab body through a stab body side port; a stab receptacle mounted on the wellhead and having a stab receiving bore for receiving the stab body; the stab receptacle having a receptacle flow bore. One end of the receptacle flow bore being in fluid communication with the stab receiving bore and the other end of the receptacle flow bore exiting the stab receptacle and being in fluid communication with the flowline; means for establishing fluid communication between the stab body side port and the one end of the receptacle flow bore when the stab body is received within the stab receiving bore. It includes means disposed on the stab member for orienting the stab member with respect to the Christmas tree for ensuring the alignment of the stab body side port with the one end of the receptable flow bore when the stab body is received within the stab receiving bore; and first and second sealing means disposed on the stab body above and below the stab body side port, respectively, for sealing engagement with the walls of the stab receiving bore above and below the one end of the receptable flow bore for establishing a non-blow-apart, fluid pressure sealed flow passage between the stab body bore of the stab member and the receptacle flow bore of the stab receptacle when the stab body is landed within the stab receiving bore.

  9. Evidence for a trade-off between early growth and tooth wear in Svalbard reindeer.

    PubMed

    Veiberg, Vebjørn; Mysterud, Atle; Bjørkvoll, Eirin; Langvatn, Rolf; Loe, Leif Egil; Irvine, R Justin; Bonenfant, Christophe; Couweleers, Fred; Stenseth, Nils Chr

    2007-11-01

    Ruminants depend on efficient physical degradation of forage through chewing to increase the surface area of the food particles presented to the microflora. Fossil evidence suggests that increased molar height is an adaptation for wear tolerance in dry ecosystems with sparse vegetation, but no study has shown selection pressure for hypsodonty in contemporary ruminants. We explored the relationships between particle size in rumen, tooth wear (scanned molar occlusal topography), age and body mass of female Svalbard reindeer living in an arctic desert at 78 degrees latitude on Svalbard. We predicted that (H1) if the rumen particle size is determined mainly by constraints due to tooth wear, and if tooth wear is mainly a function of age, average particle size in rumen should increase with age. From allometric relations it is known that larger individuals can survive on a lower-quality diet, we therefore predicted (H2) larger particle sizes with increases in (ln) body mass, irrespective of age and wear. Lastly, if there is a trade-off between growth and tooth wear in dry ecosystems (a selection pressure for hypsodonty), we predicted (H3) that teeth of heavier animals should be more worn than those of lighter animals of the same age. The proportion of small particles (<1.0 mm) decreased rapidly with increasing age (consistent with H1). Heavier females within an age class had more worn teeth (consistent with H3) than lighter ones. A close-to-isometric relationship between particle size and body mass suggested that heavier animals partly compensated for reduced tooth efficiency by chewing more. We provide the first evidence of a trade-off between fast early growth and wear (a somatic cost) of a senescence-related trait--the structure and height of the molar--in a wild ruminant inhabiting an arctic desert where selection pressure for increased tooth height is expected. This suggests that foraging conditions are more extreme than the environment in which the species

  10. No evidence of trade-offs in the evolution of sperm numbers and sperm size in mammals.

    PubMed

    Tourmente, M; Delbarco Trillo, J; Roldan, E R S

    2015-10-01

    Post-copulatory sexual selection, in the form sperm competition, has influenced the evolution of several male reproductive traits. However, theory predicts that sperm competition would lead to trade-offs between numbers and size of spermatozoa because increased costs per cell would result in a reduction of sperm number if both traits share the same energetic budget. Theoretical models have proposed that, in large animals, increased sperm size would have minimal fitness advantage compared with increased sperm numbers. Thus, sperm numbers would evolve more rapidly than sperm size under sperm competition pressure. We tested in mammals whether sperm competition maximizes sperm numbers and size, and whether there is a trade-off between these traits. Our results showed that sperm competition maximizes sperm numbers in eutherian and metatherian mammals. There was no evidence of a trade-off between sperm numbers and sperm size in any of the two mammalian clades as we did not observe any significant relationship between sperm numbers and sperm size once the effect of sperm competition was taken into account. Maximization of both numbers and size in mammals may occur because each trait is crucial at different stages in sperm's life; for example size-determined sperm velocity is a key determinant of fertilization success. In addition, numbers and size may also be influenced by diverse energetic budgets required at different stages of sperm formation. © 2015 European Society For Evolutionary Biology. Journal of Evolutionary Biology © 2015 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.

  11. Morphological differences between habitats are associated with physiological and behavioural trade-offs in stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus)

    PubMed Central

    Seebacher, Frank; Webster, Mike M.; James, Rob S.; Tallis, Jason; Ward, Ashley J. W.

    2016-01-01

    Local specialization can be advantageous for individuals and may increase the resilience of the species to environmental change. However, there may be trade-offs between morphological responses and physiological performance and behaviour. Our aim was to test whether habitat-specific morphology of stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) interacts with physiological performance and behaviour at different salinities. We rejected the hypothesis that deeper body shape of fish from habitats with high predation pressure led to decreases in locomotor performance. However, there was a trade-off between deeper body shape and muscle quality. Muscle of deeper-bodied fish produced less force than that of shallow-bodied saltmarsh fish. Nonetheless, saltmarsh fish had lower swimming performance, presumably because of lower muscle mass overall coupled with smaller caudal peduncles and larger heads. Saltmarsh fish performed better in saline water (20 ppt) relative to freshwater and relative to fish from freshwater habitats. However, exposure to salinity affected shoaling behaviour of fish from all habitats and shoals moved faster and closer together compared with freshwater. We show that habitat modification can alter phenotypes of native species, but local morphological specialization is associated with trade-offs that may reduce its benefits. PMID:27429785

  12. The interaction of nifedipine with selected cyclodextrins and the subsequent solubility-permeability trade-off.

    PubMed

    Beig, Avital; Miller, Jonathan M; Dahan, Arik

    2013-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the interaction of 2-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HPβCD) and 2,6-dimethyl-β-cyclodextrin (DMβCD) with the lipophilic drug nifedipine and to investigate the subsequent solubility-permeability interplay. Solubility curves of nifedipine with HPβCD and DMβCD in MES buffer were evaluated using phase solubility methods. Then, the apparent permeability of nifedipine was investigated as a function of increasing HPβCD/DMβCD concentration in the hexadecane-based PAMPA model. The interaction with nifedipine was CD dependent; significantly higher stability constant was obtained for DMβCD in comparison with HPβCD. Moreover, nifedipine displays different type of interaction with these CDs; a 1:1 stoichiometric inclusion complex was apparent with HPβCD, while 1:2 stoichiometry was apparent for DMβCD. In all cases, decreased apparent intestinal permeability of nifedipine as a function of increasing CD level and nifedipine apparent solubility was obtained. A quasi-equilibrium mass transport analysis was developed to explain this solubility-permeability interplay; the model enabled excellent quantitative prediction of nifedipine's permeability as a function of CD concentrations. This work demonstrates that when using CDs in solubility-enabling formulations, a trade-off exists between solubility increase and permeability decrease that must not be overlooked. This trade-off was found to be independent of the type of CD-drug interaction. The transport model presented here can aid in striking the appropriate solubility-permeability balance in order to achieve optimal overall absorption.

  13. Revisiting the Time Trade-off Hypothesis: Work, Organized Activities, and Academics during College

    PubMed Central

    Maggs, Jennifer L.

    2014-01-01

    How adolescents spend their time has long-term implications for their educational, health, and labor market outcomes, yet surprisingly little research has explored the time use of students across days and semesters. The current study used longitudinal daily diary data from a sample of college students attending a large public university in the Northeastern US (n = 726, Mage = 18.4) that was followed for 14 days within each of 7 semesters (for up to 98 diary days per student). The study had two primary aims. The first aim was to explore demographic correlates of employment time, organized activity time, and academic time. The second aim was to provide a rigorous test of the time trade-off hypothesis, which suggests that students will spend less time on academics when they spend more time on employment and extracurricular activities. The results demonstrated that time use varied by gender, parental education, and race/ethnicity. Furthermore, the results from multi-level models provided some support for the time trade-off hypothesis, although associations varied by the activity type and whether the day was a weekend. More time spent on employment was linked to less time spent on academics across days and semesters whereas organized activities were associated with less time on academics at the daily level only. The negative associations between employment and academics were most pronounced on weekdays. These results suggest that students may balance certain activities across days, whereas other activities may be in competition over longer time frames (i.e., semesters). PMID:25381597

  14. Anti-microbial Use in Animals: How to Assess the Trade-offs

    PubMed Central

    Rushton, J

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobials are widely used in preventive and curative medicine in animals. Benefits from curative use are clear – it allows sick animals to be healthy with a gain in human welfare. The case for preventive use of antimicrobials is less clear cut with debates on the value of antimicrobials as growth promoters in the intensive livestock industries. The possible benefits from the use of antimicrobials need to be balanced against their cost and the increased risk of emergence of resistance due to their use in animals. The study examines the importance of animals in society and how the role and management of animals is changing including the use of antimicrobials. It proposes an economic framework to assess the trade-offs of anti-microbial use and examines the current level of data collection and analysis of these trade-offs. An exploratory review identifies a number of weaknesses. Rarely are we consistent in the frameworks applied to the economic assessment anti-microbial use in animals, which may well be due to gaps in data or the prejudices of the analysts. There is a need for more careful data collection that would allow information on (i) which species and production systems antimicrobials are used in, (ii) what active substance of antimicrobials and the application method and (iii) what dosage rates. The species need to include companion animals as well as the farmed animals as it is still not known how important direct versus indirect spread of resistance to humans is. In addition, research is needed on pricing antimicrobials used in animals to ensure that prices reflect production and marketing costs, the fixed costs of anti-microbial development and the externalities of resistance emergence. Overall, much work is needed to provide greater guidance to policy, and such work should be informed by rigorous data collection and analysis systems. PMID:25903492

  15. Anti-microbial Use in Animals: How to Assess the Trade-offs.

    PubMed

    Rushton, J

    2015-04-01

    Antimicrobials are widely used in preventive and curative medicine in animals. Benefits from curative use are clear - it allows sick animals to be healthy with a gain in human welfare. The case for preventive use of antimicrobials is less clear cut with debates on the value of antimicrobials as growth promoters in the intensive livestock industries. The possible benefits from the use of antimicrobials need to be balanced against their cost and the increased risk of emergence of resistance due to their use in animals. The study examines the importance of animals in society and how the role and management of animals is changing including the use of antimicrobials. It proposes an economic framework to assess the trade-offs of anti-microbial use and examines the current level of data collection and analysis of these trade-offs. An exploratory review identifies a number of weaknesses. Rarely are we consistent in the frameworks applied to the economic assessment anti-microbial use in animals, which may well be due to gaps in data or the prejudices of the analysts. There is a need for more careful data collection that would allow information on (i) which species and production systems antimicrobials are used in, (ii) what active substance of antimicrobials and the application method and (iii) what dosage rates. The species need to include companion animals as well as the farmed animals as it is still not known how important direct versus indirect spread of resistance to humans is. In addition, research is needed on pricing antimicrobials used in animals to ensure that prices reflect production and marketing costs, the fixed costs of anti-microbial development and the externalities of resistance emergence. Overall, much work is needed to provide greater guidance to policy, and such work should be informed by rigorous data collection and analysis systems. © 2015 The Authors. Zoonoses and Public Health Published by Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  16. Trade-off between inverse lithography mask complexity and lithographic performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Byung-Gook; Suh, Sung Soo; Kim, Byung-Sung; Woo, Sang-Gyun; Cho, Han-Ku; Tolani, Vikram; Dai, Grace; Irby, Dave; Wang, Kechang; Xiao, Guangming; Kim, David; Baik, Ki-Ho; Gleason, Bob

    2009-04-01

    Improvements in resolution of exposure systems have not kept pace with increasing density of semiconductor products. In order to keep shrinking circuits using equipment with the same basic resolution, lithographers have turned to options such as double-patterning, and have moved beyond model-based OPC in the search for optimal mask patterns. Inverse Lithography Technology (ILT) is becoming one of the strong candidates in 32nm & below single patterning, low-k1 lithography regime. It enables computation of optimum mask patterns to minimize deviations of images from their targets not only at nominal but also over a range of process variations, such as dose, defocus, and mask CD errors. When optimizing for a factor, such as process window, more complex mask patterns are often necessary to achieve the desired depth of focus. Complex mask patterns require more shots when written with VSB systems, increasing the component of mask cost associated with writing time. It can also be more difficult to inspect or repair certain types of complex patterns. Inspection and repair may take more time, or require more expensive equipment compared to the case with simpler masks. For these reasons, we desire to determine the simplest mask patterns that meet necessary lithographic manufacturing objectives. Luminescent ILT provides means to constrain complexity of mask solutions, each of which is optimized to meet lithographic objectives within the bounds of the constraints. Results presented here show trade-offs to process window performance with varying degrees of mask complexity. The paper details ILT mask simplification schemes on contact arrays and random logic, comparing process window trade-offs in each case. Ultimately this method enables litho and mask engineers balance lithographic requirements with mask manufacturing complexity and related cost.

  17. Revisiting the Time Trade-Off Hypothesis: Work, Organized Activities, and Academics During College.

    PubMed

    Greene, Kaylin M; Maggs, Jennifer L

    2015-08-01

    How adolescents spend their time has long-term implications for their educational, health, and labor market outcomes, yet surprisingly little research has explored the time use of students across days and semesters. The current study used longitudinal daily diary data from a sample of college students attending a large public university in the Northeastern US (n = 726, M age = 18.4) that was followed for 14 days within each of seven semesters (for up to 98 diary days per student). The study had two primary aims. The first aim was to explore demographic correlates of employment time, organized activity time, and academic time. The second aim was to provide a rigorous test of the time trade-off hypothesis, which suggests that students will spend less time on academics when they spend more time on employment and extracurricular activities. The results demonstrated that time use varied by gender, parental education, and race/ethnicity. Furthermore, the results from multi-level models provided some support for the time trade-off hypothesis, although associations varied by the activity type and whether the day was a weekend. More time spent on employment was linked to less time spent on academics across days and semesters whereas organized activities were associated with less time on academics at the daily level only. The negative associations between employment and academics were most pronounced on weekdays. These results suggest that students may balance certain activities across days, whereas other activities may be in competition over longer time frames (i.e., semesters).

  18. Energy-Information Trade-Offs between Movement and Sensing

    PubMed Central

    MacIver, Malcolm A.; Patankar, Neelesh A.; Shirgaonkar, Anup A.

    2010-01-01

    While there is accumulating evidence for the importance of the metabolic cost of information in sensory systems, how these costs are traded-off with movement when sensing is closely linked to movement is poorly understood. For example, if an animal needs to search a given amount of space beyond the range of its vision system, is it better to evolve a higher acuity visual system, or evolve a body movement system that can more rapidly move the body over that space? How is this trade-off dependent upon the three-dimensional shape of the field of sensory sensitivity (hereafter, sensorium)? How is it dependent upon sensorium mobility, either through rotation of the sensorium via muscles at the base of the sense organ (e.g., eye or pinna muscles) or neck rotation, or by whole body movement through space? Here we show that in an aquatic model system, the electric fish, a choice to swim in a more inefficient manner during prey search results in a higher prey encounter rate due to better sensory performance. The increase in prey encounter rate more than counterbalances the additional energy expended in swimming inefficiently. The reduction of swimming efficiency for improved sensing arises because positioning the sensory receptor surface to scan more space per unit time results in an increase in the area of the body pushing through the fluid, increasing wasteful body drag forces. We show that the improvement in sensory performance that occurs with the costly repositioning of the body depends upon having an elongated sensorium shape. Finally, we show that if the fish was able to reorient their sensorium independent of body movement, as fish with movable eyes can, there would be significant energy savings. This provides insight into the ubiquity of sensory organ mobility in animal design. This study exposes important links between the morphology of the sensorium, sensorium mobility, and behavioral strategy for maximally extracting energy from the environment. An

  19. Trade-off between morphological convergence and opportunistic diet behavior in fish hybrid zone

    PubMed Central

    Corse, Emmanuel; Costedoat, Caroline; Pech, Nicolas; Chappaz, Rémi; Grey, Jonathan; Gilles, André

    2009-01-01

    Background The invasive Chondrostoma nasus nasus has colonized part of the distribution area of the protected endemic species Chondrostoma toxostoma toxostoma. This hybrid zone is a complex system where multiple effects such as inter-species competition, bi-directional introgression, strong environmental pressure and so on are combined. Why do sympatric Chondrostoma fish present a unidirectional change in body shape? Is this the result of inter-species interactions and/or a response to environmental effects or the result of trade-offs? Studies focusing on the understanding of a trade-off between multiple parameters are still rare. Although this has previously been done for Cichlid species flock and for Darwin finches, where mouth or beak morphology were coupled to diet and genetic identification, no similar studies have been done for a fish hybrid zone in a river. We tested the correlation between morphology (body and mouth morphology), diet (stable carbon and nitrogen isotopes) and genomic combinations in different allopatric and sympatric populations for a global data set of 1330 specimens. To separate the species interaction effect from the environmental effect in sympatry, we distinguished two data sets: the first one was obtained from a highly regulated part of the river and the second was obtained from specimens coming from the less regulated part. Results The distribution of the hybrid combinations was different in the two part of the sympatric zone, whereas all the specimens presented similar overall changes in body shape and in mouth morphology. Sympatric specimens were also characterized by a larger diet behavior variance than reference populations, characteristic of an opportunistic diet. No correlation was established between the body shape (or mouth deformation) and the stable isotope signature. Conclusion The Durance River is an untamed Mediterranean river despite the presence of numerous dams that split the river from upstream to downstream. The

  20. 76 FR 70408 - Information Collection; Understanding Value Trade-Offs Regarding Fire Hazard Reduction Programs...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-14

    ... Forest Service Information Collection; Understanding Value Trade-Offs Regarding Fire Hazard Reduction... approved information collection, Understanding Value Trade-offs Regarding Fire Hazard Reduction Programs in...-offs Regarding Fire Hazard Reduction Programs in the Wildland-Urban Interface. OMB Number:...

  1. Strong selection genome-wide enhances fitness trade-offs across environments and episodes of selection.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Jill T; Lee, Cheng-Ruei; Mitchell-Olds, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Fitness trade-offs across episodes of selection and environments influence life-history evolution and adaptive population divergence. Documenting these trade-offs remains challenging as selection can vary in magnitude and direction through time and space. Here, we evaluate fitness trade-offs at the levels of the whole organism and the quantitative trait locus (QTL) in a multiyear field study of Boechera stricta (Brassicaceae), a genetically tractable mustard native to the Rocky Mountains. Reciprocal local adaptation was pronounced for viability, but not for reproductive components of fitness. Instead, local genomes had a fecundity advantage only in the high latitude garden. By estimating realized selection coefficients from individual-level data on viability and reproductive success and permuting the data to infer significance, we examined the genetic basis of fitness trade-offs. This analytical approach (Conditional Neutrality-Antagonistic Pleiotropy, CNAP) identified genetic trade-offs at a flowering phenology QTL (costs of adaptation) and revealed genetic trade-offs across fitness components (costs of reproduction). These patterns would not have emerged from traditional ANOVA-based QTL mapping. Our analytical framework can be applied to other systems to investigate fitness trade-offs. This task is becoming increasingly important as climate change may alter fitness landscapes, potentially disrupting fitness trade-offs that took many generations to evolve. © 2013 The Author(s). Evolution © 2013 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  2. The effect of cognitive reappraisal on the emotional memory trade-off.

    PubMed

    Steinberger, Allie; Payne, Jessica D; Kensinger, Elizabeth A

    2011-11-01

    Emotional information is often remembered better than neutral information, but this enhancement can come at the cost of memory for non-emotional stimuli presented alongside emotionally salient items. Two encoding-related factors have been proposed to influence the magnitude of this trade-off: The intensity of the affective response to the scenes (which increases the trade-off) and the cognitive control exerted to process the scenes (which decreases the trade-off). The present study examined the relative importance of these two factors by assessing the effect of cognitive reappraisal on the magnitude of the trade-off effect. Cognitive reappraisal refers to the implementation of cognitive strategies to assist a person in changing the intensity of their response to an experience. Thus, reappraisal provides a way to assess both of the factors that are important for the elicitation of the trade-off. The results revealed that when participants were asked to view the scenes, without cognitive reappraisal, a robust memory trade-off occurred. But, when participants were asked to either heighten or decrease their emotional reactions via reappraisal, there was a reduction in the magnitude of the trade-off. These results suggest that the cognitive process of reappraising the scenes is sufficient to reduce the trade-off effect, even when such processing leads to an intensified affective response.

  3. Optimization based trade-off analysis of biodiesel crop production for managing a German agricultural catchment

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In agricultural production, the existence of multiple trade-offs among several conflicting objectives, such as food production, water quantity, water quality, biodiversity and ecosystem services, is well known. However, quantification of the trade-offs among objectives in bioenergy crop production i...

  4. Spatial Resolution, Grayscale, and Error Diffusion Trade-offs: Impact on Display System Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gille, Jennifer L. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    We examine technology trade-offs related to grayscale resolution, spatial resolution, and error diffusion for tessellated display systems. We present new empirical results from our psychophysical study of these trade-offs and compare them to the predictions of a model of human vision.

  5. Trade-offs in seedling growth and survival within and across tropical forest microhabitats

    Treesearch

    Faith Inman-Narahari; Rebecca Ostertag; Gregory P. Asner; Susan Cordell; Stephen P. Hubbell; Lawren Sack

    2014-01-01

    For niche differences to maintain coexistence of sympatric species, each species must grow and/or survive better than each of the others in at least one set of conditions (i.e., performance trade-offs). However, the extent of niche differentiation in tropical forests remains highly debated. We present the first test of performance trade-offs for wild seedlings in a...

  6. Magnetospheric balance of solar wind dynamic pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, Ramon E.; Gonzalez, Walter D.

    2017-04-01

    The magnetopause is the boundary established by pressure balance between the solar wind flow in the magnetosheath and the magnetosphere. Generally, this pressure balance is represented to be between the solar wind, the dynamic pressure, and the magnetic pressure of Earth's dipole field. The plasma actually in contact with the magnetosphere is the slowed, compressed, and heated solar wind downstream of the shock. The force exerted on the magnetosheath plasma is the J × B force produced by the Chapman-Ferraro current that flows on the magnetopause. Under typical solar wind conditions of relatively high magnetosonic Mach number flow (>6), this simple picture is a reasonable description of the situation. However, under conditions of low solar wind magnetosonic Mach number flow ( 2) the force on the solar wind plasma is not exerted at the magnetopause and must be exerted at the bow shock by currents that connect to the Region 1 currents. In this paper we present observations from two magnetopause crossings observed by the Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms spacecraft to compare and contrast the force balance with the solar wind for two situations with very different solar wind magnetosonic Mach numbers.

  7. Reliability, Risk and Cost Trade-Offs for Composite Designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shiao, Michael C.; Singhal, Surendra N.; Chamis, Christos C.

    1996-01-01

    Risk and cost trade-offs have been simulated using a probabilistic method. The probabilistic method accounts for all naturally-occurring uncertainties including those in constituent material properties, fabrication variables, structure geometry and loading conditions. The probability density function of first buckling load for a set of uncertain variables is computed. The probabilistic sensitivity factors of uncertain variables to the first buckling load is calculated. The reliability-based cost for a composite fuselage panel is defined and minimized with respect to requisite design parameters. The optimization is achieved by solving a system of nonlinear algebraic equations whose coefficients are functions of probabilistic sensitivity factors. With optimum design parameters such as the mean and coefficient of variation (representing range of scatter) of uncertain variables, the most efficient and economical manufacturing procedure can be selected. In this paper, optimum values of the requisite design parameters for a predetermined cost due to failure occurrence are computationally determined. The results for the fuselage panel analysis show that the higher the cost due to failure occurrence, the smaller the optimum coefficient of variation of fiber modulus (design parameter) in longitudinal direction.

  8. Trade-Offs in Delayed Information Transmission in Biochemical Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancini, F.; Marsili, M.; Walczak, A. M.

    2016-03-01

    In order to transmit biochemical signals, biological regulatory systems dissipate energy with concomitant entropy production. Additionally, signaling often takes place in challenging environmental conditions. In a simple model regulatory circuit given by an input and a delayed output, we explore the trade-offs between information transmission and the system's energetic efficiency. We determine the maximally informative network, given a fixed amount of entropy production and a delayed response, exploring both the case with and without feedback. We find that feedback allows the circuit to overcome energy constraints and transmit close to the maximum available information even in the dissipationless limit. Negative feedback loops, characteristic of shock responses, are optimal at high dissipation. Close to equilibrium positive feedback loops, known for their stability, become more informative. Asking how the signaling network should be constructed to best function in the worst possible environment, rather than an optimally tuned one or in steady state, we discover that at large dissipation the same universal motif is optimal in all of these conditions.

  9. Trade-offs in antibody repertoires to complex antigens

    PubMed Central

    Childs, Lauren M.; Baskerville, Edward B.; Cobey, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    Pathogens vary in their antigenic complexity. While some pathogens such as measles present a few relatively invariant targets to the immune system, others such as malaria display considerable antigenic diversity. How the immune response copes in the presence of multiple antigens, and whether a trade-off exists between the breadth and efficacy of antibody (Ab)-mediated immune responses, are unsolved problems. We present a theoretical model of affinity maturation of B-cell receptors (BCRs) during a primary infection and examine how variation in the number of accessible antigenic sites alters the Ab repertoire. Naive B cells with randomly generated receptor sequences initiate the germinal centre (GC) reaction. The binding affinity of a BCR to an antigen is quantified via a genotype–phenotype map, based on a random energy landscape, that combines local and distant interactions between residues. In the presence of numerous antigens or epitopes, B-cell clones with different specificities compete for stimulation during rounds of mutation within GCs. We find that the availability of many epitopes reduces the affinity and relative breadth of the Ab repertoire. Despite the stochasticity of somatic hypermutation, patterns of immunodominance are strongly shaped by chance selection of naive B cells with specificities for particular epitopes. Our model provides a mechanistic basis for the diversity of Ab repertoires and the evolutionary advantage of antigenically complex pathogens. PMID:26194759

  10. Trade-offs in antibody repertoires to complex antigens.

    PubMed

    Childs, Lauren M; Baskerville, Edward B; Cobey, Sarah

    2015-09-05

    Pathogens vary in their antigenic complexity. While some pathogens such as measles present a few relatively invariant targets to the immune system, others such as malaria display considerable antigenic diversity. How the immune response copes in the presence of multiple antigens, and whether a trade-off exists between the breadth and efficacy of antibody (Ab)-mediated immune responses, are unsolved problems. We present a theoretical model of affinity maturation of B-cell receptors (BCRs) during a primary infection and examine how variation in the number of accessible antigenic sites alters the Ab repertoire. Naive B cells with randomly generated receptor sequences initiate the germinal centre (GC) reaction. The binding affinity of a BCR to an antigen is quantified via a genotype-phenotype map, based on a random energy landscape, that combines local and distant interactions between residues. In the presence of numerous antigens or epitopes, B-cell clones with different specificities compete for stimulation during rounds of mutation within GCs. We find that the availability of many epitopes reduces the affinity and relative breadth of the Ab repertoire. Despite the stochasticity of somatic hypermutation, patterns of immunodominance are strongly shaped by chance selection of naive B cells with specificities for particular epitopes. Our model provides a mechanistic basis for the diversity of Ab repertoires and the evolutionary advantage of antigenically complex pathogens.

  11. Air quality and climate--synergies and trade-offs.

    PubMed

    von Schneidemesser, Erika; Monks, Paul S

    2013-07-01

    Air quality and climate are often treated as separate science and policy areas. Air quality encompasses the here-and-now of pollutant emissions, atmospheric transformations and their direct effect on human and ecosystem health. Climate change deals with the drivers leading to a warmer world and the consequences of that. These two science and policy issues are inexorably linked via common pollutants, such as ozone (methane) and black carbon. This short review looks at the new scientific evidence around so-called "short-lived climate forcers" and the growing realisation that a way to meet short-term climate change targets may be through the control of "air quality" pollutants. None of the options discussed here can replace reduction of long-lived greenhouse gases, such as CO2, which is required for any long-term climate change mitigation strategy. An overview is given of the underlying science, remaining uncertainties, and some of the synergies and trade-offs for addressing air quality and climate in the science and policy context.

  12. Anthrax Sampling and Decontamination: Technology Trade-Offs

    SciTech Connect

    Price, Phillip N.; Hamachi, Kristina; McWilliams, Jennifer; Sohn, Michael D.

    2008-09-12

    The goal of this project was to answer the following questions concerning response to a future anthrax release (or suspected release) in a building: 1. Based on past experience, what rules of thumb can be determined concerning: (a) the amount of sampling that may be needed to determine the extent of contamination within a given building; (b) what portions of a building should be sampled; (c) the cost per square foot to decontaminate a given type of building using a given method; (d) the time required to prepare for, and perform, decontamination; (e) the effectiveness of a given decontamination method in a given type of building? 2. Based on past experience, what resources will be spent on evaluating the extent of contamination, performing decontamination, and assessing the effectiveness of the decontamination in abuilding of a given type and size? 3. What are the trade-offs between cost, time, and effectiveness for the various sampling plans, sampling methods, and decontamination methods that have been used in the past?

  13. Equity trade-offs in conservation decision making.

    PubMed

    Law, Elizabeth A; Bennett, Nathan J; Ives, Christopher D; Friedman, Rachel; Davis, Katrina J; Archibald, Carla; Wilson, Kerrie A

    2017-09-01

    Conservation decisions increasingly involve multiple environmental and social objectives, which result in complex decision contexts with high potential for trade-offs. Improving social equity is one such objective that is often considered an enabler of successful outcomes and a virtuous ideal in itself. Despite its idealized importance in conservation policy, social equity is often highly simplified or ill-defined and is applied uncritically. What constitutes equitable outcomes and processes is highly normative and subject to ethical deliberation. Different ethical frameworks may lead to different conceptions of equity through alternative perspectives of what is good or right. This can lead to different and potentially conflicting equity objectives in practice. We promote a more transparent, nuanced, and pluralistic conceptualization of equity in conservation decision making that particularly recognizes where multidimensional equity objectives may conflict. To help identify and mitigate ethical conflicts and avoid cases of good intentions producing bad outcomes, we encourage a more analytical incorporation of equity into conservation decision making particularly during mechanistic integration of equity objectives. We recommend that in conservation planning motivations and objectives for equity be made explicit within the problem context, methods used to incorporate equity objectives be applied with respect to stated objectives, and, should objectives dictate, evaluation of equity outcomes and adaptation of strategies be employed during policy implementation This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  14. Cadmium Protection Strategies—A Hidden Trade-Off?

    PubMed Central

    Sandbichler, Adolf Michael; Höckner, Martina

    2016-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is a non-essential transition metal which is introduced into the biosphere by various anthropogenic activities. Environmental pollution with Cd poses a major health risk and Cd toxicity has been extensively researched over the past decades. This review aims at changing the perspective by discussing protection mechanisms available to counteract a Cd insult. Antioxidants, induction of antioxidant enzymes, and complexation of Cd to glutathione (GSH) and metallothionein (MT) are the most potent protective measures to cope with Cd-induced oxidative stress. Furthermore, protection mechanisms include prevention of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, mitophagy and metabolic stress, as well as expression of chaperones. Pre-exposure to Cd itself, or co-exposure to other metals or trace elements can improve viability under Cd exposure and cells have means to reduce Cd uptake and improve Cd removal. Finally, environmental factors have negative or positive effects on Cd toxicity. Most protection mechanisms aim at preventing cellular damage. However, this might not be possible without trade-offs like an increased risk of carcinogenesis. PMID:26805823

  15. Performance trade-offs in the flight initiation of Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Card, Gwyneth; Dickinson, Michael

    2008-02-01

    The fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster performs at least two distinct types of flight initiation. One kind is a stereotyped escape response to a visual stimulus that is mediated by the hard-wired giant fiber neural pathway, and the other is a more variable ;voluntary' response that can be performed without giant fiber activation. Because the simpler escape take-offs are apparently successful, it is unclear why the fly has multiple pathways to coordinate flight initiation. In this study we use high-speed videography to observe flight initiation in unrestrained wild-type flies and assess the flight performance of each of the two types of take-off. Three-dimensional kinematic analysis of take-off sequences indicates that wing use during the jumping phase of flight initiation is essential for stabilizing flight. During voluntary take-offs, early wing elevation leads to a slower and more stable take-off. In contrast, during visually elicited escapes, the wings are pulled down close to the body during take-off, resulting in tumbling flights in which the fly translates faster but also rotates rapidly about all three of its body axes. Additionally, we find evidence that the power delivered by the legs is substantially greater during visually elicited escapes than during voluntary take-offs. Thus, we find that the two types of Drosophila flight initiation result in different flight performances once the fly is airborne, and that these performances are distinguished by a trade-off between speed and stability.

  16. Fitness Trade-Offs in Competence Differentiation of Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Yüksel, Melih; Power, Jeffrey J.; Ribbe, Jan; Volkmann, Thorsten; Maier, Berenike

    2016-01-01

    In the stationary phase, Bacillus subtilis differentiates stochastically and transiently into the state of competence for transformation (K-state). The latter is associated with growth arrest, and it is unclear how the ability to develop competence is stably maintained, despite its cost. To quantify the effect differentiation has on the competitive fitness of B. subtilis, we characterized the competition dynamics between strains with different probabilities of entering the K-state. The relative fitness decreased with increasing differentiation probability both during the stationary phase and during outgrowth. When exposed to antibiotics inhibiting cell wall synthesis, transcription, and translation, cells that differentiated into the K-state showed a selective advantage compared to differentiation-deficient bacteria; this benefit did not require transformation. Although beneficial, the K-state was not induced by sub-MIC concentrations of antibiotics. Increasing the differentiation probability beyond the wt level did not significantly affect the competition dynamics with transient antibiotic exposure. We conclude that the competition dynamics are very sensitive to the fraction of competent cells under benign conditions but less sensitive during antibiotic exposure, supporting the picture of stochastic differentiation as a fitness trade-off. PMID:27375604

  17. Time trade-off: one methodology, different methods.

    PubMed

    Attema, Arthur E; Edelaar-Peeters, Yvette; Versteegh, Matthijs M; Stolk, Elly A

    2013-07-01

    There is no scientific consensus on the optimal specification of the time trade-off (TTO) task. As a consequence, studies using TTO to value health states may share the core element of trading length of life for quality of life, but can differ considerably on many other elements. While this pluriformity in specifications advances the understanding of TTO from a methodological point of view, it also results in incomparable health state values. Health state values are applied in health technology assessments, and in that context comparability of information is desired. In this article, we discuss several alternative specifications of TTO presented in the literature. The defining elements of these specifications are identified as being either methodological, procedural or analytical in nature. Where possible, it is indicated how these elements affect health state values (i.e., upward or downward). Finally, a checklist for TTO studies is presented, which incorporates a list of choices to be made by researchers who wish to perform a TTO task. Such a checklist enables other researchers to align methodologies in order to enhance the comparability of health state values.

  18. Product life trade-offs: what if products fail early?

    PubMed

    Skelton, Alexandra C H; Allwood, Julian M

    2013-02-05

    Increasing product life allows the embodied emissions in products to be spread across a longer period but can mean that opportunities to improve use-phase efficiency are foregone. In this paper, a model that evaluates this trade-off is presented and used to estimate the optimal product life for a range of metal-intensive products. Two strategies that have potential to save emissions are explored: (1) adding extra embodied emissions to make products more sturdy, increasing product life, and (2) increasing frequency of use, causing early product failure to take advantage of improvements in use-phase efficiency. These strategies are evaluated for two specific case studies (long-life washing machines and more frequent use of vehicles through car clubs) and for a range of embodied and use-phase intensive products under different use-phase improvement rate assumptions. Particular emphasis is placed on the fact that products often fail neither at their design life nor at their optimal life. Policy recommendations are then made regarding the targeting of these strategies according to product characteristics and the timing of typical product failure relative to optimal product life.

  19. Zooplankton competition promotes trade-offs affecting diapause in rotifers.

    PubMed

    Aránguiz-Acuña, Adriana; Ramos-Jiliberto, Rodrigo; Serra, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Facultative diapause should be favoured by natural selection in temporary variable habitats. Diapause patterns are evolutionary constrained because producing diapause is resource demanding, which might have implications for competitive dynamics and competitor coexistence through mechanisms such as the storage effect. Besides these implications, competition intensity might affect the quality of the diapausing stages and the reproductive success of the offspring emerging from them. We experimentally analysed traits involved in diapause in the cyclically parthenogenetic rotifer Brachionus calyciflorus, in relation to the presence of its competitor, the cladoceran Moina micrura. Under competition with Moina, Brachionus produced fewer diapausing eggs, most of which possessed visual attributes indicating a higher quality. These diapausing eggs produced under a competitive environment had a higher hatching success; however, the hatchlings exhibited a lower population growth rate. We propose the existence of trade-offs between traits related to diapause: the number of produced eggs, quality of these eggs and hatchling performance. Our results show that interspecific competition may cause fine-tuned changes in the life cycle patterns of the populations. Furthermore, these changes could affect that abundance and performance of competitors and thereby drive back effects on the competitive output. These diapause-driven feedback mechanisms may have strong implications for the dynamics of the natural communities.

  20. Emotion-induced trade-offs in spatiotemporal vision.

    PubMed

    Bocanegra, Bruno R; Zeelenberg, René

    2011-05-01

    It is generally assumed that emotion facilitates human vision in order to promote adaptive responses to a potential threat in the environment. Surprisingly, we recently found that emotion in some cases impairs the perception of elementary visual features (Bocanegra & Zeelenberg, 2009b). Here, we demonstrate that emotion improves fast temporal vision at the expense of fine-grained spatial vision. We tested participants' threshold resolution with Landolt circles containing a small spatial or brief temporal discontinuity. The prior presentation of a fearful face cue, compared with a neutral face cue, impaired spatial resolution but improved temporal resolution. In addition, we show that these benefits and deficits were triggered selectively by the global configural properties of the faces, which were transmitted only through low spatial frequencies. Critically, the common locus of these opposite effects suggests a trade-off between magno- and parvocellular-type visual channels, which contradicts the common assumption that emotion invariably improves vision. We show that, rather than being a general "boost" for all visual features, affective neural circuits sacrifice the slower processing of small details for a coarser but faster visual signal.

  1. Telomere Length and the Cancer–Atherosclerosis Trade-Off

    PubMed Central

    Stone, Rivka C.; Horvath, Kent; Kark, Jeremy D.; Susser, Ezra; Tishkoff, Sarah A.; Aviv, Abraham

    2016-01-01

    Modern humans, the longest-living terrestrial mammals, display short telomeres and repressed telomerase activity in somatic tissues compared with most short-living small mammals. The dual trait of short telomeres and repressed telomerase might render humans relatively resistant to cancer compared with short-living small mammals. However, the trade-off for cancer resistance is ostensibly increased age-related degenerative diseases, principally in the form of atherosclerosis. In this communication, we discuss (a) the genetics of human telomere length, a highly heritable complex trait that is influenced by genetic ancestry, sex, and paternal age at conception, (b) how cancer might have played a role in the evolution of telomere biology across mammals, (c) evidence that in modern humans telomere length is a determinant (rather than only a biomarker) of cancer and atherosclerosis, and (d) the potential influence of relatively recent evolutionary forces in fashioning the variation in telomere length across and within populations, and their likely lasting impact on major diseases in humans. Finally, we propose venues for future research on human telomere genetics in the context of its potential role in shaping the modern human lifespan. PMID:27386863

  2. Characterization of Arabidopsis thaliana regrowth patterns suggests a trade-off between undamaged fitness and damage tolerance.

    PubMed

    Scholes, Daniel R; Rasnick, Erika N; Paige, Ken N

    2017-07-01

    Herbivory is a fundamental type of plant-animal interaction that presents substantial selection pressure on plants to replace lost tissues and to prevent subsequent losses in fitness. Apical herbivory, which entails removal or damage to the apical meristem, causes a change in plant architecture by disrupting the balance of hormones produced in part by the apical meristem. Therefore, for an annual semelparous plant, the ability to preserve reproductive success following damage (i.e., to tolerate damage) is largely dependent on the plant's pre-damage investment into fitness and its regrowth pattern following damage. Using multiple regression analyses, we assessed the relationship of developmental and architectural traits of experimentally damaged plants relative to undamaged plants of 33 Arabidopsis thaliana genotypes that display a wide range of undamaged fitness and damage tolerance. Our analyses revealed evidence for an evolutionary bet-hedging strategy within a subset of genotypes to presumably maximize fitness under natural herbivory-genotypes with the greatest seed production when undamaged exhibited a significant reduction in seed yield when damaged, while genotypes with low undamaged seed production were the only genotypes whose seed yield increased when damaged. Patterns of endopolyploidy paralleled those of seed production, such that the increase in whole-plant ploidy by genome re-replication during growth/regrowth contributes to undamaged fitness, damage tolerance, and their trade-off. Overall, this study provides the first large-scale characterization of A. thaliana regrowth patterns and suggests that investment into fitness and endopolyploidy when undamaged may come at a cost to tolerance ability once damaged.

  3. Supply-demand equilibria and the size-number trade-off in spatially structured recreational fisheries.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Kyle L; Cantin, Ariane; Ward, Hillary G M; Newton, Eric R; Mee, Jonathan A; Varkey, Divya A; Parkinson, Eric A; Post, John R

    2016-06-01

    Recreational fishing effort varies across complex inland landscapes (e.g., lake-districts) and appears influenced by both angler preferences and qualities of the fishery resource, like fish size and abundance. However, fish size and abundance have an ecological trade-off within a population, thereby structuring equal-quality isopleths expressing this trade-off across the fishing landscape. Since expressed preferences of recreational anglers (i.e., site-selection of high-quality fishing opportunities among many lakes) can be analogous to optimal foraging strategies of natural predators, adopting such concepts can aid in understanding scale-dependence in fish-angler interactions and impacts of fishing across broad landscapes. Here, we assumed a fish supply-angler demand equilibria and adapted a novel bivariate measure of fishing quality based on fish size and catch rates to assess how recreational anglers influence fishing quality among a complex inland landscape. We then applied this metric to evaluate (1) angler preferences for caught and released fish compared to harvested fish, (2) the nonlinear size-numbers trade-off with uncertainty in both traits, and (3) the spatial-scale of the equilibria across 62 lakes and four independent management regions in British Columbia's (BC) rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss fishery. We found anglers had low preference for caught and released fish (~10% of the value compared to harvested fish), which modified anglers' perception of fishing quality. Hence, fishing quality and angler effort was not influenced simply by total fish caught, but largely by harvested fish catch rates. Fishing quality varied from BC's northern regions (larger fish and more abundant) compared to southern regions (smaller fish and less abundant) directly associated with a 2.5 times increase in annual fishing effort in southern regions, suggesting that latent fishing pressure can structure the size-numbers trade-off in rainbow trout populations. The

  4. Supply-demand equilibria and the size-number trade-off in spatially structured recreational fisheries.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Kyle L; Cantin, Ariane; Ward, Hillary G M; Newton, Eric R; Mee, Jonathan A; Varkey, Divya A; Parkinson, Eric A; Post, John R

    2016-06-01

    Recreational fishing effort varies across complex inland landscapes (e.g., lake-districts) and appears influenced by both angler preferences and qualities of the fishery resource, like fish size and abundance. However, fish size and abundance have an ecological trade-off within a population, thereby structuring equal-quality isopleths expressing this trade-off across the fishing landscape. Since expressed preferences of recreational anglers (i.e., site-selection of high-quality fishing opportunities among many lakes) can be analogous to optimal foraging strategies of natural predators, adopting such concepts can aid in understanding scale-dependence in fish-angler interactions and impacts of fishing across broad landscapes. Here, we assumed a fish supply-angler demand equilibria and adapted a novel bivariate measure of fishing quality based on fish size and catch rates to assess how recreational anglers influence fishing quality among a complex inland landscape. We then applied this metric to evaluate (1) angler preferences for caught and released fish compared to harvested fish, (2) the nonlinear size-numbers trade-off with uncertainty in both traits, and (3) the spatial-scale of the equilibria across 62 lakes and four independent management regions in British Columbia's (BC) rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss fishery. We found anglers had low preference for caught and released fish (~10% of the value compared to harvested fish), which modified anglers' perception of fishing quality. Hence, fishing quality and angler effort was not influenced simply by total fish caught, but largely by harvested fish catch rates. Fishing quality varied from BC's northern regions (larger fish and more abundant) compared to southern regions (smaller fish and less abundant) directly associated with a 2.5 times increase in annual fishing effort in southern regions, suggesting that latent fishing pressure can structure the size-numbers trade-off in rainbow trout populations. The

  5. Parasitism and Physiological Trade-Offs in Stressed Capybaras

    PubMed Central

    Eberhardt, Ayelen T.; Costa, Sebastián A.; Marini, M. Rocío; Racca, Andrea; Baldi, Cecilia J.; Robles, M. Rosario; Moreno, Pablo G.; Beldomenico, Pablo M.

    2013-01-01

    Parasites play a key role in regulating wildlife population dynamics, but their impact on the host appears to be context-dependent. Evidence indicates that a synergistic interaction between stress, host condition and parasites is implicated in this phenomenon, but more studies are needed to better understand this context-dependency. With the goal to assess the net effect of two types of chronic stress on various host-parasite interactions, we conducted an experiment in capybaras to evaluate the impact of food restriction and physical restraint on the infection intensity of specific gastrointestinal nematodes and coccidia, and how these stressors affected the growth, body condition, and some immuno-physiological parameters. Our hypothesis was that both forms of stress would result in an alteration in the host-parasite interactions, with deteriorated condition and reduced immunological investment leading to high parasite burdens and vice versa. Stressed capybaras had significantly higher coccidia infection intensities; but among individuals that were smaller, those stressed consistently showed lower helminth burdens than controls. Both stress treatments had a marked negative impact on growth and body condition, but concomitantly they had a significant positive effect on some components of the immune system. Our results suggest, on the one hand, that during prolonged periods of stress capybaras preventatively invest in some components of their immunity, such as innate humoural defenses and cells that combat helminths, which could be considered a stress-dependent prophylaxis. On the other hand, stress was found to cause greater infection intensities of protozoans but lower burdens of nematodes, indicating that the relationship between stress, physiological trade-offs and infection depends on the type of parasite in question. Moreover, both findings might be related in a causal way, as one of the immunological parameters enhanced in stressed capybaras is associated with

  6. Trade-offs between growth and reproduction in female bison.

    PubMed

    Green, Wendy C H; Rothstein, Aron

    1991-05-01

    The extent to which (a) larger females produce more or larger offspring, (b) reproduction imposes costs, and (c) the benefits of early reproduction outweigh the costs was examined for female bison (Bison bison) with data from an 8-year period. Description of ontogenetic patterns indicated that reproductive performance reached a plateau near the end of the growth period; changes with age in fecundity were little related to those of body weight during the typical reproductive lifespan (age 3-18 years). Examination of inter-and intra-individual variation showed that the relationship between growth and reproduction depends on the age of subjects. Larger juveniles matured earlier and were more fecund (though smaller) as adults. In contrast, post-pubertal growth was negatively related to reporductive performance, although intra-individual weight variation was positively associated with pregnancy rate. Fecundity was not generally lower in years after reproduction than after barren years, in spite of weight loss, suggesting that reproduction did not impose significant fitness costs. On the other hand, offspring quality was lower when mothers reproduced in successive rather than alternate years. Early maturation resulted in immediate costs, including reduced growth and infertility in the year after first parturition. However, there were long-term benefits: fecundity in the first 7-9 years was highest for early-maturing and lowest for late-maturing females, suggesting that reproductive success is greater for early-maturing females despite reduced growth. In the present study, trade-offs between growth and reproduction did not appear to reflect substantial costs as measured by long-term reproductive success.

  7. Trade-offs in designing a mobile infrared scene projector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Richard; Lastra, Henry M.; Vuong, Francisca R.; Brooks, Geoffrey W.

    2000-07-01

    Current test and evaluation methods are not adequate for fully assessing the operational performance of imaging infrared sensors while they are installed on the weapon system platform. The use of infrared (IR) scene projection in test and evaluation will augment and redefine test methodologies currently being used to test and evaluate forward looking infrared (FLIR) and imaging IR sensors. The Mobile Infrared Scene Projector (MIRSP) projects accurate, dynamic, and realistic IR imagery into the entrance aperture of the sensor, such that the sensor would perceive and respond to the imagery as it would to the real-world scenario. The MIRSP domain of application includes development, analysis, integration, exploitation, training, and test and evaluation of ground and aviation based imaging IR sensors/subsystems/systems. This applies to FLIR systems, imaging IR missile seekers/guidance sections, as well as non-imaging thermal sensors. The MIRSP Phase I, 'pathfinder' has evolved from other scene projector systems, such as the Flight Motion Simulator Infrared Scene Projector (FIRSP) and the Dynamic Infrared Scene Projector (DIRSP). Both of these projector systems were designed for laboratory test and evaluation use rather than field test and evaluation use. This paper will detail the MIRSP design to include trade-off analysis performed at the system/subsystem levels. The MIRSP Phase II will provide the capability to test and evaluate various electro-optical sensors on weapon platform. The MIRSP Phase I and II will be advancing current IR scene projector technologies by exploring other technologies such as mobility/transportability, packaging, sensors, and scene generation.

  8. Trade-offs between better hearing and better cosmetics.

    PubMed

    Tyler, Richard S; Witt, Shelley A; Dunn, Camille C

    2004-12-01

    A case study is reported of an adult bilateral cochlear implant patient who owns both a pair of ear-level and body-worn speech processors and chooses to wear them in unique configurations, knowingly compromising his auditory performance. The aim was to determine if differences in hearing could be quantified between these devices and to examine the size of these effects that would lend themselves to trading between performance and cosmetics. The patient reported wearing bilateral ear-level speech processors (programmed with the Cochlear Corporation spectral PEAK [SPEAK] coding strategy) 75% of the time for cosmetic and convenience reasons even though he "heard the best" with bilateral body-worn speech processors (programmed with the Cochlear Corporation advanced combination encoder strategy [ACE]). Speech perception and localization tests confirmed that this patient performed significantly better on monosyllabic phonemes in quiet (a difference from 60% to 75%) and localization (a total root-mean-squared-error difference from 22 degrees to 12degrees ) with bilateral body-worn speech processors and consistently rated various speech sounds as more clear than with bilateral ear-level units. There was a 2-dB difference in sentence reception threshold in noise, which was not statistically significant. These results suggest that clinicians should consider and provide options to patients when there are trade-offs to be made regarding understanding performance and cosmetics. Some individuals may choose better speech perception over cosmetics, and the ability to choose might result in greater compliance. The observations made here are relevant to hearing aid users as well.

  9. Reproduction alters oxidative status when it is traded-off against longevity.

    PubMed

    Beaulieu, Michaël; Geiger, Rina E; Reim, Elisabeth; Zielke, Luisa; Fischer, Klaus

    2015-07-01

    Oxidative stress has been proposed to mediate one of the most important aspects of life-history evolution: the trade-off between reproduction and self-maintenance. However, empirical studies have cast doubt on the generality of this intriguing notion. Here, we hypothesize that reproduction alters oxidative status only when a trade-off between reproduction and self-maintenance occurs. Accordingly, in female Bicyclus anynana butterflies, we found that reproduction affected oxidative markers only under challenging thermal conditions that made the trade-off between reproduction and longevity emerge. Interestingly, under such conditions, butterflies favored longevity over reproduction, suggesting that self-maintenance mechanisms were activated. Accordingly, butterflies reproducing under challenging thermal conditions exhibited enhanced antioxidant defenses and stable oxidative damage. Altogether, our results indicate that a trade-off between reproduction and self-maintenance is indeed a necessary condition for reproduction to alter oxidative status, and that the effects of such a trade-off on oxidative status depend on whether priority is given to self-maintenance or reproduction. Assessing the existence of the trade-off between self-maintenance and reproduction, and whether self-maintenance is prioritized relative to reproduction is therefore crucial for understanding variation in oxidative status in reproducing animals, which may clarify the general implication of oxidative stress in the resolution of life-history trade-offs.

  10. Performance trade-offs and ageing in the 'world's greatest athletes'.

    PubMed

    Careau, Vincent; Wilson, Robbie S

    2017-08-16

    The mechanistic foundations of performance trade-offs are clear: because body size and shape constrains movement, and muscles vary in strength and fibre type, certain physical traits should act in opposition with others (e.g. sprint versus endurance). Yet performance trade-offs are rarely detected, and traits are often positively correlated. A potential resolution to this conundrum is that within-individual performance trade-offs can be masked by among-individual variation in 'quality'. Although there is a current debate on how to unambiguously define and account for quality, no previous studies have partitioned trait correlations at the within- and among-individual levels. Here, we evaluate performance trade-offs among and within 1369 elite athletes that performed in a total of 6418 combined-events competitions (decathlon and heptathlon). Controlling for age, experience and wind conditions, we detected strong trade-offs between groups of functionally similar events (throwing versus jumping versus running) occurring at the among-individual level. We further modelled individual (co)variation in age-related plasticity of performance and found previously unseen trade-offs in throwing versus running performance that manifest through ageing. Our results verify that human performance is limited by fundamental genetic, environmental and ageing constraints that preclude the simultaneous improvement of performance in multiple dimensions. Identifying these constraints is fundamental to understanding performance trade-offs and predicting the ageing of motor function. © 2017 The Author(s).

  11. Insights from life history theory for an explicit treatment of trade-offs in conservation biology.

    PubMed

    Charpentier, Anne

    2015-06-01

    As economic and social contexts become more embedded within biodiversity conservation, it becomes obvious that resources are a limiting factor in conservation. This recognition is leading conservation scientists and practitioners to increasingly frame conservation decisions as trade-offs between conflicting societal objectives. However, this framing is all too often done in an intuitive way, rather than by addressing trade-offs explicitly. In contrast, the concept of trade-off is a keystone in evolutionary biology, where it has been investigated extensively. I argue that insights from evolutionary theory can provide methodological and theoretical support to evaluating and quantifying trade-offs in biodiversity conservation. I reviewed the diverse ways in which trade-offs have emerged within the context of conservation and how advances from evolutionary theory can help avoid the main pitfalls of an implicit approach. When studying both evolutionary trade-offs (e.g., reproduction vs. survival) and conservation trade-offs (e.g., biodiversity conservation vs. agriculture), it is crucial to correctly identify the limiting resource, hold constant the amount of this resource when comparing different scenarios, and choose appropriate metrics to quantify the extent to which the objectives have been achieved. Insights from studies in evolutionary theory also reveal how an inadequate selection of conservation solutions may result from considering suboptimal rather than optional solutions when examining whether a trade-off exits between 2 objectives. Furthermore, the shape of a trade-off curve (i.e., whether the relationship between 2 objectives follows a concave, convex, or linear form) is known to affect crucially the definition of optimal solutions in evolutionary biology and very likely affects decisions in biodiversity conservation planning too. This interface between evolutionary biology and biodiversity conservation can therefore provide methodological guidance to

  12. A power-efficiency trade-off in resource use alters epidemiological relationships.

    PubMed

    Hall, Spencer R; Becker, Claes R; Duffy, Meghan A; Cáceres, Carla E

    2012-03-01

    Trade-offs play pivotal roles in the ecology and evolution of natural populations. However, trade-offs are probably not static, invariant relationships. Instead, ecological factors can shift, alter, or reverse the relationships underlying trade-offs and create critical genotype x environment (G x E) interactions. But which ecological factors alter trade-offs or create G x E interactions, and why (mechanistically) do they do this? We tackle these questions using resource quality as the central ecological factor and a case study of disease in the plankton. We show that clonal genotypes of a zooplankton host (Daphnia dentifera) exhibit a "power-efficiency" trade-off in resource use, where powerful (fast-feeding) host clones perform well on richer algal resources, but more efficient (slow-feeding) clones perform relatively well on poorer resources. This resource-based trade-off then influences epidemiological relationships due to fundamental connections between resources and fecundity, transmission rate (an index of resistance), and replication of a virulent fungal parasite (Metschnikowia bicuspidata) within hosts. For instance, using experiments and dynamic energy budget models, we show that the power-efficiency trade-off overturned a previously detected trade-off between fecundity and transmission risk of hosts to this parasite. When poorer resources were eaten, transmission risk and fecundity were negatively, not positively, correlated. Additionally, poor resource quality changed positive relationships between yield of infectious stages (spores) and host fecundity: those fecundity-spore relationships with poor food became negative or nonsignificant. Finally, the power-efficiency trade-off set up an interaction between host clone and resource quality for yield of fungal spores: powerful clones yielded relatively more spores on the better resource, while efficient clones yielded relatively more on the poorer resource. Thus, the physiological ecology of resource use

  13. Life-history trade-offs and the evolution of pathogen resistance: competition between host strains.

    PubMed

    Bowers, R G; Boots, M; Begon, M

    1994-09-22

    The dynamics of a 'resistant' and a 'susceptible' strain of a self-regulated host species, in the presence of a directly transmitted pathogen, is investigated. The two strains trade off differences in pathogen transmissibility (as an aspect of pathogen resistance) against differences in birth rate and/or resistance to crowding. Depending on parameter values, either strain may be eliminated, or the two may coexist (along with the pathogen). Coexistence (polymorphism), unsurprisingly, requires an appropriate balance between the different advantages possessed by the two strains. The probability of coexistence through such a balance, however, varies nonlinearly with the degree of difference between the strains: coexistence is least likely between two very similar strains. Resistance is most likely to evolve in hosts with the characteristics of many insect pests. Moreover, with highly pathogenic pathogens, a 'susceptible' strain may exclude a 'resistant' strain because its higher growth rate is more effective against the pathogen than reduced transmissibility. 'Resistance' can reside in parameters other than those directly associated with the pathogen. Although no cycles arise and no chaotic behaviour is found, an oscillatory approach to equilibrium is commonly observed, signalling the possibility of observable oscillations in strain frequency in the (more variable) real world.

  14. Source-structure trade-offs in ambient noise correlations: Theory and numerical examples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fichtner, A.; Sager, K.; Ermert, L. A.

    2015-12-01

    We analyse the physics and geometry of trade-offs between Earth structure and noise sources in inter-station noise correlations. Our approach is based on the computation of off-diagonal Hessian elements that describe the extent to which variations in noise sources can compensate for variations in Earth structure without changing the misfit beyond the measurement uncertainty. Despite the fact that all ambient noise inverse problems are special in terms of their receiver configuration and data, some general statements concerning source-structure trade-offs can be made: (i) While source-structure trade-offs may be reduced to some extent by clever measurement design, there are inherent trade-offs that can generally not be avoided. These inherent trade-offs may lead to a mispositioning of structural heterogeneities when the noise source distribution is unknown. (ii) When attenuation is weak, source-structure trade-offs in ambient noise correlations are a global phenomenon, meaning that there is no noise source perturbation that does not trade-off with some Earth structure, and vice versa. (iii) The most significant source-structure trade-offs occur within two elliptically shaped regions connecting a potential noise source perturbation to each one of the receivers. (iv) Far from these elliptical regions, only small-scale structure can trade off against changes in the noise source. (v) While source-structure trade-offs mostly decay with increasing attenuation, they are nearly unaffected by attenuation when the noise source perturbation is located near the receiver-receiver line. We complement these theoretical considerations by numerical experiments where we model ambient noise correlations for arbitrary source geometries. The experiments illustrate how and to which extent unknown noise sources may map into spurious Earth structure. This work is intended to contribute to the development of joint source-structure inversions of ambient noise correlations, and in particular

  15. Competing values, tensions and trade-offs in management of nuclear power plants.

    PubMed

    Reiman, Teemu; Rollenhagen, Carl

    2012-01-01

    The specific goal of the study is to look how tensions, competing values and trade-offs manifest in the management of nuclear power plants. Second goal is to inspect how existing frameworks, such as Competing Values Framework, can be used to model the tensions. Empirical data consists of thirty interviews that were conducted as part of a NKS study on safety culture in the Nordic nuclear branch. Eight trade-offs are identified based on a grounded theory based analysis of the interview data. The competing values and potential tensions involved in the trade-offs are discussed.

  16. Forest management scenarios in a changing climate: trade-offs between carbon, timber, and old forest.

    PubMed

    Creutzburg, Megan K; Scheller, Robert M; Lucash, Melissa S; LeDuc, Stephen D; Johnson, Mark G

    2017-03-01

    Balancing economic, ecological, and social values has long been a challenge in the forests of the Pacific Northwest, where conflict over timber harvest and old-growth habitat on public lands has been contentious for the past several decades. The Northwest Forest Plan, adopted two decades ago to guide management on federal lands, is currently being revised as the region searches for a balance between sustainable timber yields and habitat for sensitive species. In addition, climate change imposes a high degree of uncertainty on future forest productivity, sustainability of timber harvest, wildfire risk, and species habitat. We evaluated the long-term, landscape-scale trade-offs among carbon (C) storage, timber yield, and old forest habitat given projected climate change and shifts in forest management policy across 2.1 million hectares of forests in the Oregon Coast Range. Projections highlight the divergence between private and public lands under business-as-usual forest management, where private industrial forests are heavily harvested and many public (especially federal) lands increase C and old forest over time but provide little timber. Three alternative management scenarios altering the amount and type of timber harvest show widely varying levels of ecosystem C and old-forest habitat. On federal lands, ecological forestry practices also allowed a simultaneous increase in old forest and natural early-seral habitat. The ecosystem C implications of shifts away from current practices were large, with current practices retaining up to 105 Tg more C than the alternative scenarios by the end of the century. Our results suggest climate change is likely to increase forest productivity by 30-41% and total ecosystem C storage by 11-15% over the next century as warmer winter temperatures allow greater forest productivity in cooler months. These gains in C storage are unlikely to be offset by wildfire under climate change, due to the legacy of management and effective fire

  17. Nutritional and non-nutritional food components modulate phenotypic variation but not physiological trade-offs in an insect.

    PubMed

    Pascacio-Villafán, Carlos; Williams, Trevor; Birke, Andrea; Aluja, Martín

    2016-07-12

    Our understanding of how food modulates animal phenotypes and mediate trade-offs between life-history traits has benefited greatly from the study of combinations of nutritional and non-nutritional food components, such as plant secondary metabolites. We used a fruit fly pest, Anastrepha ludens, to examine phenotypic variation across larval, pupal and adult stages as a function of larval food with varying nutrient balance and content of chlorogenic acid, a secondary metabolite. Larval insects that fed on carbohydrate-biased diets relative to protein exhibited longer larval and pupal developmental periods, were often heavier as pupae and resisted desiccation and starvation for longer periods in the adult stage than insects fed on highly protein-biased diets. Except for a potential conflict between pupal development time and adult desiccation and starvation resistance, we did not detect physiological trade-offs mediated by the nutritional balance in larval food. Chlorogenic acid affected A. ludens development in a concentration and nutrient-dependent manner. Nutrients and host plant secondary metabolites in the larval diet induced changes in A. ludens phenotype and could influence fruit fly ecological interactions. We provide a unique experimental and modelling approach useful in generating predictive models of life history traits in a variety of organisms.

  18. Nutritional and non-nutritional food components modulate phenotypic variation but not physiological trade-offs in an insect

    PubMed Central

    Pascacio-Villafán, Carlos; Williams, Trevor; Birke, Andrea; Aluja, Martín

    2016-01-01

    Our understanding of how food modulates animal phenotypes and mediate trade-offs between life-history traits has benefited greatly from the study of combinations of nutritional and non-nutritional food components, such as plant secondary metabolites. We used a fruit fly pest, Anastrepha ludens, to examine phenotypic variation across larval, pupal and adult stages as a function of larval food with varying nutrient balance and content of chlorogenic acid, a secondary metabolite. Larval insects that fed on carbohydrate-biased diets relative to protein exhibited longer larval and pupal developmental periods, were often heavier as pupae and resisted desiccation and starvation for longer periods in the adult stage than insects fed on highly protein-biased diets. Except for a potential conflict between pupal development time and adult desiccation and starvation resistance, we did not detect physiological trade-offs mediated by the nutritional balance in larval food. Chlorogenic acid affected A. ludens development in a concentration and nutrient-dependent manner. Nutrients and host plant secondary metabolites in the larval diet induced changes in A. ludens phenotype and could influence fruit fly ecological interactions. We provide a unique experimental and modelling approach useful in generating predictive models of life history traits in a variety of organisms. PMID:27406923

  19. Live fast, die young: trade-offs between fitness components and sexually antagonistic selection on weaponry in Soay sheep.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Matthew R; Pilkington, Jill G; Clutton-Brock, Tim H; Pemberton, Josephine M; Kruuk, Loeske E B

    2006-10-01

    Males are predicted to compete for reproductive opportunities, with sexual selection driving the evolution of large body size and weaponry through the advantage they confer for access to females. Few studies have explored potential trade-offs of investment in secondary sexual traits between different components of fitness or tested for sexually antagonistic selection pressures. These factors may provide explanations for observed polymorphisms in both form and quality of secondary sexual traits. We report here an analysis of selection on horn phenotype in a feral population of Soay sheep (Ovis aries) on the island of Hirta, St. Kilda, Scotland. Soay sheep display a phenotypic polymorphism for horn type with males growing either normal or reduced (scurred) horns, and females growing either normal, scurred, or no (polled) horns; further variation in size exists within horn morphs. We show that horn phenotype and the size of the trait displayed is subject to different selection pressures in males and females, generating sexually antagonistic selection. Furthermore, there was evidence of a trade-off between breeding success and longevity in normal-horned males, with both the normal horn type and larger horn size being associated with greater annual breeding success but reduced longevity. Therefore, selection through lifetime breeding success was not found to act upon horn phenotype in males. In females, a negative association of annual breeding success within the normal-horned phenotype did not result in a significant difference in lifetime fitness when compared to scurred individuals, as no significant difference in longevity was found. However, increased horn size within this group was negatively associated with breeding success and longevity. Females without horns (polled) suffered reduced longevity and thus reduced lifetime breeding success relative the other horn morphs. Our results therefore suggest that trade-offs between different components of fitness and

  20. How zooplankton feed: mechanisms, traits and trade-offs.

    PubMed

    Kiørboe, Thomas

    2011-05-01

    Zooplankton is a morphologically and taxonomically diverse group and includes organisms that vary in size by many orders of magnitude, but they are all faced with the common problem of collecting food from a very dilute suspension. In order to maintain a viable population in the face of mortality, zooplankton in the ocean have to clear daily a volume of ambient water for prey particles that is equivalent to about 10(6) times their own body volume. While most size-specific vital rates and mortality rates decline with size, the clearance requirement is largely size-independent because food availability also declines with size. There is a limited number of solutions to the problem of concentrating dilute prey from a sticky medium: passive and active ambush feeding; feeding-current feeding, where the prey is either intercepted directly, retained on a filter, or individually perceived and extracted from the feeding current; cruise feeding; and colonization of large particles and marine snow aggregates. The basic mechanics of these food-collection mechanisms are described, and it is shown that their efficiencies are inherently different and that each of these mechanisms becomes less efficient with increasing size. Mechanisms that compensate for this decline in efficiency are described, including inflation of feeding structures and development of vision. Each feeding mode has implications beyond feeding in terms of risk of encountering predators and chance of meeting mates, and they partly target different types of prey. The main dichotomy is between (inefficient) ambush feeding on motile prey and the more efficient active feeding modes; a secondary dichotomy is between (efficient) hovering and (less efficient) cruising feeding modes. The efficiencies of the various feeding modes are traded off against feeding-mode-dependent metabolic expenses, predation risks, and mating chances. The optimality of feeding strategies, evaluated as the ratio of gain over risk, varies with

  1. Heritable body size mediates apparent life-history trade-offs in a simultaneous hermaphrodite.

    PubMed

    Miller, B L W; Sinervo, B

    2007-07-01

    Physiological trade-offs between life-history traits can constrain natural selection and maintain genetic variation in the face of selection, thereby shaping evolutionary trajectories. This study examines physiological trade-offs in simultaneously hermaphroditic banana slugs, Ariolimax dolichophallus. These slugs have high heritable variation in body size, which strongly predicts the number of clutches laid, hatching success and progeny growth rate. These fitness components were associated, but only when examined in correlation with body size. Body size mediated these apparent trade-offs in a continuum where small animals produced rapidly growing progeny, intermediate-sized animals laid many clutches and large animals had high hatching success. This study uses a novel statistical method in which the components of fitness are analysed in a mancova and related to a common covariate, body size, which has high heritability. The mancova reveals physiological trade-offs among the components of fitness that were previously masked by high variation in body size.

  2. The trade-off between food and temperature in the habitat choice of bluegill sunfish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wildhaber, M.L.

    2001-01-01

    A model is presented to describe the trade-off between food and temperature in bluegills Lepomis macrochirus, where temperature was the primary factor used in determining the patch in which to reside.

  3. Competition and predation in simple food webs: intermediately strong trade-offs maximize coexistence.

    PubMed Central

    HilleRisLambers, Reinier; Dieckmann, Ulf

    2003-01-01

    Competition and predation are fundamental interactions structuring food webs. However, rather than always following these neat theoretical categories, mixed interactions are ubiquitous in nature. Of particular importance are omnivorous species, such as intra-guild predators that can both compete with and predate on their prey. Here, we examine trade-offs between competitive and predatory capacities by analysing the entire continuum of food web configurations existing between purely predator-prey and purely competitive interactions of two consumers subsisting on a single resource. Our results show that the range of conditions allowing for coexistence of the consumers is maximized at intermediately strong trade-offs. Even though coexistence under weak trade-offs and under very strong trade-offs is also possible, it occurs under much more restrictive conditions. We explain these findings by an intricate interplay between energy acquisition and interaction strength. PMID:14728782

  4. The adaptive trade-off between detection and discrimination in cortical representations and behavior.

    PubMed

    Ollerenshaw, Douglas R; Zheng, He J V; Millard, Daniel C; Wang, Qi; Stanley, Garrett B

    2014-03-05

    It has long been posited that detectability of sensory inputs can be sacrificed in favor of improved discriminability and that sensory adaptation may mediate this trade-off. The extent to which this trade-off exists behaviorally and the complete picture of the underlying neural representations that likely subserve the phenomenon remain unclear. In the rodent vibrissa system, an ideal observer analysis of cortical activity measured using voltage-sensitive dye imaging in anesthetized animals was combined with behavioral detection and discrimination tasks, thalamic recordings from awake animals, and computational modeling to show that spatial discrimination performance was improved following adaptation, but at the expense of the ability to detect weak stimuli. Together, these results provide direct behavioral evidence for the trade-off between detectability and discriminability, that this trade-off can be modulated through bottom-up sensory adaptation, and that these effects correspond to important changes in thalamocortical coding properties.

  5. Competition-colonization trade-offs and disturbance effects at multiple scales.

    PubMed

    Cadotte, Marc William

    2007-04-01

    The competition-colonization trade-off has long been a mechanism explaining patterns of species coexistence and diversity in nonequilibrium systems. It forms one explanation of the intermediate disturbance hypothesis (IDH) for local communities--specifically that diversity should be maximized at intermediate disturbance frequencies, yet only a fraction of empirical studies support IDH predictions. Similarly, this trade-off is also a powerful explanation of coexistence at larger spatial scales. I show, with a microbial experimental system, that the diversity-disturbance relationship is dependent on the relative distribution of species along this trade-off. Here I show that, when species are skewed toward late-successional habits, local diversity declines with disturbance. Yet, despite this trait skew, diversity at scales larger than the patch appears insensitive to the trade-off distribution. Intermediate disturbance frequencies produce the greatest diversity in patch successional stage, thus benefiting the maximum number of species at larger scales.

  6. Parent-offspring conflict and the genetic trade-offs shaping parental investment.

    PubMed

    Kölliker, Mathias; Boos, Stefan; Wong, Janine W Y; Röllin, Lilian; Stucki, Dimitri; Raveh, Shirley; Wu, Min; Meunier, Joël

    2015-04-16

    The genetic conflict between parents and their offspring is a cornerstone of kin selection theory and the gene-centred view of evolution, but whether it actually occurs in natural systems remains an open question. Conflict operates only if parenting is driven by genetic trade-offs between offspring performance and the parent's ability to raise additional offspring, and its expression critically depends on the shape of these trade-offs. Here we investigate the occurrence and nature of genetic conflict in an insect with maternal care, the earwig Forficula auricularia. Specifically, we test for a direct response to experimental selection on female future reproduction and correlated responses in current offspring survival, developmental rate and growth. The results demonstrate genetic trade-offs that differ in shape before and after hatching. Our study not only provides direct evidence for parent-offspring conflict but also highlights that conflict is not inevitable and critically depends on the genetic trade-offs shaping parental investment.

  7. Endocrine uncoupling of the trade-off between reproduction and somatic maintenance in eusocial insects.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Marisa A; Flatt, Thomas

    2016-08-01

    In most animals reproduction trades off with somatic maintenance and survival. Physiologically this trade-off is mediated by hormones with opposite effects on reproduction and maintenance. In many insects, this regulation is achieved by an endocrine network that integrates insulin-like/IGF-1 signaling (IIS), juvenile hormone (JH), and the yolk precursor vitellogenin (Vg) (or, more generally, yolk proteins [YPs]). Downregulation of this network promotes maintenance and survival at the expense of reproduction. Remarkably, however, queens of highly eusocial social insects exhibit both enormous reproductive output and longevity, thus escaping the trade-off. Here we argue - based on recent evidence - that the proximate reason for why eusocial insects can decouple this trade-off is that they have evolved a different 'wiring' of the IIS-JH-Vg/YP circuit. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Maximizing the right stuff: The trade-off between membrane permeability and selectivity.

    PubMed

    Park, Ho Bum; Kamcev, Jovan; Robeson, Lloyd M; Elimelech, Menachem; Freeman, Benny D

    2017-06-16

    Increasing demands for energy-efficient separations in applications ranging from water purification to petroleum refining, chemicals production, and carbon capture have stimulated a vigorous search for novel, high-performance separation membranes. Synthetic membranes suffer a ubiquitous, pernicious trade-off: highly permeable membranes lack selectivity and vice versa. However, materials with both high permeability and high selectivity are beginning to emerge. For example, design features from biological membranes have been applied to break the permeability-selectivity trade-off. We review the basis for the permeability-selectivity trade-off, state-of-the-art approaches to membrane materials design to overcome the trade-off, and factors other than permeability and selectivity that govern membrane performance and, in turn, influence membrane design. Copyright © 2017, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  9. Light Helicopter Family Trade-Off Analysis. Volume 8. Appendices S and T

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-02

    UNITED STATES AIMY MATERIEL COMMAND LIGHT I COPTER FAMlL Y TllADE-QFF ANALYSIS APPENDICES S AND T VOLUME VIII ACN : 69396 Copy IQJ. of 130...REPORT NUMBER ACN 69396 2. GOVT ACCESSION NO. 4. TITLE (and Subtltl») LIGHT HELICOPTER FAMILY TRADE-OFF ANALYSIS, APPENDICES S AND T, VOLUME VIII...UNITED STATES ARMY MATERIEL COMMAND LIGHT HELICOPTER FAMILY TRADE-OFF ANALYSIS APPENDICES S AND T . VOLUME VIII ACN : 69396 1 Accession For

  10. Risk/Requirements Trade-off Guidelines for Low Cost Satellite Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cornford, Steven L.; Man, Kin F.

    1996-01-01

    The accelerating trend toward faster, better, cheaper missions places increasing emphasis on the trade-offs between requirements and risk to reduce cost and development times, while still improving quality and reliability. The Risk/Requirement Trade-off Guidelines discussed in this paper are part of an integrated approach to address the main issues by focusing on the sum of prevention, analysis, control, or test (PACT) processes.

  11. The shape of an ecological trade-off varies with environment.

    PubMed

    Jessup, Christine M; Bohannan, Brendan J M

    2008-09-01

    Central to most theories that explain the diversity of life is the concept that organisms face trade-offs. Theoretical work has shown that the precise shape of a trade-off relationship affects evolutionary predictions. One common trade-off is that between competitive ability and resistance to predators, parasitoids, pathogens or herbivores. We used a microbial experimental system to elucidate the shape of the relationship between parasitoid resistance and competitive ability. For each of 86 bacteriophage-resistant isolates of the bacterium Escherichia coli B, we measured the degree of resistance to bacteriophage T2 (a viral parasitoid) and relative competitive ability in both the resource environment in which strains were isolated and in two alternate environments. We observed that environmental change can alter trade-off shape, and that different physiological mechanisms can lead to different trade-off shapes and different sensitivities to environmental change. These results highlight the important interaction between environment and trade-off shape in affecting ecological and evolutionary dynamics.

  12. An appraisal of the enzyme stability-activity trade-off.

    PubMed

    Miller, Scott R

    2017-07-01

    A longstanding idea in evolutionary physiology is that an enzyme cannot jointly optimize performance at both high and low temperatures due to a trade-off between stability and activity. Although a stability-activity trade-off has been observed for well-characterized examples, such a trade-off is not imposed by any physical chemical constraint. To better understand the pervasiveness of this trade-off, I investigated the stability-activity relationship for comparative biochemical studies of purified orthologous enzymes identified by a literature search. The nature of this relationship varied greatly among studies. Notably, studies of enzymes with low mean synonymous nucleotide sequence divergence were less likely to exhibit the predicted negative correlation between stability and activity. Similarly, a survey of directed evolution investigations of the stability-activity relationship indicated that these traits are often uncoupled among nearly identical yet phenotypically divergent enzymes. This suggests that the presumptive trade-off often reported for investigations of enzymes with high mean sequence divergence may in some cases instead be a consequence of the degeneration over time of enzyme function in unselected environments, rather than a direct effect of thermal adaptation. The results caution against the general assertion of a stability-activity trade-off during enzyme adaptation. © 2017 The Author(s). Evolution © 2017 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  13. The evolution of trade-offs under directional and correlational selection.

    PubMed

    Roff, Derek A; Fairbairn, Daphne J

    2012-08-01

    Using quantitative genetic theory, we develop predictions for the evolution of trade-offs in response to directional and correlational selection. We predict that directional selection favoring an increase in one trait in a trade-off will result in change in the intercept but not the slope of the trade-off function, with the mean value of the selected trait increasing and that of the correlated trait decreasing. Natural selection will generally favor an increase in some combination of trait values, which can be represented as directional selection on an index value. Such selection induces both directional and correlational selection on the component traits. Theory predicts that selection on an index value will also change the intercept but not the slope of the trade-off function but because of correlational selection, the direction of change in component traits may be in the same or opposite directions. We test these predictions using artificial selection on the well-established trade-off between fecundity and flight capability in the cricket, Gryllus firmus and compare the empirical results with a priori predictions made using genetic parameters from a separate half-sibling experiment. Our results support the predictions and illustrate the complexity of trade-off evolution when component traits are subject to both directional and correlational selection. © 2012 The Author(s). Evolution© 2012 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  14. Phenotypic constraints and community structure: linking trade-offs within and among species.

    PubMed

    Angert, Amy L; Kimball, Sarah; Peterson, Megan; Huxman, Travis E; Venable, David L

    2014-11-01

    Trade-offs are central to many topics in biology, from the evolution of life histories to ecological mechanisms of species coexistence. Trade-offs observed among species may reflect pervasive constraints on phenotypes that are achievable given biophysical and resource limitations. If so, then among-species trade-offs should be consistent with trade-offs within species. Alternatively, trait variation among co-occurring species may reflect historical contingencies during community assembly rather than within-species constraints. Here, we test whether a key trade-off between relative growth rate (RGR) and water-use efficiency (WUE) among Sonoran Desert winter annual plants is apparent within four species representing different strategies in the system. We grew progeny of maternal families from multiple populations in a greenhouse common garden. One species, Pectocarya recurvata, displayed the expected RGR-WUE trade-off among families within populations. For other species, although RGR and WUE often varied clinally among populations, among-family variation within populations was lacking, implicating a role for past selection on these traits. Our results suggest that a combination of limited genetic variation in single traits and negative trait correlations could pose constraints on the evolution of a high-RGR and high-WUE phenotype within species, providing a microevolutionary explanation for phenotypes that influence community-level patterns of abundance and coexistence.

  15. Life history trade-offs and evidence for hierarchical resource allocation in two monocarpic perennials.

    PubMed

    Cao, G-X; Worley, A C

    2013-01-01

    The evolution of floral display is thought to be constrained by trade-offs between the size and number of flowers; however, empirical evidence for the trade-off is inconsistent. We examined evidence for trade-offs and hierarchical allocation of resources within and between two populations each of the monocarpic perennials, Cardiocrinum cordatum and C. giganteum. Within all populations, flower size-number trade-offs were evident after accounting for variation in plant size. In addition, variation in flower size explained much variation in flower-level allocation to attraction, and female and male function, a pattern consistent with hierarchical allocation. However, between population differences in flower size (C. cordatum) and number (C. giganteum) were not consistent with size-number trade-offs or hierarchical allocation. The population-level difference in C. cordatum likely reflects the combined influence of a time lag between initiation and maturation of flowers, and higher light levels in one population. Thus, our study highlights one mechanism that may account for the apparent independence of flower size and number in many studies. A prediction of sex allocation theory was also supported. In C. giganteum: plants from one population invested more mass in pistils and less in stamens than did plants from the other population. Detection of floral trade-offs in Cardiocrinum may be facilitated by monocarpic reproduction, production of a single inflorescence and ease of measuring plant size.

  16. Evolution, the loss of diversity and the role of trade-offs.

    PubMed

    Best, Alex; Bowers, Roger; White, Andy

    2015-06-01

    We investigate how the loss of previously evolved diversity in host resistance to disease is dependent on the complexity of the underlying evolutionary trade-off. Working within the adaptive dynamics framework, using graphical tools (pairwise invasion plots, PIPs; trait evolution plots, TEPs) and algebraic analysis we consider polynomial trade-offs of increasing degree. Our focus is on the evolutionary trajectory of the dimorphic population after it has been attracted to an evolutionary branching point. We show that for sufficiently complex trade-offs (here, polynomials of degree three or higher) the resulting invasion boundaries can form closed 'oval' areas of invadability and strategy coexistence. If no attracting singular strategies exist within this region, then the population is destined to evolve outside of the region of coexistence, resulting in the loss of one strain. In particular, the loss of diversity in this model always occurs in such a way that the remaining strain is not attracted back to the branching point but to an extreme of the trade-off, meaning the diversity is lost forever. We also show similar results for a non-polynomial but complex trade-off, and for a different eco-evolutionary model. Our work further highlights the importance of trade-offs to evolutionary behaviour.

  17. Trade-offs between accuracy and interpretability in von Bertalanffy random-effects models of growth.

    PubMed

    Vincenzi, Simone; Crivelli, Alain J; Munch, Stephan; Skaug, Hans J; Mangel, Marc

    2016-07-01

    Better understanding of variation in growth will always be an important problem in ecology. Individual variation in growth can arise from a variety of processes; for example, individuals within a population vary in their intrinsic metabolic rates and behavioral traits, which may influence their foraging dynamics and access to resources. However, when adopting a growth model, we face trade-offs between model complexity, biological interpretability of parameters, and goodness of fit. We explore how different formulations of the von Bertalanffy growth function (vBGF) with individual random effects and environmental predictors affect these trade-offs. In the vBGF, the growth of an organism results from a dynamic balance between anabolic and catabolic processes. We start from a formulation of the vBGF that models the anabolic coefficient (q) as a function of the catabolic coefficient (k), a coefficient related to the properties of the environment (γ) and a parameter that determines the relative importance of behavior and environment in determining growth (ψ). We treat the vBGF parameters as a function of individual random effects and environmental variables. We use simulations to show how different functional forms and individual or group variability in the growth function's parameters provide a very flexible description of growth trajectories. We then consider a case study of two fish populations of Salmo marmoratus and Salmo trutta to test the goodness of fit and predictive power of the models, along with the biological interpretability of vBGF's parameters when using different model formulations. The best models, according to AIC, included individual variability in both k and γ and cohort as predictor of growth trajectories, and are consistent with the hypothesis that habitat selection is more important than behavioral and metabolic traits in determining lifetime growth trajectories of the two fish species. Model predictions of individual growth trajectories were

  18. Management trade-off between aboveground carbon storage and understory plant species richness in temperate forests.

    PubMed

    Burton, Julia I; Ares, Adrian; Olson, Deanna H; Puettmann, Klaus J

    2013-09-01

    Because forest ecosystems have the capacity to store large quantities of carbon (C), there is interest in managing forests to mitigate elevated CO2 concentrations and associated effects on the global climate. However, some mitigation techniques may contrast with management strategies for other goals, such as maintaining and restoring biodiversity. Forest thinning reduces C storage in the overstory and recruitment of detrital C. These C stores can affect environmental conditions and resource availability in the understory, driving patterns in the distribution of early and late-seral species. We examined the effects of replicated (N = 7) thinning experiments on aboveground C and understory vascular plant species richness, and we contrasted relationships between aboveground C and early- vs. late-seral species richness. Finally, we used structural equation modeling (SEM) to examine relationships among early- and late-seral species richness and live and detrital aboveground C stores. Six years following thinning, aboveground C was greater in the high-density treatment and untreated control than in moderate- (MD) and variable-density (VD) treatments as a result of reductions in live overstory C. In contrast, all thinning treatments increased species richness relative to controls. Between the growing seasons of years 6 and 11 following treatments, the live overstory C increment tended to increase with residual density, while richness decreased in MD and VD treatments. The richness of early-seral species was negatively related to aboveground C in MD and VD, while late-seral species richness was positively (albeit weakly) related to aboveground C. Structural equation modeling analysis revealed strong negative effects of live overstory C on early-seral species richness balanced against weaker positive effects on late-seral species richness, as well as positive effects of detrital C stocks. A trade-off between carbon and plant species richness thus emerges as a net result of

  19. Trade-offs Between Electricity Production from Small Hydropower Plants and Ecosystem Services in Alpine River Basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier, Philipp; Schwemmle, Robin; Viviroli, Daniel

    2015-04-01

    The need for a reduction in greenhouse gas emissions and the decision to phase out nuclear power plants in Switzerland and Germany increases pressure to develop the remaining hydropower potential in Alpine catchments. Since most of the potential for large reservoirs is already exploited, future development focusses on small run-of-the-river hydropower plants (SHP). Being considered a relatively environment-friendly electricity source, investment in SHP is promoted through subsidies. However, SHP can have a significant impact on riverine ecosystems, especially in the Alpine region where residual flow reaches tend to be long. An increase in hydropower exploitation will therefore increase pressure on ecosystems. While a number of studies assessed the potential for hydropower development in the Alps, two main factors were so far not assessed in detail: (i) ecological impacts within a whole river network, and (ii) economic conditions under which electricity is sold. We present a framework that establishes trade-offs between multiple objectives regarding environmental impacts, electricity production and economic evaluation. While it is inevitable that some ecosystems are compromised by hydropower plants, the context of these impacts within a river network should be considered when selecting suitable sites for SHP. From an ecological point of view, the diversity of habitats, and therefore the diversity of species, should be maintained within a river basin. This asks for objectives that go beyond lumped parameters of hydrological alteration, but also consider habitat diversity and the spatial configuration. Energy production in run-of-the-river power plants depends on available discharge, which can have large fluctuations. In a deregulated electricity market with strong price variations, an economic valuation should therefore be based on the expected market value of energy produced. Trade-off curves between different objectives can help decision makers to define policies

  20. Physiological Trade-Offs in Lizards: Costs for Individuals and Populations.

    PubMed

    Smith, Geoffrey D; French, Susannah S

    2017-08-01

    The immune system is a critical component of health and fitness, whereby organisms must maintain sufficient health to survive to reproduce. Because of the key role of immunity in an organism's fitness, the use of immunological indices is widespread. However, there is a paucity of empirical support for the best way to interpret immunological data, and the internal energetic state of the organism, as well as the external environmental pressures it faces, are often not considered concurrently. A stronger immune response is not always beneficial to the organism; a more attenuated response may ultimately lead to improved fitness if the animal incurs fewer performance costs on competing systems, especially reproduction. Additionally, the external pressures animals encounter (such as anthropogenic disturbance) must be considered along with the animal's internal state. A synthesis of results addressing resource allocation between the immune and reproductive systems is presented using a well-studied organism, the side-blotched lizard, from a combination of field and laboratory studies under varying environmental conditions. Specifically, experiments involving specific immune, reproductive, metabolic, and performance costs in a laboratory setting are discussed, as well as associated demographic trade-offs between survival and reproductive success, demonstrating essential links between immunity and the population. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Integrative and Comparative Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Daily foraging patterns in free-living birds: exploring the predation–starvation trade-off

    PubMed Central

    Bonter, David N.; Zuckerberg, Benjamin; Sedgwick, Carolyn W.; Hochachka, Wesley M.

    2013-01-01

    Daily patterns in the foraging behaviour of birds are assumed to balance the counteracting risks of predation and starvation. Predation risks are a function of the influence of weight on flight performance and foraging behaviours that may expose individuals to predators. Although recent research sheds light on daily patterns in weight gain, little data exist on daily foraging routines in free-living birds. In order to test the predictions of various hypotheses about daily patterns of foraging, we quantified the activity of four species of passerines in winter using radio-frequency identification receivers built into supplemental feeding stations. From records of 472 368 feeder visits by tagged birds, we found that birds generally started to feed before sunrise and continued to forage at a steady to increasing rate throughout the day. Foraging in most species terminated well before sunset, suggesting their required level of energy reserves was being reached before the end of the day. These results support the risk-spreading theorem over a long-standing hypothesis predicting bimodality in foraging behaviour purportedly driven by a trade-off between the risks of starvation and predation. Given the increased energetic demands experienced by birds during colder weather, our results suggest that birds' perceptions of risk are biased towards starvation avoidance in winter. PMID:23595267

  2. Trade-offs between biodiversity conservation and economic development in five tropical forest landscapes.

    PubMed

    Sandker, Marieke; Ruiz-Perez, Manuel; Campbell, Bruce M

    2012-10-01

    This study explores how conservation and development are interlinked and quantifies their reciprocal trade-offs. It identifies interventions which hold a promise to improve both conservation and development outcomes. The study finds that development trajectories can either be at the cost of conservation or can benefit conservation, but in all cases sustained poverty negatively affects conservation in the long term. Most scenarios with better outcomes for conservation come at a cost for development and the financial benefits of payments for environmental services (PES) are not sufficient to compensate for lost opportunities to earn cash. However, implementation of strategies for reducing emissions from deforestation and forest degradation in locations with low population densities come close to overcoming opportunity costs. Environmental services and subsistence income enhance the attractiveness of conservation scenarios to local people and in situations where these benefits are obvious, PES may provide the extra cash incentive to tip the balance in favor of such a scenario. The paper stresses the importance of external factors (such as industrial investments and the development of the national economy) in determining landscape scale outcomes, and suggests a negotiating and visioning role for conservation agencies.

  3. Biofuels from pyrolysis in perspective: trade-offs between energy yields and soil-carbon additions.

    PubMed

    Woolf, Dominic; Lehmann, Johannes; Fisher, Elizabeth M; Angenent, Largus T

    2014-06-03

    Coproduction of biofuels with biochar (the carbon-rich solid formed during biomass pyrolysis) can provide carbon-negative bioenergy if the biochar is sequestered in soil, where it can improve fertility and thus simultaneously address issues of food security, soil degradation, energy production, and climate change. However, increasing biochar production entails a reduction in bioenergy obtainable per unit biomass feedstock. Quantification of this trade-off for specific biochar-biofuel pathways has been hampered by lack of an accurate-yet-simple model for predicting yields, product compositions, and energy balances from biomass slow pyrolysis. An empirical model of biomass slow pyrolysis was developed and applied to several pathways for biochar coproduction with gaseous and liquid biofuels. Here, we show that biochar production reduces liquid biofuel yield by at least 21 GJ Mg(-1) C (biofuel energy sacrificed per unit mass of biochar C), with methanol synthesis giving this lowest energy penalty. For gaseous-biofuel production, the minimum energy penalty for biochar production is 33 GJ Mg(-1) C. These substitution rates correspond to a wide range of Pareto-optimal system configurations, implying considerable latitude to choose pyrolysis conditions to optimize for desired biochar properties or to modulate energy versus biochar yields in response to fluctuating price differentials for the two commodities.

  4. Daily foraging patterns in free-living birds: exploring the predation-starvation trade-off.

    PubMed

    Bonter, David N; Zuckerberg, Benjamin; Sedgwick, Carolyn W; Hochachka, Wesley M

    2013-06-07

    Daily patterns in the foraging behaviour of birds are assumed to balance the counteracting risks of predation and starvation. Predation risks are a function of the influence of weight on flight performance and foraging behaviours that may expose individuals to predators. Although recent research sheds light on daily patterns in weight gain, little data exist on daily foraging routines in free-living birds. In order to test the predictions of various hypotheses about daily patterns of foraging, we quantified the activity of four species of passerines in winter using radio-frequency identification receivers built into supplemental feeding stations. From records of 472,368 feeder visits by tagged birds, we found that birds generally started to feed before sunrise and continued to forage at a steady to increasing rate throughout the day. Foraging in most species terminated well before sunset, suggesting their required level of energy reserves was being reached before the end of the day. These results support the risk-spreading theorem over a long-standing hypothesis predicting bimodality in foraging behaviour purportedly driven by a trade-off between the risks of starvation and predation. Given the increased energetic demands experienced by birds during colder weather, our results suggest that birds' perceptions of risk are biased towards starvation avoidance in winter.

  5. A phallus for free? Quantitative genetics of sexual trade-offs in the snail Bulinus truncatus.

    PubMed

    Ostrowski, M F; Jarne, P; David, P

    2003-01-01

    Resource allocation is thought to play a key role in the coexistence of different sexual morphs within hermaphroditic species. Indeed, most models assume that sexual functions are subject to a balance between reproductive advantage and energetic cost. Various types of cost (e.g. organ construction, maintenance and utilization) and levels of trade-off (physiological and genetic) may be considered. We here examine physiological and genetic costs of phallus construction and maintenance in Bulinus truncatus, a snail species in which aphallic individuals (without phallus) coexist with regular hermaphrodites. We use a quantitative genetic design involving 37 inbred lines (four populations) known to produce different proportions of aphallics, to test for the existence of genetic and nongenetic correlations between aphally and a range of life-history traits over the totality of the life cycle. Our results show that aphallic and euphallic individuals of the same line do not show consistent differences in either growth, fecundity (including offspring survival), or longevity. Furthermore, none of these traits is genetically correlated across lines with the frequency of the aphallic morph. We conclude that the cost of the construction and maintenance of the phallus must be very low in this species. Future studies should investigate the cost associated with using the phallus (i.e. male outcrossing behaviour) to explain the maintenance of high frequencies of aphallic individuals in natural populations.

  6. SIRT1 and Caloric Restriction: An Insight Into Possible Trade-Offs Between Robustness and Frailty

    PubMed Central

    Imai, Shin-ichiro

    2009-01-01

    Purpose of review This review aims to summarize the importance of the mammalian NAD-dependent deacetylase SIRT1 as a critical mediator that coordinates metabolic responses to caloric restriction (CR) and the recent progress in the development of SIRT1-targeted CR mimetics. It also discusses possible trade-offs between robustness and frailty in CR and the applicability of CR or SIRT1-targeted CR mimetics to humans. Recent findings Loss- and gain-of-function mouse studies have provided genetic evidence that SIRT1 is a key mediator that orchestrates the physiological response to CR. SIRT1-activating compounds function as potential CR mimetics, at least in part, through the activation of SIRT1 in vivo. Summary Increasing SIRT1 dosage/activity is effective to provide significant protection from high-fat diet-induced metabolic complications, suggesting that SIRT1 activation likely promotes robustness in the regulation of metabolism. However, CR itself and CR mimicry through systemic SIRT1 activation might also generate frailty in response to unexpected environmental stimuli, such as bacterial and viral infections. It will be of great importance to understand the principles of systemic robustness and its spatial and temporal dynamics for the regulation of aging and longevity in mammals in order to achieve an optimal balance between robustness and frailty in our complex physiological system. PMID:19474721

  7. Compensatory mechanisms for ameliorating the fundamental trade-off between predator avoidance and foraging

    PubMed Central

    Thaler, Jennifer S.; McArt, Scott H.; Kaplan, Ian

    2012-01-01

    Most organisms face the problem of foraging and maintaining growth while avoiding predators. Typical animal responses to predator exposure include reduced feeding, elevated metabolism, and altered development rate, all of which can be beneficial in the presence of predators but detrimental in their absence. How then do animals balance growth and predator avoidance? In a series of field and greenhouse experiments, we document that the tobacco hornworm caterpillar, Manduca sexta, reduced feeding by 30–40% owing to the risk of predation by stink bugs, but developed more rapidly and gained the same mass as unthreatened caterpillars. Assimilation efficiency, extraction of nitrogen from food, and percent body lipid content all increased during the initial phase (1-3 d) of predation risk, indicating that enhanced nutritional physiology allows caterpillars to compensate when threatened. However, we report physiological costs of predation risk, including altered body composition (decreased glycogen) and reductions in assimilation efficiency later in development. Our findings indicate that hornworm caterpillars use temporally dynamic compensatory mechanisms that ameliorate the trade-off between predator avoidance and growth in the short term, deferring costs to a period when they are less vulnerable to predation. PMID:22778426

  8. Trade-Offs Between Biodiversity Conservation and Economic Development in Five Tropical Forest Landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandker, Marieke; Ruiz-Perez, Manuel; Campbell, Bruce M.

    2012-10-01

    This study explores how conservation and development are interlinked and quantifies their reciprocal trade-offs. It identifies interventions which hold a promise to improve both conservation and development outcomes. The study finds that development trajectories can either be at the cost of conservation or can benefit conservation, but in all cases sustained poverty negatively affects conservation in the long term. Most scenarios with better outcomes for conservation come at a cost for development and the financial benefits of payments for environmental services (PES) are not sufficient to compensate for lost opportunities to earn cash. However, implementation of strategies for reducing emissions from deforestation and forest degradation in locations with low population densities come close to overcoming opportunity costs. Environmental services and subsistence income enhance the attractiveness of conservation scenarios to local people and in situations where these benefits are obvious, PES may provide the extra cash incentive to tip the balance in favor of such a scenario. The paper stresses the importance of external factors (such as industrial investments and the development of the national economy) in determining landscape scale outcomes, and suggests a negotiating and visioning role for conservation agencies.

  9. Trade-Offs in Thin Film Solar Cells with Layered Chalcostibite Photovoltaic Absorbers

    DOE PAGES

    Welch, Adam W.; Baranowski, Lauryn L.; Peng, Haowei; ...

    2017-01-25

    Discovery of novel semiconducting materials is needed for solar energy conversion and other optoelectronic applications. However, emerging low-dimensional solar absorbers often have unconventional crystal structures and unusual combinations of optical absorption and electrical transport properties, which considerably slows down the research and development progress. Here, the effect of stronger absorption and weaker carrier collection of 2D-like absorber materials are studied using a high-throughput combinatorial experimental approach, complemented by advanced characterization and computations. It is found that the photoexcited charge carrier collection in CuSbSe2 solar cells is enhanced by drift in an electric field, addressing a different absorption/collection balance. The resultingmore » drift solar cells efficiency is <5% due to inherent J SC/V OC trade-off, suggesting that improved carrier diffusion and better contacts are needed to further increase the CuSbSe2 performance. Furthermore, this study also illustrates the advantages of high-throughput experimental methods for fast optimization of the optoelectronic devices based on emerging low-dimensional semiconductor materials.« less

  10. Decoupling speed and accuracy in an urgent decision-making task reveals multiple contributions to their trade-off.

    PubMed

    Salinas, Emilio; Scerra, Veronica E; Hauser, Christopher K; Costello, M Gabriela; Stanford, Terrence R

    2014-01-01

    A key goal in the study of decision making is determining how neural networks involved in perception and motor planning interact to generate a given choice, but this is complicated due to the internal trade-off between speed and accuracy, which confounds their individual contributions. Urgent decisions, however, are special: they may range between random and fully informed, depending on the amount of processing time (or stimulus viewing time) available in each trial, but regardless, movement preparation always starts early on. As a consequence, under time pressure it is possible to produce a psychophysical curve that characterizes perceptual performance independently of reaction time, and this, in turn, makes it possible to pinpoint how perceptual information (which requires sensory input) modulates motor planning (which does not) to guide a choice. Here we review experiments in which, on the basis of this approach, the origin of the speed-accuracy trade-off becomes particularly transparent. Psychophysical, neurophysiological, and modeling results in the "compelled-saccade" task indicate that, during urgent decision making, perceptual information-if and whenever it becomes available-accelerates or decelerates competing motor plans that are already ongoing. This interaction affects both the reaction time and the probability of success in any given trial. In two experiments with reward asymmetries, we find that speed and accuracy can be traded in different amounts and for different reasons, depending on how the particular task contingencies affect specific neural mechanisms related to perception and motor planning. Therefore, from the vantage point of urgent decisions, the speed-accuracy trade-off is not a unique phenomenon tied to a single underlying mechanism, but rather a typical outcome of many possible combinations of internal adjustments within sensory-motor neural circuits.

  11. Functional and evolutionary trade-offs co-occur between two consolidated memory phases in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Lagasse, Fabrice; Moreno, Celine; Preat, Thomas; Mery, Frederic

    2012-10-07

    Memory is a complex and dynamic process that is composed of different phases. Its evolution under natural selection probably depends on a balance between fitness benefits and costs. In Drosophila, two separate forms of consolidated memory phases can be generated experimentally: anaesthesia-resistant memory (ARM) and long-term memory (LTM). In recent years, several studies have focused on the differences between these long-lasting memory types and have found that, at the functional level, ARM and LTM are antagonistic. How this functional relationship will affect their evolutionary dynamics remains unknown. We selected for flies with either improved ARM or improved LTM over several generations, and found that flies selected specifically for improvement of one consolidated memory phase show reduced performance in the other memory phase. We also found that improved LTM was linked to decreased longevity in male flies but not in females. Conversely, males with improved ARM had increased longevity. We found no correlation between either improved ARM or LTM and other phenotypic traits. This is, to our knowledge, the first evidence of a symmetrical evolutionary trade-off between two memory phases for the same learning task. Such trade-offs may have an important impact on the evolution of cognitive capacities. On a neural level, these results support the hypothesis that mechanisms underlying these forms of consolidated memory are, to some degree, antagonistic.

  12. Optimal defense strategies in an idealized microbial food web under trade-off between competition and defense.

    PubMed

    Våge, Selina; Storesund, Julia E; Giske, Jarl; Thingstad, T Frede

    2014-01-01

    Trophic mechanisms that can generate biodiversity in food webs include bottom-up (growth rate regulating) and top-down (biomass regulating) factors. The top-down control has traditionally been analyzed using the concepts of "Keystone Predation" (KP) and "Killing-the-Winner" (KtW), predominately occuring in discussions of macro- and micro-biological ecology, respectively. Here we combine the classical diamond-shaped food web structure frequently discussed in KP analyses and the KtW concept by introducing a defense strategist capable of partial defense. A formalized description of a trade-off between the defense-strategist's competitive and defensive ability is included. The analysis reveals a complex topology of the steady state solution with strong relationships between food web structure and the combination of trade-off, defense strategy and the system's nutrient content. Among the results is a difference in defense strategies corresponding to maximum biomass, production, or net growth rate of invading individuals. The analysis thus summons awareness that biomass or production, parameters typically measured in field studies to infer success of particular biota, are not directly acted upon by natural selection. Under coexistence with a competition specialist, a balance of competitive and defensive ability of the defense strategist was found to be evolutionarily stable, whereas stronger defense was optimal under increased nutrient levels in the absence of the pure competition specialist. The findings of success of different defense strategies are discussed with respect to SAR11, a highly successful bacterial clade in the pelagic ocean.

  13. Sexual-size dimorphism modulates the trade-off between exploiting food and wind resources in a large avian scavenger.

    PubMed

    Alarcón, Pablo A E; Morales, Juan M; Donázar, José A; Sánchez-Zapata, José A; Hiraldo, Fernando; Lambertucci, Sergio A

    2017-09-13

    Animals are expected to synchronize activity routines with the temporal patterns at which resources appear in nature. Accordingly, species that depend on resources showing temporally mismatched patterns should be expected to schedule routines that balance the chances of exploiting each of them. Large avian scavengers depend on carcasses which are more likely available early in the morning, but they also depend on wind resources (i.e. uplifts) to subside flight which are stronger in afternoon hours. To understand how these birds deal with this potential trade-off, we studied the daily routines of GPS-tagged individuals of the world's largest terrestrial soaring scavenger, the Andean condor (Vultur gryphus). Andean condors vary largely in weight and show a huge sexual dimorphism that allowed us to evaluate the effect of sex and body size on their daily routines. We found that condors use an intermediate solution strategy between the best times to exploit carcasses and uplifts, with this strategy changing over the year. Bigger males scheduled earlier routines that aligned more closely with uplift availability compared to smaller females, resulting in a partial temporal segregation between sexes. Condors' routines reflect a sexual-size dependent trade-off that may underpin ecological and sociobiological traits of the studied population.

  14. Fitness trade-offs explain low levels of persister cells in the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Stepanyan, Kristine; Wenseleers, Tom; Duéñez-Guzmán, Edgar A; Muratori, Frédéric; Van den Bergh, Bram; Verstraeten, Natalie; De Meester, Luc; Verstrepen, Kevin J; Fauvart, Maarten; Michiels, Jan

    2015-04-01

    Microbial populations often contain a fraction of slow-growing persister cells that withstand antibiotics and other stress factors. Current theoretical models predict that persistence levels should reflect a stable state in which the survival advantage of persisters under adverse conditions is balanced with the direct growth cost impaired under favourable growth conditions, caused by the nonreplication of persister cells. Based on this direct growth cost alone, however, it remains challenging to explain the observed low levels of persistence (<1%) seen in the populations of many species. Here, we present data from the opportunistic human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa that can explain this discrepancy by revealing various previously unknown costs of persistence. In particular, we show that in the absence of antibiotic stress, increased persistence is traded off against a lengthened lag phase as well as a reduced survival ability during stationary phase. We argue that these pleiotropic costs contribute to the very low proportions of persister cells observed among natural P. aeruginosa isolates (3 × 10(-8) -3 × 10(-4)) and that they can explain why strains with higher proportions of persister cells lose out very quickly in competition assays under favourable growth conditions, despite a negligible difference in maximal growth rate. We discuss how incorporating these trade-offs could lead to models that can better explain the evolution of persistence in nature and facilitate the rational design of alternative therapeutic strategies for treating infectious diseases.

  15. Temperature effects in supercritical fluid chromatography: a trade-off between viscous heating and decompression cooling.

    PubMed

    De Pauw, Ruben; Choikhet, Konstantin; Desmet, Gert; Broeckhoven, Ken

    2014-10-24

    The study of radial and axial temperature profiles always has been an area interest both in liquid chromatography (LC) and supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC). Whereas in LC always an increase in temperature is observed due to the dominance of viscous heating, in SFC, especially for low modifier content, a decrease in temperature is found due to the much larger decompression cooling. However, for higher modifier content and higher operating pressure, the temperature effects become a trade-off between viscous heating and decompression cooling, since in SFC the latter is a strong function of operating pressure and mobile phase composition. At a temperature of 40°C and for neat CO2, the effect of decompression cooling and viscous heating cancel each other out at a pressure 450bar. This pressure decreases almost linearly with volume fraction of methanol to 150bar at 25vol%. As a result, both cooling and heating effects can be observed when operating at high back pressure, large column pressure drops or high modifier content. For example at a back pressure of 150bar and a column pressure drop of 270bar decompression cooling is observed throughout the column. However at 300bar back pressure and the same pressure drop, the mobile phase heats up in the first part of the column due to viscous heating and then cools in the second part due to decompression cooling. When coupling columns (2.1mm×150mm, 1.8μm fully porous particles) at very high operating pressure (e.g. 750bar for 8vol%), the situation is even more complex. E.g. at a back pressure of 150bar and using 8vol% methanol, viscous heating is only observed in the first column whereas only decompression cooling in the second. Further increasing the inlet pressure up to 1050bar resulted in no excessive temperature differences along the column. This implies that the inlet pressure of SFC instrumentation could be expanded above 600bar without additional band broadening caused by excessive radial temperature

  16. Dopaminergic Control of the Exploration-Exploitation Trade-Off via the Basal Ganglia

    PubMed Central

    Humphries, Mark D.; Khamassi, Mehdi; Gurney, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    We continuously face the dilemma of choosing between actions that gather new information or actions that exploit existing knowledge. This “exploration-exploitation” trade-off depends on the environment: stability favors exploiting knowledge to maximize gains; volatility favors exploring new options and discovering new outcomes. Here we set out to reconcile recent evidence for dopamine’s involvement in the exploration-exploitation trade-off with the existing evidence for basal ganglia control of action selection, by testing the hypothesis that tonic dopamine in the striatum, the basal ganglia’s input nucleus, sets the current exploration-exploitation trade-off. We first advance the idea of interpreting the basal ganglia output as a probability distribution function for action selection. Using computational models of the full basal ganglia circuit, we showed that, under this interpretation, the actions of dopamine within the striatum change the basal ganglia’s output to favor the level of exploration or exploitation encoded in the probability distribution. We also found that our models predict striatal dopamine controls the exploration-exploitation trade-off if we instead read-out the probability distribution from the target nuclei of the basal ganglia, where their inhibitory input shapes the cortical input to these nuclei. Finally, by integrating the basal ganglia within a reinforcement learning model, we showed how dopamine’s effect on the exploration-exploitation trade-off could be measurable in a forced two-choice task. These simulations also showed how tonic dopamine can appear to affect learning while only directly altering the trade-off. Thus, our models support the hypothesis that changes in tonic dopamine within the striatum can alter the exploration-exploitation trade-off by modulating the output of the basal ganglia. PMID:22347155

  17. QTL mapping of freezing tolerance: links to fitness and adaptive trade-offs.

    PubMed

    Oakley, Christopher G; Ågren, Jon; Atchison, Rachel A; Schemske, Douglas W

    2014-09-01

    Local adaptation, defined as higher fitness of local vs. nonlocal genotypes, is commonly identified in reciprocal transplant experiments. Reciprocally adapted populations display fitness trade-offs across environments, but little is known about the traits and genes underlying fitness trade-offs in reciprocally adapted populations. We investigated the genetic basis and adaptive significance of freezing tolerance using locally adapted populations of Arabidopsis thaliana from Italy and Sweden. Previous reciprocal transplant studies of these populations indicated that subfreezing temperature is a major selective agent in Sweden. We used quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping to identify the contribution of freezing tolerance to previously demonstrated local adaptation and genetic trade-offs. First, we compared the genomic locations of freezing tolerance QTL to those for previously published QTL for survival in Sweden, and overall fitness in the field. Then, we estimated the contributions to survival and fitness across both field sites of genotypes at locally adaptive freezing tolerance QTL. In growth chamber studies, we found seven QTL for freezing tolerance, and the Swedish genotype increased freezing tolerance for five of these QTL. Three of these colocalized with locally adaptive survival QTL in Sweden and with trade-off QTL for overall fitness. Two freezing tolerance QTL contribute to genetic trade-offs across environments for both survival and overall fitness. A major regulator of freezing tolerance, CBF2, is implicated as a candidate gene for one of the trade-off freezing tolerance QTL. Our study provides some of the first evidence of a trait and gene that mediate a fitness trade-off in nature. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. The Policy Trade-off Between Energy Security and Climate Change in the GCC States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahbek, Shaikha Ali

    Developing policies for energy security and climate change simultaneously can be very challenging as there is a trade-off. This research project strives to analyze the policies regarding the same that should be developed in the Gulf Co-operation Council (GCC) States which are; Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, Qatar, United Arab Emirates, Bahrain and Oman. Energy security is important in these countries because it is the prominent sector of their economies. Yet, the environment is being negatively impacted because of the energy production. There has been lot of international pressure on the GCC to divert its production and move towards clean energy production. It needs more research and development, as well as better economic diversification to maintain and improve the economic growth. Along with the literature review that has been used to study the cases and impacts of the GCC states, six in-depth interviews were conducted with professors, scholars and specialists in the environment and natural science fields to discuss about the GCC's situation. It has been alluded that the GCC states cannot be held solely responsible about the climate change because they are not the only energy producing nations in the world. Based on OPEC, there are 14 countries including the United States and China that also have prominent energy sectors. They should also be held accountable for the causes of environmental and climate change. This research provides recommendations for the GCC states to follow and apply in order to move forward with clean energy production, economic diversification and develop better policies.

  19. Life history trade-offs and relaxed selection can decrease bacterial virulence in environmental reservoirs.

    PubMed

    Mikonranta, Lauri; Friman, Ville-Petri; Laakso, Jouni

    2012-01-01

    Pathogen virulence is usually thought to evolve in reciprocal selection with the host. While this might be true for obligate pathogens, the life histories of opportunistic pathogens typically alternate between within-host and outside-host environments during the infection-transmission cycle. As a result, opportunistic pathogens are likely to experience conflicting selection pressures across different environments, and this could affect their virulence through life-history trait correlations. We studied these correlations experimentally by exposing an opportunistic bacterial pathogen Serratia marcescens to its natural protist predator Tetrahymena thermophila for 13 weeks, after which we measured changes in bacterial traits related to both anti-predator defence and virulence. We found that anti-predator adaptation (producing predator-resistant biofilm) caused a correlative attenuation in virulence. Even though the direct mechanism was not found, reduction in virulence was most clearly connected to a predator-driven loss of a red bacterial pigment, prodigiosin. Moreover, life-history trait evolution was more divergent among replicate populations in the absence of predation, leading also to lowered virulence in some of the 'predator absent' selection lines. Together these findings suggest that the virulence of non-obligatory, opportunistic bacterial pathogens can decrease in environmental reservoirs through life history trade-offs, or random accumulation of mutations that impair virulence traits under relaxed selection.

  20. Primates’ behavioural responses to tourists: evidence for a trade-off between potential risks and benefits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maréchal, Laëtitia; Maclarnon, Ann; Majolo, Bonaventura; Semple, Stuart

    2016-09-01

    The presence of, and interactions with tourists can be both risky and beneficial for wild animals. In wildlife tourism settings, animals often experience elevated rates of aggression from conspecifics, and they may also be threatened or physically aggressed by the tourists themselves. However, tourist provisioning of wild animals provides them with highly desirable foods. In situations of conflicting motivations such as this, animals would be expected to respond using behavioural coping mechanisms. In the present study, we investigated how animals respond to tourist pressure, using wild adult Barbary macaques in the Middle Atlas Mountains, Morocco, as a case study. We found evidence that these animals use a range of different behavioural coping mechanisms-physical avoidance, social support, affiliative, aggressive and displacement behaviours-to cope with the stress associated with tourists. The pattern of use of such behaviours appears to depend on a trade-off between perceived risks and potential benefits. We propose a framework to describe how animals respond to conflicting motivational situations, such as the presence of tourists, that present simultaneously risks and benefits.

  1. Trade-off between intensity and frequency of global tropical cyclones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Nam-Young; Elsner, James B.

    2015-07-01

    Global tropical cyclone climate has been investigated with indicators of frequency, intensity and activity. However, a full understanding of global warming's influence on tropical cyclone climate remains elusive because of the incomplete nature of these indicators. Here we form a complete three-dimensional variability space of tropical cyclone climate where the variabilities are continuously linked and find that global ocean warmth best explains the out-of-phase relationship between intensity and frequency of global tropical cyclones. In a year with greater ocean warmth, the tropical troposphere is capped by higher pressure anomaly in the middle and upper troposphere even with higher moist static energy anomaly in the lower troposphere, which is thought to inhibit overall tropical cyclone occurrences but lead to greater intensities. A statistical consequence is the trade-off between intensity and frequency. We calculate an average increase in global tropical cyclone intensity of 1.3 m s-1 over the past 30 years of ocean warming occurring at the expense of 6.1 tropical cyclones worldwide.

  2. Trade-off between Intensity and Frequency of Global Tropical Cyclones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, N. Y.; Elsner, J.

    2015-12-01

    Global tropical cyclone climate has been investigated with indicators of frequency, intensity and activity. However, a full understanding of global warming's influence on tropical cyclone climate remains elusive because of the incomplete nature of these indicators. Here we form a complete three-dimensional variability space of tropical cyclone climate where the variabilities are continuously linked and find that global ocean warmth best explains the out-of-phase relationship between intensity and frequency of global tropical cyclones. In a year with greater ocean warmth, the tropical troposphere is capped by higher pressure anomaly in the middle and upper troposphere even with higher moist static energy anomaly in the lower troposphere, which is thought to inhibit overall tropical cyclone occurrences but lead to greater intensities. Statistical consequence is the trade-off between intensity and frequency. We calculate an average increase in global tropical cyclone intensity of 1.3 m/s over the past 30 years of ocean warming occurring at the expense of 6.1 tropical cyclones worldwide.

  3. Safety-cost trade-offs in medical device reuse: a Markov decision process model.

    PubMed

    Sloan, Thomas W

    2007-02-01

    Healthcare expenditures in the US are approaching 2 trillion dollars, and hospitals and other healthcare providers are under tremendous pressure to rein in costs. One cost-saving approach which is gaining popularity is the reuse of medical devices which were designed only for a single use. Device makers decry this practice as unsanitary and unsafe, but a growing number of third-party firms are willing to sterilize, refurbish, and/or remanufacture devices and resell them to hospitals at a fraction of the original price. Is this practice safe? Is reliance on single-use devices sustainable? A Markov decision process (MDP) model is formulated to study the trade-offs involved in these decisions. Several key parameters are examined: device costs, device failure probabilities, and failure penalty cost. For each of these parameters, expressions are developed which identify the indifference point between using new and reprocessed devices. The results can be used to inform the debate on the economic, ethical, legal, and environmental dimensions of this complex issue.

  4. Primates’ behavioural responses to tourists: evidence for a trade-off between potential risks and benefits

    PubMed Central

    Maréchal, Laëtitia; MacLarnon, Ann; Majolo, Bonaventura; Semple, Stuart

    2016-01-01

    The presence of, and interactions with tourists can be both risky and beneficial for wild animals. In wildlife tourism settings, animals often experience elevated rates of aggression from conspecifics, and they may also be threatened or physically aggressed by the tourists themselves. However, tourist provisioning of wild animals provides them with highly desirable foods. In situations of conflicting motivations such as this, animals would be expected to respond using behavioural coping mechanisms. In the present study, we investigated how animals respond to tourist pressure, using wild adult Barbary macaques in the Middle Atlas Mountains, Morocco, as a case study. We found evidence that these animals use a range of different behavioural coping mechanisms–physical avoidance, social support, affiliative, aggressive and displacement behaviours–to cope with the stress associated with tourists. The pattern of use of such behaviours appears to depend on a trade-off between perceived risks and potential benefits. We propose a framework to describe how animals respond to conflicting motivational situations, such as the presence of tourists, that present simultaneously risks and benefits. PMID:27628213

  5. Trade-offs between tRNA abundance and mRNA secondary structure support smoothing of translation elongation rate

    PubMed Central

    Gorochowski, Thomas E.; Ignatova, Zoya; Bovenberg, Roel A.L.; Roubos, Johannes A.

    2015-01-01

    Translation of protein from mRNA is a complex multi-step process that occurs at a non-uniform rate. Variability in ribosome speed along an mRNA enables refinement of the proteome and plays a critical role in protein biogenesis. Detailed single protein studies have found both tRNA abundance and mRNA secondary structure as key modulators of translation elongation rate, but recent genome-wide ribosome profiling experiments have not observed significant influence of either on translation efficiency. Here we provide evidence that this results from an inherent trade-off between these factors. We find codons pairing to high-abundance tRNAs are preferentially used in regions of high secondary structure content, while codons read by significantly less abundant tRNAs are located in lowly structured regions. By considering long stretches of high and low mRNA secondary structure in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Escherichia coli and comparing them to randomized-gene models and experimental expression data, we were able to distinguish clear selective pressures and increased protein expression for specific codon choices. The trade-off between secondary structure and tRNA-concentration based codon choice allows for compensation of their independent effects on translation, helping to smooth overall translational speed and reducing the chance of potentially detrimental points of excessively slow or fast ribosome movement. PMID:25765653

  6. Patterns of sperm damage in Chernobyl passerine birds suggest a trade-off between sperm length and integrity.

    PubMed

    Hermosell, Ignacio G; Laskemoen, Terje; Rowe, Melissah; Møller, Anders P; Mousseau, Timothy A; Albrecht, Tomás; Lifjeld, Jan T

    2013-10-23

    Interspecific variation in sperm size is enigmatic, but generally assumed to reflect species-specific trade-offs in selection pressures. Among passerine birds, sperm length varies sevenfold, and sperm competition risk seems to drive the evolution of longer sperm. However, little is known about factors favouring short sperm or constraining the evolution of longer sperm. Here, we report a comparative analysis of sperm head abnormalities among 11 species of passerine bird in Chernobyl, presumably resulting from chronic irradiation following the 1986 accident. Frequencies of sperm abnormalities varied between 15.7 and 77.3% among species, more than fourfold higher than in uncontaminated areas. Nonetheless, species ranked similarly in sperm abnormalities in unpolluted areas as in Chernobyl, pointing to intrinsic factors underlying variation in sperm damage among species. Scanning electron microscopy of abnormal spermatozoa revealed patterns of acrosome damage consistent with premature acrosome reaction. Sperm length, but not sperm competition risk explained variation in sperm damage among species. This suggests that longer spermatozoa are more susceptible to premature acrosome reaction. Therefore, we hypothesize a trade-off between sperm length and sperm integrity affecting sperm evolution in passerine birds.

  7. Geographic variations of life history traits and potential trade-offs in different populations of the parasitoid Leptopilina heterotoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vuarin, Pauline; Allemand, Roland; Moiroux, Joffrey; van Baaren, Joan; Gibert, Patricia

    2012-11-01

    Energy allocation is determined by resource availability and trade-offs among traits, and so organisms have to give some traits priority over others to maximize their fitness according to their environment. In this study, we investigated the geographic variations in life history traits and potential trade-offs in populations of the parasitoid Leptopilina heterotoma (Hymenoptera: Figitidae) originating from the north and the south of the Rhône-Saône valley (over a gradient of 300 km, South-East France). We measured a set of traits related to reproduction, maintenance, and mobility using several estimators of each of these main functions determined at different times. We did not find any clear differences between populations from contrasting areas, whereas the southern populations, which were all assumed to be exposed to similar environmental conditions, displayed contrasting patterns of energy allocation. Thus, the most likely explanation seems to be that the evolution of the life history of L. heterotoma is probably shaped by local selective pressures, such as microclimate, microhabitats, or intensity of competition, rather than by regional ecological conditions. Using our study as an example, we discuss the interest of considering several traits and using different ways of measuring them, concluding that multiple measurements should be performed in future studies to ensure the robustness of the results.

  8. Patterns of sperm damage in Chernobyl passerine birds suggest a trade-off between sperm length and integrity

    PubMed Central

    Hermosell, Ignacio G.; Laskemoen, Terje; Rowe, Melissah; Møller, Anders P.; Mousseau, Timothy A.; Albrecht, Tomáš; Lifjeld, Jan T.

    2013-01-01

    Interspecific variation in sperm size is enigmatic, but generally assumed to reflect species-specific trade-offs in selection pressures. Among passerine birds, sperm length varies sevenfold, and sperm competition risk seems to drive the evolution of longer sperm. However, little is known about factors favouring short sperm or constraining the evolution of longer sperm. Here, we report a comparative analysis of sperm head abnormalities among 11 species of passerine bird in Chernobyl, presumably resulting from chronic irradiation following the 1986 accident. Frequencies of sperm abnormalities varied between 15.7 and 77.3% among species, more than fourfold higher than in uncontaminated areas. Nonetheless, species ranked similarly in sperm abnormalities in unpolluted areas as in Chernobyl, pointing to intrinsic factors underlying variation in sperm damage among species. Scanning electron microscopy of abnormal spermatozoa revealed patterns of acrosome damage consistent with premature acrosome reaction. Sperm length, but not sperm competition risk explained variation in sperm damage among species. This suggests that longer spermatozoa are more susceptible to premature acrosome reaction. Therefore, we hypothesize a trade-off between sperm length and sperm integrity affecting sperm evolution in passerine birds. PMID:24088561

  9. Boldness predicts an individual's position along an exploration-exploitation foraging trade-off.

    PubMed

    Patrick, Samantha C; Pinaud, David; Weimerskirch, Henri

    2017-09-01

    Individuals do not have complete information about the environment and therefore they face a trade-off between gathering information (exploration) and gathering resources (exploitation). Studies have shown individual differences in components of this trade-off but how stable these strategies are in a population and the intrinsic drivers of these differences is not well understood. Top marine predators are expected to experience a particularly strong trade-off as many species have large foraging ranges and their prey often have a patchy distribution. This environment leads these species to exhibit pronounced exploration and exploitation phases but differences between individuals are poorly resolved. Personality differences are known to be important in foraging behaviour but also in the trade-off between exploration and exploitation. Here we test whether personality predicts an individual exploration-exploitation strategy using wide ranging wandering albatrosses (Diomedea exulans) as a model system. Using GPS tracking data from 276 wandering albatrosses, we extract foraging parameters indicative of exploration (searching) and exploitation (foraging) and show that foraging effort, time in patch and size of patch are strongly correlated, demonstrating these are indicative of an exploration-exploitation (EE) strategy. Furthermore, we show these are consistent within individuals and appear stable in the population, with no reproductive advantage. The searching and foraging behaviour of bolder birds placed them towards the exploration end of the trade-off, whereas shy birds showed greater exploitation. This result provides a mechanism through which individual foraging strategies may emerge. Age and sex affected components of the trade-off, but not the trade-off itself, suggesting these factors may drive behavioural compensation to maintain resource acquisition and this was supported by the evidence that there were no fitness consequence of any EE trait nor the trade-off

  10. Taxonomic, phylogenetic, and environmental trade-offs between leaf productivity and persistence.

    PubMed

    He, Jin-Sheng; Wang, Xiangping; Flynn, Dan F B; Wang, Liang; Schmid, Bernhard; Fang, Jingyun

    2009-10-01

    Assessing the influence of climate, soil fertility, and species identity on leaf trait relationships is crucial for understanding the adaptations of plants to their environment and for interpreting leaf trait relationships across spatial scales. In a comparative field study of 171 plant species in 174 grassland sites across China, we examined the trade-offs, defined as negative covariance between two traits, between leaf persistence (leaf mass per area, LMA) and leaf productivity (mass-based photosynthetic rate, Amass, N and P content, and photosynthetic N use efficiency, PNUE). We asked to which extent these trade-offs were influenced by: (1) variation among sites within species, decomposed into variation due to climatic and soil variables; (2) variation among species within sites, decomposed into variation among taxonomic, functional, or phylogenetic groups; and (3) the joint contribution of variation among species and sites. We used mixed-model analysis of covariance to partition bivariate relationships between leaf traits into trade-off components. We found significant mass-based persistence-productivity trade-offs of LMA-Amass, LMA-N, LMA-P, and LMA-PNUE consistent with previous broadscale findings. Overall, (1) variation among sites within species explained 14-23%, (2) variation among species within sites explained 20-34%, and (3) the two together explained 42-63% of the total covariance between leaf traits. Interspecific trade-offs of LMA-Amass, LMA-N, and LMA-P were stronger than inter-site ones. A relatively low amount of covariance was explained by climatic and soil variables. However, we found the trade-offs were stronger for LMA-N and LMA-P at higher precipitation and for LMA-PNUE at greater soil fertility, if displayed by major axis regression, which combined both intra- and interspecific variation. Residual trade-offs within species and sites were weak, suggesting that intraspecific, intra-site variation in physiology was less important than variation

  11. Culture impacts the magnitude of the emotion-induced memory trade-off effect.

    PubMed

    Gutchess, Angela; Garner, Lauryn; Ligouri, Laura; Konuk, Ayse Isilay; Boduroglu, Aysecan

    2017-10-04

    The present study assessed the extent to which culture impacts the emotion-induced memory trade-off effect. This trade-off effect occurs because emotional items are better remembered than neutral ones, but this advantage comes at the expense of memory for backgrounds such that neutral backgrounds are remembered worse when they occurred with an emotional item than with a neutral one. Cultures differ in their prioritisation of focal object versus contextual background information, with Westerners focusing more on objects and Easterners focusing more on backgrounds. Americans, a Western culture, and Turks, an Eastern-influenced culture, incidentally encoded positive, negative, and neutral items placed against neutral backgrounds, and then completed a surprise memory test with the items and backgrounds tested separately. Results revealed a reduced trade-off for Turks compared to Americans. Although both groups exhibited an emotional enhancement in item memory, Turks did not show a decrement in memory for backgrounds that had been paired with emotional items. These findings complement prior ones showing reductions in trade-off effects as a result of task instructions. Here, we suggest that a contextual-focus at the level of culture can mitigate trade-off effects in emotional memory.

  12. The emergence of performance trade-offs during local adaptation: insights from experimental evolution.

    PubMed

    Bono, Lisa M; Smith, Leno B; Pfennig, David W; Burch, Christina L

    2016-12-28

    Environmental heterogeneity is considered a general explanation for phenotypic diversification, particularly when heterogeneity causes populations to diverge via local adaptation. Performance trade-offs, such as those stemming from antagonistic pleiotropy, are thought to contribute to the maintenance of diversity in this scenario. Specifically, alleles that promote adaptation in one environment are expected to promote maladaptation in alternative environments. Contrary to this expectation, however, alleles that underlie locally adaptive traits often fail to exhibit fitness costs in alternative environments. Here, we attempt to explain this paradox by reviewing the results of experimental evolution studies, including a new one of our own, that examined the evolution of trade-offs during adaptation to homogeneous versus heterogeneous environments. We propose that when pleiotropic effects vary, whether or not trade-offs emerge among diverging populations will depend critically on ecology. For example, adaptation to a locally homogeneous environment is more likely to occur by alleles that are antagonistically pleiotropic than adaptation to a locally heterogeneous environment, simply because selection is blind to costs associated with environments that are not experienced locally. Our literature review confirmed the resulting prediction that performance trade-offs were more likely to evolve during selection in homogeneous than heterogeneous environments. The nature of the environmental heterogeneity (spatial versus temporal) and the length of the experiment also contributed in predictable ways to the likelihood that performance trade-offs evolved.

  13. The offspring quantity–quality trade-off and human fertility variation

    PubMed Central

    Lawson, David W.; Borgerhoff Mulder, Monique

    2016-01-01

    The idea that trade-offs between offspring quantity and quality shape reproductive behaviour has long been central to economic perspectives on fertility. It also has a parallel and richer theoretical foundation in evolutionary ecology. We review the application of the quantity–quality trade-off concept to human reproduction, emphasizing distinctions between clutch size and lifetime fertility, and the wider set of forces contributing to fertility variation in iteroparous and sexually reproducing species like our own. We then argue that in settings approximating human evolutionary history, several factors limit costly sibling competition. Consequently, while the optimization of quantity–quality trade-offs undoubtedly shaped the evolution of human physiology setting the upper limits of reproduction, we argue it plays a modest role in accounting for socio-ecological and individual variation in fertility. Only upon entering the demographic transition can fertility limitation be clearly interpreted as strategically orientated to advancing offspring quality via increased parental investment per child, with low fertility increasing descendant socio-economic success, although not reproductive success. We conclude that existing economic and evolutionary literature has often overemphasized the centrality of quantity–quality trade-offs to human fertility variation and advocate for the development of more holistic frameworks encompassing alternative life-history trade-offs and the evolved mechanisms guiding their resolution. PMID:27022072

  14. Trade-offs shape the evolution of the vector-borne insect pathogen Xenorhabdus nematophila.

    PubMed

    Chapuis, Elodie; Arnal, Audrey; Ferdy, Jean-Baptiste

    2012-07-07

    Our current understanding on how pathogens evolve relies on the hypothesis that pathogens' transmission is traded off against host exploitation. In this study, we surveyed the possibility that trade-offs determine the evolution of the bacterial insect pathogen, Xenorhabdus nematophila. This bacterium rapidly kills the hosts it infects and is transmitted from host cadavers to new insects by a nematode vector, Steinernema carpocapsae. In order to detect trade-offs in this biological system, we produced 20 bacterial lineages using an experimental evolution protocol. These lineages differ, among other things, in their virulence towards the insect host. We found that nematode parasitic success increases with bacteria virulence, but their survival during dispersal decreases with the number of bacteria they carry. Other bacterial traits, such as production of the haemolytic protein XaxAB, have a strong impact on nematode reproduction. We then combined the result of our measurements with an estimate of bacteria fitness, which was divided into a parasitic component and a dispersal component. Contrary to what was expected in the trade-off hypothesis, we found no significant negative correlation between the two components of bacteria fitness. Still, we found that bacteria fitness is maximized when nematodes carry an intermediate number of cells. Our results therefore demonstrate the existence of a trade-off in X. nematophila, which is caused, in part, by the reduction in survival this bacterium causes to its nematode vectors.

  15. Trade-offs, temporal variation, and species coexistence in communities with intraguild predation.

    PubMed

    Amarasekare, Priyanga

    2007-11-01

    Intraguild predation/parasitism (IGP: competing species preying on or parasitizing each other) is widespread in nature, but the mechanisms by which intraguild prey and predators coexist remain elusive. Theory predicts that a trade-off between resource competition and IGP should allow local niche partitioning, but such trade-offs are expressed only at intermediate resource productivity and cannot explain observations of stable coexistence at high productivity. Coexistence must therefore involve additional mechanisms beside the trade-off, but very little is known about the operation of such mechanisms in nature. Here I present the first experimental test of multiple coexistence mechanisms in a natural community exhibiting IGP. The results suggest that, when resource productivity constrains the competition-IGP trade-off, a temporal refuge for the intraguild prey can not only promote coexistence, but also change species abundances to a pattern qualitatively different from that expected based on the trade-off or a refuge alone. This is the first empirical study to demonstrate a mechanism for why communities with IGP do not lose species diversity in highly productive environments. These results have implications for diversity maintenance in multi-trophic communities, and the use of multiple natural enemies in biological control.

  16. Characterizing Coastal Ecosystem Service Trade-offs with Future Urban Development in a Tropical City.

    PubMed

    Richards, Daniel R; Friess, Daniel A

    2017-08-23

    With rapid urbanization in the coastal zone and increasing habitat losses, it is imperative to understand how urban development affects coastal biodiversity and ecosystem service provision. Furthermore, it is important to understand how habitat fragments can best be incorporated into broader land use planning and coastal management, in order to maximize the environmental benefits they provide. In this study, we characterized the trade-offs between (a) urban development and individual mangrove environmental indicators (habitat quality and ecosystem services), and (b) between different environmental indicators in the tropical nation of Singapore. A range of biological, biophysical, and cultural indicators, including carbon, charcoal production, support for offshore fisheries, recreation, and habitat quality for a threatened species were quantified using field-based, remote sensing, and expert survey methods. The shape of the trade-off Pareto frontiers was analyzed to assess the sensitivity of environmental indicators for development. When traded off individually with urban development, four out of five environmental indicators were insensitive to development, meaning that relatively minor degradation of the indicator occurred while development was below a certain threshold, although indicator loss accelerated once this threshold was reached. Most of the pairwise relationships between the five environmental indicators were synergistic; only carbon storage and charcoal production, and charcoal production and recreational accessibility showed trade-offs. Trade-off analysis and land use optimization using Pareto frontiers could be a useful decision-support tool for understanding how changes in land use and coastal management will impact the ability of ecosystems to provide environmental benefits.

  17. Phenotypic plasticity in the developmental integration of morphological trade-offs and secondary sexual trait compensation

    PubMed Central

    Tomkins, Joseph L; Kotiaho, Janne S; LeBas, Natasha R

    2005-01-01

    Trait exaggeration through sexual selection will take place alongside other changes in phenotype. Exaggerated morphology might be compensated by parallel changes in traits that support, enhance or facilitate exaggeration: ‘secondary sexual trait compensation’ (SSTC). Alternatively, exaggeration might be realized at the expense of other traits through morphological trade-offs. For the most part, SSTC has only been examined interspecifically. For these phenomena to be important intraspecifically, the sexual trait must be developmentally integrated with the compensatory or competing trait. We studied developmental integration in two species with different development: the holometabolous beetle Onthophagus taurus and the hemimetabolous earwig Forficula auricularia. Male-dimorphic variation in trait exaggeration was exploited to expose both trade-offs and SSTC. We found evidence for morphological trade-offs in O. taurus, but not F. auricularia, supporting the notion that trade-offs are more likely in closed developmental systems. However, we found these trade-offs were not limited solely to traits growing close together. Developmental integration of structures involved in SSTC were detected in both species. The developmental integration of SSTC was phenotypically plastic, such that the compensation for relatively larger sexual traits was greater in the exaggerated male morphs. Evidence of intraspecific SSTC demands studies of the selective, genetic and developmental architecture of phenotypic integration. PMID:15799950

  18. Interactions and trade-offs among physiological determinants of performance and reproductive success.

    PubMed

    Moore, Ignacio T; Hopkins, William A

    2009-10-01

    How an animal performs in its natural environment ultimately plays a key role in its reproductive success. While a number of studies have investigated how selection acts on performance-related traits, far fewer studies have examined the mechanisms responsible for variation in performance. Among mechanisms, variable morphology has received the most attention. Although physiological traits have received less attention, they are intrinsically related to performance and ultimately to reproductive success. We present a framework whereby investigators can link some basic physiological functions with organismal performance and ultimately with reproductive success. We propose that performance and ultimately reproductive success are strongly influenced by hormones, immune functions, and energetics. We further argue that no physiological function can be considered in isolation and thus our model emphasizes interactions and trade-offs both within each physiological function as well as among them. Some of the most commonly studied trade-offs are between reproduction and immune functions, with energetics as one of the key common currencies for these trade-offs. From an evolutionary perspective, the largest gaps in our knowledge lie in how these interactions and trade-offs influence reproductive success. We believe that a full understanding of how hormones, immune functions, and energetics influence performance traits related to reproduction and, ultimately, lifetime reproductive success requires recognition of the complex relationships, interactions, and trade-offs among these processes.

  19. Control over speeded actions: a common processing locus for micro- and macro-trade-offs?

    PubMed

    Jentzsch, Ines; Leuthold, Hartmut

    2006-08-01

    Cognitive control processes associated with long- and short-term adjustments of human behaviour have attracted much interest recently. It is still unclear, however, whether the mechanisms underlying these adjustments share a common locus within the chain of stimulus-response processing. In order to address this issue, the present study employed a speed-accuracy instruction producing a macro-trade-off, whereas micro-trade-off was studied by means of posterror slowing in reaction time (RT). Participants performed a spatially compatible or incompatible four-stimuli-to-two-response alternative choice RT task. Reliable variations in micro-and macro-trade-off as well as effects of spatial compatibility were found in RT and error rate. Most importantly, posterror slowing was larger when instruction stressed accuracy rather than speed, an effect being independent of spatial compatibility. Because the influence of speed-accuracy instruction and posterror slowing on performance was strongest for response alternations, together present findings suggest that the mechanisms underlying micro- and macro-trade-offs have one common locus at the level of motor processing. Additional influences of macro-trade-off on premotoric processing are likely.

  20. The offspring quantity-quality trade-off and human fertility variation.

    PubMed

    Lawson, David W; Borgerhoff Mulder, Monique

    2016-04-19

    The idea that trade-offs between offspring quantity and quality shape reproductive behaviour has long been central to economic perspectives on fertility. It also has a parallel and richer theoretical foundation in evolutionary ecology. We review the application of the quantity-quality trade-off concept to human reproduction, emphasizing distinctions between clutch size and lifetime fertility, and the wider set of forces contributing to fertility variation in iteroparous and sexually reproducing species like our own. We then argue that in settings approximating human evolutionary history, several factors limit costly sibling competition. Consequently, while the optimization of quantity-quality trade-offs undoubtedly shaped the evolution of human physiology setting the upper limits of reproduction, we argue it plays a modest role in accounting for socio-ecological and individual variation in fertility. Only upon entering the demographic transition can fertility limitation be clearly interpreted as strategically orientated to advancing offspring quality via increased parental investment per child, with low fertility increasing descendant socio-economic success, although not reproductive success. We conclude that existing economic and evolutionary literature has often overemphasized the centrality of quantity-quality trade-offs to human fertility variation and advocate for the development of more holistic frameworks encompassing alternative life-history trade-offs and the evolved mechanisms guiding their resolution. © 2016 The Authors.

  1. Graphical analysis of evolutionary trade-off in sylvatic Trypanosoma cruzi transmission modes.

    PubMed

    Kribs-Zaleta, Christopher M

    2014-07-21

    The notion of evolutionary trade-off (one attribute increasing at the expense of another) is central to the evolution of traits, well-studied especially in life-history theory, where a framework first developed by Levins illustrates how internal (genetics) and external (fitness landscapes) forces interact to shape an organism׳s ongoing adaptation. This manuscript extends this framework to the context of vector-borne pathogens, with the example of Trypanosoma cruzi (the etiological agent of Chagas׳ disease) adapting via trade-off among three different infection routes to hosts-stercorarian, vertical, and oral-in response to an epidemiological landscape that involves both hosts and vectors (where, in particular, parasite evolution depends not on parasite density but on relative host and vector densities). Using a fitness measure derived from an invasion reproductive number, this study analyzes several different trade-off scenarios in cycles involving raccoons or woodrats, including a proper three-way trade-off (two independent parameters). Results indicate that selection favors oral transmission to raccoons but classical stercorarian transmission to woodrats even under the same predation rate, with vertical (congenital) transmission favored only when aligned with dominant oral transmission or (at trace levels) under a weak (convex) trade-off.

  2. Telecommuting: The Trade-Offs of Home Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraut, Robert E.

    1989-01-01

    Reports that relatively few people use their home as a primary work site and that those who do (substitutors, self-employed, and supplementers) balance their needs for employment flexibility against their needs for income. Discusses differing motivations and satisfactions, and the wage gap between home workers and conventional workers. (SR)

  3. Is There Evidence for a Mixture of Processes in Speed-Accuracy Trade-Off Behavior?

    PubMed

    van Maanen, Leendert

    2016-01-01

    The speed-accuracy trade-off (SAT) effect refers to the behavioral trade-off between fast yet error-prone respones and accurate but slow responses. Multiple theories on the cognitive mechanisms behind SAT exist. One theory assumes that SAT is a consequence of strategically adjusting the amount of evidence required for overt behaviors, such as perceptual choices. Another theory hypothesizes that SAT is the consequence of the mixture of multiple categorically different cognitive processes. In this paper, these theories are disambiguated by assessing whether the fixed-point property of mixture distributions holds, in both simulations and data. I conclude that, at least for perceptual decision making, there is no evidence for a mixture of different cognitive processes to trade off accuracy of responding for speed.

  4. Evolutionary trade-offs, Pareto optimality, and the geometry of phenotype space.

    PubMed

    Shoval, O; Sheftel, H; Shinar, G; Hart, Y; Ramote, O; Mayo, A; Dekel, E; Kavanagh, K; Alon, U

    2012-06-01

    Biological systems that perform multiple tasks face a fundamental trade-off: A given phenotype cannot be optimal at all tasks. Here we ask how trade-offs affect the range of phenotypes found in nature. Using the Pareto front concept from economics and engineering, we find that best-trade-off phenotypes are weighted averages of archetypes--phenotypes specialized for single tasks. For two tasks, phenotypes fall on the line connecting the two archetypes, which could explain linear trait correlations, allometric relationships, as well as bacterial gene-expression patterns. For three tasks, phenotypes fall within a triangle in phenotype space, whose vertices are the archetypes, as evident in morphological studies, including on Darwin's finches. Tasks can be inferred from measured phenotypes based on the behavior of organisms nearest the archetypes.

  5. Metabolic efficiency underpins performance trade-offs in growth of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Kleessen, Sabrina; Laitinen, Roosa; Fusari, Corina M; Antonio, Carla; Sulpice, Ronan; Fernie, Alisdair R; Stitt, Mark; Nikoloski, Zoran

    2014-03-28

    Growth often involves a trade-off between the performance of contending tasks; metabolic plasticity can play an important role. Here we grow 97 Arabidopsis thaliana accessions in three conditions with a differing supply of carbon and nitrogen and identify a trade-off between two tasks required for rosette growth: increasing the physical size and increasing the protein concentration. We employ the Pareto performance frontier concept to rank accessions based on their multitask performance; only a few accessions achieve a good trade-off under all three growth conditions. We determine metabolic efficiency in each accession and condition by using metabolite levels and activities of enzymes involved in growth and protein synthesis. We demonstrate that accessions with high metabolic efficiency lie closer to the performance frontier and show increased metabolic plasticity. We illustrate how public domain data can be used to search for additional contending tasks, which may underlie the sub-optimality in some accessions.

  6. Multivariate trade-offs, succession, and phenological differentiation in a guild of colonial invertebrates.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Kyle F; Stachowicz, John J

    2010-11-01

    For competing species limited by one or few resources, diversity is thought to be maintained by trade-offs that allow niche differentiation without resource partitioning. However, few studies have quantified multiple key traits for each species in a guild and shown that trade-offs among these traits apply across the guild. Here we document strong bivariate and multivariate relationships among growth rate, fecundity, longevity, and overgrowth ability for six co-occurring colonial invertebrates. We find that all four of these traits are constrained to a single "fast-slow" niche axis that mechanistically relates life history variation to a colonization-competition trade-off. The location of species on this axis strongly predicts the timing of their peak abundance during succession. We also find that species closer to each other on the fast-slow axis are more likely to differ in reproductive phenology, suggesting a secondary dimension of niche differentiation for otherwise similar species.

  7. The ecological damage compensation for hydropower development based on trade-offs in river ecosystem services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Bing

    2017-05-01

    Hydropower development is a kind of trade-offs in river ecosystem services, while increasing provision services but reduce some regulation or supporting services. However, some ecosystem services we lost are difficult to recover and thus affect the regulated river and riparian ecosystems inevitably. In this context, an ecological compensation framework for damaged river in hydropower development was proposed based on the trade-off in river ecosystem services. And the accounting system for affected rivers was established based on river eco-service alteration, for the hydropower services cannot replace the lost services. Using the ecosystem services valuation methods, the trade-offs of river ecosystem services were quantified and illustrated by some hydropower projects in Lancang River, Yalung River and Min Chiang in China. According to the survey data, the annual compensation standard of per unit installed capacity in above cases may range from 27 to 206 RMB Yuan.

  8. Evolution of dispersal under a fecundity-dispersal trade-off.

    PubMed

    Weigang, Helene C; Kisdi, Éva

    2015-04-21

    Resources invested in dispersal structures as well as time and energy spent during transfer may often decrease fecundity. Here we analyse an extended version of the Hamilton-May model of dispersal evolution, where we include a fecundity-dispersal trade-off and also mortality between competition and reproduction. With adaptive dynamics and critical function analysis we investigate the evolution of dispersal strategies and ask whether adaptive diversification is possible. We exclude evolutionary branching for concave trade-offs and show that for convex trade-offs diversification is promoted in a narrow parameter range. We provide theoretical evidence that dispersal strategies can monotonically decrease with increasing survival during dispersal. Moreover, we illustrate the existence of two alternative attracting dispersal strategies. The model exhibits fold bifurcation points where slight changes in survival can lead to evolutionary catastrophes.

  9. Trade-off between the Mechanical Strength and Microwave Electrical Properties of Functionalized and Irradiated Carbon Nanotube Sheets.

    PubMed

    Williams, Tiffany S; Orloff, Nathan D; Baker, James S; Miller, Sandi G; Natarajan, Bharath; Obrzut, Jan; McCorkle, Linda S; Lebron-Colón, Marisabel; Gaier, James; Meador, Michael A; Liddle, J Alexander

    2016-04-13

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) sheets represent a novel implementation of CNTs that enable the tailoring of electrical and mechanical properties for applications in the automotive and aerospace industries. Small molecule functionalization and postprocessing techniques, such as irradiation with high-energy particles, are methods that can enhance the mechanical properties of CNTs. However, the effect that these modifications have on the electrical conduction mechanisms has not been extensively explored. By characterizing the mechanical and electrical properties of multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) sheets with different functional groups and irradiation doses, we can expand our insights into the extent of the trade-off that exists between mechanical strength and electrical conductivity for commercially available CNT sheets. Such insights allow for the optimization of design pathways for engineering applications that require a balance of material property enhancements.

  10. A study of rotor and platform design trade-offs for large-scale floating vertical axis wind turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffith, D. Todd; Paquette, Joshua; Barone, Matthew; Goupee, Andrew J.; Fowler, Matthew J.; Bull, Diana; Owens, Brian

    2016-09-01

    Vertical axis wind turbines are receiving significant attention for offshore siting. In general, offshore wind offers proximity to large populations centers, a vast & more consistent wind resource, and a scale-up opportunity, to name a few beneficial characteristics. On the other hand, offshore wind suffers from high levelized cost of energy (LCOE) and in particular high balance of system (BoS) costs owing to accessibility challenges and limited project experience. To address these challenges associated with offshore wind, Sandia National Laboratories is researching large-scale (MW class) offshore floating vertical axis wind turbines (VAWTs). The motivation for this work is that floating VAWTs are a potential transformative technology solution to reduce offshore wind LCOE in deep-water locations. This paper explores performance and cost trade-offs within the design space for floating VAWTs between the configurations for the rotor and platform.

  11. Cancer susceptibility and reproductive trade-offs: a model of the evolution of cancer defences

    PubMed Central

    Boddy, Amy M.; Kokko, Hanna; Breden, Felix; Wilkinson, Gerald S.; Aktipis, C. Athena

    2015-01-01

    The factors influencing cancer susceptibility and why it varies across species are major open questions in the field of cancer biology. One underexplored source of variation in cancer susceptibility may arise from trade-offs between reproductive competitiveness (e.g. sexually selected traits, earlier reproduction and higher fertility) and cancer defence. We build a model that contrasts the probabilistic onset of cancer with other, extrinsic causes of mortality and use it to predict that intense reproductive competition will lower cancer defences and increase cancer incidence. We explore the trade-off between cancer defences and intraspecific competition across different extrinsic mortality conditions and different levels of trade-off intensity, and find the largest effect of competition on cancer in species where low extrinsic mortality combines with strong trade-offs. In such species, selection to delay cancer and selection to outcompete conspecifics are both strong, and the latter conflicts with the former. We discuss evidence for the assumed trade-off between reproductive competitiveness and cancer susceptibility. Sexually selected traits such as ornaments or large body size require high levels of cell proliferation and appear to be associated with greater cancer susceptibility. Similar associations exist for female traits such as continuous egg-laying in domestic hens and earlier reproductive maturity. Trade-offs between reproduction and cancer defences may be instantiated by a variety of mechanisms, including higher levels of growth factors and hormones, less efficient cell-cycle control and less DNA repair, or simply a larger number of cell divisions (relevant when reproductive success requires large body size or rapid reproductive cycles). These mechanisms can affect intra- and interspecific variation in cancer susceptibility arising from rapid cell proliferation during reproductive maturation, intrasexual competition and reproduction. PMID:26056364

  12. How Porin Heterogeneity and Trade-Offs Affect the Antibiotic Susceptibility of Gram-Negative Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Ferenci, Thomas; Phan, Katherine

    2015-01-01

    Variations in porin proteins are common in Gram-negative pathogens. Altered or absent porins reduce access of polar antibiotics across the outer membrane and can thus contribute to antibiotic resistance. Reduced permeability has a cost however, in lowering access to nutrients. This trade-off between permeability and nutritional competence is the source of considerable natural variation in porin gate-keeping. Mutational changes in this trade-off are frequently selected, so susceptibility to detergents and antibiotics is polymorphic in environmental isolates as well as pathogens. Understanding the mechanism, costs and heterogeneity of antibiotic exclusion by porins will be crucial in combating Gram negative infections. PMID:26506392

  13. Of Uberfleas and Krakens: Detecting Trade-offs Using Mixed Models.

    PubMed

    Careau, Vincent; Wilson, Robbie S

    2017-08-01

    All animals experience performance trade-offs as they complete tasks such as capturing prey, defending territories, acquiring mates, and escaping predators. Why then, is it so hard to detect performance trade-offs at the whole-organismal level? Why do we sometimes even obtain positive correlations between two performance traits that are predicted to be negatively associated? Here we explore two plausible explanations. First, most analyses are based on individual maximal values (i.e., personal best), which could introduce a bias in the correlation estimates. Second, phenotypic correlations alone may be poor indicators of a trade-off when contrasting processes occur at the among- versus within-individual levels. One such scenario is the "big houses big cars" model developed in life-history theory to explain the existence of "uberfleas" that are superior in all regards (because they acquire more resources than others). We highlight that the exact opposite scenario might occur for performance trade-offs, where among-individual trade-offs may be masked by within-individual changes in physical condition. One of the best ways to test among these alternative scenarios is to collect repeated pairs of performance traits and analyze them using multivariate mixed models (MMMs). MMMs allow straightforward and simultaneous examination of trait correlations at the among- and within-individual levels. We use a simple simulation tool (SQuID package in R) to create a population of Krakens, a mythical giant squid-like sea creature whose morphology generates a performance trade-off between swimming speed and strength or ability to sink ships. The simulations showed that using individual maximum values introduces a bias that is particularly severe when individuals differ in the number of repeated samples (ntrial). Finally, we show how MMMs can help detect performance (or any other type of) trade-offs and offer additional insights (e.g., help detect plasticity integration). We hope

  14. Selection and constraints on offspring size-number trade-offs in sand lizards (Lacerta agilis).

    PubMed

    Ljungström, G; Stjernstedt, M; Wapstra, E; Olsson, M

    2016-05-01

    The trade-off between offspring size and number is a central component of life-history theory, postulating that larger investment into offspring size inevitably decreases offspring number. This trade-off is generally discussed in terms of genetic, physiological or morphological constraints; however, as among-individual differences can mask individual trade-offs, the underlying mechanisms may be difficult to reveal. In this study, we use multivariate analyses to investigate whether there is a trade-off between offspring size and number in a population of sand lizards by separating among- and within-individual patterns using a 15-year data set collected in the wild. We also explore the ecological and evolutionary causes and consequences of this trade-off by investigating how a female's resource (condition)- vs. age-related size (snout-vent length) influences her investment into offspring size vs. number (OSN), whether these traits are heritable and under selection and whether the OSN trade-off has a genetic component. We found a negative correlation between offspring size and number within individual females and physical constraints (size of body cavity) appear to limit the number of eggs that a female can produce. This suggests that the OSN trade-off occurs due to resource constraints as a female continues to grow throughout life and, thus, produces larger clutches. In contrast to the assumptions of classic OSN theory, we did not detect selection on offspring size; however, there was directional selection for larger clutch sizes. The repeatabilities of both offspring size and number were low and we did not detect any additive genetic variance in either trait. This could be due to strong selection (past or current) on these life-history traits, or to insufficient statistical power to detect significant additive genetic effects. Overall, the findings of this study are an important illustration of how analyses of within-individual patterns can reveal trade-offs and

  15. How Porin Heterogeneity and Trade-Offs Affect the Antibiotic Susceptibility of Gram-Negative Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Ferenci, Thomas; Phan, Katherine

    2015-10-21

    Variations in porin proteins are common in Gram-negative pathogens. Altered or absent porins reduce access of polar antibiotics across the outer membrane and can thus contribute to antibiotic resistance. Reduced permeability has a cost however, in lowering access to nutrients. This trade-off between permeability and nutritional competence is the source of considerable natural variation in porin gate-keeping. Mutational changes in this trade-off are frequently selected, so susceptibility to detergents and antibiotics is polymorphic in environmental isolates as well as pathogens. Understanding the mechanism, costs and heterogeneity of antibiotic exclusion by porins will be crucial in combating Gram negative infections.

  16. Security trade-offs in ancilla-free quantum bit commitment in the presence of superselection rules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Divincenzo, David P.; Smolin, John A.; Terhal, Barbara M.

    2004-07-01

    Security trade-offs have previously been established for one-way bit commitment. We study this trade-off in two superselection settings. We show that for an [lsquo]abelian[rsquo] superselection rule (exemplified by particle conservation), the standard trade-off between sealing and binding properties still holds. For the non-abelian case (exemplified by angular momentum conservation), the security trade-off can be more subtle, which we illustrate by showing that if the bit commitment is forced to be ancilla-free, an asymptotically secure quantum bit commitment is possible.

  17. Condition-Dependent Trade-Off Between Weapon Size and Immunity in Males of the European Earwig.

    PubMed

    Körner, Maximilian; Vogelweith, Fanny; Foitzik, Susanne; Meunier, Joël

    2017-08-11

    Investigating the expression of trade-offs between key life-history functions is central to our understanding of how these functions evolved and are maintained. However, detecting trade-offs can be challenging due to variation in resource availability, which masks trade-offs at the population level. Here, we investigated in the European earwig Forficula auricularia whether (1) weapon size trades off with three key immune parameters - hemocyte concentration, phenoloxidase and prophenoloxidase activity - and whether (2) expression and strength of these trade-offs depend on male body condition (body size) and/or change after an immune challenge. Our results partially confirmed condition dependent trade-offs between weapon size and immunity in male earwigs. Specifically, we found that after an immune challenge, weapon size trades off with hemocyte concentrations in low-condition, but not in good-condition males. Contrastingly, weapon size was independent of pre-challenge hemocyte concentration. We also found no trade-off between weapon size and phenoloxidase activity, independent of body condition and immune challenge. Overall, our study reveals that trade-offs with sexual traits may weaken or disappear in good-condition individuals. Given the importance of weapon size for male reproductive success, our results highlight how low-condition individuals may employ alternative life-history investment strategies to cope with resource limitation.

  18. Finite element modeling of shell shape in the freshwater turtle Pseudemys concinna reveals a trade-off between mechanical strength and hydrodynamic efficiency.

    PubMed

    Rivera, Gabriel; Stayton, C Tristan

    2011-10-01

    Aquatic species can experience different selective pressures on morphology in different flow regimes. Species inhabiting lotic regimes often adapt to these conditions by evolving low-drag (i.e., streamlined) morphologies that reduce the likelihood of dislodgment or displacement. However, hydrodynamic factors are not the only selective pressures influencing organismal morphology and shapes well suited to flow conditions may compromise performance in other roles. We investigated the possibility of morphological trade-offs in the turtle Pseudemys concinna. Individuals living in lotic environments have flatter, more streamlined shells than those living in lentic environments; however, this flatter shape may also make the shells less capable of resisting predator-induced loads. We tested the idea that "lotic" shell shapes are weaker than "lentic" shell shapes, concomitantly examining effects of sex. Geometric morphometric data were used to transform an existing finite element shell model into a series of models corresponding to the shapes of individual turtles. Models were assigned identical material properties and loaded under identical conditions, and the stresses produced by a series of eight loads were extracted to describe the strength of the shells. "Lotic" shell shapes produced significantly higher stresses than "lentic" shell shapes, indicating that the former is weaker than the latter. Females had significantly stronger shell shapes than males, although these differences were less consistent than differences between flow regimes. We conclude that, despite the potential for many-to-one mapping of shell shape onto strength, P. concinna experiences a trade-off in shell shape between hydrodynamic and mechanical performance. This trade-off may be evident in many other turtle species or any other aquatic species that also depend on a shell for defense. However, evolution of body size may provide an avenue of escape from this trade-off in some cases, as changes in

  19. Nutritional physiology of life-history trade-offs: how food protein-carbohydrate content influences life-history traits in the wing-polymorphic cricket Gryllus firmus.

    PubMed

    Clark, Rebecca M; Zera, Anthony J; Behmer, Spencer T

    2015-01-15

    Although life-history trade-offs result from the differential acquisition and allocation of nutritional resources to competing physiological functions, many aspects of this topic remain poorly understood. Wing-polymorphic insects, which possess alternative morphs that trade off allocation to flight capability versus early reproduction, provide a good model system for exploring this topic. In this study, we used the wing-polymorphic cricket Gryllus firmus to test how expression of the flight capability versus reproduction trade-off was modified across a heterogeneous protein-carbohydrate nutritional landscape. Newly molted adult female long- and short-winged crickets were given one of 13 diets with different concentrations and ratios of protein and digestible carbohydrate; for each cricket, we measured consumption patterns, growth and allocation to reproduction (ovary mass) versus flight muscle maintenance (flight muscle mass and somatic lipid stores). Feeding responses in both morphs were influenced more by total macronutrient concentration than by protein-carbohydrate ratio, except at high-macronutrient concentration, where protein-carbohydrate balance was important. Mass gain tended to be greatest on protein-biased diets for both morphs, but was consistently lower across all diets for long-winged females. When long-winged females were fed high-carbohydrate foods, they accumulated greater somatic lipid stores; on high-protein foods, they accumulated greater somatic protein stores. Food protein-carbohydrate content also affected short-winged females (selected for early reproductive onset), which showed dramatic increases in ovary size, including ovarian stores of lipid and protein, on protein-biased foods. This is the first study to show how the concentration and ratio of dietary protein and carbohydrate affects consumption and allocation to key physiological features associated with the reproduction-dispersal life-history trade-off.

  20. Trade-off Analysis of Underwater Acoustic Sensor Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuna, G.; Das, R.

    2017-09-01

    In the last couple of decades, Underwater Acoustic Sensor Networks (UASNs) were started to be used for various commercial and non-commercial purposes. However, in underwater environments, there are some specific inherent constraints, such as high bit error rate, variable and large propagation delay, limited bandwidth capacity, and short-range communications, which severely degrade the performance of UASNs and limit the lifetime of underwater sensor nodes as well. Therefore, proving reliability of UASN applications poses a challenge. In this study, we try to balance energy consumption of underwater acoustic sensor networks and minimize end-to-end delay using an efficient node placement strategy. Our simulation results reveal that if the number of hops is reduced, energy consumption can be reduced. However, this increases end-to-end delay. Hence, application-specific requirements must be taken into consideration when determining a strategy for node deployment.

  1. Trade-off among different anti-herbivore defence strategies along an altitudinal gradient

    PubMed Central

    Dostálek, Tomáš; Rokaya, Maan Bahadur; Maršík, Petr; Rezek, Jan; Skuhrovec, Jiří; Pavela, Roman; Münzbergová, Zuzana

    2016-01-01

    The type and intensity of plant–herbivore interactions are likely to be altered under climate change as a consequence of differential dispersal rates of plants and their herbivores. Here, we studied variation in herbivore damage on Salvia nubicola in the field and compared its growth and defence strategies against herbivores in controlled conditions using seeds from populations along a broad altitudinal gradient. Our work is one of the first studies to simultaneously measure complex intraspecific variation in plant growth, direct and indirect defences as well as plant tolerance (ability to regrow) as a consequence of herbivore attack simulated by clipping. In the field, we found that plants experienced higher herbivore pressure in lower altitudes. In the greenhouse, plants grown from seeds collected in lower-altitude populations grew better and produced a higher content of phenolic compounds (direct defence) and volatile organic compounds (indirect defence) in response to simulated herbivory. However, there were no differences in tolerance and effect of S. nubicola extracts on the model generalist herbivore Spodoptera littoralis (direct defence) along the altitudinal gradient. Although we found that S. nubicola developed a range of defence strategies, the strategies do not seem to be used simultaneously in all populations even though most of them are correlated with altitudinal gradient. Our finding is in agreement with the current knowledge that co-expression of multiple defences might be costly for a plant, since investment in defensive traits is assumed to reduce the resource availability for growth and reproduction. Our study thus shows the importance of simultaneous study of different defence strategies since understanding these trade-offs could be necessary for detecting the mechanisms by which plants are able to cope with future climate change. PMID:27169609

  2. Regional drivers of clutch loss reveal important trade-offs for beach-nesting birds

    PubMed Central

    Schlacher, Thomas A.; Weston, Michael A.; Huijbers, Chantal M.; Anderson, Chris; Gilby, Ben L.; Olds, Andrew D.; Connolly, Rod M.; Schoeman, David S.

    2016-01-01

    Coastal birds are critical ecosystem constituents on sandy shores, yet are threatened by depressed reproductive success resulting from direct and indirect anthropogenic and natural pressures. Few studies examine clutch fate across the wide range of environments experienced by birds; instead, most focus at the small site scale. We examine survival of model shorebird clutches as an index of true clutch survival at a regional scale (∼200 km), encompassing a variety of geomorphologies, predator communities, and human use regimes in southeast Queensland, Australia. Of the 132 model nests deployed and monitored with cameras, 45 (34%) survived the experimental exposure period. Thirty-five (27%) were lost to flooding, 32 (24%) were depredated, nine (7%) buried by sand, seven (5%) destroyed by people, three (2%) failed by unknown causes, and one (1%) was destroyed by a dog. Clutch fate differed substantially among regions, particularly with respect to losses from flooding and predation. ‘Topographic’ exposure was the main driver of mortality of nests placed close to the drift line near the base of dunes, which were lost to waves (particularly during storms) and to a lesser extent depredation. Predators determined the fate of clutches not lost to waves, with the depredation probability largely influenced by region. Depredation probability declined as nests were backed by higher dunes and were placed closer to vegetation. This study emphasizes the scale at which clutch fate and survival varies within a regional context, the prominence of corvids as egg predators, the significant role of flooding as a source of nest loss, and the multiple trade-offs faced by beach-nesting birds and those that manage them. PMID:27672510

  3. Regional drivers of clutch loss reveal important trade-offs for beach-nesting birds.

    PubMed

    Maslo, Brooke; Schlacher, Thomas A; Weston, Michael A; Huijbers, Chantal M; Anderson, Chris; Gilby, Ben L; Olds, Andrew D; Connolly, Rod M; Schoeman, David S

    2016-01-01

    Coastal birds are critical ecosystem constituents on sandy shores, yet are threatened by depressed reproductive success resulting from direct and indirect anthropogenic and natural pressures. Few studies examine clutch fate across the wide range of environments experienced by birds; instead, most focus at the small site scale. We examine survival of model shorebird clutches as an index of true clutch survival at a regional scale (∼200 km), encompassing a variety of geomorphologies, predator communities, and human use regimes in southeast Queensland, Australia. Of the 132 model nests deployed and monitored with cameras, 45 (34%) survived the experimental exposure period. Thirty-five (27%) were lost to flooding, 32 (24%) were depredated, nine (7%) buried by sand, seven (5%) destroyed by people, three (2%) failed by unknown causes, and one (1%) was destroyed by a dog. Clutch fate differed substantially among regions, particularly with respect to losses from flooding and predation. 'Topographic' exposure was the main driver of mortality of nests placed close to the drift line near the base of dunes, which were lost to waves (particularly during storms) and to a lesser extent depredation. Predators determined the fate of clutches not lost to waves, with the depredation probability largely influenced by region. Depredation probability declined as nests were backed by higher dunes and were placed closer to vegetation. This study emphasizes the scale at which clutch fate and survival varies within a regional context, the prominence of corvids as egg predators, the significant role of flooding as a source of nest loss, and the multiple trade-offs faced by beach-nesting birds and those that manage them.

  4. Trade-off among different anti-herbivore defence strategies along an altitudinal gradient.

    PubMed

    Dostálek, Tomáš; Rokaya, Maan Bahadur; Maršík, Petr; Rezek, Jan; Skuhrovec, Jiří; Pavela, Roman; Münzbergová, Zuzana

    2016-01-01

    The type and intensity of plant-herbivore interactions are likely to be altered under climate change as a consequence of differential dispersal rates of plants and their herbivores. Here, we studied variation in herbivore damage on Salvia nubicola in the field and compared its growth and defence strategies against herbivores in controlled conditions using seeds from populations along a broad altitudinal gradient. Our work is one of the first studies to simultaneously measure complex intraspecific variation in plant growth, direct and indirect defences as well as plant tolerance (ability to regrow) as a consequence of herbivore attack simulated by clipping. In the field, we found that plants experienced higher herbivore pressure in lower altitudes. In the greenhouse, plants grown from seeds collected in lower-altitude populations grew better and produced a higher content of phenolic compounds (direct defence) and volatile organic compounds (indirect defence) in response to simulated herbivory. However, there were no differences in tolerance and effect of S. nubicola extracts on the model generalist herbivore Spodoptera littoralis (direct defence) along the altitudinal gradient. Although we found that S. nubicola developed a range of defence strategies, the strategies do not seem to be used simultaneously in all populations even though most of them are correlated with altitudinal gradient. Our finding is in agreement with the current knowledge that co-expression of multiple defences might be costly for a plant, since investment in defensive traits is assumed to reduce the resource availability for growth and reproduction. Our study thus shows the importance of simultaneous study of different defence strategies since understanding these trade-offs could be necessary for detecting the mechanisms by which plants are able to cope with future climate change.

  5. Flower power: Floral and resource manipulations reveal how and why reproductive trade-offs occur for lowbush blueberry (Vaccinium angustifolium).

    PubMed

    Bajcz, Alex W; Drummond, Francis A

    2017-08-01

    Plant reproductive trade-offs are thought to be caused by resource limitations or other constraints, but more empirical support for these hypotheses would be welcome. Additionally, quantitative characterization of these trade-offs, as well as consideration of whether they are linear, could yield additional insights. We expanded our flower removal research on lowbush blueberry (Vaccinium angustifolium) to explore the nature of and causes of its reproductive trade-offs. We used fertilization, defoliation, positionally biased flower removal, and multiple flower removal levels to discern why reproductive trade-offs occur in this taxon and to plot these trade-offs along two continuous axes. We found evidence through defoliation that vegetative mass per stem may trade off with reproductive effort in lowbush blueberry because the two traits compete for limited carbon. Also, several traits including ripe fruit production per reproductive node and fruit titratable acidity may be "sink-limited"-they decline with increasing reproductive effort because average reproductive structure quality declines. We found no evidence that reproductive trade-offs were caused by nitrogen limitation. Use of reproductive nodes remaining per stem as a measure of reproductive effort indicated steeper trade-offs than use of the proportion of nodes remaining. For five of six traits, we found evidence that the trade-off could be concave down or up instead of strictly linear. Synthesis. To date, studies have aimed primarily at identifying plant reproductive trade-offs. However, understanding how and why these trade-offs occur represent the exciting and necessary next steps for this line of inquiry.

  6. Fast and careless or careful and slow? Apparent holistic processing in mental rotation is explained by speed-accuracy trade-offs.

    PubMed

    Liesefeld, Heinrich René; Fu, Xiaolan; Zimmer, Hubert D

    2015-07-01

    A major debate in the mental-rotation literature concerns the question of whether objects are represented holistically during rotation. Effects of object complexity on rotational speed are considered strong evidence against such holistic representations. In Experiment 1, such an effect of object complexity was markedly present. A closer look on individual performance patterns, however, revealed that only some participants showed this effect. For others, rotational speed was independent of object complexity. The assumption that these fast-rotating participants use a holistic representation that equally well holds simple and complex objects would explain these results. Taking error rates into account disproved this explanation: Fast participants simply committed more errors in those conditions for which careful participants invested more rotation time. Whether this speed-accuracy trade-off is a stable personality trait or a somewhat flexible strategic choice was examined in Experiments 2 and 3. In Experiment 2, participants received monetary incentives that encouraged them to minimize errors. In line with a certain degree of flexible strategic control over speed-accuracy trade-offs, a large majority of participants showed effects of object complexity on rotational speed. When, in contrast, time pressure was induced in Experiment 3, error rates increased considerably and most participants' rotational speed became independent of object complexity. Our results indicate that all our participants performed mental rotation on a nonholistic representation and that apparent holistic processing strategies in mental rotation (and potentially also in other spatial tasks) might actually be speed-accuracy trade-offs in disguise.

  7. Life-history strategies of North American elk: trade-offs associated with reproduction and survival

    Treesearch

    Sabrina Morano; Kelley M. Stewart; James S. Sedinger; Christopher A. Nicolai; Marty Vavra

    2013-01-01

    The principle of energy allocation states that individuals should attempt to maximize fitness by allocating resources optimally among growth, maintenance, and reproduction. Such allocation may result in trade-offs between survival and reproduction, or between current and future reproduction. We used a marked population of North American elk (Cervus elaphus...

  8. GARBAGE: A Card Game That Simulates the Trade-Off between Competition and Concern.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thiagarajan, Sivasailam

    1991-01-01

    Describes a simulation card game involved with the dumping of hazardous wastes that was designed to explore the trade-off between industrial competition and social concern. Steps of play are described for the game, which is called GARBAGE, and debriefing techniques are suggested, including an affective phase and a cognitive phase. (LRW)

  9. Spiders in Motion: Demonstrating Adaptation, Structure-Function Relationships, and Trade-Offs in Invertebrates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowlin, Melissa S.; McLeer, Dorothy F.; Danielson-Francois, Anne M.

    2014-01-01

    Evolutionary history and structural considerations constrain all aspects of animal physiology. Constraints on invertebrate locomotion are especially straightforward for students to observe and understand. In this exercise, students use spiders to investigate the concepts of adaptation, structure-function relationships, and trade-offs. Students…

  10. The Rate-Size Trade-Off Structures Intraspecific Variation in Daphnia ambigua Life History Parameters

    PubMed Central

    DeLong, John P.; Hanley, Torrance C.

    2013-01-01

    The identification of trade-offs is necessary for understanding the evolution and maintenance of diversity. Here we employ the supply-demand (SD) body size optimization model to predict a trade-off between asymptotic body size and growth rate. We use the SD model to quantitatively predict the slope of the relationship between asymptotic body size and growth rate under high and low food regimes and then test the predictions against observations for Daphnia ambigua. Close quantitative agreement between observed and predicted slopes at both food levels lends support to the model and confirms that a ‘rate-size’ trade-off structures life history variation in this population. In contrast to classic life history expectations, growth and reproduction were positively correlated after controlling for the rate-size trade-off. We included 12 Daphnia clones in our study, but clone identity explained only some of the variation in life history traits. We also tested the hypothesis that growth rate would be positively related to intergenic spacer length (i.e. the growth rate hypothesis) across clones, but we found that clones with intermediate intergenic spacer lengths had larger asymptotic sizes and slower growth rates. Our results strongly support a resource-based optimization of body size following the SD model. Furthermore, because some resource allocation decisions necessarily precede others, understanding interdependent life history traits may require a more nested approach. PMID:24312518

  11. A Classroom Exercise to Examine the Trade-off between Mission Capacity and Life Cycle Cost

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kang, Keebom; Doerr, Kenneth H.

    2015-01-01

    This article presents a classroom exercise, centered on a simulation that has been used for 4 years in an MBA program to help students develop an understanding of the trade-offs involved in managing capital assets in the public sector. Though often ignored in business schools, "mission" is a key criterion that must be considered when…

  12. An Education Freedom Index: Why, Key Determinants, Component Weights, and Trade-Offs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merrifield, John

    2011-01-01

    Freedom of any kind has intrinsic value, and education freedom is controversial, in need of empirical assessment of possible and likely trade-offs between freedom from state control and social goals such as equity and cohesion. Without a reasonable empirical measure of education freedom we can only cite the controversies and choose sides. The…

  13. Sex Allocation in California Oaks: Trade-Offs or Resource Tracking?

    PubMed Central

    Knops, Johannes M. H.; Koenig, Walter D.

    2012-01-01

    Trade-offs in sex resource allocation are commonly inferred from a negative correlation between male and female reproduction. We found that for three California oak species, aboveground annual net productivity (ANP) differences among individuals were primarily correlated with water availability and soil fertility. Reproductive biomass increased with ANP, but the relative allocation to reproduction was constant, indicating that reproduction tracked productivity, which in turn tracked site quality. Although there was a negative correlation between male and female reproduction, this was not the result of a resource investment trade-off, but rather a byproduct of the positive correlation between female reproductive biomass and ANP combined with the greater overall resource allocation to female, compared to male, function. Thus, we reject the hypothesis of a trade-off between these key life-history components within individuals of these species. For long-lived individuals, a plastic resource tracking response to environmental fluctuations may be more adaptive than directly linking life-history traits through trade-offs. PMID:22952692

  14. Neural Trade-Offs between Recognizing and Categorizing Own- and Other-Race Faces

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jiangang; Wang, Zhe; Feng, Lu; Li, Jun; Tian, Jie; Lee, Kang

    2015-01-01

    Behavioral research has suggested a trade-off relationship between individual recognition and race categorization of own- and other-race faces, which is an important behavioral marker of face processing expertise. However, little is known about the neural mechanisms underlying this trade-off. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) methodology, we concurrently asked participants to recognize and categorize own- and other-race faces to examine the neural correlates of this trade-off relationship. We found that for other-race faces, the fusiform face area (FFA) and occipital face area (OFA) responded more to recognition than categorization, whereas for own-race faces, the responses were equal for the 2 tasks. The right superior temporal sulcus (STS) responses were the opposite to those of the FFA and OFA. Further, recognition enhanced the functional connectivity from the right FFA to the right STS, whereas categorization enhanced the functional connectivity from the right OFA to the right STS. The modulatory effects of these 2 couplings were negatively correlated. Our findings suggested that within the core face processing network, although recognizing and categorizing own- and other-race faces activated the same neural substrates, there existed neural trade-offs whereby their activations and functional connectivities were modulated by face race type and task demand due to one's differential processing expertise with own- and other-race faces. PMID:24591523

  15. An Education Freedom Index: Why, Key Determinants, Component Weights, and Trade-Offs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merrifield, John

    2011-01-01

    Freedom of any kind has intrinsic value, and education freedom is controversial, in need of empirical assessment of possible and likely trade-offs between freedom from state control and social goals such as equity and cohesion. Without a reasonable empirical measure of education freedom we can only cite the controversies and choose sides. The…

  16. Child Care and Work Absences: Trade-Offs by Type of Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Rachel A.; Kaestner, Robert; Korenman, Sanders

    2008-01-01

    Parents face a trade-off in the effect of child-care problems on employment. Whereas large settings may increase problems because of child illness, small group care may relate to provider unavailability. Analyzing the NICHD Study of Early Child Care, we find that child-care centers and large family day care lead to mothers' greater work absences…

  17. Trade-off between immunocompetence and growth in magpies: an experimental study.

    PubMed Central

    Soler, Juan José; de Neve, Liesbeth; Pérez-Contreras, Tomás; Soler, Manuel; Sorci, Gabriele

    2003-01-01

    A trade-off between immunity and growth has repeatedly been suggested, mainly based on laboratory and poultry science, but also from experiments where parasitism intensity was manipulated in field bird populations. However, as resource allocation to different activities (or organs) during growth is difficult to manipulate, this trade-off has only been experimentally tested by studying the effects of non-pathogenic antigens. By providing some nestling magpies (Pica pica) with methionine, a sulphur amino acid that specifically enhances T-cell immune response in chickens, we investigated this trade-off by directly affecting allocation of limited resources during growth. Results were in accordance with the hypothetical trade-off because nestlings fed with methionine showed a lower growth rate during the four days of methionine administration, but a larger response when fledglings were challenged with phytohaemagglutinin (a measure of the intensity of T-lymphocyte-mediated immune responsiveness) than control nestlings. Surprisingly, we found that control and experimental nestlings fledged with similar body mass, size and condition, but experimental nestlings suffered less from blood parasites (Haemoproteus) and had fewer lymphocytes (a widely used measure of health status) than control nestlings, suggesting a negative effect of blood parasites or other pathogens on nestling growth. PMID:12614572

  18. Parent–offspring conflict and the genetic trade-offs shaping parental investment

    PubMed Central

    Kölliker, Mathias; Boos, Stefan; Wong, Janine W.Y.; Röllin, Lilian; Stucki, Dimitri; Raveh, Shirley; Wu, Min; Meunier, Joël

    2015-01-01

    The genetic conflict between parents and their offspring is a cornerstone of kin selection theory and the gene-centred view of evolution, but whether it actually occurs in natural systems remains an open question. Conflict operates only if parenting is driven by genetic trade-offs between offspring performance and the parent's ability to raise additional offspring, and its expression critically depends on the shape of these trade-offs. Here we investigate the occurrence and nature of genetic conflict in an insect with maternal care, the earwig Forficula auricularia. Specifically, we test for a direct response to experimental selection on female future reproduction and correlated responses in current offspring survival, developmental rate and growth. The results demonstrate genetic trade-offs that differ in shape before and after hatching. Our study not only provides direct evidence for parent–offspring conflict but also highlights that conflict is not inevitable and critically depends on the genetic trade-offs shaping parental investment. PMID:25880586

  19. Predicting Life-History Trade-Offs with Whole-Organism Performance.

    PubMed

    Lailvaux, Simon P; Husak, Jerry F

    2017-08-01

    Whole-organism performance traits are key intermediaries between the organism and the environment. Because performance traits are energetically costly to both build and maintain, performance will compete with other life-history traits over a limited pool of acquired energetic resources at any given time, potentially leading to trade-offs in performance expression. Although these trade-offs can have important implications for organismal fitness we currently lack a conceptual framework for predicting both where trade-offs might be expected, and which traits may be especially prone to trade-offs with other fitness-related life-history traits. We propose such a framework based on an estimate of the energetic requirements of locomotion in vertebrates, the ecological cost of transport. By analyzing existing data on mammalian energetic budgets and life-history, we found that species with higher costs of locomotion also tended to be those with "slow" life histories that invest relatively less in current reproduction than "fast" life-history species. We discuss the potential implications of ectothermy for masking such relationships, and how this framework might be expanded upon in the future. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Integrative and Comparative Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Educational Systems and the Trade-Off between Labor Market Allocation and Equality of Educational Opportunity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bol, Thijs; van de Werfhorst, Herman G.

    2013-01-01

    Educational systems with a high level of tracking and vocational orientation have been shown to improve the allocation of school-leavers in the labor market. However, tracked educational systems are also known to increase inequality of educational opportunity. This presumed trade-off between equality and labor market preparation is clearly rooted…

  1. Site-specific trade-offs of harvesting cereal residues as biofuel feedstocks

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Cereal residues are considered an important feedstock for future biofuel production. Harvesting cereal residues, however, could lead to substantial soil degradation. Our objective was to evaluate trade-offs associated with harvesting straw including impacts on soil erosion and quality, soil organic ...

  2. Neural Trade-Offs between Recognizing and Categorizing Own- and Other-Race Faces.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiangang; Wang, Zhe; Feng, Lu; Li, Jun; Tian, Jie; Lee, Kang

    2015-08-01

    Behavioral research has suggested a trade-off relationship between individual recognition and race categorization of own- and other-race faces, which is an important behavioral marker of face processing expertise. However, little is known about the neural mechanisms underlying this trade-off. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) methodology, we concurrently asked participants to recognize and categorize own- and other-race faces to examine the neural correlates of this trade-off relationship. We found that for other-race faces, the fusiform face area (FFA) and occipital face area (OFA) responded more to recognition than categorization, whereas for own-race faces, the responses were equal for the 2 tasks. The right superior temporal sulcus (STS) responses were the opposite to those of the FFA and OFA. Further, recognition enhanced the functional connectivity from the right FFA to the right STS, whereas categorization enhanced the functional connectivity from the right OFA to the right STS. The modulatory effects of these 2 couplings were negatively correlated. Our findings suggested that within the core face processing network, although recognizing and categorizing own- and other-race faces activated the same neural substrates, there existed neural trade-offs whereby their activations and functional connectivities were modulated by face race type and task demand due to one's differential processing expertise with own- and other-race faces.

  3. Life history trade-offs imposed by dragline use in two money spiders.

    PubMed

    Bonte, Dries; Verduyn, Lieselot; Braeckman, Bart P

    2016-01-01

    Trade-offs among life history traits are central to understanding the limits of adaptations to stress. In animals, virtually all decisions taken during life are expected to have downstream consequences. To what degree rare, but energy-demanding, decisions carry over to individual performance is rarely studied in arthropods. We used spiders as a model system to test how single investments in silk use - for dispersal or predator escape - affect individual performance. Silk produced for safe lines and as threads for ballooning is of the strongest kind and is energetically costly, especially when resources are limited. We induced dragline spinning in two species of money spider at similar quantities to that under natural conditions and tested trade-offs with lifespan and egg sac production under unlimited prey availability and a dietary restriction treatment. We demonstrate strong trade-offs between dragline spinning and survival and fecundity. Survival trade-offs were additive to those imposed by the dietary treatment, but a reduction in eggs produced after silk use was only prevalent under conditions where food was restricted during the spider's life. Because draglines are not recycled after their use for dispersal or predator escape, their spinning incurs substantial fitness costs in dispersal, especially in environments with prey limitation. Rare but energetically costly decisions related to dispersal or predator escape may thus carry over to adult performance and explain phenotypic heterogeneity in natural populations.

  4. The tolerance–fecundity trade-off and the maintenance of diversity in seed size

    PubMed Central

    Muller-Landau, Helene C.

    2010-01-01

    Seed size commonly varies by five to six orders of magnitude among coexisting plant species, a pattern ecologists have long sought to explain. Because seed size trades off with seed number, small-seeded species clearly have the advantage in fecundity, but what is the countervailing advantage of large seeds? Higher competitive ability combined with strong competitive asymmetry can in theory allow coexistence through a competition–colonization trade-off, but empirical evidence is inconsistent with this mechanism. Instead, the key advantage of large seeds appears to be their tolerance of stresses such as shade or drought that are present in some but not all regeneration sites. Here I present a simple, analytically tractable model of species coexistence in heterogeneous habitats through a tolerance–fecundity trade-off. Under this mechanism, the more tolerant species win all of the more stressful regeneration sites and some of those that are less stressful, whereas the more fecund species win most but not all of the less stressful sites. The tolerance–fecundity trade-off enables stable coexistence of large numbers of species in models with and without seed limitation. The tolerance–fecundity mechanism provides an excellent explanation for the maintenance of diversity of seed size within plant communities and also suggests new hypotheses for coexistence in animal and microbial communities. PMID:20160078

  5. Educational Systems and the Trade-Off between Labor Market Allocation and Equality of Educational Opportunity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bol, Thijs; van de Werfhorst, Herman G.

    2013-01-01

    Educational systems with a high level of tracking and vocational orientation have been shown to improve the allocation of school-leavers in the labor market. However, tracked educational systems are also known to increase inequality of educational opportunity. This presumed trade-off between equality and labor market preparation is clearly rooted…

  6. Defensive traits exhibit an evolutionary trade-off and drive diversification in ants.

    PubMed

    Blanchard, Benjamin D; Moreau, Corrie S

    2017-02-01

    Evolutionary biologists have long predicted that evolutionary trade-offs among traits should constrain morphological divergence and species diversification. However, this prediction has yet to be tested in a broad evolutionary context in many diverse clades, including ants. Here, we reconstruct an expanded ant phylogeny representing 82% of ant genera, compile a new family-wide trait database, and conduct various trait-based analyses to show that defensive traits in ants do exhibit an evolutionary trade-off. In particular, the use of a functional sting negatively correlates with a suite of other defensive traits including spines, large eye size, and large colony size. Furthermore, we find that several of the defensive traits that trade off with a sting are also positively correlated with each other and drive increased diversification, further suggesting that these traits form a defensive suite. Our results support the hypothesis that trade-offs in defensive traits significantly constrain trait evolution and influence species diversification in ants. © 2016 The Author(s). Evolution © 2016 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  7. Assessing trade-offs between crop production and ecological services: the Calapooia Basin

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In order to assess the trade-offs between crop production and ecological services within a watershed, one must quantify linkages between conservation practices in grass seed producing areas and biophysical responses including water quality and biological indicators and develop a model to assess trad...

  8. Natural variation in a testosterone-mediated trade-off between mating effort and parental effort.

    PubMed

    McGlothlin, Joel W; Jawor, Jodie M; Ketterson, Ellen D

    2007-12-01

    Male birds frequently face a trade-off between acquiring mates and caring for offspring. Hormone manipulation studies indicate that testosterone often mediates this trade-off, increasing mating effort while decreasing parental effort. Little is known, however, about individual covariation between testosterone and relevant behavior on which selection might act. Using wild, male dark-eyed juncos (Junco hyemalis), we measured individual variation in testosterone levels before and after standardized injections of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH). The GnRH challenges have been shown to produce short-term testosterone increases that are similar to those produced naturally in response to social stimuli, repeatable in magnitude, and greater in males with more attractive ornaments. We correlated these testosterone increases with behavioral measures of mating and parental effort (aggressive response to a simulated territorial intrusion and nestling feeding, respectively). Males that showed higher postchallenge testosterone displayed more territorial behavior, and males that produced higher testosterone increases above initial levels displayed reduced parental behavior. Initial testosterone levels were positively but nonsignificantly correlated with aggression but did not predict parental behavior. These relationships suggest that natural variation in testosterone, specifically the production of short-term increases, may underlie individual variation in the mating effort/parental effort trade-off. We discuss the implications of these results for the evolution of hormonally mediated trade-offs.

  9. Regulating Interest when Learning Online: Potential Motivation and Performance Trade-Offs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sansone, Carol; Smith, Jessi L.; Thoman, Dustin B.; MacNamara, Atara

    2012-01-01

    Online learning may be particularly sensitive to self-regulatory trade-offs between maintaining interest and performance. Undergraduates in online or on-campus sections of the same course rated strategies used to motivate studying for the first exam, and interest after the first exam and at semester's end. First exam and final class grades were…

  10. A Classroom Exercise to Examine the Trade-off between Mission Capacity and Life Cycle Cost

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kang, Keebom; Doerr, Kenneth H.

    2015-01-01

    This article presents a classroom exercise, centered on a simulation that has been used for 4 years in an MBA program to help students develop an understanding of the trade-offs involved in managing capital assets in the public sector. Though often ignored in business schools, "mission" is a key criterion that must be considered when…

  11. Asymmetric, bimodal trade-offs during adaptation of Methylobacterium to distinct growth substrates.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ming-Chun; Chou, Hsin-Hung; Marx, Christopher J

    2009-11-01

    Trade-offs between selected and nonselected environments are often assumed to exist during adaptation. This phenomenon is prevalent in microbial metabolism, where many organisms have come to specialize on a narrow breadth of substrates. One well-studied example is methylotrophic bacteria that can use single-carbon (C(1)) compounds as their sole source of carbon and energy, but generally use few, if any, multi-C compounds. Here, we use adaptation of experimental populations of the model methylotroph, Methylobacterium extorquens AM1, to C(1) (methanol) or multi-C (succinate) compounds to investigate specialization and trade-offs between these two metabolic lifestyles. We found a general trend toward trade-offs during adaptation to succinate, but this was neither universal nor showed a quantitative relationship with the extent of adaptation. After 1500 generations, succinate-evolved strains had a remarkably bimodal distribution of fitness values on methanol: either an improvement comparable to the strains adapted on methanol or the complete loss of the ability to grow on C(1) compounds. In contrast, adaptation to methanol resulted in no such trade-offs. Based on the substantial, asymmetric loss of C(1) growth during growth on succinate, we suggest that the long-term maintenance of C(1) metabolism across the genus Methylobacterium requires relatively frequent use of C(1) compounds to prevent rapid loss.

  12. Economic opportunities and trade-offs in collaborative forest landscape restoration

    Treesearch

    Alan A. Ager; Kevin C. Vogler; Michelle A. Day; John D. Bailey

    2017-01-01

    We modeled forest restoration scenarios to examine socioeconomic and ecological trade-offs associated with alternative prioritization scenarios. The study examined four US national forests designated as priorities for investments to restore fire resiliency and generate economic opportunities to support local industry. We were particularly interested in economic trade-...

  13. GARBAGE: A Card Game That Simulates the Trade-Off between Competition and Concern.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thiagarajan, Sivasailam

    1991-01-01

    Describes a simulation card game involved with the dumping of hazardous wastes that was designed to explore the trade-off between industrial competition and social concern. Steps of play are described for the game, which is called GARBAGE, and debriefing techniques are suggested, including an affective phase and a cognitive phase. (LRW)

  14. Modeling trade-offs between fire threat reduction and late-seral forest structure.

    Treesearch

    David E. Calkin; Susan Stevens Hummel; James K. Agee

    2005-01-01

    Evaluating the effects of managing for one forest resource in terms of associated impacts on other resources is not easy. Yet methods to identify potential trade-offs among forest resources are necessary to inform people about the implications of management options on public land. This paper uses a case study from a forest reserve in the northwestern United States to...

  15. Ethical Implications of Validity-vs.-Reliability Trade-Offs in Educational Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fendler, Lynn

    2016-01-01

    In educational research that calls itself empirical, the relationship between validity and reliability is that of trade-off: the stronger the bases for validity, the weaker the bases for reliability (and vice versa). Validity and reliability are widely regarded as basic criteria for evaluating research; however, there are ethical implications of…

  16. Improving Real-time Performance of Intelligent Systems with Dynamic Trade-off Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwuttke, U. M.; Gasser, L.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes dynamic trade-off evalation (DTE), a new technique that has been developed to improve the performance of real-time problem solving systems. The DTE technique is most suitable for environments in which the requirement for meeting time constraints is of equal or greater importance to that of providing optimally intelligent solutions.

  17. Navigating Complex Trade-Offs in Conservation and Development: An Integrative Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirsch, Paul D.; Brosius, J. Peter

    2013-01-01

    We present a framework that makes space for multiple perspectives and ways of thinking about complex trade-off problems in conservation and development. At the core of the framework are three "integrative lenses" designed to facilitate lines of inquiry according to three unique ways of perceiving complexity. The aim of the framework is…

  18. Trade-off between land vehicle antenna cost and gain for satellite mobile communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Trade-offs between antenna cost and gain made for nine antennas as a feasibility study for the experimental land mobile satellite system, M-SAT(X) reported. This system is under development by JPL-NASA for a mobile telephone system to be used throughout the continental USA and Alaska. The mobile antenna is a key element in the development of this system.

  19. Trade-Offs in the Study of Culture and Development: Theories, Methods, and Values.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rothbaum, Fred; Pott, Martha; Azuma, Hiroshi; Miyake, Kazuo; Weisz, John

    2000-01-01

    Notes that commentators unanimously support Rothbaum et al.'s general orientation to culture and development and their developmental pathways. Views commentators' suggestions as relating to trade-offs: between theories that highlight generalization or exceptions; between methods that rely on one-, two-, or multiculture studies; and between values…

  20. Spiders in Motion: Demonstrating Adaptation, Structure-Function Relationships, and Trade-Offs in Invertebrates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowlin, Melissa S.; McLeer, Dorothy F.; Danielson-Francois, Anne M.

    2014-01-01

    Evolutionary history and structural considerations constrain all aspects of animal physiology. Constraints on invertebrate locomotion are especially straightforward for students to observe and understand. In this exercise, students use spiders to investigate the concepts of adaptation, structure-function relationships, and trade-offs. Students…

  1. THE LAUNCH WINDOW HYPOTHESIS AND THE SPEED-ACCURACY TRADE-OFF IN BASEBALL THROWING.

    PubMed

    Freeston, Jonathan; Ferdinands, Rene E D; Rooney, Kieron

    2015-08-01

    The speed-accuracy trade-off in throwing has been well described, but its cause is poorly understood. The popular impulse-variability hypothesis lacks relevance to throwing, while the launch window hypothesis has explanatory potential but has not been empirically tested. The current study therefore aimed to quantify the speed-accuracy trade-off and launch window during a throwing task at two different speeds. Nine elite junior baseball players (M age=19.6 yr.; M height=1.80 m; M weight=75.5 kg) threw 10 fastballs at 80 and 100% of maximal throwing speed (MTS) toward a 7 cm target from a distance of 20 m. A 3D motion analysis system measured ball speed and trajectory. A speed-accuracy trade-off occurred, mediated by increased vertical error. This can be attributed to the launch window, which was significantly smaller, particularly its vertical component, during 100% MTS. Maximal throwing speed correlated negatively with launch window size. The launch window hypothesis explained the observed speed-accuracy trade-off, providing a framework within which aspects of technique can be identified and altered to improve performance.

  2. The Developmental Roots of the Speed-Accuracy Trade-Off

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zaal, Frank T. J. M.; Thelen, Esther

    2005-01-01

    The speed of adult reaching movements is lawfully related to the distance of the reach and the size of the target. The authors had 7-, 9-, and 11-month-old infants reach for small and large targets to investigate a possible relation between the emergence of this speed-accuracy trade-off and the improvements in infants' ability to pick up tiny…

  3. Ethical Implications of Validity-vs.-Reliability Trade-Offs in Educational Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fendler, Lynn

    2016-01-01

    In educational research that calls itself empirical, the relationship between validity and reliability is that of trade-off: the stronger the bases for validity, the weaker the bases for reliability (and vice versa). Validity and reliability are widely regarded as basic criteria for evaluating research; however, there are ethical implications of…

  4. Valuing trade-offs of river ecosystem services in large hydropower development in Tibet, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, B.; Xu, L.

    2015-12-01

    Hydropower development can be considered as a kind of trade-offs of ecosystem services generated by human activity for their economic and energy demand, because it can increase some river ecosystem services but decrease others. In this context, an ecosystem service trade-off framework in hydropower development was proposed in this paper. It aims to identify the ecological cost of river ecosystem and serve for the ecological compensation during hydropower development, for the hydropower services cannot completely replace the regulating services of river ecosystem. The valuing trade-offs framework was integrated by the influenced ecosystem services identification and ecosystem services valuation, through ecological monitoring and ecological economic methods, respectively. With a case study of Pondo hydropower project in Tibet, China, the valuing trade-offs of river ecosystem services in large hydropower development was illustrated. The typical ecological factors including water, sediment and soil were analyzed in this study to identify the altered river ecosystem services by Pondo hydropower project. Through the field monitoring and valuation, the results showed that the Lhasa River ecosystem services value could be changed annually by Pondo hydropower project with the increment of 5.7E+8CNY, and decrement of 5.1E+7CNY. The ecological compensation for river ecosystem should be focus on water and soil conservation, reservoir dredging and tributaries habitat protection.

  5. Analysis and trade-off studies of large lightweight mirror structures. [large space telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soosaar, K.; Grin, R.; Ayer, F.

    1975-01-01

    A candidate mirror, hexagonally lightweighted, is analyzed under various loadings using as complete a procedure as possible. Successive simplifications are introduced and compared to an original analysis. A model which is a reasonable compromise between accuracy and cost is found and is used for making trade-off studies of the various structural parameters of the lightweighted mirror.

  6. University Efficiency: Complementariness versus Trade-Off between Teaching, Research and Administrative Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sellers-Rubio, Ricardo; Mas-Ruiz, Francisco J.; Casado-Diaz, Ana B.

    2010-01-01

    University managers should be aware of the importance that efficiency has for their own universities, orientating their actions towards research and teaching excellence. This study estimates teaching and research efficiency of the different departments of a university and tests the complementariness versus trade-off between them. The results…

  7. Trade-Off Analysis vs. Constrained Optimization with an Economic Control Chart Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-01-01

    description of this technique can be found in Luenberger (1989) or Reklaitis et al. (1983). Similar to the economic statistical designs, the trade-off...15] Reklaitis , G. V.; Ravindran, A.; and Ragsdell, K. M., Engineering Optimization, Methods and Applications, John Wiley & Sons, New York (1983). [16

  8. Invasion versus isolation: Trade-offs in managing native salmonids with barriers to upstream movement

    Treesearch

    Kurt D. Fausch; Bruce E. Rieman; Jason B. Dunham; Michael K. Young; Douglas P. Peterson

    2009-01-01

    Conservation biologists often face the trade-off that increasing connectivity in fragmented landscapes to reduce extinction risk of native species can foster invasion by non-native species that enter via the corridors created, which can then increase extinction risk. This dilemma is acute for stream fishes, especially native salmonids, because their populations are...

  9. Visualisation of uncertainty for the trade-off triangle used in sustainable agriculture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Paul; Takahashi, Taro; Lee, Michael

    2017-04-01

    Agriculture at the global-scale is at a critical juncture where competing requirements for maximal production and minimal pollution have led to the concept of sustainable intensification. All farming systems (arable, grasslands, etc.) are part of this debate, where each have particular associated environmental risks such as water and air pollution, greenhouse gas emissions and soil degradation, as well as issues affecting production efficiency, product quality and consumer acceptability, reflected in the development of agricultural sustainability policies. These challenges necessitate multidisciplinary solutions that can only be properly researched, implemented and tested in real-world production systems which are suited to their geographical and climatic production practice. In this respect, various high-profile agricultural data collection experiments have been set up, such as the North Wyke Farm Platform (http://www.rothamsted.ac.uk/farmplatform) to research agricultural productivity and ecosystem responses to different management practices. In this farm-scale grasslands experiment, data on hydrology, emissions, nutrient cycling, biodiversity, productivity and livestock welfare/health are collected, that in turn, are converted to trade-off metrics with respect to: (i) economic profits, (ii) societal benefits and (iii) environmental concerns, under the umbrella of sustainable intensification. Similar agriculture research platforms have similar objectives, where data collections are ultimately synthesised into trade-off metrics. Trade-offs metrics can then be usefully visualized via the usual sustainable triangle, with a new triangle for each key time period (e.g. baseline versus post-baseline). This enables a visual assessment of change in sustainability harmony or discord, according to the remit of the given research experiment. In this paper, we discuss different approaches to calculation of the sustainability trade-off metrics that are required from the farm

  10. Blood pressure associates with standing balance in elderly outpatients.

    PubMed

    Pasma, Jantsje H; Bijlsma, Astrid Y; Klip, Janneke M; Stijntjes, Marjon; Blauw, Gerard Jan; Muller, Majon; Meskers, Carel G M; Maier, Andrea B

    2014-01-01

    Assessment of the association of blood pressure measurements in supine and standing position after a postural change, as a proxy for blood pressure regulation, with standing balance in a clinically relevant cohort of elderly, is of special interest as blood pressure may be important to identify patients at risk of having impaired standing balance in routine geriatric assessment. In a cross-sectional cohort study, 197 community-dwelling elderly referred to a geriatric outpatient clinic of a middle-sized teaching hospital were included. Blood pressure was measured intermittently (n = 197) and continuously (subsample, n = 58) before and after a controlled postural change from supine to standing position. The ability to maintain standing balance was assessed during ten seconds of side-by-side, semi-tandem and tandem stance, with both eyes open and eyes closed. Self-reported impaired standing balance and history of falls were recorded by questionnaires. Logistic regression analyses were used to examine the association between blood pressure and 1) the ability to maintain standing balance; 2) self-reported impaired standing balance; and 3) history of falls, adjusted for age and sex. Blood pressure decrease after postural change, measured continuously, was associated with reduced ability to maintain standing balance in semi-tandem stance with eyes closed and with increased self-reported impaired standing balance and falls. Presence of orthostatic hypotension was associated with reduced ability to maintain standing balance in semi-tandem stance with eyes closed for both intermittent and continuous measurements and with increased self-reported impaired standing balance for continuous measurements. Continuous blood pressure measurements are of additional value to identify patients at risk of having impaired standing balance and may therefore be useful in routine geriatric care.

  11. Blood Pressure Associates with Standing Balance in Elderly Outpatients

    PubMed Central

    Pasma, Jantsje H.; Bijlsma, Astrid Y.; Klip, Janneke M.; Stijntjes, Marjon; Blauw, Gerard Jan; Muller, Majon; Meskers, Carel G. M.; Maier, Andrea B.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Assessment of the association of blood pressure measurements in supine and standing position after a postural change, as a proxy for blood pressure regulation, with standing balance in a clinically relevant cohort of elderly, is of special interest as blood pressure may be important to identify patients at risk of having impaired standing balance in routine geriatric assessment. Materials and Methods In a cross-sectional cohort study, 197 community-dwelling elderly referred to a geriatric outpatient clinic of a middle-sized teaching hospital were included. Blood pressure was measured intermittently (n = 197) and continuously (subsample, n = 58) before and after a controlled postural change from supine to standing position. The ability to maintain standing balance was assessed during ten seconds of side-by-side, semi-tandem and tandem stance, with both eyes open and eyes closed. Self-reported impaired standing balance and history of falls were recorded by questionnaires. Logistic regression analyses were used to examine the association between blood pressure and 1) the ability to maintain standing balance; 2) self-reported impaired standing balance; and 3) history of falls, adjusted for age and sex. Results Blood pressure decrease after postural change, measured continuously, was associated with reduced ability to maintain standing balance in semi-tandem stance with eyes closed and with increased self-reported impaired standing balance and falls. Presence of orthostatic hypotension was associated with reduced ability to maintain standing balance in semi-tandem stance with eyes closed for both intermittent and continuous measurements and with increased self-reported impaired standing balance for continuous measurements. Conclusion Continuous blood pressure measurements are of additional value to identify patients at risk of having impaired standing balance and may therefore be useful in routine geriatric care. PMID:25222275

  12. Association genetics, geography and ecophysiology link stomatal patterning in Populus trichocarpa with carbon gain and disease resistance trade-offs.

    PubMed

    McKown, Athena D; Guy, Robert D; Quamme, Linda; Klápště, Jaroslav; La Mantia, Jonathan; Constabel, C P; El-Kassaby, Yousry A; Hamelin, Richard C; Zifkin, Michael; Azam, M S

    2014-12-01

    Stomata are essential for diffusive entry of gases to support photosynthesis, but may also expose internal leaf tissues to pathogens. To uncover trade-offs in range-wide adaptation relating to stomata, we investigated the underlying genetics of stomatal traits and linked variability in these traits with geoclimate, ecophysiology, condensed foliar tannins and pathogen susceptibility in black cottonwood (Populus trichocarpa). Upper (adaxial) and lower (abaxial) leaf stomatal traits were measured from 454 accessions collected throughout much of the species range. We calculated broad-sense heritability (H(2) ) of stomatal traits and, using SNP data from a 34K Populus SNP array, performed a genome-wide association studies (GWAS) to uncover genes underlying stomatal trait variation. H(2) values for stomatal traits were moderate (average H(2) = 0.33). GWAS identified genes associated primarily with adaxial stomata, including polarity genes (PHABULOSA), stomatal development genes (BRASSINOSTEROID-INSENSITIVE 2) and disease/wound-response genes (GLUTAMATE-CYSTEINE LIGASE). Stomatal traits correlated with latitude, gas exchange, condensed tannins and leaf rust (Melampsora) infection. Latitudinal trends of greater adaxial stomata numbers and guard cell pore size corresponded with higher stomatal conductance (gs ) and photosynthesis (Amax ), faster shoot elongation, lower foliar tannins and greater Melampsora susceptibility. This suggests an evolutionary trade-off related to differing selection pressures across the species range. In northern environments, more adaxial stomata and larger pore sizes reflect selection for rapid carbon gain and growth. By contrast, southern genotypes have fewer adaxial stomata, smaller pore sizes and higher levels of condensed tannins, possibly linked to greater pressure from natural leaf pathogens, which are less significant in northern ecosystems. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Evolution of intrinsic growth and energy acquisition rates. I. Trade-offs with swimming performance in Menidia menidia.

    PubMed

    Billerbeck, J M; Lankford, T E; Conover, D O

    2001-09-01

    Latitudinal populations of the Atlantic silverside, Menidia menidia, show substantial genetic variation in rates of energy acquistion and allocation. Reared in common environments, silversides from northern latitudes consume more food, grow faster and more efficiently, store more energy, and produce greater quantities of eggs than their southern conspecifics. The persistence of seemingly inferior southern genotypes in the face of ostensibly superior northern genotypes suggest that there are hidden evolutionary trade-offs associated with these elevated acquisition and allocation rates. We tested the hypothesis that rapid growth and high levels of food consumption trade-off against locomotory performance in M. menidia. We compared both aerobic (prolonged and endurance) and anaerobic (burst) swimming capacities between intrinsically fast-growing fish from the north (Nova Scotia, NS) and intrinsically slow-growing fish from the south (South Carolina, SC) and between growth-manipulated phenotypes within each population. We also compared swimming speeds and endurance between fasted and recently fed fish within populations. Maximum prolonged and burst swimming speeds of NS fish were significantly lower than those of SC fish, and swimming speeds of fast-growing phenotypes were lower than those of slow-growing phenotypes within populations. Fed fish had lower burst speeds and less endurance than fasted fish from the same population. Thus, high rates of growth and the consumption of large meals clearly diminish swimming performance, which likely increases vulnerability to predation and decreases survival and relative fitness. The submaximal growth rate of southern M. menidia appears to be adaptive, resulting from balancing selection on rates of somatic growth.

  14. Optimal Defense Strategies in an Idealized Microbial Food Web under Trade-Off between Competition and Defense

    PubMed Central

    Våge, Selina; Storesund, Julia E.; Giske, Jarl; Thingstad, T. Frede

    2014-01-01

    Trophic mechanisms that can generate biodiversity in food webs include bottom-up (growth rate regulating) and top-down (biomass regulating) factors. The top-down control has traditionally been analyzed using the concepts of “Keystone Predation” (KP) and “Killing-the-Winner” (KtW), predominately occuring in discussions of macro- and micro-biological ecology, respectively. Here we combine the classical diamond-shaped food web structure frequently discussed in KP analyses and the KtW concept by introducing a defense strategist capable of partial defense. A formalized description of a trade-off between the defense-strategist's competitive and defensive ability is included. The analysis reveals a complex topology of the steady state solution with strong relationships between food web structure and the combination of trade-off, defense strategy and the system's nutrient content. Among the results is a difference in defense strategies corresponding to maximum biomass, production, or net growth rate of invading individuals. The analysis thus summons awareness that biomass or production, parameters typically measured in field studies to infer success of particular biota, are not directly acted upon by natural selection. Under coexistence with a competition specialist, a balance of competitive and defensive ability of the defense strategist was found to be evolutionarily stable, whereas stronger defense was optimal under increased nutrient levels in the absence of the pure competition specialist. The findings of success of different defense strategies are discussed with respect to SAR11, a highly successful bacterial clade in the pelagic ocean. PMID:24999739

  15. Evidence of the Trade-Off between Starvation and Predation Risks in Ducks

    PubMed Central

    Zimmer, Cédric; Boos, Mathieu; Poulin, Nicolas; Gosler, Andrew; Petit, Odile; Robin, Jean-Patrice

    2011-01-01

    The theory of trade-off between starvation and predation risks predicts a decrease in body mass in order to improve flight performance when facing high predation risk. To date, this trade-off has mainly been validated in passerines, birds that store limited body reserves for short-term use. In the largest avian species in which the trade-off has been investigated (the mallard, Anas platyrhynchos), the slope of the relationship between mass and flight performance was steeper in proportion to lean body mass than in passerines. In order to verify whether the same case can be applied to other birds with large body reserves, we analyzed the response to this trade-off in two other duck species, the common teal (Anas crecca) and the tufted duck (Aythya fuligula). Predation risk was simulated by disturbing birds. Ducks within disturbed groups were compared to non-disturbed control birds. In disturbed groups, both species showed a much greater decrease in food intake and body mass during the period of simulated high risk than those observed in the control group. This loss of body mass allows reaching a more favourable wing loading and increases power for flight, hence enhancing flight performances and reducing predation risk. Moreover, body mass loss and power margin gain in both species were higher than in passerines, as observed in mallards. Our results suggest that the starvation-predation risk trade-off is one of the major life history traits underlying body mass adjustments, and these findings can be generalized to all birds facing predation. Additionally, the response magnitude seems to be influenced by the strategy of body reserve management. PMID:21789252

  16. Is local adaptation in Mimulus guttatus caused by trade-offs at individual loci?

    PubMed

    Hall, M C; Lowry, D B; Willis, J H

    2010-07-01

    Local adaptation is considered to be the result of fitness trade-offs for particular phenotypes across different habitats. However, it is unclear whether such phenotypic trade-offs exist at the level of individual genetic loci. Local adaptation could arise from trade-offs of alternative alleles at individual loci or by complementary sets of loci with different fitness effects of alleles in one habitat but selective neutrality in the alternative habitat. To evaluate the genome-wide basis of local adaptation, we performed a field-based quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping experiment on recombinant inbred lines (RILs) created from coastal perennial and inland annual races of the yellow monkeyflower (Mimulus guttatus) grown reciprocally in native parental habitats. Overall, we detected 19 QTLs affecting one or more of 16 traits measured in two environments, most of small effect. We identified 15 additional QTL effects at two previously identified candidate QTLs [DIVERGENCE (DIV)]. Significant QTL by environment interactions were detected at the DIV loci, which was largely attributable to genotypic differences at a single field site. We found no detectable evidence for trade-offs for any one component of fitness, although DIV2 showed a trade-off involving different fitness traits between sites, suggesting that local adaptation is largely controlled by non-overlapping loci. This is surprising for an outcrosser, implying that reduced gene flow prevents the evolution of individuals adapted to multiple environments. We also determined that native genotypes were not uniformly adaptive, possibly reflecting fixed mutational load in one of the populations.

  17. Life history trade-off moderates model predictions of diversity loss from climate change

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Climate change can trigger species range shifts, local extinctions and changes in diversity. Species interactions and dispersal capacity are important mediators of community responses to climate change. The interaction between multispecies competition and variation in dispersal capacity has recently been shown to exacerbate the effects of climate change on diversity and to increase predictions of extinction risk dramatically. Dispersal capacity, however, is part of a species’ overall ecological strategy and are likely to trade off with other aspects of its life history that influence population growth and persistence. In plants, a well-known example is the trade-off between seed mass and seed number. The presence of such a trade-off might buffer the diversity loss predicted by models with random but neutral (i.e. not impacting fitness otherwise) differences in dispersal capacity. Using a trait-based metacommunity model along a warming climatic gradient the effect of three different dispersal scenarios on model predictions of diversity change were compared. Adding random variation in species dispersal capacity caused extinctions by the introduction of strong fitness differences due an inherent property of the dispersal kernel. Simulations including a fitness-equalising trade-off based on empirical relationships between seed mass (here affecting dispersal distance, establishment probability, and seedling biomass) and seed number (fecundity) maintained higher initial species diversity and predicted lower extinction risk and diversity loss during climate change than simulations with variable dispersal capacity. Large seeded species persisted during climate change, but developed lags behind their climate niche that may cause extinction debts. Small seeded species were more extinction-prone during climate change but tracked their niches through dispersal and colonisation, despite competitive resistance from residents. Life history trade-offs involved in coexistence

  18. Trade-offs between seedling growth and survival in deciduous broadleaved trees in a temperate forest.

    PubMed

    Seiwa, Kenji

    2007-03-01

    In spatially heterogeneous environments, a trade-off between seedling survival and relative growth rate may promote the coexistence of plant species. In temperate forests, however, little support for this hypothesis has been found under field conditions, as compared with shade-house experiments. Performance trade-offs were examined over a large resource gradient in a temperate hardwood forest. The relationship between seedling survival and seedling relative growth rate in mass (RGR(M)) or height (RGR(H)) was examined at three levels of canopy cover (forest understorey, FU; small gap, SG; and large gap, LG) and at two microsites within each level of canopy cover (presence or absence of leaf litter) for five deciduous broad-leaved tree species with different seed sizes. Within each species, both RGR(M) and RGR(H) usually increased with increasing light levels (in the order FU < SG < LG), whereas little difference was observed based on the presence or absence of litter. Seedling survival in FU was negatively correlated with both RGR(M) and RGR(H) in both LG and SG. The trade-off between high-light growth and low-light survival was more evident in the relationship with LG as compared with SG. An intraspecific trade-off between survival and RGR was observed along environmental gradients in Acer mono, whereas seedlings of Betula platyphylla var. japonica survived and grew better in LG. The results presented here strongly support the idea of light gradient partitioning (i.e. species coexistence) in spatially heterogeneous light environments in temperate forests, and that further species diversity would be promoted by increased spatial heterogeneity. The intraspecific trade-off between survival and RGR in Acer suggests that it has broad habitat requirements, whereas Betula has narrow habitat requirements and specializes in high-light environments.

  19. Life history trade-off moderates model predictions of diversity loss from climate change.

    PubMed

    Moor, Helen

    2017-01-01

    Climate change can trigger species range shifts, local extinctions and changes in diversity. Species interactions and dispersal capacity are important mediators of community responses to climate change. The interaction between multispecies competition and variation in dispersal capacity has recently been shown to exacerbate the effects of climate change on diversity and to increase predictions of extinction risk dramatically. Dispersal capacity, however, is part of a species' overall ecological strategy and are likely to trade off with other aspects of its life history that influence population growth and persistence. In plants, a well-known example is the trade-off between seed mass and seed number. The presence of such a trade-off might buffer the diversity loss predicted by models with random but neutral (i.e. not impacting fitness otherwise) differences in dispersal capacity. Using a trait-based metacommunity model along a warming climatic gradient the effect of three different dispersal scenarios on model predictions of diversity change were compared. Adding random variation in species dispersal capacity caused extinctions by the introduction of strong fitness differences due an inherent property of the dispersal kernel. Simulations including a fitness-equalising trade-off based on empirical relationships between seed mass (here affecting dispersal distance, establishment probability, and seedling biomass) and seed number (fecundity) maintained higher initial species diversity and predicted lower extinction risk and diversity loss during climate change than simulations with variable dispersal capacity. Large seeded species persisted during climate change, but developed lags behind their climate niche that may cause extinction debts. Small seeded species were more extinction-prone during climate change but tracked their niches through dispersal and colonisation, despite competitive resistance from residents. Life history trade-offs involved in coexistence

  20. Life-history constraints in grassland plant species: a growth-defence trade-off is the norm

    Treesearch

    E.M. Lind; E.T. Borer; E.W. Seabloom; P.B. Adler; J.D. Bakker; D.M. Blumenthal; M. Crawley; K.F. Davies; J. Firn; D.S. Gruner; S. Harpole; Y. Hautier; H. Hillebrand; J.M.H. Knops; B.A. Melbourne; B. Mortensen; A.C. Risch; M. Schuetz; C.J. Stevens; P.D. Wragg

    2013-01-01

    Plant growth can be limited by resource acquisition and defence against consumers, leading to contrasting trade-off possibilities. The competition-defence hypothesis posits a trade-off between competitive ability and defence against enemies (e.g. herbivores and pathogens). The growth-defence hypothesis suggests that strong competitors for nutrients are also defended...

  1. Pleiotropic effects of juvenile hormone in ant queens and the escape from the reproduction-immunocompetence trade-off.

    PubMed

    Pamminger, Tobias; Treanor, David; Hughes, William O H

    2016-01-13

    The ubiquitous trade-off between survival and costly reproduction is one of the most fundamental constraints governing life-history evolution. In numerous animals, gonadotropic hormones antagonistically suppressing immunocompetence cause this trade-off. The queens of many social insects defy the reproduction-survival trade-off, achieving both an extraordinarily long life and high reproductive output, but how they achieve this is unknown. Here we show experimentally, by integrating quantification of gene expression, physiology and behaviour, that the long-lived queens of the ant Lasius niger have escaped the reproduction-immunocompetence trade-off by decoupling the effects of a key endocrine regulator of fertility and immunocompetence in solitary insects, juvenile hormone (JH). This modification of the regulatory architecture enables queens to sustain a high reproductive output without elevated JH titres and suppressed immunocompetence, providing an escape from the reproduction-immunocompetence trade-off that may contribute to the extraordinary lifespan of many social insect queens.

  2. Trade-off decisions in distribution utility management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slavickas, Rimas Anthony

    As a result of the "unbundling" of traditional monopolistic electricity generation and transmission enterprises into a free-market economy, power distribution utilities are faced with very difficult decisions pertaining to electricity supply options and quality of service to the customers. The management of distribution utilities has become increasingly complex, versatile, and dynamic to the extent that conventional, non-automated management tools are almost useless and obsolete. This thesis presents a novel and unified approach to managing electricity supply options and quality of service to customers. The technique formulates the problem in terms of variables, parameters, and constraints. An advanced Mixed Integer Programming (MIP) optimization formulation is developed together with novel, logical, decision-making algorithms. These tools enable the utility management to optimize various cost components and assess their time-trend impacts, taking into account the intangible issues such as customer perception, customer expectation, social pressures, and public response to service deterioration. The above concepts are further generalized and a Logical Proportion Analysis (LPA) methodology and associated software have been developed. Solutions using numbers are replaced with solutions using words (character strings) which more closely emulate the human decision-making process and advance the art of decision-making in the power utility environment. Using practical distribution utility operation data and customer surveys, the developments outlined in this thesis are successfully applied to several important utility management problems. These involve the evaluation of alternative electricity supply options, the impact of rate structures on utility business, and the decision of whether to continue to purchase from a main grid or generate locally (partially or totally) by building Non-Utility Generation (NUG).

  3. Effects of body mass index on plantar pressure and balance.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Se-Won; Park, Woong-Sik; Lee, Jeong-Woo

    2016-11-01

    [Purpose] To suggest physiotherapy programs and to determine foot stability based on the results of plantar pressure and spontaneity balance in the normal group and in the obesity group according to the body mass index (BMI). [Subjects and Methods] The plantar pressure and balance of 20 females college students in their 20s were measured according to their BMI. BMI was measured by using BMS 330. The peak plantar pressure was measured in a static position in the forefoot and hind-foot areas. To study balance, the spontaneity balance of each foot was measured on both stable and unstable surfaces. [Results] In terms of plantar pressure, no significant change was observed in the forefoot and hind-foot peak pressure. In terms of spontaneity balance, no significant difference in foot position interaction was observed on both stable and unstable surfaces, while a significant difference was observed in the foot position between the groups. [Conclusion] The index of hind-foot spontaneity balance was low, particularly in the obesity group. This meant significant hind-foot swaying. The forefoot body weight support percentage increased to reinforce the reduced spontaneity balance index.

  4. Effects of body mass index on plantar pressure and balance

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Se-Won; Park, Woong-Sik; Lee, Jeong-Woo

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] To suggest physiotherapy programs and to determine foot stability based on the results of plantar pressure and spontaneity balance in the normal group and in the obesity group according to the body mass index (BMI). [Subjects and Methods] The plantar pressure and balance of 20 females college students in their 20s were measured according to their BMI. BMI was measured by using BMS 330. The peak plantar pressure was measured in a static position in the forefoot and hind-foot areas. To study balance, the spontaneity balance of each foot was measured on both stable and unstable surfaces. [Results] In terms of plantar pressure, no significant change was observed in the forefoot and hind-foot peak pressure. In terms of spontaneity balance, no significant difference in foot position interaction was observed on both stable and unstable surfaces, while a significant difference was observed in the foot position between the groups. [Conclusion] The index of hind-foot spontaneity balance was low, particularly in the obesity group. This meant significant hind-foot swaying. The forefoot body weight support percentage increased to reinforce the reduced spontaneity balance index. PMID:27942127

  5. Novel reduced pressure-balance syringe for chromatographic analysis.

    PubMed

    Windom, Bret C; Bruno, Thomas J

    2010-11-19

    When withdrawing a fluid sample (for additional chromatographic analyses) from an apparatus operated at a reduced pressure, a typical syringe proves to be ineffective (even if it is equipped with a gas tight plunger). It simply does not create enough pressure differential to remove a fluid sample from a reduced pressure environment. We encountered such a situation as part of efforts to extend the operation of the advanced distillation curve protocol to reduced pressures. The problem was solved by the development of a pressure balance syringe that allows reliable and precise sampling from an apparatus operating at sub-ambient pressures. This new device uses an external vacuum source to evacuate a syringe barrel, allowing a user to withdraw fluid samples from environments with pressures as low as 0.5kPa. To demonstrate the operation of the newly developed device, distillate analyses were performed on two fluids at low pressure: a predefined validation mixture, and a commercial soy based biodiesel fuel. The pressure balance syringe was used successfully for sampling in both cases. The use of the pressure balance syringe is not limited to reduced pressure distillations; indeed it can be used for a variety of applications in which chemical/compositional analyses are desired on a fluid contained in a reduced pressure environment.

  6. It's Not Easy Being Blue: Are There Olfactory and Visual Trade-Offs in Plant Signalling?

    PubMed

    Valenta, Kim; Brown, Kevin A; Melin, Amanda D; Monckton, Spencer K; Styler, Sarah A; Jackson, Derek A; Chapman, Colin A

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the signals used by plants to attract seed disperses is a pervasive quest in evolutionary and sensory biology. Fruit size, colour, and odour variation have long been discussed in the controversial context of dispersal syndromes targeting olfactory-oriented versus visually-oriented foragers. Trade-offs in signal investment could impose important physiological constraints on plants, yet have been largely ignored. Here, we measure the reflectance and volatile organic compounds of a community of Malagasy plants and our results indicate that extant plant signals may represent a trade-off between olfactory and chromatic signals. Blue pigments are the most visually-effective--blue is a colour that is visually salient to all known seed dispersing animals within the study system. Additionally, plants with blue-reflecting fruits are less odiferous than plants that reflect primarily in other regions of the colour spectrum.

  7. Trade-offs between robustness and small-world effect in complex networks

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Guan-Sheng; Tan, Suo-Yi; Wu, Jun; Holme, Petter

    2016-01-01

    Robustness and small-world effect are two crucial structural features of complex networks and have attracted increasing attention. However, little is known about the relation between them. Here we demonstrate that, there is a conflicting relation between robustness and small-world effect for a given degree sequence. We suggest that the robustness-oriented optimization will weaken the small-world effect and vice versa. Then, we propose a multi-objective trade-off optimization model and develop a heuristic algorithm to obtain the optimal trade-off topology for robustness and small-world effect. We show that the optimal network topology exhibits a pronounced core-periphery structure and investigate the structural properties of the optimized networks in detail. PMID:27853301

  8. Some trade-offs: culture, education, and economic progress on Federal Indian reservations

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, S.; Tweeten, L.

    1981-04-01

    Federal policies have not been consistent about whether to assimilate American Indians into the larger culture or whether to preserve the reservations. Single-equation, eight-variable regression models are developed to analyze per-capita income and labor-force participation on the reservation. The variables include educational levels, retention of Indian culture, the ratio of tribal to government employees on the reservation, the percentage of labor in agriculture relative to professional jobs, home ownership, automobile ownership, and marriage. A trade-off between education and culture retention is shown for both models in relation to income level. Indian residents who remain on reservations accept lower incomes in order to retain their culture, although continued government investment in reservation programs will raise per-capita income. Educational programs that emphasize traditional culture and cognitive skills can offset the trade-off dilemma of economic development. (DCK)

  9. Development of trade-off equations for EnergyStar windows

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Joe; Mitchell, Robin; Selkowitz, Steve; Arasteh, Dariush; Clear, Bob

    2004-06-09

    The authors explore the feasibility of adding a performance option to DOE's EnergyStar{copyright} Windows program whereby windows of differing U-factors and SHGCs can qualify so long as they have equivalent annual energy performance. An iterative simulation procedure is used to calculate trade-off equations giving the change in SHGC needed to compensate for a change in U-factor. Of the four EnergyStar{copyright} Window climate zones, trade-off equations are possible only in the Northern and Southern zones. In the North/Central and South/Central zones, equations are not possible either because of large intrazone climate variations or the current SHGC requirements are already near optimum.

  10. Quantum algorithm to solve function inversion with time-space trade-off

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, WanQing; Zhang, HuanGuo

    2017-07-01

    In general, it is a difficult problem to solve the inverse of any function. With the inverse implication operation, we present a quantum algorithm for solving the inversion of function via using time-space trade-off in this paper. The details are as follows. Let function f(x)=y have k solutions, where x\\in {0, 1}n, y\\in {0, 1}m for any integers n, m. We show that an iterative algorithm can be used to solve the inverse of function f( x) with successful probability 1-( 1-k/2n) L for L\\in Z+. The space complexity of proposed quantum iterative algorithm is O( Ln), where L is the number of iterations. The paper concludes that, via using time-space trade-off strategy, we improve the successful probability of algorithm.

  11. Trade-offs between robustness and small-world effect in complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Guan-Sheng; Tan, Suo-Yi; Wu, Jun; Holme, Petter

    2016-11-01

    Robustness and small-world effect are two crucial structural features of complex networks and have attracted increasing attention. However, little is known about the relation between them. Here we demonstrate that, there is a conflicting relation between robustness and small-world effect for a given degree sequence. We suggest that the robustness-oriented optimization will weaken the small-world effect and vice versa. Then, we propose a multi-objective trade-off optimization model and develop a heuristic algorithm to obtain the optimal trade-off topology for robustness and small-world effect. We show that the optimal network topology exhibits a pronounced core-periphery structure and investigate the structural properties of the optimized networks in detail.

  12. Functional trade-off between strength and thermal capacity of dermal armor: Insights from girdled lizards.

    PubMed

    Broeckhoven, Chris; du Plessis, Anton; Hui, Cang

    2017-10-01

    The presence of dermal armor is often unambiguously considered the result of an evolutionary predator-prey arms-race. Recent studies focusing predominantly on osteoderms - mineralized elements embedded in the dermis layer of various extant and extinct vertebrates - have instead proposed that dermal armor might exhibit additional functionalities besides protection. Multiple divergent functionalities could impose conflicting demands on a phenotype, yet, functional trade-offs in dermal armor have rarely been investigated. Here, we use high-resolution micro-computed tomography and voxel-based simulations to test for a trade-off between the strength and thermal capacity of osteoderms using two armored cordylid lizards as model organisms. We demonstrate that high vascularization, associated with improved thermal capacity might limit the strength of osteoderms. These results call for a holistic, cautionary future approach to studies investigating dermal armor, especially those aiming to inspire artificial protective materials. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. A fitness trade-off between seasons causes multigenerational cycles in phenotype and population size

    PubMed Central

    Betini, Gustavo S; McAdam, Andrew G; Griswold, Cortland K; Norris, D Ryan

    2017-01-01

    Although seasonality is widespread and can cause fluctuations in the intensity and direction of natural selection, we have little information about the consequences of seasonal fitness trade-offs for population dynamics. Here we exposed populations of Drosophila melanogaster to repeated seasonal changes in resources across 58 generations and used experimental and mathematical approaches to investigate how viability selection on body size in the non-breeding season could affect demography. We show that opposing seasonal episodes of natural selection on body size interacted with both direct and delayed density dependence to cause populations to undergo predictable multigenerational density cycles. Our results provide evidence that seasonality can set the conditions for life-history trade-offs and density dependence, which can, in turn, interact to cause multigenerational population cycles. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.18770.001 PMID:28164780

  14. Definition and trade-off of low power arcjet missions and system parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deininger, W. D.; de Toma, E.

    1992-08-01

    The first phase of activities of an ongoing systems study are described where missions are identified and evaluated based on where a low power arcjet propulsion subsystem can provide improved performance with respect to a monopropellant chemical subsystem. Mission requirements including delta-V, onboard spacecraft power and propellant mass are discussed. A trade-off analysis is conducted to examine the mission options and determine how the largest near-term mission benefits can be derived using arcjet propulsion. A reference mission is outlined from this trade-off analysis which is North-South stationkeeping of a 2600 kg-class telecommunications satellite. The major systems issues and factors to be evaluated in subsequent phases of the systems study are discussed.

  15. Potential trade-off between vocal ornamentation and spatial ability in a songbird.

    PubMed

    Sewall, Kendra B; Soha, Jill A; Peters, Susan; Nowicki, Stephen

    2013-08-23

    Bird song is hypothesized to be a reliable indicator of cognition because it depends on brain structure and function. Song features have been found to correlate positively with measures of cognition, but the relationship between song and cognition is complicated because not all cognitive abilities are themselves positively correlated. If cognition is not a unitary trait, developmental constraints on brain growth could generate trade-offs between some aspects of cognition and song. To further clarify the relationship between song and cognition in song sparrows (Melospiza melodia), we examined repertoire size and performance on a spatial task. We found an inverse relationship between repertoire size and speed of spatial learning and suggest that a developmental trade-off between the hippocampus and song control nuclei could be responsible for this relationship. By attending to male song, females may learn about a suite of cognitive abilities; this study suggests that females may glean information about a male's cognitive weaknesses as well as his strengths.

  16. The transcriptional regulator BZR1 mediates trade-off between plant innate immunity and growth

    PubMed Central

    Lozano-Durán, Rosa; Macho, Alberto P; Boutrot, Freddy; Segonzac, Cécile; Somssich, Imre E; Zipfel, Cyril

    2013-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms underlying the trade-off between plant innate immunity and steroid-mediated growth are controversial. Here, we report that activation of the transcription factor BZR1 is required and sufficient for suppression of immune signaling by brassinosteroids (BR). BZR1 induces the expression of several WRKY transcription factors that negatively control early immune responses. In addition, BZR1 associates with WRKY40 to mediate the antagonism between BR and immune signaling. We reveal that BZR1-mediated inhibition of immunity is particularly relevant when plant fast growth is required, such as during etiolation. Thus, BZR1 acts as an important regulator mediating the trade-off between growth and immunity upon integration of environmental cues. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00983.001 PMID:24381244

  17. The transcriptional regulator BZR1 mediates trade-off between plant innate immunity and growth.

    PubMed

    Lozano-Durán, Rosa; Macho, Alberto P; Boutrot, Freddy; Segonzac, Cécile; Somssich, Imre E; Zipfel, Cyril

    2013-12-31

    The molecular mechanisms underlying the trade-off between plant innate immunity and steroid-mediated growth are controversial. Here, we report that activation of the transcription factor BZR1 is required and sufficient for suppression of immune signaling by brassinosteroids (BR). BZR1 induces the expression of several WRKY transcription factors that negatively control early immune responses. In addition, BZR1 associates with WRKY40 to mediate the antagonism between BR and immune signaling. We reveal that BZR1-mediated inhibition of immunity is particularly relevant when plant fast growth is required, such as during etiolation. Thus, BZR1 acts as an important regulator mediating the trade-off between growth and immunity upon integration of environmental cues. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00983.001.

  18. Evolutionary trade-offs among decomposers determine responses to nitrogen enrichment.

    PubMed

    Treseder, Kathleen K; Kivlin, Stephanie N; Hawkes, Christine V

    2011-09-01

    Evolutionary trade-offs among ecological traits are one mechanism that could determine the responses of functional groups of decomposers to global changes such as nitrogen (N) enrichment. We hypothesised that bacteria targeting recalcitrant carbon compounds require relatively high levels of N availability to support the construction costs of requisite extracellular and transport enzymes. Indeed, we found that taxa that used more recalcitrant (i.e. larger and cyclic) carbon compounds were more prevalent in ocean waters with higher nitrate concentrations. Compared to recalcitrant carbon users, labile carbon users targeted more organic N compounds, were found in relatively nitrate-poor waters, and were more common in higher latitude soils, which is consistent with the paradigm that N-limitation is stronger at higher latitudes. Altogether, evolutionary trade-offs may limit recalcitrant carbon users to habitats with higher N availability. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd/CNRS.

  19. Combining predictors to achieve optimal trade-offs between selection quality and adverse impact.

    PubMed

    De Corte, Wilfried; Lievens, Filip; Sackett, Paul R

    2007-09-01

    The authors propose a procedure to determine (a) predictor composites that result in a Pareto-optimal trade-off between the often competing goals in personnel selection of quality and adverse impact and (b) the relative importance of the quality and impact objectives that correspond to each of these trade-offs. They also investigated whether the obtained Pareto-optimal composites continue to perform well under variability of the selection parameters that characterize the intended selection decision. The results of this investigation indicate that this is indeed the case. The authors suggest that the procedure be used as one of a number of potential strategies for addressing the quality-adverse impact problem in settings where estimates of the selection parameters (e.g., validity estimates, predictor intercorrelations, subgroup mean differences on the predictors and criteria) are available from either a local validation study or meta-analytic research. (c) 2007 APA.

  20. Evaluation of trade-offs in costs and environmental impacts for returnable packaging implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarupan, Lerpong; Kamarthi, Sagar V.; Gupta, Surendra M.

    2004-02-01

    The main thrust of returnable packaging these days is to provide logistical services through transportation and distribution of products and be environmentally friendly. Returnable packaging and reverse logistics concepts have converged to mitigate the adverse effect of packaging materials entering the solid waste stream. Returnable packaging must be designed by considering the trade-offs between costs and environmental impact to satisfy manufacturers and environmentalists alike. The cost of returnable packaging entails such items as materials, manufacturing, collection, storage and disposal. Environmental impacts are explicitly linked with solid waste, air pollution, and water pollution. This paper presents a multi-criteria evaluation technique to assist decision-makers for evaluating the trade-offs in costs and environmental impact during the returnable packaging design process. The proposed evaluation technique involves a combination of multiple objective integer linear programming and analytic hierarchy process. A numerical example is used to illustrate the methodology.

  1. Trade-off between false positives and false negatives in the linkage analysis of complex traits.

    PubMed

    Todorov, A A; Rao, D C

    1997-01-01

    This study examines the issue of false positives in genomic scans for detecting complex trait loci using subpair linkage methods and investigates the trade-off between the rate of false positives and the rate of false negatives. It highlights the tremendous cost in terms of power brought about by an excessive control of type I error and, at the same time, confirms that a larger number of false positives can occur otherwise in the course of a genomic scan. Finally, it compares the power and rate of false positives obtained in preplanned replicated studies conducted using a liberal significance level to those for single-step studies that use the same total sample size but stricter levels of significance. For the models considered here, replicate studies were found more attractive as long as one is willing to accept a trade-off, exchanging a much lower rate of false negatives for a slight increase in the rate of false positives.

  2. Trade-offs between robustness and small-world effect in complex networks.

    PubMed

    Peng, Guan-Sheng; Tan, Suo-Yi; Wu, Jun; Holme, Petter

    2016-11-17

    Robustness and small-world effect are two crucial structural features of complex networks and have attracted increasing attention. However, little is known about the relation between them. Here we demonstrate that, there is a conflicting relation between robustness and small-world effect for a given degree sequence. We suggest that the robustness-oriented optimization will weaken the small-world effect and vice versa. Then, we propose a multi-objective trade-off optimization model and develop a heuristic algorithm to obtain the optimal trade-off topology for robustness and small-world effect. We show that the optimal network topology exhibits a pronounced core-periphery structure and investigate the structural properties of the optimized networks in detail.

  3. Phenotypic plasticity as an adaptation to a functional trade-off.

    PubMed

    Yi, Xiao; Dean, Antony M

    2016-10-03

    We report the evolution of a phenotypically plastic behavior that circumvents the hardwired trade-off that exists when resources are partitioned between growth and motility in Escherichia coli. We propagated cultures in a cyclical environment, alternating between growth up to carrying capacity and selection for chemotaxis. Initial adaptations boosted overall swimming speed at the expense of growth. The effect of the trade-off was subsequently eased through a change in behavior; while individual cells reduced motility during exponential growth, the faction of the population that was motile increased as the carrying capacity was approached. This plastic behavior was produced by a single amino acid replacement in FliA, a regulatory protein central to the chemotaxis network. Our results illustrate how phenotypic plasticity potentiates evolvability by opening up new regions of the adaptive landscape.

  4. Trade-Off and Synergy among Ecosystem Services in the Guanzhong-Tianshui Economic Region of China

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Keyu; Li, Jing; Yang, Xiaonan

    2015-01-01

    Natural ecosystems provide society with important goods and services. With rapidly increasing populations and excessive utilization of natural resources, humans have been enhancing the production of some services at the expense of others. Although the need for certain trade-offs between conservation and development is urgent, having only a small number of efficient methods to assess such trade-offs has impeded progress. This study focuses on the evaluation of ecosystem services under different land use schemes. It reveals the spatial and temporal distributions of and changes in ecosystem services. Based on a correlation rate model and distribution mapping, the trade-offs and synergies of these ecosystem services can be found. Here, we also describe a new simple approach to quantify the relationships of every trade-off and synergy. The results show that all ecosystem services possess trade-offs and synergies in the study area. The trend of improving carbon sequestration and water interception indicate that these key ecosystem services have the strongest synergy. And the decrease in regional agricultural production and other services, except water yield, may be considered as trade-offs. The synergy between water yield and agricultural production was the most significant, while the trade-off between water interception and carbon sequestration was the most apparent, according to our interaction quantification model. The results of this study have implications for planning and monitoring the future management of natural capital and ecosystem services, and can be integrated into land use decision-making. PMID:26540068

  5. Trade-offs in visual attention and the enhancement of memory specificity for positive and negative emotional stimuli.

    PubMed

    Chipchase, Susan Y; Chapman, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Emotional influences on memory can lead to trade-offs in memory for gist or detail and trade-offs in memory for central or peripheral aspects of an event. Attentional narrowing has often been proposed as a theoretical explanation for this pattern of findings with negative emotion. These trade-offs have been less extensively investigated with positive emotion. In three experiments, we investigate memory for specific visual details of positive and negative stimuli, examine central-peripheral trade-offs in memory, and assess the hypothesis that attentional narrowing contributes to emotional enhancement of memory specificity. We found that memory for details was enhanced by negative and positive emotion. Central-peripheral trade-offs were found in memory for negative emotional stimuli but not in memory for positive emotional stimuli. These trade-offs with negative emotion were associated with attentional narrowing at the time of encoding, as measured by eye movements. There were no attentional effects at the time of encoding found with positive emotional stimuli. Evidence was found for the attentional narrowing hypothesis of memory specificity and central-peripheral trade-offs in memory for negative emotional events. Alternative explanations for the positive emotional enhancement of memory specificity are required.

  6. Trade-offs between reproductive coloration and innate immunity in a natural population of female sagebrush lizards, Sceloporus graciosus

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz, Mayté; Wang, Danfeng; Reinke, Beth A.; Demas, Gregory E.; Martins, Emília P.

    2014-01-01

    Trade-offs between immune function and reproduction are common to many organisms. Nevertheless, high energetic resources may eliminate the need for these trade-offs. In this study, we consider the effects of food availability on these trade-offs in a wild population of female sagebrush lizards (Sceloporus graciosus) during the breeding season. We manipulated food availability by supplementing some lizards but not others. We measured female orange side coloration as an indicator of reproductive state and calculated the bacterial killing capability of collected plasma exposed to Escherichia coli ex vivo as a measure of innate immunity. We found that female lizards show a natural trade-off between reproductive effort and immune function; females under high reproductive investment had lower innate immunity than those at a later reproductive state. We did not detect this trade-off with food supplementation. We show that trade-offs depend on the energetic state of the animal, illustrating that trade-offs between immune function and reproduction can be context-dependent. PMID:25400312

  7. Trade-Off and Synergy among Ecosystem Services in the Guanzhong-Tianshui Economic Region of China.

    PubMed

    Qin, Keyu; Li, Jing; Yang, Xiaonan

    2015-11-03

    Natural ecosystems provide society with important goods and services. With rapidly increasing populations and excessive utilization of natural resources, humans have been enhancing the production of some services at the expense of others. Although the need for certain trade-offs between conservation and development is urgent, having only a small number of efficient methods to assess such trade-offs has impeded progress. This study focuses on the evaluation of ecosystem services under different land use schemes. It reveals the spatial and temporal distributions of and changes in ecosystem services. Based on a correlation rate model and distribution mapping, the trade-offs and synergies of these ecosystem services can be found. Here, we also describe a new simple approach to quantify the relationships of every trade-off and synergy. The results show that all ecosystem services possess trade-offs and synergies in the study area. The trend of improving carbon sequestration and water interception indicate that these key ecosystem services have the strongest synergy. And the decrease in regional agricultural production and other services, except water yield, may be considered as trade-offs. The synergy between water yield and agricultural production was the most significant, while the trade-off between water interception and carbon sequestration was the most apparent, according to our interaction quantification model. The results of this study have implications for planning and monitoring the future management of natural capital and ecosystem services, and can be integrated into land use decision-making.

  8. Pressure balanced drag turbine mass flow meter

    DOEpatents

    Dacus, M.W.; Cole, J.H.

    1980-04-23

    The density of the fluid flowing through a tubular member may be measured by a device comprising a rotor assembly suspended within the tubular member, a fluid bearing medium for the rotor assembly shaft, independent fluid flow lines to each bearing chamber, and a scheme for detection of any difference between the upstream and downstream bearing fluid pressures. The rotor assembly reacts to fluid flow both by rotation and axial displacement; therefore concurrent measurements may be made of the velocity of blade rotation and also bearing pressure changes, where the pressure changes may be equated to the fluid momentum flux imparted to the rotor blades. From these parameters the flow velocity and density of the fluid may be deduced.

  9. Pressure balanced drag turbine mass flow meter

    DOEpatents

    Dacus, Michael W.; Cole, Jack H.

    1982-01-01

    The density of the fluid flowing through a tubular member may be measured by a device comprising a rotor assembly suspended within the tubular member, a fluid bearing medium for the rotor assembly shaft, independent fluid flow lines to each bearing chamber, and a scheme for detection of any difference between the upstream and downstream bearing fluid pressures. The rotor assembly reacts to fluid flow both by rotation and axial displacement; therefore concurrent measurements may be made of the velocity of blade rotation and also bearing pressure changes, where the pressure changes may be equated to the fluid momentum flux imparted to the rotor blades. From these parameters the flow velocity and density of the fluid may be deduced.

  10. Towards an Optimal Noise Versus Resolution Trade-Off in Wind Scatterometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Brent A.

    2011-01-01

    This paper approaches the noise versus resolution trade-off in wind scatterometry from a field-wise retrieval perspective. Theoretical considerations are discussed and practical implementation using a MAP estimator is applied to the Sea-Winds scatterometer. The approach is compared to conventional approaches as well as numerical weather predictions. The new approach incorporates knowledge of the wind spectrum to reduce the impact of components of the wind signal that are expected to be noisy.

  11. Mate choice trade-offs and women's preference for physically attractive men.

    PubMed

    Waynforth, D

    2001-09-01

    Researchers studying human sexuality have repeatedly concluded that men place more emphasis on the physical attractiveness of potential mates than women do, particularly in long-term sexual relationships. Evolutionary theorists have suggested that this is the case because male mate value (the total value of the characteristics that an individual possesses in terms of the potential contribution to his or her mate's reproductive success) is better predicted by social status and economic resources, whereas women's mate value hinges on signals conveyed by their physical appearance. This pattern may imply that women trade off attractiveness for resources in mate choice. Here I test whether a trade-off between resources and attractiveness seems to be occurring in the mate choice decisions of women in the United States. In addition, the possibility that the risk of mate desertion drives women to choose less attractive men as long-term mates is tested. The results were that women rated physically attractive men as more likely to cheat or desert a long-term relationship, whereas men did not consider attractive women to be more likely to cheat. However, women showed no aversion to the idea of forming long-term relationships with attractive men. Evidence for a trade-off between resources and attractiveness was found for women, who traded off attractiveness, but not other traits, for resources. The potential meaning of these findings, as well as how they relate to broader issues in the study of sex differences in the evolution of human mate choice for physical traits, is discussed.

  12. Primary-care patients' trade-off preferences with regard to antidepressants.

    PubMed

    Wouters, H; Van Dijk, L; Van Geffen, E C G; Gardarsdottir, H; Stiggelbout, A M; Bouvy, M L

    2014-08-01

    Antidepressants are frequently prescribed but results regarding their efficacy have been equivocal for different spectra of the severity continuum and their side-effects are often burdensome. Non-adherence is a likely consequence. The objective was therefore to examine patients' trade-offs between the efficacy, side-effects and other drawbacks of antidepressants and whether these trade-offs predicted non-adherence. Trade-offs from 225 antidepressant users, recruited through community pharmacies, were assessed with an Adaptive Conjoint Analysis (ACA) choice task that was customized to each individual patient. From the estimated utilities, relative importance scores of treatment properties were calculated. Non-adherence was measured through self-report and pharmacy refill data. Relapse prevention and symptom relief were on average equally important. Side-effects were as important and the side-effect stomach and intestine complaints was on average even slightly more important than relapse prevention and symptom relief. Additional treatment with psychotherapy was preferred by 61% of the patients. A benefit/drawback ratio revealed that 18% of the patients did not consider the efficacy to outweigh the drawbacks. A higher benefit/drawback ratio was associated with a decreased odds of intentional non-adherence [odds ratio (OR) 0.2, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.07-0.7, Wald = 6.7, p = 0.01). For nearly one in five patients, the efficacy of antidepressants does not outweigh their drawbacks. Knowing patients' trade-offs is likely to aid both physicians and patients to identify important treatment preferences, to improve adherence and to make more deliberate decisions on whether or not to continue treatment.

  13. A Trade-Off between Reproduction and Feather Growth in the Barn Swallow (Hirundo rustica)

    PubMed Central

    Saino, Nicola; Romano, Maria; Rubolini, Diego; Ambrosini, Roberto; Romano, Andrea; Caprioli, Manuela; Costanzo, Alessandra; Bazzi, Gaia

    2014-01-01

    Physiological trade-offs mediated by limiting energy, resources or time constrain the simultaneous expression of major functions and can lead to the evolution of temporal separation between demanding activities. In birds, plumage renewal is a demanding activity, which accomplishes fundamental functions, such as allowing thermal insulation, aerodynamics and socio-sexual signaling. Feather renewal is a very expensive and disabling process, and molt is often partitioned from breeding and migration. However, trade-offs between feather renewal and breeding have been only sparsely studied. In barn swallows (Hirundo rustica) breeding in Italy and undergoing molt during wintering in sub-Saharan Africa, we studied this trade-off by removing a tail feather from a large sample of individuals and analyzing growth bar width, reflecting feather growth rate, and length of the growing replacement feather in relation to the stage in the breeding cycle at removal and clutch size. Growth bar width of females and length of the growing replacement feather of both sexes were smaller when the original feather had been removed after clutch initiation. Importantly, in females both growth bar width and replacement feather length were negatively predicted by clutch size, and more strongly so for large clutches and when feather removal occurred immediately after clutch completion. Hence, we found strong, coherent evidence for a trade-off between reproduction, and laying effort in particular, and the ability to generate new feathers. These results support the hypothesis that the derived condition of molting during wintering in long-distance migrants is maintained by the costs of overlapping breeding and molt. PMID:24826890

  14. Hunger artists: yeast adapted to carbon limitation show trade-offs under carbon sufficiency.

    PubMed

    Wenger, Jared W; Piotrowski, Jeffrey; Nagarajan, Saisubramanian; Chiotti, Kami; Sherlock, Gavin; Rosenzweig, Frank

    2011-08-01

    As organisms adaptively evolve to a new environment, selection results in the improvement of certain traits, bringing about an increase in fitness. Trade-offs may result from this process if function in other traits is reduced in alternative environments either by the adaptive mutations themselves or by the accumulation of neutral mutations elsewhere in the genome. Though the cost of adaptation has long been a fundamental premise in evolutionary biology, the existence of and molecular basis for trade-offs in alternative environments are not well-established. Here, we show that yeast evolved under aerobic glucose limitation show surprisingly few trade-offs when cultured in other carbon-limited environments, under either aerobic or anaerobic conditions. However, while adaptive clones consistently outperform their common ancestor under carbon limiting conditions, in some cases they perform less well than their ancestor in aerobic, carbon-rich environments, indicating that trade-offs can appear when resources are non-limiting. To more deeply understand how adaptation to one condition affects performance in others, we determined steady-state transcript abundance of adaptive clones grown under diverse conditions and performed whole-genome sequencing to identify mutations that distinguish them from one another and from their common ancestor. We identified mutations in genes involved in glucose sensing, signaling, and transport, which, when considered in the context of the expression data, help explain their adaptation to carbon poor environments. However, different sets of mutations in each independently evolved clone indicate that multiple mutational paths lead to the adaptive phenotype. We conclude that yeasts that evolve high fitness under one resource-limiting condition also become more fit under other resource-limiting conditions, but may pay a fitness cost when those same resources are abundant.

  15. Hunger Artists: Yeast Adapted to Carbon Limitation Show Trade-Offs under Carbon Sufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Wenger, Jared W.; Piotrowski, Jeffrey; Nagarajan, Saisubramanian; Chiotti, Kami; Sherlock, Gavin; Rosenzweig, Frank

    2011-01-01

    As organisms adaptively evolve to a new environment, selection results in the improvement of certain traits, bringing about an increase in fitness. Trade-offs may result from this process if function in other traits is reduced in alternative environments either by the adaptive mutations themselves or by the accumulation of neutral mutations elsewhere in the genome. Though the cost of adaptation has long been a fundamental premise in evolutionary biology, the existence of and molecular basis for trade-offs in alternative environments are not well-established. Here, we show that yeast evolved under aerobic glucose limitation show surprisingly few trade-offs when cultured in other carbon-limited environments, under either aerobic or anaerobic conditions. However, while adaptive clones consistently outperform their common ancestor under carbon limiting conditions, in some cases they perform less well than their ancestor in aerobic, carbon-rich environments, indicating that trade-offs can appear when resources are non-limiting. To more deeply understand how adaptation to one condition affects performance in others, we determined steady-state transcript abundance of adaptive clones grown under diverse conditions and performed whole-genome sequencing to identify mutations that distinguish them from one another and from their common ancestor. We identified mutations in genes involved in glucose sensing, signaling, and transport, which, when considered in the context of the expression data, help explain their adaptation to carbon poor environments. However, different sets of mutations in each independently evolved clone indicate that multiple mutational paths lead to the adaptive phenotype. We conclude that yeasts that evolve high fitness under one resource-limiting condition also become more fit under other resource-limiting conditions, but may pay a fitness cost when those same resources are abundant. PMID:21829391

  16. Exploring a water/energy trade-off in regional sourcing of livestock feed crops.

    PubMed

    Heller, Martin C; Keoleian, Gregory A

    2011-12-15

    Feed production constitutes a major portion of the energy and water resource inputs in modern livestock production. Schemes to reduce these inputs may include local sourcing of animal feed. However, in water stressed regions where irrigation of feed crops is necessary, a trade-off between local sourcing (with high water stress) and transport from less water stressed regions can occur. We demonstrate this trade-off in the U.S. by combining state-level irrigation water use and pumping energy demand from USDA surveys with fertilizer and transportation energy demands for producing major feed crops (corn grain, soybean, alfalfa hay, corn silage) in each state and delivering them to two hypothetical dairy farms located in Kersey, CO and Rosendale, WI. A back-up technology approach is employed to express freshwater resource depletion in units of energy, allowing direct comparison with other energy resource demands. Corn grain, soybean, and alfalfa hay delivered to CO demonstrate a clear trade-off between transportation energy (proportional to the distance between CO and the production state) and water stress. On the other hand, transportation burdens dominate for corn silage, making local production most attractive, even in water stressed regions. All crops delivered to WI (a region of low water stress and minimal irrigation) are dominated by transportation burdens, making local production preferable, but this is clearly not a universal principal, as other cases show. This paper quantitatively elucidates the water-energy trade-off in sourcing feed for livestock and the method is expected to be applicable in managing supply chain logistics of other farm commodities.

  17. Towards an Optimal Noise Versus Resolution Trade-Off in Wind Scatterometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Brent A.

    2011-01-01

    This paper approaches the noise versus resolution trade-off in wind scatterometry from a field-wise retrieval perspective. Theoretical considerations are discussed and practical implementation using a MAP estimator is applied to the Sea-Winds scatterometer. The approach is compared to conventional approaches as well as numerical weather predictions. The new approach incorporates knowledge of the wind spectrum to reduce the impact of components of the wind signal that are expected to be noisy.

  18. Trade-offs in seedling growth and survival within and across tropical forest microhabitats

    PubMed Central

    Inman-Narahari, Faith; Ostertag, Rebecca; Asner, Gregory P; Cordell, Susan; Hubbell, Stephen P; Sack, Lawren

    2014-01-01

    For niche differences to maintain coexistence of sympatric species, each species must grow and/or survive better than each of the others in at least one set of conditions (i.e., performance trade-offs). However, the extent of niche differentiation in tropical forests remains highly debated. We present the first test of performance trade-offs for wild seedlings in a tropical forest. We measured seedling relative growth rate (RGR) and survival of four common native woody species across 18 light, substrate, and topography microhabitats over 2.5 years within Hawaiian montane wet forest, an ideal location due to its low species diversity and strong species habitat associations. All six species pairs exhibited significant performance trade-offs across microhabitats and for RGR versus survival within microhabitats. We also found some evidence of performance equivalence, with species pairs having similar performance in 26% of comparisons across microhabitats. Across species, survival under low light was generally positively associated with RGR under high light. When averaged over all species, topography (slope, aspect, and elevation) explained most of the variation in RGR attributable to microhabitat variables (51–53%) followed by substrate type (35–37%) and light (11–12%). However, the relative effects of microhabitat differed among species and RGR metric (i.e., RGR for height, biomass, or leaf area). These findings indicate that performance trade-offs among species during regeneration are common in low-diversity tropical forest, although other mechanisms may better explain the coexistence of species with small performance differences. PMID:25614790

  19. Simbol-X Background Minimization: Mirror Spacecraft Passive Shielding Trade-off Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fioretti, V.; Malaguti, G.; Bulgarelli, A.; Palumbo, G. G. C.; Ferri, A.; Attinà, P.

    2009-05-01

    The present work shows a quantitative trade-off analysis of the Simbol-X Mirror Spacecraft (MSC) passive shielding, in the phase space of the various parameters: mass budget, dimension, geometry and composition. A simplified physical (and geometrical) model of the sky screen, implemented by means of a GEANT4 simulation, has been developed to perform a performance-driven mass optimization and evaluate the residual background level on Simbol-X focal plane.

  20. Design Trade-off Between Performance and Fault-Tolerance of Space Onboard Computers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorbunov, M. S.; Antonov, A. A.

    2017-01-01

    It is well known that there is a trade-off between performance and power consumption in onboard computers. The fault-tolerance is another important factor affecting performance, chip area and power consumption. Involving special SRAM cells and error-correcting codes is often too expensive with relation to the performance needed. We discuss the possibility of finding the optimal solutions for modern onboard computer for scientific apparatus focusing on multi-level cache memory design.

  1. A trade-off between reproduction and feather growth in the barn swallow (Hirundo rustica).

    PubMed

    Saino, Nicola; Romano, Maria; Rubolini, Diego; Ambrosini, Roberto; Romano, Andrea; Caprioli, Manuela; Costanzo, Alessandra; Bazzi, Gaia

    2014-01-01

    Physiological trade-offs mediated by limiting energy, resources or time constrain the simultaneous expression of major functions and can lead to the evolution of temporal separation between demanding activities. In birds, plumage renewal is a demanding activity, which accomplishes fundamental functions, such as allowing thermal insulation, aerodynamics and socio-sexual signaling. Feather renewal is a very expensive and disabling process, and molt is often partitioned from breeding and migration. However, trade-offs between feather renewal and breeding have been only sparsely studied. In barn swallows (Hirundo rustica) breeding in Italy and undergoing molt during wintering in sub-Saharan Africa, we studied this trade-off by removing a tail feather from a large sample of individuals and analyzing growth bar width, reflecting feather growth rate, and length of the growing replacement feather in relation to the stage in the breeding cycle at removal and clutch size. Growth bar width of females and length of the growing replacement feather of both sexes were smaller when the original feather had been removed after clutch initiation. Importantly, in females both growth bar width and replacement feather length were negatively predicted by clutch size, and more strongly so for large clutches and when feather removal occurred immediately after clutch completion. Hence, we found strong, coherent evidence for a trade-off between reproduction, and laying effort in particular, and the ability to generate new feathers. These results support the hypothesis that the derived condition of molting during wintering in long-distance migrants is maintained by the costs of overlapping breeding and molt.

  2. Does individual quality mask the detection of performance trade-offs? A test using analyses of human physical performance.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Robbie S; Niehaus, Amanda C; David, Gwendolyn; Hunter, Andrew; Smith, Michelle

    2014-02-15

    Why are performance trade-offs so rarely detected in animals when their underlying physiological basis seems so intuitive? One possibility is that individual variation in health, fitness, nutrition, development or genetics, or 'individual quality', makes some individuals better or worse performers across all motor tasks. If this is the case, then correcting for individual quality should reveal functional trade-offs that might otherwise be overlooked. We tested this idea by exploring trade-offs in maximum physical performance and motor skill function in semi-professional soccer players. We assessed individual performance across five maximum 'athletic' tasks providing independent measures of power, stamina and speed, as well as five soccer-specific 'motor skill' tasks providing independent measures of foot control. We expected to find functional trade-offs between pairs of traits (e.g. endurance versus power/speed tasks or specialist-generalist performance) - but only after correcting for individual quality. Analyses of standardised raw data found positive associations among several pairs of traits, but no evidence of performance trade-offs. Indeed, peak performance across a single athletic task (degree of specialisation) was positively associated with performance averaged across all other athletic tasks (generalist). However, after accounting for an individual's overall quality, several functional trade-offs became evident. Within our quality-corrected data, 1500 m-speed (endurance) was negatively associated with squat time (power), jump distance (power) and agility speed - reflecting the expected speed-endurance trade-off; and degree of specialisation was negatively associated with average performance across tasks. Taken together, our data support the idea that individual variation in general quality can mask the detection of performance trade-offs at the whole-animal level. These results highlight the possibility that studies may spuriously conclude certain

  3. Evading the strength–ductility trade-off dilemma in steel through gradient hierarchical nanotwins

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Yujie; Li, Yongqiang; Zhu, Lianchun; Liu, Yao; Lei, Xianqi; Wang, Gang; Wu, Yanxin; Mi, Zhenli; Liu, Jiabin; Wang, Hongtao; Gao, Huajian

    2014-01-01

    The strength–ductility trade-off has been a long-standing dilemma in materials science. This has limited the potential of many structural materials, steels in particular. Here we report a way of enhancing the strength of twinning-induced plasticity steel at no ductility trade-off. After applying torsion to cylindrical twinning-induced plasticity steel samples to generate a gradient nanotwinned structure along the radial direction, we find that the yielding strength of the material can be doubled at no reduction in ductility. It is shown that this evasion of strength–ductility trade-off is due to the formation of a gradient hierarchical nanotwinned structure during pre-torsion and subsequent tensile deformation. A series of finite element simulations based on crystal plasticity are performed to understand why the gradient twin structure can cause strengthening and ductility retention, and how sequential torsion and tension lead to the observed hierarchical nanotwinned structure through activation of different twinning systems. PMID:24686581

  4. Soil management shapes ecosystem service provision and trade-offs in agricultural landscapes

    PubMed Central

    De Simone, Serena; Sigura, Maurizia; Boscutti, Francesco; Marini, Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    Agroecosystems are principally managed to maximize food provisioning even if they receive a large array of supporting and regulating ecosystem services (ESs). Hence, comprehensive studies investigating the effects of local management and landscape composition on the provision of and trade-offs between multiple ESs are urgently needed. We explored the effects of conservation tillage, nitrogen fertilization and landscape composition on six ESs (crop production, disease control, soil fertility, water quality regulation, weed and pest control) in winter cereals. Conservation tillage enhanced soil fertility and pest control, decreased water quality regulation and weed control, without affecting crop production and disease control. Fertilization only influenced crop production by increasing grain yield. Landscape intensification reduced the provision of disease and pest control. We also found tillage and landscape composition to interactively affect water quality regulation and weed control. Under N fertilization, conventional tillage resulted in more trade-offs between ESs than conservation tillage. Our results demonstrate that soil management and landscape composition affect the provision of several ESs and that soil management potentially shapes the trade-offs between them. PMID:27559064

  5. Tests for host-associated fitness trade-offs in the milkweed-oleander aphid.

    PubMed

    Groeters, Francis R

    1993-03-01

    The milkweed-oleander aphid, Aphis nerii (Boyer de Fonscolombe) (Homoptera: Aphididae), feeds on different milkweed species in northern California than in Puerto Rico. The hosts vary, primarily between regions, for both identity and quantity of cardenolides that the aphid sequesters for its own defense. In tests for hostassociated fitness trade-offs only one case was found in which host plant and fitness corresponded, but the effect was not significant. However, power to detect fitness trade-offs was limited and the possibility of considerable differences in fitness on a particular host for aphids from different hosts cannot be excluded. On Californian host species, among which migration is common, generalized host use could result from selection for general-purpose genotypes. However, this explanation cannot apply to generalized host use of Californian and Puerto Rican milkweeds because the regions are isolated by distance. A cardenolide sequestration mechanism that is free of substantial energy costs could provide the basis for fitness homeostasis on variable host plants that makes trade-offs unlikely even on hosts from different regions.

  6. Muscle trade-offs in a power-amplified prey capture system.

    PubMed

    Blanco, M Mendoza; Patek, S N

    2014-05-01

    Should animals operating at great speeds and accelerations use fast or slow muscles? The answer hinges on a fundamental trade-off: muscles can be maximally fast or forceful, but not both. Direct lever systems offer a straightforward manifestation of this trade-off, yet the fastest organisms use power amplification, not direct lever action. Power-amplified systems typically use slow, forceful muscles to preload springs, which then rapidly release elastic potential energy to generate high speeds and accelerations. However, a fast response to a stimulus may necessitate fast spring-loading. Across 22 mantis shrimp species (Stomatopoda), this study examined how muscle anatomy correlates with spring mechanics and appendage type. We found that muscle force is maximized through physiological cross-sectional area, but not through sarcomere length. Sit-and-wait predators (spearers) had the shortest sarcomere lengths (fastest contractions) and the slowest strike speeds. The species that crush shells (smashers) had the fastest speeds, most forceful springs, and longest sarcomeres. The origin of the smasher clade yielded dazzlingly high accelerations, perhaps due to the release from fast spring-loading for evasive prey capture. This study offers a new window into the dynamics of force-speed trade-offs in muscles in the biomechanical, comparative evolutionary framework of power-amplified systems. © 2014 The Author(s). Evolution © 2014 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  7. The life-history trade-off between fertility and child survival

    PubMed Central

    Lawson, David W.; Alvergne, Alexandra; Gibson, Mhairi A.

    2012-01-01

    Evolutionary models of human reproduction argue that variation in fertility can be understood as the local optimization of a life-history trade-off between offspring quantity and ‘quality’. Child survival is a fundamental dimension of quality in these models as early-life mortality represents a crucial selective bottleneck in human evolution. This perspective is well-rehearsed, but current literature presents mixed evidence for a trade-off between fertility and child survival, and little empirical ground to evaluate how socioecological and individual characteristics influence the benefits of fertility limitation. By compiling demographic survey data, we demonstrate robust negative relationships between fertility and child survival across 27 sub-Saharan African countries. Our analyses suggest this relationship is primarily accounted for by offspring competition for parental investment, rather than by reverse causal mechanisms. We also find that the trade-off increases in relative magnitude as national mortality declines and maternal somatic (height) and extrasomatic (education) capital increase. This supports the idea that socioeconomic development, and associated reductions in extrinsic child mortality, favour reduced fertility by increasing the relative returns to parental investment. Observed fertility, however, falls considerably short of predicted optima for maximizing total offspring survivorship, strongly suggesting that additional unmeasured costs of reproduction ultimately constrain the evolution of human family size. PMID:23034700

  8. Potential Trade-Offs in Treatment of Pre-Manifest Huntington Disease

    PubMed Central

    Albin, Roger L.; Burke, James F

    2016-01-01

    The potential long-term consequences of treatments delaying manifestations of neurodegenerative diseases have not been explored. Using Huntington disease (HD) data and Markov Chain Monte Carlo methods, we simulated the effects of therapies with equivalent effects on time to onset of HD and survival with HD. Our results suggest substantial potential trade-offs in effects of these therapies; significant delays in time to onset of HD were accompanied by significant prolongations of survival after onset of HD. Under a variety of assumptions, treatments delaying onset of HD result in some patients likely to have a greater increase in survival with manifest HD compared to delays in time to onset of HD. Our results suggest that future work in HD should be sensitive to the potential existence of such trade offs and that understanding the preferences of HD patients and the broader HD community will be increasingly important. Future research, trial design, and treatment strategies in HD and other mid-life onset neurodegenerative disorders should consider the possibility of trade-offs in long-term consequences of disease-modifying treatments. PMID:26173644

  9. Quantifying the trade-off between parameter and model structure uncertainty in life cycle impact assessment.

    PubMed

    van Zelm, Rosalie; Huijbregts, Mark A J

    2013-08-20

    To enhance the use of quantitative uncertainty assessments in life cycle impact assessment practice, we suggest to quantify the trade-off between parameter uncertainty, i.e. any uncertainty associated with data and methods used to quantify the model parameters, and model structure uncertainty, i.e. the uncertainty about the relations and mechanisms being studied. In this paper we show the trade-off between the two types of uncertainty in a case of maize production with a focus on freshwater ecotoxicity due to pesticide application in The Netherlands. Parameter uncertainty in pesticide emissions, chemical-specific data, effect and damage data, and fractions of metabolite formation of degradation products was statistically quantified via probabilistic simulation, i.e. Monte Carlo simulation. Model structure uncertainties regarding the concentration-response model to be included, the selection of the damage model, and the inclusion of pesticide transformation products were assessed via discrete choice analysis. We conclude that to arrive at a minimum level of overall uncertainty the linear concentration-response model is preferable, while the transformation products may be excluded. Selecting the damage model has a relatively low influence on the overall uncertainty. Our study shows that quantifying the trade-off between different types of uncertainty can help to identify optimal model complexity from an uncertainty point of view.

  10. Many-objective optimization and visual analytics reveal key trade-offs for London's water supply

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matrosov, Evgenii S.; Huskova, Ivana; Kasprzyk, Joseph R.; Harou, Julien J.; Lambert, Chris; Reed, Patrick M.

    2015-12-01

    In this study, we link a water resource management simulator to multi-objective search to reveal the key trade-offs inherent in planning a real-world water resource system. We consider new supplies and demand management (conservation) options while seeking to elucidate the trade-offs between the best portfolios of schemes to satisfy projected water demands. Alternative system designs are evaluated using performance measures that minimize capital and operating costs and energy use while maximizing resilience, engineering and environmental metrics, subject to supply reliability constraints. Our analysis shows many-objective evolutionary optimization coupled with state-of-the art visual analytics can help planners discover more diverse water supply system designs and better understand their inherent trade-offs. The approach is used to explore future water supply options for the Thames water resource system (including London's water supply). New supply options include a new reservoir, water transfers, artificial recharge, wastewater reuse and brackish groundwater desalination. Demand management options include leakage reduction, compulsory metering and seasonal tariffs. The Thames system's Pareto approximate portfolios cluster into distinct groups of water supply options; for example implementing a pipe refurbishment program leads to higher capital costs but greater reliability. This study highlights that traditional least-cost reliability constrained design of water supply systems masks asset combinations whose benefits only become apparent when more planning objectives are considered.

  11. Early-late life trade-offs and the evolution of ageing in the wild.

    PubMed

    Lemaître, Jean-François; Berger, Vérane; Bonenfant, Christophe; Douhard, Mathieu; Gamelon, Marlène; Plard, Floriane; Gaillard, Jean-Michel

    2015-05-07

    Empirical evidence for declines in fitness components (survival and reproductive performance) with age has recently accumulated in wild populations, highlighting that the process of senescence is nearly ubiquitous in the living world. Senescence patterns are highly variable among species and current evolutionary theories of ageing propose that such variation can be accounted for by differences in allocation to growth and reproduction during early life. Here, we compiled 26 studies of free-ranging vertebrate populations that explicitly tested for a trade-off between performance in early and late life. Our review brings overall support for the presence of early-late life trade-offs, suggesting that the limitation of available resources leads individuals to trade somatic maintenance later in life for high allocation to reproduction early in life. We discuss our results in the light of two closely related theories of ageing-the disposable soma and the antagonistic pleiotropy theories-and propose that the principle of energy allocation roots the ageing process in the evolution of life-history strategies. Finally, we outline research topics that should be investigated in future studies, including the importance of natal environmental conditions in the study of trade-offs between early- and late-life performance and the evolution of sex-differences in ageing patterns.

  12. Early-late life trade-offs and the evolution of ageing in the wild

    PubMed Central

    Lemaître, Jean-François; Berger, Vérane; Bonenfant, Christophe; Douhard, Mathieu; Gamelon, Marlène; Plard, Floriane; Gaillard, Jean-Michel

    2015-01-01

    Empirical evidence for declines in fitness components (survival and reproductive performance) with age has recently accumulated in wild populations, highlighting that the process of senescence is nearly ubiquitous in the living world. Senescence patterns are highly variable among species and current evolutionary theories of ageing propose that such variation can be accounted for by differences in allocation to growth and reproduction during early life. Here, we compiled 26 studies of free-ranging vertebrate populations that explicitly tested for a trade-off between performance in early and late life. Our review brings overall support for the presence of early-late life trade-offs, suggesting that the limitation of available resources leads individuals to trade somatic maintenance later in life for high allocation to reproduction early in life. We discuss our results in the light of two closely related theories of ageing—the disposable soma and the antagonistic pleiotropy theories—and propose that the principle of energy allocation roots the ageing process in the evolution of life-history strategies. Finally, we outline research topics that should be investigated in future studies, including the importance of natal environmental conditions in the study of trade-offs between early- and late-life performance and the evolution of sex-differences in ageing patterns. PMID:25833848

  13. Assessing trade-offs to inform ecosystem-based fisheries management of forage fish.

    PubMed

    Shelton, Andrew Olaf; Samhouri, Jameal F; Stier, Adrian C; Levin, Philip S

    2014-11-19

    Twenty-first century conservation is centered on negotiating trade-offs between the diverse needs of people and the needs of the other species constituting coupled human-natural ecosystems. Marine forage fishes, such as sardines, anchovies, and herring, are a nexus for such trade-offs because they are both central nodes in marine food webs and targeted by fisheries. An important example is Pacific herring, Clupea pallisii in the Northeast Pacific. Herring populations are subject to two distinct fisheries: one that harvests adults and one that harvests spawned eggs. We develop stochastic, age-structured models to assess the interaction between fisheries, herring populations, and the persistence of predators reliant on herring populations. We show that egg- and adult-fishing have asymmetric effects on herring population dynamics--herring stocks can withstand higher levels of egg harvest before becoming depleted. Second, ecosystem thresholds proposed to ensure the persistence of herring predators do not necessarily pose more stringent constraints on fisheries than conventional, fishery driven harvest guidelines. Our approach provides a general template to evaluate ecosystem trade-offs between stage-specific harvest practices in relation to environmental variability, the risk of fishery closures, and the risk of exceeding ecosystem thresholds intended to ensure conservation goals are met.

  14. A Primer on Foraging and the Explore/Exploit Trade-Off for Psychiatry Research.

    PubMed

    Addicott, M A; Pearson, J M; Sweitzer, M M; Barack, D L; Platt, M L

    2017-09-01

    Foraging is a fundamental behavior, and many types of animals appear to have solved foraging problems using a shared set of mechanisms. Perhaps the most common foraging problem is the choice between exploiting a familiar option for a known reward and exploring unfamiliar options for unknown rewards-the so-called explore/exploit trade-off. This trade-off has been studied extensively in behavioral ecology and computational neuroscience, but is relatively new to the field of psychiatry. Explore/exploit paradigms can offer psychiatry research a new approach to studying motivation, outcome valuation, and effort-related processes, which are disrupted in many mental and emotional disorders. In addition, the explore/exploit trade-off encompasses elements of risk-taking and impulsivity-common behaviors in psychiatric disorders-and provides a novel framework for understanding these behaviors within an ecological context. Here we explain relevant concepts and some common paradigms used to measure explore/exploit decisions in the laboratory, review clinically relevant research on the neurobiology and neuroanatomy of explore/exploit decision making, and discuss how computational psychiatry can benefit from foraging theory.

  15. Having it all: historical energy intakes do not generate the anticipated trade-offs in fecundity

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, S.L; Grune, T; Bell, L.M; Murray, S.J; Souter, D.M; Erwin, S.S; Yearsley, J.M; Gordon, I.J; Illius, A.W; Kyriazakis, I; Speakman, J.R

    2006-01-01

    An axiom of life-history theory, and fundamental to our understanding of ageing, is that animals must trade-off their allocation of resources since energy and nutrients are limited. Therefore, animals cannot ‘have it all’—combine high rates of fecundity with extended lifespans. The idea of life-history trade-offs was recently challenged by the discovery that ageing may be governed by a small subset of molecular processes independent of fitness. We tested the ‘trade-off’ and ‘having it all’ theories by examining the fecundities of C57BL/6J mice placed onto four different dietary treatments that generated caloric intakes from −21 to +8.6% of controls. We predicted body fat would be deposited in relation to caloric intake. Excessive body fat is known to cause co-morbidities that shorten lifespan, while caloric restriction enhances somatic protection and increases longevity. The trade-off model predicts that increased fat would be tolerated because reproductive gain offsets shortened longevity, while animals on a restricted intake would sacrifice reproduction for lifespan extension. The responses of body fat to treatments followed our expectations, however, there was a negative relationship between reproductive performance (fecundity, litter mass) and historical intake/body fat. Our dietary restricted animals had lower protein oxidative damage and appeared able to combine life-history traits in a manner contrary to traditional expectations by having increased fecundity with the potential to have extended lifespans. PMID:16777725

  16. Nomographic methodology for use in performance trade-off studies of parabolic dish solar power modules

    SciTech Connect

    Selcuk, M. K.; Fujita, T.

    1984-06-15

    A simple graphical method has been developed to undertake technical design trade-off studies for individual parabolic dish modules comprising a two-axis tracking parabolic dish with a cavity receiver and power conversion assembly at the focal point. The results of these technical studies can then be used in performing the techno-economic analyses required for determining appropriate subsystem sizing. Selected graphs that characterize the performance of subsystems within the module have been arranged in the form of a nomogram that would enable an investigator to carry out several design trade-off studies. Key performance parameters encompassed in the nomogram include receiver losses, intercept factor, engine rating, and engine efficiency. Design and operation parameters such as concentrator size, receiver type (open or windowed aperture), receiver aperture size, operating temperature of the receiver and engine, engine partial load characteristics, concentrator slope error, and the type of reflector surface, are also included in the graphical solution. Cost considerations are not included. The nomogram has been used to perform trade-off studies that have provided a basis for determining requirements for a single concentrator that could perform satisfactorily with either the selected Stirling or Brayton engine. This activity is summarized to illustrate the usage of the nomogram. Additionally, modeling relations used in developing the nomogram are presented so that the nomogram can be updated to reflect any changes in the performance characteristics of projected components.

  17. Trade-offs between force and fit: extreme morphologies associated with feeding behavior in carabid beetles.

    PubMed

    Konuma, Junji; Chiba, Satoshi

    2007-07-01

    We explored how functional trade-offs in resource handling strategies are associated with the divergent morphology of predators. The malacophagous carabid Damaster blaptoides shows two extreme morphologies in the forebody; there is an elongate small-headed type and a stout large-headed type. A feeding experiment showed that the small-headed type obtained a high feeding performance on snails with a thick shell and a large aperture by penetrating the shell with its head. In contrast, the large-headed type showed a high feeding performance on snails that had a thin shell and a small aperture, and they ate these prey by crushing the shell. The large-headed, strong-jawed beetles are efficient at shell crushing but are ineffective at shell entry; the large mandibles and musculature that allow for shell crushing make the beetle's head too wide to penetrate shell apertures. On the other hand, small-headed, weak-jawed beetles crush poorly but can reach into shells for direct predation on snail bodies. These findings are hypothesized to be functional trade-offs between force and fit due to morphological constraints. This trade-off would be a primary mechanism affecting both resource handling ability in animals and phenotypic diversity in predators and prey.

  18. Assessing trade-offs to inform ecosystem-based fisheries management of forage fish

    PubMed Central

    Shelton, Andrew Olaf; Samhouri, Jameal F.; Stier, Adrian C.; Levin, Philip S.

    2014-01-01

    Twenty-first century conservation is centered on negotiating trade-offs between the diverse needs of people and the needs of the other species constituting coupled human-natural ecosystems. Marine forage fishes, such as sardines, anchovies, and herring, are a nexus for such trade-offs because they are both central nodes in marine food webs and targeted by fisheries. An important example is Pacific herring, Clupea pallisii in the Northeast Pacific. Herring populations are subject to two distinct fisheries: one that harvests adults and one that harvests spawned eggs. We develop stochastic, age-structured models to assess the interaction between fisheries, herring populations, and the persistence of predators reliant on herring populations. We show that egg- and adult-fishing have asymmetric effects on herring population dynamics - herring stocks can withstand higher levels of egg harvest before becoming depleted. Second, ecosystem thresholds proposed to ensure the persistence of herring predators do not necessarily pose more stringent constraints on fisheries than conventional, fishery driven harvest guidelines. Our approach provides a general template to evaluate ecosystem trade-offs between stage-specific harvest practices in relation to environmental variability, the risk of fishery closures, and the risk of exceeding ecosystem thresholds intended to ensure conservation goals are met. PMID:25407879

  19. Impact of individual differences upon emotion-induced memory trade-offs

    PubMed Central

    Waring, Jill D.; Payne, Jessica D.; Schacter, Daniel L.; Kensinger, Elizabeth A.

    2009-01-01

    After seeing a scene containing an emotional component (e.g., a snake in a forest) people often demonstrate a “trade-off” in memory, where memory for the emotional component (e.g., the snake) is good, but memory for the nonemotional elements (e.g., the forest) is poor. The result is an incomplete memory retaining central emotional information at the expense of neutral background information. Though almost everyone demonstrates the trade-off, there may be individual differences in the magnitude of the effect. We investigated whether differences in the strength of the trade-off would correlate with anxiety levels, working memory capacity, and executive functioning abilities. Sixty-four participants studied scenes comprised of a negative or neutral item placed on a neutral background, and memory was later tested for items and backgrounds separately. The magnitude of the trade-off correlated positively with anxiety and negatively with visuospatial working memory and executive function. These results suggest that greater anxiety, poor visuospatial working memory, and poor executive function may inhibit formation of complete mental representations of these complex emotional scenes. PMID:20161513

  20. Trade-offs and coexistence: a lottery model applied to fig wasp communities.

    PubMed

    Duthie, A Bradley; Abbott, Karen C; Nason, John D

    2014-06-01

    Ecological communities in which organisms complete their life cycles on discrete ephemeral patches are common and often support an unusually large number of species. Explaining this diversity is challenging for communities of ecologically similar species undergoing preemptive competition, where classic coexistence mechanisms may not readily apply. We use nonpollinating fig wasps as a model community characterized by high diversity and preemptive competition to show how subadditive population growth and a trade-off between competitor fecundity and dispersal ability can lead to coexistence. Because nonpollinator species are often closely related, have similar life histories, and compete for the same discrete resources, understanding their coexistence is challenging given competitive exclusion is expected. Empirical observations suggest that nonpollinating fig wasp species may face a trade-off between egg loads and dispersal abilities. We model a lottery in which a species' competitive ability is determined by a trade-off between fecundity and dispersal ability. Variation in interpatch distance between figs generates temporal variability in the relative benefit of fecundity versus dispersal. We show that the temporal storage effect leads to coexistence for a range of biologically realistic parameter values. We further use individual-based modeling to show that when species' traits evolve, coexistence is less likely but trait divergence can result. We discuss the implications of this coexistence mechanism for ephemeral patch systems wherein competition is strongly preemptive.

  1. Adaptively evolved yeast mutants on galactose show trade-offs in carbon utilization on glucose.

    PubMed

    Hong, Kuk-Ki; Nielsen, Jens

    2013-03-01

    Adaptive evolution offers many opportunities in metabolic engineering; however, several constraints still exist as evolutionary trade-offs may impose collateral cost to obtain new traits. The application of adaptive evolution for strains development could be further improved by elucidating the molecular mechanisms. In this study, adaptively evolved yeast mutants with improved galactose utilization ability showed impaired glucose utilization. The molecular genetic basis of this trade-off was investigated using a systems biology approach. Transcriptional and metabolic changes resulting from the improvement of galactose utilization were found maintained during growth on glucose. Moreover, glucose repression related genes showed conserved expression patterns during growth on both sugars. Mutations in the RAS2 gene that were identified as beneficial for galactose utilization in evolved mutants exhibited significant correlation with attenuation of glucose utilization. These results indicate that antagonistic pleiotropy is the dominant mechanism in the observed trade-off, and it is likely realized by changes in glucose signaling. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Trade-off between carotenoid-based sexual ornamentation and sperm resistance to oxidative challenge.

    PubMed

    Tomášek, Oldřich; Albrechtová, Jana; Němcová, Martina; Opatová, Pavlína; Albrecht, Tomáš

    2017-01-25

    It has been hypothesized that carotenoid-based sexual ornamentation signals male fertility and sperm competitive ability as both ornamentation and sperm traits may be co-affected by oxidative stress, resulting in positive covariation (the 'redox-based phenotype-linked fertility hypothesis'; redox-based PLFH). On the other hand, the 'sperm competition theory' (SCT) predicts a trade-off between precopulatory and postcopulatory traits. Here, we manipulate oxidative status (using diquat dibromide) and carotenoid availability in adult zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata) males in order to test whether carotenoid-based beak ornamentation signals, or is traded off against, sperm resistance to oxidative challenge. Initial beak colouration, but not its change during the experiment, was associated with effect of oxidative challenge on sperm velocity, such that more intense colouration predicted an increase in sperm velocity under control conditions but a decline under oxidative challenge. This suggests a long-term trade-off between ornament expression and sperm resistance to oxidative challenge. Shortening of the sperm midpiece following oxidative challenge further suggests that redox homeostasis may constrain sperm morphometry. Carotenoid supplementation resulted in fewer sperm abnormalities but had no effect on other sperm traits. Overall, our data challenge the redox-based PLFH, partially support the SCT and highlight the importance of carotenoids for normal sperm morphology.

  3. Genetic basis of the trade-off between offspring number and quality in the bank vole.

    PubMed

    Mappes, Tapio; Koskela, Esa

    2004-03-01

    One of the main tenets of modern life-history theory is the negative relationship (trade-off) between the number and quality of offspring produced. Theory predicts a negative genetic correlation between these traits since both are closely related to fitness of individuals. However, the genetic basis of the trade-off has only been tested to a limited extent in natural populations. We examined whether size and quality of offspring are negatively related to litter size in the bank vole Clethrionomys glareolus. First, we found a significant negative phenotypic correlation between the number and size of offspring at birth in both laboratory and field populations of the bank vole. Second, a larger size at birth decreased the maturation age of female offspring in the laboratory, and increased the probability of breeding and the size of the first litter in the field. Furthermore, manipulation of offspring size at weaning indicated that structural effects of birth size in mammals have a more profound effect on the expression of life-history traits than weaning size. Finally, in addition to the phenotypic negative correlation between the number and size of offspring, we found evidence for a negative genetic correlation between these two traits, which confirms the genetic basis of the trade-off. This negative genetic covariation may have considerable effects on the rate and direction of evolution of the two related life-historical traits.

  4. Adaptation to climate change: trade-offs among responses to multiple stressors in an intertidal crustacean.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Morgan W; DeBiasse, Melissa B; Villela, Vidal A; Roberts, Hope L; Cecola, Colleen F

    2016-10-01

    Trade-offs may influence both physiological and evolutionary responses to co-occurring stressors, but their effects on both plastic and adaptive responses to climate change are poorly understood. To test for genetic and physiological trade-offs incurred in tolerating multiple stressors, we hybridized two populations of the intertidal copepod Tigriopus californicus that were divergent for both heat and salinity tolerance. Starting in the F2 generation, we selected for increased tolerance of heat, low salinity, and high salinity in replicate lines. After five generations of selection, heat-selected lines had greater heat tolerance but lower fecundity, indicating an energetic cost to tolerance. Lines selected for increased salinity tolerance did not show evidence of adaptation to their respective environments; however, hypo-osmotic selection lines showed substantial loss of tolerance to hyperosmotic stress. Neither of the salinity selection regimes resulted in diminished heat tolerance at ambient salinity; however, simultaneous exposure to heat and hypo-osmotic stress led to decreased heat tolerance, implying a physiological trade-off in tolerance to the two stressors. When we quantified the transcriptomic response to heat and salinity stress via RNA sequencing, we observed little overlap in the stress responses, suggesting the observed synergistic effects of heat and salinity stress were driven by competing energetic demands, rather than shared stress response pathways.

  5. Dopaminergic modulation of the trade-off between probability and time in economic decision-making.

    PubMed

    Arrondo, Gonzalo; Aznárez-Sanado, Maite; Fernández-Seara, Maria A; Goñi, Joaquín; Loayza, Francis R; Salamon-Klobut, Ewa; Heukamp, Franz H; Pastor, Maria A

    2015-06-01

    Studies on animals and humans have demonstrated the importance of dopamine in modulating decision-making processes. In this work, we have tested dopaminergic modulation of economic decision-making and its neural correlates by administering either placebo or metoclopramide, a dopamine D2-receptor antagonist, to healthy subjects, during a functional MRI study. The decision-making task combined probability and time delay with a fixed monetary reward. For individual behavioral characterization, we used the Probability Time Trade-off (PTT) economic model, which integrates the traditional trade-offs of reward magnitude-time and reward magnitude-probability into a single measurement, thereby quantifying the subjective value of a delayed and probabilistic outcome. A regression analysis between BOLD signal and the PTT model index permitted to identify the neural substrate encoding the subjective reward-value. Behaviorally, medication reduced the rate of temporal discounting over probability, reflected in medicated subjects being more prone to postpone the reward in order to increase the outcome probability. In addition, medicated subjects showed less activity during the task in the postcentral gyrus as well as frontomedian areas, whereas there were no differences in the ventromedial orbitofrontal cortex (VMOFC) between groups when coding the subjective value. The present study demonstrates by means of behavior and imaging that dopamine modulation alters the probability-time trade-off in human economic decision-making. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. and ECNP. All rights reserved.

  6. Are there genetic trade-offs between immune and reproductive investments in Tribolium castaneum?

    PubMed

    Hangartner, Sandra; Sbilordo, Sonja H; Michalczyk, Łukasz; Gage, Matthew J G; Martin, Oliver Y

    2013-10-01

    Parasites impose strong selection on hosts to defend themselves, which is expected to result in trade-offs with other fitness traits such as reproduction. Here we test for genetic trade-offs between reproductive traits and immunity using Tribolium castaneum lines that were subject to experimental evolution. The lines have been exposed to contrasting sexual selection intensities via different sex ratios (female-biased, equal and male-biased). After 56 generations, the lines have significantly diverged and those experiencing high sexual selection have evolved males who are superior competitors for reproductive success, and females who are more resistant to multiple mating. All selected lines were assessed for both an immune measurement (phenoloxidase (PO) activity) and host resistance to the microsporidian Nosema whitei after two generations of relaxed selection. In contrast to our expectations we did not find any evidence for a genetic trade-off between investment in reproduction and immunity. Both PO and Nosema resistance did not differ between lines, despite their divergences in reproductive investment due to variation in sexual selection and conflict. Nevertheless, overall we found that females had higher PO activities and in the Nosema free control treatment survived longer than males, suggesting that females generally invest more in PO and survival under control conditions than males. This result fits the Bateman's principle, which states that females gain fitness through increased immunity and longevity, while males gain fitness through increased mating success.

  7. No allocation trade-offs between flowering and sproutingin the lignotuberous, Mediterranean shrub Erica australis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruz, Alberto; Moreno, José M.

    2001-04-01

    Trade-offs between allocation to sexual or vegetative regeneration capacity are well established as a driving force in the life history patterns of plants in fire-prone environments. However, it is not known whether such trade-offs exist in plants which after aboveground removing disturbances, such as fire, may regenerate by sexual (seeding) or asexual (sprouting) mechanisms. We evaluated whether in the fire-recruiting resprouter Erica australis, which after fire can regenerate by seedling establishment or resprouting, a larger investment in flowers and seeds prior to being disturbed by clipping its aboveground parts would decrease subsequent sprouting, that is, its vegetative regeneration capacity. We analysed the relationships between flower and seed production and the ensuing production and growth of sprouts of six plants from thirteen different sites in central-western Spain. We found no significant relationships between measures of sexual reproductive effort and resprout production and growth 6 months after clipping the aboveground parts of the plants. No evidence of trade-offs between sexual and asexual efforts was found. Furthermore, no significant relationship was found between lignotuber total non-structural carbohydrates and sexual reproductive effort. In addition, 2 years after the disturbance, resprout biomass was positively and significantly correlated with sexual reproductive effort prior to the disturbance. This indicates that growth of resprouts was higher at the sites where plants made a greater reproductive effort. The sites that were more favourable to producing flowers and seeds could also be more favourable to resprouting.

  8. Information content of SNR/resolution trade-offs in three-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Portnoy, S; Kale, S C; Feintuch, A; Tardif, C; Pike, G B; Henkelman, R M

    2009-04-01

    In MRI, a trade-off exists between resolution and signal-to-noise ratio, since different fractions of the available scan time can be used to acquire data at higher spatial frequencies and to perform signal averaging. By comparing a wide variety of 3D isotropic MR scans with different combinations of SNR, resolution, and scan duration, the impact of this trade-off on the image information content was assessed. The information content of mouse brain, mouse whole-body, and human brain images was evaluated using a simple numerical approach, which sums the information contribution of each individual k-space data point. Results show that, with a fixed receiver bandwidth and field of view, the information content of trade-off images is always maximized when the SNR is equal to about 16. The optimal imaging resolution is dependent on the scan duration, as well as certain MR system properties, such as field strength and coil sensitivity. These properties are, however, easily accounted for with the acquisition of a single scout MR image, and the optimal imaging resolution can then be calculated using a simple mathematical relationship. If the imaging task is approached with a predetermined resolution requirement, the same scout scan can be used to calculate the scan duration that will provide the maximum possible information. Using these relationships to maximize the image information content is an excellent technique for guiding the initial selection of imaging parameters.

  9. Economic determinants of urban form: resulting trade-offs between active and sedentary forms of travel.

    PubMed

    Frank, Lawrence D

    2004-10-01

    Economic factors have an impact on how the built environment is shaped, which in turn affects how we choose to travel. Regional transportation investment decisions are firmly rooted in economic "cost-benefit" trade-off considerations. The placement (central or outlying) and mode of transportation in which investments are made (transit, highway, sidewalks, or bikeways) influence where homes, businesses, schools, and other types of uses are located. Transportation investments create or limit access and establish a set of economic trade-offs that help determine if an area will be compact or dispersed, and mixed use or single use. Developers consider cost trade-offs between constructing connected street grids versus disconnected cul-de-sac networks, which determines if residents can walk to services and transit. Taken collectively, transportation investments and resulting land-use patterns determine if destinations are far apart or close together and linked with direct and safe sidewalks or bikeways. The end result is a built environment that determines whether walking and biking is feasible or perceived as more beneficial than driving or taking transit. This paper assesses (1) the economic forces that shape transportation investment decisions, (2) the economic impact of these investments on land use, and (3) how we as consumers choose to travel as a result of these transportation investment and land-use decisions.

  10. Evidence for a Trade-Off Strategy in Stone Oak (Lithocarpus) Seeds between Physical and Chemical Defense Highlights Fiber as an Important Antifeedant

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xi; Cannon, Charles H.; Conklin-Brittan, Nancy Lou

    2012-01-01

    Trees in the beech or oak family (Fagaceae) have a mutualistic relationship with scatter-hoarding rodents. Rodents obtain nutrients and energy by consuming seeds, while providing seed dispersal for the tree by allowing some cached seeds to germinate. Seed predation and caching behavior of rodents is primarily affected by seed size, mechanical protection, macronutrient content, and chemical antifeedants. To enhance seed dispersal, trees must optimize trade-offs in investment between macronutrients and antifeedants. Here, we examine this important chemical balance in the seeds of tropical stone oak species with two substantially different fruit morphologies. These two distinct fruit morphologies in Lithocarpus differ in the degree of mechanical protection of the seed. For ‘acorn’ fruit, a thin exocarp forms a shell around the seed while for ‘enclosed receptacle’ (ER) fruit, the seed is embedded in a woody receptacle. We compared the chemical composition of numerous macronutrient and antifeedant in seeds from several Lithocarpus species, focusing on two pairs of sympatric species with different fruit morphologies. We found that macronutrients, particularly total non-structural carbohydrate, was more concentrated in seeds of ER fruits while antifeedants, primarily fibers, were more concentrated in seeds of acorn fruits. The trade-off in these two major chemical components was more evident between the two sympatric lowland species than between two highland species. Surprisingly, no significant difference in overall tannin concentrations in the seeds was observed between the two fruit morphologies. Instead, the major trade-off between macronutrients and antifeedants involved indigestible fibers. Future studies of this complex mutualism should carefully consider the role of indigestible fibers in the foraging behavior of scatter-hoarding rodents. PMID:22457722

  11. A trade-off between embryonic development rate and immune function of avian offspring is concealed by embryonic temperature

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Martin, Thomas E.; Arriero, Elena; Majewska, Ania

    2011-01-01

    Long embryonic periods are assumed to reflect slower intrinsic development that are thought to trade off to allow enhanced physiological systems, such as immune function. Yet, the relatively rare studies of this trade-off in avian offspring have not found the expected trade-off. Theory and tests have not taken into account the strong extrinsic effects of temperature on embryonic periods of birds. Here, we show that length of the embryonic period did not explain variation in two measures of immune function when temperature was ignored, based on studies of 34 Passerine species in tropical Venezuela (23 species) and north temperate Arizona (11 species). Variation in immune function was explained when embryonic periods were corrected for average embryonic temperature, in order to better estimate intrinsic rates of development. Immune function of offspring trades off with intrinsic rates of embryonic development once the extrinsic effects of embryonic temperatures are taken into account.

  12. Warmer temperatures attenuate the classic offspring number and reproductive investment trade-off in the common lizard, Zootoca vivipara

    PubMed Central

    Miles, Donald B.; Clobert, Jean; Richard, Murielle

    2016-01-01

    Life-history traits involved in trade-offs are known to vary with environmental conditions. Here, we evaluate the response of the trade-off between ‘offspring number’ versus ‘energy invested per offspring’ to ambient temperature in 11 natural populations of the common lizard, Zootoca vivipara. We provide evidence at both the intra- and interpopulation levels that the trade-off is reduced with an increase in air temperature. If this effect enhances current individual fitness, it may lead to an accelerated pace of life in warmer environments and could ultimately increase adult mortality. In the context of global warming, our results advocate the need for more studies in natural populations to explore interactions between life-history traits' trade-offs and environmental conditions. PMID:27247438

  13. Fitness trade-offs in pest management and intercropping with colour: an evolutionary framework and potential application.

    PubMed

    Farkas, Timothy E

    2015-10-01

    An important modern goal of plant science research is to develop tools for agriculturalists effective at curbing yield losses to insect herbivores, but resistance evolution continuously threatens the efficacy of pest management strategies. The high-dose/refuge strategy has been employed with some success to curb pest adaptation, and has been shown to be most effective when fitness costs (fitness trade-offs) of resistance are high. Here, I use eco-evolutionary reasoning to demonstrate the general importance of fitness trade-offs for pest control, showing that strong fitness trade-offs mitigate the threat of pest adaptation, even if adaptation were to occur. I argue that novel pest management strategies evoking strong fitness trade-offs are the most likely to persist in the face of unbridled pest adaptation, and offer the manipulation of crop colours as a worked example of one potentially effective strategy against insect herbivores.

  14. Fitness trade-offs in pest management and intercropping with colour: an evolutionary framework and potential application

    PubMed Central

    Farkas, Timothy E

    2015-01-01

    An important modern goal of plant science research is to develop tools for agriculturalists effective at curbing yield losses to insect herbivores, but resistance evolution continuously threatens the efficacy of pest management strategies. The high-dose/refuge strategy has been employed with some success to curb pest adaptation, and has been shown to be most effective when fitness costs (fitness trade-offs) of resistance are high. Here, I use eco-evolutionary reasoning to demonstrate the general importance of fitness trade-offs for pest control, showing that strong fitness trade-offs mitigate the threat of pest adaptation, even if adaptation were to occur. I argue that novel pest management strategies evoking strong fitness trade-offs are the most likely to persist in the face of unbridled pest adaptation, and offer the manipulation of crop colours as a worked example of one potentially effective strategy against insect herbivores. PMID:26495038

  15. Warmer temperatures attenuate the classic offspring number and reproductive investment trade-off in the common lizard, Zootoca vivipara.

    PubMed

    Rutschmann, Alexis; Miles, Donald B; Clobert, Jean; Richard, Murielle

    2016-06-01

    Life-history traits involved in trade-offs are known to vary with environmental conditions. Here, we evaluate the response of the trade-off between 'offspring number' versus 'energy invested per offspring' to ambient temperature in 11 natural populations of the common lizard, Zootoca vivipara We provide evidence at both the intra- and interpopulation levels that the trade-off is reduced with an increase in air temperature. If this effect enhances current individual fitness, it may lead to an accelerated pace of life in warmer environments and could ultimately increase adult mortality. In the context of global warming, our results advocate the need for more studies in natural populations to explore interactions between life-history traits' trade-offs and environmental conditions. © 2016 The Author(s).

  16. How do illusions constrain goal-directed movement: perceptual and visuomotor influences on speed/accuracy trade-off.

    PubMed

    Skewes, Joshua C; Roepstorff, Andreas; Frith, Christopher D

    2011-03-01

    Recent research shows that visual processing influences the speed/accuracy trade-off people use when performing goal-directed movement. This raises the question of how this influence is produced in visual cognition. Visual influences on speed/accuracy trade-off could be produced in conscious visual perception, in non-conscious visuomotor transformation, or by some interaction of conscious perceptual and non-conscious visuomotor processes. There is independent evidence showing that both perceptual and visuomotor processes are involved in trading off speed and accuracy; however, the interaction between these processes has yet to be investigated. We present an experiment in which we show that a change in visual consciousness induced by a perceptual illusion affects the speed and accuracy of goal-directed movements, suggesting that perceptual and visuomotor processes do interact in speed/accuracy trade-off. We discuss the consequences of these results for theories of visual function more generally.

  17. Nest Construction by a Ground-nesting Bird Represents a Potential Trade-off Between Egg Crypticity and Thermoregulation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Predation selects against conspicuous colors in bird eggs and nests, while thermoregulatory constraints select for nest building behavior that regulates incubation temperatures. We present results that reveal a trade-off between nest crypticity and thermoregulation of eggs base...

  18. Nest Construction by a Ground-nesting Bird Represents a Potential Trade-off Between Egg Crypticity and Thermoregulation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Predation selects against conspicuous colors in bird eggs and nests, while thermoregulatory constraints select for nest building behavior that regulates incubation temperatures. We present results that reveal a trade-off between nest crypticity and thermoregulation of eggs base...

  19. Plasma etch patterning of EUV lithography: balancing roughness and selectivity trade off

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rastogi, Vinayak; Beique, Genevieve; Sun, Lei; Cottle, Hongyun; Feurprier, Yannick; Metz, Andrew; Kumar, Kaushik; Labelle, Cathy; Arnold, John; Colburn, Matthew; Ranjan, Alok

    2016-03-01

    EUV based patterning is one of the frontrunner candidates enabling scaling for future technology nodes. However it poses the common challenges of `pattern roughness' and `etch resistance' aspect which are getting even more critical as we work on smaller dimension features. Continuous efforts are ongoing to improve resist materials and lithography process but the industry is slowly moving to introduce it at high volume manufacturing. Plasma Etch processes have the potential to improvise upon the incoming pattern roughness and provide improved LER/LWR downstream to expedite EUV progress. In this work we demonstrate the specific role of passivation control in the dualfrequency Capacitively Coupled Plasma (CCP) for EUV patterning process with regards to improving LER/LWR, resist selectivity and CD tunability for line/space patterns. We draw the implicit commonalities between different passivation chemistry and their effectiveness for roughness improvement. The effect of relative C:F and C:H ratio in feed gas on CFx and CHx plasma species and in turn the evolution of pattern roughness is drawn. Data that shows the role of plasma etch parameters impacting the key patterning metrics of CD, resist selectivity and LER/LWR is presented.

  20. Are trade-offs among species' ecological interactions scale dependent? A test using pitcher-plant inquiline species.

    PubMed

    Kneitel, Jamie M

    2012-01-01

    Trade-offs among species' ecological interactions is a pervasive explanation for species coexistence. The traits associated with trade-offs are typically measured to mechanistically explain species coexistence at a single spatial scale. However, species potentially interact at multiple scales and this may be reflected in the traits among coexisting species. I quantified species' ecological traits associated with the trade-offs expected at both local (competitive ability and predator tolerance) and regional (competitive ability and colonization rate) community scales. The most common species (four protozoa and a rotifer) from the middle trophic level of a pitcher plant (Sarracenia purpurea) inquiline community were used to link species traits to previously observed patterns of species diversity and abundance. Traits associated with trade-offs (competitive ability, predator tolerance, and colonization rate) and other ecological traits (size, growth rate, and carrying capacity) were measured for each of the focal species. Traits were correlated with one another with a negative relationship indicative of a trade-off. Protozoan and rotifer species exhibited a negative relationship between competitive ability and predator tolerance, indicative of coexistence at the local community scale. There was no relationship between competitive ability and colonization rate. Size, growth rate, and carrying capacity were correlated with each other and the trade-off traits: Size was related to both competitive ability and predator tolerance, but growth rate and carrying capacity were correlated with predator tolerance. When partial correlations were conducted controlling for size, growth rate and carrying capacity, the trade-offs largely disappeared. These results imply that body size is the trait that provides the basis for ecological interactions and trade-offs. Altogether, this study showed that the examination of species' traits in the context of coexistence at different scales

  1. Grayscale/resolution trade-off for text: Model predictions and psychophysical results for letter confusion and letter discrimination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gille, Jennifer; Martin, Russel; Lubin, Jeffrey; Larimer, James

    1995-01-01

    In a series of papers presented in 1994, we examined the grayscale/resolution trade-off for natural images displayed on devices with discrete pixellation, such as AMLCD's. In the present paper we extend this study by examining the grayscale/resolution trade-off for text images on discrete-pixel displays. Halftoning in printing is an example of the grayscale/resolution trade-off. In printing, spatial resolution is sacrificed to produce grayscale. Another example of this trade-off is the inherent low-pass spatial filter of a CRT, caused by the point-spread function of the electron beam in the phosphor layer. On a CRT, sharp image edges are blurred by this inherent low-pass filtering, and the block noise created by spatial quantization is greatly reduced. A third example of this trade-off is text anti-aliasing, where grayscale is used to improve letter shape, size and location when rendered at a low spatial resolution. There are additional implications for display system design from the grayscale/resolution trade-off. For example, reduced grayscale can reduce system costs by requiring less complexity in the framestore, allowing the use of lower cost drivers, potentially increasing data transfer rates in the image subsystem, and simplifying the manufacturing processes that are used to construct the active matrix for AMLCD (active-matrix liquid-crystal display) or AMTFEL (active-matrix thin-film electroluminescent) devices. Therefore, the study of these trade-offs is important for display designers and manufacturing and systems engineers who wish to create the highest performance, lowest cost device possible. Our strategy for investigating this trade-off is to generate a set of simple test images, manipulate grayscale and resolution, predict discrimination performance using the ViDEOS(Sarnoff) Human Vision Model, conduct an empirical study of discrimination using psychophysical procedures, and verify the computational results using the psychophysical results.

  2. A Balanced Diaphragm Type of Maximum Cylinder Pressure Indicator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spanogle, J A; Collins, John H , Jr

    1930-01-01

    A balanced diaphragm type of maximum cylinder pressure indicator was designed to give results consistent with engine operating conditions. The apparatus consists of a pressure element, a source of controlled high pressure and a neon lamp circuit. The pressure element, which is very compact, permits location of the diaphragm within 1/8 inch of the combustion chamber walls without water cooling. The neon lamp circuit used for indicating contact between the diaphragm and support facilitates the use of the apparatus with multicylinder engines.

  3. Testing the competition-colonization trade-off with a 32-year study of a saxicolous lichen community.

    PubMed

    Pastore, A I; Prather, C M; Gornish, E S; Ryan, W H; Ellis, R D; Milleri, T E

    2014-02-01

    Competition-colonization trade-offs are theorized to be a mechanism of coexistence in communities structured by environmental fluctuations. But many studies that have tested for the trade-off have failed to detect it, likely because a spatiotemporally structured environment and many species assemblages are needed to adequately test for a competition-colonization trade-off. Here, we present a unique 32-year study of rock-dwelling lichens in New Mexico, USA, in which photographs were used to quantify lichen life history traits and interactions through time. These data allowed us to determine whether there were any trade-offs between traits associated with colonization and competition, as well as the relationship between diversity and disturbance in the community. We did not find evidence for a trade-off between competitive ability and colonization rate or any related life history traits. Interestingly, we did find a peak in all measures of species diversity at intermediate levels of disturbance, consistent with the intermediate disturbance hypothesis pattern. We suggest that the coexistence of the dominant species in this system is regulated by differences in persistence and growth rate mediating overgrowth competition rather than a competition-colonization trade-off.

  4. Co-benefits and trade-offs in the water-energy nexus of irrigation modernization in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cremades, Roger; Rothausen, Sabrina G. S. A.; Conway, Declan; Zou, Xiaoxia; Wang, Jinxia; Li, Yu'e.

    2016-05-01

    There are strong interdependencies between water use in agriculture and energy consumption as water saving technologies can require increased pumping and pressurizing. The Chinese Government includes water efficiency improvement and carbon intensity reduction targets in the 12th Five-Year Plan (5YP. 2011-2015), yet the links between energy use and irrigation modernization are not always addressed in policy targets. Here we build an original model of the energy embedded in water pumping for irrigated agriculture and its related processes. The model is based on the physical processes of irrigation schemes and the implication of technological developments, comprising all processes from extraction and conveyance of water to its application in the field. The model uses data from government sources to assess policy targets for deployment of irrigation technologies, which aim to reduce water application and contribute to adaptation of Chinese agriculture to climate change. The consequences of policy targets involve co-beneficial outcomes that achieve water and energy savings, or trade-offs in which reduced water application leads to increasing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. We analyze irrigation efficiency and energy use in four significant provinces and nationally, using scenarios based on the targets of the 12th 5YP. At the national scale, we find that expansion of sprinklers and micro-irrigation as outlined in the 5YP would increase GHG emissions from agricultural water use, however, emissions decrease in those provinces with predominant groundwater use and planned expansion of low-pressure pipes. We show that the most costly technologies relate to trade-offs, while co-benefits are generally achieved with less expensive technologies. The investment cost per area of irrigation technology expansion does not greatly affect the outcome in terms of water, but in terms of energy the most expensive technologies are more energy-intensive and produce more emissions. The

  5. Trade-offs between nitrous oxide emission and C-sequestration in the soil: the role of earthworms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Groenigen, J.; Lubbers, I. M.; Giannopoulos, G.

    2008-12-01

    The rapidly rising concentrations of the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide (CO2) in the atmosphere has spurred the interest in soils as a potential carbon (C) sink. However, there are many reports indicating that C- sequestration is often negated by elevated emissions of the potent greenhouse gas nitrous oxide (N2O). It is not yet clear what the driving factors behind this trade-off are, nor how it can be avoided. We suggest that earthworm activity may be partly responsible for the trade-off. Earthworm activity is increasingly recognized as being beneficial to C-sequestration through stabilization of SOM. We report experimental results suggesting that they can also lead to strongly elevated N2O-emissions. In a first experiment, dried grass residue (Lolium perenne) was applied at the top of a loamy soil or mixed through the soil, and N2O-emission was followed for three months. Treatments included presence of the epigeic earthworm Lumbricus rubellus and the anecic earthworm Aporrectodea longa. Cumulative N2O-emissions increased significantly for both species. The strongest effect was measured for L. rubellus, where N2O-emissions significantly increased from 55.7 to 789.1 micro g N2O-N kg- 1 soil. This effect was only observed when residue was applied on top of the soil. In a second experiment we determined the effect of epigeic (L. rubellus) and endogeic (Aporrectodea caliginosa) earthworms on N2O-emissions for two different soil types (loam and sand) in the presence of 15N-labeled radish residue (Raphanus sativus subsp. oleiferus). Both species showed significant increases in N2O-emissions, which differed with residue application method and soil type. N2O- emissions were generally larger in loamy soils and the strongest effect was measured for A. caliginosa when residue was mixed into the soil, increasing emissions from 1350.1 to 2223.2 micro g N2O-N kg- 1 soil. L. rubellus only resulted in elevated N2O-emissions when residue was applied on top. These studies make it

  6. Reliable Adaptive Data Aggregation Route Strategy for a Trade-off between Energy and Lifetime in WSNs

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Wenzhong; Hong, Wei; Zhang, Bin; Chen, Yuzhong; Xiong, Naixue

    2014-01-01

    Mobile security is one of the most fundamental problems in Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs). The data transmission path will be compromised for some disabled nodes. To construct a secure and reliable network, designing an adaptive route strategy which optimizes energy consumption and network lifetime of the aggregation cost is of great importance. In this paper, we address the reliable data aggregation route problem for WSNs. Firstly, to ensure nodes work properly, we propose a data aggregation route algorithm which improves the energy efficiency in the WSN. The construction process achieved through discrete particle swarm optimization (DPSO) saves node energy costs. Then, to balance the network load and establish a reliable network, an adaptive route algorithm with the minimal energy and the maximum lifetime is proposed. Since it is a non-linear constrained multi-objective optimization problem, in this paper we propose a DPSO with the multi-objective fitness function combined with the phenotype sharing function and penalty function to find available routes. Experimental results show that compared with other tree routing algorithms our algorithm can effectively reduce energy consumption and trade off energy consumption and network lifetime. PMID:25215944

  7. Clinical trade-offs in cross-linked ultrahigh-molecular-weight polyethylene used in total joint arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Pruitt, Lisa A; Ansari, Farzana; Kury, Matt; Mehdizah, Amir; Patten, Elias W; Huddlestein, James; Mickelson, Dayne; Chang, Jennifer; Hubert, Kim; Ries, Michael D

    2013-04-01

    Highly cross-linked formulations of ultrahigh-molecular-weight polyethylene (XLPE) offer exceptional wear resistance for total joint arthroplasty but are offset with a reduction in postyield and fatigue fracture properties in comparison to conventional ultrahigh-molecular-weight polyethylene (UHMWPE). Oxidation resistance is also an important property for the longevity of total joint replacements (TJRs) as formulations of UHMWPE or XLPE utilizing radiation methods are susceptible to free radical generation and subsequent embrittlement. The balance of oxidation, wear, and fracture properties is an enduring concern for orthopedic polymers used as the bearing surface in total joint arthroplasty. Optimization of material properties is further challenged in designs that make use of locking mechanisms, notches, or other stress concentrations that can render the polymer susceptible to fracture due to elevated local stresses. Clinical complications involving impingements, dislocations, or other biomechanical overloads can exacerbate stresses and negate benefits of improved wear resistance provided by XLPE. This work examines trade-offs that factor into the use of XLPE in TJR implants.

  8. Pupil diameter predicts changes in the exploration-exploitation trade-off: evidence for the adaptive gain theory.

    PubMed

    Jepma, Marieke; Nieuwenhuis, Sander

    2011-07-01

    The adaptive regulation of the balance between exploitation and exploration is critical for the optimization of behavioral performance. Animal research and computational modeling have suggested that changes in exploitative versus exploratory control state in response to changes in task utility are mediated by the neuromodulatory locus coeruleus-norepinephrine (LC-NE) system. Recent studies have suggested that utility-driven changes in control state correlate with pupil diameter, and that pupil diameter can be used as an indirect marker of LC activity. We measured participants' pupil diameter while they performed a gambling task with a gradually changing payoff structure. Each choice in this task can be classified as exploitative or exploratory using a computational model of reinforcement learning. We examined the relationship between pupil diameter, task utility, and choice strategy (exploitation vs. exploration), and found that (i) exploratory choices were preceded by a larger baseline pupil diameter than exploitative choices; (ii) individual differences in baseline pupil diameter were predictive of an individual's tendency to explore; and (iii) changes in pupil diameter surrounding the transition between exploitative and exploratory choices correlated with changes in task utility. These findings provide novel evidence that pupil diameter correlates closely with control state, and are consistent with a role for the LC-NE system in the regulation of the exploration-exploitation trade-off in humans.

  9. Hydraulic limits on maximum plant transpiration and the emergence of the safety-efficiency trade-off.

    PubMed

    Manzoni, Stefano; Vico, Giulia; Katul, Gabriel; Palmroth, Sari; Jackson, Robert B; Porporato, Amilcare

    2013-04-01

    Soil and plant hydraulics constrain ecosystem productivity by setting physical limits to water transport and hence carbon uptake by leaves. While more negative xylem water potentials provide a larger driving force for water transport, they also cause cavitation that limits hydraulic conductivity. An optimum balance between driving force and cavitation occurs at intermediate water potentials, thus defining the maximum transpiration rate the xylem can sustain (denoted as E(max)). The presence of this maximum raises the question as to whether plants regulate transpiration through stomata to function near E(max). To address this question, we calculated E(max) across plant functional types and climates using a hydraulic model and a global database of plant hydraulic traits. The predicted E(max) compared well with measured peak transpiration across plant sizes and growth conditions (R = 0.86, P < 0.001) and was relatively conserved among plant types (for a given plant size), while increasing across climates following the atmospheric evaporative demand. The fact that E(max) was roughly conserved across plant types and scales with the product of xylem saturated conductivity and water potential at 50% cavitation was used here to explain the safety-efficiency trade-off in plant xylem. Stomatal conductance allows maximum transpiration rates despite partial cavitation in the xylem thereby suggesting coordination between stomatal regulation and xylem hydraulic characteristics.

  10. Land Conservation in an Evolving Agricultural Industry: Trade-offs to Consider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, J. S.; Murray, B. C.; McCarl, B. A.; Jackson, R. B.

    2008-12-01

    practices (exhibiting a 53.4% reversion rate). This reversion is a logical, low cost extensification of crop land; higher reversion rates are observed where agricultural land is most valuable, such as in Iowa and Illinois. Forecasted CRP re-cultivation accompanies environmental degradation in the form of increased chemical applications, irrigation water use and soil erosion relative to the baseline. However, if the CRP is maintained at current levels then this would shift LUC to other conversions, including a greater loss of forest amounting to 6.3 million acres relative to a case where land in CRP freely reverts. This increase in deforestation is likely to spill over into other countries as well. The net carbon loss of deforested land negates the carbon benefits of maintaining the CRP in its current state. Thus, while the environmental impacts of re-cultivating conservation lands are potentially serious, maintaining the CRP in its current form could induce LUC and even greater GHG and environmental emissions. The study concludes by discussing the environmental and economic trade-offs of land conservation under the aforementioned scenarios, and offers policy recommendations for future land conservation initiatives.

  11. Early developmental exposures shape trade-offs between acquired and innate immunity in humans

    PubMed Central

    Georgiev, Alexander V.; Kuzawa, Christopher W.; McDade, Thomas W.

    2016-01-01

    Background and objectives Life history theory predicts resource allocation trade-offs between competing functions and processes. We test the hypothesis that relative investment towards innate versus acquired immunity in humans is subject to such trade-offs and that three types of early developmental exposures are particularly salient in shaping adult immunophenotype: (i) pathogen exposure, (ii) nutritional resources; and (iii) extrinsic mortality cues. Methodology We quantified one aspect each of innate and acquired immune function, via C-reactive protein and Epstein–Barr virus antibodies, respectively, in a sample of 1248 men and women from the Philippines (ca. 21.5 years old). Early developmental exposures were assessed via long-term data collected prospectively since participants’ birth (1983–4). We calculated a standardized ratio to assess relative bias towards acquired versus innate immune function and examined its relationship to a suite of predictors via multiple regression. Results In partial support of our predictions, some of the measures of higher pathogen exposure, greater availability of nutritional resources, and lower extrinsic mortality cues in early life were associated with a bias toward acquired immunity in both men and women. The immune profile of women, in particular, appeared to be more sensitive to early life pathogen exposures than those of men. Finally, contrary to prediction, women exhibited a greater relative investment toward innate, not acquired, immunity. Conclusions and implications Early environments can exert considerable influence on the development of immunity. They affect trade-offs between innate and acquired immunity, which show adaptive plasticity and may differ in their influence in men and women. PMID:27530543

  12. Invasion versus isolation: trade-offs in managing native salmonids with barriers to upstream movement.

    PubMed

    Fausch, Kurt D; Rieman, Bruce E; Dunham, Jason B; Young, Michael K; Peterson, Douglas P

    2009-08-01

    Conservation biologists often face the trade-off that increasing connectivity in fragmented landscapes to reduce extinction risk of native species can foster invasion by non-native species that enter via the corridors created, which can then increase extinction risk. This dilemma is acute for stream fishes, especially native salmonids, because their populations are frequently relegated to fragments of headwater habitat threatened by invasion from downstream by 3 cosmopolitan non-native salmonids. Managers often block these upstream invasions with movement barriers, but isolation of native salmonids in small headwater streams can increase the threat of local extinction. We propose a conceptual framework to address this worldwide problem that focuses on 4 main questions. First, are populations of conservation value present (considering evolutionary legacies, ecological functions, and socioeconomic benefits as distinct values)? Second, are populations vulnerable to invasion and displacement by non-native salmonids? Third, would these populations be threatened with local extinction if isolated with barriers? And, fourth, how should management be prioritized among multiple populations? We also developed a conceptual model of the joint trade-off of invasion and isolation threats that considers the opportunities for managers to make strategic decisions. We illustrated use of this framework in an analysis of the invasion-isolation trade-off for native cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarkii) in 2 contrasting basins in western North America where invasion and isolation are either present and strong or farther away and apparently weak. These cases demonstrate that decisions to install or remove barriers to conserve native salmonids are often complex and depend on conservation values, environmental context (which influences the threat of invasion and isolation), and additional socioeconomic factors. Explicit analysis with tools such as those we propose can help managers make

  13. Quantifying women's stated benefit-risk trade-off preferences for IBS treatment outcomes.

    PubMed

    Johnson, F Reed; Hauber, A Brett; Ozdemir, Semra; Lynd, Larry

    2010-01-01

    The Food and Drug Administration, currently, is exploring quantitative benefit-risk methods to support regulatory decision-making. A scientifically valid method for assessing patients' benefit-risk trade-off preferences is needed to compare risks and benefits in a common metric. The study aims to quantify the maximum acceptable risk (MAR) of treatment-related adverse events (AEs) that women with diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) are willing to accept in exchange for symptom relief. A stated-choice survey was used to elicit trade-off preferences among constructed treatment profiles, each defined by symptom severity and treatment-related AEs. Symptom attributes included frequency of abdominal pain and discomfort, frequency of diarrhea, and frequency of urgency. AE attributes included frequency of mild-to-moderate constipation and the risk of four possible serious AEs. A Web-enabled survey was administered to 589 female US residents at least 18 years of age with a self-reported diagnosis of diarrhea-predominant IBS. Preference weights and MAR were estimated using mixed-logit methods. SUBJECTS were willing to accept higher risks of serious AEs in return for treatments offering better symptom control. For an improvement from the lowest to the highest of four benefit levels, subjects were willing to tolerate a 2.65% increase in impacted-bowel risk, but only a 1.34% increase in perforated-bowel risk. Variation in MARs across AE types is consistent with the relative seriousness of the AEs. Stated-preference methods offer a scientifically valid approach to quantifying benefit-risk trade-off preferences that can be used to inform regulatory decision-making.

  14. Carbon allocation during defoliation: testing a defense-growth trade-off in balsam fir

    PubMed Central

    Deslauriers, Annie; Caron, Laurie; Rossi, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    During repetitive defoliation events, carbon can become limiting for trees. To maintain growth and survival, the resources have to be shared more efficiently, which could result in a trade-off between the different physiological processes of a plant. The objective of this study was to assess the effect of defoliation in carbon allocation of balsam fir [Abies balsamea (L.) Mill.] to test the presence of a trade-off between allocation to growth, carbon storage, and defense. Three defoliation intensities [control (C-trees, 0% defoliation), moderately (M-trees, 41–60%), and heavily (H-trees, 61–80%) defoliated] were selected in order to monitor several variables related to stem growth (wood formation in xylem), carbon storage in stem and needle (non-structural soluble sugars and starch), and defense components in needles (terpenoids compound) from May to October 2011. The concentration of starch was drastically reduced in both wood and leaves of H-trees with a quasi-absence of carbon partitioning to storage in early summer. Fewer kinds of monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes were formed with an increasing level of defoliation indicating a lower carbon allocation for the production of defense. The carbon allocation to wood formation gradually reduced at increasing defoliation intensities, with a lower growth rate and fewer tracheids resulting in a reduced carbon sequestration in cell walls. The hypothesis of a trade-off between the allocations to defense components and to non-structural (NCS) and structural (growth) carbon was rejected as most of the measured variables decreased with increasing defoliation. The starch amount was highly indicative of the tree carbon status at different defoliation intensity and future research should focus on the mechanism of starch utilization for survival and growth following an outbreak. PMID:26029235

  15. Ecological Implications of a Flower Size/Number Trade-Off in Tropical Forest Trees

    PubMed Central

    Kettle, Chris J.; Maycock, Colin R.; Ghazoul, Jaboury; Hollingsworth, Pete M.; Khoo, Eyen; Sukri, Rahayu Sukmaria Haji; Burslem, David F. R. P.

    2011-01-01

    Background In angiosperms, flower size commonly scales negatively with number. The ecological consequences of this trade-off for tropical trees remain poorly resolved, despite their potential importance for tropical forest conservation. We investigated the flower size number trade-off and its implications for fecundity in a sample of tree species from the Dipterocarpaceae on Borneo. Methodology/Principal Findings We combined experimental exclusion of pollinators in 11 species, with direct and indirect estimates of contemporary pollen dispersal in two study species and published estimates of pollen dispersal in a further three species to explore the relationship between flower size, pollinator size and mean pollen dispersal distance. Maximum flower production was two orders of magnitude greater in small-flowered than large-flowered species of Dipterocarpaceae. In contrast, fruit production was unrelated to flower size and did not differ significantly among species. Small-flowered species had both smaller-sized pollinators and lower mean pollination success than large-flowered species. Average pollen dispersal distances were lower and frequency of mating between related individuals was higher in a smaller-flowered species than a larger-flowered confamilial. Our synthesis of pollen dispersal estimates across five species of dipterocarp suggests that pollen dispersal scales positively with flower size. Conclusions and Their Significance Trade-offs embedded in the relationship between flower size and pollination success contribute to a reduction in the variance of fecundity among species. It is therefore plausible that these processes could delay competitive exclusion and contribute to maintenance of species coexistence in this ecologically and economically important family of tropical trees. These results have practical implications for tree species conservation and restoration. Seed collection from small-flowered species may be especially vulnerable to cryptic genetic

  16. Trade-offs between savanna woody plant diversity and carbon storage in the Brazilian Cerrado.

    PubMed

    Pellegrini, Adam F A; Socolar, Jacob B; Elsen, Paul R; Giam, Xingli

    2016-10-01

    Incentivizing carbon storage can be a win-win pathway to conserving biodiversity and mitigating climate change. In savannas, however, the situation is more complex. Promoting carbon storage through woody encroachment may reduce plant diversity of savanna endemics, even as the diversity of encroaching forest species increases. This trade-off has important implications for the management of biodiversity and carbon in savanna habitats, but has rarely been evaluated empirically. We quantified the nature of carbon-diversity relationships in the Brazilian Cerrado by analyzing how woody plant species richness changed with carbon storage in 206 sites across the 2.2 million km(2) region at two spatial scales. We show that total woody plant species diversity increases with carbon storage, as expected, but that the richness of endemic savanna woody plant species declines with carbon storage both at the local scale, as woody biomass accumulates within plots, and at the landscape scale, as forest replaces savanna. The sharpest trade-offs between carbon storage and savanna diversity occurred at the early stages of carbon accumulation at the local scale but the final stages of forest encroachment at the landscape scale. Furthermore, the loss of savanna species quickens in the final stages of forest encroachment, and beyond a point, savanna species losses outpace forest species gains with increasing carbon accumulation. Our results suggest that although woody encroachment in savanna ecosystems may provide substantial carbon benefits, it comes at the rapidly accruing cost of woody plant species adapted to the open savanna environment. Moreover, the dependence of carbon-diversity trade-offs on the amount of savanna area remaining requires land managers to carefully consider local conditions. Widespread woody encroachment in both Australian and African savannas and grasslands may present similar threats to biodiversity. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Study designs for effectiveness and translation research :identifying trade-offs.

    PubMed

    Mercer, Shawna L; DeVinney, Barbara J; Fine, Lawrence J; Green, Lawrence W; Dougherty, Denise

    2007-08-01

    Practitioners and policymakers need credible evidence of effectiveness to justify allocating resources to complex, expensive health programs. Investigators, however, face challenges in designing sound effectiveness and translation research with relevance for "real-world" settings. Research experts and federal and foundation funders (n= approximately 120) prepared for and participated in a symposium, held May 4-5, 2004, to weigh the strengths, limitations, and trade-offs between alternate designs for studying the effectiveness and translation of complex, multilevel health interventions. Symposium attendees acknowledged that research phases (hypothesis generating, efficacy, effectiveness, translation) are iterative and cyclical, not linear, since research in advanced phases may reveal unanswered questions in earlier phases. Research questions thus always need to drive the choice of study design. When randomization and experimental control are feasible, participants noted that the randomized controlled trial with individual random assignment remains the gold standard for safeguarding internal validity. Attendees highlighted trade-offs of randomized controlled trial variants, quasi-experimental designs, and natural experiments for use when randomization or experimental control or both are impossible or inadequately address external validity. Participants discussed enhancements to all designs to increase confidence in causal inference while accommodating greater external validity. Since no single study can establish causality, participants encouraged replication of studies and triangulation using different study designs. Participants also recommended participatory research approaches for building population relevance, acceptability, and usefulness. Consideration of the study design choices, trade-offs, and enhancements discussed here can guide the design, funding, completion, and publication of appropriate policy- and practice-oriented effectiveness and translational

  18. Modeling the trade-off between diet costs and methane emissions: A goal programming approach.

    PubMed

    Moraes, L E; Fadel, J G; Castillo, A R; Casper, D P; Tricarico, J M; Kebreab, E

    2015-08-01

    Enteric methane emission is a major greenhouse gas from livestock production systems worldwide. Dietary manipulation may be an effective emission-reduction tool; however, the associated costs may preclude its use as a mitigation strategy. Several studies have identified dietary manipulation strategies for the mitigation of emissions, but studies examining the costs of reducing methane by manipulating diets are scarce. Furthermore, the trade-off between increase in dietary costs and reduction in methane emissions has only been determined for a limited number of production scenarios. The objective of this study was to develop an optimization framework for the joint minimization of dietary costs and methane emissions based on the identification of a set of feasible solutions for various levels of trade-off between emissions and costs. Such a set of solutions was created by the specification of a systematic grid of goal programming weights, enabling the decision maker to choose the solution that achieves the desired trade-off level. Moreover, the model enables the calculation of emission-mitigation costs imputing a trading value for methane emissions. Emission imputed costs can be used in emission-unit trading schemes, such as cap-and-trade policy designs. An application of the model using data from lactating cows from dairies in the California Central Valley is presented to illustrate the use of model-generated results in the identification of optimal diets when reducing emissions. The optimization framework is flexible and can be adapted to jointly minimize diet costs and other potential environmental impacts (e.g., nitrogen excretion). It is also flexible so that dietary costs, feed nutrient composition, and animal nutrient requirements can be altered to accommodate various production systems.

  19. Exaggerated Trait Allometry, Compensation and Trade-Offs in the New Zealand Giraffe Weevil (Lasiorhynchus barbicornis)

    PubMed Central

    Painting, Christina. J.; Holwell, Gregory I.

    2013-01-01

    Sexual selection has driven the evolution of exaggerated traits among diverse animal taxa. The production of exaggerated traits can come at a cost to other traits through trade-offs when resources allocated to trait development are limited. Alternatively some traits can be selected for in parallel to support or compensate for the cost of bearing the exaggerated trait. Male giraffe weevils (Lasiorhynchus barbicornis) display an extremely elongated rostrum used as a weapon during contests for mates. Here we characterise the scaling relationship between rostrum and body size and show that males have a steep positive allometry, but that the slope is non-linear due to a relative reduction in rostrum length for the largest males, suggesting a limitation in resource allocation or a diminishing requirement for large males to invest increasingly into larger rostra. We also measured testes, wings, antennae, fore- and hind-tibia size and found no evidence of a trade-off between these traits and rostrum length when comparing phenotypic correlations. However, the relative length of wings, antennae, fore- and hind-tibia all increased with relative rostrum length suggesting these traits may be under correlational selection. Increased investment in wing and leg length is therefore likely to compensate for the costs of flying with, and wielding the exaggerated rostrum of larger male giraffe weevils. These results provide a first step in identifying the potential for trait compensation and trades-offs, but are phenotypic correlations only and should be interpreted with care in the absence of breeding experiments. PMID:24312425

  20. Carbon allocation during defoliation: testing a defense-growth trade-off in balsam fir.

    PubMed

    Deslauriers, Annie; Caron, Laurie; Rossi, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    During repetitive defoliation events, carbon can become limiting for trees. To maintain growth and survival, the resources have to be shared more efficiently, which could result in a trade-off between the different physiological processes of a plant. The objective of this study was to assess the effect of defoliation in carbon allocation of balsam fir [Abies balsamea (L.) Mill.] to test the presence of a trade-off between allocation to growth, carbon storage, and defense. Three defoliation intensities [control (C-trees, 0% defoliation), moderately (M-trees, 41-60%), and heavily (H-trees, 61-80%) defoliated] were selected in order to monitor several variables related to stem growth (wood formation in xylem), carbon storage in stem and needle (non-structural soluble sugars and starch), and defense components in needles (terpenoids compound) from May to October 2011. The concentration of starch was drastically reduced in both wood and leaves of H-trees with a quasi-absence of carbon partitioning to storage in early summer. Fewer kinds of monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes were formed with an increasing level of defoliation indicating a lower carbon allocation for the production of defense. The carbon allocation to wood formation gradually reduced at increasing defoliation intensities, with a lower growth rate and fewer tracheids resulting in a reduced carbon sequestration in cell walls. The hypothesis of a trade-off between the allocations to defense components and to non-structural (NCS) and structural (growth) carbon was rejected as most of the measured variables decreased with increasing defoliation. The starch amount was highly indicative of the tree carbon status at different defoliation intensity and future research should focus on the mechanism of starch utilization for survival and growth following an outbreak.

  1. Trade-off between disease resistance and crop yield: a landscape-scale mathematical modelling perspective.

    PubMed

    Vyska, Martin; Cunniffe, Nik; Gilligan, Christopher

    2016-10-01

    The deployment of crop varieties that are partially resistant to plant pathogens is an important method of disease control. However, a trade-off may occur between the benefits of planting the resistant variety and a yield penalty, whereby the standard susceptible variety outyields the resistant one in the absence of disease. This presents a dilemma: deploying the resistant variety is advisable only if the disease occurs and is sufficient for the resistant variety to outyield the infected standard variety. Additionally, planting the resistant variety carries with it a further advantage in that the resistant variety reduces the probability of disease invading. Therefore, viewed from the perspective of a grower community, there is likely to be an optimal trade-off and thus an optimal cropping density for the resistant variety. We introduce a simple stochastic, epidemiological model to investigate the trade-off and the consequences for crop yield. Focusing on susceptible-infected-removed epidemic dynamics, we use the final size equation to calculate the surviving host population in order to analyse the yield, an approach suitable for rapid epidemics in agricultural crops. We identify a single compound parameter, which we call the efficacy of resistance and which incorporates the changes in susceptibility, infectivity and durability of the resistant variety. We use the compound parameter to inform policy plots that can be used to identify the optimal strategy for given parameter values when an outbreak is certain. When the outbreak is uncertain, we show that for some parameter values planting the resistant variety is optimal even when it would not be during the outbreak. This is because the resistant variety reduces the probability of an outbreak occurring. © 2016 The Author(s).

  2. Prezygotic resource-allocation dynamics and reproductive trade-offs in Calymperaceae (Bryophyta).

    PubMed

    Pereira, Marta R; Dambros, Cristian S; Zartman, Charles E

    2016-10-01

    Resource allocation is difficult to characterize in plants because of the challenges of quantifying gametes and propagules. We surveyed six sympatric, unisexual species in the family Calymperaceae (Bryophyta) to test for trade-offs in prezygotic sexual and asexual expression and density-dependent survivorship of female gametangia. We tallied gametangial and asexual propagule output for 1820 shoots from 17 populations of six species at monthly intervals during one year (2010-2011) in a central Amazonian forest. Generalized linear mixed models were used to test for trade-offs in sexual and asexual expression and density-dependent senescence probability of gametangia. Precipitation and microsite variables were also included in the model. For all species, sexual and asexual expression were positively correlated with mean monthly precipitation. Asexually expressing shoots produced significantly fewer gametangia than nonexpressing ones, and the probability of senescence increased with shoot density. Archegonium density per shoot was also consistently lower than the modeled optimum to maximize the number of receptive archegonia. Trade-offs among reproductive strategies and positive density-dependent senescence of female gametangia suggest that prezygotic sexual and asexual expression come at a tangible investment. However, the apparently inefficient resource-allocation dynamics in the production of female gametangia makes the possible advantages of squandering such investments unclear. One possibility is that the study populations, like those of many dioicous mosses, are skewed toward expressing females with low sporophyte production, which would suggest that asexual reproduction predominates and upstages efficient resource allocation in prezygotic investment. © 2016 Botanical Society of America.

  3. Trade-offs and evolution of thermal adaptation in the Irish potato famine pathogen Phytophthora infestans.

    PubMed

    Yang, Li-Na; Zhu, Wen; Wu, E-Jiao; Yang, Ce; Thrall, Peter H; Burdon, Jeremy J; Jin, Li-Ping; Shang, Li-Ping; Zhan, Jiasui

    2016-08-01

    Temperature is one of the most important environmental parameters with crucial impacts on nearly all biological processes. Due to anthropogenic activity, average air temperatures are expected to increase by a few degrees in coming decades, accompanied by an increased occurrence of extreme temperature events. Such global trends are likely to have various major impacts on human society through their influence on natural ecosystems, food production and biotic interactions, including diseases. In this study, we used a combination of statistical genetics, experimental evolution and common garden experiments to investigate the evolutionary potential for thermal adaptation in the potato late blight pathogen, Phytophthora infestans, and infer its likely response to changing temperatures. We found a trade-off associated with thermal adaptation to heterogeneous environments in P. infestans, with the degree of the trade-off peaking approximately at the pathogen's optimum growth temperature. A genetic trade-off in thermal adaptation was also evidenced by the negative association between a strain's growth rate and its thermal range for growth, and warm climates selecting for a low pathogen growth rate. We also found a mirror effect of phenotypic plasticity and genetic adaptation on growth rate. At below the optimum, phenotypic plasticity enhances pathogen's growth rate but nature selects for slower growing genotypes when temperature increases. At above the optimum, phenotypic plasticity reduces pathogen's growth rate but natural selection favours for faster growing genotypes when temperature increases further. We conclude from these findings that the growth rate of P. infestans will only be marginally affected by global warming.

  4. Loss of adaptation following reversion suggests trade-offs in host use by a seed beetle.

    PubMed

    Messina, F J; Durham, S L

    2015-10-01

    Experimental evolution has provided little support for the hypothesis that the narrow diets of herbivorous insects reflect trade-offs in performance across hosts; selection lines can sometimes adapt to an inferior novel host without a decline in performance on the ancestral host. An alternative approach for detecting trade-offs would be to measure adaptation decay after selection is relaxed, that is, when populations newly adapted to a novel host are reverted to the ancestral one. Lines of the seed beetle Callosobruchus maculatus rapidly adapted to a poor host (lentil); survival in lentil seeds increased from 2% to > 90% in < 30 generations. After the lines had reached a plateau with respect to survival in lentil, sublines were reverted to the ancestral host, mung bean. Twelve generations of reversion had little effect on performance in lentil, but after 25-35 generations, the reverted lines exhibited lower survival, slower development and smaller size. The most divergent pair of lines was then assayed on both lentil and mung bean. Performance on lentil was again much poorer in the reverted line than in the nonreverted one, but the lines performed equally well on mung bean. Moreover, the performance of the nonreverted line on mung bean remained comparable to that of the original mung-bean population. Our results thus present a paradox: loss of adaptation to lentil following reversion implies a trade-off, but the continued strong performance of lentil-adapted lines on mung bean does not. Genomic comparisons of the reverted, nonreverted and ancestral lines may resolve this paradox and determine the importance of selection vs. drift in causing a loss of adaptation following reversion.

  5. Trade-Off Study for an STC 70 W Stirling Engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Songgang; Peterson, Allen A.; Augenblick, Jack E.

    2005-02-01

    A high-efficiency, low-weight free-piston Stirling generator, RG-70L, has been conceptually designed. This paper reports the detailed trade-off study of newly designed RG-70L. The trades of operating frequency and piston/displacer strokes on Stirling convertor mass and efficiency are discussed. This paper shows how the operating frequency and strokes were optimized based on the trades. Losses associated with increased frequency were fully investigated and the results are discussed in the paper. Various optional linear alternator configurations are also presented and the estimated masses are reported.

  6. Performance trade-offs for conventional lenses for free-space digital optics.

    PubMed

    Neilson, D T; Barrett, C P

    1996-03-10

    We describe the limitations on the use of conventional lenses in optical computing that arise from manufacturing tolerances. The consequences on maximum array size, minimum device size, and propagation delay of systems are discussed. Two experimental optical computing systems are then compared with these results. We show that there are maximum and minimum bounds on the focal length and the ƒ-number of lenses imposed when manufacturing tolerances are considered. We also show that there are maximum bounds on image sizes and space-bandwidth products and trade-offs between spot size and system latency.

  7. Emergence of scale-free networks from local connectivity and communication trade-offs.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Valmir C; Donangelo, Raul; Souza, Sergio R

    2006-07-01

    We suggest a mechanism of connectivity evolution in networks to account for the emergence of scale-free behavior. The mechanism works on a fixed set of nodes and promotes growth from a minimally connected initial topology by the addition of edges. A new edge is added between two nodes depending on the trade-off between a gain and a cost function of local connectivity and communication properties. We report on simulation results that indicate the appearance of power-law distributions of node degrees for selected parameter combinations.

  8. Emergence of scale-free networks from local connectivity and communication trade-offs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbosa, Valmir C.; Donangelo, Raul; Souza, Sergio R.

    2006-07-01

    We suggest a mechanism of connectivity evolution in networks to account for the emergence of scale-free behavior. The mechanism works on a fixed set of nodes and promotes growth from a minimally connected initial topology by the addition of edges. A new edge is added between two nodes depending on the trade-off between a gain and a cost function of local connectivity and communication properties. We report on simulation results that indicate the appearance of power-law distributions of node degrees for selected parameter combinations.

  9. Performance trade-offs for conventional lenses for free-space digital optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neilson, D. T.; Barrett, C. P.

    1996-03-01

    We describe the limitations on the use of conventional lenses in optical computing that arise from manufacturing tolerances. The consequences on maximum array size, minimum device size, and propagation delay of systems are discussed. Two experimental optical computing systems are then compared with these results. We show that there are maximum and minimum bounds on the focal length and the f-number of lenses imposed when manufacturing tolerances are considered. We also show that there are maximum bounds on image sizes and space-bandwidth products and trade-offs between spot size and system latency.

  10. Emerging asymmetric interactions between forage and predator fisheries impose management trade-offs.

    PubMed

    Houle, J E; Andersen, K H; Farnsworth, K D; Reid, D G

    2013-10-01

    A size and trait-based marine community model was used to investigate interactions, with potential implications for yields, when a fishery targeting forage fish species (whose main adult diet is zooplankton) co-occurs with a fishery targeting larger-sized predator species. Predicted effects on the size structure of the fish community, growth and recruitment of fishes, and yield from the fisheries were used to identify management trade-offs among the different fisheries. Results showed that moderate fishing on forage fishes imposed only small effects on predator fisheries, whereas predator fisheries could enhance yield from forage fisheries under some circumstances.

  11. Towards an Optimal Noise Versus Resolution Trade-Off in Wind Scatterometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Brent A.

    2011-01-01

    A scatterometer is a radar that measures the normalized radar cross section sigma(sup 0) of the Earth's surface. Over the ocean this signal is related to the wind via the geophysical model function (GMF). The objective of wind scatterometry is to estimate the wind vector field from sigma(sup 0) measurements; however, there are many subtleties that complicate this problem-making it difficult to obtain a unique wind field estimate. Conventionally, wind estimation is split into two stages: a wind retrieval stage in which several ambiguous solutions are obtained, and an ambiguity removal stage in which ambiguities are chosen to produce an appropriate wind vector field estimate. The most common approach to wind field estimation is to grid the scatterometer swath into wind vector cells and estimate wind vector ambiguities independently for each cell. Then, field wise structure is imposed on the solution by an ambiguity selection routine. Although this approach is simple and practical, it neglects field wise structure in the retrieval step and does not account for the spatial correlation imposed by the sampling. This makes it difficult to develop a theoretically appropriate noise versus resolution trade-off using pointwise retrieval. Fieldwise structure may be imposed in the retrieval step using a model-based approach. However, this approach is generally only practical if a low order wind field model is applied, which may discard more information than is desired. Furthermore, model-based approaches do not account for the structure imposed by the sampling. A more general fieldwise approach is to estimate all the wind vectors for all the WVCs simultaneously from all the measurements. This approach can account for structure of the wind field as well as structure imposed by the sampling in the wind retrieval step. Williams and Long in 2010 developed a fieldwise retrieval method based on maximum a posteriori estimation (MAP). This MAP approach can be extended to perform a

  12. Efficiency bounds of molecular motors under a trade-off figure of merit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yanchao; Huang, Chuankun; Lin, Guoxing; Chen, Jincan

    2017-05-01

    On the basis of the theory of irreversible thermodynamics and an elementary model of the molecular motors converting chemical energy by ATP hydrolysis to mechanical work exerted against an external force, the efficiencies of the molecular motors at two different optimization configurations for trade-off figure of merit representing a best compromise between the useful energy and the lost energy are calculated. The upper and lower bounds for the efficiency at two different optimization configurations are determined. It is found that the optimal efficiencies at the two different optimization configurations are always larger than 1 / 2.

  13. Vega roll and attitude control system algorithms trade-off study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulino, N.; Cuciniello, G.; Cruciani, I.; Corraro, F.; Spallotta, D.; Nebula, F.

    2013-12-01

    This paper describes the trade-off study for the selection of the most suitable algorithms for the Roll and Attitude Control System (RACS) within the FPS-A program, aimed at developing the new Flight Program Software of VEGA Launcher. Two algorithms were analyzed: Switching Lines (SL) and Quaternion Feedback Regulation. Using a development simulation tool that models two critical flight phases (Long Coasting Phase (LCP) and Payload Release (PLR) Phase), both algorithms were assessed with Monte Carlo batch simulations for both of the phases. The statistical outcomes of the results demonstrate a 100 percent success rate for Quaternion Feedback Regulation, and support the choice of this method.

  14. Costs of encephalization: the energy trade-off hypothesis tested on birds.

    PubMed

    Isler, Karin; van Schaik, Carel

    2006-09-01

    Costs and benefits of encephalization are a major topic of debate in the study of primate and human evolution. Comparative studies provide an opportunity to test the validity of a hypothesis as a general principle, rather than it being a special case in primate or hominid evolution. If a population evolves a larger brain, the metabolic costs of doing so must be paid for by either an increased energy turnover (direct metabolic constraint) or by a trade-off with other energetically expensive costs of body maintenance, locomotion, or reproduction, here referred to as the energy trade-off hypothesis, an extension of the influential Expensive Tissue Hypothesis of Aiello and Wheeler (1995, Curr. Anthropol. 36, 199-221). In the present paper, we tested these hypotheses on birds using raw species values, family means, and independent contrasts analysis to account for phylogenetic influences. First, we tested whether basal metabolic rates are correlated with brain mass or any other variable of interest. This not being the case, we examined various trade-offs between brain mass and the mass of other expensive tissues such as gut mass, which is approximated by gut length or diet quality. Only weak support was found for this original Expensive Tissue Hypothesis in birds. However, other energy allocations such as locomotor mode and reproductive strategy may also be reduced to shunt energy to an enlarged brain. We found a significantly negative correlation between brain mass and pectoral muscle mass, which averages 18% of body mass in birds and is indicative of their relative costs of flight. Reproductive costs, on the other hand, are positively correlated with brain mass in birds. An increase in brain mass may allow birds to devote more energy to reproduction, although not through an increase in their own energy budget as in mammals, but through direct provisioning of their offspring. The trade-off between locomotor costs and brain mass in birds lets us conclude that an

  15. The growth-defense trade-off and habitat specialization by plants in Amazonian forests.

    PubMed

    Fine, Paul V A; Miller, Zachariah J; Mesones, Italo; Irazuzta, Sebastian; Appel, Heidi M; Stevens, M Henry H; Sääksjärvi, Ilari; Schultz, Jack C; Coley, Phyllis D

    2006-07-01

    Tropical forests include a diversity of habitats, which has led to specialization in plants. Near Iquitos, in the Peruvian Amazon, nutrient-rich clay forests surround nutrient-poor white-sand forests, each harboring a unique composition of habitat specialist trees. We tested the hypothesis that the combination of impoverished soils and herbivory creates strong natural selection for plant defenses in white-sand forest, while rapid growth is favored in clay forests. Recently, we reported evidence from a reciprocal-transplant experiment that manipulated the presence of herbivores and involved 20 species from six genera, including phylogenetically independent pairs of closely related white-sand and clay specialists. When protected from herbivores, clay specialists exhibited faster growth rates than white-sand specialists in both habitats. But, when unprotected, white-sand specialists outperformed clay specialists in white-sand habitat, and clay specialists outperformed white-sand specialists in clay habitat. Here we test further the hypothesis that the growth defense trade-off contributes to habitat specialization by comparing patterns of growth, herbivory, and defensive traits in these same six genera of white-sand and clay specialists. While the probability of herbivore attack did not differ between the two habitats, an artificial defoliation experiment showed that the impact of herbivory on plant mortality was significantly greater in white-sand forests. We quantified the amount of terpenes, phenolics, leaf toughness, and available foliar protein for the plants in the experiment. Different genera invested in different defensive strategies, and we found strong evidence for phylogenetic constraint in defense type. Overall, however, we found significantly higher total defense investment for white-sand specialists, relative to their clay specialist congeners. Furthermore, herbivore resistance consistently exhibited a significant trade-off against growth rate in each of

  16. Trade-offs among ecosystem services in a typical Karst watershed, SW China.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yichao; Wang, Shijie; Bai, Xiaoyong; Luo, Guangjie; Xu, Yan

    2016-10-01

    Nowadays, most research results on ecosystem services in Karst areas are limited to a single function of an ecosystem service. Few scholars conduct a comparative study on the mutual relationships among ecosystem services, let alone reveal the trade-off and synergic relationships in typical Karst watershed. This research aims to understand and quantitatively evaluate the relationships among ecosystem services in a typical Karst watershed, broaden the depth and width of trade-off and synergic relationships in ecosystem services and explore a set of technical processes involved in these relationships. With the Shibantang Karst watershed in China as the research site, we explore the trade-off and synergic relationships of net primary productivity (NPP), water yield, and sediment yield by coupling Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) and Carnegie-Ames-Stanford Approach (CASA), and simulating and evaluating these three ecosystem services between 2000 and 2010. Results of this study are as follows. (1) The annual average water yield decreased from 528mm in 2000 to 513mm in 2010, decreasing by 2.84%. (2) The annual average sediment yield decreased from 26.15t/ha in 2000 to 23.81t/ha in 2010, with an average annual reduction of 0.23t/ha. (3) The annual average NPP increased from 739.38gCm(-2)a(-1) in 2000 to 746.25gCm(-2)a(-1) in 2010, increasing by 6.87gCm(-2)a(-1) . (4) Water yield and sediment yield are in a synergic relationship. The increase of water yield can accumulate the soil erosion amount. NPP is in a trade-off relationship with water yield and sediment yield. The improvement of NPP is good for decreasing water yield and soil erosion amount and increasing soil conservation amount. This study provides policy makers and planners an approach to develop an integrated model, as well as design mapping and monitoring protocols for land use change and ecosystem service assessments. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Science requirements and trade-offs for the MOSAIC instrument for the European ELT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, C. J.; Puech, M.; Rodrigues, M.; Barbuy, B.; Cuby, J.-G.; Dalton, G.; Fitzsimons, E.; Hammer, F.; Jagourel, P.; Kaper, L.; Morris, S. L.; Morris, T. J.

    2016-08-01

    Building on the comprehensive White Paper on the scientific case for multi-object spectroscopy on the European ELT, we present the top-level instrument requirements that are being used in the Phase A design study of the MOSAIC concept. The assembled cases span the full range of E-ELT science and generally require either `high multiplex' or 'high definition' observations to best exploit the excellent sensitivity and spatial performance of the telescope. We highlight some of the science studies that are now being used in trade-off studies to inform the capabilities of MOSAIC and its technical design.

  18. Size, gain and bandwidth trade-offs for wideband diamond dipole with AMC reflector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Chetan; Lepage, Anne Claire; Sarrazin, Julien; Begaud, Xavier

    2016-03-01

    Compact and directive ultra-wideband antennas are required in variety of applications. Directional wideband antennas can be designed by using a reflector to redirect the energy back in half space and increase the gain. Use of artificial magnetic conductors (AMC) as reflectors for antennas allows reduction in the thickness of an antenna using traditional perfect electrical conductors (PEC) reflectors. The lateral size of the reflector also has an important effect on the antenna performance. In this paper, we study the trade-offs involved in the design of an AMC used as a reflector for broadband diamond dipole antenna by simulating various sizes of the reflector.

  19. Towards an Optimal Noise Versus Resolution Trade-Off in Wind Scatterometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Brent A.

    2011-01-01

    A scatterometer is a radar that measures the normalized radar cross section sigma(sup 0) of the Earth's surface. Over the ocean this signal is related to the wind via the geophysical model function (GMF). The objective of wind scatterometry is to estimate the wind vector field from sigma(sup 0) measurements; however, there are many subtleties that complicate this problem-making it difficult to obtain a unique wind field estimate. Conventionally, wind estimation is split into two stages: a wind retrieval stage in which several ambiguous solutions are obtained, and an ambiguity removal stage in which ambiguities are chosen to produce an appropriate wind vector field estimate. The most common approach to wind field estimation is to grid the scatterometer swath into wind vector cells and estimate wind vector ambiguities independently for each cell. Then, field wise structure is imposed on the solution by an ambiguity selection routine. Although this approach is simple and practical, it neglects field wise structure in the retrieval step and does not account for the spatial correlation imposed by the sampling. This makes it difficult to develop a theoretically appropriate noise versus resolution trade-off using pointwise retrieval. Fieldwise structure may be imposed in the retrieval step using a model-based approach. However, this approach is generally only practical if a low order wind field model is applied, which may discard more information than is desired. Furthermore, model-based approaches do not account for the structure imposed by the sampling. A more general fieldwise approach is to estimate all the wind vectors for all the WVCs simultaneously from all the measurements. This approach can account for structure of the wind field as well as structure imposed by the sampling in the wind retrieval step. Williams and Long in 2010 developed a fieldwise retrieval method based on maximum a posteriori estimation (MAP). This MAP approach can be extended to perform a

  20. Trade-off results and preliminary designs of Near-Term Hybrid Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandberg, J. J.

    1980-01-01

    Phase I of the Near-Term Hybrid Vehicle Program involved the development of preliminary designs of electric/heat engine hybrid passenger vehicles. The preliminary designs were developed on the basis of mission analysis, performance specification, and design trade-off studies conducted independently by four contractors. THe resulting designs involve parallel hybrid (heat engine/electric) propulsion systems with significant variation in component selection, power train layout, and control strategy. Each of the four designs is projected by its developer as having the potential to substitute electrical energy for 40% to 70% of the petroleum fuel consumed annually by its conventional counterpart.

  1. Trade-off between information format and capacity in the olfactory system.

    PubMed

    Aldworth, Zane N; Stopfer, Mark A

    2015-01-28

    As information about the sensory environment passes between layers within the nervous system, the format of the information often changes. To examine how information format affects the capacity of neurons to represent stimuli, we measured the rate of information transmission in olfactory neurons in intact, awake locusts (Schistocerca americana) while pharmacologically manipulating patterns of correlated neuronal activity. Blocking the periodic inhibition underlying odor-elicited neural oscillatory synchronization increased information transmission rates. This suggests oscillatory synchrony, which serves other information processing roles, comes at a cost to the speed with which neurons can transmit information. Our results provide an example of a trade-off between benefits and costs in neural information processing.

  2. The generality of leaf size versus number trade-off in temperate woody species.

    PubMed

    Yang, Dongmei; Li, Guoyong; Sun, Shucun

    2008-10-01

    Trade-offs are fundamental to life-history theory, and the leaf size vs. number trade-off has recently been suggested to be of importance to our understanding leaf size evolution. The purpose of the present study was to test whether the isometric, negative relationship between leaf size and number found by Kleiman and Aarssen is conserved between plant functional types and between habitats. Leaf mass, area and number, and stem mass and volume of current-year shoots were measured for 107 temperate broadleaved woody species at two altitudes on Gongga Mountain, south-west China. The scaling relationships of leaf size (leaf area and mass) vs. (mass- and volume-based) leafing intensity were analysed in relation to leaf habit, leaf form and habitat type. Trait relationships were determined with both a standardized major axis method and a phylogenetically independent comparative method. Significant negative, isometric scaling relationships between leaf size and leafing intensity were found to be consistently conserved across species independent of leaf habit, leaf form and habitat type. In particular, about 99 % of the variation in leaf mass across species could be accounted for by proportional variation in mass-based leafing intensity. The negative correlations between leaf size and leafing intensity were also observed across correlated evolutionary divergences. However, evergreen species had a lower y-intercept in the scaling relationships of leaf area vs. leafing intensity than deciduous species. This indicated that leaf area was smaller in the evergreen species at a given leafing intensity than in the deciduous species. The compound-leaved deciduous species were observed usually to have significant upper shifts along the common slopes relative to the simple-leaved species, which suggested that the compound-leaved species were larger in leaf size but smaller in leafing intensity than their simple counterparts. No significant difference was found in the scaling

  3. Universal Trade-Off Relation between Power and Efficiency for Heat Engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiraishi, Naoto; Saito, Keiji; Tasaki, Hal

    2016-11-01

    For a general thermodynamic system described as a Markov process, we prove a general lower bound for dissipation in terms of the square of the heat current, thus establishing that nonvanishing current inevitably implies dissipation. This leads to a universal trade-off relation between efficiency and power, with which we rigorously prove that a heat engine with nonvanishing power never attains the Carnot efficiency. Our theory applies to systems arbitrarily far from equilibrium, and does not assume any specific symmetry of the model.

  4. Analysis of potential trade-offs in regulation of disinfection by-products

    SciTech Connect

    Cromwell, J.E.; Zhang, X.; Regli, S.; Macler, B.

    1992-11-01

    Executive Order 12291 requires the preparation of a Regulatory Impact Analysis (RIA) on all new major federal regulations. The goal of an RIA is to develop and organize information on benefits, costs, and economic impacts so as to clarify trade-offs among alternative regulatory options. This paper outlines explicit methodology for assessing the technical potential for risk-risk tradeoffs. The strategies used to cope with complexities and uncertainties in developing the Disinfection By-Products Regulatory Analysis Model are explained. Results are presented and discussed in light of uncertainties, and in light of the analytical requirements for regulatory impact analysis.

  5. Assessment of plantar pressure and balance in patients with diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Anjos, Daniela M.C.; Gomes, Luciana P.O.; Sampaio, Luciana M.M.; Correa, João C.F.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Patients with diabetes for more than 10 years may have an increase in peak plantar pressure, considerable postural oscillation, balance deficit, alterations in gait pattern and an increased risk of falls. The aim of the present study was to assess the correlation between plantar pressure distribution and balance in patients with diabetes using a pressure platform (Footwork). Material and methods The study was carried out at the Human Movement Clinic of the Centro Universitário de Belo Horizonte (Brazil). The sample was made up of 18 right-handed individuals with type 2 diabetes – 14 females and 4 males – with an average age of 58.72 ±9.54 and an average of 18.56 ±6.61 years since diagnosis. Result Data analysis revealed that greater peak plantar pressure on the right hindfoot led to greater radial displacement (Rd) (r = 0.2022) and greater displacement velocity (r = 0.2240). Greater peak plantar pressure on the left hindfoot also led to greater displacement velocity (P) (r = 0.5728) and radial displacement (RD) (r = 0.1972). A positive correlation was found between time elapsed since diagnosis and peak midfoot pressure (r = 0.3752) on the right and left side as well as between BMI and plantar pressure on all regions of the foot. Conclusions The data reveal a correlation between postural oscillation and peak plantar pressure on the hindfoot. PMID:22371719

  6. Pressure Balanced, Low Hysteresis Finger Seal Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arora, Gul K.; Proctor, Margaret; Steinetz, Bruce M.; Delgado, Irebert R.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this presentation is to demonstrate: low cost photoetching fabrication technique; pressure balanced finger seal design; and finger seal operation. The tests and analyses includes: finger seal air leakage analysis; rotor-run out and endurance tests; and extensive analytical work and rig testing.

  7. Trade-Off between Bile Resistance and Nutritional Competence Drives Escherichia coli Diversification in the Mouse Gut

    PubMed Central

    De Paepe, Marianne; Gaboriau-Routhiau, Valérie; Rainteau, Dominique; Rakotobe, Sabine; Taddei, François; Cerf-Bensussan, Nadine

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial diversification is often observed, but underlying mechanisms are difficult to disentangle and remain generally unknown. Moreover, controlled diversification experiments in ecologically relevant environments are lacking. We studied bacterial diversification in the mammalian gut, one of the most complex bacterial environments, where usually hundreds of species and thousands of bacterial strains stably coexist. Herein we show rapid genetic diversification of an Escherichia coli strain upon colonisation of previously germ-free mice. In addition to the previously described mutations in the EnvZ/OmpR operon, we describe the rapid and systematic selection of mutations in the flagellar flhDC operon and in malT, the transcriptional activator of the maltose regulon. Moreover, within each mouse, the three mutant types coexisted at different levels after one month of colonisation. By combining in vivo studies and determination of the fitness advantages of the selected mutations in controlled in vitro experiments, we provide evidence that the selective forces that drive E. coli diversification in the mouse gut are the presence of bile salts and competition for nutrients. Altogether our results indicate that a trade-off between stress resistance and nutritional competence generates sympatric diversification of the gut microbiota. These results illustrate how experimental evolution in natural environments enables identification of both the selective pressures that organisms face in their natural environment and the diversification mechanisms. PMID:21698140

  8. A phase transition model for the speed-accuracy trade-off in response time experiments.

    PubMed

    Dutilh, Gilles; Wagenmakers, Eric-Jan; Visser, Ingmar; van der Maas, Han L J

    2011-03-01

    Most models of response time (RT) in elementary cognitive tasks implicitly assume that the speed-accuracy trade-off is continuous: When payoffs or instructions gradually increase the level of speed stress, people are assumed to gradually sacrifice response accuracy in exchange for gradual increases in response speed. This trade-off presumably operates over the entire range from accurate but slow responding to fast but chance-level responding (i.e., guessing). In this article, we challenge the assumption of continuity and propose a phase transition model for RTs and accuracy. Analogous to the fast guess model (Ollman, 1966), our model postulates two modes of processing: a guess mode and a stimulus-controlled mode. From catastrophe theory, we derive two important predictions that allow us to test our model against the fast guess model and against the popular class of sequential sampling models. The first prediction--hysteresis in the transitions between guessing and stimulus-controlled behavior--was confirmed in an experiment that gradually changed the reward for speed versus accuracy. The second prediction--bimodal RT distributions--was confirmed in an experiment that required participants to respond in a way that is intermediate between guessing and accurate responding.

  9. The person-trade-off approach to valuing health care programs.

    PubMed

    Nord, E

    1995-01-01

    The person-trade-off technique is a way of estimating the social values of different health care interventions. Basically it consists in asking people how many outcomes of one kind they consider equivalent in social value to X outcomes of another kind. The paper outlines a number of the author's previous studies using the technique. The studies suggest that while the technique is theoretically appealing for resource-allocation purposes, it is in practice quite demanding. It needs to be applied in fairly large groups of subjects to keep random measurement error at an acceptable level. Possible framing effects include the effects of argument presentation and the choice of start points in numerical exercises. To control for these effects, it seems important to take subjects through a multistep procedure, in which they are induced to carefully consider the various arguments that might be relevant in each exercise and to reconsider initial responses in the light of their implications. The investigator must also think through which decision context he or she wishes to study and make his or her choice of context very clear when reporting the results. In spite of these problems, the person-trade-off technique deserves greater attention in the field of cost-utility analysis.

  10. Androgens predict parasitism in female meerkats: a new perspective on a classic trade-off.

    PubMed

    Smyth, Kendra N; Greene, Lydia K; Clutton-Brock, Tim; Drea, Christine M

    2016-10-01

    The immunocompetence handicap hypothesis posits that androgens in males can be a 'double-edged sword', actively promoting reproductive success, while also negatively impacting health. Because there can be both substantial androgen concentrations in females and significant androgenic variation among them, particularly in species portraying female social dominance over males or intense female-female competition, androgens might also play a role in mediating female health and fitness. We examined this hypothesis in the meerkat (Suricata suricatta), a cooperatively breeding, social carnivoran characterized by aggressively mediated female social dominance and extreme rank-related reproductive skew. Dominant females also have greater androgen concentrations and harbour greater parasite loads than their subordinate counterparts, but the relationship between concurrent androgen concentrations and parasite burdens is unknown. We found that a female's faecal androgen concentrations reliably predicted her concurrent state of endoparasitism irrespective of her social status: parasite species richness and infection by Spirurida nematodes, Oxynema suricattae, Pseudandrya suricattae and coccidia were greater with greater androgen concentrations. Based on gastrointestinal parasite burdens, females appear to experience the same trade-off in the costs and benefits of raised androgens as do the males of many species. This trade-off presumably represents a health cost of sexual selection operating in females.

  11. Second-generation mobile satellite system. A conceptual design and trade-off study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sue, M. K.; Park, Y. H.

    1985-01-01

    In recent years, interest has grown in the mobile satellite (MSAT) system, a satellite-based communications system capable of providing integrated voice and data services to a large number of users. To explore the potential of a commercial mobile satellite system (MSS) beyond the horizon of the first generation, using technologies of the 1990's and to assist MSAT-X in directing its efforts, a conceptual design has been performed for a second-generation system to be launched around the mid-1990's. The design goal is to maximize the number of satellite channels and/or minimize the overall life-cycle cost, subject to the constraint of utilizing a commercial satellite bus with minimum modifications. To provide an optimal design, a series of trade-offs are performed, including antenna sizing, feed configurations, and interference analysis. Interference is a serious problem for MSAT and often an overlapping feed design is required to reduce interbeam interference. The trade-off studies will show that a simple non-overlapping feed is sufficient for the second-generation system, thus avoiding the need for the complicated beam-forming network that is associated with the overlapping feed designs. In addition, a system that operates at L-band, an alternative frequency band that is being considered by some for possible MSAT applications, is also presented.

  12. Robust Satisficing Linear Regression: performance/robustness trade-off and consistency criterion

    PubMed Central

    Zacksenhouse, Miriam; Nemets, Simona; Lebedev, Mikhail A.; Nicolelis, Miguel A.L.

    2009-01-01

    Linear regression quantifies the linear relationship between paired sets of input and output observations. The well known least-squares regression optimizes the performance criterion defined by the residual error, but is highly sensitive to uncertainties or perturbations in the observations. Robust least-squares algorithms have been developed to optimize the worst case performance for a given limit on the level of uncertainty, but they are applicable only when that limit is known. Herein, we present a robust-satisficing approach that maximizes the robustness to uncertainties in the observations, while satisficing a critical sub-optimal level of performance. The method emphasizes the trade-off between performance and robustness, which are inversely correlated. To resolve the resulting trade-off we introduce a new criterion, which assesses the consistency between the observations and the linear model. The proposed criterion determines a unique robust-satisficing regression and reveals the underlying level of uncertainty in the observations with only weak assumptions. These algorithms are demonstrated for the challenging application of linear regression to neural decoding for brain-machine interfaces. The model-consistent robust-satisfying regression provides superior performance for new observations under both similar and different conditions. PMID:20161510

  13. Trade-offs in experimental designs for estimating post-release mortality in containment studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rogers, Mark W.; Barbour, Andrew B; Wilson, Kyle L

    2014-01-01

    Estimates of post-release mortality (PRM) facilitate accounting for unintended deaths from fishery activities and contribute to development of fishery regulations and harvest quotas. The most popular method for estimating PRM employs containers for comparing control and treatment fish, yet guidance for experimental design of PRM studies with containers is lacking. We used simulations to evaluate trade-offs in the number of containers (replicates) employed versus the number of fish-per container when estimating tagging mortality. We also investigated effects of control fish survival and how among container variation in survival affects the ability to detect additive mortality. Simulations revealed that high experimental effort was required when: (1) additive treatment mortality was small, (2) control fish mortality was non-negligible, and (3) among container variability in control fish mortality exceeded 10% of the mean. We provided programming code to allow investigators to compare alternative designs for their individual scenarios and expose trade-offs among experimental design options. Results from our simulations and simulation code will help investigators develop efficient PRM experimental designs for precise mortality assessment.

  14. Trade-offs between driving nodes and time-to-control in complex networks

    PubMed Central

    Pequito, Sérgio; Preciado, Victor M.; Barabási, Albert-László; Pappas, George J.

    2017-01-01

    Recent advances in control theory provide us with efficient tools to determine the minimum number of driving (or driven) nodes to steer a complex network towards a desired state. Furthermore, we often need to do it within a given time window, so it is of practical importance to understand the trade-offs between the minimum number of driving/driven nodes and the minimum time required to reach a desired state. Therefore, we introduce the notion of actuation spectrum to capture such trade-offs, which we used to find that in many complex networks only a small fraction of driving (or driven) nodes is required to steer the network to a desired state within a relatively small time window. Furthermore, our empirical studies reveal that, even though synthetic network models are designed to present structural properties similar to those observed in real networks, their actuation spectra can be dramatically different. Thus, it supports the need to develop new synthetic network models able to replicate controllability properties of real-world networks. PMID:28054597

  15. Beyond size–number trade-offs: clutch size as a maternal effect

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Gregory P.; Shine, Richard

    2009-01-01

    Traditionally, research on life-history traits has viewed the link between clutch size and offspring size as a straightforward linear trade-off; the product of these two components is taken as a measure of maternal reproductive output. Investing more per egg results in fewer but larger eggs and, hence, offspring. This simple size–number trade-off has proved attractive to modellers, but our experimental studies on keelback snakes (Tropidonophis mairii, Colubridae) reveal a more complex relationship between clutch size and offspring size. At constant water availability, the amount of water taken up by a snake egg depends upon the number of adjacent eggs. In turn, water uptake affects hatchling size, and therefore an increase in clutch size directly increases offspring size (and thus fitness under field conditions). This allometric advantage may influence the evolution of reproductive traits such as growth versus reproductive effort, optimal age at female maturation, the body-reserve threshold required to initiate reproduction and nest-site selection (e.g. communal oviposition). The published literature suggests that similar kinds of complex effects of clutch size on offspring viability are widespread in both vertebrates and invertebrates. Our results also challenge conventional experimental methodologies such as split-clutch designs for laboratory incubation studies: by separating an egg from its siblings, we may directly affect offspring size and thus viability. PMID:19324614

  16. Examining current or future trade-offs for biodiversity conservation in north-eastern Australia.

    PubMed

    Reside, April E; VanDerWal, Jeremy; Moilanen, Atte; Graham, Erin M

    2017-01-01

    With the high rate of ecosystem change already occurring and predicted to occur in the coming decades, long-term conservation has to account not only for current biodiversity but also for the biodiversity patterns anticipated for the future. The trade-offs between prioritising future biodiversity at the expense of current priorities must be understood to guide current conservation planning, but have been largely unexplored. To fill this gap, we compared the performance of four conservation planning solutions involving 662 vertebrate species in the Wet Tropics Natural Resource Management Cluster Region in north-eastern Australia. Input species data for the four planning solutions were: 1) current distributions; 2) projected distributions for 2055; 3) projected distributions for 2085; and 4) current, 2055 and 2085 projected distributions, and the connectivity between each of the three time periods for each species. The four planning solutions were remarkably similar (up to 85% overlap), suggesting that modelling for either current or future scenarios is sufficient for conversation planning for this region, with little obvious trade-off. Our analyses also revealed that overall, species with small ranges occurring across steep elevation gradients and at higher elevations were more likely to be better represented in all solutions. Given that species with these characteristics are of high conservation significance, our results provide confidence that conservation planning focused on either current, near- or distant-future biodiversity will account for these species.

  17. Unified trade-off optimization for general heat devices with nonisothermal processes.

    PubMed

    Long, Rui; Liu, Wei

    2015-04-01

    An analysis of the efficiency and coefficient of performance (COP) for general heat engines and refrigerators with nonisothermal processes is conducted under the trade-off criterion. The specific heat of the working medium has significant impacts on the optimal configurations of heat devices. For cycles with constant specific heat, the bounds of the efficiency and COP are found to be the same as those obtained through the endoreversible Carnot ones. However, they are independent of the cycle time durations. For cycles with nonconstant specific heat, whose dimensionless contact time approaches infinity, the general alternative upper and lower bounds of the efficiency and COP under the trade-off criteria have been proposed under the asymmetric limits. Furthermore, when the dimensionless contact time approaches zero, the endoreversible Carnot model is recovered. In addition, the efficiency and COP bounds of different kinds of actual heat engines and refrigerators have also been analyzed. This paper may provide practical insight for designing and operating actual heat engines and refrigerators.

  18. The teaching/research trade-off in law: data from the right tail.

    PubMed

    Ginsburg, Tom; Miles, Thomas J

    2015-02-01

    There is a long scholarly debate on the trade-off between research and teaching in various fields, but relatively little study of the phenomenon in law. This analysis examines the relationship between the two core academic activities at one particular school, the University of Chicago Law School, which is considered one of the most productive in legal academia. We measure of scholarly productivity with the total number of publications by each professor for each year, and we approximate performance in teaching with course loads and average scores in student evaluations for each course. In OLS regressions, we estimate scholarly output as a function of teaching loads, faculty characteristics, and other controls. We also estimate teaching evaluation scores as a function of scholarly productivity, fixed effects for years and course subject, and faculty characteristics. Net of other factors, we find that, under some specifications, research and teaching are positively correlated. In particular, we find that students' perceptions of teaching quality rises, but at a decreasing rate, with the total amount of scholarship. We also find that certain personal characteristics correlate with productivity. The recent debate on the mission of American law schools has hinged on the assumption that a trade-off exists between teaching and research, and this article's analysis, although limited in various ways, casts some doubt on that assumption. © The Author(s) 2014.

  19. Foraging decisions in a capital breeder: trade-offs between mass gain and lactation.

    PubMed

    Hamel, Sandra; Côté, Steeve D

    2009-08-01

    The high energetic costs of lactation can lead to fundamental trade-offs in life-history traits, particularly in young females that reproduce before completing body growth. We assessed whether lactating female mountain goats (Oreamnos americanus) used behavioural tactics at fine spatio-temporal scales to increase energy intake to compensate for the costs of lactation. Lactating females increased bite rate and chewing rate compared with non-lactating females, but selected similar foraging sites in terms of plant quality and abundance. At peak lactation, forage intake of lactating females was >40% greater than that of non-lactating females. For females that had reached asymptotic body mass (i.e. > or =6 years old), summer mass gain of lactating females was similar to that of non-lactating females. At 4 and 5 years of age, however, daily mass gain of lactating females was about 20% lower than that of non-lactating females. We conclude that increased foraging may allow fully-grown lactating females to compensate for the energetic costs of lactation, but that there is a major trade-off between mass gain and lactation for younger females.

  20. Unified trade-off optimization for general heat devices with nonisothermal processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Rui; Liu, Wei

    2015-04-01

    An analysis of the efficiency and coefficient of performance (COP) for general heat engines and refrigerators with nonisothermal processes is conducted under the trade-off criterion. The specific heat of the working medium has significant impacts on the optimal configurations of heat devices. For cycles with constant specific heat, the bounds of the efficiency and COP are found to be the same as those obtained through the endoreversible Carnot ones. However, they are independent of the cycle time durations. For cycles with nonconstant specific heat, whose dimensionless contact time approaches infinity, the general alternative upper and lower bounds of the efficiency and COP under the trade-off criteria have been proposed under the asymmetric limits. Furthermore, when the dimensionless contact time approaches zero, the endoreversible Carnot model is recovered. In addition, the efficiency and COP bounds of different kinds of actual heat engines and refrigerators have also been analyzed. This paper may provide practical insight for designing and operating actual heat engines and refrigerators.

  1. Trade-Offs between the Metabolic Rate and Population Density of Plants

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Jian-Ming; Li, Tao; Wang, Gen-Xuan; Liu, Jing; Yu, Ze-Long; Zhao, Chang-Ming; Ji, Ming-Fei; Zhang, Qiang; Liu, Jian-quan

    2008-01-01

    The energetic equivalence rule, which is based on a combination of metabolic theory and the self-thinning rule, is one of the fundamental laws of nature. However, there is a progressively increasing body of evidence that scaling relationships of metabolic rate vs. body mass and population density vs. body mass are variable and deviate from their respective theoretical values of 3/4 and −3/4 or −2/3. These findings questioned the previous hypotheses of energetic equivalence rule in plants. Here we examined the allometric relationships between photosynthetic mass (Mp) or leaf mass (ML) vs. body mass (β); population density vs. body mass (δ); and leaf mass vs. population density, for desert shrubs, trees, and herbaceous plants, respectively. As expected, the allometric relationships for both photosynthetic mass (i.e. metabolic rate) and population density varied with the environmental conditions. However, the ratio between the two exponents was −1 (i.e. β/δ = −1) and followed the trade-off principle when local resources were limited. Our results demonstrate for the first time that the energetic equivalence rule of plants is based on trade-offs between the variable metabolic rate and population density rather than their constant allometric exponents. PMID:18350139

  2. The adaptive dynamics of Lotka-Volterra systems with trade-offs.

    PubMed

    Bowers, Roger G; White, Andrew

    2002-02-01

    We analyse the adaptive dynamics of a generalised type of Lotka-Volterra model subject to an explicit trade-off between two parameters. A simple expression for the fitness of a mutant strategy in an environment determined by the established, resident strategy is obtained leading to general results for the position of the evolutionary singular strategy and the associated second-order partial derivatives of the mutant fitness with respect to the mutant and resident strategies. Combinations of these results can be used to determine the evolutionary behaviour of the system. The theory is motivated by an example of prey evolution in a predator-prey system in which results show that only (non-EUS) evolutionary repellor dynamics, where evolution is directed away from a singular strategy, or dynamics where the singular strategy is an evolutionary attractor, are possible. Moreover, the general theory can be used to show that these results are the only possibility for all Lotka-Volterra systems in which aside from the trade-offs all parameters are independent and in which the interaction terms are of quadratic order or less. The applicability of the theory is highlighted by examining the evolution of an intermediate predator in a tri-trophic model.

  3. Trade-off between competition and facilitation defines gap colonization in mountains

    PubMed Central

    Lembrechts, Jonas J.; Milbau, Ann; Nijs, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    Recent experimental observations show that gap colonization in small-stature (e.g. grassland and dwarf shrubs) vegetation strongly depends on the abiotic conditions within them. At the same time, within-gap variation in biotic interactions such as competition and facilitation, caused by distance to the gap edge, would affect colonizer performance, but a theoretical framework to explore such patterns is missing. Here, we model how competition, facilitation and environmental conditions together determine the small-scale patterns of gap colonization along a cold gradient in mountains, by simulating colonizer survival in gaps of various sizes. Our model adds another dimension to the known effects of biotic interactions along a stress gradient by focussing on the trade-off between competition and facilitation in the within-gap environment. We show that this trade-off defines a peak in colonizer survival at a specific distance from the gap edge, which progressively shifts closer to the edge as the environment gets colder, ultimately leaving a large fraction of gaps unsuitable for colonization in facilitation-dominated systems. This is reinforced when vegetation size and temperature amelioration are manipulated simultaneously with temperature in order to simulate an elevational gradient more realistically. Interestingly, all other conditions being equal, the magnitude of the realized survival peak was always lower in large than in small gaps, making large gaps harder to colonize. The model is relevant to predict effects of non-native plant invasions and climate warming on colonization processes in mountains. PMID:26558706

  4. Energy efficiency trade-offs drive nucleotide usage in transcribed regions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Hua; Lu, Guanting; Bork, Peer; Hu, Songnian; Lercher, Martin J

    2016-04-21

    Efficient nutrient usage is a trait under universal selection. A substantial part of cellular resources is spent on making nucleotides. We thus expect preferential use of cheaper nucleotides especially in transcribed sequences, which are often amplified thousand-fold compared with genomic sequences. To test this hypothesis, we derive a mutation-selection-drift equilibrium model for nucleotide skews (strand-specific usage of 'A' versus 'T' and 'G' versus 'C'), which explains nucleotide skews across 1,550 prokaryotic genomes as a consequence of selection on efficient resource usage. Transcription-related selection generally favours the cheaper nucleotides 'U' and 'C' at synonymous sites. However, the information encoded in mRNA is further amplified through translation. Due to unexpected trade-offs in the codon table, cheaper nucleotides encode on average energetically more expensive amino acids. These trade-offs apply to both strand-specific nucleotide usage and GC content, causing a universal bias towards the more expensive nucleotides 'A' and 'G' at non-synonymous coding sites.

  5. Fundamental rate-loss trade-off for the quantum internet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azuma, Koji; Mizutani, Akihiro; Lo, Hoi-Kwong

    2016-11-01

    The quantum internet holds promise for achieving quantum communication--such as quantum teleportation and quantum key distribution (QKD)--freely between any clients all over the globe, as well as for the simulation of the evolution of quantum many-body systems. The most primitive function of the quantum internet is to provide quantum entanglement or a secret key to two points efficiently, by using intermediate nodes connected by optical channels with each other. Here we derive a fundamental rate-loss trade-off for a quantum internet protocol, by generalizing the Takeoka-Guha-Wilde bound to be applicable to any network topology. This trade-off has essentially no scaling gap with the quantum communication efficiencies of protocols known to be indispensable to long-distance quantum communication, such as intercity QKD and quantum repeaters. Our result--putting a practical but general limitation on the quantum internet--enables us to grasp the potential of the future quantum internet.

  6. Costs and trade-offs of grazer-induced defenses in Scenedesmus under deficient resource

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xuexia; Wang, Jun; Chen, Qinwen; Chen, Ge; Huang, Yuan; Yang, Zhou

    2016-03-01

    The green alga Scenedesmus obliquus can form inducible defensive morphs under grazing threat. Costs and trade-offs of inducible defense are expected to accompany the benefits of defensive morphs, but are hard to detect under nutrient-sufficient experimental conditions. To test the existence of costs associated with inducible defense, we cultured S. obliquus along resource availability gradients in the presence or absence of infochemical cues from Daphnia, and measured the strength of defensive colony formation and fitness characters. Under the lowest phosphorous concentration, the expression of inducible defensive colony resulted in decreased growth rate, which provides direct evidence for physiological costs. Along the gradient reduction of phosphorous concentration or light intensity, inducible defense in S. obliquus showed a decreasing trend. However, the photosynthetic efficiency of S. obliquus was barely affected by its defense responses, suggesting that the negative correlations between resource availability and colony formation of this alga may be due to resource-based trade-offs in the allocation of limited resources. Thus, our results indicated that expression of inducible defense of S. obliquus was impaired under insufficient phosphorus or light. Furthermore, under severe phosphate deficiency, obvious physiological costs of inducible defense could be detected even though defensive colony formation also decreased significantly.

  7. Evolutionary trade-off between vocal tract and testes dimensions in howler monkeys.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Jacob C; Halenar, Lauren B; Davies, Thomas G; Cristobal-Azkarate, Jurgi; Reby, David; Sykes, Dan; Dengg, Sabine; Fitch, W Tecumseh; Knapp, Leslie A

    2015-11-02

    Males often face a trade-off between investments in precopulatory and postcopulatory traits [1], particularly when male-male contest competition determines access to mates [2]. To date, studies of precopulatory strategies have largely focused on visual ornaments (e.g., coloration) or weapon morphology (e.g., antlers, horns, and canines). However, vocalizations can also play an important role in both male competition and female choice [3-5]. We investigated variation in vocal tract dimensions among male howler monkeys (Alouatta spp.), which produce loud roars using a highly specialized and greatly enlarged hyoid bone and larynx [6]. We examined the relative male investment in hyoids and testes among howler monkey species in relation to the level of male-male competition and analyzed the acoustic consequences of variation in hyoid morphology. Species characterized by single-male groups have large hyoids and small testes, suggesting high levels of vocally mediated competition. Larger hyoids lower formant frequencies, probably increasing the acoustic impression of male body size and playing a role analogous to investment in large body size or weaponry. Across species, as the number of males per group increases, testes volume also increases, indicating higher levels of postcopulatory sperm competition, while hyoid volume decreases. These results provide the first evidence of an evolutionary trade-off between investment in precopulatory vocal characteristics and postcopulatory sperm production.

  8. Trading-off tolerable risk with climate change adaptation costs in water supply systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borgomeo, Edoardo; Mortazavi-Naeini, Mohammad; Hall, Jim W.; O'Sullivan, Michael J.; Watson, Tim

    2016-02-01

    Choosing secure water resource management plans inevitably requires trade-offs between risks (for a variety of stakeholders), costs, and other impacts. We have previously argued that water resources planning should focus upon metrics of risk of water restrictions, accompanied by extensive simulation and scenario-based exploration of uncertainty. However, the results of optimization subject to risk constraints can be sensitive to the specification of tolerable risk, which may not be precisely or consistently defined by different stakeholders. In this paper, we recast the water resources planning problem as a multiobjective optimization problem to identify least cost schemes that satisfy a set of criteria for tolerable risk, where tolerable risk is defined in terms of the frequency of water use restrictions of different levels of severity. Our proposed method links a very large ensemble of climate model projections to a water resource system model and a multiobjective optimization algorithm to identify a Pareto optimal set of water resource management plans across a 25 years planning period. In a case study application to the London water supply system, we identify water resources management plans that, for a given financial cost, maximize performance with respect to one or more probabilistic criteria. This illustrates trade-offs between financial costs of plans and risk, and between risk criteria for four different severities of water use restrictions. Graphical representation of alternative sequences of investments in the Pareto set helps to identify water management options for which there is a robust case for including them in the plan.

  9. Host-Size Mediated Trade-Off in a Parasitoid Sclerodermus harmandi

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhudong; Xu, Bingbing; Li, Li; Sun, Jianghua

    2011-01-01

    Optimality models of host-parasitoid relationships have traditionally assumed that host quality increases as a function of host size at parasitism. However, trade-offs may play a crucial role in species evolution and should be found in host-parasitoid interactions where the host quality may differ between different sizes. Here, we investigated the effects of host size differences of Monochamus alternatus larva on foraging decisions, parasitism and related fitness in a gregarious ectoparasitoid, Sclerodermus harmandi. Two-choice and non-choice experiments were conducted with M. alternatus larvae to evaluate preference and performance of S. harmandi, respectively. Results from two-choice test showed that adult females prefer to attack large larvae rather than small larvae. In no-choice tests, adult females needed more time to paralyze large larvae than small larvae before laying eggs on the body surface of M. alternatus larvae and had lower survival and parasitism rate on those large larvae. Foraging decisions of S. harmandi led to the selection of the most profitable host size for parasitoid development, which showed more offspring gained on large M. alternatus larvae than on small larvae and got higher body weight on those large hosts. This study demonstrates the existence of trade-off occurring during host-parasitoids interactions according to host size related quality. PMID:21853096

  10. Deriving tight error-trade-off relations for approximate joint measurements of incompatible quantum observables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Branciard, Cyril

    2014-02-01

    The quantification of the "measurement uncertainty"aspect of Heisenberg's uncertainty principle—that is, the study of trade-offs between accuracy and disturbance, or between accuracies in an approximate joint measurement on two incompatible observables—has regained a lot of interest recently. Several approaches have been proposed and debated. In this paper we consider Ozawa's definitions for inaccuracies (as root-mean-square errors) in approximate joint measurements, and study how these are constrained in different cases, whether one specifies certain properties of the approximations—namely their standard deviations and/or their bias—or not. Extending our previous work [C. Branciard, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 110, 6742 (2013), 10.1073/pnas.1219331110], we derive error-trade-off relations, which we prove to be tight for pure states. We show explicitly how all previously known relations for Ozawa's inaccuracies follow from ours. While our relations are in general not tight for mixed states, we show how these can be strengthened and how tight relations can still be obtained in that case.

  11. Ecosystem services of the Southern Ocean: trade-offs in decision-making.

    PubMed

    Grant, Susie M; Hill, Simeon L; Trathan, Philip N; Murphy, Eugene J

    2013-10-01

    Ecosystem services are the benefits that mankind obtains from natural ecosystems. Here we identify the key services provided by the Southern Ocean. These include provisioning of fishery products, nutrient cycling, climate regulation and the maintenance of biodiversity, with associated cultural and aesthetic benefits. Potential catch limits for Antarctic krill (Euphausia superba Dana) alone are equivalent to 11% of current global marine fisheries landings. We also examine the extent to which decision-making within the Antarctic Treaty System (ATS) considers trade-offs between ecosystem services, using the management of the Antarctic krill fishery as a case study. Management of this fishery considers a three-way trade-off between fisheries performance, the status of the krill stock and that of predator populations. However, there is a paucity of information on how well these components represent other ecosystem services that might be degraded as a result of fishing. There is also a lack of information on how beneficiaries value these ecosystem services. A formal ecosystem assessment would help to address these knowledge gaps. It could also help to harmonize decision-making across the ATS and promote global recognition of Southern Ocean ecosystem services by providing a standard inventory of the relevant ecosystem services and their value to beneficiaries.

  12. Health or Happiness? A Note on Trading Off Health and Happiness in Rationing Decisions.

    PubMed

    van de Wetering, E J; van Exel, N J A; Brouwer, W B F

    2016-01-01

    Economic evaluations typically value the effects of an intervention in terms of quality-adjusted life-years, which combine length and health-related quality of life. It has been suggested that economic evaluations should incorporate broader outcomes than health-related quality of life. Broader well-being, for instance measured as happiness, could be a better measure of the overall welfare effects in patients because of treatment. An underexplored question is whether and how people trade off information on health and broader outcomes from treatment in rationing decisions. This article presents the results of a first experiment aimed at exploring such trade-offs between health and happiness. We used a Web-based questionnaire in a representative sample of the public from the Netherlands (N = 1015). People made choices between two groups of patients differing in terms of their health and happiness levels before treatment and gains from treatment. The results showed that about half the respondents were willing to discriminate between patient groups on the basis of their health and happiness levels before and after treatment. In the trader group, health gains were considered somewhat more important than happiness gains. Our findings suggest that both health and happiness levels of patients may play a role in priority setting. Copyright © 2016 International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Global assessment of nitrogen losses and trade-offs with yields from major crop cultivations.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenfeng; Yang, Hong; Liu, Junguo; Azevedo, Ligia B; Wang, Xiuying; Xu, Zongxue; Abbaspour, Karim C; Schulin, Rainer

    2016-12-01

    Agricultural application of reactive nitrogen (N) for fertilization is a cause of massive negative environmental problems on a global scale. However, spatially explicit and crop-specific information on global N losses into the environment and knowledge of trade-offs between N losses and crop yields are largely lacking. We use a crop growth model, Python-based Environmental Policy Integrated Climate (PEPIC), to determine global N losses from three major food crops: maize, rice, and wheat. Simulated total N losses into the environment (including water and atmosphere) are 44TgNyr(-1). Two thirds of these, or 29TgNyr(-1), are losses to water alone. Rice accounts for the highest N losses, followed by wheat and maize. The N loss intensity (NLI), defined as N losses per unit of yield, is used to address trade-offs between N losses and crop yields. The NLI presents high variation among different countries, indicating diverse N losses to produce the same amount of yields. Simulations of mitigation scenarios indicate that redistributing global N inputs and improving N management could significantly abate N losses and at the same time even increase yields without any additional total N inputs.

  14. Trade-off between mating opportunities and parental care: brood desertion by female Kentish plovers.

    PubMed

    Székely, T; Cuthill, I C

    2000-10-22

    Why do some parents care for their young whereas others divorce from their mate and abandon their offspring? This decision is governed by the trade-off between the value of the current breeding event and future breeding prospects. In the precocial Kentish plover Charadrius alexandrinus females frequently, but not always, abandon their broods to be cared for by their mate, and seek new breeding partners within the same season. We have shown previously that females' remating opportunities decline with date in the season, so brood desertion should be particularly favourable for early breeding females. However, the benefits are tempered by the fact that single-parent families have lower survival expectancies than those where the female remains to help the male care for the young. We therefore tested the prediction that increasing the value of the current brood (by brood-size manipulation) should increase the duration of female care early in the season, but that in late breeders, with reduced remating opportunities, desertion and thus the duration of female care should be independent of current brood size. These predictions were fulfilled, indicating that seasonally modulated trade-offs between current brood value and remating opportunities can be important in the desertion decisions of species with flexible patterns of parental care.

  15. Trade-off between mating opportunities and parental care: brood desertion by female Kentish plovers.

    PubMed Central

    Székely, T; Cuthill, I C

    2000-01-01

    Why do some parents care for their young whereas others divorce from their mate and abandon their offspring? This decision is governed by the trade-off between the value of the current breeding event and future breeding prospects. In the precocial Kentish plover Charadrius alexandrinus females frequently, but not always, abandon their broods to be cared for by their mate, and seek new breeding partners within the same season. We have shown previously that females' remating opportunities decline with date in the season, so brood desertion should be particularly favourable for early breeding females. However, the benefits are tempered by the fact that single-parent families have lower survival expectancies than those where the female remains to help the male care for the young. We therefore tested the prediction that increasing the value of the current brood (by brood-size manipulation) should increase the duration of female care early in the season, but that in late breeders, with reduced remating opportunities, desertion and thus the duration of female care should be independent of current brood size. These predictions were fulfilled, indicating that seasonally modulated trade-offs between current brood value and remating opportunities can be important in the desertion decisions of species with flexible patterns of parental care. PMID:11416913

  16. Nonlinear trade-offs allow the cooperation game to evolve from Prisoner's Dilemma to Snowdrift.

    PubMed

    Chao, Lin; Elena, Santiago F

    2017-05-17

    The existence of cooperation, or the production of public goods, is an evolutionary problem. Cooperation is not favoured because the Prisoner's Dilemma (PD) game drives cooperators to extinction. We have re-analysed this problem by using RNA viruses to motivate a model for the evolution of cooperation. Gene products are the public goods and group size is the number of virions co-infecting the same host cell. Our results show that if the trade-off between replication and production of gene products is linear, PD is observed. However, if the trade-off is nonlinear, the viruses evolve into separate lineages of ultra-defectors and ultra-cooperators as group size is increased. The nonlinearity was justified by the existence of real viral ultra-defectors, known as defective interfering particles, which gain a nonlinear advantage by being smaller. The evolution of ultra-defectors and ultra-cooperators creates the Snowdrift game, which promotes high-level production of public goods. © 2017 The Author(s).

  17. Industrial-strength ecology: trade-offs and opportunities in algal biofuel production.

    PubMed

    Shurin, Jonathan B; Abbott, Rachel L; Deal, Michael S; Kwan, Garfield T; Litchman, Elena; McBride, Robert C; Mandal, Shovon; Smith, Val H

    2013-11-01

    Microalgae represent one of the most promising groups of candidate organisms for replacing fossil fuels with contemporary primary production as a renewable source of energy. Algae can produce many times more biomass per unit area than terrestrial crop plants, easing the competing demands for land with food crops and native ecosystems. However, several aspects of algal biology present unique challenges to the industrial-scale aquaculture of photosynthetic microorganisms. These include high susceptibility to invading aquatic consumers and weeds, as well as prodigious requirements for nutrients that may compete with the fertiliser demands of other crops. Most research on algal biofuel technologies approaches these problems from a cellular or genetic perspective, attempting either to engineer or select algal strains with particular traits. However, inherent functional trade-offs may limit the capacity of genetic selection or synthetic biology to simultaneously optimise multiple functional traits for biofuel productivity and resilience. We argue that a community engineering approach that manages microalgal diversity, species composition and environmental conditions may lead to more robust and productive biofuel ecosystems. We review evidence for trade-offs, challenges and opportunities in algal biofuel cultivation with a goal of guiding research towards intensifying bioenergy production using established principles of community and ecosystem ecology.

  18. The landscape model: A model for exploring trade-offs between agricultural production and the environment.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Kevin; Muhammed, Shibu E; Milne, Alice E; Todman, Lindsay C; Dailey, A Gordon; Glendining, Margaret J; Whitmore, Andrew P

    2017-12-31

    We describe a model framework that simulates spatial and temporal interactions in agricultural landscapes and that can be used to explore trade-offs between production and environment so helping to determine solutions to the problems of sustainable food production. Here we focus on models of agricultural production, water movement and nutrient flow in a landscape. We validate these models against data from two long-term experiments, (the first a continuous wheat experiment and the other a permanent grass-land experiment) and an experiment where water and nutrient flow are measured from isolated catchments. The model simulated wheat yield (RMSE 20.3-28.6%), grain N (RMSE 21.3-42.5%) and P (RMSE 20.2-29% excluding the nil N plots), and total soil organic carbon particularly well (RMSE3.1-13.8%), the simulations of water flow were also reasonable (RMSE 180.36 and 226.02%). We illustrate the use of our model framework to explore trade-offs between production and nutrient losses. Copyright © 2017 Rothamsted Research. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Is There a Trade-Off between Radiation-Stimulated Growth and Metabolic Efficiency?

    PubMed

    Mitz, Charles; Thome, Christopher; Cybulski, Mary Ellen; Somers, Christopher M; Manzon, Richard G; Wilson, Joanna Y; Boreham, Douglas R

    2017-09-06

    Beneficial protective effects may result from an adaptive respose to low dose radiation exposure. However, such benefits must be accompanied by some form of cost because the responsible biological mechanisms are not normally maintained in an upregulated state. It has been suggested that stimulation of adaptive response mechanisms could be metabolically costly, or that the adaptive response could come at a sacrifice to other physiological processes. We exposed developing lake whitefish embryos to a fractionated regime of gamma radiation (662 keV; 0.3 Gy min(-1)) to determine whether radiation-stimulated growth was accompanied by a trade-off in metabolic efficiency. Developing embryos were exposed at the eyed stage to different radiation doses delivered in four fractions, ranging from 15 mGy to 8 Gy per fraction, with a 14 day separation between dose fractions. Dry weight and standard length measurements were taken 2-5 weeks after delivery of the final radiation exposure and yolk conversion efficiency was estimated by comparing the unpreserved dry weight of the yolk to the unpreserved yolk-free dry weight of the embryos and normalizing for size-related differences in somatic maintenance. Our results show that the irradiated embryos were 8-10% heavier than the controls but yolk conversion efficiency was slightly improved. This finding demonstrates that stimulated growth in developing lake whitefish embryos is not "paid for" by a trade-off in the efficiency of yolk conversion.

  20. Costs and trade-offs of grazer-induced defenses in Scenedesmus under deficient resource

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xuexia; Wang, Jun; Chen, Qinwen; Chen, Ge; Huang, Yuan; Yang, Zhou

    2016-01-01

    The green alga Scenedesmus obliquus can form inducible defensive morphs under grazing threat. Costs and trade-offs of inducible defense are expected to accompany the benefits of defensive morphs, but are hard to detect under nutrient-sufficient experimental conditions. To test the existence of costs associated with inducible defense, we cultured S. obliquus along resource availability gradients in the presence or absence of infochemical cues from Daphnia, and measured the strength of defensive colony formation and fitness characters. Under the lowest phosphorous concentration, the expression of inducible defensive colony resulted in decreased growth rate, which provides direct evidence for physiological costs. Along the gradient reduction of phosphorous concentration or light intensity, inducible defense in S. obliquus showed a decreasing trend. However, the photosynthetic efficiency of S. obliquus was barely affected by its defense responses, suggesting that the negative correlations between resource availability and colony formation of this alga may be due to resource-based trade-offs in the allocation of limited resources. Thus, our results indicated that expression of inducible defense of S. obliquus was impaired under insufficient phosphorus or light. Furthermore, under severe phosphate deficiency, obvious physiological costs of inducible defense could be detected even though defensive colony formation also decreased significantly. PMID:26932369

  1. Trade-off between warning signal efficacy and mating success in the wood tiger moth

    PubMed Central

    Nokelainen, Ossi; Hegna, Robert H.; Reudler, Joanneke H.; Lindstedt, Carita; Mappes, Johanna

    2012-01-01

    The coloration of species can have multiple functions, such as predator avoidance and sexual signalling, that directly affect fitness. As selection should favour traits that positively affect fitness, the genes underlying the trait should reach fixation, thereby preventing the evolution of polymorphisms. This is particularly true for aposematic species that rely on coloration as a warning signal to advertise their unprofitability to predators. Nonetheless, there are numerous examples of aposematic species showing remarkable colour polymorphisms. We examined whether colour polymorphism in the wood tiger moth is maintained by trade-offs between different functions of coloration. In Finland, males of this species have two distinct colour morphs: white and yellow. The efficacy of the warning signal of these morphs was tested by offering them to blue tits in the laboratory. Birds hesitated significantly longer to attack yellow than white males. In a field experiment, the survival of the yellow males was also higher than white males. However, mating experiments in the laboratory revealed that yellow males had lower mating success than white males. Our results offer an explanation for the maintenance of polymorphism via trade-off between survival selection and mating success. PMID:21653589

  2. Community dynamics, trade-offs, invasion criteria and the evolution of host resistance to microparasites.

    PubMed

    Bowers, R G; Hodgkinson, D E

    2001-10-07

    This article discusses the community dynamics of the evolution of host resistance to microparasites. We present exact results for a model with an arbitrary number of host strains. We show that these results are identical to those inferred on the basis of invadability criteria. The long-term behaviour of the model allows monomorphism or dimorphism (but no higher polymorphisms). We invoke trade-offs between pathogen transmissibility and either host intrinsic growth rate or resistance to crowding. In the first case, convexity leads to an ESS, concavity to branching points and repellers. In the second, these roles are interchanged. We present results for fixed strain distributions and establish parallels with results using an adaptive dynamics perspective. We also establish differences. For example, if an ESS is "deleted" from the strain distribution, then adjacent-strain dimorphism is possible. The invadability criteria which we obtain can be expressed in terms of geometrical properties of the trade-offs namely, the slopes of chords and tangent to the associated function. We speculate that this result may have wider applicability than provided by the context of the present work.

  3. Trade-off between warning signal efficacy and mating success in the wood tiger moth.

    PubMed

    Nokelainen, Ossi; Hegna, Robert H; Reudler, Joanneke H; Lindstedt, Carita; Mappes, Johanna

    2012-01-22

    The coloration of species can have multiple functions, such as predator avoidance and sexual signalling, that directly affect fitness. As selection should favour traits that positively affect fitness, the genes underlying the trait should reach fixation, thereby preventing the evolution of polymorphisms. This is particularly true for aposematic species that rely on coloration as a warning signal to advertise their unprofitability to predators. Nonetheless, there are numerous examples of aposematic species showing remarkable colour polymorphisms. We examined whether colour polymorphism in the wood tiger moth is maintained by trade-offs between different functions of coloration. In Finland, males of this species have two distinct colour morphs: white and yellow. The efficacy of the warning signal of these morphs was tested by offering them to blue tits in the laboratory. Birds hesitated significantly longer to attack yellow than white males. In a field experiment, the survival of the yellow males was also higher than white males. However, mating experiments in the laboratory revealed that yellow males had lower mating success than white males. Our results offer an explanation for the maintenance of polymorphism via trade-off between survival selection and mating success.

  4. Host-size mediated trade-off in a parasitoid Sclerodermus harmandi.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhudong; Xu, Bingbing; Li, Li; Sun, Jianghua

    2011-01-01

    Optimality models of host-parasitoid relationships have traditionally assumed that host quality increases as a function of host size at parasitism. However, trade-offs may play a crucial role in species evolution and should be found in host-parasitoid interactions where the host quality may differ between different sizes. Here, we investigated the effects of host size differences of Monochamus alternatus larva on foraging decisions, parasitism and related fitness in a gregarious ectoparasitoid, Sclerodermus harmandi. Two-choice and non-choice experiments were conducted with M. alternatus larvae to evaluate preference and performance of S. harmandi, respectively. Results from two-choice test showed that adult females prefer to attack large larvae rather than small larvae. In no-choice tests, adult females needed more time to paralyze large larvae than small larvae before laying eggs on the body surface of M. alternatus larvae and had lower survival and parasitism rate on those large larvae. Foraging decisions of S. harmandi led to the selection of the most profitable host size for parasitoid development, which showed more offspring gained on large M. alternatus larvae than on small larvae and got higher body weight on those large hosts. This study demonstrates the existence of trade-off occurring during host-parasitoids interactions according to host size related quality.

  5. Sampling design trade-offs in occupancy studies with imperfect detection: examples and software

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bailey, L.L.; Hines, J.E.; Nichols, J.D.

    2007-01-01

    Researchers have used occupancy, or probability of occupancy, as a response or state variable in a variety of studies (e.g., habitat modeling), and occupancy is increasingly favored by numerous state, federal, and international agencies engaged in monitoring programs. Recent advances in estimation methods have emphasized that reliable inferences can be made from these types of studies if detection and occupancy probabilities are simultaneously estimated. The need for temporal replication at sampled sites to estimate detection probability creates a trade-off between spatial replication (number of sample sites distributed within the area of interest/inference) and temporal replication (number of repeated surveys at each site). Here, we discuss a suite of questions commonly encountered during the design phase of occupancy studies, and we describe software (program GENPRES) developed to allow investigators to easily explore design trade-offs focused on particularities of their study system and sampling limitations. We illustrate the utility of program GENPRES using an amphibian example from Greater Yellowstone National Park, USA.

  6. Prefrontal connections express individual differences in intrinsic resistance to trading off honesty values against economic benefits

    PubMed Central

    Dogan, Azade; Morishima, Yosuke; Heise, Felix; Tanner, Carmen; Gibson, Rajna; Wagner, Alexander F.; Tobler, Philippe N.

    2016-01-01

    Individuals differ profoundly when they decide whether to tell the truth or to be dishonest, particularly in situations where moral motives clash with economic motives, i.e., when truthfulness comes at a monetary cost. These differences should be expressed in the decision network, particularly in prefrontal cortex. However, the interactions between the core players of the decision network during honesty-related decisions involving trade-offs with economic costs remain poorly understood. To investigate brain connectivity patterns associated with individual differences in responding to economic costs of truthfulness, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging and measured brain activations, while participants made decisions concerning honesty. We found that in participants who valued honesty highly, dorsolateral and dorsomedial parts of prefrontal cortex were more tightly coupled with the inferior frontal cortex when economic costs were high compared to when they were low. Finer-grained analysis revealed that information flow from the inferior frontal cortex to the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and bidirectional information flow between the inferior frontal cortex and dorsomedial prefrontal cortex was associated with a reduced tendency to trade off honesty for economic benefits. Our findings provide a novel account of the neural circuitry that underlies honest decisions in the face of economic temptations. PMID:27646044

  7. Process of selecting completion or workover fluids requires series of trade offs

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, R.L.; Higueras, R.

    1984-01-30

    Good fluid design requires a series of trade-offs to match cost against formation needs. Here are the fundamentals and current technology for workover or completion fluids along with guidance for the trade-off choices. A completion fluid can be broadly defined as any borehole fluid placed across the producing zone prior to bringing a new well in. Workover fluids are used during remedial work on a well which has been on production for a period of time. Both fluids have the same goal: to maximize the recovery of hydrocarbons from the producing reservoir. This article presents an overview of completion and workover fluids specifically designed to maximize the recovery of hydrocarbons. Poor productivity of promising new wells, or reworked old wells, can almost always be traced to undesirable characteristics of the borehole fluid used in the completion or workover operation. For this reason, considerable care and planning should always go into the selection of these fluids. Many factors should be considered, keeping in mind that compromises often must be made. The secret to handling completion or workover fluids is to keep them clean. They should contain no particulate matter considered damaging to the formation. If handling equipment is not clean, then the expense and effort used to secure clean, uncontaminated completion or workover fluid is wasted.

  8. Discovery–dominance trade-off among widespread invasive ant species

    PubMed Central

    Bertelsmeier, Cleo; Avril, Amaury; Blight, Olivier; Jourdan, Hervé; Courchamp, Franck

    2015-01-01

    Ants are among the most problematic invasive species. They displace numerous native species, alter ecosystem processes, and can have negative impacts on agriculture and human health. In part, their success might stem from a departure from the discovery–dominance trade-off that can promote co-existence in native ant communities, that is, invasive ants are thought to be at the same time behaviorally dominant and faster discoverers of resources, compared to native species. However, it has not yet been tested whether similar asymmetries in behavioral dominance, exploration, and recruitment abilities also exist among invasive species. Here, we establish a dominance hierarchy among four of the most problematic invasive ants (Linepithema humile, Lasius neglectus, Wasmannia auropunctata, Pheidole megacephala) that may be able to arrive and establish in the same areas in the future. To assess behavioral dominance, we used confrontation experiments, testing the aggressiveness in individual and group interactions between all species pairs. In addition, to compare discovery efficiency, we tested the species’ capacity to locate a food resource in a maze, and the capacity to recruit nestmates to exploit a food resource. The four species differed greatly in their capacity to discover resources and to recruit nestmates and to dominate the other species. Our results are consistent with a discovery–dominance trade-off. The species that showed the highest level of interspecific aggressiveness and dominance during dyadic interactions. PMID:26257879

  9. Ectoparasites and reproductive trade-offs in the barn swallow (Hirundo rustica).

    PubMed

    Saino, Nicola; Ferrari, Raffaella P; Romano, Maria; Ambrosini, Roberto; Møller, Anders

    2002-10-01

    Parents are predicted to trade offspring number and