Science.gov

Sample records for pressure coefficient

  1. Pressure-viscosity coefficient of biobased lubricants

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Film thickness is an important tribological property that is dependent on the combined effect of lubricant properties, material property of friction surfaces, and the operating conditions of the tribological process. Pressure-viscosity coefficient (PVC) is one of the lubricant properties that influe...

  2. Vapor pressures and gas-film coefficients for ketones

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rathbun, R.E.; Tai, D.Y.

    1987-01-01

    Comparison of handbook vapor pressures for seven ketones with more recent literature data showed large differences for four of the ketones. Gas-film coefficients for the volatilization of these ketones from water determined by two different methods were in reasonable agreement. ?? 1987.

  3. The coefficient of restitution of pressurized balls: a mechanistic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgallas, Alex; Landry, Gaëtan

    2016-01-01

    Pressurized, inflated balls used in professional sports are regulated so that their behaviour upon impact can be anticipated and allow the game to have its distinctive character. However, the dynamics governing the impacts of such balls, even on stationary hard surfaces, can be extremely complex. The energy transformations, which arise from the compression of the gas within the ball and from the shear forces associated with the deformation of the wall, are examined in this paper. We develop a simple mechanistic model of the dependence of the coefficient of restitution, e, upon both the gauge pressure, P_G, of the gas and the shear modulus, G, of the wall. The model is validated using the results from a simple series of experiments using three different sports balls. The fits to the data are extremely good for P_G > 25 kPa and consistent values are obtained for the value of G for the wall material. As far as the authors can tell, this simple, mechanistic model of the pressure dependence of the coefficient of restitution is the first in the literature. *%K Coefficient of Restitution, Dynamics, Inflated Balls, Pressure, Impact Model

  4. On the determinatino of high-pressure mass-diffusion coefficients for binary mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bellan, J.; Harstad, K.

    2003-01-01

    A model for high-pressure binary diffusion coefficient calculation is proposed based on considerations originating from recasting both the low pressure kinetic theory and the Stokes-Einstein infinite dilution expressions into forms consistent with corresponding states theory.

  5. Influence of the pressure dependent coefficient of friction on deep drawing springback predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gil, Imanol; Galdos, Lander; Mendiguren, Joseba; Mugarra, Endika; Sáenz de Argandoña, Eneko

    2016-10-01

    This research studies the effect of considering an advanced variable friction coefficient on the springback prediction of stamping processes. Traditional constant coefficient of friction considerations are being replaced by more advanced friction coefficient definitions. The aim of this work is to show the influence of defining a pressure dependent friction coefficient on numerical springback predictions of a DX54D mild steel, a HSLA380 and a DP780 high strength steel. The pressure dependent friction model of each material was fitted to the experimental data obtained by Strip Drawing tests. Then, these friction models were implemented in a numerical simulation of a drawing process of an industrial automotive part. The results showed important differences between defining a pressure dependent friction coefficient or a constant friction coefficient.

  6. Large scale steam flow test: Pressure drop data and calculated pressure loss coefficients

    SciTech Connect

    Meadows, J.B.; Spears, J.R.; Feder, A.R.; Moore, B.P.; Young, C.E.

    1993-12-01

    This report presents the result of large scale steam flow testing, 3 million to 7 million lbs/hr., conducted at approximate steam qualities of 25, 45, 70 and 100 percent (dry, saturated). It is concluded from the test data that reasonable estimates of piping component pressure loss coefficients for single phase flow in complex piping geometries can be calculated using available engineering literature. This includes the effects of nearby upstream and downstream components, compressibility, and internal obstructions, such as splitters, and ladder rungs on individual piping components. Despite expected uncertainties in the data resulting from the complexity of the piping geometry and two-phase flow, the test data support the conclusion that the predicted dry steam K-factors are accurate and provide useful insight into the effect of entrained liquid on the flow resistance. The K-factors calculated from the wet steam test data were compared to two-phase K-factors based on the Martinelli-Nelson pressure drop correlations. This comparison supports the concept of a two-phase multiplier for estimating the resistance of piping with liquid entrained into the flow. The test data in general appears to be reasonably consistent with the shape of a curve based on the Martinelli-Nelson correlation over the tested range of steam quality.

  7. Temperature and pressure dependence of methane correlations and osmotic second virial coefficients in water.

    PubMed

    Ashbaugh, Henry S; Weiss, Katie; Williams, Steven M; Meng, Bin; Surampudi, Lalitanand N

    2015-05-21

    We report methane's osmotic virial coefficient over the temperatures 275 to 370 K and pressures from 1 bar up to 5000 bar evaluated using molecular simulations of a united-atom description of methane in TIP4P/2005 water. In the first half of this work, we describe an approach for calculating the water-mediated contribution to the methane-methane potential-of-mean force over all separations down to complete overlap. The enthalpic, entropic, heat capacity, volumetric, compressibility, and thermal expansivity contributions to the water-mediated interaction free energy are subsequently extracted from these simulations by fitting to a thermodynamic expansion over all the simulated state points. In the second half of this work, methane's correlation functions are used to evaluate its osmotic second virial coefficient in the temperature-pressure plane. The virial coefficients evaluated from the McMillan-Mayer correlation function integral are shown to be in excellent agreement with those determined from the concentration dependence of methane's excess chemical potential, providing an independent thermodynamic consistency check on the accuracy of the procedures used here. At atmospheric pressure the osmotic virial coefficient decreases with increasing temperature, indicative of increasing hydrophobic interactions. At low temperature, the virial coefficient decreases with increasing pressure while at high temperature the virial coefficient increases with increasing pressure, reflecting the underlying hyperbolic dependence of the virial coefficient on temperature and pressure. The transition between a decreasing to increasing pressure response of the osmotic virial coefficient is shown to follow the response of the methane-methane contact peak to changes in pressure as a function of temperature, though a universal correlation is not observed.

  8. Transport coefficients and entropy-scaling law in liquid iron up to Earth-core pressures.

    PubMed

    Cao, Qi-Long; Wang, Pan-Pan; Huang, Duo-Hui; Yang, Jun-Sheng; Wan, Ming-Jie; Wang, Fan-Hou

    2014-03-21

    Molecular dynamics simulations were applied to study the structural and transport properties, including the pair distribution function, the structure factor, the pair correlation entropy, self-diffusion coefficient, and viscosity, of liquid iron under high temperature and high pressure conditions. Our calculated results reproduced experimentally determined structure factors of liquid iron, and the calculated self-diffusion coefficients and viscosity agree well with previous simulation results. We show that there is a moderate increase of self-diffusion coefficients and viscosity along the melting curve up to the Earth-core pressure. Furthermore, the temperature dependencies of the pair correlation entropy, self-diffusion, and viscosity under high pressure condition have been investigated. Our results suggest that the temperature dependence of the pair correlation entropy is well described by T(-1) scaling, while the Arrhenius law well describes the temperature dependencies of self-diffusion coefficients and viscosity under high pressure. In particular, we find that the entropy-scaling laws, proposed by Rosenfeld [Phys. Rev. A 15, 2545 (1977)] and Dzugutov [Nature (London) 381, 137 (1996)] for self-diffusion coefficients and viscosity in liquid metals under ambient pressure, still hold well for liquid iron under high temperature and high pressure conditions. Using the entropy-scaling laws, we can obtain transport properties from structural properties under high pressure and high temperature conditions. The results provide a useful ingredient in understanding transport properties of planet's cores.

  9. Entropy-scaling laws for diffusion coefficients in liquid metals under high pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Qi-Long Shao, Ju-Xiang; Wang, Fan-Hou; Wang, Pan-Pan

    2015-04-07

    Molecular dynamic simulations on the liquid copper and tungsten are used to investigate the empirical entropy-scaling laws D{sup *}=A exp(BS{sub ex}), proposed independently by Rosenfeld and Dzugutov for diffusion coefficient, under high pressure conditions. We show that the scaling laws hold rather well for them under high pressure conditions. Furthermore, both the original diffusion coefficients and the reduced diffusion coefficients exhibit an Arrhenius relationship D{sub M}=D{sub M}{sup 0} exp(−E{sub M}/K{sub B}T), (M=un,R,D) and the activation energy E{sub M} increases with increasing pressure, the diffusion pre-exponential factors (D{sub R}{sup 0} and D{sub D}{sup 0}) are nearly independent of the pressure and element. The pair correlation entropy, S{sub 2}, depends linearly on the reciprocal temperature S{sub 2}=−E{sub S}/T, and the activation energy, E{sub S}, increases with increasing pressure. In particular, the ratios of the activation energies (E{sub un}, E{sub R}, and E{sub D}) obtained from diffusion coefficients to the activation energy, E{sub S}, obtained from the entropy keep constants in the whole pressure range. Therefore, the entropy-scaling laws for the diffusion coefficients and the Arrhenius law are linked via the temperature dependence of entropy.

  10. Pressure dependence on partition coefficients for trace elements between olivine and the coexisting melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taura, Hiroshi; Yurimoto, Hisayoshi; Kurita, Kei; Sueno, Shigeho

    Partition coefficients between olivine and melt at upper mantle conditions, 3 to 14 GPa, have been determined for 27 trace elements (Li, Be, B, Na, Mg, Al, Si, P, K, Ca, Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Rb, Sr, Y, Zr, Cs, Ba, La and Ce) using secondary-ion mass-spectrometry (SIMS) and electron-probe microanalysis (EPMA). The general pattern of olivine/melt partitioning on Onuma diagrams resembles those reported previously for natural systems. This agreement strongly supports the argument that partitioning is under structural control of olivine even at high pressure. The partition coefficients for mono- and tri-valent cations show significant pressure dependence, both becoming larger with pressure, and are strongly correlated with coupled substitution into cation sites in the olivine structure. The dominant type of trace element substitution for mono- and tri-valent cations into olivine changes gradually from (Si, Mg)<-->(Al, Cr) at low pressure to (Si, Mg)<-->(Al, Al) and (Mg, Mg)<-->(Na, Al) at high pressure. The change in substitution type results in an increase in partition coefficients of Al and Na with pressure. An inverse correlation between the partition coefficients for divalent cations and pressure has been observed, especially for Ni, Co and Fe. The order of decreasing rate of partition coefficient with pressure correlates to strength of crystal field effect of the cation. The pressure dependence of olivine/melt partitioning can be attributed to the compression of cation polyhedra induced by pressure and the compensation of electrostatic valence by cation substitution.

  11. Effect of interfacial turbulence and accommodation coefficient on CFD predictions of pressurization and pressure control in cryogenic storage tank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kassemi, Mohammad; Kartuzova, Olga

    2016-03-01

    Pressurization and pressure control in cryogenic storage tanks are to a large extent affected by heat and mass transport across the liquid-vapor interface. These mechanisms are, in turn, controlled by the kinetics of the phase change process and the dynamics of the turbulent recirculating flows in the liquid and vapor phases. In this paper, the effects of accommodation coefficient and interfacial turbulence on tank pressurization and pressure control simulations are examined. Comparison between numerical predictions and ground-based measurements in two large liquid hydrogen tank experiments, performed in the K-site facility at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) and the Multi-purpose Hydrogen Test Bed (MHTB) facility at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), are used to show the impact of accommodation coefficient and interfacial and vapor phase turbulence on evolution of pressure and temperatures in the cryogenic storage tanks. In particular, the self-pressurization comparisons indicate that: (1) numerical predictions are essentially independent of the magnitude of the accommodation coefficient; and (2) surprisingly, laminar models sometimes provide results that are in better agreement with experimental self-pressurization rates, even in parametric ranges where the bulk flow is deemed fully turbulent. In this light, shortcomings of the present CFD models, especially, numerical treatments of interfacial mass transfer and turbulence, as coupled to the Volume-of-Fluid (VOF) interface capturing scheme, are underscored and discussed.

  12. Melting properties of Pt and its transport coefficients in liquid states under high pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Pan-Pan; Shao, Ju-Xiang; Cao, Qi-Long

    2016-11-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the melting and transport properties in liquid states of platinum for the pressure range (50-200 GPa) are reported. The melting curve of platinum is consistent with previous ab initio MD simulation results and the first-principles melting curve. Calculated results for the pressure dependence of fusion entropy and fusion volume show that the fusion entropy and the fusion volume decrease with increasing pressure, and the ratio of the fusion volume to fusion entropy roughly reproduces the melting slope, which has a moderate decrease along the melting line. The Arrhenius law well describes the temperature dependence of self-diffusion coefficients and viscosity under high pressure, and the diffusion activation energy decreases with increasing pressure, while the viscosity activation energy increases with increasing pressure. In addition, the entropy-scaling law, proposed by Rosenfeld under ambient pressure, still holds well for liquid Pt under high pressure conditions.

  13. Osmotic pressures and second virial coefficients for aqueous saline solutions of lysozyme

    SciTech Connect

    Moon, Y. U.; Anderson, C. O.; Blanch, H. W.; Prausnitz, J. M.

    2000-03-27

    Experimental data at 25 °C are reported for osmotic pressures of aqueous solutions containing lysozyme and any one of the following salts: ammonium sulfate, ammonium oxalate and ammonium phosphate at ionic strength 1 or 3M. Data were obtained using a Wescor Colloid Membrane Osmometer at lysozyme concentrations from about 4 to 20 grams per liter at pH 4, 7 or 8. Osmotic second virial coefficients for lysozyme were calculated from the osmotic-pressure data. All coefficients were negative, increasing in magnitude with ionic strength. Furthermore, tesults are insensitive to the nature of the anion, but rise slightly in magnitude as the size of the anion increases.

  14. Pressure coefficient of the glass transition temperature in the thermodynamic scaling regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koperwas, K.; Grzybowski, A.; Grzybowska, K.; Wojnarowska, Z.; Pionteck, J.; Sokolov, A. P.; Paluch, M.

    2012-10-01

    We report that the pressure coefficient of the glass transition temperature, dTg/dp, which is commonly used to determine the pressure sensitivity of the glass transition temperature Tg, can be predicted in the thermodynamic scaling regime. We show that the equation derived from the isochronal condition combined with the well-known scaling, TVγ = const, predicts successfully values of dTg/dp for a variety of glass-forming systems, including van der Waals liquids, polymers, and ionic liquids.

  15. Temperature and pressure coefficients of iron resonant impurity level in PbTe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skipetrov, E. P.; Kruleveckaya, O. V.; Skipetrova, L. A.; Slynko, V. E.

    2017-01-01

    We investigate temperature dependences of galvanomagnetic parameters in weak magnetic fields (4.2 ≤ T ≤ 300 K, B ≤ 0.07 T) in the p-Pb1-yFeyTe alloy from the middle part of the single-crystal ingot, where the Fermi level is pinned by the resonant impurity level lying under the top of the valence band. Experiments are performed under hydrostatic compression up to 10 kbar. Using scanning electron microscopy, we find microscopic inclusions of the secondary phase enriched with iron and show that the main phase is characterized by a good uniformity of the spatial distribution of impurities. A monotonous increase of the free hole concentration at liquid-helium temperature under pressure and anomalous temperature dependences of the Hall coefficient in the whole investigated pressure range are revealed. Experimental results are explained by a model assuming pinning of the Fermi level by the impurity level and a redistribution of electrons between the valence band and impurity states with increasing temperature and under pressure. In the framework of the two-band Kane dispersion law, theoretical temperature dependences of the Hall coefficient under pressure, which are in satisfactory agreement with the experimental ones at low temperatures, are calculated and temperature and pressure coefficients of the iron deep level are determined. Diagrams of the electronic structure rearrangement with increasing temperature for Pb1-yFeyTe at pressures up to 10 kbar are proposed.

  16. Molar Mass and Second Virial Coefficient of Polyethylene Glycol by Vapor Pressure Osmometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwinefus, Jeffrey J.; Checkal, Caleb; Saksa, Brian; Baka, Nadia; Modi, Kalpit; Rivera, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    In this laboratory experiment, students determine the number-average molar masses and second virial coefficients of polyethylene glycol (PEG) polymers ranging in molar mass from 200 to 1500 g mol[superscript -1] using vapor pressure osmometry (VPO). Students assess VPO in relation to accurate molar mass calculations of PEG polymers. Additionally,…

  17. A Simple Student Laboratory on Osmotic Flow, Osmotic Pressure, and the Reflection Coefficient.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feher, Joseph J.; Ford, George D.

    1995-01-01

    Describes a laboratory exercise containing a practical series of experiments that novice students can perform within two hours. The exercise provides a confirmation of van't Hoff's law while placing more emphasis on osmotic flow than pressure. Students can determine parameters such as the reflection coefficient which stress the interaction of both…

  18. A Simple Student Laboratory on Osmotic Flow, Osmotic Pressure, and the Reflection Coefficient.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feher, Joseph J.; Ford, George D.

    1995-01-01

    Describes a laboratory exercise containing a practical series of experiments that novice students can perform within two hours. The exercise provides a confirmation of van't Hoff's law while placing more emphasis on osmotic flow than pressure. Students can determine parameters such as the reflection coefficient which stress the interaction of both…

  19. Molar Mass and Second Virial Coefficient of Polyethylene Glycol by Vapor Pressure Osmometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwinefus, Jeffrey J.; Checkal, Caleb; Saksa, Brian; Baka, Nadia; Modi, Kalpit; Rivera, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    In this laboratory experiment, students determine the number-average molar masses and second virial coefficients of polyethylene glycol (PEG) polymers ranging in molar mass from 200 to 1500 g mol[superscript -1] using vapor pressure osmometry (VPO). Students assess VPO in relation to accurate molar mass calculations of PEG polymers. Additionally,…

  20. Correlation of high-pressure diffusion and viscosity coefficients for n-alkanes

    SciTech Connect

    Dymond, J.H.; Awan, M.A. )

    1989-09-01

    Self-diffusion coefficient and viscosity coefficient data for liquid n-alkanes over the whole pressure range at different temperatures are satisfactorily correlated simultaneously by a method which is just an extension of that previously used to apply the smooth hard-sphere theory of transport properties to individual transport coefficients. Universal curves are developed for reduced quantities D* and {eta}* as a function of reduced volume. A consistent set of values is derived for the characteristic volume V{sub 0} and for parameters R{sub D} and R{sub {eta}}, introduced to account for effects of nonspherical molecular shape and molecular roughness. On this basis, accurate calculation can be made of self-diffusion and viscosity coefficients for other members of the n-alkane series, for which data are at present limited.

  1. Temperature and water vapor pressure effects on the friction coefficient of hydrogenated diamondlike carbon films.

    SciTech Connect

    Dickrell, P. L.; Sawyer, W. G.; Eryilmaz, O. L.; Erdemir, A.; Energy Technology; Univ. of Florida

    2009-07-01

    Microtribological measurements of a hydrogenated diamondlike carbon film in controlled gaseous environments show that water vapor plays a significant role in the friction coefficient. These experiments reveal an initial high friction transient behavior that does not reoccur even after extended periods of exposure to low partial pressures of H{sub 2}O and O{sub 2}. Experiments varying both water vapor pressure and sample temperature show trends of a decreasing friction coefficient as a function of both the decreasing water vapor pressure and the increasing substrate temperature. Theses trends are examined with regard to first order gas-surface interactions. Model fits give activation energies on the order of 40 kJ/mol, which is consistent with water vapor desorption.

  2. Vapor Pressure and Evaporation Coefficient of Silicon Monoxide over a Mixture of Silicon and Silica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferguson, Frank T.; Nuth, Joseph A., III

    2012-01-01

    The evaporation coefficient and equilibrium vapor pressure of silicon monoxide over a mixture of silicon and vitreous silica have been studied over the temperature range (1433 to 1608) K. The evaporation coefficient for this temperature range was (0.007 plus or minus 0.002) and is approximately an order of magnitude lower than the evaporation coefficient over amorphous silicon monoxide powder and in general agreement with previous measurements of this quantity. The enthalpy of reaction at 298.15 K for this reaction was calculated via second and third law analyses as (355 plus or minus 25) kJ per mol and (363.6 plus or minus 4.1) kJ per mol respectively. In comparison with previous work with the evaporation of amorphous silicon monoxide powder as well as other experimental measurements of the vapor pressure of silicon monoxide gas over mixtures of silicon and silica, these systems all tend to give similar equilibrium vapor pressures when the evaporation coefficient is correctly taken into account. This provides further evidence that amorphous silicon monoxide is an intimate mixture of small domains of silicon and silica and not strictly a true compound.

  3. The Townsend coefficient of ionization in atmospheric pressure rare gas plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zvereva, G.

    2015-12-01

    In the work the influence of the processes characteristic for atmospheric pressure heavy inert gases discharge plasma on the value of the first Townsend ionization coefficient were investigated. Krypton plasma was considered. Calculations have shown that the greatest impact on the value of the first Townsend ionization coefficient has dissociative recombination of molecular ions, followed by descending influence processes occur: stepwise ionization, the electron-electron collisions and superelastic ones. The effect of these processes begins to appear at concentrations of electrons and excited particles higher than 1012 cm-3. At times shorter than the time of molecular ions formation, when dissociative recombination is absent, should expect a significant increase of the ionization coefficient.

  4. Osmotic pressures and second virial coefficients for aqueous saline solutions of lysozyme

    DOE PAGES

    Moon, Y. U.; Anderson, C. O.; Blanch, H. W.; ...

    2000-03-27

    Experimental data at 25 °C are reported for osmotic pressures of aqueous solutions containing lysozyme and any one of the following salts: ammonium sulfate, ammonium oxalate and ammonium phosphate at ionic strength 1 or 3M. Data were obtained using a Wescor Colloid Membrane Osmometer at lysozyme concentrations from about 4 to 20 grams per liter at pH 4, 7 or 8. Osmotic second virial coefficients for lysozyme were calculated from the osmotic-pressure data. All coefficients were negative, increasing in magnitude with ionic strength. Furthermore, tesults are insensitive to the nature of the anion, but rise slightly in magnitude as themore » size of the anion increases.« less

  5. Fast Fourier transform to measure pressure coefficient of muons in the GRAPES-3 experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohanty, P. K.; Ahmad, S.; Antia, H. M.; Arunbabu, K. P.; Chandra, A.; Dugad, S. R.; Gupta, S. K.; Hariharan, B.; Hayashi, Y.; Jagadeesan, P.; Jain, A.; Kawakami, S.; Kojima, H.; Morris, S. D.; Nayak, P. K.; Oshima, A.; Rao, B. S.; Reddy, L. V.; Shibata, S.

    2016-06-01

    The GRAPES-3 large area (560 m2) tracking muon telescope is operating at Ooty in India since 2001. It records 4 × 109 muons of energy ≥ 1 GeV every day. These high statistics data have enabled extremely sensitive measurements of solar phenomena, including the solar anisotropies, Forbush decreases, coronal mass ejections etc. to be made. However, prior to such studies, the variation in observed muon rate caused by changes in atmospheric pressure needs to be corrected. Traditionally, the pressure coefficient (β) for the muon rate was derived from the observed data. But the influence of various solar effects makes the measurement of β somewhat difficult. In the present work, a different approach to circumvent this difficulty was used to measure β, almost independent of the solar activity. This approach exploits a small amplitude (∼1 hPa) periodic (12 h) variation of atmospheric pressure at Ooty that introduces a synchronous variation in the muon rate. By using the fast Fourier transform technique the spectral power distributions at 12 h from the atmospheric pressure, and muon rate were used to measure β. The value of pressure coefficient was found to be β =(- 0.128 ± 0.005) % hPa-1.

  6. A simple student laboratory on osmotic flow, osmotic pressure, and the reflection coefficient.

    PubMed

    Feher, J J; Ford, G D

    1995-06-01

    Osmosis is usually taught from the point of view of the osmotic pressure developed when solutions of different concentrations of solute are separated by an ideal semipermeable membrane. The osmotic pressure is defined at equilibrium when there is no net flow, and it takes some time to reach this equilibrium. Although the osmotic pressure is certainly important, teaching only this point of view implicitly diminishes the importance of osmotic flow, which begins almost instantaneously across a membrane. A device was constructed with which students could measure the flow across a model membrane (dialysis tubing) as a function of concentration for solutes of different sizes. The device produced flows that were linearly proportional to the concentration, providing a confirmation of van't Hoff's law. Separate student groups repeated these experiments using both different solutes and different dialysis membranes. The combined results of four student groups showed that the flow across these nonideal membranes depends on the solute and membrane as well as the concentration of solute. Given a value for area times filtration coefficient (A x Lp) for the membranes (determined beforehand by their instructor), the students could calculate the reflection coefficient (sigma) for three solutes and two membranes. The results showed that large solutes had large sigma and that less porous membranes had larger sigma. A concurrent demonstration using this device and membranes showed that the osmotic flow can generate large pressures. These experiments and demonstration provide a balanced view of osmotic flow and pressure.

  7. Autofrettage to Counteract Coefficient of Thermal Expansion Mismatch in Cryogenic Pressurized Pipes with Metallic Liners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wen, Ed; Barbero, Ever; Tygielski, Phlip; Turner, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Composite feedlines with metal liners have the potential to reduce weight/cost while providing the same level of permeation resistance and material compatibility of all-metal feedlines carrying cryogenic propellants in spacecraft. The major technical challenges are the large difference in Coefficient of Thermal Expansion between the liner and the composite, and the manufacturing method required to make a very thin liner with the required strength and dimensional tolerance. This study investigates the use of autofrettage (compressive preload) to counteract Coefficient of Thermal Expansion when pre-pressurization procedures cannot be used to solve this problem. Promising materials (aluminum 2219, Inconel 718, nickel, nickel alloy) and manufacturing techniques (chemical milling, electroplating) are evaluated to determine the best liner candidates. Robust, autofrettaged feedlines with a low Coefficient of Thermal Expansion liner (Inconel 718 or nickel alloy) are shown to successfully counteract mismatch at LOX temperature. A new concept, autofrettage by temperature, is introduced for high Coefficient of Thermal Expansion materials (aluminum and pure nickel) where pressure cannot be used to add compressive preload.

  8. A pulling tension calculation program which allows coefficient of friction to vary continuously with cable sidewall pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Fee, J.M.

    1994-12-31

    A cable pulling tension calculation software program is developed which draws friction coefficients from a curve input by the user. Examples show how predicted tension and sidewall pressure vary with a coefficient of friction dependence on cable normal pressure. The software is intended as a ``what-if`` tool to help insulation planners develop better approximations of cable pulling tension.

  9. Hydrogen component fugacity coefficients in binary mixtures with ethane: Pressure dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruno, T. J.; Schroeder, J. A.; Outcalt, S. L.

    1990-09-01

    The fugacity coefficients of hydrogen in binary mixtures with ethane were measured. Data were taken using an experimental chamber which is divided into two regions by a semipermeable membrane through which hydrogen, but not ethane, can penetrate. The measurement of the gas pressures inside and outside the membrane gives the hydrogen component fugacity at a given temperature, binary mixture mole fraction, and mixture pressure. In this paper, results are reported at mixture pressures of 5.25, 6.97, 10.21, and 13.47 MPa. In each case, the temperature of the mixture was maintained at an average value of 130°C (403.15 K). The general qualitative features of the data are discussed, and comparisons are made with predictions obtained from the Redlich-Kwong and Peng-Robinson equations of state.

  10. Comparison of attenuation coefficients for VVER-440 and VVER-1000 pressure vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Marek, M.; Rataj, J.; Vandlik, S.

    2011-07-01

    The paper summarizes the attenuation coefficient of the neutron fluence with E > 0.5 MeV through a reactor pressure vessel for vodo-vodyanoi energetichesky reactor (VVER) reactor types measured and/or calculated for mock-up experiments, as well as for operated nuclear power plant (NPP) units. The attenuation coefficient is possible to evaluate directly only by using the retro-dosimetry, based on a combination of the measured activities from the weld sample and concurrent ex-vessel measurement. The available neutron fluence attenuation coefficients (E > 0.5 MeV), calculated and measured at a mock-up experiment simulating the VVER-440-unit conditions, vary from 3.5 to 6.15. A similar situation is used for the calculations and mock-up experiment measurements for the VVER-1000 RPV, where the attenuation coefficient of the neutron fluence varies from 5.99 to 8.85. Because of the difference in calculations for the real units and the mock-up experiments, the necessity to design and perform calculation benchmarks both for VVER-440 and VVER-1000 would be meaningful if the calculation model is designed adequately to a given unit. (authors)

  11. Solubility parameter and activity coefficient of HDEHP dimer in select organic diluents by vapor pressure osmometry

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, M.; Nilsson, M.; Zalupski, P.

    2013-07-01

    A thorough understanding of the non-ideal behavior of the chemical components utilized in solvent extraction contributes to the success of any large-scale spent nuclear fuel treatment. To address this, our current work uses vapor pressure osmometry to characterize the non-ideal behavior of the solvent extraction agent di-(2-ethylhexyl) phosphoric acid (HDEHP), a common extractant in proposed separation schemes. Solubility parameters were fit to data on HDEHP at four temperatures using models based on Scatchard Hildebrand regular solution theory with Flory Huggins entropic corrections. The results are comparable but not identical to the activity coefficients from prior slope analysis in the literature. (authors)

  12. Temperature- and pressure-dependent absorption coefficients for CO2 and O2 at 193 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartinger, K. T.; Nord, S.; Monkhouse, P. B.

    Absorption of laser radiation at 193 nm by CO2 and O2 was studied at a series of different temperatures up to 1273 K and pressures up to 1 bar. The spectrum for CO2 was found to be broadband, so that absorption could be fitted to a Beer-Lambert law. On the other hand, the corresponding O2 spectrum is strongly structured and parameterisation requires a more complex relation, depending on both temperature and the product (pressure × absorption path length). In this context, the influence of spectral structure on the resulting spectrally integrated absorption coefficients is discussed. Using the fitting parameters obtained, effective transmissions at 193 nm can be calculated for a wide range of experimental conditions. As an illustration of the practical application of these data, the calculation of effective transmission for a typical industrial flue gas is described.

  13. Properties of meso-Erythritol; phase state, accommodation coefficient and saturation vapour pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emanuelsson, Eva; Tschiskale, Morten; Bilde, Merete

    2016-04-01

    Introduction Saturation vapour pressure and the associated temperature dependence (enthalpy ΔH), are key parameters for improving predictive atmospheric models. Generally, the atmospheric aerosol community lack experimentally determined values of these properties for relevant organic aerosol compounds (Bilde et al., 2015). In this work we have studied the organic aerosol component meso-Erythritol. Methods Sub-micron airborne particles of meso-Erythritol were generated by nebulization from aqueous solution, dried, and a mono disperse fraction of the aerosol was selected using a differential mobility analyser. The particles were then allowed to evaporate in the ARAGORN (AaRhus Atmospheric Gas phase OR Nano particle) flow tube. It is a temperature controlled 3.5 m long stainless steel tube with an internal diameter of 0.026 m (Bilde et al., 2003, Zardini et al., 2010). Changes in particle size as function of evaporation time were determined using a scanning mobility particle sizer system. Physical properties like air flow, temperature, humidity and pressure were controlled and monitored on several places in the setup. The saturation vapour pressures were then inferred from the experimental results in the MATLAB® program AU_VaPCaP (Aarhus University_Vapour Pressure Calculation Program). Results Following evaporation, meso-Erythriol under some conditions showed a bimodal particle size distribution indicating the formation of particles of two different phase states. The issue of physical phase state, along with critical assumptions e.g. the accommodation coefficient in the calculations of saturation vapour pressures of atmospheric relevant compounds, will be discussed. Saturation vapour pressures from the organic compound meso-Erythritol will be presented at temperatures between 278 and 308 K, and results will be discussed in the context of atmospheric chemistry. References Bilde, M. et al., (2015), Chemical Reviews, 115 (10), 4115-4156. Bilde, M. et. al., (2003

  14. Heat transfer coefficient measurements on the pressure surface of a transonic airfoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodzwa, Paul M.; Eaton, John K.

    2010-02-01

    This paper presents steady-state recovery temperature and heat transfer coefficient measurements on the pressure surface of a modern, highly cambered transonic airfoil. These measurements were collected with a peak Mach number of 1.5 and a maximum turbulence intensity of 30%. We used a single passage model to simulate the idealized two-dimensional flow path between rotor blades in a modern transonic turbine. This set up offered a simpler construction than a linear cascade, yet produced an equivalent flow condition. We performed validated high accuracy (±0.2°C) surface temperature measurements using wide-band thermochromic liquid crystals allowing separate measurements of the previously listed parameters with the same heat transfer surface. We achieved maximum heat transfer coefficient uncertainties that were equivalent to similar investigations (±10%). Two key observations are the heat transfer coefficient along the aft portion of the airfoil is sensitive to the surface heat flux and is highly insensitive to the level of freestream turbulence. Possible explanations for these observations are discussed.

  15. Effective diffusion coefficients of gas mixture in heavy oil under constant-pressure conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Huazhou Andy; Sun, Huijuan; Yang, Daoyong

    2017-05-01

    We develop a method to determine the effective diffusion coefficient for each individual component of a gas mixture in a non-volatile liquid (e.g., heavy oil) at high pressures with compositional analysis. Theoretically, a multi-component one-way diffusion model is coupled with the volume-translated Peng-Robinson equation of state to quantify the mass transfer between gas and liquid (e.g., heavy oil). Experimentally, the diffusion tests have been conducted with a PVT setup for one pure CO2-heavy oil system and one C3H8-CO2-heavy oil system under constant temperature and pressure, respectively. Both the gas-phase volume and liquid-phase swelling effect are simultaneously recorded during the measurement. As for the C3H8-CO2-heavy oil system, the gas chromatography method is employed to measure compositions of the gas phase at the beginning and end of the diffusion measurement, respectively. The effective diffusion coefficients are then determined by minimizing the discrepancy between the measured and calculated gas-phase composition at the end of diffusion measurement. The newly developed technique can quantify the contributions of each component of mixture to the bulk mass transfer from gas into liquid. The effective diffusion coefficient of C3H8 in the C3H8-CO2 mixture at 3945 ± 20 kPa and 293.85 K, i.e., 18.19 × 10^{ - 10} {{m}}^{ 2} / {{s}}, is found to be much higher than CO2 at 3950 ± 18 kPa and 293.85 K, i.e., 8.68 × 10^{ - 10} {{m}}^{ 2} / {{s}}. In comparison with pure CO2, the presence of C3H8 in the C3H8-CO2 mixture contributes to a faster diffusion of CO2 from the gas phase into heavy oil and consequently a larger swelling factor of heavy oil.

  16. Effective diffusion coefficients of gas mixture in heavy oil under constant-pressure conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Huazhou Andy; Sun, Huijuan; Yang, Daoyong

    2016-09-01

    We develop a method to determine the effective diffusion coefficient for each individual component of a gas mixture in a non-volatile liquid (e.g., heavy oil) at high pressures with compositional analysis. Theoretically, a multi-component one-way diffusion model is coupled with the volume-translated Peng-Robinson equation of state to quantify the mass transfer between gas and liquid (e.g., heavy oil). Experimentally, the diffusion tests have been conducted with a PVT setup for one pure CO2-heavy oil system and one C3H8-CO2-heavy oil system under constant temperature and pressure, respectively. Both the gas-phase volume and liquid-phase swelling effect are simultaneously recorded during the measurement. As for the C3H8-CO2-heavy oil system, the gas chromatography method is employed to measure compositions of the gas phase at the beginning and end of the diffusion measurement, respectively. The effective diffusion coefficients are then determined by minimizing the discrepancy between the measured and calculated gas-phase composition at the end of diffusion measurement. The newly developed technique can quantify the contributions of each component of mixture to the bulk mass transfer from gas into liquid. The effective diffusion coefficient of C3H8 in the C3H8-CO2 mixture at 3945 ± 20 kPa and 293.85 K, i.e., 18.19 × 10^{ - 10} m^{ 2} / s, is found to be much higher than CO2 at 3950 ± 18 kPa and 293.85 K, i.e., 8.68 × 10^{ - 10} m^{ 2} / s. In comparison with pure CO2, the presence of C3H8 in the C3H8-CO2 mixture contributes to a faster diffusion of CO2 from the gas phase into heavy oil and consequently a larger swelling factor of heavy oil.

  17. Composition Dependence of the Hydrostatic Pressure Coefficients of the Bandgap of ZnSe(1-x)Te(x) Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, J.; Yu, K. M.; Walukiewicz, W.; Shan, W.; Ager, J. W., III; Haller, E. E.; Miotkowski, I.; Ramdas, A. K.; Su, Ching-Hua

    2003-01-01

    Optical absorption experiments have been performed using diamond anvil cells to measure the hydrostatic pressure dependence of the fundamental bandgap of ZnSe(sub 1-xTe(sub x) alloys over the entire composition range. The first and second-order pressure coefficients are obtained as a function of composition. Starting from the ZnSe side, the magnitude of both coefficients increases slowly until x approx. 0.7, where the ambient-pressure bandgap reaches a minimum. For larger values of x the coefficients rapidly approach the values of ZnTe. The large deviations of the pressure coefficients from the linear interpolation between ZnSe and ZnTe are explained in terms of the band anticrossing model.

  18. Composition Dependence of the Hydrostatic Pressure Coefficients of the Bandgap of ZnSe(1-x)Te(x) Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, J.; Yu, K. M.; Walukiewicz, W.; Shan, W.; Ager, J. W., III; Haller, E. E.; Miotkowski, I.; Ramdas, A. K.; Su, Ching-Hua

    2003-01-01

    Optical absorption experiments have been performed using diamond anvil cells to measure the hydrostatic pressure dependence of the fundamental bandgap of ZnSe(sub 1-xTe(sub x) alloys over the entire composition range. The first and second-order pressure coefficients are obtained as a function of composition. Starting from the ZnSe side, the magnitude of both coefficients increases slowly until x approx. 0.7, where the ambient-pressure bandgap reaches a minimum. For larger values of x the coefficients rapidly approach the values of ZnTe. The large deviations of the pressure coefficients from the linear interpolation between ZnSe and ZnTe are explained in terms of the band anticrossing model.

  19. Laboratory Pressure Broadening Coefficients To Support SOIR/VEx And SOIR-NOMAD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drummond, Rachel; Földes, T.; Vander Auwera, J.; Mahieux, A.; Robert, S.; Vandaele, A.; Wilquet, V.

    2010-10-01

    Precise spectroscopic data to describe CO2 pressure-broadened lineshapes of trace gases in the Venus and Mars atmospheres are rather scarce. In an attempt to compensate for such a situation, we recorded in the laboratory CO2 broadened absorption spectra of the 1-0 band of HCl near 2886 cm-1 and the ν3 band of CH4 near 3019 cm-1 at several pressures between 150 and 700 Torr, using a high-resolution Fourier transform spectrometer. CO2 pressure broadening half-width coefficients are extracted by least-squares fitting of suitable molecular line profiles, including instrumental effects. Sensitivity studies have been performed using the characteristics of the SOIR instrument. This instrument is currently on board the Venus Express mission (ESA) and has been proposed as payload for the future ExoMars 2016 TGO mission (ESA/NASA). The SOIR instrument is designed to measure atmospheric transmission in the near-IR (2.2 - 4.3 µm) at high resolution (0.12 cm-1) through solar occultation observations. It therefore allows the derivation of unique remote sensing information about the vertical structure and composition of the Venus mesosphere, with very good spatial resolution. At Venus, SOIR is able to provide HCl vertical profiles ranging typically from 80 to 105 km, at both morning and evening terminators, where the dynamics of the planetary atmosphere are relatively unknown. At Mars, the high resolution of the instrument will make it possible to observe CH4, if any. We show here how these two approaches, laboratory and space missions, are complimentary, as broadening coefficients measured in the laboratory allow us to simulate perfectly HCl and CH4 lines as seen by SOIR.

  20. Pressure-loss and flow coefficients inside a chordwise-finned, impingement, convection, and film air-cooled turbine vane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hippensteele, S. A.

    1974-01-01

    Total-pressure-loss coefficients, flow discharge coefficients, and friction factors were determined experimentally for the various area and geometry changes and flow passages within an air-cooled turbine vane. The results are compared with those of others obtained on similar configurations, both actual and large models, of vane passages. The supply and exit air pressures were controlled and varied. The investigation was conducted with essentially ambient-temperature air and without external flow of air over the vane.

  1. Blood flow vs. venous pressure effects on filtration coefficient in oleic acid-injured lung.

    PubMed

    Anglade, D; Corboz, M; Menaouar, A; Parker, J C; Sanou, S; Bayat, S; Benchetrit, G; Grimbert, F A

    1998-03-01

    On the basis of changes in capillary filtration coefficient (Kfc) in 24 rabbit lungs, we determined whether elevations in pulmonary venous pressure (Ppv) or blood flow (BF) produced differences in filtration surface area in oleic acid-injured (OA) or control (Con) lungs. Lungs were cyclically ventilated and perfused under zone 3 conditions by using blood and 5% albumin with no pharmacological modulation of vascular tone. Pulmonary arterial, venous, and capillary pressures were measured by using arterial, venous, and double occlusion. Before and during each Kfc-measurement maneuver, microvascular/total vascular compliance was measured by using venous occlusion. Kfc was measured before and 30 min after injury, by using a Ppv elevation of 7 cmH2O or a BF elevation from 1 to 2 l . min-1 . 100 g-1 to obtain a similar double occlusion pressure. Pulmonary arterial pressure increased more with BF than with Ppv in both Con and OA lungs [29 +/- 2 vs. 19 +/- 0.7 (means +/- SE) cmH2O; P < 0. 001]. In OA lungs compared with Con lungs, values of Kfc (200 +/- 40 vs. 83 +/- 14%, respectively; P < 0.01) and microvascular/total vascular compliance ratio (86 +/- 4 vs. 68 +/- 5%, respectively; P < 0.01) increased more with BF than with Ppv. In conclusion, for a given OA-induced increase in hydraulic conductivity, BF elevation increased filtration surface area more than did Ppv elevation. The steep pulmonary pressure profile induced by increased BF could result in the recruitment of injured capillaries and could also shift downstream the compression point of blind (zone 1) and open injured vessels (zone 2).

  2. Effect of confining pressure on diffusion coefficients in clay-rich, low-permeability sedimentary rocks.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Y; Al, T; Mazurek, M

    2016-12-01

    The effect of confining pressure (CP) on the diffusion of tritiated-water (HTO) and iodide (I(-)) tracers through Ordovician rocks from the Michigan Basin, southwestern Ontario, Canada, and Opalinus Clay from Schlattingen, Switzerland was investigated in laboratory experiments. Four samples representing different formations and lithologies in the Michigan Basin were studied: Queenston Formation shale, Georgian Bay Formation shale, Cobourg Formation limestone and Cobourg Formation argillaceous limestone. Estimated in situ vertical stresses at the depths from which the samples were retrieved range from 12.0 to 17.4MPa (Michigan Basin) and from 21 to 23MPa (Opalinus Clay). Effective diffusion coefficients (De) were determined in through-diffusion experiments. With HTO tracer, applying CP resulted in decreases in De of 12.5% for the Queenston Formation shale (CPmax=12MPa), 30% for the Georgian Bay Formation shale (15MPa), 34% for the Cobourg Formation limestone (17.4MPa), 31% for the Cobourg Formation argillaceous limestone (17.4MPa) and 43-46% for the Opalinus Clay (15MPa). Decreases in De were larger for the I(-) tracer: 13.8% for the Queenston shale, 42% for the Georgian Bay shale, 50% for the Cobourg Formation limestone, 55% for the Cobourg Formation argillaceous limestone and 63-68% for the Opalinus Clay. The tracer-specific nature of the response is attributed to an increasing influence of anion exclusion as the pore size decreases at higher CP. Results from the shales (including Opalinus Clay) indicate that the pressure effect on De can be represented by a linear relationship between De and ln(CP), which provides valuable predictive capability. The nonlinearity results in a relatively small change in De at high CP, suggesting that it is not necessary to apply the exact in situ pressure conditions in order to obtain a good estimate of the in situ diffusion coefficient. Most importantly, the CP effect on shale is reversible (±12%) suggesting that, for

  3. Effect of confining pressure on diffusion coefficients in clay-rich, low-permeability sedimentary rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Y.; Al, T.; Mazurek, M.

    2016-12-01

    The effect of confining pressure (CP) on the diffusion of tritiated-water (HTO) and iodide (I-) tracers through Ordovician rocks from the Michigan Basin, southwestern Ontario, Canada, and Opalinus Clay from Schlattingen, Switzerland was investigated in laboratory experiments. Four samples representing different formations and lithologies in the Michigan Basin were studied: Queenston Formation shale, Georgian Bay Formation shale, Cobourg Formation limestone and Cobourg Formation argillaceous limestone. Estimated in situ vertical stresses at the depths from which the samples were retrieved range from 12.0 to 17.4 MPa (Michigan Basin) and from 21 to 23 MPa (Opalinus Clay). Effective diffusion coefficients (De) were determined in through-diffusion experiments. With HTO tracer, applying CP resulted in decreases in De of 12.5% for the Queenston Formation shale (CPmax = 12 MPa), 30% for the Georgian Bay Formation shale (15 MPa), 34% for the Cobourg Formation limestone (17.4 MPa), 31% for the Cobourg Formation argillaceous limestone (17.4 MPa) and 43-46% for the Opalinus Clay (15 MPa). Decreases in De were larger for the I- tracer: 13.8% for the Queenston shale, 42% for the Georgian Bay shale, 50% for the Cobourg Formation limestone, 55% for the Cobourg Formation argillaceous limestone and 63-68% for the Opalinus Clay. The tracer-specific nature of the response is attributed to an increasing influence of anion exclusion as the pore size decreases at higher CP. Results from the shales (including Opalinus Clay) indicate that the pressure effect on De can be represented by a linear relationship between De and ln(CP), which provides valuable predictive capability. The nonlinearity results in a relatively small change in De at high CP, suggesting that it is not necessary to apply the exact in situ pressure conditions in order to obtain a good estimate of the in situ diffusion coefficient. Most importantly, the CP effect on shale is reversible (± 12%) suggesting that, for

  4. Pressure-induced absorption coefficients for radiative transfer calculations in Titan's atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Courtin, Regis

    1988-01-01

    The semiempirical theory of Birnbaum and Cohen (1976) is used to calculate the FIR pressure-induced absorption (PIA) spectra of N2, CH4, N2 + Ar, N2 + CH4, and N2 + H2 under conditions like those in the Titan troposphere. The results are presented graphically and compared with published data from laboratory measurements of PIA in the same gases and mixtures (Dagg et al., 1986; Dore et al., 1986). Good agreement is obtained, with only a slight underestimation of PIA at 300-400/cm in the case of CH4. The absorption coefficients are presented in tables, and it is suggested that the present findings are of value for evaluating the effects of tropospheric clouds on the Titan FIR spectrum and studying the greenhouse effect near the Titan surface.

  5. Instrument for stable high temperature Seebeck coefficient and resistivity measurements under controlled oxygen partial pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Ihlefeld, Jon F.; Brown-Shaklee, Harlan James; Sharma, Peter Anand

    2015-04-28

    The transport properties of ceramic materials strongly depend on oxygen activity, which is tuned by changing the partial oxygen pressure (pO2) prior to and during measurement. Within, we describe an instrument for highly stable measurements of Seebeck coefficient and electrical resistivity at temperatures up to 1300 K with controlled oxygen partial pressure. An all platinum construction is used to avoid potential materials instabilities that can cause measurement drift. Two independent heaters are employed to establish a small temperature gradient for Seebeck measurements, while keeping the average temperature constant and avoiding errors associated with pO2-induced drifts in thermocouple readings. Oxygen equilibrium is monitored using both an O2 sensor and the transient behavior of the resistance as a proxy. A pO2 range of 10-25–100 atm can be established with appropriate gas mixtures. Seebeck measurements were calibrated against a high purity platinum wire, Pt/Pt–Rh thermocouple wire, and a Bi2Te3 Seebeck coefficient Standard Reference Material. To demonstrate the utility of this instrument for oxide materials we present measurements as a function of pO2 on a 1 % Nb-doped SrTiO3 single crystal, and show systematic changes in properties consistent with oxygen vacancy defect chemistry. Thus, an approximately 11% increase in power factor over a pO2 range of 10-19–10-8 atm at 973 K for the donor-doped single crystals is observed.

  6. Instrument for stable high temperature Seebeck coefficient and resistivity measurements under controlled oxygen partial pressure

    DOE PAGES

    Ihlefeld, Jon F.; Brown-Shaklee, Harlan James; Sharma, Peter Anand

    2015-04-28

    The transport properties of ceramic materials strongly depend on oxygen activity, which is tuned by changing the partial oxygen pressure (pO2) prior to and during measurement. Within, we describe an instrument for highly stable measurements of Seebeck coefficient and electrical resistivity at temperatures up to 1300 K with controlled oxygen partial pressure. An all platinum construction is used to avoid potential materials instabilities that can cause measurement drift. Two independent heaters are employed to establish a small temperature gradient for Seebeck measurements, while keeping the average temperature constant and avoiding errors associated with pO2-induced drifts in thermocouple readings. Oxygen equilibriummore » is monitored using both an O2 sensor and the transient behavior of the resistance as a proxy. A pO2 range of 10-25–100 atm can be established with appropriate gas mixtures. Seebeck measurements were calibrated against a high purity platinum wire, Pt/Pt–Rh thermocouple wire, and a Bi2Te3 Seebeck coefficient Standard Reference Material. To demonstrate the utility of this instrument for oxide materials we present measurements as a function of pO2 on a 1 % Nb-doped SrTiO3 single crystal, and show systematic changes in properties consistent with oxygen vacancy defect chemistry. Thus, an approximately 11% increase in power factor over a pO2 range of 10-19–10-8 atm at 973 K for the donor-doped single crystals is observed.« less

  7. Temperature and pressure dependence of dichloro-difluoromethane (CF2C12) absorption coefficients for CO2 waveguide laser radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harward, C. N.

    1977-01-01

    Measurements were performed to determine the pressure and temperature dependence of CFM-12 absorption coefficients for CO2 waveguide laser radiation. The absorption coefficients of CFM-12 for CO2 waveguide laser radiation were found to have no spectral structure within small spectral bandwidths around the CO2 waveguide laser lines in the CO2 spectral band for pressures above 20 torr. All of the absorption coefficients for the CO2 laser lines studied are independent of pressure above 100 torr, except for the P(36) laser CO2 spectral band. The absorption coefficients associated with the P(42) line in the same band showed the greatest change with temperature, and it also has the largest value of all the lines studied.

  8. Air- and N2-Broadening Coefficients and Pressure-Shift Coefficients in the C-12(O2-16) Laser Bands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devi, V. Malathy; Benner, D. Chris; Smith, Mary Ann H.; Rinsland, Curtis P.

    1998-01-01

    In this paper we report the pressure broadening and the pressure-induced line shift coefficients for 46 individual rovibrational lines in both the (12)C(16)O2, 00(sup 0)1-(10(sup 0)0-02(sup 0)0)I, and 00(sup 0)1-(10(sup 0)0-02(sup 0)0)II, laser bands (laser band I centered at 960.959/cm and laser band II centered at 1063.735/cm) determined from spectra recorded with the McMath-Pierce Fourier transform spectrometer. The results were obtained from analysis of 10 long-path laboratory absorption spectra recorded at room temperature using a multispectrum nonlinear least-squares technique. Pressure effects caused by both air and nitrogen have been investigated. The air-broadening coefficients determined in this study agree well with the values in the 1996 HITRAN database; ratios and standard deviations of the ratios of the present air-broadening measurements to the 1996 HITRAN values for the two laser bands are: 1.005(15) for laser band I and 1.005(14) for laser band II. Broadening by nitrogen is 3 to 4% larger than that of air. The pressure-induced line shift coefficients are found to be transition dependent and different for the P- and R-branch lines with same J" value. No noticeable differences in the shift coefficients caused by air and nitrogen were found. The results obtained are compared with available values previously reported in the literature.

  9. Validity of the Ruff-MKW boiling point method: Vapor pressures, diffusion coefficients in argon and helium, and viscosity coefficients for gaseous cadmium and zinc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahlbeck, P. G.; Myers, D. L.; Truong, V. V.

    1985-09-01

    The Ruff-MKW boiling point method is used to determine equilibrium vapor pressures greater than 660 Pa (5 Torr). Samples are vaporized from a Ruff cell, which has a capillary exit, in the presence of an inert gas. Viscosity coefficients and gaseous interdiffusion coefficients may be determined also. This is a second study of the method using Cd(l) and Zn(l) as samples. For the first study with CsCl(l), see J. Chem. Phys. 81, 915 (1984). Vapor pressure data are in good agreement with previous data and gave a third-law ΔsubH0(298) for Cd(s) of 111.95±0.42 kJ/mol and for Zn(s) of 130.65±0.48 kJ/mol. Analyses of the diffusion coefficients gave atomic diameters of 4.06×10-10 m for Cd and 3.46×10-10 m for Zn; these values are somewhat larger than previously measured values. In these experiments when the equilibrium vapor pressures were greater than 13 000 Pa (100 Torr), the need to consider heat transfer from the furnace to the vaporizing sample was noted, i.e., sample cooling occured due to rapid vaporization. Validity of the MKW analysis was found.

  10. Measurements of Pressure Distributions and Force Coefficients in a Squeeze Film Damper. Part 1: Fully Open Ended Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jung, S. Y.; Sanandres, Luis A.; Vance, J. M.

    1991-01-01

    Measurements of pressure distributions and force coefficients were carried out in two types of squeeze film dampers, executing a circular centered orbit, an open-ended configuration, and a partially sealed one, in order to investigate the effect of fluid inertia and cavitation on pressure distributions and force coefficients. Dynamic pressure measurements were carried out for two orbit radii, epsilon 0.5 and 0.8. It was found that the partially sealed configuration was less influenced by fluid inertia than the open ended configuration.

  11. Osmotic virial coefficients of hydroxyethyl starch from aqueous hydroxyethyl starch-sodium chloride vapor pressure osmometry.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jingjiang; Gier, Martin; Ross-Rodriguez, Lisa U; Prasad, Vinay; Elliott, Janet A W; Sputtek, Andreas

    2013-09-05

    Hydroxyethyl starch (HES) is an important industrial additive in the paper, textile, food, and cosmetic industries and has been shown to be an effective cryoprotectant for red blood cells; however, little is known about its thermodynamic solution properties. In many applications, in particular those in biology, HES is used in an aqueous solution with sodium chloride (NaCl). The osmotic virial solution thermodynamics approach accurately captures the dependence of osmolality on molality for many types of solutes in aqueous systems, including electrolytes, sugars, alcohols, proteins, and starches. Elliott et al. proposed mixing rules for the osmotic virial equation to be used for osmolality of multisolute aqueous solutions [Elliott, J. A. W.; et al. J. Phys. Chem. B 2007, 111, 1775-1785] and recently applied this approach to the fitting of one set of aqueous HES-NaCl solution data reported by Jochem and Körber [Cryobiology 1987, 24, 513-536], indicating that the HES osmotic virial coefficients are dependent on HES-to-NaCl mass ratios. The current study reports new aqueous HES-NaCl vapor pressure osmometry data which are analyzed using the osmotic virial equation. HES modifications were measured after dialysis (membrane cut off: 10,000 g/mol) and freeze-drying using vapor pressure osmometry at different mass ratios of HES to NaCl for HES up to 50% and NaCl up to 25% with three different HES modifications (weight average molecular weights [g/mol]/degree of substitution: 40,000/0.5; 200,000/0.5; 450,000/0.7). Equations were then fit to the data to provide a model for HES osmotic virial coefficient dependence on mass ratio of HES to NaCl. The osmolality data of the three HES modifications were accurately described over a broad range of HES-to-NaCl mass ratios using only four parameters, illustrating the power of the osmotic virial approach in analyzing complex data sets. As expected, the second osmotic virial coefficients increase with molecular weight of the HES and

  12. Screening of octanol-water partition coefficients for pharmaceuticals by pressure-assisted microemulsion electrokinetic chromatography.

    PubMed

    Jia, Zhongjiang; Mei, Lijie; Lin, Fangling; Huang, Sujuan; Killion, Robert B

    2003-07-25

    A rapid screening assay for the determination of octanol-water partition coefficients (log P(OW)) of pharmaceuticals was developed by using pressure-assisted microemulsion electrokinetic chromatography (MEEKC). The microemulsion system contains 50 mM sodium dodecyl sulfate, 0.87 M l-butanol, 82 mM heptane, and 50 mM borate-phosphate (2:3) at pH 10. Ten standard compounds with known log P(OW) values from -0.26 to 4.88 were used for constructing the calibration curve of log P(OW) against the MEEKC retention factor, log k. The log P(OW) values of the compounds were calculated based on the log k values measured by MEEKC and the slope and intercept of the calibration curve. For 13 literature and 32 Roche compounds, about 90% of the log P(OW) values measured by MEEKC are within 0.5 log units of the values from the literature and potentiometric titration. The throughput is about 2 samples/h using +20 kV voltage plus 5 mbar air pressure for separation. This MEEKC method is applicable for log P(OW) screening of weakly basic, weakly acidic, and neutral pharmaceuticals with log P(OW) = 0-5 and pKa < or = 10.

  13. Water absorption lines, 931-961 nm - Selected intensities, N2-collision-broadening coefficients, self-broadening coefficients, and pressure shifts in air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giver, L. P.; Gentry, B.; Schwemmer, G.; Wilkerson, T. D.

    1982-01-01

    Intensities were measured for 97 lines of H2O vapor between 932 and 961 nm. The lines were selected for their potential usefulness for remote laser measurements of H2O vapor in the earth's atmosphere. The spectra were obtained with several different H2O vapor abundances and N2 broadening gas pressures; the spectral resolution was 0.046/cm FWHM. Measured H2O line intensities range from 7 x 10 to the -25th to 7 x 10 to the -22nd/cm per (molecules/sq cm). H2O self-broadening coefficients were measured for 13 of these strongest lines; the mean value was 0.5/cm per atm. N2-collision-broadening coefficients were measured for 73 lines, and the average was 0.11 cm per atm HWHM. Pressure shifts in air were determined for a sample of six lines between 948 and 950 nm; these lines shift to lower frequency by an amount comparable to 0.1 of the collision-broadened widths measured in air or N2. The measured intensities of many lines of 300-000 band are much larger than expected from prior computations, in some cases by over an order of magnitude. Coriolis interactions with the stronger 201-000 band appear to be the primary cause of the enhancement of these line intensities.

  14. Interpretation of negative second virial coefficients from non-attractive protein solution osmotic pressure data: an alternate perspective.

    PubMed

    McBride, Devin W; Rodgers, V G J

    2013-12-31

    A negative second virial coefficient has long been a predictor of potential protein crystallization and salting out. However, the assumption that this is due to attractive solute-solute interactions remains a source of debate. Here we reexamine the second virial coefficient from protein osmometry in terms of the free-solvent model. The free-solvent model has been shown to provide excellent predictions of the osmotic pressure of concentrated and crowded environments for aqueous protein solutions in moderate ionic strengths. The free-solvent model relies on two critical parameters, hydration and ion binding, both which can be determined independently of osmotic pressure data. Herein, the free-solvent model is mathematically represented as a virial expansion model and the second virial coefficient is expressed in terms of solute-solvent interactions, namely hydration and ion binding. Hydration and ion binding values are then used to estimate the second virial coefficient at various protein concentrations for three model proteins ovalbumin (OVA), bovine serum albumin (BSA), and hen egg lysozyme (HEL) in various monovalent salt aqueous solutions. The results show that the conditions for obtaining a negative second virial coefficient emerge when the ionic strength of the influenced region of the protein is higher than that of the bulk. This analysis suggests a plausible explanation as to why proteins are more favorable for salting out or crystallization when the solution is represented by a negative second virial coefficient.

  15. The superconducting gap ratio, isotope-shift exponent and pressure coefficient of Tc for high- Tc systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, A. N.; Sarkar, Sujit

    1996-02-01

    The superconducting gap ratio, isotope-shift exponent and the pressure co-efficient of the superconducting transition temperature are studied within different models proposed for high- Tc cuprate oxide systems. A comparison with the experimental results of high- Tc oxide systems is made.

  16. COMPUTATIONAL CHEMISTRY METHOD FOR PREDICTING VAPOR PRESSURES AND ACTIVITY COEFFICIENTS OF POLAR ORGANIC OXYGENATES IN PM2.5

    EPA Science Inventory

    Parameterizations of interactions of polar multifunctional organic oxygenates in PM2.5 must be included in aerosol chemistry models for evaluating control strategies for reducing ambient concentrations of PM2.5 compounds. Vapor pressures and activity coefficients of these compo...

  17. COMPUTATIONAL CHEMISTRY METHOD FOR PREDICTING VAPOR PRESSURES AND ACTIVITY COEFFICIENTS OF POLAR ORGANIC OXYGENATES IN PM2.5

    EPA Science Inventory

    Parameterizations of interactions of polar multifunctional organic oxygenates in PM2.5 must be included in aerosol chemistry models for evaluating control strategies for reducing ambient concentrations of PM2.5 compounds. Vapor pressures and activity coefficients of these compo...

  18. Vapor pressures and evaporation coefficients for melts of ferromagnesian chondrule-like compositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedkin, A. V.; Grossman, L.; Ghiorso, M. S.

    2006-01-01

    To determine evaporation coefficients for the major gaseous species that evaporate from silicate melts, the Hertz-Knudsen equation was used to model the compositions of residues of chondrule analogs produced by evaporation in vacuum by Hashimoto [Hashimoto A. (1983) Evaporation metamorphism in the early solar nebula-evaporation experiments on the melt FeO-MgO-SiO 2-CaO-Al 2O 3 and chemical fractionations of primitive materials. Geochem. J. 17, 111-145] and Wang et al. [Wang J., Davis A. M., Clayton R. N., Mayeda T. K., Hashimoto A. (2001) Chemical and isotopic fractionation during the evaporation of the FeO-MgO-SiO 2-CaO-Al 2O 3-TiO 2 rare earth element melt system. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 65, 479-494], in vacuum and in H 2 by Yu et al. [Yu Y., Hewins R. H., Alexander C. M. O'D., Wang J. (2003) Experimental study of evaporation and isotopic mass fractionation of potassium in silicate melts. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 67, 773-786], and in H 2 by Cohen et al. [Cohen B. A., Hewins R. H., Alexander C. M. O'D. (2004) The formation of chondrules by open-system melting of nebular condensates. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 68, 1661-1675]. Vapor pressures were calculated using the thermodynamic model of Ghiorso and Sack [Ghiorso M. S., Sack R. O. (1995) Chemical mass transfer in magmatic processes IV. A revised and internally consistent thermodynamic model for the interpolation and extrapolation of liquid-solid equilibria in magmatic systems at elevated temperatures and pressures. Contrib. Mineral. Petrol. 119, 197-212], except for the late, FeO-free stages of the Wang et al. (2001) and Cohen et al. (2004) experiments, where the CMAS activity model of Berman [Berman R. G. (1983) A thermodynamic model for multicomponent melts, with application to the system CaO-MgO-Al 2O 3-SiO 2. Ph.D. thesis, University of British Columbia] was used. From these vapor pressures, evaporation coefficients ( α) were obtained that give the best fits to the time variation of the residue compositions

  19. Vapor pressures, gas-phase PVT properties, and second virial coefficients for 1,1,1-trifluoroethane

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, H.L.; Sato, Haruki; Watanabe, Koichi

    1995-07-01

    The PVT properties of 1,1,1-trifluoroethane (R-143a) in the gas phase have been measured by a Burnett apparatus in the range of temperatures from 320 to 380 K and at pressures up to 6 MPa. The vapor pressures in the range of temperatures from 295 to 342 K have also been measured, and a vapor-pressure correlation has been developed. The critical pressure was determined to be (3.776 {+-} 0.005) MPa on the basis of the present measurements. The second virial coefficients have been determined along seven isotherms, and a truncated virial equation of state has also been developed to represent the temperature dependence of the second virial coefficients and the present Burnett PVT measurements. The experimental uncertainties of temperature, pressure, density, and second virial coefficient throughout the present study were estimated to be no more than {+-} 8 mK, {+-} 0.8 kPa, {+-} 0.12%, and {+-} 5%, respectively. The purity of the R-143a sample used was better than 99.95 mol %.

  20. Capillary-based instrument for the simultaneous measurement of solution viscosity and solute diffusion coefficient at pressures up to 2000 bar and implications for ultrahigh pressure liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, Theodore J; Thompson, J Will; Mellors, J Scott; Jorgenson, James W

    2009-04-15

    An instrument based on the Poiseuille flow principle capable of measuring solution viscosities at high pressures has been modified to observe UV-absorbent analytes in order to allow for the simultaneous measurement of analyte diffusivity. A capillary time-of-flight (CTOF) instrument was used to measure the viscosity of acetonitrile-water mixtures in all decade volume percent increments and the corresponding diffusion coefficients of small aromatic molecules in these solvent mixtures from atmospheric pressure to 2000 bar (approximately 30,000 psi) at 25 degrees C. The instrument works by utilizing a relatively small pressure drop (<100 bar) across a fused-silica capillary which has both the inlet and outlet pressurized so that the average column pressure can be significantly elevated (up to 2000 bar). Measurements with this instrument agree with high-pressure viscosity data collected previously using a CTOF viscometer, as well as with literature values obtained with falling-body viscometers of the Bridgman design. It has been further determined that, for the small molecules included in this study, trends in solute diffusivity with respect to pressure follow the predictions of the Stokes-Einstein equation when the solvent viscosity is corrected as a function of pressure. Because the instrument described herein determines viscosity and diffusivity independently, the effect of pressure on analyte hydrodynamic radius can also be monitored. An analysis of ultrahigh pressure liquid chromatography (UHPLC) data was performed using the pressure-corrected diffusion coefficient of hydroquinone to demonstrate the effect of this phenomenon on the analysis of chromatographic performance.

  1. Effect of Interfacial Turbulence and Accommodation Coefficient on CFD Predictions of Pressurization and Pressure Control in Cryogenic Storage Tank

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kassemi, Mohammad; Kartuzova, Olga; Hylton, Sonya

    2015-01-01

    Laminar models agree closely with the pressure evolution and vapor phase temperature stratification but under-predict liquid temperatures. Turbulent SST k-w and k-e models under-predict the pressurization rate and extent of stratification in the vapor but represent liquid temperature distributions fairly well. These conclusions seem to equally apply to large cryogenic tank simulations as well as small scale simulant fluid pressurization cases. Appropriate turbulent models that represent both interfacial and bulk vapor phase turbulence with greater fidelity are needed. Application of LES models to the tank pressurization problem can serve as a starting point.

  2. Whole-body systemic transcapillary filtration rates, coefficients, and isogravimetric capillary pressures in Bufo marinus and Rana catesbeiana.

    PubMed

    Hancock, T V; Hoagland, T M; Hillman, S S

    2000-01-01

    Whole-body and organ-level transcapillary filtration rates and coefficients are virtually unexamined in ectothermal vertebrates. These filtration rates appear to be greater than in mammals when plasma volume shifts and lymphatic function are analyzed. Gravimetric techniques monitoring whole-body mass changes were used to estimate net systemic filtration in Bufo marinus and Rana catesbeiana while perfusing with low-protein Ringer's and manipulating venous pressure. Capillary pressures were estimated from arterial and venous pressures after measuring the venous to arterial resistance ratio of 0.23. The capillary filtration coefficient (CFC) for the two species was 25.2+/-1.47 mL min-1 kg-1 kPa-1. Isogravimetric capillary pressure (Pci), the pressure at which net fluid is neither filtered nor reabsorbed, was 1.12+/-0.054 kPa and was confirmed by an independent method. None of these variables showed a significant interspecific difference. The anuran CFC and Pci are significantly higher than those found using the same method on rats (7.6+/-2.04 mL min-1 kg-1 kPa-1 and 0.3+/-0.37 kPa, respectively) and those commonly reported in mammals. Despite the high CFC, the high Pci predicts that little net filtration will occur at resting in vivo capillary pressures.

  3. Spatial dispersion effects in spectral line broadening by pressure. I. The Bouguer Law and absorption coefficient

    SciTech Connect

    Cherkasov, M.R.

    1995-04-01

    Based on the general principles of semiclassical electrodynamics, the Bouguer law is derived, and the expression for the absorption coefficient is obtained, formally including all effects related to the phenomenon of spatial dispersion.

  4. Activity coefficients and free energies of nonionic mixed surfactant solutions from vapor-pressure and freezing-point osmometry.

    PubMed

    MacNeil, Jennifer A; Ray, Gargi Basu; Leaist, Derek G

    2011-05-19

    The thermodynamic properties of mixed surfactant solutions are widely investigated, prompted by numerous practical applications of these systems and by interest in molecular association and self-organization. General techniques for measuring thermodynamic activities, such as isopiestic equilibration, are well-established for multicomponent solutions. Surprisingly, these techniques have not yet been applied to mixed surfactant solutions, despite the importance of the free energy for micelle stability. In this study, equations are developed for the osmotic coefficients of solutions of nonionic surfactant A + nonionic surfactant B. A mass-action model is used, with virial equations for the activity coefficients of the micelles and free surfactant monomer species. The equations are fitted to osmotic coefficients of aqueous decylsulfobetaine + dodecylsulfobetaine solutions measured by vapor-pressure and freezing-point osmometry. Equilibrium constants for mixed-micelle formation are calculated from the free monomer concentrations at the critical micelle concentrations. The derived activity coefficients of the micelles and free monomers indicate large departures from ideal solution behavior, even for dilute solutions of the surfactants. Stoichiometric activity coefficients of the total surfactant components are evaluated by Gibbs-Duhem integration of the osmotic coefficients. Relatively simple colligative property measurements hold considerable promise for free energy studies of multicomponent surfactant solutions.

  5. Pressure coefficient evaluation on the surface of the SONDA III model tested in the TTP Pilot Transonic Wind Tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reis, M. L. C. C.; Falcao Filho, J. B. P.; Basso, E.; Caldas, V. R.

    2015-02-01

    A test campaign of the Brazilian sounding rocket Sonda III was carried out at the Pilot Transonic Wind Tunnel, TTP. The aim of the campaign was to investigate aerodynamic phenomena taking place at the connection region of the first and second stages. Shock and expansion waves are expected at this location causing high gradients in airflow properties around the vehicle. Pressure taps located on the surface of a Sonda III half model measure local static pressures. Other measured parameters were freestream static and total pressures of the airflow. Estimated parameters were pressure coefficients and Mach numbers. Uncertainties associated with the estimated parameters were calculated by employing the Law of Propagation of Uncertainty and the Monte Carlo method. It was found that both uncertainty evaluation methods resulted in similar values. A Computational Fluid Dynamics simulation code was elaborated to help understand the changes in the flow field properties caused by the disturbances.

  6. Pressure distribution and aerodynamic coefficients associated with heat addition to supersonic air stream adjacent to two-dimensional supersonic wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinkel, I Irving; Serafini, John S; Gregg, John L

    1952-01-01

    The modifications in the pressure distributions and the aerodynamic coefficients associated with additions of heat to the two-dimensional supersonic in viscid flow field adjacetnt to the lower surface of of a 5-percent-thickness symmetrical circular-arc wing are presented in this report. The pressure distributions are obtained by the use of graphical method which gives the two-dimensional supersonic inviscid flow field obtained with moderate heat addition. The variation is given of the lift-drag ratio and of the aerodynamic coefficients of lift, drag, and moment with free stream Mach number, angle of attack, and parameters defining extent and amount of heat addition. The six graphical solutions used in this study included Mach numbers of 3.0 and 5.0 and angles of attack of 0 degrees and 2 degrees.

  7. Application of deterministic chaos theory to local instantaneous temperature, pressure, and heat transfer coefficients in a gas fluidized bed

    SciTech Connect

    Karamavruc, A.I.; Clark, N.N.

    1996-09-01

    A stainless steel heat transfer tube, carrying a hot water flow, was placed in a cold bubbling fluidized bed. The tube was instrumented in the circumferential direction with five fast-responding surface thermocouples and a vertical pressure differential sensor. The local temperature and pressure data were measured simultaneously at a frequency of 120 Hz. Additionally, the local instantaneous heat transfer coefficient was evaluated by solving the transient two-dimensional heat conduction equation across the tube wall numerically. The mutual information function (MIF) has been applied to the signals to observe the relationship between points separated in time. MIF was also used to provide the most appropriate time delay constant {tau} to reconstruct an m-dimensional phase portrait of the one-dimensional time series. The distinct variation of MIF around the tube indicates the variations of solid-surface contact in the circumferential direction. The correlation coefficient was evaluated to calculate the correlation exponent {nu}, which is closely related to the fractal dimension. The correlation exponent is a measure of the strange attractor. The minimum embedding dimension as well as the degrees of freedom of the system were evaluated via the correlation coefficient. Kolmogorov entropies of the signals were approximated by using the correlation coefficient. Kolmogorov entropy considers the inherent multi-dimensional nature of chaotic data. A positive estimation of Kolmogorov entropy is an indication of the chaotic nature of the signal. The Kolmogorov entropies of the temperature data around the tube were found to be between 10 bits/s and 24 bits/s. A comparison between the signals has shown that the local instantaneous heat transfer coefficient exhibits a higher degree of chaos than the local temperature and pressure signals.

  8. Experimental verification of heat transfer coefficient for nucleate boiling at sub-atmospheric pressure and small heat fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zajaczkowski, Bartosz; Halon, Tomasz; Krolicki, Zbigniew

    2016-02-01

    In this paper we study the influence of sub-atmospheric pressure on nucleate boiling. Sixteen correlations for pool boiling available in literature are gathered and evaluated. Analysis is performed in the pressure range 1-10 kPa and for heat flux densities 10-45 kW/m2. Superheats are set between 6.2 and 28.7 K. The results of calculations were compared with experimental values for the same parameters. The experiments were conducted using isolated glass cylinder and water boiling above the copper plate. Results show that low pressure adjust the character of boiling curve—the curve flattened and the natural convection region of boiling is shifted towards higher wall temperature superheats due to the influence of low pressure on the bubble creation and process of its departure. In result, 8 of 16 analyzed correlations were determined as completely invalid in subatmospheric conditions and the remaining set of equations was compared to experimental results. Experimentally obtained values of heat transfer coefficients are between 1 and 2 kW/m2K. With mean absolute deviation (MAD) we have found that the most accurate approximation of heat transfer coefficient is obtained using Mostinski reduced pressure correlation (0.13-0.35 MAD) and Labuntsov correlation (0.12-0.89 MAD).

  9. Experimental and numerical investigation of pressure drop and heat transfer coefficient in converging-diverging microchannel heat sink

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakravarthii, M. K. Dheepan; Mutharasu, D.; Shanmugan, S.

    2017-07-01

    The major challenge in microelectronic chips is to eliminate the generated heat for stable and reliable operation of the devices. Microchannel heat sinks are efficient method to dissipate high heat flux. The pressure drop and heat transfer coefficient are the important parameters which determine the thermal-hydraulic performance of the microchannel heat sink. In this study, a converging-diverging (CD) microchannel heat sink was experimentally investigated for the variation of pressure drop and heat transfer coefficient. De-ionized water was considered as the working fluid. Experiments were conducted for single phase fluid flow with mass flow rate and heat flux ranging from 0.001232 to 0.01848 kg/s and 10-50 W/cm2 respectively. The fluid and solid temperature were measured to calculate the heat transfer coefficients. Numerical results were computed using the CFD software and validated against the experimental results. The CD microchannel possesses high heat transfer coefficient than the straight microchannels. Theoretical correlations were proposed for comparing the experimental Nusselt number of CD microchannel. Evaluation of thermal-hydraulic performance of CD microchannel is important to quantify its applications in electronics cooling.

  10. Reaction of hydroxyl radicals with C4H5N (pyrrole): temperature and pressure dependent rate coefficients.

    PubMed

    Dillon, Terry J; Tucceri, Maria E; Dulitz, Katrin; Horowitz, Abraham; Vereecken, Luc; Crowley, John N

    2012-06-21

    Absolute (pulsed laser photolysis, 4-639 Torr N(2) or air, 240-357 K) and relative rate methods (50 and 760 Torr air, 296 K) were used to measure rate coefficients k(1) for the title reaction, OH + C(4)H(5)N → products (R1). Although the pressure and temperature dependent rate coefficient is adequately represented by a falloff parametrization, calculations of the potential energy surface indicate a complex reaction system with multiple reaction paths (addition only) in the falloff regime. At 298 K and 760 Torr (1 Torr = 1.33 mbar) the rate coefficient obtained from the parametrization is k(1) = (1.28 ± 0.1) × 10(-10) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1), in good agreement with the value of (1.10 ± 0.27) × 10(-10) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) obtained in the relative rate study (relative to C(5)H(8), isoprene) at this temperature and pressure. The accuracy of the absolute rate coefficient determination was enhanced by online optical absorption measurements of the C(4)H(5)N concentration at 184.95 nm using a value σ(184.95nm) = (1.26 ± 0.02) × 10(-17) cm(2) molecule(-1), which was determined in this work.

  11. Experimental and numerical investigation of pressure drop and heat transfer coefficient in converging-diverging microchannel heat sink

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakravarthii, M. K. Dheepan; Mutharasu, D.; Shanmugan, S.

    2017-01-01

    The major challenge in microelectronic chips is to eliminate the generated heat for stable and reliable operation of the devices. Microchannel heat sinks are efficient method to dissipate high heat flux. The pressure drop and heat transfer coefficient are the important parameters which determine the thermal-hydraulic performance of the microchannel heat sink. In this study, a converging-diverging (CD) microchannel heat sink was experimentally investigated for the variation of pressure drop and heat transfer coefficient. De-ionized water was considered as the working fluid. Experiments were conducted for single phase fluid flow with mass flow rate and heat flux ranging from 0.001232 to 0.01848 kg/s and 10-50 W/cm2 respectively. The fluid and solid temperature were measured to calculate the heat transfer coefficients. Numerical results were computed using the CFD software and validated against the experimental results. The CD microchannel possesses high heat transfer coefficient than the straight microchannels. Theoretical correlations were proposed for comparing the experimental Nusselt number of CD microchannel. Evaluation of thermal-hydraulic performance of CD microchannel is important to quantify its applications in electronics cooling.

  12. Influence of the marvelous™ three-way stopcock on the natural frequency and damping coefficient in blood pressure transducer kits.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Shigeki Joseph Luke; Tachihara, Keiichi; Mori, Satoshi; Ouchi, Kentaro; Itakura, Shoko; Yasuda, Michiko; Hitosugi, Takashi; Imaizumi, Uno; Miki, Yoichiro; Toyoguchi, Izumi; Yoshida, Kazu-Ichi; Yokoyama, Takeshi

    2017-01-10

    Two types of Planecta™ ports are commonly used as sampling ports in blood pressure transducer kits: a flat-type port (FTP) and a port with a three-way stopcock (PTS). Recently, a new type of three-way stopcock (Marvelous™) has been released as a Planecta™ counterpart, but its effects on the frequency characteristics and reliability of blood pressure monitoring have not been investigated. We assessed the influence of the Marvelous™ stopcock on the frequency characteristics of the pressure transducer kit. The basic pressure transducer kit, DT4812J, was modified by replacing one or two of the original three-way stopcocks with Marvelous™ stopcocks. The frequency characteristics (i.e., natural frequency and damping coefficient) of each kit were determined using wave parameter analysis software, and subsequently evaluated on a Gardner chart. Replacement of the original blood pressure transducer kit stopcocks with Marvelous™ stopcocks decreased the natural frequency (48.3 Hz) to 46.3 Hz or 44.8 Hz, respectively; the damping coefficient was not significantly changed. Plotting the data on a Gardner chart revealed that the changes fell within the adequate dynamic response region, indicating they were within the allowable range. Insertion of Marvelous™ stopcocks slightly affects the natural frequency of the pressure transducer kit, similar to inserting a PTS. The results indicate that the Marvelous™ stopcock is useful for accurate monitoring of arterial blood pressure, and may be recommended when insertion of two or more closed-loop blood sampling systems is necessary.

  13. CFD Modeling of the Multipurpose Hydrogen Test Bed (MHTB) Self-Pressurization and Spray Bar Mixing Experiments in Normal Gravity: Effect of Accommodation Coefficient on the Tank Pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kartuzova, Olga; Kassemi, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a computational model that describes pressure control phase of a typical MHTB experiment will be presented. The fidelity of the model will be assessed by comparing the models predictions with MHTB experimental data. In this paper CFD results for MHTB spray bar cooling case with 50 tank fill ratio will be presented and analyzed. Effect of accommodation coefficient for calculating droplet-ullage mass transfer will be evaluated.

  14. Pressure broadening coefficients for the 811.5nm Ar line and 811.3nm Kr line in rare gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghildina, A. R.; Mikheyev, P. A.; Chernyshov, A. K.; Ufimtsev, N. I.; Azyazov, V. N.; Heaven, M. C.

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes systematic measurements of pressure broadening coefficients for argon and krypton lines in an RF (radio-frequency) discharge plasma sustained in a mixture of inert gases. Using tunable diode laser spectroscopy we obtained experimental data for pressure broadening of argon and krypton lines. Pressure broadening coefficients were determined for Ar+Ne and Kr+Ne and Kr+Ar. For krypton, the isotopic structure of the line was taken into account and an appropriate fitting function was used to determine pressure broadening coefficients for the natural mixture of isotopes. These data may be used for diagnostics of the active medium of optically pumped all-rare-gas lasers.

  15. Determination of oral mucosal Poisson's ratio and coefficient of friction from in-vivo contact pressure measurements.

    PubMed

    Chen, Junning; Suenaga, Hanako; Hogg, Michael; Li, Wei; Swain, Michael; Li, Qing

    2016-01-01

    Despite their considerable importance to biomechanics, there are no existing methods available to directly measure apparent Poisson's ratio and friction coefficient of oral mucosa. This study aimed to develop an inverse procedure to determine these two biomechanical parameters by utilizing in vivo experiment of contact pressure between partial denture and beneath mucosa through nonlinear finite element (FE) analysis and surrogate response surface (RS) modelling technique. First, the in vivo denture-mucosa contact pressure was measured by a tactile electronic sensing sheet. Second, a 3D FE model was constructed based on the patient CT images. Third, a range of apparent Poisson's ratios and the coefficients of friction from literature was considered as the design variables in a series of FE runs for constructing a RS surrogate model. Finally, the discrepancy between computed in silico and measured in vivo results was minimized to identify the best matching Poisson's ratio and coefficient of friction. The established non-invasive methodology was demonstrated effective to identify such biomechanical parameters of oral mucosa and can be potentially used for determining the biomaterial properties of other soft biological tissues.

  16. Evaluation of interfacial mass transfer coefficient as a function of temperature and pressure in carbon dioxide/normal alkane systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikkhou, Fatemeh; Keshavarz, Peyman; Ayatollahi, Shahab; Jahromi, Iman Raoofi; Zolghadr, Ali

    2015-04-01

    CO2 gas injection is known as one of the most popular enhanced oil recovery techniques for light and medium oil reservoirs, therefore providing an acceptable mass transfer mechanism for CO2-oil systems seems necessary. In this study, interfacial mass transfer coefficient has been evaluated for CO2-normal heptane and CO2-normal hexadecane systems using equilibrium and dynamic interfacial tension data, which have been measured using the pendant drop method. Interface mass transfer coefficient has been calculated as a function of temperature and pressure in the range of 313-393 K and 1.7-8.6 MPa, respectively. The results showed that the interfacial resistance is a parameter that can control the mass transfer process for some CO2-normal alkane systems, and cannot be neglected. Additionally, it was found that interface mass transfer coefficient increased with pressure. However, the variation of this parameter with temperature did not show a clear trend and it was strongly dependent on the variation of diffusivity and solubility of CO2 in the liquid phase.

  17. Section drag coefficients from pressure probe transverses of a wing wake at low speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montoya, L. C.; Bikle, P. F.; Banner, R. D.

    1978-01-01

    An in-flight wing wake section drag investigation was conducted using traversing pitot and static probes. The primary objective was to develop measurement techniques and improve the accuracy of in-flight wing profile drag measurements for low values of dynamic pressure and Reynolds number. Data were obtained on a sailplane for speeds from about 40 knots to 125 knots at chord Reynolds numbers between 1,000,000 and 3,000,000. Tests were conducted with zero flap deflection, deflected flaps, and various degrees of surface roughness, and for smooth and rough atmospheric conditions. Several techniques were used to increase data reliability and to minimize certain bias errors. A discussion of the effects of a total pressure probe in a pressure gradient, and the effects of discrete turbulence levels, on the data presented and other experimental results is also included.

  18. A comparison of experimental and theoretical results for leakage, pressure distribution, and rotordynamic coefficients for annular gas seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicks, C. O.; Childs, D. W.

    1984-01-01

    The importance of seal behavior in rotordynamics is discussed and current annular seal theory is reviewed. A Nelson's analytical-computational method for determining rotordynamic coefficients for this type of compressible-flow seal is outlined. Various means for the experimental identification of the dynamic coefficients are given, and the method employed at the Texas A and M University (TAMU) test facility is explained. The TAMU test apparatus is described, and the test procedures are discussed. Experimental results, including leakage, entrance-loss coefficients, pressure distributions, and rotordynamic coefficients for a smooth and a honeycomb constant-clearance seal are presented and compared to theoretical results from Nelson's analysis. The results for both seals show little sensitivity to the running speed over the test range. Agreement between test results and theory for leakage through the seal is satisfactory. Test results for direct stiffness show a greater sensitivity to fluid pre-rotation than predicted. Results also indicate that the deliberately roughened surface of the honeycomb seal provides improved stability versus the smooth seal.

  19. Ab initio intermolecular potential energy surface and second pressure virial coefficients of methane.

    PubMed

    Hellmann, Robert; Bich, Eckard; Vogel, Eckhard

    2008-06-07

    A six-dimensional potential energy hypersurface (PES) for two interacting rigid methane molecules was determined from high-level quantum-mechanical ab initio computations. A total of 272 points for 17 different angular orientations on the PES were calculated utilizing the counterpoise-corrected supermolecular approach at the CCSD(T) level of theory with basis sets of aug-cc-pVTZ and aug-cc-pVQZ qualities. The calculated interaction energies were extrapolated to the complete basis set limit. An analytical site-site potential function with nine sites per methane molecule was fitted to the interaction energies. In addition, a semiempirical correction to the analytical potential function was introduced to take into account the effects of zero-point vibrations. This correction includes adjustments of the dispersion coefficients and of a single-parameter within the fit to the measured values of the second virial coefficient B(T) at room temperature. Quantitative agreement was then obtained with the measured B values over the whole temperature range of the measurements. The calculated B values should definitely be more reliable at very low temperatures (T<150 K) than values extrapolated using the currently recommended equation of state.

  20. Aqueous solubilities, vapor pressures, and 1-octanol-water partition coefficients for C9-C14 linear alkylbenzenes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sherblom, P.M.; Gschwend, P.M.; Eganhouse, R.P.

    1992-01-01

    Measurements and estimates of aqueous solubilities, 1-octanol-water partition coefficients (Kow), and vapor pressures were made for 29 linear alkylbenzenes having alkyl chain lengths of 9-14 carbons. The ranges of values observed were vapor pressures from 0.002 to 0.418 Pa, log Kow, from 6.83 to 9.95, and aqueous solubilities from 4 to 38 nmol??L-1. Measured values exhibited a relationship to both the alkyl chain length and the position of phenyl substitution on the alkyl chain. Measurement of the aqueous concentrations resulting from equilibration of a mixture of alkylbenzenes yielded higher than expected values, indicating cosolute or other interactive effects caused enhanced aqueous concentrations of these compounds. ?? 1992 American Chemical Society.

  1. A comparison of experimental and theoretical results for leakage, pressure gradients, and rotordynamic coefficients for tapered annular gas seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elrod, D. A.; Childs, D. W.

    1986-01-01

    A brief review of current annular seal theory and a discussion of the predicted effect on stiffness of tapering the seal stator are presented. An outline of Nelson's analytical-computational method for determining rotordynamic coefficients for annular compressible-flow seals is included. Modifications to increase the maximum rotor speed of an existing air-seal test apparatus at Texas A&M University are described. Experimental results, including leakage, entrance-loss coefficients, pressure distributions, and normalized rotordynamic coefficients, are presented for four convergent-tapered, smooth-rotor, smooth-stator seals. A comparison of the test results shows that an inlet-to-exit clearance ratio of 1.5 to 2.0 provides the maximum direct stiffness, a clearance ratio of 2.5 provides the greatest stability, and a clearance ratio of 1.0 provides the least stability. The experimental results are compared to theoretical results from Nelson's analysis with good agreement. Test results for cross-coupled stiffness show less sensitivity of fluid prerotation than predicted.

  2. Line positions, pressure broadening and shift coefficients for the second overtone transitions of carbon monoxide in argon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowzan, G.; Stec, K.; Zaborowski, M.; Wójtewicz, S.; Cygan, A.; Lisak, D.; Masłowski, P.; Trawiński, R. S.

    2017-04-01

    Absolute positions and spectral line-shape parameters of carbon monoxide 0 → 3 band, P branch transitions are reported. The speed-dependent effects and the influence of velocity-changing collisions were taken into account in the fitted line-shape models. For the first time the values of pressure shift coefficients of CO in argon for this band were determined. The measurements were made with the Pound-Drever-Hall-locked frequency-stabilized cavity ring-down spectrometer, with the frequency axis linked through an optical frequency comb to the UTC(AOS) frequency reference based on a hydrogen maser. Achieved uncertainties of line positions are between 70 kHz and 420 kHz.

  3. Surface tension and its temperature coefficient of molten tin determined with the sessile drop method at different oxygen partial pressures.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Zhang Fu; Mukai, Kusuhiro; Takagi, Katsuhiko; Ohtaka, Masahiko; Huang, Wen Lai; Liu, Qiu Sheng

    2002-10-15

    The surface tension of molten tin has been determined by the sessile drop method at temperatures ranging from 523 to 1033 K and in the oxygen partial pressure (P(O(2))) range from 2.85 x 10(-19) to 8.56 x 10(-6) MPa, and its dependence on temperature and oxygen partial pressure has been analyzed. At P(O(2))=2.85 x 10(-19) and 1.06 x 10(-15) MPa, the surface tension decreases linearly with the increase of temperature and its temperature coefficients are -0.151 and -0.094 mN m(-1) K(-1), respectively. However, at high P(O(2)) (3.17 x 10(-10), 8.56 x 10(-6) MPa), the surface tension increases with the temperature near the melting point (505 K) and decreases above 723 K. The surface tension decrease with increasing P(O(2)) is much larger near the melting point than at temperatures above 823 K. The contact angle between the molten tin and the alumina substrate is 158-173 degrees, and the wettability is poor.

  4. The coefficient variation of home blood pressure is a novel factor associated with macroalbuminuria in type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Ushigome, Emi; Fukui, Michiaki; Hamaguchi, Masahide; Senmaru, Takafumi; Sakabe, Kazumi; Tanaka, Muhei; Yamazaki, Masahiro; Hasegawa, Goji; Nakamura, Naoto

    2011-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the association between day-by-day variability in home blood pressure (HBP) on 14 consecutive days and macroalbuminuria in patients with type 2 diabetes. We compared the coefficient of variation (CV) of HBP in 858 Japanese patients with and without macroalbuminuria. Next, we analyzed the relationship between the logarithm of urinary albumin excretion (UAE) and the CV of HBP using linear regression analysis. Then, we evaluated the association between the CV of HBP and macroalbuminuria, defined as UAE ≥300 mg g(-1) creatinine, using logistic regression analysis. The CVs of morning and evening systolic blood pressure (SBP) were significantly greater in patients with macroalbuminuria than in those without (8.08±3.35 vs. 7.19±2.25%, P<0.05 and 9.01±3.58 vs. 7.98±2.57%, P<0.05, respectively). Multivariate linear regression analyses indicated that the CVs of morning SBP (P<0.05) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP; P<0.05), and those of evening SBP (P<0.05) were the independent explanatory variables for the logarithm of UAE. Multivariate logistic regression analyses also demonstrated that the odds ratio for the CVs of morning SBP, morning DBP and evening SBP for macroalbuminuria were 1.35 (P<0.05), 1.29 (P<0.05) and 1.44 (P<0.05), respectively. We conclude that the CV of HBP is correlated with macroalbuminuria, independent of the known risk factors, in Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes.

  5. Determination of diffusion coefficients of carbon dioxide in water between 268 and 473 K in a high-pressure capillary optical cell with in situ Raman spectroscopic measurements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lu, Wanjun; Guo, Huirong; Chou, I.-Ming; Burruss, R.C.; Li, Lanlan

    2013-01-01

    Accurate values of diffusion coefficients for carbon dioxide in water and brine at reservoir conditions are essential to our understanding of transport behavior of carbon dioxide in subsurface pore space. However, the experimental data are limited to conditions at low temperatures and pressures. In this study, diffusive transfer of carbon dioxide in water at pressures up to 45 MPa and temperatures from 268 to 473 K was observed within an optical capillary cell via time-dependent Raman spectroscopy. Diffusion coefficients were estimated by the least-squares method for the measured variations in carbon dioxide concentration in the cell at various sample positions and time. At the constant pressure of 20 MPa, the measured diffusion coefficients of carbon dioxide in water increase with increasing temperature from 268 to 473 K. The relationship between diffusion coefficient of carbon dioxide in water [D(CO2) in m2/s] and temperature (T in K) was derived with Speedy–Angell power-law approach as: D(CO2)=D0[T/Ts-1]m where D0 = 13.942 × 10−9 m2/s, Ts = 227.0 K, and m = 1.7094. At constant temperature, diffusion coefficients of carbon dioxide in water decrease with pressure increase. However, this pressure effect is rather small (within a few percent).

  6. Thermal plasma properties for Ar-Cu, Ar-Fe and Ar-Al mixtures used in welding plasmas processes: II. Transport coefficients at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cressault, Y.; Murphy, A. B.; Teulet, Ph; Gleizes, A.; Schnick, M.

    2013-10-01

    This article is devoted to the calculation of thermodynamic properties (mass density, enthalpy and specific heat at constant pressure) and transport coefficients (viscosity, electrical conductivity, thermal conductivity and combined diffusion coefficients) of mixtures of argon and aluminum, iron and copper vapour at atmospheric pressure. Data are presented for the temperature range 300 to 30 000 K, for different concentrations of the metal vapours. The dependence of the properties on metal vapour type and concentration are discussed. Mixtures of argon and metal vapour occur in the arc welding and in other plasma applications. Tabulations of the data are presented, and will be of use in computational modelling of such applications.

  7. Measured pressure distributions, aerodynamic coefficients and shock shapes on blunt bodies at incidence in hypersonic air and CF4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, C. G., III

    1982-01-01

    Pressure distributions, aerodynamic coefficients, and shock shapes were measured on blunt bodies of revolution in Mach 6 CF4 and in Mach 6 and Mach 10 air. The angle of attack was varied from 0 deg to 20 deg in 4 deg increments. Configurations tested were a hyperboloid with an asymptotic angle of 45 deg, a sonic-corner paraboloid, a paraboloid with an angle of 27.6 deg at the base, a Viking aeroshell generated in a generalized orthogonal coordinate system, and a family of cones having a 45 deg half-angle with spherical, flattened, concave, and cusp nose shapes. Real-gas effects were simulated for the hperboloid and paraboloid models at Mach 6 by testing at a normal-shock density ratio of 5.3 in air and 12 CF4. Predictions from simple theories and numerical flow field programs are compared with measurement. It is anticipated that the data presented in this report will be useful for verification of analytical methods for predicting hypersonic flow fields about blunt bodies at incidence.

  8. Measurements of argon broadened Lorentz width and pressure-induced line shift coefficients in the nu4 band of (C-12)H4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinsland, Curtis P.; Smith, Mary Ann H.; Devi, V. Malathy; Benner, D. Chris

    1989-01-01

    Room temperature argon broadened halfwidth and pressure-induced line shift coefficients have been determined for 118 transitions in the nu4 band of (C-12)H4 from analysis of high resolution laboratory absorption spectra recorded with the McMath Fourier transform spectrometer operated on Kitt Peak by the National Solar Observatory. Transitions up to J-double-prime = 12 have been measured using a nonlinear least-squares spectral fitting procedure. The variation of the measured halfwidth coefficients with symmetry type and rotational quantum number is very similar to that measured previously for N2 and air broadening, but the absolute values of the argon broadening coefficients are all smaller. On average, the ratio of the argon broadened halfwidth coefficient to the corresponding N2 broadened halfwidth coefficient is 0.877 + or - 0.017 (2 Sigma). More than 95 percent of the pressure-induced shifts are negative with values ranging from -0.0081 to +0.0055/cm atm. The pressure shifts in argon are nearly equal to corresponding values measured previously in N2 and air.

  9. Measurements of argon broadened Lorentz width and pressure-induced line shift coefficients in the nu4 band of (C-12)H4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinsland, Curtis P.; Smith, Mary Ann H.; Devi, V. Malathy; Benner, D. Chris

    1989-01-01

    Room temperature argon broadened halfwidth and pressure-induced line shift coefficients have been determined for 118 transitions in the nu4 band of (C-12)H4 from analysis of high resolution laboratory absorption spectra recorded with the McMath Fourier transform spectrometer operated on Kitt Peak by the National Solar Observatory. Transitions up to J-double-prime = 12 have been measured using a nonlinear least-squares spectral fitting procedure. The variation of the measured halfwidth coefficients with symmetry type and rotational quantum number is very similar to that measured previously for N2 and air broadening, but the absolute values of the argon broadening coefficients are all smaller. On average, the ratio of the argon broadened halfwidth coefficient to the corresponding N2 broadened halfwidth coefficient is 0.877 + or - 0.017 (2 Sigma). More than 95 percent of the pressure-induced shifts are negative with values ranging from -0.0081 to +0.0055/cm atm. The pressure shifts in argon are nearly equal to corresponding values measured previously in N2 and air.

  10. Measurement and modelling of forced convective heat transfer coefficient and pressure drop of Al2O3- and SiO2-water nanofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Julia, J. E.; Hernández, L.; Martínez-Cuenca, R.; Hibiki, T.; Mondragón, R.; Segarra, C.; Jarque, J. C.

    2012-11-01

    Forced convective heat transfer coefficient and pressure drop of SiO2- and Al2O3-water nanofluids were characterized. The experimental facility was composed of thermal-hydraulic loop with a tank with an immersed heater, a centrifugal pump, a bypass with a globe valve, an electromagnetic flow-meter, a 18 kW in-line pre-heater, a test section with band heaters, a differential pressure transducer and a heat exchanger. The test section consists of a 1000 mm long aluminium pipe with an inner diameter of 31.2 mm. Eighteen band heaters were placed all along the test section in order to provide a uniform heat flux. Heat transfer coefficient was calculated measuring fluid temperature using immersed thermocouples (Pt100) placed at both ends of the test section and surface thermocouples in 10 axial locations along the test section (Pt1000). The measurements have been performed for different nanoparticles (Al2O3 and SiO2 with primary size of 11 nm and 12 nm, respectively), volume concentrations (1% v., 5% v.), and flow rates (3 103Re<105). Maximum heat transfer coefficient enhancement (300%) and pressure drop penalty (1000%) is obtained with 5% v. SiO2 nanofluid. Existing correlations can predict, at least in a first approximation, the heat transfer coefficient and pressure drop of nanofluids if thermal conductivity, viscosity and specific heat were properly modelled.

  11. The pressure reduction coefficient: A new parameter to assess aneurysmal blood stasis induced by flow diverters/disruptors.

    PubMed

    Gascou, Gregory; Ferrara, Riccardo; Ambard, Dominique; Sanchez, Mathieu; Lobotesis, Kyriakos; Jourdan, Franck; Costalat, Vincent

    2017-02-01

    Background and purpose Pore density (PD), surface metal coverage (SMC) and the number of wires are all different parameters which can influence the efficacy of a flow disruptor/diverter. Nevertheless, the relative importance of a parameter to induce intra-aneurysmal blood stasis is still poorly evaluated. Therefore, comparison between devices based on a unique value is not reliable. The aim of this study was to propose a new bench top parameter (the pressure reduction coefficient (PRC; ξ)) in order to assess the global haemodynamic effect of each flow diverter/disruptor to slow flow. Methods Eight devices were tested in vitro during three different flow conditions. For the eight devices, the PRC was computed at different volumetric flow rates to characterise flow reduction. Comparison was made with SMC, PD and the number of wires. Results The PRC obtained for flow disruptors was on average 1.5 times more efficient in reducing flow compared to flow diverters. PD (mm(2)) ranged from 24 to 38 for flow diverters and did not independently correlate with the PRC. The SMC of flow diverters ranged from 25% to 70%, and ranged from 20% to 100% for flow disruptors, without independent correlation to the PRC. The number of wires ranged from 48 to 96 for the flow diverters and did not correlate independently to the PRC. Conclusion There were no direct correlations between individual device characteristics and the PRC, suggesting a multifaceted and interrelating association of the overall design of each implant. Hence, the PRC could be used as a simple, reliable parameter to assess the overall capacity of flow disruptors/diverters to induce intra-aneurysmal blood stasis.

  12. Can MRI water apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) value discriminate between idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus, Alzheimer's disease and subcortical vascular dementia?

    PubMed

    Goujon, Adrien; Mejdoubi, Mehdi; Purcell, Yvonne; Banydeen, Rishika; Colombani, Sylvie; Arrigo, Alessandro

    2017-09-15

    Numerous similarities in MRI and clinical symptoms exist between Alzheimer's disease (AD), subcortical vascular dementia (sVD) and possible idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (iHPN). The aim of this study is to explore mean apparent coefficient diffusion (ADC) difference between theses diseases in different periventricular and deep white matter areas, as compared to healthy controls. This retrospective study analyzed mean ADC values of 120 patients in normal appearing deep white matter and lenticular nuclei, frontal, caudate nuclei corpus and parietal periventricular and deep white matter areas INPH group showed significantly lower ADC than sVD group in frontal periventricular region (1567.10(-6)mm(2)/s vs 1755.10(-6)mm(2)/s; P=0.0009) and in parietal deep region (1087.10(-6)mm(2)/s vs 1271.10(-6)mm(2)/s; P=0.0052), but showed significantly higher ADC in lenticular nuclei ROI (834.10(-6)mm(2)/s vs 753.10(-6)mm(2)/s; P=0.002). The comparison between iNPH and sVD showed a cut-off value of 1676.10(-6)mm(2)/s (sensitivity 0.70, specificity 0.77) in periventricular frontal area. INPH group, in comparison with NA group, showed significantly higher ADC in all ROIs. The iNPH group also showed significantly higher ADC than AD group in all ROIs. AD group showed significantly lower ADC than sVD group in all regions, except in normal appearing lenticular nuclei and caudate nuclei corpus deep ROI. SVD group showed significantly higher ADC than NA in all ROIs, except in normal appearing lenticular nucleus ROI. Different patterns of ADC values can differentiate between AD, sVD and iNPH, even when other MRI sequences appear morphologically similar. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Precise determination of the pressure distortion coefficient of new controlled-clearance piston-cylinders based on the Heydemann-Welch model.

    PubMed

    Kajikawa, Hiroaki; Ide, Kazunori; Kobata, Tokihiko

    2009-09-01

    A new controlled-clearance (CC) pressure balance has been developed with the aim of improving hydraulic pressure standards up to pressures of 1 GPa. The pressure balance is equipped with a weight-loading unit that can load/unload selected weights automatically and a CC piston-cylinder that is designed for the jacket pressure to be applied independently. In this paper, the effective area A(e) of two kinds of the CC piston-cylinders for pressures of 200 and 500 MPa was examined based on the Heydemann-Welch model. The two parameters in the model, the jacket pressure coefficient and the zero clearance jacket pressure, were precisely determined by the characterization experiments, after which the pressure dependence of A(e) and its uncertainty were estimated. The uncertainty due to the pressure dependence of A(e) for the 500 MPa CC piston-cylinder was less than 7.5x10(-8) MPa(-1). To confirm the consistency of the estimations, the results of the two CC piston-cylinders were compared through a free-deformation (FD) piston-cylinder; the two estimations were in agreement with each other. Moreover, it was shown that the extent of nonlinearity in the pressure dependence of A(e) of the FD piston-cylinder can be evaluated by calibration against the CC piston-cylinder.

  14. Observation of Ortho-Para Dependence of Pressure Broadening Coefficient in Acetylene νb{1}+νb{3} Vibration Band Using Dual-Comb Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwakuni, Kana; Okubo, Sho; Inaba, Hajime; Onae, Atsushi; Hong, Feng-Lei; Sasada, Hiroyuki; Yamada, Koichi MT

    2016-06-01

    We observe that the pressure-broadening coefficients depend on the ortho-para levels. The spectrum is taken with a dual-comb spectrometer which has the resolution of 48 MHz and the frequency accuracy of 8 digit when the signal-to-noise ratio is more than 20. In this study, about 4.4-Tz wide spectra of the P(31) to R(31) transitions in the νb{1}+νb{3} vibration band of 12C_2H_2 are observed at the pressure of 25, 60, 396, 1047, 1962 and 2654 Pa. Each rotation-vibration absorption line is fitted to Voight function and we determined pressure-broadening coefficients for each rotation-vibration transition. The Figure shows pressure broadening coefficient as a function of m. Here m is J"+1 for R and -J" for P-branch. The graph shows obvious dependence on ortho and para. We fit it to Pade function considering the population ratio of three-to-one for the ortho and para levels. This would lead to detailed understanding of the pressure boarding mechanism. S. Okubo et al., Applied Physics Express 8, 082402 (2015)

  15. Flight-measured afterbody pressure coefficients from an airplane having twin side-by-side jet engines for Mach numbers from 0.6 to 1.6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steers, L. L.

    1979-01-01

    Afterbody pressure distribution data were obtained in flight from an airplane having twin side-by-side jet exhausts. The data were obtained in level flight at Mach numbers from 0.60 to 1.60 and at elevated load factors for Mach numbers of 0.60, 0.90, and 1.20. The test altitude varied from 2300 meters (7500 feet) to 15,200 meters (50,000 feet) over a speed range that provided a matrix of constant Mach number and constant unit Reynolds number test conditions. The results of the full-scale flight afterbody pressure distribution program are presented in the form of plotted pressure distributions and tabulated pressure coefficients with Mach number, angle of attack, engine nozzle pressure ratio, and unit Reynolds number as controlled parameters.

  16. High-pressure Seebeck coefficients and thermoelectric behaviors of Bi and PbTe measured using a Paris-Edinburgh cell

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, Jason; Kumar, Ravhi S.; Park, Changyong; Kenney-Benson, Curtis; Cornelius, Andrew L.; Velisavljevic, Nenad

    2016-01-01

    A new sample cell assembly design for the Paris-Edinburgh type large-volume press for simultaneous measurements of X-ray diffraction, electrical resistance, Seebeck coefficient and relative changes in the thermal conductance at high pressures has been developed. The feasibility of performing in situ measurements of the Seebeck coefficient and thermal measurements is demonstrated by observing well known solid–solid phase transitions of bismuth (Bi) up to 3 GPa and 450 K. A reversible polarity flip has been observed in the Seebeck coefficient across the Bi-I to Bi-II phase boundary. Also, successful Seebeck coefficient measurements have been performed for the classical high-temperature thermoelectric material PbTe under high pressure and temperature conditions. In addition, the relative change in the thermal conductivity was measured and a relative change in ZT, the dimensionless figure of merit, is described. Furthermore, this new capability enables pressure-induced structural changes to be directly correlated to electrical and thermal properties.

  17. High-pressure Seebeck coefficients and thermoelectric behaviors of Bi and PbTe measured using a Paris-Edinburgh cell

    DOE PAGES

    Baker, Jason; Kumar, Ravhi S.; Park, Changyong; ...

    2016-01-01

    A new sample cell assembly design for the Paris-Edinburgh type large-volume press for simultaneous measurements of X-ray diffraction, electrical resistance, Seebeck coefficient and relative changes in the thermal conductance at high pressures has been developed. The feasibility of performing in situ measurements of the Seebeck coefficient and thermal measurements is demonstrated by observing well known solid–solid phase transitions of bismuth (Bi) up to 3 GPa and 450 K. A reversible polarity flip has been observed in the Seebeck coefficient across the Bi-I to Bi-II phase boundary. Also, successful Seebeck coefficient measurements have been performed for the classical high-temperature thermoelectric materialmore » PbTe under high pressure and temperature conditions. In addition, the relative change in the thermal conductivity was measured and a relative change in ZT, the dimensionless figure of merit, is described. Furthermore, this new capability enables pressure-induced structural changes to be directly correlated to electrical and thermal properties.« less

  18. CFD Modeling of the Multipurpose Hydrogen Test Bed (MHTB) Self-Pressurization and Spray Bar Mixing Experiments in Normal Gravity: Effect of the Accommodation Coefficient on the Tank Pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kartuzova, Olga; Kassemi, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    A CFD model for simulating the self-pressurization of a large scale liquid hydrogen storage tank is utilized in this paper to model the MHTB self-pressurization experiment. The kinetics-based Schrage equation is used to account for the evaporative and condensi ng interfacial mass flows in this model. The effect of the accommodation coefficient for calculating the interfacial mass transfer rate on the tank pressure during tank selfpressurization is studied. The values of the accommodation coefficient which were considered in this study vary from 1.0e-3 to 1.0e-1 for the explicit VOF model and from 1.0e-4 to 1.0e-3 for the implicit VOF model. The ullage pressure evolutions are compared against experimental data. A CFD model for controlling pressure in cryogenic storage tanks by spraying cold liquid into the ullage is also presented. The Euler-Lagrange approach is utilized for tracking the spray droplets and for modeling the interaction between the droplets and the continuous phase (ullage). The spray model is coupled with the VOF model by performing particle tracking in the ullage, removing particles from the ullage when they reach the interface, and then adding their contributions to the liquid. Droplet-ullage heat and mass transfer are modeled. The flow, temperature, and interfacial mass flux, as well as droplets trajectories, size distribution and temperatures predicted by the model are presented. The ul lage pressure and vapor temperature evolutions are compared with experimental data obtained from the MHTB spray bar mixing experiment. The effect of the accommodation coefficient for calculating the interfacial and droplet mass transfer rates on the tank pressure during mixing of the vapor using spray is studied. The values used for the accommodation coefficient at the interface vary from 1.0e-5 to 1.0e-2. The droplet accommodation coefficient values vary from 2.0e-6 to 1.0e-4.

  19. A time-resolved single-pass technique for measuring optical absorption coefficients of window materials under 100 GPa shock pressures.

    PubMed

    Li, Jun; Zhou, Xianming; Li, Jiabo

    2008-12-01

    An experimental method was developed to perform time-resolved, single-pass optical absorption measurements and to determine absorption coefficients of window materials under strong shock compression up to approximately 200 GPa. Experimental details are described of (i) a configuration to generate an in situ dynamic, bright, optical source and (ii) a sample assembly with a lithium fluoride plate to essentially eliminate heat transfer from the hot radiator into the specimen and to maintain a constant optical source within the duration of the experiment. Examples of measurements of optical absorption coefficients of several initially transparent single crystal materials at high shock pressures are presented.

  20. Measurements of air-broadened and nitrogen-broadened Lorentz width coefficients and pressure shift coefficients in the nu4 and nu2 bands of C-12H4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinsland, Curtis P.; Smith, Mary Ann H.; Devi, V. Malathy; Benner, D. Chris

    1988-01-01

    Air-broadened and N2-broadened halfwidth and pressure shift coefficients of 294 transitions in the nu4 and nu2 bands of C-12H4 have been measured from laboratory absorption spectra recorded at room temperature with the Fourier transform spectrometer in the McMath solar telescope facility of the National Solar Observatory. Total pressures of up to 551 Torr were employed with absorption paths of 5-150 cm, CH4 volume mixing ratios of 2.6 percent or less, and resolutions of 0.005 and 0.01/cm. A nonlinear least-squares spectral fitting technique has been utilized in the analysis of the twenty-five measured spectra. Lines up to J double-prime = 18 in the nu4 band and J double-prime = 15 in the nu2 band have been analyzed.

  1. Measurements of air-broadened and nitrogen-broadened Lorentz width coefficients and pressure shift coefficients in the nu4 and nu2 bands of C-12H4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinsland, Curtis P.; Smith, Mary Ann H.; Devi, V. Malathy; Benner, D. Chris

    1988-01-01

    Air-broadened and N2-broadened halfwidth and pressure shift coefficients of 294 transitions in the nu4 and nu2 bands of C-12H4 have been measured from laboratory absorption spectra recorded at room temperature with the Fourier transform spectrometer in the McMath solar telescope facility of the National Solar Observatory. Total pressures of up to 551 Torr were employed with absorption paths of 5-150 cm, CH4 volume mixing ratios of 2.6 percent or less, and resolutions of 0.005 and 0.01/cm. A nonlinear least-squares spectral fitting technique has been utilized in the analysis of the twenty-five measured spectra. Lines up to J double-prime = 18 in the nu4 band and J double-prime = 15 in the nu2 band have been analyzed.

  2. FORTRAN programs for generating fluid inclusion isochores and fugacity coefficients for the system H 2O-CO 2-NaCl at high pressures and temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowers, Teresa Suter; Helgeson, Harold C.

    Program DENFIND permits calculation of pressures and temperatures corresponding to isochores for H 2O-CO 2-NaCl fluids which can be used to generate pressure corrections of fluid inclusion homogenization temperatures. Program FUGCO facilitates calculation of fugacity coefficients in the system H 2O-CO 2-NaCl as a function of pressure, temperature and fluid composition. Both programs employ a modified Redlich-Kwong equation of state for the ternary system (Bowers and Helgeson, 1983a), which is applicable to fluids containing up to 35 wt. % NaCl (relative to H 2O + NaCl) at pressures above 500 bars and temperature from 350 to 600°C.

  3. Infrared absorption by pure CO2 near 3340 cm-1: Measurements and analysis of collisional coefficients and line-mixing effects at subatmospheric pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daneshvar, L.; Földes, T.; Buldyreva, J.; Vander Auwera, J.

    2014-12-01

    High resolution Fourier transform spectra of the 21102-00001 band of 12C16O2 near 3340 cm-1 have been recorded and analyzed to extract isolated-line intensities and collisional parameters, and first-order line-mixing coefficients. Voigt, hard-collision Rautian and Sobel'man, and quadratic-speed-dependent Voigt profiles have been used. The line-mixing coefficients measured for the three branches have also been evaluated using an Energy-Corrected Sudden approach employing a symmetric metric in the Liouville space. These coefficients compare very favorably with the experimental results and estimations with an algorithm available in the literature. Results of straightforward ECS-modeling of complete band shapes have been compared to the recorded spectra and future improvements of this model required at subatmospheric pressures have been outlined.

  4. Evaluation of evaporation coefficient for micro-droplets exposed to low pressure: A semi-analytical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Prodyut R.; Hiremath, Kirankumar R.; Sharma, Manvendra

    2017-02-01

    Evaporation rate of water is strongly influenced by energy barrier due to molecular collision and heat transfer limitations. The evaporation coefficient, defined as the ratio of experimentally measured evaporation rate to that maximum possible theoretical limit, varies over a conflicting three orders of magnitude. In the present work, a semi-analytical transient heat diffusion model of droplet evaporation is developed considering the effect of change in droplet size due to evaporation from its surface, when the droplet is injected into vacuum. Negligible effect of droplet size reduction due to evaporation on cooling rate is found to be true. However, the evaporation coefficient is found to approach theoretical limit of unity, when the droplet radius is less than that of mean free path of vapor molecules on droplet surface contrary to the reported theoretical predictions. Evaporation coefficient was found to reduce rapidly when the droplet under consideration has a radius larger than the mean free path of evaporating molecules, confirming the molecular collision barrier to evaporation rate. The trend of change in evaporation coefficient with increasing droplet size predicted by the proposed model will facilitate obtaining functional relation of evaporation coefficient with droplet size, and can be used for benchmarking the interaction between multiple droplets during evaporation in vacuum.

  5. Statistically optimal estimation of degree-1 and C20 coefficients based on GRACE data and an ocean bottom pressure model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yu; Ditmar, Pavel; Riva, Riccardo

    2017-09-01

    In this study, we develop a methodology to estimate monthly variations in degree-1 and C20 coefficients by combing Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) data with oceanic mass anomalies (combination approach). With respect to the method by Swenson et al., the proposed approach exploits noise covariance information of both input data sets and thus produces stochastically optimal solutions supplied with realistic error information. Numerical simulations show that the quality of degree-1 and -2 coefficients may be increased in this way by about 30 per cent in terms of RMS error. We also proved that the proposed approach can be reduced to the approach of Sun et al. provided that the GRACE data are noise-free and noise in oceanic data is white. Subsequently, we evaluate the quality of the resulting degree-1 and C20 coefficients by estimating mass anomaly time-series within carefully selected validation areas, where mass transport is small. Our validation shows that, compared to selected Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) and joint inversion degree-1 solutions, the proposed combination approach better complements GRACE solutions. The annual amplitude of the SLR-based C10 is probably overestimated by about 1 mm. The performance of the C20 coefficients, on the other hand, is similar to that of traditionally used solution from the SLR technique.

  6. Electron-induced secondary electron emission coefficient of lithium, tungsten and stainless steel surfaces exposed to low-pressure plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oyarzabal, E.; Martin-Rojo, A. B.; Tabarés, F. L.

    2014-09-01

    The secondary electron emission (SEE) coefficient by electron impact of Li, W and stainless steel (SS) surfaces exposed to a glow discharge is evaluated and analyzed in the energy range of Ee < 200 eV. While the values of the SEE coefficient for SS and W show a small increase with respect to their vacuum value, an enhancement of this parameter up to a factor of 6 has been deduced for clean Li surfaces. Experiments with different plasma gas discharges (He, Ar and H2) are undertaken in order to address the possible mechanisms related to such enhancement. No major effect of the bombarding ion mass or incident electron flux is observed. The implications of these findings on the use of Li as a plasma-facing component in fusion devices are addressed.

  7. Donor impurity-related linear and nonlinear intraband optical absorption coefficients in quantum ring: effects of applied electric field and hydrostatic pressure

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The linear and nonlinear intraband optical absorption coefficients in GaAs three-dimensional single quantum rings are investigated. Taking into account the combined effects of hydrostatic pressure and electric field, applied along the growth direction of the heterostructure, the energies of the ground and first excited states of a donor impurity have been found using the effective mass approximation and a variational method. The energies of these states are examined as functions of the dimensions of the structure, electric field, and hydrostatic pressure. We have also investigated the dependencies of the linear, nonlinear, and total optical absorption coefficients as a function of incident photon energy for several configurations of the system. It is found that the variation of distinct sizes of the structure leads to either a redshift and/or a blueshift of the resonant peaks of the intraband optical spectrum. In addition, we have found that the application of an electric field leads to a redshift, whereas the influence of hydrostatic pressure leads to a blueshift (in the case of on-ring-center donor impurity position) of the resonant peaks of the intraband optical spectrum. PMID:23021497

  8. Pressure-broadening and narrowing coefficients and temperature dependence measurements of CO2 at 2.68 μm by laser diode absorption spectroscopy for atmospheric applications.

    PubMed

    Ghysels, M; Durry, G; Amarouche, N

    2013-04-15

    By using a tunable diode laser absorption spectrometer in conjunction with a cryogenically cooled multipath cell, we have revisited the air-induced pressure-broadening coefficients and the narrowing coefficients related to the Dicke effect, as well as the temperature dependences, for the R(18) and R(20) lines of the (10°1)I←(00°0) vibrational band at 2.68 μm of carbon dioxide. The selected transitions are used to probe in situ CO2 in the troposphere and the lower stratosphere by using balloon-borne laser sensors. The achieved measurements are thoroughly compared to existing former determinations. The impact of processing the in situ atmospheric CO2 spectra with this new set of molecular data is reported.

  9. A Numerical Procedure for Flow Distribution and Pressure Drops for U and Z Type Configurations Plate Heat Exchangers with Variable Coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López, R.; Lecuona, A.; Ventas, R.; Vereda, C.

    2012-11-01

    In Plate Heat Exchangers it is important to determine the flow distribution and pressure drops, because they affect directly the performance of a heat exchanger [1]. This work proposes an incompressible, one-dimensional, steady state, discrete model allowing for variable overall momentum coefficients to determine these magnitudes. The model consists on a modified version of the Bajura and Jones [2] model for dividing and combining flow manifolds. The numerical procedure is based on the finite differences approximation approach proposed by Datta and Majumdar [3]. A linear overall momentum coefficient distribution is used in the dividing manifold, but the model is not limited to linear distributions. Comparisons are made with experimental, numerical and analytical data, yielding good results.

  10. Pressure coefficients for direct optical transitions in MoS2, MoSe2, WS2, and WSe2 crystals and semiconductor to metal transitions

    PubMed Central

    Dybała, F.; Polak, M. P.; Kopaczek, J.; Scharoch, P.; Wu, K.; Tongay, S.; Kudrawiec, R.

    2016-01-01

    The electronic band structure of MoS2, MoSe2, WS2, and WSe2, crystals has been studied at various hydrostatic pressures experimentally by photoreflectance (PR) spectroscopy and theoretically within the density functional theory (DFT). In the PR spectra direct optical transitions (A and B) have been clearly observed and pressure coefficients have been determined for these transitions to be: αA = 2.0 ± 0.1 and αB = 3.6 ± 0.1 meV/kbar for MoS2, αA = 2.3 ± 0.1 and αB = 4.0 ± 0.1 meV/kbar for MoSe2, αA = 2.6 ± 0.1 and αB = 4.1 ± 0.1 meV/kbar for WS2, αA = 3.4 ± 0.1 and αB = 5.0 ± 0.5 meV/kbar for WSe2. It has been found that these coefficients are in an excellent agreement with theoretical predictions. In addition, a comparative study of different computational DFT approaches has been performed and analyzed. For indirect gap the pressure coefficient have been determined theoretically to be −7.9, −5.51, −6.11, and −3.79, meV/kbar for MoS2, MoSe2, WS2, and WSe2, respectively. The negative values of this coefficients imply a narrowing of the fundamental band gap with the increase in hydrostatic pressure and a semiconductor to metal transition for MoS2, MoSe2, WS2, and WSe2, crystals at around 140, 180, 190, and 240 kbar, respectively. PMID:27215469

  11. Pressure coefficients for direct optical transitions in MoS2, MoSe2, WS2, and WSe2 crystals and semiconductor to metal transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dybała, F.; Polak, M. P.; Kopaczek, J.; Scharoch, P.; Wu, K.; Tongay, S.; Kudrawiec, R.

    2016-05-01

    The electronic band structure of MoS2, MoSe2, WS2, and WSe2, crystals has been studied at various hydrostatic pressures experimentally by photoreflectance (PR) spectroscopy and theoretically within the density functional theory (DFT). In the PR spectra direct optical transitions (A and B) have been clearly observed and pressure coefficients have been determined for these transitions to be: αA = 2.0 ± 0.1 and αB = 3.6 ± 0.1 meV/kbar for MoS2, αA = 2.3 ± 0.1 and αB = 4.0 ± 0.1 meV/kbar for MoSe2, αA = 2.6 ± 0.1 and αB = 4.1 ± 0.1 meV/kbar for WS2, αA = 3.4 ± 0.1 and αB = 5.0 ± 0.5 meV/kbar for WSe2. It has been found that these coefficients are in an excellent agreement with theoretical predictions. In addition, a comparative study of different computational DFT approaches has been performed and analyzed. For indirect gap the pressure coefficient have been determined theoretically to be -7.9, -5.51, -6.11, and -3.79, meV/kbar for MoS2, MoSe2, WS2, and WSe2, respectively. The negative values of this coefficients imply a narrowing of the fundamental band gap with the increase in hydrostatic pressure and a semiconductor to metal transition for MoS2, MoSe2, WS2, and WSe2, crystals at around 140, 180, 190, and 240 kbar, respectively.

  12. Tabulated Pressure Coefficient Data from a Tail Loads Investigation on a 1/15-Scale Model of the Goodyear XZP5K Airship

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cannon, Michael D.

    1956-01-01

    This paper contains tail and hull loads data obtained in an investigation of a l/15-scale model of the Goodyear XZP5K airship. Data are presented in the form of tabulated pressure coefficients over a pitch and yaw range of +/-20 deg and 0 deg to 30 deg respectively, with various rudder and elevator deflections. Two tail configurations of different plan forms were tested on the model. The investigation was conducted in the Langley full-scale tunnel at a Reynolds number of approximately 16.5 x 10(exp 6) based on hull length, which corresponds to a Mach number of about 0.12.

  13. H2-,He-and CO2-line broadening coefficients and pressure shifts for the HITRAN database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilzewski, Jonas; Gordon, Iouli E.; Rothman, Laurence S.

    2014-06-01

    To increase the potential of the HITRAN database in astronomy, experimental and theoretical line broadening coefficients and line shifts of molecules of planetary interest broadened by H2,He,and CO2 have been assembled from available peer-reviewed sources. Since H2 and He are major constituents in the atmospheres of gas giants, and CO2 predominates in atmospheres of some rocky planets with volcanic activity, these spectroscopic data are important for studying planetary atmospheres. The collected data were used to create semi-empirical models for complete data sets from the microwave to the UV part of the spectrum of the studied molecules. The presented work will help identify the need for further investigations of broadening and shifting of spectral lines.

  14. Temperature- and pressure-dependent densities, self-diffusion coefficients, and phase behavior of monoacid saturated triacylglycerides: toward molecular-level insights into processing.

    PubMed

    Greiner, Maximilian; Reilly, Anthony M; Briesen, Heiko

    2012-05-23

    Using molecular-dynamics (MD) simulations the densities and self-diffusion coefficients of a range of liquid monoacid triacylglycerides (TAGs) have been studied as a function of temperature and, for the first time, pressure. While offset by their ambient properties, the response of the TAGs to temperature and pressure is qualitatively similar. Application of pressure was found to significantly increase densities and reduce diffusion of the TAG molecules, suggesting that it may have as much a role in processing and crystallizing TAGs as supercooling does. A solution of glycerol tripalmitate and glycerol trihexanoate was also studied, showing that application of pressure should lead to a significant decrease in the saturation point of the solution, which is an important consideration for processing TAGs. Different solid/liquid interfaces of glycerol tripalmitate have also been investigated. Although crystal growth could not be observed, dissolution of one interface was seen in the MD simulations. The results suggest that over moderate distances the melting of TAGs may be cooperative in nature, rather than involving dissolution of individual TAG molecules.

  15. An Experimental and Master Equation Study of the Kinetics of OH/D + SO2: The Limiting High Pressure Rate Coefficients.

    PubMed

    Blitz, Mark A; Salter, Robert J; Heard, Dwayne E; Seakins, Paul W

    2017-03-31

    The kinetics of the reaction OH/OD + SO2 have been studied using a laser flash photolysis / laser induced fluorescence technique. Evidence for two-photon photolysis of SO2 at 248 nm is presented and quantified, and which appears to have been evident to some extent in most previous photolysis studies, potentially leading to values for the rate coefficient, k1, that are too large. The kinetics of the reaction OH(v=0) + SO2 (T = 295 K, p = 25 - 300 Torr) were measured under conditions where SO2 photolysis was taken into account. These results, together with literature data, were modelled using a master equation analysis. This analysis highlighted problems with the literature data: the rate coefficients derived from flash photolysis data were generally too high and from the flow tube data too low. Our best estimate of the high-pressure limiting rate coefficient, k1∞ was obtained from selected data and gives a value of (7.8 ± 2.2) × 10(-13) cm(3) molecule(-1) s-1, which is lower than that recommended in the literature. A parameterized form of k1([N2],T) is provided. The OD(v=0) + SO2 (T = 295 K, p = 25 - 300 Torr) data are reported for the first time and master equation analysis reinforces our assignment of k1∞.

  16. A study of the effects of Reynolds number and Mach number on constant pressure coefficient jump for shock-induced trailing-edge separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunningham, Atlee M., Jr.; Spragle, Gregory S.

    1987-01-01

    The influence of Mach and Reynolds numbers as well as airfoil and planform geometry on the phenomenon of constant shock jump pressure coefficient for conditions of shock induced trailing edge separation (SITES) was studied. It was demonstrated that the phenomenon does exist for a wide variety of two and three dimensional flow cases and that the influence of free stream Mach number was not significant. The influence of Reynolds number was found to be important but was not strong. Airfoil and planform geometric characteristics were found to be very important where the pressure coefficient jump was shown to vary with the sum of: (1) airfoil curvature at the upper surface crest, and (2) camber surface slope at the trailing edge. It was also determined that the onset of SITES could be defined as a function of airfoil geometric parameters and Mach number normal to the leading edge. This onset prediction was shown to predict the angle of onset to within + or - 1 deg accuracy or better for about 90% of the cases studied.

  17. Diffusion-weighted 19F-MRI of lung periphery: Influence of pressure and air-SF6 composition on apparent diffusion coefficients.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Cabello, Jesús; Pérez-Sánchez, José Manuel; Pérez de Alejo, Rigoberto; Rodríguez, Ignacio; González-Mangado, Nicolás; Peces-Barba, Germán; Cortijo, Manuel

    2005-08-25

    Lung functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become a reality using different inert hyperpolarized gases, such as 3He and 129Xe, which have provided an extraordinary boost in lung imaging and has also attracted interest to other chemically inert gaseous contrast agents. In this context, we have recently demonstrated the first diffusion-weighted images using thermally polarized inhaled sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) in small animals. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether or not the diffusion coefficient of this fluorinated gas is sensitive to pulmonary structure, gas concentration and air pressure in the airways. Diffusion coefficients of SF6 (both pure and in air mixtures) measured in vitro at different pressures and 20 degrees C showed an excellent agreement with theoretical values. Measurements of diffusion coefficients were also performed in vivo and post-mortem on healthy rats, achieving satisfactory signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs), and SF6 gas was found to be in an almost completely restricted diffusion regime in the lung, i.e., the transport by molecular diffusion is delayed by collisions with barriers such as the alveolar septa. This observed low diffusivity means that this gas will be less sensitive to structural changes in the lungs than other magnetic resonance sensitive gas such as 3He, particularly at human scale. However, it is still possible that SF6 plays a role since it opens a new structural window. Thus, the interest of researchers in delimiting the important limiting technical factors that makes this process very challenging is obvious. Among them, T2 relaxation is very fast, so gradient systems with very fast switching rate and probably large radiofrequency (RF) power and high field systems will be needed for hexafluoride to be used in human studies.

  18. Overall heat transfer coefficient and pressure drop in a typical tubular exchanger employing alumina nano-fluid as the tube side hot fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabeel, A. E.; Abdelgaied, Mohamed

    2016-08-01

    Nano-fluids are used to improve the heat transfer rates in heat exchangers, especially; the shell-and-tube heat exchanger that is considered one of the most important types of heat exchangers. In the present study, an experimental loop is constructed to study the thermal characteristics of the shell-and-tube heat exchanger; at different concentrations of Al2O3 nonmetallic particles (0.0, 2, 4, and 6 %). This material concentrations is by volume concentrations in pure water as a base fluid. The effects of nano-fluid concentrations on the performance of shell and tube heat exchanger have been conducted based on the overall heat transfer coefficient, the friction factor, the pressure drop in tube side, and the entropy generation rate. The experimental results show that; the highest heat transfer coefficient is obtained at a nano-fluid concentration of 4 % of the shell side. In shell side the maximum percentage increase in the overall heat transfer coefficient has reached 29.8 % for a nano-fluid concentration of 4 %, relative to the case of the base fluid (water) at the same tube side Reynolds number. However; in the tube side the maximum relative increase in pressure drop has recorded the values of 12, 28 and 48 % for a nano-material concentration of 2, 4 and 6 %, respectively, relative to the case without nano-fluid, at an approximate value of 56,000 for Reynolds number. The entropy generation reduces with increasing the nonmetallic particle volume fraction of the same flow rates. For increase the nonmetallic particle volume fraction from 0.0 to 6 % the rate of entropy generation decrease by 10 %.

  19. Temperature dependence of Lorentz air-broadening and pressure-shift coefficients of (12)CH4 lines in the 2.3-micron spectral region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devi, V. Malathy; Benner, D. Chris; Smith, M. A. H.; Rinsland, C. P.

    1994-01-01

    High-resolution (0.01/cm) absorption spectra of lean mixtures of CH4 in dry air were recorded with the McMath-Pierce Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) of the National Solar Observatory on Kitt Peak at various temperatures between 24 and -61 C. The spectra have been analyzed to determine the values at room temperature of pressure-broadened widths and pressure-induced shifts of more than 740 transitions. The temperature dependence of air-broadened widths and pressure-induced shifts was deduced for approx. 370 transitions in the nu(sub 1) + nu(sub 4), nu(sub 3) + nu(sub 4), and nu(sub 2) + nu(sub 3) bands of (12)CH4 located between 4118 and 4615/cm. These results were obtained by analyzing a total of 29 spectra simultaneously using a multi-spectral non-linear least-squares fitting technique. This new technique allowed the determination of correlated spectral line parameters (e.g. intensity and broadening coefficient) better than the procedure of averaging values obtained by fitting the spectra individually. This method also provided a direct determination of the uncertainties in the retrieved parameters due to random errors. For each band analysed in this study the dependence of the various spectral line parameters upon the tetrahedral symmetry species and the rotational quantum numbers of the transitions is also presented.

  20. Temperature dependence of Lorentz air-broadening and pressure-shift coefficients of (12)CH4 lines in the 2.3-micron spectral region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devi, V. Malathy; Benner, D. Chris; Smith, M. A. H.; Rinsland, C. P.

    1994-01-01

    High-resolution (0.01/cm) absorption spectra of lean mixtures of CH4 in dry air were recorded with the McMath-Pierce Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) of the National Solar Observatory on Kitt Peak at various temperatures between 24 and -61 C. The spectra have been analyzed to determine the values at room temperature of pressure-broadened widths and pressure-induced shifts of more than 740 transitions. The temperature dependence of air-broadened widths and pressure-induced shifts was deduced for approx. 370 transitions in the nu(sub 1) + nu(sub 4), nu(sub 3) + nu(sub 4), and nu(sub 2) + nu(sub 3) bands of (12)CH4 located between 4118 and 4615/cm. These results were obtained by analyzing a total of 29 spectra simultaneously using a multi-spectral non-linear least-squares fitting technique. This new technique allowed the determination of correlated spectral line parameters (e.g. intensity and broadening coefficient) better than the procedure of averaging values obtained by fitting the spectra individually. This method also provided a direct determination of the uncertainties in the retrieved parameters due to random errors. For each band analysed in this study the dependence of the various spectral line parameters upon the tetrahedral symmetry species and the rotational quantum numbers of the transitions is also presented.

  1. Quantitative structure-activity relationships of perfluorinated hetero-hydrocarbons as potential respiratory media. Application to oxygen solubility, partition coefficient, viscosity, vapor pressure, and density.

    PubMed

    Gabriel, J L; Miller, T F; Wolfson, M R; Shaffer, T H

    1996-01-01

    It has been extensively reported that liquid-assisted ventilation, using inert perfluorocarbon liquids (PFCs), can reduce interfacial surface tension and allow for improved ventilation at decreased alveolar pressures. PFCs are bioinert, minimally absorbed, and have no deleterious histologic, cellular, or biochemical effects when used as respiratory media. Although several types of PFCs have been characterized, a select few are considered to be compatible with life. Compatibility is often related to the physicochemical profile inherent to the PFC liquids. It is essential that certain physical properties such as respiratory gas solubility, vapor pressure, density, viscosity, and tissue permeability be within a narrow, acceptable range for a PFC to be considered as a possible candidate for respiratory media. The current study sought to characterize the physicochemical profile of commercially available PFCs. This was accomplished by creating a method for accurate, rapid prediction of a host of unknown physical characteristics of PFCs. The physicochemical properties of 16 perfluorinated hetero-hydrocarbons were catalogued from the literature. The input data were categorized into three major groups: empiric properties, geometric indices, and quantum mechanical descriptors, to generate a database. Algorithms were then developed, one for each dependent variable (FUNCTION), including oxygen solubility, partition coefficient (logP), vapor pressure, viscosity, and density, that related the values of these physical properties of potential breathable PFC liquids to the parameters listed in the database. The general form of the algorithm can be written as follows: FUNCTION = sigma (CiPi/magnitude of Pi) + constant; where the FUNCTIONS are oxygen solubility, logP, vapor pressure, viscosity, and density. Ci is a coefficient that weights the relative contribution of each parameter. Each independent parameter, Pi, was normalized by the average value of the parameter used in the

  2. Experimental Determination of CO_2 Diffusion Coefficient in Aqueous Solutions Under Pressure via Raman Spectroscopy at Room Temparature: Impact of Salinity (NaCl) on Dissolved CO_2 Diffusivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belgodere, C.; Dubessy, J.; Sterpenich, J.; Pironon, J.; Vautrin, D.; Caumon, M. C.; Robert, P.; Randi, A.; Birat, J. P.

    2014-06-01

    Diffusion coefficient of dissolved CO_ at 40 bar pressure and 21 ± 1°C was calculated using Raman spectroscopy of aqueous solutions, from 0 to 6 molNaCl . Kg^-1 H_2O, loaded in a High-Pressure Optical Cell.

  3. Vapour pressures, aqueous solubility, Henry's law constants and air/water partition coefficients of 1,8-dichlorooctane and 1,8-dibromooctane.

    PubMed

    Sarraute, Sabine; Mokbel, Ilham; Costa Gomes, Margarida F; Majer, Vladimir; Delepine, Hervé; Jose, Jacques

    2006-09-01

    New data on the vapour pressures and aqueous solubility of 1,8-dichlorooctane and 1,8-dibromooctane are reported as a function of temperature between 20 degrees C and 80 degrees C and 1 degrees C and 40 degrees C, respectively. For the vapour pressures, a static method was used during the measurements which have an estimated uncertainty between 3% and 5%. The aqueous solubilities were determined using a dynamic saturation column method and the values are accurate to within +/-10%. 1,8-Dichlorooctane is more volatile than 1,8-dibromooctane in the temperature range covered (p(sat) varies from 3 to 250 Pa and from 0.53 to 62 Pa, respectively) and is also approximately three times more soluble in water (mole fraction solubilities at 25 degrees C of 5.95 x 10(-7) and 1.92 x 10(-7), respectively). A combination of the two sets of data allowed the calculation of the Henry's law constants and the air water partition coefficients. A simple group contribution concept was used to rationalize the data obtained.

  4. An Experimental Study of the Kinetics of OH/OD(ν=1,2,3) + SO2: the Limiting High Pressure Rate Coefficients as a Function of Temperature.

    PubMed

    Blitz, Mark A; Salter, Robert J; Heard, Dwayne E; Seakins, Paul W

    2017-03-31

    The kinetics of the reaction OH/OD(ν=1,2,3) + SO2 have been studied using a photolysis / laser induced fluorescence technique. The rate coefficients OH/OD(v=1,2,3) + SO2, k1, over the temperature range 295 - 810 K were used to determine the limiting high pressure limit, k1(∞). This method is usually applicable if the reaction samples the potential well of the adduct, HOSO2, and if intramolecular vibrational relaxation is fast. In the present case, however, the rate coefficients showed an additional fast removal contribution as evidenced by the increase in k1 with vibrational level; this behaviour together with its temperature dependence is consistent with the existence of a weakly bound complex on the potential energy surface prior to adduct formation. The data were analysed using a composite mechanism that incoporates energy transfer mechanisms via both the adduct and the complex, and yielded a value of k1(∞)(295 K) equal to (7.2 ± 3.3) × 10(-13) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1), (errors at 1σ) a factor of between two to three smaller than the current recommended IUPAC and JPL values of (2.0) and (1.6 ± 0.4) × 10(-12) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) at 298 K, respectively, although the error bars do overlap. k1(∞) was observed to only depend weakly on temperature. Further evidence for a smaller k1(∞) is presented in the companion paper.

  5. A re-examination of the minor role of unstirred layers during the measurement of transport coefficients of Chara corallina internodes with the cell pressure probe.

    PubMed

    Ye, Qing; Kim, Yangmin; Steudle, Ernst

    2006-05-01

    The impact of unstirred layers (USLs) during cell pressure probe experiments with Chara corallina internodes has been quantified. The results show that the hydraulic conductivity (Lp) measured in hydrostatic relaxations was not significantly affected by USLs even in the presence of high water flow intensities ('sweep-away effect'). During pressure clamp, there was a reversible reduction in Lp by 20%, which was explained by the constriction of water to aquaporins (AQPs) in the C. corallina membrane and a rapid diffusional equilibration of solutes in arrays where water protruded across AQPs. In osmotic experiments, Lp, and permeability (Ps) and reflection (sigma s) coefficients increased as external flow rate of medium increased, indicating some effects of external USLs. However, the effect was levelling off at 'usual' flow rates of 0.20-0.30 m s(-1) and in the presence of vigorous stirring by air bubbles, suggesting a maximum thickness of external USLs of around 30 microm including the cell wall. Because the diameters of internodes were around 1 mm, internal USLs could have played a significant or even a dominating role, at least in the presence of the rapidly permeating solutes used [acetone, 2-propanol and dimethylformamide (DMF)]. A comparison of calculated (diffusion kinetics) and of measured permeabilities indicated an upper limit of the contribution of USLs for the rapidly moving solute acetone of 29%, and of 15% for the less rapidly permeating DME The results throw some doubt on recent claims that in C. corallina, USLs rather than the cell membrane dominate solute uptake, at least for the most rapidly moving solute acetone.

  6. Effect of Process Parameters, Casting Thickness, and Alloys on the Interfacial Heat-Transfer Coefficient in the High-Pressure Die-Casting Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Zhi-Peng; Xiong, Shou-Mei; Liu, Bai-Cheng; Li, Mei; Allison, John

    2008-12-01

    The heat transfer at the metal-die interface is believed to have great influence on the solidification process and cast structure of the high-pressure die-casting (HPDC) process. The present article focused on the effects of process parameters, casting thickness, and alloys on the metal-die interfacial heat-transfer coefficient (IHTC) in the HPDC process. Experiment was carried out on a cold-chamber die-casting machine with two casting alloys AM50 and ADC12. A special casting, namely, “step-shape” casting, was used and cast against a H13 steel die. The IHTC was determined using an inverse approach based on the temperature measurements inside the die. Results show that the IHTC is different at different steps and changes as the solidification of the casting proceeds. Process parameters only influence the IHTC in its peak value, and for both AM50 and ADC12 alloys, a greater fast shot velocity leads to a greater IHTC peak value at steps 1 and 2. The initial die surface temperature has a more prominent influence on the IHTC peak values at the thicker steps, especially step 5. Results also show that a closer contact between the casting and die could be achieved when the casting alloy is ADC12 instead of AM50, which consequently leads to a higher IHTC.

  7. Thermal plasma properties for Ar-Al, Ar-Fe and Ar-Cu mixtures used in welding plasmas processes: I. Net emission coefficients at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cressault, Y.; Gleizes, A.

    2013-10-01

    This article is devoted to the calculation of the net emission coefficient (NEC) of Ar-Al, Ar-Fe and Ar-Cu mixtures at atmospheric pressure for arc welding processes. The results are given in data tables for temperatures between 3 kK and 30 kK, for five plasma thicknesses (0, 0.5, 1, 2, 5 mm) and ten concentrations of metallic vapours (pure gas, 0.01%, 0.1%, 1%, 5%, 10%, 25%, 50%, 75% and pure metal vapours in mass proportions). The results are in good agreement with most of the works published on the subject for such mixtures. They highlight the influence of three parameters on the radiation of the plasma: the NEC is directly related to temperature and inversely related to plasma radius and is highly sensitive to the presence of metal vapours. Finally, numerical data are supplied in tables in order to develop accurate computational modelling of welding arc and to estimate both qualitatively and quantitatively the influence of each metallic vapour on the size and on the shape of the weld pool.

  8. COMPARISON OF THE OCTANOL-AIR PARTITION COEFFICIENT AND LIQUID-PHASE VAPOR PRESSURE AS DESCRIPTORS FOR PARTICLE/GAS PARTITIONING USING LABORATORY AND FIELD DATA FOR PCBS AND PCNS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The conventional Junge-Pankow adsorption model uses the sub-cooled liquid vapor pressure (pLo) as a correlation parameter for gas/particle interactions. An alternative is the octanol-air partition coefficient (Koa) absorption model. Log-log plots of the particle-gas partition c...

  9. COMPARISON OF THE OCTANOL-AIR PARTITION COEFFICIENT AND LIQUID-PHASE VAPOR PRESSURE AS DESCRIPTORS FOR PARTICLE/GAS PARTITIONING USING LABORATORY AND FIELD DATA FOR PCBS AND PCNS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The conventional Junge-Pankow adsorption model uses the sub-cooled liquid vapor pressure (pLo) as a correlation parameter for gas/particle interactions. An alternative is the octanol-air partition coefficient (Koa) absorption model. Log-log plots of the particle-gas partition c...

  10. The influence of pressure and temperature on the metal-silicate partition coefficients of nickel and cobalt in a model C1 chondrite and implications for metal segregation in a deep magma ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thibault, Yves; Walter, Michael J.

    1995-03-01

    The metal-silicate partition coefficients of Ni and Co in a model C1 chondrite were determined at pressures ranging from 1.2 to 12.0 GPa and temperatures between 2123 and 2750 K. At 5.0 GPa and 2500 K, the effect of variable oxygen contents on the partitioning of Ni and Co was also investigated. Graphite was chosen as the sample container. Carbon is an integral part of the system because about 5 wt% C dissolved in the metal liquid. The slopes obtained for the relation between log D M∗met/sil (M = Ni or Co) and log f O 2 (ΔIW) are compatible with Ni and Co, having valencies of 2 in the silicate melt. This allows the partitioning of Ni and Co as a function of pressure and temperature to be expressed in terms of exchange partition coefficients KDM/Fe met/sil = ( XMmet/XMOsil)( XFeOsil/ XFemet), which are essentially independent of oxygen fugacity. In the pressure-temperature interval investigated, increasing temperature and pressure both result in lowering KDNi/Fe met/sil and K D Co/Femet¡l. In the context of reasonable geothermal gradients, the pressure effect is significantly more important, especially for Ni. The results obtained agree with recent studies on the partitioning of Ni and Co at high pressure and high temperature in that they all record much lower metal-silicate partition coefficients for these elements than those obtained at lower temperature and atmospheric pressure. The significant differences in the experimental conditions between these recent high-pressure/high-temperature studies can probably explain the small but significant discrepancies observed in the results. The abundance of Ni and Co that would be observed in the primitive mantle for pressures of equilibration up to 12.0 GPa were calculated assuming simple core-mantle equilibrium in a magma ocean. The resulting abundances of Ni and Co do not reach the values estimated for Earth's primitive mantle. Nevertheless, the significant decrease in the partition coefficients of Ni and Co with

  11. Calculation of the standard partial molal thermodynamic properties of KCl{sup 0} and activity coefficients of aqueous KCl at temperatures and pressures to 1000{degree}C and 5 kbar

    SciTech Connect

    Pokrovskii, V.A.; Helgeson, H.C.

    1997-06-01

    Regression of experimental activity coefficient and dissociation constant data reported in the literature with the Hueckel and Setchenow equations and the revised HKF equations of state generated parameters and thermodynamic properties of dissociated KCl and KCl{sup 0} at 25{degrees}C and bar that can be used to calculate the standard partial molal thermodynamic properties of KCl{sup 0} and the activity coefficients of KCl at temperatures and pressures to 1000{degrees}C and 5 kbar. 46 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  12. Room-temperature Broadening and Pressure-shift Coefficients in the nu(exp 2) Band of CH3D-O2: Measurements and Semi-classical Calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Predoi-Cross, Adriana; Hambrook, Kyle; Brawley-Tremblay, Shannon; Bouanich, Jean-Pierre; Devi, V. Malathy; Smith, Mary Ann H.

    2006-01-01

    We report measured Lorentz O2-broadening and O2-induced pressure-shift coefficients of CH3D in the nu(exp 2) fundamental band. Using a multispectrum fitting technique we have analyzed 11 laboratory absorption spectra recorded at 0.011 cm(exp 1) resolution using the McMath-Pierce Fourier transform spectrometer, Kitt Peak, Arizona. Two absorption cells with path lengths of 10.2 and 25 cm were used to record the spectra. The total sample pressures ranged from 0.98 to 339.85 Torr with CH3D volume mixing ratios of 0.012 in oxygen. We report measurements for O2 pressure-broadening coefficients of 320 nu(exp 2) transitions with quantum numbers as high as J0(sup w) = 17 and K = 14, where K(sup w) = K' is equivalent to K (for a parallel band). The measured O2-broadening coefficients range from 0.0153 to 0.0645 cm(exp -1) atm(exp -1) at 296 K. All the measured pressure-shifts are negative. The reported O2-induced pressure-shift coefficients vary from about -0.0017 to -0.0068 cm(exp -1) atm(exp -1). We have examined the dependence of the measured broadening and shift parameters on the J(sup W), and K quantum numbers and also developed empirical expressions to describe the broadening coefficients in terms of m (m = -J(sup W), J(sup W), and J(sup w) + 1 in the QP-, QQ-, and QR-branch, respectively) and K. On average, the empirical expressions reproduce the measured broadening coefficients to within 4.4%. The O2-broadening and pressure shift coefficients were calculated on the basis of a semiclassical model of interacting linear molecules performed by considering in addition to the electrostatic contributions the atom-atom Lennard-Jones potential. The theoretical results of the broadening coefficients are generally larger than the experimental data. Using for the trajectory model an isotropic Lennard-Jones potential derived from molecular parameters instead of the spherical average of the atom-atom model, a better agreement is obtained with these data, especially for |m| <= 12

  13. Room-temperature Broadening and Pressure-shift Coefficients in the nu(exp 2) Band of CH3D-O2: Measurements and Semi-classical Calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Predoi-Cross, Adriana; Hambrook, Kyle; Brawley-Tremblay, Shannon; Bouanich, Jean-Pierre; Devi, V. Malathy; Smith, Mary Ann H.

    2006-01-01

    We report measured Lorentz O2-broadening and O2-induced pressure-shift coefficients of CH3D in the nu(exp 2) fundamental band. Using a multispectrum fitting technique we have analyzed 11 laboratory absorption spectra recorded at 0.011 cm(exp 1) resolution using the McMath-Pierce Fourier transform spectrometer, Kitt Peak, Arizona. Two absorption cells with path lengths of 10.2 and 25 cm were used to record the spectra. The total sample pressures ranged from 0.98 to 339.85 Torr with CH3D volume mixing ratios of 0.012 in oxygen. We report measurements for O2 pressure-broadening coefficients of 320 nu(exp 2) transitions with quantum numbers as high as J0(sup w) = 17 and K = 14, where K(sup w) = K' is equivalent to K (for a parallel band). The measured O2-broadening coefficients range from 0.0153 to 0.0645 cm(exp -1) atm(exp -1) at 296 K. All the measured pressure-shifts are negative. The reported O2-induced pressure-shift coefficients vary from about -0.0017 to -0.0068 cm(exp -1) atm(exp -1). We have examined the dependence of the measured broadening and shift parameters on the J(sup W), and K quantum numbers and also developed empirical expressions to describe the broadening coefficients in terms of m (m = -J(sup W), J(sup W), and J(sup w) + 1 in the QP-, QQ-, and QR-branch, respectively) and K. On average, the empirical expressions reproduce the measured broadening coefficients to within 4.4%. The O2-broadening and pressure shift coefficients were calculated on the basis of a semiclassical model of interacting linear molecules performed by considering in addition to the electrostatic contributions the atom-atom Lennard-Jones potential. The theoretical results of the broadening coefficients are generally larger than the experimental data. Using for the trajectory model an isotropic Lennard-Jones potential derived from molecular parameters instead of the spherical average of the atom-atom model, a better agreement is obtained with these data, especially for |m| <= 12

  14. Determination of octanol-air partition coefficients and supercooled liquid vapor pressures of PAHs as a function of temperature: Application to gas-particle partitioning in an urban atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odabasi, Mustafa; Cetin, Eylem; Sofuoglu, Aysun

    Octanol-air partition coefficients ( KOA) for 14 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were determined as a function of temperature using the gas chromatographic retention time method. log KOA values at 25° ranged over six orders of magnitude, between 6.34 (acenaphthylene) and 12.59 (dibenz[ a,h]anthracene). The determined KOA values were within factor of 0.7 (dibenz[ a,h]anthracene) to 15.1 (benz[ a]anthracene) of values calculated as the ratio of octanol-water partition coefficient to dimensionless Henry's law constant. Supercooled liquid vapor pressures ( PL) of 13 PAHs were also determined using the gas chromatographic retention time technique. Activity coefficients in octanol calculated using KOA and PL ranged between 3.2 and 6.2 indicating near-ideal solution behavior. Atmospheric concentrations measured in this study in Izmir, Turkey were used to investigate the partitioning of PAHs between particle and gas-phases. Experimental gas-particle partition coefficients ( Kp) were compared to the predictions of KOA absorption and KSA (soot-air partition coefficient) models. Octanol-based absorptive partitioning model predicted lower partition coefficients especially for relatively volatile PAHs. Ratios of measured/modeled partition coefficients ranged between 1.1 and 15.5 (4.5±6.0, average±SD) for KOA model. KSA model predictions were relatively better and measured to modeled ratios ranged between 0.6 and 5.6 (2.3±2.7, average±SD).

  15. First experimental determination of the absolute gas-phase rate coefficient for the reaction of OH with 4-hydroxy-2-butanone (4H2B) at 294 K by vapor pressure measurements of 4H2B.

    PubMed

    El Dib, Gisèle; Sleiman, Chantal; Canosa, André; Travers, Daniel; Courbe, Jonathan; Sawaya, Terufat; Mokbel, Ilham; Chakir, Abdelkhaleq

    2013-01-10

    The reaction of the OH radicals with 4-hydroxy-2-butanone was investigated in the gas phase using an absolute rate method at room temperature and over the pressure range 10-330 Torr in He and air as diluent gases. The rate coefficients were measured using pulsed laser photolysis (PLP) of H(2)O(2) to produce OH and laser induced fluorescence (LIF) to measure the OH temporal profile. An average value of (4.8 ± 1.2) × 10(-12) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) was obtained. The OH quantum yield following the 266 nm pulsed laser photolysis of 4-hydroxy-2-butanone was measured for the first time and found to be about 0.3%. The investigated kinetic study required accurate measurements of the vapor pressure of 4-hydroxy-2-butanone, which was measured using a static apparatus. The vapor pressure was found to range from 0.056 to 7.11 Torr between 254 and 323 K. This work provides the first absolute rate coefficients for the reaction of 4-hydroxy-2-butanone with OH and the first experimental saturated vapor pressures of the studied compound below 311 K. The obtained results are compared to those of the literature and the effects of the experimental conditions on the reactivity are examined. The calculated tropospheric lifetime obtained in this work suggests that once emitted into the atmosphere, 4H2B may contribute to the photochemical pollution in a local or regional scale.

  16. In situ study of mass transfer in aqueous solutions under high pressures via Raman spectroscopy: a new method for the determination of diffusion coefficients of methane in water near hydrate formation conditions.

    PubMed

    Lu, W J; Chou, I M; Burruss, R C; Yang, M Z

    2006-02-01

    A new method was developed for in situ study of the diffusive transfer of methane in aqueous solution under high pressures near hydrate formation conditions within an optical capillary cell. Time-dependent Raman spectra of the solution at several different spots along the one-dimensional diffusion path were collected and thus the varying composition profile of the solution was monitored. Diffusion coefficients were estimated by the least squares method based on the variations in methane concentration data in space and time in the cell. The measured diffusion coefficients of methane in water at the liquid (L)-vapor (V) stable region and L-V metastable region are close to previously reported values determined at lower pressure and similar temperature. This in situ monitoring method was demonstrated to be suitable for the study of mass transfer in aqueous solution under high pressure and at various temperature conditions and will be applied to the study of nucleation and dissolution kinetics of methane hydrate in a hydrate-water system where the interaction of methane and water would be more complicated than that presented here for the L-V metastable condition.

  17. In situ study of mass transfer in aqueous solutions under high pressures via Raman spectroscopy: A new method for the determination of diffusion coefficients of methane in water near hydrate formation conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lu, W.J.; Chou, I.-Ming; Burruss, R.C.; Yang, M.Z.

    2006-01-01

    A new method was developed for in situ study of the diffusive transfer of methane in aqueous solution under high pressures near hydrate formation conditions within an optical capillary cell. Time-dependent Raman spectra of the solution at several different spots along the one-dimensional diffusion path were collected and thus the varying composition profile of the solution was monitored. Diffusion coefficients were estimated by the least squares method based on the variations in methane concentration data in space and time in the cell. The measured diffusion coefficients of methane in water at the liquid (L)-vapor (V) stable region and L-V metastable region are close to previously reported values determined at lower pressure and similar temperature. This in situ monitoring method was demonstrated to be suitable for the study of mass transfer in aqueous solution under high pressure and at various temperature conditions and will be applied to the study of nucleation and dissolution kinetics of methane hydrate in a hydrate-water system where the interaction of methane and water would be more complicated than that presented here for the L-V metastable condition. ?? 2006 Society for Applied Spectroscopy.

  18. Circadian Variations in Blood Pressure, Heart Rate, and HR-BP Cross-Correlation Coefficient during Progression of Diabetes Mellitus in Rat.

    PubMed

    Anigbogu, Chikodi N; Williams, Daniel T; Brown, David R; Silcox, Dennis L; Speakman, Richard O; Brown, Laura C; Karounos, Dennis G; Randall, David C

    2011-01-01

    Circadian changes in cardiovascular function during the progression of diabetes mellitus in the diabetes prone rat (BBDP) (n = 8) were studied. Age-matched diabetes-resistant rats (BBDR) served as controls. BP was recorded via telemetry in contiguous 4 hr time periods over 24 hours starting with 12 midnight to 4 am as period zero (P0). Prior to onset of diabetes BP was high at P0, peaked at P2, and then fell again at P3; BP and heart rate (HR) then increased gradually at P4 and leveled off at P5, thereby exhibiting a bipodal rhythm. These patterns changed during long-term diabetes. The cross-correlation coefficient of BP and HR was not significantly different across groups at onset, but it fell significantly at 9 months of duration of diabetes (BBDP: 0.39 ± 0.06; BBDR: 0.65 ± 0.03; P < .05). These results show that changes in circadian cardiovascular rhythms in diabetes mellitus became significant at the late stage of the disease.

  19. Laser-based air data system for aircraft control using Raman and elastic backscatter for the measurement of temperature, density, pressure, moisture, and particle backscatter coefficient.

    PubMed

    Fraczek, Michael; Behrendt, Andreas; Schmitt, Nikolaus

    2012-01-10

    Flight safety in all weather conditions demands exact and reliable determination of flight-critical air parameters. Air speed, temperature, density, and pressure are essential for aircraft control. Conventional air data systems can be impacted by probe failure caused by mechanical damage from hail, volcanic ash, and icing. While optical air speed measurement methods have been discussed elsewhere, in this paper, a new concept for optically measuring the air temperature, density, pressure, moisture, and particle backscatter is presented, being independent on assumptions on the atmospheric state and eliminating the drawbacks of conventional aircraft probes by providing a different measurement principle. The concept is based on a laser emitting laser pulses into the atmosphere through a window and detecting the signals backscattered from a fixed region just outside the disturbed area of the fuselage flows. With four receiver channels, different spectral portions of the backscattered light are extracted. The measurement principle of air temperature and density is based on extracting two signals out of the rotational Raman (RR) backscatter signal of air molecules. For measuring the water vapor mixing ratio-and thus the density of the moist air-a water vapor Raman channel is included. The fourth channel serves to detect the elastic backscatter signal, which is essential for extending the measurements into clouds. This channel contributes to the detection of aerosols, which is interesting for developing a future volcanic ash warning system for aircraft. Detailed and realistic optimization and performance calculations have been performed based on the parameters of a first prototype of such a measurement system. The impact and correction of systematic error sources, such as solar background at daytime and elastic signal cross talk appearing in optically dense clouds, have been investigated. The results of the simulations show the high potential of the proposed system for

  20. Henry's law constant, octanol-air partition coefficient and supercooled liquid vapor pressure of carbazole as a function of temperature: application to gas/particle partitioning in the atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Odabasi, Mustafa; Cetin, Banu; Sofuoglu, Aysun

    2006-02-01

    The Henry's law constant for carbazole was experimentally determined between 5 and 35 degrees C using a gas-stripping technique. The following equation was obtained for dimensionless Henry's law constant (H') versus temperature (T, K): ln H' = -3982(T,K)(-1) + 1.01. Temperature-dependent octanol-air partition coefficients (KOA) and supercooled liquid vapor pressures (PL,Pa) of carbazole were also determined using the GC retention time method. The temperature dependence of KOA and PL were explained by the following: log KOA = 4076/(T,K) - 5.65, log PL(Pa) = -3948(T,K)(- 1) + 11.48. The gas and particle-phase carbazole concentrations measured previously in Chicago, IL in 1995 was used for gas/particle partitioning modeling. Octanol based absorptive partitioning model consistently underpredicted the gas/particle partition coefficients (Kp) for all sampling periods. However, overall there was a good agreement between the measured Kp and soot-based model predictions.

  1. Measurements of octanol-air partition coefficients, vapor pressures and vaporization enthalpies of the (E) and (Z) isomers of the 2-ethylhexyl 4-methoxycinnamate as parameters of environmental impact assessment.

    PubMed

    Pegoraro, César N; Chiappero, Malisa S; Montejano, Hernán A

    2015-11-01

    2-Ethylhexyl 4-methoxycinnamate is one of the UVB blocking agents more widely used in a variety of industrial fields. There are more than one hundred industrial suppliers worldwide. Given the enormous annual consumption of octinoxate, problems that arise due to the accumulation of this compound in nature should be taken into consideration. The GC-RT was used in this work with the aim of determining the vapor pressure, enthalpies of vaporization and octanol-air partition coefficient, for the BBP, DOP, E- and Z-EHMC esters. The results showed that Z-EHMC is almost five times more volatile than E-EHMC. Moreover, BBP, Z-EHMC and E-EHMC can be classified as substances with a relatively low mobility since they lie within the range of 810 and log(PL/Pa)<-4, therefore, a low mobility can be expected. From these parameters, their particle-bound fraction and gas-particle partition coefficient were also derived.

  2. Factor Scores, Structure Coefficients, and Communality Coefficients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodwyn, Fara

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents heuristic explanations of factor scores, structure coefficients, and communality coefficients. Common misconceptions regarding these topics are clarified. In addition, (a) the regression (b) Bartlett, (c) Anderson-Rubin, and (d) Thompson methods for calculating factor scores are reviewed. Syntax necessary to execute all four…

  3. Effect of internal pressure and gas/liquid interface area on the CO mass transfer coefficient using hollow fibre membranes as a high mass transfer gas diffusing system for microbial syngas fermentation.

    PubMed

    Yasin, Muhammad; Park, Shinyoung; Jeong, Yeseul; Lee, Eun Yeol; Lee, Jinwon; Chang, In Seop

    2014-10-01

    This study proposed a submerged hollow fibre membrane bioreactor (HFMBR) system capable of achieving high carbon monoxide (CO) mass transfer for applications in microbial synthesis gas conversion systems. Hydrophobic polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) membrane fibres were used to fabricate a membrane module, which was used for pressurising CO in water phase. Pressure through the hollow fibre lumen (P) and membrane surface area per unit working volume of the liquid (A(S)/V(L)) were used as controllable parameters to determine gas-liquid volumetric mass transfer coefficient (k(L)a) values. We found a k(L)a of 135.72 h(-1) when P was 93.76 kPa and AS/VL was fixed at 27.5m(-1). A higher k(L)a of 155.16 h(-1) was achieved by increasing AS/VL to 62.5m(-1) at a lower P of 37.23 kPa. Practicality of HFMBR to support microbial growth and organic product formation was assessed by CO/CO2 fermentation using Eubacterium limosum KIST612.

  4. Ultrasound coefficient of nonlinearity imaging.

    PubMed

    van Sloun, Ruud; Demi, Libertario; Shan, Caifeng; Mischi, Massimo

    2015-07-01

    Imaging the acoustical coefficient of nonlinearity, β, is of interest in several healthcare interventional applications. It is an important feature that can be used for discriminating tissues. In this paper, we propose a nonlinearity characterization method with the goal of locally estimating the coefficient of nonlinearity. The proposed method is based on a 1-D solution of the nonlinear lossy Westerfelt equation, thereby deriving a local relation between β and the pressure wave field. Based on several assumptions, a β imaging method is then presented that is based on the ratio between the harmonic and fundamental fields, thereby reducing the effect of spatial amplitude variations of the speckle pattern. By testing the method on simulated ultrasound pressure fields and an in vitro B-mode ultrasound acquisition, we show that the designed algorithm is able to estimate the coefficient of nonlinearity, and that the tissue types of interest are well discriminable. The proposed imaging method provides a new approach to β estimation, not requiring a special measurement setup or transducer, that seems particularly promising for in vivo imaging.

  5. Calculation of combined diffusion coefficients in SF6-Cu mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Linlin; Wang, Xiaohua; Rong, Mingzhe; Wu, Yi; Murphy, Anthony B.

    2014-10-01

    Diffusion coefficients play an important role in the description of the transport of metal vapours in gas mixtures. This paper is devoted to the calculation of four combined diffusion coefficients, namely, the combined ordinary diffusion coefficient, combined electric field diffusion coefficient, combined temperature diffusion coefficient, and combined pressure diffusion coefficient in SF6-Cu mixtures at temperatures up to 30 000 K. These four coefficients describe diffusion due to composition gradients, applied electric fields, temperature gradients, and pressure gradients, respectively. The influence of copper fluoride and sulfide species on the diffusion coefficients is shown to be negligible. The effect of copper proportion and gas pressures on these diffusion coefficients is investigated. It is shown that increasing the proportion of copper generally increases the magnitude of the four diffusion coefficients, except for copper mole fractions of 90% or more. It is further found that increasing the pressure reduces the magnitude of the coefficients, except for the combined temperature diffusion coefficient, and shifts the maximum of all four coefficients towards higher temperatures. The results presented in this paper can be applied to the simulation of high-voltage circuit breaker arcs.

  6. Modified Biserial Correlation Coefficients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraemer, Helena Chmura

    1981-01-01

    Asymptotic distribution theory of Brogden's form of biserial correlation coefficient is derived and large sample estimates of its standard error obtained. Its relative efficiency to the biserial correlation coefficient is examined. Recommendations for choice of estimator of biserial correlation are presented. (Author/JKS)

  7. Measurements of thermal accommodation coefficients.

    SciTech Connect

    Rader, Daniel John; Castaneda, Jaime N.; Torczynski, John Robert; Grasser, Thomas W.; Trott, Wayne Merle

    2005-10-01

    A previously-developed experimental facility has been used to determine gas-surface thermal accommodation coefficients from the pressure dependence of the heat flux between parallel plates of similar material but different surface finish. Heat flux between the plates is inferred from measurements of temperature drop between the plate surface and an adjacent temperature-controlled water bath. Thermal accommodation measurements were determined from the pressure dependence of the heat flux for a fixed plate separation. Measurements of argon and nitrogen in contact with standard machined (lathed) or polished 304 stainless steel plates are indistinguishable within experimental uncertainty. Thus, the accommodation coefficient of 304 stainless steel with nitrogen and argon is estimated to be 0.80 {+-} 0.02 and 0.87 {+-} 0.02, respectively, independent of the surface roughness within the range likely to be encountered in engineering practice. Measurements of the accommodation of helium showed a slight variation with 304 stainless steel surface roughness: 0.36 {+-} 0.02 for a standard machine finish and 0.40 {+-} 0.02 for a polished finish. Planned tests with carbon-nanotube-coated plates will be performed when 304 stainless-steel blanks have been successfully coated.

  8. Coefficients of Effective Length.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Roger H.

    1981-01-01

    Under certain conditions, a validity Coefficient of Effective Length (CEL) can produce highly misleading results. A modified coefficent is suggested for use when empirical studies indicate that underlying assumptions have been violated. (Author/BW)

  9. Determination of diffusion coefficients for supercritical fluids.

    PubMed

    Medina, Ignacio

    2012-08-10

    A review of the diffusion coefficients for solutes in supercritical fluids as reported in the literature is presented together with the correlation methods applied by the authors for modeling the experimentally determined data. Supercritical carbon dioxide has been the preferred solvent in most of the systems investigated, although other solvents at elevated pressure have also been used. The influence of pressure, temperature, density, and viscosity on the binary diffusion coefficients is discussed, and some general trends have been established. A number of experimental methods for determining diffusion coefficients in supercritical fluids have been reported in the literature. The methods are described, their advantages and disadvantages are discussed and some examples of their application are given. Predictive equations based on the Stokes-Einstein model, the Rough-Hard-Sphere theory, and other methods for the calculation of diffusion coefficients in supercritical fluids at infinite dilution are reviewed. The review also looks at the ternary systems reported in the literature. The latter are discussed in terms of temperature, pressure, the type of modifier employed, amount of modifier, and solute-modifier interactions. Several equations have been proposed for correlating and predicting the diffusion coefficients in ternary systems. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. JKTLD: Limb darkening coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Southworth, John

    2015-11-01

    JKTLD outputs theoretically-calculated limb darkening (LD) strengths for equations (LD laws) which predict the amount of LD as a function of the part of the star being observed. The coefficients of these laws are obtained by bilinear interpolation (in effective temperature and surface gravity) in published tables of coefficients calculated from stellar model atmospheres by several researchers. Many observations of stars require the strength of limb darkening (LD) to be estimated, which can be done using theoretical models of stellar atmospheres; JKTLD can help in these circumstances.

  11. Measuring Seebeck Coefficient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, G. Jeffrey (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A high temperature Seebeck coefficient measurement apparatus and method with various features to minimize typical sources of errors is described. Common sources of temperature and voltage measurement errors which may impact accurate measurement are identified and reduced. Applying the identified principles, a high temperature Seebeck measurement apparatus and method employing a uniaxial, four-point geometry is described to operate from room temperature up to 1300K. These techniques for non-destructive Seebeck coefficient measurements are simple to operate, and are suitable for bulk samples with a broad range of physical types and shapes.

  12. H2, He, and CO2 line-broadening coefficients, pressure shifts and temperature-dependence exponents for the HITRAN database. Part 1: SO2, NH3, HF, HCl, OCS and C2H2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilzewski, Jonas S.; Gordon, Iouli E.; Kochanov, Roman V.; Hill, Christian; Rothman, Laurence S.

    2016-01-01

    To increase the potential for use of the HITRAN database in astronomy, experimental and theoretical line-broadening coefficients, line shifts and temperature-dependence exponents of molecules of planetary interest broadened by H2, He, and CO2 have been assembled from available peer-reviewed sources. The collected data were used to create semi-empirical models so that every HITRAN line of the studied molecules has corresponding parameters. Since H2 and He are major constituents in the atmospheres of gas giants, and CO2 predominates in atmospheres of some rocky planets with volcanic activity, these spectroscopic data are important for remote sensing studies of planetary atmospheres. In this paper we make the first step in assembling complete sets of these parameters, thereby creating datasets for SO2, NH3, HF, HCl, OCS and C2H2.

  13. Correlation and prediction of gaseous diffusion coefficients.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marrero, T. R.; Mason, E. A.

    1973-01-01

    A new correlation method for binary gaseous diffusion coefficients from very low temperatures to 10,000 K is proposed based on an extended principle of corresponding states, and having greater range and accuracy than previous correlations. There are two correlation parameters that are related to other physical quantities and that are predictable in the absence of diffusion measurements. Quantum effects and composition dependence are included, but high-pressure effects are not. The results are directly applicable to multicomponent mixtures.

  14. Correlation and prediction of gaseous diffusion coefficients.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marrero, T. R.; Mason, E. A.

    1973-01-01

    A new correlation method for binary gaseous diffusion coefficients from very low temperatures to 10,000 K is proposed based on an extended principle of corresponding states, and having greater range and accuracy than previous correlations. There are two correlation parameters that are related to other physical quantities and that are predictable in the absence of diffusion measurements. Quantum effects and composition dependence are included, but high-pressure effects are not. The results are directly applicable to multicomponent mixtures.

  15. Tabulations of static pressure coefficients on the surfaces of 3 pylon-mounted axisymmetric flow-through nacelles at Mach numbers from 0.40 to 0.98

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Re, R. J.; Peddrew, K. H.

    1982-01-01

    Three flow through nacelles mounted on an 82 deg swept pylon (10 percent thickness-to-chord ratio) were tested in the Langley 16 foot Transonic Tunnel. The long uncambered pylon was supported from a small body of revolution so that pressure measurements on the nacelle and pylon represent a pylon nacelle flow field without a wing present. Two nacelles had NACA 1-85-100 inlets and different circular arc afterbodies. The third nacelle had an NACA 1-70-100 inlet with a circular arc afterbody having the same external shape as one of the other nacelles. Nacelle length to maximum diameter ratio was 3.5. Data were obtained at angles of attack from 2 deg to 8 deg at selected Mach numbers.

  16. Flight-measured base pressure coefficients for thick boundary-layer flow over an aft-facing step for Mach numbers from 0.4 to 2.5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goecke, S. A.

    1973-01-01

    A 0.56-inch thick aft-facing step was located 52.1 feet from the leading edge of the left wing of an XB-70 airplane. A boundary-layer rake at a mirror location on the right wing was used to obtain local flow properties. Reynolds numbers were near 10 to the 8th power, resulting in a relatively thick boundary-layer. The momentum thickness ranged from slightly thinner to slightly thicker than the step height. Surface static pressures forward of the step were obtained for Mach numbers near 0.9, 1.5, 2.0, and 2.4. The data were compared with thin boundary-layer results from flight and wind-tunnel experiments and semiempirical relationships. Significant differences were found between the thick and the thin boundary-layer data.

  17. Hood entry coefficients of compound exhaust hoods.

    PubMed

    Figueroa, Crescente E

    2011-12-01

    A traditional method for assessing the flow rate in ventilation systems is based on multiple readings of velocity or velocity pressure (VP) (usually 10 or 20 points) taken in ductwork sections located away from fittings (> seven × diameters of straight duct). This study seeks to eliminate the need for a multiple-point evaluation and replace it with a simplified method that requires only a single measurement of hood static pressure (SP(h)) taken at a more accessible location (< three × diameters of straight duct from the hood entry). The SP(h) method is widely used for the assessment of flow rate in simple hoods. However, industrial applications quite often use compound hoods that are regularly of the slot/plenum type. For these hoods, a "compound coefficient of entry" has not been published, which makes the use of the hood static pressure method unfeasible. This study proposes a model for the computation of a "compound coefficient of entry" and validates the use of this model to assess flow rate in two systems of well-defined geometry (multi-slotted/plenum and single-slotted/tapered or "fish-tail" types). When using a conservative value of the slot loss factor (1.78), the proposed model yielded an estimate of the volumetric flow rate within 10% of that provided by a more comprehensive method of assessment. The simplicity of the hood static pressure method makes it very desirable, even in the upper range of experimental error found in this study.

  18. Activity coefficients of chlorophenols in water at infinite dilution

    SciTech Connect

    Tabai, S.; Rogalski, M.; Solimando, R.; Malanowski, S.K.

    1997-11-01

    The total pressure of aqueous solutions of chlorophenols was determined by a ebulliometric total pressure method for the aqueous solutions of phenol, 2-chlorophenol, 3-chlorophenol, 4-chlorophenol, and 2,4-dichlorophenol in the temperature range from 40 to 90 C. The activity coefficients at infinite dilution and the Henry constants were derived.

  19. Cryogenic High Pressure Sensor Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, John J. (Inventor); Shams, Qamar A. (Inventor); Powers, William T. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A pressure sensor is provided for cryogenic, high pressure applications. A highly doped silicon piezoresistive pressure sensor is bonded to a silicon substrate in an absolute pressure sensing configuration. The absolute pressure sensor is bonded to an aluminum nitride substrate. Aluminum nitride has appropriate coefficient of thermal expansion for use with highly doped silicon at cryogenic temperatures. A group of sensors, either two sensors on two substrates or four sensors on a single substrate are packaged in a pressure vessel.

  20. Cryogenic, Absolute, High Pressure Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, John J. (Inventor); Shams. Qamar A. (Inventor); Powers, William T. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A pressure sensor is provided for cryogenic, high pressure applications. A highly doped silicon piezoresistive pressure sensor is bonded to a silicon substrate in an absolute pressure sensing configuration. The absolute pressure sensor is bonded to an aluminum nitride substrate. Aluminum nitride has appropriate coefficient of thermal expansion for use with highly doped silicon at cryogenic temperatures. A group of sensors, either two sensors on two substrates or four sensors on a single substrate are packaged in a pressure vessel.

  1. Multiple element airfoils optimized for maximum lift coefficient.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ormsbee, A. I.; Chen, A. W.

    1972-01-01

    Optimum airfoils in the sense of maximum lift coefficient are obtained for incompressible fluid flow at large Reynolds number. The maximum lift coefficient is achieved by requiring that the turbulent skin friction be zero in the pressure rise region on the airfoil upper surface. Under this constraint, the pressure distribution is optimized. The optimum pressure distribution is a function of Reynolds number and the trailing edge velocity. Geometries of those airfoils which will generate these optimum pressure distributions are obtained using a direct-iterative method which is developed in this study. This method can be used to design airfoils consisting of any number of elements. Numerical examples of one- and two-element airfoils are given. The maximum lift coefficients obtained range from 2 to 2.5.

  2. Calculation and application of combined diffusion coefficients in thermal plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Anthony B.

    2014-03-01

    The combined diffusion coefficient method is widely used to treat the mixing and demixing of different plasma gases and vapours in thermal plasmas, such as welding arcs and plasma jets. It greatly simplifies the treatment of diffusion for many gas mixtures without sacrificing accuracy. Here, three subjects that are important in the implementation of the combined diffusion coefficient method are considered. First, it is shown that different expressions for the combined diffusion coefficients, arising from different definitions for the stoichiometric coefficients that assign the electrons to the two gases, are equivalent. Second, an approach is presented for calculating certain partial differential terms in the combined temperature and pressure diffusion coefficients that can cause difficulties. Finally, a method for applying the combined diffusion coefficients in computational models, which typically require diffusion to be expressed in terms of mass fraction gradients, is given.

  3. Calculation and application of combined diffusion coefficients in thermal plasmas.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Anthony B

    2014-03-07

    The combined diffusion coefficient method is widely used to treat the mixing and demixing of different plasma gases and vapours in thermal plasmas, such as welding arcs and plasma jets. It greatly simplifies the treatment of diffusion for many gas mixtures without sacrificing accuracy. Here, three subjects that are important in the implementation of the combined diffusion coefficient method are considered. First, it is shown that different expressions for the combined diffusion coefficients, arising from different definitions for the stoichiometric coefficients that assign the electrons to the two gases, are equivalent. Second, an approach is presented for calculating certain partial differential terms in the combined temperature and pressure diffusion coefficients that can cause difficulties. Finally, a method for applying the combined diffusion coefficients in computational models, which typically require diffusion to be expressed in terms of mass fraction gradients, is given.

  4. Coefficient Alpha: A Reliability Coefficient for the 21st Century?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Yanyun; Green, Samuel B.

    2011-01-01

    Coefficient alpha is almost universally applied to assess reliability of scales in psychology. We argue that researchers should consider alternatives to coefficient alpha. Our preference is for structural equation modeling (SEM) estimates of reliability because they are informative and allow for an empirical evaluation of the assumptions…

  5. Coefficient Alpha: A Reliability Coefficient for the 21st Century?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Yanyun; Green, Samuel B.

    2011-01-01

    Coefficient alpha is almost universally applied to assess reliability of scales in psychology. We argue that researchers should consider alternatives to coefficient alpha. Our preference is for structural equation modeling (SEM) estimates of reliability because they are informative and allow for an empirical evaluation of the assumptions…

  6. Activity coefficient of aqueous sodium bicarbonate

    SciTech Connect

    Pitzer, Kenneth S.; Peiper, J. Christopher

    1980-09-01

    The determination of the activity coefficient and related properties of sodium bicarbonate presents special problems because of the appreciable vapor pressure of CO2 above such solutions. With the development of reliable equations for the thermodynamic properties of mixed electrolytes, it is possible to determine the parameters for NaHCO3 from cell measurements or NaCl-NaHCO3 mixtures. Literature data are analyzed to illustrate the method and provide interim values, hoever it is noted that further measurements over a wider range of concentrations would yield more definitive results. Lastly, an estimate is also given for the activity coefficient of KHCO3.

  7. Calculation of combined diffusion coefficients in SF{sub 6}-Cu mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong, Linlin; Wang, Xiaohua Rong, Mingzhe Wu, Yi; Murphy, Anthony B.

    2014-10-15

    Diffusion coefficients play an important role in the description of the transport of metal vapours in gas mixtures. This paper is devoted to the calculation of four combined diffusion coefficients, namely, the combined ordinary diffusion coefficient, combined electric field diffusion coefficient, combined temperature diffusion coefficient, and combined pressure diffusion coefficient in SF{sub 6}-Cu mixtures at temperatures up to 30 000 K. These four coefficients describe diffusion due to composition gradients, applied electric fields, temperature gradients, and pressure gradients, respectively. The influence of copper fluoride and sulfide species on the diffusion coefficients is shown to be negligible. The effect of copper proportion and gas pressures on these diffusion coefficients is investigated. It is shown that increasing the proportion of copper generally increases the magnitude of the four diffusion coefficients, except for copper mole fractions of 90% or more. It is further found that increasing the pressure reduces the magnitude of the coefficients, except for the combined temperature diffusion coefficient, and shifts the maximum of all four coefficients towards higher temperatures. The results presented in this paper can be applied to the simulation of high-voltage circuit breaker arcs.

  8. Standardized Discriminant Coefficients: A Rejoinder.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mueller, Ralph O.; Cozad, James B.

    1993-01-01

    Although comments of D.J. Nordlund and R. Nagel are welcomed, their arguments are not sufficient to accept the recommendation of using total variance estimates to standardize canonical discriminant function coefficients. If standardized coefficients are used to help interpret a discriminant analysis, pooled within-group variance estimates should…

  9. Experimental rotordynamic coefficient results for honeycomb seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elrod, David A.; Childs, Dara W.

    1988-01-01

    Test results (leakage and rotordynamic coefficients) are presented for seven honeycomb-stator smooth-rotor seals. Tests were carried out with air at rotor speeds up to 16,000 cpm and supply pressures up to 8.2 bars. Test results for the seven seals are compared, and the most stable configuration is identified based on the whirl frequency ratio. Results from tests of a smooth-rotor/smooth-stator seal, a teeth-on-stator labyrinth seal, and the most stable honeycomb seal are compared.

  10. Intermittent-flow coefficients of a poppet valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waldron, C D

    1939-01-01

    Flow coefficients were determined for the inlet valve of a modern air-cooled cylinder during operation of the valve. The cylinder head with valves was mounted on a large tank that could be evacuated. Operating the valve with a rotating cam allowed air to flow through the valve into the evacuated tank. The change of pressure in the tank was a measure of the amount of air flowing though the valve in a given number of cycles. The flow coefficients were determined from the pressure across the valve, the quantity of air flowing, and the valve-lift curve. Coefficients were measured with lifts of 0.1 to 0.6 inch and speeds of 130 to 1,200 r.p.m. The results obtained with intermittent flow were compared with the results of tests made with steady flow through this cylinder head. This comparison indicated that steady-flow coefficients can be used for intermittent flow.

  11. Transmission-Reflection Coefficient in the Lattice Boltzmann Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Hiroaki; Hayashi, Hidemitsu

    2014-04-01

    We consider the permeable bounce-back scheme in the lattice Boltzmann (LB) method for incompressible flows, in which a fraction of the distribution function is bounced back and the remainder travels to the neighboring lattice points. An asymptotic analysis of the scheme is carried out in order to show that the fractional coefficient, referred to as the transmission-reflection coefficient, relates the pressure drop to the flow velocity. The derived relation, which clarifies the role played by the transmission-reflection coefficient in the macroscopic description, is helpful in using the scheme to simulate flows involving a pressure drop or gradient. The scheme is compared with the existing methods in which the transmission-reflection coefficient is employed, and the difference is clarified. As an application of the permeable bounce-back scheme, we perform an LB simulation for flows through porous media described by the Brinkman model.

  12. Transport Coefficients in weakly compressible turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubinstein, Robert; Erlebacher, Gordon

    1996-01-01

    A theory of transport coefficients in weakly compressible turbulence is derived by applying Yoshizawa's two-scale direct interaction approximation to the compressible equations of motion linearized about a state of incompressible turbulence. The result is a generalization of the eddy viscosity representation of incompressible turbulence. In addition to the usual incompressible eddy viscosity, the calculation generates eddy diffusivities for entropy and pressure, and an effective bulk viscosity acting on the mean flow. The compressible fluctuations also generate an effective turbulent mean pressure and corrections to the speed of sound. Finally, a prediction unique to Yoshizawa's two-scale approximation is that terms containing gradients of incompressible turbulence quantities also appear in the mean flow equations. The form these terms take is described.

  13. Determination of Dimensionless Attenuation Coefficient in Shaped Resonators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniels, C.; Steinetz, B.; Finkbeiner, J.; Raman, G.; Li, X.

    2003-01-01

    The value of dimensionless attenuation coefficient is an important factor when numerically predicting high-amplitude acoustic waves in shaped resonators. Both the magnitude of the pressure waveform and the quality factor rely heavily on this dimensionless parameter. Previous authors have stated the values used, but have not completely explained their methods. This work fully describes the methodology used to determine this important parameter. Over a range of frequencies encompassing the fundamental resonance, the pressure waves were experimentally measured at each end of the shaped resonators. At the corresponding dimensionless acceleration, the numerical code modeled the acoustic waveforms generated in the resonator using various dimensionless attenuation coefficients. The dimensionless attenuation coefficient that most closely matched the pressure amplitudes and quality factors of the experimental and numerical results was determined to be the value to be used in subsequent studies.

  14. Uranium plasma emission coefficient in the visible and near UV.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mack, J. M., Jr.; Usher, J. L.; Schneider, R. T.; Campbell, H. D.

    1971-01-01

    Measurements of the specific emission coefficient in the near ultra-violet and visible region of a uranium arc plasma are reported. Spatial unfolding of the intensity profile is used to determine the emission coefficient in the spectral range of 2000 A to 6000 A. The uranium partial pressure is estimated to range between .001 and .01 atmosphere, and the corresponding temperature range is 5000 - 10,000 K.

  15. Uranium plasma emission coefficient in the visible and near UV.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mack, J. M., Jr.; Usher, J. L.; Schneider, R. T.; Campbell, H. D.

    1971-01-01

    Measurements of the specific emission coefficient in the near ultra-violet and visible region of a uranium arc plasma are reported. Spatial unfolding of the intensity profile is used to determine the emission coefficient in the spectral range of 2000 A to 6000 A. The uranium partial pressure is estimated to range between .001 and .01 atmosphere, and the corresponding temperature range is 5000 - 10,000 K.

  16. Vapor-Phase Infrared Absorptivity Coefficient of HN1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-01

    infrared spectrometer GC gas chromatography HD sulfur mustard HeNe helium–neon (laser) HgCdTe mercury–cadmium–telluride detector HN1, HN2, HN3...coefficient of the compound. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Vapor phase Saturator cell Infrared (IR) HN1 Vapor pressure Nitrogen mustard Vesicant...9 1 VAPOR-PHASE INFRARED ABSORPTIVITY COEFFICIENT OF HN1 1. INTRODUCTION The nitrogen mustards (HN1, HN2, and HN3) are similar to

  17. Cytoplasmic hydrogen ion diffusion coefficient.

    PubMed Central

    al-Baldawi, N F; Abercrombie, R F

    1992-01-01

    The apparent cytoplasmic proton diffusion coefficient was measured using pH electrodes and samples of cytoplasm extracted from the giant neuron of a marine invertebrate. By suddenly changing the pH at one surface of the sample and recording the relaxation of pH within the sample, an apparent diffusion coefficient of 1.4 +/- 0.5 x 10(-6) cm2/s (N = 7) was measured in the acidic or neutral range of pH (6.0-7.2). This value is approximately 5x lower than the diffusion coefficient of the mobile pH buffers (approximately 8 x 10(-6) cm2/s) and approximately 68x lower than the diffusion coefficient of the hydronium ion (93 x 10(-6) cm2/s). A mobile pH buffer (approximately 15% of the buffering power) and an immobile buffer (approximately 85% of the buffering power) could quantitatively account for the results at acidic or neutral pH. At alkaline pH (8.2-8.6), the apparent proton diffusion coefficient increased to 4.1 +/- 0.8 x 10(-6) cm2/s (N = 7). This larger diffusion coefficient at alkaline pH could be explained quantitatively by the enhanced buffering power of the mobile amino acids. Under the conditions of these experiments, it is unlikely that hydroxide movement influences the apparent hydrogen ion diffusion coefficient. PMID:1617134

  18. Computational Seebeck Coefficient Measurement Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Joshua

    2012-01-01

    We have employed finite element analysis to develop computational Seebeck coefficient metrology simulations. This approach enables a unique exploration of multiple probe arrangements and measurement techniques within the same temporal domain. To demonstrate the usefulness of this approach, we have performed these Seebeck coefficient measurement simulations to quantitatively explore perturbations to voltage and temperature correspondence, by comparing simultaneous and staggered data acquisition techniques under the quasi-steady-state condition. The results indicate significant distortions to the Seebeck coefficient and a strong dependence on the time delay, the acquisition sequence, and the probe arrangement. PMID:26900521

  19. The resistance coefficient of commercial round wire grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckert, B; Pfluger, F

    1942-01-01

    The resistance coefficients of commercial types of round wire grids were examined for the purpose of obtaining the necessary data on supercharger test stands for throttling the inducted air to a pressure corresponding to a desired air density. The measurements of the coefficients ranged up to Reynolds numbers of 1000. In the arrangement of two grids in tandem, which was necessary in order to obtain high resistance coefficients with the solidity, that is, mesh density of grid, was found to be accompanied by a further relationship with the mutual spacing of the individual grids.

  20. Discharge Coefficients for Axisymmetric Supersonic Nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahmad, Rashid A.; McCool, A. A. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis was used to compute effective nozzle discharge coefficients for subscale sharp-edged converging/diverging nozzles, with a variety of convergence half-angles, motor operating conditions, and two propellants with different ballistics. Convergence half-angles ranged from 0 to 80 deg. Analysis was conducted at total temperatures from 2946K (5303R) to 3346K (6023R) and over total pressures ranged from 2.72 MPa (395 psia) to 20.68 MPa (3000 psia). Area ratios (A(sub e)/A*) ranged from 7.43 to 9.39. Ratio of specific heats (gamma) ranged from 1.13 to 1.18. Throat and exit Reynolds numbers were calculated to be 8.26 x 10(exp 5) and 5.51 x 10(exp 5), respectively. Present results of nozzle discharge coefficients are reported and correlated as a function of nozzle convergence half-angle (theta(sub c)) and area ratios (A(sub e)/A*) for a constant divergence half-angle (theta(sub d)) of 15 deg. Computed discharge coefficients ranged from 0.88 to 0.97. They are compared with theory and experimental data available in literature. Available turbulence models with respect to grid refinements and heat transfer are discussed.

  1. Discharge Coefficients for Axisymmetric Supersonic Nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahmad, Rashid A.; McCool, A. A. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis was used to compute effective nozzle discharge coefficients for subscale sharp-edged converging/diverging nozzles, with a variety of convergence half-angles, motor operating conditions, and two propellants with different ballistics. Convergence half-angles ranged from 0 to 80 deg. Analysis was conducted at total temperatures from 2946K (5303R) to 3346K (6023R) and over total pressures ranged from 2.72 MPa (395 psia) to 20.68 MPa (3000 psia). Area ratios (A(sub e)/A*) ranged from 7.43 to 9.39. Ratio of specific heats (gamma) ranged from 1.13 to 1.18. Throat and exit Reynolds numbers were calculated to be 8.26 x 10(exp 5) and 5.51 x 10(exp 5), respectively. Present results of nozzle discharge coefficients are reported and correlated as a function of nozzle convergence half-angle (theta(sub c)) and area ratios (A(sub e)/A*) for a constant divergence half-angle (theta(sub d)) of 15 deg. Computed discharge coefficients ranged from 0.88 to 0.97. They are compared with theory and experimental data available in literature. Available turbulence models with respect to grid refinements and heat transfer are discussed.

  2. Rotordynamic coefficients for stepped labyrinth gas seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scharrer, Joseph K.

    1989-01-01

    The basic equations are derived for compressible flow in a stepped labyrinth gas seal. The flow is assumed to be completely turbulent in the circumferential direction where the friction factor is determined by the Blasius relation. Linearized zeroth and first-order perturbation equations are developed for small motion about a centered position by an expansion in the eccentricity ratio. The zeroth-order pressure distribution is found by satisfying the leakage equation while the circumferential velocity distribution is determined by satisfying the momentum equations. The first order equations are solved by a separation of variables solution. Integration of the resultant pressure distribution along and around the seal defines the reaction force developed by the seal and the corresponding dynamic coefficients. The results of this analysis are presented in the form of a parametric study, since there are no known experimental data for the rotordynamic coefficients of stepped labyrinth gas seals. The parametric study investigates the relative rotordynamic stability of convergent, straight and divergent stepped labyrinth gas seals. The results show that, generally, the divergent seal is more stable, rotordynamically, than the straight or convergent seals. The results also show that the teeth-on-stator seals are not always more stable, rotordynamically, then the teeth-on-rotor seals as was shown by experiment by Childs and Scharrer (1986b) for a 15 tooth seal.

  3. Functional constraints on phenomenological coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klika, Václav; Pavelka, Michal; Benziger, Jay B.

    2017-02-01

    Thermodynamic fluxes (diffusion fluxes, heat flux, etc.) are often proportional to thermodynamic forces (gradients of chemical potentials, temperature, etc.) via the matrix of phenomenological coefficients. Onsager's relations imply that the matrix is symmetric, which reduces the number of unknown coefficients is reduced. In this article we demonstrate that for a class of nonequilibrium thermodynamic models in addition to Onsager's relations the phenomenological coefficients must share the same functional dependence on the local thermodynamic state variables. Thermodynamic models and experimental data should be validated through consistency with the functional constraint. We present examples of coupled heat and mass transport (thermodiffusion) and coupled charge and mass transport (electro-osmotic drag). Additionally, these newly identified constraints further reduce the number of experiments needed to describe the phenomenological coefficient.

  4. Wrong Signs in Regression Coefficients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGee, Holly

    1999-01-01

    When using parametric cost estimation, it is important to note the possibility of the regression coefficients having the wrong sign. A wrong sign is defined as a sign on the regression coefficient opposite to the researcher's intuition and experience. Some possible causes for the wrong sign discussed in this paper are a small range of x's, leverage points, missing variables, multicollinearity, and computational error. Additionally, techniques for determining the cause of the wrong sign are given.

  5. Wrong Signs in Regression Coefficients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGee, Holly

    1999-01-01

    When using parametric cost estimation, it is important to note the possibility of the regression coefficients having the wrong sign. A wrong sign is defined as a sign on the regression coefficient opposite to the researcher's intuition and experience. Some possible causes for the wrong sign discussed in this paper are a small range of x's, leverage points, missing variables, multicollinearity, and computational error. Additionally, techniques for determining the cause of the wrong sign are given.

  6. On Pressure Affected Shear Viscosity of Poly(Lactic) Acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piyamanocha, Pongprapat; Sedlacek, Tomas; Saha, Petr

    2011-07-01

    Evaluation of pressure coefficient of polymer melt viscosity has become important parameter taken into account for flow behavior prediction in polymer processing simulation software. In this paper, the pressure coefficient of biodegradable polymers, poly(lactic) acid (PLA), was investigated. A capillary rheometer equipped with back pressure device controlling pressure in polymer melt during flow was employed for experiments. Pressure sensitivity was evaluated through pressure coefficient calculated via fitting of obtained viscosity data by the help of Carreau-Yasuda model. It was found that pressure coefficient of PLAs is strongly affected by the internal structure of tested polymer.

  7. Performance of conical jet nozzles in terms of flow and velocity coefficients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grey, Ralph E; Wilsted, H Dean

    1949-01-01

    Performance characteristics of conical jet nozzles were determined in an investigation covering a range of pressure ratios from 1.0 to 2.8, cone half-angles from 5 degrees to 90 degrees, and outlet-inlet diameter ratios from 0.50 to 0.91. All nozzles investigated had an inlet diameter of 5 inches. The flow coefficients of the conical nozzles investigated were dependent on the cone half-angle, outlet-inlet diameter ratio, and pressure ratio. The velocity coefficients were essentially constant at pressure ratios below the critical. For increasing pressures above critical pressure ratio, there was a small decrease in velocity coefficient that was dependent on pressure ratio and independent of cone half-angle and outlet-inlet diameter ratio. Therefore the variation in performance (air flow and thrust) of several nozzles, selected for the same performance at a particular design condition, was proportional to the ratio of their flow coefficients.

  8. Predicting Abraham model solvent coefficients.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Jean-Claude; Abraham, Michael H; Acree, William E; Lang, Andrew Sid

    2015-01-01

    The Abraham general solvation model can be used in a broad set of scenarios involving partitioning and solubility, yet is limited to a set of solvents with measured Abraham coefficients. Here we extend the range of applicability of Abraham's model by creating open models that can be used to predict the solvent coefficients for all organic solvents. We created open random forest models for the solvent coefficients e, s, a, b, and v that had out-of-bag R(2) values of 0.31, 0.77, 0.92, 0.47, and 0.63 respectively. The models were used to suggest sustainable solvent replacements for commonly used solvents. For example, our models predict that propylene glycol may be used as a general sustainable solvent replacement for methanol. The solvent coefficient models extend the range of applicability of the Abraham general solvation equations to all organic solvents. The models were developed under Open Notebook Science conditions which makes them open, reproducible, and as useful as possible. Graphical AbstractChemical space for solvents with known Abraham coefficients.

  9. Orthogonality of spherical harmonic coefficients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcleod, M. G.

    1980-01-01

    Orthogonality relations are obtained for the spherical harmonic coefficients of functions defined on the surface of a sphere. Following a brief discussion of the orthogonality of Fourier series coefficients, consideration is given to the values averaged over all orientations of the coordinate system of the spherical harmonic coefficients of a function defined on the surface of a sphere that can be expressed in terms of Legendre polynomials for the special case where the function is the sum of two delta functions located at two different points on the sphere, and for the case of an essentially arbitrary function. It is noted that the orthogonality relations derived have found applications in statistical studies of the geomagnetic field.

  10. Orthogonality of spherical harmonic coefficients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcleod, M. G.

    1980-01-01

    Orthogonality relations are obtained for the spherical harmonic coefficients of functions defined on the surface of a sphere. Following a brief discussion of the orthogonality of Fourier series coefficients, consideration is given to the values averaged over all orientations of the coordinate system of the spherical harmonic coefficients of a function defined on the surface of a sphere that can be expressed in terms of Legendre polynomials for the special case where the function is the sum of two delta functions located at two different points on the sphere, and for the case of an essentially arbitrary function. It is noted that the orthogonality relations derived have found applications in statistical studies of the geomagnetic field.

  11. Seebeck coefficient of one electron

    SciTech Connect

    Durrani, Zahid A. K.

    2014-03-07

    The Seebeck coefficient of one electron, driven thermally into a semiconductor single-electron box, is investigated theoretically. With a finite temperature difference ΔT between the source and charging island, a single electron can charge the island in equilibrium, directly generating a Seebeck effect. Seebeck coefficients for small and finite ΔT are calculated and a thermally driven Coulomb staircase is predicted. Single-electron Seebeck oscillations occur with increasing ΔT, as one electron at a time charges the box. A method is proposed for experimental verification of these effects.

  12. Transport coefficients of gluonic fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Santosh K.; Alam, Jan-e

    2011-06-01

    The shear ({eta}) and bulk ({zeta}) viscous coefficients have been evaluated for a gluonic fluid. The elastic, gg{yields}gg and the inelastic, number nonconserving, gg{yields}ggg processes have been considered as the dominant perturbative processes in evaluating the viscous coefficients to entropy density (s) ratios. Recently the processes: gg{yields}ggg has been revisited and a correction to the widely used Gunion-Bertsch (GB) formula has been obtained. The {eta} and {zeta} have been evaluated for gluonic fluid with the formula recently derived. At large {alpha}{sub s} the value of {eta}/s approaches its lower bound, {approx}1/4{pi}.

  13. The Sound Wave Method for Measurement of Evaporation Coefficient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Shigeto; Yano, Takeru; Watanabe, Masao; Fujikawa, Shigeo

    A new method for measurement of evaporation coefficient using sound resonance experiment is proposed on the basis of a theory of molecular gas dynamics, by which the evaporation coefficient is expressed as a function of the amplitude of standing sound wave between a planar sound source and a vapor-liquid interface facing against it. To demonstrate the applicability of this method, we carried out test experiments under the condition of neither evaporation nor condensation for several initial pressures, 30, 50, 80 and 101 kPa, at room temperature. In the experiments, we measure the amplitude of standing wave with a resonant frequency generated in a cylindrical space filled with air and closed by liquid water. We utilize the second harmonics component excited by the nonlinearity of sound to determine the evaporation coefficient, thereby eliminating the electromagnetic noises from measured signals. We find that the amplitude of the second harmonics at sound resonance decreases with the decrease in the initial pressure.

  14. A technique for measuring dynamic friction coefficient under impact loading.

    PubMed

    Lin, Y L; Qin, J G; Chen, R; Zhao, P D; Lu, F Y

    2014-09-01

    We develop a novel setup based on the split Hopkinson pressure bar technique to test the dynamic friction coefficient under impact loading. In the setup, the major improvement is that the end of the incident bar near the specimen is wedge-shaped, which results in a combined compressive and shear loading applied to the specimen. In fact, the shear loading is caused by the interfacial friction between specimen and bars. Therefore, when the two loading force histories are measured, the friction coefficient histories can be calculated without any assumptions and theoretical derivations. The geometry of the friction pairs is simple, and can be either cuboid or cylindrical. Regarding the measurements, two quartz transducers are used to directly record the force histories, and an optical apparatus is designed to test the interfacial slip movement. By using the setup, the dynamic friction coefficient of PTFE/aluminum 7075 friction pairs was tested. The time resolved dynamic friction coefficient and slip movement histories were achieved. The results show that the friction coefficient changes during the loading process, the average data of the relatively stable flat plateau section of the friction coefficient curves is 0.137, the maximum normal pressure is 52 MPa, the maximum relative slip velocity is 1.5 m/s, and the acceleration is 8400 m(2)/s. Furthermore, the friction test was simulated using an explicit FEM code LS-DYNA. The simulation results showed that the constant pressure and slip velocity can both be obtained with a wide flat plateau incident pulse. For some special friction pairs, normal pressure up to a few hundred MPa, interfacial slip velocities up to 10 m/s, and slip movement up to centimeter-level can be expected.

  15. A technique for measuring dynamic friction coefficient under impact loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Y. L.; Qin, J. G.; Chen, R.; Zhao, P. D.; Lu, F. Y.

    2014-09-01

    We develop a novel setup based on the split Hopkinson pressure bar technique to test the dynamic friction coefficient under impact loading. In the setup, the major improvement is that the end of the incident bar near the specimen is wedge-shaped, which results in a combined compressive and shear loading applied to the specimen. In fact, the shear loading is caused by the interfacial friction between specimen and bars. Therefore, when the two loading force histories are measured, the friction coefficient histories can be calculated without any assumptions and theoretical derivations. The geometry of the friction pairs is simple, and can be either cuboid or cylindrical. Regarding the measurements, two quartz transducers are used to directly record the force histories, and an optical apparatus is designed to test the interfacial slip movement. By using the setup, the dynamic friction coefficient of PTFE/aluminum 7075 friction pairs was tested. The time resolved dynamic friction coefficient and slip movement histories were achieved. The results show that the friction coefficient changes during the loading process, the average data of the relatively stable flat plateau section of the friction coefficient curves is 0.137, the maximum normal pressure is 52 MPa, the maximum relative slip velocity is 1.5 m/s, and the acceleration is 8400 m2/s. Furthermore, the friction test was simulated using an explicit FEM code LS-DYNA. The simulation results showed that the constant pressure and slip velocity can both be obtained with a wide flat plateau incident pulse. For some special friction pairs, normal pressure up to a few hundred MPa, interfacial slip velocities up to 10 m/s, and slip movement up to centimeter-level can be expected.

  16. Investigation on heat transfer between two coaxial cylinders for measurement of thermal accommodation coefficient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Hiroki; Kanazawa, Kazuaki; Matsuda, Yu; Niimi, Tomohide; Polikarpov, Alexey; Graur, Irina

    2012-06-01

    The heat flux between two coaxial cylinders was measured in the range from the free molecular to the early transitional flow regimes for extraction of the thermal accommodation coefficient using an approximate relation on the pressure dependence of the heat flux. The experimental coaxial cylinders' geometry has been traditionally implemented for the measurement of the thermal accommodation coefficient using the low-pressure method; however, the actual experimental setup was characterized by large temperature difference and large cylinders' radius ratio. Compared to the original low-pressure method, much higher pressure range was applied. In order to verify assumptions in the accommodation coefficient extraction, the heat flux under measurement conditions was simulated numerically by the nonlinear S-model kinetic equation. Very good agreement was found between the measured and the simulated heat flux. The proposed procedure of the thermal accommodation coefficient extraction was discussed in detail and verified. The temperature dependence of the thermal accommodation coefficient was also found.

  17. Effect of applied mechanical stress on absorption coefficient of compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Manoj Kumar; Singh, Gurinderjeet; Dhaliwal, A. S.; Kahlon, K. S.

    2015-08-28

    The absorption coefficient of given materials is the parameter required for the basic information. The measurement of absorption coefficient of compounds Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, CaCO{sub 3}, ZnO{sub 2}, SmO{sub 2} and PbO has been taken at different incident photon energies 26, 59.54, 112, 1173, 1332keV. The studies involve the measurements of absorption coefficient of the self supporting samples prepared under different mechanical stress. This mechanical stress is render in terms of pressure up to 0-6 ton by using hydraulic press. Measurements shows that absorption coefficient of a material is directly proportional to applied mechanical stress on it up to some extent then become independent. Experimentally measured results are in fairly good agreement with in theoretical values obtained from WinXCOM.

  18. Integer Solutions of Binomial Coefficients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbertson, Nicholas J.

    2016-01-01

    A good formula is like a good story, rich in description, powerful in communication, and eye-opening to readers. The formula presented in this article for determining the coefficients of the binomial expansion of (x + y)n is one such "good read." The beauty of this formula is in its simplicity--both describing a quantitative situation…

  19. Identities for generalized hypergeometric coefficients

    SciTech Connect

    Biedenharn, L.C.; Louck, J.D.

    1991-01-01

    Generalizations of hypergeometric functions to arbitrarily many symmetric variables are discussed, along with their associated hypergeometric coefficients, and the setting within which these generalizations arose. Identities generalizing the Euler identity for {sub 2}F{sub 1}, the Saalschuetz identity, and two generalizations of the {sub 4}F{sub 3} Bailey identity, among others, are given. 16 refs.

  20. Effective Viscosity Coefficient of Nanosuspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudyak, V. Ya.; Belkin, A. A.; Egorov, V. V.

    2008-12-01

    Systematic calculations of the effective viscosity coefficient of nanosuspensions have been performed using the molecular dynamics method. It is established that the viscosity of a nanosuspension depends not only on the volume concentration of the nanoparticles but also on their mass and diameter. Differences from Einstein's relation are found even for nanosuspensions with a low particle concentration.

  1. Integer Solutions of Binomial Coefficients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbertson, Nicholas J.

    2016-01-01

    A good formula is like a good story, rich in description, powerful in communication, and eye-opening to readers. The formula presented in this article for determining the coefficients of the binomial expansion of (x + y)n is one such "good read." The beauty of this formula is in its simplicity--both describing a quantitative situation…

  2. Irrational "Coefficients" in Renaissance Algebra.

    PubMed

    Oaks, Jeffrey A

    2017-06-01

    Argument From the time of al-Khwārizmī in the ninth century to the beginning of the sixteenth century algebraists did not allow irrational numbers to serve as coefficients. To multiply by x, for instance, the result was expressed as the rhetorical equivalent of . The reason for this practice has to do with the premodern concept of a monomial. The coefficient, or "number," of a term was thought of as how many of that term are present, and not as the scalar multiple that we work with today. Then, in sixteenth-century Europe, a few algebraists began to allow for irrational coefficients in their notation. Christoff Rudolff (1525) was the first to admit them in special cases, and subsequently they appear more liberally in Cardano (1539), Scheubel (1550), Bombelli (1572), and others, though most algebraists continued to ban them. We survey this development by examining the texts that show irrational coefficients and those that argue against them. We show that the debate took place entirely in the conceptual context of premodern, "cossic" algebra, and persisted in the sixteenth century independent of the development of the new algebra of Viète, Decartes, and Fermat. This was a formal innovation violating prevailing concepts that we propose could only be introduced because of the growing autonomy of notation from rhetorical text.

  3. TOPAZ II Temperature Coefficient Analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loaiza, David; Haskin, F. Eric; Marshall, Albert C.

    1994-07-01

    A two-dimensional model of the Topaz II reactor core suitable for neutronic analyses of temperature coefficients of reactivity is presented. The model is based on a 30° r-theta segment of the core. Results of TWODANT calculations are used to estimate temperature coefficients associated with fuel, electrodes, moderator, reflector, and tube plates over the range of temperatures anticipated during startup and operation. Results are presented to assess the reactivity effects associated with Doppler broadening, spectral effects and thermal expansion. Comparisons are made between the TWODANT results and empirical Russian curves used for simulating Topaz II system transients. TWODANT results indicate that the prompt temperature coefficients associated with temperature changes in fuel and emitters are negative. This is primarily because of Doppler broadening of the absorption resonances of uranium and molybdenum. The delayed effect of tube plate heating is also negative because fuel is moved radially outward in the core where it is less important. Temperature coefficients associated with delayed heating of the zirconium hydride moderator and the Beryllium reflector are positive, as the change in the neutron spectrum with moderator or reflector temperature decreases the rate of absorption in these components. The TWODANT results agree with the results obtained from the empirical Russian correlations.

  4. Tables of the coefficients A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandra, N.

    1974-01-01

    Numerical coefficients required to express the angular distribution for the rotationally elastic or inelastic scattering of electrons from a diatomic molecule were tabulated for the case of nitrogen and in the energy range from 0.20 eV to 10.0 eV. Five different rotational states are considered.

  5. Full wave-field reflection coefficient inversion.

    PubMed

    Dettmer, Jan; Dosso, Stan E; Holland, Charles W

    2007-12-01

    This paper develops a Bayesian inversion for recovering multilayer geoacoustic (velocity, density, attenuation) profiles from a full wave-field (spherical-wave) seabed reflection response. The reflection data originate from acoustic time series windowed for a single bottom interaction, which are processed to yield reflection coefficient data as a function of frequency and angle. Replica data for inversion are computed using a wave number-integration model to calculate the full complex acoustic pressure field, which is processed to produce a commensurate seabed response function. To address the high computational cost of calculating short range acoustic fields, the inversion algorithms are parallelized and frequency averaging is replaced by range averaging in the forward model. The posterior probability density is interpreted in terms of optimal parameter estimates, marginal distributions, and credibility intervals. Inversion results for the full wave-field seabed response are compared to those obtained using plane-wave reflection coefficients. A realistic synthetic study indicates that the plane-wave assumption can fail, producing erroneous results with misleading uncertainty bounds, whereas excellent results are obtained with the full-wave reflection inversion.

  6. Kinetic Friction Coefficient of Ice,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-03-01

    For the hardest ice tested (xi = 0.33 described by Rabinowicz (1965), where To is inter- mm, H, = 1525 kPa), the calculated values of a preted as...material with a low elastic pressures. The frictional force was measured at modulus ( Rabinowicz 1965). It has been observed the application point of...tion 10, pp. 8-16. Barnes, P. and D. Tabor (1966) Plastic flow and Rabinowicz , E. (1965) Friction and Wear of Mate- pressure melting in the deformation

  7. Surface activity coefficients of spread monolayers of behenic acid salts at air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Chattoraj, D K; Halder, E; Das, K P; Mitra, A

    2006-11-16

    The pressure-area isotherms of ionized monolayers of behenic acid at air-water interface at pH 12.0 have been obtained from the Langmuir film balance experiments under various physico-chemical conditions. The value of the measured surface pressure at a given area per molecule is equal to the sum of the ideal pressure, cohesive pressure and electrical pressure. The electrical pressure term is regarded as the sum of the pressure originating from the Gouy-Chapman double layer including discrete ion effect, ion binding and monolayer hydration effect. At a given area, the deviation of the measured surface pressure from its ideal value has been calculated in terms of the apparent surface compressibility coefficients, surface fugacity coefficients for gaseous monolayer and surface activity coefficients of solute forming two-dimensional solutions in the monolayer phase respectively. Values of all these coefficients have been calculated for different compositions of the monolayer using non-ideal gas model and Raoult's and Henry's laws modified for two-dimensional non-ideal solutions respectively. Values of these coefficients may be higher or lower than unity depending upon ionic strengths and nature of inorganic salts present in the sub-phase. Using these values of surface activity coefficients, the standard free energies of formation, of spread monolayers of salts of behenic acid have been calculated at different standard states of reference.

  8. Portable vapor diffusion coefficient meter

    DOEpatents

    Ho, Clifford K.

    2007-06-12

    An apparatus for measuring the effective vapor diffusion coefficient of a test vapor diffusing through a sample of porous media contained within a test chamber. A chemical sensor measures the time-varying concentration of vapor that has diffused a known distance through the porous media. A data processor contained within the apparatus compares the measured sensor data with analytical predictions of the response curve based on the transient diffusion equation using Fick's Law, iterating on the choice of an effective vapor diffusion coefficient until the difference between the predicted and measured curves is minimized. Optionally, a purge fluid can forced through the porous media, permitting the apparatus to also measure a gas-phase permeability. The apparatus can be made lightweight, self-powered, and portable for use in the field.

  9. High temperature Seebeck coefficient metrology

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, J.; Tritt, T.; Uher, C.

    2010-12-15

    We present an overview of the challenges and practices of thermoelectric metrology on bulk materials at high temperature (300 to 1300 K). The Seebeck coefficient, when combined with thermal and electrical conductivity, is an essential property measurement for evaluating the potential performance of novel thermoelectric materials. However, there is some question as to which measurement technique(s) provides the most accurate determination of the Seebeck coefficient at high temperature. This has led to the implementation of nonideal practices that have further complicated the confirmation of reported high ZT materials. To ensure meaningful interlaboratory comparison of data, thermoelectric measurements must be reliable, accurate, and consistent. This article will summarize and compare the relevant measurement techniques and apparatus designs required to effectively manage uncertainty, while also providing a reference resource of previous advances in high temperature thermoelectric metrology.

  10. Study of Dispersion Coefficient Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akiyama, K. R.; Bressan, C. K.; Pires, M. S. G.; Canno, L. M.; Ribeiro, L. C. L. J.

    2016-08-01

    The issue of water pollution has worsened in recent times due to releases, intentional or not, of pollutants in natural water bodies. This causes several studies about the distribution of pollutants are carried out. The water quality models have been developed and widely used today as a preventative tool, ie to try to predict what will be the concentration distribution of constituent along a body of water in spatial and temporal scale. To understand and use such models, it is necessary to know some concepts of hydraulic high on their application, including the longitudinal dispersion coefficient. This study aims to conduct a theoretical and experimental study of the channel dispersion coefficient, yielding more information about their direct determination in the literature.

  11. Consistent transport coefficients in astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fontenla, Juan M.; Rovira, M.; Ferrofontan, C.

    1986-01-01

    A consistent theory for dealing with transport phenomena in stellar atmospheres starting with the kinetic equations and introducing three cases (LTE, partial LTE, and non-LTE) was developed. The consistent hydrodynamical equations were presented for partial-LTE, the transport coefficients defined, and a method shown to calculate them. The method is based on the numerical solution of kinetic equations considering Landau, Boltzmann, and Focker-Planck collision terms. Finally a set of results for the transport coefficients derived for a partially ionized hydrogen gas with radiation was shown, considering ionization and recombination as well as elastic collisions. The results obtained imply major changes is some types of theoretical model calculations and can resolve some important current problems concerning energy and mass balance in the solar atmosphere. It is shown that energy balance in the lower solar transition region can be fully explained by means of radiation losses and conductive flux.

  12. Convection coefficients at building surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kammerud, R. C.; Altmayer, E.; Bauman, F. S.; Gadgil, A.; Bohn, M.

    1982-09-01

    Correlations relating the rate of heat transfer from the surfaces of rooms to the enclosed air are being developed, based on empirical and analytic examinations of convection in enclosures. The correlations express the heat transfer rate in terms of boundary conditions relating to room geometry and surface temperatures. Work to date indicates that simple convection coefficient calculation techniques can be developed, which significantly improve accuracy of heat transfer predictions in comparison with the standard calculations recommended by ASHRAE.

  13. The interpretation of selection coefficients.

    PubMed

    Barton, N H; Servedio, M R

    2015-05-01

    Evolutionary biologists have an array of powerful theoretical techniques that can accurately predict changes in the genetic composition of populations. Changes in gene frequencies and genetic associations between loci can be tracked as they respond to a wide variety of evolutionary forces. However, it is often less clear how to decompose these various forces into components that accurately reflect the underlying biology. Here, we present several issues that arise in the definition and interpretation of selection and selection coefficients, focusing on insights gained through the examination of selection coefficients in multilocus notation. Using this notation, we discuss how its flexibility-which allows different biological units to be identified as targets of selection-is reflected in the interpretation of the coefficients that the notation generates. In many situations, it can be difficult to agree on whether loci can be considered to be under "direct" versus "indirect" selection, or to quantify this selection. We present arguments for what the terms direct and indirect selection might best encompass, considering a range of issues, from viability and sexual selection to kin selection. We show how multilocus notation can discriminate between direct and indirect selection, and describe when it can do so. © 2015 The Author(s).

  14. Equation of state and transport coefficients for dense plasmas.

    PubMed

    Blancard, C; Faussurier, G

    2004-01-01

    We hereby present a model to describe the thermodynamic and transport properties of dense plasmas. The electronic and ionic structures are determined self-consistently using finite-temperature density functional theory and Gibbs-Bogolyubov inequality. The main thermodynamic quantities, i.e., internal energy, pressure, entropy, and sound speed, are obtained by numerical differentiation of the plasma total Helmholtz free energy. Electronic electrical and thermal conductivities are calculated from the Ziman approach. Ionic transport coefficients are estimated using those of hard-sphere system and the Rosenfeld semiempirical "universal" correspondence between excess entropy and dimensionless transport coefficients of dense fluids. Numerical results and comparisons with experiments are presented and discussed.

  15. Viscosity and thermal conductivity coefficients of gaseous and liquid oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanley, H. J. M.; Mccarty, R. D.; Sengers, J. V.

    1974-01-01

    Equations and tables are presented for the viscosity and thermal conductivity coefficients of gaseous and liquid oxygen at temperatures between 80 K and 400 K for pressures up to 200 atm. and at temperatures between 80 K and 2000 K for the dilute gas. A description of the anomalous behavior of the thermal conductivity in the critical region is included. The tabulated coefficients are reliable to within about 15% except for a region in the immediate vicinity of the critical point. Some possibilities for future improvements of this reliability are discussed.

  16. Experimental determination of the filling coefficient for an aspirated spark-ignition engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raţiu, S.; Alexa, V.; Kiss, I.; Cioată, V.

    2017-01-01

    This study aims at determining, by experiment, the filling coefficient of a spark-ignition, normal aspirated engine, with carburettor. For this purpose, a pilot plant was designed for measuring the pressure at various points on the route, simulating a stationary air flow regime by means of a vacuum pump. Measurements were made for various lifting heights of the intake valve and various opening positions of the throttle body, thus highlighting how their influence on the pressure loss and on the filling coefficient.

  17. Virial coefficients of neon, argon, and krypton at temperatures up to 3000/sup 0/K

    SciTech Connect

    Sevast'yanov, R.M.; Chernyavskaya, R.A.

    1987-12-01

    The second and third virial coefficients are calculated for a (12-7, delta) pair model potential. With their help the fourth virial coefficient is determined from the experimental pressure, density, and temperature data from the Amsterdam laboratory. The limits of applicability of the equation of state obtained are indicated.

  18. Partitioning coefficients between olivine and silicate melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bédard, J. H.

    2005-08-01

    Variation of Nernst partition coefficients ( D) between olivine and silicate melts cannot be neglected when modeling partial melting and fractional crystallization. Published natural and experimental olivine/liquidD data were examined for covariation with pressure, temperature, olivine forsterite content, and melt SiO 2, H 2O, MgO and MgO/MgO + FeO total. Values of olivine/liquidD generally increase with decreasing temperature and melt MgO content, and with increasing melt SiO 2 content, but generally show poor correlations with other variables. Multi-element olivine/liquidD profiles calculated from regressions of D REE-Sc-Y vs. melt MgO content are compared to results of the Lattice Strain Model to link melt MgO and: D0 (the strain compensated partition coefficient), EM3+ (Young's Modulus), and r0 (the size of the M site). Ln D0 varies linearly with Ln MgO in the melt; EM3+ varies linearly with melt MgO, with a dog-leg at ca. 1.5% MgO; and r0 remains constant at 0.807 Å. These equations are then used to calculate olivine/liquidD for these elements using the Lattice Strain Model. These empirical parameterizations of olivine/liquidD variations yield results comparable to experimental or natural partitioning data, and can easily be integrated into existing trace element modeling algorithms. The olivine/liquidD data suggest that basaltic melts in equilibrium with pure olivine may acquire small negative Ta-Hf-Zr-Ti anomalies, but that negative Nb anomalies are unlikely to develop. Misfits between results of the Lattice Strain Model and most light rare earth and large ion lithophile partitioning data suggest that kinetic effects may limit the lower value of D for extremely incompatible elements in natural situations characterized by high cooling/crystallization rates.

  19. Dissociative recombination coefficient for low temperature equilibrium cesium plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Momozaki, Yoichi; El-Genk, Mohamed S.

    2002-07-01

    The dissociative recombination (DR) coefficient in decaying low temperature Cs plasma is calculated based on the experimentally measured relaxation time of decaying Cs plasma by L. P. Harris [J. Appl. Phys. 36, 1543 (1965)]. Results showed that DR is the dominant recombination process over three-body recombination at T<1650 K and PCs of 0.5-20 Torr (67-2666 Pa). The estimated DR coefficient for Cs is between 10-12 and 10-13 m3/s at T<1750 K and PCs of 0.5-20 Torr. Although theory predicts that DR coefficient solely depends on temperature, the present results show pressure dependency. For typical operating conditions in thermionic converters (T<1650 K and PCsless-than-or-equal400 Pa), DR is constant and approx5.26 x10-13 m3/s.

  20. Experimental study of the Biot coefficient of Bakken cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, X.; Zoback, M. D.

    2015-12-01

    We have performed a series of exhaustive experiments to measure the Biot coefficient (α) of the tight cores from the Bakken shale oil play. Five distinct, bedding-normal cores from a vertical well were tested, covering the sequences of Three Forks, Lower, Middle, and Upper Bakken, and Lodgepole. The scope of this laboratory study is two-fold: (1) to obtain realistic Biot coefficient for modeling reservoir stress changes due to depletion and injection; (2) to characterize the poromechanical properties in relation to rock's mineral composition and microstructure. The experiments were carried out as follows: Argon-saturated specimen (1-inch length, 1-inch diameter) was subjected to hydrostatic confining pressure under drained conditions. Pore pressure was regulated as Argon was injected into both ends of the specimen. We drilled multiple non-through-going boreholes (1-mm diameter) in the specimen to facilitate pressure equilibrium, without compromising its integrity. The specimen was put through a loading path to experience confining pressure and pore pressure up to 70 and 60 MPa, respectively. Axial and lateral strains were recorded and used to calculate the rock's bulk stiffness, and subsequently the static Biot coefficient, which is related to reservoir deformation and associated stress changes. Results of all five cores unanimously show that α is less than unity and is a function of both confining and pore pressure. α generally varies between 0.3 and 0.9 for the pressure levels we applied. This implies that models of reservoir deformation and its stress change using Terzaghi's simple effective stress law (α = 1) or a constant α less than 1 may be erroneous. Typically, α rises significantly with pore pressure, but declines with confining pressure to the degree that is dependent on rock's bulk stiffness. We found the stiffness of these rocks does not correlate well with the content of compliant components (e.g., clay and kerogen), and the drastic difference in

  1. Measurement of attenuation coefficients of the fundamental and second harmonic waves in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shuzeng; Jeong, Hyunjo; Cho, Sungjong; Li, Xiongbing

    2016-02-01

    Attenuation corrections in nonlinear acoustics play an important role in the study of nonlinear fluids, biomedical imaging, or solid material characterization. The measurement of attenuation coefficients in a nonlinear regime is not easy because they depend on the source pressure and requires accurate diffraction corrections. In this work, the attenuation coefficients of the fundamental and second harmonic waves which come from the absorption of water are measured in nonlinear ultrasonic experiments. Based on the quasilinear theory of the KZK equation, the nonlinear sound field equations are derived and the diffraction correction terms are extracted. The measured sound pressure amplitudes are adjusted first for diffraction corrections in order to reduce the impact on the measurement of attenuation coefficients from diffractions. The attenuation coefficients of the fundamental and second harmonics are calculated precisely from a nonlinear least squares curve-fitting process of the experiment data. The results show that attenuation coefficients in a nonlinear condition depend on both frequency and source pressure, which are much different from a linear regime. In a relatively lower drive pressure, the attenuation coefficients increase linearly with frequency. However, they present the characteristic of nonlinear growth in a high drive pressure. As the diffraction corrections are obtained based on the quasilinear theory, it is important to use an appropriate source pressure for accurate attenuation measurements.

  2. Determination of Karsch Coefficients for 2-colour QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cotter, S.

    We give an update of results from two-colour, two-flavour QCD. Using a Wilson fermion action we calculate thermodynamic quantities as a function of chemical potential {\\mu}. Calculating the Karsch Coefficients non-perturbatively gives us access to the derivative method. Compared to our previously published results, we have improved our analysis leading to revised and more accurate estimates for the renormalised energy density, pressure and the trace anomaly.

  3. Measurement of magnetostriction coefficients of epitaxial garnet films.

    PubMed

    Vella-Coleiro, G P

    1979-09-01

    A technique for measuring the magnetostriction coefficients of epitaxial garnet films on 50-mm-diam wafers is described. The measurement is based on the shift of the microwave ferrimagnetic resonance produced by stressing the film, which is achieved by supporting the wafer around its circumference and reducing the atmospheric pressure on one side. A simple, nonresonant transmission microwave spectrometer which is well suited for measurements on large wafers is also described.

  4. Generic transport coefficients of a confined electrolyte solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Hiroaki; Mizuno, Hideyuki; Kinjo, Tomoyuki; Washizu, Hitoshi; Barrat, Jean-Louis

    2014-11-01

    Physical parameters characterizing electrokinetic transport in a confined electrolyte solution are reconstructed from the generic transport coefficients obtained within the classical nonequilibrium statistical thermodynamic framework. The electro-osmotic flow, the diffusio-osmotic flow, the osmotic current, as well as the pressure-driven Poiseuille-type flow, the electric conduction, and the ion diffusion are described by this set of transport coefficients. The reconstruction is demonstrated for an aqueous NaCl solution between two parallel charged surfaces with a nanoscale gap, by using the molecular dynamic (MD) simulations. A Green-Kubo approach is employed to evaluate the transport coefficients in the linear-response regime, and the fluxes induced by the pressure, electric, and chemical potential fields are compared with the results of nonequilibrium MD simulations. Using this numerical scheme, the influence of the salt concentration on the transport coefficients is investigated. Anomalous reversal of diffusio-osmotic current, as well as that of electro-osmotic flow, is observed at high surface charge densities and high added-salt concentrations.

  5. Ratios of internal conversion coefficients

    SciTech Connect

    Raman, S.; Ertugrul, M.; Nestor, C.W. . E-mail: CNestorjr@aol.com; Trzhaskovskaya, M.B.

    2006-03-15

    We present here a database of available experimental ratios of internal conversion coefficients for different atomic subshells measured with an accuracy of 10% or better for a number of elements in the range 26 {<=} Z {<=} 100. The experimental set involves 414 ratios for pure and 1096 ratios for mixed-multipolarity nuclear transitions in the transition energy range from 2 to 2300 keV. We give relevant theoretical ratios calculated in the framework of the Dirac-Fock method with and without regard for the hole in the atomic subshell after conversion. For comparison, the ratios obtained within the relativistic Hartree-Fock-Slater approximation are also presented. In cases where several ratios were measured for the same transition in a given isotope in which two multipolarities were involved, we present the mixing ratio {delta} {sup 2} obtained by a least squares fit.

  6. Pressure Sores

    MedlinePlus

    ... night. Pressure sores also are called bedsores or pressure ulcers. The sores change appearance over 4 stages. In ... SeniorsTags: antibiotics, Dermatologic, elderly, higher, older adults, Overview, Pressure Ulcers Family Health, Seniors September 2000 Copyright © American Academy ...

  7. Blood pressure

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    Normal blood pressure is important for proper blood flow to the body's organs and tissues. The force of the blood on the walls of the arteries is called blood pressure. Blood pressure is measured both as the heart ...

  8. Peer Pressure

    MedlinePlus

    ... Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Peer Pressure KidsHealth > For Teens > Peer Pressure A A A ... for the school play. previous continue When the Pressure's On Sometimes, though, the stresses in your life ...

  9. Partitioning Drag Coefficient Estimates over Flat and Rippled Beds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez-Abudo, S.; Foster, D. L.

    2012-12-01

    Drag forces are imparted on a sediment bed by means of pressure and shear stresses. In coastal environments with ripples present, the pressure drag can be partitioned into a pressure contribution imposed by the waves, which is fairly accurately approximated with linear wave theory, and a bedform-induced pressure contribution that arises due to the presence of an uneven boundary. Experimentally resolving the bedform-induced pressure is difficult due to the highly dynamic granular boundary, and the turbulent nature flow, characterized by coherent flow structures highly correlated to the free-stream hydrodynamics. In this effort we use a physics-based formulation that explicitly yields a momentum balance between the bedform-induced pressure drag, vertical stress gradient and acceleration deficit. The formulation is derived from the Double-Averaged Navier Stokes (DANS) equations (Gimenez-Curto and Corniero Lera, 1996), in which the two-dimensional velocity field is decomposed into temporal and spatial components, followed by a double average (in time and space). Direct estimates of the drag coefficient are computed from Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) observations of the wave bottom boundary layer in a variety of wave forcing conditions, including laboratory experiments at full and 1:10 scales, and a field observational effort in a sheltered beach of New England. The results show that the relative importance of the bedform-induced pressure drag increases with increasing bedform signature.

  10. The emission coefficient of uranium plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, R. T.; Campbell, H. D.; Mack, J. M.

    1973-01-01

    The emission coefficient for uranium plasmas (Temperature: 8000 K) was measured for the wavelength range (200 A - 6000 A). The results are compared to theory and other measurements. The absorption coefficient for the same wavelength interval is also given.

  11. Note on Two Generalizations of Coefficient Alpha.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raju, Nambury S.

    1979-01-01

    An important relationship is given for two generalizations of coefficient alpha: (1) Rajaratnam, Cronbach, and Gleser's generalizability formula for stratified-parallel tests, and (2) Raju's coefficient beta. (Author/CTM)

  12. Chondroitin sulfate reduces the friction coefficient of articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Basalo, Ines M; Chahine, Nadeen O; Kaplun, Michael; Chen, Faye H; Hung, Clark T; Ateshian, Gerard A

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of chondroitin sulfate (CS)-C on the frictional response of bovine articular cartilage. The main hypothesis is that CS decreases the friction coefficient of articular cartilage. Corollary hypotheses are that viscosity and osmotic pressure are not the mechanisms that mediate the reduction in the friction coefficient by CS. In Experiment 1, bovine articular cartilage samples (n=29) were tested in either phosphate buffered saline (PBS) or in PBS containing 100mg/ml of CS following 48h incubation in PBS or in PBS+100mg/ml CS (control specimens were not subjected to any incubation). In Experiment 2, samples (n=23) were tested in four different solutions: PBS, PBS+100mg/ml CS, and PBS+polyethylene glycol (PEG) (133 or 170mg/ml). In Experiment 3, samples (n=18) were tested in three solutions of CS (0, 10 and 100mg/ml). Frictional tests (cartilage-on-glass) were performed under constant stress (0.5MPa) for 3600s and the time-dependent friction coefficient was measured. Samples incubated or tested in a 100mg/ml CS solution exhibited a significantly lower equilibrium friction coefficient than the respective PBS control. PEG solutions delayed the rise in the friction coefficient relative to the PBS control, but did not reduce the equilibrium value. Testing in PBS+10mg/ml of CS did not cause any significant decrease in the friction coefficient. In conclusion, CS at a concentration of 100mg/ml significantly reduces the friction coefficient of bovine articular cartilage and this mechanism is neither mediated by viscosity nor osmolarity. These results suggest that direct injection of CS into the joint may provide beneficial tribological effects.

  13. M-Bonomial Coefficients and Their Identities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asiru, Muniru A.

    2010-01-01

    In this note, we introduce M-bonomial coefficients or (M-bonacci binomial coefficients). These are similar to the binomial and the Fibonomial (or Fibonacci-binomial) coefficients and can be displayed in a triangle similar to Pascal's triangle from which some identities become obvious.

  14. Coefficient rings of formal group laws

    SciTech Connect

    Buchstaber, V M; Ustinov, A V

    2015-11-30

    We describe the coefficient rings of universal formal group laws which arise in algebraic geometry, algebraic topology and their application to mathematical physics. We also describe the homomorphisms of these coefficient rings coming from reductions of one formal group law to another. The proofs are based on the number-theoretic properties of binomial coefficients. Bibliography: 37 titles.

  15. Soccer Ball Lift Coefficients via Trajectory Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goff, John Eric; Carre, Matt J.

    2010-01-01

    We performed experiments in which a soccer ball was launched from a machine while two high-speed cameras recorded portions of the trajectory. Using the trajectory data and published drag coefficients, we extracted lift coefficients for a soccer ball. We determined lift coefficients for a wide range of spin parameters, including several spin…

  16. M-Bonomial Coefficients and Their Identities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asiru, Muniru A.

    2010-01-01

    In this note, we introduce M-bonomial coefficients or (M-bonacci binomial coefficients). These are similar to the binomial and the Fibonomial (or Fibonacci-binomial) coefficients and can be displayed in a triangle similar to Pascal's triangle from which some identities become obvious.

  17. Soccer Ball Lift Coefficients via Trajectory Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goff, John Eric; Carre, Matt J.

    2010-01-01

    We performed experiments in which a soccer ball was launched from a machine while two high-speed cameras recorded portions of the trajectory. Using the trajectory data and published drag coefficients, we extracted lift coefficients for a soccer ball. We determined lift coefficients for a wide range of spin parameters, including several spin…

  18. A Note on the Dynamic Correlation Coefficient.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-11-04

    The use of the dynamic correlation coefficient as a test of spuriousness in longitudinal designs was examined. It was shown that given conditions of...spuriousness and perfect stationarity, the dynamic correlation coefficient was positively, rather than inversely, related to spuriousness. It was...recommended that the dynamic correlation coefficient not be used in the future as a test of spuriousness. (Author)

  19. Note on Methodology: The Coefficient of Variation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheret, Michael

    1984-01-01

    Addresses applications of the coefficient of variation as a measure of educational inequality or as a means of measuring changes of inequality status. Suggests the Gini coefficient has many advantages over the coefficient of variation since it can be used with the Lorenz curve (Lorenz provides detail Gini omits). (BRR)

  20. Standards for Standardized Logistic Regression Coefficients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Menard, Scott

    2011-01-01

    Standardized coefficients in logistic regression analysis have the same utility as standardized coefficients in linear regression analysis. Although there has been no consensus on the best way to construct standardized logistic regression coefficients, there is now sufficient evidence to suggest a single best approach to the construction of a…

  1. Standards for Standardized Logistic Regression Coefficients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Menard, Scott

    2011-01-01

    Standardized coefficients in logistic regression analysis have the same utility as standardized coefficients in linear regression analysis. Although there has been no consensus on the best way to construct standardized logistic regression coefficients, there is now sufficient evidence to suggest a single best approach to the construction of a…

  2. Radon emanation coefficients for phosphogypsum.

    PubMed

    Rutherford, P M; Dudas, M J; Arocena, J M

    1995-10-01

    Phosphogypsum is a by-product of the phosphate fertilizer industry which is stockpiled in large quantities world-wide. Phosphogypsum consists mainly of dihydrate gypsum (CaSO42H2O) but also contains elevated concentrations of 226Ra and other inorganic species which originate from the processing of phosphate rock. 222Rn gas is the first decay product of 226Ra and has been identified as one of the major environmental concerns associated with phosphogypsum. This study was conducted to determine effects of particle size, weathering, and moisture content on the 222Rn emanation coefficient (epsilon) for phosphogypsum. Average epsilon for air-dry, unfractionated phosphogypsums derived from Togo, Florida, or Idaho rock was approximately 12%. Average epsilon for fine fraction phosphogypsum (< 20 microns diameter) was greater than for unfractionated phosphogypsum by a factor of 4.6, 1.4, and 4.4 for samples derived from Idaho rock, Togo rock, and Florida rock, respectively. Phosphogypsum samples subjected to an artificial weathering procedure lost 40% mass, with no change in epsilon. Increasing water content was found to first slightly decrease, then to increase epsilon compared to air-dry samples; epsilon for 100% saturated phosphogypsum was 1.9-fold greater than in air-dry phosphogypsum. Particle size sorting could account for variability of 222Rn exhalation at repositories. Very high moisture contents could slightly increase 222Rn emanation, but exhalation would likely be reduced due to slow diffusion through porosity of saturated phosphogypsum.

  3. Pressurized Anneal of Consolidated Powders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemir, David Charles (Inventor); Rubio, Edward S. (Inventor); Beck, Jan Bastian (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    Systems and methods for producing a dense, well bonded solid material from a powder may include consolidating the powder utilizing any suitable consolidation method, such as explosive shockwave consolidation. The systems and methods may also include a post-processing thermal treatment that exploits a mismatch between the coefficients of thermal expansion between the consolidated material and the container. Due to the mismatch in the coefficients, internal pressure on the consolidated material during the heat treatment may be increased.

  4. Physiologically derived critical evaporative coefficients for protective clothing ensembles.

    PubMed

    Kenney, W L; Lewis, D A; Hyde, D E; Dyksterhouse, T S; Armstrong, C G; Fowler, S R; Williams, D A

    1987-09-01

    When work is performed in heavy clothing, evaporation of sweat from the skin to the environment is limited by layers of wet clothing and air. The magnitude of decrement in evaporative cooling is a function of the clothing's resistance to permeation of water vapor. A physiological approach has been used to derive effective evaporative coefficients (he) which define this ability to evaporate sweat. We refined this approach by correcting the critical effective evaporative coefficient (K for sweating efficiency (Ke,eta') since only a portion of the sweat produced under such conditions is evaporated through the clothing. Six acclimated men and women walked at 30% maximal O2 consumption (150-200 W.m-2) at a constant dry bulb temperature as ambient water vapor pressure was systematically increased 1 Torr every 10 min. Critical pressure was defined as the partial pressure of water vapor (Pw) at which thermal balance could no longer be maintained and rectal temperature rose sharply. Each test was performed in various clothing ensembles ranging from cotton shirt and pants to "impermeable" suits. This approach was used to derive he by solving the general heat balance equation, M - W +/- (R + C) = w.he.(Psk - Pw), where M is metabolic heat production, W is external work, R is radiant heat exchange, C is convective heat transfer, w is skin wettedness, and Psk is water vapor pressure of fully wet skin.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. New method for measuring compressibility and poroelasticity coefficients in porous and permeable rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pimienta, Lucas; Fortin, Jérôme; Guéguen, Yves

    2017-04-01

    Over the last decades, a large understanding has been gained on the elastic properties of rocks. Rocks are, however, porous materials, which properties depend on both response of the bulk material and of the pores. Because in that case both the applied external pressure and the fluid pressure play a role, different poroelasticity coefficients exist. While theoretical relations exist, measuring precisely those different coefficients remains an experimental challenge. Accounting for the different experimental complexities, a new methodology is designed that allows attaining accurately a large set of compressibility and poroelasticity coefficients in porous and permeable rocks. This new method relies on the use of forced confining or pore fluid pressure oscillations. In total, seven independent coefficients have been measured using three different boundary conditions. Because the usual theories predict only four independent coefficients, this overdetermined set of data can be checked against existing thermodynamic relations. Measurements have been performed on a Bentheim sandstone under, water- and glycerine-saturated conditions for different values of confining and pore fluid pressure. Consistently with the poroelasticity theory, the effect of the fluid bulk modulus is observed under undrained conditions but not under drained ones. Using thermodynamic relations, (i) the unjacketed, quartz, and skeleton (Zimmerman's relation) bulk moduli fit, (ii) the drained and undrained properties fit, and (iii) it is directly inferred from the measurements that the pore skeleton compressibility Cϕ is expected to be constant with pressure and to be exceedingly near the bulk skeleton Cs and mineral Cm compressibility coefficients.

  6. Size-dependent second virial coefficients of quantum dots from quantitative cryogenic electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    van Rijssel, J; Peters, V F D; Meeldijk, J D; Kortschot, R J; van Dijk-Moes, R J A; Petukhov, A V; Erné, B H; Philipse, A P

    2014-09-18

    Cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM) is utilized to determine the second virial coefficient of osmotic pressure of PbSe quantum dots (QDs) dispersed in apolar liquid. Cryo-TEM images from vitrified samples provide snapshots of the equilibrium distribution of the particles. These snapshots yield radial distribution functions from which second virial coefficients are calculated, which agree with second virial coefficients determined with analytical centrifugation and small-angle X-ray scattering. The size dependence of the second virial coefficient points to an interparticle interaction that is proportional to the QD surface area. A plausible cause for this attraction is the interaction between the surface ions on adjacent QDs.

  7. Correlation of tissue, blood, and air partition coefficients of volatile organic chemicals.

    PubMed Central

    Paterson, S; Mackay, D

    1989-01-01

    The physical chemical factors controlling partition coefficients between air, water, blood, and various tissues are discussed. It is suggested that improved insights into the relations between partition coefficients, which are frequently expressed as correlations, may be obtained by viewing the partition coefficients as ratios of solubilities or pseudosolubilities. A simple, novel correlation approach is developed and applied to 24 volatile organic chemicals, which enables tissue/blood, tissue/air, and blood/air partition coefficients to be estimated from water solubility and vapour pressure. An illustration is presented in which these solubilities are used to calculate the equilibrium distribution of dichloromethane between air, blood, and various tissues. PMID:2751930

  8. Second virial coefficients for chain molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Bokis, C.P.; Donohue, M.D. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering); Hall, C.K. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1994-01-01

    The importance of having accurate second virial coefficients in phase equilibrium calculations, especially for the calculation of dew points, is discussed. The square-well potentials results in a simple but inaccurate equation for the second virial coefficient for small, spherical molecules such as argon. Here, the authors present a new equation for the second virial coefficient of both spherical molecules and chain molecules which is written in a form similar to that for the square-well potential. This new equation is accurate in comparison to Monte Carlo simulation data on second virial coefficients for square-well chain molecules and with second virial coefficients obtained from experiments on n-alkanes.

  9. Methane Absorption Coefficients for the Jovian Planets and Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karkoschka, Erich; Tomasko, M. G.

    2009-09-01

    We combined 11 data sets of methane transmission measurements within 0.4-5.5 micrometer wavelength in order to better understand the variation of methane absorption with temperature and pressure for conditions in the atmospheres of the Jovian planets and Titan. Eight data sets are based on published laboratory measurements. Another two data sets come from two spectrometers onboard the Huygens probe that measured methane absorption inside Titan's atmosphere (Tomasko et al. 2008, PSS 56, 624). We present the data with a refined analysis. The last data set consists of Hubble Space Telescope images of Jupiter taken in 2005 and 2007 as Ganymede started to be occulted by Jupiter. Using Ganymede as a light source, we probed Jupiter's stratosphere with large methane pathlengths. Below 1000 nm wavelength, we find methane absorption coefficients generally similar to those by Karkoschka (1998, Icarus 133, 134). We added descriptions of temperature and pressure dependence, which are typically small in this wavelength range. Data in this wavelength range are consistent with each other, except between 882 and 902 nm wavelength where laboratory data predict larger absorptions in the Jovian atmospheres than observed. We present possible explanations. Above 1000 nm, our analysis of the Huygens data confirms methane absorption coefficients by Irwin et al. (2006, Icarus 181, 309) at their laboratory temperatures. Huygens data are consistent with Irwin's model of the pressure dependence of methane absorption. However, when large extrapolations were needed, such as from laboratory data above 200 K to Titan's temperatures near 80 K, Irwin's model of temperature dependence predicts absorption coefficients up to 100 times lower than measured by Huygens. We combined Irwin's and Huygens' data to obtain more reliable methane absorption coefficients for the temperatures in the atmospheres of the Jovian planets and Titan. This research was supported by NASA grants NAG5-12014 and NNX08AE74G.

  10. A comparison of the experimental subsonic pressure distributions about several bodies of revolution with pressure distributions computed by means of the linearized theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matthews, Clarence W

    1953-01-01

    An analysis is made of the effects of compressibility on the pressure coefficients about several bodies of revolution by comparing experimentally determined pressure coefficients with corresponding pressure coefficients calculated by the use of the linearized equations of compressible flow. The results show that the theoretical methods predict the subsonic pressure-coefficient changes over the central part of the body but do not predict the pressure-coefficient changes near the nose. Extrapolation of the linearized subsonic theory into the mixed subsonic-supersonic flow region fails to predict a rearward movement of the negative pressure-coefficient peak which occurs after the critical stream Mach number has been attained. Two equations developed from a consideration of the subsonic compressible flow about a prolate spheroid are shown to predict, approximately, the change with Mach number of the subsonic pressure coefficients for regular bodies of revolution of fineness ratio 6 or greater.

  11. Determination of second virial coefficients and viscosities of gases with a capillary column

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, J.C.; Madey, R.

    1982-05-01

    It appears possible to determine the second virial coefficient, the viscosity at zero pressure, and the pressure dependence of the viscosity of gases and gas mixtures by varying the pressures at both ends of a capillary column. Since the method assumes an empty column, it is therefore free from the interference of solvents or packing solids. The use of a chromatograph to analyze the composition of the gas mixture permits a rapid measurement of the second virial coefficient and the viscosity of the mixture.

  12. Determination of second virial coefficients and viscosities of gases with a capillary column

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, J.C.; Madey, R.

    1982-05-01

    Mathematical analysis suggests that a laboratory method that varies the pressures at both ends of a capillary column should be able to determine the second virial coefficient, viscosity at zero pressure, and pressure dependence of the viscosity of pure gases and gas mixtures. By assuming an empty column, the approach would be free from the interference of solvents or packing solids. Using a chromatograph to analyze the composition of the gas mixture permits rapid measurements of the second virial coefficient and the viscosity of the mixture.

  13. Investigating bias in squared regression structure coefficients.

    PubMed

    Nimon, Kim F; Zientek, Linda R; Thompson, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    The importance of structure coefficients and analogs of regression weights for analysis within the general linear model (GLM) has been well-documented. The purpose of this study was to investigate bias in squared structure coefficients in the context of multiple regression and to determine if a formula that had been shown to correct for bias in squared Pearson correlation coefficients and coefficients of determination could be used to correct for bias in squared regression structure coefficients. Using data from a Monte Carlo simulation, this study found that squared regression structure coefficients corrected with Pratt's formula produced less biased estimates and might be more accurate and stable estimates of population squared regression structure coefficients than estimates with no such corrections. While our findings are in line with prior literature that identified multicollinearity as a predictor of bias in squared regression structure coefficients but not coefficients of determination, the findings from this study are unique in that the level of predictive power, number of predictors, and sample size were also observed to contribute bias in squared regression structure coefficients.

  14. Investigating bias in squared regression structure coefficients

    PubMed Central

    Nimon, Kim F.; Zientek, Linda R.; Thompson, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    The importance of structure coefficients and analogs of regression weights for analysis within the general linear model (GLM) has been well-documented. The purpose of this study was to investigate bias in squared structure coefficients in the context of multiple regression and to determine if a formula that had been shown to correct for bias in squared Pearson correlation coefficients and coefficients of determination could be used to correct for bias in squared regression structure coefficients. Using data from a Monte Carlo simulation, this study found that squared regression structure coefficients corrected with Pratt's formula produced less biased estimates and might be more accurate and stable estimates of population squared regression structure coefficients than estimates with no such corrections. While our findings are in line with prior literature that identified multicollinearity as a predictor of bias in squared regression structure coefficients but not coefficients of determination, the findings from this study are unique in that the level of predictive power, number of predictors, and sample size were also observed to contribute bias in squared regression structure coefficients. PMID:26217273

  15. Gas-film coefficients for streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rathbun, R.E.; Tai, D.Y.

    1983-01-01

    Equations for predicting the gas-film coefficient for the volatilization of organic solutes from streams are developed. The film coefficient is a function of windspeed and water temperature. The dependence of the coefficient on windspeed is determined from published information on the evaporation of water from a canal. The dependence of the coefficient on temperature is determined from laboratory studies on the evaporation of water. Procedures for adjusting the coefficients for different organic solutes are based on the molecular diffusion coefficient and the molecular weight. The molecular weight procedure is easiest to use because of the availability of molecular weights. However, the theoretical basis of the procedure is questionable. The diffusion coefficient procedure is supported by considerable data. Questions, however, remain regarding the exact dependence of the film coefficint on the diffusion coefficient. It is suggested that the diffusion coefficient procedure with a 0.68-power dependence be used when precise estimate of the gas-film coefficient are needed and that the molecular weight procedure be used when only approximate estimates are needed.

  16. Fluctuation of Ultrafiltration Coefficient of Hemodialysis Membrane During Reuse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arif, Idam; Christin

    2010-12-01

    Hemodialysis treatment for patient with kidney failure is to regulate body fluid and to excrete waste products of metabolism. The patient blood and the dialyzing solution (dialysate) are flowed counter currently in a dialyzer to allow volume flux of fluid and diffusion of solutes from the blood to the dialysate through a semipermiable membrane. The volume flux of fluid depends on the hydrostatic and the osmotic pressure difference between the blood and the dialysate. It also depends on the membrane parameter that represents how the membrane allows the fluid and the solutes to move across as a result of the pressure difference, known as the ultrafiltration coefficient Kuf. The coefficient depends on the number and the radius of membrane pores for the movement of the fluids and the solutes across the membrane. The measured membrane ultrafiltration coefficient of reused dialyzer shows fluctuation between one uses to another without any significant trend of change. This indicates that the cleaning process carried out before reuse does not cause perfect removal of clots that happen in the previous use. Therefore the unblocked pores are forced to work hardly to obtain targeted volume flux in a certain time of treatment. This may increase the unblocked pore radius. Reuse is stopped when there is indication of blood leakage during the hemodialysis treatment.

  17. Measurement of Soret coefficients of crude oil in microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hart, D'arcy; Legros, Jean-Claude; Montel, François

    1998-01-01

    Optimum technical and economic development of an oil field requires accurate knowledge of the behavior of the fluids that impregnate petroleum reservoirs and of their evolution during production. Many reservoirs being explored today are at sufficient depth to be close to critical pressure and temperature conditions. Therefore, they are very sensitive to applied forces of gravity plus temperature and pressure gradients. Compositional differences induced by such forces can be very significant. The thermodiffusion (Soret) process exists in the presence of a temperature gradient in fluid mixtures, inducing a mass flux. Very few numerical models of oil reservoirs take into account the thermodiffusion process mainly due to a severe lack of Soret coefficients measured in crude oil. Soret coefficients of crude oil must be measured to provide for accurate numerical models. The Microgravity Research Center is collaborating with C-CORE to develop a microgravity experiment to fly on NASA's Space Shuttle. This paper describes the development and potential benefits of the Soret coefficient project.

  18. Activity and osmotic coefficients of aqueous sulfuric acid at 298.15 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staples, Bert R.

    1981-07-01

    A critical evaluation of the mean activity coefficient, γ±, and osmotic coefficient, φ, of aqueous sulfuric acid at 298.15 K is presented for the molality range of 0 to 28 molṡkg-1. Osmotic coefficients were calculated from direct vapor pressure measurements, from isopietic measurements or from freezing point depression measurements. Activity coefficients were calculated from electromotive force measurements of galvanic cells. A least-squares program was used to fit data from all sources using both φ and ln γ± as functions of molality. A nine parameter equation describes the osmotic coefficient, the mean activity coefficient, and the excess. Gibbs energy as a function of the one-half power of molality. The scientific literature has been covered through January, 1979.

  19. Estimation of high temperature metal-silicate partition coefficients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, John H.; Capobianco, Christopher J.; Drake, Michael J.

    1992-01-01

    It has been known for some time that abundances of siderophile elements in the upper mantle of the Earth are far in excess of those expected from equilibrium between metal and silicate at low pressures and temperatures. Murthy (1991) has re-examined this excess of siderophile element problem by estimating liquid metal/liquid silicate partition coefficients reduces from their measured values at a lower temperature, implying that siderophile elements become much less siderophilic at high temperatures. Murthy then draws the important conclusion that metal/silicate equilibrium at high temperatures can account for the abundances of siderophile elements in the Earth's mantle. Of course, his conclusion is critically dependent on the small values of the partition coefficients he calculates. Because the numerical values of most experimentally-determined partition coefficients increase with increasing temperature at both constant oxygen fugacity and at constant redox buffer, we think it is important to try an alternative extrapolation for comparison. We have computed high temperature metal/silicate partition coefficients under a different set of assumptions and show that such long temperature extrapolations yield values which are critically dependent upon the presumed chemical behavior of the siderophile elements in the system.

  20. An experimental assembly for precise measurement of thermal accommodation coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trott, Wayne M.; Castañeda, Jaime N.; Torczynski, John R.; Gallis, Michael A.; Rader, Daniel J.

    2011-03-01

    An experimental apparatus has been developed to determine thermal accommodation coefficients for a variety of gas-surface combinations. Results are obtained primarily through measurement of the pressure dependence of the conductive heat flux between parallel plates separated by a gas-filled gap. Measured heat-flux data are used in a formula based on Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) simulations to determine the coefficients. The assembly also features a complementary capability for measuring the variation in gas density between the plates using electron-beam fluorescence. Surface materials examined include 304 stainless steel, gold, aluminum, platinum, silicon, silicon nitride, and polysilicon. Effects of gas composition, surface roughness, and surface contamination have been investigated with this system; the behavior of gas mixtures has also been explored. Without special cleaning procedures, thermal accommodation coefficients for most materials and surface finishes were determined to be near 0.95, 0.85, and 0.45 for argon, nitrogen, and helium, respectively. Surface cleaning by in situ argon-plasma treatment reduced coefficient values by up to 0.10 for helium and by ˜0.05 for nitrogen and argon. Results for both single-species and gas-mixture experiments compare favorably to DSMC simulations.

  1. Recursive prescription for logarithmic jet rate coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerwick, Erik

    2013-11-01

    We derive a recursion relation for the analytic leading logarithmic coefficients of a final state gluon cascade. We demonstrate the potential of our method by analytically computing the rate coefficients for the emission of up to 80 gluons in both the exclusive-kt (Durham) and generalized inclusive-kt class of jet algorithms. There is a particularly simple form for the ratios of resolved coefficients. We suggest potential applications for our method including the efficient generation of shower histories.

  2. Apparatus for measurement of coefficient of friction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slifka, A. J.; Siegwarth, J. D.; Sparks, L. L.; Chaudhuri, Dilip K.

    1990-01-01

    An apparatus designed to measure the coefficient of friction in certain controlled atmospheres is described. The coefficient of friction observed during high-load tests was nearly constant, with an average value of 0.56. This value is in general agreement with that found in the literature and also with the initial friction coefficient value of 0.67 measured during self-mated friction of 440C steel in an oxygen environment.

  3. Apparatus for measurement of coefficient of friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slifka, A. J.; Siegwarth, J. D.; Sparks, L. L.; Chaudhuri, Dilip K.

    An apparatus designed to measure the coefficient of friction in certain controlled atmospheres is described. The coefficient of friction observed during high-load tests was nearly constant, with an average value of 0.56. This value is in general agreement with that found in the literature and also with the initial friction coefficient value of 0.67 measured during self-mated friction of 440C steel in an oxygen environment.

  4. 46 CFR 45.55 - Freeboard coefficient.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Freeboard coefficient. 45.55 Section 45.55 Shipping... § 45.55 Freeboard coefficient. (a) For ships less than 350 feet in length (L), the freeboard coefficient is P 1 in the formula: P 1=P+A[(L/D)-(L/D s)] where P is a factor, which is a function of...

  5. 46 CFR 45.55 - Freeboard coefficient.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Freeboard coefficient. 45.55 Section 45.55 Shipping... § 45.55 Freeboard coefficient. (a) For ships less than 350 feet in length (L), the freeboard coefficient is P 1 in the formula: P 1=P+A[(L/D)-(L/D s)] where P is a factor, which is a function of...

  6. 46 CFR 45.55 - Freeboard coefficient.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Freeboard coefficient. 45.55 Section 45.55 Shipping... § 45.55 Freeboard coefficient. (a) For ships less than 350 feet in length (L), the freeboard coefficient is P 1 in the formula: P 1=P+A[(L/D)-(L/D s)] where P is a factor, which is a function of...

  7. Data analysis for Seebeck coefficient measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Boor, J.; Müller, E.

    2013-06-01

    The Seebeck coefficient is one of the key quantities of thermoelectric materials and routinely measured in various laboratories. There are, however, several ways to calculate the Seebeck coefficient from the raw measurement data. We compare these different ways to extract the Seebeck coefficient, evaluate the accuracy of the results, and show methods to increase this accuracy. We furthermore point out experimental and data analysis parameters that can be used to evaluate the trustworthiness of the obtained result. The shown analysis can be used to find and minimize errors in the Seebeck coefficient measurement and therefore increase the reliability of the measured material properties.

  8. Pressure Sores

    MedlinePlus

    Pressure sores are areas of damaged skin caused by staying in one position for too long. They ... wheelchair, or are unable to change your position. Pressure sores can cause serious infections, some of which ...

  9. The evaluation of the power coefficient of a Savonius rotor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chauvin, A.; Botrini, M.; Brun, R.; Beguier, C.

    1983-03-01

    Measurements of the pressure variations and the blade drag on a Savonius rotor with partially overlapping blades set at different angles of attack are employed to develop a model for the power coefficient. The data were taken in a wind tunnel with probes placed on the interior and exterior surfaces of a blade from the leading edge to the trailing edge in a series of seven trials with each angle of attack. Two rotationary regimes were noted, the first, motoring, which lasted up to an angle of attack of 145 deg, and a resistant mode, which lasted up to 180 deg. A two-dimensional model is developed for a horizontal slice of the Savonius, taking into account the aerodynamic forces on the retreating and advancing blades. It is found that the drag increase with the rotation speed, eventually providing an upper limit to the power available. A maximum power coefficient of 0.17 is projected.

  10. Calculation of Dynamic Coefficients for Multiwound Foil Bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Kai; Kaneko, Shigehiko

    Dynamic performance of multiwound foil bearings with the effects of foil local deflection is investigated. The foils, separated and supported by projections on the ir surface are treated as thin plates. Deflections of the foils are solved with a finite element model. The air pressure is calculated with the Reynolds' equation by treating the lubricant as an isothermal idea gas. The effects of foils are simulated with the deflection of top foil added to the film thickness. A finite difference computer program is developed to solve the Reynolds equation and the elastic deflection equation, simultaneously. Perturbation method is used to determine the dynamic coefficients. The effects of foil deflection is discussed by comparing the dynamic coefficients of a foil bearing and a rigid bearing. Experimental data from a test rig supported by two multiwound foil bearings are used to validate this numerical solution.

  11. Cough gastric pressure and maximum expiratory mouth pressure in humans.

    PubMed

    Man, William D-C; Kyroussis, Dimitris; Fleming, Tracey A; Chetta, Alfredo; Harraf, Farzaneh; Mustfa, Naveed; Rafferty, Gerrard F; Polkey, Michael I; Moxham, John

    2003-09-15

    Maximal expiratory mouth pressure is a well established test that is used to assess expiratory muscle strength. However, low values are difficult to interpret, as they may result from technical difficulties in performing the test, particularly in patients with facial muscle weakness or bulbar dysfunction. We hypothesized that measuring the gastric pressure during a cough, a natural maneuver recruiting the expiratory muscles, might prove to be a useful additional test in the assessment of expiratory muscle function. Mouth expiratory and cough gastric pressures were measured in 99 healthy volunteers to obtain normal values and in 293 patients referred for respiratory muscle assessment to compare the two measurements. Between-occasion within-subject coefficient of variation, assessed in 24 healthy volunteers, was 10.3% for mouth pressure and 6.9% for cough. Mean +/- SD cough gastric pressure for normal males was 214.4 +/- 42.2 and 165.1 +/- 34.8 cm H2O for females. In 171 patients deemed weak by a low mouth expiratory pressure, 42% had a normal cough gastric pressure. In 105 patients deemed weak by a low cough gastric pressure, 5.7% had a normal expiratory mouth pressure. Low maximal expiratory mouth pressures do not always indicate expiratory muscle weakness. Cough gastric pressure provides a useful complementary test for the assessment of expiratory muscle strength.

  12. Barometric pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Billings, C. E.

    1973-01-01

    The effects of alterations in barometric pressure on human beings are described. Human tolerances for gaseous environments and low and high barometric pressure are discussed, including effects on specific areas, such as the ear, lungs, teeth, and sinuses. Problems due to trapped gas within the body, high dynamic pressures on the body, and blasts are also considered.

  13. Streaming potential coupling coefficient in unsaturated carbonate rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerepi, A.; Cherubini, A.; Garcia, B.; Deschamps, H.; Revil, A.

    2017-07-01

    The seismoelectric and self-potential methods are showing promises to characterize both the vadose zone of the Earth, hydrocarbon reservoirs and CO2 sequestration. That said, the dependence of a key parameter, the streaming coupling coefficient, with the saturation remains highly debated. We explore here the relationship between the streaming potential coupling coefficient, the electrical resistivity, the capillary pressure curves and the permeability in two saturated and partially saturated carbonate rocks characterized by distinct textures. We investigate a limestone from the Paris basin (the Brauvilliers limestone) and a dolostone from the Aquitain basin (sample labeled LS2), both in France. The two core samples are characterized in terms of their porosity and intrinsic formation factor. A new core flooding system is used to measure simultaneously and, for the first time, both the relative permeability, the resistivity index and the streaming potential coupling coefficient in steady-state two-phase flow conditions as a function of the saturation with CO2 or N2. The results are compared with a recently developed theoretical model, which can accommodate either the Brooks and Corey model or the van Genuchten model for the capillary pressure curves. This model is predicting a set of relationships between the streaming potential coupling coefficient, the relative permeability and the second Archie's exponent. We found a good agreement between the model based on the van Genuchten approach and experimental data, but still we could not fit all the curves with the same value of the pore size index λ or van Genuchten exponent mv especially for the relative permeability.

  14. Deriving Second Osmotic Virial Coefficients from Equations of State and from Experiment.

    PubMed

    Koga, K; Holten, Vincent; Widom, B

    2015-10-22

    The osmotic virial coefficients, which are measures of the effective interactions between solute molecules in dilute solution, may be obtained from expansions of the osmotic pressure or of the solute activity in powers of the solute concentration. In these expansions, the temperature is held fixed, and one additional constraint is imposed. When the additional constraint is that of fixed chemical potential of the solvent, the coefficient of the second-order term yields directly the second osmotic virial coefficient itself. Alternative constraints, such as fixed pressure, fixed solvent density, or the specification of liquid-vapor equilibrium, yield alternative measures of the solute-solute interaction, different from but related to the osmotic virial coefficient. These relations are summarized and, where new, are derived here. The coefficient in question may be calculated from equations of state in which the parameters have been obtained by fitting to other experimental properties. Alternatively, the coefficients may be calculated from direct experimental measurements of the deviations from Henry's law based on measurements of the activity of the solute in a coexisting gas phase. It is seen for propane in water as a test case that with the latter method, even with what appear to be the best available experimental data, there are still large uncertainties in the resulting second osmotic virial coefficient. With the former method, by contrast, the coefficient may be obtained with high numerical precision but then depends for its accuracy on the quality of the equation of state from which it is derived.

  15. Periodic Heat Transfer at Small Pressure Fluctuations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pfriem, H.

    1943-01-01

    The effect of cyclic gas pressure variations on the periodic heat transfer at a flat wall is theoretically analyzed and the differential equation describing the process and its solution for relatively. Small pressure fluctuations developed, thus explaining the periodic heat cycle between gas and wall surface. The processes for pure harmonic pressure and temperature oscillations, respectively, in the gas space are described by means of a constant heat transfer coefficient and the equally constant phase angle between the appearance of the maximum values of the pressure and heat flow most conveniently expressed mathematically in the form of a complex heat transfer coefficient. Any cyclic pressure oscillations, can be reduced by Fourier analysis to harmonic oscillations, which result in specific, mutual relationships of heat-transfer coefficients and phase angles for the different harmonics.

  16. Coefficient Alpha and Reliability of Scale Scores

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Almehrizi, Rashid S.

    2013-01-01

    The majority of large-scale assessments develop various score scales that are either linear or nonlinear transformations of raw scores for better interpretations and uses of assessment results. The current formula for coefficient alpha (a; the commonly used reliability coefficient) only provides internal consistency reliability estimates of raw…

  17. Coefficient Alpha Bootstrap Confidence Interval under Nonnormality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Padilla, Miguel A.; Divers, Jasmin; Newton, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    Three different bootstrap methods for estimating confidence intervals (CIs) for coefficient alpha were investigated. In addition, the bootstrap methods were compared with the most promising coefficient alpha CI estimation methods reported in the literature. The CI methods were assessed through a Monte Carlo simulation utilizing conditions…

  18. 46 CFR 45.55 - Freeboard coefficient.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Freeboard coefficient. 45.55 Section 45.55 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) LOAD LINES GREAT LAKES LOAD LINES Freeboards § 45.55 Freeboard coefficient. (a) For ships less than 350 feet in length (L), the freeboard...

  19. 46 CFR 45.55 - Freeboard coefficient.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Freeboard coefficient. 45.55 Section 45.55 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) LOAD LINES GREAT LAKES LOAD LINES Freeboards § 45.55 Freeboard coefficient. (a) For ships less than 350 feet in length (L), the freeboard...

  20. Coefficient Alpha Bootstrap Confidence Interval under Nonnormality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Padilla, Miguel A.; Divers, Jasmin; Newton, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    Three different bootstrap methods for estimating confidence intervals (CIs) for coefficient alpha were investigated. In addition, the bootstrap methods were compared with the most promising coefficient alpha CI estimation methods reported in the literature. The CI methods were assessed through a Monte Carlo simulation utilizing conditions…

  1. Decay of (p,q)-Fourier coefficients.

    PubMed

    Edmunds, David E; Gurka, Petr; Lang, Jan

    2014-10-08

    We show that essentially the speed of decay of the Fourier sine coefficients of a function in a Lebesgue space is comparable to that of the corresponding coefficients with respect to the basis formed by the generalized sine functions sin p,q .

  2. Prediction of friction coefficients for gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, M. F.

    1969-01-01

    Empirical relations are used for correlating laminar and turbulent friction coefficients for gases, with large variations in the physical properties, flowing through smooth tubes. These relations have been used to correlate friction coefficients for hydrogen, helium, nitrogen, carbon dioxide and air.

  3. Implications of NGA for NEHRP site coefficients

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Borcherdt, Roger D.

    2012-01-01

    Three proposals are provided to update tables 11.4-1 and 11.4-2 of Minimum Design Loads for Buildings and Other Structures (7-10), by the American Society of Civil Engineers (2010) (ASCE/SEI 7-10), with site coefficients implied directly by NGA (Next Generation Attenuation) ground motion prediction equations (GMPEs). Proposals include a recommendation to use straight-line interpolation to infer site coefficients at intermediate values of ̅vs (average shear velocity). Site coefficients are recommended to ensure consistency with ASCE/SEI 7-10 MCER (Maximum Considered Earthquake) seismic-design maps and simplified site-specific design spectra procedures requiring site classes with associated tabulated site coefficients and a reference site class with unity site coefficients. Recommended site coefficients are confirmed by independent observations of average site amplification coefficients inferred with respect to an average ground condition consistent with that used for the MCER maps. The NGA coefficients recommended for consideration are implied directly by the NGA GMPEs and do not require introduction of additional models.

  4. A gain-coefficient switched Alexandrite laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chris J.; van der Slot, Peter J. M.; Boller, Klaus-J.

    2013-01-01

    We report on a gain-coefficient switched Alexandrite laser. An electro-optic modulator is used to switch between high and low gain states by making use of the polarization dependent gain of Alexandrite. In gain-coefficient switched mode, the laser produces 85 ns pulses with a pulse energy of 240 mJ at a repetition rate of 5 Hz.

  5. Commentary on Coefficient Alpha: A Cautionary Tale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Samuel B.; Yang, Yanyun

    2009-01-01

    The general use of coefficient alpha to assess reliability should be discouraged on a number of grounds. The assumptions underlying coefficient alpha are unlikely to hold in practice, and violation of these assumptions can result in nontrivial negative or positive bias. Structural equation modeling was discussed as an informative process both to…

  6. Commentary on Coefficient Alpha: A Cautionary Tale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Samuel B.; Yang, Yanyun

    2009-01-01

    The general use of coefficient alpha to assess reliability should be discouraged on a number of grounds. The assumptions underlying coefficient alpha are unlikely to hold in practice, and violation of these assumptions can result in nontrivial negative or positive bias. Structural equation modeling was discussed as an informative process both to…

  7. Coefficient Alpha and Reliability of Scale Scores

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Almehrizi, Rashid S.

    2013-01-01

    The majority of large-scale assessments develop various score scales that are either linear or nonlinear transformations of raw scores for better interpretations and uses of assessment results. The current formula for coefficient alpha (a; the commonly used reliability coefficient) only provides internal consistency reliability estimates of raw…

  8. Calculator program set up for film coefficients

    SciTech Connect

    Gracey, J.O.; Teter, D.L.

    1982-11-15

    Describes a mechanized computation scheme for the film coefficients used in heat transfer calculations designed for the Texas Instruments TI-59 programmable calculator. Presents tables showing application conditions (small diagram included) and the corresponding heat transfer equations for 10 heat flow situations; symbols used; user instructions, a complete film coefficient program; and storage assignments. Example problem and corresponding printout are given.

  9. Meta-Analysis of Coefficient Alpha

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodriguez, Michael C.; Maeda, Yukiko

    2006-01-01

    The meta-analysis of coefficient alpha across many studies is becoming more common in psychology by a methodology labeled reliability generalization. Existing reliability generalization studies have not used the sampling distribution of coefficient alpha for precision weighting and other common meta-analytic procedures. A framework is provided for…

  10. [Development of an automatic pneumatic tourniquet system that determines pressures in synchrony with systolic blood pressure].

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongyun; Li, Kaiyuan; Zhang, Zhengbo; Guo, Junyan; Wang, Weidong

    2012-11-01

    The correlation coefficients between arterial occlusion pressure and systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, limb circumference, body mass etc were obtained through healthy volunteer experiments, in which tourniquet were applied on upper/lower extremities. The prediction equations were derived from the data of experiments by multiple regression analysis. Based on the microprocessor C8051F340, a new pneumatic tourniquet system that can determine tourniquet pressure in synchrony with systolic blood pressure was developed and verified the function and stability of designed system. Results showed that the pneumatic tourniquet which automatically adjusts occlusion pressure in accordance with systolic blood pressure could stop the flow of blood to get a bloodless field.

  11. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring in hypertensive adolescents.

    PubMed

    Fixler, D E; Wallace, J M; Thornton, W E; Dimmitt, P

    1990-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the ability of ambulatory blood pressure monitoring to identify youths with chronic blood pressure elevation. Nineteen adolescent boys were studied, ten had 5-year average systolic or diastolic pressures above the 95th percentile, nine had normal pressure. A Del Mar Avionics Pressurometer III system recorded an average of 121 readings on each subject. The coefficients of variation for pressure were similar for hypertensive and normotensive individuals. During classes, eight of the ten hypertensive youths had elevated pressures in over half of the measurements. Also during these classes eight of ten hypertensive boys had average systolic or diastolic pressure above the 95th percentile, whereas only one of nine normotensive boys had average pressures above this level. We suggest that schooltime ambulatory pressures may be most useful in classifying the blood pressure trend in a youth.

  12. Seebeck Coefficient Metrology: Do Contemporary Protocols Measure Up?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Joshua; Wong-Ng, Winnie; Green, Martin L.

    2015-06-01

    Comparative measurements of the Seebeck coefficient are challenging due to the diversity of instrumentation and measurement protocols. With the implementation of standardized measurement protocols and the use of Standard Reference Materials (SRMs®), for example, the recently certified National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) SRM® 3451 ``Low Temperature Seebeck Coefficient Standard (10-390 K)'', researchers can reliably analyze and compare data, both intra- and inter-laboratory, thereby accelerating the development of more efficient thermoelectric materials and devices. We present a comparative overview of commonly adopted Seebeck coefficient measurement practices. First, we examine the influence of asynchronous temporal and spatial measurement of electric potential and temperature. Temporal asynchronicity introduces error in the absolute Seebeck coefficient of the order of ≈10%, whereas spatial asynchronicity introduces error of the order of a few percent. Second, we examine the influence of poor thermal contact between the measurement probes and the sample. This is especially critical at high temperature, wherein the prevalent mode of measuring surface temperature is facilitated by pressure contact. Each topic will include the comparison of data measured using different measurement techniques and using different probe arrangements. We demonstrate that the probe arrangement is the primary limit to high accuracy, wherein the Seebeck coefficients measured by the 2-probe arrangement and those measured by the 4-probe arrangement diverge with the increase in temperature, approaching ≈14% at 900 K. Using these analyses, we provide recommended measurement protocols to guide members of the thermoelectric materials community in performing more accurate measurements and in evaluating more comprehensive uncertainty limits.

  13. Hydrophobicity and retention coefficient of selected bile Acid oxo derivatives.

    PubMed

    Poša, Mihalj; Pilipović, Mladena Ana Lalić; Popović, Jovan

    2010-12-01

    Retention coefficients (k) of cholic acid and its keto derivatives are determined by means of Reversed Phase High Pressure Liquid Chromatography at different temperatures (303K, 309K, and 313K). At each studied temperature, retention factor decreases if the hydroxyl group in the cholic acid molecule replaces oxo group. In addition, the change of retention coefficient in a function of temperature (Δk/ΔT) is dominant for the cholic acid while by increasing the number of oxo groups it decreases. Introduction of an oxo group in a bile acid molecule leads to the lower hydrophobicity of the β side of the steroid nucleus. Because of that, less interaction happens between β side of the steroid nucleus and stationary phase. For dehydrocholic acid (three- oxo derivative), the value for Δk/ΔT shows an exception of this explanation. This suggests that in this molecule the planar polarity is disturbed. Partition coefficient K of nitrazepam (probe molecule) in micelles of bile acid salts at the examined temperatures shows a high linear correlation with retention factors of the selected bile acids. This indicates the importance of hydrophobic interactions in mixed micelles between the examined drug and bile acid salts. Haemolytic potential (erythrocyte haemolysis, log (Lys50)) represents measure of membranotoxicity of bile acids. In addition, it is shown that haemolytic potential correlates highly with the retention coefficient. All experiments that we conducted to obtain the values of K and log (Lys50) as well as their correlations with k, contribute to significance of retention coefficient as a measure of hydrophobicity in biopharmaceutical experiments.

  14. An agreement coefficient for image comparison

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ji, L.; Gallo, K.

    2006-01-01

    Combination of datasets acquired from different sensor systems is necessary to construct a long time-series dataset for remotely sensed land-surface variables. Assessment of the agreement of the data derived from various sources is an important issue in understanding the data continuity through the time-series. Some traditional measures, including correlation coefficient, coefficient of determination, mean absolute error, and root mean square error, are not always optimal for evaluating the data agreement. For this reason, we developed a new agreement coefficient for comparing two different images. The agreement coefficient has the following properties: non-dimensional, bounded, symmetric, and distinguishable between systematic and unsystematic differences. The paper provides examples of agreement analyses for hypothetical data and actual remotely sensed data. The results demonstrate that the agreement coefficient does include the above properties, and therefore is a useful tool for image comparison.

  15. An agreement coefficient for image comparison

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ji, L.; Gallo, K.

    2006-01-01

    Combination of datasets acquired from different sensor systems is necessary to construct a long time-series dataset for remotely sensed land-surface variables. Assessment of the agreement of the data derived from various sources is an important issue in understanding the data continuity through the time-series. Some traditional measures, including correlation coefficient, coefficient of determination, mean absolute error, and root mean square error, are not always optimal for evaluating the data agreement. For this reason, we developed a new agreement coefficient for comparing two different images. The agreement coefficient has the following properties: non-dimensional, bounded, symmetric, and distinguishable between systematic and unsystematic differences. The paper provides examples of agreement analyses for hypothetical data and actual remotely sensed data. The results demonstrate that the agreement coefficient does include the above properties, and therefore is a useful tool for image comparison. ?? 2006 American Society for Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing.

  16. Estimation of the simple correlation coefficient.

    PubMed

    Shieh, Gwowen

    2010-11-01

    This article investigates some unfamiliar properties of the Pearson product-moment correlation coefficient for the estimation of simple correlation coefficient. Although Pearson's r is biased, except for limited situations, and the minimum variance unbiased estimator has been proposed in the literature, researchers routinely employ the sample correlation coefficient in their practical applications, because of its simplicity and popularity. In order to support such practice, this study examines the mean squared errors of r and several prominent formulas. The results reveal specific situations in which the sample correlation coefficient performs better than the unbiased and nearly unbiased estimators, facilitating recommendation of r as an effect size index for the strength of linear association between two variables. In addition, related issues of estimating the squared simple correlation coefficient are also considered.

  17. Molecular dynamics simulation of self-diffusion coefficients for several alkanols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhiwei; Lai, Shuhui; Gao, Wei; Chen, Liuping

    2017-07-01

    The transfer properties and microscopic structures of methanol, ethanol, 1-propanol, 2-propanol, and 1-pentanol in the temperature range from 290 to 450 K and pressure range from 0.1 to 200 MPa were studied by molecular dynamics (MD) simulation through the calculation of the self-diffusion coefficients, velocity autocorrelation functions (VACF), and radial distribution function (RDF). The calculated self-diffusion coefficients conform to the experimental values on the whole, and the temperature has greater influence, which weaken with the increase of the carbon chain, on self-diffusion coefficient than pressure. The factors affecting self-diffusion coefficients were also analyzed from micro perspective by calculation of VACF and RDF, which is helpful to understand the relationship between microscopic structures of fluid and its transfer properties. This work not only provides a reliable simulation method for transfer properties of alkanols, but also provides the prediction data for design and development of chemical processes.

  18. PWR (pressurized water reactor) pressurizer transient response: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, S.I.

    1987-08-01

    To predict PWR pressurizer transients, Ahl proposed a three region model with a universal coefficient to represent condensation on the water surface. Specifically, this work checks the need for three regions and the modeling of the interfacial condensation coefficient. A computer model has been formulated using the basic mass and energy conservation laws. A two region vapor and liquid model was first used to predict transients run on a one-eleventh scale Freon pressurizer. These predictions verified the need for a second liquid region. As a result, a three region model was developed and used to predict full-scale pressurizer transients at TMI-2, Shippingport, and Stade. Full-scale pressurizer predictions verified the three region model and pointed out the shortcomings of Ahl's universal condensation coefficient. In addition, experiments were run using water at low pressure to study interface condensation. These experiments showed interface condensation to be significant only when spray flow is turned on; this result was incorporated in the final three region model.

  19. High pressure pulsed capillary viscometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, R. L.; Walowitt, J. A.; Pan, C. H. T.

    1972-01-01

    An analytical and test program was conducted in order to establish the feasibility of a multichamber pulsed-capillary viscometer. The initial design incorporated a piston, ram, and seals which produced measured pulses up to 30,000 psi in the closed chamber system. Pressure pulses from one to ten milliseconds were investigated in a system volume of 1 cuin. Four test fluids: a MIL-L-7808, a 5P4E polyphenyl ether, a MIL-L-23699A, and a synthetic hydrocarbon were examined in the test pressure assembly. The pressure-viscosity coefficient and viscosity delay time were determined for the MIL-L-7808 lubricant tested.

  20. Raised intracranial pressure and cerebral blood flow

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, I. H.; Rowan, J. O.

    1974-01-01

    Pressure changes within the venous outflow tract from the brain were studied in anaesthetized baboons. Segmental vascular resistance changes were also calculated and the results correlated with the changes in cerebral blood flow, measured by the 133Xenon clearance method. Three different methods were used to raise intracranial pressure: cisterna magna infusion, a supratentorial subdural balloon, and an infratentorial subdural balloon. A close correlation was found between the cortical vein pressure and intracranial pressure with all methods of raising intracranial pressure: the overall correlation coefficient was 0·98. In the majority of animals sagittal sinus pressure showed little change through a wide range of intracranial pressure. In three of the six animals in the cisterna magna infusion group, however, sagittal sinus pressure increased to levels approaching the intracranial pressure during the later stages of intracranial hypertension. Jugular venous pressure showed little change with increasing intracranial pressure. The relationship between cerebral prefusion pressure and cerebral blood flow differed according to the method of increasing intracranial pressure. This was due to differing patterns of change in prevenous vascular resistance as venous resistance increased progressively with increasing pressure in all three groups. The present results confirm, therefore, the validity of the current definition of cerebral perfusion pressure—that is, cerebral perfusion pressure is equal to mean arterial pressure minus mean intracranial pressure—by demonstrating that intracranial pressure does represent the effective cerebral venous outflow pressure. Images PMID:4209160

  1. Excess and unlike interaction second virial coefficients and excess enthalpy of mixing of (carbon monoxide + pentane)

    SciTech Connect

    McElroy, P.J.; Buchanan, S.

    1995-03-01

    Carbon monoxide and pentane are minor components of natural gas. The excess second virial coefficient of the mixture carbon monoxide + pentane has been determined at 299.5, 313.15, 328.15, and 343.15 K using the pressure change on mixing method. Unlike interaction second virial coefficients were derived and compared with the predictions of the Tsonopoulos correlation. The excess enthalpy of mixing was also estimated.

  2. Influence of gas humidity on the reflection coefficient of multilayer dielectric mirrors.

    PubMed

    Serdyukov, V I; Sinitsa, L N; Lugovskoi, A A

    2016-06-10

    The influence of water vapor on the reflection coefficient of multilayer mirrors was studied using a gas cell with multiple reflections from the mirrors. A strong change in the reflection coefficient of the mirrors (up to 0.9%) was found when water vapor under a pressure of 23 mbar was injected into the cell, which was interpreted as a change in the refraction index of the layers of multilayer coatings when water vapor penetrated into the porous coating structure.

  3. Optical measurements of lung microvascular filtration coefficient using polysulfone fibers.

    PubMed

    Klaesner, J W; Roselli, R J; Evans, S; Pou, N A; Parker, R E; Tack, G; Parham, M

    1994-01-01

    Lung fluid balance, which is governed by the product of net transvascular pressure difference and lung filtration coefficient, can be altered in pulmonary diseases. A simple measurement of the lung filtration coefficient (Kfc) would be clinically useful and has been examined by several researchers. Current methods of determining Kfc include gravimetric measurement in isolated lungs and lymph node cannulation, neither of which can be extended to human use. Optical measurements of protein concentration changes in venous blood can be combined with pressure measurements to calculate Kfc. Blood, though, contains red corpuscles, which tend to absorb and scatter light, obscuring these optical measurements. In this study, an optical system was developed in which a polysulfone filter cartridge was used to remove red blood cells before the filtrate was passed through a spectrophotometer. Absorbance changes caused by changes in concentration of albumin labeled with Evans Blue were monitored at 620 nm after venous pressure was elevated by about 13 cm H2O. Optical measurements of Kfc averaged 0.401 +/- 0.074 (ml/min cm H2O 100 g DLW) for an isolated canine lung. Optical measurements of Kfc (0.363 +/- 0.120 ml/min cm H2O 100 g DLW) were made for the first time in an intact, closed chest sheep in which pulmonary pressure was altered by inflating a Foley balloon in the left atrium. We conclude that absorbance and scattering artifacts introduced by red blood cells can be eliminated by first filtering the blood through polysulfone fibers. Kfc measurements using the optical method are similar to values obtained by others using gravimetric methods. Finally, we have demonstrated that the technique can be used to estimate Kfc in an intact animal.

  4. Theoretical calculation of Joule-Thomson coefficient by using third virial coefficient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamedov, Bahtiyar Akber; Somuncu, Elif; Askerov, Iskender M.

    2017-02-01

    The Joule-Thomson coefficient has been theoretical investigated by using third virial coefficient. Established expressions enable us accurate and rapid calculations of Joule-Thomson coefficient. As seen from numerical results the analytical expressions for third virial coefficients are a very useful, giving a very fast method to calculate other thermodynamics properties of gasses. As an example, the calculation results have been successfully tested by using various literature data.

  5. Non-local thermodynamic equilibrium effects on isentropic coefficient in argon and helium thermal plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Rohit; Singh, Kuldip

    2014-03-15

    In the present work, two cases of thermal plasma have been considered; the ground state plasma in which all the atoms and ions are assumed to be in the ground state and the excited state plasma in which atoms and ions are distributed over various possible excited states. The variation of Zγ, frozen isentropic coefficient and the isentropic coefficient with degree of ionization and non-equilibrium parameter θ(= T{sub e}/T{sub h}) has been investigated for the ground and excited state helium and argon plasmas at pressures 1 atm, 10 atm, and 100 atm in the temperature range from 6000 K to 60 000 K. For a given value of non-equilibrium parameter, the relationship of Zγ with degree of ionization does not show any dependence on electronically excited states in helium plasma whereas in case of argon plasma this dependence is not appreciable till degree of ionization approaches 2. The minima of frozen isentropic coefficient shifts toward lower temperature with increase of non-equilibrium parameter for both the helium and argon plasmas. The lowering of non-equilibrium parameter decreases the frozen isentropic coefficient more emphatically in helium plasma at high pressures in comparison to argon plasma. The increase of pressure slightly reduces the ionization range over which isentropic coefficient almost remains constant and it does not affect appreciably the dependence of isentropic coefficient on non-equilibrium parameter.

  6. Cavitation study of a pump-turbine at turbine mode with critical cavitation coefficient condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J.; Yang, D.; Xu, J. W.; Liu, J. T.; Jiao, L.

    2016-05-01

    To study the cavitation phenomenon of a pump-turbine at turbine mode when it ran at the critical cavitation coefficient condition, a high-head model pump-turbine was disperse using hexahedron grid. Three dimensional, steady cavitating flow was numerically studied using SST k-ω model. It is confirmed that ZGB cavitation model and SST k-ω model are useful ways to study the two-phase cavitation flow in pump-turbine. Mass flow inlet and pressure outlet were specified at the casing inlet and draft tube outlet, respectively. The static pressure was set according to the cavitation coefficient. The steady cavitating flows at critical cavitation coefficient condition were analysed. The cavitation area in the runner was investigated. It was found that the pressure of the suction on the blade surface was decreasing gradually with the decrease of the cavitation coefficient. In addition, the vortex flow in the draft tube was observed at the critical cavitation coefficient. It was found that the vortex flow appeared at the center of the draft tube inlet with the decreasing of the cavitation coefficient. Compared with the experimental data, the simulation results show reasonable agreement with the experimental data.

  7. Evaluation of Dimensionality in the Assessment of Internal Consistency Reliability: Coefficient Alpha and Omega Coefficients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Samuel B.; Yang, Yanyun

    2015-01-01

    In the lead article, Davenport, Davison, Liou, & Love demonstrate the relationship among homogeneity, internal consistency, and coefficient alpha, and also distinguish among them. These distinctions are important because too often coefficient alpha--a reliability coefficient--is interpreted as an index of homogeneity or internal consistency.…

  8. Path-counting formulas for generalized kinship coefficients and condensed identity coefficients.

    PubMed

    Cheng, En; Ozsoyoglu, Z Meral

    2014-01-01

    An important computation on pedigree data is the calculation of condensed identity coefficients, which provide a complete description of the degree of relatedness of two individuals. The applications of condensed identity coefficients range from genetic counseling to disease tracking. Condensed identity coefficients can be computed using linear combinations of generalized kinship coefficients for two, three, four individuals, and two pairs of individuals and there are recursive formulas for computing those generalized kinship coefficients (Karigl, 1981). Path-counting formulas have been proposed for the (generalized) kinship coefficients for two (three) individuals but there have been no path-counting formulas for the other generalized kinship coefficients. It has also been shown that the computation of the (generalized) kinship coefficients for two (three) individuals using path-counting formulas is efficient for large pedigrees, together with path encoding schemes tailored for pedigree graphs. In this paper, we propose a framework for deriving path-counting formulas for generalized kinship coefficients. Then, we present the path-counting formulas for all generalized kinship coefficients for which there are recursive formulas and which are sufficient for computing condensed identity coefficients. We also perform experiments to compare the efficiency of our method with the recursive method for computing condensed identity coefficients on large pedigrees.

  9. Evaluation of Dimensionality in the Assessment of Internal Consistency Reliability: Coefficient Alpha and Omega Coefficients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Samuel B.; Yang, Yanyun

    2015-01-01

    In the lead article, Davenport, Davison, Liou, & Love demonstrate the relationship among homogeneity, internal consistency, and coefficient alpha, and also distinguish among them. These distinctions are important because too often coefficient alpha--a reliability coefficient--is interpreted as an index of homogeneity or internal consistency.…

  10. Pressure gauge

    SciTech Connect

    Morita, S.

    1985-04-02

    A pressure receiving element for receiving an external pressure is attached to one end of a body and a temperature compensating diaphragm is attached to the other end of the body. A coupling shaft disposed in the body is fixed at both ends to the pressure receiving element and the diaphragm, respectively. A liquid is sealed in the body and means is provided for detecting displacement or force applied to the coupling shaft in accordance with a pressure received by the pressure receiving element. The diaphragm has corrugations of concentric circles and the crests of a plurality of them are made flat and one of the flat crests is fixed to the body. The effective area of the diaphragm inside of the flat crest that is fixed to the body is selected substantially to be equal to the effective area of the pressure receiving element.

  11. Low-speed aerodynamic characteristics of an airfoil optimized for maximum lift coefficient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bingham, G. J.; Chen, A. W.

    1972-01-01

    An investigation has been conducted in the Langley low-turbulence pressure tunnel to determine the two-dimensional characteristics of an airfoil optimized for maximum lift coefficient. The design maximum lift coefficient was 2.1 at a Reynolds number of 9.7 million. The airfoil with a smooth surface and with surface roughness was tested at angles of attack from 6 deg to 26 deg, Reynolds numbers (based on airfoil chord) from 2.0 million to 12.9 million, and Mach numbers from 0.10 to 0.35. The experimental results are compared with values predicted by theory. The experimental pressure distributions observed at angles of attack up to at least 12 deg were similar to the theoretical values except for a slight increase in the experimental upper-surface pressure coefficients forward of 26 percent chord and a more severe gradient just behind the minimum-pressure-coefficient location. The maximum lift coefficients were measured with the model surface smooth and, depending on test conditions, varied from 1.5 to 1.6 whereas the design value was 2.1.

  12. Low-temperature pressure variations in a self-clamping pressure cell

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, J.D.

    1984-02-01

    A simple method is described that permits a consistent determination of thermally induced pressure variations in a piston-cylinder, self-clamping pressure cell at temperatures less than ambient. Significant pressure changes are found to be present even for T<75 K. It is also shown that the pressure coefficient of resistance of a manganin-wire gauge is, to within experimental uncertainty, independent of temperature over the range 0

  13. Dielectric-Constant Gas Thermometry and the Relation to the Virial Coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaiser, C.; Fellmuth, B.; Zandt, T.

    2014-04-01

    At PTB new dielectric-constant gas thermometry (DCGT) measurements were performed at the temperature of the triple point of water. As discussed recently in an accompanying paper, the main goal was the determination of the Boltzmann constant as a contribution to the international efforts directed to a new definition of the base unit kelvin via fixing the value of . Besides the linear term in the series expansion used for fitting the results of measurements of DCGT isotherms that reveals , in this paper the higher-order terms are analyzed. For retrieving highly accurate virial coefficients of helium from the data obtained at gas pressures up to 7 MPa, an extended DCGT working equation is developed. Applying this equation, information is deduced on the viral coefficients up to the fourth density virial coefficient. Finally, comparisons with the latest ab initio calculations for the second and third density virial coefficients as well as the second dielectric virial coefficient are performed.

  14. Preliminary Investigation of the Effect of Compressibility on the Maximum Lift Coefficient, Special Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stack, John; Fedziuk, Henry A.; Cleary, Harold E.

    1943-01-01

    Preliminary data are presented on the variation of the maximum lift coefficient with Mach number. The data were obtained from tests in the 8-foot high-speed tunnel of three NACA 16-series airfoils of 1-foot chord. Measurements consisted primarily of pressure-distribution measurements in order to illustrate the nature of the phenomena. It was found that the maximum lift coefficient of airfoils is markedly affected by compressibility even at Mach numbers as low as 0.2. At high Mach numbers pronounced decrease of the maximum lift coefficient was found. The magnitude of the effects of compressibility on the maximum lift coefficient and the low speeds at which these effects first appear indicate clearly that consideration of the take-off thrust for propellers will give results seriously in error if these considerations are based on the usual low-speed maximum-lift-coefficient data generally used.

  15. Spreading coefficients of aliphatic hydrocarbons on water

    SciTech Connect

    Takii, Taichi; Mori, Y.H. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

    1993-11-01

    Experiments have been performed to determine the equilibrium spreading coefficients of some aliphatic hydrocarbons (C[sub 6]C[sub 10]) on water. The thickness of a discrete lens of each hydrocarbon sample floating on a stagnant water pool was measured interferometrically and used to calculate the spreading coefficient of the hydrocarbon with the aid of Langmuir's capillarity theory. The dependences of the spreading coefficient, thus observed, on temperature (0--50 C) and on the number of carbon atoms in the hydrocarbon molecule are in qualitative agreement with the predictions based on the Lifshitz theory of van der Waals forces.

  16. Determination of absorption coefficients of thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Lodenquai, J.F. )

    1994-08-01

    The equations that are usually presented as those used to determine the absorption coefficients of materials in film form based on measurements of transmission and reflection coefficients are fundamentally incorrect. These equations omit a multiplicative factor arising from the complex nature of the refractive indices of the materials. This factor enters explicitly into the relationship between the transmission and reflection coefficients for such materials and is not necessarily close to unity, although in practice this factor can be approximated by unity at least in the infrared through the optical range of wavelengths.

  17. Diffusion coefficients in leaflets of bilayer membranes.

    PubMed

    Seki, Kazuhiko; Mogre, Saurabh; Komura, Shigeyuki

    2014-02-01

    We study diffusion coefficients of liquid domains by explicitly taking into account the two-layered structure called leaflets of the bilayer membrane. In general, the velocity fields associated with each leaflet are different and the layers sliding past each other cause frictional coupling. We obtain analytical results of diffusion coefficients for a circular liquid domain in a leaflet, and quantitatively study their dependence on the interleaflet friction. We also show that the diffusion coefficients diverge in the absence of coupling between the bilayer and solvents, even when the interleaflet friction is taken into account. In order to corroborate our theory, the effect of the interleaflet friction on the correlated diffusion is examined.

  18. On the emission coefficient of uranium plasmas.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, R. T.; Campbell, H. D.; Mack, J. M.

    1973-01-01

    The emission coefficient for uranium plasmas (temperature: 8000 K) was measured for the wavelength range from 1200 to 6000 A. The results were compared to theoretical calculations and other measurements. Reasonable agreement between theoretical predictions and our measurements was found in the region from 1200 to 2000 A. Although it was difficult to make absolute comparisons among the different reported measurements, considerable disagreement was found for the higher wavelength region. A short discussion regarding the overall comparisons is given, and final suggestions are made as to the most appropriate emission coefficient values to be used in future design calculations. The absorption coefficient for the same wavelength interval is also reported.

  19. Coefficient of restitution of aspherical particles.

    PubMed

    Glielmo, Aldo; Gunkelmann, Nina; Pöschel, Thorsten

    2014-11-01

    We consider the motion of an aspherical inelastic particle of dumbbell type bouncing repeatedly on a horizontal flat surface. The coefficient of restitution of such a particle depends not only on material properties and impact velocity but also on the angular orientation at the instant of the collision whose variance is considerable, even for small eccentricity. Assuming random angular orientation of the particle at the instant of contact we characterize the measured coefficient of restitution as a fluctuating quantity and obtain a wide probability density function including a finite probability for negative values of the coefficient of restitution. This may be understood from the partial exchange of translational and rotational kinetic energy.

  20. Spatial correlation coefficient images for ultrasonic detection.

    PubMed

    Cepel, Raina; Ho, K C; Rinker, Brett A; Palmer, Donald D; Lerch, Terrence P; Neal, Steven P

    2007-09-01

    In ultrasonics, image formation and detection are generally based on signal amplitude. In this paper, we introduce correlation coefficient images as a signal-amplitude independent approach for image formation. The correlation coefficients are calculated between A-scans digitized at adjacent measurement positions. In these images, defects are revealed as regions of high or low correlation relative to the background correlations associated with noise. Correlation coefficient and C-scan images are shown to demonstrate flat-bottom-hole detection in a stainless steel annular ring and crack detection in an aluminum aircraft structure.

  1. Soccer ball lift coefficients via trajectory analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goff, John Eric; Carré, Matt J.

    2010-07-01

    We performed experiments in which a soccer ball was launched from a machine while two high-speed cameras recorded portions of the trajectory. Using the trajectory data and published drag coefficients, we extracted lift coefficients for a soccer ball. We determined lift coefficients for a wide range of spin parameters, including several spin parameters that have not been obtained by today's wind tunnels. Our trajectory analysis technique is not only a valuable tool for professional sports scientists, it is also accessible to students with a background in undergraduate-level classical mechanics.

  2. In Situ Raman Spectroscopic Study of the Diffusion Coefficients and Solubility:Indicates to Carbon Dioxide Injection into Hexadecane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Dan; Lu, Wanjun

    2015-04-01

    Injecting CO2 into lean-oil reservoirs is not only a way to geological storage but also enhanced oil recovery. In the secondary displacements of oil reservoir by CO2-injection, diffusion coefficients and solubility of CO2 are key parameters to calculate the volume of CO2 injected and the time to achieve the desired viscosity in the numerical simulation. Unfortunately, the experimental data on the CO2 diffusion coefficient and solubility in liquid hydrocarbons under high pressure conditions are scarce. Hexadecane has properties similar to the average properties of Brazilian heavy oil. Experimental data on the diffusion coefficients and solubility of CO2 in hexadecane were reviewed by Nieuwoudt and Rand (2002), Rincon and Trejo (2001) and Breman et al (1994), indicating that the data in the literature were limited at relatively low temperatures and/or low pressures. In this paper, the diffusion coefficients of carbon dioxide in hexadecane at different temperature and pressure were determined with in situ Raman spectroscopy. A model was established to describe relationship among diffusion coefficients, temperature, and pressure. The solubility of CO2 in hexadecane was obtained from 298.15 to 473.15 K and 10 to 45 MPa. The experimental results show that:(1) Solubility of CO2 decreases with increasing temperature.(2) Increasing pressure increases the CO2 solubility. in terms of the degree of influence,100K is similar with 10MPa.(3) Diffusion coefficients of CO2 increases with increasing temperature. (4) Increasing pressure decreases the CO2 diffusion coefficients, whereas the pressure effect on CO2 diffusion coefficients is very weak. Compared with traditional sampling and analytical methods, the advantages of our method include: (1) the use of in situ Raman signals for solubility measurements eliminates possible uncertainty caused by sampling and ex situ analysis. (2) it is simple and efficient, and (3) high-pressure data can be obtained safely.

  3. Isobaric expansion coefficient and isothermal compressibility for a finite-size ideal Fermi gas system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Guozhen; Chen, Liwei; Chen, Jincan

    2014-06-01

    Due to quantum size effects (QSEs), the isobaric thermal expansion coefficient and isothermal compressibility well defined for macroscopic systems are invalid for finite-size systems. The two parameters are redefined and calculated for a finite-size ideal Fermi gas confined in a rectangular container. It is found that the isobaric thermal expansion coefficient and isothermal compressibility are generally anisotropic, i.e., they are generally different in different directions. Moreover, it is found the thermal expansion coefficient may be negative in some directions under the condition that the pressures in all directions are kept constant.

  4. Virial coefficients and equation of state of the penetrable sphere model.

    PubMed

    Viererblová, Linda; Kolafa, Jirí; Labík, Stanislav; Malijevský, Anatol

    2010-01-07

    We study the penetrable sphere (alias square mound) model in the fluid phase by means of the virial expansion, molecular dynamics simulations, and Ornstein-Zernike integral equation. The virial coefficients up to B(8) are expressed as polynomials in the Boltzmann factor with the coefficients calculated by a Monte Carlo integration. New data for pressure and internal energy are obtained by molecular dynamics simulations with attention paid to finite-size errors and properties of the Andersen thermostat. The data and virial coefficients are correlated by a formula for the Helmholtz free energy. We also propose a new closure for the Ornstein-Zernike equation and test several other closures.

  5. Theory versus experiment for the rotordynamic coefficients of annular gas seals. I - Test facility and apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Childs, D. W.; Nelson, C. E.; Nicks, C.; Scharrer, J.; Elrod, D.

    1985-01-01

    A facility and apparatus are described for determining the rotordynamic coefficients and leakage characteristics of annular gas seals. The coefficients and leakage characteristics of annular gas seals. The apparatus has a current top speed of 8000 cpm with a nominal seal diameter of 15.24 cmn (6 in.). The air supply unit yields a seal pressure ratio of approximately 7. An external shaker is used to excite the test rotor. The capability to independently calculate all rotordynamic coefficients at a given operating condition with one excitation frequency are discussed.

  6. Chromatographic determination of the diffusion coefficients of light hydrocarbons in polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakubenko, E. E.; Korolev, A. A.; Chapala, P. P.; Bermeshev, M. V.; Kanat'eva, A. Yu.; Kurganov, A. A.

    2017-01-01

    Gas-chromatographic determination of the diffusion coefficients that allows for the compressibility of the mobile phase has been suggested. The diffusion coefficients were determined for light hydrocarbons C1-C4 in four polymers with a high free volume, which are candidates for use as gas-separating membranes. The diffusion coefficients calculated from chromatographic data were shown to be one or two orders of magnitude smaller than the values obtained by the membrane method. This may be due to the presence of an additional flow through the membrane caused by the pressure gradient across the membrane in membrane methods.

  7. Theoretical Investigation of the Viscous Damping Coefficient of Hydraulic Actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Ming-Hui; Pan, Qing; Li, Yi-Bo; Ma, Peng-Da; Ma, Jun

    2017-07-01

    The viscous damping coefficient (VDC) of hydraulic actuators is crucial for system modeling, control and dynamic characteristic analysis. Currently, the researches on hydraulic actuators focus on behavior assessment, promotion of control performance and efficiency. However, the estimation of the VDC is difficult due to a lack of study. Firstly, using two types of hydraulic cylinders, behaviors of the VDC are experimentally examined with velocities and pressure variations. For the tested plunger type hydraulic cylinder, the exponential model B = α υ^{ - β } ,(α > 0,β > 0) or B = α1 e^{{ - β1 υ }} + α2 e^{{ - β2 υ }} (α1 ,α2 > 0,β1 ,β2 > 0), fits the relation between the VDC and velocities for a given pressure of chamber with high precision. The magnitude of the VDC decreases almost linearly under certain velocities when increasing the chamber pressure from 0.6 MPa to 6.0 MPa. Furthermore, the effects of the chamber pressures on the VDC of piston and plunge type hydraulic cylinders are different due to different sealing types. In order to investigate the VDC of a plunger type hydraulic actuator drastically, a steady-state numerical model has been developed to describe the mechanism incorporating tandem seal lubrication, back-up ring related friction behaviors and shear stress of fluid. It is shown that the simulated results of VDC agree with the measured results with a good accuracy. The proposed method provides an instruction to predict the VDC in system modeling and analysis.

  8. Influence of the accommodation coefficient on nonlinear bubble oscillations.

    PubMed

    Fuster, Daniel; Hauke, Guillermo; Dopazo, Cesar

    2010-07-01

    This paper numerically investigates the effect of mass transfer processes on spherical single bubble dynamics using the Hertz-Langmuir-Knudsen approximation for the mass flux across the interface. Bubble behavior, with and without mass transfer, is studied for different values of pressure wave amplitude and frequency, as well as initial bubble radius. Whereas mass transfer processes do not seem to play a significant role on the bubble response for pressure amplitudes smaller than 0.9 atm, they appear to have an important effect when the amplitude is greater than or equal to 1 atm. For the later case, where the minimum liquid pressure reaches values around its vapor pressure, the importance of mass transfer depends on frequency. For frequencies in the 10(3)-10(5) Hz range and initial bubble radii of the order of tens of microns, bubble implosions with and with no mass transfer are significantly different; smaller radii display a lower sensitivity. In this regime, accurate model predictions must, therefore, carefully select the correct value of the accommodation coefficient. For frequencies greater than 10(5) Hz, as a first approximation mass transfer can be ignored.

  9. Collective Self-Diffusion in Simple Liquids Under Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malomuzh, Nikolay P.; Shakun, Konstantin S.; Bardik, Vitaliy Yu.

    The behavior of the self diffusion coefficient in simple liquids under pressure is discussed. It is taken into account that the self-diffusion coefficient is the sum of the collective and one-particle contributions. From our reasons it follows that the collective contribution monotonously increases with pressure. The comparison with the computer simulation data for the full self-diffusion coefficient of argon shows that the relative value of the collective part increases from 0.2 for the pressure of saturated vapor up to 0.76 and larger for pressure 10 GPa.

  10. A comparison of experimental and theoretical results for rotordynamic coefficients of four annular gas seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Childs, D. W.; Nelson, C. C.; Elrod, D.; Nicks, C.

    1985-01-01

    The test facility and initial test program developed to experimentally measure the fluid forces induced by annular gas seals is described. A comparison of theoretically predicted and experimentally obtained data for smooth and honeycomb seals is provided. And a comparison of experimental data from the tests of three smooth-rotor/smooth-stator seals is provided. The leakage of the working fluid through the seal, the pressure gradient along the seal length, entrance pressure-loss data, and rotordynamic coefficients provide a basis for comparison. A short discussion on seal theory is included, and various rotordynamic coefficient identification schemes are described.

  11. Friction coefficient and effective interference at the implant-bone interface.

    PubMed

    Damm, Niklas B; Morlock, Michael M; Bishop, Nicholas E

    2015-09-18

    Although the contact pressure increases during implantation of a wedge-shaped implant, friction coefficients tend to be measured under constant contact pressure, as endorsed in standard procedures. Abrasion and plastic deformation of the bone during implantation are rarely reported, although they define the effective interference, by reducing the nominal interference between implant and bone cavity. In this study radial forces were analysed during simulated implantation and explantation of angled porous and polished implant surfaces against trabecular bone specimens, to determine the corresponding friction coefficients. Permanent deformation was also analysed to determine the effective interference after implantation. For the most porous surface tested, the friction coefficient initially increased with increasing normal contact stress during implantation and then decreased at higher contact stresses. For a less porous surface, the friction coefficient increased continually with normal contact stress during implantation but did not reach the peak magnitude measured for the rougher surface. Friction coefficients for the polished surface were independent of normal contact stress and much lower than for the porous surfaces. Friction coefficients were slightly lower for pull-out than for push-in for the porous surfaces but not for the polished surface. The effective interference was as little as 30% of the nominal interference for the porous surfaces. The determined variation in friction coefficient with radial contact force, as well as the loss of interference during implantation will enable a more accurate representation of implant press-fitting for simulations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. OH, HO2, and ozone gaseous diffusion coefficients.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, Andrey V; Trakhtenberg, Sofia; Bertram, Allan K; Gershenzon, Yulii M; Molina, Mario J

    2007-03-08

    The diffusion of OH, HO2, and O3 in He, and of OH in air, has been investigated using a coated-wall flow tube reactor coupled to a chemical ionization mass spectrometry. The diffusion coefficients were determined from measurements of the loss of the reactive species to the flow tube wall as a function of pressure. On the basis of the experimental results, D(OH-He) = 662 +/- 33 Torr cm2 s-1, D(OH-air) = 165 +/- 20 Torr cm2 s-1, D(HO2-He) = 430 +/- 30 Torr cm2 s-1, and D(O3-He) = 410 +/- 25 Torr cm2 s-1 at 296 K. We show that the measured values for OH and HO2 are in better agreement with measured values of their polar analogues (H2O and H2O2) compared with measured values of their nonpolar analogues (O and O2). The measured value for OH in air is 25% smaller than that for O (the nonpolar analogue). The difference between the measured value for HO2 and O2 (the nonpolar analogue) in air is expected to be even larger. Also we show that calculations of the diffusion coefficients based on Lennard-Jones potentials are in excellent agreement with the measurements. This gives further confidence that these calculations can be used to estimate accurate diffusion coefficients for conditions where laboratory data currently do not exist.

  13. Mixing coefficients for subchannel analyses with supercritical water

    SciTech Connect

    Vogt, Bastian; Laurien, Eckart; Class, Andreas G.; Schulenberg, Thomas

    2007-07-01

    This paper is related to pressure drop and mixing correlations which are used in subchannel codes. The commercial CFD code STAR-CD has been applied for central subchannels of a supercritical water reactor fuel assembly design. First, pressure drop coefficients for cross flow have been evaluated for this geometry using steady state calculations. Different from established correlations for cross flow in rod bundles, the effects of strong axial flow in the bundle have been taken into account for the presented geometry, flow conditions and fluid properties. In the second part of the paper the unsteady RANS CFD-method is applied and assessed with respect to the prediction of flow pulsation phenomena and turbulent mixing. The results are compared with experimental correlations for the turbulent mixing coefficient and the flow pulsation frequency. It is found that the applied unsteady RANS method is able to predict the flow pulsation frequency but over-predicts the turbulent mixing by a factor of around 3.5. (authors)

  14. Second virial coefficient of one dimensional gas

    SciTech Connect

    Mijatovic, M.

    1982-08-01

    The second virial coefficient of a one dimensional gas is calculated using the expressions for the scattering amplitude. The scattering amplitude is chosen in the form of rational function of wave vector.

  15. Friction coefficient dependence on electrostatic tribocharging.

    PubMed

    Burgo, Thiago A L; Silva, Cristiane A; Balestrin, Lia B S; Galembeck, Fernando

    2013-01-01

    Friction between dielectric surfaces produces patterns of fixed, stable electric charges that in turn contribute electrostatic components to surface interactions between the contacting solids. The literature presents a wealth of information on the electronic contributions to friction in metals and semiconductors but the effect of triboelectricity on friction coefficients of dielectrics is as yet poorly defined and understood. In this work, friction coefficients were measured on tribocharged polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), using three different techniques. As a result, friction coefficients at the macro- and nanoscales increase many-fold when PTFE surfaces are tribocharged, but this effect is eliminated by silanization of glass spheres rolling on PTFE. In conclusion, tribocharging may supersede all other contributions to macro- and nanoscale friction coefficients in PTFE and probably in other insulating polymers.

  16. Friction coefficient dependence on electrostatic tribocharging

    PubMed Central

    Burgo, Thiago A. L.; Silva, Cristiane A.; Balestrin, Lia B. S.; Galembeck, Fernando

    2013-01-01

    Friction between dielectric surfaces produces patterns of fixed, stable electric charges that in turn contribute electrostatic components to surface interactions between the contacting solids. The literature presents a wealth of information on the electronic contributions to friction in metals and semiconductors but the effect of triboelectricity on friction coefficients of dielectrics is as yet poorly defined and understood. In this work, friction coefficients were measured on tribocharged polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), using three different techniques. As a result, friction coefficients at the macro- and nanoscales increase many-fold when PTFE surfaces are tribocharged, but this effect is eliminated by silanization of glass spheres rolling on PTFE. In conclusion, tribocharging may supersede all other contributions to macro- and nanoscale friction coefficients in PTFE and probably in other insulating polymers. PMID:23934227

  17. Universal relations of transport coefficients from holography

    SciTech Connect

    Cherman, Aleksey; Nellore, Abhinav

    2009-09-15

    We show that there are universal high-temperature relations for transport coefficients of plasmas described by a wide class of field theories with gravity duals. These theories can be viewed as strongly coupled large-N{sub c} conformal field theories deformed by one or more relevant operators. The transport coefficients we study are the speed of sound and bulk viscosity, as well as the conductivity, diffusion coefficient, and charge susceptibility of probe U(1) charges. We show that the sound bound v{sub s}{sup 2}{<=}1/3 is satisfied at high temperatures in these theories and also discuss bounds on the diffusion coefficient, the conductivity, and the bulk viscosity.

  18. Friction coefficient dependence on electrostatic tribocharging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgo, Thiago A. L.; Silva, Cristiane A.; Balestrin, Lia B. S.; Galembeck, Fernando

    2013-08-01

    Friction between dielectric surfaces produces patterns of fixed, stable electric charges that in turn contribute electrostatic components to surface interactions between the contacting solids. The literature presents a wealth of information on the electronic contributions to friction in metals and semiconductors but the effect of triboelectricity on friction coefficients of dielectrics is as yet poorly defined and understood. In this work, friction coefficients were measured on tribocharged polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), using three different techniques. As a result, friction coefficients at the macro- and nanoscales increase many-fold when PTFE surfaces are tribocharged, but this effect is eliminated by silanization of glass spheres rolling on PTFE. In conclusion, tribocharging may supersede all other contributions to macro- and nanoscale friction coefficients in PTFE and probably in other insulating polymers.

  19. Heat transfer coefficient of cryotop during freezing.

    PubMed

    Li, W J; Zhou, X L; Wang, H S; Liu, B L; Dai, J J

    2013-01-01

    Cryotop is an efficient vitrification method for cryopreservation of oocytes. It has been widely used owing to its simple operation and high freezing rate. Recently, the heat transfer performance of cryotop was studied by numerical simulation in several studies. However, the range of heat transfer coefficient in the simulation is uncertain. In this study, the heat transfer coefficient for cryotop during freezing process was analyzed. The cooling rates of 40 percent ethylene glycol (EG) droplet in cryotop during freezing were measured by ultra-fast measurement system and calculated by numerical simulation at different value of heat transfer coefficient. Compared with the results obtained by two methods, the range of the heat transfer coefficient necessary for the numerical simulation of cryotop was determined, which is between 9000 W/(m(2)·K) and 10000 W/(m (2)·K).

  20. Transonic Blunt Body Aerodynamic Coefficients Computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sancho, Jorge; Vargas, M.; Gonzalez, Ezequiel; Rodriguez, Manuel

    2011-05-01

    In the framework of EXPERT (European Experimental Re-entry Test-bed) accurate transonic aerodynamic coefficients are of paramount importance for the correct trajectory assessment and parachute deployment. A combined CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) modelling and experimental campaign strategy was selected to obtain accurate coefficients. A preliminary set of coefficients were obtained by CFD Euler inviscid computation. Then experimental campaign was performed at DNW facilities at NLR. A profound review of the CFD modelling was done lighten up by WTT results, aimed to obtain reliable values of the coefficients in the future (specially the pitching moment). Study includes different turbulence modelling and mesh sensitivity analysis. Comparison with the WTT results is explored, and lessons learnt are collected.

  1. Second coefficient of viscosity in air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ash, Robert L.; Zuckerwar, Allan J.; Zheng, Zhonquan

    1991-01-01

    Acoustic attenuation measurements in air were analyzed in order to estimate the second coefficient of viscosity. Data over a temperature range of 11 C to 50 C and at relative humidities between 6 percent and 91 percent were used. This analysis showed that the second coefficient of viscosity varied between 1900 and 20,000 times larger than the dynamic or first coefficient of viscosity over the temperature and humidity range of the data. In addition, the data showed that the molecular relaxation effects, which are responsible for the magnitude of the second coefficient of viscosity, place severe limits on the use of time-independent, thermodynamic equations of state. Compressible flows containing large streamwise velocity gradients, like shock waves, which cause significant changes in particle properties to occur during time intervals shorter than hundredths of seconds, must be modeled using dynamic equations of state. The dynamic model approach is described briefly.

  2. Frequency characteristics of pressure transducer kits with inserted pressure-resistant extension tubes.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Shigeki; Mori, Satoshi; Tachihara, Keiichi; Yamamoto, Takeshi; Yokoe, Chizuko; Imaizumi, Uno; Morimoto, Yoshinari; Miki, Yoichiro; Toyoguchi, Izumi; Yoshida, Kazu-Ichi; Yokoyama, Takeshi

    2017-04-01

    The accurate monitoring of arterial blood pressure is important for cardiovascular management. However, the frequency characteristics of pressure transducer kits are influenced by the length of the pressure-resistant tube. To date, there have been few studies addressing the frequency characteristics of pressure transducer kits with inserted pressure-resistant extension tubes (pressure-resistant extension tube (ET) circuits). In this study, we examine ET circuits from the viewpoint of the frequency characteristics of pressure transducer kits. DT4812J transducer kits (length 150 cm; Argon Medical Devices, TX, USA) were used. Three original ET circuits were prepared, with the pressure-resistant tube of the DT4812J being extended with a 30-cm length of pressure-resistant tube (180ET circuit), a 60-cm length of pressure-resistant tube (210ET circuit), and a 90-cm length of pressure-resistant tube (240ET circuit). Each of these circuits was evaluated as part of this study. The natural frequency of the original DT4812J circuit was 45.90 Hz while the damping coefficient was 0.160. For the 180 ET circuit, the natural frequency and damping coefficient were 36.4 Hz and 0.162, respectively. For the ET210 circuit, the natural frequency and damping coefficient were 30.3 Hz and 0.175, respectively. For the ET210 circuit, the natural frequency and damping coefficient were 25.3 Hz and 0.180, respectively. As a result of extending the circuit, it was found that the natural frequency decreased drastically, while the damping coefficient increased slightly. When the extension of a pressure transducer kit is required, we should pay careful attention to the major decrease in the natural frequency, which may influence the pressure monitoring.

  3. Hydraulic forces caused by annular pressure seals in centrifugal pumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iino, T.; Kaneko, H.

    1980-01-01

    The hydraulic forces caused by annular pressure seals were investigated. The measured inlet and exit loss coefficients of the flow through the seals were much smaller than the conventional values. The results indicate that the damping coefficient and the inertia coefficient of the fluid film in the seal are not affected much by the rotational speed or the eccentricity of the rotor, though the stiffness coefficient seemed to be influenced by the eccentricity.

  4. Effects of Mach Number and Reynolds Number on the Maximum Lift Coefficient of a Wing of NACA 230-series Airfoil Sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Furlong, G. Chester; Fitzpatrick, James E.

    1947-01-01

    Wing was tested with full-span, partial-span, or split flaps deflected 60 Degrees and without flaps. Chordwise pressure-distribution measurements were made for all flap configurations.. Peak values of maximum lift coefficient were obtained at relatively low free-stream Mach numbers and, before critical Mach number was reached, were almost entirely dependent on Reynolds Number. Lift coefficient increased by increasing Mach number or deflecting flaps while critical pressure coefficient was reached at lower free-stream Mach numbers.

  5. On computing Laplace's coefficients and their derivatives.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerasimov, I. A.; Vinnikov, E. L.

    The algorithm of computing Laplace's coefficients and their derivatives is proposed with application of recurrent relations. The A.G.M.-method is used for the calculation of values L0(0), L0(1). The FORTRAN-program corresponding to the algorithm is given. The precision control was provided with numerical integrating by Simpsons method. The behavior of Laplace's coefficients and their third derivatives whith varying indices K, n for fixed values of the α-parameter is presented graphically.

  6. Absorption coefficient instrument for turbid natural waters.

    PubMed

    Friedman, E; Poole, L; Cherdak, A; Houghton, W

    1980-05-15

    An instrument has been developed that directly measures the multispectral absorption coefficient of turbid natural water. The design incorporates methods for compensation of variation in the internal light source intensity, correction of the spectrally dependent nature of the optical elements, and correction for variation in background light level. When used in conjunction with a spectrally matched total attenuation instrument, the spectrally dependent scattering coefficient can also be derived. Systematic errors associated with multiple scattering have been estimated using Monte Carlo techniques.

  7. Drag and energy accommodation coefficients during sunspot maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pardini, Carmen; Anselmo, Luciano; Moe, Kenneth; Moe, Mildred M.

    A hundred years of laboratory measurements have shown that gas-surface interactions depend not only on the chemistry and energy of the incident particles but also on the degree of surface contamination. The conditions appropriate to gas-surface interaction in space have not been successfully duplicated in the laboratory. Consequently, knowledge of satellite drag coefficients has been dependent upon opportunities to compare theoretical models with observations of satellite decay. From such studies it is now known that the great majority of molecules which strike satellite surfaces are reemitted in a diffuse angular distribution with an energy loss given by the energy accommodation coefficient, α. Although a few measurements of α were made in the past, none was made near sunspot maximum. In the present study, we take advantage of the increasing data base to compare theoretical determinations of satellite drag coefficients with the history of satellite orbital decay during sunspot maximum. An example is the SNOE satellite which was in a circular orbit with an initial perigee altitude of 515 km during dates from October 1999 to December 2002. SNOE had a cylinder-like shape with a hexagonal cross section. It was attitude stabilized so that it maintained a constant aspect relative to the incident velocity vector, a feature which facilitated the computation of its drag coefficient as a function of α. The satellite drag coefficient was obtained by fitting, in a least squares sense, the semi-major axis decay inferred from the historical two-line elements acquired by the US Space Surveillance Network. All the principal orbital perturbations, namely geopotential harmonics up to the 16th degree and order, third body attraction of the Moon and the Sun, direct solar radiation pressure (with eclipses), and aerodynamic drag were included, using the Jacchia Bowman 2006 (JB2006) model to describe the atmospheric density. The average drag coefficient (fitted to JB2006), calculated

  8. Pressurized Sleeve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lerner, Amy

    1988-01-01

    Garment part sustains pressure differential without unduly restricting the user. Sleeve withstands pressure difference of 8 lb/in2 while allowing wearer fairly easy movement. Sleeve consists of low-torque joint hardware, sewn fabric sections, and lengthwise strips of fabric that restrain sections.

  9. Local Rank Inference for Varying Coefficient Models.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lan; Kai, Bo; Li, Runze

    2009-12-01

    By allowing the regression coefficients to change with certain covariates, the class of varying coefficient models offers a flexible approach to modeling nonlinearity and interactions between covariates. This paper proposes a novel estimation procedure for the varying coefficient models based on local ranks. The new procedure provides a highly efficient and robust alternative to the local linear least squares method, and can be conveniently implemented using existing R software package. Theoretical analysis and numerical simulations both reveal that the gain of the local rank estimator over the local linear least squares estimator, measured by the asymptotic mean squared error or the asymptotic mean integrated squared error, can be substantial. In the normal error case, the asymptotic relative efficiency for estimating both the coefficient functions and the derivative of the coefficient functions is above 96%; even in the worst case scenarios, the asymptotic relative efficiency has a lower bound 88.96% for estimating the coefficient functions, and a lower bound 89.91% for estimating their derivatives. The new estimator may achieve the nonparametric convergence rate even when the local linear least squares method fails due to infinite random error variance. We establish the large sample theory of the proposed procedure by utilizing results from generalized U-statistics, whose kernel function may depend on the sample size. We also extend a resampling approach, which perturbs the objective function repeatedly, to the generalized U-statistics setting; and demonstrate that it can accurately estimate the asymptotic covariance matrix.

  10. Concordance correlation coefficient applied to discrete data.

    PubMed

    Carrasco, Josep L; Jover, Lluis

    2005-12-30

    In any field in which decisions are subject to measurements, interchangeability between the methods used to obtain these measurements is essential. To consider methods as interchangeable, a certain degree of agreement is needed between the measurements they provide. The concordance correlation coefficient is an index that assesses the strength of agreement and it has been widely applied in situations in which measurements are made on a continuous scale. Recently the concordance correlation coefficient has been defined as a specific intraclass correlation coefficient estimated by the variance components of a Normal-Normal mixed linear model. Although this coefficient was defined for the continuous scale case, it may also be used with a discrete scale. In this case the data are often transformed and normalized, and the concordance correlation is applied. This study discusses the expression of the concordance correlation coefficient for discrete Poisson data by means of the Poisson-Normal generalized linear mixed model. The behaviour of the concordance correlation coefficient estimate is assessed by means of a simulation study, in which the estimates were compared using four models: three Normal-Normal mixed models with raw data, log-transformed data and square-root transformed data, and the Poisson-Normal generalized linear mixed model. An example is provided in which two different methods are used to measure CD34+ cells.

  11. WWW Database of Variable Star Fourier Coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, Siobahn M.

    2003-10-01

    Fourier coefficients are a valuable tool in the study of a wide variety of pulsating stars. In the case of RR Lyrae stars they, can be used to estimate various physical parameters, such as mass, luminosity, metallicity, and effective temperature. They are frequently used to discriminate between different pulsation modes for both RR Lyrae stars and Cepheids. Fourier coefficients have been published for stars based on many different photometric systems as well as for radial velocity measurements. With the release of coefficients from large-scale surveys and the availability of these data on the Internet, the number of Fourier coefficients available for study has significantly increased, and it is difficult to obtain all available data for individual stars or a given subset of stars. To assist researchers in obtaining and making use of Fourier coefficients, an on-line archive of published values of Fourier coefficients has been established. Users can search the database using a variety of tools, and the data sets extend beyond the Milky Way to include extragalactic variables. The archive is located at the Web site http://nitro9.earth.uni.edu/fourier/.

  12. Quantitative Ultrasound Imaging Using Acoustic Backscatter Coefficients.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boote, Evan Jeffery

    Current clinical ultrasound scanners render images which have brightness levels related to the degree of backscattered energy from the tissue being imaged. These images offer the interpreter a qualitative impression of the scattering characteristics of the tissue being examined, but due to the complex factors which affect the amplitude and character of the echoed acoustic energy, it is difficult to make quantitative assessments of scattering nature of the tissue, and thus, difficult to make precise diagnosis when subtle disease effects are present. In this dissertation, a method of data reduction for determining acoustic backscatter coefficients is adapted for use in forming quantitative ultrasound images of this parameter. In these images, the brightness level of an individual pixel corresponds to the backscatter coefficient determined for the spatial position represented by that pixel. The data reduction method utilized rigorously accounts for extraneous factors which affect the scattered echo waveform and has been demonstrated to accurately determine backscatter coefficients under a wide range of conditions. The algorithms and procedures used to form backscatter coefficient images are described. These were tested using tissue-mimicking phantoms which have regions of varying scattering levels. Another phantom has a fat-mimicking layer for testing these techniques under more clinically relevant conditions. Backscatter coefficient images were also formed of in vitro human liver tissue. A clinical ultrasound scanner has been adapted for use as a backscatter coefficient imaging platform. The digital interface between the scanner and the computer used for data reduction are described. Initial tests, using phantoms are presented. A study of backscatter coefficient imaging of in vivo liver was performed using several normal, healthy human subjects.

  13. Static coefficient of friction between stainless steel and PMMA used in cemented hip and knee implants.

    PubMed

    Nuño, N; Groppetti, R; Senin, N

    2006-11-01

    Design of cemented hip and knee implants, oriented to improve the longevity of artificial joints, is largely based on numerical models. The static coefficient of friction between the implant and the bone cement is necessary to characterize the interface conditions in these models and must be accurately provided. The measurement of this coefficient using a repeatable and reproducible methodology for materials used in total hip arthroplasty is missing from the literature. A micro-topographic surface analysis characterized the surfaces of the specimens used in the experiments. The coefficient of friction between stainless steel and bone cement in dry and wet conditions using bovine serum was determined using a prototype computerized sliding friction tester. The effects of surface roughness (polished versus matt) and of contact pressure on the coefficient of friction have also been investigated. The serum influences little the coefficient of friction for the matt steel surface, where the mechanical interactions due to higher roughness are still the most relevant factor. However, for polished steel surfaces, the restraining effect of proteins plays a very relevant role in increasing the coefficient of friction. When the coefficient of friction is used in finite element analysis, it is used for the debonded stem-cement situation. It can thus be assumed that serum will propagate between the stem and the cement mantle. The authors believe that the use of a static coefficient of friction of 0.3-0.4, measured in the present study, is appropriate in finite element models.

  14. Fuselage and nozzle pressure distributions on a 1/12-scale F-15 propulsion model at transonic speeds. [conducted in langley 16 foot transonic tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pendergraft, O. C., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    Static pressure coefficient distributions on the forebody, afterbody, and nozzles of a 1/12 scale F-15 propulsion model were determined. The effects of nozzle power setting and horizontal tail deflection angle on the pressure coefficient distributions were investigated.

  15. Drag Coefficient and Foam in Hurricane Conditions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golbraikh, E.; Shtemler, Y.

    2016-12-01

    he present study is motivated by recent findings of saturation and even decrease in the drag coefficient (capping) in hurricane conditions, which is accompanied by the production of a foam layer on the ocean surface. As it is difficult to expect at present a comprehensive numerical modeling of the drag coefficient saturation that is followed by wave breaking and foam production, there is no complete confidence and understanding of the saturation phenomenon. Our semi-empirical model is proposed for the estimation of the foam impact on the variation of the effective drag coefficient, Cd , with the reference wind speed U10 in stormy and hurricane conditions. The proposed model treats the efficient air-sea aerodynamic roughness length as a sum of two weighted aerodynamic roughness lengths for the foam-free and foam-covered conditions. On the available optical and radiometric measurements of the fractional foam coverage,αf, combined with direct wind speed measurements in hurricane conditions, which provide the minimum of the effective drag coefficient, Cd for the sea covered with foam. The present model yields Cd10 versus U10 in fair agreement with that evaluated from both open-ocean and laboratory measurements of the vertical variation of mean wind speed in the range of U10 from low to hurricane speeds. The present approach opens opportunities for drag coefficient modeling in hurricane conditions and hurricane intensity estimation by the foam-coverage value using optical and radiometric measurements.

  16. Computing spatial information from Fourier coefficient distributions.

    PubMed

    Heinz, William F; Werbin, Jeffrey L; Lattman, Eaton; Hoh, Jan H

    2011-05-01

    The spatial relationships between molecules can be quantified in terms of information. In the case of membranes, the spatial organization of molecules in a bilayer is closely related to biophysically and biologically important properties. Here, we present an approach to computing spatial information based on Fourier coefficient distributions. The Fourier transform (FT) of an image contains a complete description of the image, and the values of the FT coefficients are uniquely associated with that image. For an image where the distribution of pixels is uncorrelated, the FT coefficients are normally distributed and uncorrelated. Further, the probability distribution for the FT coefficients of such an image can readily be obtained by Parseval's theorem. We take advantage of these properties to compute the spatial information in an image by determining the probability of each coefficient (both real and imaginary parts) in the FT, then using the Shannon formalism to calculate information. By using the probability distribution obtained from Parseval's theorem, an effective distance from the uncorrelated or most uncertain case is obtained. The resulting quantity is an information computed in k-space (kSI). This approach provides a robust, facile and highly flexible framework for quantifying spatial information in images and other types of data (of arbitrary dimensions). The kSI metric is tested on a 2D Ising model, frequently used as a model for lipid bilayer; and the temperature-dependent phase transition is accurately determined from the spatial information in configurations of the system.

  17. Temporal correlation coefficient for directed networks.

    PubMed

    Büttner, Kathrin; Salau, Jennifer; Krieter, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies dealing with network theory focused mainly on the static aggregation of edges over specific time window lengths. Thus, most of the dynamic information gets lost. To assess the quality of such a static aggregation the temporal correlation coefficient can be calculated. It measures the overall possibility for an edge to persist between two consecutive snapshots. Up to now, this measure is only defined for undirected networks. Therefore, we introduce the adaption of the temporal correlation coefficient to directed networks. This new methodology enables the distinction between ingoing and outgoing edges. Besides a small example network presenting the single calculation steps, we also calculated the proposed measurements for a real pig trade network to emphasize the importance of considering the edge direction. The farm types at the beginning of the pork supply chain showed clearly higher values for the outgoing temporal correlation coefficient compared to the farm types at the end of the pork supply chain. These farm types showed higher values for the ingoing temporal correlation coefficient. The temporal correlation coefficient is a valuable tool to understand the structural dynamics of these systems, as it assesses the consistency of the edge configuration. The adaption of this measure for directed networks may help to preserve meaningful additional information about the investigated network that might get lost if the edge directions are ignored.

  18. Sublimation kinetics and diffusion coefficients of TNT, PETN, and RDX in air by thermogravimetry.

    PubMed

    Hikal, Walid M; Weeks, Brandon L

    2014-07-01

    The diffusion coefficients of explosives are crucial in their trace detection and lifetime estimation. We report on the experimental values of diffusion coefficients of three of the most important explosives in both military and industry: TNT, PETN, and RDX. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) was used to determine the sublimation rates of TNT, PETN, and RDX powders in the form of cylindrical billets. The TGA was calibrated using ferrocene as a standard material of well-characterized sublimation rates and vapor pressures to determine the vapor pressures of TNT, PETN, and RDX. The determined sublimation rates and vapor pressures were used to indirectly determine the diffusion coefficients of TNT, PETN, and RDX for the first time. A linear log-log dependence of the diffusion coefficients on temperature is observed for the three materials. The diffusion coefficients of TNT, PETN, and RDX at 273 K were determined to be 5.76×10(-6)m(2)/sec, 4.94×10(-6)m(2)/s, and 5.89×10(-6)m(2)/s, respectively. Values are in excellent agreement with the theoretical values in literature.

  19. Pressure sensor

    DOEpatents

    Mee, David K.; Ripley, Edward B.; Nienstedt, Zachary C.; Nienstedt, Alex W.; Howell, Jr., Layton N.

    2015-09-29

    Disclosed is a passive, in-situ pressure sensor. The sensor includes a sensing element having a ferromagnetic metal and a tension inducing mechanism coupled to the ferromagnetic metal. The tension inducing mechanism is operable to change a tensile stress upon the ferromagnetic metal based on a change in pressure in the sensing element. Changes in pressure are detected based on changes in the magnetic switching characteristics of the ferromagnetic metal when subjected to an alternating magnetic field caused by the change in the tensile stress. The sensing element is embeddable in a closed system for detecting pressure changes without the need for any penetrations of the system for power or data acquisition by detecting changes in the magnetic switching characteristics of the ferromagnetic metal caused by the tensile stress.

  20. Pressure Drop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawson, Mike

    2010-01-01

    Mike Lawson briefly discussed pressure drop for aerospace applications and presented short stories about adventures experienced while working at NASA and General Dynamics, including exposure to technologies like the Crew and Equipment Translation Aid (CETA) cart and the SWME.

  1. PRESSURE TRANSDUCER

    DOEpatents

    Sander, H.H.

    1959-10-01

    A pressure or mechanical force transducer particularly adaptable to miniature telemetering systems is described. Basically the device consists of a transistor located within a magnetic field adapted to change in response to mechanical force. The conduction characteristics of the transistor in turn vary proportionally with changes in the magnetic flux across the transistor such that the output (either frequency of amplitude) of the transistor circuit is proportional to mechanical force or pressure.

  2. Pressure regulator

    DOEpatents

    Ebeling, Jr., Robert W.; Weaver, Robert B.

    1979-01-01

    The pressure within a pressurized flow reactor operated under harsh environmental conditions is controlled by establishing and maintaining a fluidized bed of uniformly sized granular material of selected density by passing the gas from the reactor upwardly therethrough at a rate sufficient to fluidize the bed and varying the height of the bed by adding granular material thereto or removing granular material therefrom to adjust the backpressure on the flow reactor.

  3. Power coefficient of tornado-type wind turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Rangwalla, A.A.; Hsu, C.T.

    1983-11-01

    In a tornado-type wind turbine the wind collecting tower is equipped with adjustable vanes that can be opened on the windward side and closed on the leeward side. The wind enters the tower tangentially through these open vanes and exits from the top. As a result, a vortex is formed inside the tower. A vertical axis turbine which is located underneath the tower floor admits air vertically and exhausts it into the vortex core. The pressure drop in the vortex core can be high, depending upon the vortex concentration, thus enhancing manyfold the total pressure drop across the turbine. The power coefficient C /SUB p/ of this system depends mainly on how low a pressure can be created in the vortex core. A maximum C /SUB p/ of about 2.5 was obtained by Yen for a spiral shaped tower. This is about 6.25 times the C /SUB p/ of conventional windmills. Analytical studies have been carried out by several investigators to study the C /SUB p/ of this vortex machine. Loth considered the conservation of angular momentum and obtained a C /SUB p/ based on the tower frontal area, which is not impressive.

  4. Temperature coefficients of multijunction solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Virshup, G. F.; Chung, B.-C.; Ladle Ristow, M.; Kuryla, M. S.; Brinker, D.

    1990-01-01

    Temperature coefficients measured in solar simulators with those measured under AM0 solar illumination are compared to illustrate the challenges in making these measurements. It is shown that simulator measurements of the short-circuit current (delta Jsc/delta T) are inaccurate due to the mismatch between the solar spectrum and the simulators at the bandgaps of the solar cells. Especially susceptible to error is the delta Jsc/delta T of cells which are components in monolithic multijunction solar cells, such as GaAs filtered by 1.93-eV AlGaAs, which has an AM0 coefficient of 6.82 micro-A/sq cm/deg C, compared to a Xenon simulator coefficient of 22.2 micro-A/sq cm/deg C.

  5. Parametric modeling of quantile regression coefficient functions.

    PubMed

    Frumento, Paolo; Bottai, Matteo

    2016-03-01

    Estimating the conditional quantiles of outcome variables of interest is frequent in many research areas, and quantile regression is foremost among the utilized methods. The coefficients of a quantile regression model depend on the order of the quantile being estimated. For example, the coefficients for the median are generally different from those of the 10th centile. In this article, we describe an approach to modeling the regression coefficients as parametric functions of the order of the quantile. This approach may have advantages in terms of parsimony, efficiency, and may expand the potential of statistical modeling. Goodness-of-fit measures and testing procedures are discussed, and the results of a simulation study are presented. We apply the method to analyze the data that motivated this work. The described method is implemented in the qrcm R package.

  6. Note on the calculation of the second osmotic virial coefficient in stable and metastable liquid states.

    PubMed

    Widom, B; Koga, K

    2013-01-31

    The second osmotic virial coefficient is calculated from analytical equations of state as illustrated with the van der Waals two-component equation. It is shown that when the fixed solvent chemical potential or pressure at which the virial coefficient is calculated is taken to be that of the pure solvent in coexistence with its vapor, as in a recent report, the liquid solution is in a metastable state. When, by contrast, that fixed chemical potential or pressure is that of the pure solvent in its one-phase liquid state, the solution, with increasing solute concentration, is initially in a stable state; then, on crossing the liquid-vapor equilibrium line, it becomes metastable and ultimately approaches a spinodal and incipient instability. Nevertheless, in practice, as seen in a numerical illustration for a hydrocarbon dissolved in water, there is scarcely any difference in the virial coefficient calculated with the fixed solvent chemical potential or pressure of the pure solvent at its vapor pressure (metastable states of the solution) or at 1 bar (initially stable states). It is also seen in that example that the virial coefficient may be reliably calculated only for solute concentrations that are neither too small nor too large; typically only for mole fractions roughly from 10(-7) to 10(-3.5).

  7. Onsager coefficients of a Brownian Carnot cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izumida, Y.; Okuda, K.

    2010-10-01

    We study a Brownian Carnot cycle introduced by Schmiedl and Seifert [Europhys. Lett. 81, 20003 (2008)] from a viewpoint of the linear irreversible thermodynamics. By considering the entropy production rate of this cycle, we can determine thermodynamic forces and fluxes of the cycle and calculate the Onsager coefficients for general protocols, that is, arbitrary schedules to change the potential confining the Brownian particle. We show that these Onsager coefficients contain the information of the protocol shape and they satisfy the tight-coupling condition irrespective of whatever protocol shape we choose. These properties may give an explanation why the Curzon-Ahlborn efficiency often appears in the finite-time heat engines.

  8. Second virial coefficients of dipolar hard spheres.

    PubMed

    Philipse, Albert P; Kuipers, Bonny W M

    2010-08-18

    An asymptotic formula is reported for the second virial coefficient B(2) of a dipolar hard-sphere (DHS) fluid, in zero external field, for strongly coupled dipolar interactions. This simple formula, together with the one for the weak-coupling B(2), provides an accurate prediction of the second virial coefficient for a wide range of dipole moments, including those that are experimentally accessible in magnetite ferrofluids. The weak-coupling B(2) also yields an estimate of the magnetic moment minimally needed for isotropic gas-liquid phase-separation, if any, in the DHS fluid.

  9. Asymptotics of loop quantum gravity fusion coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alesci, Emanuele; Bianchi, Eugenio; Magliaro, Elena; Perini, Claudio

    2010-05-01

    The fusion coefficients from SO(3) to SO(4) play a key role in the definition of spin foam models for the dynamics in loop quantum gravity. In this paper we give a simple analytic formula of the Engle-Pereira-Rovelli-Livine fusion coefficients. We study the large spin asymptotics and show that they map SO(3) semiclassical intertwiners into SU(2)L × SU(2)R semiclassical intertwiners. This non-trivial property opens the possibility for an analysis of the semiclassical behavior of the model.

  10. Defining the coupling coefficient for electrodynamic transducers.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shuo; Arnold, David P

    2013-11-01

    This paper provides a simple, practical definition of the coupling coefficient for electrodynamic transducers. Comparing to efforts made in previous works that assumed a lossless spring-inductor model, the definition presented here is based on a lossy mass-inductor model. Time-harmonic analysis is used to model the energy flow in the transducer. Both energy storage and energy dissipation are included in the electrodynamic coupling coefficient definition. An in-depth discussion is provided to explain and justify the derivation and overall methodology. This definition is expected to provide a useful and practical measure of the electromechanical energy conversion performance of electrodynamic transducers, both actuators and generators.

  11. Seebeck Coefficient Measured With Differential Heat Pulses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zoltan, L.; Wood, C.; Stapfer, G.

    1986-01-01

    Common experimental errors reduced because pulse technique suppresses drifts in thermoelectric measurements. Differential-heat-pulse apparatus measures Seebeck coefficient in semiconductors at temperatures up to 1,900 K. Sample heated to measuring temperature in furnace. Ends of sample then differentially heated a few degrees more by lamps. Differential temperature rise and consequent Seebeck voltage measured via thermocouple leads. Because pulse technique used, errors that often arise from long-term drifts in thermoelectric measurements suppressed. Apparatus works with temperature differences of only few degrees, further increasing accuracy of coefficients obtained.

  12. Diffusion and transport coefficients in synthetic opals

    SciTech Connect

    Sofo, J. O.; Mahan, G. D.

    2000-07-15

    Opals are structures composed of close-packed spheres in the size range of nano to micrometers. They are sintered to create small necks at the points of contact. We have solved the diffusion problem in such structures. The relation between the diffusion coefficient and the thermal and electrical conductivity is used to estimate the transport coefficients of opal structures as a function of the neck size and the mean free path of the carriers. The theory presented is also applicable to the diffusion problem in other periodic structures. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  13. Shear viscosity coefficient of liquid lanthanides

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, H. P. Thakor, P. B. Prajapati, A. V.; Sonvane, Y. A.

    2015-05-15

    Present paper deals with the computation of shear viscosity coefficient (η) of liquid lanthanides. The effective pair potential v(r) is calculated through our newly constructed model potential. The Pair distribution function g(r) is calculated from PYHS reference system. To see the influence of local field correction function, Hartree (H), Tailor (T) and Sarkar et al (S) local field correction function are used. Present results are compared with available experimental as well as theoretical data. Lastly, we found that our newly constructed model potential successfully explains the shear viscosity coefficient (η) of liquid lanthanides.

  14. Absorption coefficient instrument for turbid natural waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, E.; Cherdak, A.; Poole, L.; Houghton, W.

    1980-05-01

    The paper presents an instrument that directly measures multispectral absorption coefficient of turbid natural water. Attention is given to the design, which is shown to incorporate methods for the compensation of variation in the internal light source intensity, correction of the spectrally dependent nature of the optical elements, and correction for variation in the background light level. In addition, when used in conjunction with a spectrally matched total attenuation instrument, the spectrally dependent scattering coefficient can also be derived. Finally, it is reported that systematic errors associated with multiple scattering have been estimated using Monte Carlo techniques.

  15. Absorption coefficient instrument for turbid natural waters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedman, E.; Cherdak, A.; Poole, L.; Houghton, W.

    1980-01-01

    The paper presents an instrument that directly measures multispectral absorption coefficient of turbid natural water. Attention is given to the design, which is shown to incorporate methods for the compensation of variation in the internal light source intensity, correction of the spectrally dependent nature of the optical elements, and correction for variation in the background light level. In addition, when used in conjunction with a spectrally matched total attenuation instrument, the spectrally dependent scattering coefficient can also be derived. Finally, it is reported that systematic errors associated with multiple scattering have been estimated using Monte Carlo techniques.

  16. Rotordynamic coefficient test results for a four-stage brush seal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conner, Kelly J.; Childs, Dara W.

    1993-06-01

    Experimental results are presented for the direct and cross-coupled stiffness and direct damping coefficients for a four-stage brush seal. Variable test parameters include the inlet pressure, pressure ratio, shaft speed, fluid prerotation, and seal spacing. Direct damping slightly increases with running speed; otherwise, the rotordynamic coefficients are relatively insensitive to changes in the test parameters. Cross-coupled stiffness is generally unchanged by increasing the inlet tangential velocity to the seals, in contrast to conventional labyrinth seals. Comparisons of test results for the four-stage brush seal with an eight-cavity labyrinth showed superior rotordynamic performance for the brush seal, namely, larger values for direct stiffness and lower values for the (destabilizing) cross-coupled stiffness coefficient.

  17. Pressure sensitive conductive rubber blends

    SciTech Connect

    Hassan, H.H. ); Abdel-Bary, E.M. ); El-Mansy, M.K.; Khodair, H.A. )

    1989-12-01

    Butadiene-acrylonitrile rubber (NBR) was blended with polychloroprene (CR) according to standard techniques. The blend was mixed with different concentrations of ZnO. The vulcanized sample was subjected to electrical conductivity ({sigma}) measurements while different values of static pressure were applied on the sample. It was found that samples containing 7.5 phr ZnO showed a reasonable pressure sensitive increase of {sigma}. Furthermore, the {sigma} vs pressure relationship of rubber blend mixed with different concentrations of Fast Extrusion Furnace black (FEF) was investigated. It was found that rubber vulcanizate containing 40 phr FEF resulted in a negative value of the pressure coefficient of conductivity {approx equal} {minus} 4.5 KPa{sup {minus}1}.

  18. The performance of robust correlation coefficient under contaminated bivariate data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakaria, Nur Amira; Abdullah, Suhaida; Ahad, Nor Aishah; Yusof, Norhayati; Yahaya, Sharipah Soaad Syed

    2016-10-01

    Classical correlation coefficient is a powerful statistical analysis when measuring a relationship between the bivariate normal distribution when the assumptions are fulfill. However, this classical correlation coefficient performs poor in the presence of outlier. Thus, this study aims to propose new version of robust correlation coefficient based on MADn and Sn. The performance of this proposed robust correlation coefficient will be evaluated based on three indicators which were the value of the correlation coefficient, average bias and standard error. The proposed procedure is expected to produce MADn correlation coefficient and Sn correlation coefficient. Both coefficients are expected to perform better than classical correlation coefficient and resistance to the outlier.

  19. Measurement of molecular diffusion coefficients in supercritical carbon dioxide using a coated capillary column

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, C.C.; Tan, C.S. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1995-02-01

    Molecular diffusion coefficients of ethyl acetate, toluene, phenol, and caffeine in supercritical carbon dioxide were measured by a chromatographic peak broadening technique in a coated capillary column at temperatures of 308, 318, and 328 K and pressures up to 145 bar. A linear adsorption in the polymer layer coated on the inner wall of the capillary column was observed. The experimentally determined diffusion coefficients showed substantial agreement with those reported in the literature. The diffusion coefficients were in the order of 10[sup [minus]4] cm[sup 2]/s and decreased with increasing carbon dioxide density. Based on the molecular diffusion coefficient data reported here and those published elsewhere, an empirically modified Wilke-Chang equation was proposed which was found to be more quantitative than some existing equations such as the Stokes-Einstein and Wilke-Chang equations.

  20. Problems on Divisibility of Binomial Coefficients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osler, Thomas J.; Smoak, James

    2004-01-01

    Twelve unusual problems involving divisibility of the binomial coefficients are represented in this article. The problems are listed in "The Problems" section. All twelve problems have short solutions which are listed in "The Solutions" section. These problems could be assigned to students in any course in which the binomial theorem and Pascal's…

  1. Coefficient Omega Bootstrap Confidence Intervals: Nonnormal Distributions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Padilla, Miguel A.; Divers, Jasmin

    2013-01-01

    The performance of the normal theory bootstrap (NTB), the percentile bootstrap (PB), and the bias-corrected and accelerated (BCa) bootstrap confidence intervals (CIs) for coefficient omega was assessed through a Monte Carlo simulation under conditions not previously investigated. Of particular interests were nonnormal Likert-type and binary items.…

  2. Bayesian Meta-Analysis of Coefficient Alpha

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brannick, Michael T.; Zhang, Nanhua

    2013-01-01

    The current paper describes and illustrates a Bayesian approach to the meta-analysis of coefficient alpha. Alpha is the most commonly used estimate of the reliability or consistency (freedom from measurement error) for educational and psychological measures. The conventional approach to meta-analysis uses inverse variance weights to combine…

  3. The Seebeck coefficient of superionic conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahan, G. D.

    2015-01-01

    We present a theory of the anomalous Seebeck coefficient found in the superionic conductor Cu2Se. It has a phase transition at T = 400 K where the cations disorder but the anions do not. This disorder gives a temperature-dependent width to the electronic states in the conduction band. This width provides the anomalous Seebeck contribution.

  4. Coefficient Omega Bootstrap Confidence Intervals: Nonnormal Distributions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Padilla, Miguel A.; Divers, Jasmin

    2013-01-01

    The performance of the normal theory bootstrap (NTB), the percentile bootstrap (PB), and the bias-corrected and accelerated (BCa) bootstrap confidence intervals (CIs) for coefficient omega was assessed through a Monte Carlo simulation under conditions not previously investigated. Of particular interests were nonnormal Likert-type and binary items.…

  5. Static coefficient test method and apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haehner, C. L.; Tarpley, J. L. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    The static coefficient of friction between contacting surfaces of a plurality of bodies is determined by applying a load to the bodies in a direction normal to the contacting surfaces. Opposite ends of a flexible filament are connected to a load cell and the first of the bodies. A motor continuously moves the second of the bodies away from the load cell at constant velocity at right angles to the force of the normal load so that the first body moves intermittently relative to the second body across a contact surface between them. The load on the surfaces, the nature of the surfaces, and the speed of the first body relative to the load cell are such that the filament is alternately and cyclically tensioned and relaxed as the movement occurs. The maximum tension occurs at the incipient stages of movement of the first body relative to the second body. The load cell derives a series of measurements which are coupled to an x-y recorder, from which the maximum forces of the filament are determined to enable the static coefficient of friction to be determined. From the maximum forces and the normal force, the coefficient is determined. For determining coefficients of friction where there are large compression loads, the normal load is applied with a calibrated compression spring that is deflected by a predetermined amount determined by a spring load vs. deflection calibration curve.

  6. Problems on Divisibility of Binomial Coefficients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osler, Thomas J.; Smoak, James

    2004-01-01

    Twelve unusual problems involving divisibility of the binomial coefficients are represented in this article. The problems are listed in "The Problems" section. All twelve problems have short solutions which are listed in "The Solutions" section. These problems could be assigned to students in any course in which the binomial theorem and Pascal's…

  7. Experimental Influence Coefficients and Vibration Modes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weidman, Deene J.; Kordes, Eldon E.

    1959-01-01

    Test results are presented for both symmetrical and antisymmetrical static loading of a wing model mounted on a three-point support system. The first six free-free vibration modes were determined experimentally. A comparison is made of the symmetrical nodal patterns and frequencies with the symmetrical nodal patterns and frequencies calculated from the experimental influence coefficients.

  8. Uses and Misuses of the Correlation Coefficient.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Onwuegbuzie, Anthony J.; Daniel, Larry G.

    The purpose of this paper is to provide an in-depth critical analysis of the use and misuse of correlation coefficients. Various analytical and interpretational misconceptions are reviewed, beginning with the egregious assumption that correlational statistics may be useful in inferring causality. Additional misconceptions, stemming from…

  9. Molecular Diffusion Coefficients: Experimental Determination and Demonstration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fate, Gwendolyn; Lynn, David G.

    1990-01-01

    Presented are laboratory methods which allow the demonstration and determination of the diffusion coefficients of compounds ranging in size from water to small proteins. Included are the procedures involving the use of a spectrometer, UV cell, triterated agar, and oxygen diffusion. Results including quantification are described. (CW)

  10. Measurement of Coefficient of Restitution Made Easy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farkas, N.; Ramsier, R. D.

    2006-01-01

    We present a simple activity that permits students to determine the coefficient of restitution of bouncing balls using only a stopwatch, a metre stick and graphical analysis. The experiment emphasizes that simple models, in combination with careful attention to how students make measurements, can lead to good results in a straightforward way.

  11. Apparatus Measures Seebeck Coefficient And Resistivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zoltan, Leslie D.; Wood, Charles; Fleurial, Jean-Pierre; Liu, Yixin

    1993-01-01

    Electrical measurements made by four point probes, two of which double as temperature probes. Laboratory apparatus measures both Seebeck coefficients and electrical resistivities of candidate thermoelectric materials at temperatures from ambient to 1,300 K. Apparatus makes possible to take both measurements alternately and in rapid succession during same heating cycle, thereby reducing distortion.

  12. Computer programs for the concordance correlation coefficient.

    PubMed

    Crawford, Sara B; Kosinski, Andrzej S; Lin, Hung-Mo; Williamson, John M; Barnhart, Huiman X

    2007-10-01

    The CCC macro is presented for computation of the concordance correlation coefficient (CCC), a common measure of reproducibility. The macro has been produced in both SAS and R, and a detailed presentation of the macro input and output for the SAS program is included. The macro provides estimation of three versions of the CCC, as presented by Lin [L.I.-K. Lin, A concordance correlation coefficient to evaluate reproducibility, Biometrics 45 (1989) 255-268], Barnhart et al. [H.X. Barnhart, J.L. Haber, J.L. Song, Overall concordance correlation coefficient for evaluating agreement among multiple observers, Biometrics 58 (2002) 1020-1027], and Williamson et al. [J.M. Williamson, S.B. Crawford, H.M. Lin, Resampling dependent concordance correlation coefficients, J. Biopharm. Stat. 17 (2007) 685-696]. It also provides bootstrap confidence intervals for the CCC, as well as for the difference in CCCs for both independent and dependent samples. The macro is designed for balanced data only. Detailed explanation of the involved computations and macro variable definitions are provided in the text. Two biomedical examples are included to illustrate that the macro can be easily implemented.

  13. The Evolution of Pearson's Correlation Coefficient

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kader, Gary D.; Franklin, Christine A.

    2008-01-01

    This article describes an activity for developing the notion of association between two quantitative variables. By exploring a collection of scatter plots, the authors propose a nonstandard "intuitive" measure of association; and by examining properties of this measure, they develop the more standard measure, Pearson's Correlation Coefficient. The…

  14. The Evolution of Pearson's Correlation Coefficient

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kader, Gary D.; Franklin, Christine A.

    2008-01-01

    This article describes an activity for developing the notion of association between two quantitative variables. By exploring a collection of scatter plots, the authors propose a nonstandard "intuitive" measure of association; and by examining properties of this measure, they develop the more standard measure, Pearson's Correlation Coefficient. The…

  15. Apparatus Measures Seebeck Coefficient And Resistivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zoltan, Leslie D.; Wood, Charles; Fleurial, Jean-Pierre; Liu, Yixin

    1993-01-01

    Electrical measurements made by four point probes, two of which double as temperature probes. Laboratory apparatus measures both Seebeck coefficients and electrical resistivities of candidate thermoelectric materials at temperatures from ambient to 1,300 K. Apparatus makes possible to take both measurements alternately and in rapid succession during same heating cycle, thereby reducing distortion.

  16. The Seebeck coefficient of superionic conductors

    SciTech Connect

    Mahan, G. D.

    2015-01-28

    We present a theory of the anomalous Seebeck coefficient found in the superionic conductor Cu{sub 2}Se. It has a phase transition at T = 400 K where the cations disorder but the anions do not. This disorder gives a temperature-dependent width to the electronic states in the conduction band. This width provides the anomalous Seebeck contribution.

  17. Skidding Coefficients on an Alluvial Soil

    Treesearch

    W. N. Darwin

    1965-01-01

    The Southern Hardwoods Laboratory is studying the influence of ground conditions and load characteristics on the performance of skidding vehicles in southern bottom lands. The exploratory test was aimed at evaluating the effects of bark on skidding coefficients, but it also yielded information on other log characteristics and on effects of soil moisture.

  18. Bayesian Meta-Analysis of Coefficient Alpha

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brannick, Michael T.; Zhang, Nanhua

    2013-01-01

    The current paper describes and illustrates a Bayesian approach to the meta-analysis of coefficient alpha. Alpha is the most commonly used estimate of the reliability or consistency (freedom from measurement error) for educational and psychological measures. The conventional approach to meta-analysis uses inverse variance weights to combine…

  19. A new method for calculating loss coefficients

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Y.C.; Yang, W.T.; Liu, C.C. . Dept. of Electrical Engineering)

    1994-08-01

    A method is proposed which avoids many limitations associated with traditional B-coefficient loss coefficient calculation. The proposed method, unlike the traditional B-coefficient method, is very fast and can handle line outages. The method utilizes network sensitivity factors which are established from DC load flow solutions. Line outage distribution factors (ODF's) are formulated using changes in network power generations to simulate the outaged line from the network. The method avoids the use of complicated reference frame transformations based upon Kron's tensor analysis. The necessity of data normalization used in least squares and the evaluation of the slope of [theta][sub j] versus PG[sub n] is not necessary with the proposed method. Using IEEE standard 14-bus and 30-bus systems, the method's results are compared against results obtained from an AC load flow program (LFED). The method's solution speed is compared to that of the LFED method, the base case database method and the conventional B-coefficient method based on A[sub jn]-factor. The proposed method is easy to implement and, when compared to other methods, has exhibited good accuracy and rapid execution times. The method is well suited to on-line dispatch applications.

  20. On Not Interpreting Coefficients: Comment on Holt.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Thomas P.

    1979-01-01

    A recent recommendation by Holt (EJ 200 576) that coefficients resulting from estimating log-linear and similar models should not be interpreted is argued to be based on lack of clarity about the substantive and theoretical importance of the choice between dummy and effect coding for categorical variables. (Author/GDC)

  1. Calculation of aberration coefficients by ray tracing.

    PubMed

    Oral, M; Lencová, B

    2009-10-01

    In this paper we present an approach for the calculation of aberration coefficients using accurate ray tracing. For a given optical system, intersections of a large number of trajectories with a given plane are computed. In the Gaussian image plane the imaging with the selected optical system can be described by paraxial and aberration coefficients (geometric and chromatic) that can be calculated by least-squares fitting of the analytical model on the computed trajectory positions. An advantage of such a way of computing the aberration coefficients is that, in comparison with the aberration integrals and the differential algebra method, it is relatively easy to use and its complexity stays almost constant with the growing complexity of the optical system. This paper shows a tested procedure for choosing proper initial conditions and computing the coefficients of the fifth-order geometrical and third-order, first-degree chromatic aberrations by ray tracing on an example of a weak electrostatic lens. The results are compared with the values for the same lens from a paper Liu [Ultramicroscopy 106 (2006) 220-232].

  2. Extending the Constant Coefficient Solution Technique to Variable Coefficient Ordinary Differential Equations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mohammed, Ahmed; Zeleke, Aklilu

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a class of second-order ordinary differential equations (ODEs) with variable coefficients whose closed-form solutions can be obtained by the same method used to solve ODEs with constant coefficients. General solutions for the homogeneous case are discussed.

  3. Extending the Constant Coefficient Solution Technique to Variable Coefficient Ordinary Differential Equations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mohammed, Ahmed; Zeleke, Aklilu

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a class of second-order ordinary differential equations (ODEs) with variable coefficients whose closed-form solutions can be obtained by the same method used to solve ODEs with constant coefficients. General solutions for the homogeneous case are discussed.

  4. Factor Scores, Structure Coefficients, and Communality Coefficients: It's All One General Linear Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marsh, S. Neil

    This paper explains the meaning and use of three important factor analytic statistics: factor scores, factor structure coefficients, and communality coefficients. For the discussion, 301 observations of junior high school students 11 measured variables from a previous study are analyzed. While factors provide the researcher with general…

  5. Zernike aberration coefficients transformed to and from Fourier series coefficients for wavefront representation.

    PubMed

    Dai, Guang-Ming

    2006-02-15

    The set of Fourier series is discussed following some discussion of Zernike polynomials. Fourier transforms of Zernike polynomials are derived that allow for relating Fourier series expansion coefficients to Zernike polynomial expansion coefficients. With iterative Fourier reconstruction, Zernike representations of wavefront aberrations can easily be obtained from wavefront derivative measurements.

  6. Impacts of air-sea exchange coefficients on snowfall events over the Korean Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Jung-Yoon; Kwon, Young Cheol

    2016-08-01

    Snowfall over the Korean Peninsula is mainly associated with air mass transformation by the fluxes across the air-sea interface during cold-air outbreaks over the warm Yellow Sea. The heat and momentum exchange coefficients in the surface flux parameterization are key parameters of flux calculations across the air-sea interface. This study investigates the effects of the air-sea exchange coefficients on the simulations of snowfall events over the Korean Peninsula using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. Two snowfall cases are selected for this study. One is a heavy snowfall event that took place on January 4, 2010, and the other is a light snowfall event that occurred on December 23-24, 2011. Several sensitivity tests are carried out with increased and decreased heat and momentum exchange coefficients. The domain-averaged precipitation is increased (decreased) with increased (decreased) heat exchange coefficient because the increased (decreased) surface heat flux leads to more (less) moist conditions in the low level of the atmosphere. On the other hand, the domain-averaged precipitation is decreased (increased) with increased (decreased) momentum exchange coefficient because the increased (decreased) momentum coefficient causes reduction (increase) of wind speed and heat flux. The variation of precipitation in the heat exchange coefficient experiments is much larger than that in the momentum exchange coefficient experiments because the change of heat flux has a more direct impact on moisture flux and snowfall amount, while the change of momentum flux has a rather indirect impact via wind speed changes. The low-pressure system is intensified and moves toward North when the heat exchange coefficient is increased because warming and moistening of the lower atmosphere contributes to destabilize the air mass, resulting in the change of precipitation pattern over the Korean Peninsula in the heat exchange coefficient experiments.

  7. Effect of pore and confining pressure on the supercritical CO2 permeability of sandstone: Implications for the effective pressure law

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, C. S.; Cheon, D. S.; Song, J. J.

    2017-08-01

    The liquid permeability of rock with distilled water or brine is different from that obtained using gas by variation in the confining pressure Pc and pore pressure Pp. In this study, as part of the research on CO2 geological storage, the permeability of sandstone was measured using supercritical CO2, and the effect of Pc and Pp on this permeability was analyzed. For applying the effective pressure law to the analysis, an effective pressure coefficient for permeability was derived experimentally. In order to utilize supercritical CO2, a non-Darcy flow test with a high flow rate was conducted, and the permeability was estimated through the Forchheimer equation. We contoured iso-permeability lines with confining and pore pressure conditions that have identical permeability, and the effective pressure coefficient, χ, was derived from the gradient of the lines following the definition of the effective pressure law. It was identified that the coefficient could be different depending on the pressure conditions. To clarify the variation of the coefficient, we derived the coefficient of χ(Pc, Pp) as a function of pore and confining pressure. The coefficient increased nonlinearly as the difference between Pc and Pp decreased, with a maximum of 1.36 being observed. The correlation between the effective pressure and the permeability were examined by applying empirical models. It was determined that the power law model was appropriate to estimate the change in supercritical CO2 permeability. Especially, it was deduced that the effective pressure with the derived coefficient would be more valid than the Terzaghi effective pressure.

  8. Hall coefficient measurement for nondestructive materials characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagy, Peter B.

    2013-01-01

    Although Hall detectors are widely used for magnetic flux density measurements in numerous electromagnetic NDE applications, measurement of the Hall coefficient of metals and their alloys for NDE purposes has not been successfully attempted before. While other intrinsic electric properties, such as electric conductivity and, to a lesser degree, thermoelectric power, are widely used for NDE, Hall coefficient measurements have never been really considered mainly because the measurements are rather difficult to carry out, especially in high-conductivity materials. In contrast to electric conductivity, the Hall coefficient is influenced mainly by the concentration density of the free charge carriers, i.e., electrons in metals, and not so much by their mobility, therefore it could be a valuable addition to our NDE arsenal. We modified the alternating current potential drop (ACPD) method with square-electrode configuration by adding an external bias magnetic field modulation to measure the Hall coefficient. The presence of such a bias field violates the Reciprocity Theorem unless the sign of the magnetic field is switched between the two measurements, which can be exploited to measure the Hall coefficient in the presence of other variations that would otherwise hide it. This new experimental method was tested on paramagnetic alloys and yielded a ±4% reproducibility that probably could be further improved by additional development efforts. As a first step towards illustrating some of the potential applications of this new technique, we have done reversible applied stress measurements in Al 1100 plates and found the sensitivity of the technique to elastic strain surprisingly high.

  9. Layer coefficients for NHDOT pavement materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janoo, Vincent C.

    1994-09-01

    In 1992, the New Hampshire Department of Transportation (NHDOT) experimented with the use of reclaimed asphalt concrete as a base course material, identified by NHDOT as reclaimed stabilized base (RSB). The RSB and a control test section were placed on Interstate 93 between exits 18 and 19. The RSB test section was designed to the same structural number (SN) as the control. To evaluate the structural capacity of these test sections, the U.S. Army Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory (CRREL) conducted deflection tests using a Dynatest 8000 falling weight deflectometer (FWD). Preliminary analysis of the results by NHDOT personnel showed higher deflection in the reclaimed asphalt concrete test sections. The explanation was that the layer coefficient used for the RSB layer in the design was probably incorrect. A total of 10 test sections constituting the base course materials used by NHDOT were built near Bow, New Hampshire. CRREL evaluated and estimated the layer coefficients of the base course materials. The test program was developed to characterize the material in more than one way. Tests were conducted with the heavy weight deflectometer (HWD), dynamic cone penetrometer (DCP) and the Clegg hammer. In situ California bearing ratio (CBR) tests were also conducted. The deflection from the HWD were used with the WESDEF back calculation program to determine the layer moduli. The moduli were than used with the AASHTO Design Guide to calculate the layer coefficients. The layer coefficients were also determined with the method proposed by Rohde. The CBR values from the Clegg hammer, in situ CBR and DCP tests were also used in the relationships in the HDM model to determine the layer coefficients.

  10. The NO Vibrational Fundamental Band: O2-Broadening Coefficients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freedman, R. S.; Giver, L. P.; Gore, Warren J. Y. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Rovibrational spectra of the vibrational fundamental of nitric oxide at 1875 cm-1 have been recorded under O2-broadening conditions at 296 K and 0.0056 cm-1 resolution using the Solar Nemeth FTS at the Kitt Peak National Observatory. The use of a flow system, which maintains the NO2 at trace levels, has enabled the first measurement of these broadening coefficients. The broadening of the trace contaminant, N2O, allowed checks of the measured pressures. The least-squares analysis of the spectra includes the nuclear hyperfine structure in addition to (lambda) doubling. We observed differential broadening between the e and f (lambda) components of 2II 1/2 transitions as well as larger differences in broadening observed between 2II3/2 transitions.

  11. Dynamic force and moment coefficients for short length annular seals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    San Andres, Luis

    1993-01-01

    Close form expressions for the dynamic force and moment coefficients in short length annular pressure seals operating at the concentric and aligned position are derived. The analysis considers fully developed turbulent flow within the seal and determines a set of ordinary differential equations for the bulk-flow field due to perturbations in rotor displacements and angular motions. The flow equations are solved exactly for seals of short length where dynamic variations in circumferential velocity are neglected. The analytical solution derived is simple and reasonably accurate for seals of length to diameter ratios (L/D) as large as 0.5 as comparisons with results from full-scale numerical solutions show. The formulae presented are practical for use in preliminary design stages and parametric studies of dynamic seal performance.

  12. Implications of New Methane Absorption Coefficients on Uranus Vertical Structure Derived from Near-IR Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fry, Patrick M.; Sromovsky, L. A.

    2009-09-01

    Using new methane absorption coefficients from Karkoschka and Tomasko (2009, submitted to Icarus, "Methane Absorption Coefficients for the Jovian Planets from Laboratory, Huygens, and HST Data"), we fit Uranus near-IR spectra previously analyzed in Sromovsky et al. (2006, Icarus 182, 577-593, Fink and Larson, 1979 J- and H-band), Sromovsky and Fry (2008, Icarus 193, 252-266, 2006 NIRC2 J- and H-band, 2006 SpeX) using Irwin et al. (2006, Icarus 181, 309-319) methane absorption coefficients. Because the new absorption coefficients usually result in higher opacities at the low temperatures seen in Uranus' upper troposphere, our previously derived cloud altitudes are expected to generally rise to higher altitudes. For example, using Lindal et al. (1987, JGR 92, 14987-15001) model D temperature and methane abundance profiles, we are better able to fit the J-band 43-deg. south bright band with the new coefficients (chi-square=205, vs. 315 for Irwin), with the pressure of the upper tropospheric cloud decreasing to 1.6 bars (from 2.4 bars using Irwin coefficients). Improvements in fitting H-band spectra from the same latitude are not as readily obtained. Derived upper tropospheric cloud pressures are very similar using the two absorption datasets (1.6-1.7 bars), but the character of the fits differs. New Karkoschka and Tomasko coefficients better fit some details in the 1.5-1.58 micron region, but Irwin fits the broad absorption band wing at 1.61-1.62 microns better, and the fit chi-square values are similar (K&T: 243, Irwin: 220). Results for a higher methane concentration (Lindal et al. model F) were similar. Whether the new coefficients will simply raise derived altitudes across the planet or will result in fundamental changes in structure is as yet unclear. This work was suported by NASA planetary astronomy and planetary atmospheres programs.

  13. Liquid-Level Monitor for Pressurized Vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, J. J.; Davis, W. T.; Mall, G. H.

    1986-01-01

    Technique for monitoring water levels in pressurized stainless-steel cylinders, based on differences in gamma-ray attenuation coefficients in water and air, developed. Full-scale laboratory prototype system constructed to test technique. Technique usable with liquids other than water, since linear attenuation coefficients for intermediate-energy gamma rays in air considerably lower than in liquids. Also adaptable for continuous monitoring of liquid levels in resevoir systems and in underground storage tanks.

  14. MHD Modeling of the Transition Region Using Realistic Transport Coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodman, Michael L.

    1997-05-01

    Most of the transition region (TR) consists of a collision dominated plasma. The dissipation and transport of energy in such a plasma is accurately described by the well known classical transport coefficients which include the electrical and thermal conductivity, viscosity, and thermo- electric tensors. These tensors are anisotropic and are functions of local values of temperature, density, and magnetic field. They may be used in an MHD model to obtain a self consistent, physically realistic description of the TR. The physics of kinetic processes is included in the MHD model through the transport coefficients. As a first step in studying heating and cooling processes in the TR in a realistic, quantitative manner, a 1.5 dimensional, steady state MHD model with a specified temperature profile is considered. The momentum equation includes the inertial, pressure gradient, Lorentz, and gravitational forces. The Ohm's law includes the exact expressions for the electrical conductivity and thermo- electric tensors. The electrical conductivity relates the generalized electric field to the conduction current density while the thermo-electric tensor relates the temperature gradient to the thermo-electric current density. The total current density is the sum of the two. It is found that the thermo-electric current density can be as large as the conduction current density, indicating that thermo-electric effects are probably important in modeling the dynamics of energy dissipation, such as wave dissipation, in the TR. Although the temperature gradient is in the vertical direction, the thermo-electric current density is in the horizontal direction, indicating the importance of the effects of anisotropic transport. The transport coefficients are valid for all magnetic field strengths, and so may be used to study the physics of weakly as well as strongly magnetized regions of the TR. Numerical examples are presented.

  15. Predicting blood:air partition coefficients using basic physicochemical properties.

    PubMed

    Buist, Harrie E; Wit-Bos, Lianne de; Bouwman, Tialda; Vaes, Wouter H J

    2012-02-01

    Quantitative Property Property Relationships (QPPRs) for human and rat blood:air partition coefficients (PBAs) have been derived, based on vapour pressure (Log(VP)), the octanol:water partition coefficient (Log(K(OW))) and molecular weight (MW), using partial least squares multilinear modelling. These parameters are all included in the standard data to be submitted under REACH. The chemical dataset consisted of volatile organic chemicals, principally aliphatic hydrocarbons, benzene derivatives with one aromatic ring, and ethers, with and without halogen atoms. Other chemicals represented were cyclic hydrocarbons and carbonic acid esters. Separate rat and human models were derived, as well as mixed ones. Log(VP) and Log(K(OW)) contributed most to the prediction of Log(PBA) in the three-parameter model, while the contribution of MW was relatively small. Still, the three-parameter model differed significantly from the two-parameter model and performed better. Its performance was comparable to that of models published in public literature, which are based on more complex molecular parameters or on measured olive:oil air and saline/water:air partition coefficients. Since, based on the available data for humans, rats, mice, dogs and rabbits, existence of interspecies differences of PBAs cannot be clearly excluded, the use of separate models for each species is advisable. Concluding, the three-parameter human model Log(PBA)=6.96-1.04 Log(VP)-0.533 Log(K(OW))-0.00495MW and the three-parameter rat model 6.16-0.888 Log(VP)-0.521 Log(K(OW))-0.00201MW provide robust and reliable models for predicting PBA values of volatile organic chemicals using commonly available chemical properties of molecules.

  16. Flow Coefficient Behavior for Boundary Layer Bleed Holes and Slots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willis, B. P.; Davis, D. O.; Hingst, W. R.

    1995-01-01

    An experimental investigation into the flow coefficient behavior for nine boundary layer bleed orifice configurations is reported. This test was conducted for the purposes of exploring boundary layer control through mass flow removal and does not address issues of stability bleed. Parametric data consist of bleed region flow coefficient as a function of Mach number, bleed plenum pressure, and bleed orifice geometry. Seven multiple hole configurations and two single slot configurations were tested over a supersonic Mach number range of 1.3 to 2.5 (nominal). Advantages gained by using multiple holes in a bleed region instead of a single spanwise slot are discussed and the issue of modeling an entire array of bleed orifices based on the performance of a single orifice is addressed. Preconditioning the flow approaching a 90 degree inclined (normal) hole configuration resulted in a significant improvement in the performance of the configuration. The same preconditioning caused only subtle changes in performance for a 20 degree inclined (slanted) configuration.

  17. Damping coefficients due to tail surfaces in aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, Lynn

    1923-01-01

    The object of the investigation described in this report was to compare the damping coefficients of an airfoil as calculated from a knowledge of the static characteristics of the section with those obtained experimentally with an oscillation. The damping coefficients as obtained, according to the conventional notation, can be considered either as due to pitching or as due to yawing, the oscillation in these experiments being so arranged that the surfaces oscillate about a vertical axis. This is in reality the case when the influence is yawing about the standard Z-axis, but it can also be considered as a pitching motion when the model is so rigged that its standard Y-axis becomes vertical. The horizontal oscillation has the advantage of eliminating the gravity action and avoiding the use of counterweights, whose presence in the wind tunnel is undesirable because of their interference with the air flow. The real point of the investigation was to separate the damping due to rotation from that due to translation. By varying the distance between the center of pressure and the center of rotation on the oscillator, the variation of damping moment can be observed and the rotational and translational effects can be separated.

  18. Measurements of the absorption coefficient of stratospheric aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ogren, J. A.; Ahlquist, N. C.; Clarke, A. D.; Charlson, R. J.

    1981-01-01

    The absorption coefficients of stratospheric aerosols are measured using a variation on the integrating plate method. The technique is based on the decrease in the transparency of a substrate when an absorbing aerosol is deposited on it. A Lambert scatterer is placed behind the substrate to integrate forward scattered light and minimize the effect of scattering on the measurement. The low pressure in the stratosphere is used for the direct impaction of particles onto a narrow strip of opal glass. The eight samples collected had a median value of 4 x 10 to the -9th m with an uncertainty of + or - 5 x 10 to the -9th m. If this absorption is due to graphitic carbon, then its concentration is estimated at about 0.4 ng/cu m, or about 0.25% of the total aerosol mass concentration. Estimates of the aerosol scattering coefficients based on satellite extinction inversions result in an aerosol single-scattering albedo in the range of 0.96-1.0.

  19. Using wave intensity analysis to determine local reflection coefficient in flexible tubes.

    PubMed

    Li, Ye; Parker, Kim H; Khir, Ashraf W

    2016-09-06

    It has been shown that reflected waves affect the shape and magnitude of the arterial pressure waveform, and that reflected waves have physiological and clinical prognostic values. In general the reflection coefficient is defined as the ratio of the energy of the reflected to the incident wave. Since pressure has the units of energy per unit volume, arterial reflection coefficient are traditionally defined as the ratio of reflected to the incident pressure. We demonstrate that this approach maybe prone to inaccuracies when applied locally. One of the main objectives of this work is to examine the possibility of using wave intensity, which has units of energy flux per unit area, to determine the reflection coefficient. We used an in vitro experimental setting with a single inlet tube joined to a second tube with different properties to form a single reflection site. The second tube was long enough to ensure that reflections from its outlet did not obscure the interactions of the initial wave. We generated an approximately half sinusoidal wave at the inlet of the tube and took measurements of pressure and flow along the tube. We calculated the reflection coefficient using wave intensity (RdI and RdI(0.5)) and wave energy (RI and RI(0.5)) as well as the measured pressure (RdP) and compared these results with the reflection coefficient calculated theoretically based on the mechanical properties of the tubes. The experimental results show that the reflection coefficients determined by all the techniques we studied increased or decreased with distance from the reflection site, depending on the type of reflection. In our experiments, RdP, RdI(0.5) and RI(0.5) are the most reliable parameters to measure the mean reflection coefficient, whilst RdI and RI provide the best measure of the local reflection coefficient, closest to the reflection site. Additional work with bifurcations, tapered tubes and in vivo experiments are needed to further understand, validate the method

  20. Experimental study of dynamic effective stress coefficient for ultrasonic velocities of Bakken cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, X.; Zoback, M. D.

    2016-12-01

    We have performed a series of exhaustive experiments to measure the effective stress coefficient (α) of the tight cores from the Bakken shale oil play. Five distinct, bedding-normal cores from a vertical well were tested, covering the sequences of Lodgepole, Middle Bakken, and Three Forks. The scope of this laboratory study is two-fold: (1) to obtain the dynamic effective stress coefficient for ultrasonic velocities; (2) to characterize the poromechanical properties in relation to rock's mineral composition and microstructure. The experiments were carried out as follows: Argon-saturated specimen (1-inch length, 1-inch diameter) was subjected to hydrostatic confining pressure under drained conditions. Pore pressure was regulated as Argon was injected into both ends of the specimen. We drilled multiple non-through-going boreholes (1-mm diameter) in the specimen to facilitate pore pressure equilibrium, without compromising its integrity. The specimen was put through a loading path to experience confining pressure and pore pressure up to 70 and 60 MPa, respectively. P- and S- wave velocities were measured and used to calculate the rock's dynamic effective stress coefficient. Results of all five cores unanimously show that the dynamic a is a function of both confining and pore pressures, regardless of the wave type and loading path. When the simple effective stress is low, α is close to unity; however, α consistently increases as the simple effective stress rises and can reach as much as 3 when the latter reaches 60 MPa. This trend is rather surprising as it is diametrically the opposite of what was observed for the static α. A possible explanation is that high-frequency wave-induced pore pressure increment may have not remained equilibrated throughout the pore space, especially in very thin cracks, according to the squirt model. This phenomenon can be enhanced when the bulk modulus of pore fluid (gas typically considered to be `soft' and `non-viscous') increases

  1. A Statistical Analysis of YORP Coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMahon, Jay W.; Scheeres, D.

    2013-10-01

    The YORP (Yarkovsky-O'Keefe-Radzievskii-Paddack) effect is theorized to be a major factor in the evolution of small asteroids (<10 km) in the near-Earth and main belt populations. YORP torques, which originate from absorbed sunlight and subsequent thermal radiation, causes secular changes in an asteroid's spin rate and spin vector orientation (e.g. Rubincam, Journal of Geophysical Research, 1995). This in turn controls the magnitude and direction of the Yarkovsky effect, which causes a drift in an asteroid's heliocentric semi-major axis (Vokrouhlicky and Farinella, Nature, 2000). YORP is also thought to be responsible for the creation of multiple asteroid systems and asteroid pairs through the process of rotational fission (Pravec et al, Nature, 2010). Despite the fact that the YORP effect has been measured on several asteroids (e.g. Taylor et al, Science, 2007 and Kaasalainen et al, Nature, 2007), it has proven very difficult to predict the effect accurately from a shape model due to the sensitivity of the YORP coefficients to shape changes (Statler, Icarus, 2009). This has been especially troublesome for Itokawa, for which a very detailed shape model is available (Scheeres et al, Icarus 2007; Breiter et al, Astronomy & Astrophysics, 2009). In this study, we compute the YORP coefficients for a number asteroids with detailed shape models available on the PDS-SBN. We then statistically perturb the asteroid shapes at the same resolution, creating a family of YORP coefficients for each shape. Next, we analyze the change in YORP coefficients between a shape model of accuracy obtainable from radar with one including small-scale topography on the surface as was observed on Itokawa. The combination of these families of coefficients will effectively give error bars on our knowledge of the YORP coefficients given a shape model of some accuracy. Finally, we discuss the statistical effect of boulder and craters, and the modification of these results due to recent studies on

  2. A parameterization scheme for the x-ray linear attenuation coefficient and energy absorption coefficient.

    PubMed

    Midgley, S M

    2004-01-21

    A novel parameterization of x-ray interaction cross-sections is developed, and employed to describe the x-ray linear attenuation coefficient and mass energy absorption coefficient for both elements and mixtures. The new parameterization scheme addresses the Z-dependence of elemental cross-sections (per electron) using a simple function of atomic number, Z. This obviates the need for a complicated mathematical formalism. Energy dependent coefficients describe the Z-direction curvature of the cross-sections. The composition dependent quantities are the electron density and statistical moments describing the elemental distribution. We show that it is possible to describe elemental cross-sections for the entire periodic table and at energies above the K-edge (from 6 keV to 125 MeV), with an accuracy of better than 2% using a parameterization containing not more than five coefficients. For the biologically important elements 1 < or = Z < or = 20, and the energy range 30-150 keV, the parameterization utilizes four coefficients. At higher energies, the parameterization uses fewer coefficients with only two coefficients needed at megavoltage energies.

  3. Series extension: predicting approximate series coefficients from a finite number of exact coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guttmann, Anthony J.

    2016-10-01

    Given the first 20-100 coefficients of a typical generating function of the type that arises in many problems of statistical mechanics or enumerative combinatorics, we show that the method of differential approximants performs surprisingly well in predicting (approximately) subsequent coefficients. These can then be used by the ratio method to obtain improved estimates of critical parameters. In favourable cases, given only the first 20 coefficients, the next 100 coefficients are predicted with useful accuracy. More surprisingly, this is also the case when the method of differential approximants does not do a useful job in estimating the critical parameters, such as those cases in which one has stretched exponential asymptotic behaviour. Nevertheless, the coefficients are predicted with surprising accuracy. As one consequence, significant computer time can be saved in enumeration problems where several runs would normally be made, modulo different primes, and the coefficients constructed from their values modulo different primes. Another is in the checking of newly calculated coefficients. We believe that this concept of approximate series extension opens up a whole new chapter in the method of series analysis.

  4. Pressure of two-dimensional Yukawa liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Yan; Goree, J.; Liu, Bin; Wang, Lei; Tian, Wen-de

    2016-06-01

    A simple analytic expression for the pressure of a two-dimensional Yukawa liquid is found by fitting results from a molecular dynamics simulation. The results verify that the pressure can be written as the sum of a potential term which is a simple multiple of the Coulomb potential energy at a distance of the Wigner-Seitz radius, and a kinetic term which is a multiple of the one for an ideal gas. Dimensionless coefficients for each of these terms are found empirically, by fitting. The resulting analytic expression, with its empirically determined coefficients, is plotted as isochores, or curves of constant area. These results should be applicable to monolayer dusty plasmas.

  5. Measurement of the iodine partition coefficient

    SciTech Connect

    Furrer, M.; Cripps, R.C.; Gubler, R.

    1985-08-01

    The hydrolysis of iodine is complicated because it involves a number of species that differ considerably in their individual volatilities. Large uncertainties exist in the thermodynamic data of some of the iodine species, especially at temperatures above 25C. Because of this, an experiment was undertaken to measure the partition coefficient under varying physical and chemical conditions. Measurements of P were made for a temperature range of 21 to 113C under well-defined conditions (liquid molar concentration, pH, and redox potential) for inorganic iodine. The experimental results are interpreted with the aid of an analytical model and published thermodynamic data. A good agreement between calculated and measured values was found. The experimental setup allows the determination of very high partition coefficients up to a value of 2.0 X 10W. This is demonstrated by adding cesium-iodide to the fuel pool water of a boiling water reactor.

  6. Gas-film coefficients for the volatilization of ketones from water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rathbun, R.E.; Tai, D.Y.

    1986-01-01

    Volatilization is a significant process in determining the fate of many organic compounds in streams and rivers. Quantifying this process requires knowledge of the mass-transfer coefficient from water, which is a function of the gas-film and liquid-film coefficients. The gas-film coefficient can be determined by measuring the flux for the volatilization of pure organic liquids. Volatilization fluxes for acetone, 2-butanone, 2-pentanone, 3-pentanone, 4-methyl-2-pentanone, 2-heptanone, and 2-octanone were measured in the laboratory over a range of temperatures. Gas-film coefficients were then calculated from these fluxes and from vapor pressure data from the literature. An equation was developed for predicting the volatilization flux of pure liquid ketones as a function of vapor pressure and molecular weight. Large deviations were found for acetone, and these were attributed to the possibility that acetone may be hydrogen bonded. A second equation for predicting the flux as a function of molecular weight and temperature resulted in large deviations for 4methyl-2-pentanone. These deviations were attributed to the branched structure of this ketone. Four factors based on the theory of volatilization and relating the volatilization flux or rate to the vapor pressure, molecular weight, temperature, and molecular diffusion coefficient were not constant as suggested by the literature. The factors generally increased with molecular weight and with temperature. Values for acetone corresponded to ketones with a larger molecular weight, and the acetone factors showed the greatest dependence on temperature. Both of these results are characteristic of compounds that are hydrogen bonded. Relations from the literature commonly used for describing the dependence of the gas-film coefficient on molecular weight and molecular diffusion coefficient were not applicable to the ketone gas-film coefficients. The dependence on molecular weight and molecular diffusion coefficient was in

  7. Negative Temperature Coefficient in Chemical Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leenson, I. A.; Sergeev, Gleb B.

    1984-05-01

    A systematic analysis of reactions whose rate decreases with increase of temperature is presented. The possibility of a negative temperature coefficient in the elementary reactions is examined from the standpoint of the transition state theory and of collision theory. The mechanisms of complex reactions in which the temperature dependence of the rate is anomalous are discussed, and possible reasons for the anomaly are examined. The bibliography contains 175 references.

  8. Gasoline-Water Distribution Coefficients of Xylidines

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1943-06-01

    sample calculated. The extinction (absorption) of light is related to the concentration of the absorbing group by the Beer - Lambert law. It was neceaaar...the use of a Beckman quartz spectrophotometer . Data obtained 1dth the spectzrograph were checzed with the spectrophotom- eter and were reproducible to...within 5 percent of the value of the distribution coefficient given, The use of the spectrophotometer greatly enhanced the speed with which the

  9. Absorption Coefficient of Alkaline Earth Halides.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-04-01

    levels . As a natural consequence, the magnitude of the absorption coefficient is the key parameter in selecting laser window materials. Over the past...of as can be achieved through improved crystal growing techniques and surface polishing. 2.5. Urbach’s Rule A central question for the development of...high absorption levels , inaccuracies progressively increasing with decreasing absorption level , a natural consequence of decreasing in instrumental

  10. A Paradoxical Result in Estimating Regression Coefficients

    PubMed Central

    Tarpey, Thaddeus; Ogden, R. Todd; Petkova, Eva; Christensen, Ronald

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a counterintuitive result regarding the estimation of a regression slope co-efficient. Paradoxically, the precision of the slope estimator can deteriorate when additional information is used to estimate its value. In a randomized experiment, the distribution of baseline variables should be identical across treatments due to randomization. The motivation for this paper came from noting that the precision of slope estimators deteriorated when pooling baseline predictors across treatment groups. PMID:25620804

  11. Haldane exclusion statistics and second virial coefficient

    SciTech Connect

    Murthy, M.V.N.; Shankar, R. )

    1994-06-06

    We show that Haldane's new definition of statistics, when generalized to infinite dimensional Hilbert spaces, is determined by the high temperature limit of the second virial coefficient. We thus show that this exclusion statistics parameter [ital g] of anyone is nontrivial and is completely determined by its exchange statistics parameter [alpha]. We also compute [ital g] for quasiparticles in the Luttinger model and show that it is equal to [alpha].

  12. Numerical Integral of Resistance Coefficients in Diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Q. S.

    2017-01-01

    The resistance coefficients in the screened Coulomb potential of stellar plasma are evaluated to high accuracy. I have analyzed the possible singularities in the integral of scattering angle. There are possible singularities in the case of an attractive potential. This may result in a problem for the numerical integral. In order to avoid the problem, I have used a proper scheme, e.g., splitting into many subintervals where the width of each subinterval is determined by the variation of the integrand, to calculate the scattering angle. The collision integrals are calculated by using Romberg’s method, therefore the accuracy is high (i.e., ∼10‑12). The results of collision integrals and their derivatives for ‑7 ≤ ψ ≤ 5 are listed. By using Hermite polynomial interpolation from those data, the collision integrals can be obtained with an accuracy of 10‑10. For very weakly coupled plasma (ψ ≥ 4.5), analytical fittings for collision integrals are available with an accuracy of 10‑11. I have compared the final results of resistance coefficients with other works and found that, for a repulsive potential, the results are basically the same as others’ for an attractive potential, the results in cases of intermediate and strong coupling show significant differences. The resulting resistance coefficients are tested in the solar model. Comparing with the widely used models of Cox et al. and Thoul et al., the resistance coefficients in the screened Coulomb potential lead to a slightly weaker effect in the solar model, which is contrary to the expectation of attempts to solve the solar abundance problem.

  13. A Paradoxical Result in Estimating Regression Coefficients.

    PubMed

    Tarpey, Thaddeus; Ogden, R Todd; Petkova, Eva; Christensen, Ronald

    2014-10-01

    This paper presents a counterintuitive result regarding the estimation of a regression slope co-efficient. Paradoxically, the precision of the slope estimator can deteriorate when additional information is used to estimate its value. In a randomized experiment, the distribution of baseline variables should be identical across treatments due to randomization. The motivation for this paper came from noting that the precision of slope estimators deteriorated when pooling baseline predictors across treatment groups.

  14. Quenching of spontaneous emission coefficients in plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Y.; Lemaire, P.; Suckewer, S.

    1987-09-01

    We have observed changing Einstein coefficients of spontaneous emission as a function of electron density in CO/sub 2/ laser-produced plasmas. These measurements are based on the intensity branching ratio of CIV lines 5801 to 5812 A and 312.41 to 312.46 A which share a common upper level. Similar observations for CIII lines are also discussed. 12 refs., 3 figs.

  15. Polynomials with Restricted Coefficients and Their Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-01-01

    JAMES S . BYRNES, PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR DONALD. J. NEWMAN, PRINCIPAL SCIENTIST MARTIN GOLDSTEIN, SENIOR SCIENTIST AIR FORCE OFFICE OF SCIENTIFIC...lacludd SecuntrY ClaaIflcationJ Polynomials with Restricted Coefficienks a@,d Thei• Applic tions 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR( S ) JAI.MES S . Byrnes 13a, TYPE OF...COEFFICIENTS AND THEIR APPLICATIONS PREPARED BY: JAMES S . BYRNES, PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR DONALD J. NEWMAN, PRINCIPAL SCIENTIST S " MARTIN GOLDSTEIN

  16. Evaluation of gastric pressures as an indirect method for measurement of intraabdominal pressures in the horse.

    PubMed

    Munsterman, Amelia S; Hanson, Russell Reid

    2011-02-01

    To develop an indirect method for measurement of intraabdominal pressures in the standing horse using measurement of gastric pressures as a less invasive technique, and to compare this method with direct intraabdominal pressures obtained from the peritoneal cavity. Prospective, experimental study. University-based equine research facility. Ten healthy adult horses, 7 geldings and 3 mares. Gastric pressures were measured using a nasogastric tube with a U-tube manometry technique, while intraperitoneal pressures were measured with a peritoneal cannula. Measurements of intraabdominal pressure were obtained by both methods, simultaneously, and were evaluated using 5 increasing volumes of fluid infused into the stomach (0, 400, 1,000, 2,000, and 3,000 mL). Bias and agreement between the 2 methods were determined using Bland-Altman analysis and Lin's concordance correlation coefficients. Mean gastric pressure was 14.44 ± 4.69 cm H(2)O and ranged from 0 to 25.8 cm H(2)O. Intraperitoneal pressure measurements were generally subatmospheric, and ranged from -6.6 to 3.1 cm H(2) O (mean ± SD, -1.59 ± 2.09 cm H(2)O). Measurements of intraperitoneal pressures were repeatable; however, intra- and interindividual variance was significantly larger for measurements of gastric pressures. The mean and relative bias for comparison between the 2 techniques was 15.9 ± 5.3 cm H(2)O and 244.3 ± 199.2%, respectively. The Lin's concordance correlation coefficient between gastric and intraperitoneal pressures was -0.003 but this was not statistically significant (P=0.75). There was no statistical concordance between measurements of intraabdominal pressure using gastric and intraperitoneal pressure measurement, indicating that gastric pressures cannot be substituted for intraperitoneal pressure measurement. Direct measurement of intraperitoneal pressures may be a more consistent method for comparison of intraabdominal pressures between horses, due to less variability within and between

  17. Experimental measurement of compressibility coefficients of synthetic sandstone in hydrostatic conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asaei, H.; Moosavi, M.

    2013-10-01

    For the characterization of the mechanical behavior of porous media in elastic conditions, the theory of poroelasticity is used. The number of poroelastic coefficients is greater in elastic conditions because of the complexity of porous media. The laboratory measurement of poroelastic coefficients needs a system that can control and measure the variables of poroelasticity. In this paper, experimental measurements of these coefficients are presented. Laboratory tests are performed using a system designed by the authors. Laboratory hydrostatic tests are performed on cylindrical samples in drained, pore pressure loading, undrained and dry conditions. Compressibilities (bulk and pore compressibility), effective stress and Skempton coefficients are measured by these tests. Samples are made of a composition (sand and cement) and are made by a compaction process synthetically. Calibration tests are performed for the setup to identify possible errors in the system and to correct the results of the main tests. This is done by performing similar compressibility tests at each stress level on a cylindrical steel sample (5.47 mm in diameter) with a longitudinal hole along it (hollow cylinder). A steel sample is used to assume an incompressible sample. The results of the tests are compared with the theory of poroelasticity and the obtained graphs and their errors are analyzed. This study shows that the results of the drained and pore pressure loading tests are compatible with poroelastic formulation, while the undrained results have errors because of extra fluid volume in the pore pressure system and calibration difficulties.

  18. Coefficients of discharge of fuel-injection nozzles for compression-ignition engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gelalles, A G

    1932-01-01

    This report presents the results of an investigation to determine the coefficients of discharge of nozzles with small, round orifices of the size used with high-speed compression-ignition engines. The injection pressures and chamber back pressures employed were comparable to those existing in compression-ignition engines during injection. The construction of the nozzles was varied to determine the effect of the nozzle design on the coefficient. Tests were also made with nozzles assembled in an automatic injection valve, both with a plain and with a helically grooved stem. It was found that a smooth passage before the orifice is requisite for high flow efficiency. A beveled leading edge before the orifice gave a higher coefficient of discharge than a rounded edge. The results with the nozzles assembled in an automatic injection valve having a plain stem duplicated those with the nozzles assembled at the end of a straight tube of constant diameter. Lower coefficients were obtained with the nozzles assembled in an injection valve having a helically grooved stem. When the coefficients of nozzles of any one geometrical shape were plotted against values of corresponding Reynold's numbers for the orifice diameters and rates of flow tested, it was found that experimental points were distributed along a single curve.

  19. Diffusion coefficients in gravel under unsaturated conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Conca, J.L.; Wright, J. )

    1990-05-01

    Diffusion coefficients were experimentally determined in unsaturated gravel to evaluate the effectiveness of gravel as a diffusion barrier to ionic transport in the vadose zone. Water contents were fixed by use of an ultracentrifuge with an ultralow constant rate flow pump supplying solution to the sample via a rotating seal. Once the gravel was at hydraulic steady state, the electrical conductivity was measured, and the diffusion coefficient calculated using the Nernst-Einstein equation. Diffusion coefficient values for potassium ion (D{sub e}) in four types of angular gravel ranged from 1.7 {times} 10{sup {minus}11} m{sup 2}/s (1.7 {times} 10{sup {minus}7} cm{sup 2}/s) for a 6.3-9.5 mm angular granitic gravel at a volumetric water content of 5.5% to 2.2 {times} 10{sup {minus}14} m{sup 2}/s (2.2 {times} 10{sup {minus}10} cm{sup 2}/s) in a 4.0-6.3 mm quartzite gravel at a volumetric water content of 0.47%. Variations in D{sub e} values resulted primarily from differences in water content which depends on gravel type and particle size.

  20. Drag coefficients for winter Antarctic pack ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wamser, Christian; Martinson, Douglas G.

    1993-01-01

    Air-ice and ice-water drag coefficients referenced to 10-m-height winds for winter Antarctic pack ice based on measurements made from R/V Polarstern during the Winter Weddell Sea Project, 1986 (WWSP-86), and from R/V Akademik Fedorov during the Winter Weddell Gyre Study, 1989 (WWGS-89), are presented. The optimal values of the air-ice drag coefficients, made from turbulent flux measurements, are (1.79 +/- 0.06) x 10 exp -3 for WWSP-86 and (1.45 +/- 0.09) x 10 exp -3 for WWGS-89. A single ice-water drag coefficient for both WWSP-86 and WWGS-89, estimated from periods of ice drift throught to represent free-drift conditions, is (1.13 +/- 0.26) x 10 exp -3, and the ice-water turning angle is 18 +/- 18 deg. It is suggested that for a typical Antarctic winter pack ice cover, the ice cover reduces the momentum flux from the atmosphere to the ocean by about 33 percent.

  1. Determining the Temperature Coefficient of Reference Resistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bojkovski, J.; Batagelj, V.; Žužek, V.

    2017-04-01

    The influence of temperature on electrical resistance of standard resistors is presented within this paper. Electrical resistance is like any other quantity temperature dependent. This dependence is specified with the temperature coefficient, which gives the relative change of resistance with temperature. The level of resistance change is not linear as it changes with temperature, and therefore the coefficient is temperature dependent as well. At a certain temperature, its value is equal to zero—the stationary point. Use of the standard resistor at this exact temperature or in a narrow interval around it greatly reduces the influence of temperature on electrical resistance, even if the thermal conditions are not optimal. Measurements of temperature coefficient were taken on a group of standard resistors of the same type in a wide temperature range, and the temperature of the stationary point was determined. Measurements were taken by placing the resistors in an oil bath and changing its set point temperature from 18°C to 38°C. Electrical resistance of each resistor was measured using a resistance bridge, which had its reference resistor placed in a separate thermal enclosure at a constant temperature.

  2. MULTIVARIATE VARYING COEFFICIENT MODEL FOR FUNCTIONAL RESPONSES

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Hongtu; Li, Runze; Kong, Linglong

    2012-01-01

    Motivated by recent work studying massive imaging data in the neuroimaging literature, we propose multivariate varying coefficient models (MVCM) for modeling the relation between multiple functional responses and a set of covariates. We develop several statistical inference procedures for MVCM and systematically study their theoretical properties. We first establish the weak convergence of the local linear estimate of coefficient functions, as well as its asymptotic bias and variance, and then we derive asymptotic bias and mean integrated squared error of smoothed individual functions and their uniform convergence rate. We establish the uniform convergence rate of the estimated covariance function of the individual functions and its associated eigenvalue and eigenfunctions. We propose a global test for linear hypotheses of varying coefficient functions, and derive its asymptotic distribution under the null hypothesis. We also propose a simultaneous confidence band for each individual effect curve. We conduct Monte Carlo simulation to examine the finite-sample performance of the proposed procedures. We apply MVCM to investigate the development of white matter diffusivities along the genu tract of the corpus callosum in a clinical study of neurodevelopment. PMID:23645942

  3. MULTIVARIATE VARYING COEFFICIENT MODEL FOR FUNCTIONAL RESPONSES

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Hongtu; Li, Runze; Kong, Linglong

    2012-01-01

    Motivated by recent work studying massive imaging data in the neuroimaging literature, we propose multivariate varying coefficient models (MVCM) for modeling the relation between multiple functional responses and a set of covariates. We develop several statistical inference procedures for MVCM and systematically study their theoretical properties. We first establish the weak convergence of the local linear estimate of coefficient functions, as well as its asymptotic bias and variance, and then we derive asymptotic bias and mean integrated squared error of smoothed individual functions and their uniform convergence rate. We establish the uniform convergence rate of the estimated covariance function of the individual functions and its associated eigenvalue and eigenfunctions. We propose a global test for linear hypotheses of varying coefficient functions, and derive its asymptotic distribution under the null hypothesis. We also propose a simultaneous confidence band for each individual effect curve. We conduct Monte Carlo simulation to examine the finite-sample performance of the proposed procedures. We apply MVCM to investigate the development of white matter diffusivities along the genu tract of the corpus callosum in a clinical study of neurodevelopment. PMID:12926711

  4. MULTIVARIATE VARYING COEFFICIENT MODEL FOR FUNCTIONAL RESPONSES.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hongtu; Li, Runze; Kong, Linglong

    2012-10-01

    Motivated by recent work studying massive imaging data in the neuroimaging literature, we propose multivariate varying coefficient models (MVCM) for modeling the relation between multiple functional responses and a set of covariates. We develop several statistical inference procedures for MVCM and systematically study their theoretical properties. We first establish the weak convergence of the local linear estimate of coefficient functions, as well as its asymptotic bias and variance, and then we derive asymptotic bias and mean integrated squared error of smoothed individual functions and their uniform convergence rate. We establish the uniform convergence rate of the estimated covariance function of the individual functions and its associated eigenvalue and eigenfunctions. We propose a global test for linear hypotheses of varying coefficient functions, and derive its asymptotic distribution under the null hypothesis. We also propose a simultaneous confidence band for each individual effect curve. We conduct Monte Carlo simulation to examine the finite-sample performance of the proposed procedures. We apply MVCM to investigate the development of white matter diffusivities along the genu tract of the corpus callosum in a clinical study of neurodevelopment.

  5. Edge Diffraction Coefficients around Critical Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fradkin, L.; Harmer, M.; Darmon, M.

    2014-04-01

    The classical GTD (Geometrical Theory of Diffraction) gives a recipe, based on high-frequency asymptotics, for calculating edge diffraction coefficients in the geometrical regions where only diffracted waves propagate. The Uniform GTD extends this recipe to transition zones between irradiated and silent regions, known as penumbra. For many industrial materials, e.g. steels, and frequencies utlized in industrial ultrasonic transducers, that is, around 5 MHz, asymptotics suggested for description of geometrical regions supporting the head waves or transition regions surrounding their boundaries, known as critical rays, prove unsatisfactory. We present a numerical extension of GTD, which is based on a regularized, variable step Simpson's method for evaluating the edge diffraction coefficients in the regions of interference between head waves, diffracted waves and/or reflected waves. In mathematical terms, these are the regions of coalescence of three critical points - a branch point, stationary point and/or pole, respectively. We show that away from the shadow boundaries, near the critical rays the GTD still produces correct values of the edge diffraction coefficients.

  6. Roughness coefficients for stream channels in Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Aldridge, B.N.; Garrett, J.M.

    1973-01-01

           n in which V = mean cross-sectional velocity of flow, in feet per second; R = hydraulic radius at a cross section, which is the cross-sectional area divided by the wetter perimeter, in feet; Se = energy slope; and n = coefficient of roughness. Many research studies have been made to determine "n" values for open-channel flow (Carter and others, 1963). Guidelines for selecting coefficient of roughness for stream channels are given in most of the literature of stream-channel hydraulics, but few of the data relate directly to streams of Arizona, The U.S> Geological Survey, at the request of the Arizona Highway Department, assembled the color photographs and tables of the Manning "n" values in this report to aid highway engineers in the selection of roughness coefficients for Arizona streams. Most of the photographs show channel reaches for which values of "n" have been assigned by experienced Survey personnel; a few photographs are included for reaches where "n" values have been verified. Verified "n" values are computed from a known discharge and measured channel geometry. Selected photographs of stream channels for which "n" values have been verified are included in U.S. Geological Survey Water-Supply Paper 1849 (Barnes, 1967); stereoscopic slides of Barnes' (1967) photographs and additional photographs can be inspected at U.S> Geological Survey offices in: 2555 E. First Street, Tucson; and 5017 Federal Building, 230 N. First Avenue, Phoenix.

  7. Drag coefficients for winter Antarctic pack ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wamser, Christian; Martinson, Douglas G.

    1993-01-01

    Air-ice and ice-water drag coefficients referenced to 10-m-height winds for winter Antarctic pack ice based on measurements made from R/V Polarstern during the Winter Weddell Sea Project, 1986 (WWSP-86), and from R/V Akademik Fedorov during the Winter Weddell Gyre Study, 1989 (WWGS-89), are presented. The optimal values of the air-ice drag coefficients, made from turbulent flux measurements, are (1.79 +/- 0.06) x 10 exp -3 for WWSP-86 and (1.45 +/- 0.09) x 10 exp -3 for WWGS-89. A single ice-water drag coefficient for both WWSP-86 and WWGS-89, estimated from periods of ice drift throught to represent free-drift conditions, is (1.13 +/- 0.26) x 10 exp -3, and the ice-water turning angle is 18 +/- 18 deg. It is suggested that for a typical Antarctic winter pack ice cover, the ice cover reduces the momentum flux from the atmosphere to the ocean by about 33 percent.

  8. Field verification of the wind tunnel coefficients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gawronski, W. K.; Mellstrom, J. A.

    1994-01-01

    Accurate information about wind action on antennas is required for reliable prediction of antenna pointing errors in windy weather and for the design of an antenna controller with wind disturbance rejection properties. The wind tunnel data obtained 3 years ago using a scaled antenna model serves as an antenna industry standard, frequently used for the first purpose. The accuracy of the wind tunnel data has often been challenged, since they have not yet been tested in a field environment (full-aized antenna, real wind, actual terrain, etc.). The purpose of this investigation was to obtain selected field measurements and compare them with the available wind tunnel data. For this purpose, wind steady-state torques of the DSS-13 antenna were measured, and dimensionless wind torque coefficients were obtained for a variety of yaw and elevation angles. The results showed that the differences between the wind tunnel torque coefficients and the field torque coefficients were less than 10 percent of their values. The wind-gusting action on the antenna was characterized by the power spectra of the antenna encoder and the antenna torques. The spectra showed that wind gusting primarily affects the antenna principal modes.

  9. Foil-like manganin gauges for dynamic high pressure measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Zhuoping; Liu, Yan; Pi, Aiguo; Huang, Fenglei

    2011-07-01

    Foil-like manganin gauges with a variety of shapes used in different ranges of pressure for the one-dimensional strain mode and axisymmetric strain mode were designed for measuring the detonation pressures of explosives and high shock pressure in materials. In the stress range of 0-53.5 GPa, the pressure-piezoresistance relationships of the manganin gauges were calibrated by the light gas gun and the planar lens of explosive. The piezoresistance coefficients were obtained in different ranges of pressure. To verify the coefficients, the detonation pressure (CJ pressure) of TNT explosive was measured by the manganin gauges, which give similar CJ pressure values to those reported by Zhang et al (2009 Detonation Physics (Beijing: Ordnance Industry Press)) with the maximum relative deviation being less than 3%.

  10. Experimentally Determined Heat Transfer Coefficients for Spacesuit Liquid Cooled Garments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bue, Grant; Watts, Carly; Rhodes, Richard; Anchondo, Ian; Westheimer, David; Campbell, Colin; Vonau, Walt; Vogel, Matt; Conger, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    A Human-In-The-Loop (HITL) Portable Life Support System 2.0 (PLSS 2.0) test has been conducted at NASA Johnson Space Center in the PLSS Development Laboratory from October 27, 2014 to December 19, 2014. These closed-loop tests of the PLSS 2.0 system integrated with human subjects in the Mark III Suit at 3.7 psi to 4.3 psi above ambient pressure performing treadmill exercise at various metabolic rates from standing rest to 3000 BTU/hr (880 W). The bulk of the PLSS 2.0 was at ambient pressure but effluent water vapor from the Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator (SWME) and the Auxiliary Membrane Evaporator (Mini-ME), and effluent carbon dioxide from the Rapid Cycle Amine (RCA) were ported to vacuum to test performance of these components in flight-like conditions. One of the objectives of this test was to determine the heat transfer coefficient (UA) of the Liquid Cooling Garment (LCG). The UA, an important factor for modeling the heat rejection of an LCG, was determined in a variety of conditions by varying inlet water temperature, flowrate, and metabolic rate. Three LCG configurations were tested: the Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) LCG, the Oceaneering Space Systems (OSS) LCG, and the OSS auxiliary LCG. Other factors influencing accurate UA determination, such as overall heat balance, LCG fit, and the skin temperature measurement, will also be discussed.

  11. The compressibility and the capacitance coefficient of helium-oxygen atmospheres.

    PubMed

    Imbert, G; Dejours, P; Hildwein, G

    1982-12-01

    The capacitance coefficient beta of an ideal gas mixture depends only on its temperature T, and its value is derived from the ideal gas law (i.e., beta = 1/RT, R being the ideal gas constant). But real gases behave as ideal gases only at low pressures, and this would not be the case in deep diving. High pressures of helium-oxygen are used in human and animal experimental dives (up to 7 or 12 MPa or more, respectively). At such pressures deviations from the ideal gas law cannot be neglected in hyperbaric atmospheres with respect to current accuracy of measuring instruments. As shown both theoretically and experimentally by this study, the non-ideal nature of helium-oxygen has a significant effect on the capacitance coefficient of hyperbaric atmospheres. The theoretical study is based on interaction energy in either homogeneous (He-He and O2-O2) or heterogeneous (He-O2) molecular pairs, and on the virial equation of state for gas mixtures. The experimental study is based on weight determination of samples of known volume of binary helium-oxygen mixtures, which are prepared in well-controlled pressure and temperature conditions. Our experimental results are in good agreement with theoretical predictions. 1) The helium compressibility factor ZHe increases linearly with pressure [ZHe = 1 + 0.0045 P (in MPa) at 30 degrees C]; and 2) in same temperature and pressure conditions (T = 303 K and P = 0.1 to 15 MPa), the same value for Z is valid for a helium-oxygen binary mixture and for pure helium. As derived from the equation of state of real gases, the capacitance coefficient is inversely related to Z (beta = 1/ZRT); therefore, for helium-oxygen mixtures, this coefficient would decrease with increasing pressure. A table is given for theoretical values of helium-oxygen capacitance coefficient, at pressures ranging from 0.1 to 15.0 MPa and at temperatures ranging from 25 degrees C to 37 degrees C.

  12. Pressure Alopecia

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Kate E; Yesudian, PD

    2012-01-01

    Postoperative or pressure alopecia (PA) is an infrequently reported group of scarring and non-scarring alopecias. It has been reported after immobilization of the head during surgery and following prolonged stays on intensive care units, and may be analogous to a healed pressure ulcer. This review presents a summary of cases published in pediatrics and after cardiac, gynecological, abdominal and facial surgeries. PA may manifest as swelling, tenderness, and ulceration of the scalp in the first few postoperative days; in other cases, the alopecia may be the presenting feature with a history of scalp immobilization in the previous four weeks. The condition may cause considerable psychological distress in the long term. Regular head turning schedules and vigilance for the condition should be used as prophylaxis to prevent permanent alopecia. A multi-center study in high-risk patients would be beneficial to shed further light on the etiology of the condition. PMID:23180911

  13. Alpha-Particle Gas-Pressure Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buehler, M. C.; Bell, L. D.; Hecht, M. H.

    1996-01-01

    An approximate model was developed to establish design curves for the saturation region and a more complete model developed to characterize the current-voltage curves for an alpha-particle pressure sensor. A simple two-parameter current-voltage expression was developed to describe the dependence of the ion current on pressure. The parameters are the saturation-current pressure coefficient and mu/D, the ion mobility/diffusion coefficient. The sensor is useful in the pressure range between 0.1 and 1000 mb using a 1 - mu Ci(241) Am source. Experimental results, taken between 1 and up to 200 mb, show the sensor operates with an anode voltage of 5 V and a sensitivity of 20 fA/mb in nitrogen.

  14. Pressure drop in two-phase flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akashah, S. A.

    1980-12-01

    A computer program was developed containing some of the methods for predicting pressure drop in two-phase flow. The program contains accurate methods for predicting phase behavior and physical properties and can be used to calculate pressure drops for horizontal, inclined and vertical phases. The program was used to solve test cases for many types of flow, varying the diameter, roughness, composition, overall heat transfer coefficient, angle of inclination, and length. The Lockhart-Martinelli correlation predicts the highest pressure drop while the Beggs and Brill method predicts the lowest. The American Gas Association-American Petroleum Institute method is consistent and proved to be reliable in vertical, horizontal and inclined flow. The roughness of the pipe diameter had great effect on pressure drop in two-phase flow, while the overall heat transfer coefficient had little effect.

  15. Phonon Drag Dislocations at High Pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfer, W.G.

    1999-10-19

    Phonon drag on dislocations is the dominant process which determines the flow stress of metals at elevated temperatures and at very high plastic deformation rates. The dependence of the phonon drag on pressure or density is derived using a Mie-Grueneisen equation of state. The phonon drag is shown to increase nearly linearly with temperature but to decrease with density or pressure. Numerical results are presented for its variation for shock-loaded copper and aluminum. In these cases, density and temperature increase simultaneously, resulting in a more modest net increase in the dislocation drag coefficient. Nevertheless, phonon drag increases by more than an order of magnitude during shock deformations which approach melting. Since the dependencies of elastic moduli and of the phonon drag coefficient on pressure and temperature are fundamentally different, the effect of pressure on the constitutive law for plastic deformation can not simply be accounted for by its effect on the elastic shear modulus.

  16. Pressurized hopper

    SciTech Connect

    Densley, P.J.; Goldmann, L.H. Jr.

    1980-04-01

    A Secure Automated Fuel Fabrication Line is being developed to reduce personnel exposure and to improve safeguards. Fertile and fissile fuel powders are blended in the line for making fuel pellets. A pressurized hopper was developed for use not only as a blender, but also as a storage and feeding device. It works with or without injection tubes to produce a well-blended powder with reduced agglomerate population. Results of blending experiments using dry Kaolin clay and Tempra pigment are given. (DLC)

  17. Pressure transducer

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, T.T.; Roop, C.J.; Schmidt, K.J.; Gunchin, E.R.

    1987-02-13

    A pressure transducer suitable for use in high temperature environments includes two pairs of induction coils, each pair being bifilarly wound together, and each pair of coils connected as opposite arms of a four arm circuit; an electrically conductive target moveably positioned between the coil pairs and connected to a diaphragm such that deflection of the diaphragm causes axial movement of the target and an unbalance in the bridge output. 7 figs.

  18. Pressure transducer

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Thomas T.; Roop, Conard J.; Schmidt, Kenneth J.; Gunchin, Elmer R.

    1989-01-01

    A pressure transducer suitable for use in high temperature environments includes two pairs of induction coils, each pair being bifilarly wound together, and each pair of coils connected as opposite arms of a four arm circuit; an electrically conductive target moveably positioned between the coil pairs and connected to a diaphragm such that deflection of the diaphragm causes axial movement of the target and an unbalance in the bridge output.

  19. Performance back-deduction from a loading to flow coefficient map: Application to radial turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbonneau, Xavier; Binder, Nicolas

    2012-12-01

    Radial turbine stages are often used for applications requiring off-design operation, as turbocharging for instance. The off-design ability of such stages is commonly analyzed through the traditional turbine map, plotting the reduced mass-flow against the pressure-ratio, for reduced-speed lines. However, some alternatives are possible, such as the flow-coefficient ( Ψ) to loading-coefficient ( φ) diagram where the pressure-ratio lines are actually straight lines, very convenient property to perform prediction. A robust method re-creating this map from a predicted Ψ-φ diagram is needed. Recent work has shown that this back-deduction quality, without the use of any loss models, depends on the knowledge of an intermediate pressure-ratio. A modelization of this parameter is then proposed. The comparison with both experimental and CFD results is presented, with quite good agreement for mass flow rate and rotational speed, and for the intermediate pressure ratio. The last part of the paper is dedicated to the application of the intermediate pressure-ratio knowledge to the improvement of the deduction of the pressure ratio lines in the Ψ-φ diagram. Beside this improvement, the back-deduction method of the classical map is structured, applied and evaluated.

  20. Granular clustering: self-consistent analysis for general coefficients of restitution.

    PubMed

    Thiesen, E; Morgado, W A M

    2006-05-01

    We study the equilibrium behavior of one-dimensional granular clusters and one-particle granular gases for a variety of velocity-dependent coefficients of restitution r. We obtain equations describing the long-time behavior for the cluster's pressure, rms velocity, and granular interspacing. We show that for extremely long times, clusters with velocity-dependent coefficients of restitution are unstable and dissolve into homogeneous, quasielastic gases, but clusters with velocity-independent r are permanent. This is in accordance with hydrodynamic studies pointing to the transient nature of density instabilities for granular gases with velocity-dependent r.

  1. Experimental Study of Coupling Coefficients for Propulsion on TEA CO2 Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Tan Rongqing; Lin Jun; Hughes, Jeremy; Pakhomov, Andrew V.

    2004-03-30

    The original purpose of this study was to address a partition of propulsive energy between air and metal, when the breakdown is initiated at the metal surface and/or in adjacent air space. Coupling coefficient as a function of air pressure varied in the range 4 mTorr - 1 atm is presented. The experiments were conducted by focusing output pulses of a TEA CO2 laser system (0.2-{mu}s pulsewidth at 10.6 {mu}m wavelength and {approx} 10.0 J energy) on aluminum targets. Coupling coefficients were derived from the pendulum displacements.

  2. Tunable diode laser measurements of HO2NO2 absorption coefficients near 12.5 microns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    May, R. D.; Molina, L. T.; Webster, C. R.

    1988-01-01

    A tunable diode laser spectrometer has been used to measure absorption coefficients of peroxynitric acid (HO2NO2) near the 803/cm Q branch. HO2NO2 concentrations in a low-pressure flowing gas mixture were determined from chemical titration procedures and UV absorption spectroscopy. The diode laser measured absorption coefficients, at a spectral resolution of better than 0.001/cm, are about 10 percent larger than previous Fourier transform infrared measurements made at a spectral resolution of 0.06/cm.

  3. Quantum statistics of classical particles derived from the condition of a free diffusion coefficient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoyuelos, M.; Sisterna, P.

    2016-12-01

    We derive an equation for the current of particles in energy space; particles are subject to a mean-field effective potential that may represent quantum effects. From the assumption that noninteracting particles imply a free diffusion coefficient in energy space, we derive Maxwell-Boltzmann, Fermi-Dirac, and Bose-Einstein statistics. Other new statistics are associated to a free diffusion coefficient; their thermodynamic properties are analyzed using the grand partition function. A negative relation between pressure and energy density for low temperatures can be derived, suggesting a possible connection with cosmological dark energy models.

  4. Tunable diode laser measurements of HO2NO2 absorption coefficients near 12.5 microns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    May, R. D.; Molina, L. T.; Webster, C. R.

    1988-01-01

    A tunable diode laser spectrometer has been used to measure absorption coefficients of peroxynitric acid (HO2NO2) near the 803/cm Q branch. HO2NO2 concentrations in a low-pressure flowing gas mixture were determined from chemical titration procedures and UV absorption spectroscopy. The diode laser measured absorption coefficients, at a spectral resolution of better than 0.001/cm, are about 10 percent larger than previous Fourier transform infrared measurements made at a spectral resolution of 0.06/cm.

  5. Quantum statistics of classical particles derived from the condition of a free diffusion coefficient.

    PubMed

    Hoyuelos, M; Sisterna, P

    2016-12-01

    We derive an equation for the current of particles in energy space; particles are subject to a mean-field effective potential that may represent quantum effects. From the assumption that noninteracting particles imply a free diffusion coefficient in energy space, we derive Maxwell-Boltzmann, Fermi-Dirac, and Bose-Einstein statistics. Other new statistics are associated to a free diffusion coefficient; their thermodynamic properties are analyzed using the grand partition function. A negative relation between pressure and energy density for low temperatures can be derived, suggesting a possible connection with cosmological dark energy models.

  6. Reduced basis technique for evaluating the sensitivity coefficients of the nonlinear tire response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, Ahmed K.; Tanner, John A.; Peters, Jeanne M.

    1992-01-01

    An efficient reduced-basis technique is proposed for calculating the sensitivity of nonlinear tire response to variations in the design variables. The tire is modeled using a 2-D, moderate rotation, laminated anisotropic shell theory, including the effects of variation in material and geometric parameters. The vector of structural response and its first-order and second-order sensitivity coefficients are each expressed as a linear combination of a small number of basis vectors. The effectiveness of the basis vectors used in approximating the sensitivity coefficients is demonstrated by a numerical example involving the Space Shuttle nose-gear tire, which is subjected to uniform inflation pressure.

  7. Experimental and theoretical rotordynamic stiffness coefficients for a three-stage brush seal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pugachev, A. O.; Deckner, M.

    2012-08-01

    Experimental and theoretical results are presented for a multistage brush seal. Experimental stiffness is obtained from integrating circumferential pressure distribution measured in seal cavities. A CFD analysis is used to predict seal performance. Bristle packs are modeled by the porous medium approach. Leakage is predicted well by the CFD method. Theoretical stiffness coefficients are in reasonable agreement with the measurements. Experimental results are also compared with a three-teeth-on-stator labyrinth seal. The multistage brush seal gives about 60% leakage reduction over the labyrinth seal. Rotordynamic stiffness coefficients are also improved: the brush seal has positive direct stiffness and smaller cross-coupled stiffness.

  8. Thermal coefficient of delay for various coaxial and fiber-optic cables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lutes, G. F.; Diener, W.

    1989-01-01

    Data are presented on the thermal coefficient of delay for various coaxial and fiber optic cables, as measured by the Frequency and Timing Systems Engineering Group and the Time and Frequency Systems Research Group. The measured pressure coefficient of delay is also given for the air-dielectric coaxial cables. A description of the measurement method and a description of each of the cables and its use at JPL and in the DSN are included. An improvement in frequency and phase stability by a factor of ten is possible with the use of fiber optics.

  9. Calculating Mass Diffusion in High-Pressure Binary Fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bellan, Josette; Harstad, Kenneth

    2004-01-01

    A comprehensive mathematical model of mass diffusion has been developed for binary fluids at high pressures, including critical and supercritical pressures. Heretofore, diverse expressions, valid for limited parameter ranges, have been used to correlate high-pressure binary mass-diffusion-coefficient data. This model will likely be especially useful in the computational simulation and analysis of combustion phenomena in diesel engines, gas turbines, and liquid rocket engines, wherein mass diffusion at high pressure plays a major role.

  10. Hydriding system for moderately severe conditions of pressure and temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elton, J.; Oesterreicher, H.

    1983-12-01

    A hydriding system capable of pressures up to 1000 atm and temperatures up to 550 °C is described. A pressure generator in which H is outgassed from a metal hydride is used to produce the highest pressures. With this unit one can rather accurately determine the hydrogen uptake in metal hydrides at elevated temperatures and pressures by employing the virial equation of state out to the fourth virial coefficient.

  11. High-pressure Raman spectroscopy of carbon onions and nanocapsules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, J. J.; Liu, G. H.; Wang, X. M.; Fujita, T.; Xu, B. S.; Chen, M. W.

    2009-08-01

    We report high-pressure Raman spectra of carbon onions and nanocapsules investigated by diamond anvil cell experiments. The pressure coefficient and elastic behavior of carbon onions and nanocapsules are found to be very similar to those of multiwall carbon nanotubes. Additionally, detectable structure changes, particularly the collapse of the concentric graphite structure, cannot been seen at pressures as high as ˜20 GPa, demonstrating that carbon onions and nanocapsules have significant hardness and can sustain very high pressures.

  12. Accuracy of Pressure Sensitive Paint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Tianshu; Guille, M.; Sullivan, J. P.

    2001-01-01

    Uncertainty in pressure sensitive paint (PSP) measurement is investigated from a standpoint of system modeling. A functional relation between the imaging system output and luminescent emission from PSP is obtained based on studies of radiative energy transports in PSP and photodetector response to luminescence. This relation provides insights into physical origins of various elemental error sources and allows estimate of the total PSP measurement uncertainty contributed by the elemental errors. The elemental errors and their sensitivity coefficients in the error propagation equation are evaluated. Useful formulas are given for the minimum pressure uncertainty that PSP can possibly achieve and the upper bounds of the elemental errors to meet required pressure accuracy. An instructive example of a Joukowsky airfoil in subsonic flows is given to illustrate uncertainty estimates in PSP measurements.

  13. Accuracy of Pressure Sensitive Paint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Tianshu; Guille, M.; Sullivan, J. P.

    2001-01-01

    Uncertainty in pressure sensitive paint (PSP) measurement is investigated from a standpoint of system modeling. A functional relation between the imaging system output and luminescent emission from PSP is obtained based on studies of radiative energy transports in PSP and photodetector response to luminescence. This relation provides insights into physical origins of various elemental error sources and allows estimate of the total PSP measurement uncertainty contributed by the elemental errors. The elemental errors and their sensitivity coefficients in the error propagation equation are evaluated. Useful formulas are given for the minimum pressure uncertainty that PSP can possibly achieve and the upper bounds of the elemental errors to meet required pressure accuracy. An instructive example of a Joukowsky airfoil in subsonic flows is given to illustrate uncertainty estimates in PSP measurements.

  14. Vapor Pressure of Coal Chemicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, J.; Lin, C. T.; Chung, T. H.

    1983-10-01

    The vapor pressure data on 324 coal compounds are collected and analyzed. The adopted data sets for each substance are weighted and combined to fit into a Cox vapor pressure equation, log10P=(1-D/T)×10(A+BT+CT2) by the least-squares method. The results of the literature review and the evaluated values of coefficients for the vapor pressure equations are presented in separate tables. For ease of presentation, the coal compounds are divided into seven groups, based upon their molecular structures. They are (1) benzene and its derivatives, (2) naphthalene and its derivatives, (3) saturated ring compounds, (4) unsaturated ring compounds, (5) heterocyclic sulfur compounds, (6) heterocyclic nitrogen compounds, and (7) heterocyclic oxygen compounds.

  15. A Method for Maximizing Split-Half Reliability Coefficients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callender, John C.; Osburn, H. G.

    1977-01-01

    An efficient algorithm for maximizing split-half reliability coefficients is described. Coefficients derived by the algorithm were found to be generally larger than odd-even split-half coefficients or other internal consistency measures and nearly as large as the largest split half coefficients. MSPLIT, Odd-Even, and Kuder-Richardson-20…

  16. Reliability of nocturnal blood pressure dipping.

    PubMed

    Dimsdale, J E; von Känel, R; Profant, J; Nelesen, R; Ancoli-Israel, S; Ziegler, M

    2000-08-01

    Increasing evidence documents the fact that individuals whose blood pressure drops or 'dips' relatively little at night have a higher risk of numerous cardiovascular illnesses. To examine the reliability of various measures of nocturnal blood pressure dipping. This study examined 17 individuals with ambulatory blood pressure monitoring on three 24 h recordings while they pursued a schedule similar to that of in-patients on a clinical research unit. Nocturnal dipping of blood pressure was scored three ways: as the drop in blood pressure between 10 p.m. and 6 a.m. ('clocktime'), as the drop in blood pressure tailored to each individual's reported bedtime ('bedtime'), and as the drop in blood pressure accompanying polysomnographically verified sleep ('sleeptime'). Adequate reliability was obtained for all three measures of dipping. There was, in general, a significant correlation across testing occasions (P<0.05). The correlation coefficient ranged from 0.5 to 0.8, depending on which criterion of dipping was selected and whether the endpoint was systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, or mean arterial blood pressure. The reliability of systolic blood pressure dipping was somewhat lower than that of diastolic or mean arterial blood pressure dipping. Dipping appears to be a reliable construct. While no one definition of dipping was demonstrably better than another, the most sensible definition of dipping would allow some adjustment for defining 'night' on the basis of each individual's idiosyncratic bed time.

  17. Reference Phantom Method for Acoustic Backscatter Coefficient and Attenuation Coefficient Measurements.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Linxin

    1990-08-01

    In previous work in our laboratory accurate backscatter coefficient measurements were obtained with a data reduction method that explicitly accounts for experimental factors involved in recording echo data. An alternative, relative processing method for determining the backscatter coefficient and the attenuation coefficient is presented here. This method involves comparison of echo data from a sample with data recorded from a reference phantom whose backscatter and attenuation coefficients are known. The ratio of the signals cancels depth-dependent instrumentation factors. This saves the efforts of beam profile computation and various calibrations. The attenuation coefficient and backscatter coefficient of the sample are found from these ratios and the known acoustic properties of the reference phantom. This method is tested using tissue-mimicking phantoms with known scattering and attenuation properties. Various experiments have been done using clinical scanners with different transducers to compute attenuation coefficients and backscatter coefficients, and to make quantitative images. This method has been found to be accurate for media containing Rayleigh scatterers, as well as samples containing intermediate-size scatterers. Accuracy was maintained over different frequency bands and for a wide range of transducer-to-ROI distances. Measurements were done in vivo for human livers, kidneys and dog myocardium. The results have shown that the reference phantom method simplifies the measurement procedure as well as keeps the accuracy, and therefore is practical clinically. Statistical uncertainties propagated in the data reduction have been analyzed in detail. Formulae are deduced to predict statistical errors in the attenuation and backscatter coefficients measured with the reference phantom method. Spatial correlations of the echo signals are also considered. A 2-dimensional lateral correlation matrix is introduced to compute the number of effective independent

  18. Influence of surface modification on friction coefficient of the titanium-elastomer couple.

    PubMed

    Chladek, Wiesław; Hadasik, Eugeniusz; Chladek, Grzegorz

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a study of the friction coefficient of titanium-elastomer couple. The study was carried out with a view to potential future utilization of its results for constructing retentive elements of implanted prostheses. Changes in the friction force were recorded while removing titanium specimens placed between two silicone counter specimens made of Ufi Gel. The influence of the titanium specimen movement speed in relation that of to the counter specimens and the influence of clamping force on the friction force were assessed. Additionally, the surface roughness of titanium specimens differed; in one case, titanium was coated with polyethylene. The effect of introducing artificial saliva between the cooperating surfaces on the friction force and friction coefficient was analyzed as well. Based on the characteristics recorded, the possibilities of shaping the friction coefficient have been assessed, since it is the friction coefficient that determines effective operation of a friction couple through increasing the titanium specimen roughness. The artificial saliva being introduced between the specimens reduces considerably the friction coefficient through a change of the phenomenon model. An increase in the pressure force for the specimens of high roughness entails a reduction of the friction coefficient. The study carried out allows us to identify the roughness parameters, which in turn will enable obtaining the prescribed retention force for friction/membrane couplings.

  19. New topic of supercritical fluids: local activity coefficients of supercritical solvent and cosolvent around solute.

    PubMed

    Hou, Minqiang; Zhang, Xiaogang; Han, Buxing; Song, Jiyuan; Liu, Gang; Zhang, Zhaofu; Zhang, Jianling

    2008-03-14

    The study of inhomogeneity in supercritical fluids (SCFs) is of great importance. In this work, we propose the concept of local activity coefficients in supercritical (SC) solutions, which link thermodynamics and inhomogeneity in SC systems. The local activity coefficients of CO(2)+acetonitrile+phenol blue and CO(2)+acetic acid+phenol blue systems are investigated at 308.15 K in critical region and outside critical region. To do this, the local compositions of CO(2)+acetonitrile and CO(2)+acetic acid mixed solvents around phenol blue are first estimated using UV-visible spectroscopy. Then it is considered that there exist bulk phase and local phase around phenol blue in the systems. The activity coefficients of CO(2) and the cosolvents (acetonitrile or acetic acid) in bulk phase are calculated using Peng-Robinson equation of state. The local activity coefficients of CO(2) and the cosolvents are then calculated on the basis of thermodynamic principles. It is demonstrated that in the critical region the local activity coefficients differ from bulk activity coefficients significantly and are sensitive to pressure. This can explain many unusual phenomena in SC systems in critical region thermodynamically.

  20. New topic of supercritical fluids: Local activity coefficients of supercritical solvent and cosolvent around solute

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Minqiang; Zhang, Xiaogang; Han, Buxing; Song, Jiyuan; Liu, Gang; Zhang, Zhaofu; Zhang, Jianling

    2008-03-01

    The study of inhomogeneity in supercritical fluids (SCFs) is of great importance. In this work, we propose the concept of local activity coefficients in supercritical (SC) solutions, which link thermodynamics and inhomogeneity in SC systems. The local activity coefficients of CO2+acetonitrile+phenol blue and CO2+aceticacid+phenol blue systems are investigated at 308.15K in critical region and outside critical region. To do this, the local compositions of CO2+acetonitrile and CO2+acetic acid mixed solvents around phenol blue are first estimated using UV-visible spectroscopy. Then it is considered that there exist bulk phase and local phase around phenol blue in the systems. The activity coefficients of CO2 and the cosolvents (acetonitrile or acetic acid) in bulk phase are calculated using Peng-Robinson equation of state. The local activity coefficients of CO2 and the cosolvents are then calculated on the basis of thermodynamic principles. It is demonstrated that in the critical region the local activity coefficients differ from bulk activity coefficients significantly and are sensitive to pressure. This can explain many unusual phenomena in SC systems in critical region thermodynamically.

  1. Evaluated activity and osmotic coefficients for aqueous solutions: thirty-six uni-bivalent electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldberg, R. N.

    1981-07-01

    A critical evaluation of the mean acivity and osmotic coefficients in aqueous solutions of thirty-five uni-bivalent electrolytes at 298.15 K is presented. The systems which have been treated are ammonium orthophosphate, guanadinium carbonate, 1,2-ethane disulfonic acid, m-benzene disulfonic acid, ammonium decahydroborate, and the unibivalent compounds of lithium, sodium, potasium, rubidium, and cesium. Osmotic coefficients were calculated from direct vapor pressure measurements, from isopiestic measurements and from freezing-point depression measurements. Activity coefficients were calculated from electromotive force measurements on galvanic cells without transference and from diffusion measurements. Given are empirical coefficients for three different correlating equations, obtained by a weighted least squares fit to the experimental data, and tables consisting of the activity coefficients of the compounds, the osmotic coefficients and activity of water, and the excess Gibbs energy of the solution as functions of the molality for each electrolyte system. The literature coverage is through the computerized version of Chemical Abstracts of September 1979.

  2. Transport coefficients of hard sphere fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigurgeirsson, H.; Heyes, D. M.

    New calculations have been made of the self-diffusion coefficient D, the shear viscosity ηs , the bulk viscosity ηb and thermal conductivity λ of the hard sphere fluid, using molecular dynamics (MD) computer simulation. A newly developed hard sphere MD scheme was used to model the hard sphere fluid over a wide range up to the glass transition (~0.57 packing fraction). System sizes of up to 32 000 hard spheres were considered. This set of transport coefficient data was combined with others taken from the literature to test a number of previously proposed analytical formulae for these quantities together with some new ones given here. Only the self-diffusion coefficient showed any substantial n dependence for N > 500 at equilibrium fluid densities ( ξ < 0.494). D increased with N , especially at intermediate densities in the range ξ ~ 0.3-0.35. The expression for the packing fraction dependence of D proposed by Speedy, R. J., 1987, Molec. Phys. , 62 , 509 was shown to fit these data well for N ~ 500 particle systems. We found that the packing fraction ξ dependence of the two viscosities and thermal conductivity, generically denoted by X , were represented well by the simple formula X/X0 = 1/[1 -( ξ / gr;1)]m within the equilibrium fluid range 0 < ξ <0.493. This formula has two disposable parameters, ξ1 and m, and X0 is the value of the property X in the limit of zero density. This expression has the same form as the Krieger-Dougherty formula (Kreiger, I. M., 1972,Adv. Colloid. Interface Sci. , 3, 111) which is used widely in the colloid literature to represent the packing fraction dependence of the Newtonian shear viscosity of monodisperse colloidal near-hard spheres. Of course, in the present case, X0 was the dilute gas transport coefficient of the pure liquid rather than the solvent viscosity. It was not possible to fit the transport coefficient normalized by their Enskog values with such a simple expression because these ratios are typically of order

  3. Transport coefficients of He+ ions in helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viehland, Larry A.; Johnsen, Rainer; Gray, Benjamin R.; Wright, Timothy G.

    2016-02-01

    This paper demonstrates that the transport coefficients of 4He+ in 4He can be calculated over wide ranges of E/N, the ratio of the electrostatic field strength to the gas number density, with the same level of precision as can be obtained experimentally if sufficiently accurate potential energy curves are available for the X2Σu+ and A2Σg+ states and one takes into account resonant charge transfer. We start by computing new potential energy curves for these states and testing their accuracy by calculating spectroscopic values for the separate states. It is established that the potentials obtained by extrapolation of results from d-aug-cc-pVXZ (X = 6, 7) basis sets using the CASSCF+MRCISD approach are each in exceptionally close agreement with the best potentials available and with experiment. The potentials are then used in a new computer program to determine the semi-classical phase shifts and the transport cross sections, and from these the gaseous ion transport coefficients are determined. In addition, new experimental values are reported for the mobilities of 4He+ in 4He at 298.7 K, as a function of E/N, where careful consideration is given to minimizing various sources of uncertainty. Comparison with previously measured values establishes that only one set of previous data is reliable. Finally, the experimental and theoretical ion transport coefficients are shown to be in very good to excellent agreement, once corrections are applied to account for quantum-mechanical effects.

  4. Transport coefficients of He(+) ions in helium.

    PubMed

    Viehland, Larry A; Johnsen, Rainer; Gray, Benjamin R; Wright, Timothy G

    2016-02-21

    This paper demonstrates that the transport coefficients of (4)He(+) in (4)He can be calculated over wide ranges of E/N, the ratio of the electrostatic field strength to the gas number density, with the same level of precision as can be obtained experimentally if sufficiently accurate potential energy curves are available for the X(2)Σu (+) and A(2)Σg (+) states and one takes into account resonant charge transfer. We start by computing new potential energy curves for these states and testing their accuracy by calculating spectroscopic values for the separate states. It is established that the potentials obtained by extrapolation of results from d-aug-cc-pVXZ (X = 6, 7) basis sets using the CASSCF+MRCISD approach are each in exceptionally close agreement with the best potentials available and with experiment. The potentials are then used in a new computer program to determine the semi-classical phase shifts and the transport cross sections, and from these the gaseous ion transport coefficients are determined. In addition, new experimental values are reported for the mobilities of (4)He(+) in (4)He at 298.7 K, as a function of E/N, where careful consideration is given to minimizing various sources of uncertainty. Comparison with previously measured values establishes that only one set of previous data is reliable. Finally, the experimental and theoretical ion transport coefficients are shown to be in very good to excellent agreement, once corrections are applied to account for quantum-mechanical effects.

  5. Conditional Reliability Coefficients for Test Scores.

    PubMed

    Nicewander, W Alan

    2017-04-06

    The most widely used, general index of measurement precision for psychological and educational test scores is the reliability coefficient-a ratio of true variance for a test score to the true-plus-error variance of the score. In item response theory (IRT) models for test scores, the information function is the central, conditional index of measurement precision. In this inquiry, conditional reliability coefficients for a variety of score types are derived as simple transformations of information functions. It is shown, for example, that the conditional reliability coefficient for an ordinary, number-correct score, X, is equal to, ρ(X,X'|θ)=I(X,θ)/[I(X,θ)+1] Where: θ is a latent variable measured by an observed test score, X; p(X, X'|θ) is the conditional reliability of X at a fixed value of θ; and I(X, θ) is the score information function. This is a surprisingly simple relationship between the 2, basic indices of measurement precision from IRT and classical test theory (CTT). This relationship holds for item scores as well as test scores based on sums of item scores-and it holds for dichotomous as well as polytomous items, or a mix of both item types. Also, conditional reliabilities are derived for computerized adaptive test scores, and for θ-estimates used as alternatives to number correct scores. These conditional reliabilities are all related to information in a manner similar-or-identical to the 1 given above for the number-correct (NC) score. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  6. Elastic-Stiffness Coefficients of Titanium Diboride

    PubMed Central

    Ledbetter, Hassel; Tanaka, Takaho

    2009-01-01

    Using resonance ultrasound spectroscopy, we measured the monocrystal elastic-stiffness coefficients, the Voigt Cij, of TiB2. With hexagonal symmetry, TiB2 exhibits five independent Cij: C11, C33, C44, C12, C13. Using Voigt-Reuss-Hill averaging, we converted these monocrystal values to quasiisotropic (polycrystal) elastic stiffnesses. Briefly, we comment on effects of voids. From the Cij, we calculated the Debye characteristic temperature, the Grüneisen parameter, and various sound velocities. Our study resolves the enormous differences between two previous reports of TiB2’s Cij. PMID:27504232

  7. Effective distribution coefficient in magnetic Czochralski growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurle, D. T. J.; Series, R. W.

    1985-10-01

    The analysis by Burton, Prim and Slichter (1953) of the dependence of the effective distribution coefficient (keff) on the growth and crystal rotation rates in Czochralski growth is extended to include the effect of an imposed steady axial magnetic field. The theory is based on the analysis of the hydromagnetic flow at a rotating disk due to Kakutani (1962). It is shown that keff approaches unity as the field increases. The likely effects of this on the growth of silicon and gallium arsenide are discussed.

  8. Random Matrices and Lyapunov Coefficients Regularity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallavotti, Giovanni

    2017-02-01

    Analyticity and other properties of the largest or smallest Lyapunov exponent of a product of real matrices with a "cone property" are studied as functions of the matrices entries, as long as they vary without destroying the cone property. The result is applied to stability directions, Lyapunov coefficients and Lyapunov exponents of a class of products of random matrices and to dynamical systems. The results are not new and the method is the main point of this work: it is is based on the classical theory of the Mayer series in Statistical Mechanics of rarefied gases.

  9. Modeling canopy reflectance and microwave backscattering coefficient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goel, N. S.

    1985-01-01

    Various approaches to model canopy reflectance (CR) in the visible/infrared region and backscattering coefficient (BSC) in the microwave region are compared and contrasted. It is noted that BSC can be related to CR in the source direction (the 'hot spot' direction). By assuming a frequency dependent leaf reflectance and transmittance it is shown that the observed dependence of BSC on leaf area index, leaf angle distribution, angle of incidence, soil moisture content, and frequency can be simulated by a CR model. Thus both BSC and CR can, in principle, be calculated using a single model which has essentially the same parameters as many CR models do.

  10. Surface area coefficients for airship envelopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diehl, W S

    1922-01-01

    In naval architecture, it is customary to determine the wetted surface of a ship by means of some formula which involves the principal dimensions of the design and suitable constants. These formulas of naval architecture may be extended and applied to the calculation of the surface area of airship envelopes by the use of new values of the constants determined for this purpose. Surface area coefficients were calculated from the actual dimensions, surfaces, and volumes of 52 streamline bodies, which form a series covering the entire range of shapes used in the present aeronautical practice.

  11. Fresnel coefficients in materials with magnetic monopoles.

    PubMed

    Costa-Quintana, J; López-Aguilar, F

    2011-02-14

    Recent experiments have found entities in crystals whose behavior is equivalent to magnetic monopoles. In this paper, we explain some optical properties based on the reformulated "Maxwell" equations in material media in which there are equivalent magnetic charges. We calculate the coefficients of reflection and transmission of an electromagnetic wave in a plane interface between the vacuum and a medium with magnetic charges. These results can give a more extended vision of the properties of the materials with magnetic monopoles, since the phase and the amplitudes of the reflected and transmitted waves, differ with and without these magnetic entities.

  12. Micro-Fluidic Diffusion Coefficient Measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Forster, F.K.; Galambos, P.

    1998-10-06

    A new method for diffusion coefficient measurement applicable to micro-fluidics is pre- sented. The method Iltilizes an analytical model describing laminar dispersion in rect- anglllar ~llicro_channe]s. The Illethod ~vas verified throllgh measllremen~ of fllloresceill diffusivity in water and aqueolls polymer solutions of differing concentration. The diffll- sivity of flllorescein was measlmed as 0.64 x 10-gm2/s in water, 0.49 x 10-gm2/s in the 4 gm/dl dextran solution and 0.38 x 10-9n12/s in the 8 gnl/dl dextran solution.

  13. Coefficient of restitution for wet impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gollwitzer, Frank; Huang, Kai; Krülle, Christof A.; Rehberg, Ingo

    2012-02-01

    As the experience of playing football in the rain may tell, wetting could influence the coefficient of restitution (COR) dramatically. This is due to the extra energy dissipation from the wetting liquid, for instance viscous damping. To unveil the underlying mechanisms accounting for the influence, we study experimentally the COR by tracing free falling particles bouncing on a wet surface. The dependance of the COR on the impact velocity, various particle and liquid properties will be presented and discussed in terms of dimensionless Stokes' and capillary numbers.

  14. Benzene risk estimation using radiation equivalent coefficients.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Aki; Isono, Tomomi; Kikuchi, Takuro; Ohnishi, Iichiro; Igarashi, Junichiro; Yoneda, Minoru; Morisawa, Shinsuke

    2009-03-01

    We estimated benzene risk using a novel framework of risk assessment that employed the measurement of radiation dose equivalents to benzene metabolites and a PBPK model. The highest risks for 1 microg/m(3) and 3.2 mg/m(3) life time exposure of benzene estimated with a linear regression were 5.4 x 10(-7) and 1.3 x 10(-3), respectively. Even though these estimates were based on in vitro chromosome aberration test data, they were about one-sixth to one-fourteenth that from other studies and represent a fairly good estimate by using radiation equivalent coefficient as an "internal standard."

  15. Gauge Invariance of Thermal Transport Coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ercole, Loris; Marcolongo, Aris; Umari, Paolo; Baroni, Stefano

    2016-10-01

    Thermal transport coefficients are independent of the specific microscopic expression for the energy density and current from which they can be derived through the Green-Kubo formula. We discuss this independence in terms of a kind of gauge invariance resulting from energy conservation and extensivity, and demonstrate it numerically for a Lennard-Jones fluid, where different forms of the microscopic energy density lead to different time correlation functions for the heat flux, all of them, however, resulting in the same value for the thermal conductivity.

  16. Onsager coefficients for systems with periodic potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosas, Alexandre; Van den Broeck, Christian; Lindenberg, Katja

    2016-11-01

    We carry out the thermodynamic analysis of a Markovian stochastic engine, driven by a spatially and temporally periodic modulation in a d -dimensional space. We derive the analytic expressions for the Onsager coefficients characterizing the linear response regime for the isothermal transfer of one type of work (a driver) to another (a load), mediated by a stochastic time-periodic machine. As an illustration, we obtain the explicit results for a Markovian kangaroo process coupling two orthogonal directions and find extremely good agreement with numerical simulations. In addition, we obtain and discuss expressions for the entropy production, power, and efficiency for the kangaroo process.

  17. Peltier coefficient measurement in a thermoelectric module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrido, Javier; Casanovas, Alejandro; María Chimeno, José

    2013-09-01

    A new method for measuring the Peltier coefficient in a thermocouple X/Y based on the energy balance at the junction has been proposed recently. This technique needs only the hot and cold temperatures of a thermoelectric module when an electric current flows through it as the operational variables. The temperature evolutions of the two module sides provide an evident and accurate idea of the Peltier effect. From these temperatures, the heat transfer between the module and the ambient is also evaluated. The thermoelectric phenomena are described in the framework of an observable theory. Based on this procedure, an experiment is presented for a university teaching laboratory at the undergraduate level.

  18. Theory versus experiment for the rotordynamic coefficients of annular gas seals. Part 1: Test facility and apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Childs, D. W.; Nelson, C. E.; Nicks, C.; Scharrer, J. K.; Elrod, D.; Hale, K.

    1983-01-01

    A facility and apparatus are described for determining the rotordynamic coefficients and leakage characteristics of annular gas seals. The apparatus has a current top speed of 8000 cpm with a nominal seal diameter of 15.24 cmn (6 in). The air supply unit yields a seal pressure ratio of approximately 7. An external shaker is used to excite the test rotor. The capability to independently calculate all rotordynamic coefficients at a given operating condition with one excitation frequency are discussed.

  19. Tests of Hypotheses Arising In the Correlated Random Coefficient Model*

    PubMed Central

    Heckman, James J.; Schmierer, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines the correlated random coefficient model. It extends the analysis of Swamy (1971), who pioneered the uncorrelated random coefficient model in economics. We develop the properties of the correlated random coefficient model and derive a new representation of the variance of the instrumental variable estimator for that model. We develop tests of the validity of the correlated random coefficient model against the null hypothesis of the uncorrelated random coefficient model. PMID:21170148

  20. Tests of Hypotheses Arising In the Correlated Random Coefficient Model.

    PubMed

    Heckman, James J; Schmierer, Daniel

    2010-11-01

    This paper examines the correlated random coefficient model. It extends the analysis of Swamy (1971), who pioneered the uncorrelated random coefficient model in economics. We develop the properties of the correlated random coefficient model and derive a new representation of the variance of the instrumental variable estimator for that model. We develop tests of the validity of the correlated random coefficient model against the null hypothesis of the uncorrelated random coefficient model.