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Sample records for pressure ionization permanent

  1. Atmospheric Pressure Ionization Permanent Magnet Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Vilkov, Andrey N.; Gamage, Chaminda M.; Misharin, Alexander S.; Doroshenko, Vladimir M.; Tolmachev, Dmitry A.; Tarasova, Irina A.; Kharybin, Oleg N.; Novoselov, Konstantin P.; Gorshkov, Michael V.

    2007-01-01

    A new Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance mass spectrometer based on a permanent magnet with an atmospheric pressure ionization source was designed and constructed. A mass resolving power (full-width-at-half-maximum) of up to 80,000 in the electron ionization mode and 25,000 in the electrospray mode was obtained. Also, a mass measurement accuracy at low-ppm level has been demonstrated for peptide mixtures in a mass range of up to 1,200 m/z in the isotopically resolved mass spectra. PMID:17587594

  2. Postoperative permanent pressure alopecia.

    PubMed

    Chang, Zi Yun; Ngian, Jan; Chong, Claudia; Chong, Chin Ted; Liew, Qui Yin

    2016-04-01

    A 49-year-old Chinese female underwent elective laparoscopic assisted Whipple's surgery lasting 12 h. This was complicated by postoperative pressure alopecia at the occipital area of the scalp. Pressure-induced hair loss after general anaesthesia is uncommon and typically temporary, but may be disconcerting to the patient. We report this case of postoperative permanent pressure alopecia due to its rarity in the anaesthesia/local literature, and review the risk factors for its development.

  3. High pressure xenon ionization detector

    DOEpatents

    Markey, J.K.

    1989-11-14

    A method is provided for detecting ionization comprising allowing particles that cause ionization to contact high pressure xenon maintained at or near its critical point and measuring the amount of ionization. An apparatus is provided for detecting ionization, the apparatus comprising a vessel containing a ionizable medium, the vessel having an inlet to allow high pressure ionizable medium to enter the vessel, a means to permit particles that cause ionization of the medium to enter the vessel, an anode, a cathode, a grid and a plurality of annular field shaping rings, the field shaping rings being electrically isolated from one another, the anode, cathode, grid and field shaping rings being electrically isolated from one another in order to form an electric field between the cathode and the anode, the electric field originating at the anode and terminating at the cathode, the grid being disposed between the cathode and the anode, the field shaping rings being disposed between the cathode and the grid, the improvement comprising the medium being xenon and the vessel being maintained at a pressure of 50 to 70 atmospheres and a temperature of 0 to 30 C. 2 figs.

  4. High pressure xenon ionization detector

    DOEpatents

    Markey, John K.

    1989-01-01

    A method is provided for detecting ionization comprising allowing particles that cause ionization to contact high pressure xenon maintained at or near its critical point and measuring the amount of ionization. An apparatus is provided for detecting ionization, the apparatus comprising a vessel containing a ionizable medium, the vessel having an inlet to allow high pressure ionizable medium to enter the vessel, a means to permit particles that cause ionization of the medium to enter the vessel, an anode, a cathode, a grid and a plurality of annular field shaping rings, the field shaping rings being electrically isolated from one another, the anode, cathode, grid and field shaping rings being electrically isolated from one another in order to form an electric field between the cathode and the anode, the electric field originating at the anode and terminating at the cathode, the grid being disposed between the cathode and the anode, the field shaping rings being disposed between the cathode and the grid, the improvement comprising the medium being xenon and the vessel being maintained at a pressure of 50 to 70 atmospheres and a temperature of 0.degree. to 30.degree. C.

  5. Fluid hydrogen at high density - Pressure ionization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saumon, Didier; Chabrier, Gilles

    1992-01-01

    The Helmholtz-free-energy model for nonideal mixtures of hydrogen atoms and molecules by Saumon and Chabrier (1991) is extended to describe dissociation and ionization in similar mixtures in chemical equilibrium. A free-energy model is given that describes partial ionization in the pressure and temperature ionization region. The plasma-phase transition predicted by the model is described for hydrogen mixtures including such components as H2, H, H(+), and e(-). The plasma-phase transition has a critical point at Tc = 15,300 K and Pc = 0.614 Mbar, and thermodynamic instability is noted in the pressure-ionization regime. The pressure dissociation and ionization of fluid hydrogen are described well with the model yielding information on the nature of the plasma-phase transition. The model is shown to be valuable for studying dissociation and ionization in astrophysical objects and in high-pressure studies where pressure and temperature effects are significant.

  6. Creating of the permanent space patrol of ionizing solar radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avakyan, Sergey V.; Andreev, Evgenii P.; Afanas'ev, Il'ia M.; Leonov, Nikita B.; Savushkin, Alexander V.; Serova, Alla E.; Voronin, Nikolai A.

    2003-02-01

    One of the gaps of the modern solar-terrestrial physics is an absence of the permanent space monitoring of the soft X-ray and extreme ultraviolet radiation from the full disk of Sun. The permanent Solar Patrol at the main part of the ionizing radiation spectra 0.8-115 (119) nm does not exist. These measurements are very complicated because of the technical and methodological difficulties. In S.I. Vavilov State Optical Institute (SOI) the apparatus for the Space Solar Patrol (SSP) has been developed in the period 1996-2002 years which includes multiyear experience of developing such apparatus. The base of this apparatus is the use of unique detectors of ionizing radiation the open secondary electron multipliers, which are “solar blind” to near UV, visible and IR radiations of the Sun, and new methodology of these solar spectrophotometric absolute measurements. There are plans to launch the optical electronic apparatus (OEA) of SSP at the Russian Segment of the International Space Station for experimental operation. The paper presents results on the methodology, creating and laboratory testing of the apparatus for Space Solar Patrol Mission.

  7. Atmospheric-pressure Penning ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hiraoka, Kenzo; Fujimaki, Susumu; Kambara, Shizuka; Furuya, Hiroko; Okazaki, Shigemitsu

    2004-01-01

    A preliminary study on the atmospheric-pressure Penning ionization (APP(e)I) of gaseous organic compounds with Ar* has been made. The metastable argon atoms (Ar*: 11.55 eV for (3)P(2) and 11.72 eV for (3)P(0)) were generated by the negative-mode corona discharge of atmospheric-pressure argon gas. By applying a high positive voltage (+500 to +1000 V) to the stainless steel capillary for the sample introduction (0.1 mm i.d., 0.3 mm o.d.), strong ion signals could be obtained. The ions formed were sampled through an orifice into the vacuum and mass-analyzed by an orthogonal time-of-flight mass spectrometer. The major ions formed by APP(e)I are found to be molecular-related ions for alkanes, aromatics, and oxygen-containing compounds. Because only the molecules with ionization energies less than the internal energy of Ar* are ionized, the present method will be a selective and highly sensitive interface for gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

  8. Picosecond ionization dynamics in femtosecond filaments at high pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xiaohui; Patwardhan, Gauri; Schrauth, Samuel; Zhu, Daiwei; Popmintchev, Tenio; Kapteyn, Henry C.; Murnane, Margaret M.; Romanov, Dmitri A.; Levis, Robert J.; Gaeta, Alexander L.

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the plasma dynamics inside a femtosecond-pulse-induced filament generated in an argon gas for a wide range of pressures up to 60 bar. At higher pressures, we observe ionization immediately following a pulse, with up to a threefold increase in the electron density within 30 ps after the filamentary propagation of a femtosecond pulse. Our study suggests that this picosecond evolution can be attributed to collisional ionization including Penning and associative ionizations and electron-impact ionization of excited atoms generated during the pulse. The dominance of excited atoms over ionized atoms at the end of the pulse also indicates an intrapulse inhibition of avalanche ionization. This delayed ionization dynamics provides evidence for diagnosing atomic and molecular excitation and ionization in intense laser interaction with high-pressure gases.

  9. The thermodynamical instability induced by pressure ionization in fluid helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qiong; Liu, Hai-Feng; Zhang, Gong-Mu; Zhao, Yan-Hong; Lu, Guo; Tian, Ming-Feng; Song, Hai-Feng

    2016-11-01

    A systematic study of pressure ionization is carried out in the chemical picture by the example of fluid helium. By comparing the variants of the chemical model, it is demonstrated that the behavior of pressure ionization depends on the construction of the free energy function. In the chemical model with the Coulomb free energy described by the Padé interpolation formula, thermodynamical instability induced by pressure ionization is found to be manifested by a discontinuous drop or a continuous fall and rise along the pressure-density curve as well as the pressure-temperature curve, which is very much like the first order liquid-liquid phase transition of fluid hydrogen from the first principles simulations. In contrast, in the variant chemical model with the Coulomb free energy term empirically weakened, no thermodynamical instability is induced when pressure ionization occurs, and the resulting equation of state achieves a good agreement with the first principles simulations of fluid helium.

  10. High pressure (>1 atm) electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lee Chuin; Mandal, Mridul Kanti; Hiraoka, Kenzo

    2011-03-01

    High pressure electrospray ionization mass spectrometry has been performed by pressurizing a custom made ion source chamber with compressed air to a pressure higher than the atmospheric pressure. The ion source was coupled to a commercial time-of-flight mass spectrometer using a nozzle-skimmer arrangement. The onset voltage for the electrospray of aqueous solution was found to be independent on the operating pressure. The onset voltage for the corona discharge, however, increased with the rise of pressure following the Paschen's law. Thus, besides having more working gas for the desolvation process, gaseous breakdown could also be avoided by pressurizing the ESI ion source with air to an appropriate level. Stable electrospray ionization has been achieved for the sample solution with high surface tension such as pure water in both positive and negative ion modes. Fragmentation of labile compounds during the ionization process could also be reduced by optimizing the operating pressure of the ion source.

  11. On the permanent hip-stabilizing effect of atmospheric pressure.

    PubMed

    Prietzel, Torsten; Hammer, Niels; Schleifenbaum, Stefan; Kaßebaum, Eric; Farag, Mohamed; von Salis-Soglio, Georg

    2014-08-22

    Hip joint dislocations related to total hip arthroplasty (THA) are a common complication especially in the early postoperative course. The surgical approach, the alignment of the prosthetic components, the range of motion and the muscle tone are known factors influencing the risk of dislocation. A further factor that is discussed until today is atmospheric pressure which is not taken into account in the present THA concepts. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of atmospheric pressure on hip joint stability. Five joint models (Ø 28-44 mm), consisting of THA components were hermetically sealed with a rubber capsule, filled with a defined amount of fluid and exposed to varying ambient pressure. Displacement and pressure sensors were used to record the extent of dislocation related to intraarticular and ambient pressure. In 200 experiments spontaneous dislocations of the different sized joint models were reliably observed once the ambient pressure was lower than 6.0 kPa. Increasing the ambient pressure above 6.0 kPa immediately and persistently reduced the joint models until the ambient pressure was lowered again. Displacement always exceeded half the diameter of the joint model and was independent of gravity effects. This experimental study gives strong evidence that the hip joint is permanently stabilized by atmospheric pressure, confirming the theories of Weber and Weber (1836). On basis of these findings the use of larger prosthetic heads, capsular repair and the deployment of an intracapsular Redon drain are proposed to substantially decrease the risk of dislocation after THA.

  12. Ionization of EPA contaminants in direct and dopant-assisted atmospheric pressure photoionization and atmospheric pressure laser ionization.

    PubMed

    Kauppila, Tiina J; Kersten, Hendrik; Benter, Thorsten

    2015-06-01

    Seventy-seven EPA priority environmental pollutants were analyzed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) equipped with an optimized atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI) and an atmospheric pressure laser ionization (APLI) interface with and without dopants. The analyzed compounds included e.g., polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), nitro compounds, halogenated compounds, aromatic compounds with phenolic, acidic, alcohol, and amino groups, phthalate and adipatic esters, and aliphatic ethers. Toluene, anisole, chlorobenzene, and acetone were tested as dopants. The widest range of analytes was ionized using direct APPI (66/77 compounds). The introduction of dopants decreased the amount of compounds ionized in APPI (e.g., 54/77 with toluene), but in many cases the ionization efficiency increased. While in direct APPI the formation of molecular ions via photoionization was the main ionization reaction, dopant-assisted (DA) APPI promoted ionization reactions, such as charge exchange and proton transfer. Direct APLI ionized a much smaller amount of compounds than APPI (41/77 compounds), showing selectivity towards compounds with low ionization energies (IEs) and long-lived resonantly excited intermediate states. DA-APLI, however, was able to ionize a higher amount of compounds (e.g. 51/77 with toluene), as the ionization took place entirely through dopant-assisted ion/molecule reactions similar to those in DA-APPI. Best ionization efficiency in APPI and APLI (both direct and DA) was obtained for PAHs and aromatics with O- and N-functionalities, whereas nitro compounds and aliphatic ethers were the most difficult to ionize. Halogenated aromatics and esters were (mainly) ionized in APPI, but not in APLI.

  13. Ionization of EPA Contaminants in Direct and Dopant-Assisted Atmospheric Pressure Photoionization and Atmospheric Pressure Laser Ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kauppila, Tiina J.; Kersten, Hendrik; Benter, Thorsten

    2015-06-01

    Seventy-seven EPA priority environmental pollutants were analyzed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) equipped with an optimized atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI) and an atmospheric pressure laser ionization (APLI) interface with and without dopants. The analyzed compounds included e.g., polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), nitro compounds, halogenated compounds, aromatic compounds with phenolic, acidic, alcohol, and amino groups, phthalate and adipatic esters, and aliphatic ethers. Toluene, anisole, chlorobenzene, and acetone were tested as dopants. The widest range of analytes was ionized using direct APPI (66/77 compounds). The introduction of dopants decreased the amount of compounds ionized in APPI (e.g., 54/77 with toluene), but in many cases the ionization efficiency increased. While in direct APPI the formation of molecular ions via photoionization was the main ionization reaction, dopant-assisted (DA) APPI promoted ionization reactions, such as charge exchange and proton transfer. Direct APLI ionized a much smaller amount of compounds than APPI (41/77 compounds), showing selectivity towards compounds with low ionization energies (IEs) and long-lived resonantly excited intermediate states. DA-APLI, however, was able to ionize a higher amount of compounds (e.g. 51/77 with toluene), as the ionization took place entirely through dopant-assisted ion/molecule reactions similar to those in DA-APPI. Best ionization efficiency in APPI and APLI (both direct and DA) was obtained for PAHs and aromatics with O- and N-functionalities, whereas nitro compounds and aliphatic ethers were the most difficult to ionize. Halogenated aromatics and esters were (mainly) ionized in APPI, but not in APLI.

  14. Variable pressure ionization detector for gas chromatography

    DOEpatents

    Buchanan, Michelle V.; Wise, Marcus B.

    1988-01-01

    Method and apparatus for differentiating organic compounds based on their electron affinity. An electron capture detector cell (ECD) is operated at pressures ranging from atmospheric to less than 1 torr. Through variation of the pressure within the ECD cell, the organic compounds are induced to either capture or emit electrons. Differentiation of isomeric compounds can be obtianed when, at a given pressure, one isomer is in the emission mode and the other is in the capture mode. Output of the ECD is recorded by chromatogram. The invention also includes a method for obtaining the zero-crossing pressure of a compound, defined as the pressure at which the competing emission and capture reactions are balanced and which may be correlated to the electron affinity of a compound.

  15. Atmospheric Pressure Ionization Using a High Voltage Target Compared to Electrospray Ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubin, Arnaud; Bajic, Steve; Cabooter, Deirdre; Augustijns, Patrick; Cuyckens, Filip

    2017-02-01

    A new atmospheric pressure ionization (API) source, viz. UniSpray, was evaluated for mass spectrometry (MS) analysis of pharmaceutical compounds by head-to-head comparison with electrospray ionization (ESI) on the same high-resolution MS system. The atmospheric pressure ionization source is composed of a grounded nebulizer spraying onto a high voltage, cylindrical stainless steel target. Molecules are ionized in a similar fashion to electrospray ionization, predominantly producing protonated or deprotonated species. Adduct formation (e.g., proton and sodium adducts) and in-source fragmentation is shown to be almost identical between the two sources. The performance of the new API source was compared with electrospray by infusion of a mix of 22 pharmaceutical compounds with a wide variety of functional groups and physico-chemical properties (molecular weight, logP, and pKa) in more than 100 different conditions (mobile phase strength, solvents, pH, and flow rate). The new API source shows an intensity gain of a factor 2.2 compared with ESI considering all conditions on all compounds tested. Finally, some hypotheses on the ionization mechanism, similarities, and differences with ESI, are discussed.

  16. Past Exposure to Densely Ionizing Radiation Leaves a Unique Permanent Signature in the Genome

    PubMed Central

    Hande, M. Prakash; Azizova, Tamara V.; Geard, Charles R.; Burak, Ludmilla E.; Mitchell, Catherine R.; Khokhryakov, Valentin F.; Vasilenko, Evgeny K.; Brenner, David J.

    2003-01-01

    Speculation has long surrounded the question of whether past exposure to ionizing radiation leaves a unique permanent signature in the genome. Intrachromosomal rearrangements or deletions are produced much more efficiently by densely ionizing radiation than by chemical mutagens, x-rays, or endogenous aging processes. Until recently, such stable intrachromosomal aberrations have been very hard to detect, but a new chromosome band painting technique has made their detection practical. We report the detection and quantification of stable intrachromosomal aberrations in lymphocytes of healthy former nuclear-weapons workers who were exposed to plutonium many years ago. Even many years after occupational exposure, more than half the blood cells of the healthy plutonium workers contain large (>6 Mb) intrachromosomal rearrangements. The yield of these aberrations was highly correlated with plutonium dose to the bone marrow. The control groups contained very few such intrachromosomal aberrations. Quantification of this large-scale chromosomal damage in human populations exposed many years earlier will lead to new insights into the mechanisms and risks of cytogenetic damage. PMID:12679897

  17. Acetonitrile Ion Suppression in Atmospheric Pressure Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Colizza, Kevin; Mahoney, Keira E; Yevdokimov, Alexander V; Smith, James L; Oxley, Jimmie C

    2016-11-01

    Efforts to analyze trace levels of cyclic peroxides by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry gave evidence that acetonitrile suppressed ion formation. Further investigations extended this discovery to ketones, linear peroxides, esters, and possibly many other types of compounds, including triazole and menadione. Direct ionization suppression caused by acetonitrile was observed for multiple adduct types in both electrospray ionization and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization. The addition of only 2% acetonitrile significantly decreased the sensitivity of analyte response. Efforts to identify the mechanism were made using various nitriles. The ion suppression was reduced by substitution of an acetonitrile hydrogen with an electron-withdrawing group, but was exacerbated by electron-donating or steric groups adjacent to the nitrile. Although current theory does not explain this phenomenon, we propose that polar interactions between the various functionalities and the nitrile may be forming neutral aggregates that manifest as ionization suppression. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  18. Acetonitrile Ion Suppression in Atmospheric Pressure Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colizza, Kevin; Mahoney, Keira E.; Yevdokimov, Alexander V.; Smith, James L.; Oxley, Jimmie C.

    2016-11-01

    Efforts to analyze trace levels of cyclic peroxides by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry gave evidence that acetonitrile suppressed ion formation. Further investigations extended this discovery to ketones, linear peroxides, esters, and possibly many other types of compounds, including triazole and menadione. Direct ionization suppression caused by acetonitrile was observed for multiple adduct types in both electrospray ionization and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization. The addition of only 2% acetonitrile significantly decreased the sensitivity of analyte response. Efforts to identify the mechanism were made using various nitriles. The ion suppression was reduced by substitution of an acetonitrile hydrogen with an electron-withdrawing group, but was exacerbated by electron-donating or steric groups adjacent to the nitrile. Although current theory does not explain this phenomenon, we propose that polar interactions between the various functionalities and the nitrile may be forming neutral aggregates that manifest as ionization suppression.

  19. The ionization mechanisms in direct and dopant-assisted atmospheric pressure photoionization and atmospheric pressure laser ionization.

    PubMed

    Kauppila, Tiina J; Kersten, Hendrik; Benter, Thorsten

    2014-11-01

    A novel, gas-tight API interface for gas chromatography-mass spectrometry was used to study the ionization mechanism in direct and dopant-assisted atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI) and atmospheric pressure laser ionization (APLI). Eight analytes (ethylbenzene, bromobenzene, naphthalene, anthracene, benzaldehyde, pyridine, quinolone, and acridine) with varying ionization energies (IEs) and proton affinities (PAs), and four common APPI dopants (toluene, acetone, anisole, and chlorobenzene) were chosen. All the studied compounds were ionized by direct APPI, forming mainly molecular ions. Addition of dopants suppressed the signal of the analytes with IEs above the IE of the dopant. For compounds with suitable IEs or Pas, the dopants increased the ionization efficiency as the analytes could be ionized through dopant-mediated gas-phase reactions, such as charge exchange, proton transfer, and other rather unexpected reactions, such as formation of [M + 77](+) in the presence of chlorobenzene. Experiments with deuterated toluene as the dopant verified that in case of proton transfer, the proton originated from the dopant instead of proton-bound solvent clusters, as in conventional open or non-tight APPI sources. In direct APLI using a 266 nm laser, a narrower range of compounds was ionized than in direct APPI, because of exceedingly high IEs or unfavorable two-photon absorption cross-sections. Introduction of dopants in the APLI system changed the ionization mechanism to similar dopant-mediated gas-phase reactions with the dopant as in APPI, which produced mainly ions of the same form as in APPI, and ionized a wider range of analytes than direct APLI.

  20. Pressurized rf cavities in ionizing beams

    DOE PAGES

    Freemire, B.; Tollestrup, A.  V.; Yonehara, K.; ...

    2016-06-20

    A muon collider or Higgs factory requires significant reduction of the six dimensional emittance of the beam prior to acceleration. One method to accomplish this involves building a cooling channel using high pressure gas filled radio frequency cavities. The performance of such a cavity when subjected to an intense particle beam must be investigated before this technology can be validated. To this end, a high pressure gas filled radio frequency (rf) test cell was built and placed in a 400 MeV beam line from the Fermilab linac to study the plasma evolution and its effect on the cavity. Hydrogen, deuterium, helium and nitrogen gases were studied. Additionally, sulfur hexafluoride and dry air were used as dopants to aid in the removal of plasma electrons. Measurements were made using a variety of beam intensities, gas pressures, dopant concentrations, and cavity rf electric fields, both with and without a 3 T external solenoidal magnetic field. In conclusion, energy dissipation per electron-ion pair, electron-ion recombination rates, ion-ion recombination rates, and electron attachment times to SFmore » $$_6$$ and O$$_2$$ were measured.« less

  1. Pressurized rf cavities in ionizing beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freemire, B.; Tollestrup, A. V.; Yonehara, K.; Chung, M.; Torun, Y.; Johnson, R. P.; Flanagan, G.; Hanlet, P. M.; Collura, M. G.; Jana, M. R.; Leonova, M.; Moretti, A.; Schwarz, T.

    2016-06-01

    A muon collider or Higgs factory requires significant reduction of the six dimensional emittance of the beam prior to acceleration. One method to accomplish this involves building a cooling channel using high pressure gas filled radio frequency cavities. The performance of such a cavity when subjected to an intense particle beam must be investigated before this technology can be validated. To this end, a high pressure gas filled radio frequency (rf) test cell was built and placed in a 400 MeV beam line from the Fermilab linac to study the plasma evolution and its effect on the cavity. Hydrogen, deuterium, helium and nitrogen gases were studied. Additionally, sulfur hexafluoride and dry air were used as dopants to aid in the removal of plasma electrons. Measurements were made using a variety of beam intensities, gas pressures, dopant concentrations, and cavity rf electric fields, both with and without a 3 T external solenoidal magnetic field. Energy dissipation per electron-ion pair, electron-ion recombination rates, ion-ion recombination rates, and electron attachment times to SF6 and O2 were measured.

  2. Achieving 50% ionization efficiency in sub-ambient pressure ionization with nanoelectrospray

    PubMed Central

    Marginean, Ioan; Page, Jason S.; Tolmachev, Aleksey V.; Tang, Keqi; Smith, Richard D.

    2010-01-01

    Inefficient ionization and poor transmission of the charged species produced by an electrospray from the ambient pressure mass spectrometer source into the high vacuum region required for mass analysis significantly limits achievable sensitivity. Here we present evidence that, when operated at flow rates of 50 nL/min, a new electrospray-based ion source operated at ~20 Torr can deliver ~50% of the analyte ions initially in the solution as charged desolvated species into the rough vacuum region of mass spectrometers. The ion source can be tuned to optimize the analyte signal for readily ionized species while reducing the background contribution. PMID:21028835

  3. Low-Pressure, Field-Ionizing Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartley, Frank; Smith, Steven

    2009-01-01

    A small mass spectrometer utilizing a miniature field ionization source is now undergoing development. It is designed for use in a variety of applications in which there are requirements for a lightweight, low-power-consumption instrument that can analyze the masses of a wide variety of molecules and ions. The device can operate without need for a high-vacuum, carrier-gas feed radioactive ionizing source, or thermal ionizer. This mass spectrometer can operate either in the natural vacuum of outer space or on Earth at any ambient pressure below 50 torr (below about 6.7 kPa) - a partial vacuum that can easily be reached by use of a small sampling pump. This mass spectrometer also has a large dynamic range - from singly charged small gas ions to deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) fragments larger than 104 atomic mass units - with sensitivity adequate for detecting some molecules and ions at relative abundances of less than one part per billion. This instrument (see figure) includes a field ionizer integrated with a rotating-field mass spectrometer (RFMS). The field ionizer effects ionization of a type characterized as "soft" in the art because it does not fragment molecules or initiate avalanche arcing. What makes the "soft" ionization mode possible is that the distance between the ionizing electrodes is less than mean free path for ions at the maximum anticipated operating pressure, so that the ionizer always operates on the non-breakdown side of the applicable Paschen curve (a standard plot of breakdown potential on the ordinate and pressure electrode separation on the abscissa). The field ionizer in this instrument is fabricated by micromachining a submicron-thick membrane out of an electrically nonconductive substrate, coating the membrane on both sides to form electrodes, then micromachining small holes through the electrodes and membrane. Because of the submicron electrode separation, even a potential of only 1 V applied between the electrodes gives rise to an electric

  4. System and method for preventing stator permanent magnet demagnetization during vacuum pressure impregnation

    DOEpatents

    Raminosoa, Tsarafidy; Alexander, James Pellegrino; EL-Refaie, Ayman Mohamed Fawzi

    2017-06-06

    A permanent magnet electrical machine includes a stator having conductive windings wound thereon and one or more permanent magnets embedded in the stator. A magnetic keeper element is positioned on the stator so as to form a magnetic flux path with the permanent magnets, with the magnetic keeper element closing the magnetic flux path of the permanent magnets by providing a low reluctance flux path to magnetic flux generated by the permanent magnets. A vacuum pressure impregnation (VPI) process is performed on the stator to increase a thermal conductivity of the windings, with the VPI process including a curing step that is performed at a selected temperature. The magnetic keeper element sets an operating point of the permanent magnets to an internal flux density level above a demagnetization threshold associated with the selected temperature at which the curing step is performed.

  5. Transmission geometry laserspray ionization vacuum using an atmospheric pressure inlet.

    PubMed

    Lutomski, Corinne A; El-Baba, Tarick J; Inutan, Ellen D; Manly, Cory D; Wager-Miller, James; Mackie, Ken; Trimpin, Sarah

    2014-07-01

    This represents the first report of laserspray ionization vacuum (LSIV) with operation directly from atmospheric pressure for use in mass spectrometry. Two different types of electrospray ionization source inlets were converted to LSIV sources by equipping the entrance of the atmospheric pressure inlet aperture with a customized cone that is sealed with a removable glass plate holding the matrix/analyte sample. A laser aligned in transmission geometry (at 180° relative to the inlet) ablates the matrix/analyte sample deposited on the vacuum side of the glass slide. Laser ablation from vacuum requires lower inlet temperature relative to laser ablation at atmospheric pressure. However, higher inlet temperature is required for high-mass analytes, for example, α-chymotrypsinogen (25.6 kDa). Labile compounds such as gangliosides and cardiolipins are detected in the negative ion mode directly from mouse brain tissue as intact doubly deprotonated ions. Multiple charging enhances the ion mobility spectrometry separation of ions derived from complex tissue samples.

  6. Laser ionization and radiofrequency sustainment of high- pressure seeded plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, Kurtis Lester

    2001-10-01

    The feasibility of using a low-ionization potential organic gas to initiate a high-pressure plasma discharge is examined. Laser photoionization of the organic gas creates a high-density initial condition that eliminates the need for capacitive breakdown to form the plasma. The seed gas, tetrakis(dimethylamino)ethylene, has an ionization potential of 6.1 eV and is ionized by an ultraviolet laser through 6.4 eV photon absorption forming a plasma column inside a vacuum chamber. The plasma absorbs power through collisional damping of the induced 13.56 MHz radiofrequency wave fields. The laser initiation of 2-6 mTorr of the seed gas in 1-150 Torr of argon is accomplished producing steady-state plasma densities of ne >= 1012 cm-3 in a volume of 300-500 cm3 with radiofrequency power densities of 3-10 Watts/cm3. Electron density measurements are taken using a millimeter wave interferometer. The dependence of the antenna radiation resistance and reactance on the plasma density and neutral gas pressure is measured, examined and compared to a transformer coupled equivalent circuit and to a computer model. The coupling can be described by propagation and absorption of the fields into a lossy plasma medium. Antenna design is aided by understanding the radial absorption profile of the inductive radiofrequency fields, and how these fields are excited by various antenna designs. It is found that the azimuthally symmetric helical coil excites the wave fields most conducive to sustaining the plasma at high pressure. The two-body recombination coefficient of the organic seed gas and its optimum partial pressure when mixed with argon at 50-150 Torr are experimentally determined. Particle losses and power requirements for maintaining the discharge are estimated by examining diffusion, two-body and three-body recombination processes. It is found that recombination losses play a dominant role at these high pressures which places an upper bound on the density that is achievable with the 2

  7. Desorption and ionization mechanisms in desorption atmospheric pressure photoionization.

    PubMed

    Luosujärvi, Laura; Arvola, Ville; Haapala, Markus; Pól, Jaroslav; Saarela, Ville; Franssila, Sami; Kotiaho, Tapio; Kostiainen, Risto; Kauppila, Tiina J

    2008-10-01

    The factors influencing desorption and ionization in newly developed desorption atmospheric pressure photoionization-mass spectrometry (DAPPI-MS) were studied. Redirecting the DAPPI spray was observed to further improve the versatility of the technique: for dilute samples, parallel spray with increased analyte signal was found to be the best suited, while for more concentrated samples, the orthogonal spray with less risk for contamination is recommended. The suitability of various spray solvents and sampling surface materials was tested for a variety of analytes with different polarities and molecular weights. As in atmospheric pressure photoionization, the analytes formed [M + H](+), [M - H](-), M(+*), M(-*), [M - H + O](-), or [M - 2H + 2O](-) ions depending on the analyte, spray solvent, and ionization mode. In positive ion mode, anisole and toluene as spray solvents promoted the formation of M(+*) ions and were therefore best suited for the analysis of nonpolar compounds (anthracene, benzo[a]pyrene, and tetracyclone). Acetone and hexane were optimal spray solvents for polar compounds (MDMA, testosterone, and verapamil) since they produced intensive [M + H](+) ion peaks of the analytes. In negative ion mode, the type of spray solvent affected the signal intensity, but not the ion composition. M(-*) ions were formed from 1,4-dinitrobenzene, and [M - H + O](-) and [M - 2H + 2O](-) ions from 1,4-naphthoquinone, whereas acidic compounds (naphthoic acid and paracetamol) formed [M - H](-) ions. The tested sampling surfaces included various materials with different thermal conductivities. The materials with low thermal conductivity, i.e., polymers like poly(methyl methacrylate) and poly(tetrafluoroethylene) (Teflon) were found to be the best, since they enable localized heating of the sampling surface, which was found to be essential for efficient analyte desorption. Nevertheless, the sampling surface material did not affect the ionization mechanisms.

  8. Ionization pattern obtained in electrospray ionization or atmospheric pressure chemical ionization interfaces for authorized antidepressants in Romania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grecu, Iulia; Ionicǎ, Mihai; Vlǎdescu, Marian; Truţǎ, Elena; Sultan, Carmen; Viscol, Oana; Horhotǎ, Luminiţa; Radu, Simona

    2016-12-01

    Antidepressants were found in 1950. In the 1990s there was a new generation of antidepressants. They act on the level of certain neurotransmitters extrasinpatic by its growth. After their mode of action antidepressants may be: SSRIs (Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors); (Serotonin-Norepinephrine Reuptake Inhibitors); SARIs (Serotonin Antagonist Reuptake Inhibitors); NRIs (Norepinephrine Reuptake Inhibitors); NDRIs (Norepinephrine-Dopamine Reuptake Inhibitors) NDRAs (Norepinephrine-Dopamine Releasing Agents); TCAs (Tricyclic Antidepressants); TeCAs (Tetracyclic Antidepressants); MAOIs (Monoamine Oxidase Inhibitors); agonist receptor 5-HT1A (5- hydroxytryptamine); antagonist receptor 5-HT2; SSREs (Selective Serotonin Reuptake Enhancers) and Sigma agonist receptor. To determine the presence of antidepressants in biological products, it has been used a system HPLC-MS (High Performance Liquid Chromatography - Mass Spectrometry) Varian 12001. The system is equipped with APCI (Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization) or ESI (ElectroSpray Ionization) interface. To find antidepressants in unknown samples is necessary to recognize them after mass spectrum. Because the mass spectrum it is dependent on obtaining private parameters work of HPLC-MS system, and control interfaces, the mass spectra library was filled with the mass spectra of all approved antidepressants in Romania. The paper shows the mass spectra obtained in the HPLCMS system.

  9. Flame Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization Coupled with Negative Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry for Ion Molecule Reactions.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Sy-Chyi; Bhat, Suhail Muzaffar; Shiea, Jentaie

    2017-07-01

    Flame atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (FAPCI) combined with negative electrospray ionization (ESI) mass spectrometry was developed to detect the ion/molecule reactions (IMRs) products between nitric acid (HNO3) and negatively charged amino acid, angiotensin I (AI) and angiotensin II (AII), and insulin ions. Nitrate and HNO3-nitrate ions were detected in the oxyacetylene flame, suggesting that a large quantity of nitric acid (HNO3) was produced in the flame. The HNO3 and negatively charged analyte ions produced by a negative ESI source were delivered into each arm of a Y-shaped stainless steel tube where they merged and reacted. The products were subsequently characterized with an ion trap mass analyzer attached to the exit of the Y-tube. HNO3 showed the strongest affinity to histidine and formed (Mhistidine-H+HNO3)(-) complex ions, whereas some amino acids did not react with HNO3 at all. Reactions between HNO3 and histidine residues in AI and AII resulted in the formation of dominant [MAI-H+(HNO3)](-) and [MAII-H+(HNO3)](-) ions. Results from analyses of AAs and insulin indicated that HNO3 could not only react with basic amino acid residues, but also with disulfide bonds to form [M-3H+(HNO3)n](3-) complex ions. This approach is useful for obtaining information about the number of basic amino acid residues and disulfide bonds in peptides and proteins. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  10. Flame Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization Coupled with Negative Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry for Ion Molecule Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Sy-Chyi; Bhat, Suhail Muzaffar; Shiea, Jentaie

    2017-07-01

    Flame atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (FAPCI) combined with negative electrospray ionization (ESI) mass spectrometry was developed to detect the ion/molecule reactions (IMRs) products between nitric acid (HNO3) and negatively charged amino acid, angiotensin I (AI) and angiotensin II (AII), and insulin ions. Nitrate and HNO3-nitrate ions were detected in the oxyacetylene flame, suggesting that a large quantity of nitric acid (HNO3) was produced in the flame. The HNO3 and negatively charged analyte ions produced by a negative ESI source were delivered into each arm of a Y-shaped stainless steel tube where they merged and reacted. The products were subsequently characterized with an ion trap mass analyzer attached to the exit of the Y-tube. HNO3 showed the strongest affinity to histidine and formed (Mhistidine-H+HNO3)- complex ions, whereas some amino acids did not react with HNO3 at all. Reactions between HNO3 and histidine residues in AI and AII resulted in the formation of dominant [MAI-H+(HNO3)]- and [MAII-H+(HNO3)]- ions. Results from analyses of AAs and insulin indicated that HNO3 could not only react with basic amino acid residues, but also with disulfide bonds to form [M-3H+(HNO3)n]3- complex ions. This approach is useful for obtaining information about the number of basic amino acid residues and disulfide bonds in peptides and proteins.

  11. Microchip atmospheric pressure chemical ionization source for mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ostman, Pekka; Marttila, Seppo J; Kotiaho, Tapio; Franssila, Sami; Kostiainen, Risto

    2004-11-15

    A novel microchip heated nebulizer for atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry is presented. Anisotropic wet etching is used to fabricate the flow channels, inlet, and nozzle on a silicon wafer. An integrated heater of aluminum is sputtered on a glass wafer. The two wafers are jointed by anodic bonding, creating a two-dimensional version of an APCI source with a sample channel in the middle and gas channels symmetrically on both sides. The ionization is initiated with an external corona-discharge needle positioned 2 mm in front of the microchip heated nebulizer. The microchip APCI source provides flow rates down to 50 nL/min, stable long-term analysis with chip lifetime of weeks, good quantitative repeatability (RSD < 10%) and linearity (r(2) > 0.995) with linear dynamic rage of at least 4 orders of magnitude, and cost-efficient manufacturing. The limit of detection (LOD) for acridine measured with microchip APCI at flow rate of 6.2 muL/min was 5 nM, corresponding to a mass flow of 0.52 fmol/s. The LOD with commercial macro-APCI at a flow rate of 1 mL/min for acridine was the same, 5 nM, corresponding to a significantly worse mass flow sensitivity (83 fmol/s) than measured with microchip APCI. The advantages of microchip APCI makes it a very attractive new microfluidic detector.

  12. Development of an Atmospheric Pressure Ionization Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    A commercial atmospheric pressure ionization mass spectrometer (APIMS) was purchased from EXTREL Mass Spectrometry, Inc. (Pittsburgh, PA). Our research objectives were to adapt this instrument and develop techniques for real-time determinations of the concentrations of trace species in the atmosphere. The prototype instrument is capable of making high frequency measurements with no sample preconcentrations. Isotopically labeled standards are used as an internal standard to obtain high precision and to compensate for changes in instrument sensitivity and analyte losses in the sampling manifold as described by Bandy and coworkers. The prototype instrument is capable of being deployed on NASA C130, Electra, P3, and DC8 aircraft. After purchasing and taking delivery by June 1994, we assembled the mass spectrometer, data acquisition, and manifold flow control instrumentation in electronic racks and performed tests.

  13. Plasma Ion Sources for Atmospheric Pressure Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jian-Guo

    1994-01-01

    Atmospheric pressure ionization (API) sources using direct-current (DC) and radio-frequency (RF) plasma have been developed in this thesis work. These ion sources can provide stable discharge currents of ~ 1 mA, 2-3 orders of magnitude larger than that of the corona discharge, a widely used API source. The plasmas can be generated and maintained in 1 atm of various buffer gases by applying -500 to -1000 V (DC plasma) or 1-15 W with a frequency of 165 kHz (RF plasma) on the needle electrode. These ion sources have been used with liquid injection to detect various organic compounds of pharmaceutical, biotechnological and environmental interest. Key features of these ion sources include soft ionization with the protonated molecule as the largest peak, and superb sensitivity with detection limits in the low picogram or femtomole range and a linear dynamic range over ~4 orders of magnitude. The RF plasma has advantages over the DC plasma in its ability to operate in various buffer gases and to produce a more stable plasma. Factors influencing the performance of the ion sources have been studied, including RF power level, liquid flow rate, chamber temperature, solvent composition, and voltage affecting the collision induced dissociation (CID). Ionization of hydrocarbons by the RF plasma API source was also studied. Soft ionization is generally produced. To obtain high sensitivity, the ion source must be very dry and the needle-to-orifice distance must be small. Nitric oxide was used to enhance the sensitivity. The RF plasma source was then used for the analysis of hydrocarbons in auto emissions. Comparisons between the corona discharge and the RF plasma have been made in terms of discharge current, ion residence time, and the ion source model. The RF plasma source provides larger linear dynamic range and higher sensitivity than the corona discharge, due to its much larger discharge current. The RF plasma was also observed to provide longer ion residence times and was not

  14. Influence of permanent dipole and dynamic core-electron polarization on tunneling ionization of polar molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoang, Van-Hung; Zhao, Song-Feng; Le, Van-Hoang; Le, Anh-Thu

    2017-02-01

    We present a detailed theoretical investigation on strong-field ionization of polar (CO and NO) as well as nonpolar molecules (N2, O2, and CO2). Our results indicate that accounting for the Stark correction in the molecular tunneling ionization theory leads to overall fairly good agreements with numerical solutions of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation. Furthermore, we show that the effect of dynamic core-electron polarization, in general, has a weak influence on the angle-dependent ionization probability. However, in the case of CO we confirm the recent finding by B. Zhang, J. Yuan, and Z. Zhao [Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 163001 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.111.163001] that accounting for dynamic core-polarization is crucial to achieving an overall good agreement with experiments.

  15. Atmospheric pressure soft ionization for gas chromatography with dielectric barrier discharge ionization-mass spectrometry (GC-DBDI-MS).

    PubMed

    Mirabelli, Mario F; Wolf, Jan-Christoph; Zenobi, Renato

    2017-05-30

    In this study, a gas chromatography (GC) system was interfaced to a high-resolution Orbitrap mass spectrometer by means of an active capillary plasma ionization source, based on dielectric barrier discharge ionization (DBDI). This allowed highly efficient soft ionization of gas-phase, chromatographically resolved compounds at ambient pressure. Several pesticides and illicit drugs were analyzed, and the limits of detections (LODs) were as low as 30 pg mL(-1) for the GC-DBDI-MS coupling (corresponding to 60 fg on-column sensitivity) and 30 fg mL(-1) for SPME-GC-DBDI-MS.

  16. The updated bottom up solution applied to atmospheric pressure photoionization and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The Updated Bottom Up Solution (UBUS) was recently applied to atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) mass spectrometry (MS) of triacylglycerols (TAGs). This report demonstrates that the UBUS applies equally well to atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI) MS and to electrospray ionizatio...

  17. Charge Exchange Reaction in Dopant-Assisted Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization and Atmospheric Pressure Photoionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaikkinen, Anu; Kauppila, Tiina J.; Kostiainen, Risto

    2016-08-01

    The efficiencies of charge exchange reaction in dopant-assisted atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (DA-APCI) and dopant-assisted atmospheric pressure photoionization (DA-APPI) mass spectrometry (MS) were compared by flow injection analysis. Fourteen individual compounds and a commercial mixture of 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons were chosen as model analytes to cover a wide range of polarities, gas-phase ionization energies, and proton affinities. Chlorobenzene was used as the dopant, and methanol/water (80/20) as the solvent. In both techniques, analytes formed the same ions (radical cations, protonated molecules, and/or fragments). However, in DA-APCI, the relative efficiency of charge exchange versus proton transfer was lower than in DA-APPI. This is suggested to be because in DA-APCI both dopant and solvent clusters can be ionized, and the formed reagent ions can react with the analytes via competing charge exchange and proton transfer reactions. In DA-APPI, on the other hand, the main reagents are dopant-derived radical cations, which favor ionization of analytes via charge exchange. The efficiency of charge exchange in both DA-APPI and DA-APCI was shown to depend heavily on the solvent flow rate, with best efficiency seen at lowest flow rates studied (0.05 and 0.1 mL/min). Both DA-APCI and DA-APPI showed the radical cation of chlorobenzene at 0.05-0.1 mL/min flow rate, but at increasing flow rate, the abundance of chlorobenzene M+. decreased and reagent ion populations deriving from different gas-phase chemistry were recorded. The formation of these reagent ions explains the decreasing ionization efficiency and the differences in charge exchange between the techniques.

  18. Charge Exchange Reaction in Dopant-Assisted Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization and Atmospheric Pressure Photoionization.

    PubMed

    Vaikkinen, Anu; Kauppila, Tiina J; Kostiainen, Risto

    2016-08-01

    The efficiencies of charge exchange reaction in dopant-assisted atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (DA-APCI) and dopant-assisted atmospheric pressure photoionization (DA-APPI) mass spectrometry (MS) were compared by flow injection analysis. Fourteen individual compounds and a commercial mixture of 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons were chosen as model analytes to cover a wide range of polarities, gas-phase ionization energies, and proton affinities. Chlorobenzene was used as the dopant, and methanol/water (80/20) as the solvent. In both techniques, analytes formed the same ions (radical cations, protonated molecules, and/or fragments). However, in DA-APCI, the relative efficiency of charge exchange versus proton transfer was lower than in DA-APPI. This is suggested to be because in DA-APCI both dopant and solvent clusters can be ionized, and the formed reagent ions can react with the analytes via competing charge exchange and proton transfer reactions. In DA-APPI, on the other hand, the main reagents are dopant-derived radical cations, which favor ionization of analytes via charge exchange. The efficiency of charge exchange in both DA-APPI and DA-APCI was shown to depend heavily on the solvent flow rate, with best efficiency seen at lowest flow rates studied (0.05 and 0.1 mL/min). Both DA-APCI and DA-APPI showed the radical cation of chlorobenzene at 0.05-0.1 mL/min flow rate, but at increasing flow rate, the abundance of chlorobenzene M(+.) decreased and reagent ion populations deriving from different gas-phase chemistry were recorded. The formation of these reagent ions explains the decreasing ionization efficiency and the differences in charge exchange between the techniques. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  19. Gas chromatography coupled to atmospheric pressure ionization mass spectrometry (GC-API-MS): review.

    PubMed

    Li, Du-Xin; Gan, Lin; Bronja, Amela; Schmitz, Oliver J

    2015-09-03

    Although the coupling of GC/MS with atmospheric pressure ionization (API) has been reported in 1970s, the interest in coupling GC with atmospheric pressure ion source was expanded in the last decade. The demand of a "soft" ion source for preserving highly diagnostic molecular ion is desirable, as compared to the "hard" ionization technique such as electron ionization (EI) in traditional GC/MS, which fragments the molecule in an extensive way. These API sources include atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI), atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI), atmospheric pressure laser ionization (APLI), electrospray ionization (ESI) and low temperature plasma (LTP). This review discusses the advantages and drawbacks of this analytical platform. After an introduction in atmospheric pressure ionization the review gives an overview about the history and explains the mechanisms of various atmospheric pressure ionization techniques used in combination with GC such as APCI, APPI, APLI, ESI and LTP. Also new developments made in ion source geometry, ion source miniaturization and multipurpose ion source constructions are discussed and a comparison between GC-FID, GC-EI-MS and GC-API-MS shows the advantages and drawbacks of these techniques. The review ends with an overview of applications realized with GC-API-MS.

  20. Capillary atmospheric pressure electron capture ionization (cAPECI): a highly efficient ionization method for nitroaromatic compounds.

    PubMed

    Derpmann, Valerie; Mueller, David; Bejan, Iustinian; Sonderfeld, Hannah; Wilberscheid, Sonja; Koppmann, Ralf; Brockmann, Klaus J; Benter, Thorsten

    2014-03-01

    We report on a novel method for atmospheric pressure ionization of compounds with elevated electron affinity (e.g., nitroaromatic compounds) or gas phase acidity (e.g., phenols), respectively. The method is based on the generation of thermal electrons by the photo-electric effect, followed by electron capture of oxygen when air is the gas matrix yielding O2(-) or of the analyte directly with nitrogen as matrix. Charge transfer or proton abstraction by O2(-) leads to the ionization of the analytes. The interaction of UV-light with metals is a clean method for the generation of thermal electrons at atmospheric pressure. Furthermore, only negative ions are generated and neutral radical formation is minimized, in contrast to discharge- or dopant assisted methods. Ionization takes place inside the transfer capillary of the mass spectrometer leading to comparably short transfer times of ions to the high vacuum region of the mass spectrometer. This strongly reduces ion transformation processes, resulting in mass spectra that more closely relate to the neutral analyte distribution. cAPECI is thus a soft and selective ionization method with detection limits in the pptV range. In comparison to standard ionization methods (e.g., PTR), cAPECI is superior with respect to both selectivity and achievable detection limits. cAPECI demonstrates to be a promising ionization method for applications in relevant fields as, for example, explosives detection and atmospheric chemistry.

  1. Pressure sores–a constant problem for plegic patients and a permanent challenge for plastic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Marinescu, S; Florescu, IP; Jecan, C

    2010-01-01

    Pressure sores–a constant problem for plegic patients and a permanent challenge for plastic surgery Pressure sores can be defined as lesions caused by unrelieved pressure resulting in damage of the underlying tissue. They represent a common problem in the pathology of plegic patients and, plastic surgery has a significant role in their treatment. Pressure sores occur over bony prominences and so, they are most commonly seen at the sacrum and trochanters in paralyzed patients and at ischium for the patients who sit in a wheelchair for a long time. For these patients, surgical treatment is very important because on one hand, it stops the loss of nutrients and proteins at the site of the pressure sore, and on the other hand, it permits the initiation of neuromuscular recuperation treatment much faster. PMID:20968200

  2. Choosing between atmospheric pressure chemical ionization and electrospray ionization interfaces for the HPLC/MS analysis of pesticides

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thurman, E.M.; Ferrer, I.; Barcelo, D.

    2001-01-01

    An evaluation of over 75 pesticides by high-performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (HPLC/MS) clearly shows that different classes of pesticides are more sensitive using either atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) or electrospray ionization (ESI). For example, neutral and basic pesticides (phenylureas, triazines) are more sensitive using APCI (especially positive ion). While cationic and anionic herbicides (bipyridylium ions, sulfonic acids) are more sensitive using ESI (especially negative ion). These data are expressed graphically in a figure called an ionization-continuum diagram, which shows that protonation in the gas phase (proton affinity) and polarity in solution, expressed as proton addition or subtraction (pKa), is useful in selecting APCI or ESI. Furthermore, sodium adduct formation commonly occurs using positive ion ESI but not using positive ion APCI, which reflects the different mechanisms of ionization and strengthens the usefulness of the ionization-continuum diagram. The data also show that the concept of "wrong-way around" ESI (the sensitivity of acidic pesticides in an acidic mobile phase) is a useful modification of simple pKa theory for mobile-phase selection. Finally, this finding is used to enhance the chromatographic separation of oxanilic and sulfonic acid herbicides while maintaining good sensitivity in LC/MS using ESI negative.

  3. Radiation pressure confinement - III. The origin of the broad ionization distribution in AGN outflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stern, Jonathan; Behar, Ehud; Laor, Ari; Baskin, Alexei; Holczer, Tomer

    2014-12-01

    The winds of ionized gas driven by active galactic nuclei (AGN) can be studied through absorption lines in their X-ray spectra. A recurring feature of these outflows is their broad ionization distribution, including essentially all ionization levels (e.g., Fe0+ to Fe25+). This characteristic feature can be quantified with the absorption measure distribution (AMD), defined as the distribution of column density with ionization parameter |dN/d log ξ|. Observed AMDs extend over 0.1 ≲ ξ ≲ 104 (cgs), and are remarkably similar in different objects. Power-law fits (|dN/d log ξ| ≈ N1ξa) yield N1 = 3 × 1021 cm- 2 ± 0.4 dex and a = 0-0.4. What is the source of this broad ionization distribution, and what sets the small range of observed N1 and a? A common interpretation is a multiphase outflow, with a wide range of gas densities in a uniform gas pressure medium. However, the incident radiation pressure leads to a gas pressure gradient in the photoionized gas, and therefore to a broad range of ionization states within a single slab. We show that this compression of the gas by the radiation pressure leads to an AMD with |dN/d log ξ| = 8 × 1021 ξ0.03 cm-2, remarkably similar to that observed. The calculated values of N1 and a depend weakly on the gas metallicity, the ionizing spectral slope, the distance from the nucleus, the ambient density, and the total absorber column. Thus, radiation pressure compression (RPC) of the photoionized gas provides a natural explanation for the observed AMD. RPC predicts that the gas pressure increases with decreasing ionization, which can be used to test the validity of RPC in ionized AGN outflows.

  4. Low pressure microplasmas enabled by field ionization: Kinetic modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Macheret, Sergey O. Tholeti, Siva Sashank; Alexeenko, Alina A.

    2016-05-09

    A principle of microplasma generation that utilizes field emission of electrons at the cathode and field ionization producing ions at the anode, both processes relying on nanorods or nanotubes, is explored theoretically. In this plasma generation concept, collisional ionization of atoms and molecules by electron impact would play a negligible role. Analytical estimates as well as plasma kinetic modeling by particle-in-cell method with Monte Carlo collisions in argon confirm that this principle can enable substantial plasma densities at near-collisionless microgaps, while requiring relatively low voltages, less than 100 V. An order of magnitude increase in electron number density can be achieved due to enhancement of field emission at the cathode by positive space charge at high field ionization ion current densities.

  5. Comparison of the sensitivity of mass spectrometry atmospheric pressure ionization techniques in the analysis of porphyrinoids.

    PubMed

    Swider, Paweł; Lewtak, Jan P; Gryko, Daniel T; Danikiewicz, Witold

    2013-10-01

    The porphyrinoids chemistry is greatly dependent on the data obtained in mass spectrometry. For this reason, it is essential to determine the range of applicability of mass spectrometry ionization methods. In this study, the sensitivity of three different atmospheric pressure ionization techniques, electrospray ionization, atmospheric pressure chemical ionization and atmospheric pressure photoionization, was tested for several porphyrinods and their metallocomplexes. Electrospray ionization method was shown to be the best ionization technique because of its high sensitivity for derivatives of cyanocobalamin, free-base corroles and porphyrins. In the case of metallocorroles and metalloporphyrins, atmospheric pressure photoionization with dopant proved to be the most sensitive ionization method. It was also shown that for relatively acidic compounds, particularly for corroles, the negative ion mode provides better sensitivity than the positive ion mode. The results supply a lot of relevant information on the methodology of porphyrinoids analysis carried out by mass spectrometry. The information can be useful in designing future MS or liquid chromatography-MS experiments.

  6. Ghost peaks observed after atmospheric pressure matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization experiments may disclose new ionization mechanism of matrix-assisted hypersonic velocity impact ionization.

    PubMed

    Moskovets, Eugene

    2015-08-30

    Understanding the mechanisms of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) promises improvements in the sensitivity and specificity of many established applications in the field of mass spectrometry. This paper reports a serendipitous observation of a significant ion yield in a post-ionization experiment conducted after the sample had been removed from a standard atmospheric pressure (AP)-MALDI source. This post-ionization is interpreted in terms of collisions of microparticles moving with a hypersonic velocity into a solid surface. Calculations show that the thermal energy released during such collisions is close to that absorbed by the top matrix layer in traditional MALDI. The microparticles, containing both the matrix and analytes, could be detached from a film produced inside the inlet capillary during the sample ablation and accelerated by the flow rushing through the capillary. These observations contribute some new perspective to ion formation in both laser and laser-less matrix-assisted ionization. An AP-MALDI ion source hyphenated with a three-stage high-pressure ion funnel system was utilized for peptide mass analysis. After the laser had been turned off and the MALDI sample removed, ions were detected during a gradual reduction of the background pressure in the first funnel. The constant-rate pressure reduction led to the reproducible appearance of different singly and doubly charged peptide peaks in mass spectra taken a few seconds after the end of the MALDI analysis of a dried-droplet spot. The ion yield as well as the mass range of ions observed with a significant delay after a completion of the primary MALDI analysis depended primarily on the background pressure inside the first funnel. The production of ions in this post-ionization step was exclusively observed during the pressure drop. A lower matrix background and significant increase in relative yield of double-protonated ions are reported. The observations were partially consistent

  7. Super-atmospheric pressure ionization mass spectrometry and its application to ultrafast online protein digestion analysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lee Chuin; Ninomiya, Satoshi; Hiraoka, Kenzo

    2016-06-01

    Ion source pressure plays a significant role in the process of ionization and the subsequent ion transmission inside a mass spectrometer. Pressurizing the ion source to a gas pressure greater than atmospheric pressure is a relatively new approach that aims to further improve the performance of atmospheric pressure ionization sources. For example, under a super-atmospheric pressure environment, a stable electrospray can be sustained for liquid with high surface tension such as pure water, because of the suppression of electric discharge. Even for nano-electrospray ionization (nano-ESI), which is known to work with aqueous solution, its stability and sensitivity can also be enhanced, particularly in the negative mode when the ion source is pressurized. A brief review on the development of super-atmospheric pressure ion sources, including high-pressure electrospray, field desorption and superheated ESI, and the strategies to interface these ion sources to a mass spectrometer will be given. Using a recent ESI prototype with an operating temperature at 220 °C under 27 atm, we also demonstrate that it is possible to achieve an online Asp-specific protein digestion analysis in which the whole processes of digestion, ionization and MS acquisition could be completed on the order of a few seconds. This method is fast, and the reaction can even be monitored on a near-real-time basis. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Highly informative multiclass profiling of lipids by ultra-high performance liquid chromatography - Low resolution (quadrupole) mass spectrometry by using electrospray ionization and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization interfaces.

    PubMed

    Beccaria, Marco; Inferrera, Veronica; Rigano, Francesca; Gorynski, Krzysztof; Purcaro, Giorgia; Pawliszyn, Janusz; Dugo, Paola; Mondello, Luigi

    2017-08-04

    A simple, fast, and versatile method, using an ultra-high performance liquid chromatography system coupled with a low resolution (single quadrupole) mass spectrometer was optimized to perform multiclass lipid profiling of human plasma. Particular attention was made to develop a method suitable for both electrospray ionization and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization interfaces (sequentially in positive- and negative-ion mode), without any modification of the chromatographic conditions (mobile phase, flow-rate, gradient, etc.). Emphasis was given to the extrapolation of the structural information based on the fragmentation pattern obtained using atmospheric pressure chemical ionization interface, under each different ionization condition, highlighting the complementary information obtained using the electrospray ionization interface, of support for related molecule ions identification. Furthermore, mass spectra of phosphatidylserine and phosphatidylinositol obtained using the atmospheric pressure chemical ionization interface are reported and discussed for the first time. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Performance of dielectric barrier discharge ionization mass spectrometry for pesticide testing: a comparison with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization and electrospray ionization.

    PubMed

    Gilbert-López, Bienvenida; Geltenpoth, Helma; Meyer, Cordula; Michels, Antje; Hayen, Heiko; Molina-Díaz, Antonio; García-Reyes, Juan F; Franzke, Joachim

    2013-02-15

    The present study reports on the evaluation of dielectric barrier discharge microplasma ionization (DBDI) for liquid chromatography/high resolution mass spectrometry (LC/HRMS) analyses of pesticide residues in fruit and vegetables. Ionization, fragmentation, analytical performance and matrix effects displayed by LC/DBDI-MS were critically evaluated and compared with both atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) and electrospray (ESI), using a set of over 40 representative multiclass pesticides. Sample preparation was accomplished using standard QuEChERS procedure and the identification and quantitation of the pesticides tested accomplished by means of LC/MS with a hybrid linear quadrupole ion trap (LIT)-Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) mass spectrometer operated in full-scan positive ion mode using DBDI, APCI and ESI sources. The developed LC/DBDI-MS method allowed the screening of 43 pesticides in three different vegetable matrices: apple, orange and tomato. Minor matrix effects (i.e. signal suppression or enhancement ≤20%) were observed in most of the studied compounds: 95%, 70% and 81% of the studied compounds showed minor matrix effects in extracts of apple, orange and tomato, respectively. The results of the analysis of spiked orange extracts showed that the sensitivity obtained with LC/DBDI-MS is appropriate for multi-residue analysis of pesticide residues in fruit and vegetable samples. The limits of quantitation (LOQs) obtained for most of the studied pesticides were in compliance with the European Regulation 396/2005 (and subsequent updates) on food commodities (default maximum residue level of 10 µg kg(-1)). Comparative studies with commercial sources demonstrate the suitability of DBDI as an ionization technique for residue analysis, because of the combination of the following two advantages: (1) the use of DBDI provides minimized matrix effects compared with APCI, and (2) improved the detection - in terms of sensitivity - of

  10. Atmospheric pressure ionization-tandem mass spectrometry of the phenicol drug family.

    PubMed

    Alechaga, Élida; Moyano, Encarnación; Galceran, M Teresa

    2013-11-01

    In this work, the mass spectrometry behaviour of the veterinary drug family of phenicols, including chloramphenicol (CAP) and its related compounds thiamphenicol (TAP), florfenicol (FF) and FF amine (FFA), was studied. Several atmospheric pressure ionization sources, electrospray (ESI), atmospheric pressure chemical ionization and atmospheric pressure photoionization were compared. In all atmospheric pressure ionization sources, CAP, TAP and FF were ionized in both positive and negative modes; while for the metabolite FFA, only positive ionization was possible. In general, in positive mode, [M + H](+) dominated the mass spectrum for FFA, while the other compounds, CAP, TAP and FF, with lower proton affinity showed intense adducts with species present in the mobile phase. In negative mode, ESI and atmospheric pressure photoionization showed the deprotonated molecule [M-H](-), while atmospheric pressure chemical ionization provided the radical molecular ion by electron capture. All these ions were characterized by tandem mass spectrometry using the combined information obtained by multistage mass spectrometry and high-resolution mass spectrometry in a quadrupole-Orbitrap instrument. In general, the fragmentation occurred via cyclization and losses or fragmentation of the N-(alkyl)acetamide group, and common fragmentation pathways were established for this family of compounds. A new chemical structure for the product ion at m/z 257 for CAP, on the basis of the MS(3) and MS(4) spectra is proposed. Thermally assisted ESI and selected reaction monitoring are proposed for the determination of these compounds by ultra high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry, achieving instrumental detection limits down to 0.1 pg.

  11. The Townsend coefficient of ionization in atmospheric pressure rare gas plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zvereva, G.

    2015-12-01

    In the work the influence of the processes characteristic for atmospheric pressure heavy inert gases discharge plasma on the value of the first Townsend ionization coefficient were investigated. Krypton plasma was considered. Calculations have shown that the greatest impact on the value of the first Townsend ionization coefficient has dissociative recombination of molecular ions, followed by descending influence processes occur: stepwise ionization, the electron-electron collisions and superelastic ones. The effect of these processes begins to appear at concentrations of electrons and excited particles higher than 1012 cm-3. At times shorter than the time of molecular ions formation, when dissociative recombination is absent, should expect a significant increase of the ionization coefficient.

  12. Improving N-Glycan Coverage using HPLC-MS with Electrospray Ionization at Subambient Pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Marginean, Ioan; Kronewitter, Scott R.; Moore, Ronald J.; Slysz, Gordon W.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Tang, Keqi; Smith, Richard D.

    2012-10-01

    Human serum glycan profiling with mass spectrometry (MS) has been employed to study several disease conditions and is demonstrating promise for e.g. clinical biomarker discovery. However, the poor glycan ionization efficiency and the large dynamic range of glycan concentrations in human sera hinder comprehensive profiling. In particular, large glycans are problematic because they are present at low concentrations and prone to fragmentation. Here we show that the sub-ambient pressure ionization with nanoelectrospray (SPIN)-MS can expand the serum glycome profile when compared with the conventional atmospheric pressure electrospray ionization (ESI)-MS with a heated capillary inlet. Notably, the ions generated by the SPIN interface were observed at higher charge states for 50% of the annotated glycans. Out of a total of 130 detected glycans, 34 were only detected with the SPIN-MS, resulting in improved coverage of glycan families as well as of glycans with larger numbers of labile monosaccharides.

  13. Numerical and experimental study on atmospheric pressure ionization waves propagating through a U-shape channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Wen; Xia, Yang; Bi, Zhenhua; Song, Ying; Wang, Dezhen; Sosnin, Eduard A.; Skakun, Victor S.; Liu, Dongping

    2017-08-01

    A 2D computational study of ionization waves propagating in U-shape channels at atmospheric pressure was performed, with emphasis on the effect of voltage polarity and the curvature of the bend. The discharge was ignited by a HV needle electrode inside the channel, and power was applied in the form of a trapezoidal pulse lasting 2 µs. We have shown that behavior of ionization waves propagating in U-shape channels was quite different with that in straight tubes. For positive polarity of applied voltage, the ionization waves tended to propagate along one side of walls rather than filling the channel. The propagation velocity of ionization waves predicted by the simulation was in good agreement with the experiment results; the velocity was first increasing rapidly in the vicinity of the needle tip and then decreasing with the increment of propagation distance. Then we have studied the influence of voltage polarity on discharge characteristics. For negative polarity, the ionization waves tended to propagate along the opposite side of the wall, while the discharge was more diffusive and volume-filling compared with the positive case. It was found that the propagation velocity for the negative ionization wave was higher than that for the positive one. Meanwhile, the propagation of the negative ionization wave depended less on the pre-ionization level than the positive ionization wave. Finally, the effect of the radius of curvature was studied. Simulations have shown that the propagation speeds were sensitive to the radii of the curvature of the channels for both polarities. Higher radii of curvature tended to have higher speed and longer length of plasma. The simulation results were supported by experimental observations under similar discharge conditions.

  14. Radical electronic transformation of strongly coupled plasma at megabar pressure ionization, dielectrization and phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortov, Vladimir

    2007-06-01

    The work presents new results of investigation of pressure and temperature ionization of coupled nonideal plasmas generated as a result of multiple shock compression of metals, H2, He, noble gases, S, I, fullerene C60, H2O in the megabar pressure range. The highly time-resolved diagnostics permit us to measure thermodynamical, radiative and mechanical properties of high pressure condensed matter in a broad region of the phase diagram. This data in combination with exploding wire conductivity measurements demonstrate an ionization rate increase up to ten orders of magnitude as a result of compression of degenerate plasmas at p 104-107 bars. Shock compression of H2, Ar, He, Kr, Ne, Xe in initially gaseous and cryogenic liquid state allows measuring the electrical conductivity, Hall effect parameters, equation of state, and emission spectra of strongly nonideal plasma. Thermal and pressure ionization of strongly coupled states of matter is the most prominent effects under the experimental conditions. It was shown that plasma compression strongly deforms the ionization potentials, emission spectra and scattering cross-sections of the neutrals and ions in the strongly coupled plasmas. In contrast to the plasma compression the multiple shock compression of solid Li, Na, Ca shows ``dielectrization'' of the elements. Phase transitions in strongly nonideal plasmas are discussed.

  15. Low pressure electrospray ionization system and process for effective transmission of ions

    DOEpatents

    Tang, Keqi [Richland, WA; Page, Jason S [Kennewick, WA; Kelly, Ryan T [West Richland, WA; Smith, Richard D [Richland, WA

    2012-05-08

    Systems and methods that provide up to complete transmission of ions between coupled stages with low effective ion losses. An "interfaceless" electrospray ionization system is further described that operates an electrospray at a reduced pressure such that standard electrospray sample solutions can be directly sprayed into an electrodynamic ion funnel which provides ion focusing and transmission of ions into a mass analyzer. Furthermore, chambers maintained at different pressures can allow for more optimal operating conditions for an electrospray emitter and an ion guide.

  16. Pyroelectricity Assisted Infrared-Laser Desorption Ionization (PAI-LDI) for Atmospheric Pressure Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yanyan; Ma, Xiaoxiao; Wei, Zhenwei; Gong, Xiaoyun; Yang, Chengdui; Zhang, Sichun; Zhang, Xinrong

    2015-08-01

    A new atmospheric pressure ionization method termed pyroelectricity-assisted infrared laser desorption ionization (PAI-LDI) was developed in this study. The pyroelectric material served as both sample target plate and enhancing ionization substrate, and an IR laser with wavelength of 1064 nm was employed to realize direct desorption and ionization of the analytes. The mass spectra of various compounds obtained on pyroelectric material were compared with those of other substrates. For the five standard substances tested in this work, LiNbO3 substrate produced the highest ion yield and the signal intensity was about 10 times higher than that when copper was used as substrate. For 1-adamantylamine, as low as 20 pg (132.2 fmol) was successfully detected. The active ingredient in (Compound Paracetamol and 1-Adamantylamine Hydrochloride Capsules), 1-adamantylamine, can be sensitively detected at an amount as low as 150 pg, when the medicine stock solution was diluted with urine. Monosaccharide and oligosaccharides in Allium Cepa L. juice was also successfully identified with PAI-LDI. The method did not require matrix-assisted external high voltage or other extra facility-assisted set-ups for desorption/ionization. This study suggested exciting application prospect of pyroelectric materials in matrix- and electricity-free atmospheric pressure mass spectrometry research.

  17. Fundamentals of ambient metastable-induced chemical ionization mass spectrometry and atmospheric pressure ion mobility spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Glenn A.

    Molecular ionization is owed much of its development from the early implementation of electron ionization (EI). Although dramatically increasing the library of compounds discovered, an inherent problem with EI was the low abundance of molecular ions detected due to high fragmentation leading to the difficult task of the correct chemical identification after mass spectrometry (MS). These problems stimulated the research into new ionization methods which sought to "soften" the ionization process. In the late 1980s the advancements of ionization techniques was thought to have reached its pinnacle with both electrospray ionization (ESI) and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI). Both ionization techniques allowed for "soft" ionization of large molecular weight and/or labile compounds for intact characterization by MS. Albeit pervasive, neither ESI nor MALDI can be viewed as "magic bullet" ionization techniques. Both techniques require sample preparation which often included native sample destruction, and operation of these techniques took place in sealed enclosures and often, reduced pressure conditions. New open-air ionization techniques termed "ambient MS" enable direct analysis of samples of various physical states, sizes and shapes. One particular technique named Direct Analysis In Real Time (DART) has been steadily growing as one of the ambient tools of choice to ionize small molecular weight (< 1000 Da) molecules with a wide range of polarities. Although there is a large list of reported applications using DART as an ionization source, there have not been many studies investigating the fundamental properties of DART desorption and ionization mechanisms. The work presented in this thesis is aimed to provide in depth findings on the physicochemical phenomena during open-air DART desorption and ionization MS and current application developments. A review of recent ambient plasma-based desorption/ionization techniques for analytical MS is presented in

  18. An Open Port Sampling Interface for Liquid Introduction Atmospheric Pressure Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    DOE PAGES

    Van Berkel, Gary J.; Kertesz, Vilmos

    2015-01-01

    RATIONALE: A simple method to introduce unprocessed samples into a solvent for rapid characterization by liquid introduction atmospheric pressure ionization mass spectrometry has been lacking. The continuous flow, self-cleaning open port sampling interface introduced here fills this void. METHODS: The open port sampling interface used a vertically aligned, co-axial tube arrangement enabling solvent delivery to the sampling end of the device through the tubing annulus and solvent aspiration down the center tube and into the mass spectrometer ionization source via the commercial APCI emitter probe. The solvent delivery rate to the interface was set to exceed the aspiration rate creatingmore » a continuous sampling interface along with a constant, self-cleaning spillover of solvent from the top of the probe. RESULTS: Using the open port sampling interface with positive ion mode APCI and a hybrid quadrupole time of flight mass spectrometer, rapid, direct sampling and analysis possibilities are exemplified with plastics, ballpoint and felt tip ink pens, skin, and vegetable oils. These results demonstrated that the open port sampling interface could be used as a simple, versatile and self-cleaning system to rapidly introduce multiple types of unprocessed, sometimes highly concentrated and complex, samples into a solvent flow stream for subsequent ionization and analysis by mass spectrometry. The basic setup presented here could be incorporated with any self-aspirating liquid introduction ionization source (e.g., ESI, APCI, APPI, ICP, etc.) or any type of atmospheric pressure sampling ready mass spectrometer system. CONCLUSIONS: The open port sampling interface provides a means to introduce and quickly analyze unprocessed solid or liquid samples with liquid introduction atmospheric pressure ionization source without fear of sampling interface or ionization source contamination.« less

  19. An Open Port Sampling Interface for Liquid Introduction Atmospheric Pressure Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Van Berkel, Gary J.; Kertesz, Vilmos

    2015-01-01

    RATIONALE: A simple method to introduce unprocessed samples into a solvent for rapid characterization by liquid introduction atmospheric pressure ionization mass spectrometry has been lacking. The continuous flow, self-cleaning open port sampling interface introduced here fills this void. METHODS: The open port sampling interface used a vertically aligned, co-axial tube arrangement enabling solvent delivery to the sampling end of the device through the tubing annulus and solvent aspiration down the center tube and into the mass spectrometer ionization source via the commercial APCI emitter probe. The solvent delivery rate to the interface was set to exceed the aspiration rate creating a continuous sampling interface along with a constant, self-cleaning spillover of solvent from the top of the probe. RESULTS: Using the open port sampling interface with positive ion mode APCI and a hybrid quadrupole time of flight mass spectrometer, rapid, direct sampling and analysis possibilities are exemplified with plastics, ballpoint and felt tip ink pens, skin, and vegetable oils. These results demonstrated that the open port sampling interface could be used as a simple, versatile and self-cleaning system to rapidly introduce multiple types of unprocessed, sometimes highly concentrated and complex, samples into a solvent flow stream for subsequent ionization and analysis by mass spectrometry. The basic setup presented here could be incorporated with any self-aspirating liquid introduction ionization source (e.g., ESI, APCI, APPI, ICP, etc.) or any type of atmospheric pressure sampling ready mass spectrometer system. CONCLUSIONS: The open port sampling interface provides a means to introduce and quickly analyze unprocessed solid or liquid samples with liquid introduction atmospheric pressure ionization source without fear of sampling interface or ionization source contamination.

  20. An open port sampling interface for liquid introduction atmospheric pressure ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Van Berkel, Gary J; Kertesz, Vilmos

    2015-10-15

    A simple method to introduce unprocessed samples into a solvent for rapid characterization by liquid introduction atmospheric pressure ionization mass spectrometry has been lacking. The continuous flow, self-cleaning open port sampling interface introduced here fills this void. The open port sampling interface used a vertically aligned, co-axial tube arrangement enabling solvent delivery to the sampling end of the device through the tubing annulus and solvent aspiration down the center tube and into the ionization source of the mass spectrometer via the commercial APCI emitter probe. The solvent delivery rate to the interface was set to exceed the aspiration rate, creating a continuous sampling interface along with a constant, self-cleaning spillover of solvent from the top of the probe. Using the open port sampling interface with positive ion mode APCI and a hybrid quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometer, rapid, direct sampling and analysis possibilities are exemplified with plastics, ballpoint and felt tip ink pens, skin, and vegetable oils. These results demonstrated that the open port sampling interface could be used as a simple, versatile and self-cleaning system to rapidly introduce multiple types of unprocessed, sometimes highly concentrated and complex, samples into a solvent flow stream for subsequent ionization and analysis by mass spectrometry. The basic setup presented here could be incorporated with any self-aspirating liquid introduction ionization source (e.g., ESI, APCI, APPI, ICP, etc.) or any type of atmospheric pressure sampling-ready mass spectrometer system. The open port sampling interface provides a means to introduce and quickly analyze unprocessed solid or liquid samples with the liquid introduction atmospheric pressure ionization source without fear of sampling interface or ionization source contamination. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. High-Pressure Photon Ionization Source for TOFMS and Its Application for Online Breath Analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Jiang, Jichun; Hua, Lei; Hou, Keyong; Xie, Yuanyuan; Chen, Ping; Liu, Wei; Li, Qingyun; Wang, Shuang; Li, Haiyang

    2016-09-20

    Photon ionization mass spectrometry (PI-MS) is a widely used technique for the online detection of trace substances in complex matrices. In this work, a new high-pressure photon ionization (HPPI) ion source based on a vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) Kr lamp was developed for time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOFMS). The detection sensitivity was improved by elevating the ion source pressure to about 700 Pa. A radio frequency (RF)-only quadrupole was employed as the ion guide system following the HPPI source to achieve high ion transmission efficiency. In-source collision induced dissociation (CID) was conducted for accurate chemical identification by varying the voltage between the ion source and the ion guide. The high humidity of the breath air can promote the detection of some compounds with higher ionization potentials (IPs) that could not be well detected by single photon ionization (SPI) at low pressure. Under 100% relative humidity (37 °C), the limits of detection down to 0.015 ppbv (parts per billion by volume) for aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons were obtained. This HPPI-TOFMS system was preliminarily applied for online investigations of the exhaled breath from both healthy nonsmoker and smoker subjects, demonstrating its analytical capacity for complicated gases analysis. Subsequently, several frequently reported VOCs in the breath of healthy volunteers, i.e., acetone, isoprene, 2-butanone, ethanol, acetic acid, and isopropanol, were successfully identified and quantified.

  2. Resonance ionization spectroscopy measurement of the vapor pressure of several molecular species

    SciTech Connect

    Capelle, G.A.; Jessup, D.A.; Borella, H.M.; Franks, L.A.

    1984-01-01

    In recent years resonance ionization spectroscopy (RIS) has found increasing application to various problems involving detection of low levels of atomic, and more recently molecular, species. This work demonstrates the usefulness of RIS in measuring vapor pressure curves of molecular species at very low pressures. Specifically, the vapor pressures versus temperature relationship for rubidium iodide (RbI) and potassium iodide (KI) was measured by applying RIS to atomic Rb and K, using a two-laser system. A pulsed molecular nitrogen laser first dissociated the RbI to produce ground-state Rb atoms in the experimental cell. A flashlamp-pumped dye laser then ionized the Rb in a process wherein two photons of the same wavelength are absorbed, the first exciting Rb via an allowed transition to an upper state (5/sup 2/S/sub 1/2/ ..-->.. 6/sup 2//sub 1/2 or 3/2/) lying in energy slightly more than half the distance to the ionization limit, and the second photon ionizing the excited Rb. In the case of KI, an excimer-laser-pumped dye laser was used in a similar way. An applied dc electric field swept the photoelectrons to a proportional counter for subsequent amplification and detection. The photoelectron signal was then related back to RbI and KI concentrations.

  3. Atmospheric pressure laser desorption/ionization of plant metabolites and plant tissue using colloidal graphite.

    PubMed

    Perdian, D C; Schieffer, G M; Houk, R S

    2010-02-01

    Colloidal graphite is a promising matrix for atmospheric pressure laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry. Intact [M+H](+) and [M-H](-) ions are readily produced from a wide range of small molecule plant metabolites, particularly anthocyanins, fatty acids, lipids, glycerides, and ceramides. Compared with a more traditional organic acid matrix, colloidal graphite provides more efficient ionization for small hydrophobic molecules and has a much cleaner background spectrum, especially in negative ion mode. Some important metabolites, e.g., fatty acids and glycosylated flavonoids, can be observed from Arabidopsis thaliana leaf and flower petal tissues in situ. Copyright (c) 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Permanent downhole fiber optic pressure and temperature monitoring during CO2 injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt-Hattenberger, C.; Moeller, F.; Liebscher, A.; Koehler, S.

    2009-04-01

    Permanent downhole monitoring of pressure and temperature, ideally over the entire length of the injection string, is essential for any smooth and safe CO2 injection within the framework of geological CO2 storage: i) To avoid fracturing of the cap-rock, a certain, site dependent pressure threshold within the reservoir should not be exceeded; ii) Any CO2 phase transition within the injection string, i.e. either condensation or evaporation, should be avoided. Such phase transitions cause uncontrolled and undetermined P-T regimes within the injection string that may ultimately result in a shut-in of the injection facility; and iii) Precise knowledge of the P and T response of the reservoir to the CO2 injection is a prerequisite to any reservoir modeling. The talk will present first results from our permanent downhole P-T monitoring program from the Ketzin CO2 storage test site (CO2SINK). At Ketzin, a fiber Bragg grating pressure sensor has been installed at the end of the injection string in combination with distributed temperature profiling over the entire length (about 550 m) of the string for continuous P-T monitoring during operation. Such fiber optic monitoring technique is used by default in the oil and gas industry but has not yet been applied as standard on a long-term routine mode for CO2 injection. Pressure is measured every 5 seconds with a resolution of < 1 bar. The data are later processed by user-defined program. The temperature logs along the injection string are measured every 3 minutes with a spatial resolution of one meter and with a temperature resolution of about 0.1°C. The long-term stability under full operational conditions is currently under investigation. The main computer of the P-T system operates as a stand-alone data-acquisition unit, and is connected with a secure intranet in order to ensure remote data access and system maintenance. The on-line measurements are displayed on the operator panel of the injection facility for direct control

  5. Desorption electro-flow focusing ionization of explosives and narcotics for ambient pressure mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Forbes, Thomas P; Brewer, Tim M; Gillen, Greg

    2013-10-07

    Desorption electro-flow focusing ionization (DEFFI), a desorption-based ambient ion source, was developed, characterized, and evaluated as a possible source for field deployable ambient pressure mass spectrometry (APMS). DEFFI, based on an electro-flow focusing system, provides a unique configuration for the generation of highly charged energetic droplets for sample analysis and ionization. A concentrically flowing carrier gas focuses the liquid emanating from a capillary through a small orifice, generating a steady fluid jet. An electric field is applied across this jet formation region, producing high velocity charged droplets that impinge on an analyte laden surface. This configuration separates the jet charging region from the external environment, eliminating detrimental effects from droplet space charge or target surface charging. The sample desorption and ionization processes operate similar to desorption electrospray ionization (DESI). DEFFI demonstrated strong signal intensities and improved signal-to-noise ratios in both positive and negative mode mass spectrometry for narcotics, i.e., cocaine, and explosives, i.e., cyclotrimethylenetrinitramine (RDX), respectively. A characterization of DEFFI ionization mechanisms identified operation regimes of both electrospray and corona discharge based analyte ionization, as well as limitations in overall signal. In addition, the DEFFI response was directly compared to DESI-MS under similar operating conditions. This comparison established a wider and more stable optimal operating range, while requiring an order of magnitude lower applied gas pressure and applied potential for DEFFI than DESI. These reductions are due to the physical mode of jet formation and geometric configuration differences between DEFFI and DESI, pointing to a potential benefit of DEFFI-MS for field implementation.

  6. Precursor ion scan profiles of acylcarnitines by atmospheric pressure thermal desorption chemical ionization tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Paglia, Giuseppe; D'Apolito, Oceania; Corso, Gaetano

    2008-12-01

    The fatty acyl esters of L-carnitine (acylcarnitines) are useful biomarkers for the diagnosis of some inborn errors of metabolism analyzed by liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry. In this study the acylcarnitines were analyzed by atmospheric pressure thermal desorption chemical ionization using a commercial tandem mass spectrometer (APTDCI-MS/MS). The method is based on the precursor ion scan mode determination of underivatized acylcarnitines desorbed from samples by a hot desolvation gas flow and ionized by a corona pin discharge. During desorption/ionization step the temperature induces the degradation of acylcarnitines; nevertheless, the common fragment to all acylcarnitines [MH-59](+) is useful for analyzing their profile. APTDCI parameters, including angle of collection and incidence, gas flows and temperatures, were optimized for acylcarnitines. The experiments were performed drying 2 microL of an equimolar mixture of acylcarnitine standards on a glass slide. The specificity was evaluated by comparing product ion spectra and the precursor ion spectra of 85 m/z of acylcarnitines obtained by the APTDCI method and by electrospray ionization flow injection analysis (ESI-FIA). The method was also employed to analyze acylcarnitines extracted from a pathological dried blood spot and a control. The method enables analysis of biological samples and recognition of some acylcarnitines that are diagnostic markers of inherited metabolic diseases. The intrinsic high-throughput analysis of the ambient desorption ionization methods offers a new opportunity either for its potential application in clinical chemistry and for the expanded screening of some inborn errors of metabolism.

  7. Double Ionization Gauge for Atmosphere Density/Pressure Measurements On Board the Rocket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yushkov, V.; Shturkov, O.; Balugin, N.; Zhurin, S.; Kusov, A.

    2015-09-01

    A description of the ionization gauge for atmospheric density/pressure measurements on board a Russian meteorological rocket is presented. Its operation is based on the principle employed in an ionization gauge. The measuring density/pressure range is 1 06 102 kg/m3 / 10 ~ - 10 mm Hg. There are two output channels for ion and electron current measurements, respectively. The calibration curves are in a fairly good agreement with the classical electron impact ionization theory. The calibration error is less than 7%, that has been definitely confirmed through laboratory bench calibration. This rocket-borne device does not require pre-flight sealing. It greatly simplifies the design of the flight device. The ionization source is an electron flux emitted from the surface of a semi-impermeable metal plate under the influence of vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) radiation. The vUv radiation source is a portable glow-discharge krypton lamp. The flight instrument has been tested for shock loads up to 200 g for rocket measurement applications.

  8. Atmospheric pressure chemical ionization studies of non-polar isomeric hydrocarbons using ion mobility spectrometry and mass spectrometry with different ionization techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borsdorf, H.; Nazarov, E. G.; Eiceman, G. A.

    2002-01-01

    The ionization pathways were determined for sets of isomeric non-polar hydrocarbons (structural isomers, cis/trans isomers) using ion mobility spectrometry and mass spectrometry with different techniques of atmospheric pressure chemical ionization to assess the influence of structural features on ion formation. Depending on the structural features, different ions were observed using mass spectrometry. Unsaturated hydrocarbons formed mostly [M - 1]+ and [(M - 1)2H]+ ions while mainly [M - 3]+ and [(M - 3)H2O]+ ions were found for saturated cis/trans isomers using photoionization and 63Ni ionization. These ionization methods and corona discharge ionization were used for ion mobility measurements of these compounds. Different ions were detected for compounds with different structural features. 63Ni ionization and photoionization provide comparable ions for every set of isomers. The product ions formed can be clearly attributed to the structures identified. However, differences in relative abundance of product ions were found. Although corona discharge ionization permits the most sensitive detection of non-polar hydrocarbons, the spectra detected are complex and differ from those obtained with 63Ni ionization and photoionization. c. 2002 American Society for Mass Spectrometry.

  9. Atmospheric pressure chemical ionization studies of non-polar isomeric hydrocarbons using ion mobility spectrometry and mass spectrometry with different ionization techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borsdorf, H.; Nazarov, E. G.; Eiceman, G. A.

    2002-01-01

    The ionization pathways were determined for sets of isomeric non-polar hydrocarbons (structural isomers, cis/trans isomers) using ion mobility spectrometry and mass spectrometry with different techniques of atmospheric pressure chemical ionization to assess the influence of structural features on ion formation. Depending on the structural features, different ions were observed using mass spectrometry. Unsaturated hydrocarbons formed mostly [M - 1]+ and [(M - 1)2H]+ ions while mainly [M - 3]+ and [(M - 3)H2O]+ ions were found for saturated cis/trans isomers using photoionization and 63Ni ionization. These ionization methods and corona discharge ionization were used for ion mobility measurements of these compounds. Different ions were detected for compounds with different structural features. 63Ni ionization and photoionization provide comparable ions for every set of isomers. The product ions formed can be clearly attributed to the structures identified. However, differences in relative abundance of product ions were found. Although corona discharge ionization permits the most sensitive detection of non-polar hydrocarbons, the spectra detected are complex and differ from those obtained with 63Ni ionization and photoionization. c. 2002 American Society for Mass Spectrometry.

  10. Absolute pressure dependence of the second ionization level of EL2 in GaAs

    SciTech Connect

    Bliss, D.E.; Nolte, D.D.; Walukiewicz, W.; Haller, E.E. Department of Materials Science and Mineral Engineering, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, California 94720 ); Lagowski, J. )

    1990-03-19

    We report the results of deep level transient spectroscopy experiments with the second ionization level of the double donor defect (EL2) under uniaxial stress in {ital p}-type GaAs. We measure the shift in the hole emission rate as a function of stress applied in the (100) and (110) directions. By modeling the valence band with two independently displacing bands and appropriately derived effective masses, we determine the absolute hydrostatic pressure derivative of the defect to be 39{plus minus}15 meV GPa{sup {minus}1}. The shear contribution is negligible. These results are very different from those obtained for the first ionization level, which has a much higher absolute pressure derivative of 90 meV GPa{sup {minus}1}.

  11. Atmospheric Pressure Surface Sampling/Ionization Techniques for Direct Coupling of Planar Separations with Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Pasilis, Sofie P; Van Berkel, Gary J

    2010-01-01

    Planar separations, which include thin layer chromatography and gel electrophoresis, are in widespread use as important and powerful tools for conducting separations of complex mixtures. To increase the utility of planar separations, new methods are needed that allow in-situ characterization of the individual components of the separated mixtures. A large number of atmospheric pressure surface sampling and ionization techniques for use with mass spectrometry have emerged in the past several years, and several have been investigated as a means for mass spectrometric read-out of planar separations. In this article, we review the atmospheric pressure surface sampling and ionization techniques that have been used for the read-out of planar separation media. For each technique, we briefly explain the operational basics and discuss the analyte type for which it is appropriate and some specific applications from the literature.

  12. Low pressure electrospray ionization system and process for effective transmission of ions

    DOEpatents

    Tang, Keqi [Richland, WA; Page, Jason S [Kennewick, WA; Kelly, Ryan T [Wet Richland, WA; Smith, Richard D [Richland, WA

    2010-03-02

    A system and method are disclosed that provide up to complete transmission of ions between coupled stages with low effective ion losses. A novel "interfaceless" electrospray ionization system is further described that operates the electrospray at a reduced pressure such that standard electrospray sample solutions can be directly sprayed into an electrodynamic ion funnel which provides ion focusing and transmission of ions into a mass analyzer.

  13. Microplasma discharge vacuum ultraviolet photoionization source for atmospheric pressure ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Symonds, Joshua M; Gann, Reuben N; Fernández, Facundo M; Orlando, Thomas M

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate the first use of an atmospheric pressure microplasma-based vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) photoionization source in atmospheric pressure mass spectrometry applications. The device is a robust, easy-to-operate microhollow cathode discharge (MHCD) that enables generation of VUV photons from Ne and Ne/H(2) gas mixtures. Photons were detected by excitation of a microchannel plate detector and by analysis of diagnostic sample ions using a mass spectrometer. Reactive ions, charged particles, and metastables produced in the discharge were blocked from entering the ionization region by means of a lithium fluoride window, and photoionization was performed in a nitrogen-purged environment. By reducing the output pressure of the MHCD, we observed heightened production of higher-energy photons, making the photoionization source more effective. The initial performance of the MHCD VUV source has been evaluated by ionizing model analytes such as acetone, azulene, benzene, dimethylaniline, and glycine, which were introduced in solid or liquid phase. These molecules represent species with both high and low proton affinities, and ionization energies ranging from 7.12 to 9.7 eV.

  14. Ionized gas pressure correlates with star formation intensity in nearby starbursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Tianxing; Malhotra, Sangeeta; Yang, Huan

    2016-06-01

    We estimate the electron density of the ionized gas and thus the thermal pressure in HII regions; and compare that to the SFR (star formation rate) surface density for a combined sample of about 40 green peas and Lyman Break Analogs at z < 0.30. The electron density of the ionized gas is measured from sulfur line ratio ([SII] 6716 / 6731). We find that the SFR surface density is correlated with the electron density and the thermal pressure in HII regions for the star-forming galaxies with SFR surface density above a certain threshold. This work shows quantitatively the correlation between SFR surface density and electron density and that between SFR surface density and the thermal pressure in HII regions for the nearby starburst galaxies. This is consistent with theoretical models of disks (e.g. Kim et al. (2011) if we assume that the thermal pressure in HII regions is comparable to the total diffuse gas pressure at the midplane of the diffuse neutral gas. It is also in agreement with the results from star-forming galaxies at z ~ 2.5. We might infer that the starburst galaxies at low-redshift (z < 0.3) share similar physical properties to the galaxies at high redshift (z ~ 2.5).

  15. A subambient pressure ionization with nanoelectrospray (SPIN) source and interface for improved sensitivity in mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Page, Jason S.; Tang, Keqi; Kelly, Ryan T.; Smith, Richard D.

    2008-01-01

    An electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) source and interface has been designed that enables efficient ion production and transmission in a 30 Torr pressure environment using solvents compatible with typical reversed-phase liquid chromatography (RPLC) separations. In this design, the electrospray emitter is located inside the mass spectrometer in the same region as an electrodynamic ion funnel. This avoids the use of a conductance limit ion inlet, as required by a conventional atmospheric pressure ESI source, and allows more efficient ion transmission to the mass analyzer. The new source, titled Subambient Pressure Ionization with Nanoelectrospray (SPIN), improves instrument sensitivity, increases the understanding of the electrospray process, and enables new electrospray interface designs. Performance of the SPIN source was evaluated by electrospraying standard solutions at 300 nL/min, and comparing results with those obtained from a standard atmospheric pressure ESI source that used a heated capillary inlet. The importance of desolvation was also investigated by electrospraying at different flow rates, which showed that the ion funnel provided an effective desolvation region to aid the creation of gas phase analyte ions. This initial study demonstrated a ∼ 5-fold improvement in sensitivity when the SPIN source was used compared to a standard atmospheric pressure ESI source. PMID:18237189

  16. Laser-Induced Acoustic Desorption/Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Jinshan; Borton, David J.; Owen, Benjamin C.; Jin, Zhicheng; Hurt, Matt; Amundson, Lucas M.; Madden, Jeremy T.; Qian, Kuangnan; Kenttämaa, Hilkka I.

    2010-01-01

    Laser-induced acoustic desorption (LIAD) was successfully coupled to a conventional atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) source in a linear quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer (LQIT). Model compounds representing a wide variety of different types, including basic nitrogen and oxygen compounds, aromatic and aliphatic compounds, as well as unsaturated and saturated hydrocarbons, were tested separately and as a mixture. These model compounds were successfully evaporated into the gas phase by using LIAD and then ionized by using APCI with different reagents. Four APCI reagent systems were tested: the traditionally used mixture of methanol and water, neat benzene, neat carbon disulfide, and nitrogen gas (no liquid reagent). The mixture of methanol and water produced primarily protonated molecules, as expected. However, only the most basic compounds yielded ions under these conditions. In sharp contrast, using APCI with either neat benzene or neat carbon disulfide as the reagent resulted in the ionization of all the analytes studied to predominantly yield stable molecular ions. Benzene yielded a larger fraction of protonated molecules than carbon disulfide, which is a disadvantage. A similar amount of fragmentation was observed for these reagents. When the experiment was performed without a liquid reagent(nitrogen gas was the reagent), more fragmentation was observed. Analysis of a known mixture as well as a petroleum cut was also carried out. In summary, the new experiment presented here allows the evaporation of thermally labile compounds, both polar and nonpolar, without dissociation or aggregation, and their ionization to form stable molecular ions. PMID:21472571

  17. Laser-induced acoustic desorption/atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jinshan; Borton, David J; Owen, Benjamin C; Jin, Zhicheng; Hurt, Matt; Amundson, Lucas M; Madden, Jeremy T; Qian, Kuangnan; Kenttämaa, Hilkka I

    2011-03-01

    Laser-induced acoustic desorption (LIAD) was successfully coupled to a conventional atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) source in a commercial linear quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer (LQIT). Model compounds representing a wide variety of different types, including basic nitrogen and oxygen compounds, aromatic and aliphatic compounds, as well as unsaturated and saturated hydrocarbons, were tested separately and as a mixture. These model compounds were successfully evaporated into the gas phase by using LIAD and then ionized by using APCI with different reagents. From the four APCI reagent systems tested, neat carbon disulfide provided the best results. The mixture of methanol and water produced primarily protonated molecules, as expected. However, only the most basic compounds yielded ions under these conditions. In sharp contrast, using APCI with either neat benzene or neat carbon disulfide as the reagent resulted in the ionization of all the analytes studied to predominantly yield stable molecular ions. Benzene yielded a larger fraction of protonated molecules than carbon disulfide, which is a disadvantage. A similar but minor amount of fragmentation was observed for these two reagents. When the experiment was performed without a liquid reagent (nitrogen gas was the reagent), more fragmentation was observed. Analysis of a known mixture as well as a petroleum cut was also carried out. In summary, the new experiment presented here allows the evaporation of thermally labile compounds, both polar and nonpolar, without dissociation or aggregation, and their ionization to predominantly form stable molecular ions.

  18. In-Line Reactions and Ionizations of Vaporized Diphenylchloroarsine and Diphenylcyanoarsine in Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Okumura, Akihiko; Takada, Yasuaki; Watanabe, Susumu; Hashimoto, Hiroaki; Ezawa, Naoya; Seto, Yasuo; Takayama, Yasuo; Sekioka, Ryoji; Yamaguchi, Shintaro; Kishi, Shintaro; Satoh, Takafumi; Kondo, Tomohide; Nagashima, Hisayuki; Nagoya, Tomoki

    2016-07-01

    We propose detecting a fragment ion (Ph2As(+)) using counter-flow introduction atmospheric pressure chemical ionization ion trap mass spectrometry for sensitive air monitoring of chemical warfare vomiting agents diphenylchloroarsine (DA) and diphenylcyanoarsine (DC). The liquid sample containing of DA, DC, and bis(diphenylarsine)oxide (BDPAO) was heated in a dry air line, and the generated vapor was mixed into the humidified air flowing through the sampling line of a mass spectrometer. Humidity effect on the air monitoring was investigated by varying the humidity of the analyzed air sample. Evidence of the in-line conversion of DA and DC to diphenylarsine hydroxide (DPAH) and then BDPAO was obtained by comparing the chronograms of various ions from the beginning of heating. Multiple-stage mass spectrometry revealed that the protonated molecule (MH(+)) of DA, DC, DPAH, and BDPAO could produce Ph2As(+) through their in-source fragmentation. Among the signals of the ions that were investigated, the Ph2As(+) signal was the most intense and increased to reach a plateau with the increased air humidity, whereas the MH(+) signal of DA decreased. It was suggested that DA and DC were converted in-line into BDPAO, which was a major source of Ph2As(+). Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  19. In-Line Reactions and Ionizations of Vaporized Diphenylchloroarsine and Diphenylcyanoarsine in Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okumura, Akihiko; Takada, Yasuaki; Watanabe, Susumu; Hashimoto, Hiroaki; Ezawa, Naoya; Seto, Yasuo; Takayama, Yasuo; Sekioka, Ryoji; Yamaguchi, Shintaro; Kishi, Shintaro; Satoh, Takafumi; Kondo, Tomohide; Nagashima, Hisayuki; Nagoya, Tomoki

    2016-07-01

    We propose detecting a fragment ion (Ph2As+) using counter-flow introduction atmospheric pressure chemical ionization ion trap mass spectrometry for sensitive air monitoring of chemical warfare vomiting agents diphenylchloroarsine (DA) and diphenylcyanoarsine (DC). The liquid sample containing of DA, DC, and bis(diphenylarsine)oxide (BDPAO) was heated in a dry air line, and the generated vapor was mixed into the humidified air flowing through the sampling line of a mass spectrometer. Humidity effect on the air monitoring was investigated by varying the humidity of the analyzed air sample. Evidence of the in-line conversion of DA and DC to diphenylarsine hydroxide (DPAH) and then BDPAO was obtained by comparing the chronograms of various ions from the beginning of heating. Multiple-stage mass spectrometry revealed that the protonated molecule (MH+) of DA, DC, DPAH, and BDPAO could produce Ph2As+ through their in-source fragmentation. Among the signals of the ions that were investigated, the Ph2As+ signal was the most intense and increased to reach a plateau with the increased air humidity, whereas the MH+ signal of DA decreased. It was suggested that DA and DC were converted in-line into BDPAO, which was a major source of Ph2As+.

  20. [Ambulatory blood pressure profiles of patients with permanent or occasional hypertension. Correlation with clinical data].

    PubMed

    Herpin, D; Amiel, A; Boutaud, P; Ciber, M A; Demange, J

    1987-06-01

    Ambulatory blood pressure (BP) recording was performed in 57 untreated hypertensive patients by means of the "Spacelabs" non-invasive apparatus. Patients were divided into two groups according to BP measurements previously made during medical consultation. Group I comprised 25 "permanently hypertensive" patients (diastolic BP always above 95 mmHg) and group II, 32 "occasionally hypertensive" patients (diastolic BP sometimes normal, sometimes above 95 mmHg). The same circadian rhythm was observed in both groups. The mean ambulatory BP level was significantly higher (p less than 0.001) in group I patients than in group II patients, either over the whole of the 24-hour period (142.0/88.0 versus 122.7/75.3 mmHg), or in day time (149.0/92.5 versus 128.2/78.9 mmHg) or at night (128.0/80.1 versus 111.5/68.0 mmHg). In contrast, there did not seem to be any significant difference between the two groups in relative long-term variability of BP, expressed as the standard deviation/mean BP values ratio. Comparison with clinical data showed that BP values measured during consultation (160/103 mmHg in group I, 143/94 mmHg in group II) were higher than ambulatory values and, chiefly, that there was very poor correlation between the two measurement methods, precluding any extrapolation. Automatic ambulatory BP recording provides for more accurate evaluation of hypertensive patients, enabling emotional "artefacts" to be excluded and patients "reactivity" to their socio-professional environment to be assessed. However, in the absence of sufficient epidemiological data, doctors should not feel authorized to base their therapeutic decisions on the sole data supplied by ambulatory BP recordings.

  1. High Sensitivity Combined with Extended Structural Coverage of Labile Compounds via Nanoelectrospray Ionization at Subambient Pressures

    DOE PAGES

    Cox, Jonathan T.; Kronewitter, Scott R.; Shukla, Anil K.; ...

    2014-09-15

    Subambient pressure ionization with nanoelectrospray (SPIN) has proven to be effective in producing ions with high efficiency and transmitting them to low pressures for high sensitivity mass spectrometry (MS) analysis. Here we present evidence that not only does the SPIN source improve MS sensitivity but also allows for gentler ionization conditions. The gentleness of a conventional heated capillary electrospray ionization (ESI) source and the SPIN source was compared by the liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS) analysis of colominic acid. Colominic acid is a mixture of sialic acid polymers of different lengths containing labile glycosidic linkages between monomer units necessitating amore » gentle ion source. By coupling the SPIN source with high resolution mass spectrometry and using advanced data processing tools, we demonstrate much extended coverage of sialic acid polymer chains as compared to using the conventional ESI source. Additionally we show that SPIN-LC-MS is effective in elucidating polymer features with high efficiency and high sensitivity previously unattainable by the conventional ESI-LC-MS methods.« less

  2. Absolute pressure dependence of the second ionization level of EL2 in GaAs

    SciTech Connect

    Bliss, D.E.; Walukiewicz, W.; Nolte, D.D.; Haller, E.E.

    1989-11-01

    We report the results of DLTS experiments under uniaxial stress on the second ionization level of EL2(++/+) in p-type GaAs. We measured the shift in the hole emission rate as a function of stress applied in the (100) and (110) directions. By modeling the valence band with two independently displacing bands and appropriately derived effective masses, we obtain a small absolute hydrostatic pressure derivative for the defect, 39 {plus minus} 15 MeV GPa{sup {minus}1}. The shear contribution is negligible. This result is very different than for the first ionization level, EL2(+/o) with a emission energy pressure derivative of 90 {plus minus} 15 MeV GPa{sup {minus}1}. The difference can be accounted for by the pressure dependence of the electron capture barrier of EL2(+/o), 49 {plus minus} 15 MeV GPa{sup {minus}1}. The absolute pressure derivatives of the two levels are then comparable and in good agreement with simple theory for Ga site point defects. 20 refs., 2 figs.

  3. Vapor Pressure of Hexamethylene Triperoxide Diamine (HMTD) Estimated Using Secondary Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Aernecke, Matthew J; Mendum, Ted; Geurtsen, Geoff; Ostrinskaya, Alla; Kunz, Roderick R

    2015-11-25

    A rapid method for vapor pressure measurement was developed and used to derive the vapor pressure curve of the thermally labile peroxide-based explosive hexamethylene triperoxide diamine (HMTD) over the temperature range from 28 to 80 °C. This method uses a controlled flow of vapor from a solid-phase HMTD source that is presented to an ambient-pressure-ionization mass spectrometer equipped with a secondary-electrospray-ionization (SESI) source. The subpart-per-trillion sensitivity of this system enables direct detection of HMTD vapor through an intact [M + H](+) ion in real time at temperatures near 20 °C. By calibrating this method using vapor sources of cocaine and heroin, which have known pressure-temperature (P-T) curves, the temperature dependence of HMTD vapor was determined, and a Clausius-Clapeyron plot of ln[P (Pa)] vs 1/[T (K)] yielded a straight line with the expression ln[P (Pa)] = {(-11091 ± 356) × 1/[T (K)]} + 25 ± 1 (error limits are the standard error of the regression analysis). From this equation, the sublimation enthalpy of HMTD was estimated to be 92 ± 3 kJ/mol, which compares well with the theoretical estimate of 95 kJ/mol, and the vapor pressure at 20 °C was estimated to be ∼60 parts per trillion by volume, which is within a factor of 2 of previous theoretical estimates. Thus, this method provides not only the first direct experimental determination of HMTD vapor pressure but also a rapid, near-real-time capability to quantitatively measure low-vapor-pressure compounds, which will be useful for aiding in the development of training aids for bomb-sniffing canines.

  4. Gas Chromatography/Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization Tandem Mass Spectrometry for Fingerprinting the Macondo Oil Spill.

    PubMed

    Lobodin, Vladislav V; Maksimova, Ekaterina V; Rodgers, Ryan P

    2016-07-05

    We report the first application of a new mass spectrometry technique (gas chromatography combined to atmospheric pressure chemical ionization tandem mass spectrometry, GC/APCI-MS/MS) for fingerprinting a crude oil and environmental samples from the largest accidental marine oil spill in history (the Macondo oil spill, the Gulf of Mexico, 2010). The fingerprinting of the oil spill is based on a trace analysis of petroleum biomarkers (steranes, diasteranes, and pentacyclic triterpanes) naturally occurring in crude oil. GC/APCI enables soft ionization of petroleum compounds that form abundant molecular ions without (or little) fragmentation. The ability to operate the instrument simultaneously in several tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) modes (e.g., full scan, product ion scan, reaction monitoring) significantly improves structural information content and sensitivity of analysis. For fingerprinting the oil spill, we constructed diagrams and conducted correlation studies that measure the similarity between environmental samples and enable us to differentiate the Macondo oil spill from other sources.

  5. Direct coupling of supercritical fluid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry for the analysis of amino acids and related compounds: Comparing electrospray ionization and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization.

    PubMed

    Wolrab, Denise; Frühauf, Peter; Gerner, Christopher

    2017-08-15

    For acceptance of supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC) as a routine analysis method, the hyphenation to mass spectrometry (MS), which is typically achieved either by a splitting device or by the employment of an additional make up flow, has to be improved. Direct coupling of SFC to MS (/MS) would simplify the handling of this method. Consequently, this work focused on the direct coupling of SFC to mass spectrometry and the influence of the employed ion source on signal intensities of polar and ionic compounds in biological samples. A method for separating metabolites of the tryptophan pathway as well as other amino acids is shown. Results demonstrate that SFC is capable of separating analytes of polar and ionic nature. Modifications of the SFC system by cryostat cooling lead to higher temperature stability in the booster pump and therefore to a better reproducibility of retention times and a low dispersion nozzle inside the active back pressure regulator (ABPR) significantly improves peak shape and sensitivity when using the MS. The comparison of the ionization efficiencies using electrospray ionization (ESI) and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) in positive and negative ion mode shows analyte depending sensitivities. However, results indicate that APCI is better suitable for the ionization of amino acids with polar side chains, whereas ESI proved superior for the ionization of amino acids featuring hydrophobic residues. Analyte signals were suppressed with ESI when using a complex matrix such as human serum, but rather enhanced when using APCI. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Gas chromatography-microchip atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ostman, Pekka; Luosujärvi, Laura; Haapala, Markus; Grigoras, Kestas; Ketola, Raimo A; Kotiaho, Tapio; Franssila, Sami; Kostiainen, Risto

    2006-05-01

    An atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) microchip is presented for combining a gas chromatograph (GC) to a mass spectrometer (MS). The chip includes capillary insertion channel, stopper, vaporizer channel, nozzle and nebulizer gas inlet fabricated on the silicon wafer, and a platinum heater sputtered on a glass wafer. These two wafers are joined by anodic bonding creating a two-dimensional version of an APCI microchip. The sample from GC is directed via heated transfer line capillary to the vaporizer channel of the APCI chip. The etched nozzle forms narrow sample plume, which is ionized by an external corona discharge needle, and the ions are analyzed by a mass spectrometer. The GC-microchip APCI-MS combination provides an efficient method for qualitative and quantitative analysis. The spectra produced by microchip APCI show intensive protonated molecule and some fragmentation products as in classical chemical ionization for structure elucidation. In quantitative analysis the GC-microchip APCI-MS showed good linearity (r(2) = 0.9989) and repeatability (relative standard deviation 4.4%). The limits of detection with signal-to-noise ratio of three were between 0.5 and 2 micromol/L with MS mode using selected ion monitoring and 0.05 micromol/L with MS/MS using multiple reaction monitoring.

  7. Suppression of diamagnetism by neutrals pressure in partially ionized, high-beta plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinohara, Shunjiro; Kuwahara, Daisuke; Yano, Kazuki; Fruchtman, Amnon

    2016-12-01

    Suppression of diamagnetism in a partially ionized plasma with high beta was experimentally investigated by the use of Langmuir and Hall sensor probes, focusing on a neutrals pressure effect. The plasma beta, which is the ratio of plasma to vacuum magnetic pressures, varied from ˜1% to >100% while the magnetic field varied from ˜120 G to ˜1 G. Here, a uniform magnetized argon plasma was operated mostly in an inductive mode, using a helicon plasma source of the Large Helicon Plasma Device [S. Shinohara et al., Phys. Plasmas 16, 057104 (2009)] with a diameter of 738 mm and an axial length of 4860 mm. Electron density varied from 5 × 1015 m-3 to <3 × 1018 m-3, while an argon fill pressure was varied from ˜0.02 Pa to 0.75 Pa as well as the magnetic field mentioned above, with the fixed radio frequency (rf) and power of 7 MHz and ˜3.5 kW, respectively. The observed magnetic field reduction rate, a decrease of the magnetic field divided by the vacuum one, was up to 18%. However, in a certain parameter regime, where the product of ion and electron Hall terms is a key parameter, the measured diamagnetic effect was smaller than that expected by the plasma beta. This suppressed diamagnetism is explained by the neutrals pressure replacing magnetic pressure in balancing plasma pressure. Diamagnetism is weakened if neutrals pressure is comparable to the plasma pressure and if the coupling of plasma and neutrals pressures by ion-neutral collisions is strong enough.

  8. Atmospheric pressure chemical ionization of fluorinated phenols in atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry, tandem mass spectrometry, and ion mobility spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eiceman, G. A.; Bergloff, J. F.; Rodriguez, J. E.; Munro, W.; Karpas, Z.

    1999-01-01

    Atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI)-mass spectrometry (MS) for fluorinated phenols (C6H5-xFxOH Where x = 0-5) in nitrogen with Cl- as the reagent ion yielded product ions of M Cl- through ion associations or (M-H)- through proton abstractions. Proton abstraction was controllable by potentials on the orifice and first lens, suggesting that some proton abstraction occurs through collision induced dissociation (CID) in the interface region. This was proven using CID of adduct ions (M Cl-) with Q2 studies where adduct ions were dissociated to Cl- or proton abstracted to (M-H)-. The extent of proton abstraction depended upon ion energy and structure in order of calculated acidities: pentafluorophenol > tetrafluorophenol > trifluorophenol > difluorophenol. Little or no proton abstraction occurred for fluorophenol, phenol, or benzyl alcohol analogs. Ion mobility spectrometry was used to determine if proton abstraction reactions passed through an adduct intermediate with thermalized ions and mobility spectra for all chemicals were obtained from 25 to 200 degrees C. Proton abstraction from M Cl- was not observed at any temperature for phenol, monofluorophenol, or difluorophenol. Mobility spectra for trifluorophenol revealed the kinetic transformations to (M-H)- either from M Cl- or from M2 Cl- directly. Proton abstraction was the predominant reaction for tetra- and penta-fluorophenols. Consequently, the evidence suggests that proton abstraction occurs from an adduct ion where the reaction barrier is reduced with increasing acidity of the O-H bond in C6H5-xFxOH.

  9. Atmospheric pressure chemical ionization of fluorinated phenols in atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry, tandem mass spectrometry, and ion mobility spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eiceman, G. A.; Bergloff, J. F.; Rodriguez, J. E.; Munro, W.; Karpas, Z.

    1999-01-01

    Atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI)-mass spectrometry (MS) for fluorinated phenols (C6H5-xFxOH Where x = 0-5) in nitrogen with Cl- as the reagent ion yielded product ions of M Cl- through ion associations or (M-H)- through proton abstractions. Proton abstraction was controllable by potentials on the orifice and first lens, suggesting that some proton abstraction occurs through collision induced dissociation (CID) in the interface region. This was proven using CID of adduct ions (M Cl-) with Q2 studies where adduct ions were dissociated to Cl- or proton abstracted to (M-H)-. The extent of proton abstraction depended upon ion energy and structure in order of calculated acidities: pentafluorophenol > tetrafluorophenol > trifluorophenol > difluorophenol. Little or no proton abstraction occurred for fluorophenol, phenol, or benzyl alcohol analogs. Ion mobility spectrometry was used to determine if proton abstraction reactions passed through an adduct intermediate with thermalized ions and mobility spectra for all chemicals were obtained from 25 to 200 degrees C. Proton abstraction from M Cl- was not observed at any temperature for phenol, monofluorophenol, or difluorophenol. Mobility spectra for trifluorophenol revealed the kinetic transformations to (M-H)- either from M Cl- or from M2 Cl- directly. Proton abstraction was the predominant reaction for tetra- and penta-fluorophenols. Consequently, the evidence suggests that proton abstraction occurs from an adduct ion where the reaction barrier is reduced with increasing acidity of the O-H bond in C6H5-xFxOH.

  10. Kinetic model of ionization waves in a positive column at intermediate pressures in inert gases.

    PubMed

    Golubovskii, Y B; Maiorov, V A; Nekutchaev, V O; Behnke, J; Behnke, J F

    2001-03-01

    A kinetic model of ionization waves in the inert gas discharge is constructed, which is based on the simultaneous solution of the kinetic equation for electrons and the continuity equations for ions and excited atoms. The model corresponds to a range of intermediate pressures and small currents, when elastic collisions dominate in the electron energy balance and electron-electron collisions are negligibly small. A linear theory of ionization waves is constructed, growth rates and frequencies of wave disturbances able to propagate in plasma are found. It is shown that there is an upper bound to the existence of striations by pressure, as well as the lower bound by current. The self-consistent solution of the source system of equations is obtained, which describes a nonlinear wave. The profile of electric field and the electron distribution function in this field are calculated. The results of calculations are compared with the experimental data. The wavelengths obtained are essentially larger than the electron energy relaxation length. Such waves cannot be described within the limits of fluid models.

  11. High molecular weight non-polar hydrocarbons as pure model substances and in motor oil samples can be ionized without fragmentation by atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hourani, Nadim; Kuhnert, Nikolai

    2012-10-15

    High molecular weight non-polar hydrocarbons are still difficult to detect by mass spectrometry. Although several studies have targeted this problem, lack of good self-ionization has limited the ability of mass spectrometry to examine these hydrocarbons. Failure to control ion generation in the atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) source hampers the detection of intact stable gas-phase ions of non-polar hydrocarbon in mass spectrometry. Seventeen non-volatile non-polar hydrocarbons, reported to be difficult to ionize, were examined by an optimized APCI methodology using nitrogen as the reagent gas. All these analytes were successfully ionized as abundant and intact stable [M-H](+) ions without the use of any derivatization or adduct chemistry and without significant fragmentation. Application of the method to real-life hydrocarbon mixtures like light shredder waste and car motor oil was demonstrated. Despite numerous reports to the contrary, it is possible to ionize high molecular weight non-polar hydrocarbons by APCI, omitting the use of additives. This finding represents a significant step towards extending the applicability of mass spectrometry to non-polar hydrocarbon analyses in crude oil, petrochemical products, waste or food. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Bullet-shaped ionization front of plasma jet plumes driven by microwave pulses at atmospheric gas pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhaoquan; Xia, Guangqing; Zou, Changlin; Liu, Xiaodong; Feng, Deren; Li, Ping; Hu, Yelin; Stepanova, Olga; Kudryavtsev, A. A.

    2017-09-01

    Ionization waves (propagating bullet-shaped plasma) are always present in atmospheric-pressure plasma jets generated by a pulsed DC power supply or low-frequency voltages. Nevertheless, whether these ionization waves exist for pulsed microwave plasma jets remains unclear. In this paper, a coaxial transmission line resonator driven by microwave pulses is capable of generating atmospheric pressure plasma jet plumes. Depending on the discharges, these plasma jet plumes exhibit distinctive characteristics, such as bullet-shaped ionization fronts for argon plasma and ball-shaped for helium plasma. Fast images show argon plasma plumes generating several small branches but only one dominant ionization front travels more distance along the jet axis. Both ionization-wave images and electromagnetic simulation results indicate that the bullet-shaped ionization front forms a plasma jet plume immediately. The dominant ionization wave is resonantly excited by the local enhanced electric field, which originates from the local net charge of the streamer plus surface plasmon polariton located at the open end of the resonator.

  13. Simulation of High Pressure Ionization Waves in Straight and Circuitous Dielectric Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Zhongmin; Takashima, Keisuke; Adamovich, Igor V.; Kushner, Mark J.

    2011-10-01

    High pressure non-equilibrium plasmas are often transient and in the form of fast ionization waves (FIWs) with applications from plasma assisted combustion to plasma medicine. A numerical study of FIWs, with comparison to experiments, was conducted using nonPDPSIM, a 2-d plasma hydrodynamics model with radiation transport. We first investigated the fundamental properties of moderate pressure FIWs in straight dielectric channels to quantify their propagation mechanisms. The FIWs were generated by ns high voltage pulses in N2 and He at pressures of 10-20 Torr. Simulations are compared to experiments for transient electric fields and wave speed. The effects of the secondary emission properties of bounding surfaces on plasma uniformity will be discussed. We then applied these results to a study of the propagation of FIWs in Ne at atmospheric pressure through long, circuitous channels (length > 15 cm, width < 1 mm) as used to deliver plasma to remote sites. The FIW speed and front structure for positive and negative polarities, and the effects of channel curvature and dielectric constants of the channel wall on FIW dynamics will be discussed. Work is supported by the DOE Office of Fusion Energy Science.

  14. Dynamic high pressure process for fabricating superconducting and permanent magnetic materials

    DOEpatents

    Nellis, W.J.; Geballe, T.H.; Maple, M.B.

    1990-03-13

    Shock wave formation of thin layers of materials with improved superconducting and permanent magnetic properties and improved microstructures is disclosed. The material fabrication system includes a sandwiched structure including a powder material placed between two solid members to enable explosive shock consolidation. The two solid members are precooled to about 80--100 K to reduce the residual temperatures attained as a result of the shock wave treatment, and thereby increase the quench rate of the consolidated powder. 9 figs.

  15. Dynamic high pressure process for fabricating superconducting and permanent magnetic materials

    DOEpatents

    Nellis, William J.; Geballe, Theodore H.; Maple, M. Brian

    1990-01-01

    Shock wave formation of thin layers of materials with improved superconducting and permanent magnetic properties and improved microstructures. The material fabrication system includes a sandwiched structure including a powder material placed between two solid members to enable explosive shock consolidation. The two solid members are precooled to about 80.degree.-100.degree. K. to reduce the residual temperatures attained as a result of the shock wave treatment, and thereby increase the quench rate of the consolidated powder.

  16. Characterization of Nonpolar Lipids and Selected Steroids by Using Laser-Induced Acoustic Desorption/Chemical Ionization, Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization, and Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry†

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Zhicheng; Daiya, Shivani; Kenttämaa, Hilkka I.

    2011-01-01

    Laser-induced acoustic desorption (LIAD) combined with ClMn(H2O)+ chemical ionization (CI) was tested for the analysis of nonpolar lipids and selected steroids in a Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer (FT-ICR). The nonpolar lipids studied, cholesterol, 5α-cholestane, cholesta-3,5-diene, squalene, and β-carotene, were found to solely form the desired water replacement product (adduct-H2O) with the ClMn(H2O)+ ions. The steroids, androsterone, dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), estrone, estradiol, and estriol, also form abundant adduct-H2O ions, but less abundant adduct-2H2O ions were also observed. Neither (+)APCI nor (+)ESI can ionize the saturated hydrocarbon lipid, cholestane. APCI successfully ionizes the unsaturated hydrocarbon lipids to form exclusively the intact protonated analytes. However, it causes extensive fragmentation for cholesterol and the steroids. The worst case is cholesterol that does not produce any stable protonated molecules. On the other hand, ESI cannot ionize any of the hydrocarbon analytes, saturated or unsaturated. However, ESI can be used to protonate the oxygen-containing analytes with substantially less fragmentation than for APCI in all cases except for cholesterol and estrone. In conclusion, LIAD/ClMn(H2O)+ chemical ionization is superior over APCI and ESI for the mass spectrometric characterization of underivatized nonpolar lipids and steroids. PMID:21528012

  17. Basic rules for the interpretation of atmospheric pressure ionization mass spectra of small molecules.

    PubMed

    Holcapek, Michal; Jirásko, Robert; Lísa, Miroslav

    2010-06-18

    This review summarizes the basic rules for the interpretation of atmospheric pressure ionization (API) mass spectra of small molecules written with the style primarily intended for beginners and low-experienced researchers with the mass spectra interpretation. The first and basic step in any interpretation of mass spectra is always the determination of molecular weight, which is relatively easy in case of soft ionization techniques due to the limited extend of fragmentation and the prevailing presence of (de)protonated molecules in the full scan mass spectra. These [M+H](+) and [M-H](-) ions are often accompanied by low abundant molecular adducts, which can be used as the supplementary information for the unambiguous determination of molecular weights. In certain cases, adduct ions may dominate the spectra. The subsequent interpretation of full scan and tandem mass spectra is more complicated due to a high number of possible functional groups, structural subunits and their combinations resulting in numerous competitive fragmentation pathways. Typical neutral losses and the effect of individual functional groups on the fragmentation are discussed in detail and illustrated with selected examples. Modern mass analyzers have powerful features for the structural elucidation, for example high resolving power, high mass accuracy, multistage tandem mass spectrometry, dedicated softwares for the interpretation of mass spectra and prediction of their fragmentation. Background information on differences among individual ionization techniques suitable for the HPLC-MS coupling and basic types of mass analyzers with consequences for the data interpretation is briefly discussed as well. Selected examples illustrate that the right optimization of chromatographic separation and the use of other than mass spectrometric detectors can bring valuable complementary information. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. A microfluidic reactor for rapid, low-pressure proteolysis with on-chip electrospray ionization.

    PubMed

    Liuni, Peter; Rob, Tamanna; Wilson, Derek J

    2010-02-01

    A microfluidic reactor that enables rapid digestion of proteins prior to on-line analysis by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) is introduced. The device incorporates a wide (1.5 cm), shallow (10 microm) reactor 'well' that is functionalized with pepsin-agarose, a design that facilitates low-pressure operation and high clogging resistance. Electrospray ionization is carried out directly from a short metal capillary integrated into the chip outlet. Fabrication, involving laser ablation of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA), is exceedingly straightforward and inexpensive. High sequence coverage spectra of myoglobin (Mb), ubiquitin (Ub) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) digests were obtained after <4 s of residence time in the reactor. Stress testing showed little loss of performance over approximately 2 h continuous use at high flow rates (30 microL/min). The device provides a convenient platform for a range of applications in proteomics and structural biology, i.e. to enable high-throughput workflows or to limit back-exchange in spatially resolved hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) experiments. Copyright 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Laser Microdissection and Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry Coupled for Multimodal Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Lorenz, Matthias; Ovchinnikova, Olga S; Kertesz, Vilmos; Van Berkel, Gary J

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the coupling of ambient laser ablation surface sampling, accomplished using a laser capture microdissection system, with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry for high spatial resolution multimodal imaging. A commercial laser capture microdissection system was placed in close proximity to a modified ion source of a mass spectrometer designed to allow for sampling of laser ablated material via a transfer tube directly into the ionization region. Rhodamine 6G dye of red sharpie ink in a laser etched pattern as well as cholesterol and phosphatidylcholine in a cerebellum mouse brain thin tissue section were identified and imaged from full scan mass spectra. A minimal spot diameter of 8 m was achieved using the 10X microscope cutting objective with a lateral oversampling pixel resolution of about 3.7 m. Distinguishing between features approximately 13 m apart in a cerebellum mouse brain thin tissue section was demonstrated in a multimodal fashion including co-registered optical and mass spectral chemical images.

  20. Femtosecond laser ablation particle introduction to a liquid sampling-atmospheric pressure glow discharge ionization source

    SciTech Connect

    Carado, Anthony J.; Quarles, C. Derrick; Duffin, Andrew M.; Barinaga, Charles J.; Russo, Richard E.; Marcus, R. Kenneth; Eiden, Gregory C.; Koppenaal, David W.

    2012-01-01

    This work describes the use of a compact, liquid sampling – atmospheric pressure glow discharge (LS-APGD) ionization source to ionize metal particles within a laser ablation aerosol. Mass analysis was performed with a Thermo Scientific Exactive Mass Spectrometer which utilizes an orbitrap mass analyzer capable of producing mass resolution exceeding M/ΔM > 160,000. The LS-APGD source generates a low-power plasma between the surface of an electrolytic solution flowing at several µl min-1 through a fused silica capillary and a counter electrode consisting of a stainless steel capillary employed to deliver the laser ablation particles into the plasma. Sample particles of approximately 100 nm were generated with an Applied Spectra femtosecond laser located remotely and transported through 25 meters of polyurethane tubing by means of argon carrier gas. Samples consisted of an oxygen free copper shard, a disk of solder, and a one-cent U.S. coin. Analyte signal onset was readily detectable relative to the background signal produced by the carrier gas alone. The high mass resolution capability of the orbitrap mass spectrometer was demonstrated on the solder sample with resolution exceeding 90,000 for Pb and 160,000 for Cu. In addition, results from a laser ablation depth-profiling experiment of a one cent coin revealed retention of the relative locations of the ~10 µm copper cladding and zinc rich bulk layers.

  1. Fast Differential Analysis of Propolis Using Surface Desorption Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xue-yong; Guo, Xia-li; Luo, Huo-lin; Fang, Xiao-wei; Zhu, Teng-gao; Zhang, Xing-lei; Chen, Huan-wen; Luo, Li-ping

    2015-01-01

    Mass spectral fingerprints of 24 raw propolis samples, including 23 from China and one from the United States, were directly obtained using surface desorption atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry (SDAPCI-MS) without sample pretreatment. Under the optimized experimental conditions, the most abundant signals were detected in the mass ranges of 70 to 500 m/z and 200 to 350 m/z, respectively. Principal component analyses (PCA) for the two mass ranges showed similarities in that the colors had a significant correlation with the first two PCs; in contrast there was no correlation with the climatic zones from which the samples originated. Analytes such as chrysin, pinocembrin, and quercetin were detected and identified using multiple stage mass spectrometry within 3 min. Therefore, SDAPCI-MS can be used for rapid and reliable high-throughput analysis of propolis. PMID:26339245

  2. A sensitive gas chromatography detector based on atmospheric pressure chemical ionization by a dielectric barrier discharge.

    PubMed

    Kirk, Ansgar T; Last, Torben; Zimmermann, Stefan

    2017-02-03

    In this work, we present a novel concept for a gas chromatography detector utilizing an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization which is initialized by a dielectric barrier discharge. In general, such a detector can be simple and low-cost, while achieving extremely good limits of detection. However, it is non-selective apart from the use of chemical dopants. Here, a demonstrator manufactured entirely from fused silica capillaries and printed circuit boards is shown. It has a size of 75×60×25mm(3) and utilizes only 2W of power in total. Unlike other known discharge detectors, which require high-purity helium, this detector can theoretically be operated using any gas able to form stable ion species. Here, purified air is used. With this setup, limits of detection in the low parts-per-billion range have been obtained for acetone.

  3. The transfer of atmospheric-pressure ionization waves via a metal wire

    SciTech Connect

    Xia, Yang; Liu, Dongping; Wang, Wenchun; Peng, Yifeng; Niu, Jinhai; Bi, Zhenhua; Ji, Longfei; Song, Ying; Wang, Xueyang; Qi, Zhihua

    2016-01-15

    Our study has shown that the atmospheric-pressure He ionization waves (IWs) may be transferred from one dielectric tube (tube 1) to the other one (tube 2) via a floating metal wire. The propagation of IWs along the two tubes is not affected by the diameter of a floating metal wire, however, their propagation is strongly dependent on the length of a floating metal wire. The propagation of one IW along the tube 1 may result in the second IW propagating reversely inside the tube in vicinity of a floating metal wire, which keeps from their further propagation through the tube 1. After they merge together as one conduction channel inside the tube 1, the transferred plasma bullet starts to propagate along the tube 2. The propagation of transferred plasma bullets along the tube 2 is mainly determined by the capacitance and inductance effects, and their velocity and density can be controlled by the length of a floating metal wire.

  4. HPLC/atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-mass spectroscopy of eight regulated sulfonamides.

    PubMed

    Combs, M T; Ashraf-Khorassani, M; Taylor, L T

    1999-03-01

    Reversed phase high performance liquid chromatography coupled with on-line atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry, HPLC,APCI-MS, has been applied to a mixture of eight sulfonamides. In full scan mode, extracted ion chromatograms produced minimum detectable quantities (MDQ) of 0.8 ng on column, for six of the eight regulated sulfonamides investigated. Selected ion monitoring yielded a 50 pg MDQ for sulfamerazine, sulfadiazine and sulfamethazine, while, the other compounds presented higher values. Analysis of supercritical fluid extracts of chicken liver containing sulfadimethoxine were found to be easily detected by HPLC/APCI-MS. In extracts of chicken liver spiked with 25 microg/kg(-1) (25 ppb) of sulfadimethoxine this compound could be detected in selected ion mode, while 100 pg/microl(-1) was detectable in either full scan or single ion modes. The analysis method for extracted sulfadimethoxine also demonstrated good linearity and reproducibility in both single ion and scan mode.

  5. Established and Emerging Atmospheric Pressure Surface Sampling/Ionization Techniques for Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Van Berkel, Gary J; Pasilis, Sofie P; Ovchinnikova, Olga S

    2008-01-01

    The number and type of atmospheric pressure techniques suitable for sampling analytes from surfaces, forming ions from those analytes, and subsequently transporting those ions into vacuum for interrogation by mass spectrometry has rapidly expanded over the last several years. Moreover, the literature in this area is complicated by an explosion in acronyms for these techniques, many of which provide no information relating to the chemical or physical processes involved. In this review, we sort this vast array of techniques into a relatively few categories on the basis of the approaches used for surface sampling and ionization. For each technique, we explain, as best known, many of the underlying principles of operation, describe representative applications, and in some cases, discuss needed research or advancements and attempt to forecast their future analytical utility.

  6. Ion/molecule reaction and ion evaporation in atmospheric pressure spray ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirabayashi, Atsumu; Takada, Yasuaki; Kambara, Hideki; Umemura, Yuta; Ohta, Hitoshi; Ito, Haruhiko; Kuchitsu, Kozo

    1992-12-01

    The positive ions produced in atmospheric pressure spray ionization of ammonia, alanine and sucrose in aqueous solution were detected with a double-focusing mass spectrometer. The relative intensities of the quasi-molecular ions of ammonia, NH+4 (H2O)n (n = 0-3), were found to be proportional to the concentration of the ammonia solution and to increase with increasing distance d between the nozzle tip and the sample aperture of the mass spectrometer; this observation shows that the ammonia molecule is produced by the spray and is protonated at atmospheric pressure by a proton transfer reaction with the hydronium ion and its hydrated clusters. The observed dependences of the relative intensities of the protonated alanine molecules from alanine solution and the cationized sucrose molecules from sucrose solution on d show that some part of these quasi-molecular ions are also produced by the ion/molecule reaction in the gas phase. However, their dependences on the concentration, which are steeper than that in the ammonia case, indicate that a significant proportion of these ions are produced by ion evaporation from a droplet or liquid.

  7. Ionization instability induced striations in atmospheric pressure He/H2O RF and DC discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamura, E.; Lieberman, M. A.; Lichtenberg, A. J.

    2017-04-01

    One-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations of a 1 mm gap atmospheric pressure He/2%{{\\text{H}}2}\\text{O} rf capacitive discharge showed standing striations in the bulk (Kawamura et al 2016 Plasma Sources Sci. Technol. 25 054009). We found that these striations were consistent with an ionization instability induced by non-local electron kinetics. We developed a theoretical instability criterion in good agreement with the numerical results which showed that discharges with larger bulk recombination rates tend to be more unstable. We also determined a critical wavelength such that shorter wavelengths are suppressed by diffusion while longer wavelengths may be restricted by the gap width. In this paper, we extend the gap size of the atmospheric pressure He/2%{{\\text{H}}2}\\text{O} discharges in the PIC simulations to 2 and 4 mm and drive them by either dc or rf current sources. We compare the results to the 1 mm gap rf simulations and theoretical model in Kawamura et al (2016 Plasma Sources Sci. Technol. 25 054009). We find that wider gap discharges tend to be more unstable as they can accommodate a wider range of wavelengths. Furthermore, the mixture of the various excited modes in the wider gaps can lead to distinctly non-sinusoidal spatial oscillations.

  8. Atmospheric Pressure-Thermal Desorption (AP-TD)/Electrospray Ionization-Mass Spectrometry for the Rapid Analysis of Bacillus Spores

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A technique is described where an atmospheric pressure-thermal desorption (AP-TD) device and electrospray ionization (ESI)-mass spectrometry are coupled and used for the rapid analysis of Bacillus spores in complex matrices. The resulting AP-TD/ESI-MS technique combines the generation of volatile co...

  9. Capillary liquid chromatography-microchip atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ostman, Pekka; Jäntti, Sirkku; Grigoras, Kestas; Saarela, Ville; Ketola, Raimo A; Franssila, Sami; Kotiaho, Tapio; Kostiainen, Risto

    2006-07-01

    A miniaturized nebulizer chip for capillary liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-mass spectrometry (capillary LC-microchip APCI-MS) is presented. The APCI chip consists of two wafers, a silicon wafer and a Pyrex glass wafer. The silicon wafer has a DRIE etched through-wafer nebulizer gas inlet, an edge capillary insertion channel, a stopper, a vaporizer channel and a nozzle. The platinum heater electrode and pads for electrical connection were patterned on to the Pyrex glass wafer. The two wafers were joined by anodic bonding, creating a microchip version of an APCI-source. The sample inlet capillary from an LC column is directly connected to the vaporizer channel of the APCI chip. The etched nozzle in the microchip forms a narrow sample plume, which is ionized by an external corona needle, and the formed ions are analyzed by a mass spectrometer. The nebulizer chip enables for the first time the use of low flow rate separation techniques with APCI-MS. The performance of capillary LC-microchip APCI-MS was tested with selected neurosteroids. The capillary LC-microchip APCI-MS provides quantitative repeatability and good linearity. The limits of detection (LOD) with a signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) of 3 in MS/MS mode for the selected neurosteroids were 20-1000 fmol (10-500 nmol l(-1)). LODs (S/N = 3) with commercial macro APCI with the same compounds using the same MS were about 10 times higher. Fast heat transfer allows the use of the optimized temperature for each compound during an LC run. The microchip APCI-source provides a convenient and easy method to combine capillary LC to any API-MS equipped with an APCI source. The advantages and potentials of the microchip APCI also make it a very attractive interface in microfluidic APCI-MS.

  10. Permanent tuning of the opal stop-band with the application of uniaxial pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khokhar, Ali Z.; DeLa Rue, Richard M.; Ren, Kun; Li, Zhi-Yuan; Johnson, Nigel P.

    2007-05-01

    Three-dimensional photonic crystals have been prepared by self-assembly from sub-micrometre polystyrene spheres. Such crystals are known as a synthetic opal and possess a partial stop-band in the \\langle 111\\rangle direction. The stop-band is tuned towards the shorter wavelengths by applying uniaxial pressure along the \\langle 111\\rangle direction of the face-centred cubic opal structure. The tuning is found to be irreversible and it was also observed that the normalized stop-bandwidth increased after applying uniaxial pressure. The experimental results are compared with the simulation results and found to be in very close agreement.

  11. Alternately Pulsed Nano-electrospray Ionization/Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization for Ion/Ion Reactions in an Electrodynamic Ion Trap

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Xiaorong; Xia, Yu; McLuckey, Scott A.

    2008-01-01

    The alternate operation of nano-electrospray ionization (nano-ESI) and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI), using a common atmosphere/vacuum interface and ion path, has been implemented to facilitate ion/ion reaction experiments in a linear ion trap-based tandem mass spectrometer. The ion sources are operated in opposite polarity modes whereby one of the ion sources is used to form analyte ions while the other is used to form reagent ions of opposite polarity. This combination of ion sources is well-suited to implementation of experiments involving multiply charged ions in reaction with singly charged ions of opposite polarity. Three analytically useful ion/ion reactions types are illustrated: the partial deprotonation of a multiply protonated protein, the partial protonation of a multiply deprotonated oligonucleotide, and electron transfer to a multiply protonated peptide. The approach described herein is attractive in that it enables both single proton transfer and single electron transfer ion/ion reaction experiments to be implemented without requiring major modifications to the tandem mass spectrometer hardware. Furthermore, a wide range of reactant ions can be formed with these ionization methods and the pulsed nature of operation appears to lead to no significant compromise in the performance of either ion source. PMID:16643016

  12. Ionization mechanism of the ambient pressure pyroelectric ion source (APPIS) and its applications to chemical nerve agent detection.

    PubMed

    Neidholdt, Evan L; Beauchamp, J L

    2009-11-01

    We present studies of the ionization mechanism operative in the ambient pressure pyroelectric ionization source (APPIS), along with applications that include detection of simulants for chemical nerve agents. It is found that ionization by APPIS occurs in the gas-phase. As the crystal is thermally cycled over a narrow temperature range, electrical discharges near the surface of the crystal produce energetic species which, through reactions with atmospheric molecules, result in reactant ions such as protonated water clusters or clusters of hydroxide and water. Reactant ions can be observed directly in the mass spectrometer. These go on to react with trace neutrals via proton transfer reactions to produce the ions observed in mass spectra, which are usually singly protonated or deprotonated species. Further implicating gas-phase ionization, observed product distributions are highly dependent on the composition of ambient gases, especially the concentration of water vapor and oxygen surrounding the source. For example, basic species such as triethylamine are observed as singly protonated cations at a water partial pressure of 10 torr. At a water pressure of 4 torr, reactive oxygen species are formed and lead to observation of protonated amine oxides. The ability of the APPIS source to detect basic molecules with high proton affinities makes it highly suited for the detection of chemical nerve agents. We demonstrate this application using simulants corresponding to VX and GA (Tabun). With the present source configuration pyridine is detected readily at a concentration of 4 ppm, indicating ultimate sensitivity in the high ppb range.

  13. Microfluidic Chip Coupled with Thermal Desorption Atmospheric Pressure Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chia-Hsien; Chen, Tsung-Yi; Chen, Yu-Chie

    2014-01-01

    Microfluidic chips have been used as platforms for a diversity of research purposes such as for separation and micro-reaction. One of the suitable detectors for microfluidic chip is mass spectrometry. Because microfluidic chips are generally operated in an open air condition, mass spectrometry coupled with atmospheric pressure ion sources can suit the requirement with minimum compromise. In this study, we develop a new interface to couple a microfluidic chip with mass spectrometry. A capillary tip coated with a layer of graphite, capable of absorbing energy of near-infrared (NIR) light is used to interface microfluidic chip with mass spectrometry. An NIR laser diode (λ=808 nm) is used to irradiate the capillary tip for assisting the generation of spray from the eluent of the microfluidic chip. An electrospray is provided to fuse with the spray generated from the microfluidic chip for post-ionization. Transesterification is used as the example to demonstrate the feasibility of using this interface to couple microfluidic chip with mass spectrometry. PMID:26839753

  14. Document authentication at molecular levels using desorption atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry imaging.

    PubMed

    Li, Ming; Jia, Bin; Ding, Liying; Hong, Feng; Ouyang, Yongzhong; Chen, Rui; Zhou, Shumin; Chen, Huanwen; Fang, Xiang

    2013-09-01

    Molecular images of documents were obtained by sequentially scanning the surface of the document using desorption atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry (DAPCI-MS), which was operated in either a gasless, solvent-free or methanol vapor-assisted mode. The decay process of the ink used for handwriting was monitored by following the signal intensities recorded by DAPCI-MS. Handwritings made using four types of inks on four kinds of paper surfaces were tested. By studying the dynamic decay of the inks, DAPCI-MS imaging differentiated a 10-min old from two 4 h old samples. Non-destructive forensic analysis of forged signatures either handwritten or computer-assisted was achieved according to the difference of the contour in DAPCI images, which was attributed to the strength personalized by different writers. Distinction of the order of writing/stamping on documents and detection of illegal printings were accomplished with a spatial resolution of about 140 µm. A Matlab® written program was developed to facilitate the visualization of the similarity between signature images obtained by DAPCI-MS. The experimental results show that DAPCI-MS imaging provides rich information at the molecular level and thus can be used for the reliable document analysis in forensic applications.

  15. The Protonation Site of para-Dimethylaminobenzoic Acid Using Atmospheric Pressure Ionization Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chai, Yunfeng; Weng, Guofeng; Shen, Shanshan; Sun, Cuirong; Pan, Yuanjiang

    2015-04-01

    The protonation site of para-dimethylaminobenzoic acid ( p-DMABA) was investigated using atmospheric pressure ionization methods (ESI and APCI) coupled with collision-induced dissociation (CID), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), and computational chemistry. Theoretical calculations and NMR experiments indicate that the dimethyl amino group is the preferred site of protonation both in the gas phase and aqueous solution. Protonation of p-DMABA occurs at the nitrogen atom by ESI independent of the solvents and other operation conditions under typical thermodynamic control. However, APCI produces a mixture of the nitrogen- and carbonyl oxygen-protonated p-DMABA when aprotic organic solvents (acetonitrile, acetone, and tetrahydrofuran) are used, exhibiting evident kinetic characteristics of protonation. But using protic organic solvents (methanol, ethanol, and isopropanol) in APCI still leads to the formation of thermodynamically stable N-protonated p-DMABA. These structural assignments were based on the different CID behavior of the N- and O-protonated p-DMABA. The losses of methyl radical and water are the diagnostic fragmentations of the N- and O-protonated p-DMABA, respectively. In addition, the N-protonated p-DMABA is more stable than the O-protonated p-DMABA in CID revealed by energy resolved experiments and theoretical calculations.

  16. Determination of nitrogen monoxide in high purity nitrogen gas with an atmospheric pressure ionization mass spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kato, K.

    1985-01-01

    An atmospheric pressure ionization mass spectrometric (API-MS) method was studied for the determination of residual NO in high purity N2 gas. The API-MS is very sensitive to NO, but the presence of O2 interferes with the NO measurement. Nitrogen gas in cylinders as sample gas was mixed with NO standard gas and/or O2 standard gas, and then introduced into the API-MS. The calibration curves of NO and O2 has linearity in the region of 0 - 2 ppm, but the slopes changed with every cylinder. The effect of O2 on NO+ peak was additive and proportional to O2 concentration in the range of 0 - 0.5 ppm. The increase in NO+ intensity due to O2 was (0.07 - 0.13)%/O2, 1 ppm. Determination of NO and O2 was carried out by the standard addition method to eliminate the influence of variation of slopes. The interference due to O2 was estimated from the product of the O2 concentration and the ratio of slope A to Slope B. Slope A is the change in the NO+ intensity with the O2 concentration. Slope B is the intensity with O2 concentration.

  17. Tracing origins of complex pharmaceutical preparations using surface desorption atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xinglei; Jia, Bin; Huang, Keke; Hu, Bin; Chen, Rong; Chen, Huanwen

    2010-10-01

    A novel strategy to trace the origins of commercial pharmaceutical products has been developed based on the direct chemical profiling of the pharmaceutical products by surface desorption atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry (DAPCI-MS). Besides the unambiguous identification of active drug components, various compounds present in the matrixes are simultaneously detected without sample pretreatment, providing valuable information for drug quality control and origin differentiation. Four sources of commercial amoxicillin products made by different manufacturers have been successfully differentiated. This strategy has been extended to secerning six sources of Liuwei Dihuang Teapills, which are herbal medicine preparations with extremely complex matrixes. The photolysis status of chemical drug products and the inferior natural herd medicine products prepared with different processes (e.g., extra heating) were also screened using the method reported here. The limit of detection achieved in the MS/MS experiments was estimated to be 1 ng/g for amoxicillin inside the capsule product. Our experimental data demonstrate that DAPCI-MS is a useful tool for rapid pharmaceutical analysis, showing promising perspectives for tracking the entire pharmaceutical supply chain to prevent counterfeit intrusions.

  18. Back corona enhanced organic film deposition inside an Atmospheric Pressure Weakly Ionized Plasma reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, Rokibul; Xie, Shuzheng; Englund, Karl; Pedrow, Patrick

    2014-10-01

    A grounded screen with short needle-like protrusions has been designed to generate back corona in an Atmospheric Pressure Weakly Ionized Plasma (APWIP) reactor. The grounded screen with protrusions is placed downstream at a variable gap length from an array of needles that is energized with 60 Hz high voltage. The excitation voltage is in the range 0--10 kV RMS and the feed gas mixture consists of argon and acetylene. A Lecroy 9350AL 500 MHz digital oscilloscope is used to monitor the reactor voltage and current using a resistive voltage divider and a current viewing resistor, respectively. The current signal contains many positive and negative current pulses associated with corona discharge. Analysis of the current signal shows asymmetry between positive and negative corona discharge currents. Photographs show substantial back corona generated near the tips of the protrusions situated at the grounded screen. The back corona activates via bond scission acetylene radicals that are transported downstream to form a plasma-polymerized film on a substrate positioned downstream from the grounded screen. The oscillograms will be used to generate corona mode maps that show the nature of the corona discharge as a function of gap spacing, applied voltage and many other reactor parameters.

  19. Ionization Capabilities of Hydronium Ions and High Electric Fields Produced by Atmospheric Pressure Corona Discharge.

    PubMed

    Sato, Natsuhiko; Sekimoto, Kanako; Takayama, Mitsuo

    2016-01-01

    Atmospheric pressure corona discharge (APCD) was applied to the ionization of volatile organic compounds. The mass spectra of analytes having aromatic, phenolic, anilinic, basic and aliphatic in nature were obtained by using vapor supply and liquid smear supply methods. The vapor supply method mainly gave protonated analytes [A+H](+) caused by proton transfer from hydronium ion H3O(+), except for benzene, toluene and n-hexane that have lower proton affinity. The use of the liquid smear supply method resulted in the formation of molecular ion A(·+) and/or dehydride analyte [A-H](+), according to the nature of analytes used. The formation of A(·+) without fragment ions could be explained by the electron tunneling via high electric fields 10(8) V/m at the tip of the corona needle. The dehydride analytes [A-H](+) observed in the mass spectra of n-hexane, di- and tributylamines may be explained by the hydride abstraction from the alkyl chains by the hydronium ion. The hydronium ion can play the two-roles for analytes, i.e., the proton donor to form [A+H](+) and the hydride acceptor to form [A-H](+).

  20. Study of spatial distributions of highly ionized nonequilibrium helium plasma at atmospheric pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chinnov, V. F.; Kavyrshin, D. I.; Ageev, A. G.; Korshunov, O. V.; Sargsyan, M. A.; Efimov, A. V.

    2016-11-01

    Experimental study of helium plasma in the state of quasistationary heating under atmospheric pressure was made. The plasma state is shown to fail to be described by Saha- Boltzmann approximation at high ionization levels α i = 0.5-0.9, temperatures 2.5-4.0 eV and electron concentrations about 1017 cm-3. The deviation from the equilibrium state of the plasma is caused by lack of spatial uniformity due to charged particles loss by ambipolar diffusion. In order to thoroughly study the temporal changes of plasma radiation characteristics, spectroscopic analysis was carried out with DFS-452 spectrometer and high-speed CMOS camera Andor iStar attached to its output. The system yields the spatial resolution of 30-50 μm and temporal resolution of 5-50 μs. Electron concentration ne was measured from the half-width of the local Hei spectrum line contours having dominant quadruple Stark effect with well-known constants. In order to determine the temperature of heavy particles, Doppler component of HeI line triplet at 1083 nm was studied. The temporal evolution of the following important characteristics has been determined for helium plasma during pulsed heating: current power, intensities of a number of HeI and HeII spectral lines, electron temperatures and concentrations.

  1. Liquid-solid transition in fully ionized hydrogen at ultra-high pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liberatore, Elisa; Pierleoni, Carlo; Ceperley, D. M.

    2011-05-01

    We study the phase diagram of an effective ion model of fully ionized hydrogen at ultra-high pressure. We assume that the protons interact with a screened Coulomb potential derived from a static linear response theory. This model accurately reproduces the physical properties of hydrogen for densities greater than ρ m=10 g/cm^3 corresponding to the range of the coupling parameter rs ≲ 0.6. The pressure range, P ≳ 20 TPa, is well beyond present experimental limitations. Assuming classical protons, we find that the zero temperature enthalpy of the perfect bcc crystal is slightly lower than for other structures at ρ m= 12.47 g/cm3 while the fcc structure gains stability at higher density. Using Monte Carlo calculations, we compute the free energy of various phases and locate the melting transition versus density. We find that on melting, bcc is energetically favored with respect to fcc over the entire range investigated. In the solid phase the system undergoes a structural transition from bcc at higher temperature to fcc at lower temperature. The free energy difference between these two structures is very small so that obtaining a quantitative estimate of this second transition line requires accuracy beyond that provided by our method. We estimate the effect of proton zero point motion on the bcc melting line for hydrogen, deuterium, and tritium by a path integral Monte Carlo method. Although zero point effects on hydrogen are large, since the two competing phases (bcc and liquid) have locally similar environments, the effect on the melting line is small; the melting temperature for hydrogen is lowered by about 10% with respect to the classical value.

  2. Sample introduction and pressure measuring system for chemical ionization mass spectrometers

    SciTech Connect

    Illies, A.J.; Bowers, M.T.; Meisels, G.G.

    1981-08-01

    One of the difficulties with using chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS) in magnetic sector instruments has been that of electrical dischargers through the gaseous sample between the ion source, which may be at potentials at 10kV and ground. A sample introduction method is presented to offset this. It was first used at the University of Nebraska, Lincoln on a modified Atlas CH-4 mass spectrometer operated at ion source potentials up to 3 kV and pressures up to 3 torr. The same technique has been extended at the University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB), for use with a VG-Micromass ZAB-2F mass spectrometer operated at source potentials as high as 10 kV and pressures up to 1 torr. The basic features of the design are presented. The sample leak valve which is at ground potential feeds into a glass tube which has been packed with approximately 4 in. of glass wool. The end of this glass tube is in contact with the ion source potential. The authors believe that the glass wool may prevent discharging by reducing the positive ion velocities below that required for the emission of secondary electrons and/or providing a very large surface area which may act as the third body in the ion-electron recombination reaction I/sup +/ + e/sup -/ + M ..-->.. I + M. At UCSB this sample introduction system is used for all gaseous and volatile liquid samples in both EI and CI modes. The only disadvantage with the sample introduction system involves the removal of very polar samples from the glass wool. However, overnight pumping has removed all samples we have used to date.

  3. Specific interaction between negative atmospheric ions and organic compounds in atmospheric pressure corona discharge ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Sekimoto, Kanako; Sakai, Mami; Takayama, Mitsuo

    2012-06-01

    The interaction between negative atmospheric ions and various types of organic compounds were investigated using atmospheric pressure corona discharge ionization (APCDI) mass spectrometry. Atmospheric negative ions such as O(2)(-), HCO(3)(-), COO(-)(COOH), NO(2)(-), NO(3)(-), and NO(3)(-)(HNO(3)) having different proton affinities served as the reactant ions for analyte ionization in APCDI in negative-ion mode. The individual atmospheric ions specifically ionized aliphatic and aromatic compounds with various functional groups as atmospheric ion adducts and deprotonated analytes. The formation of the atmospheric ion adducts under certain discharge conditions is most likely attributable to the affinity between the analyte and atmospheric ion and the concentration of the atmospheric ion produced under these conditions. The deprotonated analytes, in contrast, were generated from the adducts of the atmospheric ions with higher proton affinity attributable to efficient proton abstraction from the analyte by the atmospheric ion.

  4. The effects of added hydrogen on a helium atmospheric-pressure plasma jet ambient desorption/ionization source.

    PubMed

    Wright, Jonathan P; Heywood, Matthew S; Thurston, Glen K; Farnsworth, Paul B

    2013-03-01

    We present mass spectrometric data demonstrating the effect that hydrogen has on a helium-based dielectric-barrier discharge (DBD) atmospheric-pressure plasma jet used as an ambient desorption/ionization (ADI) source. The addition of 0.9 % hydrogen to the helium support gas in a 35-W plasma jet increased signals for a range of test analytes, with enhancement factors of up to 68, without proportional increases in background levels. The changes in signal levels result from a combination of changes in the desorption kinetics from the surface and increased ion production in the gas phase. The enhancement in ADI-MS performance despite the quenching of key plasma species reported in earlier studies suggests that ionization with a H2/He plasma jet is the result of an alternate mechanism involving the direct generation of ionized hydrogen.

  5. Desorption Flame-Induced Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry for Rapid Real-World Sample Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Sy-Chyi; Chen, Shih-His; Shiea, Jentaie

    2017-01-01

    Flame-induced atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (FAPCI) is a solvent and high voltage-free APCI technique. It uses a flame to produce charged species that reacts with analytes for ionization, and generates intact molecular ions from organic compounds with minimal fragmentation. In this study, desorption FAPCI/MS was developed to rapidly characterize thermally stable organic compounds in liquid, cream, and solid states. Liquid samples were introduced into the ion source through a heated nebulizer, and the analytes formed in the heated nebulizer reacted with charged species in the source. For cream and solid sample analysis, the samples were positioned near the flame of the FAPCI source for thermal desorption and ionization. This approach provided a useful method to directly characterize samples with minimal pretreatment. Standards and real-world samples, such as drug tablets, ointment, and toy were analyzed to demonstrate the capability of desorption FAPCI/MS for rapid organic compound analysis. PMID:28573084

  6. Understanding the atmospheric pressure ionization of petroleum components: The effects of size, structure, and presence of heteroatoms.

    PubMed

    Huba, Anna Katarina; Huba, Kristina; Gardinali, Piero R

    2016-10-15

    Understanding the composition of crude oil and its changes with weathering is essential when assessing its provenience, fate, and toxicity. High-resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS) has provided the opportunity to address the complexity of crude oil by assigning molecular formulae, and sorting compounds into "classes" based on heteroatom content. However, factors such as suppression effects and discrimination towards certain components severely limit a truly comprehensive mass spectrometric characterization, and, despite the availability of increasingly better mass spectrometers, a complete characterization of oil still represents a major challenge. In order to fully comprehend the significance of class abundances, as well as the nature and identity of compounds detected, a good understanding of the ionization efficiency of the various compound classes is indispensable. The current study, therefore, analyzed model compounds typically found in crude oils by high-resolution mass spectrometry with atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI), atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI), and electrospray ionization (ESI), in order to provide a better understanding of benefits and drawbacks of each source. The findings indicate that, overall, APPI provides the best results, being able to ionize the broadest range of compounds, providing the best results with respect to ionization efficiencies, and exhibiting the least suppression effects. However, just like in the other two sources, in APPI several factors have shown to affect the ionization efficiency of petroleum model compounds. The main such factor is the presence or absence of functional groups that can be easily protonated/deprotonated, in addition to other factors such as size, methylation level, presence of heteroatoms, and ring structure. Overall, this study evidences the intrinsic limitations and benefits of each of the three sources, and should provide the fundamental knowledge required to expand the power

  7. Producing highly charged ions without solvent using laserspray ionization: a total solvent-free analysis approach at atmospheric pressure.

    PubMed

    Wang, Beixi; Lietz, Christopher B; Inutan, Ellen D; Leach, Samantha M; Trimpin, Sarah

    2011-06-01

    First examples of highly charged ions in mass spectrometry (MS) produced from the solid state without using solvent during either sample preparation or mass measurement are reported. Matrix material, matrix/analyte homogenization time and frequency, atmospheric pressure (AP) to vacuum inlet temperature, and mass analyzer ion trap conditions are factors that influence the abundance of the highly charged ions created by laserspray ionization (LSI). LSI, like matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI), uses laser ablation of a matrix/analyte mixture from a surface to produce ions. Preparing the matrix/analyte sample without the use of solvent provides the ability to perform total solvent-free analysis (TSA) consisting of solvent-free ionization and solvent-free gas-phase separation using ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) MS. Peptides and small proteins such as non-β-amyloid components of Alzheimer's disease and bovine insulin are examples in which LSI and TSA were combined to produce multiply charged ions, similar to electrospray ionization, but without the use of solvent. Advantages using solvent-free LSI and IMS-MS include simplicity, rapid data acquisition, reduction of sample complexity, and the potential for an enhanced effective dynamic range. This is achieved by more inclusive ionization and improved separation of mixture components as a result of multiple charging.

  8. Comment on "The thermodynamical instability induced by pressure ionization in fluid helium" [Phys. Plasmas 23, 112709 (2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quan, W. L.

    2017-06-01

    In a recent paper, Li et al. [Phys. Plasmas 23, 112709 (2016)] reported the instability induced by pressure ionization in fluid helium based on minimization of Helmholtz free energy within chemical picture. Here, I argue that their calculations may have some bugs directly resulting in the so-called instability, because a problematic iterative strategy also produces a similar, but mathematically incorrect instability that can be removed by improving iterative strategy.

  9. Probe electrospray ionization (PESI) mass spectrometry with discontinuous atmospheric pressure interface (DAPI).

    PubMed

    Hiraoka, Kenzo; Usmanov, Dilshadbek T; Chen, Lee Chuin; Ninomiya, Satoshi; Mandal, Mridul K; Saha, Subhrakanti

    2015-01-01

    Probe electrospray ionization (PESI) using a 0.2 mm outside diameter titanium wire was performed and the generated ions were introduced into the mass spectrometer via a discontinuous atmospheric pressure interface using a pinch valve. Time-lapse PESI mass spectra were acquired by gradually increasing delay time for the pinch valve opening with respect to the start of each electrospray event when a high voltage was applied. The opening time of the pinch valve was 20 ms. Time-resolved PESI mass spectra showed marked differences for 10 mM NaCl, 10(-5) M gramicidin S and insulin in H(2)O/CH(3)OH/CH(3)COOH/CH(3)COONH(4) (65/35/1) with and without the addition of 10 mM CH(3)COONH(4). This was ascribed to the pH change of the liquid attached to the needle caused by electrochemical reactions taking place at the interface between the metal probe and the solution. NaCl cluster ions appeared only after the depletion of analytes. For the mixed solution of 10(-5) M cytochrome c, insulin, and gramicidin S in H(2)O/CH(3)OH/CH(3)COOH (65/35/1), a sequential appearance of analyte ions in the order of cytochrome c→insulin→gramicidin S was observed. The present technique was applied to three narcotic samples; methamphetamine, morphine and codeine. Limits of detection for these compounds were 10 ppb in H(2)O/CH(3)OH (1/1) for the single sampling with a pinch valve opening time of 200 ms.

  10. Supercritical fluid chromatography coupled with in-source atmospheric pressure ionization hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry for compound speciation.

    PubMed

    Cho, Yunju; Choi, Man-Ho; Kim, Byungjoo; Kim, Sunghwan

    2016-04-29

    An experimental setup for the speciation of compounds by hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) with atmospheric pressure ionization while performing chromatographic separation is presented. The proposed experimental setup combines the high performance supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC) system that can be readily used as an inlet for mass spectrometry (MS) and atmospheric pressure photo ionization (APPI) or atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) HDX. This combination overcomes the limitation of an approach using conventional liquid chromatography (LC) by minimizing the amount of deuterium solvents used for separation. In the SFC separation, supercritical CO2 was used as a major component of the mobile phase, and methanol was used as a minor co-solvent. By using deuterated methanol (CH3OD), AP HDX was achieved during SFC separation. To prove the concept, thirty one nitrogen- and/or oxygen-containing standard compounds were analyzed by SFC-AP HDX MS. The compounds were successfully speciated from the obtained SFC-MS spectra. The exchange ions were observed with as low as 1% of CH3OD in the mobile phase, and separation could be performed within approximately 20min using approximately 0.24 mL of CH3OD. The results showed that SFC separation and APPI/APCI HDX could be successfully performed using the suggested method.

  11. Commercial intermediate pressure MALDI ion mobility spectrometry mass spectrometer capable of producing highly charged laserspray ionization ions.

    PubMed

    Inutan, Ellen D; Wang, Beixi; Trimpin, Sarah

    2011-02-01

    The first examples of highly charged ions observed under intermediate pressure (IP) vacuum conditions are reported using laser ablation of matrix/analyte mixtures. The method and results are similar to those obtained at atmospheric pressure (AP) using laserspray ionization (LSI) and/or matrix assisted inlet ionization (MAII). Electrospray ionization (ESI), LSI, and MAII are methods operating at AP and have been shown, with or without the use of a voltage or a laser, to produce highly charged ions with very similar ion abundance and charge states. A commercial matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) mass spectrometry (MS) instrument (SYNAPT G2) was used for the IP developments. The necessary conditions for producing highly charged ions of peptides and small proteins at IP appear to be a pressure drop region and the use of suitable matrixes and laser fluence. Ionization to produce these highly charged ions under the low pressure conditions of IP does not require specific heating or a special inlet ion transfer region. However, under the current setup, ubiquitin is the highest molecular weight protein observed. These findings are in accord with the need to provide thermal energy in the pressure drop region, similar to LSI and MAII, to improve sensitivity and extend the types of compounds that produce highly charged ions. The practical utility of IP-LSI in combination with IMS-MS is demonstrated for the analysis of model mixtures composed of a lipid, peptides, and a protein. Further, endogenous multiply charged peptides are observed directly from delipified mouse brain tissue with drift time distributions that are nearly identical in appearance to those obtained from a synthesized neuropeptide standard analyzed by either LSI- or ESI-IMS-MS at AP. Efficient solvent-free gas-phase separation enabled by the IMS dimension separates the multiply charged peptides from lipids that remained on the delipified tissue. Lipid and peptide

  12. Influence of field emission on the propagation of cylindrical fast ionization wave in atmospheric-pressure nitrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Levko, Dmitry; Raja, Laxminarayan L.

    2016-04-21

    The influence of field emission of electrons from surfaces on the fast ionization wave (FIW) propagation in high-voltage nanosecond pulse discharge in the atmospheric-pressure nitrogen is studied by a one-dimensional Particle-in-Cell Monte Carlo Collisions model. A strong influence of field emission on the FIW dynamics and plasma parameters is obtained. Namely, the accounting for the field emission makes possible the bridging of the cathode–anode gap by rather dense plasma (∼10{sup 13 }cm{sup −3}) in less than 1 ns. This is explained by the generation of runaway electrons from the field emitted electrons. These electrons are able to cross the entire gap pre-ionizing it and promoting the ionization wave propagation. We have found that the propagation of runaway electrons through the gap cannot be accompanied by the streamer propagation, because the runaway electrons align the plasma density gradients. In addition, we have obtained that the field enhancement factor allows controlling the speed of ionization wave propagation.

  13. Benzylammonium Thermometer Ions: Internal Energies of Ions Formed by Low Temperature Plasma and Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephens, Edward R.; Dumlao, Morphy; Xiao, Dan; Zhang, Daming; Donald, William A.

    2015-12-01

    The extent of internal energy deposition upon ion formation by low temperature plasma and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization was investigated using novel benzylammonium thermometer ions. C-N heterolytic bond dissociation enthalpies of nine 4-substituted benzylammoniums were calculated using CAM-B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p), which was significantly more accurate than B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p), MP2/6-311++G(d,p), and CBS-QB3 for calculating the enthalpies of 20 heterolytic dissociation reactions that were used to benchmark theory. All 4-substituted benzylammonium thermometer ions fragmented by a single pathway with comparable dissociation entropies, except 4-nitrobenzylammonium. Overall, the extent of energy deposition into ions formed by low temperature plasma was significantly lower than those formed by atmospheric pressure chemical ionization under these conditions. Because benzylamines are volatile, this new suite of thermometer ions should be useful for investigating the extent of internal energy deposition during ion formation for a wide range of ionization methods, including plasma, spray and laser desorption-based techniques.

  14. Benzylammonium Thermometer Ions: Internal Energies of Ions Formed by Low Temperature Plasma and Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization.

    PubMed

    Stephens, Edward R; Dumlao, Morphy; Xiao, Dan; Zhang, Daming; Donald, William A

    2015-12-01

    The extent of internal energy deposition upon ion formation by low temperature plasma and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization was investigated using novel benzylammonium thermometer ions. C-N heterolytic bond dissociation enthalpies of nine 4-substituted benzylammoniums were calculated using CAM-B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p), which was significantly more accurate than B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p), MP2/6-311++G(d,p), and CBS-QB3 for calculating the enthalpies of 20 heterolytic dissociation reactions that were used to benchmark theory. All 4-substituted benzylammonium thermometer ions fragmented by a single pathway with comparable dissociation entropies, except 4-nitrobenzylammonium. Overall, the extent of energy deposition into ions formed by low temperature plasma was significantly lower than those formed by atmospheric pressure chemical ionization under these conditions. Because benzylamines are volatile, this new suite of thermometer ions should be useful for investigating the extent of internal energy deposition during ion formation for a wide range of ionization methods, including plasma, spray and laser desorption-based techniques. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  15. Standing striations due to ionization instability in atmospheric pressure He/H2O radio frequency capacitive discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamura, E.; Lieberman, M. A.; Lichtenberg, A. J.

    2016-10-01

    One-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations of a narrow gap atmospheric pressure He/2%{{\\text{H}}2}\\text{O} radio frequency capacitive discharge showed standing striations in the bulk plasma region while previously conducted PIC simulations of a narrow gap atmospheric pressure He/0.1%{{\\text{N}}2} discharges [1] showed no such instabilities. We successively modified the base He/{{\\text{H}}2}\\text{O} chemistry to make it more similar to the He/{{\\text{N}}2} chemistry in order to determine the cause of the striations. Setting the e-{{\\text{H}}2}\\text{O} scattering, attachment, vibrational and rotational excitation rates to zero did not suppress the striations. However, a systematic reduction of the e-ion recombination cross section resulted in a transition to a stable state with no striations. The results are interpreted in terms of a model in which the balance between bulk direct ionization and bulk recombination loss determines the bulk plasma equilibrium. Perturbing the equilibrium, we find that the striations are consistent with an ionization instability induced by non-local electron kinetics that form a spatially-varying high energy tail of the electron energy distribution, causing the ionization rate coefficient to decrease with increasing electron temperature T e and root-mean-square electric field E in the instability regime.

  16. Atmospheric pressure photo ionization hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry--a method to differentiate isomers by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Arif; Kim, Sunghwan

    2013-12-01

    In this report, a method for in-source hydrogen/deuterium (H/D) exchange at atmospheric pressure is reported. The method was named atmospheric pressure photo ionization hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (APPI HDX MS). H/D exchange was performed by mixing samples dissolved in toluene with CH3OD solvent and analyzing the mixture using atmospheric pressure photo ionization mass spectrometry (APPI-MS). The APPI HDX spectra obtained with contact times between the analyte solution and methanol-OD (CH3OD) of < 0.5 s or 1 h showed the same pattern of H/D exchange. Therefore, it was concluded that APPI HDX occurred in the source but not in the solution. The proposed method does not require a specific type of mass spectrometer and can be performed at atmospheric pressure. H/D exchange can be performed in any laboratory with a mass spectrometer and a commercial APPI source. Using this method, multiple H/D exchanges of aromatic hydrogen and/or H/D exchange of active hydrogen were observed. These results demonstrated that H/D exchange can be used to distinguish between isomers containing primary, secondary, and tertiary amines, as well as pyridine and pyrrole functional groups.

  17. Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization Sources Used in The Detection of Explosives by Ion Mobility Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Waltman, Melanie J.

    2010-05-01

    Explosives detection is a necessary and wide spread field of research. From large shipping containers to airline luggage, numerous items are tested for explosives every day. In the area of trace explosives detection, ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) is the technique employed most often because it is a quick, simple, and accurate way to test many items in a short amount of time. Detection by IMS is based on the difference in drift times of product ions through the drift region of an IMS instrument. The product ions are created when the explosive compounds, introduced to the instrument, are chemically ionized through interactions with the reactant ions. The identity of the reactant ions determines the outcomes of the ionization process. This research investigated the reactant ions created by various ionization sources and looked into ways to manipulate the chemistry occurring in the sources.

  18. Potential of gas chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-tandem mass spectrometry for screening and quantification of hexabromocyclododecane.

    PubMed

    Sales, Carlos; Portolés, Tania; Sancho, Juan Vicente; Abad, Esteban; Ábalos, Manuela; Sauló, Jordi; Fiedler, Heidelore; Gómara, Belén; Beltrán, Joaquim

    2016-01-01

    A fast method for the screening and quantification of hexabromocyclododecane (sum of all isomers) by gas chromatography using a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (GC-APCI-QqQ) is proposed. This novel procedure makes use of the soft atmospheric pressure chemical ionization source, which results in less fragmentation of the analyte than by conventional electron impact (EI) and chemical ionization (CI) sources, favoring the formation of the [M - Br](+) ion and, thus, enhancing sensitivity and selectivity. Detection was based on the consecutive loses of HBr from the [M - Br](+) ion to form the specific [M - H5Br6](+) and [M - H4Br5](+) ions, which were selected as quantitation (Q) and qualification (q) transitions, respectively. Parameters affecting ionization and MS/MS detection were studied. Method performance was also evaluated; calibration curves were found linear from 1 pg/μL to 100 pg/μL for the total HBCD concentration; instrumental detection limit was estimated to be 0.10 pg/μL; repeatability and reproducibility, expressed as relative standard deviation, were better than 7% in both cases. The application to different real samples [polyurethane foam disks (PUFs), food, and marine samples] pointed out a rapid way to identify and allow quantification of this compound together with a number of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (BDE congeners 28, 47, 66, 85, 99, 100, 153, 154, 183, 184, 191, 196, 197, and 209) and two other novel brominated flame retardants [i.e., decabromodiphenyl ethane (DBDPE) and 1,2-bis(2,4,6-tribromophenoxy)ethane (BTBPE)] because of their presence in the same fraction when performing the usual sample treatment.

  19. Cyclic acyloxonium ions as diagnostic aids in the characterization of chloropropanol esters under electron impact (EI), electrospray ionization (ESI), and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) conditions.

    PubMed

    Rahn, Anja K K; Yaylayan, Varoujan A

    2013-06-26

    During mass spectrometric analysis of various lipids and lipid derivatives such as the chlorinated counterparts of triacylglycerols, the detailed structure of the characteristic and common ions formed under electron impact (EI), electrospray ionization (ESI), and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) conditions by the loss of a single fatty acid remains ambiguous. These ions are designated in the literature as "diacylglyceride ions" and are frequently depicted with a molecular formula without showing any structural features and sometimes represented as cyclic acyloxonium ions. Characterization of these ions is of considerable importance due to their utility in structural identification of lipid derivatives. This study provides complementary evidence on the cyclic nature of "diacylglyceride ions" through the use of the simplest 3-monochloropropanediol diester as a model and the use of isotope labeling technique. Tandem MS/MS studies have indicated that the ion at m/z 135.6 generated from 1,2-bis(acetoyl)-3-chloropropane through the loss of an acetyl group was identical to the ion at m/z 135.6 generated from 4-chloromethyl-2,2-dimethyl-1,3-dioxolane, the latter being generated from a cyclic precursor through the loss of a methyl radical, keeping the dioxolane ring structure intact, thus confirming the cyclic nature of these ions. The corresponding cyclic oxonium ions generated from longer chain chloropropanol diesters, such as the ion at m/z 331.2 originating from 3-monochloropropanediol (3-MCPD) diesters containing palmitic acid(s), could serve as chemical markers for the presence chloropropanol esters.

  20. Plasma-Spray Ionization (PLASI): A Multimodal Atmospheric Pressure Ion Source for Liquid Stream Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaylor, Adam; Dwivedi, Prabha; Pittman, Jennifer J.; Monge, María Eugenia; Cheng, Guilong; Li, Shelly; Fernández, Facundo M.

    2014-10-01

    A new ion generation method, named plasma-spray ionization (PLASI) for direct analysis of liquid streams, such as in continuous infusion experiments or liquid chromatography (LC), is reported. PLASI addresses many of the analytical limitations of electrospray ionization (ESI) and has potential for real time process stream analysis and reaction monitoring under atmospheric conditions in non-ESI friendly scenarios. In PLASI-mass spectrometry (MS), the liquid stream is pneumatically nebulized and partially charged at low voltages; the resultant aerosol is thus entrained with a gaseous plasma plume from a distal glow discharge prior to MS detection. PLASI-MS not only overcomes ESI-MS limitations but also generates simpler mass spectra with minimal adduct and cluster formation. PLASI utilizes the atomization capabilities of an ESI sprayer operated below the ESI threshold to generate gas-phase aerosols that are then ionized by the plasma stream. When operated at or above the ESI threshold, ionization by traditional ESI mechanisms is achieved. The multimodal nature of the technique enables readily switching between plasma and ESI operation. It is expected that PLASI will enable analyzing a wide range of analytes in complex matrices and less-restricted solvent systems, providing more flexibility than that achievable by ESI alone.

  1. Identification and determination of glycosides in tobacco leaves by liquid chromatography with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Pang, Tao; Yuan, Zhongyi; Dai, Yongsheng; Wang, Chang; Yang, Jun; Peng, Liming; Xu, Guowang

    2007-02-01

    HPLC-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization MS (HPLC-APCI-MS) was used to screen and identify glycosides in tobacco leaf. MS/MS and MS3 and photodiode array (PDA) detection were also used in the characterization. A total of 12 glycosides were found and four of them were identified based on their abundant [M + H]+ ions, UV spectra, and MS/MS analysis and they are scopolin, rutin, quercetin-3-glycoside, and kaempferol-3-rutinoside. Analytical characteristics of the method were investigated. The contents of these glycosides were obtained and compared based on the relative peak area to the internal standard in seven kinds of tobacco leaf.

  2. Absolute method for the assay of oleuropein in olive oils by atmospheric pressure chemical ionization tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    De Nino, Antonio; Di Donna, Leonardo; Mazzotti, Fabio; Muzzalupo, Enzo; Perri, Enzo; Sindona, Giovanni; Tagarelli, Antonio

    2005-09-15

    Oleuropein (OLP, 1), the active ingredient present (i) in food integrators extracted from olive leaves, (ii) in table olives, and (iii) in extra virgin olive oils is a nutraceutical whose health benefits have been widely documented. A new analytical method for its assay, which is based on the utilization of atmospheric pressure chemical ionization tandem mass spectrometry and on the use of a synthetic labeled analogue, the 4-trideuteriocarboxyoleuropein (2), as an internal standard, is presented. The results obtained with extra virgin olive oils from different cultivars and different Italian regions are discussed.

  3. 49 CFR 173.302b - Additional requirements for shipment of non-liquefied (permanent) compressed gases in UN pressure...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... prescribed in this section, the working pressure of a UN pressure receptacle may not exceed 2/3 of the test... may the internal pressure at 65 °C (149 °F) exceed the test pressure. (c) Fluorine, compressed, UN... must be packaged in a UN pressure receptacle with a minimum test pressure of 200 bar and a...

  4. 49 CFR 173.302b - Additional requirements for shipment of non-liquefied (permanent) compressed gases in UN pressure...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... prescribed in this section, the working pressure of a UN pressure receptacle may not exceed 2/3 of the test... may the internal pressure at 65 °C (149 °F) exceed the test pressure. (c) Fluorine, compressed, UN... must be packaged in a UN pressure receptacle with a minimum test pressure of 200 bar and a...

  5. Combined chemical and topographic imaging at atmospheric pressure via microprobe laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry-atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Bradshaw, James A; Ovchinnikova, Olga S; Meyer, Kent A; Goeringer, Douglas E

    2009-12-01

    The operational characteristics and imaging performance are described for a new instrument comprising an atomic force microscope coupled with a pulsed laser and a linear ion trap mass spectrometer. The operating mode of the atomic force microscope is used to produce topographic surface images having sub-micrometer spatial and height resolution. Spatially resolved mass spectra of ions, produced from the same surface via microprobe-mode laser desorption/ionization at atmospheric pressure, are also used to create a 100 x 100 microm chemical image. The effective spatial resolution of the image (approximately 2 microm) was constrained by the limit of detection (estimated to be 10(9)-10(10) molecules) rather than by the diameter of the focused laser spot or the step size of the sample stage. The instrument has the potential to be particularly useful for surface analysis scenarios in which chemical analysis of targeted topographic features is desired; consequently, it should have extensive application in a number of scientific areas. Because the number density of desorbed neutral species in laser desorption/ionization is known to be orders-of-magnitude greater than that of ions, it is expected that improvements in imaging performance can be realized by implementation of post-ionization methods.

  6. Design and Performance of a Novel Interface for Combined Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization at Elevated Pressure and Electrospray Ionization with Orbitrap Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Belov, Mikhail E; Ellis, Shane R; Dilillo, Marialaura; Paine, Martin R L; Danielson, William F; Anderson, Gordon A; de Graaf, Erik L; Eijkel, Gert B; Heeren, Ron M A; McDonnell, Liam A

    2017-07-18

    Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization, MALDI, has been increasingly used in a variety of biomedical applications, including tissue imaging of clinical tissue samples, and in drug discovery and development. These studies strongly depend on the performance of the analytical instrumentation and would drastically benefit from improved sensitivity, reproducibility, and mass/spatial resolution. In this work, we report on a novel combined MALDI/ESI interface, which was coupled to different Orbitrap mass spectrometers (Elite and Q Exactive Plus) and extensively characterized with peptide and protein standards, and in tissue imaging experiments. In our approach, MALDI is performed in the elevated pressure regime (5-8 Torr) at a spatial resolution of 15-30 μm, while ESI-generated ions are injected orthogonally to the interface axis. We have found that introduction of the MALDI-generated ions into an electrodynamic dual-funnel interface results in increased sensitivity characterized by a limit of detection of ∼400 zmol, while providing a mass measurement accuracy of 1 ppm and a mass resolving power of 120 000 in analysis of protein digests. In tissue imaging experiments, the MALDI/ESI interface has been employed in experiments with rat brain sections and was shown to be capable of visualizing and spatially characterizing very low abundance analytes separated only by 20 mDa. Comparison of imaging data has revealed excellent agreement between the MALDI and histological images.

  7. Studies of the mechanism of the cluster formation in a thermally sampling atmospheric pressure ionization mass spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Albrecht, Sascha Stroh, Fred; Klopotowski, Sebastian Derpmann, Valerie Klee, Sonja Brockmann, Klaus J. Benter, Thorsten

    2014-01-15

    In this study a thermally sampling atmospheric pressure ionization mass spectrometer is described and characterized. The ion transfer stage offers the capability to sample cluster ions at thermal equilibrium and during this transfer fundamental processes possibly affecting the cluster distribution are also readily identified. Additionally, the transfer stage combines optional collision-induced dissociation (CID) analysis of the cluster composition with thermal equilibrium sampling of clusters. The performance of the setup is demonstrated with regard to the proton-bound water cluster system. The benefit of the studied processes is that they can help to improve future transfer stages and to understand cluster ion reactions in ion mobility tubes and high-pressure ion sources. In addition, the instrument allows for the identification of fragmentation and protonation reactions caused by CID.

  8. Measurements of neutron energy using a recoil-proton telescope and a high-pressure ionization chamber.

    PubMed

    Folkard, M; Makrigiorgos, G; Roper, M J; Waker, A J; Michael, B D

    1989-04-01

    Two very different techniques for measuring the energy of neutrons in the energy range 0.1-10 MeV are presented and compared. A recoil-proton spectrometer is used to determine the energy spectra of neutrons produced by the d(4)-Be and p(4)-Be reactions down to the low-energy threshold of 0.7 MeV. The same radiation fields are also measured with a recently developed method using a high-pressure ionization chamber that can be used to determine the mean energy of the neutrons in a mixed neutron-gamma radiation field provided the gamma-ray absorbed dose fraction is determined independently. An intercomparison of the two methods shows that the high-pressure ionization chamber compares well and supplements the established recoil-proton spectrometer technique. The almost isotropic response of the chamber has enabled measurements to be made of the variation of mean neutron energy with depth in water for the two radiation fields.

  9. Body mass index, blood pressure, and glucose and lipid metabolism among permanent and fixed-term workers in the manufacturing industry: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Mariko; Minami, Masahide; Yano, Eiji

    2014-02-27

    Temporary employment, a precarious form of employment, is recognized as social determinant of poor health. However, evidence supporting precarious employment as a risk factor for health is mainly obtained from subjective data. Studies using objective clinical measurement data in the assessment of health status are limited. This study compared body mass index (BMI), lipid and glucose metabolism, and health-related lifestyle factors between permanent workers and fixed-term workers employed in the manufacturing industry. Data of 1,701 male manufacturing industry workers <50 years old in Japan were collected and analyzed. Anthropometric data were BMI, calculated using measured height and weight of study participants, and blood pressure. For lipid metabolism, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and triglyceride levels were determined. For glucose metabolism, fasting plasma glucose and hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels were measured. Multiple regression analysis adjusted for age and lifestyle factors was performed. BMI was significantly higher in permanent workers (22.9 kg/m2) compared with fixed-term workers (22.4 kg/m2). The leaner population (BMI < 18.5) was greater among fixed-term workers (8.3%) compared with permanent workers (4.0%), whereas the overweight population (BMI ≥ 25.0) was greater among permanent workers (21.4%) compared with fixed-term workers (18.1%). Although fixed-term workers tended not to be overweight, regression analysis adjusted for age and lifestyle factors suggested that fixed-term employment was significantly associated with higher blood pressure (systolic β = 2.120, diastolic β = 2.793), triglyceride (β = 11.147), fasting blood glucose (β = 2.218), and HbA1c (β = 0.107) compared with permanent workers (all p < 0.01). Fixed-term workers showed more health risks, such as poorer blood pressure and lipid and glucose metabolism, even when adjusted for age and lifestyle

  10. Body mass index, blood pressure, and glucose and lipid metabolism among permanent and fixed-term workers in the manufacturing industry: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Temporary employment, a precarious form of employment, is recognized as social determinant of poor health. However, evidence supporting precarious employment as a risk factor for health is mainly obtained from subjective data. Studies using objective clinical measurement data in the assessment of health status are limited. This study compared body mass index (BMI), lipid and glucose metabolism, and health-related lifestyle factors between permanent workers and fixed-term workers employed in the manufacturing industry. Methods Data of 1,701 male manufacturing industry workers <50 years old in Japan were collected and analyzed. Anthropometric data were BMI, calculated using measured height and weight of study participants, and blood pressure. For lipid metabolism, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and triglyceride levels were determined. For glucose metabolism, fasting plasma glucose and hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels were measured. Multiple regression analysis adjusted for age and lifestyle factors was performed. Results BMI was significantly higher in permanent workers (22.9 kg/m2) compared with fixed-term workers (22.4 kg/m2). The leaner population (BMI < 18.5) was greater among fixed-term workers (8.3%) compared with permanent workers (4.0%), whereas the overweight population (BMI ≥ 25.0) was greater among permanent workers (21.4%) compared with fixed-term workers (18.1%). Although fixed-term workers tended not to be overweight, regression analysis adjusted for age and lifestyle factors suggested that fixed-term employment was significantly associated with higher blood pressure (systolic β = 2.120, diastolic β = 2.793), triglyceride (β = 11.147), fasting blood glucose (β = 2.218), and HbA1c (β = 0.107) compared with permanent workers (all p < 0.01). Conclusions Fixed-term workers showed more health risks, such as poorer blood pressure and lipid and glucose metabolism

  11. Hall instability of a weakly ionized, rotating disk with equilibrium pressure stratification and thermal loss

    SciTech Connect

    Bora, Madhurjya P.; Buzar Baruah, Manasi

    2011-01-15

    A linear stability analysis of a thin rotating Keplerian disk is presented in the framework of Hall-magnetohydrodynamics with equilibrium pressure stratification and radiative cooling. Anisotropic pressure is considered in view of a stronger axial magnetic field. The analysis is relevant in studying the stability of protoplanetary disks. It has been shown that the equilibrium pressure stratification determines the growth rate of the Hall instability. With radiative loss, the thermal modes are affected by the Hall mode and the classical instability conditions.

  12. Mass spectrometry in the characterization of ambers. I. Studies of amber samples of different origin and ages by laser desorption ionization, atmospheric pressure chemical ionization and atmospheric pressure photoionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Tonidandel, Loris; Ragazzi, Eugenio; Roghi, Guido; Traldi, Pietro

    2008-01-01

    Amber is a fossil resin constituted of organic polymers derived through complex maturation processes of the original plant resin. A classification of eight samples of amber of different geological age (Miocene to Triassic) and geographical origin is here proposed using direct mass spectrometric techniques, i.e. laser desorption ionization (LDI), atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) and atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI), in order to obtain a fingerprint related to the amber origin. Differences and similarities were detected among the spectra with the four methods, showing quite complex spectra, full of ionic species in the mass range investigated (up to m/z 2000). The evaluation required statistical analysis involving multivariate techniques. Cluster analysis or principal component analysis (PCA) generally did not show a clear clustering with respect to the age of samples, except for the APPI method, which allowed a satisfying clustering. Using the total ion current (TIC) obtained by the different analytical approaches on equal quantities of the different amber samples and plotted against the age, the only significant correlation appeared to be that involving APPI. To validate the method, four amber samples from Cretaceous of Spain were analyzed. Also in this case a significant correlation with age was found only with APPI data. PCA obtained with TIC values from all the MS methods showed a fair grouping of samples, according to their age. Three main clusters could be detected, belonging to younger, intermediate and older fossil resins, respectively. This MS analysis on crude amber, either solid or extract, followed by appropriate multivariate statistical evaluation, can provide useful information on amber age. The best results are those obtained by APPI, indicating that the quantity of amber soluble components that can be photoionized decreases with increasing age, in agreement with the formation of highly stable, insoluble polymers.

  13. Atmospheric pressure ionization of chlorinated ethanes in ion mobility spectrometry and mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Ewing, Robert G.; Atkinson, David A.; Benson, Michael T.

    2015-05-16

    This study investigates the APCI mechanisms associated with chlorinated ethanes in an attempt to define conditions under which unique pseudo-molecular adducts, in addition to chloride ion, can be produced for analytical measurements using IMS and MS. The ionization chemistry of chlorinated compounds typically leads to the detection of only the halide ions. Using molecular modeling, which provides insights into the ion formation and relative binding energies, predictions for the formation of pseudo-molecular adducts are postulated. Predicted structures of the chloride ion with multiple hydrogens on the ethane backbone was supported by the observation of specific pseudo-molecular adducts in IMS and MS spectra. With the proper instrumental conditions, such as short reaction times and low temp.

  14. Detection of non-prescription heroin markers in urine with liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bogusz, M J; Maier, R D; Erkens, M; Kohls, U

    2001-09-01

    The planned introduction of a prescription heroin program in Germany created a need for differentiation between non-prescription and prescribed diamorphine use. The following substances were chosen as markers of non-prescription heroin: acetylcodeine (AC); its metabolites codeine (C) and codeine 6-glucuronide (C6G); papaverine (P); and noscapine (N). Typical heroin markers diamorphine (DAM) and its metabolites monoacetylmorphine (MAM) and morphine (M) were also determined. The drugs were extracted from urine samples with solid-phase extraction (C18) using standard 200-mg columns and 96-well microplates (100 mg). The extracts were examined with liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry (positive ionization) in two isocratic systems. Selected ion monitoring procedures were applied for protonated molecular masses and characteristic fragments of drugs involved. The limits of detection were in the range of 0.5-1 ng/mL urine. The occurrence of selected heroin markers was investigated in 25 urine samples collected from heroin abusers (road traffic offenders and overdosed patients). C6G was found in all samples, C in 24 samples, N in 22 samples, MAM in 16 samples, P in 14 samples, DAM in 12 samples, and AC in 4 samples. The appearance of these compounds in urine reflects their pharmacokinetic properties and the composition of non-prescription heroin.

  15. Kinetic modeling of evolution of 3 + 1:Resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization plasma in argon at low pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Tholeti, Siva Sashank; Alexeenko, Alina A.; Shneider, Mikhail N.

    2014-06-15

    We present numerical kinetic modeling of generation and evolution of the plasma produced as a result of resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) in Argon gas. The particle-in-cell/Monte Carlo collision (PIC/MCC) simulations capture non-equilibrium effects in REMPI plasma expansion by considering the major collisional processes at the microscopic level: elastic scattering, electron impact ionization, ion charge exchange, and recombination and quenching for metastable excited atoms. The conditions in one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) formulations correspond to known experiments in Argon at a pressure of 5 Torr. The 1D PIC/MCC calculations are compared with the published results of local drift-diffusion model, obtained for the same conditions. It is shown that the PIC/MCC and diffusion-drift models are in qualitative and in reasonable quantitative agreement during the ambipolar expansion stage, whereas significant non-equilibrium exists during the first few 10 s of nanoseconds. 2D effects are important in the REMPI plasma expansion. The 2D PIC/MCC calculations produce significantly lower peak electron densities as compared to 1D and show a better agreement with experimentally measured microwave radiation scattering.

  16. Accurate quantitation of pentaerythritol tetranitrate and its degradation products using liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Brust, Hanneke; van Asten, Arian; Koeberg, Mattijs; Dalmolen, Jan; van der Heijden, Antoine; Schoenmakers, Peter

    2014-04-18

    After an explosion of pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN), its degradation products pentaerythritol trinitrate (PETriN), dinitrate (PEDiN) and mononitrate (PEMN) were detected using liquid chromatography-atmospheric-pressure chemical-ionization-mass spectrometry (LC-APCI-MS). Discrimination between post-explosion and naturally degraded PETN could be achieved based on the relative amounts of the degradation products. This information can be used as evidence when investigating a possible relationship between a suspect and a post-explosion crime scene. The present work focuses on accurate quantitation of PETN and its degradation products, using PETriN, PEDiN and PEMN standards specifically synthesized for this purpose. With the use of these standards, the ionization behavior of these compounds was studied, and a quantitative method was developed. Quantitation of PETN and trace levels of its degradation products was shown to be possible with accuracy between 85.7% and 103.7% and a precision ranging from 1.3% to 11.5%. The custom-made standards resulted in a more robust and reliable method to discriminate between post-explosion and naturally-degraded PETN. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Trace determination of 13 haloacetamides in drinking water using liquid chromatography triple quadrupole mass spectrometry with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization.

    PubMed

    Chu, Wenhai; Gao, Naiyun; Yin, Daqiang; Krasner, Stuart W; Templeton, Michael R

    2012-04-27

    The haloacetamides (HAcAms) are disinfection by-products (DBPs) in drinking water which are currently receiving increased scientific attention due to their elevated toxicity relative to regulated disinfection by-products. A simultaneous determination method of 13 HAcAms, combining solid-phase extraction (SPE) enrichment, liquid chromatographic (LC) separation, and triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (tqMS) detection with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) using selective reaction monitoring in positive mode, was developed to measure HAcAms, including chlorinated, brominated, and iodinated analogs. Ammonium chloride and Oasis HLB were selected as the dechlorinating reagent and polymeric SPE sorbent of HAcAm samples. The used tqMS apparatus showed higher sensitivity for the studied HAcAms in the APCI mode than electrospray ionization. 13 HAcAms were separated by LC in 9.0 min, and the detection limits ranged from 7.6 to 19.7 ng/L. The SPE-LC/tqMS method was successfully applied to quantify 13 HAcAms in drinking water samples for the first time, and first indentified tribromoacetamide and chloroiodoacetamide as DBPs in drinking water.

  18. Gas Chromatography Coupled to Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization FT-ICR Mass Spectrometry for Improvement of Data Reliability.

    PubMed

    Schwemer, Theo; Rüger, Christopher P; Sklorz, Martin; Zimmermann, Ralf

    2015-12-15

    Atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) offers the advantage of molecular ion information with low fragmentation. Hyphenating APCI to gas chromatography (GC) and ultrahigh resolution mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS) enables an improved characterization of complex mixtures. Data amounts acquired by this system are very huge, and existing peak picking algorithms are usually extremely time-consuming, if both gas chromatographic and ultrahigh resolution mass spectrometric data are concerned. Therefore, automatic routines are developed that are capable of handling these data sets and further allow the identification and removal of known ionization artifacts (e.g., water- and oxygen-adducts, demethylation, dehydrogenation, and decarboxylation). Furthermore, the data quality is enhanced by the prediction of an estimated retention index, which is calculated simply from exact mass data combined with a double bond equivalent correction. This retention index is used to identify mismatched elemental compositions. The approach was successfully tested for analysis of semivolatile components in heavy fuel oil and diesel fuel as well as primary combustion particles emitted by a ship diesel research engine. As a result, 10-28% of the detected compounds, mainly low abundant species, classically assigned by using only the mass spectrometric information, were identified as not valid and removed. Although GC separation is limited by the slow acquisition rate of the FT-ICR MS (<1 Hz), a database driven retention time comparison, as commonly used for low resolution GC/MS, can be applied for revealing isomeric information.

  19. 49 CFR 173.302b - Additional requirements for shipment of non-liquefied (permanent) compressed gases in UN pressure...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... may the internal pressure at 65 °C (149 °F) exceed the test pressure. (c) Fluorine, compressed, UN 1045 and Oxygen difluoride, compressed, UN 2190. Fluorine, compressed and Oxygen difluoride,...

  20. 49 CFR 173.302b - Additional requirements for shipment of non-liquefied (permanent) compressed gases in UN pressure...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... may the internal pressure at 65 °C (149 °F) exceed the test pressure. (c) Fluorine, compressed, UN 1045 and Oxygen difluoride, compressed, UN 2190. Fluorine, compressed and Oxygen difluoride,...

  1. 49 CFR 173.302b - Additional requirements for shipment of non-liquefied (permanent) compressed gases in UN pressure...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... may the internal pressure at 65 °C (149 °F) exceed the test pressure. (c) Fluorine, compressed, UN 1045 and Oxygen diflouride, compressed, UN 2190. Fluorine, compressed and Oxygen difluoride,...

  2. Hybrid Simulation of Supersonic Flow of Weakly Ionized Plasma along Open Field Magnetic Line Effect of Background Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laosunthara, Ampan; Akatsuka, Hiroshi

    2016-09-01

    In previous study, we experimentally examined physical properties of supersonic flow of weakly ionized expanding arc-jet plasma through an open magnetic field line (Bmax 0.16T). We found supersonic velocity of helium plasma up to Mach 3 and the space potential drop at the end of the magnets. To understand the plasma in numerical point of view, the flows of ion and neutral are treated by particle-based Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method, electron is treated as a fluid. The previous numerical study, we assumed 2 conditions. Ion and electron temperatures were the same (LTE condition). Ion and electron velocities were the same (current-free condition). We found that ion velocity decreased by collision with residual gas molecules (background pressure). We also found that space potential changing with background pressure. In other words, it was indicated that electric field exists and the current-free assumption is not proper. In this study, we add electron continuity and electron momentum equations to obtain electron velocity and space potential. We find that space potential changing with background pressure slightly. It is indicated that electron is essential to space potential formation than ion.

  3. Atmospheric-pressure ionization: New approaches and applications for plasmas in contact with liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Go, D. B.

    2015-10-01

    Historically, gas discharges have been difficult to stabilize at atmospheric pressure, and this has confined them to operation at low pressure under vacuum conditions. However, recent advances in plasma technology have enabled stable high pressure gas discharges up to and even exceeding atmospheric pressure. One significant advantage of operating at atmospheric pressure is that the plasma can be brought into contact with non-conventional substrates, especially soft materials such as plastics, biological tissue, and aqueous solutions. This last example is of prime interest as plasma/liquid interactions have a number of important implications in applications ranging from water purification to plasma medicine. In this paper, recent work studying the impact of electrons in the plasma inducing reactions in aqueous solutions is discussed. These studies include measurements of the bulk solution as the electrons induce long-lived species as well as interfacial measurements directly at the plasma/liquid interface to probe the behaviour of electrons traversing from the plasma into the liquid.

  4. Application of Atmospheric Pressure Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry for Rapid Identification of Neisseria Species

    PubMed Central

    Gudlavalleti, Seshu K.; Sundaram, Appavu K; Razumovski, Jane; Doroshenko, Vladimir

    2008-01-01

    Atmospheric pressure matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (AP-MALDI MS) was applied to develop a proteomics-based method to detect and identify Neisseria species. Heat-inactivated clinical isolate cell suspensions of Neisseria gonorrhoeae and strains belonging to five serogroups (A, B, C, W135, and Y) of Neisseria meningitidis were subjected to on-probe protein/peptide extraction and tryptic digestion followed by AP-MALDI tandem MS (MS/MS)-based proteomic analysis. Amino acid sequences derived from three protonated peptides with m/z values of 1743.8, 1894.8, and 1946.8 were identified by AP-MALDI MS/MS and MASCOT proteome database search analysis as belonging to neisserial acyl carrier protein, neisserial-conserved hypothetical protein, and neisserial putative DNA binding protein, respectively. These three peptide masses can thus be potential biomarkers for neisserial species identification by AP-MALDI MS. PMID:19137107

  5. Laserspray ionization on a commercial atmospheric pressure-MALDI mass spectrometer ion source: selecting singly or multiply charged ions.

    PubMed

    McEwen, Charles N; Larsen, Barbara S; Trimpin, Sarah

    2010-06-15

    Multiply charged ions, similar to those obtained with electrospray ionization, are produced at atmospheric pressure (AP) using standard MALDI conditions of laser fluence and reflective geometry. Further, the charge state can be switched to singly charged ions nearly instantaneously by changing the voltage applied to the MALDI target plate. Under normal AP-MALDI operating conditions in which a voltage is applied to the target plate, primarily singly charged ions are observed, but at or near zero volts, highly charged ions are observed for peptides and proteins. Thus, switching between singly and multiply charged ions requires only manipulation of a single voltage. As in ESI, multiple charging, produced using the AP-MALDI source, allows compounds with molecular weights beyond the mass-to-charge limit of the mass spectrometer to be observed and improves the fragmentation relative to singly charged ions.

  6. Atomic Force Microscopy Thermally-Assisted Microsampling with Atmospheric Pressure Temperature Ramped Thermal Desorption/Ionization-Mass Spectrometry Analysis.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, William D; Kertesz, Vilmos; Srijanto, Bernadeta R; Van Berkel, Gary J

    2017-03-07

    The use of atomic force microscopy controlled nanothermal analysis probes for reproducible spatially resolved thermally assisted sampling of micrometer-sized areas (ca. 11 × 17 μm wide × 2.4 μm deep) from relatively low number-average molecular weight (Mn < 3000) polydisperse thin films of poly(2-vinylpyridine) (P2VP) is presented. Following sampling, the nanothermal analysis probes were moved up from the surface and the probe temperature ramped to liberate the sampled materials into the gas phase for atmospheric pressure chemical ionization and mass spectrometric analysis. The procedure and mechanism for material pickup, the sampling reproducibility and sampling size are discussed, and the oligomer distribution information available from slow temperature ramps versus ballistic temperature jumps is presented. For the Mn = 970 P2VP, the Mn and polydispersity index determined from the mass spectrometric data were in line with both the label values from the sample supplier and the value calculated from the simple infusion of a solution of polymer into the commercial atmospheric pressure chemical ionization source on this mass spectrometer. With a P2VP sample of higher Mn (Mn = 2070 and 2970), intact oligomers were still observed (as high as m/z 2793 corresponding to the 26-mer), but a significant abundance of thermolysis products were also observed. In addition, the capability for confident identification of the individual oligomers by slowly ramping the probe temperature and collecting data-dependent tandem mass spectra was also demonstrated. The material type limits to the current sampling and analysis approach as well as possible improvements in nanothermal analysis probe design to enable smaller area sampling and to enable controlled temperature ramps beyond the present upper limit of about 415 °C are also discussed.

  7. Atomic Force Microscopy Thermally-Assisted Microsampling with Atmospheric Pressure Temperature Ramped Thermal Desorption/Ionization-Mass Spectrometry Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffmann, William D; Kertesz, Vilmos; Srijanto, Bernadeta R; Van Berkel, Gary J

    2017-01-01

    The use of atomic force microscopy controlled nano-thermal analysis probes for reproducible spatially resolved thermally-assisted sampling of micrometer-sized areas (ca. 11 m 17 m wide 2.4 m deep) from relatively low number average molecular weight (Mn < 3000) polydisperse thin films of poly(2-vinylpyridine) (P2VP) is presented. Following sampling, the nano-thermal analysis probes were moved up from the surface and the probe temperature ramped to liberate the sampled materials into the gas phase for atmospheric pressure chemical ionization and mass spectrometric analysis. The procedure and mechanism for material pickup, the sampling reproducibility and sampling size are discussed and the oligomer distribution information available from slow temperature ramps versus ballistic temperature jumps is presented. For the Mn = 970 P2VP, the Mn and polydispersity index determined from the mass spectrometric data were in line with both the label values from the sample supplier and the value calculated from the simple infusion of a solution of polymer into the commercial atmospheric pressure chemical ionization source on this mass spectrometer. With a P2VP sample of higher Mn (Mn = 2070 and 2970), intact oligomers were still observed (as high as m/z 2793 corresponding to the 26-mer), but a significant abundance of thermolysis products were also observed. In addition, the capability for confident identification of the individual oligomers by slowly ramping the probe temperature and collecting data dependent tandem mass spectra was also demonstrated. The material type limits to the current sampling and analysis approach as well as possible improvements in nano-thermal analysis probe design to enable smaller area sampling and to enable controlled temperature ramps beyond the present upper limit of about 415 oC are also discussed.

  8. Atomic Force Microscopy Thermally-Assisted Microsampling with Atmospheric Pressure Temperature Ramped Thermal Desorption/Ionization-Mass Spectrometry Analysis

    DOE PAGES

    Hoffmann, William D.; Kertesz, Vilmos; Srijanto, Bernadeta R.; ...

    2017-02-20

    The use of atomic force microscopy controlled nano-thermal analysis probes for reproducible spatially resolved thermally-assisted sampling of micrometer-sized areas (ca. 11 m 17 m wide 2.4 m deep) from relatively low number average molecular weight (Mn < 3000) polydisperse thin films of poly(2-vinylpyridine) (P2VP) is presented. Following sampling, the nano-thermal analysis probes were moved up from the surface and the probe temperature ramped to liberate the sampled materials into the gas phase for atmospheric pressure chemical ionization and mass spectrometric analysis. Furthermore, the procedure and mechanism for material pickup, the sampling reproducibility and sampling size are discussed and the oligomermore » distribution information available from slow temperature ramps versus ballistic temperature jumps is presented. For the Mn = 970 P2VP, the Mn and polydispersity index determined from the mass spectrometric data were in line with both the label values from the sample supplier and the value calculated from the simple infusion of a solution of polymer into the commercial atmospheric pressure chemical ionization source on this mass spectrometer. With a P2VP sample of higher Mn (Mn = 2070 and 2970), intact oligomers were still observed (as high as m/z 2793 corresponding to the 26-mer), but a significant abundance of thermolysis products were also observed. In addition, the capability for confident identification of the individual oligomers by slowly ramping the probe temperature and collecting data dependent tandem mass spectra was also demonstrated. We also discuss the material type limits to the current sampling and analysis approach as well as possible improvements in nano-thermal analysis probe design to enable smaller area sampling and to enable controlled temperature ramps beyond the present upper limit of about 415°C.« less

  9. Dynamics of ionization processes in high-pressure nitrogen, air, and SF{sub 6} during a subnanosecond breakdown initiated by runaway electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Tarasenko, V. F. Beloplotov, D. V.; Lomaev, M. I.

    2015-10-15

    The dynamics of ionization processes in high-pressure nitrogen, air, and SF{sub 6} during breakdown of a gap with a nonuniform distribution of the electric field by nanosecond high-voltage pulses was studied experimentally. Measurements of the amplitude and temporal characteristics of a diffuse discharge and its radiation with a subnanosecond time resolution have shown that, at any polarity of the electrode with a small curvature radius, breakdown of the gap occurs via two ionization waves, the first of which is initiated by runaway electrons. For a voltage pulse with an ∼500-ps front, UV radiation from different zones of a diffuse discharge is measured with a subnanosecond time resolution. It is shown that the propagation velocity of the first ionization wave increases after its front has passed one-half of the gap, as well as when the pressure in the discharge chamber is reduced and/or when SF{sub 6} is replaced with air or nitrogen. It is found that, at nitrogen pressures of 0.4 and 0.7 MPa and the positive polarity of the high-voltage electrode with a small curvature radius, the ionization wave forms with a larger (∼30 ps) time delay with respect to applying the voltage pulse to the gap than at the negative polarity. The velocity of the second ionization wave propagating from the plane electrode is measured. In a discharge in nitrogen at a pressure of 0.7 MPa, this velocity is found to be ∼10 cm/ns. It is shown that, as the nitrogen pressure increases to 0.7 MPa, the propagation velocity of the front of the first ionization wave at the positive polarity of the electrode with a small curvature radius becomes lower than that at the negative polarity.

  10. Dynamics of ionization processes in high-pressure nitrogen, air, and SF6 during a subnanosecond breakdown initiated by runaway electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasenko, V. F.; Beloplotov, D. V.; Lomaev, M. I.

    2015-10-01

    The dynamics of ionization processes in high-pressure nitrogen, air, and SF6 during breakdown of a gap with a nonuniform distribution of the electric field by nanosecond high-voltage pulses was studied experimentally. Measurements of the amplitude and temporal characteristics of a diffuse discharge and its radiation with a subnanosecond time resolution have shown that, at any polarity of the electrode with a small curvature radius, breakdown of the gap occurs via two ionization waves, the first of which is initiated by runaway electrons. For a voltage pulse with an ˜500-ps front, UV radiation from different zones of a diffuse discharge is measured with a subnanosecond time resolution. It is shown that the propagation velocity of the first ionization wave increases after its front has passed one-half of the gap, as well as when the pressure in the discharge chamber is reduced and/or when SF6 is replaced with air or nitrogen. It is found that, at nitrogen pressures of 0.4 and 0.7 MPa and the positive polarity of the high-voltage electrode with a small curvature radius, the ionization wave forms with a larger (˜30 ps) time delay with respect to applying the voltage pulse to the gap than at the negative polarity. The velocity of the second ionization wave propagating from the plane electrode is measured. In a discharge in nitrogen at a pressure of 0.7 MPa, this velocity is found to be ˜10 cm/ns. It is shown that, as the nitrogen pressure increases to 0.7 MPa, the propagation velocity of the front of the first ionization wave at the positive polarity of the electrode with a small curvature radius becomes lower than that at the negative polarity.

  11. Measurement of neutral gas pressure in the D-module of GAMMA 10/PDX by using ASDEX type fast ionization gauge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichimura, K.; Fukumoto, M.; Islam, M. M.; Islam, M. S.; Shimizu, K.; Fukui, K.; Ohuchi, M.; Nojiri, K.; Terakado, A.; Yoshikawa, M.; Ezumi, N.; Sakamoto, M.; Nakashima, Y.

    2016-11-01

    In the divertor simulation experiments in the GAMMA 10/PDX tandem mirror, pressure of the neutral gas was investigated by using a fast ionization gauge. The gauge was absolutely calibrated for hydrogen gas by using a capacitance manometer. Change of the gauge sensitivity due to the magnetic field of GAMMA 10/PDX was also evaluated. The typical gas pressure measured in detached plasma experiments was 0.1-10 Pa. The degree of plasma detachment determined from the reduction of heat flux was enhanced as the gas pressure increases. Rapid increase of the gas pressure under the plasma flow was also observed.

  12. Capillary electrochromatography-atmospheric pressure ionization mass spectrometry of pesticides using a surfactant-bound monolithic column

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Congying; Shamsi, Shahab A.

    2011-01-01

    A surfactant bound poly (11-acrylaminoundecanoic acid-ethylene dimethacrylate) (AAUA-EDMA) monolithic column was simply prepared by in-situ co-polymerization of AAUA and EDMA with 1-propanol, 1,4-butanediol and water as porogens in 100 µm id fused silica capillary in one step. This column was used in capillary electrochromatography (CEC)-atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI)-mass spectrometry system for separation and detection of N-methylcarbamates (NMCs) pesticides. Numerous parameters are optimized for CEC-APPI-MS. After evaluation of the mobile phase composition, sheath liquid composition and the monolithic capillary outlet position, a fractional factorial design (FFD) was selected as a screening procedure to identify factors of ionization source parameters, such as sheath liquid flow rate, drying gas flow rate, drying gas temperature, nebulizing gas pressure, vaporizer temperature, and capillary voltage, which significantly influence APPI-MS sensitivity. A face-centered central composite design (CCD) was further utilized to optimize the most significant parameters and predict the best sensitivity. Under optimized conditions signal-to-noise ratios (S/N) around 78 were achieved for an injection of 100 ng/mL of each pesticide. Finally, this CEC-APPI-MS method was successfully applied to the analysis of nine NMCs in spiked apple juice sample after solid phase extraction with recoveries in the range of 65 to 109%. PMID:20349511

  13. Are clusters important in understanding the mechanisms in atmospheric pressure ionization? Part 1: Reagent ion generation and chemical control of ion populations.

    PubMed

    Klee, Sonja; Derpmann, Valerie; Wißdorf, Walter; Klopotowski, Sebastian; Kersten, Hendrik; Brockmann, Klaus J; Benter, Thorsten; Albrecht, Sascha; Bruins, Andries P; Dousty, Faezeh; Kauppila, Tiina J; Kostiainen, Risto; O'Brien, Rob; Robb, Damon B; Syage, Jack A

    2014-08-01

    It is well documented since the early days of the development of atmospheric pressure ionization methods, which operate in the gas phase, that cluster ions are ubiquitous. This holds true for atmospheric pressure chemical ionization, as well as for more recent techniques, such as atmospheric pressure photoionization, direct analysis in real time, and many more. In fact, it is well established that cluster ions are the primary carriers of the net charge generated. Nevertheless, cluster ion chemistry has only been sporadically included in the numerous proposed ionization mechanisms leading to charged target analytes, which are often protonated molecules. This paper series, consisting of two parts, attempts to highlight the role of cluster ion chemistry with regard to the generation of analyte ions. In addition, the impact of the changing reaction matrix and the non-thermal collisions of ions en route from the atmospheric pressure ion source to the high vacuum analyzer region are discussed. This work addresses such issues as extent of protonation versus deuteration, the extent of analyte fragmentation, as well as highly variable ionization efficiencies, among others. In Part 1, the nature of the reagent ion generation is examined, as well as the extent of thermodynamic versus kinetic control of the resulting ion population entering the analyzer region.

  14. Direct probe atmospheric pressure photoionization/atmospheric pressure chemical ionization high-resolution mass spectrometry for fast screening of flame retardants and plasticizers in products and waste.

    PubMed

    Ballesteros-Gómez, A; Brandsma, S H; de Boer, J; Leonards, P E G

    2014-04-01

    In this study, we develop fast screening methods for flame retardants and plasticizers in products and waste based on direct probe (DP) atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI) and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) coupled to a high-resolution (HR) time-of-flight mass spectrometer. DP-APPI is reported for the first time in this study, and DP-APCI that has been scarcely exploited is optimized for comparison. DP-APPI was more selective than DP-APCI and also more sensitive for the most hydrophobic compounds. No sample treatment was necessary, and only a minimal amount of sample (few milligrams) was used for analysis that was performed within a few minutes. Both methods were applied to the analysis of plastic products, electronic waste, and car interiors. Polybrominated diphenylethers, new brominated flame retardants, and organophosphorus flame retardants were present in most of the samples. The combination of DP with HR mass spectra and data processing based on mass accuracy and isotopic patterns allowed the unambiguous identification of chemicals at low levels of about 0.025 % (w/w). Under untargeted screening, resorcinol bis(biphenylphosphate) and bisphenol A bis(bisphenylphosphate) were identified in many of the consumer products of which literature data are still very limited.

  15. KINEMATICS AND EXCITATION OF THE RAM PRESSURE STRIPPED IONIZED GAS FILAMENTS IN THE COMA CLUSTER OF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshida, Michitoshi; Yagi, Masafumi; Komiyama, Yutaka; Kashikawa, Nobunari; Furusawa, Hisanori; Hattori, Takashi; Okamura, Sadanori

    2012-04-10

    We present the results of deep imaging and spectroscopic observations of very extended ionized gas (EIG) around four member galaxies of the Coma Cluster of galaxies: RB 199, IC 4040, GMP 2923, and GMP 3071. The EIGs were serendipitously found in an H{alpha} narrowband imaging survey of the central region of the Coma Cluster. The relative radial velocities of the EIGs with respect to the systemic velocities of the parent galaxies from which they emanate increase almost monotonically with the distance from the nucleus of the respective galaxies, reaching {approx} - 400 to - 800 km s{sup -1} at around 40-80 kpc from the galaxies. The one-sided morphologies and the velocity fields of the EIGs are consistent with the predictions of numerical simulations of ram pressure stripping. We found a very low velocity filament (v{sub rel} {approx} -1300 km s{sup -1}) at the southeastern edge of the disk of IC 4040. Some bright compact knots in the EIGs of RB 199 and IC 4040 exhibit blue continuum and strong H{alpha} emission. The equivalent widths of the H{alpha} emission exceed 200 A and are greater than 1000 Angstrom-Sign for some knots. The emission-line intensity ratios of the knots are basically consistent with those of sub-solar abundance H II regions. These facts indicate that intensive star formation occurs in the knots. Some filaments, including the low-velocity filament of the IC 4040 EIG, exhibit shock-like emission-line spectra, suggesting that shock heating plays an important role in ionization and excitation of the EIGs.

  16. Quantitation of ceramides in nude mouse skin by normal-phase liquid chromatography and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Liou, Yi-Bo; Sheu, Ming-Thau; Liu, Der-Zen; Lin, Shan-Yang; Ho, Hsiu-O

    2010-06-01

    A sensitive and accurate normal-phase liquid chromatography and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry (LC-APCI-MS) method for determining the standard ceramide [NS] (Cer[NS]) was developed and validated so as to improve the traditional thin-layer chromatography (TLC) technique and LC-electrospray ionization (ESI)-MS method to profile and quantify ceramides in nude mouse skin. Normal-phase LC-APCI-MS was optimized to separate the nine classes of ceramides presented in the stratum corneum (SC) of nude mouse skin. A normal-phase silica column eluted with the gradient system from heptane:acetone/butanol (90:10, v/v) of 75:25 to 100% acetone/butanol (90:10, v/v) (with each solvent containing 0.1% [v/v] triethylamine and 0.1% [v/v] formic acid) at a flow rate of 0.8 ml/min was found to be optimal for analyzing standard Cer[NS]. The analysis of Cer[NS] was validated and employed as the standard for constructing a calibration curve to quantitate all classes of ceramides. This method was applied to profile the classes and contents of ceramides in the SC of nude mouse skin and proved to be workable. It was concluded that this improved method can be used to directly detect and quantify all classes of ceramides in the SC of nude mouse skin and that it is more convenient and labor-saving than the traditional TLC method.

  17. Automatic sampling and analysis of organics and biomolecules by capillary action-supported contactless atmospheric pressure ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Cheng-Huan; Meher, Anil Kumar; Chen, Yu-Chie

    2013-01-01

    Contactless atmospheric pressure ionization (C-API) method has been recently developed for mass spectrometric analysis. A tapered capillary is used as both the sampling tube and spray emitter in C-API. No electric contact is required on the capillary tip during C-API mass spectrometric analysis. The simple design of the ionization method enables the automation of the C-API sampling system. In this study, we propose an automatic C-API sampling system consisting of a capillary (∼1 cm), an aluminium sample holder, and a movable XY stage for the mass spectrometric analysis of organics and biomolecules. The aluminium sample holder is controlled by the movable XY stage. The outlet of the C-API capillary is placed in front of the orifice of a mass spectrometer, whereas the sample well on the sample holder is moved underneath the capillary inlet. The sample droplet on the well can be readily infused into the C-API capillary through capillary action. When the sample solution reaches the capillary outlet, the sample spray is readily formed in the proximity of the mass spectrometer applied with a high electric field. The gas phase ions generated from the spray can be readily monitored by the mass spectrometer. We demonstrate that six samples can be analyzed in sequence within 3.5 min using this automatic C-API MS setup. Furthermore, the well containing the rinsing solvent is alternately arranged between the sample wells. Therefore, the C-API capillary could be readily flushed between runs. No carryover problems are observed during the analyses. The sample volume required for the C-API MS analysis is minimal, with less than 1 nL of the sample solution being sufficient for analysis. The feasibility of using this setup for quantitative analysis is also demonstrated.

  18. Automatic Sampling and Analysis of Organics and Biomolecules by Capillary Action-Supported Contactless Atmospheric Pressure Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Cheng-Huan; Meher, Anil Kumar; Chen, Yu-Chie

    2013-01-01

    Contactless atmospheric pressure ionization (C-API) method has been recently developed for mass spectrometric analysis. A tapered capillary is used as both the sampling tube and spray emitter in C-API. No electric contact is required on the capillary tip during C-API mass spectrometric analysis. The simple design of the ionization method enables the automation of the C-API sampling system. In this study, we propose an automatic C-API sampling system consisting of a capillary (∼1 cm), an aluminium sample holder, and a movable XY stage for the mass spectrometric analysis of organics and biomolecules. The aluminium sample holder is controlled by the movable XY stage. The outlet of the C-API capillary is placed in front of the orifice of a mass spectrometer, whereas the sample well on the sample holder is moved underneath the capillary inlet. The sample droplet on the well can be readily infused into the C-API capillary through capillary action. When the sample solution reaches the capillary outlet, the sample spray is readily formed in the proximity of the mass spectrometer applied with a high electric field. The gas phase ions generated from the spray can be readily monitored by the mass spectrometer. We demonstrate that six samples can be analyzed in sequence within 3.5 min using this automatic C-API MS setup. Furthermore, the well containing the rinsing solvent is alternately arranged between the sample wells. Therefore, the C-API capillary could be readily flushed between runs. No carryover problems are observed during the analyses. The sample volume required for the C-API MS analysis is minimal, with less than 1 nL of the sample solution being sufficient for analysis. The feasibility of using this setup for quantitative analysis is also demonstrated. PMID:23762484

  19. Qualitative analysis of some carboxylic acids by ion-exclusion chromatography with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometric detection.

    PubMed

    Helale, Murad I H; Tanaka, Kazuhiko; Taoda, Hiroshi; Hu, Wenzhi; Hasebe, Kiyoshi; Haddad, Paul R

    2002-05-17

    A simple, selective and sensitive method for the determination of carboxylic acids has been developed. A mixture of formic, acetic, propionic, valeric, isovaleric, isobutyric, and isocaproic acids has been separated on a polymethacrylate-based weak acidic cation-exchange resin (TSK gel OA pak-A) based on an ion-exclusion chromatographic mechanism with detection using UV-photodiode array, conductivity and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry (APCI-MS). A mobile phase consisting of 0.85 mM benzoic acid in 10% aqueous methanol (pH 3.89) was used to separate the above carboxylic acids in about 40 min. For LC-MS, the APCI interface was used in the negative ionization mode. Linear plots of peak area versus concentration were obtained over the range 1-30 mM (r2=0.9982) and 1-30 mM (r2=0.9958) for conductimetric and MS detection, respectively. The detection limits of the target carboxylic acids calculated at S/N=3 ranged from 0.078 to 2.3 microM for conductimetric and photometric detection and from 0.66 to 3.82 microM for ion-exclusion chromatography-APCI-MS. The reproducibility of retention times was 0.12-0.16% relative standard deviation for ion-exclusion chromatography and 1.21-2.5% for ion-exclusion chromatography-APCI-MS. The method was applied to the determination of carboxylic acids in red wine, white wine, apple vinegar, and Japanese rice wine.

  20. Investigation and Applications of In-Source Oxidation in Liquid Sampling-Atmospheric Pressure Afterglow Microplasma Ionization (LS-APAG) Source.

    PubMed

    Xie, Xiaobo; Wang, Zhenpeng; Li, Yafeng; Zhan, Lingpeng; Nie, Zongxiu

    2016-12-19

    A liquid sampling-atmospheric pressure afterglow microplasma ionization (LS-APAG) source is presented for the first time, which is embedded with both electrospray ionization (ESI) and atmospheric pressure afterglow microplasma ionization (APAG) techniques. This ion source is capable of analyzing compounds with diverse molecule weights and polarities. An unseparated mixture sample was detected as a proof-of-concept, giving complementary information (both polarities and non-polarities) with the two ionization modes. It should also be noted that molecular mass can be quickly identified by ESI with clean and simple spectra, while the structure can be directly studied using APAG with in-source oxidation. The ionization/oxidation mechanism and applications of the LS-APAG source have been further explored in the analysis of nonpolar alkanes and unsaturated fatty acids/esters. A unique [M + O - 3H](+) was observed in the case of individual alkanes (C5-C19) and complex hydrocarbons mixture under optimized conditions. Moreover, branched alkanes generated significant in-source fragments, which could be further applied to the discrimination of isomeric alkanes. The technique also facilitates facile determination of double bond positions in unsaturated fatty acids/esters due to diagnostic fragments (the acid/ester-containing aldehyde and acid oxidation products) generated by on-line ozonolysis in APAG mode. Finally, some examples of in situ APAG analysis by gas sampling and surface sampling were given as well. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  1. Investigation and Applications of In-Source Oxidation in Liquid Sampling-Atmospheric Pressure Afterglow Microplasma Ionization (LS-APAG) Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Xiaobo; Wang, Zhenpeng; Li, Yafeng; Zhan, Lingpeng; Nie, Zongxiu

    2017-06-01

    A liquid sampling-atmospheric pressure afterglow microplasma ionization (LS-APAG) source is presented for the first time, which is embedded with both electrospray ionization (ESI) and atmospheric pressure afterglow microplasma ionization (APAG) techniques. This ion source is capable of analyzing compounds with diverse molecule weights and polarities. An unseparated mixture sample was detected as a proof-of-concept, giving complementary information (both polarities and non-polarities) with the two ionization modes. It should also be noted that molecular mass can be quickly identified by ESI with clean and simple spectra, while the structure can be directly studied using APAG with in-source oxidation. The ionization/oxidation mechanism and applications of the LS-APAG source have been further explored in the analysis of nonpolar alkanes and unsaturated fatty acids/esters. A unique [M + O - 3H]+ was observed in the case of individual alkanes (C5-C19) and complex hydrocarbons mixture under optimized conditions. Moreover, branched alkanes generated significant in-source fragments, which could be further applied to the discrimination of isomeric alkanes. The technique also facilitates facile determination of double bond positions in unsaturated fatty acids/esters due to diagnostic fragments (the acid/ester-containing aldehyde and acid oxidation products) generated by on-line ozonolysis in APAG mode. Finally, some examples of in situ APAG analysis by gas sampling and surface sampling were given as well. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  2. Investigation and Applications of In-Source Oxidation in Liquid Sampling-Atmospheric Pressure Afterglow Microplasma Ionization (LS-APAG) Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Xiaobo; Wang, Zhenpeng; Li, Yafeng; Zhan, Lingpeng; Nie, Zongxiu

    2016-12-01

    A liquid sampling-atmospheric pressure afterglow microplasma ionization (LS-APAG) source is presented for the first time, which is embedded with both electrospray ionization (ESI) and atmospheric pressure afterglow microplasma ionization (APAG) techniques. This ion source is capable of analyzing compounds with diverse molecule weights and polarities. An unseparated mixture sample was detected as a proof-of-concept, giving complementary information (both polarities and non-polarities) with the two ionization modes. It should also be noted that molecular mass can be quickly identified by ESI with clean and simple spectra, while the structure can be directly studied using APAG with in-source oxidation. The ionization/oxidation mechanism and applications of the LS-APAG source have been further explored in the analysis of nonpolar alkanes and unsaturated fatty acids/esters. A unique [M + O - 3H]+ was observed in the case of individual alkanes (C5-C19) and complex hydrocarbons mixture under optimized conditions. Moreover, branched alkanes generated significant in-source fragments, which could be further applied to the discrimination of isomeric alkanes. The technique also facilitates facile determination of double bond positions in unsaturated fatty acids/esters due to diagnostic fragments (the acid/ester-containing aldehyde and acid oxidation products) generated by on-line ozonolysis in APAG mode. Finally, some examples of in situ APAG analysis by gas sampling and surface sampling were given as well.

  3. Stabilization of the ionization overheating thermal instability in atmospheric pressure microplasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Staack, D.; Farouk, B.; Gutsol, A.; Fridman, A.

    2009-07-01

    Stable direct current atmospheric pressure plasmas can regularly be generated in air using microplasma systems, and rapid cooling due to the small size is typically suggested as the thermally stabilizing mechanism. However, temperatures of the stable discharges are significantly higher than ambient, and stable operation is not easily achieved in all gases at similar sizes. Revisiting a traditional analysis of the thermal instability, we find that the inclusion of the simple ballasted external circuit in the analysis leads to additional stabilizing mechanisms. This stabilization occurs in microplasmas due to the characteristic times of the external circuit and the instability being comparable, which allows the electric field to change during the time frame of the instability. Experimentally this is implemented by reducing the stray capacitance of the external circuit. This stabilizing mechanism is verified in several gases and its application in a plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition system leads to a more uniform film deposition.

  4. Three-electrode low pressure discharge apparatus and method for uniform ionization of gaseous media

    DOEpatents

    McLellan, Edward J.

    1983-01-01

    Uniform, transverse electrical discharges are produced in gaseous media without the necessity of switching the main discharge voltage with an external device which carries the entire discharge current. A three-electrode low pressure discharge tube is charged across its anode (1) and cathode (2) to below breakdown voltage using a dc voltage source (3). An array of resistors (4) or capacitors can be made to discharge to the wire screen anode by means of a low energy high voltage pulse circuit (5) producing sufficient preionization in the region between the anode and cathode to initiate and control the main discharge. The invention has been demonstrated to be useful as a CO.sub.2 laser oscillator and pulse-smoother. It can be reliably operated in the sealed-off mode.

  5. Cold-cathode Penning discharge-based ionizer for detection of hyperthermal neutral beams.

    PubMed

    Abolmasov, S N; Samukawa, S

    2007-07-01

    Plasmas produced in a cold-cathode Penning discharge have been studied for possible use as an active ionizing medium in commercial quadrupole mass/energy analyzers for detection of low-energy neutral beams. Two distinct Penning discharge modes have been examined: (1) high-pressure (HP) mode and (2) high magnetic field (HMF) mode. It is shown that the ionization efficiency in the HP mode is independent of the length of ionization region; however, somewhat high working pressures (p>10(-4) Torr) and large discharge currents limit the practical use of this mode. This is not the case in the HMF mode, which appears at lower pressures, with an effective ionization region length of the order of electron cyclotron radius. The design and operation of a compact (5x4x4 cm(3)), low-maintenance ionizer based on a Penning cell with permanent magnets is described. The ability to ionize 40 eV neutral-argon beams with subsequent detection in a Hiden EQP energy-resolved mass spectrometer is shown. The ionization efficiency of the ionizer was found to be as high as 10(-3). Unlike conventional electron impact ionizers, the Penning discharge configuration allows to eliminate the thermal background component in the detected signal. The ionizer has potential application for the detection of hyperthermal neutral beams of various species.

  6. Planar differential mobility spectrometer as a pre-filter for atmospheric pressure ionization mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Bradley B.; Covey, Thomas R.; Coy, Stephen L.; Krylov, Evgeny V.

    2010-01-01

    Ion filters based on planar DMS can be integrated with the inlet configuration of most mass spectrometers, and are able to enhance the quality of mass analysis and quantitative accuracy by reducing chemical noise, and by pre-separating ions of similar mass. This paper is the first in a series of three papers describing the optimization of DMS / MS instrumentation. In this paper the important physical parameters of a planar DMS-MS interface including analyzer geometry, analyzer coupling to a mass spectrometer, and transport gas flow control are considered. The goal is to optimize ion transmission and transport efficiency, provide optimal and adjustable resolution, and produce stable operation under conditions of high sample contamination. We discuss the principles of DMS separations and highlight the theoretical underpinnings. The main differences between planar and cylindrical geometries are presented, including a discussion of the advantages and disadvantages of RF ion focusing. In addition, we present a description of optimization of the frequency and amplitude of the DMS fields for resolution and ion transmission, and a discussion of the influence and importance of ion residence time in DMS. We have constructed a mass spectrometer interface for planar geometries that takes advantage of atmospheric pressure gas dynamic principles, rather than ion focusing, to minimize ion losses from diffusion in the analyzer and to maximize total ion transport into the mass spectrometer. A variety of experimental results has been obtained that illustrate the performance of this type of interface, including tests of resistance to high contamination levels, and the separation of stereoisomers. In a subsequent publication the control of the chemical interactions that drive the separation process of a DMS / MS system will be considered. In a third publication we describe novel electronics designed to provide the high voltages asymmetric waveform fields (SV) required for these

  7. Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry for the Analysis of Selected Emerging Brominated Flame Retardants in Foods.

    PubMed

    Lv, Surong; Niu, Yumin; Zhang, Jing; Shao, Bing; Du, Zhenxia

    2017-03-10

    Emerging brominated flame retardants (eBFRs) other than polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), polybrominated biphenyls (PBBs) and their derivatives in foods have been in focus in recent years due to their increasing production volumes, indefinite information on toxicities and the lack of data on occurrence in environments, foods as well as humans. In this study, gas chromatography was coupled to an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (APGC-MS/MS) for the analysis of six eBFRs in pork, chicken, egg, milk and fish. A short section of unpacked capillary column coupled to the end of the analytical column was applied to improve the chromatographic behaviors of high boiling point compounds. The method was comprehensively validated with method limit of quantification (mLOQ) lower than 8 pg/g wet weight (w.w.). Samples from Chinese Total Diet study were quantified following the validated APGC-MS/MS method. 2,3,4,5-pentabromo-6-ethylbenzene (PBEB), hexabromobenzene (HBB), pentabromotoluene (PBT) and 1,2-bis(2,4,6-tribromophenoxy)ethane (BTBPE) were most frequently detected in samples. The highest concentration was found in fish with 351.9 pg/g w.w. of PBT. This is the first report on the presence of PBT in food samples with non-ignorable concentrations and detection rate.

  8. Self-Aspirated Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization Source for Direct Sampling of Analytes on Surfaces and in Liquid Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Asano, Keiji G; Ford, Michael J; Tomkins, Bruce A; Van Berkel, Gary J

    2005-01-01

    A self-aspirating heated nebulizer probe is described and demonstrated for use in the direct analysis of analytes on surfaces and in liquid samples by atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) mass spectrometry. Functionality and performance of the probe as a self-aspirating APCI source is demonstrated using reserpine and progesterone as test compounds. The utility of the probe to sample analytes directly from surfaces was demonstrated first by scanning development lanes of a reversed-phase thin-layer chromatography plate in which a three-component dye mixture, viz., Fat Red 7B, Solvent Green 3, and Solvent Blue 35, was spotted and the components were separated. Development lanes were scanned by the sampling probe operated under computer control (x, y plane) while full-scan mass spectra were recorded using a quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer. In addition, the ability to sample the surface of pharmaceutical tablets (viz., Extra Strength Tylenol(reg. sign) and Evista(reg. sign) tablets) and to detect the active ingredients (acetaminophen and raloxifene, respectively) selectively was demonstrated using tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). Finally, the capability to sample analyte solutions from the wells of a 384-well microtiter plate and to perform quantitative analyses using MS/MS detection was illustrated with cotinine standards spiked with cotinine-d{sub 3} as an internal standard.

  9. Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry for the Analysis of Selected Emerging Brominated Flame Retardants in Foods

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Surong; Niu, Yumin; Zhang, Jing; Shao, Bing; Du, Zhenxia

    2017-01-01

    Emerging brominated flame retardants (eBFRs) other than polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), polybrominated biphenyls (PBBs) and their derivatives in foods have been in focus in recent years due to their increasing production volumes, indefinite information on toxicities and the lack of data on occurrence in environments, foods as well as humans. In this study, gas chromatography was coupled to an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (APGC-MS/MS) for the analysis of six eBFRs in pork, chicken, egg, milk and fish. A short section of unpacked capillary column coupled to the end of the analytical column was applied to improve the chromatographic behaviors of high boiling point compounds. The method was comprehensively validated with method limit of quantification (mLOQ) lower than 8 pg/g wet weight (w.w.). Samples from Chinese Total Diet study were quantified following the validated APGC-MS/MS method. 2,3,4,5-pentabromo-6-ethylbenzene (PBEB), hexabromobenzene (HBB), pentabromotoluene (PBT) and 1,2-bis(2,4,6-tribromophenoxy)ethane (BTBPE) were most frequently detected in samples. The highest concentration was found in fish with 351.9 pg/g w.w. of PBT. This is the first report on the presence of PBT in food samples with non-ignorable concentrations and detection rate. PMID:28281659

  10. Feasibility of desorption atmospheric pressure photoionization and desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry to monitor urinary steroid metabolites during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Vaikkinen, Anu; Rejšek, Jan; Vrkoslav, Vladimír; Kauppila, Tiina J; Cvačka, Josef; Kostiainen, Risto

    2015-06-23

    Steroids have important roles in the progress of pregnancy, and their study in maternal urine is a non-invasive method to monitor the steroid metabolome and its possible abnormalities. However, the current screening techniques of choice, namely immunoassays and gas and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, do not offer means for the rapid and non-targeted multi-analyte studies of large sample sets. In this study, we explore the feasibility of two ambient mass spectrometry methods in steroid fingerprinting. Urine samples from pregnant women were screened by desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) and desorption atmospheric pressure photoionization (DAPPI) Orbitrap high resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS). The urine samples were processed by solid phase extraction for the DESI measurements and by enzymatic hydrolysis and liquid-liquid-extraction for DAPPI. Consequently, steroid glucuronides and sulfates were detected by negative ion mode DESI-HRMS, and free steroids by positive ion mode DAPPI-HRMS. In DESI, signals of eleven steroid metabolite ions were found to increase as the pregnancy proceeded, and in DAPPI ten steroid ions showed at least an order of magnitude increase during pregnancy. In DESI, the increase was seen for ions corresponding to C18 and C21 steroid glucuronides, while DAPPI detected increased excretion of C19 and C21 steroids. Thus both techniques show promise for the steroid marker screening in pregnancy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Desorption electrospray ionization-mass spectrometric analysis of low vapor pressure chemical particulates collected from a surface.

    PubMed

    Ewing, K J; Gibson, D; Sanghera, J; Miklos, F

    2015-01-01

    The collection of a low vapor pressure chemical simulant triethyl phosphate sorbed onto silica gel (TEP/SG) from a surface with subsequent analysis of the TEP/SG particulates using desorption electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (DESI-MS) is described. Collection of TEP/SG particulates on a surface was accomplished using a sticky screen sampler composed of a stainless steel screen coated with partially polymerized polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). DESI-MS analysis of TEP/SG particulates containing different percentages of TEP sorbed onto silica gel enabled the generation of response curves for the TEP ions m/z 155 and m/z 127. Using the response curves the calculation of the mass of TEP in a 25 wt% sample of TEP/SG was calculated, results show that the calculated mass of TEP was 14% different from the actual mass of TEP in the sample using the m/z 127 TEP ion response curve. Detection limits for the TEP vapor and TEP/SG particulates were calculated to be 4 μg and 6 particles, respectively.

  12. Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry for the Analysis of Selected Emerging Brominated Flame Retardants in Foods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Surong; Niu, Yumin; Zhang, Jing; Shao, Bing; Du, Zhenxia

    2017-03-01

    Emerging brominated flame retardants (eBFRs) other than polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), polybrominated biphenyls (PBBs) and their derivatives in foods have been in focus in recent years due to their increasing production volumes, indefinite information on toxicities and the lack of data on occurrence in environments, foods as well as humans. In this study, gas chromatography was coupled to an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (APGC-MS/MS) for the analysis of six eBFRs in pork, chicken, egg, milk and fish. A short section of unpacked capillary column coupled to the end of the analytical column was applied to improve the chromatographic behaviors of high boiling point compounds. The method was comprehensively validated with method limit of quantification (mLOQ) lower than 8 pg/g wet weight (w.w.). Samples from Chinese Total Diet study were quantified following the validated APGC-MS/MS method. 2,3,4,5-pentabromo-6-ethylbenzene (PBEB), hexabromobenzene (HBB), pentabromotoluene (PBT) and 1,2-bis(2,4,6-tribromophenoxy)ethane (BTBPE) were most frequently detected in samples. The highest concentration was found in fish with 351.9 pg/g w.w. of PBT. This is the first report on the presence of PBT in food samples with non-ignorable concentrations and detection rate.

  13. Analysis of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons using desorption atmospheric pressure chemical ionization coupled to a portable mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Jjunju, Fred P M; Maher, Simon; Li, Anyin; Badu-Tawiah, Abraham K; Taylor, Stephen; Cooks, R Graham

    2015-02-01

    Desorption atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (DAPCI) is implemented on a portable mass spectrometer and applied to the direct detection of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and alkyl substituted benzenes. The presence of these compounds in the environment poses a significant threat to the health of both humans and wildlife because of their carcinogenic, toxic, and mutagenic properties. As such, instant detection outside of the laboratory is of particular importance to allow in-situ measurement at the source. Using a rapid, high throughput, miniature, handheld mass spectrometer, several alkyl substituted benzenes and PAHs (i.e., 1,2,3,5-tetramethylbenzene, pentamethylbenzene, hexamethylbenzene, fluoranthene, anthracene, benzo[k]fluoranthene, dibenz[a,h]anthracene, acenaphthene, indeno[1,2,3-c,d]pyrene, 9-ethylfluorene, and 1-benzyl-3-methyl-naphthalene) were identified and characterized using tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) from ambient surfaces, in the open air. This method can provide almost instantaneous information while minimizing sample preparation, which is advantageous in terms of both cost and simplicity of analysis. This MS-based technique is applicable to a wide range of environmental organic molecules.

  14. Molecular differentiation of five Cinnamomum camphora chemotypes using desorption atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry of raw leaves.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiali; Cui, Meng; Deng, Min; Liu, Xingxing; Huang, Xueyong; Zhang, Xinglei; Luo, Liping

    2017-04-20

    Five chemotypes, the isoborneol-type, camphora-type, cineole-type, linalool-type and borneol-type of Cinnamomum camphora (L.) Presl have been identified at the molecular level based on the multivariate analysis of mass spectral fingerprints recorded from a total of 750 raw leaf samples (i.e., 150 leaves equally collected for each chemotype) using desorption atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry (DAPCI-MS). Both volatile and semi-volatile metabolites of the fresh leaves of C. camphora were simultaneously detected by DAPCI-MS without any sample pretreatment, reducing the analysis time from half a day using conventional methods (e.g., GC-MS) down to 30 s. The pattern recognition results obtained using principal component analysis (PCA) was cross-checked by cluster analysis (CA), showing that the difference visualized by the DAPCI-MS spectral fingerprints was validated with 100% accuracy. The study demonstrates that DAPCI-MS meets the challenging requirements for accurate differentiation of all the five chemotypes of C. camphora leaves, motivating more advanced application of DAPCI-MS in plant science and forestry studies.

  15. Molecular differentiation of five Cinnamomum camphora chemotypes using desorption atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry of raw leaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Xiali; Cui, Meng; Deng, Min; Liu, Xingxing; Huang, Xueyong; Zhang, Xinglei; Luo, Liping

    2017-04-01

    Five chemotypes, the isoborneol-type, camphora-type, cineole-type, linalool-type and borneol-type of Cinnamomum camphora (L.) Presl have been identified at the molecular level based on the multivariate analysis of mass spectral fingerprints recorded from a total of 750 raw leaf samples (i.e., 150 leaves equally collected for each chemotype) using desorption atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry (DAPCI-MS). Both volatile and semi-volatile metabolites of the fresh leaves of C. camphora were simultaneously detected by DAPCI-MS without any sample pretreatment, reducing the analysis time from half a day using conventional methods (e.g., GC-MS) down to 30 s. The pattern recognition results obtained using principal component analysis (PCA) was cross-checked by cluster analysis (CA), showing that the difference visualized by the DAPCI-MS spectral fingerprints was validated with 100% accuracy. The study demonstrates that DAPCI-MS meets the challenging requirements for accurate differentiation of all the five chemotypes of C. camphora leaves, motivating more advanced application of DAPCI-MS in plant science and forestry studies.

  16. Determination and characterization of organic explosives using porous graphitic carbon and liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Holmgren, Erik; Carlsson, Håkan; Goede, Patrick; Crescenzi, Carlo

    2005-12-16

    A new LC-MS method for the determination and characterization of three groups of commonly used organic explosives (nitroaromatic compounds, cyclic nitroamines and nitrate esters) was developed using a porous graphitic carbon (PGC) (Hypercarb) column. Twenty-one different explosive-related compounds--including 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene, its by-products and its degradation products--were chromatographically separated in a single analysis. This efficient separation facilitates the identification of the manufacturer of the explosive using the identified analytes as a fingerprint. A final, conclusive identification of the analytes can be obtained using LC-MS equipped with an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) interface. Solvent effects on chromatographic behaviour were investigated, as were the effects of solvent mixtures and mobile phase additives. The number and the relative positions of the nitro groups within analyte molecules influence their order of elution; these effects were investigated. The data thus generated can be interpreted to support a hypothesis concerning the retention mechanism of nitro-containing compounds when using PGC. Limits of detection ranged from 0.5 to 41.2 ng. The new methodology described herein improves the sensitivity and selectivity of explosive detection. The effectiveness of the method is demonstrated by the analysis of soil samples containing explosives residue from test fields in Sweden and Afghanistan.

  17. A novel method for analyzing solanesyl esters in tobacco leaves using atmospheric pressure chemical ionization/mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Naoyuki

    2010-09-10

    A direct and simple method for analyzing solanesyl esters found in tobacco leaves was developed. Sample preparation was performed by accelerated solvent extractor 200 (ASE200) using n-hexane followed by evaporating solution in vacuo and dissolving residue with acetone. The separation of analytes was conducted through high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) equipped with an SIL-C18/5C column and the non-aqueous reversed phase chromatography (NARP) technique using acetone and acetonitrile as the mobile phase with a linear gradient. Atmospheric pressure chemical ionization/mass spectrometer (APCI/MS) in positive mode was used to detect solanesyl esters in the following conditions: capillary voltage 4000 V, corona current 10 microA, drying gas flow 5 mL/min, fragmentor voltage 200 V, nebulizer pressure 60 psi, and vaporizer temperature 500 degrees C. Each solanesyl ester was identified by the comparison of analyte with synthesized solanesyl esters. Quantification was conducted by selected ion monitoring (SIM) mode in order to detect the specific product ion (613.6 m/z) fragmented from solanesyl ester. The calibration curve was made in the range of 0.1-40 microg/mL with a regression coefficient over 0.999 on almost all solanesyl esters. The limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantification (LOQ) ranged from 0.01 to 0.05 microg/mL and from 0.03 to 0.15 microg/mL, respectively, on the SIM mode of MS for quantification. Recovery (%) ranged from about 80 to 120%. The direct quantification using the developed method succeeded in showing a different amount and composition of solanesyl esters among various tobacco leaves.

  18. Analysis of lipids with desorption atmospheric pressure photoionization-mass spectrometry (DAPPI-MS) and desorption electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (DESI-MS).

    PubMed

    Suni, Niina M; Aalto, Henni; Kauppila, Tiina J; Kotiaho, Tapio; Kostiainen, Risto

    2012-05-01

    In this article, the effect of spray solvent on the analysis of selected lipids including fatty acids, fat-soluble vitamins, triacylglycerols, steroids, phospholipids, and sphingolipids has been studied by two different ambient mass spectrometry (MS) methods, desorption electrospray ionization-MS (DESI-MS) and desorption atmospheric pressure photoionization-MS (DAPPI-MS). The ionization of the lipids with DESI and DAPPI was strongly dependent on the spray solvent. In most cases, the lipids were detected as protonated or deprotonated molecules; however, other ions were also formed, such as adduct ions (in DESI), [M-H](+) ions (in DESI and DAPPI), radical ions (in DAPPI), and abundant oxidation products (in DESI and DAPPI). DAPPI provided efficient desorption and ionization for neutral and less polar as well as for ionic lipids but caused extensive fragmentation for larger and more labile compounds because of a thermal desorption process. DESI was more suitable for the analysis of the large and labile lipids, but the ionization efficiency for less polar lipids was poor. Both methods were successfully applied to the direct analysis of lipids from pharmaceutical and food products. Although DESI and DAPPI provide efficient analysis of lipids, the multiple and largely unpredictable ionization reactions may set challenges for routine lipid analysis with these methods. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Stability studies of propoxur herbicide in environmental water samples by liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization ion-trap mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lei; Lee, Hian Kee

    2003-10-03

    Liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure ionization ion-trap mass spectrometry has been investigated for the analysis of polar pesticides in water. The degradation behavior of propoxur, selected as a model pesticide belonging to the N-methylcarbamate group, in various aqueous matrices (Milli-Q water, drinking water, rain water, seawater and river water) was investigated. Two interfaces of atmospheric pressure ionization, atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) and electrospray ionization (ESI), were compared during the study. Propoxur and its transformation product (N-methylformamide) were best ionized as positive ions with both APCI and ESI, while another transformation product (2-isopropoxyphenol) yielded stronger signals as negative ions only with APCI. In addition, the effects of various pH, matrix type and irradiation sources (sunlight, darkness, indoor lighting and artificial UV lamp) on the chemical degradation (hydrolysis) were also assessed. From the kinetic studies of degradation, it was found that the half-life of propoxur was reduced from 327 to 161 h in Milli-Q water with variation of irradiation conditions from dark to sunlight exposure. Degradation rates largely increased with increasing pH. The half-life of the target compound dissolved in Milli-Q water under darkness decreased from 407 to 3 h when the pH of Milli-Q water was increased from 5 to 8.5. These suggest that hydrolysis of propoxur is light-intensity and pH-dependent. In order to mimic contaminated natural environmental waters, propoxur was spiked into real water samples at 30 microg/l. The degradation of propoxur in such water samples under various conditions were studied in detail and compared. With the ion trap run in a time-scheduled single ion monitoring mode, typical limits of detection of the instrument were in the range of 1-10 microg/l.

  20. Characterization and quantification of triacylglycerols in peanut oil by off-line comprehensive two-dimensional liquid chromatography coupled with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jun; Wei, Fang; Dong, Xu-Yan; Lv, Xin; Jiang, Mu-Lan; Li, Guang-Ming; Chen, Hong

    2013-01-01

    The complexity of natural triacylglycerols (TAGs) in various edible oils is prodigious due to the hundreds of set is of TAG compositions, which makes the identification of TAGs quite difficult. In this investigation, the off-line 2D system coupling of nonaqueous RP and silver-ion HPLC with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization MS detection has been applied to the identification and quantification of TAGs in peanut oil. The method was successful in the separation of a high number of TAG solutes, and the TAG structures were evaluated by analyzing their atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectra information. HPLC and MS conditions have been optimized and the fragmentation mechanisms of isomers have been validated. In addition, an internal standard approach has been developed for TAG quantification. Then this system was applied in peanut oil samples and there was a total of 48 TAGs including regioisomers that have been determined and quantified.

  1. Analysis of gaseous toxic industrial compounds and chemical warfare agent simulants by atmospheric pressure ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Cotte-Rodríguez, Ismael; Justes, Dina R; Nanita, Sergio C; Noll, Robert J; Mulligan, Christopher C; Sanders, Nathaniel L; Cooks, R Graham

    2006-04-01

    The suitability of atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry as sensing instrumentation for the real-time monitoring of low levels of toxic compounds is assessed, especially with respect to public safety applications. Gaseous samples of nine toxic industrial compounds, NH3, H2S, Cl2, CS2, SO2, C2H4O, HBr, C6H6 and AsH3, and two chemical warfare agent simulants, dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP) and methyl salicylate (MeS), were studied. API-MS proves highly suited to this application, with speedy analysis times (<30 seconds), high sensitivity, high selectivity towards analytes, good precision, dynamic range and accuracy. Tandem MS methods were implemented in selected cases for improved selectivity, sensitivity, and limits of detection. Limits of detection in the parts-per-billion and parts-per-trillion range were achieved for this set of analytes. In all cases detection limits were well below the compounds' permissible exposure limits (PELs), even in the presence of added complex mixtures of alkanes. Linear responses, up to several orders of magnitude, were obtained over the concentration ranges studied (sub-ppb to ppm), with relative standard deviations less than 3%, regardless of the presence of alkane interferents. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves are presented to show the performance trade-off between sensitivity, probability of correct detection, and false positive rate. A dynamic sample preparation system for the production of gas phase analyte concentrations ranging from 100 pptr to 100 ppm and capable of admixing gaseous matrix compounds and control of relative humidity and temperature is also described.

  2. Atmospheric pressure matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization as a plume diagnostic tool in laser evaporation methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callahan, John H.; Galicia, Marsha C.; Vertes, Akos

    2002-09-01

    Laser evaporation techniques, including matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE), are attracting increasing attention due to their ability to deposit thin layers of undegraded synthetic and biopolymers. Laser evaporation methods can be implemented in reflection geometry with the laser and the substrate positioned on the same side of the target. In some applications (e.g. direct write, DW), however, transmission geometry is used, i.e. the thin target is placed between the laser and the substrate. In this case, the laser pulse perforates the target and transfers some target material to the substrate. In order to optimize evaporation processes it is important to know the composition of the target plume and the material deposited from the plume. We used a recently introduced analytical method, atmospheric pressure matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (AP-MALDI) to characterize the ionic components of the plume both in reflection and in transmission geometry. This technique can also be used to directly probe materials deposited on surfaces (such as glass slides) by laser evaporation methods. The test compound (small peptides, e.g. Angiotensin I, ATI or Substance P) was mixed with a MALDI matrix (α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid (CHCA), sinapinic acid (SA) or 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHB)) and applied to the stainless steel (reflection geometry) or transparent conducting (transmission geometry) target holder. In addition to the classical dried droplet method, we also used electrospray target deposition to gain better control of crystallite size, thickness and homogeneity. The target was mounted in front of the inlet orifice of an ion trap mass spectrometer (IT-MS) that sampled the ionic components of the plume generated by a nitrogen laser. We studied the effect of several parameters, such as, the orifice to target distance, illumination geometry, extracting voltage distribution and sample preparation on the generated ions. Various analyte-matrix and

  3. Group additivity calculation of the standard molal thermodynamic properties of aqueous amino acids, polypeptides and unfolded proteins as a function of temperature, pressure and ionization state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dick, J. M.; Larowe, D. E.; Helgeson, H. C.

    2005-10-01

    Thermodynamic calculation of the chemical speciation of proteins and the limits of protein metastability affords a quantitative understanding of the biogeochemical constraints on the distribution of proteins within and among different organisms and chemical environments. These calculations depend on accurate determination of the ionization states and standard molal Gibbs free energies of proteins as a function of temperature and pressure, which are not generally available. Hence, to aid predictions of the standard molal thermodynamic properties of ionized proteins as a function of temperature and pressure, calculated values are given below of the standard molal thermodynamic properties at 25°C and 1 bar and the revised Helgeson-Kirkham-Flowers equations of state parameters of the structural groups comprising amino acids, polypeptides and unfolded proteins. Group additivity and correlation algorithms were used to calculate contributions by ionized and neutral sidechain and backbone groups to the standard molal Gibbs free energy (Δ G°), enthalpy (Δ H°), entropy (S°), isobaric heat capacity (C°P), volume (V°) and isothermal compressibility (κ°T) of multiple reference model compounds. Experimental values of C°P, V° and κ°T at high temperature were taken from the recent literature, which ensures an internally consistent revision of the thermodynamic properties and equations of state parameters of the sidechain and backbone groups of proteins, as well as organic groups. As a result, Δ G°, Δ H°, S° C°P, V° and κ°T of unfolded proteins in any ionization state can be calculated up to T~-300°C and P~-5000 bars. In addition, the ionization states of unfolded proteins as a function of not only pH, but also temperature and pressure can be calculated by taking account of the degree of ionization of the sidechain and backbone groups present in the sequence. Calculations of this kind represent a first step in the prediction of chemical affinities of many

  4. Temperature, pressure, and electrochemical constraints on protein speciation: Group additivity calculation of the standard molal thermodynamic properties of ionized unfolded proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dick, J. M.; Larowe, D. E.; Helgeson, H. C.

    2006-07-01

    Thermodynamic calculations can be used to quantify environmental constraints on the speciation of proteins, such as the pH and temperature dependence of ionization state, and the relative chemical stabilities of proteins in different biogeochemical settings. These calculations depend in part on values of the standard molal Gibbs energies of proteins and their ionization reactions as a function of temperature and pressure. Because these values are not generally available, we calculated values of the standard molal thermodynamic properties at 25°C and 1 bar as well as the revised Helgeson-Kirkham-Flowers equations of state parameters of neutral and charged zwitterionic reference model compounds including aqueous amino acids, polypeptides, and unfolded proteins. The experimental calorimetric and volumetric data for these species taken from the literature were combined with group additivity algorithms to calculate the properties and parameters of neutral and ionized sidechain and backbone groups in unfolded proteins. The resulting set of group contributions enables the calculation of the standard molal Gibbs energy, enthalpy, entropy, isobaric heat capacity, volume, and isothermal compressibility of unfolded proteins in a range of proton ionization states to temperatures and pressures exceeding 100°C and 1000 bar. This approach provides a useful frame of reference for thermodynamic studies of protein folding and complexation reactions. It can also be used to assign provisional values of the net charge and Gibbs energy of ionized proteins as a function of temperature and pH. Using these values, an Eh-pH diagram for a reaction representing the speciation of extracellular proteins from Pyrococcus furiosus and Bacillus subtilis was generated. The predicted predominance limits of these proteins correspond with the different electrochemical conditions of hydrothermal vents and soils. More comprehensive calculations of this kind may reveal pervasive chemical potential

  5. Photo-ionization cross-section of donor-related in (In,Ga)N/GaN core/shell under hydrostatic pressure and electric field effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Ghazi, Haddou; John Peter, A.

    2017-04-01

    Hydrogenic-like donor-impurity related self and induced polarizations, bending energy and photo-ionization cross section in spherical core/shell zinc blende (In,Ga)N/GaN are computed. Based on the variational approach and within effective-mass and one parabolic approximations, the calculations are made under finite potential barrier taking into account of the discontinuity of the effective-mass and the constant dielectric. The photo-ionization cross section is studied according to the photon incident energy considering the effects of hydrostatic pressure, applied electric field, structure's radius, impurity's position and indium composition in the core. It is obtained that the influences mentioned above lead to either blue shifts or redshifts of the resonant peak of the photo-ionization cross section spectrum. The unusual behavior related to the structure radius is discussed which is as a consequence of the finite potential confinement. We have shown that the photo-ionization cross section can be controlled with adjusting the internal and external factors. These properties can be useful for producing some device applications such as quantum dot infrared photodetectors.

  6. Characterization of the atmospheric pressure ionization mass spectrometric process obtained using a fused-silica emitter with the high voltage applied upstream

    PubMed

    Sjoberg; Nyholm; Markides

    2000-03-01

    The atmospheric pressure ionization process obtained when a mixture of methanol and water (90:10, v/v) also containing 50 microM sodium hydroxide is dispersed from a fused-silica emitter was studied. A combination of a high electric field and a nebulizer gas with the high voltage applied upstream in the liquid flow was utilized to facilitate the spray process. By comparing the dependences of the spray current and ion signals on the spray potential, it was found that electrical corona discharges were obtained for potentials higher than about 2.6 kV, which resulted in a mixed electrospray and chemical ionization process. By introducing vapour from a solvent, such as benzene or toluene, with a low ionization energy into the nebulizing gas, it was found that the appearance of the corresponding molecular ion was correlated with a change in the slope of the spray current-potential curve. This indicates that the breakpoints in the spray current-potential curves observed were correlated with the onsets of corona discharges. It was shown that the mixed ionization process gives rise to increased amounts of protonated solvent molecules and assists in the formation of sodiated adduct ions from an uncharged fatty acid methyl ester.

  7. The effect of dielectric tube diameter on the propagation velocity of ionization waves in a He atmospheric-pressure micro-plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talviste, Rasmus; Jõgi, Indrek; Raud, Jüri; Paris, Peeter

    2016-05-01

    The focus of this study was to investigate the effect of the dielectric tube diameter on the velocity of the ionization wave in an atmospheric pressure plasma jet in He gas flow. Plasma was ignited in quartz tubes with inner diameter in the range of 80-500 μm by 6 kHz sinusoidal voltage applied to a cylindrical electrode surrounding the quartz tube and positioned 10 mm from the tube orifice. A grounded plane was placed 2-3 cm downstream from the powered electrode to measure the plasma current. The spatial development of ionization waves was monitored by registering the optical emission along the axis of the tube. The ionization wave velocity was deduced from the temporal shift of the onset of radiation at different axial positions. The velocity of ionization wave increased by almost an order of magnitude with the tube diameter decreasing from 500 to 80 μm and was for the 80 μm microtube 1.7 · 105 m s-1 during the positive half-cycle and 1.45 · 105 m s-1 during the negative half-cycle.

  8. Measurement of scintillation and ionization yield with high-pressure gaseous mixtures of Xe and TMA for improved neutrinoless double beta decay and dark matter searches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, Y.; Goldschmidt, A.; Matis, H. S.; Nygren, D.; Oliveira, C.; Renner, J.

    2015-11-01

    Liquid Xe TPCs are among the most popular choices for double beta decay and WIMP dark matter searches. Gaseous Xe has intrinsic advantages when compared to Liquid Xe, specifically, tracking capability and better energy resolution for double beta decay searches. The performance of gaseous Xe can be further improved by molecular additives such as trimethylamine(TMA), which are expected to (1) cool down the ionization electrons, (2) convert Xe excitation energy to TMA ionizations through Penning transfer, and (3) produce scintillation and electroluminescence light in a more easily detectable wavelength (300 nm). These features may provide better tracking and energy resolution for double-beta decay searches. They are also expected to enhance columnar recombination for nuclear recoils, which can be used for searches for WIMP dark matter with directional sensitivity. We constructed a test ionization chamber and successfully measured scintillation and ionization yields at high precision with various Xe and TMA mixtures and pressures. We observed the Penning effect and an increase in recombination with the addition of TMA. However, many undesired features for dark matter searches, such as strong suppression of the scintillation light and no sign of recombination light, were also found. This work has been carried out within the context of the NEXT collaboration.

  9. Simultaneous measurement of nitric oxide (NO) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) in simulated automobile exhaust using medium pressure ionization-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Short, Luke Chandler; Frey, Rüdiger; Benter, Thorsten

    2006-02-01

    In previous papers we have demonstrated two different, two-color resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) schemes for the simultaneous measurement of trace amounts (ppbV to pptV) of nitrogen monoxide (NO) and nitrogen dioxide (NO(2)). The goal of this study is to provide a laser ionization-mass spectrometric scheme capable of measuring ppmV to ppthV concentrations of NO and NO(2) within vehicle exhaust containing up to ppthV of aromatic hydrocarbons and a time frame of seconds. Two ionization schemes are used here to measure NO and NO(2) in simulated automobile exhaust with three different sources. REMPI Scheme 1 uses broad-bandwidth light and an effusive source to measure NO (limit of detection (LOD) 300 ppmV), NO(2) (LOD 100 ppmV), and aromatic hydrocarbons (via photoionization) along with fragments (via electron impact). REMPI Scheme 2 uses narrow-bandwidth light and a medium pressure laser ionization (MPLI) source to measure NO (LOD 60 ppmV), NO(2) (LOD 3 ppmV), and fragments (via electron impact). The LOD is determined using 10-second sampling times. A newly developed delayed-ion extraction technique for MPLI is then applied to REMPI Scheme 2, dramatically reducing the electron impact signal, so that only NO and NO(2) are observed. We conclude that Scheme 2 with delayed-electron extraction is best suited for measuring in situ NO and NO(2) within engine exhaust.

  10. Evaluation of gas chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-mass spectrometry as an alternative to gas chromatography-electron ionization-mass spectrometry: avocado fruit as example.

    PubMed

    Hurtado-Fernández, Elena; Pacchiarotta, Tiziana; Longueira-Suárez, Enrique; Mayboroda, Oleg A; Fernández-Gutiérrez, Alberto; Carrasco-Pancorbo, Alegría

    2013-10-25

    Although GC-APCI-MS was developed more than 40 years ago this coupling is still far from being a routine technique. One of the reasons explaining the limited use of GC-APCI so far is the lack of spectral database which facilitates the identification of the compounds under study. The first application of a very recently developed GC-APCI database to identify as many compounds as possible in a complex matrix such as avocado fruit is presented here. The results achieved by using this database has been checked against those obtained using traditional GC-EI-MS and a comparison of the MS signals observed in both ionization sources has been carried out. 100 compounds belonging to different chemical families were identified in the matrix under study. Considering the results of this study, the wide range of application (in terms of polarity and size of analytes) and the robustness of APCI as interface, the high quality of TOF spectra, and our library as a publicly available resource, GC-APCI-TOF MS is definitively a valuable addition to the "metabolomics toolbox". Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Pressurized H2 rf Cavities in Ionizing Beams and Magnetic Fields

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, M.; Collura, M. G.; Flanagan, G.; Freemire, B.; Hanlet, P. M.; Jana, M. R.; Johnson, R. P.; Kaplan, D. M.; Leonova, M.; Moretti, A.; Popovic, M.; Schwarz, T.; Tollestrup, A.; Torun, Y.; Yonehara, K.

    2013-10-01

    A major technological challenge in building a muon cooling channel is operating RF cavities in multi-tesla external magnetic fields. We report the first experimental characterization of a high pressure gas-filled 805 MHz RF cavity for use with intense ionizing beams and strong external magnetic fields. RF power consumption by beam-induced plasma was investigated with hydrogen and deuterium gases with pressures between 20 and 100 atm and peak RF gradients between 5 and 50 MV/m. The energy absorption per ion pair-RF cycle ranges from 10-18 to 10-16 J. The low pressure case agrees well with an analytical model based on electron and ion mobilities. Varying concentrations of oxygen gas were investigated to remove free electrons from the cavity and reduce the RF power consumption. Measurements of the electron attachment time to oxygen and rate of ion-ion recombination were also made. Additionally, we demonstrate the operation of the gas-filled RF cavity in a solenoidal field of up to 3 T, finding no major magnetic field dependence. These results indicate that a high pressure gas-filled cavity is potentially a viable technology for muon ionization cooling.

  12. Gas Chromatography/Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization-Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry of Pyrolysis Oil from German Brown Coal

    PubMed Central

    Zuber, Jan; Kroll, Marius M.; Rathsack, Philipp; Otto, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Pyrolysis oil from the slow pyrolysis of German brown coal from Schöningen, obtained at a temperature of 500°C, was separated and analyzed using hyphenation of gas chromatography with an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization source operated in negative ion mode and Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (GC-APCI-FT-ICR-MS). Development of this ultrahigh-resolving analysis method is described, that is, optimization of specific GC and APCI parameters and performed data processing. The advantages of GC-APCI-FT-ICR-MS hyphenation, for example, soft ionization, ultrahigh-resolving detection, and most important isomer separation, were demonstrated for the sample liquid. For instance, it was possible to separate and identify nine different propylphenol, ethylmethylphenol, and trimethylphenol isomers. Furthermore, homologous series of different acids, for example, alkyl and alkylene carboxylic acids, were verified, as well as homologous series of alkyl phenols, alkyl dihydroxy benzenes, and alkoxy alkyl phenols. PMID:27066076

  13. Gas Chromatography/Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization-Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry of Pyrolysis Oil from German Brown Coal.

    PubMed

    Zuber, Jan; Kroll, Marius M; Rathsack, Philipp; Otto, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Pyrolysis oil from the slow pyrolysis of German brown coal from Schöningen, obtained at a temperature of 500°C, was separated and analyzed using hyphenation of gas chromatography with an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization source operated in negative ion mode and Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (GC-APCI-FT-ICR-MS). Development of this ultrahigh-resolving analysis method is described, that is, optimization of specific GC and APCI parameters and performed data processing. The advantages of GC-APCI-FT-ICR-MS hyphenation, for example, soft ionization, ultrahigh-resolving detection, and most important isomer separation, were demonstrated for the sample liquid. For instance, it was possible to separate and identify nine different propylphenol, ethylmethylphenol, and trimethylphenol isomers. Furthermore, homologous series of different acids, for example, alkyl and alkylene carboxylic acids, were verified, as well as homologous series of alkyl phenols, alkyl dihydroxy benzenes, and alkoxy alkyl phenols.

  14. Sensitive monitoring of volatile chemical warfare agents in air by atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry with counter-flow introduction.

    PubMed

    Seto, Yasuo; Kanamori-Kataoka, Mieko; Tsuge, Koichiro; Ohsawa, Isaac; Iura, Kazumitsu; Itoi, Teruo; Sekiguchi, Hiroyuki; Matsushita, Koji; Yamashiro, Shigeharu; Sano, Yasuhiro; Sekiguchi, Hiroshi; Maruko, Hisashi; Takayama, Yasuo; Sekioka, Ryoji; Okumura, Akihiko; Takada, Yasuaki; Nagano, Hisashi; Waki, Izumi; Ezawa, Naoya; Tanimoto, Hiroyuki; Honjo, Shigeru; Fukano, Masumi; Okada, Hidehiro

    2013-03-05

    A new method for sensitively and selectively detecting chemical warfare agents (CWAs) in air was developed using counter-flow introduction atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry (MS). Four volatile and highly toxic CWAs were examined, including the nerve gases sarin and tabun, and the blister agents mustard gas (HD) and Lewisite 1 (L1). Soft ionization was performed using corona discharge to form reactant ions, and the ions were sent in the direction opposite to the airflow by an electric field to eliminate the interfering neutral molecules such as ozone and nitrogen oxide. This resulted in efficient ionization of the target CWAs, especially in the negative ionization mode. Quadrupole MS (QMS) and ion trap tandem MS (ITMS) instruments were developed and investigated, which were movable on the building floor. For sarin, tabun, and HD, the protonated molecular ions and their fragment ions were observed in the positive ion mode. For L1, the chloride adduct ions of L1 hydrolysis products were observed in negative ion mode. The limit of detection (LOD) values in real-time or for a 1 s measurement monitoring the characteristic ions were between 1 and 8 μg/m(3) in QMS instrument. Collision-induced fragmentation patterns for the CWAs were observed in an ITMS instrument, and optimized combinations of the parent and daughter ion pairs were selected to achieve real-time detection with LOD values of around 1 μg/m(3). This is a first demonstration of sensitive and specific real-time detection of both positively and negatively ionizable CWAs by MS instruments used for field monitoring.

  15. Atmospheric pressure chemical ionization of explosives induced by soft X-radiation in ion mobility spectrometry: mass spectrometric investigation of the ionization reactions of drift gasses, dopants and alkyl nitrates.

    PubMed

    Riebe, Daniel; Erler, Alexander; Ritschel, Thomas; Beitz, Toralf; Löhmannsröben, Hans-Gerd; Beil, Andreas; Blaschke, Michael; Ludwig, Thomas

    2016-08-01

    A promising replacement for the radioactive sources commonly encountered in ion mobility spectrometers is a miniaturized, energy-efficient photoionization source that produce the reactant ions via soft X-radiation (2.8 keV). In order to successfully apply the photoionization source, it is imperative to know the spectrum of reactant ions and the subsequent ionization reactions leading to the detection of analytes. To that end, an ionization chamber based on the photoionization source that reproduces the ionization processes in the ion mobility spectrometer and facilitates efficient transfer of the product ions into a mass spectrometer was developed. Photoionization of pure gasses and gas mixtures containing air, N2 , CO2 and N2 O and the dopant CH2 Cl2 is discussed. The main product ions of photoionization are identified and compared with the spectrum of reactant ions formed by radioactive and corona discharge sources on the basis of literature data. The results suggest that photoionization by soft X-radiation in the negative mode is more selective than the other sources. In air, adduct ions of O2(-) with H2 O and CO2 were exclusively detected. Traces of CO2 impact the formation of adduct ions of O2(-) and Cl(-) (upon addition of dopant) and are capable of suppressing them almost completely at high CO2 concentrations. Additionally, the ionization products of four alkyl nitrates (ethylene glycol dinitrate, nitroglycerin, erythritol tetranitrate and pentaerythritol tetranitrate) formed by atmospheric pressure chemical ionization induced by X-ray photoionization in different gasses (air, N2 and N2 O) and dopants (CH2 Cl2 , C2 H5 Br and CH3 I) are investigated. The experimental studies are complemented by density functional theory calculations of the most important adduct ions of the alkyl nitrates (M) used for their spectrometric identification. In addition to the adduct ions [M + NO3 ](-) and [M + Cl](-) , adduct ions such as [M + N2 O2 ](-) , [M

  16. Rapid on-site detection of explosives on surfaces by ambient pressure laser desorption and direct inlet single photon ionization or chemical ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ehlert, S; Hölzer, J; Rittgen, J; Pütz, M; Schulte-Ladbeck, R; Zimmermann, R

    2013-09-01

    Considering current security issues, powerful tools for detection of security-relevant substances such as traces of explosives and drugs/drug precursors related to clandestine laboratories are required. Especially in the field of detection of explosives and improvised explosive devices, several relevant compounds exhibit a very low vapor pressure. Ambient pressure laser desorption is proposed to make these substances available in the gas phase for the detection by adapted mass spectrometers or in the future with ion-mobility spectrometry as well. In contrast to the state-of-the-art thermal desorption approach, by which the sample surface is probed for explosive traces by a wipe pad being transferred to a thermal desorber unit, by the ambient pressure laser desorption approach presented here, the sample is directly shockwave ablated from the surface. The laser-dispersed molecules are sampled by a heated sniffing capillary located in the vicinity of the ablation spot into the mass analyzer. This approach has the advantage that the target molecules are dispersed more gently than in a thermal desorber unit where the analyte molecules may be decomposed by the thermal intake. In the technical realization, the sampling capillary as well as the laser desorption optics are integrated in the tip of an endoscopic probe or a handheld sampling module. Laboratory as well as field test scenarios were performed, partially in cooperation with the Federal Criminal Police Office (Bundeskriminalamt, BKA, Wiesbaden, Germany), in order to demonstrate the applicability for various explosives, drugs, and drug precursors. In this work, we concentrate on the detection of explosives. A wide range of samples and matrices have been investigated successfully.

  17. Deposition profile of Ti film inside a trench and its correlation with gas-phase ionization in high-pressure magnetron sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Nafarizal, N.; Takada, N.; Nakamura, K.; Sago, Y.; Sasaki, K.

    2006-11-15

    This article reports the relationship between the degree of ionization of Ti in the gas phase and the thickness profile of Ti film inside a trench in magnetron sputtering deposition. A conventional magnetron sputtering plasma source was used for depositing Ti films inside trenches formed on rf-biased SiO{sub 2} substrates. It was found that a high bottom coverage was obtained when a high gas pressure and a long distance between the target and the substrate were employed for the deposition. On the other hand, at a short distance between the target and the substrate, the bottom coverage was small and was almost independent of the gas pressure. The deposition profile was compared with the spatial distributions of Ti and Ti{sup +} densities measured by laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) imaging spectroscopy. The LIF results revealed that the density ratio of Ti{sup +} to Ti in the downstream region increased with the gas pressure up to 0.3, while in the upstream region, it was small (<0.05) and was roughly constant with the gas pressure. In the case with the enhanced density ratio of 0.3, the flux ratio of Ti{sup +} to Ti was estimated to be 4.4. Hence, it was concluded that, with a high gas pressure and a long distance between the target and substrate, the deposition profile with a high bottom coverage was obtained by accelerating Ti{sup +} toward the bottom of the trench. The high-pressure magnetron sputtering discharge is useful for enhancing the degree of ionization and the bottom coverage.

  18. Atmospheric-pressure chemical ionization tandem mass spectrometry (APGC/MS/MS) an alternative to high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRGC/HRMS) for the determination of dioxins.

    PubMed

    van Bavel, Bert; Geng, Dawei; Cherta, Laura; Nácher-Mestre, Jaime; Portolés, Tania; Ábalos, Manuela; Sauló, Jordi; Abad, Esteban; Dunstan, Jody; Jones, Rhys; Kotz, Alexander; Winterhalter, Helmut; Malisch, Rainer; Traag, Wim; Hagberg, Jessika; Ericson Jogsten, Ingrid; Beltran, Joaquim; Hernández, Félix

    2015-09-01

    The use of a new atmospheric-pressure chemical ionization source for gas chromatography (APGC) coupled with a tandem quadrupole mass spectrometry (MS/MS) system, as an alternative to high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS), for the determination of PCDDs/PCDFs is described. The potential of using atmospheric-pressure chemical ionization (APCI) coupled to a tandem quadrupole analyzer has been validated for the identification and quantification of dioxins and furans in different complex matrices. The main advantage of using the APCI source is the soft ionization at atmospheric pressure, which results in very limited fragmentation. APCI mass spectra are dominated by the molecular ion cluster, in contrast with the high energy ionization process under electron ionization (EI). The use of the molecular ion as the precursor ion in MS/MS enhances selectivity and, consequently, sensitivity by increasing the signal-to-noise ratios (S/N). For standard solutions of 2,3,7,8-TCDD, injections of 10 fg in the splitless mode on 30- or 60-m-length, 0.25 mm inner diameter (id), and 25 μm film thickness low-polarity capillary columns (DB5MS type), signal-to-noise (S/N) ratios of >10:1 were routinely obtained. Linearity was achieved in the region (correlation coefficient of r(2) > 0.998) for calibration curves ranging from 100 fg/μL to 1000 pg/μL. The results from a wide variety of complex samples, including certified and standard reference materials and samples from several QA/QC studies, which were previously analyzed by EI HRGC/HRMS, were compared with the results from the APGC/MS/MS system. Results between instruments showed good agreement both in individual congeners and toxic equivalence factors (TEQs). The data show that the use of APGC in combination with MS/MS for the analysis of dioxins has the same potential, in terms of sensitivity and selectivity, as the traditional HRMS instrumentation used for this analysis. However, the APCI/MS/MS system, as a benchtop system, is

  19. Comparative study of fourteen alkaloids from Uncaria rhynchophylla hooks and leaves using HPLC-diode array detection-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization/MS method.

    PubMed

    Qu, Jialin; Gong, Tianxing; Ma, Bin; Zhang, Lin; Kano, Yoshihiro; Yuan, Dan

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to compare alkaloid profile of Uncaria rhynchophylla hooks and leaves. Ten oxindole alkaloids and four glycosidic indole alkaloids were identified using HPLC-diode array detection (DAD) or LC-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI)-MS method, and a HPLC-UV method for simultaneous quantification of major alkaloids was validated. The hooks are characterized by high levels of four oxindole alkaloids rhynchophylline (R), isorhynchophylline (IR), corynoxeine (C) and isocorynoxeine (IC), while the leaves contained high level of two glycosidic indole alkaloids vincoside lactam (VL) and strictosidine (S). The presented methods have proven its usefulness in chemical characterization of U. rhynchophylla hooks and leaves.

  20. Analysis of 13 fentanils, including sufentanil and carfentanil, in human urine by liquid chromatography-atmospheric-pressure ionization-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lanqing; Bernert, John T

    2006-06-01

    A sensitive, semiautomated method for the analysis of several fentanils and fentanil metabolites in human urine is described. This method uses solid-phase extraction of urine samples followed by liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure ionization-tandem mass spectrometry. Isotopically labeled internal standards were included for 6 of the 13 analytes in this study. Estimated detection limits ranged from 3 to 27 pg/mL, and good accuracy and long-term precision were observed in most cases. This method should be useful for the rapid and sensitive screening of human urine samples for a number of fentanils and their metabolites as indicators of exposure.

  1. Non-proximate detection of small and large molecules by desorption electrospray ionization and desorption atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry: instrumentation and applications in forensics, chemistry, and biology.

    PubMed

    Cotte-Rodríguez, Ismael; Mulligan, Christopher C; Cooks, R Graham

    2007-09-15

    Ambient surfaces are examined by mass spectrometry at distances of up to 3 m from the instrument without any prior sample preparation. Non-proximate versions of the desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) and desorption atmospheric pressure chemical ionization experiments are shown to allow rapid, sensitive, and selective detection of trace amounts of active ingredients in pharmaceutical drug formulations, illicit drugs (methamphetamine, cocaine, and diacetylmorphine), organic salts, peptides, chemical warfare agent simulants, and other small organic compounds. Utilizing an ion transport tube to transport analyte ions to the mass spectrometer, nonproximate DESI allows one to collect high-quality, largely interference-free spectra with signal-to-noise (S/N) ratios of more than 100. High selectivity is achieved by tandem mass spectrometry and by reactive DESI, a variant experiment in which reagents added into the solvent spray allow bond-forming reactions with the analyte. Ion/molecule reactions were found to selectively suppress the response of mixture components other than the analyte of interest in nonproximate-DESI. Flexible ion transport tubing is also investigated, allowing performance similar to stainless steel tubing in the transport of ions from the sample to the mass spectrometer. Transfer tube temperature effects are examined. A multiple sprayer DESI source capable of analyzing a larger sample area was evaluated to decrease the sampling time and increase sample throughput. Low nanogram detection limits were obtained for the compounds studied from a wide variety of surfaces, even those present in complex matrixes.

  2. Continuous Flow Atmospheric Pressure Laser Desorption/Ionization Using a 6–7-µm-Band Mid-Infrared Tunable Laser for Biomolecular Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Hiraguchi, Ryuji; Hazama, Hisanao; Senoo, Kenichirou; Yahata, Yukinori; Masuda, Katsuyoshi; Awazu, Kunio

    2014-01-01

    A continuous flow atmospheric pressure laser desorption/ionization technique using a porous stainless steel probe and a 6–7-µm-band mid-infrared tunable laser was developed. This ion source is capable of direct ionization from a continuous flow with a high temporal stability. The 6–7-µm wavelength region corresponds to the characteristic absorption bands of various molecular vibration modes, including O–H, C=O, CH3 and C–N bonds. Consequently, many organic compounds and solvents, including water, have characteristic absorption peaks in this region. This ion source requires no additional matrix, and utilizes water or acetonitrile as the solvent matrix at several absorption peak wavelengths (6.05 and 7.27 µm, respectively). The distribution of multiply-charged peptide ions is extremely sensitive to the temperature of the heated capillary, which is the inlet of the mass spectrometer. This ionization technique has potential for the interface of liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS). PMID:24937686

  3. Atmospheric pressure matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry of friction modifier additives analyzed directly from base oil solutions.

    PubMed

    Widder, Lukas; Brennerb, Josef; Huttera, Herbert

    2014-01-01

    To develop new products and to apply measures of quality control quick and simple accessibility of additive composition in automo- tive lubrication is important. The aim of this study was to investigate the possibility of analyzing organic friction modifier additives by means of atmospheric pressure matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry [AP-MALDI-MS] from lubricant solu- tions without the use of additional separation techniques. Analyses of selected friction modifier ethoxylated tallow amines and oleic acid amide were compared using two ionization methods, positive-ion electrospray ionization (ESI) and AP-MALDI, using a LTQ Orbitrap mass spectrometer. Pure additives were characterized from solvent solutions, as well as from synthetic and mineral base oil mixtures. Detected ions of pure additive samples consisted mainly of [M + H]+, but also alkaLi metal adducts [M + Na]+ and [M + K]+ could be seen. Characterizations of blends of both friction modifiers from the base oil mixtures were carried out as well and showed significant inten- sities for several additive peaks. Thus, this work shows a method to directly analyze friction modifier additives used in the automotive industry from an oil blend via the use of AP-MALDI without any further separation steps. The method presented will further simplify the acquisition of data on lubricant composition and additives. Furthermore, it allows the perspective of analyzing additive reaction products directly from formulated oil blends.

  4. Comparison of electrospray ionization and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization for multi-residue analysis of biocides, UV-filters and benzothiazoles in aqueous matrices and activated sludge by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wick, Arne; Fink, Guido; Ternes, Thomas A

    2010-04-02

    This paper describes the development of a multi-residue method for the determination of 36 emerging organic pollutants (26 biocides, 5 UV-filters and 5 benzothiazoles) in raw and treated wastewater, activated sludge and surface water using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). The target analytes were enriched from water samples adjusted to pH 6 by solid-phase extraction (SPE) on Oasis HLB 200mg cartridges and eluted with a mixture of methanol and acetone (60/40, v/v). Extraction of freeze-dried sludge samples was accomplished by pressurized liquid extraction (PLE) using a mixture of methanol and water (50/50, v/v) as extraction solvent followed by SPE. LC-tandem MS detection was compared using electrospray ionization (ESI) and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) in positive and negative ionization mode. ESI exhibited strong ion suppression for most target analytes, while APCI was generally less susceptible to ion suppression but partially leading to ion enhancement of up to a factor of 10. In general, matrix effects could be compensated using stable isotope-labeled surrogate standards, indicated by relative recoveries ranging from 70% to 130%. In wastewater, activated sludge and surface water up to 33 analytes were detected. Maximum concentrations up to 5.1 and 3.9mugL(-1) were found in raw wastewater for the water-soluble UV-filters benzophenone-4 (BZP-4) and phenylbenz-imidazole sulfonic acid (PBSA), respectively. For the first time, the anti-dandruff climbazole was detected in raw wastewater and in activated sludge with concentrations as high as 1.4 microg L(-1) and 1.2 microg gTSS(-1), respectively. Activated sludge is obviously a sink for four benzothiazoles and two isothiazolones, as concentrations were detected in activated sludge between 120 ng gTSS(-1) (2-n-octyl-4-isothiazolin-3-one, OIT) to 330 ng gTSS(-1) (benzothiazole-2-sulfonic acid, BTSA). Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. In situ identification of organic components of ink used in books from the 1900s by atmospheric pressure matrix assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giurato, Laura; Candura, Andrea; Grasso, Giuseppe; Spoto, Giuseppe

    2009-11-01

    This paper describes the use of atmospheric pressure/matrix assisted laser desorption ionization-mass spectrometry (AP/MALDI-MS) as a spatially resolved analytical technique for the study of organic components of inks used to print coloured parts of ancient books. The possibility to operate at atmospheric pressure makes MALDI-MS a new in situ micro-destructive diagnostic tool suitable for analysing samples in air, simplifying the investigation of the organic components of artistic and archaeological objects. In this work, several organic dyes and pigments were identified in situ by analysing different coloured areas of books printed in the years 1911 and 1920. The detected colouring materials, which were available since the 1890s, were often identified as a mixture, confirming the typical procedures used in the lithographic printing processes. The matrix deposition and the laser desorption process did not cause visible alteration of the sample surface.

  6. Screening of lake sediments for emerging contaminants by liquid chromatography atmospheric pressure photoionization and electrospray ionization coupled to high resolution mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Chiaia-Hernandez, Aurea C; Krauss, Martin; Hollender, Juliane

    2013-01-15

    We developed a multiresidue method for the target and suspect screening of more than 180 pharmaceuticals, personal care products, pesticides, biocides, additives, corrosion inhibitors, musk fragrances, UV light stabilizers, and industrial chemicals in sediments. Sediment samples were freeze-dried, extracted by pressurized liquid extraction, and cleaned up by liquid-liquid partitioning. The quantification and identification of target compounds with a broad range of physicochemical properties (log K(ow) 0-12) was carried out by liquid chromatography followed by electrospray ionization (ESI) and atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI) coupled to high resolution Orbitrap mass spectrometry (HRMS/MS). The overall method average recoveries and precision are 103% and 9% (RSD), respectively. The method detection limits range from 0.010 to 4 ng/g(dw), while limits of quantification range from 0.030 to 14 ng/g(dw). The use of APPI as an alternative ionization source helped to distinguish two isomeric musk fragrances by means of different ionization behavior. The method was demonstrated on sediment cores from Lake Greifensee located in northeastern Switzerland. The results show that biocides, musk fragrances, and other personal care products were the most frequently detected compounds with concentrations ranging from pg/g(dw) to ng/g(dw), whereas none of the targeted pharmaceuticals were found. The concentrations of many urban contaminants originating from wastewater correlate with the highest phosphorus input into the lake as a proxy for treatment efficiency. HRMS enabled a retrospective analysis of the full-scan data acquisition allowing the detection of suspected compounds like quaternary ammonium surfactants, the biocide triclocarban, and the tentative identification of further compounds without reference standards, among others transformation products of triclosan and triclocarban.

  7. An Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization MS/MS Assay Using Online Extraction for the Analysis of 11 Cannabinoids and Metabolites in Human Plasma and Urine.

    PubMed

    Klawitter, Jelena; Sempio, Cristina; Mörlein, Sophie; De Bloois, Erik; Klepacki, Jacek; Henthorn, Thomas; Leehey, Maureen A; Hoffenberg, Edward J; Knupp, Kelly; Wang, George S; Hopfer, Christian; Kinney, Greg; Bowler, Russell; Foreman, Nicholas; Galinkin, Jeffrey; Christians, Uwe; Klawitter, Jost

    2017-10-01

    Although, especially in the United States, there has been a recent surge of legalized cannabis for either recreational or medicinal purposes, surprisingly little is known about clinical dose-response relationships, pharmacodynamic and toxicodynamic effects of cannabinoids such as Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). Even less is known about other active cannabinoids. To address this knowledge gap, an online extraction, high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry method for simultaneous quantification of 11 cannabinoids and metabolites including THC, 11-hydroxy-Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol, 11-nor-Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol-9-carboxylic acid, 11-nor-Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol-9-carboxylic acid glucuronide (THC-C-gluc), cannabinol, cannabidiol, cannabigerol, cannabidivarin, Δ9-tetrahydrocannabivarin (THCV), and 11-nor-9-carboxy-Δ9-tetrahydrocannabivarin (THCV-COOH) was developed and validated in human urine and plasma. In contrast to atmospheric pressure chemical ionization, electrospray ionization was associated with extensive ion suppression in plasma and urine samples. Thus, the atmospheric pressure chemical ionization assay was validated showing a lower limit of quantification ranging from 0.39 to 3.91 ng/mL depending on study compound and matrix. The upper limit of quantification was 400 ng/mL except for THC-C-gluc with an upper limit of quantification of 2000 ng/mL. The linearity was r > 0.99 for all analyzed calibration curves. Acceptance criteria for intrabatch and interbatch accuracy (85%-115%) and imprecision (<15%) were met for all compounds. In plasma, the only exceptions were THCV (75.3%-121.2% interbatch accuracy) and cannabidivarin (interbatch imprecision, 15.7%-17.2%). In urine, THCV did not meet predefined acceptance criteria for intrabatch accuracy. This assay allows for monitoring not only THC and its major metabolites but also major cannabinoids that are of interest for marijuana research and clinical practice.

  8. Fast determination of 3-ethenylpyridine as a marker of environmental tobacco smoke at trace level using direct atmospheric pressure chemical ionization tandem mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Cheng-Yong; Sun, Shi-Hao; Zhang, Qi-Dong; Liu, Jun-Hui; Zhang, Jian-Xun; Zong, Yong-Li; Xie, Jian-Ping

    2013-03-01

    A method with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization tandem mass spectrometry (APCI-MS/MS) was developed and applied to direct analysis of Environmental Tobacco Smoke (ETS), using 3-ethenylpyridine (3-EP) as a vapour-phase marker. In this study, the ion source of APCI-MS/MS was modified and direct analysis of gas sample was achieved by the modified instrument. ETS samples were directly introduced, via an atmospheric pressure inlet, into the APCI source. Ionization was carried out in positive-ion APCI mode and 3-EP was identified by both full scan mode and daughter scan mode. Quantification of 3-EP was performed by multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mode. The calibration curve was obtained in the range of 1-250 ng L-1 with a satisfactory regression coefficient of 0.999. The limit of detection (LOD) and the limit of quantification (LOQ) were 0.5 ng L-1 and 1.6 ng L-1, respectively. The precision of the method, calculated as relative standard deviation (RSD), was characterized by repeatability (RSD 3.92%) and reproducibility (RSD 4.81%), respectively. In real-world ETS samples analysis, compared with the conventional GC-MS method, the direct APCI-MS/MS has shown better reliability and practicability in the determination of 3-EP at trace level. The developed method is simple, fast, sensitive and repeatable; furthermore, it could provide an alternative way for the determination of other volatile pollutants in ambient air at low levels.

  9. Does asymmetric charge transfer play an important role as an ionization mode in low power-low pressure glow discharge mass spectrometry?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mushtaq, S.; Steers, E. B. M.; Churchill, G.; Barnhart, D.; Hoffmann, V.; Pickering, J. C.; Putyera, K.

    2016-04-01

    We report results of comprehensive studies using the Nu Instruments Astrum high-resolution glow discharge mass spectrometer (GD-MS) and optical emission spectrometry (OES) to investigate the relative importance of discharge mechanisms, such as Penning ionization (PI) and asymmetric charge transfer (ACT), at low-power/low-pressure discharge conditions. Comparison of the ratios of the ion signals of each constituent element to that of the plasma gas shows that for oxygen, the ratio in krypton is more than ten times higher than in argon (oxygen ground state ions are produced by Kr-ACT). For many elements, the ratios are very similar but that for tungsten is higher with krypton, while for iron, the reverse holds. These effects are linked to the arrangement of ionic energy levels of the elements concerned and the resulting relative importance of ACT and PI. The GD-MS and GD-OES results have shown that the ACT process can play an important role as the ionization mode in low-power/low-pressure discharges. However, OES results have shown that the magnitude of change in spectral intensities of elements studied are dependent on the discharge conditions.

  10. Determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in fractions in asphalt mixtures using liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization.

    PubMed

    Nascimento, Paulo Cicero; Gobo, Luciana Assis; Bohrer, Denise; Carvalho, Leandro Machado; Cravo, Margareth Coutinho; Leite, Leni Figueiredo Mathias

    2015-07-01

    An analytical method using liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization for the determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in asphalt fractions has been developed. The 14 compounds determined, characterized by having two or more condensed aromatic rings, are expected to be present in asphalt and are considered carcinogenic and mutagenic. The parameters of the atmospheric pressure chemical ionization interface were optimized to obtain the highest possible sensitivity for all of the compounds. The limits of detection ranged from 0.5 to 346.5 μg/L and the limits of quantification ranged from 1.7 to 1550 μg/L. The method was validated against a diesel particulate extract standard reference material (NIST SRM 1975), and the obtained concentrations agreed with the certified values. The method was applied to asphalt samples after its fractionation according to ASTM D4124 and the method of Green. The concentrations of the seven polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons quantified in the sample ranged from 0.86 mg/kg for benzo[ghi]perylene to 98.32 mg/kg for fluorene. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Trace determination of caffeine in surface water samples by liquid chromatography--atmospheric pressure chemical ionization--mass spectrometry (LC-APCI-MS).

    PubMed

    Gardinali, Piero R; Zhao, Xu

    2002-12-01

    A new method based on liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) coupled to reverse phase liquid chromatography and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry (LC-APCI-MS) has been applied to determine trace amounts of caffeine (1,3,7-trimethylxanthine) in surface water samples from a near coastal ecosystem such as Biscayne Bay, Florida. The rational behind the development of such method will be to evaluate the use of unmetabolized caffeine as a potential dissolved phase tracer of human waste contamination. The method allows for the determination of caffeine at levels as low as 4.0 ng/l (ppt) in both salt and freshwater by extracting and concentrating a 1-1 water sample to a final volume of 500 microl and using HPLC separation coupled to an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry (APCI-MS) system operated in selected ion monitoring (SIM) for the protonated molecular ions (M + H(+)). Samples from different portions of Biscayne Bay and the Miami River, one of its major tributaries, were analyzed and caffeine was detected in those areas previously identified for consistently exceeding the water quality criteria for fecal coliform bacteria contamination. The caffeine concentration in the samples with positive detection was generally low at levels equal or lower than 41 ng/l. However, there is a marked difference between samples collected in open bay areas and those collected from the Miami River.

  12. Effects of ionizing irradiation and hydrostatic pressure on Escherichia coli O157:H7 inactivation, chemical composition, and sensory acceptability of ground beef patties.

    PubMed

    Schilling, M W; Yoon, Y; Tokarskyy, O; Pham, A J; Williams, R C; Marshall, D L

    2009-04-01

    A randomized complete block design with three replications was utilized to determine the effects of ionizing irradiation and hydrostatic pressure on the inactivation of Escherichia coli O157:H7, volatile composition, and consumer acceptability (n=155) of frozen ground beef patties. E-beam and X-ray irradiation (2kGy) inactivated E. coli O157:H7 below the limit of detection, while hydrostatic pressure treatment (300mPa for 5min at 4°C) did not inactivate this pathogen. Solid-phase microextraction (SPME) was used to extract volatile compounds from treated ground beef patties. Irradiation and hydrostatic pressure altered the volatile composition (P<0.05) of the ground beef patties in respect to radiolytic products. However, results were inconclusive on whether these differences were great enough to use this method to differentiate between irradiated and non-irradiated samples in a commercial setting. Irradiation did not affect (P>0.05) consumer acceptability of ground beef patties when compared to untreated samples, but hydrostatic pressure caused decreased acceptability (P<0.05) when compared to other treatments.

  13. Diclofenac in municipal wastewater treatment plant: quantification using laser diode thermal desorption--atmospheric pressure chemical ionization--tandem mass spectrometry approach in comparison with an established liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry method.

    PubMed

    Lonappan, Linson; Pulicharla, Rama; Rouissi, Tarek; Brar, Satinder K; Verma, Mausam; Surampalli, Rao Y; Valero, José R

    2016-02-12

    Diclofenac (DCF), a prevalent non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) is often detected in wastewater and surface water. Analysis of the pharmaceuticals in complex matrices is often laden with challenges. In this study a reliable, rapid and sensitive method based on laser diode thermal desorption/atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (LDTD/APCI) coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) has been developed for the quantification of DCF in wastewater and wastewater sludge. An established conventional LC-ESI-MS/MS (liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry) method was compared with LDTD-APCI-MS/MS approach. The newly developed LDTD-APCI-MS/MS method reduced the analysis time to 12s in lieu of 12 min for LC-ESI-MS/MS method. The method detection limits for LDTD-APCI-MS/MS method were found to be 270 ng L(-1) (LOD) and 1000 ng L(-1) (LOQ). Furthermore, two extraction procedures, ultrasonic assisted extraction (USE) and accelerated solvent extraction (ASE) for the extraction of DCF from wastewater sludge were compared and ASE with 95.6 ± 7% recovery was effective over USE with 86 ± 4% recovery. The fate and partitioning of DCF in wastewater (WW) and wastewater sludge (WWS) in wastewater treatment plant was also monitored at various stages of treatment in Quebec Urban community wastewater treatment plant. DCF exhibited affinity towards WW than WWS with a presence about 60% of DCF in WW in contrary with theoretical prediction (LogKow=4.51).

  14. Ion suppression and enhancement effects of co-eluting analytes in multi-analyte approaches: systematic investigation using ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry with atmospheric-pressure chemical ionization or electrospray ionization.

    PubMed

    Remane, Daniela; Meyer, Markus R; Wissenbach, Dirk K; Maurer, Hans H

    2010-11-15

    In multi-analyte procedures, sufficient separation is important to avoid interferences, particularly when using liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS) because of possible ion suppression or enhancement. However, even using ultra-high-performance LC, baseline separation is not always possible. For development and validation of an LC/MS/MS approach for quantification of 140 antidepressants, benzodiazepines, neuroleptics, beta-blockers, oral antidiabetics, and analytes measured in the context of brain death diagnosis in plasma, the extent of ion suppression or enhancement of co-eluting analytes within and between the drug classes was investigated using atmospheric-pressure chemical ionization (APCI) or electrospray ionization (ESI). Within the drug classes, five analytes showed ion enhancement of over 25% and six analytes ion suppression of over 25% using APCI and 16 analytes ion suppression of over 25% using ESI. Between the drug classes, two analytes showed ion suppression of over 25% using APCI. Using ESI, one analyte showed ion enhancement of over 25% and five analytes ion suppression of over 25%. These effects may influence the drug quantification using calibrators made in presence of overlapping and thus interfering analytes. Ion suppression/enhancement effects induced by co-eluting drugs of different classes present in the patient sample may also lead to false measurements using class-specific calibrators made in absence of overlapping and thus interfering analytes. In conclusion, ion suppression and enhancement tests are essential during method development and validation in LC/MS/MS multi-analyte procedures, with special regards to co-eluting analytes.

  15. Microstructual investigation of mixed rar earth iron boron processed vis melt-spinning and high-pressure gas-atomization for isotrophic bonded permanent magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Buelow, Nicholas Lee

    2005-01-01

    A solid solution of three rare earths (RE) in the RE2Fe14B structure have been combined to create the novel mixed rare earth iron boron (MRE2Fe14B) alloy family. MRE2Fe14B exhibits reduced temperature dependent magnetic properties; remanence and coercivity. The desired form of MRE2Fe14B is a powder that can be blended with a polymer binder and compression or injection molded to form an isotropic polymer bonded permanent magnet (PBM). Commercially, Nd2Fe14B is the alloy of choice for PBMs. Powders of Nd2Fe14B are made via melt-spinning as can be MRE2Fe14B which allows for direct comparisons. MRE2Fe14B made using melt-spinning at high wheel speeds is overquenched and must be annealed to an optimal hard magnetic state. Due to the rare earth content in the MRE2Fe14B powders, they must be protected from the environment in which they operate. This protection is accomplished by using a modified fluidized bed process to grow a protective fluoride coating nominally 15nm thick, to reduce air oxidation. MRE2Fe14B has demonstrated reduced temperature dependent magnetic properties in ribbon and PBM form. The real challenge has been modifying alloy designs that were successfully melt-spun to be compatible with high-pressure gas-atomization (HPGA). The cooling rates in HPGA are lower than melt-spinning, as the powders are quenched via convective cooling, compared to melt-spinning, which quenches initially by conductive cooling. Early alloy designs, in gas atomized and melt-spun form, did not have similar phase compositions or microstructures. Alloy additions, such as the addition of zirconium as a nucleation catalyst, were successful in creating similar phases and microstructures in the HPGA powders and melt-spun ribbon of the same MRE2Fe14

  16. Potential of atmospheric pressure chemical ionization source in gas chromatography tandem mass spectrometry for the screening of urinary exogenous androgenic anabolic steroids.

    PubMed

    Raro, M; Portolés, T; Pitarch, E; Sancho, J V; Hernández, F; Garrostas, L; Marcos, J; Ventura, R; Segura, J; Pozo, O J

    2016-02-04

    The atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) source for gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis has been evaluated for the screening of 16 exogenous androgenic anabolic steroids (AAS) in urine. The sample treatment is based on the strategy currently applied in doping control laboratories i.e. enzymatic hydrolysis, liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) and derivatization to form the trimethylsilyl ether-trimethylsilyl enol ether (TMS) derivatives. These TMS derivatives are then analyzed by gas chromatography tandem mass spectrometry using a triple quadrupole instrument (GC-QqQ MS/MS) under selected reaction monitoring (SRM) mode. The APCI promotes soft ionization with very little fragmentation resulting, in most cases, in abundant [M + H](+) or [M + H-2TMSOH](+) ions, which can be chosen as precursor ions for the SRM transitions, improving in this way the selectivity and sensitivity of the method. Specificity of the transitions is also of great relevance, as the presence of endogenous compounds can affect the measurements when using the most abundant ions. The method has been qualitatively validated by spiking six different urine samples at two concentration levels each. Precision was generally satisfactory with RSD values below 25 and 15% at the low and high concentration level, respectively. Most the limits of detection (LOD) were below 0.5 ng mL(-1). Validation results were compared with the commonly used method based on the electron ionization (EI) source. EI analysis was found to be slightly more repeatable whereas lower LODs were found for APCI. In addition, the applicability of the developed method has been tested in samples collected after the administration of 4-chloromethandienone. The highest sensitivity of the APCI method for this compound, allowed to increase the period in which its administration can be detected.

  17. Effects of Ionization, Thermal Transport, and Radiation on Scaling Performance for Peak Pressure in Imploding Plasma Liners Formed by Converging Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanic, Milos; Cassibry, Jason; Hsu, Scott

    2012-10-01

    This paper is an extension of work done by (Cassibry et.al., in preparation) who performed similar research using Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics Code (SPHC) with an ideal gas equation of state model, neglecting electron-thermal conduction, radiation conduction and radiation losses (in cases of optically thin plasma). SPHC has been modified to use a tabular equation of state, accounting for ionization effects and to include the mentioned thermal transport models. Series of simulations have been carried out and the results were analyzed in terms of recognizing the scaling laws for peak pressure and dwell time. Comparison with the previous work of (Cassibry et.al., in preparation) has also been carried out in an attempt to isolate and recognize the effects of ionization and thermal transport models. The work has been done in support of the Plasma Liner Experiment (PLX), which is a multi-institutional project working on validation of the imploding plasma liner concept for reaching High Energy Density (HEDP) regimes and a possible stand-off solution for Plasma Jet driven Magneto-Inertial Fusion (PJMIF).

  18. [Isolation and purification of solanesol from potato leaves by high-speed counter-current chromatography and identification by atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Hu, Jiangyong; Liang, Yong; Xie, Ya; Huang, Zhaofeng; Zhong, Hanzuo

    2007-07-01

    Preparative high-speed counter-current chromatography (HSCCC) was used for the isolation and purification of solanesol from potato leaves. Experimental conditions of the extraction of solanesol from potato leaves have been optimized. An ultrafine extraction method was applied in this study. The efficiency using an ultrafine extraction was found to be improved in the investigation, the yields of solanesol by different extraction methods were 0.083% by ultrafine extraction and 0.050% by ultrasonic extraction. Using n-hexane-methanol (10:7, v/v) as the two-phase solvent system, preparative HSCCC was successfully performed with the yield of 5 mg solanesol at 98.7% of purity from 60 mg of crude extract in the one-step separation. The mobile phase was the lower phase and operated at a flow rate of 1.5 mL/min, while the apparatus rotated at 800 r/min. The solanesol was identified by the atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry (APCI-MS). The ionization and cleavage mechanisms of solanesol in APCI-MS and APCI-MS/MS are discussed.

  19. Potential of gas chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry for the determination of sterols in human plasma.

    PubMed

    Matysik, S; Schmitz, G; Bauer, S; Kiermaier, J; Matysik, F-M

    2014-04-11

    The application of Gas Chromatography (GC)-Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization (APCI)-Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (TOF-MS) is presented for sterol analysis in human plasma. A commercial APCI interface was modified to ensure a well-defined humidity which is essential for controlled ionization. In the first step, optimization regarding flow rates of auxiliary gases was performed by using a mixture of model analytes. Secondly, the qualitative and quantitative analysis of sterols including oxysterols, cholesterol precursors, and plant sterols as trimethylsilyl-derivatives was successfully carried out. The characteristics of APCI together with the very good mass accuracy of TOF-MS data enable the reliable identification of relevant sterols in complex matrices. Linear calibration lines and plausible results for healthy volunteers and patients could be obtained whereas all mass signals were extracted with an extraction width of 20 ppm from the full mass data set. One advantage of high mass accuracy can be seen in the fact that from one recorded run any search for m/z can be performed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Sensitive and comprehensive detection of chemical warfare agents in air by atmospheric pressure chemical ionization ion trap tandem mass spectrometry with counterflow introduction.

    PubMed

    Seto, Yasuo; Sekiguchi, Hiroshi; Maruko, Hisashi; Yamashiro, Shigeharu; Sano, Yasuhiro; Takayama, Yasuo; Sekioka, Ryoji; Yamaguchi, Shintaro; Kishi, Shintaro; Satoh, Takafumi; Sekiguchi, Hiroyuki; Iura, Kazumitsu; Nagashima, Hisayuki; Nagoya, Tomoki; Tsuge, Kouichiro; Ohsawa, Isaac; Okumura, Akihiko; Takada, Yasuaki; Ezawa, Naoya; Watanabe, Susumu; Hashimoto, Hiroaki

    2014-05-06

    A highly sensitive and specific real-time field-deployable detection technology, based on counterflow air introduction atmospheric pressure chemical ionization, has been developed for a wide range of chemical warfare agents (CWAs) comprising gaseous (two blood agents, three choking agents), volatile (six nerve gases and one precursor agent, five blister agents), and nonvolatile (three lachrymators, three vomiting agents) agents in air. The approach can afford effective chemical ionization, in both positive and negative ion modes, for ion trap multiple-stage mass spectrometry (MS(n)). The volatile and nonvolatile CWAs tested provided characteristic ions, which were fragmented into MS(3) product ions in positive and negative ion modes. Portions of the fragment ions were assigned by laboratory hybrid mass spectrometry (MS) composed of linear ion trap and high-resolution mass spectrometers. Gaseous agents were detected by MS or MS(2) in negative ion mode. The limits of detection for a 1 s measurement were typically at or below the microgram per cubic meter level except for chloropicrin (submilligram per cubic meter). Matrix effects by gasoline vapor resulted in minimal false-positive signals for all the CWAs and some signal suppression in the case of mustard gas. The moisture level did influence the measurement of the CWAs.

  1. Characterizing and compensating for matrix effects using atmospheric pressure chemical ionization liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry: analysis of neutral pharmaceuticals in municipal wastewater.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiaoming; Metcalfe, Chris D

    2008-03-15

    Matrix effects are a great challenge for the quantitative analysis of environmental samples by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Signal suppression or enhancement can compromise the accuracy of analytical results. While matrix effects have been relatively well studied for applications of LC-MS/MS instrumentation with electrospray ionization, there have been relatively few studies to evaluate matrix effects when using atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) as the ion source. In this study, we determined the effects of sample matrix on the analysis of six neutral pharmaceuticals (i.e., caffeine, cotinine, carbamazepine and its major metabolite, carbamazepine-10,11-dihydrodiol, trimethoprim, and fluoxetine) in samples of municipal wastewater using LC-APCI-MS/MS and evaluated whether isotope-labeled internal standards can be used to compensate for matrix effects. The matrix effects were measured using postextraction spikes and postcolumn direct infusion, respectively. The results showed that the matrix in the extracts prepared from municipal wastewater enhanced the signals for four of the six analytes when using an APCI source. Without correction for signal enhancement, apparent recoveries of the analytes from wastewater samples were overestimated to levels as high as 178% of the spiked amount. Isotope-labeled compounds corrected for these overestimates that occurred as a result of interferences from the sample matrix.

  2. Determination of triclosan metabolites by using in-source fragmentation from high-performance liquid chromatography/negative atmospheric pressure chemical ionization ion trap mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jian-lin; Liu, Jie; Cai, Zongwei

    2010-07-15

    Triclosan is a widely used broad-spectrum antibacterial agent that acts by specifically inhibiting enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase. An in vitro metabolic study of triclosan was performed by using Sprague-Dawley (SD) rat liver S9 and microsome, while the in vivo metabolism was investigated on SD rats. Twelve metabolites were identified by using in-source fragmentation from high-performance liquid chromatography/negative atmospheric pressure chemical ionization ion trap mass spectrometry (HPLC/APCI-ITMS) analysis. Compared to electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) that gave little fragmentation for triclosan and its metabolites, the in-source fragmentation under APCI provided intensive fragmentations for the structural identifications. The in vitro metabolic rate of triclosan was quantitatively determined by using HPLC/ESI-ITMS with the monitoring of the selected triclosan molecular ion. The metabolism results indicated that glucuronidation and sulfonation were the major pathways of phase II metabolism and the hydroxylated products were the major phase I metabolites. Moreover, glucose, mercapturic acid and cysteine conjugates of triclosan were also observed in the urine samples of rats orally administrated with triclosan.

  3. Comparison of electrospray ionization and atmospheric pressure photoionization liquid chromatography mass spectrometry methods for analysis of ergot alkaloids from endophyte-infected sleepygrass (Achnatherum robustum).

    PubMed

    Jarmusch, Alan K; Musso, Ashleigh M; Shymanovich, Tatsiana; Jarmusch, Scott A; Weavil, Miranda J; Lovin, Mary E; Ehrmann, Brandie M; Saari, Susanna; Nichols, David E; Faeth, Stanley H; Cech, Nadja B

    2016-01-05

    Ergot alkaloids are mycotoxins with an array of biological effects. With this study, we investigated for the first time the application of atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI) as an ionization method for LC-MS analysis of ergot alkaloids, and compared its performance to that of the more established technique of electrospray ionization (ESI). Samples of the grass Achnatherum robustum infected with the ergot producing Epichloë fungus were extracted using cold methanol and subjected to reserved-phase HPLC-ESI-MS and HPLC-APPI-MS analysis. The ergot alkaloids ergonovine and lysergic acid amide were detected in these samples, and quantified via external calibration. Validation parameters were recorded in accordance with ICH guidelines. A triple quadrupole MS operated in multiple reaction monitoring yielded the lowest detection limits. The performance of APPI and ESI methods was comparable. Both methods were subject to very little matrix interference, with percent recoveries ranging from 82% to 100%. As determined with HPLC-APPI-MS quantification, lysergic acid amide and ergonovine were extracted from an A. robustum sample infected with the Epichloë fungus at concentrations of 1.143±0.051 ppm and 0.2822±0.0071 ppm, respectively. There was no statistically significant difference between these concentrations and those determined using ESI for the same samples.

  4. Characterization of triacylglycerol and diacylglycerol composition of plant oils using high-performance liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Holcapek, Michal; Jandera, Pavel; Zderadicka, Petr; Hrubá, Lucie

    2003-08-29

    Triacylglycerols (TGs) and diacylglycerols (DGs) in 16 plant oil samples (hazelnut, pistachio, poppy-seed, almond, palm, Brazil-nut, rapeseed, macadamia, soyabean, sunflower, linseed, Dracocephalum moldavica, evening primrose, corn, amaranth, Silybum arianum) were analyzed by HPLC-MS with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) and UV detection at 205 nm on two Nova-Pak C18 chromatographic columns connected in series. A single chromatographic column and non-aqueous ethanol-acetonitrile gradient system was used as a compromise between the analysis time and the resolution for the characterization of TG composition of five plant oils. APCI mass spectra were applied for the identification of all TGs and other acylglycerols. The isobaric positional isomers can be distinguished on the basis of different relative abundances of the fragment ions formed by preferred losses of the fatty acid from sn-1(3) positions compared to the sn-2 position. Excellent chromatographic resolution and broad retention window together with APCI mass spectra enabled positive identification of TGs containing fatty acids with odd numbers of carbon atoms such as margaric (C17:0) and heptadecanoic (C17:1) acids. The general fragmentation patterns of TGs in both APCI and electrospray ionization mass spectra were proposed on the basis of MSn spectra measured with an ion trap analyzer. The relative concentrations of particular TGs in the analyzed plant oils were estimated on the basis of relative peak areas measured with UV detection at 205 nm.

  5. The determination of carbon dioxide concentration using atmospheric pressure ionization mass spectrometry/isotopic dilution and errors in concentration measurements caused by dryers.

    PubMed

    DeLacy, Brendan G; Bandy, Alan R

    2008-01-01

    An atmospheric pressure ionization mass spectrometry/isotopically labeled standard (APIMS/ILS) method has been developed for the determination of carbon dioxide (CO(2)) concentration. Descriptions of the instrumental components, the ionization chemistry, and the statistics associated with the analytical method are provided. This method represents an alternative to the nondispersive infrared (NDIR) technique, which is currently used in the atmospheric community to determine atmospheric CO(2) concentrations. The APIMS/ILS and NDIR methods exhibit a decreased sensitivity for CO(2) in the presence of water vapor. Therefore, dryers such as a nafion dryer are used to remove water before detection. The APIMS/ILS method measures mixing ratios and demonstrates linearity and range in the presence or absence of a dryer. The NDIR technique, on the other hand, measures molar concentrations. The second half of this paper describes errors in molar concentration measurements that are caused by drying. An equation describing the errors was derived from the ideal gas law, the conservation of mass, and Dalton's Law. The purpose of this derivation was to quantify errors in the NDIR technique that are caused by drying. Laboratory experiments were conducted to verify the errors created solely by the dryer in CO(2) concentration measurements post-dryer. The laboratory experiments verified the theoretically predicted errors in the derived equations. There are numerous references in the literature that describe the use of a dryer in conjunction with the NDIR technique. However, these references do not address the errors that are caused by drying.

  6. High performance liquid chromatography/atmospheric pressure ionization/tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC/API/MS/MS) in drug metabolism and toxicology.

    PubMed

    Kamel, Amin; Prakash, Chandra

    2006-12-01

    Studies of the metabolic fate of drugs and other xenobiotics in living systems may be divided into three broad areas: (1) elucidation of biotransformation pathways through identification of circulatory and excretory metabolites (qualitative studies); (2) determination of pharmacokinetics of the parent drug and/or its primary metabolites (quantitative studies); and (3) identification of chemically-reactive metabolites, which play a key role as mediators of drug-induced toxicities (mechanistic studies). Mass spectrometry has been regarded as one of the most important analytical tools in studies of drug metabolism, pharmacokinetics and biochemical toxicology. With the commercial introduction of new ionization methods such as those based on atmospheric pressure ionization (API) techniques and the combination of liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS), it has now become a truly indispensable technique in pharmaceutical research. Triple stage quadrupole and ion trap mass spectrometers are presently used for this purpose, because of their sensitivity and selectivity. API-TOF mass spectrometry has also been very attractive due to its enhanced full-scan sensitivity, scan speed, improved resolution and ability to measure the accurate masses for protonated molecules and fragment ions. This review aims to survey the utility of mass spectrometry in drug metabolism and toxicology and to highlight novel applications and future trends in this field.

  7. Quantification of S-carboxymethyl-(R)-cysteine in human plasma by high-performance ion-exchange liquid chromatography/atmospheric pressure ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Anacardio, R; Cantalini, M G; De Angelis, F; Gentile, M

    1997-04-01

    The determination of S-carboxymethyl-(R)-cysteine (SCMC) in human plasma during extended bioequivalence studies demands a rapid, accurate and selective assay technique. A liquid chromatographic/mass spectrometric method was developed which involves rough protein precipitation followed by high-performance liquid chromatographic separation with an ion-exchange column and atmospheric pressure ionization (API) mass spectrometric detection, with the instrument operating with electrospray ionization (ESI) and in the selected-ion monitoring mode. The drug and the internal standard S-[(R)-1-carboxyethyl]-(R)-cysteine (SCEC) are detected by focusing the first quadrupole of the triple stage system on MH+ ions, thus permitting elimination of endogenous interfering substances and allowing a detection limit of 0.05 microgram ml-1. The chromatographic run time is 16 min and the method has sufficient sensitivity, precision, accuracy and selectivity for routine analyses of clinical plasma samples containing SCMC at concentrations in the range 0.2-20 micrograms ml-1. In summary, this LC/MS-based assay of SCMC demonstrates advantages of easy sample preparation, low limit of quantification (200 ng per ml of human plasma) without any derivatization step, high specificity and rapid sample analysis with an overall throughput of more than 60 analyses per day.

  8. Generation of highly charged peptide and protein ions by atmospheric pressure matrix-assisted infrared laser desorption/ionization ion trap mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    König, Simone; Kollas, Oliver; Dreisewerd, Klaus

    2007-07-15

    We show that highly charged ions can be generated if a pulsed infrared laser and a glycerol matrix are employed for atmospheric pressure matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry with a quadrupole ion trap. Already for small peptides like bradykinin, doubly protonated ions form the most abundant analyte signal in the mass spectra. The center of the charge-state distribution increases with the size of the analyte. For example, insulin is detected with a most abundant ion signal corresponding to a charge state of four, whereas for cytochrome c, the 10 times protonated ion species produces the most intense signal. Myoglobin is observed with up to 13 charges. The high m/z ratios allow us to use the Paul trap for the detection of MALDI-generated protein ions that are, owing to their high molecular weight, not amenable in their singly protonated charge state. Formation of multiple charges critically depends on the addition of diluted acid to the analyte-matrix solution. Tandem mass spectra generated by collision-induced dissociation of doubly charged peptides are also presented. The findings allow speculations about the involvement of electrospray ionization processes in these MALDI experiments.

  9. Achieving Stable Radiation Pressure Acceleration of Heavy Ions via Successive Electron Replenishment from Ionization of a High-Z Material Coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, X. F.; Qiao, B.; Chang, H. X.; Kar, S.; Zhou, C. T.; Borghesi, M.; He, X. T.

    2016-10-01

    Generation of monoenergetic heavy ion beams aroused more scientific interest in recent years. Radiation pressure acceleration (RPA) is an ideal mechanism for obtaining high-quality heavy ion beams, in principle. However, to achieve the same energy per nucleon (velocity) as protons, heavy ions undergo much more serious Rayleigh-Taylor-like (RT) instability and afterwards much worse Coulomb explosion due to loss of co-moving electrons. This leads to premature acceleration termination of heavy ions and very low energy attained in experiment. The utilization of a high-Z coating in front of the target may suppress the RT instability and Coulomb explosion by continuously replenishing the accelerating heavy ion foil with co-moving electrons due to its successive ionization under laser fields with Gaussian temporal and spatial profiles. Thus stable RPA can be realized. Two-dimensional and three-dimensional particles-in-cell simulations with dynamic ionization show that a monoenergetic Al13+ beam with peak energy 4.0GeV and particle number 1010 (charge > 20nC) can be obtained at intensity 1022 W/cm2. Supported by the NSF, Nos. 11575298 and 1000-Talents Program of China.

  10. High-throughput walkthrough detection portal for counter terrorism: detection of triacetone triperoxide (TATP) vapor by atmospheric-pressure chemical ionization ion trap mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Takada, Yasuaki; Nagano, Hisashi; Suzuki, Yasutaka; Sugiyama, Masuyuki; Nakajima, Eri; Hashimoto, Yuichiro; Sakairi, Minoru

    2011-09-15

    With the aim of improving security, a high-throughput portal system for detecting triacetone triperoxide (TATP) vapor emitted from passengers and luggage was developed. The portal system consists of a push-pull air sampler, an atmospheric-pressure chemical ionization (APCI) ion source, and an explosives detector based on mass spectrometry. To improve the sensitivity of the explosives detector, a novel linear ion trap mass spectrometer with wire electrodes (wire-LIT) is installed in the portal system. TATP signals were clearly obtained 2 s after the subject under detection passed through the portal system. Preliminary results on sensitivity and throughput show that the portal system is a useful tool for preventing the use of TATP-based improvised explosive devices by screening persons in places where many people are coming and going.

  11. Achieving Stable Radiation Pressure Acceleration of Heavy Ions via Successive Electron Replenishment from Ionization of a High-Z Material Coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, X. F.; Qiao, B.; Zhang, H.; Kar, S.; Zhou, C. T.; Chang, H. X.; Borghesi, M.; He, X. T.

    2017-05-01

    A method to achieve stable radiation pressure acceleration (RPA) of heavy ions from laser-irradiated ultrathin foils is proposed, where a high-Z material coating in front is used. The coated high-Z material, acting as a moving electron repository, continuously replenishes the accelerating heavy ion foil with comoving electrons in the light-sail acceleration stage due to its successive ionization under laser fields with Gaussian temporal profile. As a result, the detrimental effects such as foil deformation and electron loss induced by the Rayleigh-Taylor-like and other instabilities in RPA are significantly offset and suppressed so that stable acceleration of heavy ions are maintained. Particle-in-cell simulations show that a monoenergetic Al13 + beam with peak energy 3.8 GeV and particle number 1 010 (charge >20 nC ) can be obtained at intensity 1 022 W /cm2 .

  12. Multianalyte quantification of five sesqui- and ethyl ether oxy-mustard metabolites in human urine by liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ash, Doris H; Lemire, Sharon W; McGrath, Sara C; McWilliams, Lisa G; Barr, John R

    2008-01-01

    Sesqui- and oxy-mustards pose a significant threat to military forces and civilians because they are potent vesicants. We have developed an isotope-dilution high-performance liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-tandem mass spectrometry method utilizing negative ion multiple reaction monitoring for the analysis of sesqui-mustard metabolites bis(2-hydroxyethylthio)alkanes (n = 1-5) and oxy-mustard metabolite bis(2-hydroxyethylthioethyl)ether in human urine. Relative standard deviations were < 10% and the reportable limits of detection were 1 ng/mL in 0.5 mL of urine. We applied this method to 100 samples collected from individuals with no known exposure to sesqui- or oxy-mustards, and no urines showed detectable levels of any of the analytes, suggesting that these metabolites may be used for monitoring exposure to sesqui- and oxy-mustards.

  13. Development and validation of sensitive method for determination of serum cotinine in smokers and nonsmokers by liquid chromatography/atmospheric pressure ionization tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bernert, J T; Turner, W E; Pirkle, J L; Sosnoff, C S; Akins, J R; Waldrep, M K; Ann, Q; Covey, T R; Whitfield, W E; Gunter, E W; Miller, B B; Patterson, D G; Needham, L L; Hannon, W H; Sampson, E J

    1997-12-01

    We describe a sensitive and specific method for measuring cotinine in serum by HPLC coupled to an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization tandem mass spectrometer. This method can analyze 100 samples/day on a routine basis, and its limit of detection of 50 ng/L makes it applicable to the analysis of samples from nonsmokers potentially exposed to environmental tobacco smoke. Analytical accuracy has been demonstrated from the analysis of NIST cotinine standards and from comparative analyses by both the current method and gas chromatography/high-resolution mass spectrometry. Precision has been examined through the repetitive analysis of a series of bench and blind QC materials. This method has been applied to the analysis of cotinine in serum samples collected as part of the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III).

  14. Determination of testosterone concentrations in rat plasma using liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry combined with ethyl oxime and acetyl ester derivatization.

    PubMed

    Niwa, Makoto; Watanabe, Noriko; Ochiai, Hisashi; Yamashita, Kouwa

    2005-09-25

    A quantitative method for measuring testosterone (T) concentrations in rat plasma was developed using ethyl oxime and acetyl ester derivatization and liquid chromatography-atmosphere pressure chemical ionization tandem mass spectrometry (LC-APCI-MS/MS). The method utilizes a solid phase extraction with Varian Bond Elut C18, a derivatization process to form testosterone ethoxime acetate and LC-APCI-MS/MS with a reversed phase LC and a C8 column. This method is capable of detecting testosterone concentrations as low as 0.2 ng/ml in a 0.05 ml sample of rat plasma. This method can be used as a sensitive chromatography-based assay for small sample volumes of rat blood.

  15. Determination of metformin in mouse, rat, dog and human plasma samples by laser diode thermal desorption/atmospheric pressure chemical ionization tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Swales, John G; Gallagher, Richard; Peter, Raimund M

    2010-11-02

    A simple, rapid and robust high-throughput assay for the quantitative analysis of metformin in plasma from different species using laser diode thermal desorption interfaced with atmospheric chemical pressure ionization tandem mass spectrometry (LDTD-APCI-MSMS) was developed for use in a pharmaceutical discovery environment. In order to minimize sample preparation a generic protein precipitation method was used to extract metformin from the plasma. Laser diode thermal desorption is a relatively new sample introduction method, the optimization of the instrumental parameters are presented. The method was successfully applied to spiked mouse, rat, dog and human plasma samples and was subsequently used to determine the oral pharmacokinetics of metformin after dosing to male rats in order to support drug discovery projects. The deviations for intra-assay accuracy and precision across the four species were less than 30% at all calibration and quality control levels.

  16. Detection of flunixin in equine urine using high-performance liquid chromatography with particle beam and atmospheric pressure ionization mass spectrometry after solid-phase extraction.

    PubMed

    Stanley, S M; Owens, N A; Rodgers, J P

    1995-05-05

    A normal-phase HPLC method combined with particle-beam mass spectrometry (PB-MS) was developed for the analysis of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). The forty one NSAIDs analysed responded in one or more (electron impact, positive and negative chemical ionisation) modes and highly characteristic spectra were produced. A mixed-mode solid-phase extraction (SPE) method for isolating acidic NSAIDs was developed using the Bond Elut Certify II cartridge. The average recovery was 88.5%. Flunixin, extracted by SPE from urine of a mare to which the meglumine salt had been administered was positively identified by HPLC-PB-MS and HPLC-atmospheric pressure ionization (API) MS methods.

  17. Confirmation of eprinomectin, moxidectin, abamectin, doramectin, and ivermectin in beef liver by liquid chromatography/positive ion atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ali, M S; Sun, T; McLeroy, G E; Phillippo, E T

    2000-01-01

    A liquid chromatographic (LC) multiresidue screening procedure was developed for determination of eprinomectin, moxidectin, abamectin, doramectin, and ivermectin in beef liver at 0, 25, 50, and 100 ppb levels. A procedure using low resolution LC/atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) mass spectrometry (MS) was developed with further purification steps added to the quantitative LC method to confirm residues. Acetonitrile extracts of liver, prior to derivatization for LC analysis, were further purified by using a C8 solid-phase extraction cartridge and an alumina-B cartridge. The purified extract was analyzed by injection into an LC/positive ion APCI MS. Identity of the compound was confirmed by comparison of its retention time and relative intensity data with those of a standard or recovery from a fortified control liver sample. Anthelmintic drugs in acetonitrile extracts of liver containing eprinomectin, moxidectin, abamectin, doramectin, and ivermectin at 25 ppb, the lowest level of fortification used in the LC determinative method, were successfully confirmed.

  18. Achieving Stable Radiation Pressure Acceleration of Heavy Ions via Successive Electron Replenishment from Ionization of a High-Z Material Coating.

    PubMed

    Shen, X F; Qiao, B; Zhang, H; Kar, S; Zhou, C T; Chang, H X; Borghesi, M; He, X T

    2017-05-19

    A method to achieve stable radiation pressure acceleration (RPA) of heavy ions from laser-irradiated ultrathin foils is proposed, where a high-Z material coating in front is used. The coated high-Z material, acting as a moving electron repository, continuously replenishes the accelerating heavy ion foil with comoving electrons in the light-sail acceleration stage due to its successive ionization under laser fields with Gaussian temporal profile. As a result, the detrimental effects such as foil deformation and electron loss induced by the Rayleigh-Taylor-like and other instabilities in RPA are significantly offset and suppressed so that stable acceleration of heavy ions are maintained. Particle-in-cell simulations show that a monoenergetic Al^{13+} beam with peak energy 3.8 GeV and particle number 10^{10} (charge >20  nC) can be obtained at intensity 10^{22}  W/cm^{2}.

  19. Highly sensitive and rapid normal-phase chiral screen using high-performance liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure ionization tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC/MS).

    PubMed

    de la Puente, María Luz

    2004-11-05

    In the last years, there has been an increasing demand on the development of quantitative assays for determination of enantiopurity. Herein, we present a methodology based on a direct linking of an atmospheric pressure ionization mass spectrometer (MS-APCI) with a high-performance liquid chromatography HPLC (DAD) system, operated under normal-phase mode and without post-column addition of MS-compatible solvents, which provides the high specificity/selectivity (identification of isomers in complex mixtures) and accuracy (1-2% area level) required for daily chiral studies. As result of the success of our screen, the preparation of individual enantiomers or the racemic mixture in our Drug Discovery Research Laboratories at Lilly, Spain is usually not required. Therefore, additional non-valuable synthetic work is eliminated.

  20. Analysis of plant sterol and stanol esters in cholesterol-lowering spreads and beverages using high-performance liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-mass spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Mezine, Igor; Zhang, Huizhen; Macku, Carlos; Lijana, Robert

    2003-09-10

    Plant sterol and stanol esters were separated on a Luna hexyl-phenyl column using a gradient of acetonitrile (90-100%) in water. The eluted compounds were detected by atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI)-mass spectroscopy (MS) in the positive mode. Sterol and stanol esters produced [M + H - HOOCR](+) ions. Application of the hyphenated technique-LC-MS-allowed differentiation between a number of esters of sitosterol, campesterol, stigmasterol, and (tentatively) avenasterol, as well as sitostanol and campestanol esters. With cholesteryl decanoate used as the internal standard, the method showed good linearity, precision, and reproducibility. The method required minimal sample pretreatment and can be applied to samples with high water content (juices) as well as samples with high oil content (margarine spreads). The method could be useful for the analysis of sterol and stanol esters in fortified food products.

  1. Online atmospheric pressure chemical ionization ion trap mass spectrometry (APCI-IT-MSn) for measuring organic acids in concentrated bulk aerosol - a laboratory and field study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, A. L.; Äijälä, M.; Brüggemann, M.; Ehn, M.; Junninen, H.; Petäjä, T.; Worsnop, D. R.; Kulmala, M.; Williams, J.; Hoffmann, T.

    2013-02-01

    The field application of an aerosol concentrator in conjunction with an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization ion trap mass spectrometer (APCI-IT-MS) at the boreal forest station SMEAR II at Hyytiälä, Finland, is demonstrated in this study. APCI is a soft-ionization technique allowing online measurements of organic acids in the gas and particle phase. The detection limit for the acid species in the particle phase was improved by a factor of 7.5 to 11 (e.g. ∼40 ng m3 for pinonic acid) by using the miniature versatile aerosol concentration enrichment system (mVACES) upstream of the mass spectrometer. The APCI-IT-MS was calibrated in the negative ion mode with two biogenic organic acid standards - pinic acid and pinonic acid. Pinic acid was used as a surrogate for the quantification of the total amount of organic acids in the ambient aerosol based on the total signal intensities in the negative ion mode. The results were compared with the total organic signal of a C-ToF-AMS during the HUMPPA-COPEC 2010 field campaign. The campaign average contribution of organic acids measured by APCI-IT-MS to the total submicron organic aerosol mass was estimated to be about 60%, based on the response of pinic acid. Very good correlation between APCI-IT-MS and C-ToF-AMS (Pearson's R = 0.94) demonstrates soft-ionization mass spectrometry as a complimentary technique to AMS with electron impact ionization. MS2 studies of specific m/z ratios recorded during the HUMPPA-COPEC 2010 field campaign were compared to MS2 studies of selected monoterpene oxidation products formed in simulation chamber experiments. The comparison of the resulting fragments shows that oxidation products of the main VOCs emitted at Hyytiälä (α-pinene and Δ3-carene) cannot account for all of the measured fragments. Possible explanations for those unaccounted fragments are the presence of unidentified or underestimated biogenic SOA precursors, or that different products are formed by a different oxidant

  2. Online atmospheric pressure chemical ionization ion trap mass spectrometry (APCI-IT-MSn) for measuring organic acids in concentrated bulk aerosol - a laboratory and field study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, A. L.; Äijälä, M.; Brüggemann, M.; Ehn, M.; Junninen, H.; Petäjä, T.; Worsnop, D. R.; Kulmala, M.; Williams, J.; Hoffmann, T.

    2012-08-01

    The field application of an aerosol concentrator in conjunction with an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization ion trap mass spectrometer (APCI-IT-MS) at the boreal forest station SMEAR II at Hyytiälä, Finland, is demonstrated in this study. APCI is a soft ionization technique allowing online measurements of organic acids in the gas and particle phase. The detection limit for the acid species in the particle phase was increased by a factor of 7.5 to 11 (e.g. ~40 ng m-3 for pinonic acid) by using the miniature Versatile Aerosol Concentration Enrichment System (mVACES) upstream of the mass spectrometer. The APCI-IT-MS was calibrated in the negative ion mode with two biogenic organic acid standards - pinic acid and pinonic acid. Pinic acid was used as a surrogate for the quantification of the total amount of organic acids in the ambient aerosol based on the total signal intensities in the negative ion mode. The results were compared with the total organic signal of a C-ToF-AMS during the HUMPPA-COPEC 2010 field campaign. The campaign average contribution of organic acids measured by APCI-IT-MS to the total sub-micron organic aerosol mass was estimated to be about 60%. Very good correlation between APCI-IT-MS and C-ToF-AMS (Pearson's R = 0.94) demonstrates soft ionization mass spectrometry as a complimentary technique to AMS with electron impact ionization. MS2 studies of specific m/z ratios recorded during the HUMPPA-COPEC 2010 field campaign were compared to MS2 studies of selected monoterpene oxidation products formed in simulation chamber experiments. The comparison of the resulting fragments shows that oxidation products of the main VOCs emitted at Hyytiälä (α-pinene and Δ3-carene) cannot account for all of the measured fragments, which illustrates the complexity of ambient aerosol and possibly indicates unidentified or underestimated biogenic SOA precursor in the boreal forest.

  3. Determination of oxygen and nitrogen derivatives of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in fractions of asphalt mixtures using liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization.

    PubMed

    Nascimento, Paulo Cicero; Gobo, Luciana Assis; Bohrer, Denise; Carvalho, Leandro Machado; Cravo, Margareth Coutinho; Leite, Leni Figueiredo Mathias

    2015-12-01

    Liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization was used for the determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon derivatives, the oxygenated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and nitrated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, formed in asphalt fractions. Two different methods have been developed for the determination of five oxygenated and seven nitrated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons that are characterized by having two or more condensed aromatic rings and present mutagenic and carcinogenic properties. The parameters of the atmospheric pressure chemical ionization interface were optimized to obtain the highest possible sensitivity for all compounds. The detection limits of the methods ranged from 0.1 to 57.3 μg/L for nitrated and from 0.1 to 6.6 μg/L for oxygenated derivatives. The limits of quantification were in the range of 4.6-191 μg/L for nitrated and 0.3-8.9 μg/L for oxygenated derivatives. The methods were validated against a diesel particulate extract standard reference material (National Institute of Standards and Technology SRM 1975), and the obtained concentrations (two nitrated derivatives) agreed with the certified values. The methods were applied in the analysis of asphalt samples after their fractionation into asphaltenes and maltenes, according to American Society for Testing and Material D4124, where the maltenic fraction was further separated into its basic, acidic, and neutral parts following the method of Green. Only two nitrated derivatives were found in the asphalt sample, quinoline and 2-nitrofluorene, with concentrations of 9.26 and 2146 mg/kg, respectively, whereas no oxygenated derivatives were detected. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Distinguishing N-oxide and hydroxyl compounds: impact of heated capillary/heated ion transfer tube in inducing atmospheric pressure ionization source decompositions.

    PubMed

    Peiris, Dilrukshi M; Lam, Wing; Michael, Steven; Ramanathan, Ragu

    2004-06-01

    In the pharmaceutical industry, a higher attrition rate during the drug discovery process means a lower drug failure rate in the later stages. This translates into shorter drug development time and reduced cost for bringing a drug to market. Over the past few years, analytical strategies based on liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS) have gone through revolutionary changes and presently accommodate most of the needs of the pharmaceutical industry. Among these LC/MS techniques, collision induced dissociation (CID) or tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS and MS(n)) techniques have been widely used to identify unknown compounds and characterize metabolites. MS/MS methods are generally ineffective for distinguishing isomeric compounds such as metabolites involving oxygenation of carbon or nitrogen atoms. Most recently, atmospheric pressure ionization (API) source decomposition methods have been shown to aid in the mass spectral distinction of isomeric oxygenated (N-oxide vs hydroxyl) products/metabolites. In previous studies, experiments were conducted using mass spectrometers equipped with a heated capillary interface between the mass analyzer and the ionization source. In the present study, we investigated the impact of the length of a heated capillary or heated ion transfer tube (a newer version of the heated capillary designed for accommodating orthogonal API source design) in inducing for-API source deoxygenation that allows the distinction of N-oxide from hydroxyl compounds. 8-Hydroxyquinoline (HO-Q), quinoline-N-oxide (Q-NO) and 8-hydroxyquinoline-N-oxide (HO-Q-NO) were used as model compounds on three different mass spectrometers (LCQ Deca, LCQ Advantage and TSQ Quantum). Irrespective of heated capillary or ion transfer tube length, N-oxides from this class of compounds underwent predominantly deoxygenation decomposition under atmospheric pressure chemical ionization conditions and the abundance of the diagnostic [M + H - O](+) ions increased with

  5. Essure Permanent Birth Control

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Prosthetics Essure Permanent Birth Control Essure Permanent Birth Control Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... Essure System Essure is a a permanently implanted birth control device for women (female sterilization). Implantation of Essure ...

  6. Steady-state permanent magnet MPD thruster

    SciTech Connect

    Arakawa, Y.; Sasoh, A.

    1987-01-01

    A steady-state MPD arc thruster with permanent magnets has been made. The effect of the permanent magnets on thruster performance and the plasma acceleration mechanism was examined through measurements of thrust, chamber pressure, current densities, and plasma properties in the exhaust plume. Experimental results show that the use of the permanent magnets is desirable in steady-state MPD thrusters of the greater than 10 kW power range. 7 references.

  7. Surface swabbing technique for the rapid screening for pesticides using ambient pressure desorption ionization with high-resolution mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Edison, Sara E; Lin, Lora A; Gamble, Bryan M; Wong, Jon; Zhang, Kai

    2011-01-15

    A rapid screening method for pesticides has been developed to promote more efficient processing of produce entering the United States. Foam swabs were used to recover a multiclass mixture of 132 pesticides from the surfaces of grapes, apples, and oranges. The swabs were analyzed using direct analysis in real time (DART) ionization coupled with a high-resolution Exactive Orbitrap™ mass spectrometer. By using a DART helium temperature gradient from 100-350°C over 3 min, a minimal separation of analytes based on volatility differences was achieved. This, combined with the Exactive's mass resolution of 100,00, allowed the chromatographic step, along with the typical compositing and extraction steps associated with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) or liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS) approaches, to be eliminated. Detection of 86% of the analytes present was consistently achieved at levels of 2 ng/g (per each apple or orange) and 10 ng/g (per grape). A resolution study was conducted with four pairs of isobaric compounds analyzed at a mass resolution of 100 000. Baseline separation was achieved with analyte ions differing in mass by 25 ppm and analyte ions with a mass difference of 10 ppm were partially resolved. In addition, field samples that had undergone traditional sample preparation using QuEChERS (quick, easy, cheap, rugged, and safe) were analyzed using both LC/MS and DART-MS and the results from the two techniques were found to be comparable in terms of identification of the pesticides present. The use of swabs greatly increased sample throughput by reducing sample preparation and analysis time.

  8. Determination of LY355703 in dog and mouse plasma by positive ion liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization.

    PubMed

    Berna, M; Shugert, R; Mullen, J

    1998-02-01

    A liquid chromatographic/mass spectrometric assay was developed for the determination of LY355703, a potent anti-tumor drug, in mouse and dog plasma. Empore (3M) C18 solid-phase extraction cartridges were used for sample preparation in conjunction with a positive pressure manifold. Chromatographic separation was obtained with a cyano high-performance liquid chromatographic column and detection was conducted using atmospheric pressure chemical ionization tandem mass spectrometry in the selected reaction monitoring mode. A structural analog, compound LY354504, was used as the internal standard. The assay was validated for the determination of LY355703 in mouse (ICR and NuNu) and dog (beagle) plasma. The lower and upper limits of quantitation were 2.1 and 527 ng ml-1, respectively, using a 0.1 ml plasma aliquot. The signal-to-noise ratio of a typical 2.1 ng ml-1 standard was approximately 40:1. The inter-day precision (relative standard deviation) and accuracy (relative error) derived from the analysis of validation samples at five concentrations ranged from 2.7 to 7.6% and from 4.8 to 4.5%, respectively. Throughput is approximately one sample every 3 min. This assay is simple, sensitive, accurate, precise and is being used to support toxicokinetic studies in dog and mouse.

  9. Automated Annotation and Evaluation of In-Source Mass Spectra in GC/Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization-MS-Based Metabolomics.

    PubMed

    Jaeger, Carsten; Hoffmann, Friederike; Schmitt, Clemens A; Lisec, Jan

    2016-10-04

    Gas chromatography using atmospheric pressure chemical ionization coupled to mass spectrometry (GC/APCI-MS) is an emerging metabolomics platform, providing much-enhanced capabilities for structural mass spectrometry as compared to traditional electron ionization (EI)-based techniques. To exploit the potential of GC/APCI-MS for more comprehensive metabolite annotation, a major bottleneck in metabolomics, we here present the novel R-based tool InterpretMSSpectrum assisting in the common task of annotating and evaluating in-source mass spectra as obtained from typical full-scan experiments. After passing a list of mass-intensity pairs, InterpretMSSpectrum locates the molecular ion (M0), fragment, and adduct peaks, calculates their most likely sum formula combination, and graphically summarizes results as an annotated mass spectrum. Using (modifiable) filter rules for the commonly used methoximated-trimethylsilylated (MeOx-TMS) derivatives, covering elemental composition, typical substructures, neutral losses, and adducts, InterpretMSSpectrum significantly reduces the number of sum formula candidates, minimizing manual effort for postprocessing candidate lists. We demonstrate the utility of InterpretMSSpectrum for 86 in-source spectra of derivatized standard compounds, in which rank-1 sum formula assignments were achieved in 84% of the cases, compared to only 63% when using mass and isotope information on the M0 alone. We further use, for the first time, automated annotation to evaluate the purity of pseudospectra generated by different metabolomics preprocessing tools, showing that automated annotation can serve as an integrative quality measure for peak picking/deconvolution methods. As an R package, InterpretMSSpectrum integrates flexibly into existing metabolomics pipelines and is freely available from CRAN ( https://cran.r-project.org/ ).

  10. Open Port Probe Sampling Interface for the Direct Coupling of Biocompatible Solid-Phase Microextraction to Atmospheric Pressure Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Ríos, Germán Augusto; Liu, Chang; Tascon, Marcos; Reyes-Garcés, Nathaly; Arnold, Don W; Covey, Thomas R; Pawliszyn, Janusz

    2017-04-04

    In recent years, the direct coupling of solid phase microextraction (SPME) and mass spectrometry (MS) has shown its great potential to improve limits of quantitation, accelerate analysis throughput, and diminish potential matrix effects when compared to direct injection to MS. In this study, we introduce the open port probe (OPP) as a robust interface to couple biocompatible SPME (Bio-SPME) fibers to MS systems for direct electrospray ionization. The presented design consisted of minimal alterations to the front-end of the instrument and provided better sensitivity, simplicity, speed, wider compound coverage, and high-throughput in comparison to the LC-MS based approach. Quantitative determination of clenbuterol, fentanyl, and buprenorphine was successfully achieved in human urine. Despite the use of short extraction/desorption times (5 min/5 s), limits of quantitation below the minimum required performance levels (MRPL) set by the world antidoping agency (WADA) were obtained with good accuracy (≥90%) and linearity (R(2) > 0.99) over the range evaluated for all analytes using sample volumes of 300 μL. In-line technologies such as multiple reaction monitoring with multistage fragmentation (MRM(3)) and differential mobility spectrometry (DMS) were used to enhance the selectivity of the method without compromising analysis speed. On the basis of calculations, once coupled to high throughput, this method can potentially yield preparation times as low as 15 s per sample based on the 96-well plate format. Our results demonstrated that Bio-SPME-OPP-MS efficiently integrates sampling/sample cleanup and atmospheric pressure ionization, making it an advantageous configuration for several bioanalytical applications, including doping in sports, in vivo tissue sampling, and therapeutic drug monitoring.

  11. Normal phase liquid chromatography coupled to quadrupole time of flight atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry for separation, detection and mass spectrometric profiling of neutral sphingolipids and cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Farwanah, Hany; Wirtz, Jennifer; Kolter, Thomas; Raith, Klaus; Neubert, Reinhard H H; Sandhoff, Konrad

    2009-10-01

    Many lipidomic approaches focus on investigating aspects of sphingolipid metabolism. Special emphasis is put on neutral sphingolipids and cholesterol and their interaction. Such an interest is attributed to the fact that those lipids are altered in a series of serious disorders including various sphingolipidoses. High performance thin-layer chromatography (HPTLC) has become a widely used technique for lipid analysis. However, mass spectrometric profiling is irreplaceable for gaining an overview about the various molecular species within a lipid class. In this work we have developed a sensitive method based on a gradient normal phase high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) coupled to quadrupole time of flight (QTOF) atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry (APCI-MS) in positive mode, which for the first time enables separation, on-line detection, and mass spectrometric profiling of multiple neutral sphingolipids including ceramide, glucosylceramide, lactosylceramide, globotriaosylceramide, globotetraosylceramide, sphingomyelin as well as cholesterol within less than 15min. An important advantage of the presented HPLC/APCI-MS approach is that the separation pattern emulates the one obtained by an optimized HPTLC method with a multiple stage development. Thus, the lipid classes previously separated and quantified by HPTLC can be easily screened regarding their mass spectrometric profiles by HPLC/APCI-MS. In addition, the selected ionization conditions enable in-source fragmentation providing useful structural information. The methods (HPLC/APCI-MS and the optimized HPTLC) were applied for the analysis of the mentioned lipids in human fibroblasts. This approach is aimed basically at investigators who perform studies based on genetic modifications or treatment with pharmacological agents leading to changes in the biochemical pathways of neutral sphingolipids and cholesterol. In addition, it can be of interest for research on disorders related to

  12. Effect of pressure-induced changes in the ionization equilibria of buffers on inactivation of Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus by high hydrostatic pressure.

    PubMed

    Gayán, Elisa; Condón, Santiago; Álvarez, Ignacio; Nabakabaya, Maria; Mackey, Bernard

    2013-07-01

    Survival rates of Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus after high-pressure treatment in buffers that had large or small reaction volumes (ΔV°), and which therefore underwent large or small changes in pH under pressure, were compared. At a low buffer concentration of 0.005 M, survival was, as expected, better in MOPS (morpholinepropanesulfonic acid), HEPES, and Tris, whose ΔV° values are approximately 5.0 to 7.0 cm(3) mol(-1), than in phosphate or dimethyl glutarate (DMG), whose ΔV° values are about -25 cm(3) mol(-1). However, at a concentration of 0.1 M, survival was unexpectedly better in phosphate and DMG than in MOPS, HEPES, or Tris. This was because the baroprotective effect of phosphate and DMG increased much more rapidly with increasing concentration than it did with MOPS, HEPES, or Tris. Further comparisons of survival in solutions of salts expected to cause large electrostriction effects (Na2SO4 and CaCl2) and those causing lower electrostriction (NaCl and KCl) were made. The salts with divalent ions were protective at much lower concentrations than salts with monovalent ions. Buffers and salts both protected against transient membrane disruption in E. coli, but the molar concentrations necessary for membrane protection were much lower for phosphate and Na2SO4 than for HEPES and NaCl. Possible protective mechanisms discussed include effects of electrolytes on water compressibility and kosmotropic and specific ion effects. The results of this systematic study will be of considerable practical significance in studies of pressure inactivation of microbes under defined conditions but also raise important fundamental questions regarding the mechanisms of baroprotection by ionic solutes.

  13. Effect of Pressure-Induced Changes in the Ionization Equilibria of Buffers on Inactivation of Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus by High Hydrostatic Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Gayán, Elisa; Condón, Santiago; Álvarez, Ignacio; Nabakabaya, Maria

    2013-01-01

    Survival rates of Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus after high-pressure treatment in buffers that had large or small reaction volumes (ΔV°), and which therefore underwent large or small changes in pH under pressure, were compared. At a low buffer concentration of 0.005 M, survival was, as expected, better in MOPS (morpholinepropanesulfonic acid), HEPES, and Tris, whose ΔV° values are approximately 5.0 to 7.0 cm3 mol−1, than in phosphate or dimethyl glutarate (DMG), whose ΔV° values are about −25 cm3 mol−1. However, at a concentration of 0.1 M, survival was unexpectedly better in phosphate and DMG than in MOPS, HEPES, or Tris. This was because the baroprotective effect of phosphate and DMG increased much more rapidly with increasing concentration than it did with MOPS, HEPES, or Tris. Further comparisons of survival in solutions of salts expected to cause large electrostriction effects (Na2SO4 and CaCl2) and those causing lower electrostriction (NaCl and KCl) were made. The salts with divalent ions were protective at much lower concentrations than salts with monovalent ions. Buffers and salts both protected against transient membrane disruption in E. coli, but the molar concentrations necessary for membrane protection were much lower for phosphate and Na2SO4 than for HEPES and NaCl. Possible protective mechanisms discussed include effects of electrolytes on water compressibility and kosmotropic and specific ion effects. The results of this systematic study will be of considerable practical significance in studies of pressure inactivation of microbes under defined conditions but also raise important fundamental questions regarding the mechanisms of baroprotection by ionic solutes. PMID:23624471

  14. Analytical instruments, ionization sources, and ionization methods

    DOEpatents

    Atkinson, David A.; Mottishaw, Paul

    2006-04-11

    Methods and apparatus for simultaneous vaporization and ionization of a sample in a spectrometer prior to introducing the sample into the drift tube of the analyzer are disclosed. The apparatus includes a vaporization/ionization source having an electrically conductive conduit configured to receive sample particulate which is conveyed to a discharge end of the conduit. Positioned proximate to the discharge end of the conduit is an electrically conductive reference device. The conduit and the reference device act as electrodes and have an electrical potential maintained between them sufficient to cause a corona effect, which will cause at least partial simultaneous ionization and vaporization of the sample particulate. The electrical potential can be maintained to establish a continuous corona, or can be held slightly below the breakdown potential such that arrival of particulate at the point of proximity of the electrodes disrupts the potential, causing arcing and the corona effect. The electrical potential can also be varied to cause periodic arcing between the electrodes such that particulate passing through the arc is simultaneously vaporized and ionized. The invention further includes a spectrometer containing the source. The invention is particularly useful for ion mobility spectrometers and atmospheric pressure ionization mass spectrometers.

  15. Quantitation of triacylglycerols in edible oils by off-line comprehensive two-dimensional liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry using a single column.

    PubMed

    Wei, Fang; Hu, Na; Lv, Xin; Dong, Xu-Yan; Chen, Hong

    2015-07-24

    In this investigation, off-line comprehensive two-dimensional liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry using a single column has been applied for the identification and quantification of triacylglycerols in edible oils. A novel mixed-mode phenyl-hexyl chromatographic column was employed in this off-line two-dimensional separation system. The phenyl-hexyl column combined the features of traditional C18 and silver-ion columns, which could provide hydrophobic interactions with triacylglycerols under acetonitrile conditions and can offer π-π interactions with triacylglycerols under methanol conditions. When compared with traditional off-line comprehensive two-dimensional liquid chromatography employing two different chromatographic columns (C18 and silver-ion column) and using elution solvents comprised of two phases (reversed-phase/normal-phase) for triacylglycerols separation, the novel off-line comprehensive two-dimensional liquid chromatography using a single column can be achieved by simply altering the mobile phase between acetonitrile and methanol, which exhibited a much higher selectivity for the separation of triacylglycerols with great efficiency and rapid speed. In addition, an approach based on the use of response factor with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry has been developed for triacylglycerols quantification. Due to the differences between saturated and unsaturated acyl chains, the use of response factors significantly improves the quantitation of triacylglycerols. This two-dimensional liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry system was successfully applied for the profiling of triacylglycerols in soybean oils, peanut oils and lord oils. A total of 68 triacylglycerols including 40 triacylglycerols in soybean oils, 50 triacylglycerols in peanut oils and 44 triacylglycerols in lord oils have been identified and quantified. The liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry data were analyzed

  16. Differentiation of various kinds of Fructus schisandrae by surface desorption atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry combined with principal component analysis.

    PubMed

    Pi, Zifeng; Yue, Hao; Ma, Li; Ding, Liying; Liu, Zhiqiang; Liu, Shuying

    2011-11-14

    Various kinds of Fructus schisandrae were studied by surface desorption atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry (DAPCI-MS) without any sample pretreatment. The volatile components in F. schisandrae were detected in the ambient environment and the analytical time for each sample was only 30s. F. schisandrae are produced mainly in 5 different geographical regions (Elunchun, Mudanjiang, Tonghua, Tieling and Shangluo), and they could be successfully differentiated according to their chemical markers by Principal Component Analysis (PCA). A total of 8 components which gave more contribution for PCA analysis were unambiguously identified by comparison of the MS(2) data of chemical markers to the data of reference compounds as reported in the literature. Similarly, wild grown and cultivatable species of F. schisandrae were well separated by the above-mentioned method. In addition, raw and processed cultivatable F. schisandrae (steamed by water, alcohol, vinegar, or honey, and fried by honey) were found to be clustered at different location, respectively. Furthermore, the clustered degree of differently processed products was correlated with their clinical effects. Our results demonstrated that DAPCI-MS in combination with PCA was a feasible technique for high-throughput differentiation of various kinds of F. schisandrae. It is also possible that DAPCI-MS could become a powerful technology in the studies of traditional Chinese medicine studies and in situ analysis of Chinese herbs. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Localization of double bonds in triacylglycerols using high-performance liquid chromatography/atmospheric pressure chemical ionization ion-trap mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Háková, Eva; Vrkoslav, Vladimír; Míková, Radka; Schwarzová-Pecková, Karolina; Bosáková, Zuzana; Cvačka, Josef

    2015-07-01

    A method for localizing double bonds in triacylglycerols using high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) was developed. The technique was based on collision-induced dissociation or pulsed Q collision-induced dissociation of the C3H5N(+•) adducts ([M + 55](+•)) formed in the presence of acetonitrile in the APCI source. The spectra were investigated using a large series of standards obtained from commercial sources and prepared by randomization. The fragmentation spectra made it possible to determine (i) the total number of carbons and double bonds in the molecule, (ii) the number of carbons and double bonds in acyls, (iii) the acyl in the sn-2 position on the glycerol backbone, and (iv) the double-bond positions in acyls. The double-bond positions were determined based on two types of fragments (alpha and omega ions) formed by cleavages of C-C bonds vinylic to the original double bond. The composition of the acyls and their positions on glycerol were established from the masses and intensities of the ions formed by the elimination of fatty acids from the [M + 55](+•) precursor. The method was applied for the analysis of triacylglycerols in olive oil and vernix caseosa.

  18. Quantitative real-time monitoring of chemical reactions by autosampling flow injection analysis coupled with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhenqian; Bartmess, John E; McNally, Mary Ellen; Hoffman, Ron M; Cook, Kelsey D; Song, Liguo

    2012-09-04

    Although qualitative and/or semiquantitative real-time monitoring of chemical reactions have been reported with a few mass spectrometric approaches, to our knowledge, no quantitative mass spectrometric approach has been reported so far to have a calibration valid up to molar concentrations as required by process control. This is mostly due to the absence of a practical solution that could well address the sample overloading issue. In this study, a novel autosampling flow injection analysis coupled with an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry (FIA/APCI-MS) system, consisting of a 1 μL automatic internal sample injector, a postinjection splitter with 1:10 splitting ratio, and a detached APCI source connected to the mass spectrometer using a 4.5 in. long, 0.042 in. inner diameter (ID) stainless-steel capillary, was thus introduced. Using this system together with an optional FIA solvent modifier, e.g., 0.05% (v/v) isopropylamine, a linear quantitative calibration up to molar concentration has been achieved with 3.4-7.2% relative standard deviations (RSDs) for 4 replicates. As a result, quantitative real-time monitoring of a model reaction was successfully performed at the 1.63 M level. It is expected that this novel autosampling FIA/APCI-MS system can be used in quantitative real-time monitoring of a wide range of reactions under diverse reaction conditions.

  19. Analysis of vitamin K1 in fruits and vegetables using accelerated solvent extraction and liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization.

    PubMed

    Jäpelt, Rie Bak; Jakobsen, Jette

    2016-02-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a rapid, sensitive, and specific analytical method to study vitamin K1 in fruits and vegetables. Accelerated solvent extraction and solid phase extraction was used for sample preparation. Quantification was done by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization in selected reaction monitoring mode with deuterium-labeled vitamin K1 as an internal standard. The precision was estimated as the pooled estimate of three replicates performed on three different days for spinach, peas, apples, banana, and beetroot. The repeatability was 5.2% and the internal reproducibility was 6.2%. Recovery was in the range 90-120%. No significant difference was observed between the results obtained by the present method and by a method using the same principle as the CEN-standard i.e. liquid-liquid extraction and post-column zinc reduction with fluorescence detection. Limit of quantification was estimated to 0.05 μg/100g fresh weight. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. A highly specific and sensitive quantification analysis of the sterols in silkworm larvae by high performance liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Igarashi, Fumihiko; Hikiba, Juri; Ogihara, Mari H; Nakaoka, Takayoshi; Suzuki, Minoru; Kataoka, Hiroshi

    2011-12-15

    The biochemical quantification of sterols in insects has been difficult because only small amounts of tissues can be obtained from insect bodies and because sterol metabolites are structurally related. We have developed a highly specific and sensitive quantitative method for determining of the concentrations of seven sterols-7-dehydrocholesterol, desmosterol, cholesterol, ergosterol, campesterol, stigmasterol, and β-sitosterol-using a high performance liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC/APCI-MS/MS). The sterols were extracted from silkworm larval tissues using the Bligh and Dyer method and were analyzed using HPLC/APCI-MS/MS with selected reaction monitoring, using cholesterol-3,4-(13)C(2) as an internal standard. The detection limits of the method were between 12.1 and 259 fmol. The major sterol in most silkworm larval tissues was cholesterol, whereas only small quantities of the dietary sterols were detected. Thus, a simple, sensitive, and specific method was successfully developed for the quantification of the sterol concentrations in each tissue of an individual silkworm larva. This method will be a useful tool for investigating to molecular basis of sterol physiology in insects, facilitating the quantification of femtomole quantities of sterols in biological samples. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Screening of pesticides and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in feeds and fish tissues by gas chromatography coupled to high-resolution mass spectrometry using atmospheric pressure chemical ionization.

    PubMed

    Nácher-Mestre, Jaime; Serrano, Roque; Portolés, Tania; Berntssen, Marc H G; Pérez-Sánchez, Jaume; Hernández, Félix

    2014-03-12

    This paper reports a wide-scope screening for detection and identification of pesticides and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in feeds and fish tissues. QuEChERS sample treatment was applied, using freezing as an additional cleanup. Analysis was carried out by gas chromatography coupled to hybrid quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (GC-(APCI) QTOF MS). The qualitative validation was performed for over 133 representative pesticides and 24 PAHs at 0.01 and 0.05 mg/kg. Subsequent application of the screening method to aquaculture samples made it possible to detect several compounds from the target list, such as chlorpyrifos-methyl, pirimiphos-methyl, and ethoxyquin, among others. Light PAHs (≤4 rings) were found in both animal and vegetable samples. The reliable identification of the compounds was supported by accurate mass measurements and the presence of at least two representative m/z ions in the spectrum together with the retention time of the peak, in agreement with the reference standard. Additionally, the search was widened to include other pesticides for which standards were not available, thanks to the expected presence of the protonated molecule and/or molecular ion in the APCI spectra. This could allow the detection and tentative identification of other pesticides different from those included in the validated target list.

  2. Quantitation of lysergic acid diethylamide in urine using atmospheric pressure matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization ion trap mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Cui, Meng; McCooeye, Margaret A; Fraser, Catharine; Mester, Zoltán

    2004-12-01

    A quantitative method was developed for analysis of lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) in urine using atmospheric pressure matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization ion trap mass spectrometry (AP MALDI-ITMS). Following solid-phase extraction of LSD from urine samples, extracts were analyzed by AP MALDI-ITMS. The identity of LSD was confirmed by fragmentation of the [M + H](+) ion using tandem mass spectrometry. The quantification of LSD was achieved using stable-isotope-labeled LSD (LSD-d(3)) as the internal standard. The [M + H](+) ion fragmented to produce a dominant fragment ion, which was used for a selected reaction monitoring (SRM) method for quantitative analysis of LSD. SRM was compared with selected ion monitoring and produced a wider linear range and lower limit of quantification. For SRM analysis of samples of LSD spiked in urine, the calibration curve was linear in the range of 1-100 ng/mL with a coefficient of determination, r(2), of 0.9917. This assay was used to determine LSD in urine samples and the AP MALDI-MS results were comparable to the HPLC/ ESI-MS results.

  3. Determination of pramipexole (U-98,528) in human plasma by high-performance liquid chromatography with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lau, Y Y; Selenka, J M; Hanson, G D; Talaat, R; Ichhpurani, N

    1996-08-30

    A highly sensitive and selective HPLC-MS-MS method was developed for the determination of pramipexole in human plasma. The analytes, pramipexole and BHT-920 (internal standard), were extracted from plasma at basic pH with methyl tert.-butyl ether (MTBE). MTBE was evaporated to dryness and reconstituted in 100 microliters of (95:5) methanol-water. Chromatographic separation was achieved on a Zorbax SB-CN column with a mobile phase of (15:5:80) water-0.1 M ammonium acetate-methanol. The analytes were detected utilizing HPLC in conjunction with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) tandem mass spectrometry (MS-MS). The assay was linear in the concentration ranges of 50 to 5000 pg/ml. The analysis of pooled quality controls (150, 750, and 3000 pg/ml) demonstrated excellent precision with relative standard deviations (R.S.D.) (n = 18) of 7.2%, 5.3% and 5.2%, respectively. The method is accurate with all intra-day (n = 6) and overall (n = 18) mean values being less than 11.7% from theoretical.

  4. Analysis of the enantiomers of VX using normal-phase chiral liquid chromatography with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Smith, J R

    2004-01-01

    The chemical warfare nerve agent O-ethyl S-(2-diisopropylaminoethyl) methylphosphonothioate (VX) is a mixture of two enantiomers resulting from the chiral center at the phosphorus atom. Significant differences exist in the reported toxicity and acetylcholinesterase inhibition rates of the two enantiomers. This makes the ability to distinguish between them desirable for either toxicological studies or the development of antidotal therapies. Using a Chiralcel OD-H column with normal-phase liquid chromatography, the enantiomers were baseline resolved in less than 7 min. Atmospheric pressure chemical ionization was utilized as the interface between a liquid chromatograph and mass spectrometer. The mass spectra of the two enantiomers were virtually identical. The protonated molecule was readily observed at m/z 268. VX was incubated with human plasma for 13 min, followed by hexane extraction. The areas of the first and second eluting VX enantiomers decreased by approximately 40% and 6%, respectively, when compared with VX-spiked plasma samples that were not allowed an incubation phase. Currently, research by others has been directed towards the identification, isolation, and possible modification of enzymes capable of hydrolyzing VX. The method presented here provides an analytical tool capable of monitoring the stereospecificity of enzymes that react with VX.

  5. Continuous water infusion enhances atmospheric pressure chemical ionization of methyl chloroformate derivatives in gas chromatography coupled to time-of-flight mass spectrometry-based metabolomics.

    PubMed

    Wachsmuth, Christian J; Dettmer, Katja; Lang, Sven A; Mycielska, Maria E; Oefner, Peter J

    2014-09-16

    The effects of continuous water infusion on efficiency and repeatability of atmospheric pressure chemical ionization of both methyl chloroformate (MCF) and methoxime-trimethylsilyl (MO-TMS) derivatives of metabolites were evaluated using gas chromatography-time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Water infusion at a flow-rate of 0.4 mL/h yielded not only an average 16.6-fold increase in intensity of the quasimolecular ion for 20 MCF-derivatized metabolite standards through suppression of in-source fragmentation but also the most repeatable peak area integrals. The impact of water infusion was the greatest for dicarboxylic acids and the least for (hetero-) aromatic compounds. Water infusion also improved the ability to detect reliably fold changes as small as 1.33-fold for the same 20 MCF-derivatized metabolite standards spiked into a human serum extract. On the other hand, MO-TMS derivatives were not significantly affected by water infusion, neither in their fragmentation patterns nor with regard to the detection of differentially regulated compounds. As a proof of principle, we applied MCF derivatization and GC-APCI-TOFMS to the detection of changes in abundance of metabolites in pancreatic cancer cells upon treatment with 17-DMAG. Water infusion increased not only the number of metabolites identified via their quasimolecular ion but also the reproducibility of peak areas, thereby almost doubling the number of significantly regulated metabolites (false discovery rate < 0.05) to a total of 23.

  6. Carbamazepine in municipal wastewater and wastewater sludge: ultrafast quantification by laser diode thermal desorption-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization coupled with tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Mohapatra, D P; Brar, S K; Tyagi, R D; Picard, P; Surampalli, R Y

    2012-09-15

    In this study, the distribution of the anti-epileptic drug carbamazepine (CBZ) in wastewater (WW) and aqueous and solid phases of wastewater sludge (WWS) was carried out. A rapid and reliable method enabling high-throughput sample analysis for quicker data generation, detection, and monitoring of CBZ in WW and WWS was developed and validated. The ultrafast method (15s per sample) is based on the laser diode thermal desorption-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (LDTD-APCI) coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). The optimization of instrumental parameters and method application for environmental analysis are presented. The performance of the novel method was evaluated by estimation of extraction recovery, linearity, precision and detection limit. The method detection limits was 12 ng L(-1) in WW and 3.4 ng g(-1) in WWS. The intra- and inter-day precisions were 8% and 11% in WW and 6% and 9% in WWS, respectively. Furthermore, three extraction methods, ultrasonic extraction (USE), microwave-assisted extraction (MAE) and accelerated solvent extraction (ASE) with three different solvent condition such as methanol, acetone and acetonitrile:ethyle acetate (5:1, v/v) were compared on the basis of procedural blank and method recovery. Overall, ASE showed the best extraction efficiency with methanol as compared to USE and MAE. Furthermore, the quantification of CBZ in WW and WWS samples showed the presence of contaminant in all stages of the treatment plant.

  7. Identification and quantification of antitumor thioproline and methylthioproline in Korean traditional foods by a liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sun Hyo; Kim, Hyun-Ji; Shin, Ho-Sang

    2014-11-01

    A liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-tandem mass spectrometric method (LC-APCI-MS/MS) has been developed for the sensitive determination of antitumor thioproline and methylthioproline from fermented foods. Thioproline and methylthioproline were derivatized in one step with ethyl chloroformate at room temperature. These compounds were identified and quantified in various traditional Korean fermented foods by LC-APCI-MS/MS. The concentration range of thioproline of each food was found for doenjang (0.011-0.032mg/kg), gochujang (0.010-0.038mg/kg), and ganjang (0.010-0.038mg/kg). Those of methylthioproline of each food was found for doenjang (0.098-0.632mg/kg), gochujang (0.015-0.112mg/kg), and ganjang (0.023-1.468mg/kg). A prolonged aging time leads to an increase in both the thioproline and methylthioproline contents, suggesting that the storage time plays a key role in the formation of thioproline and methylthioproline in Korean traditional foods. The results here suggest that thioproline and methylthioproline are related to the biological activities of traditional Korean fermented foods.

  8. A method for simultaneous analysis of phytosterols and phytosterol esters in tobacco leaves using non aqueous reversed phase chromatography and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry detector.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Naoyuki

    2014-05-02

    While numerous analytical methods for phytosterols have been reported, the similar polarity and large molecules of phytosterol esters have made the methods lengthy and complicated. For this reason, an analytical method that could completely separate phytosterol esters including the higher fatty acids such as palmitic acid, stearic acid, oleic acid, linoleic acid and linolenic acid in addition to phytosterols without preliminary separation was developed. The separation was accomplished by non-aqueous reversed phase chromatography technique using only acetone and acetonitrile. An atmospheric pressure chemical ionization/mass spectrometry detector configured at selected ion monitoring mode was hyphenated with the separation system to detect phytosterols and phytosterol esters. Twenty-four types of these were consequently separated and then identified with their authentic components. The calibration curve was drawn in the range of about 5 to 25,000 ng/mL with a regression coefficient over 0.999. The limit of detection and limit of quantification, respectively, ranged from 0.9 to 3.0 ng/mL and from 3.0 to 11.0 ng/mL. Recovery rates ranged from 80 to 120%. The quantification results were subjected to statistical analysis and hierarchical clustering analysis, and were used to determine the differences in the amounts of phytosterols and phytosterol esters across tobacco leaves. The newly developed method succeeded in clarifying the whole composition of phytosterols and phytosterol esters in tobacco leaves and in explaining compositional differences across the variety of tobacco leaves.

  9. Triacylglycerols profiling in plant oils important in food industry, dietetics and cosmetics using high-performance liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lísa, Miroslav; Holcapek, Michal

    2008-07-11

    Optimized non-aqueous reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography method using acetonitrile-2-propanol gradient elution and the column coupling in the total length of 45 cm has been applied for the high resolution separation of plant oils important in food industry, dietetics and cosmetics. Positive-ion atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry is used for the unambiguous identification and also the reliable quantitation with the response factors approach. Based on the precise determination of individual triacyglycerol concentrations, the calculation of average parameters important in the nutrition is performed, i.e. average carbon number, average double bond number, relative concentrations of essential, saturated, monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids. Results are reported in the form of both chromatographic fingerprints and tables containing relative concentrations for all triacylglycerols and fatty acids in individual samples. In total, 264 triacylglycerols consisting of 28 fatty acids with the alkyl chain length from 6 to 26 carbon atoms and 0 to 4 double bonds have been identified in 26 industrial important plant oils.

  10. Characterization of major and minor alk(en)ylresorcinols from mango (Mangifera indica L.) peels by high-performance liquid chromatography/atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Knödler, Matthias; Berardini, Nicolai; Kammerer, Dietmar R; Carle, Reinhold; Schieber, Andreas

    2007-01-01

    5-Alkyl- and 5-alkenylresorcinols, as well as their hydroxylated derivatives, were extracted from mango (Mangifera indica L.) peels, purified on polyamide and characterized by high-performance liquid chromatography/atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry (HPLC/APcI-MS) for the first time. Among the 15 compounds analyzed, 3 major and 12 minor C(15)-, C(17)-, and C(19)-substituted resorcinols and related analogues, showing varying degrees of unsaturation, were characterized by their specific fragmentation patterns in collision-induced dissociation experiments. This marks the first report on the occurrence of mono-, di-, and triunsaturated C(15)-homologues, saturated and triunsaturated C(17)-homologues, and mono- and diunsaturated C(19)-homologues in mango peels. Additionally, several hydroxylated C(15)- and C(17)-homologues, also not yet described in mango, and a C(14)-monoene, unique because of its even-numbered side chain, were tentatively identified on the basis of their fragmentation patterns. The results obtained in the present study indicate that HPLC-DAD-APcI-MS(n), combined with the newly developed solid-phase extraction, is a powerful tool for the analysis of alk(en)ylresorcinols and could therefore be used for their determination in various matrices.

  11. Structure-dependent degradation of polar compounds in weathered oils observed by atmospheric pressure photo-ionization hydrogen/deuterium exchange ultrahigh resolution mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Islam, Ananna; Kim, Donghwi; Yim, Un Hyuk; Shim, Won Joon; Kim, Sunghwan

    2015-10-15

    The resin fractions of fresh mixtures of three oils spilled during the M/V Hebei Spirit oil spill, as well as weathered oils collected at weathering stages II and IV from the oil spill site were analyzed and compared by atmospheric pressure photo-ionization hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX MS). The significantly decreased abundance of N(+) and [N-H+D](+) ions suggested that secondary and tertiary amine-containing compounds were preferentially degraded during the early stage of weathering. [N+H](+) and [N+D](+) ions previously attributed to pyridine-type compounds degraded more slowly than secondary and tertiary amine-containing compounds. The preferential degradation of nitrogen-containing compounds was confirmed by photo-degradation experiments using 15 standard compounds. In addition, significant increases of [S1O1+H](+) and [S1O1+D](+) ions with higher DBE values were observed from fresh oil mixtures as compared to stages II and IV samples, and that could be linked with the decrease of higher DBE compounds of the S1 class. This study presented convincing arguments and evidence demonstrating that secondary and tertiary amines were more vulnerable to photo-degradation than compounds containing pyridine, and hence, preferential degradation depending on chemical structures must be considered in the production of hazardous or toxic components. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Application of pentafluorophenyl hydrazine derivatives to the analysis of nabumetone and testosterone in human plasma by liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Sheen, J F; Her, G R

    2004-12-01

    Two carbonyl compounds, nabumetone and testosterone, were derivatized with pentafluorophenyl hydrazine (PFPH) and analyzed by atmospheric-pressure chemical-ionization mass spectrometry. The PFPH derivatives underwent dissociative electron capture in negative-ion APCI (ECAPCI) and gave intense [M-20](-) ions in the mass spectra. In positive-ion APCI, the PFPH derivatives underwent efficient protonation and gave intense [M + H](+) ions in the mass spectra. In CID, the major product ions of the [M-20](-) ions in ECAPCI corresponded to the partial moiety of PFPH. In contrast, the major product ions of [M + H](+) corresponded to the partial moiety of the analyte. By using selected reaction monitoring (SRM) detection, low pg of nabumetone (1 pg) and testosterone (7 pg) could be detected in both ECAPCI and positive-ion APCI. In comparison with the detection limits (SRM) of the underivatized analytes, use of the PFPH derivatives resulted in 2500-fold and 35-fold sensitivity enhancements for nabumetone and testosterone, respectively. The PFPH derivatives were applied to the analysis of nabumetone and testosterone in human plasma by both ECAPCI and positive-ion APCI and were found to enable detection of 0.1 ng mL(-1) nabumetone in spiked plasma. For testosterone, endogenous testosterone in female plasma was detected in both ECAPCI and positive-ion APCI.

  13. Trace analysis of selected hormones and sterols in river sediments by liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Matić, Ivana; Grujić, Svetlana; Jauković, Zorica; Laušević, Mila

    2014-10-17

    In this paper, development and optimization of new LC-MS method for determination of twenty selected hormones, human/animal and plant sterols in river sediments were described. Sediment samples were prepared using ultrasonic extraction and clean up with silica gel/anhydrous sodium sulphate cartridge. Extracts were analyzed by liquid chromatography-linear ion trap-tandem mass spectrometry, with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization. The optimized extraction parameters were extraction solvent (methanol), weight of the sediment (2 g) and time of ultrasonic extraction (3× 10 min). Successful chromatographic separation of hormones (estriol and estrone, 17α- and 17β-estradiol) and four human/animal sterols (epicoprostanol, coprostanol, α-cholestanol and β-cholestanol) that have identical fragmentation reactions was achieved. The developed and optimized method provided high recoveries (73-118%), low limits of detection (0.8-18 ng g(-1)) and quantification (2.5-60 ng g(-1)) with the RSDs generally lower than 20%. Applicability of the developed method was confirmed by analysis of six river sediment samples. A widespread occurrence of human/animal and plant sterols was found. The only detected hormone was mestranol in just one sediment sample. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Rapid and sensitive analysis of azadirachtin and related triterpenoids from Neem (Azadirachta indica) by high-performance liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Schaaf, O; Jarvis, A P; van der Esch, S A; Giagnacovo, G; Oldham, N J

    2000-07-21

    Based on reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) mass spectrometry, a HPLC-MS method was developed to permit the rapid qualitative and quantitative analysis of azadirachtin and related tetranortriterpenoids from seeds and tissue cultures of Neem (Azadirachta indica). APCI+ standard scanning mass spectra of the major Neem triterpenoids were recorded and utilized to select suitable ions for selected ion monitoring (SIM). Transitions for selective reaction monitoring (SRM) were based on MS-MS experiments. Using SIM, major Neem triterpenoids were detected in callus culture material and seed kernels of A. indica. The limit of detection for azadirachtin in extract samples (approximately 1 ng ml(-1) or 10 pg in SIM mode) was determined to be (with respect to injected absolute amounts) approximately 1000-times lower than values quoted in the literature for existing HPLC methods (approximately 200 ng ml(-1) or 10 ng). In addition to high sensitivity, the HPLC-MS method is able to tolerate minimal sample preparation and purification, dramatically reducing total analysis time.

  15. Simultaneous determination of eight underivatized amphetamines in hair by high-performance liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry (HPLC-APCI-MS).

    PubMed

    Stanaszek, Roman; Piekoszewski, Wojciech

    2004-03-01

    The aim of this study was to develop, optimize, and validate an analytical procedure to determine a group of eight amphetamines, amphetamine (AMP), ephedrine (EP), methcathinone (MTC), paramethoxyamphetamine (PMA), methamphetamine (MA), methylenedioxyamphetamine (MDA), methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA), and methylenedioxyethylamphetamine (MDEA), in hair. The target substances were extracted with 1-chlorobutane after alkaline (1M NaOH) digestion and analyzed underivatized with high-performance liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry (LC-APCI-MS). APCI-MS parameters such as fragmentor and capillary voltage, corona current, drying gas temperature and flow rate, vaporizer temperature, and nebulizer gas pressure were optimized with the application of flow injection analysis. Quantitation was performed using selected ion monitoring of protonated molecular ions of the studied drugs, and their deuterated analogues were used as internal standards. The limits of detection were 0.05 ng/mg for MA, MDA, MDMA, and MDEA; 0.10 ng/mg for EP and AMP; and 0.20 ng/mg for MTC and PMA. A linear response was observed for all drugs from 0 to 20 ng/mg. The method was applied to the determination of amphetamines in 93 authentic hair samples obtained from detoxification and methadone treatment patients, revealing the following concentrations: 0.17-17.28 ng/mg (EP), 0.52-2.08 ng/mg (MTC), 0.15-62.52 ng/mg (AMP), 0.10-16.52 ng/mg (MA), 0.10-0.88 ng/mg (MDMA), and 0.10-0.16 ng/mg (MDEA). MDA and PMA were never detected.

  16. Gas chromatography/atmospheric pressure chemical ionization/mass spectrometry for the analysis of organochlorine pesticides and polychlorinated biphenyls in human serum.

    PubMed

    Geng, Dawei; Jogsten, Ingrid Ericson; Dunstan, Jody; Hagberg, Jessika; Wang, Thanh; Ruzzin, Jerome; Rabasa-Lhoret, Rémi; van Bavel, Bert

    2016-07-01

    A method using a novel atmospheric pressure chemical ionization source for coupling gas chromatography (GC/APCI) to triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (MS/MS) for the determination of organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) regulated by the Stockholm Convention is presented. One microliter injection of a six-point calibration curve of native PCBs and OCPs, ranging from 0.04 to 300pg/μL, was performed. The relative standard deviation (RSD) of the relative response factors (RRFs) was less than 15% with a coefficient of determination (r(2))>0.995. Meanwhile, two calibration solutions (CS), CS 2 (0.4pg/μL) and CS 3 (4pg/μL) were analyzed to study the repeatability calculated for both area and RRFs. The RSD for RRF ranged from 3.1 to 16% and 3.6 to 5.5% for CS 2 and CS 3, respectively. The limits of detection (LOD) determined by peak-to-peak signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) of 3 were compared between the GC/APCI/MS/MS and a GC coupled to high resolution mass spectrometry (GC/HRMS) system. GC/APCI/MS/MS resulted in lower LOD for most of the compounds, except for PCB#74, cis-chlordane and trans-chlordane. GC/APCI/MS/MS and GC/HRMS were also compared by performing analysis on 75 human serum samples together with eight QA/QC serum samples. The comparison between GC/APCI/MS/MS system and GC/HRMS system for 16 of the targeted compounds was carried out. No statistically significant difference was discovered. Due to increased sensitivity and user friendly operation under atmospheric pressure, GC/APCI/MS/MS is a powerful alternative technique that can easily meet the specification of GC/HRMS. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Ionizing radiation

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This chapter gives a comprehensive review on ionizing irradiation of fresh fruits and vegetables. Topics include principles of ionizing radiation, its effects on pathogenic and spoilage microorganisms, shelf-life, sensory quality, nutritional and phytochemical composition, as well as physiologic and...

  18. Characterization of aromatic organosulfur model compounds relevant to fossil fuels by using atmospheric pressure chemical ionization with CS2 and high-resolution tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Tang, Weijuan; Sheng, Huaming; Jin, Chunfen; Riedeman, James S; Kenttämaa, Hilkka I

    2016-04-15

    The chemistry of desulfurization involved in processing crude oil is greatly dependent on the forms of sulfur in the oil. Sulfur exists in different chemical bonding environments in fossil fuels, including those in thiophenes and benzothiophenes, thiols, sulfides, and disulfides. In this study, the fragmentation behavior of the molecular ions of 17 aromatic organosulfur compounds with various functionalities was systematically investigated by using high-resolution tandem mass spectrometry. Multiple-stage tandem mass spectrometric experiments were carried out using a linear quadrupole ion trap (LQIT) equipped with an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) source. (+)APCI/CS2 was used to generate stable dominant molecular ions for all the compounds studied except for three sulfides that also showed abundant fragment ions. The LQIT coupled with an orbitrap mass spectrometer was used for elemental composition analysis, which facilitated the identification of the neutral molecules lost during fragmentation. The characteristic fragment ions generated in MS(2) and MS(3) experiments provide clues for the chemical bonding environment of sulfur atoms in the examined compounds. Upon collision-induced dissociation (CID), the molecular ions can lose the sulfur atom in a variety of ways, including as S (32 Da), HS(•) (33 Da), H2 S (34 Da), CS (44 Da), (•) CHS (45 Da) and CH2 S (46 Da). These neutral fragments are not only indicative of the presence of sulfur, but also of the type of sulfur present in the compound. Generally, losses of HS(•) and H2 S were found to be associated with compounds containing saturated sulfur functionalities, while losses of S, CS and (•) CHS were more common for heteroaromatic sulfur compounds. High-resolution tandem mass spectrometry with APCI/CS2 ionization is a viable approach to determining the types of organosulfur compounds. It can potentially be applied to analysis of complex mixtures, which is beneficial to improving the

  19. "Magic" Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Trimpin, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    The systematic study of the temperature and pressure dependence of matrix-assisted ionization (MAI) led us to the discovery of the seemingly impossible, initially explained by some reviewers as either sleight of hand or the misinterpretation by an overzealous young scientist of results reported many years before and having little utility. The “magic” that we were attempting to report was that with matrix assistance, molecules, at least as large as bovine serum albumin (66 kDa), are lifted into the gas phase as multiply charged ions simply by exposure of the matrix:analyte sample to the vacuum of a mass spectrometer. Applied heat, a laser, or voltages are not necessary to achieve charge states and ion abundances only previously observed with electrospray ionization (ESI). The fundamentals of how solid phase volatile or nonvolatile compounds are converted to gas-phase ions without added energy currently involves speculation providing a great opportunity to rethink mechanistic understanding of ionization processes used in mass spectrometry. Improved understanding of the mechanism(s) of these processes and their connection to ESI and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization may provide opportunities to further develop new ionization strategies for traditional and yet unforeseen applications of mass spectrometry. This Critical Insights article covers developments leading to the discovery of a seemingly magic ionization process that is simple to use, fast, sensitive, robust, and can be directly applied to surface characterization using portable or high performance mass spectrometers.

  20. "Magic" Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trimpin, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    The systematic study of the temperature and pressure dependence of matrix-assisted ionization (MAI) led us to the discovery of the seemingly impossible, initially explained by some reviewers as either sleight of hand or the misinterpretation by an overzealous young scientist of results reported many years before and having little utility. The "magic" that we were attempting to report was that with matrix assistance, molecules, at least as large as bovine serum albumin (66 kDa), are lifted into the gas phase as multiply charged ions simply by exposure of the matrix:analyte sample to the vacuum of a mass spectrometer. Applied heat, a laser, or voltages are not necessary to achieve charge states and ion abundances only previously observed with electrospray ionization (ESI). The fundamentals of how solid phase volatile or nonvolatile compounds are converted to gas-phase ions without added energy currently involves speculation providing a great opportunity to rethink mechanistic understanding of ionization processes used in mass spectrometry. Improved understanding of the mechanism(s) of these processes and their connection to ESI and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization may provide opportunities to further develop new ionization strategies for traditional and yet unforeseen applications of mass spectrometry. This Critical Insights article covers developments leading to the discovery of a seemingly magic ionization process that is simple to use, fast, sensitive, robust, and can be directly applied to surface characterization using portable or high performance mass spectrometers.

  1. Increasing Polyaromatic Hydrocarbon (PAH) Molecular Coverage during Fossil Oil Analysis by Combining Gas Chromatography and Atmospheric-Pressure Laser Ionization Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry (FT-ICR MS).

    PubMed

    Benigni, Paolo; DeBord, J Daniel; Thompson, Christopher J; Gardinali, Piero; Fernandez-Lima, Francisco

    2016-01-21

    Thousands of chemically distinct compounds are encountered in fossil oil samples that require rapid screening and accurate identification. In the present paper, we show for the first time, the advantages of gas chromatography (GC) separation in combination with atmospheric-pressure laser ionization (APLI) and ultrahigh-resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS) for the screening of polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in fossil oils. In particular, reference standards of organics in shale oil, petroleum crude oil, and heavy sweet crude oil were characterized by GC-APLI-FT-ICR MS and APLI-FT-ICR MS. Results showed that, while APLI increases the ionization efficiency of PAHs, when compared to other ionization sources, the complexity of the fossil oils reduces the probability of ionizing lower-concentration compounds during direct infusion. When gas chromatography precedes APLI-FT-ICR MS, an increase (more than 2-fold) in the ionization efficiency and an increase in the signal-to-noise ratio of lower-concentration fractions are observed, giving better molecular coverage in the m/z 100-450 range. That is, the use of GC prior to APLI-FT-ICR MS resulted in higher molecular coverage, higher sensitivity, and the ability to separate and characterize molecular isomers, while maintaining the ultrahigh resolution and mass accuracy of the FT-ICR MS separation.

  2. The upper atmosphere of the exoplanet HD 209458 b revealed by the sodium D lines. Temperature-pressure profile, ionization layer, and thermosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidal-Madjar, A.; Sing, D. K.; Lecavelier Des Etangs, A.; Ferlet, R.; Désert, J.-M.; Hébrard, G.; Boisse, I.; Ehrenreich, D.; Moutou, C.

    2011-03-01

    A complete reassessment of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) observations of the transits of the extrasolar planet HD 209458 b has provided a transmission spectrum of the atmosphere over a wide range of wavelengths. Analysis of the NaI absorption line profile has already shown that the sodium abundance has to drop by at least a factor of ten above a critical altitude. Here we analyze the profile in the deep core of the NaI doublet line from HST and high-resolution ground-based spectra to further constrain the vertical structure of the HD 209458 b atmosphere. With a wavelength-dependent cross section that spans more than 5 orders of magnitude, we use the absorption signature of the NaI doublet as an atmospheric probe. The NaI transmission features are shown to sample the atmosphere of HD 209458 b over an altitude range of more than 6500 km, corresponding to a pressure range of 14 scale heights spanning 1 millibar to 10-9 bar pressures. By comparing the observations with a multi-layer model in which temperature is a free parameter at the resolution of the atmospheric scale height, we constrain the temperature vertical profile and variations in the Na abundance in the upper part of the atmosphere of HD 209458 b. We find a rise in temperature above the drop in sodium abundance at the 3 mbar level. We also identify an isothermal atmospheric layer at 1500 ± 100 K spanning almost 6 scale heights in altitude, from 10-5 to 10-7 bar. Above this layer, the temperature rises again to 2500+1500-1000 K at ~10-9 bar, indicating the presence of a thermosphere. The resulting temperature-pressure (T-P) profile agrees with the Na condensation scenario at the 3 mbar level, with a possible signature of sodium ionization at higher altitudes, near the 3 × 10-5 bar level. Our T-P profile is found to be in good agreement with the profiles obtained with aeronomical models including hydrodynamic escape.

  3. Atmospheric sampling glow discharge ionization source

    DOEpatents

    McLuckey, S.A.; Glish, G.L.

    1989-07-18

    An atmospheric sampling glow discharge ionization source that can be used in combination with an analytical instrument which operates at high vacuum, such as a mass spectrometer. The atmospheric sampling glow discharge ionization source comprises a chamber with at least one pair of electrodes disposed therein, an inlet for a gaseous sample to be analyzed and an outlet communicating with an analyzer which operates at subatmospheric pressure. The ionization chamber is maintained at a pressure below atmospheric pressure, and a voltage difference is applied across the electrodes to induce a glow discharge between the electrodes, so that molecules passing through the inlet are ionized by the glow discharge and directed into the analyzer. The ionization source accepts the sample under atmospheric pressure conditions and processes it directly into the high vacuum instrument, bridging the pressure gap and drawing off unwanted atmospheric gases. The invention also includes a method for analyzing a gaseous sample using the glow discharge ionization source described above. 3 figs.

  4. Atmospheric sampling glow discharge ionization source

    DOEpatents

    McLuckey, Scott A.; Glish, Gary L.

    1989-01-01

    An atmospheric sampling glow discharge ionization source that can be used in combination with an analytical instrument which operates at high vacuum, such as a mass spectrometer. The atmospheric sampling glow discharge ionization source comprises a chamber with at least one pair of electrodes disposed therein, an inlet for a gaseous sample to be analyzed and an outlet communicating with an analyzer which operates at subatmospheric pressure. The ionization chamber is maintained at a pressure below atmospheric pressure, and a voltage difference is applied across the electrodes to induce a glow discharge between the electrodes, so that molecules passing through the inlet are ionized by the glow discharge and directed into the analyzer. The ionization source accepts the sample under atmospheric pressure conditions and processes it directly into the high vacuum instrument, bridging the pressure gap and drawing off unwanted atmospheric gases. The invention also includes a method for analyzing a gaseous sample using the glow discharge ionization source described above.

  5. APPLICATION III: Permanent Magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gotoh, Satoshi

    The following sections are included: * Introduction * Superconducting permanent magnet using pinned type superconductor * Magnetization process based on the critical state * Demagnetizing curve and permanent magnetic properties * Demagnetizing field of pinned type II superconductor * Samples and experiments * Sample preparation * Magnetization measurements * Permanent magnetic properties of the melt processed YBCO * QMG processed YBCO * MPMG processed YBCO * Summary * References

  6. Microchip sonic spray ionization.

    PubMed

    Pól, Jaroslav; Kauppila, Tiina J; Haapala, Markus; Saarela, Ville; Franssila, Sami; Ketola, Raimo A; Kotiaho, Tapio; Kostiainen, Risto

    2007-05-01

    The first microchip version of sonic spray ionization (SSI) as an atmospheric pressure ionization source for mass spectrometry (MS) is presented. The microchip used for SSI has recently been developed in our laboratory, and it has been used before as an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) and atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI) source. Now the ionization is achieved simply by applying high (sonic) speed nebulizer gas, without heat, corona discharge, or high voltage. The microchip SSI was applied to the analysis of tetra-N-butylammonium, verapamil, testosterone, angiotensin I, and ibuprofen. The limits of detection were in the range of 15 nM to 4 microM. The technique was found to be highly dependent on the position of the chip toward the mass spectrometer inlet, and on the gas and the sample solution flow rates. The microchip SSI provided dynamic linearity following a pattern similar to that used with electrospray, good quantitative repeatability (RSD=16%), and long-term signal stability.

  7. Rare earth permanent magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Major-Sosias, M.A.

    1993-10-01

    Permanent magnets were discovered centuries ago from what was known as {open_quotes}lodestone{close_quotes}, a rock containing large quantities of the iron-bearing mineral magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}). The compass was the first technological use for permanent magnetic materials; it was used extensively for navigational purposes by the fifteenth century. During the twentieth century, as new applications for permanent magnets were developed, interest and research in permanent magnetic materials soared. Four major types of permanent magnets have been developed since the turn of the century.

  8. Determination of lycopene, alpha-carotene and beta-carotene in serum by liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry with selected-ion monitoring.

    PubMed

    Hagiwara, T; Yasuno, T; Funayama, K; Suzuki, S

    1998-04-24

    A selected-ion monitoring (SIM) determination of serum lycopene, alpha-carotene and beta-carotene by an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry (APCI-MS) was developed. A large amount of serum cholesterols disturbed the SIM determination of carotenoids by contaminating the segment of interface with the LC-MS. Therefore, separation of carotenoids from the cholesterols was performed using a mixed solution of methanol and acetonitrile (70:30) as the mobile phase on a C18 column of mightsil ODS-5 (75 mm x 4.6 mm I.D.). The SIM determination was carried out by introducing only the peak portions of carotenoids and I.S. (squalene) by means of an auto switching valve. In the positive mode of APCI-MS, lycopene, alpha-carotene and beta-carotene were monitored at m/z 537 and I.S. was monitored at m/z 411. This method was linear for all analytes in the range of 15-150 ng for lycopene, 7-70 ng for alpha-carotene and 25-50 ng for beta-carotene. The detection limit of LC-APCI-MS-SIM for carotenoids was about 3 ng per 1 ml of serum (S/N = 3). The repeatabilities, expressed as C.V.s, were 10%, 8.4% and 5.3% for lycopene, alpha-carotene and beta-carotene, respectively. The intermediate precisions, expressed as C.V.s, were 11.2%, 8.8% and 6.5% for lycopene, alpha-carotene and beta-carotene, respectively.

  9. Determination and differentiation of triacylglycerol molecular species in Antarctic and non-Antarctic yeasts by atmospheric pressure-chemical ionization-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bhuiyan, Mohammad; Tucker, David; Watson, Kenneth

    2013-09-01

    Yeast, particularly Saccharomyces cerevisiae, has long served as a model eukaryotic system for studies on the regulation of lipid metabolism. We developed a high performance liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-mass spectrometry method for the detailed analysis of triacylglycerols (TAGs) in 14 species of yeast consisting of seven Antarctic yeasts (grown at 15°C and 5°C) and seven non-Antarctic yeasts (grown at 25°C and 15°C), the latter including 3 strains of S. cerevisiae. Analysis of TAG molecular species established that the sn-2 position was invariably occupied by an unsaturated fatty acyl moiety. In S. cerevisiae the preference was for oleic acid 18:1>palmitoleic acid 16:1, in Candida albicans, Cryptococcus humicolus and Rhodotorula mucilaginosa 18:1>linoleic acid 18:2 and in Zygosaccharomyces rouxii 18:2>18:1. In the Antarctic yeasts (Cryptococcus watticus, Cryptococcus victoriae, Cryptococcus nyarrowii, Leucosporidium antarcticum, Leucosporidium fellii, Candida psychrophila and Rhodotorula mucilaginosa) the general pattern was for the sn-2 position to be occupied by 18:1, 18:2 or linolenic acid 18:3. A trend towards synthesis of increased unsaturated fatty acid in TAGs was observed as the growth temperature was lowered. The application of principal component analysis demonstrated that the yeasts were differentiated into three distinct groups. One group consisted of the three S. cerevisiae strains, a second the other four non-Antarctic yeasts and the third the seven Antarctic yeasts. The data for the Antarctic yeasts, to the best of our knowledge, have not been previously reported. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Analysis of trimethoprim, lincomycin, sulfadoxin and tylosin in swine manure using laser diode thermal desorption-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Solliec, Morgan; Massé, Daniel; Sauvé, Sébastien

    2014-10-01

    A new extraction method coupled to a high throughput sample analysis technique was developed for the determination of four veterinary antibiotics. The analytes belong to different groups of antibiotics such as chemotherapeutics, sulfonamides, lincosamides and macrolides. Trimethoprim (TMP), sulfadoxin (SFX), lincomycin (LCM) and tylosin (TYL) were extracted from lyophilized manure using a sonication extraction. McIlvaine buffer and methanol (MeOH) were used as extraction buffers, followed by cation-exchange solid phase extraction (SPE) for clean-up. Analysis was performed by laser diode thermal desorption-atmospheric pressure chemical-ionization (LDTD-APCI) tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) with selected reaction monitoring (SRM) detection. The LDTD is a high throughput sample introduction method that reduces total analysis time to less than 15s per sample, compared to minutes when using traditional liquid chromatography (LC). Various SPE parameters were optimized after sample extraction: the stationary phase, the extraction solvent composition, the quantity of sample extracted and sample pH. LDTD parameters were also optimized: solvent deposition, carrier gas, laser power and corona discharge. The method limit of detection (MLD) ranged from 2.5 to 8.3 µg kg(-1) while the method limit of quantification (MLQ) ranged from 8.3 to 28µgkg(-1). Calibration curves in the manure matrix showed good linearity (R(2)≥ 0.996) for all analytes and the interday and intraday coefficients of variation were below 14%. Recoveries of analytes from manure ranged from 53% to 69%. The method was successfully applied to real manure samples. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Natural products in Glycyrrhiza glabra (licorice) rhizome imaged at the cellular level by atmospheric pressure matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization tandem mass spectrometry imaging.

    PubMed

    Li, Bin; Bhandari, Dhaka Ram; Janfelt, Christian; Römpp, Andreas; Spengler, Bernhard

    2014-10-01

    The rhizome of Glycyrrhiza glabra (licorice) was analyzed by high-resolution mass spectrometry imaging and tandem mass spectrometry imaging. An atmospheric pressure matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization imaging ion source was combined with an orbital trapping mass spectrometer in order to obtain high-resolution imaging in mass and space. Sections of the rhizome were imaged with a spatial resolution of 10 μm in the positive ion mode, and a large number of secondary metabolites were localized and identified based on their accurate mass and MS/MS fragmentation patterns. Major tissue-specific metabolites, including free flavonoids, flavonoid glycosides and saponins, were successfully detected and visualized in images, showing their distributions at the cellular level. The analytical power of the technique was tested in the imaging of two isobaric licorice saponins with a mass difference of only 0.02 Da. With a mass resolving power of 140 000 and a bin width of 5 ppm in the image processing, the two compounds were well resolved in full-scan mode, and appeared with different distributions in the tissue sections. The identities of the compounds and their distributions were validated in a subsequent MS/MS imaging experiment, thereby confirming their identities and excluding possible analyte interference. The use of high spatial resolution, high mass resolution and tandem mass spectrometry in imaging experiments provides significant information about the biosynthetic pathway of flavonoids and saponins in legume species, combing the spatially resolved chemical information with morphological details at the microscopic level. Furthermore, the technique offers a scheme capable of high-throughput profiling of metabolites in plant tissues. © 2014 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Validation of a qualitative screening method for pesticides in fruits and vegetables by gas chromatography quadrupole-time of flight mass spectrometry with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization.

    PubMed

    Portolés, T; Mol, J G J; Sancho, J V; López, Francisco J; Hernández, F

    2014-08-01

    A wide-scope screening method was developed for the detection of pesticides in fruit and vegetables. The method was based on gas chromatography coupled to a hybrid quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometer with an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization source (GC-(APCI)QTOF MS). A non-target acquisition was performed through two alternating scan events: one at low collision energy and another at a higher collision energy ramp (MS(E)). In this way, both protonated molecule and/or molecular ion together with fragment ions were obtained in a single run. Validation was performed according to SANCO/12571/2013 by analysing 20 samples (10 different commodities in duplicate), fortified with a test set of 132 pesticides at 0.01, 0.05 and 0.20mg kg(-1). For screening, the detection was based on one diagnostic ion (in most cases the protonated molecule). Overall, at the 0.01mg kg(-1) level, 89% of the 2620 fortifications made were detected. The screening detection limit for individual pesticides was 0.01mg kg(-1) for 77% of the pesticides investigated. The possibilities for identification according to the SANCO criteria, requiring two ions with a mass accuracy ≤±5ppm and an ion-ratio deviation ≤±30%, were investigated. At the 0.01mg kg(-1) level, identification was possible for 70% of the pesticides detected during screening. This increased to 87% and 93% at the 0.05 and 0.20mg kg(-1) level, respectively. Insufficient sensitivity for the second ion was the main reason for the inability to identify detected pesticides, followed by deviations in mass accuracy and ion ratios. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Profiling of triacylglycerols in plant oils by high-performance liquid chromatography-atmosphere pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry using a novel mixed-mode column.

    PubMed

    Hu, Na; Wei, Fang; Lv, Xin; Wu, Lin; Dong, Xu-Yan; Chen, Hong

    2014-12-01

    In this investigation, a rapid and high-throughput method for profiling of TAGs in plant oils by liquid chromatography using a single column coupled with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) mass spectrometry was reported. A novel mixed-mode phenyl-hexyl chromatographic column was employed in this separation system. The phenyl-hexyl column could provide hydrophobic interactions as well as π-π interactions. Compared with two traditionally columns used in TAG separation - the C18 column and silver-ion column, this column exhibited much higher selectivity for the separation of TAGs with great efficiency and rapid speed. By comparison with a novel mix-mode column (Ag-HiSep OTS column), which can also provide both hydrophobic interactions as well as π-π interactions for the separation of TAGs, phenyl-hexyl column exhibited excellent stability. LC method using phenyl-hexyl column coupled with APCI-MS was successfully applied for the profiling of TAGs in soybean oils, peanut oils, corn oils, and sesame oils. 29 TAGs in peanut oils, 22 TAGs in soybean oils, 19 TAGs in corn oils, and 19 TAGs in sesame oils were determined and quantified. The LC-MS data was analyzed by barcodes and principal component analysis (PCA). The resulting barcodes constitute a simple tool to display differences between different plant oils. Results of PCA also enabled a clear identification of different plant oils. This method provided an efficient and convenient chromatographic technology for the fast characterization and quantification of complex TAGs in plant oils at high selectivity. It has great potential as a routine analytical method for analysis of edible oil quality and authenticity control.

  14. Identification of organic nitrates in the NO3 radical initiated oxidation of alpha-pinene by atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Perraud, Véronique; Bruns, Emily A; Ezell, Michael J; Johnson, Stanley N; Greaves, John; Finlayson-Pitts, Barbara J

    2010-08-01

    The gas-phase reactions of nitrate radicals (NO3) with biogenic organic compounds are a major sink for these organics during night-time. These reactions form secondary organic aerosols, including organic nitrates that can undergo long-range transport, releasing NOx downwind. We report here studies of the reaction of NO3 with alpha-pinene at 1 atm in dry synthetic air (relative humidity approximately 3%) and at 298 K using atmospheric pressure chemical ionization triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (APCI-MS) to identify gaseous and particulate products. The emphasis is on the identification of individual organic nitrates in the particle phase that were obtained by passing the product mixture through a denuder to remove gas-phase reactants and products prior to entering the source region of the mass spectrometer. Filter extracts were also analyzed by GC-MS and by APCI time-of-flight mass spectrometry (APCI-ToF-MS) with methanol as the proton source. In addition to pinonaldehyde and pinonic acid, five organic nitrates were identified in the particles as well as in the gas phase: 3-oxopinane-2-nitrate, 2-hydroxypinane-3-nitrate, pinonaldehyde-PAN, norpinonaldehyde-PAN, and (3-acetyl-2,2-dimethyl-3-nitrooxycyclobutyl)acetaldehyde. Furthermore, there was an additional first-generation organic nitrate product tentatively identified as a carbonyl hydroxynitrate with a molecular mass of 229. These studies suggest that a variety of organic nitrates would partition between the gas phase and particles in the atmosphere, and serve as a reservoir for NOx.

  15. Quantitative Analysis of Mixed Halogen Dioxins and Furans in Fire Debris Utilizing Atmospheric Pressure Ionization Gas Chromatography-Triple Quadrupole Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Organtini, Kari L; Myers, Anne L; Jobst, Karl J; Reiner, Eric J; Ross, Brian; Ladak, Adam; Mullin, Lauren; Stevens, Douglas; Dorman, Frank L

    2015-10-20

    Residential and commercial fires generate a complex mixture of volatile, semivolatile, and nonvolatile compounds. This study focused on the semi/nonvolatile components of fire debris to better understand firefighter exposure risks. Using the enhanced sensitivity of gas chromatography coupled to atmospheric pressure ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (APGC-MS/MS), complex fire debris samples collected from simulation fires were analyzed for the presence of potentially toxic polyhalogenated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PXDD/Fs and PBDD/Fs). Extensive method development was performed to create multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) methods for a wide range of PXDD/Fs from dihalogenated through hexa-halogenated homologue groups. Higher halogenated compounds were not observed due to difficulty eluting them off the long column used for analysis. This methodology was able to identify both polyhalogenated (mixed bromo-/chloro- and polybromo-) dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans in the simulated burn study samples collected, with the dibenzofuran species being the dominant compounds in the samples. Levels of these compounds were quantified as total homologue groups due to the limitations of commercial congener availability. Concentration ranges in household simulation debris were observed at 0.01-5.32 ppb (PXDFs) and 0.18-82.11 ppb (PBDFs). Concentration ranges in electronics simulation debris were observed at 0.10-175.26 ppb (PXDFs) and 0.33-9254.41 ppb (PBDFs). Samples taken from the particulate matter coating the firefighters' helmets contained some of the highest levels of dibenzofurans, ranging from 4.10 ppb to 2.35 ppm. The data suggest that firefighters and first responders at fire scenes are exposed to a complex mixture of potentially hundreds to thousands of different polyhalogenated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans that could negatively impact their health.

  16. Enantioselective determination of cetirizine in human plasma by normal-phase liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kang, Seung Woo; Jang, Hae Jong; Moore, Victor S; Park, Ji-Young; Kim, Kyoung-Ah; Youm, Jeong-Rok; Han, Sang Beom

    2010-12-15

    A highly sensitive and enantioselective method has been developed and validated for the determination of levocetirizine [(R)-cetirizine] in human plasma by normal-phase liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry with an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) interface in the positive ion mode. Enantioselective separation was achieved on a CHIRALPAK AD-H column using an isocratic mobile phase consisting of a mixture of n-hexane, ethyl alcohol, diethylamine, and acetic acid (60:40:0.1:0.1, v/v/v/v). Levocetirizine-D(8) was used as an internal standard (IS). Levocetirizine and the IS were detected by multiple-reaction monitoring (MRM). Mass transitions of analyte and IS were m/z 389.2→201.1 and 397.2→201.1, respectively. Under optimized analytical conditions, a baseline separation of two enantiomers and IS was obtained in less than 11 min. Samples were prepared by a simple two-step extraction by protein precipitation using acetonitrile followed by liquid-liquid extraction with a n-hexane-dichloromethane mixture (50:50, v/v). The standard curve for levocetirizine was linear (r(2)>0.995) in the concentration range 0.5-300 ng/mL. Recovery was between 97.0 and 102.2% at low, medium, and high concentration. The limit of quantification (LOQ) was 0.5 ng/mL. Other method validation parameters, such as precision, accuracy, and stability, were very satisfactory. Finally, the proposed method was successfully applied to the study of enantioselective oral pharmacokinetics of levocetirizine in healthy Korean volunteers.

  17. Atmospheric pressure laser desorption/ionization using a 6-7 µm-band mid-infrared tunable laser and liquid water matrix.

    PubMed

    Hiraguchi, Ryuji; Hazama, Hisanao; Masuda, Katsuyoshi; Awazu, Kunio

    2015-01-01

    Due to the characteristic absorption peaks in the IR region, various molecules can be used as a matrix for infrared matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (IR-MALDI). Especially in the 6-7 µm-band IR region, solvents used as the mobile phase for liquid chromatography have absorption peaks that correspond to their functional groups, such as O-H, C=O, and CH3. Additionally, atmospheric pressure (AP) IR-MALDI, which is applicable to liquid-state samples, is a promising technique to directly analyze untreated samples. Herein we perform AP-IR-MALDI mass spectrometry of a peptide, angiotensin II, using a mid-IR tunable laser with a tunable wavelength range of 5.50-10.00 µm and several different matrices. The wavelength dependences of the ion signal intensity of [M + H](+) of the peptide are measured using a conventional solid matrix, α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid (CHCA) and a liquid matrix composed of CHCA and 3-aminoquinoline. Other than the O-H stretching and bending vibration modes, the characteristic absorption peaks are useful for AP-IR-MALDI. Peptide ions are also observed from an aqueous solution of the peptide without an additional matrix, and the highest peak intensity of [M + H](+) is at 6.00 µm, which is somewhat shorter than the absorption peak wavelength of liquid water corresponding to the O-H bending vibration mode. Moreover, long-lasting and stable ion signals are obtained from the aqueous solution. AP-IR-MALDI using a 6-7 µm-band IR tunable laser and solvents as the matrix may provide a novel on-line interface between liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Determination of eight nitrosamines in water at the ng L(-1) levels by liquid chromatography coupled to atmospheric pressure chemical ionization tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ripollés, Cristina; Pitarch, Elena; Sancho, Juan V; López, Francisco J; Hernández, Félix

    2011-09-19

    In this work, we have developed a sensitive method for detection and quantification of eight N-nitrosamines, N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA), N-nitrosomorpholine (NMor), N-nitrosomethylethylamine (NMEA), N-nitrosopirrolidine (NPyr), N-nitrosodiethylamine (NDEA), N-nitrosopiperidine (NPip), N-nitroso-n-dipropylamine (NDPA) and N-nitrosodi-n-butylamine (NDBA) in drinking water. The method is based on liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry, using atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) in positive mode with a triple quadrupole analyzer (QqQ). The simultaneous acquisition of two MS/MS transitions in selected reaction monitoring mode (SRM) for each compound, together with the evaluation of their relative intensity, allowed the simultaneous quantification and reliable identification in water at ppt levels. Empirical formula of the product ions selected was confirmed by UHPLC-(Q)TOF MS accurate mass measurements from reference standards. Prior to LC-MS/MS QqQ analysis, a preconcentration step by off-line SPE using coconut charcoal EPA 521 cartridges (by passing 500 mL of water sample) was necessary to improve the sensitivity and to meet regulation requirements. For accurate quantification, two isotope labelled nitrosamines (NDMA-d(6) and NDPA-d(14)) were added as surrogate internal standards to the samples. The optimized method was validated at two concentration levels (10 and 100 ng L(-1)) in drinking water samples, obtaining satisfactory recoveries (between 90 and 120%) and precision (RSD<20%). Limits of detection were found to be in the range of 1-8 ng L(-1). The described methodology has been applied to different types of water samples: chlorinated from drinking water and wastewater treatment plants (DWTP and WWTP, respectively), wastewaters subjected to ozonation and tap waters.

  19. In-Line Ozonation for Sensitive Air-Monitoring of a Mustard-Gas Simulant by Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Okumura, Akihiko

    2015-09-01

    A highly sensitive method for real-time air-monitoring of mustard gas (bis(2-chloroethyl) sulfide, HD), which is a lethal blister agent, is proposed. Humidified air containing a HD simulant, 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (2CEES), was mixed with ozone and then analyzed by using an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization ion trap tandem mass spectrometer. Mass-spectral ion peaks attributable to protonated molecules of intact, monooxygenated, and dioxygenated 2CEES (MH(+), MOH(+), and MO(2)H(+), respectively) were observed. As ozone concentration was increased from zero to 30 ppm, the signal intensity of MH(+) sharply decreased, that of MOH(+) increased once and then decreased, and that of MO(2)H(+) sharply increased until reaching a plateau. The signal intensity of MO(2)H(+) at the plateau was 40 times higher than that of MH(+) and 100 times higher than that of MOH(+) in the case without in-line ozonation. Twenty-ppm ozone gas was adequate to give a linear calibration curve for 2CEES obtained by detecting the MO(2)H(+) signal in the concentration range up to 60 μg/m(3), which is high enough for hygiene management. In the low concentration range lower than 3 μg/m(3), which is equal to the short-term exposure limit for HD, calibration plots unexpectedly fell off the linear calibration curve, but 0.6-μg/m(3) vapor was actually detected with the signal-to-noise ratio of nine. Ozone was generated from instrumentation air by using a simple and inexpensive home-made generator. 2CEES was ozonated in 1-m extended sampling tube in only 1 s.

  20. In-Line Ozonation for Sensitive Air-Monitoring of a Mustard-Gas Simulant by Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okumura, Akihiko

    2015-09-01

    A highly sensitive method for real-time air-monitoring of mustard gas (bis(2-chloroethyl) sulfide, HD), which is a lethal blister agent, is proposed. Humidified air containing a HD simulant, 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (2CEES), was mixed with ozone and then analyzed by using an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization ion trap tandem mass spectrometer. Mass-spectral ion peaks attributable to protonated molecules of intact, monooxygenated, and dioxygenated 2CEES (MH+, MOH+, and MO2H+, respectively) were observed. As ozone concentration was increased from zero to 30 ppm, the signal intensity of MH+ sharply decreased, that of MOH+ increased once and then decreased, and that of MO2H+ sharply increased until reaching a plateau. The signal intensity of MO2H+ at the plateau was 40 times higher than that of MH+ and 100 times higher than that of MOH+ in the case without in-line ozonation. Twenty-ppm ozone gas was adequate to give a linear calibration curve for 2CEES obtained by detecting the MO2H+ signal in the concentration range up to 60 μg/m3, which is high enough for hygiene management. In the low concentration range lower than 3 μg/m3, which is equal to the short-term exposure limit for HD, calibration plots unexpectedly fell off the linear calibration curve, but 0.6-μg/m3 vapor was actually detected with the signal-to-noise ratio of nine. Ozone was generated from instrumentation air by using a simple and inexpensive home-made generator. 2CEES was ozonated in 1-m extended sampling tube in only 1 s.

  1. High performance liquid chromatography coupled with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry for sensitive determination of bioactive amines in donkey milk.

    PubMed

    La Torre, Giovanna Loredana; Saitta, Marcello; Giorgia Potortì, Angela; Di Bella, Giuseppa; Dugo, Giacomo

    2010-08-06

    In the present study we report on the optimization and validation of a sensitive high performance liquid chromatography atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry (HPLC-APCI-MS) method for the determination of 8 bioactive amines (histamine, tyramine, tryptamine, 2-phenylethylamine, cadaverine, putrescine, spermidine and spermine) in donkey milk samples. The method involves donkey milk pre-treatment to remove proteins and pre-column dansylation of the amines. HPLC in reversed phase mode has been used for bioactive amines separation and the operating condition of the APCI-MS system proved to be powerful and very efficient for peak assignment. The separation was accomplished in a short time with an excellent resolution for all the amine peaks. Quantification was carried out by monitoring the characteristic [M+H](+) ion of each amine derivative. The method sensitivity, linearity and repeatability were assayed with satisfactory results. The detection limits of the analysed amines ranged from 0.5 microg L(-1) to 15 microg L(-1); the highest LOD was for spermine. Also remarkably good recovery values were obtained; at the lowest spiking level (1 microg L(-1)) the percent mean recoveries ranged from 77.7 to 109.7. Furthermore, as the investigations relate to a complex matrix as donkey milk, suitable studies on matrix effect were performed. Finally, the developed and validated method was applied to analyse 13 donkey milk samples. Among the identified bioactive amines, putrescine, spermine and spermidine proved to be the main amines in donkey milk. Their concentration levels in the present study were lower than the values determined in mature human, cow and sow milk.

  2. Determination of 21-hydroxydeflazacort in human plasma by high-performance liquid chromatography/atmospheric pressure chemical ionization tandem mass spectrometry. Application to bioequivalence study.

    PubMed

    Ifa, D R; Moraes, M E; Moraes, M O; Santagada, V; Caliendo, G; de Nucci, G

    2000-03-01

    A liquid chromatographic atmospheric pressure chemical ionization tandem mass spectrometric method is described for the determination of 21-hydroxydeflazacort in human plasma using dexamethasone 21-acetate as an internal standard. The procedure requires a single diethyl ether extraction. After evaporation of the solvent under a nitrogen flow, the analytes are reconstituted in the mobile phase, chromatographed on a C18 reversed-phase column and analyzed by mass spectrometry via a heated nebulizer interface where they are detected by multiple reaction monitoring. The method has a chromatographic run time of less than 5 min and a linear calibration curve with a range of 1-400 ng ml(-1) (r>0.999). The between-run precision, based on the relative standard deviation for replicate quality controls, was < or =5.5% (10 ng ml(-1)), 1.0% (50 ng ml(-1)) and 2.7% (200 ng ml(-1)). The between-run accuracy was +/-7.1, 3.8 and 4.8% for the above concentrations, respectively. This method was employed in a bioequivalence study of two DFZ tablet formulations (Denacen from Marjan Industria e Comercio, Brazil, as a test formulation, and Calcort from Merrell Lepetit, Brazil, as a reference formulation) in 24 healthy volunteers of both sexes who received a single 30 mg dose of each formulation. The study was conducted using an open, randomized, two-period crossover design with a 7-day washout interval. The 90% confidence interval (CI) of the individual geometric mean ratio for Denacen/Calcort was 89.8-109.5% for area under the curve AUC(0-24 h) and 80.7-98.5% for Cmax. Since both the 90% CI for AUC(0-24 h) and Cmax were included in the 80-125% interval proposed by the US Food and Drug Administration, Denacen was considered bioequivalent to Calcort according to both the rate and extent of absorption.

  3. Clinical Application of Ambient Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Li, Li-Hua; Hsieh, Hua-Yi; Hsu, Cheng-Chih

    2017-01-01

    Ambient ionization allows mass spectrometry analysis directly on the sample surface under atmospheric pressure with almost zero sample pretreatment. Since the development of desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) in 2004, many other ambient ionization techniques were developed. Due to their simplicity and low operation cost, rapid and on-site clinical mass spectrometry analysis becomes real. In this review, we will highlight some of the most widely used ambient ionization mass spectrometry approaches and their applications in clinical study. PMID:28337399

  4. Modified-Atmospheric Pressure-Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Identification of Friction Modifier Additives Oleamide and Ethoxylated Tallow Amines on Varied Metal Target Materials and Tribologically Stressed Steel Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Widder, Lukas; Ristic, Andjelka; Brenner, Florian; Brenner, Josef; Hutter, Herbert

    2015-11-17

    For many tasks in failure and damage analysis of surfaces deteriorated in heavy tribological contact, the detailed characterization of used lubricants and their additives is essential. The objective of the presented work is to establish accessibility of tribostressed surfaces for direct characterization via modified atmospheric pressure-matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization-mass spectrometry (m-AP-MALDI-MS). Special target holders were constructed to allow target samples of differing shape and form to fit into the desorption/ionization chamber. The best results of desorption and ionization on different target materials and varying roughnesses were achieved on smooth surfaces with low matrix/substrate interaction. M-AP-MALDI characterization of tribologically stressed steel surfaces after pin-on-disc sliding wear tests (SRV-tribotests) yielded positive identification of used friction modifier additives. Further structure elucidation by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and measurements of worn surfaces by time-of-flight-secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) accompanied findings about additive behavior and deterioration during tribological contact. Using m-AP-MALDI for direct offline examinations of worn surfaces may set up a quick method for determination of additives used for lubrication and general characterization of a tribological system.

  5. Permanent Contraception for Women.

    PubMed

    Patil, Eva; Jensen, Jeffrey T

    2016-05-01

    Permanent contraception is a highly desired and commonly used contraceptive option for women around the world who desire never to become pregnant. Current methods of female permanent contraception require surgery. Postpartum tubal ligation and interval surgical tubal ligation are safe and effective, do not interfere with menstrual cycles, and require no ongoing cost or medical checkups. Hysteroscopic tubal occlusion offers a less invasive surgical approach, but requires an imaging study for verification of correct placement. However, not all women have access to a surgeon trained to provide permanent contraception, or they may face other prohibitive logistic or financial burdens. The development of novel permanent contraception methods that are immediately effective and/or nonsurgical could help improve access to and acceptability of permanent contraception. The expansion of permanent contraception options could help women achieve their family planning goals and reduce unintended pregnancies.

  6. Oscillating Permanent Magnets.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michaelis, M. M.; Haines, C. M.

    1989-01-01

    Describes several ways to partially levitate permanent magnets. Computes field line geometries and oscillation frequencies. Provides several diagrams illustrating the mechanism of the oscillation. (YP)

  7. Laser diode thermal desorption atmospheric pressure chemical ionization tandem mass spectrometry applied for the ultra-fast quantitative analysis of BKM120 in human plasma.

    PubMed

    Lanshoeft, Christian; Heudi, Olivier; Leuthold, Luc Alexis; Schlotterbeck, Götz; Elbast, Walid; Picard, Franck; Kretz, Olivier

    2014-09-01

    A sensitive and ultra-fast method utilizing the laser diode thermal desorption ion source using atmospheric pressure chemical ionization coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LDTD-APCI-MS/MS) was developed for the quantitative analysis of BKM120, an investigational anticancer drug in human plasma. Samples originating from protein precipitation (PP) followed by salting-out assisted liquid-liquid extraction (SALLE) were spotted onto the LazWell™ plate prior to their thermal desorption and detection by tandem mass spectrometry in positive mode. The validated method described in this paper presents a high absolute extraction recovery (>90 %) for BKM120 and its internal standard (ISTD) [D8]BKM120, with precision and accuracy meeting the acceptance criteria. Standard curves were linear over the range of 5.00 to 2000 ng mL(-1) with a coefficient of determination (R (2)) >0.995. The method specificity was demonstrated in six different batches of human plasma. Intra- and inter-run precision as well as accuracy within ±20 % at the lower limit of quantification (LLOQ) and ±15 % (other levels) were achieved during a three-run validation for quality control (QC) samples. The post-preparative stability on the LazWell™ plate at room temperature was 72 h and a 200-fold dilution of spiked samples was demonstrated. The method was applied successfully to three clinical studies (n = 847) and cross-checked with the validated LC-ESI-MS/MS reference method. The sample analysis run time was 10 s as compared to 4.5 min for the current validated LC-ESI-MS/MS method. The resultant data were in agreement with the results obtained using the validated reference LC-ESI-MS/MS assay and the same pharmacokinetic (PK) parameters were calculated for both analytical assays. This work demonstrates that LDTD-APCI-MS/MS is a reliable method for the ultra-fast quantitative analysis of BKM120 which can be used to speed-up and support its bioanalysis in the frame of the clinical trials.

  8. Determination of benzoylurea insecticide residues in tomatoes by high-performance liquid chromatography with ultraviolet-diode array and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-mass spectrometry detection.

    PubMed

    Markoglou, Anastasios N; Bempelou, Eleftheria D; Liapis, Konstantinos S; Ziogas, Basil N

    2007-01-01

    A simple and sensitive method using high-performance liquid chromatography/ mass spectrometry (LC/MS) was developed and validated for simultaneous determination of 5 benzoylurea insecticides-diflubenzuron, triflumuron, teflubenzuron, lufenuron, and flufenoxuron-in tomatoes. Residues were successfully separated on a C18 column by methanol-water isocratic elution. Detection was carried out by an ultraviolet diode array detector (UV-DAD) coupled with a quadrupole mass spectrometer, using atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) in negative-ion mode. The main ions were the deprotonated molecules [M-H]- for triflumuron, and the anions formed by elimination of hydrofluoric acid [M-H-HF]- for diflubenzuron and flufenoxuron, and [M-2H-HF] for lufenuron and teflubenzuron. The calibration plots were linear for both detectors over the range 0.05 to 10 microg/mL, and the method presented good quality parameters. The limits of detection for standard solutions were 0.008-0.01 mg/L (equivalent to 0.08-0.1 ng injected) for both detectors, and the limits of quantification (LOQs) were approximately 10 times lower than national maximum residue levels (MRLs). Depending on the compound and the detector, the LOQ values ranged from 0.2 to 0.4 ng injected. The optimum LC-UV-DAD/APCI-MS conditions were applied to the analysis of benzoylureas in tomatoes. The obtained recoveries from fortified tomato samples (50 g), extracted with ethyl acetate and purified by solid-phase extraction on silica sorbent, were 88-100 and 92.9-105% for the UV-DAD and MS detectors, respectively, with precision values (relative standard deviations) of 2.9-11 and 3.7-14%, respectively. The method was applied to 12 tomato samples from local markets, and diflubenzuron and lufenuron were detected in only one sample at concentrations lower than the MRLs. The results indicate that the developed LC/MS method is accurate, precise, and sensitive for quantitative and qualitative analysis at low levels of benzoylureas

  9. Accurate mass fragment library for rapid analysis of pesticides on produce using ambient pressure desorption ionization with high-resolution mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kern, Sara E; Lin, Lora A; Fricke, Frederick L

    2014-08-01

    U.S. food imports have been increasing steadily for decades, intensifying the need for a rapid and sensitive screening technique. A method has been developed that uses foam disks to sample the surface of incoming produce. This work provides complimentary information to the extensive amount of published pesticide fragmentation data collected using LCMS systems (Sack et al. Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, 59, 6383-6411, 2011; Mol et al. Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry, 403, 2891-2908, 2012). The disks are directly analyzed using transmission-mode direct analysis in real time (DART) ambient pressure desorption ionization coupled to a high resolution accurate mass-mass spectrometer (HRAM-MS). In order to provide more certainty in the identification of the pesticides detected, a library of accurate mass fragments and isotopes of the protonated parent molecular ion (the [M+H]⁺) has been developed. The HRAM-MS is equipped with a quadrupole mass filter, providing the capability of "data-dependent" fragmentation, as opposed to "all -ion" fragmentation (where all of the ions enter a collision chamber and are fragmented at once). A temperature gradient for the DART helium stream and multiple collision energies were employed to detect and fragment 164 pesticides of varying chemical classes, sizes, and polarities. The accurate mass information of precursor ([M+H]⁺ ion) and fragment ions is essential in correctly identifying chemical contaminants on the surface of imported produce. Additionally, the inclusion of isotopes of the [M+H]⁺ in the database adds another metric to the confirmation process. The fragmentation data were collected using a Q-Exactive mass spectrometer and were added to a database used to process data collected with an Exactive mass spectrometer, an instrument that is more readily available for this screening application. The commodities investigated range from smooth-skinned produce such as apples to rougher surfaces like broccoli

  10. Online profiling of triacylglycerols in plant oils by two-dimensional liquid chromatography using a single column coupled with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wei, Fang; Ji, Shu-Xian; Hu, Na; Lv, Xin; Dong, Xu-Yan; Feng, Yu-Qi; Chen, Hong

    2013-10-18

    The complexity of natural triacylglycerols (TAGs) in various edible oils is high because of the hundreds of TAG compositions, which makes the profiling of TAGs quite difficult. In this investigation, a rapid and high-throughput method for online profiling of TAGs in plant oils by two-dimensional (2D) liquid chromatography using a single column coupled with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) mass spectrometry was reported. A novel mixed-mode 2D chromatographic column packed with silver-ion-modified octyl and sulfonic co-bonded silica was employed in this online 2D separation system. This novel 2D column combined the features of C8 column and silver-ion. In comparison with the traditional C18 column and silver-ion column, which are the two main columns used for the separation of complex TAGs in natural oil samples, this novel 2D column, could provide hydrophobic interactions as well as π-complexation interactions. It exhibited much higher selectivity for the separation of TAGs, and the separation was rapid. This online 2D separation system was successful in the separation of a large number of TAG solutes, and the TAG structures were evaluated by analyzing their APCI mass spectra information. This system was applied for the profiling of TAGs in peanut oils, corn oils, and soybean oils. 30 TAGs in peanut oils, 18 TAGs in corn oils, and 21 TAGs in soybean oils were determined and quantified. The highest relative content of TAGs was LLL, which was found in corn oil with the relative content up to 45.43 (%, w/w), and the lowest relative content of TAGs was LLS and OSS, which was found in soybean oil and corn oil respectively, with the relative content only 0.01 (%, w/w). In addition, the TAG data were analyzed by principal component analysis (PCA). Results of PCA enabled a clear identification of different plant oils. This method provided an efficient and convenient chromatographic technology for the fast characterization and quantification of complex TAGs

  11. Accurate Mass Fragment Library for Rapid Analysis of Pesticides on Produce Using Ambient Pressure Desorption Ionization with High-Resolution Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kern, Sara E.; Lin, Lora A.; Fricke, Frederick L.

    2014-08-01

    U.S. food imports have been increasing steadily for decades, intensifying the need for a rapid and sensitive screening technique. A method has been developed that uses foam disks to sample the surface of incoming produce. This work provides complimentary information to the extensive amount of published pesticide fragmentation data collected using LCMS systems (Sack et al. Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, 59, 6383-6411, 2011; Mol et al. Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry, 403, 2891-2908, 2012). The disks are directly analyzed using transmission-mode direct analysis in real time (DART) ambient pressure desorption ionization coupled to a high resolution accurate mass-mass spectrometer (HRAM-MS). In order to provide more certainty in the identification of the pesticides detected, a library of accurate mass fragments and isotopes of the protonated parent molecular ion (the [M+H]+) has been developed. The HRAM-MS is equipped with a quadrupole mass filter, providing the capability of "data-dependent" fragmentation, as opposed to "all -ion" fragmentation (where all of the ions enter a collision chamber and are fragmented at once). A temperature gradient for the DART helium stream and multiple collision energies were employed to detect and fragment 164 pesticides of varying chemical classes, sizes, and polarities. The accurate mass information of precursor ([M+H]+ ion) and fragment ions is essential in correctly identifying chemical contaminants on the surface of imported produce. Additionally, the inclusion of isotopes of the [M+H]+ in the database adds another metric to the confirmation process. The fragmentation data were collected using a Q-Exactive mass spectrometer and were added to a database used to process data collected with an Exactive mass spectrometer, an instrument that is more readily available for this screening application. The commodities investigated range from smooth-skinned produce such as apples to rougher surfaces like broccoli. The

  12. Screening and quantification of pesticide residues in fruits and vegetables making use of gas chromatography-quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization.

    PubMed

    Cervera, M I; Portolés, T; López, F J; Beltrán, J; Hernández, F

    2014-11-01

    An atmospheric pressure chemical ionization source has been used to enhance the potential of gas chromatography coupled with quadrupole time-of-flight (QTOF) mass spectrometry (MS) for screening and quantification purposes in pesticide residue analysis. A screening method developed in our laboratory for around 130 pesticides has been applied to fruit and vegetable samples, including strawberries, oranges, apples, carrots, lettuces, courgettes, red peppers, and tomatoes. Samples were analyzed together with quality control samples (at 0.05 mg/kg) for each matrix and for matrix-matched calibration standards. The screening strategy consisted in first rapid searching and detection, and then a refined identification step using the QTOF capabilities (MS(E) and accurate mass). Identification was based on the presence of one characteristic m/z ion (Q) obtained with the low collision energy function and at least one fragment ion (q) obtained with the high collision energy function, both with mass errors of less than 5 ppm, and an ion intensity ratio (q/Q) within the tolerances permitted. Following this strategy, 15 of 130 pesticides were identified in the samples. Afterwards, the quantitation capabilities were tested by performing a quantitative validation for those pesticides detected in the samples. To this aim, five matrices were selected (orange, apple, tomato, lettuce, and carrot) and spiked at two concentrations (0.01 and 0.1 mg/kg), and quantification was done using matrix-matched calibration standards (relative responses versus triphenyl phosphate used as an internal standard). Acceptable average recoveries and relative standard deviations were obtained for many but not all pesticide-matrix combinations. These figures allowed us to perform a retrospective quantification of positives found in the screening without the need for additional analysis. Taking advantage of the accurate-mass full-spectrum data provided by QTOF MS, we searched for a higher number of compounds

  13. Liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure laser ionization-mass spectrometry (LC-APLI-MS) analysis of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons with 6-8 rings in the environment.

    PubMed

    Thiäner, Jan B; Achten, Christine

    2017-03-01

    A method has been developed for the sensitive and rapid analysis of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in environmental samples using liquid chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry as well as the selective atmospheric pressure laser ionization (APLI) process (LC-APLI-MS). Upon analyzing 34 PAHs, the limits of detection of this method were found to range from 0.008 to 1.824 pg (0.024 pg for benzo[a]pyrene). The method therefore provides 30-fold to 5,400-fold increased sensitivity compared with the established GC-MS technique. This LC-APLI-MS method was optimized for higher molecular weight PAHs (C24-C30 PAHs with 6-8 rings), which are difficult to detect or cannot be detected by GC-MS. Using the LC-APLI-MS method, various 6- to 8-ring PAHs were detected in environmental samples for the first time. After developing the method, it was successfully validated in ruggedness tests. The concentrations determined by the LC-APLI-MS method were in good accord with the certified concentrations in three certified reference materials (contaminated soils and sediments). Upon applying the method to environmental samples, it was found that (1) the presence of dibenzo[a,i]pyrene and dibenzo[a,h]pyrene in urban soil samples could only be detected using LC-APLI-MS (i.e., not GC-MS) due to its high sensitivity, (2) a bituminous coal sample yielded 211 tentative peaks from aromatic compounds in the C24-C30 range, and (3) eleven of those compounds occurred in different environmental samples in similar patterns. Hence, 6- to 8-ring PAHs occur in solid environmental samples in which other 6-ring PAHs such as indeno[1,2,3-cd]pyrene or benzo[ghi]perylene may also be present. Some of these numerous higher molecular weight PAH compounds could have very high carcinogenic potential, which will need to be elucidated to ensure the reliability of PAH risk assessments.

  14. IONIZATION CHAMBER

    DOEpatents

    Redman, W.C.; Shonka, F.R.

    1958-02-18

    This patent describes a novel ionization chamber which is well suited to measuring the radioactivity of the various portions of a wire as the wire is moved at a uniform speed, in order to produce the neutron flux traverse pattern of a reactor in which the wire was previously exposed to neutron radiation. The ionization chamber of the present invention is characterized by the construction wherein the wire is passed through a tubular, straight electrode and radiation shielding material is disposed along the wire except at an intermediate, narrow area where the second electrode of the chamber is located.

  15. Sensitive determination of RDX, nitroso-RDX metabolites, and other munitions in ground water by solid-phase extraction and isotope dilution liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure electro-spray [correction of chemical] ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Cassada, D A; Monson, S J; Snow, D D; Spalding, R F

    1999-06-04

    Recent improvements in the LC-MS interface have increased the sensitivity and selectivity of this instrument in the analysis of polar and thermally-labile aqueous constituents. Determination of RDX, nitroso-RDX metabolites, and other munitions was enhanced using LC-MS with solid-phase extraction, 15N3-RDX internal standard, and electrospray ionization (ESI) in negative ion mode. ESI produced a five-fold increase in detector response over atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) for the nitramine compounds, while the more energetic APCI produced more than twenty times the ESI response for nitroaromatics. Method detection limits in ESI for nitramines varied from 0.03 microgram l-1 for MNX to 0.05 microgram l-1 for RDX.

  16. Systematic investigation of ion suppression and enhancement effects of fourteen stable-isotope-labeled internal standards by their native analogues using atmospheric-pressure chemical ionization and electrospray ionization and the relevance for multi-analyte liquid chromatographic/mass spectrometric procedures.

    PubMed

    Remane, Daniela; Wissenbach, Dirk K; Meyer, Markus R; Maurer, Hans H

    2010-04-15

    In clinical and forensic toxicology, multi-analyte procedures are very useful to quantify drugs and poisons of different classes in one run. For liquid chromatographic/tandem mass spectrometric (LC/MS/MS) multi-analyte procedures, often only a limited number of stable-isotope-labeled internal standards (SIL-ISs) are available. If an SIL-IS is used for quantification of other analytes, it must be excluded that the co-eluting native analyte influences its ionization. Therefore, the effect of ion suppression and enhancement of fourteen SIL-ISs caused by their native analogues has been studied. It could be shown that the native analyte concentration influenced the extent of ion suppression and enhancement effects leading to more suppression with increasing analyte concentration especially when electrospray ionization (ESI) was used. Using atmospheric-pressure chemical ionization (APCI), methanolic solution showed mainly enhancement effects, whereas no ion suppression and enhancement effect, with one exception, occurred when plasma extracts were used under these conditions. Such differences were not observed using ESI. With ESI, eleven SIL-ISs showed relevant suppression effects, but only one analyte showed suppression effects when APCI was used. The presented study showed that ion suppression and enhancement tests using matrix-based samples of different sources are essential for the selection of ISs, particularly if used for several analytes to avoid incorrect quantification. In conclusion, only SIL-ISs should be selected for which no suppression and enhancement effects can be observed. If not enough ISs are free of ionization interferences, a different ionization technique should be considered.

  17. Novel analytical approach for brominated flame retardants based on the use of gas chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-tandem mass spectrometry with emphasis in highly brominated congeners.

    PubMed

    Portolés, Tania; Sales, Carlos; Gómara, Belén; Sancho, Juan Vicente; Beltrán, Joaquim; Herrero, Laura; González, María José; Hernández, Félix

    2015-10-06

    The analysis of brominated flame retardants (BFRs) commonly relies on the use of gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC-MS) operating in electron ionization (EI) and electron capture negative ionization (ECNI) modes using quadrupole, triple quadrupole, ion trap, and magnetic sector analyzers. However, these brominated contaminants are examples of compounds for which a soft and robust ionization technique might be favorable since they show high fragmentation in EI and low specificity in ECNI. In addition, the low limits of quantification (0.01 ng/g) required by European Commission Recommendation 2014/118/EU on the monitoring of traces of BFRs in food put stress on the use of highly sensitive techniques/methods. In this work, a new approach for the extremely sensitive determination of BFRs taking profit of the potential of atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) combined with GC and triple quadrupole (QqQ) mass analyzer is proposed. The objective was to explore the potential of this approach for the BFRs determination in samples at pg/g levels, taking marine samples and a cream sample as a model. Ionization and fragmentation behavior of 14 PBDEs (congeners 28, 47, 66, 85, 99, 100, 153, 154, 183, 184, 191, 196, 197, and 209) and two novel BFRs, decabromodiphenyl ethane (DBDPE) and 1,2-bis(2,4,6-tribromophenoxy)ethane (BTBPE), in the GC-APCI-MS system has been investigated. The formation of highly abundant (quasi) molecular ion was the main advantage observed in relation to EI. Thus, a notable improvement in sensitivity and specificity was observed when using it as precursor ion in tandem MS. The improved detectability (LODs < 10 fg) achieved when using APCI compared to EI has been demonstrated, which is especially relevant for highly brominated congeners. Analysis of samples from an intercomparison exercise and samples from the marine field showed the potential of this approach for the reliable identification and quantification at very low

  18. Permanent magnet assembly

    DOEpatents

    Chell, Jeremy; Zimm, Carl B.

    2006-12-12

    A permanent magnet assembly is disclosed that is adapted to provide a magnetic field across an arc-shaped gap. Such a permanent magnet assembly can be used, for example, to provide a time-varying magnetic field to an annular region for use in a magnetic refrigerator.

  19. Permanent tensions in organization.

    PubMed

    Jansson, Noora

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationship between permanent tensions and organizational change. This study used paradox theory and a case study. The case organization is a public university hospital in Finland involving several stakeholders. The analysis suggests that the relationship between permanent tensions and organizational change is a paradox that is part of organizational reality. As an organization learns to live with its permanent tensions, the renewal paradox settles into equilibrium. When tensions are provoked, the paradox is disturbed until it finds a new balance. This flexible nature of the paradox is the force that keeps the different stakeholders simultaneously empowered to maintain their unique missions and cohesive in order to benefit from the larger synergy. This research suggests that identification and evaluation of each permanent tension within an organization is important when executing organizational change. The fact that certain tensions are permanent and cannot be solved may have an influence on how planned change initiatives are executed. The results show that permanent tensions may be harnessed for the benefit of an organizational change. This research demonstrates originality by offering an alternative view of tensions, a view which emphasizes not only their permanent and plural nature but their importance for enabling the organization to change at its own, non-disruptive pace. The research also proposes a new concept, the "renewal paradox", to enhance understanding of the relationship between permanent tensions and organizational change.

  20. Electron impact ionization and multiphoton ionization of doped superfluid helium droplets: A comparison.

    PubMed

    He, Yunteng; Zhang, Jie; Kong, Wei

    2016-02-28

    We compare characteristics of electron impact ionization (EI) and multiphoton ionization (MPI) of doped superfluid helium droplets using the same droplet source. Selected dopant ion fragments from the two ionization schemes demonstrate different dependence on the doping pressure, which could be attributed to the different ionization mechanisms. While EI directly ionizes helium atoms in a droplet therefore has higher yields for bigger droplets (within a limited size range), MPI is insensitive to the helium in a droplet and is only dependent on the number of dopant molecules. The optimal timing of the ionization pulse also varies with the doping pressure, implying a velocity slip among different sized droplets. Calculations of the doping statistics and ionization probabilities qualitatively agree with the experimental data. Our results offer a word of caution in interpreting the pressure and timing dependence of superfluid helium droplets, and we also devise a scheme in achieving a high degree of doping while limiting the contribution of dopant clusters.

  1. Electron impact ionization and multiphoton ionization of doped superfluid helium droplets: A comparison

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    We compare characteristics of electron impact ionization (EI) and multiphoton ionization (MPI) of doped superfluid helium droplets using the same droplet source. Selected dopant ion fragments from the two ionization schemes demonstrate different dependence on the doping pressure, which could be attributed to the different ionization mechanisms. While EI directly ionizes helium atoms in a droplet therefore has higher yields for bigger droplets (within a limited size range), MPI is insensitive to the helium in a droplet and is only dependent on the number of dopant molecules. The optimal timing of the ionization pulse also varies with the doping pressure, implying a velocity slip among different sized droplets. Calculations of the doping statistics and ionization probabilities qualitatively agree with the experimental data. Our results offer a word of caution in interpreting the pressure and timing dependence of superfluid helium droplets, and we also devise a scheme in achieving a high degree of doping while limiting the contribution of dopant clusters. PMID:26931697

  2. Method of making permanent magnets

    DOEpatents

    McCallum, R.W.; Dennis, K.W.; Lograsso, B.K.; Anderson, I.E.

    1993-09-07

    A method for making an isotropic permanent magnet comprises atomizing a melt of a rare earth-transition metal alloy (e.g., an Nd--Fe--B alloy enriched in Nd and B) under conditions to produce protectively coated, rapidly solidified, generally spherical alloy particles. Wherein a majority of the particles are produced/size classified within a given size fraction (e.g., 5 to 40 microns diameter) exhibiting optimum as-atomized magnetic properties and subjecting the particles to concurrent elevated temperature and elevated isotropic pressure for a time effective to yield a densified, magnetically isotropic magnet compact having enhanced magnetic properties and mechanical properties. 13 figures.

  3. Method of making permanent magnets

    DOEpatents

    McCallum, R. William; Dennis, Kevin W.; Lograsso, Barbara K.; Anderson, Iver E.

    1993-09-07

    A method for making an isotropic permanent magnet comprises atomizing a melt of a rare earth-transition metal alloy (e.g., an Nd--Fe--B alloy enriched in Nd and B) under conditions to produce protectively coated, rapidly solidified, generally spherical alloy particles wherein a majority of the particles are produced/size classified within a given size fraction (e.g., 5 to 40 microns diameter) exhibiting optimum as-atomized magnetic properties and subjecting the particles to concurrent elevated temperature and elevated isotropic pressure for a time effective to yield a densified, magnetically isotropic magnet compact having enhanced magnetic properties and mechanical properties.

  4. Liquid chromatography coupled to different atmospheric pressure ionization sources-quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometry and post-column addition of metal salt solutions as a powerful tool for the metabolic profiling of Fusarium oxysporum.

    PubMed

    Cirigliano, Adriana M; Rodriguez, M Alejandra; Gagliano, M Laura; Bertinetti, Brenda V; Godeas, Alicia M; Cabrera, Gabriela M

    2016-03-25

    Fusarium oxysporum L11 is a non-pathogenic soil-borne fungal strain that yielded an extract that showed antifungal activity against phytopathogens. In this study, reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) coupled to different atmospheric pressure ionization sources-quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (API-QTOF-MS) was applied for the comprehensive profiling of the metabolites from the extract. The employed sources were electrospray (ESI), atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) and atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI). Post-column addition of metal solutions of Ca, Cu and Zn(II) was also tested using ESI. A total of 137 compounds were identified or tentatively identified by matching their accurate mass signals, suggested molecular formulae and MS/MS analysis with previously reported data. Some compounds were isolated and identified by NMR. The extract was rich in cyclic peptides like cyclosporins, diketopiperazines and sansalvamides, most of which were new, and are reported here for the first time. The use of post-column addition of metals resulted in a useful strategy for the discrimination of compound classes since specific adducts were observed for the different compound families. This technique also allowed the screening for compounds with metal binding properties. Thus, the applied methodology is a useful choice for the metabolic profiling of extracts and also for the selection of metabolites with potential biological activities related to interactions with metal ions.

  5. Comparing Laser Desorption Ionization and Atmospheric Pressure Photoionization Coupled to Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry To Characterize Shale Oils at the Molecular Level

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cho, Yunjo; Jin, Jang Mi; Witt, Matthias; Birdwell, Justin E.; Na, Jeong-Geol; Roh, Nam-Sun; Kim, Sunghwan

    2013-01-01

    Laser desorption ionization (LDI) coupled to Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS) was used to analyze shale oils. Previous work showed that LDI is a sensitive ionization technique for assessing aromatic nitrogen compounds, and oils generated from Green River Formation oil shales are well-documented as being rich in nitrogen. The data presented here demonstrate that LDI is effective in ionizing high-double-bond-equivalent (DBE) compounds and, therefore, is a suitable method for characterizing compounds with condensed structures. Additionally, LDI generates radical cations and protonated ions concurrently, the distribution of which depends upon the molecular structures and elemental compositions, and the basicity of compounds is closely related to the generation of protonated ions. This study demonstrates that LDI FT-ICR MS is an effective ionization technique for use in the study of shale oils at the molecular level. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that LDI FT-ICR MS has been applied to shale oils.

  6. Non-polar lipids characterization of Quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa) seed by comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography with flame ionization/mass spectrometry detection and non-aqueous reversed-phase liquid chromatography with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry detection.

    PubMed

    Fanali, Chiara; Beccaria, Marco; Salivo, Simona; Tranchida, Peter; Tripodo, Giusy; Farnetti, Sara; Dugo, Laura; Dugo, Paola; Mondello, Luigi

    2015-07-08

    A chemical characterization of major lipid components, namely, triacylglycerols, fatty acids and the unsaponifiable fraction, in a Quinoa seed lipids sample is reported. To tackle such a task, non-aqueous reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry detection was employed. The latter was interfaced with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization for the analysis of triacylglycerols. The main triacylglycerols (>10%) were represented by OLP, OOL and OLL (P = palmitoyl, O = oleoyl, L = linoleoyl); the latter was present in the oil sample at the highest percentage (18.1%). Furthermore, fatty acid methyl esters were evaluated by gas chromatography with flame ionization detection. 89% of the total fatty acids was represented by unsaturated fatty acid methyl esters with the greatest percentage represented by linoleic and oleic acids accounting for approximately 48 and 28%, respectively. An extensive characterization of the unsaponifiable fraction of Quinoa seed lipids was performed for the first time, by using comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography with dual mass spectrometry/flame ionization detection. Overall, 66 compounds of the unsaponifiable fraction were tentatively identified, many constituents of which (particularly sterols) were confirmed by using gas chromatography with high-resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

  7. Gridded electron reversal ionizer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chutjian, Ara (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A gridded electron reversal ionizer forms a three dimensional cloud of zero or near-zero energy electrons in a cavity within a filament structure surrounding a central electrode having holes through which the sample gas, at reduced pressure, enters an elongated reversal volume. The resultant negative ion stream is applied to a mass analyzer. The reduced electron and ion space-charge limitations of this configuration enhances detection sensitivity for material to be detected by electron attachment, such as narcotic and explosive vapors. Positive ions may be generated by generating electrons having a higher energy, sufficient to ionize the target gas and pulsing the grid negative to stop the electron flow and pulsing the extraction aperture positive to draw out the positive ions.

  8. Profiling of acylcarnitines and sterols from dried blood or plasma spot by atmospheric pressure thermal desorption chemical ionization (APTDCI) tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Corso, Gaetano; D'Apolito, Oceania; Garofalo, Daniela; Paglia, Giuseppe; Dello Russo, Antonio

    2011-11-01

    Free carnitine and acylcarnitines play an important role in the metabolism of fatty acids. Sterols are structural lipids found in the membranes of many eukaryotic cells, and they also have functional roles such as the regulation of membrane permeability and fluidity, activity of membrane-bound enzymes and signals transduction. Abnormal profiles of these compounds in biological fluids may be useful markers of metabolic changes. In this review, we describe the subset of the lipidome represented by acylcarnitines and sterols, and we summarize how these compounds have been analyzed in the past. Over the last 50years, lipid mass spectrometry (MS) has evolved to become one of the most useful techniques for metabolic analysis. Today, the introduction of new ambient ionization techniques coupled to MS (AMS), which are characterized by the direct desorbing/ionizing of molecules from solid samples, is generating new possibilities for in situ analysis. Recently, we developed an AMS approach called APTDCI to desorb/ionize using a heated gas flow and an electrical discharge to directly analyze sterols and indirectly investigate acylcarnitines in dried blood or plasma spot samples. Here, we also describe the APTDCI method and some of its clinical applications, and we underline the common complications and issues that remain to be resolved. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Comparison of reversed-phase liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry with electrospray and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization for analysis of dietary tocopherols.

    PubMed

    Lanina, Svetlana A; Toledo, Patricia; Sampels, Sabine; Kamal-Eldin, Afaf; Jastrebova, Jelena A

    2007-07-20

    ESI and APCI ionization techniques in both negative and positive ion modes were evaluated for simultaneous LC-MS analysis of the four tocopherol homologues (alpha, beta, gamma and delta). The ESI and APCI ionization of tocopherols in positive ion mode was not efficient and proceeded via two competitive mechanisms, with the formation of protonated pseudo-molecular ions and molecular ions, which adversely influenced the repeatability of MS signal. Ionization in negative ion mode in both ESI and APCI was more efficient as it only produced target deprotonated pseudo-molecular ions. The APCI in negative ion mode showed larger linearity range, lower detection limits and was less sensitive to the differences in chemical structure of analytes and nature of applied solvents than negative ion ESI. Negative ion APCI was, therefore, chosen for the development of LC-MS method for simultaneous determination of the four tocopherols in foods. A baseline separation of the tocopherols was achieved on novel pentafluorophenyl silica-based column Fluophase PFP. The use of methanol-water (95:5, v/v) as a mobile phase was preferable to the use of acetonitrile-water due to considerable gain in MS signal. The limits of quantifications were 9 ng/mL for alpha-tocopherol, 8 ng/mL for beta- and gamma- and 7.5 ng/mL for delta-tocopherol when 2 microL was injected. This method was successfully applied to determination of tocopherols in sunflower oil and milk.

  10. The method for on-site determination of trace concentrations of methyl mercaptan and dimethyl sulfide in air using a mobile mass spectrometer with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization, combined with a fast enrichment/separation system.

    PubMed

    Kudryavtsev, Andrey S; Makas, Alexey L; Troshkov, Mikhail L; Grachev, Mikhail А; Pod'yachev, Sergey P

    2014-06-01

    A method for fast simultaneous on-site determination of methyl mercaptan and dimethyl sulfide in air was developed. The target compounds were actively collected on silica gel, followed by direct flash thermal desorption, fast separation on a short chromatographic column and detection by means of mass spectrometer with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization. During the sampling of ambient air, water vapor was removed with a Nafion selective membrane. A compact mass spectrometer prototype, which was designed earlier at Trofimuk Institute of Petroleum Geology and Geophysics, was used. The minimization of gas load of the atmospheric pressure ion source allowed reducing the power requirements and size of the vacuum system and increasing its ruggedness. The measurement cycle is about 3 min. Detection limits in a 0.6 L sample are 1 ppb for methyl mercaptan and 0.2 ppb for dimethyl sulfide. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Final Technical Report on STTR Project DE-FG02-02ER86145 Pressurized RF Cavities for Muon Ionization Cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Rolland Johnson

    2006-07-13

    This project was to design and build an RF test cell (TC), which could be operated at 800 MHz, filled with high pressure gases including hydrogen, at temperatures down to that of liquid nitrogen, in strong magnetic fields, in a strong radiation environment, and with interchangeable electrodes, in order to examine the use of high-pressure RF cavities for muon beam cooling.

  12. Ion thermalization using pressure transients in a quadrupole ion trap coupled to a vacuum matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization source and a reflectron time-of-flight mass analyzer.

    PubMed

    Papanastasiou, D; Belgacem, O; Sudakov, M; Raptakis, E

    2008-05-01

    Efficient trapping and detection of intact peptide ions is demonstrated in a quadrupole ion trap (QIT) coupled to an external vacuum matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) source. Deactivation of metastable ions generated by MALDI is achieved in a pressure transient environment inside the QIT established by pulsing gas to access the higher pressures required for fast thermalization, without affecting vacuum conditions in the ion source and time-of-flight (TOF) mass analyzer. Pressure transients are experimentally determined and a threshold of approximately 10 mTorr is identified where internally excited ions, which commonly observed to dissociate upon injection in a QIT, are stabilized. Fragment-free spectra are presented for a set of peptides by using 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHB) as a matrix, and significantly reduced fragmentation is observed by using a-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid (CHCA). Intact peptide spectra of a protein tryptic digest are also recorded with CHCA. The process of translational cooling for externally injected ions in a dynamic pressure environment is visualized by using ion trajectory simulations that employ hard sphere collisions. Statistical theory of dynamic equilibrium of ions stored in rf fields is applied to our QIT to characterize a translationally thermalized ion cloud, to explain observed ejection efficiency into the TOF mass analyzer, and to further discuss collisional deactivation of metastable ions.

  13. Laserspray Ionization, a New Atmospheric Pressure MALDI Method for Producing Highly Charged Gas-phase Ions of Peptides and Proteins Directly from Solid Solutions*

    PubMed Central

    Trimpin, Sarah; Inutan, Ellen D.; Herath, Thushani N.; McEwen, Charles N.

    2010-01-01

    The first example of a matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) process producing multiply charged mass spectra nearly identical to those observed with electrospray ionization (ESI) is presented. MALDI is noted for its ability to produce singly charged ions, but in the experiments described here multiply charged ions are produced by laser ablation of analyte incorporated into a common MALDI matrix, 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid, using standard solvent-based sample preparation protocols. Laser ablation is known to produce matrix clusters in MALDI provided a threshold energy is achieved. We propose that these clusters (liquid droplets) are highly charged, and under conditions that produce sufficient matrix evaporation, ions are field-evaporated from the droplets similarly to ESI. Because of the multiple charging, advanced mass spectrometers with limited mass-to-charge range can be used for protein characterization. Thus, using an Orbitrap mass spectrometer, low femtomole quantities of proteins produce full-range mass spectra at 100,000 mass resolution with <5-ppm mass accuracy and with 1-s acquisition. Furthermore, the first example of protein fragmentation using electron transfer dissociation with MALDI is presented. PMID:19955086

  14. Measurement of scintillation and ionization yield with high-pressure gaseous mixtures of Xe and TMA for improved neutrinoless double beta decay and dark matter searches

    SciTech Connect

    Nakajima, Y.; Goldschmidt, A.; Matis, H. S.; Miller, T.; Nygren, D. R.; Oliveira, C. A. B.; Renner, J.

    2016-03-18

    The gaseous Xenon(Xe) time projection chamber (TPC) is an attractive detector technique for neutrinoless double beta decay and WIMP dark matter searches. While it is less dense compared to Liquid Xe detectors, it has intrinsic advantages in tracking capability and better energy resolution. The performance of gaseous Xe can be further improved by molecular additives such as trimethylamine(TMA), which is expected to (1) cool down the ionization electrons, (2) convert Xe excitation energy to TMA ionizations through Penning transfer, and (3) produce scintillation and electroluminescence light in a more easily detectable wavelength (300 nm). In order to test the feasibility of the performance improvements with TMA, in this paper we made the first direct measurement of Penning and fluorescence transfer efficiency with gaseous mixtures of Xe and TMA. While we observed a Penning transfer efficiency up to ~35%, we found strong suppression of primary scintillation light with TMA. We also found that the primary scintillation light with Xe and TMA mixture can be well characterized by ~3% fluorescence transfer from Xe to TMA, with further suppression due to TMA self-quenching. No evidence of the scintillation light produced by recombination of TMA ions was found. This strong suppression of scintillation light makes dark matter searches quite challenging, while the possibility of improved neutrinoless double beta decay searches remains open. Finally, this work has been carried out within the context of the NEXT collaboration.

  15. Measurement of scintillation and ionization yield with high-pressure gaseous mixtures of Xe and TMA for improved neutrinoless double beta decay and dark matter searches

    DOE PAGES

    Nakajima, Y.; Goldschmidt, A.; Matis, H. S.; ...

    2016-03-18

    The gaseous Xenon(Xe) time projection chamber (TPC) is an attractive detector technique for neutrinoless double beta decay and WIMP dark matter searches. While it is less dense compared to Liquid Xe detectors, it has intrinsic advantages in tracking capability and better energy resolution. The performance of gaseous Xe can be further improved by molecular additives such as trimethylamine(TMA), which is expected to (1) cool down the ionization electrons, (2) convert Xe excitation energy to TMA ionizations through Penning transfer, and (3) produce scintillation and electroluminescence light in a more easily detectable wavelength (300 nm). In order to test the feasibilitymore » of the performance improvements with TMA, in this paper we made the first direct measurement of Penning and fluorescence transfer efficiency with gaseous mixtures of Xe and TMA. While we observed a Penning transfer efficiency up to ~35%, we found strong suppression of primary scintillation light with TMA. We also found that the primary scintillation light with Xe and TMA mixture can be well characterized by ~3% fluorescence transfer from Xe to TMA, with further suppression due to TMA self-quenching. No evidence of the scintillation light produced by recombination of TMA ions was found. This strong suppression of scintillation light makes dark matter searches quite challenging, while the possibility of improved neutrinoless double beta decay searches remains open. Finally, this work has been carried out within the context of the NEXT collaboration.« less

  16. Laserspray ionization, a new atmospheric pressure MALDI method for producing highly charged gas-phase ions of peptides and proteins directly from solid solutions.

    PubMed

    Trimpin, Sarah; Inutan, Ellen D; Herath, Thushani N; McEwen, Charles N

    2010-02-01

    The first example of a matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) process producing multiply charged mass spectra nearly identical to those observed with electrospray ionization (ESI) is presented. MALDI is noted for its ability to produce singly charged ions, but in the experiments described here multiply charged ions are produced by laser ablation of analyte incorporated into a common MALDI matrix, 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid, using standard solvent-based sample preparation protocols. Laser ablation is known to produce matrix clusters in MALDI provided a threshold energy is achieved. We propose that these clusters (liquid droplets) are highly charged, and under conditions that produce sufficient matrix evaporation, ions are field-evaporated from the droplets similarly to ESI. Because of the multiple charging, advanced mass spectrometers with limited mass-to-charge range can be used for protein characterization. Thus, using an Orbitrap mass spectrometer, low femtomole quantities of proteins produce full-range mass spectra at 100,000 mass resolution with <5-ppm mass accuracy and with 1-s acquisition. Furthermore, the first example of protein fragmentation using electron transfer dissociation with MALDI is presented.

  17. Measurement of scintillation and ionization yield with high-pressure gaseous mixtures of Xe and TMA for improved neutrinoless double beta decay and dark matter searches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, Y.; Goldschmidt, A.; Matis, H. S.; Miller, T.; Nygren, D. R.; Oliveira, C. A. B.; Renner, J.

    2016-03-01

    The gaseous Xenon(Xe) time projection chamber (TPC) is an attractive detector technique for neutrinoless double beta decay and WIMP dark matter searches. While it is less dense compared to Liquid Xe detectors, it has intrinsic advantages in tracking capability and better energy resolution. The performance of gaseous Xe can be further improved by molecular additives such as trimethylamine(TMA), which is expected to (1) cool down the ionization electrons, (2) convert Xe excitation energy to TMA ionizations through Penning transfer, and (3) produce scintillation and electroluminescence light in a more easily detectable wavelength (300 nm). In order to test the feasibility of the performance improvements with TMA, we made the first direct measurement of Penning and fluorescence transfer efficiency with gaseous mixtures of Xe and TMA. While we observed a Penning transfer efficiency up to ~35%, we found strong suppression of primary scintillation light with TMA. We also found that the primary scintillation light with Xe and TMA mixture can be well characterized by ~3% fluorescence transfer from Xe to TMA, with further suppression due to TMA self-quenching. No evidence of the scintillation light produced by recombination of TMA ions was found. This strong suppression of scintillation light makes dark matter searches quite challenging, while the possibility of improved neutrinoless double beta decay searches remains open. This work has been carried out within the context of the NEXT collaboration.

  18. [INSEE's permanent demographic sample].

    PubMed

    Sautory, O

    1987-01-01

    This article discusses the permanent demographic sample survey developed by France's Institut National de la Statistique et des Etudes Economiques (INSEE), which has been in use in that country since the census of 1968. Approximately one percent of the metropolitan population of France was chosen for inclusion by birthdate. By adding data on marriage, births of children, change of residence, schooling, employment status, and death to each person's file, longitudinal studies of fertility, nuptiality, and mortality can be conducted. Two such studies are included as examples of how the permanent sample survey can be best put to use.

  19. Evaluation of the capabilities of atmospheric pressure chemical ionization source coupled to tandem mass spectrometry for the determination of dioxin-like polychlorobiphenyls in complex-matrix food samples.

    PubMed

    Portolés, T; Sales, C; Abalos, M; Sauló, J; Abad, E

    2016-09-21

    The use of the novel atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) source for gas chromatography (GC) coupled to triple quadrupole using tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) and its potential for the simultaneous determination of the 12 dioxin-like polychlorobiphenyls (DL-PCBs) in complex food and feed matrices has been evaluated. In first place, ionization and fragmentation behavior of DL-PCBs on the APCI source under charge transfer conditions has been studied followed by their fragmentation in the collision cell. Linearity, repeatability and sensitivity have been studied obtaining instrumental limits of detection and quantification of 0.0025 and 0.005 pg μL(-1) (2.5 and 5 fg on column) respectively for every DL-PCB. Finally, application to real samples has been carried out and DL-PCB congeners (PCB 77, 81, 105, 114, 118, 123, 126, 156, 157, 167, 169, 189) have been detected in the different samples in the range of 0.40-10000 pg g(-1). GC-(APCI)MS/MS has been proved as a suitable alternative to the traditionally accepted confirmation method based on the use of high resolution mass spectrometry and other triple quadrupole tandem mass spectrometry techniques operating with electron ionization. The development of MS/MS methodologies for the analysis of dioxins and DL-PCBs is nowadays particularly important, since this technique was included as a confirmatory method in the present European Union regulations that establish the requirements for the determination of these compounds in food and feed matrices.

  20. Alkaline "Permanent" Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pacey, Antony

    1991-01-01

    Discussion of paper manufacturing processes and their effects on library materials focuses on the promotion of alkaline "permanent" paper, with less acid, by Canadian library preservation specialists. Standards for paper acidity are explained; advantages of alkaline paper are described, including decreased manufacturing costs; and…

  1. Technical note: Detection of dimethylamine in the low pptv range using nitrate Chemical Ionization-Atmospheric Pressure interface-Time Of Flight (CI-APi-TOF) mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, M.; Heinritzi, M.; Herzog, S.; Leiminger, M.; Bianchi, F.; Praplan, A.; Dommen, J.; Curtius, J.; Kürten, A.

    2015-12-01

    Amines are potentially important for atmospheric new particle formation and therefore the demand for highly sensitive gas phase amine measurements has emerged in the last several years. Nitrate Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry (CIMS) is routinely used for the measurement of gas phase-sulfuric acid in the sub-pptv range. Furthermore, Extremely Low Volatile Organic Compounds (ELVOCs) can be detected with a nitrate CIMS. In this study we demonstrate that a nitrate CIMS can also be used for the sensitive measurement of dimethylamine ((CH3)2NH, DMA) using the NO3-(HNO3)1-2(DMA) cluster ion signals. This observation was made at the CLOUD aerosol chamber, which was also used for calibration measurements. Good linearity between 0 and ~120 pptv of DMA as well as a sub-pptv detection limit of 0.7 pptv for a 10 min integration time are demonstrated at 278 K and 38 % RH.

  2. Determination of azolic fungicides in wine by solid-phase extraction and high-performance liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Nozal, Maria J; Bernal, J L; Jiménez, J J; Martín, Maria T; Bernal, J

    2005-05-27

    A method for simultaneous analysis of eight azolic fungicides: cyproconazole, diniconazole, tetraconazole, thiabendazole, flusilazole, triadimenol, triadimefon, carbendazim and the degradation product 2-aminobenzimidazole in wine samples is described. The compounds are isolated from the samples and concentrated by solid-phase extraction on polymeric cartridges. The determination is carried out by liquid chromatography with mass spectrometric detection in positive ionization and selected ion monitoring modes. The influence of parameters such as the mobile phase composition, column temperature, corona current and fragmentor voltage is studied and the proposed method is validated. Recoveries of the nine compounds added to wine samples range from 83 to 109%, with relative standard deviations below 10%. The quantitation limits are between 9 and 31 microg/L. Real wine samples are analyzed by the proposed method, also.

  3. Quantitative analysis of cortisol and 6β-hydroxycortisol in urine by fully automated SPE and ultra-performance LC coupled with electrospray and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (ESCi)-TOF-MS.

    PubMed

    Lang, Lotte M; Dalsgaard, Petur W; Linnet, Kristian

    2013-01-01

    An ultra-performance LC TOF MS method for quantitative analysis of cortisol and 6β-hydroxycortisol in urine was developed. The method was used for determination of the ratio between 6β-hydroxycortisol and cortisol in urine received from autopsy cases and living persons as a measure of cytochrome P450 3A enzyme activity. Urine samples (0.25 mL) were extracted with an in-house developed fully automated 96-well SPE system. The compounds were quantified using a Waters ACQUITY UPLC system coupled to a Waters SYNAPT G2. The MS sensitivity was optimized by using negative ionization in sensitivity mode (resolution >10 000 full-width at half-maximum), and further optimized by using the enhanced duty cycle around the 410 m/z. ESCi (simultaneous electrospray and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization) mode was used to compensate for the matrix effects of postmortem urine. Finally, the SYNAPT G2 was tested as a quantitative instrument. The developed method has a measurement range from 2.5-300 ng/mL for cortisol to 10-1200 ng/mL for 6β-hydroxycortisol. Mean overall process efficiencies were 29.4 and 23.0% for cortisol and 6β-hydroxycortisol, respectively. In 20 forensic reference cases, the range of the 6β-hydroxycortisol/cortisol ratio was 0.29-14.2 with a median of 3.04.

  4. On-chip solid-phase extraction pre-concentration/focusing substrates coupled to atmospheric pressure matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization ion trap mass spectrometry for high sensitivity biomolecule analysis.

    PubMed

    Navare, Arti; Nouzova, Marcela; Noriega, Fernando G; Hernández-Martínez, Salvador; Menzel, Christoph; Fernández, Facundo M

    2009-02-01

    Atmospheric pressure matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (AP-MALDI) has proven a convenient and rapid method for ion production in the mass spectrometric (MS) analysis of biomolecules. AP-MALDI and electrospray ionization (ESI) sources are easily interchangeable in most mass spectrometers. However, AP-MALDI suffers from less-than-optimal sensitivity due to ion losses during transport from the atmosphere into the vacuum of the mass spectrometer. Here, we study the signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) gains observed when an on-chip dynamic pre-concentration/focusing approach is coupled to AP-MALDI for the MS analysis of neuropeptides and protein digests. It was found that, in comparison with conventional AP-MALDI targets, focusing targets showed (1) a sensitivity enhancement of approximately two orders of magnitude with S/N gains of 200-900 for hydrophobic substrates, and 150-400 for weak cation-exchange (WCX) substrates; (2) improved detection limits as low as 5 fmol/microL for standard peptides; (3) significantly reduced matrix background; and (4) higher inter-day reproducibility. The improved sensitivity allowed successful tandem mass spectrometric (MS/MS) sequencing of dilute solutions of a derivatized tryptic digest of a protein standard, and enabled the first reported AP-MALDI MS detection of neuropeptides from Aedes aegypti mosquito heads.

  5. Is CO2 ice permanent?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindner, Bernhard Lee

    1992-01-01

    Carbon dioxide ice has been inferred to exist at the south pole in summertime, but Earth based measurements in 1969 of water vapor in the Martian atmosphere suggest that all CO2 ice sublined from the southern polar cap and exposed underlying water ice. This implies that the observed summertime CO2 ice is of recent origin. It appears possible to construct an energy balance model that maintains seasonal CO2 ice at the south pole year round and still reasonably simulates the polar cap regression and atmospheric pressure data. This implies that the CO2 ice observed in the summertime south polar cap could be seasonal in origin, and that minor changes in climate could cause CO2 ice to completely vanish, as would appear to have happened in 1969. However, further research remains before it is certain whether the CO2 ice observed in the summertime south polar cap is seasonal or is part of a permanent reservoir.

  6. Permanent deformation of flexible pavements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, S. F.; Broderick, B. V.; Pappin, J. W.

    1980-06-01

    Seven pairs of pavements with granular bases were tested under controlled conditions. One pavement in each pair contained fabric inclusions. An improved testing facility was developed, including: (1) servo-hydraulic system for the loading carriage; (2) amplification and read-out system for pressure cells; (3) linearizing unit for strain coils; (4) transducers for measuring vertical and resilient deflection; (5) techniques for measuring in situ strain on fabric inclusions; (6) extensive use of nuclear density meter to monitor pavement and foundation materials. The following conclusions are drawn: (1) No improvement in performance resulted from fabric inclusions. (2) No consistent reduction in in-situ stresses, resilient strains, or permanent strains was observed as a result of fabric inclusion. (3) No consistent improvement in densities resulted from fabric inclusions. (4) Some slip apparently occurred between fabric and soil on those pavements which involved large deformations. The slip occurred between fabric and crushed limestone base rather than between fabric and silty-clay subgrade.

  7. High-performance liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry and gas chromatography-flame ionization detection characterization of Delta5-polyenoic fatty acids in triacylglycerols from conifer seed oils.

    PubMed

    Lísa, Miroslav; Holcapek, Michal; Rezanka, Tomás; Kabátová, Nadezda

    2007-03-30

    Edible conifer seeds can serve as a source of triacylglycerols (TGs) with unusual Delta5 unsaturated polymethylene interrupted fatty acids (UPIFAs), such as cis-5,9-octadecadienoic (taxoleic), cis-5,9,12-octadecatrienoic (pinolenic), cis-5,11-eicosadienoic (keteleeronic) and cis-5,11,14-eicosatrienoic acids (sciadonic). Conifer seed oils from European Larch (Larix decidua), Norway Spruce (Picea abies) and European Silver Fir (Abies alba) have been analyzed by non-aqueous reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (NARP-HPLC) with atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation (APCI)-MS detection. The influence of different positions of double bonds in Delta5-UPIFAs on the retention and fragmentation behavior is described and used for the successful identification of TGs in each oil. TGs containing Delta5-UPIFAs have a higher retention in comparison with common TGs found in plant oils with single methylene interrupted Delta6(9)-FAs and also significantly changed relative abundances of fragment ions in APCI mass spectra. Results obtained from HPLC/MS analyses are supported by validated GC/FID analyses of fatty acid methyl esters after the transesterification. The total content of Delta5-UPIFAs is about 32% for European Larch, 27% for Norway Spruce and 20% for European Silver Fir. In total, 20 FAs with acyl chain lengths from 16 to 24 carbon atoms and from 0 to 3 double bonds have been identified in 64 triacylglycerols from 3 conifer seed oils.

  8. Matrix Assisted Ionization Vacuum (MAIV), a New Ionization Method for Biological Materials Analysis Using Mass Spectrometry*

    PubMed Central

    Inutan, Ellen D.; Trimpin, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    The introduction of electrospray ionization (ESI) and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) for the mass spectrometric analysis of peptides and proteins had a dramatic impact on biological science. We now report that a wide variety of compounds, including peptides, proteins, and protein complexes, are transported directly from a solid-state small molecule matrix to gas-phase ions when placed into the vacuum of a mass spectrometer without the use of high voltage, a laser, or added heat. This ionization process produces ions having charge states similar to ESI, making the method applicable for high performance mass spectrometers designed for atmospheric pressure ionization. We demonstrate highly sensitive ionization using intermediate pressure MALDI and modified ESI sources. This matrix and vacuum assisted soft ionization method is suitable for the direct surface analysis of biological materials, including tissue, via mass spectrometry. PMID:23242551

  9. Products of the reaction between alpha- or gamma-tocopherol and nitrogen oxides analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography with UV-visible and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometric detection.

    PubMed

    Nagata, Yoshiko; Matsumoto, Yohta; Kanazawa, Hideko

    2004-05-21

    The reaction products of alpha- or gamma-tocopherol with nitric oxide in the presence of molecular oxygen were isolated and characterized. The consumption of tocopherols and the formation of the major products were monitored by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) by a gradient elution method. The quantitative analysis of these compounds with UV-Vis detectors, however, was interfered by several minor products having similar UV spectra and retention times as those of the major ones. In order to establish a quantitative analytical method for the products, we investigated other detection methods, and found that atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI), LC-MS was a more selective and better analytical method for these compounds.

  10. High-sensitivity detection of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons adsorbed onto soot particles using laser desorption/laser ionization/time-of-flight mass spectrometry: An approach to studying the soot inception process in low-pressure flames

    SciTech Connect

    Faccinetto, Alessandro; Desgroux, Pascale; Therssen, Eric; Ziskind, Michael; Focsa, Cristian

    2011-02-15

    Species adsorbed at the surfaces of soot particles sampled at different locations in a low-pressure methane flame have been analyzed. The analysis method is laser desorption/laser ionization/time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LD/LI/TOF-MS) applied to soot particles deposited on a filter after probe extraction in the flame. In order to fully characterize the experimental apparatus, a strategy of systematic investigations has been adopted, beginning with the study of less complex systems constituted by model soot (standard polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, PAHs, adsorbed on black carbon), and then natural soot sampled from a literature reference ethylene flame. This characterization allowed a good understanding of the analytical response of PAHs to the desorption and ionization processes and the definition of the optimal experimental conditions. The soot PAH content was then investigated on a low-pressure methane/oxygen/nitrogen premixed flat flame ({phi} = 2.32) as a function of the sampling height above the burner (HAB). The obtained mass spectra are reproducible, fragment-free, well resolved in the analyzed m/z range and they are characterized by an excellent signal-to-noise ratio. They all feature regular peak sequences, where each signal peak has been assigned to the most stable high-temperature-formed PAHs. The structure of the mass spectra depends on the sampling HAB into the flame, i.e., on the reaction time. An original contribution to the data interpretation comes from the development of a new sampling method that makes it possible to infer hypotheses about the PAH partition between the gas phase and the soot particles. This method highlights the presence of high-mass PAHs in the soot nucleation zone, and it suggests the importance of heterogeneous reactions occurring between flame PAHs and soot particles. (author)

  11. Analysis of secondary organic aerosol using a Micro-Orifice Volatilization Impactor (MOVI) coupled to an ion trap mass spectrometer with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI-IT/MS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brueggemann, M.; Vogel, A.; Hoffmann, T.

    2012-04-01

    We describe the development and characterization of a Micro-Orifice Volatilization Impactor (MOVI) which is coupled to an ion trap mass spectrometer with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI-IT/MS), and its application in laboratory and field measurements. The MOVI-APCI-IT/MS allows the quantification of organic acids and other oxidation products of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in secondary organic aerosols (SOA) on a semi-continuous basis. Furthermore, the vapor pressure and saturation concentration of the particle components can be estimated. The MOVI was first described in 2010 by Yatavelli and Thornton (Yatavelli and Thornton, 2010). It is a single stage, multi-nozzle impactor with 100 nozzles, each having a diameter of 150 μm. At a flow-rate of 10 L·min-1 air is drawn through the MOVI and particles are collected on a deposition plate. The cut-point diameter (d50, diameter of 50% collection efficiency) is at 130 nm. A low pressure-drop of only 5.3% of atmospheric pressure behind the nozzles allows collecting not only low-volatile but even semi-volatile compounds, which are an important part of SOA. After collecting particles hydrocarbon-free synthetic air is led over the collection surface into the APCI-IT/MS and the collection surface is heated up to 120 ° C in less than 200 s, volatilizing the sampled SOA. The vaporized compounds are transferred into the ion source and subsequently analyzed by mass spectrometry. Due to the soft ionization at atmospheric pressure the obtained mass spectra show only low fragmentations and can easily be interpreted. In laboratory experiments the MOVI-APCI-IT/MS was used for the chemical analysis of SOA generated from α-pinene-ozonolysis in a smog chamber. The limit of detection was found at 7.3 ng for pinic acid. The vapor pressure log p0 and the saturation concentration C25* for pinic acid were calculated from the desorption temperature using the method presented by Faulhaber et al. (Faulhaber et al., 2009

  12. Skeletal muscle fiber analysis by atmospheric pressure scanning microprobe matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometric imaging at high mass and high spatial resolution.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Yu-Hsuan; Bhandari, Dhaka Ram; Garrett, Timothy J; Carter, Christy S; Spengler, Bernhard; Yost, Richard A

    2016-06-01

    Skeletal muscles are composed of heterogeneous muscle fibers with various fiber types. These fibers can be classified into different classes based on their different characteristics. MALDI mass spectrometric imaging (MSI) has been applied to study and visualize different metabolomics profiles of different fiber types. Here, skeletal muscles were analyzed by atmospheric pressure scanning microprobe MALDI-MSI at high spatial and high mass resolution.

  13. Variable Permanent Magnet Quadrupole

    SciTech Connect

    Mihara, T.; Iwashita, Y.; Kumada, M.; Spencer, C.M.; /SLAC

    2007-05-23

    A permanent magnet quadrupole (PMQ) is one of the candidates for the final focus lens in a linear collider. An over 120 T/m strong variable permanent magnet quadrupole is achieved by the introduction of saturated iron and a 'double ring structure'. A fabricated PMQ achieved 24 T integrated gradient with 20 mm bore diameter, 100 mm magnet diameter and 20 cm pole length. The strength of the PMQ is adjustable in 1.4 T steps, due to its 'double ring structure': the PMQ is split into two nested rings; the outer ring is sliced along the beam line into four parts and is rotated to change the strength. This paper describes the variable PMQ from fabrication to recent adjustments.

  14. Managing Permanent Objects

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-11-01

    sorage me hanism is the Chunk Management System ( CMS ). CMS provides a database-like interface for POMW. On first reference to a permanent object POMS...19] M.P. Atkinson, K.J. Chisholm, and W.P. Cockshott. CMS - A Chunk Management System . Technical Report CSR-110-82, Department of Computer Science...database manager . Creating and using emibedded systems is not always bad. In most large programming projets one ends up constructing and using some sort

  15. Permanent magnet design methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leupold, Herbert A.

    1991-01-01

    Design techniques developed for the exploitation of high energy magnetically rigid materials such as Sm-Co and Nd-Fe-B have resulted in a revolution in kind rather than in degree in the design of a variety of electron guidance structures for ballistic and aerospace applications. Salient examples are listed. Several prototype models were developed. These structures are discussed in some detail: permanent magnet solenoids, transverse field sources, periodic structures, and very high field structures.

  16. Detection of dimethylamine in the low pptv range using nitrate chemical ionization atmospheric pressure interface time-of-flight (CI-APi-TOF) mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Mario; Heinritzi, Martin; Herzog, Stephan; Leiminger, Markus; Bianchi, Federico; Praplan, Arnaud; Dommen, Josef; Curtius, Joachim; Kürten, Andreas

    2016-05-01

    Amines are potentially important for atmospheric new particle formation, but their concentrations are usually low with typical mixing ratios in the pptv range or even smaller. Therefore, the demand for highly sensitive gas-phase amine measurements has emerged in the last several years. Nitrate chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS) is routinely used for the measurement of gas-phase sulfuric acid in the sub-pptv range. Furthermore, extremely low volatile organic compounds (ELVOCs) can be detected with a nitrate CIMS. In this study we demonstrate that a nitrate CIMS can also be used for the sensitive measurement of dimethylamine (DMA, (CH3)2NH) using the NO3-•(HNO3)1 - 2• (DMA) cluster ion signal. Calibration measurements were made at the CLOUD chamber during two different measurement campaigns. Good linearity between 0 and ˜ 120 pptv of DMA as well as a sub-pptv detection limit of 0.7 pptv for a 10 min integration time are demonstrated at 278 K and 38 % RH.

  17. Simultaneous resonant enhanced multiphoton ionization and electron avalanche ionization in gas mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Shneider, Mikhail N.; Zhang Zhili; Miles, Richard B.

    2008-07-15

    Resonant enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) and electron avalanche ionization (EAI) are measured simultaneously in Ar:Xe mixtures at different partial pressures of mixture components. A simple theory for combined REMPI+EAI in gas mixture is developed. It is shown that the REMPI electrons seed the avalanche process, and thus the avalanche process amplifies the REMPI signal. Possible applications are discussed.

  18. Role of the Permanent Dipole Moment in Coulomb Explosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Cai-Ping; Miao, Xiang-Yang

    2013-10-01

    By numerically solving the non-Born—Oppenheimer time-dependent Schrödinger equation in a few-cycle chirped laser field (5-fs, 800-nm), the effect of the permanent dipole moment on the Coulomb explosion is studied by the kinetic-energy-release spectra with the “virtual detector" method. The results indicate that with the effect of the permanent dipole moment, different multiphoton processes for heteronuclear and homonuclear diatomic molecular ions may take place when the wave packets transit from the ground state (1sσg) to the first excited state (2pσu), and then move along the excited potential curve, and finally charge-resonant enhanced ionization occurs at critical internuclear distance. As a result, despite the similar ionization probabilities for these two systems at higher vibrational level with larger chirp parameter β, the structure of the Coulomb explosion spectrum for the former is prominently different from that for the latter.

  19. Liquids with permanent porosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giri, Nicola; Del Pópolo, Mario G.; Melaugh, Gavin; Greenaway, Rebecca L.; Rätzke, Klaus; Koschine, Tönjes; Pison, Laure; Gomes, Margarida F. Costa; Cooper, Andrew I.; James, Stuart L.

    2015-11-01

    Porous solids such as zeolites and metal-organic frameworks are useful in molecular separation and in catalysis, but their solid nature can impose limitations. For example, liquid solvents, rather than porous solids, are the most mature technology for post-combustion capture of carbon dioxide because liquid circulation systems are more easily retrofitted to existing plants. Solid porous adsorbents offer major benefits, such as lower energy penalties in adsorption-desorption cycles, but they are difficult to implement in conventional flow processes. Materials that combine the properties of fluidity and permanent porosity could therefore offer technological advantages, but permanent porosity is not associated with conventional liquids. Here we report free-flowing liquids whose bulk properties are determined by their permanent porosity. To achieve this, we designed cage molecules that provide a well-defined pore space and that are highly soluble in solvents whose molecules are too large to enter the pores. The concentration of unoccupied cages can thus be around 500 times greater than in other molecular solutions that contain cavities, resulting in a marked change in bulk properties, such as an eightfold increase in the solubility of methane gas. Our results provide the basis for development of a new class of functional porous materials for chemical processes, and we present a one-step, multigram scale-up route for highly soluble ‘scrambled’ porous cages prepared from a mixture of commercially available reagents. The unifying design principle for these materials is the avoidance of functional groups that can penetrate into the molecular cage cavities.

  20. Real-time air monitoring of mustard gas and Lewisite 1 by detecting their in-line reaction products by atmospheric pressure chemical ionization ion trap tandem mass spectrometry with counterflow ion introduction.

    PubMed

    Okumura, Akihiko; Takada, Yasuaki; Watanabe, Susumu; Hashimoto, Hiroaki; Ezawa, Naoya; Seto, Yasuo; Sekiguchi, Hiroshi; Maruko, Hisashi; Takayama, Yasuo; Sekioka, Ryoji; Yamaguchi, Shintaro; Kishi, Shintaro; Satoh, Takafumi; Kondo, Tomohide; Nagashima, Hisayuki; Nagoya, Tomoki

    2015-01-20

    A new method enabling sensitive real-time air monitoring of highly reactive chemical warfare agents, namely, mustard gas (HD) and Lewisite 1 (L1), by detecting ions of their in-line reaction products instead of intact agents, is proposed. The method is based on corona discharge-initiated atmospheric pressure chemical ionization coupled with ion trap tandem mass spectrometry (MS(n)) via counterflow ion introduction. Therefore, it allows for highly sensitive and specific real-time detection of a broad range of airborne compounds. In-line chemical reactions, ionization reactions, and ion fragmentations of these agents were investigated. Mustard gas is oxygenated in small quantity by reactive oxygen species generated in the corona discharge. With increasing air humidity, the MS(2) signal intensity of protonated molecules of mono-oxygenated HD decreases but exceeds that of dominantly existing intact HD. This result can be explained in view of proton affinity. Lewisite 1 is hydrolyzed and oxidized. As the humidity increases from zero, the signal of the final product, namely, didechlorinated, dihydroxylated, and mono-oxygenated L1, quickly increases and reaches a plateau, giving the highest MS(2) and MS(3) signals among those of L1 and its reaction products. The addition of minimal moisture gives the highest signal intensity, even under low humidity. The method was demonstrated to provide sufficient analytical performance to meet the requirements concerning hygienic management and counter-terrorism. It will be the first practical method, in view of sensitivity and specificity, for real-time air monitoring of HD and L1 without sample pretreatment.

  1. Permanence can be Defended.

    PubMed

    McGee, Andrew; Gardiner, Dale

    2017-03-01

    In donation after the circulatory-respiratory determination of death (DCDD), the dead donor rule requires that the donor be dead before organ procurement can proceed. Under the relevant limb of the Uniform Determination of Death Act 1981 (USA), a person is dead when the cessation of circulatory-respiratory function is 'irreversible'. Critics of current practice in DCDD have argued that the donor is not dead at the time organs are procured, and so the procurement of organs from these donors violates the dead donor rule. We offer a new argument here in defence of current DCDD practice, and, in particular, of the interpretation of the requirement of 'irreversibility' as permanence.

  2. Permanent Turbidity-Standards

    PubMed Central

    Roessler, William G.; Brewer, Carl R.

    1967-01-01

    Permanent turbidity reference standards suitable for measurement of microbial suspensions were prepared by suspending finely divided titanium dioxide in aryl sulfonamide-formaldehyde or methylstyrene resins. Turbidities of these standards, adjusted to a useful range for microbiological and immunological studies, were compared with other reference standards in use today. Tube holders for a Coleman Photonephelometer and a Nepho-Colorimeter were modified to eliminate the water well and to allow use of optically standardized 10-, 16-, or 18-mm test tubes. The standards and the tube holders have been used satisfactorily for more than 12 years. Images Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:6077410

  3. Pressure-assisted capillary electrochromatography with electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry based on silica-based monolithic column for rapid analysis of narcotics.

    PubMed

    Lu, Minghua; Zhang, Lan; Feng, Qiang; Xia, Shifei; Chi, Yuwu; Tong, Ping; Chen, Guonan

    2008-02-01

    A pressure-assisted CEC (pCEC) with ESI-MS based on silica-based monolithic column was developed for rapid analysis of narcotics. Combining the extremely high permeability and separation efficiency of silica-based monolithic column with the high selectivity and sensitivity of pCEC-ESI-MS, the developed system exhibited its prominent advantages in separation and detection. A systematic investigation of the pCEC separation and ESI-MS detection parameters was performed. Experiment results showed that the optimized separation efficiency could be obtained at 8 bar assisted pressure with 25 kV separation voltage, using the solution containing 65% ACN v/v and 20 mmol/L ammonium acetate with pH 6.0 as running buffer. 3 microL/min of sheath liquid was considered as the optimized flow rate since it could provide the maximum signal intensity. Under the optimum conditions, the tested five narcotics could be completely separated within 10 min with the detection limit in the range of 2.0-80 nmol/L. The proposed method has been successfully used for detection of narcotics in real urine samples.

  4. Cryogenic Permanent Magnet Undulators

    SciTech Connect

    Chavanne, J.; Lebec, G.; Penel, C.; Revol, F.; Kitegi, C.

    2010-06-23

    For an in-vacuum undulator operated at small gaps the permanent magnet material needs to be highly resistant to possible electron beam exposure. At room temperature, one generally uses Sm{sub 2}Co{sub 17} or high coercivity NdFeB magnets at the expense of a limited field performance. In a cryogenic permanent magnet undulator (CPMU), at a temperature of around 150 K, any NdFeB grade reveals a coercivity large enough to be radiation resistant. In particular, very high remanence NdFeB material can be used to build undulators with enhanced field and X-ray brilliance at high photon energy provided that the pre-baking of the undulator above 100 deg. C can be eliminated. The ESRF has developed a full scale 2 m long CPMU with a period of 18 mm. This prototype has been in operation on the ID6 test beamline since January 2008. A significant effort was put into the characterization of NdFeB material at low temperature, the development of dedicated magnetic measurement systems and cooling methods. The measured heat budget with beam is found to be larger than expected without compromising the smooth operation of the device. Leading on from this first experience, new CPMUs are currently being considered for the upgrade of the ESRF.

  5. Three-electrode low pressure discharge apparatus and method for uniform ionization of gaseous media. [CO/sub 2/ laser oscillator and pulse smoother

    DOEpatents

    McLellan, E.J.

    1980-10-17

    Uniform, transverse electrical discharges are produced in gaseous media without the necessity of switching the main discharge voltage with an external device which carries the entire discharge current. A three-electrode low pressure discharge tube is charged across its anode and cathode to below breakdown voltage using a dc voltage source. An array of resistors or capacitors can be made to discharge to the wire screen anode by means of a low energy high voltage pulse circuit producing sufficient preionization in the region between the anode and cathode to initiate and control the main discharge. The invention has been demonstrated to be useful as a CO/sub 2/ laser oscillator and pulse-smoother. It can be reliably operated in the sealed-off mode.

  6. Low-density ionization behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, G.A. Jr.

    1995-04-01

    As part of a continuing study of the physics of matter under extreme conditions, I give some results on matter at extremely low density. In particular I compare a quantum mechanical calculation of the pressure for atomic hydrogen with the corresponding pressure given by Thomas-Fermi theory. (This calculation differs from the ``confined atom`` approximation in a physically significant way.) Since Thomas-Fermi theory in some sense, represents the case of infinite nuclear charge, these cases should represent extremes. Comparison is also made with Saha theory, which considers ionization from a chemical point of view, but is weak on excited-state effects. In this theory, the pressure undergoes rapid variation as electron ionization levels are passed. This effect is in contrast to the smooth behavior of the Thomas-Fermi fixed temperature, complete ionization occurs in the low density limit, I study the case where the temperature goes appropriately to zero with the density. Although considerable modification is required, Saha theory is closer to the actual results for this case than is Thomas-Fermi theory.

  7. Study and Control of Various Corona Modes in an Atmospheric Pressure Weakly Ionized Plasma Reactor Using a Current Sensor Characterized by a Broad Frequency Band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, Rokibul; Pedrow, Patrick; Lekobou, William; Englund, Karl

    2013-09-01

    A broad band current sensor is being used to monitor the various phenomena (primary streamers, secondary streamers, back corona, etc.) associated with an atmospheric pressure needle-array-to-grounded-screen corona discharge. The reactor consists of a PVC tube and the needle array consists of nickel coated steel electrodes with radius of curvature about 50 μ . The grounded screen is made from stainless steel mesh and applied voltage has a frequency of 60 Hz with an RMS value ranging from 0 to 10 kV. The voltage sensor is a resistive divider and the current sensor is a viewing resistor with value 50 Ω. The feed gas stream is presently (argon + acetylene) or (argon + oxygen) with the argon acting as carrier gas and the acetylene and oxygen acting as precursor gases. Voltage and current are captured with a LeCroy 9350AL 500MHz oscilloscope and analyzed with Matlab using digital signal processing algorithms. The goals of the research are 1) to measure reactor electrical power on a real time basis; 2) to provide real time control of the applied voltage and thus avoid spark conditions; and 3) to identify the various corona modes present in the reactor. Processing of substrates takes place downstream from the grounded screen, outside of the harsh corona discharge environment.

  8. Neutral depletion versus repletion due to ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Fruchtman, A.; Makrinich, G.; Raimbault, J.-L.; Liard, L.; Rax, J.-M.; Chabert, P.

    2008-05-15

    Recent theoretical analyses which predicted unexpected effects of neutral depletion in both collisional and collisionless plasmas are reviewed. We focus on the depletion of collisionless neutrals induced by strong ionization of a collisionless plasma and contrast this depletion with the effect of strong ionization on thermalized neutrals. The collisionless plasma is analyzed employing a kinetic description. The collisionless neutrals and the plasma are coupled through volume ionization and wall recombination only. The profiles of density and pressure both of the plasma and of the neutral-gas and the profile of the ionization rate are calculated. It is shown that for collisionless neutrals the ionization results in neutral depletion, while when neutrals are thermalized the ionization induces a maximal neutral-density at the discharge center, which we call neutral repletion. The difference between the two cases stems from the relation between the neutral density and pressure. The pressure of the collisionless neutral-gas turns out to be maximal where its density is minimal, in contrast to the case of a thermalized neutral gas.

  9. Preliminary Figures of Merit for Isotope Ratio Measurements: The Liquid Sampling-Atmospheric Pressure Glow Discharge Microplasma Ionization Source Coupled to an Orbitrap Mass Analyzer.

    PubMed

    Hoegg, Edward D; Barinaga, Charles J; Hager, George J; Hart, Garret L; Koppenaal, David W; Marcus, R Kenneth

    2016-08-01

    In order to meet a growing need for fieldable mass spectrometer systems for precise elemental and isotopic analyses, the liquid sampling-atmospheric pressure glow discharge (LS-APGD) has a number of very promising characteristics. One key set of attributes that await validation deals with the performance characteristics relative to isotope ratio precision and accuracy. Owing to its availability and prior experience with this research team, the initial evaluation of isotope ratio (IR) performance was performed on a Thermo Scientific Exactive Orbitrap instrument. While the mass accuracy and resolution performance for Orbitrap analyzers are well-documented, no detailed evaluations of the IR performance have been published. Efforts described here involve two variables: the inherent IR precision and accuracy delivered by the LS-APGD microplasma and the inherent IR measurement qualities of Orbitrap analyzers. Important to the IR performance, the various operating parameters of the Orbitrap sampling interface, high-energy collisional dissociation (HCD) stage, and ion injection/data acquisition have been evaluated. The IR performance for a range of other elements, including natural, depleted, and enriched uranium isotopes was determined. In all cases, the precision and accuracy are degraded when measuring low abundance (<0.1% isotope fractions). In the best case, IR precision on the order of 0.1% RSD can be achieved, with values of 1%-3% RSD observed for low-abundance species. The results suggest that the LS-APGD is a promising candidate for field deployable MS analysis and that the high resolving powers of the Orbitrap may be complemented with a here-to-fore unknown capacity to deliver high-precision IRs. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  10. Preliminary Figures of Merit for Isotope Ratio Measurements: The Liquid Sampling-Atmospheric Pressure Glow Discharge Microplasma Ionization Source Coupled to an Orbitrap Mass Analyzer

    SciTech Connect

    Hoegg, Edward D.; Barinaga, Charles J.; Hager, George J.; Hart, Garret L.; Koppenaal, David W.; Marcus, R. Kenneth

    2016-04-14

    ABSTRACT In order to meet a growing need for fieldable mass spectrometer systems for precise elemental and isotopic analyses, the liquid sampling-atmospheric pressure glow discharge (LS-APGD) has a number of very promising characteristics. One key set of attributes that await validation deals with the performance characteristics relative to isotope ratio precision and accuracy. Due to its availability and prior experience with this research team, the initial evaluation of isotope ratio (IR) performance was performed on a Thermo Scientific Exactive Orbitrap instrument. While the mass accuracy and resolution performance for orbitrap analyzers are very well documented, no detailed evaluations of the IR performance have been published. Efforts described here involve two variables: the inherent IR precision and accuracy delivered by the LSAPGD microplasma and the inherent IR measurement qualities of orbitrap analyzers. Important to the IR performance, the various operating parameters of the orbitrap sampling interface, HCD dissociation stage, and ion injection/data acquisition have been evaluated. The IR performance for a range of other elements, including natural, depleted, and enriched uranium isotopes was determined. In all cases the precision and accuracy are degraded when measuring low abundance (<0.1% isotope fractions). In the best case, IR precision on the order of 0.1 %RSD can be achieved, with values of 1-3 %RSD observed for low-abundance species. The results suggest that the LSAPGD is a very good candidate for field deployable MS analysis and that the high resolving powers of the orbitrap may be complemented with a here-to-fore unknown capacity to deliver high-precision isotope ratios.

  11. Preliminary Figures of Merit for Isotope Ratio Measurements: The Liquid Sampling-Atmospheric Pressure Glow Discharge Microplasma Ionization Source Coupled to an Orbitrap Mass Analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoegg, Edward D.; Barinaga, Charles J.; Hager, George J.; Hart, Garret L.; Koppenaal, David W.; Marcus, R. Kenneth

    2016-08-01

    In order to meet a growing need for fieldable mass spectrometer systems for precise elemental and isotopic analyses, the liquid sampling-atmospheric pressure glow discharge (LS-APGD) has a number of very promising characteristics. One key set of attributes that await validation deals with the performance characteristics relative to isotope ratio precision and accuracy. Owing to its availability and prior experience with this research team, the initial evaluation of isotope ratio (IR) performance was performed on a Thermo Scientific Exactive Orbitrap instrument. While the mass accuracy and resolution performance for Orbitrap analyzers are well-documented, no detailed evaluations of the IR performance have been published. Efforts described here involve two variables: the inherent IR precision and accuracy delivered by the LS-APGD microplasma and the inherent IR measurement qualities of Orbitrap analyzers. Important to the IR performance, the various operating parameters of the Orbitrap sampling interface, high-energy collisional dissociation (HCD) stage, and ion injection/data acquisition have been evaluated. The IR performance for a range of other elements, including natural, depleted, and enriched uranium isotopes was determined. In all cases, the precision and accuracy are degraded when measuring low abundance (<0.1% isotope fractions). In the best case, IR precision on the order of 0.1% RSD can be achieved, with values of 1%-3% RSD observed for low-abundance species. The results suggest that the LS-APGD is a promising candidate for field deployable MS analysis and that the high resolving powers of the Orbitrap may be complemented with a here-to-fore unknown capacity to deliver high-precision IRs.

  12. Miniature Oxidizer Ionizer for a Fuel Cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartley, Frank

    2006-01-01

    A proposed miniature device for ionizing the oxygen (or other oxidizing gas) in a fuel cell would consist mostly of a membrane ionizer using the same principles as those of the device described in the earlier article, Miniature Bipolar Electrostatic Ion Thruster (NPO-21057). The oxidizing gas would be completely ionized upon passage through the holes in the membrane ionizer. The resulting positively charged atoms or molecules of oxidizing gas could then, under the influence of the fringe fields of the ionizer, move toward the fuel-cell cathode that would be part of a membrane/electrode assembly comprising the cathode, a solid-electrolyte membrane, and an anode. The electro-oxidized state of the oxidizer atoms and molecules would enhance transfer of them through the cathode, thereby reducing the partial pressure of the oxidizer gas between the ionizer and the fuel-cell cathode, thereby, in turn, causing further inflow of oxidizer gas through the holes in the membrane ionizer. Optionally the ionizer could be maintained at a positive electric potential with respect to the cathode, in which case the resulting electric field would accelerate the ions toward the cathode.

  13. Ionization potentials of seaborgium

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, E.; Pershina, V.; Fricke, B.

    1999-10-21

    Multiconfiguration relativistic Dirac-Fock values were calculated for the first six ionization potentials of seaborgium and of the other group 6 elements. No experimental ionization potentials are available for seaborgium. Accurate experimental values are not available for all of the other ionization potentials. Ionic radii for the 4+ through 6+ ions of seaborgium are also presented. The ionization potentials and ionic radii obtained will be used to predict some physiochemical properties of seaborgium and its compounds.

  14. Achieving permanency for LGBTQ youth.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Jill; Freundlich, Madelyn

    2006-01-01

    This article brings together two significant efforts in the child welfare field: achieving permanence for youth in out-of-home care and meeting the needs of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and questioning (LGBTQ) youth. During the past several years, a national movement has taken place to assure all children and youth have a permanent family connection before leaving the child welfare system; however, LGBTQ youth are not routinely included in the permanency discussions. At the same time, efforts in addressing the needs of LGBTQ youth have increased, but permanency is rarely mentioned as a need. This article offers models of permanence and practices to facilitate permanence with LGBTQ youth and their families. It also offers a youth-driven, individualized process, using youth development principles to achieve relational, physical, and legal permanence. Reunification efforts are discussed, including services, supports, and education required for youth to return to their family of origin. For those who cannot return home, other family resources are explored. The article also discusses cultural issues as they affect permanence for LGBTQ youth, and, finally, addresses the need for ongoing support services to sustain and support permanency.

  15. Comparison of microbial communities in Lake Tahoe surface sample with Tonga Trench water column samples using High Pressure Liquid Chromatography - Electrospray Ionization - Mass Spectroscopy (HPLC - ESI - MS) and Global Natural Products Social Molecular Network (GNPS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belmonte, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    Intact polar lipids (IPLs) are lipids composed of a head group, a glycerol, and a fatty acid chain that make up the lipid bilayer of cell membranes in living cells; and the varying head groups can be indicative of the type of microbes present in the environment (Van Mooy 2010). So by distinguishing and identifying the IPL distribution in an environment one can make inferences about the microbial communities in the said environment. In this study, we used High Pressure Liquid Chromatography-Electrospray Ionization- Mass Spectroscopy (HPLC-ESI-MS) and Global Natural Products Social Molecular Networking (GNPS) to compare the IPL distributions of two oligotrophic environments: surface waters of Lake Tahoe in the Sierra Nevada Mountains, and the water column of the Tonga Trench in the South Pacific. We hypothesized that the similar nutrient dynamics of the two oligotrophic environments would result in similar eukaryotic and prokaryotic communities, which would be reflected in the IPL composition of suspended particulate organic matter (POM). For simplicity we focused on the classes of IPLs most commonly observed in the marine environment: phosphotidylglycerol (PG), phosphotidylethanolamine (PE), diacylglyceryl-trimethyl-homoserine (DGTS), diacylglyceryl-hydroxymethyl-trimethylalanine (DGTA), sulfoquinovosyldiacylglycerol (SQDG), monoglycosyldiacylglycerol (MGDG) and diglycosyldiacylglycerol (DGDG). Our results showed that all of the marine IPLs of interest were present in Lake Tahoe which confirms that there are many of the same microbial communities in the fresh waters of Lake Tahoe and the salt waters Tonga Trench.

  16. Liquid Microjunction Surface Sampling Coupled with High-Pressure Liquid Chromatography-Electrospray Ionization-Mass Spectrometry for Analysis of Drugs and Metabolites in Whole-Body Thin Tissue Sections

    SciTech Connect

    Kertesz, Vilmos; Van Berkel, Gary J

    2010-01-01

    In this work, a commercially available autosampler was adapted to perform direct liquid microjunction (LMJ) surface sampling followed by a high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) separation of the extract components and detection with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). To illustrate the utility of coupling a separation with this direct liquid extraction based surface sampling approach, four different organs (brain, lung, kidney, and liver) from whole-body thin tissue sections of propranolol dosed and control mice were examined. The parent drug was observed in the chromatograms of the surface sampling extracts from all the organs of the dosed mouse examined. In addition, two isomeric phase II metabolites of propranolol (an aliphatic and an aromatic hydroxypropranolol glucuronide) were observed in the chromatograms of the extracts from lung, kidney, and liver. Confirming the presence of one or the other or both of these glucuronides in the extract from the various organs was not possible without the separation. These drug and metabolite data obtained using the LMJ surface sampling/HPLC-MS method and the results achieved by analyzing similar samples by conventional extraction of the tissues and subsequent HPLC-MS analysis were consistent.

  17. Analysis of aldehydes in beer by gas-diffusion microextraction: characterization by high-performance liquid chromatography-diode-array detection-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Luís Moreira; Magalhães, Paulo Jorge; Valente, Inês Maria; Pacheco, João Grosso; Dostálek, Pavel; Sýkora, David; Rodrigues, José António; Barros, Aquiles Araújo

    2010-06-11

    In this work, a recently developed extraction technique for sample preparation aiming the analysis of volatile and semi-volatile compounds named gas-diffusion microextraction (GDME) is applied in the chromatographic analysis of aldehydes in beer. Aldehydes-namely acetaldehyde (AA), methylpropanal (MA) and furfural (FA)-were simultaneously extracted and derivatized with 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine (DNPH), then the derivatives were separated and analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography with spectrophotometric detection (HPLC-UV). The identity of the eluted compounds was confirmed by high-performance liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-mass-spectrometry detection in the negative ion mode (HPLC-APCI-MS). The developed methodology showed good repeatability (ca. 5%) and linearity as well as good limits of detection (AA-12.3, FA-1.5 and MA 5.4microgL(-1)) and quantification (AA-41, FA-4.9 and MA 18microgL(-1)); it also appears to be competitive in terms of speed and cost of analysis.

  18. Identification of organic hydroperoxides and hydroperoxy acids in secondary organic aerosol formed during the ozonolysis of different monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes by on-line analysis using atmospheric pressure chemical ionization ion trap mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Reinnig, Marc-Christopher; Warnke, Jörg; Hoffmann, Thorsten

    2009-06-01

    On-line ion trap mass spectrometry (ITMS) enables the real-time characterization of reaction products of secondary organic aerosol (SOA). The analysis was conducted by directly introducing the aerosol particles into the ion source. Positive-ion chemical ionization at atmospheric pressure (APCI(+)) ITMS was used for the characterization of constituents of biogenic SOA produced in reaction-chamber experiments. APCI in the positive-ion mode usually enables the detection of [M+H](+) ions of the individual SOA components. In this paper the identification of organic peroxides from biogenic volatile organic compounds (VOCs) by on-line APCI-ITMS is presented. Organic peroxides containing a hydroperoxy group, generated by gas-phase ozonolysis of monoterpenes (alpha-pinene and beta-pinene) and sesquiterpenes (alpha-cedrene and alpha-copaene), could be detected via on-line APCI(+)-MS/MS experiments. A characteristic neutral loss of 34 Da (hydrogen peroxide, H(2)O(2)) in the on-line MS/MS spectra is a clear indication for the existence of an organic peroxide, containing a hydroperoxy functional group.

  19. Quantitative method for analysis of monensin in soil, water, and urine by direct combination of single-drop microextraction with atmospheric pressure matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Sekar, Ramaiyan; Wu, Hui-Fen

    2006-09-15

    A simple and selective analytical method for the quantitative determination of low concentrations of monensin in soil, surface water, and human urine has been developed. Prior to atmospheric pressure matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (AP-MALDI-MS) analysis, the samples were preconcentrated by using the single-drop microextraction (SDME) technique. Several factors that affect the analyte's extraction, including selection of solvent, microdrop volume, extraction time, and ionic strength, were investigated. Chloroform-toluene (1:1, v/v) was selected as the extraction solvent. Reliable results were obtained using dibenzo-30-crown-10-ether as an internal standard. The proposed method has been successfully applied for the determination of monensin in soil, surface water, and human urine spiked samples. Under the optimized conditions, the limits of quantification of the analyte in surface water, soil, and human urine were 6.7, 12.4 and 7.8 ng/mL, respectively. The intraday and interday precision variation and accuracy of the present method is within the acceptable ranges. The present method avoids the pre- and postderivatization of weak UV absorbing monensin determination using high performance liquid chromatography-ultraviolet detection (HPLC-UV). Furthermore, these techniques are time-consuming, nonreproducible at trace levels, and form undesirable products. The proposed SDME combined with AP-MALDI-MS is simple, fast, and selective for the determination of monensin in environmental and urine samples.

  20. A validated method for the determination of nicotine, cotinine, trans-3'-hydroxycotinine, and norcotinine in human plasma using solid-phase extraction and liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kim, Insook; Huestis, Marilyn A

    2006-06-01

    A liquid chromatographic-mass spectrometric method for the simultaneous determination of nicotine, cotinine, trans-3'-hydroxycotinine, and norcotinine in human plasma was developed and validated. Analytes and deuterated internal standards were extracted from human plasma using solid-phase extraction and analyzed by liquid chromatography/atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-mass spectrometric detection with selected ion monitoring (SIM). Limits of detection and quantification were 1.0 and 2.5 ng/ml, respectively, for all analytes. Linearity ranged from 2.5 to 500 ng/ml of human plasma using a weighting factor of 1/x; correlation coefficients for the calibration curves were > 0.99. Intra- and inter-assay precision and accuracy were < 15.0%. Recoveries were 108.2-110.8% nicotine, 95.8-108.7% cotinine, 90.5-99.5% trans-3'-hydroxycotinine, and 99.5-109.5% norcotinine. The method was also partially validated in bovine serum, owing to the difficulty of obtaining nicotine-free human plasma for the preparation of calibrators and quality control (QC) samples. This method proved to be robust and accurate for the quantification of nicotine, cotinine, trans-3'-hydroxycotinine, and norcotinine in human plasma collected in clinical studies of acute nicotine effects on brain activity and on the development of neonates of maternal smokers.

  1. Method development for the determination of 24S-hydroxycholesterol in human plasma without derivatization by high-performance liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry in atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mode.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Hiroshi; Kakehi, Masaaki; Satomi, Yoshinori; Kamiguchi, Hidenori; Jinno, Fumihiro

    2015-10-01

    We developed a highly sensitive and specific high-performance liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry method with an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization interface to determine 24S-hydroxycholesterol, a major metabolite of cholesterol formed by cytochrome P450 family 46A1, in human plasma without any derivatization step. Phosphate buffered saline including 1% Tween 80 was used as the surrogate matrix for preparation of calibration curves and quality control samples. The saponification process to convert esterified 24S-hydroxycholesterol to free sterols was optimized, followed by liquid-liquid extraction using hexane. Chromatographic separation of 24S-hydroxycholesterol from other isobaric endogenous oxysterols was successfully achieved with gradient mobile phase comprised of 0.1% propionic acid and acetonitrile using L-column2 ODS (2 μm, 2.1 mm id × 150 mm). This assay was capable of determining 24S-hydroxycholesterol in human plasma (200 μL) ranging from 1 to 100 ng/mL with acceptable intra- and inter-day precision and accuracy. The potential risk of in vitro formation of 24S-hydroxycholesterol by oxidation from endogenous cholesterol in human plasma was found to be negligible. The stability of 24S-hydroxycholesterol in relevant solvents and human plasma was confirmed. This method was successfully applied to quantify the plasma concentrations of 24S-hydroxycholesterol in male and female volunteers.

  2. Liquid microjunction surface sampling coupled with high-pressure liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry for analysis of drugs and metabolites in whole-body thin tissue sections.

    PubMed

    Kertesz, Vilmos; Van Berkel, Gary J

    2010-07-15

    In this work, a commercially available autosampler was adapted to perform direct liquid microjunction (LMJ) surface sampling followed by a high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) separation of the extract components and detection with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). To illustrate the utility of coupling a separation with this direct liquid extraction based surface sampling approach, four different organs (brain, lung, kidney, and liver) from whole-body thin tissue sections of propranolol dosed and control mice were examined. The parent drug was observed in the chromatograms of the surface sampling extracts from all the organs of the dosed mouse examined. In addition, two isomeric phase II metabolites of propranolol (an aliphatic and an aromatic hydroxypropranolol glucuronide) were observed in the chromatograms of the extracts from lung, kidney, and liver. Confirming the presence of one or the other or both of these glucuronides in the extract from the various organs was not possible without the separation. These drug and metabolite data obtained using the LMJ surface sampling/HPLC-MS method and the results achieved by analyzing similar samples by conventional extraction of the tissues and subsequent HPLC-MS analysis were consistent. The ability to directly and efficiently sample from thin tissue sections via a liquid extraction and then perform a subsequent liquid phase separation increases the utility of this liquid extraction surface sampling approach.

  3. Comparison of Atmospheric Pressure Ionization Gas Chromatography-Triple Quadrupole Mass Spectrometry to Traditional High-Resolution Mass Spectrometry for the Identification and Quantification of Halogenated Dioxins and Furans.

    PubMed

    Organtini, Kari L; Haimovici, Liad; Jobst, Karl J; Reiner, Eric J; Ladak, Adam; Stevens, Douglas; Cochran, Jack W; Dorman, Frank L

    2015-08-04

    The goal of this study was to qualify gas chromatography coupled to atmospheric pressure ionization tandem mass spectrometry (APGC-MS/MS) as a reliable and valid technique for analysis of halogenated dioxins and furans that could be used in place of more traditional gas chromatography coupled to high-resolution mass spectrometry (GC-HRMS) analysis. A direct comparison of the two instrumental techniques was performed. APGC-MS/MS system sensitivity was demonstrated to be on the single femtogram level. The APGC-MS/MS analysis also demonstrated method detection limits (MDLs) in both sediment and fish that were 2-18 times lower than those determined for the GC-HRMS. Inlet conditions were established to prevent issues with sample carry-over, due largely to the enhanced sensitivity of this technique. Additionally, this work utilized direct injection for sample introduction through the split/splittless inlet. Finally, quantification of both sediment and fish certified reference materials were directly compared between the APGC-MS/MS and GC-HRMS. The APGC-MS/MS performed similarly to, if not better than, the GC-HRMS instrument in the analysis of these samples. This data is intended to substantiate APGC-MS/MS as a comparable technique to GC-HRMS for the analysis of dioxins and furans.

  4. Quantitative analysis of selegiline and three metabolites (N-desmethylselegiline, methamphetamine, and amphetamine) in human plasma by high-performance liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Slawson, Matthew H; Taccogno, James L; Foltz, Rodger L; Moody, David E

    2002-10-01

    This report describes a sensitive and specific high-performance liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-tandem mass spectrometry method for the detection of subnanogram concentrations of selegiline and its three principle metabolites, N-desmethylselegiline, methamphetamine, and amphetamine, in human plasma. The assay has a dynamic range of 0.1-20 ng/mL for selegiline and N-desmethylselegiline (norselegiline) and 0.2-20 ng/mL for methamphetamine and amphetamine. The inter- and intra-assay precision and accuracy varied by less than 11% for all analytes at 0.3, 2.5, and 15 ng/mL and less than 16% at the lower limit of quantitation (0.1 ng/mL for selegiline and norselegiline; and 0.2 ng/mL for methamphetamine and amphetamine). Selegiline and its metabolites showed no significant loss in quantitative accuracy after three freeze/thaw cycles or after up to 6 h at room temperature prior to extraction. Extracted plasma samples retained quantitative accuracy after storage for at least 7 days at -20 degrees C or up to 70 h at room temperature. Methanolic stock solutions were stable for at least 6 h when kept at room temperature or at least 90 days when kept at -20 degrees C.

  5. Ionization Energies of Lanthanides

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lang, Peter F.; Smith, Barry C.

    2010-01-01

    This article describes how data are used to analyze the pattern of ionization energies of the lanthanide elements. Different observed pathways of ionization between different ground states are discussed, and the effects of pairing, exchange, and orbital interactions on ionization energies of the lanthanides are evaluated. When all the above…

  6. Ionization Energies of Lanthanides

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lang, Peter F.; Smith, Barry C.

    2010-01-01

    This article describes how data are used to analyze the pattern of ionization energies of the lanthanide elements. Different observed pathways of ionization between different ground states are discussed, and the effects of pairing, exchange, and orbital interactions on ionization energies of the lanthanides are evaluated. When all the above…

  7. Matrix assisted ionization in vacuum, a sensitive and widely applicable ionization method for mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Trimpin, Sarah; Inutan, Ellen D

    2013-05-01

    An astonishingly simple new method to produce gas-phase ions of small molecules as well as proteins from the solid state under cold vacuum conditions is described. This matrix assisted ionization vacuum (MAIV) mass spectrometry (MS) method produces multiply charged ions similar to those that typify electrospray ionization (ESI) and uses sample preparation methods that are nearly identical to matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI). Unlike these established methods, MAIV does not require a laser or voltage for ionization, and unlike the recently introduced matrix assisted ionization inlet method, does not require added heat. MAIV-MS requires only introduction of a crystalline mixture of the analyte incorporated with a suitable small molecule matrix compound such as 3-nitrobenzonitrile directly to the vacuum of the mass spectrometer. Vacuum intermediate pressure MALDI sources and modified ESI sources successfully produce ions for analysis by MS with this method. As in ESI-MS, ion formation is continuous and, without a laser, little chemical background is observed. MAIV, operating from a surface offers the possibility of significantly improved sensitivity relative to atmospheric pressure ionization because ions are produced in the vacuum region of the mass spectrometer eliminating losses associated with ion transfer from atmospheric pressure to vacuum. Mechanistic aspects and potential applications for this new ionization method are discussed.

  8. IONIZATION IN ATMOSPHERES OF BROWN DWARFS AND EXTRASOLAR PLANETS. V. ALFVÉN IONIZATION

    SciTech Connect

    Stark, C. R.; Helling, Ch.; Rimmer, P. B.; Diver, D. A.

    2013-10-10

    Observations of continuous radio and sporadic X-ray emission from low-mass objects suggest they harbor localized plasmas in their atmospheric environments. For low-mass objects, the degree of thermal ionization is insufficient to qualify the ionized component as a plasma, posing the question: what ionization processes can efficiently produce the required plasma that is the source of the radiation? We propose Alfvén ionization as a mechanism for producing localized pockets of ionized gas in the atmosphere, having sufficient degrees of ionization (≥10{sup –7}) that they constitute plasmas. We outline the criteria required for Alfvén ionization and demonstrate its applicability in the atmospheres of low-mass objects such as giant gas planets, brown dwarfs, and M dwarfs with both solar and sub-solar metallicities. We find that Alfvén ionization is most efficient at mid to low atmospheric pressures where a seed plasma is easier to magnetize and the pressure gradients needed to drive the required neutral flows are the smallest. For the model atmospheres considered, our results show that degrees of ionization of 10{sup –6}-1 can be obtained as a result of Alfvén ionization. Observable consequences include continuum bremsstrahlung emission, superimposed with spectral lines from the plasma ion species (e.g., He, Mg, H{sub 2}, or CO lines). Forbidden lines are also expected from the metastable population. The presence of an atmospheric plasma opens the door to a multitude of plasma and chemical processes not yet considered in current atmospheric models. The occurrence of Alfvén ionization may also be applicable to other astrophysical environments such as protoplanetary disks.

  9. Achieving Permanency for LGBTQ Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, Jill; Freundlich, Madelyn

    2006-01-01

    This article brings together two significant efforts in the child welfare field: achieving permanence for youth in out-of-home care and meeting the needs of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and questioning (LGBTQ) youth. During the past several years, a national movement has taken place to assure all children and youth have a permanent family…

  10. Permanent-Magnet Meissner Bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, Glen A.

    1994-01-01

    Permanent-magnet meissner bearing features inherently stable, self-centering conical configuration. Bearing made stiffer or less stiff by selection of magnets, springs, and spring adjustments. Cylindrical permanent magnets with axial magnetization stacked coaxially on rotor with alternating polarity. Typically, rare-earth magnets used. Magnets machined and fitted together to form conical outer surface.

  11. Permanent-Magnet Meissner Bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, Glen A.

    1994-01-01

    Permanent-magnet meissner bearing features inherently stable, self-centering conical configuration. Bearing made stiffer or less stiff by selection of magnets, springs, and spring adjustments. Cylindrical permanent magnets with axial magnetization stacked coaxially on rotor with alternating polarity. Typically, rare-earth magnets used. Magnets machined and fitted together to form conical outer surface.

  12. [The Object Permanence Fallacy.] Commentary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradley, Ben S.

    1996-01-01

    Suggests that Greenberg's challenge to the centrality of object permanence in developmental thinking reveals that developmentalists' theories about childhood speak about their own self-images. Notes that developmentalists have been guilty of not only the object permanence fallacy but also the genetic fallacy, or the mistaken belief that describing…

  13. The "Permanent" Patient Problem.

    PubMed

    Bruce, Courtenay R; Majumder, Mary A

    2014-01-01

    Patients who enter the health care system for acute care may become "permanent" patients of the hospital when a lack of resources precludes discharge to the next level of post-acute care. Legal, professional, and ethical norms prohibit physician and acute care hospital "dumping" of these patients. However, limitless use of hospital resources for indefinite stays is untenable. In the absence of hospital policy addressing this specific issue, the availability of financial support will be determined by health care professionals' willingness to advocate for the patient and negotiate with hospital administrators and the ability and willingness of administrators to authorize the use of hospital resources. We propose five mid-level ethical principles to guide advocacy and administrative decision-making about provision of financial support for post-acute care for those patients who cannot afford it. We use two actual, de-identified cases to illustrate how these principles can be used to make reasoned, consistent decisions about the provision of post-acute financial support. © 2014 American Society of Law, Medicine & Ethics, Inc.

  14. Tissue Imaging Using Nanospray Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Laskin, Julia; Heath, Brandi S.; Roach, Patrick J.; Cazares, Lisa H.; Semmes, O. John

    2012-01-03

    We present the first results showing the ambient imaging of biological samples in their native environment using nanospray desorption ionization (nanoDESI) mass spectrometry. NanoDESI is an ambient pressure ionization technique that enables precise control of ionization of molecules from substrates. We demonstrate highly sensitive and robust analysis of tissue samples with high spatial resolution (<12 {mu}m) without sample preparation, which will be essential for applications in clinical diagnostics, drug discovery, molecular biology, and biochemistry.

  15. Single drop microextraction as a concentrating probe for rapid screening of low molecular weight drugs from human urine in atmospheric-pressure matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Shrivas, Kamlesh; Wu, Hui-Fen

    2007-01-01

    The present work reports the development of a new analytical procedure for simple and rapid screening of low molecular weight drugs (<500 Da) from human urine samples by atmospheric-pressure matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (AP-MALDI-MS) combined with single drop microextraction (SDME). The success of the proposed method is due to the use of methyltrioctylammonium chloride (MTOAC) as additive to avoid the noise arising from the matrix ions (alpha-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid (CHCA)). SDME also aided in alleviating the interferences arising from other matrix ions present in the urine samples prior to AP-MALDI-MS analysis. Factors affecting the extraction efficiency of drugs, such as selection of solvent, stirring speed, extraction time, exposure volume of extraction phase and salt addition, have been optimized. The optimum molar ratio of CHCA/MTOAC that gave the minimum background noise of CHCA ions was 700:1. The limit of detection (LOD) and relative standard deviation (RSD) of the method were in the ranges 0.3-1.6 microM and 7.8-11.4%, respectively. The SDME method was compared with liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) and hollow fiber liquid-phase microextraction (HF-LPME) to evaluate the compatibility of the present method in the extraction of drugs from urine samples. The role of MTOAC as matrix ion signal suppressor and SDME as analyte-separating device in the rapid screening of low molecular weight drugs from human urine samples using AP-MALDI/MS has been reported. Copyright (c) 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. A novel derivatization method for the determination of Fosfomycin in human plasma by liquid chromatography coupled with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometric detection via phase transfer catalyzed derivatization.

    PubMed

    Papakondyli, Theodora A; Gremilogianni, Aikaterini M; Megoulas, Nikolaos C; Koupparis, Michael A

    2014-03-07

    An analytical method employing novel sample preparation and liquid chromatography coupled with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometric detection (LC-APCI/MS) was developed for the determination of fosfomycin in human plasma. Sample preparation involves derivatization through phase transfer catalysis (PTC) which offers multiple advantages due to the simultaneous extraction, preconcentration and derivatization of the analyte. Using a PT catalyst, fosfomycin was extracted from plasma in an organic phase and, then converted to a pentafluorobenzyl ester with the use of pentafluorobenzyl bromide (PFBBr) derivatization reagent. The method was fully optimized by taking into account both PTC and derivatization parameters. Several catalysts, in a wide range of concentrations, with different counter ions and polarities were tested along with different extraction solvents and pH values. Thereafter, the derivatization procedure was optimized by altering the amount of the derivatization reagent, the temperature of the reaction and finally, the derivatization duration. As internal standard (I.S.) ethylphosphonic acid was chosen and underwent the same pretreatment. The derivatives were separated on a pentafluorophenyl (PFP)-C18 analytical column, which provides unique selectivity, using an isocratic elution with acetonitrile-water (70-30, v/v). The method was validated according to US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) guidelines and can be used for a bioequivalence study of fosfomycin in human plasma. The correlation coefficient (r(2)) of the calibration curve of spiked plasma solutions in the range of 50-12000 ng/mL was found greater than 0.999 with a limit of quantitation (LOQ) equal to 50 ng/ml (for 500 μL plasma sample). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Quantification of β-carotene, retinol, retinyl acetate and retinyl palmitate in enriched fruit juices using dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction coupled to liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Viñas, Pilar; Bravo-Bravo, María; López-García, Ignacio; Hernández-Córdoba, Manuel

    2013-02-01

    A detailed optimization of dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) was carried out for developing liquid chromatographic (HPLC) techniques, using both fluorescence and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometric (APCI-MS) detection, for the simultaneous analysis of preforms of vitamin A: retinol (R), retinyl acetate (RA), retinyl palmitate (RP) and β-carotene (β-C). The HPLC analyses were carried out using a mobile phase composed of methanol and water, with gradient elution. The APCI-MS and fluorescence spectra permitted the correct identification of compounds in the analyzed samples. Parameters affecting DLLME were optimized using 2 mL of methanol (disperser solvent) containing 150 μL carbon tetrachloride (extraction solvent). The precision ranged from 6% to 8% (RSD) and the limits of detection were between 0.03 and 1.4 ng mL(-1), depending on the compound. The enrichment factor values were in the 21-44 range. Juice samples were analyzed without saponification and no matrix effect was found when using fluorescence detection, so calibration was possible with aqueous standards. However, a matrix effect appeared with APCI-MS, in which case it was necessary to apply matrix-matched calibration. There was great variability in the forms of vitamin A present in the juices, the most abundant ester being retinyl acetate (0.04 to 3.4 μg mL(-1)), followed by the amount of retinol (0.01 to 0.16 μg mL(-1)), while retinyl palmitate was not detected, except in the milk-containing juice, in which RP was the main form. The representative carotenoid β-carotene was present in the orange, peach, mango and multifruit juices in high amounts. The method was validated using two certified reference materials. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. A rapid and simple method for the simultaneous determination of four endogenous monoamine neurotransmitters in rat brain using hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography coupled with atmospheric-pressure chemical ionization tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wenbin; Zhu, Bangjie; Liu, Feng; Lyu, Chunming; Zhang, Shen; Yan, Chao; Cheng, Yu; Wei, Hai

    2015-10-01

    Endogenous monoamine neurotransmitters play an essential role in neural communication in mammalians. Many quantitative methods for endogenous monoamines have been developed during recent decades. Yet, matrix effect was usually a challenge in the quantification, in many cases asking for tedious sample preparation or sacrificing sensitivity. In this work, a simple, fast and sensitive method with no matrix effect was developed to simultaneously determine four endogenous monoamines including serotonin, dopamine, epinephrine and norepinephrine in rat brain tissues, using hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography coupled with atmospheric-pressure chemical ionization tandem mass spectrometry. Various conditions, including columns, chromatographic conditions, ion source, MS/MS conditions, and brain tissue preparation methods, were optimized and validated. Pre-weighed 20mg brain sample could be effectively and reproducibly homogenized and protein-precipitated by 20 times value of 0.2% formic acid in cold organic solvents (methanol-acetonitrile, 10:90, v/v). This method exhibited excellent linearity for all analytes (regression coefficients>0.998 or 0.999). The precision, expressed as coefficients of variation, was less than 3.43% for intra-day analyses and ranged from 4.17% to 15.5% for inter-day analyses. Good performance was showed in limit of detection (between 0.3nM and 3.0nM for all analytes), recovery (90.8-120%), matrix effect (84.4-107%), accuracy (89.8-100%) and stability (88.3-104%). The validated method was well applied to simultaneously determine the endogenous serotonin, dopamine, epinephrine and norepinephrine in four brain sections of 18 Wistar rats. The quantification of four endogenous monoamines in rat brain performed excellently in the sensitivity, high throughput, simple sample preparation and matrix effect. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. An improved high performance liquid chromatography-photodiode array detection-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-mass spectrometry method for determination of chlorophylls and their derivatives in freeze-dried and hot-air-dried Rhinacanthus nasutus (L.) Kurz.

    PubMed

    Kao, Tsai Hua; Chen, Chia Ju; Chen, Bing Huei

    2011-10-30

    Rhinacanthus nasutus (L.) Kurz, a traditional Chinese herb possessing antioxidant and anti-cancer activities, has been reported to contain functional components like carotenoids and chlorophylls. However, the variety and amount of chlorophylls remain uncertain. The objectives of this study were to develop a high performance liquid chromatography-photodiode array detection-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-mass spectrometry (HPLC-DAD-APCI-MS) method for determination of chlorophylls and their derivatives in hot-air-dried and freeze-dried R. nasutus. An Agilent Eclipse XDB-C18 column and a gradient mobile phase composed of methanol/N,N-dimethylformamide (97:3, v/v), acetonitrile and acetone were employed to separate internal standard zinc-phthalocyanine plus 12 cholorophylls and their derivatives within 21 min, including chlorophyll a, chlorophyll a', hydroxychlorophyll a, 15-OH-lactone chlorophyll a, chlorophyll b, chlorophyll b', hydroxychlorophyll b, pheophytin a, pheophytin a', hydroxypheophytin a, hydroxypheophytin a' and pheophytin b in hot-air-dried R. nasutus with flow rate at 1 mL/min and detection at 660 nm. But, in freeze-dried R. nasutus, only 4 chlorophylls and their derivatives, including chlorophyll a, chlorophyll a', chlorophyll b and pheophytin a were detected. Zinc-phthalocyanine was found to be an appropriate internal standard to quantify all the chlorophyll compounds. After quantification by HPLC-DAD, both chlorophyll a and pheophytin a were the most abundant in hot-air-dried R. nasutus, while in freeze-dried R. nasutus, chlorophyll a and chlorophyll b dominated.

  20. An approach based on ultrahigh performance liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-mass spectrometry allowing the quantification of both individual phytosteryl and phytostanyl fatty acid esters in complex mixtures.

    PubMed

    Scholz, Birgit; Menzel, Nicole; Lander, Vera; Engel, Karl-Heinz

    2016-01-15

    A method for the analysis of both individual phytosteryl and phytostanyl fatty acid esters in complex mixtures was established. The approach was based on a previously not described combination of three elements: (i) the formation of [M-FA+H](+) fragment ions via APCI (atmospheric pressure chemical ionization), (ii) a highly efficient UHPLC-based separation on a 1.7 μ C8 column, previously established for phytostanyl fatty acid esters, allowing the distinction of individual fatty acid esters sharing the same sterol/stanol nucleus and of isotope peaks of phytosteryl fatty acid esters and corresponding phytostanyl fatty acid esters based on these [M-FA+H](+) fragment ions, and (iii) the adjustment of the APCI conditions allowing the differential APCI-MS-SIM (single ion monitoring) detection of phytostanyl esters of linoleic and linolenic acid based on their distinct formation of a [M+H](+) ion. The usefulness of the methodology was demonstrated by the analysis of a commercially available enriched margarine. Two runs per sample allowed the quantification of 35 target analytes; the total amounts of esters were between 124.7 and 125.3g/kg, being in good agreement with the labelled 125 g/kg. Validation data were elaborated for 35 individual fatty acid esters of sitosterol, campesterol, brassicasterol, stigmasterol, sitostanol and campestanol. Recovery rates ranged from 95 to 106%; the coefficients of variation were consistently <5%, except for stigmasteryl-18:1. The approach describes for the first time a quantification of both individual phytosteryl and phytostanyl fatty acid esters and thus closes an analytical gap related to this class of health-relevant food constituents. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Metabolite localization by atmospheric pressure high-resolution scanning microprobe matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry imaging in whole-body sections and individual organs of the rove beetle Paederus riparius.

    PubMed

    Bhandari, Dhaka Ram; Schott, Matthias; Römpp, Andreas; Vilcinskas, Andreas; Spengler, Bernhard

    2015-03-01

    Mass spectrometry imaging provides for non-targeted, label-free chemical imaging. In this study, atmospheric pressure high-resolution scanning microprobe matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry imaging (AP-SMALDI MSI) was used for the first time to describe the chemical distribution of the defensive compounds pederin, pseudopederin, and pederon in tissue sections (16 μm thick) of the rove beetle Paederus riparius. The whole-insect tissue section was scanned with a 20-μm step size. Mass resolution of the orbital trapping mass spectrometer was set to 100,000 at m/z 200. Additionally, organ-specific compounds were identified for brain, nerve cord, eggs, gut, ovaries, and malpighian tubules. To confirm the distribution of the specific compounds, individual organs from the insect were dissected, and MSI experiments were performed on the dissected organs. Three ganglia of the nerve cord, with a dimension of 250-500 μm, were measured with 10-μm spatial resolution. High-quality m/z images, based on high spatial resolution and high mass accuracy were generated. These features helped to assign mass spectral peaks with high confidence. Mass accuracy of the imaging experiments was <3 ppm root mean square error, and mapping of different compound classes from a single experiment was possible. This approach improved the understanding of the biochemistry of P. riparius. Concentration differences and distributions of pederin and its analogues could be visualized in the whole-insect section. Without any labeling, we assigned key lipids for specific organs to describe their location in the body and to identify morphological structures with a specificity higher than with staining or immunohistology methods.

  2. Preparative mass-spectrometry profiling of bioactive metabolites in Saudi-Arabian propolis fractionated by high-speed countercurrent chromatography and off-line atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass-spectrometry injection.

    PubMed

    Jerz, Gerold; Elnakady, Yasser A; Braun, André; Jäckel, Kristin; Sasse, Florenz; Al Ghamdi, Ahmad A; Omar, Mohamed O M; Winterhalter, Peter

    2014-06-20

    Propolis is a glue material collected by honeybees which is used to seal cracks in beehives and to protect the bee population from infections. Propolis resins have a long history in medicinal use as a natural remedy. The multiple biological properties are related to variations in their chemical compositions. Geographical settings and availability of plant sources are important factors for the occurrence of specific natural products in propolis. A propolis ethylacetate extract (800mg) from Saudi Arabia (Al-Baha region) was separated by preparative scale high-speed countercurrent chromatography (HSCCC) using a non-aqueous solvent system n-hexane-ACN (1:1, v/v). For multiple metabolite detection, the resulting HSCCC-fractions were sequentially injected off-line into an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass-spectrometry (APCI-MS/MS) device, and a reconstituted mass spectrometry profile of the preparative run was visualized by selected ion traces. Best ion-intensities for detected compounds were obtained in the negative APCI mode and monitored occurring co-elution effects. HSCCC and successive purification steps resulted in the isolation and characterization of various bioactive natural products such as (12E)- and (12Z)-communic acid, sandaracopimaric acid, (+)-ferruginol, (+)-totarol, and 3β-acetoxy-19(29)-taraxasten-20a-ol using EI-, APCI-MS and 1D/2D-NMR. Cycloartenol-derivatives and triterpene acetates were isolated in mixtures and elucidated by EI-MS and 1D-NMR. Free fatty acids, and two labdane fatty acid esters were identified by APCI-MS/MS. In total 19 metabolites have been identified. The novel combination of HSCCC fractionation, and APCI-MS-target-guided molecular mass profiling improve efficiency of lead-structure identification.

  3. Development of a new multi-residue laser diode thermal desorption atmospheric pressure chemical ionization tandem mass spectrometry method for the detection and quantification of pesticides and pharmaceuticals in wastewater samples.

    PubMed

    Boisvert, Michel; Fayad, Paul B; Sauvé, Sébastien

    2012-11-19

    A new solid phase extraction (SPE) method coupled to a high throughput sample analysis technique was developed for the simultaneous determination of nine selected emerging contaminants in wastewater (atrazine, desethylatrazine, 17β-estradiol, ethynylestradiol, norethindrone, caffeine, carbamazepine, diclofenac and sulfamethoxazole). We specifically included pharmaceutical compounds from multiple therapeutic classes, as well as pesticides. Sample pre-concentration and clean-up was performed using a mixed-mode SPE cartridge (Strata ABW) having both cation and anion exchange properties, followed by analysis by laser diode thermal desorption atmospheric pressure chemical ionization coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LDTD-APCI-MS/MS). The LDTD interface is a new high-throughput sample introduction method, which reduces total analysis time to less than 15s per sample as compared to minutes with traditional liquid-chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Several SPE parameters were evaluated in order to optimize recovery efficiencies when extracting analytes from wastewater, such as the nature of the stationary phase, the loading flow rate, the extraction pH, the volume and composition of the washing solution and the initial sample volume. The method was successfully applied to real wastewater samples from the primary sedimentation tank of a municipal wastewater treatment plant. Recoveries of target compounds from wastewater ranged from 78% to 106%, the limit of detection ranged from 30 to 122ng L(-1) while the limit of quantification ranged from 90 to 370ng L(-1). Calibration curves in the wastewater matrix showed good linearity (R(2)≥0.991) for all target analytes and the intraday and interday coefficient of variation was below 15%, reflecting a good precision.

  4. Periodic permanent magnet focused klystron

    DOEpatents

    Ferguson, Patrick; Read, Michael; Ives, R Lawrence

    2015-04-21

    A periodic permanent magnet (PPM) klystron has beam transport structures and RF cavity structures, each of which has permanent magnets placed substantially equidistant from a beam tunnel formed about the central axis, and which are also outside the extent of a cooling chamber. The RF cavity sections also have permanent magnets which are placed substantially equidistant from the beam tunnel, but which include an RF cavity coupling to the beam tunnel for enhancement of RF carried by an electron beam in the beam tunnel.

  5. Topology optimized permanent magnet systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bjørk, R.; Bahl, C. R. H.; Insinga, A. R.

    2017-09-01

    Topology optimization of permanent magnet systems consisting of permanent magnets, high permeability iron and air is presented. An implementation of topology optimization for magnetostatics is discussed and three examples are considered. The Halbach cylinder is topology optimized with iron and an increase of 15% in magnetic efficiency is shown. A topology optimized structure to concentrate a homogeneous field is shown to increase the magnitude of the field by 111%. Finally, a permanent magnet with alternating high and low field regions is topology optimized and a Λcool figure of merit of 0.472 is reached, which is an increase of 100% compared to a previous optimized design.

  6. Tattoos and Permanent Make-Up

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information by Audience For Women Tattoos and Permanent Make-up Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... your skin. Permanent tattoos last a lifetime . Permanent Make-Up : A needle inserts colored ink into your skin ...

  7. Investigation of metal evaporation by the laser ionization method

    SciTech Connect

    Kasimov, A.K.; Tursunov, A.T.

    1995-04-01

    Evaporation rates and vapor pressures of metallic gallium are measured, and spatial structures of gallium atomic beams are studied using the method of laser stepwise selective excitation of atoms and their ionization by the electric field.

  8. Comparison of the structures of triacylglycerols from native and transgenic medium-chain fatty acid-enriched rape seed oil by liquid chromatography--atmospheric pressure chemical ionization ion-trap mass spectrometry (LC-APCI-ITMS).

    PubMed

    Beermann, Christopher; Winterling, Nadine; Green, Angelika; Möbius, Michael; Schmitt, Joachim J; Boehm, Günther

    2007-04-01

    The sn position of fatty acids in seed oil lipids affects physiological function in pharmaceutical and dietary applications. In this study the composition of acyl-chain substituents in the sn positions of glycerol backbones in triacylglycerols (TAG) have been compared. TAG from native and transgenic medium-chain fatty acid-enriched rape seed oil were analyzed by reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography coupled with online atmospheric-pressure chemical ionization ion-trap mass spectrometry. The transformation of summer rape with thioesterase and 3-ketoacyl-[ACP]-synthase genes of Cuphea lanceolata led to increased expression of 1.5% (w/w) caprylic acid (8:0), 6.7% (w/w) capric acid (10:0), 0.9% (w/w) lauric acid (12:0), and 0.2% (w/w) myristic acid (14:0). In contrast, linoleic (18:2n6) and alpha-linolenic acid (18:3n3) levels decreased compared with the original seed oil. The TAG sn position distribution of fatty acids was also modified. The original oil included eleven unique TAG species whereas the transgenic oil contained sixty. Twenty species were common to both oils. The transgenic oil included trioctadecenoyl-glycerol (18:1/18:1/18:1) and trioctadecatrienoyl-glycerol (18:3/18:3/18:3) whereas the native oil included only the latter. The transgenic TAG were dominated by combinations of caprylic, capric, lauric, myrisitic, palmitic (16:0), stearic (18:0), oleic (18:1n9), linoleic, arachidic (20:0), behenic (22:0), and lignoceric acids (24:0), which accounted for 52% of the total fat. In the original TAG palmitic, stearic, oleic, and linoleic acids accounted for 50% of the total fat. Medium-chain triacylglycerols with capric and lauric acids combined with stearic, oleic, linoleic, alpha-linolenic, arachidic, and gondoic acids (20:1n9) accounted for 25% of the transgenic oil. The medium-chain fatty acids were mainly integrated into the sn-1/3 position combined with the essential linoleic and alpha-linolenic acids at the sn-2 position. Eight species

  9. Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Ingram, M.; Mason, W. B.; Whipple, G. H.; Howland, J. W.

    1952-04-07

    This report presents a review of present knowledge and concepts of the biological effects of ionizing radiations. Among the topics discussed are the physical and chemical effects of ionizing radiation on biological systems, morphological and physiological changes observed in biological systems subjected to ionizing radiations, physiological changes in the intact animal, latent changes following exposure of biological systems to ionizing radiations, factors influencing the biological response to ionizing radiation, relative effects of various ionizing radiations, and biological dosimetry.

  10. Qualitative permanence of Lotka-Volterra equations.

    PubMed

    Hofbauer, Josef; Kon, Ryusuke; Saito, Yasuhisa

    2008-12-01

    In this paper, we consider permanence of Lotka-Volterra equations. We investigate the sign structure of the interaction matrix that guarantees the permanence of a Lotka-Volterra equation whenever it has a positive equilibrium point. An interaction matrix with this property is said to be qualitatively permanent. Our results provide both necessary and sufficient conditions for qualitative permanence.

  11. A mechanism for ionization of nonvolatile compounds in mass spectrometry: considerations from MALDI and inlet ionization.

    PubMed

    Trimpin, Sarah; Wang, Beixi; Inutan, Ellen D; Li, Jing; Lietz, Christopher B; Harron, Andrew; Pagnotti, Vincent S; Sardelis, Diana; McEwen, Charles N

    2012-10-01

    Mechanistic arguments relative to matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry (MS) address observations that predominately singly charged ions are detected. However, recently a matrix assisted laser ablation method, laserspray ionization (LSI), was introduced that can use the same sample preparation and laser as MALDI, but produce highly charged ions from proteins. In MALDI, ions are generated from neutral molecules by the photon energy provided to a matrix, while in LSI ions are produced inside a heated inlet tube linking atmospheric pressure and the first vacuum region of the mass spectrometer. Some LSI matrices also produce highly charged ions with MALDI ion sources operated at intermediate pressure or high vacuum. The operational similarity of LSI to MALDI, and the large difference in charge states observed by these methods, provides information of fundamental importance to proposed ionization mechanisms for LSI and MALDI. Here, we present data suggesting that the prompt and delayed ionization reported for vacuum MALDI are both fast processes relative to producing highly charged ions by LSI. The energy supplied to produce these charged clusters/droplets as well as their size and time available for desolvation are determining factors in the charge states of the ions observed. Further, charged droplets/clusters may be a common link for ionization of nonvolatile compounds by a variety of MS ionization methods, including MALDI and LSI.

  12. Ionization in the Knock Zone of an Internal-combustion Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasting, Charles E

    1940-01-01

    The ionization in the knock zone of an internal-combustion engine was investigated. A suspected correlation between the intensity of knock and the degree of ionization was verified and an oscillation in the degree of ionization corresponding in frequency to the knock vibrations in the cylinder pressure was observed.

  13. Additive manufacturing of permanent magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Paranthaman, M. P.; Nlebedim, I. C.; Johnson, F.; McCall, S. K.

    2016-10-28

    Here, permanent magnets enable energy conversion. Motors and generators are used to convert both electrical to mechanical energy and mechanical to electrical energy, respectively. They are precharged (magnetized) prior to being used in an application and must remain magnetized during operation. In addition, they should generate sufficient magnetic flux for a given application. Nevertheless permanent magnets can be demagnetized (discharged of their magnetization) by other magnetic materials in their service vicinity, temperature changes (thermal demagnetization), microstructural degradations and the magnet’s internal demagnetizing field. Therefore a permanent magnet can be qualified based on the properties that measure its ability to withstand demagnetization and to supply sufficient magnetic flux required for a given application. Some of those properties are further discussed below. Additive manufacturing followed by exchange spring magnets will be discussed afterwards.

  14. Additive manufacturing of permanent magnets

    DOE PAGES

    Paranthaman, M. P.; Nlebedim, I. C.; Johnson, F.; ...

    2016-10-28

    Here, permanent magnets enable energy conversion. Motors and generators are used to convert both electrical to mechanical energy and mechanical to electrical energy, respectively. They are precharged (magnetized) prior to being used in an application and must remain magnetized during operation. In addition, they should generate sufficient magnetic flux for a given application. Nevertheless permanent magnets can be demagnetized (discharged of their magnetization) by other magnetic materials in their service vicinity, temperature changes (thermal demagnetization), microstructural degradations and the magnet’s internal demagnetizing field. Therefore a permanent magnet can be qualified based on the properties that measure its ability to withstandmore » demagnetization and to supply sufficient magnetic flux required for a given application. Some of those properties are further discussed below. Additive manufacturing followed by exchange spring magnets will be discussed afterwards.« less

  15. Lodestone: Nature's own permanent magnet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wasilewski, P.

    1976-01-01

    Magnetic hysteresis and microstructural details are presented which explain why the class of magnetic iron ores defined as proto-lodestones, can behave as permanent magnets, i.e. lodestones. Certain of these proto-lodestones which are not permanent magnets can be made into permanent magnets by charging in a field greater than 1000 oersted. This fact, other experimental observations, and field evidence from antiquity and the middle ages, which seems to indicate that lodestones are found as localized patches within massive ore bodies, suggests that lightning might be responsible for the charging of lodestones. The large remanent magnetization, high values of coercive force, and good time stability for the remanent magnetization are all characteristics of proto-lodestone iron ores which behave magnetically as fine scale ( 10 micrometer) intergrowths when subjected to magnetic hysteresis analysis. The magnetic results are easily understood by analysis of the complex proto lodestone microstructural patterns observable at the micrometer scale and less.

  16. Liquid-filled ionization chamber temperature dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franco, L.; Gómez, F.; Iglesias, A.; Pardo, J.; Pazos, A.; Pena, J.; Zapata, M.

    2006-05-01

    Temperature and pressure corrections of the read-out signal of ionization chambers have a crucial importance in order to perform high-precision absolute dose measurements. In the present work the temperature and pressure dependences of a sealed liquid isooctane filled ionization chamber (previously developed by the authors) for radiotherapy applications have been studied. We have analyzed the thermal response of the liquid ionization chamber in a ˜20C interval around room temperature. The temperature dependence of the signal can be considered linear, with a slope that depends on the chamber collection electric field. For example, a relative signal slope of 0.27×10-2 K-1 for an operation electric field of 1.67×106 V m-1 has been measured in our detector. On the other hand, ambient pressure dependence has been found negligible, as expected for liquid-filled chambers. The thermal dependence of the liquid ionization chamber signal can be parametrized within the Onsager theory on initial recombination. Considering that changes with temperature of the detector response are due to variations in the free ion yield, a parametrization of this dependence has been obtained. There is a good agreement between the experimental data and the theoretical model from the Onsager framework.

  17. An atmospheric pressure chemical ionization study of the positive and negative ion chemistry of the hydrofluorocarbons 1,1-difluoroethane (HFC-152a) and 1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane (HFC-134a) and of perfluoro-n-hexane (FC-72) in air plasma at atmospheric pressure.

    PubMed

    Marotta, Ester; Paradisi, Cristina; Scorrano, Gianfranco

    2004-07-01

    A report is given on the ionization/dissociation behavior of the title compounds within air plasmas produced by electrical corona discharges at atmospheric pressure: both positive and negative ions were investigated at different temperatures using atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry (APCI-MS). CHF(2)CH(3) (HFC-152a) undergoes efficient ionic oxidation to C(2)H(5)O(+), in which the oxygen comes from water present in the plasma. In contrast, CF(3)CH(2)F (HFC-134a) does not produce any characteristic positive ion under APCI conditions, its presence within the plasma being revealed only as a neutral ligand in ion-molecule complexes with ions of the background (H(3)O(+) and NO(+)). Analogously, the perfluorocarbon FC-72 (n-C(6)F(14)) does not produce significant positive ions at 30 degrees C: at high temperature, however, it undergoes dissociative ionization to form many product ions including C(3)F(6)(+), C(2)F(4)(+), C(n)F(2n+1)(+) and a few families of oxygen containing cations (C(n)F(2n+1)OH(2)(+), C(n)F(2n)OH(+), C(n)F(2n-1)O(+), C(n)F(2n-1)O(2)H(2)(+), C(n)F(2n-2)O(2)H(+)) which are suggested to derive from C(n)F(2n+1)(+) in a cascade of steps initiated by condensation with water followed by steps of HF elimination and H(2)O addition. Negative ions formed from the fluoroethanes CHF(2)CH(3) and CF(3)CH(2)F (M) include complexes with ions of the background, O(2)(-)(M), O(3)(-)(M) and some higher complexes involving also water, and complexes of the fluoride ion, F(-)(H(2)O), F(-)(M) and higher complexes with both M and H(2)O also together. The interesting product O(2)(-)(HF) is also formed from 1,1-difluoroethane. In contrast to the HFCs, perfluoro-n-hexane gives stable molecular anions, M(-), which at low source temperature or in humidified air are also detected as hydrates, M(-)(H(2)O). In addition, in humidified air F(-)(H(2)O)(n) complexes are also formed. The reactions leading to all major positive and negative product ions are discussed

  18. High-Compression-Ratio; Atkinson-Cycle Engine Using Low-Pressure Direct Injection and Pneumatic-Electronic Valve Actuation Enabled by Ionization Current and Foward-Backward Mass Air Flow Sensor Feedback

    SciTech Connect

    Harold Schock; Farhad Jaberi; Ahmed Naguib; Guoming Zhu; David Hung

    2007-12-31

    This report describes the work completed over a two and one half year effort sponsored by the US Department of Energy. The goal was to demonstrate the technology needed to produce a highly efficient engine enabled by several technologies which were to be developed in the course of the work. The technologies included: (1) A low-pressure direct injection system; (2) A mass air flow sensor which would measure the net airflow into the engine on a per cycle basis; (3) A feedback control system enabled by measuring ionization current signals from the spark plug gap; and (4) An infinitely variable cam actuation system based on a pneumatic-hydraulic valve actuation These developments were supplemented by the use of advanced large eddy simulations as well as evaluations of fuel air mixing using the KIVA and WAVE models. The simulations were accompanied by experimental verification when possible. In this effort a solid base has been established for continued development of the advanced engine concepts originally proposed. Due to problems with the valve actuation system a complete demonstration of the engine concept originally proposed was not possible. Some of the highlights that were accomplished during this effort are: (1) A forward-backward mass air flow sensor has been developed and a patent application for the device has been submitted. We are optimistic that this technology will have a particular application in variable valve timing direct injection systems for IC engines. (2) The biggest effort on this project has involved the development of the pneumatic-hydraulic valve actuation system. This system was originally purchased from Cargine, a Swedish supplier and is in the development stage. To date we have not been able to use the actuators to control the exhaust valves, although the actuators have been successfully employed to control the intake valves. The reason for this is the additional complication associated with variable back pressure on the exhaust valves when

  19. Molecular Ionization-Desorption Analysis Source (MIDAS) for Mass Spectrometry: Thin-Layer Chromatography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winter, Gregory T.; Wilhide, Joshua A.; LaCourse, William R.

    2016-02-01

    Molecular ionization-desorption analysis source (MIDAS), which is a desorption atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (DAPCI) type source, for mass spectrometry has been developed as a multi-functional platform for the direct sampling of surfaces. In this article, its utility for the analysis of thin-layer chromatography (TLC) plates is highlighted. Amino acids, which are difficult to visualize without staining reagents or charring, were detected and identified directly from a TLC plate. To demonstrate the full potential of MIDAS, all active ingredients from an analgesic tablet, separated on a TLC plate, were successfully detected using both positive and negative ion modes. The identity of each of the compounds was confirmed from their mass spectra and compared against standards. Post separation, the chemical signal (blue permanent marker) as reference marks placed at the origin and solvent front were used to calculate retention factor (Rf) values from the resulting ion chromatogram. The quantitative capabilities of the device were exhibited by scanning caffeine spots on a TLC plate of increasing sample amount. A linear curve based on peak are, R2 = 0.994, was generated for seven spots ranging from 50 to 1000 ng of caffeine per spot.

  20. Molecular Ionization-Desorption Analysis Source (MIDAS) for Mass Spectrometry: Thin-Layer Chromatography.

    PubMed

    Winter, Gregory T; Wilhide, Joshua A; LaCourse, William R

    2016-02-01

    Molecular ionization-desorption analysis source (MIDAS), which is a desorption atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (DAPCI) type source, for mass spectrometry has been developed as a multi-functional platform for the direct sampling of surfaces. In this article, its utility for the analysis of thin-layer chromatography (TLC) plates is highlighted. Amino acids, which are difficult to visualize without staining reagents or charring, were detected and identified directly from a TLC plate. To demonstrate the full potential of MIDAS, all active ingredients from an analgesic tablet, separated on a TLC plate, were successfully detected using both positive and negative ion modes. The identity of each of the compounds was confirmed from their mass spectra and compared against standards. Post separation, the chemical signal (blue permanent marker) as reference marks placed at the origin and solvent front were used to calculate retention factor (Rf) values from the resulting ion chromatogram. The quantitative capabilities of the device were exhibited by scanning caffeine spots on a TLC plate of increasing sample amount. A linear curve based on peak are, R2 = 0.994, was generated for seven spots ranging from 50 to 1000 ng of caffeine per spot.

  1. Electron ionization of acetylene.

    PubMed

    King, Simon J; Price, Stephen D

    2007-11-07

    Relative partial ionization cross sections and precursor specific relative partial ionization cross sections for fragment ions formed by electron ionization of C2H2 have been measured using time-of-flight mass spectrometry coupled with a 2D ion-ion coincidence technique. We report data for the formation of H+, H+2, C2+, C+/C2+ 2, CH+/C2H+2, CH+2, C+2, and C2H+ relative to the formation of C2H+2, as a function of ionizing electron energy from 30-200 eV. While excellent agreement is found between our data and one set of previously published absolute partial ionization cross sections, some discrepancies exist between the results presented here and two other recent determinations of these absolute partial ionization cross sections. We attribute these differences to the loss of some translationally energetic fragment ions in these earlier studies. Our relative precursor-specific partial ionization cross sections enable us, for the first time, to quantify the contribution to the yield of each fragment ion from single, double, and triple ionization. Analysis shows that at 50 eV double ionization contributes 2% to the total ion yield, increasing to over 10% at an ionizing energy of 100 eV. From our ion-ion coincidence data, we have derived branching ratios for charge separating dissociations of the acetylene dication. Comparison of our data to recent ab initio/RRKM calculations suggest that close to the double ionization potential C2H2+2 dissociates predominantly on the ground triplet potential energy surface (3Sigma*g) with a much smaller contribution from dissociation via the lowest singlet potential energy surface (1Delta g). Measurements of the kinetic energy released in the fragmentation reactions of C2H2+2 have been used to obtain precursor state energies for the formation of product ion pairs, and are shown to be in good agreement with available experimental data and with theory.

  2. Alkali metal ionization detector

    DOEpatents

    Bauerle, James E.; Reed, William H.; Berkey, Edgar

    1978-01-01

    Variations in the conventional filament and collector electrodes of an alkali metal ionization detector, including the substitution of helical electrode configurations for either the conventional wire filament or flat plate collector; or, the substitution of a plurality of discrete filament electrodes providing an in situ capability for transferring from an operationally defective filament electrode to a previously unused filament electrode without removing the alkali metal ionization detector from the monitored environment. In particular, the helical collector arrangement which is coaxially disposed about the filament electrode, i.e. the thermal ionizer, provides an improved collection of positive ions developed by the filament electrode. The helical filament design, on the other hand, provides the advantage of an increased surface area for ionization of alkali metal-bearing species in a monitored gas environment as well as providing a relatively strong electric field for collecting the ions at the collector electrode about which the helical filament electrode is coaxially positioned. Alternatively, both the filament and collector electrodes can be helical. Furthermore, the operation of the conventional alkali metal ionization detector as a leak detector can be simplified as to cost and complexity, by operating the detector at a reduced collector potential while maintaining the sensitivity of the alkali metal ionization detector adequate for the relatively low concentration of alkali vapor and aerosol typically encountered in leak detection applications.

  3. Microfilm Permanence and Archival Quality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avedon, Don M.

    1972-01-01

    The facts about microfilm permanence and archival quality are presented in simple terms. The major factors, including the film base material, the film emulsion, processing, and storage conditions are reviewed. The designations on the edge of the film are explained and a list of refernces provided. (14 references) (Author)

  4. Magnetic Fields: Visible and Permanent.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winkeljohn, Dorothy R.; Earl, Robert D.

    1983-01-01

    Children will be able to see the concept of a magnetic field translated into a visible reality using the simple method outlined. Standard shelf paper, magnets, iron filings, and paint in a spray can are used to prepare a permanent and well-detailed picture of the magnetic field. (Author/JN)

  5. Meteoric Ionization Layers in the Martian Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pesnell, W. D.; Grebowsky, J. M.

    1997-12-01

    Mars, like the other planets, is bombarded by meteorites. At least two families of particles impact the planets: sporadic and shower. In the terrestrial atmosphere both families cause sporadic-E layers when the introduced material is ionized by charge-exchange, photoionization, or impact ionization. Narrow layers of ionized material are produced when the long-lived metallic ions are compressed by tidal or gravity wave motions in the atmosphere. We will examine how the ion-neutral chemistry and dynamics of the Martian atmosphere affect the deposited meteoric material. Our emphasis is on magnesium, an easily ionized species that is a major component of the meteoric debris. The parameters that affect the meteoric ionization differ between Earth and Mars. In particular, the atmospheric compositions and ionospheric densities differ. Further, the lower atmospheric pressure on Mars means lower altitudes for the bulk of the atmospheric ablation of the meteorites. However, the range of atmospheric density variation at high altitudes is greater at Mars than at Earth, so that sputtering of high speed shower streams which occurs at high altitudes may be relatively more important at Mars than Earth.

  6. Fuel cell with ionization membrane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartley, Frank T. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A fuel cell is disclosed comprising an ionization membrane having at least one area through which gas is passed, and which ionizes the gas passing therethrough, and a cathode for receiving the ions generated by the ionization membrane. The ionization membrane may include one or more openings in the membrane with electrodes that are located closer than a mean free path of molecules within the gas to be ionized. Methods of manufacture are also provided.

  7. Electronegative plasma equilibria with spatially varying ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamura, E.; Lichtenberg, A. J.; Lieberman, M. A.

    2012-12-01

    Electronegative inductive discharges in higher pressure ranges typically exhibit strongly localized ionization near the coil structure, with decay of the electron temperature and ionization into the central discharge region. We use a two-dimensional (2D) fluid code with a chlorine feedstock gas to determine the spatial profiles of the particle densities and electron temperature in a cylindrical transformer-coupled plasma device excited by a stove-top coil on top of the plasma chamber. To compare with one-dimensional (1D) analytical models, the 2D results are area-averaged over the radius. The area-averaged ionization frequency νiz is found to decay exponentially away from the coils, allowing the ansatz of an exponentially decaying axial variation for νiz to be used in a 1D numerical model. The 1D model captures the main features of the axial variations of the area-averaged 2D fluid simulation, indicating that the main diffusion mechanisms act along the axial direction. A simple analytical global discharge model is also developed, accounting for the asymmetric density and ionization profiles. The global model gives the scalings of the ion densities and electron temperature with power and pressure. The 1D and global models are compared with the 2D fluid simulations, showing reasonable agreement.

  8. Diagnostics Systems for Permanent Hall Thrusters Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, Jose Leonardo; Soares Ferreira, Ivan; Santos, Jean; Miranda, Rodrigo; Possa, M. Gabriela

    This work describes the development of Permanent Magnet Hall Effect Plasma Thruster (PHALL) and its diagnostic systems at The Plasma Physics Laboratory of University of Brasilia. The project consists on the construction and characterization of plasma propulsion engines based on the Hall Effect. Electric thrusters have been employed in over 220 successful space missions. Two types stand out: the Hall-Effect Thruster (HET) and the Gridded Ion Engine (GIE). The first, which we deal with in this project, has the advantage of greater simplicity of operation, a smaller weight for the propulsion subsystem and a longer shelf life. It can operate in two configurations: magnetic layer and anode layer, the difference between the two lying in the positioning of the anode inside the plasma channel. A Hall-Effect Thruster-HET is a type of plasma thruster in which the propellant gas is ionized and accelerated by a magneto hydrodynamic effect combined with electrostatic ion acceleration. So the essential operating principle of the HET is that it uses a J x B force and an electrostatic potential to accelerate ions up to high speeds. In a HET, the attractive negative charge is provided by electrons at the open end of the Thruster instead of a grid, as in the case of the electrostatic ion thrusters. A strong radial magnetic field is used to hold the electrons in place, with the combination of the magnetic field and the electrostatic potential force generating a fast circulating electron current, the Hall current, around the axis of the Thruster, mainly composed by drifting electrons in an ion plasma background. Only a slow axial drift towards the anode occurs. The main attractive features of the Hall-Effect Thruster are its simple design and operating principles. Most of the Hall-Effect Thrusters use electromagnet coils to produce the main magnetic field responsible for plasma generation and acceleration. In this paper we present a different new concept, a Permanent Magnet Hall

  9. Atmospheric Ionization Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slack, Thomas; Mayes, Riley

    2015-04-01

    The measurement of atmospheric ionization is a largely unexplored science that potentially holds the key to better understanding many different geophysical phenomena through this new and valuable source of data. Through the LaACES program, which is funded by NASA through the Louisiana Space Consortium, students at Loyola University New Orleans have pursued the goal of measuring high altitude ionization for nearly three years, and were the first to successfully collect ionization data at altitudes over 30,000 feet using a scientific weather balloon flown from the NASA Columbia Scientific Ballooning Facility in Palestine, TX. In order to measure atmospheric ionization, the science team uses a lightweight and highly customized sensor known as a Gerdien condenser. Among other branches of science the data is already being used for, such as the study of aerosol pollution levels in the atmosphere, the data may also be useful in meteorology and seismology. Ionization data might provide another variable with which to predict weather or seismic activity more accurately and further in advance. Thomas Slack and Riley Mayes have served as project managers for the experiment, and have extensive knowledge of the experiment from the ground up. LaSPACE Louisiana Space Consortium.

  10. Automated phenotyping of permanent crops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McPeek, K. Thomas; Steddom, Karl; Zamudio, Joseph; Pant, Paras; Mullenbach, Tyler

    2017-05-01

    AGERpoint is defining a new technology space for the growers' industry by introducing novel applications for sensor technology and data analysis to growers of permanent crops. Serving data to a state-of-the-art analytics engine from a cutting edge sensor platform, a new paradigm in precision agriculture is being developed that allows growers to understand the unique needs of each tree, bush or vine in their operation. Autonomous aerial and terrestrial vehicles equipped with multiple varieties of remote sensing technologies give AGERpoint the ability to measure key morphological and spectral features of permanent crops. This work demonstrates how such phenotypic measurements combined with machine learning algorithms can be used to determine the variety of crops (e.g., almond and pecan trees). This phenotypic and varietal information represents the first step in enabling growers with the ability to tailor their management practices to individual plants and maximize their economic productivity.

  11. SCREENED COULOMB FORMULATION OF THE IONIZATION EQUILIBRIUM EQUATION OF STATE,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The ionization equilibrium equation of state (IEEOS) is formulated relative to the numerical solutions of the Schrodinger equation with the complete...for hydrogen and iron, where pressures at high densities and temperature are compared with pressures from the equation of state based upon the Thomas...IEEOS represents a significant improvement over the TFD equation of state . (Author)

  12. Ambient ionization mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebedev, A. T.

    2015-07-01

    Ambient ionization mass spectrometry emerged as a new scientific discipline only about ten years ago. A considerable body of information has been reported since that time. Keeping the sensitivity, performance and informativity of classical mass spectrometry methods, the new approach made it possible to eliminate laborious sample preparation procedures and triggered the development of miniaturized instruments to work directly in the field. The review concerns the theoretical foundations and design of ambient ionization methods. Their advantages and drawbacks, as well as prospects for application in chemistry, biology, medicine, environmetal analysis, etc., are discussed. The bibliography includes 194 references.

  13. Pressure Alopecia

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Kate E; Yesudian, PD

    2012-01-01

    Postoperative or pressure alopecia (PA) is an infrequently reported group of scarring and non-scarring alopecias. It has been reported after immobilization of the head during surgery and following prolonged stays on intensive care units, and may be analogous to a healed pressure ulcer. This review presents a summary of cases published in pediatrics and after cardiac, gynecological, abdominal and facial surgeries. PA may manifest as swelling, tenderness, and ulceration of the scalp in the first few postoperative days; in other cases, the alopecia may be the presenting feature with a history of scalp immobilization in the previous four weeks. The condition may cause considerable psychological distress in the long term. Regular head turning schedules and vigilance for the condition should be used as prophylaxis to prevent permanent alopecia. A multi-center study in high-risk patients would be beneficial to shed further light on the etiology of the condition. PMID:23180911

  14. Teaching Object Permanence: An Action Research Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruce, Susan M.; Vargas, Claudia

    2013-01-01

    "Object permanence," also known as "object concept" in the field of visual impairment, is one of the most important early developmental milestones. The achievement of object permanence is associated with the onset of representational thought and language. Object permanence is important to orientation, including the recognition of landmarks.…

  15. 21 CFR 886.4445 - Permanent magnet.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Permanent magnet. 886.4445 Section 886.4445 Food... DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Surgical Devices § 886.4445 Permanent magnet. (a) Identification. A permanent magnet is a nonelectric device that generates a magnetic field intended to find and remove...

  16. 21 CFR 886.4445 - Permanent magnet.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Permanent magnet. 886.4445 Section 886.4445 Food... DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Surgical Devices § 886.4445 Permanent magnet. (a) Identification. A permanent magnet is a nonelectric device that generates a magnetic field intended to find and remove...

  17. 21 CFR 886.4445 - Permanent magnet.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Permanent magnet. 886.4445 Section 886.4445 Food... DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Surgical Devices § 886.4445 Permanent magnet. (a) Identification. A permanent magnet is a nonelectric device that generates a magnetic field intended to find and remove...

  18. Teaching Object Permanence: An Action Research Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruce, Susan M.; Vargas, Claudia

    2013-01-01

    "Object permanence," also known as "object concept" in the field of visual impairment, is one of the most important early developmental milestones. The achievement of object permanence is associated with the onset of representational thought and language. Object permanence is important to orientation, including the recognition of landmarks.…

  19. 22 CFR 401.3 - Permanent offices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Permanent offices. 401.3 Section 401.3 Foreign Relations INTERNATIONAL JOINT COMMISSION, UNITED STATES AND CANADA RULES OF PROCEDURE General § 401.3 Permanent offices. The permanent offices of the Commission shall be at Washington, in the District of...

  20. Dispersal of molecular clouds by ionizing radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walch, S. K.; Whitworth, A. P.; Bisbas, T.; Wünsch, R.; Hubber, D.

    2012-11-01

    Feedback from massive stars is believed to be a key element in the evolution of molecular clouds. We use high-resolution 3D smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations to explore the dynamical effects of a single O7 star-emitting ionizing photons at 1049 s-1 and located at the centre of a molecular cloud with mass 104 M⊙ and radius 6.4 pc; we also perform comparison simulations in which the ionizing star is removed. The initial internal structure of the cloud is characterized by its fractal dimension, which we vary between D=2.0 and 2.8, and the standard deviation of the approximately log-normal initial densityPDF, which is σ10 = 0.38 for all clouds. (i) As regards star formation, in the short term ionizing feedback is positive, in the sense that star formation occurs much more quickly (than in the comparison simulations), in gas that is compressed by the high pressure of the ionized gas. However, in the long term ionizing feedback is negative, in the sense that most of the cloud is dispersed with an outflow rate of up to ˜10-2 M⊙yr-1, on a time-scale comparable with the sound-crossing time for the ionized gas (˜1-2 Myr ), and triggered star formation is therefore limited to a few per cent of the cloud's mass. We will describe in greater detail the statistics of the triggered star formation in a companion paper. (ii) As regards the morphology of the ionization fronts (IFs) bounding the H II region and the systematics of outflowing gas, we distinguish two regimes. For low D≲2.2, the initial cloud is dominated by large-scale structures, so the neutral gas tends to be swept up into a few extended coherent shells, and the ionized gas blows out through a few large holes between these shells; we term these H II regions shell dominated. Conversely, for high D≳2.6, the initial cloud is dominated by small-scale structures, and these are quickly overrun by the advancing IF, thereby producing neutral pillars protruding into the H II region, whilst the ionized gas

  1. Charge Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry of Droplets

    PubMed Central

    Jorabchi, Kaveh; Westphall, Michael S.; Smith, Lloyd M.

    2008-01-01

    We propose and evaluate a new mechanism to account for analyte ion signal enhancement in ultraviolet-laser desorption mass spectrometry of droplets in the presence of corona ions. Our new insights are based on timing control of corona ion production, laser desorption, and peptide ion extraction achieved by a novel pulsed corona apparatus. We demonstrate that droplet charging rather than gas-phase ion-neutral reactions is the major contributor to analyte ion generation from an electrically isolated droplet. Implications of the new mechanism, termed charge assisted laser desorption/ionization (CALDI), are discussed and contrasted to those of the laser desorption atmospheric pressure chemical ionization method (LD-APCI). It is also demonstrated that analyte ion generation in CALDI occurs with external electric fields about one order of magnitude lower than those needed for atmospheric pressure matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization or electrospray ionization of droplets. PMID:18387311

  2. Electrospray ionization of volatiles in breath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Lozano, P.; de La Mora, J. Fernández

    2007-08-01

    Recent work by Zenobi and colleagues [H. Chen, A. Wortmann, W. Zhang, R. Zenobi, Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 46 (2007) 580] reports that human breath charged by contact with an electrospray (ES) cloud yields many mass peaks of species such as urea, glucose, and other ions, some with molecular weights above 1000 Da. All these species are presumed to be involatile, and to originate from breath aerosols by so-called extractive electrospray ionization EESI [H. Chen, A. Venter, R.G. Cooks, Chem. Commun. (2006) 2042]. However, prior work by Fenn and colleagues [C.M. Whitehouse, F. Levin, C.K. Meng, J.B. Fenn, Proceedings of the 34th ASMS Conference on Mass Spectrometry and Allied Topics, Denver, 1986 p. 507; S. Fuerstenau, P. Kiselev, J.B. Fenn, Proceedings of the 47th ASMS Conference on Mass Spectrometry, 1999, Dallas, TX, 1999] and by Hill and colleagues [C. Wu, W.F. Siems, H.H. Hill Jr., Anal. Chem. 72 (2000) 396] have reported the ability of electrospray drops to ionize a variety of low vapor pressure substances directly from the gas phase, without an apparent need for the vapor to be brought into the charging ES in aerosol form. The Ph.D. Thesis of Martínez-Lozano [P. Martínez-Lozano Sinués, Ph.D. Thesis, Department of Thermal and Fluid Engineering, University Carlos III of Madrid; April 5, 2006 (in Spanish); http://hdl.handle.net/10016/655] had also previously argued that the numerous human breath species observed via a similar ES ionization approach were in fact ionized directly from the vapor. Here, we observe that passage of the breath stream through a submicron filter does not eliminate the majority of the breath vapors seen in the absence of the filter. We conclude that direct vapor charging is the leading mechanism in breath ionization by electrospray drops, though aerosol ionization may also play a role.

  3. Guided ionization waves: Theory and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, X.; Naidis, G. V.; Laroussi, M.; Ostrikov, K.

    2014-07-01

    This review focuses on one of the fundamental phenomena that occur upon application of sufficiently strong electric fields to gases, namely the formation and propagation of ionization waves-streamers. The dynamics of streamers is controlled by strongly nonlinear coupling, in localized streamer tip regions, between enhanced (due to charge separation) electric field and ionization and transport of charged species in the enhanced field. Streamers appear in nature (as initial stages of sparks and lightning, as huge structures-sprites above thunderclouds), and are also found in numerous technological applications of electrical discharges. Here we discuss the fundamental physics of the guided streamer-like structures-plasma bullets which are produced in cold atmospheric-pressure plasma jets. Plasma bullets are guided ionization waves moving in a thin column of a jet of plasma forming gases (e.g., He or Ar) expanding into ambient air. In contrast to streamers in a free (unbounded) space that propagate in a stochastic manner and often branch, guided ionization waves are repetitive and highly-reproducible and propagate along the same path-the jet axis. This property of guided streamers, in comparison with streamers in a free space, enables many advanced time-resolved experimental studies of ionization waves with nanosecond precision. In particular, experimental studies on manipulation of streamers by external electric fields and streamer interactions are critically examined. This review also introduces the basic theories and recent advances on the experimental and computational studies of guided streamers, in particular related to the propagation dynamics of ionization waves and the various parameters of relevance to plasma streamers. This knowledge is very useful to optimize the efficacy of applications of plasma streamer discharges in various fields ranging from health care and medicine to materials science and nanotechnology.

  4. Ionizing radiation and life.

    PubMed

    Dartnell, Lewis R

    2011-01-01

    Ionizing radiation is a ubiquitous feature of the Cosmos, from exogenous cosmic rays (CR) to the intrinsic mineral radioactivity of a habitable world, and its influences on the emergence and persistence of life are wide-ranging and profound. Much attention has already been focused on the deleterious effects of ionizing radiation on organisms and the complex molecules of life, but ionizing radiation also performs many crucial functions in the generation of habitable planetary environments and the origins of life. This review surveys the role of CR and mineral radioactivity in star formation, generation of biogenic elements, and the synthesis of organic molecules and driving of prebiotic chemistry. Another major theme is the multiple layers of shielding of planetary surfaces from the flux of cosmic radiation and the various effects on a biosphere of violent but rare astrophysical events such as supernovae and gamma-ray bursts. The influences of CR can also be duplicitous, such as limiting the survival of surface life on Mars while potentially supporting a subsurface biosphere in the ocean of Europa. This review highlights the common thread that ionizing radiation forms between the disparate component disciplines of astrobiology. © Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.

  5. Ionizing radiation from tobacco

    SciTech Connect

    Westin, J.B.

    1987-04-24

    Accidents at nuclear power facilities seem inevitably to bring in their wake a great deal of concern on the part of both the lay and medical communities. Relatively little attention, however, is given to what may be the largest single worldwide source of effectively carcinogenic ionizing radiation: tobacco. The risk of cancer deaths from the Chernobyl disaster are tobacco smoke is discussed.

  6. Alkali ionization detector

    DOEpatents

    Hrizo, John; Bauerle, James E.; Witkowski, Robert E.

    1982-01-01

    A calibration filament containing a sodium-bearing compound is included in combination with the sensing filament and ion collector plate of a sodium ionization detector to permit periodic generation of sodium atoms for the in-situ calibration of the detector.

  7. Permanent-File-Validation Utility Computer Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Derry, Stephen D.

    1988-01-01

    Errors in files detected and corrected during operation. Permanent File Validation (PFVAL) utility computer program provides CDC CYBER NOS sites with mechanism to verify integrity of permanent file base. Locates and identifies permanent file errors in Mass Storage Table (MST) and Track Reservation Table (TRT), in permanent file catalog entries (PFC's) in permit sectors, and in disk sector linkage. All detected errors written to listing file and system and job day files. Program operates by reading system tables , catalog track, permit sectors, and disk linkage bytes to vaidate expected and actual file linkages. Used extensively to identify and locate errors in permanent files and enable online correction, reducing computer-system downtime.

  8. SU-E-T-123: Anomalous Altitude Effect in Permanent Implant Brachytherapy Seeds

    SciTech Connect

    Watt, E; Spencer, DP; Meyer, T

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Permanent seed implant brachytherapy procedures require the measurement of the air kerma strength of seeds prior to implant. This is typically accomplished using a well-type ionization chamber. Previous measurements (Griffin et al., 2005; Bohm et al., 2005) of several low-energy seeds using the air-communicating HDR 1000 Plus chamber have demonstrated that the standard temperature-pressure correction factor, P{sub TP}, may overcompensate for air density changes induced by altitude variations by up to 18%. The purpose of this work is to present empirical correction factors for two clinically-used seeds (IsoAid ADVANTAGE™ {sup 103}Pd and Nucletron selectSeed {sup 125}I) for which empirical altitude correction factors do not yet exist in the literature when measured with the HDR 1000 Plus chamber. Methods: An in-house constructed pressure vessel containing the HDR 1000 Plus well chamber and a digital barometer/thermometer was pumped or evacuated, as appropriate, to a variety of pressures from 725 to 1075 mbar. Current measurements, corrected with P{sub TP}, were acquired for each seed at these pressures and normalized to the reading at ‘standard’ pressure (1013.25 mbar). Results: Measurements in this study have shown that utilization of P{sub TP} can overcompensate in the corrected current reading by up to 20% and 17% for the IsoAid Pd-103 and the Nucletron I-125 seed respectively. Compared to literature correction factors for other seed models, the correction factors in this study diverge by up to 2.6% and 3.0% for iodine (with silver) and palladium respectively, indicating the need for seed-specific factors. Conclusion: The use of seed specific altitude correction factors can reduce uncertainty in the determination of air kerma strength. The empirical correction factors determined in this work can be applied in clinical quality assurance measurements of air kerma strength for two previously unpublished seed designs (IsoAid ADVANTAGE™ {sup 103}Pd and

  9. Modulated voltage metastable ionization detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carle, G. C.; Kojiro, D. R.; Humphrey, D. E. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    The output current from a metastable ionization detector (MID) is applied to a modulation voltage circuit. An adjustment is made to balance out the background current, and an output current, above background, is applied to an input of a strip chart recorder. For low level concentrations, i.e., low detected output current, the ionization potential will be at a maximum and the metastable ionization detector will operate at its most sensitive level. When the detected current from the metastable ionization detector increases above a predetermined threshold level, a voltage control circuit is activated which turns on a high voltage transistor which acts to reduce the ionization potential. The ionization potential applied to the metastable ionization detector is then varied so as to maintain the detected signal level constant. The variation in ionization potential is now related to the concentration of the constituent and a representative amplitude is applied to another input of said strip chart recorder.

  10. A Miniaturized Linear Wire Ion Trap with Electron Ionization and Single Photon Ionization Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Qinghao; Tian, Yuan; Li, Ailin; Andrews, Derek; Hawkins, Aaron R.; Austin, Daniel E.

    2017-05-01

    A linear wire ion trap (LWIT) with both electron ionization (EI) and single photon ionization (SPI) sources was built. The SPI was provided by a vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) lamp with the ability to softly ionize organic compounds. The VUV lamp was driven by a pulse amplifier, which was controlled by a pulse generator, to avoid the detection of photons during ion detection. Sample gas was introduced through a leak valve, and the pressure in the system is shown to affect the signal-to-noise ratio and resolving power. Under optimized conditions, the limit of detection (LOD) for benzene was 80 ppbv using SPI, better than the LOD using EI (137 ppbv). System performance was demonstrated by distinguishing compounds in different classes from gasoline.

  11. A Miniaturized Linear Wire Ion Trap with Electron Ionization and Single Photon Ionization Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Qinghao; Tian, Yuan; Li, Ailin; Andrews, Derek; Hawkins, Aaron R.; Austin, Daniel E.

    2017-01-01

    A linear wire ion trap (LWIT) with both electron ionization (EI) and single photon ionization (SPI) sources was built. The SPI was provided by a vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) lamp with the ability to softly ionize organic compounds. The VUV lamp was driven by a pulse amplifier, which was controlled by a pulse generator, to avoid the detection of photons during ion detection. Sample gas was introduced through a leak valve, and the pressure in the system is shown to affect the signal-to-noise ratio and resolving power. Under optimized conditions, the limit of detection (LOD) for benzene was 80 ppbv using SPI, better than the LOD using EI (137 ppbv). System performance was demonstrated by distinguishing compounds in different classes from gasoline.

  12. Comments on ionization cooling channels

    DOE PAGES

    Neuffer, David

    2017-09-25

    Ionization cooling channels with a wide variety of characteristics and cooling properties are being developed. These channels can produce cooling performances that are largely consistent with the linear ionization cooling theory developed previously. In this study, we review ionization cooling theory, discuss its application to presently developing cooling channels, and discuss criteria for optimizing cooling.

  13. Comments on ionization cooling channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neuffer, D.

    2017-09-01

    Ionization cooling channels with a wide variety of characteristics and cooling properties are being developed. These channels can produce cooling performances that are largely consistent with the linear ionization cooling theory developed previously. In this paper we review ionization cooling theory, discuss its application to presently developing cooling channels, and discuss criteria for optimizing cooling.

  14. High-performance permanent magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goll, D.; Kronmüller, H.

    High-performance permanent magnets (pms) are based on compounds with outstanding intrinsic magnetic properties as well as on optimized microstructures and alloy compositions. The most powerful pm materials at present are RE-TM intermetallic alloys which derive their exceptional magnetic properties from the favourable combination of rare earth metals (RE=Nd, Pr, Sm) with transition metals (TM=Fe, Co), in particular magnets based on (Nd,Pr)2Fe14B and Sm2(Co,Cu,Fe,Zr)17. Their development during the last 20 years has involved a dramatic improvement in their performance by a factor of >15 compared with conventional ferrite pms therefore contributing positively to the ever-increasing demand for pms in many (including new) application fields, to the extent that RE-TM pms now account for nearly half of the worldwide market. This review article first gives a brief introduction to the basics of ferromagnetism to confer an insight into the variety of (permanent) magnets, their manufacture and application fields. We then examine the rather complex relationship between the microstructure and the magnetic properties for the two highest-performance and most promising pm materials mentioned. By using numerical micromagnetic simulations on the basis of the Finite Element technique the correlation can be quantitatively predicted, thus providing a powerful tool for the further development of optimized high-performance pms.

  15. High-performance permanent magnets.

    PubMed

    Goll, D; Kronmüller, H

    2000-10-01

    High-performance permanent magnets (pms) are based on compounds with outstanding intrinsic magnetic properties as well as on optimized microstructures and alloy compositions. The most powerful pm materials at present are RE-TM intermetallic alloys which derive their exceptional magnetic properties from the favourable combination of rare earth metals (RE = Nd, Pr, Sm) with transition metals (TM = Fe, Co), in particular magnets based on (Nd.Pr)2Fe14B and Sm2(Co,Cu,Fe,Zr)17. Their development during the last 20 years has involved a dramatic improvement in their performance by a factor of > 15 compared with conventional ferrite pms therefore contributing positively to the ever-increasing demand for pms in many (including new) application fields, to the extent that RE-TM pms now account for nearly half of the worldwide market. This review article first gives a brief introduction to the basics of ferromagnetism to confer an insight into the variety of (permanent) magnets, their manufacture and application fields. We then examine the rather complex relationship between the microstructure and the magnetic properties for the two highest-performance and most promising pm materials mentioned. By using numerical micromagnetic simulations on the basis of the Finite Element technique the correlation can be quantitatively predicted, thus providing a powerful tool for the further development of optimized high-performance pms.

  16. Pericarditis following permanent pacemaker insertion.

    PubMed

    Levy, Yair; Shovman, Ora; Granit, Chava; Luria, David; Gurevitz, Osnat; Bar-Lev, David; Eldar, Michael; Shoenfeld, Yehuda; Glikson, Michael

    2004-10-01

    The appearance of pericarditis following insertion of a permanent pacemaker is not widely acknowledged in the literature. To describe our experience with pericarditis following 395 permanent pacemaker implantations over 2 years. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 395 consecutive patients in whom new pacing systems or pacemaker leads had been implanted over a 2 year period. We searched the records for pericarditis that developed within 1 month after pacemaker implantation according to the ICD-9 code. The incidence, clinical picture, response to treatment, and relationship to lead design and location were studied. Eight cases (2%) of pericarditis following implantation were detected. Clinical manifestations in all patients were similar to those of post-pericardiotomy syndrome and included chest pain (n = 7), friction rub (n = 1), fever (n = 2), fatigue (n = 2), pleural effusion (n = 2), new atrial fibrillation (n = 2), elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate (n = 4), and echcardiographic evidence of pericardial effusion (n = 8). All affected patients had undergone active fixation (screw-in) lead implantation in the atrial position. The incidence of pericarditis with screw-in atrial leads was 3% compared to 0% in other cases (P < 0.05). Pericarditis is not uncommon following pacemaker implantation with active fixation atrial leads. Special attention should be paid to identifying pericardial complications following pacemaker implantation, especially when anticoagulant therapy is resumed or initiated. The use of passive fixation leads is likely to reduce the incidence of pericarditis but this issue should be further investigated.

  17. Development and initial testing of a permanently implantable centrifugal pump.

    PubMed

    Nakazawa, T; Takami, Y; Benkowski, R; Ohtsubo, S; Yukio, O; Tayama, E; Ohtsuka, G; Niimi, Y; Glueck, J; Sueoka, A; Schmallegger, H; Schima, H; Wolner, E; Nosé, Y

    1997-07-01

    To be able to salvage heart failure patients, the need for an economical permanent ventricular assist device is increasing. To meet this increasing demand, a miniaturized centrifugal blood pump has been developed as a permanently implantable device. The Gyro permanently implantable model (PI-601) incorporates a sealless design with a blood stagnation free structure. The pump impeller is magnetically coupled to the driver magnet in a sealless manner. This pump is atraumatic and antithrombogenic and incorporates a double pivot bearing system. A miniaturized actuator was utilized in this system in collaboration with the University of Vienna. The priming volume of this pump is 20 ml. The overall size of the pump actuator package is 53 mm in height and 65 mm in diameter, 145 ml of displacement volume, and 305 g in weight. Testing to date has included in vitro hydraulic performance and hemolysis. This pump can provide 5 L/min against a 110 mm Hg total pressure head at 2,000 rpm and 8 L/min against 150 mm Hg at 2,500 rpm. The normalized index of hemolysis (NIH) value of this pump was 0.0028 g/100 L at 5 L/min against 100 mm Hg. A preliminary anatomical study revealed the possibility of the implantability of 2 such systems in biventricular bypass at a preperitoneal location. This system is feasible for use as a permanently implantable biventricular assist device.

  18. Note: Discharging fused silica test masses with ionized nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ugolini, D.; Funk, Q.; Amen, T.

    2011-04-01

    We have developed a technique for discharging fused silica test masses in a gravitational-wave interferometer with nitrogen ionized by an electron beam. The electrons are produced from a heated filament by thermionic emission in a low-pressure region to avoid contamination and burnout. Some electrons then pass through a small aperture and ionize nitrogen in a higher-pressure region, and this ionized gas is pumped across the test mass surface, neutralizing both polarities of charge. The discharge rate varies exponentially with charge density and filament current, quadratically with filament potential, and has an optimal working pressure of ˜8 mT. Adapting the technique to larger test mass chambers is also discussed.