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Sample records for pressure pulse amplitude

  1. PULSE AMPLITUDE ANALYZER

    DOEpatents

    Greenblatt, M.H.

    1958-03-25

    This patent pertains to pulse amplitude analyzers for sorting and counting a serles of pulses, and specifically discloses an analyzer which ls simple in construction and presents the puise height distribution visually on an oscilloscope screen. According to the invention, the pulses are applied to the vertical deflection plates of an oscilloscope and trigger the horizontal sweep. Each pulse starts at the same point on the screen and has a maximum amplitude substantially along the same vertical line. A mask is placed over the screen except for a slot running along the line where the maximum amplitudes of the pulses appear. After the slot has been scanned by a photocell in combination with a slotted rotating disk, the photocell signal is displayed on an auxiliary oscilloscope as vertical deflection along a horizontal time base to portray the pulse amplitude distribution.

  2. PULSE AMPLITUDE ANALYZER

    DOEpatents

    Gray, G.W.; Jensen, A.S.

    1957-10-22

    A pulse-height analyzer system of improved design for sorting and counting a series of pulses, such as provided by a scintillation detector in nuclear radiation measurements, is described. The analyzer comprises a main transmission line, a cathode-ray tube for each section of the line with its deflection plates acting as the line capacitance; means to bias the respective cathode ray tubes so that the beam strikes a target only when a prearranged pulse amplitude is applied, with each tube progressively biased to respond to smaller amplitudes; pulse generating and counting means associated with each tube to respond when the beam is deflected; a control transmission line having the same time constant as the first line per section with pulse generating means for each tube for initiating a pulse on the second transmission line when a pulse triggers the tube of corresponding amplitude response, the former pulse acting to prevent successive tubes from responding to the pulse under test. This arrangement permits greater deflection sensitivity in the cathode ray tube and overcomes many of the disadvantages of prior art pulse-height analyzer circuits.

  3. PULSE AMPLITUDE DISTRIBUTION RECORDER

    DOEpatents

    Cowper, G.

    1958-08-12

    A device is described for automatica1ly recording pulse annplitude distribution received from a counter. The novelty of the device consists of the over-all arrangement of conventional circuit elements to provide an easy to read permanent record of the pulse amplitude distribution during a certain time period. In the device a pulse analyzer separates the pulses according to annplitude into several channels. A scaler in each channel counts the pulses and operates a pen marker positioned over a drivable recorder sheet. Since the scalers in each channel have the sanne capacity, the control circuitry permits counting of the incoming pulses until one scaler reaches capacity, whereupon the input is removed and an internal oscillator supplies the necessary pulses to fill up the other scalers. Movement of the chart sheet is initiated wben the first scaler reaches capacity to thereby give a series of marks at spacings proportional to the time required to fill the remaining scalers, and accessory equipment marks calibration points on the recorder sheet to facilitate direct reading of the number of external pulses supplied to each scaler.

  4. Pulse amplitude modulated chlorophyll fluorometer

    DOEpatents

    Greenbaum, Elias; Wu, Jie

    2015-12-29

    Chlorophyll fluorometry may be used for detecting toxins in a sample because of changes in micro algae. A portable lab on a chip ("LOAC") based chlorophyll fluorometer may be used for toxin detection and environmental monitoring. In particular, the system may include a microfluidic pulse amplitude modulated ("PAM") chlorophyll fluorometer. The LOAC PAM chlorophyll fluorometer may analyze microalgae and cyanobacteria that grow naturally in source drinking water.

  5. Influence of shock wave pressure amplitude and pulse repetition frequency on the lifespan, size and number of transient cavities in the field of an electromagnetic lithotripter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, Peter; Jöchle, Knut; Debus, Jürgen

    1998-10-01

    Monitoring the generation of cavitation is of great interest for diagnostic and therapeutic use of ultrasound in medicine, since cavitation is considered to play a major role in nonthermal ultrasound interactions with tissue. Important parameters are the number of cavitation events and the energy released during the bubble collapse. This energy is correlated to the maximum bubble radius which is related to the cavitation lifespan. The aim of this study was therefore to investigate the influence of the acoustic pressure amplitude and the pulse repetition frequency (PRF) in the field of a lithotripter (Lithostar, Siemens) on the number, size and lifespan of transient cavitation bubbles in water. We used scattered laser light recorded by a photodiode and stroboscopic photographs to monitor the cavitation activity. We found that PRF (range 0.5-5 Hz) had no influence on the cavitation bubble lifespan and size, whereas lifespan and size increased with the acoustic pressure amplitude. In contrast, the number of cavitation events strongly increased with PRF, whereas the pressure amplitude had no significant influence on the number of cavitation events. Thus, by varying the pressure amplitude and PRF, it might be possible to deliver a defined relative number of cavitations at a defined relative energy level in a defined volume. This seems to be relevant to further studies that address the biological effects of transient cavitation occurring in the fields of lithotripters.

  6. The best marker for guiding the clinical management of patients with raised intracranial pressure-the RAP index or the mean pulse amplitude?

    PubMed

    Hall, Allan; O'Kane, Roddy

    2016-10-01

    Raised intracranial pressure is a common problem in a variety of neurosurgical conditions including traumatic brain injury, hydrocephalus and intracranial haemorrhage. The clinical management of these patients is guided by a variety of haemodynamic, biochemical and clinical factors. However to date there is no single parameter that is used to guide clinical management of patients with raised intracranial pressure (ICP). However, the role of ICP indices, specifically the mean pulse amplitude (AMP) and RAP index [correlation coefficient (R) between AMP amplitude (A) and mean ICP pressure (P); index of compensatory reserve], as an indicator of true ICP has been investigated. Whilst the RAP index has been used both as a descriptor of neurological deterioration in TBI patients and as a way of characterising the compensatory reserve in hydrocephalus, more recent studies have highlighted the limitation of the RAP index due to the influence that baseline effect errors have on the mean ICP, which is used in the calculation of the RAP index. These studies have suggested that the ICP mean pulse amplitude may be a more accurate marker of true intracranial pressure due to the fact that it is uninfluenced by the mean ICP and, therefore, the AMP may be a more reliable marker than the RAP index for guiding the clinical management of patients with raised ICP. Although further investigation needs to be undertaken in order to fully assess the role of ICP indices in guiding the clinical management of patients with raised ICP, the studies undertaken to date provide an insight into the potential role of ICP indices to treat raised ICP proactively rather than reactively and therefore help prevent or minimise secondary brain injury.

  7. Dependence of macrophage superoxide release on the pulse amplitude of an applied pressure regime: a potential factor at the soft tissue-implant interface.

    PubMed

    Shin, Hainsworth Y; Frechette, Danielle M; Rohner, Nathan; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Puleo, David A; Bjursten, Lars M

    2016-03-01

    Failure of soft tissue implants has been largely attributed to the influence of biomaterial surface properties on the foreign body response, but some implant complications, e.g. macrophage accumulation and necrosis, are still not effectively addressed with surface treatments to minimize deleterious biomaterial effects. We explored an alternative explanation for implant failure, linking biocompatibility with implant micromotion-induced pressure fluctuations at the tissue-biomaterial interface. For this purpose, we used a custom in vitro system to characterize the effects of pressure fluctuations on the activity of macrophages, the predominant cells at a healing implant site. Initially, we quantified superoxide production by HL60-derived macrophage-like cells under several different pressure regimes with means of 5-40 mmHg, amplitudes of 0-15 mmHg and frequencies of 0-1.5 Hz. All pressure regimes tested elicited significantly (p < 0.05) reduced superoxide production by macrophage-like cells relative to parallel controls. Notably, pressure-sensitive reductions in superoxide release correlated (r(2)  = 0.74; p < 0.01) only with pulse pressures. Based on the connection between superoxide production and cell viability, we also explored the influence of cyclic pressure on macrophage numbers and death. Compared to controls, adherent macrophage-like cells exposed to 7.5/2.5 mmHg cyclic pressures for 6 h exhibited significantly (p < 0.01) reduced cell numbers, independent of cell death. A similar effect was observed for cells treated with 10 U/ml superoxide dismutase. Collectively, our results suggest that pressure pulses are a putative regulator of macrophage adhesion via a superoxide-related effect. Pressure fluctuations, e.g. due to implant micromotion, may, therefore, potentially modulate macrophage-dependent wound healing.

  8. Dual amplitude pulse generator for radiation detectors

    DOEpatents

    Hoggan, Jerry M.; Kynaston, Ronnie L.; Johnson, Larry O.

    2001-01-01

    A pulsing circuit for producing an output signal having a high amplitude pulse and a low amplitude pulse may comprise a current source for providing a high current signal and a low current signal. A gate circuit connected to the current source includes a trigger signal input that is responsive to a first trigger signal and a second trigger signal. The first trigger signal causes the gate circuit to connect the high current signal to a pulse output terminal whereas the second trigger signal causes the gate circuit to connect the low current signal to the pulse output terminal.

  9. The pulsed amplitude unit for the SLC

    SciTech Connect

    Rolfe, J.; Browne, M.J.; Jobe, R.K.

    1987-02-01

    There is a recurring requirement in the SLC for the control of devices such as magnets, phase shifters, and attenuators on a beam-by-beam basis. The Pulsed Amplitude Unit (PAU) is a single width CAMAC module developed for this purpose. It provides digitally programmed analog output voltages on a beam-by-beam basis. Up to 32 preprogrammed values of output voltage are available from the single analog output of the module, and any of these values can be associated with any of the 256 possible SLC beam definitions. A 12-bit Analog-to-Digital Converter (ADC) digitizes an analog input signal at the appropriate beam time and stores it in a buffer memory. This feature is normally used to monitor the response of the device being controlled by the PAU at each beam time. Initial application of the PAU is a part of the system that controls the output of Klystrons in the SLC. The PAU combines several different functions in a single module. In order to accommodate these functions in a single width CAMAC module, field programmed logic is used extensively. Field Programmable Logic Arrays, Programmed Array Logic, and a Field Programmable Logic Sequencer are employed.

  10. Simple, one transistor circuit boosts pulse amplitude

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keon, T.; Matchett, M. W.

    1966-01-01

    Simple circuit that uses a single transistor to accomplish capacitor storage followed by common-base switching supplies a pulse voltage, higher than that normally available from emitter-follower circuits, to drive a 100-watt transmitter.

  11. Respiratory variations in the photoplethysmographic waveform amplitude depend on type of pulse oximetry device.

    PubMed

    Høiseth, Lars Øivind; Hoff, Ingrid Elise; Hagen, Ove Andreas; Kirkebøen, Knut Arvid; Landsverk, Svein Aslak

    2016-06-01

    Respiratory variations in the photoplethysmographic waveform amplitude predict fluid responsiveness under certain conditions. Processing of the photoplethysmographic signal may vary between different devices, and may affect respiratory amplitude variations calculated by the standard formula. The aim of the present analysis was to explore agreement between respiratory amplitude variations calculated using photoplethysmographic waveforms available from two different pulse oximeters. Analysis of registrations before and after fluid loads performed before and after open-heart surgery (aortic valve replacement and/or coronary artery bypass grafting) with patients on controlled mechanical ventilation. Photoplethysmographic (Nellcor and Masimo pulse oximeters) and arterial pressure waveforms were recorded. Amplitude variations induced by ventilation were calculated and averaged over ten respiratory cycles. Agreements for absolute values are presented in scatterplots (with least median square regression through the origin, LMSO) and Bland-Altman plots. Agreement for trending presented in a four-quadrant plot. Agreement between respiratory photoplethysmographic amplitude variations from the two pulse oximeters was poor with LMSO ΔPOPNellc = 1.5 × ΔPOPMas and bias ± limits of agreement 7.4 ± 23 %. Concordance rate with a fluid load was 91 %. Agreement between respiratory variations in the photoplethysmographic waveform amplitude calculated from the available signals output by two different pulse oximeters was poor, both evaluated by LMSO and Bland-Altman plot. Respiratory amplitude variations from the available signals output by these two pulse oximeters are not interchangeable.

  12. High pressure pulsed capillary viscometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, R. L.; Walowitt, J. A.; Pan, C. H. T.

    1972-01-01

    An analytical and test program was conducted in order to establish the feasibility of a multichamber pulsed-capillary viscometer. The initial design incorporated a piston, ram, and seals which produced measured pulses up to 30,000 psi in the closed chamber system. Pressure pulses from one to ten milliseconds were investigated in a system volume of 1 cuin. Four test fluids: a MIL-L-7808, a 5P4E polyphenyl ether, a MIL-L-23699A, and a synthetic hydrocarbon were examined in the test pressure assembly. The pressure-viscosity coefficient and viscosity delay time were determined for the MIL-L-7808 lubricant tested.

  13. SPECTRAL AMPLITUDE AND PHASE EVOLUTION IN PETAWATT LASER PULSES

    SciTech Connect

    Filip, C V

    2010-11-22

    The influence of the active gain medium on the spectral amplitude and phase of amplified pulses in a CPA system is studied. Results from a 10-PW example based on Nd-doped mixed glasses are presented. In conclusion, this study shows that, by using spectral shaping and gain saturation in a mixed-glass amplifier, it is possible to produce 124 fs, 1.4 kJ laser pulses. One detrimental effect, the pulse distortion due to resonant amplification medium, has been investigated and its magnitude as well as its compensation calculated.

  14. Nonlinear amplitude frequency characteristics of attenuation in rock under pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashinskii, E. I.

    2006-12-01

    Laboratory experiments have been carried out to investigate the influence of change in strain amplitude on the frequency dependence of attenuation in samples of sandstone, smoky quartz and duralumin. The measurements were performed using the reflection method on pulse frequency of 1 MHz in the strain range ~(0.3-2.0) × 10-6 under a confining pressure of 20 MPa. The attenuation in rocks is nonlinearly dependent on frequency and strain amplitude. In sandstone for P-waves and in smoky quartz for P- and S-waves, the dependences Q-1p(f) and Q-1s(f) have the attenuation peak. With increasing amplitude, the peak frequency can shift towards both the lower and the higher frequencies. It depends on the location of the frequency of an incident (input) pulse with respect to the peak frequency on the frequency axis. For sandstone the peak frequency of P-waves shifts towards the higher frequencies. For smoky quartz the shift of peak frequency is absent in P-waves, and S-waves shift towards the lower frequencies. The attenuation at the incident frequency always monotonically decreases with amplitude, and the other frequency components have complex or monotonic characters depending on the location of the incident frequency in the relaxation spectrum. Q-1p(f) in duralumin has monotonic character, i.e. a relaxation peak in the measurement frequency band is absent. Attenuation strongly decreases with increasing frequency and weakly depends on strain amplitude. The curve Q-1s(f) has an attenuation peak, and its character essentially depends on strain amplitude. With increasing amplitude, the peak frequency shifts towards the lower frequencies. The unusual increase of peak frequency of the P-wave spectrum in the bottom reflection in comparison with peak frequency in spectrum of the initial reflection is detected. The unusual behaviour of attenuation is explained by features of the joint action of viscoelastic and microplastic mechanisms. These results can be used for improving methods

  15. Pressure Pulse Measurements Using Optical Hydrophone Principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueberle, Friedrich; Jamshidi-Rad, Abtin

    2011-02-01

    Pressure pulses are used in extracorporeal lithotripsy, pain therapy and other medical applications. Typical lithotripter pulses reach positive pressure amplitudes of ca. 20 to more than 100 MPa and negative pressures of -5 to more than -20 MPa, depending on the focusing properties and energy settings of the source. The IEC standard 61846, which defines the acoustic parameters of pressure pulse fields, describes the properties of "Focus-" and "Field-" type hydrophones, which were originally specified as PVDF sensors. During recent years, two types of optical sensors were developed, which are based on the principle of measuring reflection changes of a laser beam at a glass-water surface: The fiber optic sensor using bare optical fibers and the "light spot" sensor using a thick glass block. Measurements with both hydrophone types were made with a low pressure transducer (p+max=3 MPa), and two electromagnetic lithotripter sources with the same total acoustic energy (E5MPa=90mJ), one with a wide focus (FWHM = 11 mm, p+max = 30 MPa) and the other with a small focus (FWHM = 3,5 mm, p+max = 83 MPa). The results show that both optical sensor types provide high pressure-time signal fidelity comparable to PVDF membrane sensors. Both optical hydrophones can serve as "Focus-" and "Field-" hydrophones as defined in the lithotripsy measurement standard IEC 61846.

  16. Superposed pulse amplitude modulation for visible light communication.

    PubMed

    Li, J F; Huang, Z T; Zhang, R Q; Zeng, F X; Jiang, M; Ji, Y F

    2013-12-16

    We propose and experimentally demonstrate a novel modulation scheme called superposed pulse amplitude modulation (SPAM) which is low-cost, insensitive to non-linearity of light emitting diode (LED). Multiple optical pulses transmit parallelly from different spatial position in the LED array and overlap linearly in free space to realize SPAM. With LED arrangement, the experimental results show that using the modulation we proposed the data rate of 120 Mbit/s with BER 1 × 10(-3) can be achieved with an optical blue filter and RC post-equalization.

  17. Pulse Pressure: An Indicator of Heart Health?

    MedlinePlus

    ... resting blood pressure is 120/80 millimeters of mercury (mm Hg), your pulse pressure is 40. For ... the same pulse pressure: 160/120 millimeters of mercury (mm Hg) indicates a higher risk than 110/ ...

  18. Shuttle extravehicular activity signal processor pulse amplitude modulation decommutator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noble, D. E.; Conrad, W. M.

    1974-01-01

    To provide data with long-term stability and accuracy, the pulse amplitude modulation (PAM) decommutator was synchronized to the PAM-return to zero wavetrain, and each channel was sampled with a common sample and hold circuit and digitized sequentially. The digital value of each channel was then scaled by the digital value of the calibration channels. The corrected digital value of each channel was stored for one complete frame and then transferred to the multiplexer-demultiplexer at a high rate in one block of serial digital data. A test model was built to demonstrate this design approach taken for the PAM decom and performance data was provided. The accuracies obtained with various signal to noise ratios are shown.

  19. Population transfer by an amplitude-modulated pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Vitanov, N.V.; Yatsenko, L.P.; Bergmann, K.

    2003-10-01

    We propose a technique for coherent population inversion of a two-state system, which uses an amplitude-modulated pulse. In the modulation-free adiabatic basis, the modulation introduces oscillating interaction between the adiabatic states. In a second rotating-wave approximation picture, this oscillating interaction induces a pair of level crossings between the energies of the adiabatic states if the modulation frequency is chosen appropriately. By suitably offsetting the modulation with respect to the center of the pulse, one can make the modulation act only in the vicinity of one of these crossings. In a higher-order adiabatic basis, this crossing shows up as an avoided crossing between the energies of the higher-order adiabatic states. As a result robust and efficient population transfer can be achieved between the adiabatic states, and hence, between the original bare states. We derive analytically the conditions on the interaction parameters for this technique and verify them with numerical simulations. Possible experimental implementations are discussed.

  20. Streaming Induced by High-Amplitude Acoustic Pulses and its Implications.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starritt, Hazel Catherine

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. This thesis investigates some aspects of the nonlinear propagation of high amplitude ultrasound in the context of medical diagnostic applications. Nonlinear propagation occurring in focused diagnostic fields is shown to enhance acoustic streaming in water due to the increased absorption of the high frequency components in the distorted wave. The results of an extensive experimental investigation of streaming in water are presented. The streaming velocities were measured using the technique of hot film anemometry and were found to vary with total acoustic power, pulse repetition frequency, pulse duration and pulse pressure amplitude. The velocity in a high amplitude beam was shown to be enhanced typically by a factor of 5 compared with that in a low amplitude beam of the same acoustic power. Measurements of acoustic parameters were made for comparison. The results showed that in a nonlinear field absorption is enhanced in the region immediately on the transducer side of the focus and this region is shown to act as the "source pump" for the stream. The maximum streaming velocities generated by commercial ultrasonic equipment were measured in the fields of pulsed Doppler units, with maximum velocities generated in the fields of scanned imaging beams being an order of magnitude lower. Streams in stationary beams were observed to become established in time periods which are short compared with the "dwell time" of the transducer at a single location in clinical use. The implications of acoustic streaming and the forces associated with it are discussed in the context of the current diagnostic usage of ultrasound. In particular, obstetric applications are considered where the fetus is scanned through a low loss fluid path in which nonlinear propagation and acoustic streaming may occur.

  1. Nonlinear rocket motor stability prediction: Limit amplitude, triggering, and mean pressure shifta)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flandro, Gary A.; Fischbach, Sean R.; Majdalani, Joseph

    2007-09-01

    High-amplitude pressure oscillations in solid propellant rocket motor combustion chambers display nonlinear effects including: (1) limit cycle behavior in which the fluctuations may dwell for a considerable period of time near their peak amplitude, (2) elevated mean chamber pressure (DC shift), and (3) a triggering amplitude above which pulsing will cause an apparently stable system to transition to violent oscillations. Along with the obvious undesirable vibrations, these features constitute the most damaging impact of combustion instability on system reliability and structural integrity. The physical mechanisms behind these phenomena and their relationship to motor geometry and physical parameters must, therefore, be fully understood if instability is to be avoided in the design process, or if effective corrective measures must be devised during system development. Predictive algorithms now in use have limited ability to characterize the actual time evolution of the oscillations, and they do not supply the motor designer with information regarding peak amplitudes or the associated critical triggering amplitudes. A pivotal missing element is the ability to predict the mean pressure shift; clearly, the designer requires information regarding the maximum chamber pressure that might be experienced during motor operation. In this paper, a comprehensive nonlinear combustion instability model is described that supplies vital information. The central role played by steep-fronted waves is emphasized. The resulting algorithm provides both detailed physical models of nonlinear instability phenomena and the critically needed predictive capability. In particular, the origin of the DC shift is revealed.

  2. Improvement of a large-amplitude sinusoidal pressure generator for dynamic calibration of pressure transducers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, R. E.

    1972-01-01

    Results of research on the improvement of a sinusoidal pressure generator are presented. The generator is an inlet-area-modulated, gas-flow-through device (siren type) which was developed to dynamically calibrate pressure transducers and pressure probes. Tests were performed over a frequency range of 100 Hz to 20 kHz at average chamber pressures (bias pressure) between 30 and 50 psia (21 and 35 N/sq cm abs) and between 150 and 300 psia (104 and 207 N/sq cm abs). Significant improvements in oscillation pressure waveform were obtained but with reduction in available generator oscillation pressure amplitude range. Oscillation pressure amplitude, waveform, and waveform spectral content are given as functions of frequency for the two bias pressure conditions. The generator and instrumentation for frequency, amplitude, and spectrum measurements are described.

  3. Influential factors for pressure pulse waveform in healthy young adults.

    PubMed

    Du, Yi; Wang, Ling; Li, Shuyu; Zhi, Guang; Li, Deyu; Zhang, Chi

    2015-01-01

    The effects of gender and other contributory factors on pulse waveform are still under arguments. In view of different results caused by few considerations of possible influential factors and general agreement of gender relating to pulse waveform, this study aims to address the confounding factors interfering with the association between gender and pulse waveform characteristics. A novel method was proposed to noninvasively detect pressure pulse wave and assess the morphology of pulse wave. Forty healthy young subjects were included in the present research. Height, weight, systolic blood pressure (SBP), and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) were measured manually and body mass index (BMI), pulse blood pressure (PP) and heart rate (HR) were calculated automatically. Student's t test was used to analyze the gender difference and analysis of variance (ANOVA) to examine the effects of intrinsic factors. Univariate regression analysis was performed to assess the main factors on the waveform characteristics. Waveform features were found significantly different between genders. However this study indicates that the main factors for time-related and amplitude-related parameters are HR and SBP respectively. In conclusion, the impact of HR and SBP on pulse waveform features should not be underestimated, especially when analyzing the gender difference.

  4. Imbalance of group velocities for amplitude and phase pulses propagating in a resonant atomic medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basalaev, M. Yu.; Taichenachev, A. V.; Yudin, V. I.

    2016-11-01

    The dynamics of light pulses with amplitude and phase modulations is investigated for a medium of resonant two-level atoms. It is shown that the pulse-like variations of the phase can be also described in terms of group velocity. It is found that in the nonlinear regime of atom-field interaction, the group velocities of amplitude and phase pulses can have a large imbalance. Namely, amplitude pulses travel at a velocity less than c , whereas the group velocity of phase pulses is greater than the velocity of light in free space or it is even negative. The predicted imbalance of the group velocities can be important in the case of chirped pulses propagating in a resonant medium.

  5. Large amplitude fluxional behaviour of elemental calcium under high pressure

    PubMed Central

    Tse, J. S.; Desgreniers, S.; Ohishi, Y.; Matsuoka, T.

    2012-01-01

    Experimental evidences are presented showing unusually large and highly anisotropic vibrations in the “simple cubic” (SC) unit cell adopted by calcium over a broad pressure ranging from 30–90 GPa and at temperature as low as 40 K. X-ray diffraction patterns show a preferential broadening of the (110) Bragg reflection indicating that the atomic displacements are not isotropic but restricted to the [110] plane. The unusual observation can be rationalized invoking a simple chemical perspective. As the result of pressure-induced s → d transition, Ca atoms situated in the octahedral environment of the simple cubic structure are subjected to Jahn-Teller distortions. First-principles molecular dynamics calculations confirm this suggestion and show that the distortion is of dynamical nature as the cubic unit cell undergoes large amplitude tetragonal fluctuations. The present results show that, even under extreme compression, the atomic configuration is highly fluxional as it constantly changes. PMID:22523635

  6. Reducing the duration of broadband excitation pulses using optimal control with limited RF amplitude.

    PubMed

    Skinner, Thomas E; Reiss, Timo O; Luy, Burkhard; Khaneja, Navin; Glaser, Steffen J

    2004-03-01

    Combining optimal control theory with a new RF limiting step produces pulses with significantly reduced duration and improved performance for a given maximum RF amplitude compared to previous broadband excitation by optimized pulses (BEBOP). The resulting pulses tolerate variations in RF homogeneity relevant for standard high-resolution NMR probes. Design criteria were transformation of Iz-->Ix over resonance offsets of +/-20kHz and RF variability of +/-5%, with a pulse length of 500 micros and peak RF amplitude equal to 17.5 kHz. Simulations transform Iz to greater than 0.995 Ix, with phase deviations of the final magnetization less than 2 degrees, over ranges of resonance offset and RF variability that exceed the design targets. Experimental performance of the pulse is in excellent agreement with the simulations. Performance tradeoffs for yet shorter pulses or pulses with decreased digitization are also investigated.

  7. Nyquist 4-ary pulse amplitude modulation scheme based on electrical Nyquist pulse shaping and fiber Bragg grating filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Na; Chen, Xue; Ju, Cheng; Zhang, Qi; Wang, Huitao

    2015-04-01

    Intensity modulation and direct detection signal are sensitive to power fading and nonlinear intersymbol interference (ISI) induced by modulator chirp, fiber dispersion, and square-law photo-detection. We propose and experimentally demonstrate a Nyquist 4-ary pulse amplitude modulation and direct detection scheme relying on pulse-shaping with an electrical filter and optical equalization with a vestigial-sideband (VSB) filter in the transmitter. The power fading could be eliminated by using the VSB filter. Compared with conventional 4-ary pulse amplitude modulation, the Nyquist signal has a stronger resistance to nonlinear ISI.

  8. Modified fiber Bragg grating pulse pressure sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaczmarek, Tomasz; Kaczmarek, Zdzisław

    2007-04-01

    A new fiber optic, pulse pressure sensor with a Bragg grating, in the structure of which the operating principle of the Hopkinson bar is applied, is presented in the paper. The delivery of the measured pressure to the sensor is realized by means of a measuring head with truncated cone, made of silica glass and fusion-spliced to the grating's fiber. The optical and the electronic setup of the sensor is given. The sensor was employed to measure pulse pressure generated by an electric discharge in water. The obtained measurement results and the conclusions arising from them are presented.

  9. Direct generation of all-optical random numbers from optical pulse amplitude chaos.

    PubMed

    Li, Pu; Wang, Yun-Cai; Wang, An-Bang; Yang, Ling-Zhen; Zhang, Ming-Jiang; Zhang, Jian-Zhong

    2012-02-13

    We propose and theoretically demonstrate an all-optical method for directly generating all-optical random numbers from pulse amplitude chaos produced by a mode-locked fiber ring laser. Under an appropriate pump intensity, the mode-locked laser can experience a quasi-periodic route to chaos. Such a chaos consists of a stream of pulses with a fixed repetition frequency but random intensities. In this method, we do not require sampling procedure and external triggered clocks but directly quantize the chaotic pulses stream into random number sequence via an all-optical flip-flop. Moreover, our simulation results show that the pulse amplitude chaos has no periodicity and possesses a highly symmetric distribution of amplitude. Thus, in theory, the obtained random number sequence without post-processing has a high-quality randomness verified by industry-standard statistical tests.

  10. Critically ill patients in emergency department may be characterized by low amplitude and high variability of amplitude of pulse photoplethysmography

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The aim of the present pilot study was to determine if pulse photoplethysmography amplitude (PPGA) could be used as an indicator of critical illness and as a predictor of higher need of care in emergency department patients. Methods This was a prospective observational study. We collected vital signs and one minute of pulse photoplethysmograph signal from 251 consecutive patients admitted to a university hospital emergency department. The patients were divided in two groups regarding to the modified Early Warning Score (mEWS): > 3 (critically ill) and ≤ 3 (non-critically ill). Photoplethysmography characteristics were compared between the groups. Results Sufficient data for analysis was acquired from 212 patients (84.5%). Patients in critically ill group more frequently required intubation and invasive hemodynamic monitoring in the ED and received more intravenous fluids. Mean pulse photoplethysmography amplitude (PPGA) was significantly lower in critically ill patients (median 1.105 [95% CI of mean 0.9946-2.302] vs. 2.476 [95% CI of mean 2.239-2.714], P = 0.0257). Higher variability of PPGA significantly correlated with higher amount of fluids received in the ED (r = 0.1501, p = 0.0296). Conclusions This pilot study revealed differences in PPGA characteristics between critically ill and non-critically ill patients. Further studies are needed to determine if these easily available parameters could help increase accuracy in triage when used in addition to routine monitoring of vital signs. PMID:23799988

  11. Dependence of Two-Photon eGFP Bleaching on Femtosecond Pulse Spectral Amplitude and Phase

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Shu-Fen; Hsieh, Jer-Tsong; Chen, David J.; Alexandrakis, George

    2015-01-01

    Photobleaching is a key limitation in two-photon imaging of fluorescent proteins with femtosecond pulsed excitation. We present measurements of the dependence of eGFP photobleaching on the spectral amplitude and phase of the pulses used. A strong dependence on the excitation wavelength was confirmed and measured over a 800–950 nm range. A fiber continuum light source and pulse shaping techniques were used to investigate photobleaching with broadband, 15 fs transform limited, pulses with differing spectral amplitude and phase. Narrow band pulses, >150 fs transform limited, typical of femtosecond laser sources used in two-photon imaging applications, were also investigated for their photobleaching dependence on pulse dispersion and bandwidth. The bleach rate for broadband pulses was found to be primarily determined by the second harmonic spectrum of the excitation light. On the other hand, for narrow band excitation pulses with similar center wavelengths improvement in bleach rate was found to be mostly dependent on reducing the pulse length. A simple model to predict the relative bleach rates for broadband pulses is presented and compared to the experimental data. PMID:26411799

  12. Pressure wave charged repetitively pulsed gas laser

    DOEpatents

    Kulkarny, Vijay A.

    1982-01-01

    A repetitively pulsed gas laser in which a system of mechanical shutters bracketing the laser cavity manipulate pressure waves resulting from residual energy in the cavity gas following a lasing event so as to draw fresh gas into the cavity and effectively pump spent gas in a dynamic closed loop.

  13. Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy versus Temporal Pulse Amplitude Biofeedback Training for Recurrent Headache

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Paul R.; Forsyth, Michael R.; Reece, John

    2007-01-01

    Sixty-four headache sufferers were allocated randomly to cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT), temporal pulse amplitude (TPA) biofeedback training, or waiting-list control. Fifty-one participants (14M/37F) completed the study, 30 with migraine and 21 with tension-type headache. Treatment consisted of 8, 1-hour sessions. CBT was highly effective,…

  14. The neuronal response to electrical constant-amplitude pulse train stimulation: additive Gaussian noise.

    PubMed

    Matsuoka, A J; Abbas, P J; Rubinstein, J T; Miller, C A

    2000-11-01

    Experimental results from humans and animals show that electrically evoked compound action potential (EAP) responses to constant-amplitude pulse train stimulation can demonstrate an alternating pattern, due to the combined effects of highly synchronized responses to electrical stimulation and refractory effects (Wilson et al., 1994). One way to improve signal representation is to reduce the level of across-fiber synchrony and hence, the level of the amplitude alternation. To accomplish this goal, we have examined EAP responses in the presence of Gaussian noise added to the pulse train stimulus. Addition of Gaussian noise at a level approximately -30 dB relative to EAP threshold to the pulse trains decreased the amount of alternation, indicating that stochastic resonance may be induced in the auditory nerve. The use of some type of conditioning stimulus such as Gaussian noise may provide a more 'normal' neural response pattern.

  15. Neural Network Burst Pressure Prediction in Graphite/Epoxy Pressure Vessels from Acoustic Emission Amplitude Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Eric v. K.; Walker, James L., II; Rowell, Ginger H.

    1995-01-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) data were taken during hydroproof for three sets of ASTM standard 5.75 inch diameter filament wound graphite/epoxy bottles. All three sets of bottles had the same design and were wound from the same graphite fiber; the only difference was in the epoxies used. Two of the epoxies had similar mechanical properties, and because the acoustic properties of materials are a function of their stiffnesses, it was thought that the AE data from the two sets might also be similar; however, this was not the case. Therefore, the three resin types were categorized using dummy variables, which allowed the prediction of burst pressures all three sets of bottles using a single neural network. Three bottles from each set were used to train the network. The resin category, the AE amplitude distribution data taken up to 25 % of the expected burst pressure, and the actual burst pressures were used as inputs. Architecturally, the network consisted of a forty-three neuron input layer (a single categorical variable defining the resin type plus forty-two continuous variables for the AE amplitude frequencies), a fifteen neuron hidden layer for mapping, and a single output neuron for burst pressure prediction. The network trained on all three bottle sets was able to predict burst pressures in the remaining bottles with a worst case error of + 6.59%, slightly greater than the desired goal of + 5%. This larger than desired error was due to poor resolution in the amplitude data for the third bottle set. When the third set of bottles was eliminated from consideration, only four hidden layer neurons were necessary to generate a worst case prediction error of - 3.43%, well within the desired goal.

  16. Influence of air pressure on the detailed characteristics of corona current pulse due to positive corona discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xuebao; Cui, Xiang; Lu, Tiebing; Li, Dayong; Chen, Bo; Fu, Yuke

    2016-12-01

    Air pressure is one of the main factors affecting the corona discharge and influence of air pressure should be carefully investigated. In order to obtain the influence of air pressure on the detailed characteristics of corona current pulse, such as pulse amplitude, rise time, pulse width, duration time, and pulse repetition frequency, a systematic investigation is carried out though a coaxial conductor-cylinder electrode structure with a corona point on the conductor. The electrodes are put into a pressure chamber for adjusting the air pressure. The results show that pulse amplitude increases with the increase of air pressure, while rise time, pulse width, duration time, and pulse repetition frequency decrease significantly at the same ratio between applied voltage and onset voltage (U/U0). Empirical formulas for the pulse amplitude, rise time, pulse width, and duration time varying with air pressure are first established. On the basis of the development of positive corona discharge, the influence of air pressure on the typical time intervals and experimental results are qualitatively explained.

  17. Generation and characterization of phase and amplitude shaped femtosecond mid-IR pulses.

    PubMed

    Shim, Sang-Hee; Strasfeld, David B; Zanni, Martin T

    2006-12-25

    A germanium acousto-optic modulator was recently reported (Shim et al., Optics Letters, 31, 838, 2006) that is capable of generating phase and amplitude shaped femtosecond pulses directly in the mid-infrared. In this paper, the design, implementation and performance of this novel mid-IR shaper is described in detail as is the sub-50 fs optical parametric amplifier that provides large bandwidth for generation of complex pulse shapes. These details include the acoustic power and wavelength dependence of the deflection efficiency, the phase stability of the shaper, the synchronization of electronics, and a study on how the mid-IR bandwidth of the optical parametric amplifier depends on its optical configuration. With these details quantified, the accuracy of the device is tested by creating a series of shaped pulses that are characterized by cross-correlation with well-known mid-IR reference pulses and by simulations. Test waveforms include optimally compressed, phase-chirped and amplitude-modulated mid-IR pulses. The shaped pulses are of sufficient quality that they will enable new experiments in 2D IR spectroscopy and in the coherent control of vibrations in ground electronic states.

  18. Pulsed laser manipulation of an optically trapped bead: averaging thermal noise and measuring the pulsed force amplitude.

    PubMed

    Lindballe, Thue B; Kristensen, Martin V G; Berg-Sørensen, Kirstine; Keiding, Søren R; Stapelfeldt, Henrik

    2013-01-28

    An experimental strategy for post-eliminating thermal noise on position measurements of optically trapped particles is presented. Using a nanosecond pulsed laser, synchronized to the detection system, to exert a periodic driving force on an optically trapped 10 μm polystyrene bead, the laser pulse-bead interaction is repeated hundreds of times. Traces with the bead position following the prompt displacement from equilibrium, induced by each laser pulse, are averaged and reveal the underlying deterministic motion of the bead, which is not visible in a single trace due to thermal noise. The motion of the bead is analyzed from the direct time-dependent position measurements and from the power spectrum. The results show that the bead is on average displaced 208 nm from the trap center and exposed to a force amplitude of 71 nanoNewton, more than five orders of magnitude larger than the trapping forces. Our experimental method may have implications for microrheology.

  19. A simple method of calculating pulse amplitudes and shapes arising from reflection from linear segments

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, S.A. Jr.

    1988-01-02

    A new formulation for the amplitude and pulse shape from reflections from a linear segment for a bistatic planar geometry is presented. The formulation is useful in calculating reverberation from high intensity signals in an deep ocean basin where long range propagation can occur. This reverberation is important in calculating the acoustic interference to sonar arising from the detonation of nuclear or large chemical explosives, and for modeling long range active sonar. The reflections computed with the new formulation are significantly different from those of earlier versions of the reverberation model, with pulses generally shorter and more intense, leading to predictions of louder but more sporadic reverberation than previously estimated. 9 refs

  20. Width and amplitude tunable square-wave pulse in dual-pump passively mode-locked fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Mei, Li; Chen, Guoliang; Xu, Lixin; Zhang, Xianming; Gu, Chun; Sun, Biao; Wang, Anting

    2014-06-01

    We have proposed and demonstrated a figure-8 dual-pump passively mode-locked fiber laser to generate square-wave pulse tunable by both width and amplitude. Just by simply adjusting the power of the pumps, both the amplitude and width of the output square-wave pulse can be tuned independently and continuously. One pump is used to tune the output pulsewidth while the other is used to tune amplitude.

  1. Solitary Water Waves of Large Amplitude Generated by Surface Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, Miles H.

    2015-11-01

    We consider exact nonlinear solitary water waves on a shear flow with an arbitrary distribution of vorticity. Ignoring surface tension, we impose a non-constant pressure on the free surface. Starting from a uniform shear flow with a flat free surface and a supercritical wave speed, we vary the surface pressure and use a continuation argument to construct a global connected set of symmetric solitary waves. This set includes waves of depression whose profiles increase monotonically from a central trough where the surface pressure is at its lowest, as well as waves of elevation whose profiles decrease monotonically from a central crest where the surface pressure is at its highest. There may also be two waves in this connected set with identical surface pressure, only one of which is a wave of depression.

  2. Trellis-coded pulse amplitude modulation for indoor visible light communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yu; Yang, Aiying; Wu, Yongsheng; Feng, Lihui; Sun, Yu-nan; Li, Yankun

    2013-12-01

    Trellis-coded pulse-amplitude modulation (TC-PAM) is applied in visible light communication (VLC) system using RGB-LED. Based on natural modulation, we propose a modified modulation to yield performance enhancement. Further, a decoding method of combing soft-decision Viterbi algorithm with most significant bit (MSB) decoding is developed. Finally, the results of Monte-Carlo simulation are presented to verify the best modulation and decoding method among the mentioned modulation and decoding techniques.

  3. Pulsed magnetic stimulation modifies amplitude of action potentials in vitro via ionic channels-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Zaghloul; Wieraszko, Andrzej

    2015-07-01

    This paper investigates the influence of pulsed magnetic fields (PMFs) on amplitude of evoked, compound action potential (CAP) recorded from the segments of sciatic nerve in vitro. PMFs were applied for 30 min at frequency of 0.16 Hz and intensity of 15 mT. In confirmation of our previous reports, PMF exposure enhanced amplitude of CAPs. The effect persisted beyond PMF activation period. As expected, CAP amplitude was attenuated by antagonists of sodium channel, lidocaine, and tetrodotoxin. Depression of the potential by sodium channels antagonists was reversed by subsequent exposure to PMFs. The effect of elevated potassium concentration and veratridine on the action potential was modified by exposure to PMFs as well. Neither inhibitors of protein kinase C and protein kinase A, nor known free radicals scavengers had any effects on PMF action. Possible mechanisms of PMF action are discussed.

  4. Effect of strain amplitude on relaxation spectra of attenuation in dry and saturated sandstone under pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashinskii, E. I.

    2007-06-01

    Laboratory experiments have been carried out to investigate the amplitude-frequency dependence of compressional- and shear-wave attenuation in samples of dry and saturated sandstone. The measurements were performed using the reflection method on a pulse frequency of 1 MHz in the strain range ~(0.3-2.0) × 10-6 under a confining pressure of 20 MPa. In general, the attenuation decreases monotonically with increasing strain amplitude as Q^{-1} \\propto \\varepsilon ^{-n_{\\sim} }, where n~ = 0.003-0.045. The decrease in P-wave attenuation, Q-1p, for dry sandstone is 5%, but for saturated sandstone there is no change. The analogous decrease for Q-1s in the dry and the saturated sandstone is 8% and 4%, respectively. The P-wave relaxation spectra, Q-1p(f), in the dry and saturated sandstone are slightly different from each other but the S-wave relaxation spectra, Q-1s(f), are very different. The amplitude variation causes the change in the value of the relaxation strength Δ that leads to the displacement of the curve Q-1(f) in the Y-direction. The value of Δs in the saturated rock is four times more than the value Δp in the dry rock, and the curves Q-1s(f) are shifted relative to Q-1p(f) towards higher frequencies. The upward-downward amplitude dependence Δp(ɛ1-6-1) both in the dry and the saturated rock is represented by the descending curve. The Δs(ɛ1-6-1) curve for the saturated rock shows hysteresis, but for the dry rock hysteresis is absent. The increase in the strain amplitude gives rise to a small change in peak frequency, but stimulates considerable (up to 40%) decrease in the S-wave relaxation peak width. The unusual behaviour of attenuation is explained by a feature of the joint action of viscoelastic and microplastic mechanisms. These results can be used to improve methods of geological interpretation of acoustical and seismic data.

  5. Psychosocial stress inhibits amplitude of gonadotropin-releasing hormone pulses independent of cortisol action on the type II glucocorticoid receptor.

    PubMed

    Wagenmaker, Elizabeth R; Breen, Kellie M; Oakley, Amy E; Tilbrook, Alan J; Karsch, Fred J

    2009-02-01

    Our laboratory has developed a paradigm of psychosocial stress (sequential layering of isolation, blindfold, and predator cues) that robustly elevates cortisol secretion and decreases LH pulse amplitude in ovariectomized ewes. This decrease in LH pulse amplitude is due, at least in part, to a reduction in pituitary responsiveness to GnRH, caused by cortisol acting via the type II glucocorticoid receptor (GR). The first experiment of the current study aimed to determine whether this layered psychosocial stress also inhibits pulsatile GnRH release into pituitary portal blood. The stress paradigm significantly reduced GnRH pulse amplitude compared with nonstressed ovariectomized ewes. The second experiment tested if this stress-induced decrease in GnRH pulse amplitude is mediated by cortisol action on the type II GR. Ovariectomized ewes were allocated to three groups: nonstress control, stress, and stress plus the type II GR antagonist RU486. The layered psychosocial stress paradigm decreased GnRH and LH pulse amplitude compared with nonstress controls. Importantly, the stress also lowered GnRH pulse amplitude to a comparable extent in ewes in which cortisol action via the type II GR was antagonized. Therefore, we conclude that psychosocial stress reduces the amplitude of GnRH pulses independent of cortisol action on the type II GR. The present findings, combined with our recent observations, suggest that the mechanisms by which psychosocial stress inhibits reproductive neuroendocrine activity at the hypothalamic and pituitary levels are fundamentally different.

  6. Prenatal exposure to androgen excess increases LH pulse amplitude during postnatal life in male sheep.

    PubMed

    Recabarren, S E; Recabarren, M; Rojas-Garcia, P P; Cordero, M; Reyes, C; Sir-Petermann, T

    2012-09-01

    Prenatal exposure to excess testosterone has a profound impact on reproductive and metabolic functions in young and adult female sheep. Nevertheless, few studies have addressed the impact of prenatal exposure to an excess of androgens on reproductive and metabolic functions in males. The aim of the present study was to assess the impact of prenatal exposure to an excess of testosterone or dihydrotestosterone on the luteinizing hormone (LH) pulse characteristics during sexual development in male sheep. Control male sheep (C-males) and males born to mothers exposed to twice weekly injections of 30 mg testosterone or dihydrotestosterone from day 30-90 and 40 mg from day 90-120 of gestation (T-males, DHT-males) were studied at 5, 10, and 20 weeks of age, ages that represent infancy, early prepubertal, and late prepubertal stages of sexual development in this species, respectively. Patterns of LH pulsatility showed that T- and DHT-males exhibited a higher secretion of LH during the 6-h study and a higher amplitude of the LH pulses compared with C-males. Moreover, nadir of the pulses was higher in T- and DHT-males compared with C-males. Frequency of LH pulses, however, was not different within ages or between groups. These results show that males can be responsive to prenatal androgenization and suggest that treatment transiently alters the amplitude of LH pulses probably as the result of defects in the pituitary responsiveness pattern or in the gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) release pattern.

  7. Characterization of pulse amplitude and pulse rate modulation for a human vestibular implant during acute electrical stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, T. A. K.; DiGiovanna, J.; Cavuscens, S.; Ranieri, M.; Guinand, N.; van de Berg, R.; Carpaneto, J.; Kingma, H.; Guyot, J.-P.; Micera, S.; Perez Fornos, A.

    2016-08-01

    Objective. The vestibular system provides essential information about balance and spatial orientation via the brain to other sensory and motor systems. Bilateral vestibular loss significantly reduces quality of life, but vestibular implants (VIs) have demonstrated potential to restore lost function. However, optimal electrical stimulation strategies have not yet been identified in patients. In this study, we compared the two most common strategies, pulse amplitude modulation (PAM) and pulse rate modulation (PRM), in patients. Approach. Four subjects with a modified cochlear implant including electrodes targeting the peripheral vestibular nerve branches were tested. Charge-equivalent PAM and PRM were applied after adaptation to baseline stimulation. Vestibulo-ocular reflex eye movement responses were recorded to evaluate stimulation efficacy during acute clinical testing sessions. Main results. PAM evoked larger amplitude eye movement responses than PRM. Eye movement response axes for lateral canal stimulation were marginally better aligned with PRM than with PAM. A neural network model was developed for the tested stimulation strategies to provide insights on possible neural mechanisms. This model suggested that PAM would consistently cause a larger ensemble firing rate of neurons and thus larger responses than PRM. Significance. Due to the larger magnitude of eye movement responses, our findings strongly suggest PAM as the preferred strategy for initial VI modulation.

  8. Large amplitude ship motions and bow flare slamming pressures in regular head seas

    SciTech Connect

    Tao, Z.; Incecik, A.

    1996-12-31

    In this paper, the motion equations incorporating nonlinear terms due to large amplitude motions and bow flare slamming pressures are described in regular head seas. Numerical predictions of ship motions based on a small amplitude linear theory and large amplitude nonlinear method and experimental data are compared with each other in the frequency and time domain. The nonlinear restoring force, nonlinear damping force and nonlinear fluid momentum force are considered in predicting ship motions. The frequency dependent added mass and damping coefficient are computed at the instantaneous submerged sections of the ship. The momentum slamming theory and Wagner theory are used to predict the bow flare slamming pressure. The total impact pressure is expressed as the sum of water immersion impact pressure and wave striking impact pressure. There is a satisfactory agreement between theoretical predictions and model test measurements.

  9. The pulse-train auditory aftereffect and the perception of rapid amplitude modulations.

    PubMed

    Gutschalk, Alexander; Micheyl, Christophe; Oxenham, Andrew J

    2008-02-01

    Prolonged listening to a pulse train with repetition rates around 100 Hz induces a striking aftereffect, whereby subsequently presented sounds are heard with an unusually "metallic" timbre [Rosenblith et al., Science 106, 333-335 (1947)]. The mechanisms responsible for this auditory aftereffect are currently unknown. Whether the aftereffect is related to an alteration of the perception of temporal envelope fluctuations was evaluated. Detection thresholds for sinusoidal amplitude modulation (AM) imposed onto noise-burst carriers were measured for different AM frequencies (50-500 Hz), following the continuous presentation of a periodic pulse train, a temporally jittered pulse train, or an unmodulated noise. AM detection thresholds for AM frequencies of 100 Hz and above were significantly elevated compared to thresholds in quiet, following the presentation of the pulse-train inducers, and both induced a subjective auditory aftereffect. Unmodulated noise, which produced no audible aftereffect, left AM detection thresholds unchanged. Additional experiments revealed that, like the Rosenblith et al. aftereffect, the effect on AM thresholds does not transfer across ears, is not eliminated by protracted training, and can last several tens of seconds. The results suggest that the Rosenblith et al. aftereffect is related to a temporary alteration in the perception of fast temporal envelope fluctuations in sounds.

  10. Ultrafast phase and amplitude pulse shaping with a single, one-dimensional, high-resolution phase mask.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Jesse W; Schlup, Philip; Bartels, Randy A

    2007-07-09

    An ultrafast pulse shaper, capable of both phase and amplitude shaping, is constructed using a single high-resolution liquid crystal phase mask. The shaper is calibrated with an inline spectral interferometry technique. Amplitude shaping is accomplished by writing to the mask a phase grating, whose period is smaller than the spectral focus, diffracting away selected frequencies in a controllable manner.

  11. Envelope pulsed ultrasonic distance measurement system based upon amplitude modulation and phase modulation

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Y. P.; Wang, J. S.; Huang, K. N.; Ho, C. T.; Huang, J. D.; Young, M. S.

    2007-06-15

    A novel microcomputer-based ultrasonic distance measurement system is presented. This study proposes an efficient algorithm which combines both the amplitude modulation (AM) and the phase modulation (PM) of the pulse-echo technique. The proposed system can reduce error caused by inertia delay and amplitude attenuation effect when using the AM and PM envelope square wave form (APESW). The APESW ultrasonic driving wave form causes a phase inversion phenomenon in the relative wave form of the receiver. The phase inversion phenomenon sufficiently identifies the ''measurement pulse'' in the received wave forms, which can be used for accurate time-of-flight (TOF) measurement. In addition, combining a countertechnique to compute the phase shifts of the last cycle for TOF, the presented system can obtain distance resolution of 0.1% of the wavelength corresponding to the 40 kHz frequency of the ultrasonic wave. The standard uncertainty of the proposed distance measurement system is found to be 0.2 mm at a range of 50-500 mm. The APESW signal generator and phase detector of this measuring system are designed on a complex programmable logic device, which is used to govern the TOF measurement and send the data to a personal computer for distance calibration and examination. The main advantages of this APESW system are high resolution, low cost, narrow bandwidth requirement, and ease of implementation.

  12. Envelope pulsed ultrasonic distance measurement system based upon amplitude modulation and phase modulation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Y P; Wang, J S; Huang, K N; Ho, C T; Huang, J D; Young, M S

    2007-06-01

    A novel microcomputer-based ultrasonic distance measurement system is presented. This study proposes an efficient algorithm which combines both the amplitude modulation (AM) and the phase modulation (PM) of the pulse-echo technique. The proposed system can reduce error caused by inertia delay and amplitude attenuation effect when using the AM and PM envelope square wave form (APESW). The APESW ultrasonic driving wave form causes a phase inversion phenomenon in the relative wave form of the receiver. The phase inversion phenomenon sufficiently identifies the "measurement pulse" in the received wave forms, which can be used for accurate time-of-flight (TOF) measurement. In addition, combining a countertechnique to compute the phase shifts of the last cycle for TOF, the presented system can obtain distance resolution of 0.1% of the wavelength corresponding to the 40 kHz frequency of the ultrasonic wave. The standard uncertainty of the proposed distance measurement system is found to be 0.2 mm at a range of 50-500 mm. The APESW signal generator and phase detector of this measuring system are designed on a complex programmable logic device, which is used to govern the TOF measurement and send the data to a personal computer for distance calibration and examination. The main advantages of this APESW system are high resolution, low cost, narrow bandwidth requirement, and ease of implementation.

  13. Spectral and amplitude-time characteristics of radiation of plasma of a repetitively pulsed discharge initiated by runaway electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lomaev, M. I.; Beloplotov, D. V.; Sorokin, D. A.; Tarasenko, V. F.

    2016-02-01

    Spectral and amplitude-time characteristics of radiation of plasma of a repetitively pulsed discharge initiated by runaway electrons were studied experimentally in nitrogen. Intense emission lines of copper atoms, nitrogen atoms, and ions, as well as the first and the second positive systems of nitrogen, NO, and CN, were observed in the regime of repetitively pulsed excitation.

  14. Two-Step Pseudomaximum Amplitude-Based Confidence Interval Estimation for Oscillometric Blood Pressure Measurements.

    PubMed

    Lee, Soojeong; Jeon, Gwanggil; Kang, Seokhoon

    2015-01-01

    Blood pressure (BP) is an important vital sign to determine the health of an individual. Although the estimation of average arterial blood pressure using oscillometric methods is possible, there are no established methods for obtaining confidence intervals (CIs) for systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP). In this paper, we propose a two-step pseudomaximum amplitude (TSPMA) as a novel approach to obtain improved CIs of SBP and DBP using a double bootstrap approach. The weighted median (WM) filter is employed to reduce impulsive and Gaussian noises in the step of preprocessing. Application of the proposed method provides tighter CIs and smaller standard deviation of CIs than the pseudomaximum amplitude-envelope and maximum amplitude algorithms with Student's t-method.

  15. High fidelity femtosecond pulses from an ultrafast fiber laser system via adaptive amplitude and phase pre-shaping.

    PubMed

    Prawiharjo, Jerry; Daga, Nikita K; Geng, Rui; Price, Jonathan H; Hanna, David C; Richardson, David J; Shepherd, David P

    2008-09-15

    The generation of high-fidelity femtosecond pulses is experimentally demonstrated in a fiber based chirped-pulse amplification (CPA) system through an adaptive amplitude and phase pre-shaping technique. A pulse shaper, based on a dual-layer liquid crystal spatial light modulator (LC-SLM), was implemented in the fiber CPA system for amplitude and phase shaping prior to amplification. The LC-SLM was controlled using a differential evolution algorithm, to maximize a two-photon absorption detector signal from the compressed fiber CPA output pulses. It is shown that this approach compensates for both accumulated phase from material dispersion and nonlinear phase modulation. A train of pulses was produced with an average power of 12.6W at a 50MHz repetition rate from our fiber CPA system, which were compressible to high fidelity pulses with a duration of 170 fs.

  16. Pulse Wave Amplitude Drops during Sleep are Reliable Surrogate Markers of Changes in Cortical Activity

    PubMed Central

    Delessert, Alexandre; Espa, Fabrice; Rossetti, Andrea; Lavigne, Gilles; Tafti, Mehdi; Heinzer, Raphael

    2010-01-01

    Background: During sleep, sudden drops in pulse wave amplitude (PWA) measured by pulse oximetry are commonly associated with simultaneous arousals and are thought to result from autonomic vasoconstriction. In the present study, we determine whether PWA drops were associated with changes in cortical activity as determined by EEG spectral analysis. Methods: A 20% decrease in PWA was chosen as a minimum for a drop. A total of 1085 PWA drops from 10 consecutive sleep recordings were analyzed. EEG spectral analysis was performed over 5 consecutive epochs of 5 seconds: 2 before, 1 during, and 2 after the PWA drop. EEG spectral analysis was performed over delta, theta, alpha, sigma, and beta frequency bands. Within each frequency band, power density was compared across the five 5-sec epochs. Presence or absence of visually scored EEG arousals were adjudicated by an investigator blinded to the PWA signal and considered associated with PWA drop if concomitant. Results: A significant increase in EEG power density in all EEG frequency bands was found during PWA drops (P < 0.001) compared to before and after drop. Even in the absence of visually scored arousals, PWA drops were associated with a significant increase in EEG power density (P < 0.001) in most frequency bands. Conclusions: Drops in PWA are associated with a significant increase in EEG power density, suggesting that these events can be used as a surrogate for changes in cortical activity during sleep. This approach may prove of value in scoring respiratory events on limited-channel (type III) portable monitors. Citation: Delessert A; Espa F; Rossetti A; Lavigne G; Tafti M; Heinzer R. Pulse wave amplitude drops during sleep are reliable surrogate markers of changes in cortical activity. SLEEP 2010;33(12):1687-1692. PMID:21120131

  17. Studies on gas breakdown in pulsed radio frequency atmospheric pressure glow discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Huo, W. G.; Jian, S. J.; Yao, J.; Ding, Z. F.

    2014-05-15

    In pulsed RF atmospheric pressure glow discharges, the gas breakdown judged by the rapid drop in the amplitude of the pulsed RF voltage is no longer universally true. The steep increment of the plasma-absorbed RF power is proposed to determine the gas breakdown. The averaged plasma-absorbed RF power over a pulse period is used to evaluate effects of the preceding pulsed RF discharge on the breakdown voltage of the following one, finding that the breakdown voltage decreases with the increment in the averaged plasma-absorbed RF power under constant pulse duty ratio. Effects of the pulse off-time on the breakdown voltage and the breakdown delay time are also studied. The obtained dependence of the breakdown voltage on the pulse off-time is indicative of the transitional plasma diffusion processes in the afterglow. The breakdown voltage varies rapidly as the plasma diffuses fast in the region of moderate pulse off-time. The contribution of nitrogen atom recombination at the alumina surface is demonstrated in the prolonged memory effect on the breakdown delay time vs. the pulse off-time and experimentally validated by introducing a trace amount of nitrogen into argon at short and long pulse off-times.

  18. Application of pulsed photoacoustics in water at high pressure.

    PubMed

    Freeborn, S S; Hannigan, J; MacKenzie, H A

    1999-08-20

    The application of pulsed photoacoustics to the study of liquids at pressures of up to 350 bars is discussed. The design and development of an in-line sensor for the subsea monitoring of crude oil concentrations in water is reported. Crude oil detection sensitivities at parts per million concentrations were achieved with prototype instrumentation. A comparison of experimental results and a theoretical prediction of the pressure dependence of the pulsed photoacoustic response from water is outlined. The results demonstrate that existing models that describe pulsed photoacoustic generation in liquids are applicable to high-pressure conditions.

  19. Application of Pulsed Photoacoustics in Water at High Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeborn, Scott S.; Hannigan, John; MacKenzie, Hugh A.

    1999-08-01

    The application of pulsed photoacoustics to the study of liquids at pressures of up to 350 bars is discussed. The design and development of an in-line sensor for the subsea monitoring of crude oil concentrations in water is reported. Crude oil detection sensitivities at parts per million concentrations were achieved with prototype instrumentation. A comparison of experimental results and a theoretical prediction of the pressure dependence of the pulsed photoacoustic response from water is outlined. The results demonstrate that existing models that describe pulsed photoacoustic generation in liquids are applicable to high-pressure conditions.

  20. Thermal Non-equilibrium Revealed by Periodic Pulses of Random Amplitudes in Solar Coronal Loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auchère, F.; Froment, C.; Bocchialini, K.; Buchlin, E.; Solomon, J.

    2016-08-01

    We recently detected variations in extreme ultraviolet intensity in coronal loops repeating with periods of several hours. Models of loops including stratified and quasi-steady heating predict the development of a state of thermal non-equilibrium (TNE): cycles of evaporative upflows at the footpoints followed by falling condensations at the apex. Based on Fourier and wavelet analysis, we demonstrate that the observed periodic signals are indeed not signatures of vibrational modes. Instead, superimposed on the power law expected from the stochastic background emission, the power spectra of the time series exhibit the discrete harmonics and continua expected from periodic trains of pulses of random amplitudes. These characteristics reinforce our earlier interpretation of these pulsations as being aborted TNE cycles.

  1. 33 CFR 159.111 - Pressure and vacuum pulse test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Pressure and vacuum pulse test... (CONTINUED) POLLUTION MARINE SANITATION DEVICES Design, Construction, and Testing § 159.111 Pressure and... installed must be subjected to 50 fillings of water at a pressure head of 7 feet or the maximum...

  2. 33 CFR 159.111 - Pressure and vacuum pulse test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Pressure and vacuum pulse test... (CONTINUED) POLLUTION MARINE SANITATION DEVICES Design, Construction, and Testing § 159.111 Pressure and... installed must be subjected to 50 fillings of water at a pressure head of 7 feet or the maximum...

  3. Investigation on the generation characteristic of pressure pulse wave signal during the measurement-while-drilling process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Changqing, Zhao; Kai, Liu; Tong, Zhao; Takei, Masahiro; Weian, Ren

    2014-04-01

    The mud-pulse logging instrument is an advanced measurement-while-drilling (MWD) tool and widely used by the industry in the world. In order to improve the signal transmission rate, ensure the accurate transmission of information and address the issue of the weak signal on the ground of oil and gas wells, the signal generator should send out the strong mud-pulse signals with the maximum amplitude. With the rotary valve pulse generator as the study object, the three-dimensional Reynolds NS equations and standard k - ɛ turbulent model were used as a mathematical model. The speed and pressure coupling calculation was done by simple algorithms to get the amplitudes of different rates of flow and axial clearances. Tests were done to verify the characteristics of the pressure signals. The pressure signal was captured by the standpiece pressure monitoring system. The study showed that the axial clearances grew bigger as the pressure wave amplitude value decreased and caused the weakening of the pulse signal. As the rate of flow got larger, the pressure wave amplitude would increase and the signal would be enhanced.

  4. Experimental study of pulsed corona discharge in air at high pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yunghsu; Singleton, Dan; Sanders, Jason; Kuthi, Andras; Gundersen, Martin A.

    2012-10-01

    Understanding of the dynamics of nanosecond scale pulse discharges in air at multiatmospheric pressure is essential for the development of transient plasma enhanced combustion in internal combustion engines. Here we report the result of our experimental investigation of cathode-directed streamer discharges in synthetic air at pressures ranging from 1 to 20 bar. Two pulse generators with maximum pulse amplitudes of 50 kV and 65 kV, pulse width of approximately 12 ns and 85 ns and pulse rise times of 5 ns and 50 ns are used to generate streamers. The electrodes are coaxial with various radial gaps up to 11.75 mm. The discharge chamber is evacuated and backfilled with synthetic dry air at room temperature. Optical data is obtained from PI-MAX 3 ICCD camera with 3 ns gate width. The streamer propagation velocity variation with applied voltage, different pressures and reduced electric field, E/P, will be shown. Preliminary results indicate that the (pd) similarity law is violated at high pressures in agreement with other recent experiments [1].[4pt] [1] ``Nanosecond Scale Discharge Dynamics in High Pressure Air,'' Pierre Tardiveau, Nicolas Moreau, Francois Jorand, Christian Postel, St'ephane Pasquiers, and Pierre Vervisch, IEEE Trans. on Plasma Sci., Vol. 36, No. 4, 2008.

  5. Ion Acceleration in a Solitary Wave by Laser Pulse with Ramping-up Amplitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Min-Qing; Tripathi, Vipin; Liu, Chuan-Sheng; Shao, Xi; Liu, Tung-Chang; Su, Jao-Jang; Sheng, Zheng-Ming

    2012-10-01

    Recent work by Jung et al. demonstrated experimentally the acceleration of mono-energetic ion beam by solitary waves generated and maintained by laser light with ramping-up amplitude.footnotetextD. Jung, L. Yin, B.J. Albright, D.C. Gautier, R. H"orlein, D. Kiefer, A. Henig, R. Johnson, S. Letzring, S. Palaniyappan, R. Shah, T. Shimada, X.Q. Yan, K.J. Bowers, T. Tajima, J.C. Fern'andez, D. Habs, and B.M. Hegelich, Phys. Rev. Lett. 107,115002(2011). Theoretical model is developed in this work to study the formation of the solitary wave and effects of the radiation pressure force on a soliton in the accelerating plasma. 2D Particle-In-Cell (PIC) simulations are performed to compare and validate the theory. Differences in generating and maintaining solitary wave for laser with and without ramping-up amplitude are also investigated. We will also investigate effects of radiation pressure acceleration of plasma with near critical density.

  6. Analysis of Sterilization Effect of Atmospheric Pressure Pulsed Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Ekem, N.; Akan, T.; Pat, S.; Akgun, Y.; Kiremitci, A.; Musa, G.

    2007-04-23

    We have developed a new technology, the High Voltage Atmospheric Pressure Pulsed Plasma (HVAPPP), for bacteria killing. The aim of this paper is to present a simple device to generate plasma able to kill efficiently bacteria.

  7. 33 CFR 159.111 - Pressure and vacuum pulse test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Pressure and vacuum pulse test. 159.111 Section 159.111 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... vacuum pulse test. Liquid retention components of the device with manufacturer specified...

  8. 33 CFR 159.111 - Pressure and vacuum pulse test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Pressure and vacuum pulse test. 159.111 Section 159.111 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... vacuum pulse test. Liquid retention components of the device with manufacturer specified...

  9. 33 CFR 159.111 - Pressure and vacuum pulse test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Pressure and vacuum pulse test. 159.111 Section 159.111 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... vacuum pulse test. Liquid retention components of the device with manufacturer specified...

  10. Pulse plasma carburizing and high pressure gas quenching -- Industrial applications

    SciTech Connect

    Preisser, F.; Schnatbaum, F.

    1995-12-31

    Pulse plasma carburizing with high pressure gas quenching up to 20 bar is the newly developed case hardening process now available in production size equipment. The first part of results demonstrates the tremendous potential of high pressure gas quenching for successful hardening of case hardening steels. The second part opens a window to glance at the pulse plasma carburizing of complex shaped parts. Both processes improve economical data and performance of carburizing processes.

  11. The pulse amplitude variation with QPO frequency in SAX J1808.4-3658: Resonances with the accretion disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caliskan, Sirin; Alpar, Mehmet Ali; Sasmaz Mus, Sinem

    2016-07-01

    SAX J1808.4-3658 is an accreting millisecond pulsar with a spin period of 401 Hz. The pulsed amplitudes of this source vary with its kHz QPO frequencies (Bult & van der Klis 2015). The pulsed amplitude peaks at certain upper kHz QPO frequencies which we associate with boundary layer modes of the viscous accretion disk (Erkut et al. 2008). We model this as peaks in the energy dissipation rate at the accretion caps due to resonances between the accretion column and the driving modes of the boundary layer.

  12. Noninvasive Measurement of Central Vascular Pressures With Arterial Tonometry: Clinical Revival of the Pulse Pressure Waveform?

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Matthew R.; Stepanek, Jan; Cevette, Michael; Covalciuc, Michael; Hurst, R. Todd; Tajik, A. Jamil

    2010-01-01

    The arterial pulse has historically been an essential source of information in the clinical assessment of health. With current sphygmomanometric and oscillometric devices, only the peak and trough of the peripheral arterial pulse waveform are clinically used. Several limitations exist with peripheral blood pressure. First, central aortic pressure is a better predictor of cardiovascular outcome than peripheral pressure. Second, peripherally obtained blood pressure does not accurately reflect central pressure because of pressure amplification. Lastly, antihypertensive medications have differing effects on central pressures despite similar reductions in brachial blood pressure. Applanation tonometry can overcome the limitations of peripheral pressure by determining the shape of the aortic waveform from the radial artery. Waveform analysis not only indicates central systolic and diastolic pressure but also determines the influence of pulse wave reflection on the central pressure waveform. It can serve as a useful adjunct to brachial blood pressure measurements in initiating and monitoring hypertensive treatment, in observing the hemodynamic effects of atherosclerotic risk factors, and in predicting cardiovascular outcomes and events. Radial artery applanation tonometry is a noninvasive, reproducible, and affordable technology that can be used in conjunction with peripherally obtained blood pressure to guide patient management. Keywords for the PubMed search were applanation tonometry, radial artery, central pressure, cardiovascular risk, blood pressure, and arterial pulse. Articles published from January 1, 1995, to July 1, 2009, were included in the review if they measured central pressure using radial artery applanation tonometry. PMID:20435839

  13. Differential pulse amplitude modulation for multiple-input single-output OWVLC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, S. H.; Kwon, D. H.; Kim, S. J.; Son, Y. H.; Han, S. K.

    2015-01-01

    White light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are widely used for lighting due to their energy efficiency, eco-friendly, and small size than previously light sources such as incandescent, fluorescent bulbs and so on. Optical wireless visible light communication (OWVLC) based on LED merges lighting and communications in applications such as indoor lighting, traffic signals, vehicles, and underwater communications because LED can be easily modulated. However, physical bandwidth of LED is limited about several MHz by slow time constant of the phosphor and characteristics of device. Therefore, using the simplest modulation format which is non-return-zero on-off-keying (NRZ-OOK), the data rate reaches only to dozens Mbit/s. Thus, to improve the transmission capacity, optical filtering and pre-, post-equalizer are adapted. Also, high-speed wireless connectivity is implemented using spectrally efficient modulation methods: orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) or discrete multi-tone (DMT). However, these modulation methods need additional digital signal processing such as FFT and IFFT, thus complexity of transmitter and receiver is increasing. To reduce the complexity of transmitter and receiver, we proposed a novel modulation scheme which is named differential pulse amplitude modulation. The proposed modulation scheme transmits different NRZ-OOK signals with same amplitude and unit time delay using each LED chip, respectively. The `N' parallel signals from LEDs are overlapped and directly detected at optical receiver. Received signal is demodulated by power difference between unit time slots. The proposed scheme can overcome the bandwidth limitation of LEDs and data rate can be improved according to number of LEDs without complex digital signal processing.

  14. Resolving the contribution of the uncoupled phycobilisomes to cyanobacterial pulse-amplitude modulated (PAM) fluorometry signals.

    PubMed

    Acuña, Alonso M; Snellenburg, Joris J; Gwizdala, Michal; Kirilovsky, Diana; van Grondelle, Rienk; van Stokkum, Ivo H M

    2016-01-01

    Pulse-amplitude modulated (PAM) fluorometry is extensively used to characterize photosynthetic organisms on the slow time-scale (1-1000 s). The saturation pulse method allows determination of the quantum yields of maximal (F(M)) and minimal fluorescence (F(0)), parameters related to the activity of the photosynthetic apparatus. Also, when the sample undergoes a certain light treatment during the measurement, the fluorescence quantum yields of the unquenched and the quenched states can be determined. In the case of cyanobacteria, however, the recorded fluorescence does not exclusively stem from the chlorophyll a in photosystem II (PSII). The phycobilins, the pigments of the cyanobacterial light-harvesting complexes, the phycobilisomes (PB), also contribute to the PAM signal, and therefore, F(0) and F(M) are no longer related to PSII only. We present a functional model that takes into account the presence of several fluorescent species whose concentrations can be resolved provided their fluorescence quantum yields are known. Data analysis of PAM measurements on in vivo cells of our model organism Synechocystis PCC6803 is discussed. Three different components are found necessary to fit the data: uncoupled PB (PB(free)), PB-PSII complexes, and free PSI. The free PSII contribution was negligible. The PB(free) contribution substantially increased in the mutants that lack the core terminal emitter subunits allophycocyanin D or allophycocyanin F. A positive correlation was found between the amount of PB(free) and the rate constants describing the binding of the activated orange carotenoid protein to PB, responsible for non-photochemical quenching.

  15. Pulse pressure amplification in relation to body fatness

    PubMed Central

    Wykretowicz, Andrzej; Rutkowska, Agnieszka; Krauze, Tomasz; Przymuszala, Dagmara; Guzik, Przemyslaw; Marciniak, Ryszard; Wysocki, Henryk

    2012-01-01

    AIMS Arterial pressure transfer to the periphery is accompanied by pulse pressure amplification (PPA). Pulse pressure is influence by body fat. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate any possible inter-relation between body fatness and PPA in healthy subjects. METHODS Haemodynamic and wave reflection indices were estimated by pulse wave analysis. Body fat was measured by bio-impedance. RESULTS A total of 367 healthy volunteers (136 men and 231 women) was studied. Pulse pressure amplification correlated significantly with percentage of body fat (r = −0.53, P < 0.0001), age (r = −0.62, P < 0.0001), height (r = 0.43, P < 0.0001), heart rate (r = 0.28, P < 0.0001) and mean blood pressure (r = −0.29, P < 0.0001). The association of PPA with body fat was also significant in a multiple linear regression model. Age was an independent predictor of PPA and analysis of study subjects subdivided into two groups, those <50 years and those >50 years showed that body fatness correlated inversely and significantly with PPA in individuals both younger and older than 50 years (r = −0.44, P < 0.0001, r = −0.37, P < 0.0001 respectively). Augmentation pressure was also associated significantly with percentage of body fat in both subgroups (r = 0.48, P < 0.0001 and r = 0.49, P < 0.0001 respectively). CONCLUSIONS This study performed on healthy subjects showed that pulse pressure amplification is related to body fatness over a wide age range. Percentage body fat is significantly associated with augmentation pressure, a component of central pulse pressure. PMID:22008022

  16. Single-cycle Terahertz Pulses with >0.2 V/A Field Amplitudes via Coherent Transition Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Daranciang, Dan; Goodfellow, John; Fuchs, Matthias; Wen, Haidan; Ghimire, Shambhu; Reis, David A.; Loos, Henrik; Fisher, Alan S.; Lindenberg, Aaron M.; /Stanford U. Materials Sci. Dept. /SIMES, Stanford /SLAC, PULSE

    2012-02-15

    We demonstrate terahertz pulses with field amplitudes exceeding 0.2 V/{angstrom} generated by coherent transition radiation. Femtosecond, relativistic electron bunches generated at the Linac Coherent Light Source are passed through a beryllium foil, and the emitted radiation is characterized as a function of the bunch duration and charge. Broadband pulses centered at a frequency of 10 THz with energies of 140 {mu}J are measured. These far-below-bandgap pulses drive a nonlinear optical response in a silicon photodiode, with which we perform nonlinear autocorrelations that yield information regarding the terahertz temporal profile. Simulations of the spatiotemporal profile agree well with experimental results.

  17. Method for Estimating the Acoustic Pressure in Tissues Using Low-Amplitude Measurements in Water.

    PubMed

    Keravnou, Christina P; Izamis, Maria-Louisa; Averkiou, Michalakis A

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate a simple, reliable and reproducible method for accuracy in estimating the acoustic pressure delivered in tissue exposed to ultrasound. Such a method would be useful for therapeutic applications of ultrasound with microbubbles, for example, sonoporation. The method is based on (i) low-amplitude water measurements that are easily made and do not suffer from non-linear propagation effects, and (ii) the attenuation coefficient of the tissue of interest. The range of validity of the extrapolation method for different attenuation and pressure values was evaluated with a non-linear propagation theoretical model. Depending on the specific tissue attenuation, the method produces good estimates of pressures in excess of 10 MPa. Ex vivo machine-perfused pig liver tissue was used to validate the method for source pressures up to 3.5 MPa. The method can be used to estimate the delivered pressure in vivo in diagnostic and therapeutic applications of ultrasound.

  18. Interrelation between external oscillatory muscle coupling amplitude and in vivo intramedullary pressure related bone adaptation.

    PubMed

    Hu, Minyi; Cheng, Jiqi; Bethel, Neville; Serra-Hsu, Frederick; Ferreri, Suzanne; Lin, Liangjun; Qin, Yi-Xian

    2014-09-01

    Interstitial bone fluid flow (IBFF) is suggested as a communication medium that bridges external physical signals and internal cellular activities in the bone, which thus regulates bone remodeling. Intramedullary pressure (ImP) is one main regulatory factor of IBFF and bone adaptation related mechanotransduction. Our group has recently observed that dynamic hydraulic stimulation (DHS), as an external oscillatory muscle coupling, was able to induce local ImP with minimal bone strain as well as to mitigate disuse bone loss. The current study aimed to evaluate the dose dependent relationship between DHS's amplitude, i.e., 15 and 30mmHg, and in vivo ImP induction, as well as this correlation on bone's phenotypic change. Simultaneous measurements of ImP and DHS cuff pressures were obtained from rats under DHS with various magnitudes and a constant frequency of 2Hz. ImP inductions and cuff pressures upon DHS loading showed a positively proportional response over the amplitude sweep. The relationship between ImP and DHS cuff pressure was evaluated and shown to be proportional, in which ImP was raised with increases of DHS cuff pressure amplitudes (R(2)=0.98). A 4-week in vivo experiment using a rat hindlimb suspension model demonstrated that the mitigation effect of DHS on disuse trabecular bone was highly dose dependent and related to DHS's amplitude, where a higher ImP led to a higher bone volume. This study suggested that sufficient physiological DHS is needed to generate ImP. Oscillatory DHS, potentially induces local fluid flow, has shown dose dependence in attenuation of disuse osteopenia.

  19. Fuzzy control with amplitude/pulse-width modulation of nerve electrical stimulation for muscle force control.

    PubMed

    Lin, C-C K; Liu, W-C; Chan, C-C; Ju, M-S

    2012-04-01

    The main goal of this study was to study the performance of fuzzy logic controllers combined with simplified hybrid amplitude/pulse-width (AM/PW) modulation to regulate muscle force via nerve electrical stimulation. The recruitment curves with AM/PW and AM modulations were constructed for the calf muscles of rabbits. Integrated with the modulation methods, a proportional-integral-derivative (PID) and three fuzzy logic controllers were designed and applied for the electrical stimulation of tibial nerves to control the ankle torque under isometric conditions. The performance of the two modulation methods combined with the four controllers was compared when the ankle was fixed at three positions for both in vivo experiments and model simulations using a nonlinear muscle model. For the animal experiments, AM/PW modulation performed better than AM modulation alone. The fuzzy PI controller performed marginally better and was resistant to external noises, though it tended to have a larger overshoot. The performance of the controllers had a similar trend in the three different joint positions, and the simulation results with the nonlinear model matched the experimental results well. In conclusion, AM/PW modulation improved controller performance, while the contribution of fuzzy logic was only marginal.

  20. Ozone formation in pulsed SDBD in a wide pressure range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starikovskiy, Andrey; Nudnova, Maryia; mipt Team

    2011-10-01

    Ozone concentration in surface anode-directed DBD for wide pressure range (150 - 1300 torr) was experimentally measured. Voltage and pressure effect were investigated. Reduced electric field was measured for anode-directed and cathode-directed SDBD. E/n values in cathode-directed SDBD is higher than in cathode-directed on 50 percent at atmospheric pressure. E/n value increase leads to decrease the rate of oxygen dissociation and Ozone formation at lower pressures. Radiating region thickness of sliding discharge was measured. Typical thickness of radiating zone is 0.4-1.0 mm within pressure range 220-740 torr. It was shown that high-voltage pulsed nanosecond discharge due to high E/n value produces less Ozone with compare to other discharges. Kinetic model was proposed to describe Ozone formation in the pulsed nanosecond SDBD.

  1. Spatio-temporal characteristics of Trichel pulse at low pressure

    SciTech Connect

    He, Shoujie; Jing, Ha

    2014-01-15

    Trichel pulses are investigated using a needle-to-plane electrode geometry at low pressure. The evolution of current and voltage, the spatio-temporal discharge images of Trichel pulse are measured. The rising time and duration time in a pulse are about 10 μs and several tens of microseconds, respectively. One period of pulse can be divided into three stages: the stage preceding cathode breakdown, cathode glow formation, and discharge decaying process. Besides a cathode glow and a dark space, an anode glow is also observed. The emission spectra mainly originate from the C{sup 3}Π{sub u} → B{sup 3}Π{sub g} transition for nitrogen. In addition, the capacitances in parallel connected with the discharge cell have important influence on the pulsing frequency.

  2. Predictions of psychophysical measurements for sinusoidal amplitude modulated (SAM) pulse-train stimuli from a stochastic model.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yifang; Collins, Leslie M

    2007-08-01

    Two approaches have been proposed to reduce the synchrony of the neural response to electrical stimuli in cochlear implants. One approach involves adding noise to the pulse-train stimulus, and the other is based on using a high-rate pulse-train carrier. Hypotheses regarding the efficacy of the two approaches can be tested using computational models of neural responsiveness prior to time-intensive psychophysical studies. In our previous work, we have used such models to examine the effects of noise on several psychophysical measures important to speech recognition. However, to date there has been no parallel analytic solution investigating the neural response to the high-rate pulse-train stimuli and their effect on psychophysical measures. This work investigates the properties of the neural response to high-rate pulse-train stimuli with amplitude modulated envelopes using a stochastic auditory nerve model. The statistics governing the neural response to each pulse are derived using a recursive method. The agreement between the theoretical predictions and model simulations is demonstrated for sinusoidal amplitude modulated (SAM) high rate pulse-train stimuli. With our approach, predicting the neural response in modern implant devices becomes tractable. Psychophysical measurements are also predicted using the stochastic auditory nerve model for SAM high-rate pulse-train stimuli. Changes in dynamic range (DR) and intensity discrimination are compared with that observed for noise-modulated pulse-train stimuli. Modulation frequency discrimination is also studied as a function of stimulus level and pulse rate. Results suggest that high rate carriers may positively impact such psychophysical measures.

  3. Subnanosecond pulsed X-ray source based on nanosecond discharge in air at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostyrya, I. D.; Tarasenko, V. F.

    2009-06-01

    We have studied the characteristics of an X-ray source based on a gas diode filled with air at atmospheric pressure. Driven by a SLEP-150 pulser with a maximum voltage amplitude of ˜140 kV, a pulse full width at half maximum (FWHM) of ˜1 ns, and a leading front width of ˜0.3 ns, a soft X-ray source produces subnanosecond pulses with an FWHM not exceeding 600 ps and an exposure dose of ˜3 mR per pulse. It is shown that the main contribution to the measured exposure dose is due to X-ray quanta with an effective energy of ˜7.5 keV.

  4. Subharmonic scattering of phospholipid-shell microbubbles at low acoustic pressure amplitudes.

    PubMed

    Frinking, Peter J A; Brochot, Jean; Arditi, Marcel

    2010-08-01

    Subharmonic scattering of phospholipid-shell microbubbles excited at relatively low acoustic pressure amplitudes (<30 kPa) has been associated with echo responses from compression-only bubbles having initial surface tension values close to zero. In this work, the relation between sbharmonics and compression-only behavior of phospholipid-shell microbubbles was investigated, experimentally and by simulation, as a function of the initial surface tension by applying ambient overpressures of 0 and 180 mmHg. The microbubbles were excited using a 64-cycle transmit burst with a center frequency of 4 MHz and peak-negative pressure amplitudes ranging from 20 of 150 kPa. In these conditions, an increase in subharmonic response of 28.9 dB (P < 0.05) was measured at 50 kPa after applying an overpressure of 180 mmHg. Simulations using the Marmottant model, taking into account the effect of ambient overpressure on bubble size and initial surface tension, confirmed the relation between subharmonics observed in the pressure-time curves and compression-only behavior observed in the radius-time curves. The trend of an increase in subharmonic response as a function of ambient overpressure, i.e., as a function of the initial surface tension, was predicted by the model. Subharmonics present in the echo responses of phospholipid-shell microbubbles excited at low acoustic pressure amplitudes are indeed related to the echo responses from compression-only bubbles. The increase in subharmonics as a function of ambient overpressure may be exploited for improving methods for noninvasive pressure measurement in heart cavities or big vessels in the human body.

  5. Abnormal Central Pulsatile Hemodynamics in Adolescents With Obesity: Higher Aortic Forward Pressure Wave Amplitude Is Independently Associated With Greater Left Ventricular Mass.

    PubMed

    Pierce, Gary L; Pajaniappan, Mohanasundari; DiPietro, Amy; Darracott-Woei-A-Sack, Kathryn; Kapuku, Gaston K

    2016-11-01

    We hypothesized that increased aortic forward pressure wave amplitude (Pf), which is determined by characteristic impedance (Zc) in the proximal aorta, is the primary hemodynamic determinant of obesity-associated higher left ventricular (LV) mass in adolescents. Aortic pulsatile hemodynamics were measured noninvasively in 60 healthy adolescents (age 14-19 years; 42% male; 50% black) by sequential recordings of pulse waveforms via tonometry, brachial blood pressure, and pulsed Doppler and diameter of the LV outflow tract using 2-dimensional echocardiography. Adolescents who were overweight/obese (n=23; age 16.0±0.3 years; body mass index ≥85th percentile) had higher LV mass index, brachial and carotid systolic blood pressure and pulse pressure, normalized Zc and Pf compared with adolescents with healthy weight (n=37; 16.7±0.3 years; body mass index <85th percentile, all P<0.01). In contrast, there was no difference in mean or diastolic blood pressure, carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity, carotid augmentation index, or aortic backward wave amplitude (all P>0.05). Stepwise multiple linear regression analysis that included age, sex, race, normalized Zc, and brachial systolic blood pressure revealed that body mass index (B±SE; 0.49±0.20, P=0.02, R(2)=0.26), aortic Pf (0.22±0.07; P<0.02, R(2) change=0.11), and cardiac output (2.82±1.02, P<0.01; R(2) change=0.08) were significant correlates of LV mass index (total R(2)=0.44, P<0.01). These findings suggest that higher aortic Pf is a major hemodynamic determinant of increased LV mass in adolescents with elevated adiposity. Improper matching between aortic diameter and pulsatile flow during early systole potentially contributes to the early development of LV hypertrophy in childhood obesity.

  6. Sensitivity evaluation of the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii to uranium by pulse amplitude modulated (PAM) fluorometry.

    PubMed

    Herlory, Olivier; Bonzom, Jean-Marc; Gilbin, Rodolphe

    2013-09-15

    Although ecotoxicological studies tend to address the toxicity thresholds of uranium in freshwaters, there is a lack of information on the effects of the metal on physiological processes, particularly in aquatic plants. Knowing that uranium alters photosynthesis via impairment of the water photo-oxidation process, we determined whether pulse amplitude modulated (PAM) fluorometry was a relevant tool for assessing the impact of uranium on the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and investigated how and to what extent uranium hampered photosynthetic performance. Photosynthetic activity and quenching were assessed from fluorescence induction curves generated by PAM fluorometry, after 1 and 5h of uranium exposure in controlled conditions. The oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) of PSII was identified as the primary action site of uranium, through alteration of the water photo-oxidation process as revealed by F0/Fv. Limiting re-oxidation of the plastoquinone pool, uranium impaired the electron flux between the photosystems until almost complete inhibition of the PSII quantum efficiency ( [Formula: see text] , EC50=303 ± 64 μg UL(-1) after 5h of exposure) was observed. Non-photochemical quenching (qN) was identified as the most sensitive fluorescence parameter (EC50=142 ± 98 μg UL(-1) after 5h of exposure), indicating that light energy not used in photochemistry was dissipated in non-radiative processes. It was shown that parameters which stemmed from fluorescence induction kinetics are valuable indicators for evaluating the impact of uranium on PSII in green algae. PAM fluorometry provided a rapid and reasonably sensitive method for assessing stress response to uranium in microalgae.

  7. Ocular pulse amplitude as a diagnostic adjunct in giant cell arteritis

    PubMed Central

    Knecht, P B; Bachmann, L M; Thiel, M A; Landau, K; Kaufmann, C

    2015-01-01

    Background To develop an algorithm based on the ocular pulse amplitude (OPA) to predict the probability of a positive temporal artery biopsy (TAB) result in the acute phase of suspected giant cell arteritis (GCA). Methods Unilateral TAB was performed and ipsilateral OPA measurements were taken by Dynamic Contour Tonometry. Among the clinical signs and laboratory findings tested in univariate analyses, OPA, Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate (ESR) and thrombocyte count showed a strong association with a positive TAB result. Algorithm parameters were categorized into three groups (OPA >3.5, 2.5–3.5, and <2.5 mm Hg; ESR <25, 25–60, and >60 mm/h; thrombocyte count <250'000, 250'000–500'000, and >500'000/μl). Score values (0, 1, and 2) were attributed to each group, resulting in a total score range from 0 to 6. A univariate logistic regression analysis using the GCA diagnosis as the dependent and the total score as the independent variate was fitted and probability estimates were calculated. Results Thirty-one patients with suspected GCA undergoing TAB during an eighteen-month observation period were enrolled. Twenty patients showed histologically proven GCA. Four patients had score values ≤2, fourteen between 3 and 4, and thirteen of ≥5. The corresponding estimated probabilities of GCA were<7, 52.6, and >95%. Conclusion The present study confirms previous findings of reduced OPA levels, elevated ESR, and elevated thrombocyte counts in GCA. It indicates that a sum score based on OPA, ESR, and thrombocyte count can be helpful in predicting TAB results, especially at the upper and the lower end of the sum score range. PMID:26088675

  8. Measurement of pulse pressure in plasma by crusher gauge

    SciTech Connect

    Kalachnikov, E.V.; Rogovtsev, P.N.

    1988-06-01

    Results are presented of pressure measurements in the plasma of a stabilized pinched discharge with axial blow through of the current channel by plasma using static and dynamic methods for crusher gauge calibration. Accuracies for maximum pressure measurements for both calibration methods are evaluated. The dynamic properties of the crusher gauge are taken into account experimentally in studying pulse forces and pressures in the 1-100 MPa range for times of 10/sup /minus/5/ to 10/sup /minus/3/ seconds. A piezoelectric method and device for dynamic calibration of the pressure gauges is described.

  9. Pulse Rise Time Characterization of a High Pressure Xenon Gamma Detector for use in Resolution Enhancement

    SciTech Connect

    TROYER, G.L.

    2000-08-25

    High pressure xenon ionization chamber detectors are possible alternatives to traditional thallium doped sodium iodide (NaI(Tl)) and hyperpure germanium as gamma spectrometers in certain applications. Xenon detectors incorporating a Frisch grid exhibit energy resolutions comparable to cadmium/zinc/telluride (CZT) (e.g. 2% {at} 662keV) but with far greater sensitive volumes. The Frisch grid reduces the position dependence of the anode pulse risetimes, but it also increases the detector vibration sensitivity, anode capacitance, voltage requirements and mechanical complexity. We have been investigating the possibility of eliminating the grid electrode in high-pressure xenon detectors and preserving the high energy resolution using electronic risetime compensation methods. A two-electrode cylindrical high pressure xenon gamma detector coupled to time-to-amplitude conversion electronics was used to characterize the pulse rise time of deposited gamma photons. Time discrimination was used to characterize the pulse rise time versus photo peak position and resolution. These data were collected to investigate the effect of pulse rise time compensation on resolution and efficiency.

  10. An experimental study of the interaction between a pulsed electron beam and a large-amplitude electromagnetic wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalinin, Yu. A.; Starodubov, A. V.; Fokin, A. S.

    2015-01-01

    We experimentally investigate the interaction between an electron beam with a periodically varying diameter and a large-amplitude electromagnetic wave. The effect of different factors on the pulsed beam formation and current density in bunches is established. Compared with the electron beam deceleration circuits (low-voltage vircator systems), the generators based on pulsed turbulent beams have a broader band due to the formation of a large number of space charge bunches and an integral power efficiency that is higher by a factor of 2-2.5.

  11. Single pulse analysis of intracranial pressure for a hydrocephalus implant.

    PubMed

    Elixmann, I M; Hansinger, J; Goffin, C; Antes, S; Radermacher, K; Leonhardt, S

    2012-01-01

    The intracranial pressure (ICP) waveform contains important diagnostic information. Changes in ICP are associated with changes of the pulse waveform. This change has explicitly been observed in 13 infusion tests by analyzing 100 Hz ICP data. An algorithm is proposed which automatically extracts the pulse waves and categorizes them into predefined patterns. A developed algorithm determined 88 %±8 % (mean ±SD) of all classified pulse waves correctly on predefined patterns. This algorithm has low computational cost and is independent of a pressure drift in the sensor by using only the relationship between special waveform characteristics. Hence, it could be implemented on a microcontroller of a future electromechanic hydrocephalus shunt system to control the drainage of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF).

  12. Modeling the pressure pulse shape of piezoelectric lithotripters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dreyer, Thomas; Riedlinger, Rainer

    2002-11-01

    Piezoelectric focusing transducers are widely used in extracorporeal lithotripsy. To optimize the therapeutically relevant focal pressure pulse it is necessary to affect the generated pulse shape at the transducer surface. Therefore a modeling approach is required containing the acousto-mechanical properties of the transducer structure as well as the influence of the electrical drive. The procedure presented here uses three dimensional transient finite element simulations to calculate an electro-acoustical impulse response of the transducer structure and linear systems theory to model the influence of the driving circuit on the emitted acoustical signal. Applying a short electrical pulse an acoustical impulse response can be simulated under plane wave conditions, which is valid at sufficiently large distances from the transducer. Focal pressures are estimated rapidly by linear calculations or accurately by a nonlinear propagation model. The influence of electrical drive conditions on the emitted acoustical signal is investigated very efficiently by a convolution with the desired electrical input, avoiding FEM simulations for each case. Reverting this process the required driving voltage course for a given pressure signal is determined. Alterations of the pressure signal in terms of pulse width and tensile components are demonstrated theoretically, varying the design parameters of the transducer.

  13. Time-resolved pulsed spray drop sizing at elevated pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drallmeier, J. A.; Peters, J. E.

    1986-04-01

    An experimental program was conducted to measure drop sizes in pulsed sprays for diesel and fuel-injected spark ignition engine applications. A forward-scattering unit was designed with a high-speed data acquisition system to permit the measurement of drop sizes in sprays at 0.4-ms intervals. Data were taken at elevated pressures from 0.345 to 3.45 MPa with a 0-deg pintle nozzle. The Sauter Mean Diameter (SMD) and size distribution were calculated using a computational method that is independent of a predetermined distribution function. Results taken at the spray centerline indicate that for most elevated pressures, the SMD in the secondary injection region tended to increase as the pressure in the fuel line decreased and tended to increase with increasing environmental pressure, both suggesting an inverse relationship between drop size and the pressure drop across the nozzle. Also as the environmental pressure was raised, the distribution width decreased at a slower rate than the SMD increased, indicating a spreading of the drop sizes with injection time at elevated pressures. Significant cycle-to-cycle variation in both the SMD and distribution width indicate that cycle-to-cycle variations must be considered in pulsed sprays. In addition, more variation was seen between random rather than consecutive cycles.

  14. A search for upstream pressure pulses associated with flux transfer events: An AMPTE/ISEE case study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elphic, R. C.; Baumjohann, W.; Cattell, C. A.; Luehr, H.; Smith, M. F.

    1994-01-01

    On September 19, 1984, the Active Magnetospheric Particle Tracers Explorers (AMPTE) United Kingdom Satellite (UKS) and Ion Release Module (IRM) and International Sun Earth Explorers (ISEE) 1 and 2 spacecraft passed outbound through the dayside magnetopause at about the same time. The AMPTE spacecraft pair crossed first and were in the near-subsolar magnetosheath for more than an hour. Meanwhile the ISEE pair, about 5 R(sub E) to the south, observed flux transfer event (FTE) signatures. We use the AMPTE UKS and IRM plasma and field observations of magnetosheath conditions directly upstream of the subsolar magnetopause to check whether pressure pulses are responsible for the FTE signatures seen at ISEE. Pulses in both the ion thermal pressure and the dynamic pressure are observed in the magnetosheath early on when IRM and UKS are close to the magnetopause, but not later. These large pulses appear to be related to reconnection going on at the magnetopause nearby. AMPTE magnetosheath data far from the magnetopause do not show a pressure pulse correlation with FTEs at ISEE. Moreover, the magnetic pressure and tension effects seen in the ISEE FTEs are much larger than any pressure effects seen in the magnetosheath. A superposed epoch analysis based on small-amplitude peaks in the AMPTE magnetosheath total static pressure (nkT + B(exp 2)/2 mu(sub 0)) hint at some boundary effects, less than 5 nT peak-to-peak variations in the ISEE 1 and 2 B(sub N) signature starting about 1 min after the pressure peak epoch. However, these variations are much smaller than the standard deviations of the B(sub N) field component. Thus the evidence from this case study suggests that upstream magnetosheath pressure pulses do not give rise to FTEs, but may produce very small amplitude signatures in the magnetic field at the magnetopause.

  15. A novel measuring implementation of femtosecond pulse amplitude and phase based on frequency-resolved optical gating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chunping; Ruan, Shuang-chen; Liu, Chengxiang; Long, Jinhua

    2005-01-01

    A novel measuring implementation based on second-harmonic generation frequency-resolved optical gating (SHG-FROG) has been presented. Both the intensity and phase of arbitrary-shaped ultra-short laser pulses can be got. According to SHG-FROG, the femtosecond pulse produced by a laser resource is split into two beams which variable time delay one another is controlled by a stepped electromotor. The second-harmonic signal field is generated by focusing these two beams to a 100um BBO crystal. Changing the delay from 0 to N (N is the samples number of time domain or frequency domain) delay units, the two-dimensional spectrum data of the second-harmonic signal field are acquired by PC2000-ISA card spectrometer and OOIwinIP of Ocean Optics. These data are provided to a pulse amplitude and phase retrieval algorithm to retrieve the parameters of the pulse. An experimental system is erected and the all software modules, including spectrum data acquiring, pulse retrieving and displaying, are based on Labwindows/CVI of National Instrument Corp. The stepped electromotor is driven by the commands coming from RS-232 interface. The results show that after 50 times iterations or so, the iterative error of the algorithm can be reduced to an enough small value and then the pulse amplitude, phase and other parameters are the desired parameters. The whole measuring process can be finished in 2~3 seconds while the spectrum data is a 64x64 matrix and the iterative times are set to 50.

  16. Augmentation pressure is influenced by ventricular contractility/relaxation dynamics: novel mechanism of reduction of pulse pressure by nitrates.

    PubMed

    Fok, Henry; Guilcher, Antoine; Li, Ye; Brett, Sally; Shah, Ajay; Clapp, Brian; Chowienczyk, Phil

    2014-05-01

    Augmentation pressure (AP), the increment in aortic pressure above its first systolic shoulder, is thought to be determined mainly by pressure wave reflection but could be influenced by ventricular ejection characteristics. We sought to determine the mechanism by which AP is selectively reduced by nitroglycerin (NTG). Simultaneous measurements of aortic pressure and flow were made at the time of cardiac catheterization in 30 subjects (11 women; age, 61±13 years [mean±SD]) to perform wave intensity analysis and calculate forward and backward components of AP generated by the ventricle and arterial tree, respectively. Measurements were made at baseline and after NTG given systemically (800 μg sublingually, n=20) and locally by intracoronary infusion (1 μg/min; n=10). Systemic NTG had no significant effect on first shoulder pressure but reduced augmentation (and central pulse pressure) by 12.8±3.1 mm Hg (P<0.0001). This resulted from a reduction in forward and backward wave components of AP by 7.0±2.4 and 5.8±1.3 mm Hg, respectively (each P<0.02). NTG had no significant effect on the ratio of amplitudes of either backward/forward waves or backward/forward compression wave energies, suggesting that effects on the backward wave were largely secondary to those on the forward wave. Time to the forward expansion wave was reduced (P<0.05). Intracoronary NTG decreased AP by 8.3±3.6 mm Hg (P<0.05) with no significant effect on the backward wave. NTG reduces AP and central pulse pressure by a mechanism that is, at least in part, independent of arterial reflections and relates to ventricular contraction/relaxation dynamics with enhanced myocardial relaxation.

  17. Can the use of pulsed direct current induce oscillation in the applied pressure during spark plasma sintering?

    PubMed

    Salamon, David; Eriksson, Mirva; Nygren, Mats; Shen, Zhijian

    2012-02-01

    The spark plasma sintering (SPS) process is known for its rapid densification of metals and ceramics. The mechanism behind this rapid densification has been discussed during the last few decades and is yet uncertain. During our SPS experiments we noticed oscillations in the applied pressure, related to a change in electric current. In this study, we investigated the effect of pulsed electrical current on the applied mechanical pressure and related changes in temperature. We eliminated the effect of sample shrinkage in the SPS setup and used a transparent quartz die allowing direct observation of the sample. We found that the use of pulsed direct electric current in our apparatus induces pressure oscillations with the amplitude depending on the current density. While sintering Ti samples we observed temperature oscillations resulting from pressure oscillations, which we attribute to magnetic forces generated within the SPS apparatus. The described current-pressure-temperature relations might increase understanding of the SPS process.

  18. Mapping cerebral pulse pressure and arterial compliance over the adult lifespan with optical imaging

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Chin Hong; Low, Kathy A.; Kong, Tania; Fletcher, Mark A.; Zimmerman, Benjamin; Maclin, Edward L.; Chiarelli, Antonio M.; Gratton, Gabriele

    2017-01-01

    Cerebrovascular health is important for maintaining a high level of cognitive performance, not only in old age, but also throughout the lifespan. Recently, it was first demonstrated that diffuse optical imaging measures of pulse amplitude and arterial compliance can provide estimates of cerebral arterial health throughout the cortex, and were associated with age, estimated cardiorespiratory fitness (eCRF), neuroanatomy and cognitive function in older adults (aged 55–87). The current study replicates and extends the original findings using a broader age range (a new adult sample aged 18–75), longer recording periods (360 s), and a more extensive optical montage (1536 channels). These methodological improvements represent a 5-fold increase in recording time and a 4-fold increase in coverage compared to the initial study. Results show that reliability for both pulse amplitude and compliance measures across recording blocks was very high (r(45) = .99 and .75, respectively). Pulse amplitude and pulse pressure were shown to correlate with age across the broader age range. We also found correlations between arterial health and both cortical and subcortical gray matter volumes. Additionally, we replicated the correlations between arterial compliance and age, eCRF, global brain atrophy, and cognitive flexibility. New regional analyses revealed that higher performance on the operation span (OSPAN) working memory task was associated with greater localized arterial compliance in frontoparietal cortex, but not with global arterial compliance. Further, greater arterial compliance in frontoparietal regions was associated with younger age and higher eCRF. These associations were not present in the visual cortex. The current study not only replicates the initial one in a sample including a much wider age range, but also provides new evidence showing that frontoparietal regions may be especially vulnerable to vascular degeneration during brain aging, with potential functional

  19. Mapping cerebral pulse pressure and arterial compliance over the adult lifespan with optical imaging.

    PubMed

    Tan, Chin Hong; Low, Kathy A; Kong, Tania; Fletcher, Mark A; Zimmerman, Benjamin; Maclin, Edward L; Chiarelli, Antonio M; Gratton, Gabriele; Fabiani, Monica

    2017-01-01

    Cerebrovascular health is important for maintaining a high level of cognitive performance, not only in old age, but also throughout the lifespan. Recently, it was first demonstrated that diffuse optical imaging measures of pulse amplitude and arterial compliance can provide estimates of cerebral arterial health throughout the cortex, and were associated with age, estimated cardiorespiratory fitness (eCRF), neuroanatomy and cognitive function in older adults (aged 55-87). The current study replicates and extends the original findings using a broader age range (a new adult sample aged 18-75), longer recording periods (360 s), and a more extensive optical montage (1536 channels). These methodological improvements represent a 5-fold increase in recording time and a 4-fold increase in coverage compared to the initial study. Results show that reliability for both pulse amplitude and compliance measures across recording blocks was very high (r(45) = .99 and .75, respectively). Pulse amplitude and pulse pressure were shown to correlate with age across the broader age range. We also found correlations between arterial health and both cortical and subcortical gray matter volumes. Additionally, we replicated the correlations between arterial compliance and age, eCRF, global brain atrophy, and cognitive flexibility. New regional analyses revealed that higher performance on the operation span (OSPAN) working memory task was associated with greater localized arterial compliance in frontoparietal cortex, but not with global arterial compliance. Further, greater arterial compliance in frontoparietal regions was associated with younger age and higher eCRF. These associations were not present in the visual cortex. The current study not only replicates the initial one in a sample including a much wider age range, but also provides new evidence showing that frontoparietal regions may be especially vulnerable to vascular degeneration during brain aging, with potential functional

  20. Generation of very high pressure pulses with 1-bit time reversal in a solid waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montaldo, Gabriel; Roux, Phillippe; Derode, Arnaud; Negreira, Carlos; Fink, Mathias

    2001-12-01

    The use of piezoelectric transducer arrays has opened up the possibility of electronic steering and focusing of acoustic beams to track kidney stones. However, owing to the limited pressure delivered by each transducer (typically 10 bar), the number of transducers needed to reach an amplitude at the focus on the order of 1000 bars is typically of some hundreds of elements. We present here a new solution based on 1-bit time reversal in a solid waveguide to obtain, with a small number of transducers, a very high amplitude pulse in tissues located in front of the waveguide. The idea is to take advantage of the temporal dispersion in the waveguide to create, after time reversal, a temporally recompressed pulse with a stronger amplitude. The aim of this work is threefold: first, we experimentally demonstrate 1-bit time reversal between a point source in water and several transducers fastened to one section of a finite-length cylindrical waveguide. Second, we numerically and experimentally study the temporal and spatial focusing at the source as a function of the characteristics of the ``solid waveguide-time reversal mirror (TRM)'' system: length and diameter of the guide, number of transducers of the TRM. Last, we show that the instantaneous power delivered in water at the focus of the solid waveguide is much higher than the power directly transmitted into water from a classically focused transducer. The combination of 1-bit time reversal and a solid waveguide leads to shock wave lithotripsy with low-power electronics.

  1. CAVITATION DAMAGE STUDY VIA A NOVEL REPETITIVE PRESSURE PULSE APPROACH

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jy-An John; Ren, Fei; Wang, Hong

    2010-01-01

    Cavitation damage can significantly affect system performance. Thus, there is great interest in characterizing cavitation damage and improving materials resistance to cavitation damage. In this paper, we present a novel methodology to simulate cavitation environment. A pulsed laser is utilized to induce optical breakdown in the cavitation media, with the emission of shock wave and the generation of bubbles. The pressure waves induced by the optical breakdown fluctuate/propagate within the media, which enables the cavitation to occur and to further develop cavitation damage at the solid boundary. Using the repetitive pulsed-pressure apparatus developed in the current study, cavitation damage in water media was verified on stainless steel and aluminum samples. Characteristic cavitation damages such as pitting and indentation are observed on sample surfaces using scanning electron microscopy.

  2. FEASIBILITY STUDY OF PRESSURE PULSING PIPELINE UNPLUGGING TECHNOLOGIES FOR HANFORD

    SciTech Connect

    Servin, M. A.; Garfield, J. S.; Golcar, G. R.

    2012-12-20

    The ability to unplug key waste transfer routes is generally essential for successful tank farms operations. All transfer lines run the risk of plugging but the cross site transfer line poses increased risk due to its longer length. The loss of a transfer route needed to support the waste feed delivery mission impacts the cost and schedule of the Hanford clean up mission. This report addresses the engineering feasibility for two pressure pulse technologies, which are similar in concept, for pipeline unplugging.

  3. Generation of longitudinally polarized terahertz pulses with field amplitudes exceeding 2 kV/cm

    SciTech Connect

    Cliffe, M. J. Rodak, A.; Graham, D. M.; Jamison, S. P.

    2014-11-10

    We demonstrate the generation of near-single cycle longitudinally polarized terahertz radiation using a large-area radially biased photoconductive antenna with a longitudinal field amplitude in excess of 2 kV/cm. The 76 mm diameter antenna was photo-excited by a 0.5 mJ amplified near-infrared femtosecond laser system and biased with a voltage of up to 100 kV applied over concentric electrodes. Amplitudes for both the transverse and longitudinal field components of the source were measured using a calibrated electro-optic detection scheme. By tightly focusing the radiation emitted from the photoconductive antenna, we obtained a maximum longitudinal field amplitude of 2.22 kV/cm with an applied bias field of 38.5 kV/cm.

  4. Numerical Investigation on Atmospheric-Pressure Dielectric Barrier Discharges Driven by Combined rf and Short-Pulse Sources in Co-Axial Electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qi; Sun, Ji-zhong; Nozaki, Tomohiro; Wang, De-zhen

    Atmospheric-pressure discharges driven by combined rf and short-pulse sources in co-axial electrodes were investigated in this work using a one-dimensional self-consistent fluid model. It demonstrated that the plasma intensity in the rf discharge could be enhanced drastically when an additional low-duty-ratio pulse source was applied to the discharge. The study investigated how the plasma density varied with the voltage amplitude of the pulse source. Results showed that the discharge mode turned into glow mode as the pulse amplitude exceeded a critical value. Two cases were investigated on the premise that the outer electrode was electrically grounded: in the first case the positive pulse was applied to the inner electrode while in the second case the negative pulse was used instead, and the spatial discharge characteristics were compared.

  5. Temperature and Pressure Dependence of Signal Amplitudes for Electrostriction Laser-Induced Thermal Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herring, Gregory C.

    2015-01-01

    The relative signal strength of electrostriction-only (no thermal grating) laser-induced thermal acoustics (LITA) in gas-phase air is reported as a function of temperature T and pressure P. Measurements were made in the free stream of a variable Mach number supersonic wind tunnel, where T and P are varied simultaneously as Mach number is varied. Using optical heterodyning, the measured signal amplitude (related to the optical reflectivity of the acoustic grating) was averaged for each of 11 flow conditions and compared to the expected theoretical dependence of a pure-electrostriction LITA process, where the signal is proportional to the square root of [P*P /( T*T*T)].

  6. [High-frequency ventilation. I. Distribution of alveolar pressure amplitudes during high frequency oscillation in the lung model].

    PubMed

    Theissen, J; Lunkenheimer, P P; Niederer, P; Bush, E; Frieling, G; Lawin, P

    1987-09-01

    The pattern of intrapulmonary pressure distribution was studied during high-frequency ventilation in order to explain the inconsistent results reported in the literature. Methods. Pressure and flow velocity (hot-wire anemometry) were measured in different lung compartments: 1. In transalveolar chambers sealed to the perforated pleural surfaces of dried pig lungs; 2. In emphysema-simulating airbags sealed to the isolated bronchial trees of dried pig lungs; and 3. In transalveolar chambers sealed to the perforated pleural surfaces of freshly excised pig lungs. Results. 1. The pressure amplitudes change from one area to another and depending on the exciting frequency. 2. High-frequency oscillation is associated with an increase in pressure amplitude when the exciting frequency rises, whereas with conventional high-frequency jet ventilation the pressure amplitude is more likely to decrease with frequency. 3. During high-frequency jet ventilation the local pressure amplitude changes with the position of the tube in the trachea rather than with the exciting frequency. 4. When the volume of the measuring chamber is doubled the resulting pressure amplitude falls to half the control value. 5. The pressure amplitude and mean pressure measured in the transalveolar chamber vary more or less independently from the peak flow velocity. High-frequency ventilation is thus seen to be a frequency-dependant, inhomogeneous mode of ventilation that can essentially be homogenized by systematically changing the exciting frequency. The frequency-dependant response to different lung areas to excitation is likely to result from an intrabronchially-localized aerodynamic effect rather than the mechanical properties of the lung parenchyma.

  7. Comparison of discrete multi-tone and pulse amplitude modulation for beyond 100 Gbps short-reach application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishihara, Masato; Kai, Yutaka; Tanaka, Toshiki; Takahara, Tomoo; Li, Lei; Yan, Weizhen; Liu, Bo; Tao, Zhenning; Rasmussen, Jens C.

    2013-12-01

    Advanced multi-level modulation is an attractive modulation technique for beyond 100 Gbps short reach optical transmission system. Above all, discrete multi-tone (DMT) technique and pulse amplitude modulation (PAM) technique are the strong candidates. We compared the 100 Gbps transmission characteristics of DMT and PAM by simulation and experiment. The comparison was done by using same devices and only the digital signal processing was changed. We studied the transmission distance dependence for 0.5 to 40 km and the impact of the frequency responses of the optical devices. Finally we discuss the features of the both modulation techniques.

  8. Impact of colored noise in pulse amplitude measurements: A time-domain approach using differintegrals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regadío, Alberto; Tabero, Jesús; Sánchez-Prieto, Sebastián

    2016-03-01

    In particle detectors, pulse shaping is the process of changing the waveform of the pulses in order to maximize the signal to noise ratio. This shaping usually only takes into account white, pink (flicker) and red (Brownian) noise. In this paper, a generalization of noise indexes as a function to an arbitrary fβ noise type, where β is a real number, is presented. This generalization has been created using the differintegral operator, defined in Fractional Calculus. These formulas are used to calculate the Equivalent Noise Change (ENC) in detector particle systems.

  9. Can the use of pulsed direct current induce oscillation in the applied pressure during spark plasma sintering?

    PubMed Central

    Salamon, David; Eriksson, Mirva; Nygren, Mats; Shen, Zhijian

    2012-01-01

    The spark plasma sintering (SPS) process is known for its rapid densification of metals and ceramics. The mechanism behind this rapid densification has been discussed during the last few decades and is yet uncertain. During our SPS experiments we noticed oscillations in the applied pressure, related to a change in electric current. In this study, we investigated the effect of pulsed electrical current on the applied mechanical pressure and related changes in temperature. We eliminated the effect of sample shrinkage in the SPS setup and used a transparent quartz die allowing direct observation of the sample. We found that the use of pulsed direct electric current in our apparatus induces pressure oscillations with the amplitude depending on the current density. While sintering Ti samples we observed temperature oscillations resulting from pressure oscillations, which we attribute to magnetic forces generated within the SPS apparatus. The described current–pressure–temperature relations might increase understanding of the SPS process. PMID:27877472

  10. Pulse pressure is associated with walking impairment in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Heffernan, Kevin S; Ranadive, Sushant; Weikert, Madeline; Lane, Abbi; Yan, Huiman; Fernhall, Bo; Motl, Robert W

    2011-10-15

    Persons with multiple sclerosis (MS) have reduced gait performance and this is associated with disability and disease progression. The current study sought to test the hypothesis that higher central (aortic and carotid) and peripheral (brachial) pulse pressure (PP), manifestations of ventricular-vascular uncoupling related to increased arterial stiffness and pressure from wave reflections, would be associated with reduced gait performance in persons with MS. Participants consisted of 33 individuals with MS and 33 age/sex matched controls. Central blood pressure (BP) was assessed via applanation tonometry. Brachial BP was measured using an automated oscillometric cuff. PP was defined as systolic BP--diastolic BP. Gait performance was measured as 6-minute walk (6 MW) distance. Within the sample with MS, the 6 MW distance was significantly associated with brachial (r = -.49, p<.005), aortic (r = -.52, p<.001), and carotid (r = -.57, p<.001) pulse pressure. There was no association between any PP measure and 6 MW distance in controls (p>0.05 for all). In conclusion, PP is a predictor of gait performance in persons with MS. These findings suggest that vascular senescence and altered ventricular-vascular coupling may contribute, in part, to the deterioration of physical function in persons with MS.

  11. Sea-level constraints on the amplitude and source distribution of Meltwater Pulse 1A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jean; Milne, Glenn A.; Kopp, Robert E.; Clark, Peter U.; Shennan, Ian

    2016-02-01

    During the last deglaciation, sea levels rose as ice sheets retreated. This climate transition was punctuated by periods of more intense melting; the largest and most rapid of these--Meltwater Pulse 1A--occurred about 14,500 years ago, with rates of sea-level rise reaching approximately 4 m per century. Such rates of rise suggest ice-sheet instability, but the meltwater sources are poorly constrained, thus limiting our understanding of the causes and impacts of the event. In particular, geophysical modelling studies constrained by tropical sea-level records suggest an Antarctic contribution of more than seven metres, whereas most reconstructions from Antarctica indicate no substantial change in ice-sheet volume around the time of Meltwater Pulse 1A. Here we use a glacial isostatic adjustment model to reinterpret tropical sea-level reconstructions from Barbados, the Sunda Shelf and Tahiti. According to our results, global mean sea-level rise during Meltwater Pulse 1A was between 8.6 and 14.6 m (95% probability). As for the melt partitioning, we find an allowable contribution from Antarctica of either 4.1 to 10.0 m or 0 to 6.9 m (95% probability), using two recent estimates of the contribution from the North American ice sheets. We conclude that with current geologic constraints, the method applied here is unable to support or refute the possibility of a significant Antarctic contribution to Meltwater Pulse 1A.

  12. Sex differences in pulse pressure trends with age are cross-cultural.

    PubMed

    Skurnick, Joan H; Aladjem, Mordechay; Aviv, Abraham

    2010-01-01

    Sex differences in systolic and diastolic blood pressure levels and trends with age have been consistently observed in both industrialized and unindustrialized populations. However, the impact of sex on pulse pressure, an index of vascular aging, in unindustrialized populations has not been addressed. The objective of this report was to characterize sex differences in aging trends of pulse pressure within unindustrialized populations. Using PubMed and Medline, we identified 60 articles with blood pressure data from unacculturated or partially acculturated populations. Data on 27 populations from 22 articles were included for analysis, on the basis of adequate description of study design and blood pressure measurement. Blood pressure means of adult age groups were modeled by linear and polynomial regression. The pulse pressure levels of women were lower than those of men in early adulthood and higher in older ages. Women had a steeper, steady increase in pulse pressure with age than men (P<0.001), whereas men had a stronger curvilinear upswing in pulse pressure with age (P=0.006). Partially acculturated populations had higher pulse pressures than unacculturated populations. Sex had a stronger effect on pulse pressure than acculturation. Pulse pressure trajectories of unindustrialized populations were slightly attenuated compared with those seen in National Health and Nutritional Examination Surveys III and IV of the US population. A sex effect on pulse pressure trends with age prevails across unacculturated and acculturated populations. Accordingly, the biological principles of arterial aging, as expressed in pulse pressure, are the same in all humans, regardless of demography.

  13. Note: Measurement of extreme-short current pulse duration of runaway electron beam in atmospheric pressure air

    SciTech Connect

    Tarasenko, V. F.; Rybka, D. V.; Burachenko, A. G.; Lomaev, M. I.; Balzovsky, E. V.

    2012-08-15

    This note reports the time-amplitude characteristic of the supershort avalanche electron beam with up to 20 ps time resolution. For the first time it is shown that the electron beam downstream of small-diameter diaphragms in atmospheric pressure air has a complex structure which depends on the interelectrode gap width and cathode design. With a spherical cathode and collimator the minimum duration at half maximum of the supershort avalanche electron beam current pulse was shown to be {approx}25 ps. The minimum duration at half maximum of one peak in the pulses with two peaks can reach {approx}25 ps too.

  14. Note: measurement of extreme-short current pulse duration of runaway electron beam in atmospheric pressure air.

    PubMed

    Tarasenko, V F; Rybka, D V; Burachenko, A G; Lomaev, M I; Balzovsky, E V

    2012-08-01

    This note reports the time-amplitude characteristic of the supershort avalanche electron beam with up to 20 ps time resolution. For the first time it is shown that the electron beam downstream of small-diameter diaphragms in atmospheric pressure air has a complex structure which depends on the interelectrode gap width and cathode design. With a spherical cathode and collimator the minimum duration at half maximum of the supershort avalanche electron beam current pulse was shown to be ~25 ps. The minimum duration at half maximum of one peak in the pulses with two peaks can reach ~25 ps too.

  15. Systolic Blood Pressure Accuracy Enhancement in the Electronic Palpation Method Using Pulse Waveform

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    1 of 4 SYSTOLIC BLOOD PRESSURE ACCURACY ENHANCEMENT IN THE ELECTRONIC PALPATION METHOD USING PULSE WAVEFORM H. S. S. Sorvoja1, R. A. Myllylä1...systolic blood pressure measurements based on pulse waveform. A set of measurement was carried out with elderly cardiac surgery patients. The experiments... blood pressure . Systolic pressure errors were defined and correlations with other specific values, like pressure rise time, pulse wave velocity

  16. Waveform descriptor for pulse onset detection of intracranial pressure signal.

    PubMed

    Yang, Li; Zhao, Mingxi; Peng, Chenglin; Hu, Xiao; Feng, Hua; Ji, Zhong

    2012-03-01

    We present an algorithm to identify the onset of intracranial pressure (ICP) pulses. The algorithm creates a waveform descriptor to extract the feature of each local minimum of the waveform and then identifies the onset by comparing the feature with a customized template. The waveform descriptor is derived by transforming the vectors connecting a given point and the local waveform samples around it into log-polar coordinates and ranking them into uniform bins. Using an ICP dataset consisting of 40933 normal beats and 306 segments of artifacts and noise, we investigated the performance of our algorithm (waveform descriptor, WD), global minimum within a sliding window (GM) and two other algorithms originally proposed for arterial blood pressure (ABP) signal (slope sum function, SSF and pulse waveform delineator, PUD). As a result, all the four algorithms showed good performance and WD showed overall better one. At a tolerance level of 30 ms (i.e., the predicted onset and ground truth were considered as correctly matched if the distance between the two was equal or less than 30 ms), WD achieved a sensitivity of 0.9723 and PPV of 0.9475, GM achieved a sensitivity of 0.9226 and PPV of 0.8968, PUD achieved a sensitivity of 0.9599 and PPV of 0.9327 and SSF, a sensitivity of 0.9720 and PPV of 0.9136. The evaluation indicates that the algorithms are effective for identifying the onset of ICP pulses.

  17. Effects of Biphasic Current Pulse Frequency, Amplitude, Duration and Interphase Gap on Eye Movement Responses to Prosthetic Electrical Stimulation of the Vestibular Nerve

    PubMed Central

    Davidovics, Natan S.; Fridman, Gene Y.; Chiang, Bryce; Della Santina, Charles C.

    2011-01-01

    An implantable prosthesis that stimulates vestibular nerve branches to restore sensation of head rotation and vision-stabilizing reflexes could benefit individuals disabled by bilateral loss of vestibular (inner ear balance) function. We developed a prosthesis that partly restores normal function in animals by delivering pulse frequency modulated (PFM) biphasic current pulses via electrodes implanted in semicircular canals. Because the optimal stimulus encoding strategy is not yet known, we investigated effects of varying biphasic current pulse frequency, amplitude, duration and interphase gap on vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) eye movements in chinchillas. Increasing pulse frequency increased response amplitude while maintaining a relatively constant axis of rotation. Increasing pulse amplitude (range 0–325 μA) also increased response amplitude but spuriously shifted eye movement axis, probably due to current spread beyond the target nerve. Shorter pulse durations (range 28–340 μs) required less charge to elicit a given response amplitude and caused less axis shift than longer durations. Varying interphase gap (range 25–175 μs) had no significant effect. While specific values reported herein depend on microanatomy and electrode location in each case, we conclude that PFM with short duration biphasic pulses should form the foundation for further optimization of stimulus encoding strategies for vestibular prostheses intended to restore sensation of head rotation. PMID:20813652

  18. Multi-Pulsed High Hydrostatic Pressure Treatment of Foods

    PubMed Central

    Buzrul, Sencer

    2015-01-01

    Multi-pulsed high hydrostatic pressure (mpHHP) treatment of foods has been investigated for more than two decades. It was reported that the mpHHP treatment, with few exceptions, is more effective than the classical or single-pulsed HHP (spHHP) treatment for inactivation of microorganisms in fruit juice, dairy products, liquid whole egg, meat products, and sea foods. Moreover, the mpHHP treatment could be also used to inactivate enzymes in foods and to increase the shelf-life of foods. The effects of the mpHHP treatment of foods are summarized and the differences between the mpHHP and spHHP are also emphasized. PMID:28231197

  19. Intracranial pressure pulse waveform correlates with aqueductal cerebrospinal fluid stroke volume.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Robert; Baldwin, Kevin; Fuller, Jennifer; Vespa, Paul; Hu, Xiao; Bergsneider, Marvin

    2012-11-01

    This study identifies a novel relationship between cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) stroke volume through the cerebral aqueduct and the characteristic peaks of the intracranial pulse (ICP) waveform. ICP waveform analysis has become much more advanced in recent years; however, clinical practice remains restricted to mean ICP, mainly due to the lack of physiological understanding of the ICP waveform. Therefore, the present study set out to shed some light on the physiological meaning of ICP morphological metrics derived by the morphological clustering and analysis of continuous intracranial pulse (MOCAIP) algorithm by investigating their relationships with a well defined physiological variable, i.e., the stroke volume of CSF through the cerebral aqueduct. Seven patients received both overnight ICP monitoring along with a phase-contrast MRI (PC-MRI) of the cerebral aqueduct to quantify aqueductal stroke volume (ASV). Waveform morphological analysis of the ICP signal was performed by the MOCAIP algorithm. Following extraction of morphological metrics from the ICP signal, nine temporal ICP metrics and two amplitude-based metrics were compared with the ASV via Spearman's rank correlation. Of the nine temporal metrics correlated with the ASV, only the width of the P2 region (ICP-Wi2) reached significance. Furthermore, both ICP pulse pressure amplitude and mean ICP did not reach significance. In this study, we showed the width of the second peak (ICP-Wi2) of an ICP pulse wave is positively related to the volume of CSF movement through the cerebral aqueduct. This finding is an initial step in bridging the gap between ICP waveform morphology research and clinical practice.

  20. Bystander Effect Induced by Electroporation is Possibly Mediated by Microvesicles and Dependent on Pulse Amplitude, Repetition Frequency and Cell Type.

    PubMed

    Prevc, Ajda; Bedina Zavec, Apolonija; Cemazar, Maja; Kloboves-Prevodnik, Veronika; Stimac, Monika; Todorovic, Vesna; Strojan, Primoz; Sersa, Gregor

    2016-10-01

    Bystander effect, a known phenomenon in radiation biology, where irradiated cells release signals which cause damage to nearby, unirradiated cells, has not been explored in electroporated cells yet. Therefore, our aim was to determine whether bystander effect is present in electroporated melanoma cells in vitro, by determining viability of non-electroporated cells exposed to medium from electroporated cells and by the release of microvesicles as potential indicators of the bystander effect. Here, we demonstrated that electroporation of cells induces bystander effect: Cells exposed to electric pulses mediated their damage to the non-electroporated cells, thus decreasing cell viability. We have shown that shedding microvesicles may be one of the ways used by the cells to mediate the death signals to the neighboring cells. The murine melanoma B16F1 cell line was found to be more electrosensitive and thus more prone to bystander effect than the canine melanoma CMeC-1 cell line. In B16F1 cell line, bystander effect was present above the level of electropermeabilization of the cells, with the threshold at 800 V/cm. Furthermore, with increasing electric field intensities and the number of pulses, the bystander effect also increased. In conclusion, electroporation can induce bystander effect which may be mediated by microvesicles, and depends on pulse amplitude, repetition frequency and cell type.

  1. Antibody responses of mice exposed to low-power microwaves under combined, pulse-and-amplitude modulation

    SciTech Connect

    Veyret, B.; Bouthet, C.; Deschaux, P.; de Seze, R.; Geffard, M.; Joussot-Dubien, J.; le Diraison, M.; Moreau, J.M.; Caristan, A.

    1991-01-01

    Irradiation by pulsed microwaves (9.4 GHz, 1 microsecond pulses at 1,000/s), both with and without concurrent amplitude modulation (AM) by a sinusoid at discrete frequencies between 14 and 41 MHz, was assessed for effects on the immune system of Balb/C mice. The mice were immunized either by sheep red blood cells (SRBC) or by glutaric-anhydride conjugated bovine serum albumin (GA-BSA), then exposed to the microwaves at a low rms power density (30 microW/cm2; whole-body-averaged SAR approximately 0.015 W/kg). Sham exposure or microwave irradiation took place during each of five contiguous days, 10 h/day. The antibody response was evaluated by the plaque-forming cell assay (SRBC experiment) or by the titration of IgM and IgG antibodies (GA-BSA experiment). In the absence of AM, the pulsed field did not greatly alter immune responsiveness. In contrast, exposure to the field under the combined-modulation condition resulted in significant, AM-frequency-dependent augmentation or weakening of immune responses.

  2. Method of pressure pulse cleaning a tube bundle heat exchanger

    SciTech Connect

    Scharton, T.D.; Taylor, G.B.

    1987-04-07

    A method is described of removing the products of corrosion, oxidation, sedimentation and comparable chemical reactions collectively known as sludge which settle on the bottom of a tube bundle heat exchange and form a pile of sludge. The tube bundle heat exchanger is characterized by a tube bundle heat exchanger wall and a thick metal plate known as a tube sheet near the lower portion of the tube bundle heat exchanger wall's interior surface. The tube sheet serves to support the lower ends of a multiplicity of heat exchanger tubes within the tube bundle heat exchanger. The tube bundle heat exchange wall further comprises a multiplicity of small holes known as hand holes, manways, drain lines and vents, located around its circumference and above the tube sheet. The method is described of removing the pile of sludge which settles on the tube sheet comprising: a. locating at least one air-gun type pressure pulse shock wave source outside the tube bundle heat exchanger so as to be able to introduce pressure pulse shock waves through one or more of the multiplicity of hand holes, manways, drain lines and vents; and b. filling the tube bundle heat exchanger with a liquid to a level above the pile of sludge.

  3. Understanding Cavitation Intensity through Pitting and Pressure Pulse Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayaprakash, A.; Singh, S.; Choi, J.-K.; Chahine, G.

    2011-11-01

    Cavitation erosion is of interest to the designers of ship propulsion devices because of its detrimental effects. One of the difficulties of predicting cavitation erosion is that the intensity of cavitation is not well predicted or defined. In this work we attempt to define the intensity of a cavitation erosion field through analysis of cavitation induced erosion pits and pressure pulses. In the pitting tests, material samples were subjected to cavitation field for a short duration of time selected within the test sample's incubation period, so that the test sample undergoes plastic deformation only. The sample material reacts to these cavitation events by undergoing localized permanent deformation, called pits. The resulting pitted sample surfaces were then optically scanned and analyzed. The pressure signals under cavitating jets and ultrasonic horns, for different conditions, were experimentally recorded using high frequency response pressure transducers. From the analysis of the pitting data and recorded pressure signals, we propose a model that describes the statistics, which in the future can be used to define the cavitation field intensity. Support for this work was provided by Office of Naval Research (ONR) under contract number N00014-08-C-0450, monitored by Dr. Ki-Han Kim.

  4. Particle Densities of the Atmospheric-Pressure Argon Plasmas Generated by the Pulsed Dielectric Barrier Discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Jie; Li, Li; Wang, Yunuan; Xiu, Xianwu; Wang, Chao; Song, Yuzhi

    2016-11-01

    Atmospheric-pressure argon plasmas have received increasing attention due to their high potential in many industrial and biomedical applications. In this paper, a 1-D fluid model is used for studying the particle density characteristics of the argon plasmas generated by the pulsed dielectric barrier discharges. The temporal evolutions of the axial particle density distributions are illustrated, and the influences of changing the main discharge conditions on the averaged particle densities are researched by independently varying the various discharge conditions. The calculation results show that the electron density and the ion density reach two peaks near the momentary cathodes during the rising and the falling edges of the pulsed voltage. Compared with the charged particle densities, the densities of the resonance state atom Arr and the metastable state atom Arm have more uniform axial distributions, reach higher maximums and decay more slowly. During the platform of the pulsed voltage and the time interval between the pulses, the densities of the excited state atom Ar* are far lower than those of the Arr or the Arm. The averaged particle densities of the different considered particles increase with the increases of the amplitude and the frequency of the pulsed voltage. Narrowing the discharge gap and increasing the relative dielectric constant of the dielectric also contribute to the increase of the averaged particle densities. The effects of reducing the discharge gap distance on the neutral particle densities are more significant than the influences on the charged particle densities. supported by Natural Science Foundation of Shandong Province, China (No. ZR2015AQ008), and Project of Shandong Province Higher Educational Science and Technology Program of China (No. J15LJ04)

  5. Fully programmable two-dimensional pulse shaper for broadband line-by-line amplitude and phase control.

    PubMed

    Metcalf, Andrew J; Torres-Company, Victor; Supradeepa, V R; Leaird, Daniel E; Weiner, Andrew M

    2013-11-18

    We introduce a fully programmable two-dimensional (2D) pulse shaper, able to simultaneously control the amplitude and phase of very fine spectral components over a broad bandwidth. This is achieved by aligning two types of spectral dispersers in a cross dispersion setup: a virtually imaged phased array for accessing fine resolution and a transmission grating for achieving broad bandwidth. We take advantage of the resultant 2D dispersion profile as well as introduce programmability by adding a 2D liquid crystal on silicon spatial light modulator at the masking plane. Our shaper has a resolution of ~3 GHz operating over the entire 'C' band of >5.8 THz. Experimental evidence is provided that highlights the full programmability, fine spectral control, and broad bandwidth operation (limited currently by the bandwidth of the input light). We also show line-by-line manipulation of record 836 comb lines over the C-band.

  6. Evaluation of the amperex 56 TVP photomultiplier. [characteristics: photoelectron time spread, anode pulse amplitude and photocathode sensing area

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lo, C. C.; Leskovar, B.

    1976-01-01

    Characteristics were measured for the Amperex 56 TVP 42 mm-diameter photomultiplier. Some typical photomultiplier characteristics-such as gain, dark current, transit and rise times-are compared with data provided. Photomultiplier characteristics generally not available such as the single photoelectron time spread, the relative collection efficiency, the relative anode pulse amplitude as a function of the voltage between the photocathode and focusing electrode, and the position of the photocathode sensing area were measured and are discussed for two 56 TVP's. The single photoelectron time spread, the relative collection efficiency, and the transit time difference as a function of the voltage between photocathode and focusing electrode were also measured and are discussed, particularly with respect to the optimization of photomultiplier operating conditions for timing applications.

  7. [Pulse pressure as a prognostic indicator of organ damage in patients with essential hypertension].

    PubMed

    Jołda-Mydłowska, Beata; Kobusiak-Prokopowicz, Małgorzata; Sławuta, Agnieszka; Witkowska, Maria

    2004-05-01

    Pulse pressure (PP), defined as systolic blood pressure minus diastolic blood pressure, plays an important role as a risk factor for cardiovascular events. Pulse pressure is pulsatile component of blood pressure. A widened pulse pressure reflects increased stiffness of the large arteries. The aim of the study was to evaluate the association between pulse pressure and organ damage in essential hypertension. We examined 60 subjects, 34 women aged 59 +/- 13 years and 26 men aged 48 +/- 17 years with primary hypertension. In every subject we performed 24-hour automatic blood pressure measurement and echocardiography, abdominal ultrasonography, funduscopy, chest x-ray. We measured sodium potassium, creatinine level in serum and in urine, creatinine clearance and microalbuminuria. Pulse pressure is proportional to the stage of hypertension. A dimension of the aorta parallels with measures of blood pressure. The strong correlation between pulse pressure and damage in funduscopy can indicate, that complication in fundus of the eye are dependent more than the level of a pressure. The significantly higher sodium level in serum and the positive correlation between natremia, natriuresis and pulse pressure proves the role of natrium in pathophysiology of hypertension.

  8. Ultrasonic Power Output Measurement by Pulsed Radiation Pressure.

    PubMed

    Fick, Steven E; Breckenridge, Franklin R

    1996-01-01

    Direct measurements of time-averaged spatially integrated output power radiated into reflectionless water loads can be made with high accuracy using techniques which exploit the radiation pressure exerted by sound on all objects in its path. With an absorptive target arranged to intercept the entirety of an ultrasound beam, total beam power can be determined as accurately as the radiation force induced on the target can be measured in isolation from confounding forces due to buoyancy, streaming, surface tension, and vibration. Pulse modulation of the incident ultrasound at a frequency well above those characteristics of confounding phenomena provides the desired isolation and other significant advantages in the operation of the radiation force balance (RFB) constructed in 1974. Equipped with purpose-built transducers and electronics, the RFB is adjusted to equate the radiation force and a counterforce generated by an actuator calibrated against reference masses using direct current as the transfer variable. Improvements made during its one overhaul in 1988 have nearly halved its overall measurement uncertainty and extended the capabilities of the RFB to include measuring the output of ultrasonic systems with arbitrary pulse waveforms.

  9. Ultrasonic Power Output Measurement by Pulsed Radiation Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Fick, Steven E.; Breckenridge, Franklin R.

    1996-01-01

    Direct measurements of time-averaged spatially integrated output power radiated into reflectionless water loads can be made with high accuracy using techniques which exploit the radiation pressure exerted by sound on all objects in its path. With an absorptive target arranged to intercept the entirety of an ultrasound beam, total beam power can be determined as accurately as the radiation force induced on the target can be measured in isolation from confounding forces due to buoyancy, streaming, surface tension, and vibration. Pulse modulation of the incident ultrasound at a frequency well above those characteristics of confounding phenomena provides the desired isolation and other significant advantages in the operation of the radiation force balance (RFB) constructed in 1974. Equipped with purpose-built transducers and electronics, the RFB is adjusted to equate the radiation force and a counterforce generated by an actuator calibrated against reference masses using direct current as the transfer variable. Improvements made during its one overhaul in 1988 have nearly halved its overall measurement uncertainty and extended the capabilities of the RFB to include measuring the output of ultrasonic systems with arbitrary pulse waveforms. PMID:27805084

  10. Pulsed, atmospheric pressure plasma source for emission spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Duan, Yixiang; Jin, Zhe; Su, Yongxuan

    2004-05-11

    A low-power, plasma source-based, portable molecular light emission generator/detector employing an atmospheric pressure pulsed-plasma for molecular fragmentation and excitation is described. The average power required for the operation of the plasma is between 0.02 W and 5 W. The features of the optical emission spectra obtained with the pulsed plasma source are significantly different from those obtained with direct current (dc) discharge higher power; for example, strong CH emission at 431.2 nm which is only weakly observed with dc plasma sources was observed, and the intense CN emission observed at 383-388 nm using dc plasma sources was weak in most cases. Strong CN emission was only observed using the present apparatus when compounds containing nitrogen, such as aniline were employed as samples. The present apparatus detects dimethylsulfoxide at 200 ppb using helium as the plasma gas by observing the emission band of the CH radical. When coupled with a gas chromatograph for separating components present in a sample to be analyzed, the present invention provides an apparatus for detecting the arrival of a particular component in the sample at the end of the chromatographic column and the identity thereof.

  11. Impact of body tilt on the central aortic pressure pulse.

    PubMed

    Rotaru, Corina; Liaudet, Lucas; Waeber, Bernard; Feihl, François

    2015-04-01

    The present work was undertaken to investigate, in young healthy volunteers, the relationships between the forward propagation times of arterial pressure waves and the timing of reflected waves observable on the aortic pulse, in the course of rapid changes in body position. 20 young healthy subjects, 10 men, and 10 women, were examined on a tilt table at two different tilt angles, -10° (Head-down) and + 45° (Head-up). In each position, carotid-femoral (Tcf) and carotid-tibial forward propagation times (Tct) were measured with the Complior device. In each position also, the central aortic pressure pulse was recorded with radial tonometry, using the SphygmoCor device and a generalized transfer function, so as to evaluate the timing of reflected waves reaching the aorta in systole (onset of systolic reflected wave, sT1r) and diastole (mean transit time of diastolic reflected wave, dMTT). The position shift from Head-up to Head-down caused a massive increase in both Tct (women from 130 ± 10 to 185 ± 18 msec P < 0.001, men from 136 ± 9 to 204 ± 18 msec P < 0.001) and dMTT (women from 364 ± 35 to 499 ± 33 msec P < 0.001, men from 406 ± 22 to 553 ± 21 msec P < 0.001). Mixed model regression showed that the changes in Tct and dMTT observed between Head-up and Head-down were tightly coupled (regression coefficient 2.1, 95% confidence interval 1.9-2.3, P < 0.001). These results strongly suggest that the diastolic waves observed on central aortic pulses reconstructed from radial tonometric correspond at least in part to reflections generated in the lower limbs.

  12. Nanosecond pulsed power generator for a voltage amplitude up to 300 kV and a repetition rate up to 16 Hz for fine disintegration of quartz

    SciTech Connect

    Krastelev, E. G. Sedin, A. A.; Tugushev, V. I.

    2015-12-15

    A generator of high-power high-voltage nanosecond pulses is intended for electrical discharge disintegration of mineral quartz and other nonconducting minerals. It includes a 320 kV Marx pulsed voltage generator, a high-voltage glycerin-insulated coaxial peaking capacitor, and an output gas spark switch followed by a load, an electric discharge disintegration chamber. The main parameters of the generator are as follows: a voltage pulse amplitude of up to 300 kV, an output impedance of ≈10 Ω, a discharge current amplitude of up to 25 kA for a half-period of 80–90 ns, and a pulse repetition rate of up to 16 Hz.

  13. Nanosecond pulsed power generator for a voltage amplitude up to 300 kV and a repetition rate up to 16 Hz for fine disintegration of quartz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krastelev, E. G.; Sedin, A. A.; Tugushev, V. I.

    2015-12-01

    A generator of high-power high-voltage nanosecond pulses is intended for electrical discharge disintegration of mineral quartz and other nonconducting minerals. It includes a 320 kV Marx pulsed voltage generator, a high-voltage glycerin-insulated coaxial peaking capacitor, and an output gas spark switch followed by a load, an electric discharge disintegration chamber. The main parameters of the generator are as follows: a voltage pulse amplitude of up to 300 kV, an output impedance of ≈10 Ω, a discharge current amplitude of up to 25 kA for a half-period of 80-90 ns, and a pulse repetition rate of up to 16 Hz.

  14. Characterization of a setup to test the impact of high-amplitude pressure waves on living cells.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Mischa; Kahlert, Ulf; Wessolleck, Johanna; Maciaczyk, Donata; Merkt, Benjamin; Maciaczyk, Jaroslaw; Osterholz, Jens; Nikkhah, Guido; Steinhauser, Martin O

    2014-01-24

    The impact of pressure waves on cells may provide several possible applications in biology and medicine including the direct killing of tumors, drug delivery or gene transfection. In this study we characterize the physical properties of mechanical pressure waves generated by a nanosecond laser pulse in a setup with well-defined cell culture conditions. To systematically characterize the system on the relevant length and time scales (micrometers and nanoseconds) we use photon Doppler velocimetry (PDV) and obtain velocity profiles of the cell culture vessel at the passage of the pressure wave. These profiles serve as input for numerical pressure wave simulations that help to further quantify the pressure conditions on the cellular length scale. On the biological level we demonstrate killing of glioblastoma cells and quantify experimentally the pressure threshold for cell destruction.

  15. Characterization of a Setup to test the Impact of High-Amplitude Pressure Waves on Living Cells

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Mischa; Kahlert, Ulf; Wessolleck, Johanna; Maciaczyk, Donata; Merkt, Benjamin; Maciaczyk, Jaroslaw; Osterholz, Jens; Nikkhah, Guido; Steinhauser, Martin O.

    2014-01-01

    The impact of pressure waves on cells may provide several possible applications in biology and medicine including the direct killing of tumors, drug delivery or gene transfection. In this study we characterize the physical properties of mechanical pressure waves generated by a nanosecond laser pulse in a setup with well-defined cell culture conditions. To systematically characterize the system on the relevant length and time scales (micrometers and nanoseconds) we use photon Doppler velocimetry (PDV) and obtain velocity profiles of the cell culture vessel at the passage of the pressure wave. These profiles serve as input for numerical pressure wave simulations that help to further quantify the pressure conditions on the cellular length scale. On the biological level we demonstrate killing of glioblastoma cells and quantify experimentally the pressure threshold for cell destruction. PMID:24458018

  16. Characterization of a Setup to test the Impact of High-Amplitude Pressure Waves on Living Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Mischa; Kahlert, Ulf; Wessolleck, Johanna; Maciaczyk, Donata; Merkt, Benjamin; Maciaczyk, Jaroslaw; Osterholz, Jens; Nikkhah, Guido; Steinhauser, Martin O.

    2014-01-01

    The impact of pressure waves on cells may provide several possible applications in biology and medicine including the direct killing of tumors, drug delivery or gene transfection. In this study we characterize the physical properties of mechanical pressure waves generated by a nanosecond laser pulse in a setup with well-defined cell culture conditions. To systematically characterize the system on the relevant length and time scales (micrometers and nanoseconds) we use photon Doppler velocimetry (PDV) and obtain velocity profiles of the cell culture vessel at the passage of the pressure wave. These profiles serve as input for numerical pressure wave simulations that help to further quantify the pressure conditions on the cellular length scale. On the biological level we demonstrate killing of glioblastoma cells and quantify experimentally the pressure threshold for cell destruction.

  17. INTERACTION OF RADIATION WITH MATTER. LASER PLASMA: Increase in the amplitude of hf currents during exposure of a neutral target to microsecond CO2 laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antipov, A. A.; Losev, Leonid L.; Meshalkin, E. A.

    1988-09-01

    High-frequency electric currents were generated by irradiation of a metal target with CO2 laser pulses. It was found that the region where the ambient gas was photoionized had a decisive influence on the hf current amplitude. A method for increasing the amplitude of the current by creating an auxiliary laser jet on the target was proposed and used. An hf current of up to 1 A amplitude was observed at a frequency of 75 MHz and this current lasted for 1.5 μs.

  18. Neural network burst pressure prediction in impact damaged Kevlar/epoxy bottles from acoustic emission amplitude data

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, J.L.; Workman, G.L.; Russell, S.S.

    1994-12-31

    Acoustic emission (AE) signal analysis has been used to measure the effect of impact damage on the burst pressure of 5.75 inch diameter filament wound Kevlar/epoxy pressure vessels. A calibrated dead weight drop fixture, featuring both sharp and blunt hemispherical impact tups, generated impact damages with energies up to twenty ft-lb{sub f} in the mid hoop region of each vessel. Burst pressures were obtained by hydrostatically testing twenty-seven damaged and undamaged bottles, eleven of which were filled with inert propellant to simulate a rocket motor. Burst pressure prediction models were developed by correlating the differential AE amplitude distributions, Generated during the first pressure ramp to 25% of the expected burst pressure for the undamaged vessels, to known burst pressures using back propagation neural networks. Independent networks were created for the inert propellant filled vessels and the unfilled vessels using a small subset of each during the training phases. The remaining bottles served as the test sets. The eleven filled vessels had an average prediction error of 5.6%, while the unfilled bottles averaged 5.4%. Both of these results were within the 95% prediction interval, but a portion of the vessel burst pressure errors were greater than the {+-}5% worst case error obtained in previous work. in conclusion, the AE amplitude distribution data collected at low proof loads provided a suitable input for neural network burst pressure prediction in damaged and undamaged Kevlar/epoxy bottles. This included pressure vessels both with and without propellant backing. Work is ongoing to decrease the magnitude of the prediction error through network restructuring.

  19. Surface pressure distributions on a delta wing undergoing large amplitude pitching oscillations. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Scott A.

    1989-01-01

    Wind tunnel experiments were performed on a 70 deg sweep delta wing to determine the effect of a sinusoidal pitching motion on the pressure field on the suction side of the wing. Twelve pressure taps were placed from 35 to 90 percent of the chord, at 60 percent of the local semi-span. Pressure coefficients were measured as a function of Reynolds number and pitch rate. The pressure coefficient was seen to vary at approximately the same frequency as the pitching frequency. The relative pressure variation at each chord location was comparable for each case. The average pressure distribution through each periodic motion was near the static distribution for the average angle of attack. Upon comparing the upstroke and downstroke pressures for a specific angle of attack, the downstroke pressures were slightly larger. Vortex breakdown was seen to have the most significant effect at the 40 to 45 percent chord location, where a decrease in pressure was apparent.

  20. Risk Associated with Pulse Pressure on Out-of-Office Blood Pressure Measurement

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Yu-Mei; Aparicio, Lucas S.; Liu, Yan-Ping; Asayama, Kei; Hansen, Tine W.; Niiranen, Teemu J.; Boggia, José; Thijs, Lutgarde; Staessen, Jan A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Longitudinal studies have demonstrated that the risk of cardiovascular disease increases with pulse pressure (PP). However, PP remains an elusive cardiovascular risk factor with findings being inconsistent between studies. The 2013 ESH/ESC guideline proposed that PP is useful in stratification and suggested a threshold of 60 mm Hg, which is 10 mm Hg higher compared to that in the 2007 guideline; however, no justification for this increase was provided. Methodology Published thresholds of PP are based on office blood pressure measurement and often on arbitrary categorical analyses. In the International Database on Ambulatory blood pressure in relation to Cardiovascular Outcomes (IDACO) and the International Database on HOme blood pressure in relation to Cardiovascular Outcome (IDHOCO), we determined outcome-driven thresholds for PP based on ambulatory or home blood pressure measurement, respectively. Results The main findings were that for people aged <60 years, PP did not refine risk stratification, whereas in older people the thresholds were 64 and 76 mm Hg for the ambulatory and home PP, respectively. However, PP provided little added predictive value over and beyond classical risk factors. PMID:26587443

  1. Genome-wide association study identifies six new loci influencing pulse pressure and mean arterial pressure.

    PubMed

    Wain, Louise V; Verwoert, Germaine C; O'Reilly, Paul F; Shi, Gang; Johnson, Toby; Johnson, Andrew D; Bochud, Murielle; Rice, Kenneth M; Henneman, Peter; Smith, Albert V; Ehret, Georg B; Amin, Najaf; Larson, Martin G; Mooser, Vincent; Hadley, David; Dörr, Marcus; Bis, Joshua C; Aspelund, Thor; Esko, Tõnu; Janssens, A Cecile J W; Zhao, Jing Hua; Heath, Simon; Laan, Maris; Fu, Jingyuan; Pistis, Giorgio; Luan, Jian'an; Arora, Pankaj; Lucas, Gavin; Pirastu, Nicola; Pichler, Irene; Jackson, Anne U; Webster, Rebecca J; Zhang, Feng; Peden, John F; Schmidt, Helena; Tanaka, Toshiko; Campbell, Harry; Igl, Wilmar; Milaneschi, Yuri; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Vitart, Veronique; Chasman, Daniel I; Trompet, Stella; Bragg-Gresham, Jennifer L; Alizadeh, Behrooz Z; Chambers, John C; Guo, Xiuqing; Lehtimäki, Terho; Kühnel, Brigitte; Lopez, Lorna M; Polašek, Ozren; Boban, Mladen; Nelson, Christopher P; Morrison, Alanna C; Pihur, Vasyl; Ganesh, Santhi K; Hofman, Albert; Kundu, Suman; Mattace-Raso, Francesco U S; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Sijbrands, Eric J G; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Vasan, Ramachandran S; Wang, Thomas J; Bergmann, Sven; Vollenweider, Peter; Waeber, Gérard; Laitinen, Jaana; Pouta, Anneli; Zitting, Paavo; McArdle, Wendy L; Kroemer, Heyo K; Völker, Uwe; Völzke, Henry; Glazer, Nicole L; Taylor, Kent D; Harris, Tamara B; Alavere, Helene; Haller, Toomas; Keis, Aime; Tammesoo, Mari-Liis; Aulchenko, Yurii; Barroso, Inês; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Galan, Pilar; Hercberg, Serge; Lathrop, Mark; Eyheramendy, Susana; Org, Elin; Sõber, Siim; Lu, Xiaowen; Nolte, Ilja M; Penninx, Brenda W; Corre, Tanguy; Masciullo, Corrado; Sala, Cinzia; Groop, Leif; Voight, Benjamin F; Melander, Olle; O'Donnell, Christopher J; Salomaa, Veikko; d'Adamo, Adamo Pio; Fabretto, Antonella; Faletra, Flavio; Ulivi, Sheila; Del Greco, Fabiola M; Facheris, Maurizio; Collins, Francis S; Bergman, Richard N; Beilby, John P; Hung, Joseph; Musk, A William; Mangino, Massimo; Shin, So-Youn; Soranzo, Nicole; Watkins, Hugh; Goel, Anuj; Hamsten, Anders; Gider, Pierre; Loitfelder, Marisa; Zeginigg, Marion; Hernandez, Dena; Najjar, Samer S; Navarro, Pau; Wild, Sarah H; Corsi, Anna Maria; Singleton, Andrew; de Geus, Eco J C; Willemsen, Gonneke; Parker, Alex N; Rose, Lynda M; Buckley, Brendan; Stott, David; Orru, Marco; Uda, Manuela; van der Klauw, Melanie M; Zhang, Weihua; Li, Xinzhong; Scott, James; Chen, Yii-Der Ida; Burke, Gregory L; Kähönen, Mika; Viikari, Jorma; Döring, Angela; Meitinger, Thomas; Davies, Gail; Starr, John M; Emilsson, Valur; Plump, Andrew; Lindeman, Jan H; Hoen, Peter A C 't; König, Inke R; Felix, Janine F; Clarke, Robert; Hopewell, Jemma C; Ongen, Halit; Breteler, Monique; Debette, Stéphanie; Destefano, Anita L; Fornage, Myriam; Mitchell, Gary F; Smith, Nicholas L; Holm, Hilma; Stefansson, Kari; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Samani, Nilesh J; Preuss, Michael; Rudan, Igor; Hayward, Caroline; Deary, Ian J; Wichmann, H-Erich; Raitakari, Olli T; Palmas, Walter; Kooner, Jaspal S; Stolk, Ronald P; Jukema, J Wouter; Wright, Alan F; Boomsma, Dorret I; Bandinelli, Stefania; Gyllensten, Ulf B; Wilson, James F; Ferrucci, Luigi; Schmidt, Reinhold; Farrall, Martin; Spector, Tim D; Palmer, Lyle J; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Pfeufer, Arne; Gasparini, Paolo; Siscovick, David; Altshuler, David; Loos, Ruth J F; Toniolo, Daniela; Snieder, Harold; Gieger, Christian; Meneton, Pierre; Wareham, Nicholas J; Oostra, Ben A; Metspalu, Andres; Launer, Lenore; Rettig, Rainer; Strachan, David P; Beckmann, Jacques S; Witteman, Jacqueline C M; Erdmann, Jeanette; van Dijk, Ko Willems; Boerwinkle, Eric; Boehnke, Michael; Ridker, Paul M; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Abecasis, Goncalo R; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; Levy, Daniel; Munroe, Patricia B; Psaty, Bruce M; Caulfield, Mark J; Rao, Dabeeru C; Tobin, Martin D; Elliott, Paul; van Duijn, Cornelia M

    2011-09-11

    Numerous genetic loci have been associated with systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) in Europeans. We now report genome-wide association studies of pulse pressure (PP) and mean arterial pressure (MAP). In discovery (N = 74,064) and follow-up studies (N = 48,607), we identified at genome-wide significance (P = 2.7 × 10(-8) to P = 2.3 × 10(-13)) four new PP loci (at 4q12 near CHIC2, 7q22.3 near PIK3CG, 8q24.12 in NOV and 11q24.3 near ADAMTS8), two new MAP loci (3p21.31 in MAP4 and 10q25.3 near ADRB1) and one locus associated with both of these traits (2q24.3 near FIGN) that has also recently been associated with SBP in east Asians. For three of the new PP loci, the estimated effect for SBP was opposite of that for DBP, in contrast to the majority of common SBP- and DBP-associated variants, which show concordant effects on both traits. These findings suggest new genetic pathways underlying blood pressure variation, some of which may differentially influence SBP and DBP.

  2. Genome-wide association study identifies six new loci influencing pulse pressure and mean arterial pressure

    PubMed Central

    Wain, Louise V; Verwoert, Germaine C; O’Reilly, Paul F; Shi, Gang; Johnson, Toby; Johnson, Andrew D; Bochud, Murielle; Rice, Kenneth M; Henneman, Peter; Smith, Albert V; Ehret, Georg B; Amin, Najaf; Larson, Martin G; Mooser, Vincent; Hadley, David; Dörr, Marcus; Bis, Joshua C; Aspelund, Thor; Esko, Tõnu; Janssens, A Cecile JW; Zhao, Jing Hua; Heath, Simon; Laan, Maris; Fu, Jingyuan; Pistis, Giorgio; Luan, Jian’an; Arora, Pankaj; Lucas, Gavin; Pirastu, Nicola; Pichler, Irene; Jackson, Anne U; Webster, Rebecca J; Zhang, Feng; Peden, John F; Schmidt, Helena; Tanaka, Toshiko; Campbell, Harry; Igl, Wilmar; Milaneschi, Yuri; Hotteng, Jouke-Jan; Vitart, Veronique; Chasman, Daniel I; Trompet, Stella; Bragg-Gresham, Jennifer L; Alizadeh, Behrooz Z; Chambers, John C; Guo, Xiuqing; Lehtimäki, Terho; Kühnel, Brigitte; Lopez, Lorna M; Polašek, Ozren; Boban, Mladen; Nelson, Christopher P; Morrison, Alanna C; Pihur, Vasyl; Ganesh, Santhi K; Hofman, Albert; Kundu, Suman; Mattace-Raso, Francesco US; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Sijbrands, Eric JG; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Vasan, Ramachandran S; Wang, Thomas J; Bergmann, Sven; Vollenweider, Peter; Waeber, Gérard; Laitinen, Jaana; Pouta, Anneli; Zitting, Paavo; McArdle, Wendy L; Kroemer, Heyo K; Völker, Uwe; Völzke, Henry; Glazer, Nicole L; Taylor, Kent D; Harris, Tamara B; Alavere, Helene; Haller, Toomas; Keis, Aime; Tammesoo, Mari-Liis; Aulchenko, Yurii; Barroso, Inês; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Galan, Pilar; Hercberg, Serge; Lathrop, Mark; Eyheramendy, Susana; Org, Elin; Sõber, Siim; Lu, Xiaowen; Nolte, Ilja M; Penninx, Brenda W; Corre, Tanguy; Masciullo, Corrado; Sala, Cinzia; Groop, Leif; Voight, Benjamin F; Melander, Olle; O’Donnell, Christopher J; Salomaa, Veikko; d’Adamo, Adamo Pio; Fabretto, Antonella; Faletra, Flavio; Ulivi, Sheila; Del Greco, M Fabiola; Facheris, Maurizio; Collins, Francis S; Bergman, Richard N; Beilby, John P; Hung, Joseph; Musk, A William; Mangino, Massimo; Shin, So-Youn; Soranzo, Nicole; Watkins, Hugh; Goel, Anuj; Hamsten, Anders; Gider, Pierre; Loitfelder, Marisa; Zeginigg, Marion; Hernandez, Dena; Najjar, Samer S; Navarro, Pau; Wild, Sarah H; Corsi, Anna Maria; Singleton, Andrew; de Geus, Eco JC; Willemsen, Gonneke; Parker, Alex N; Rose, Lynda M; Buckley, Brendan; Stott, David; Orru, Marco; Uda, Manuela; van der Klauw, Melanie M; Zhang, Weihua; Li, Xinzhong; Scott, James; Chen, Yii-Der Ida; Burke, Gregory L; Kähönen, Mika; Viikari, Jorma; Döring, Angela; Meitinger, Thomas; Davies, Gail; Starr, John M; Emilsson, Valur; Plump, Andrew; Lindeman, Jan H; ’t Hoen, Peter AC; König, Inke R; Felix, Janine F; Clarke, Robert; Hopewell, Jemma C; Ongen, Halit; Breteler, Monique; Debette, Stéphanie; DeStefano, Anita L; Fornage, Myriam; Mitchell, Gary F; Smith, Nicholas L; Holm, Hilma; Stefansson, Kari; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Samani, Nilesh J; Preuss, Michael; Rudan, Igor; Hayward, Caroline; Deary, Ian J; Wichmann, H-Erich; Raitakari, Olli T; Palmas, Walter; Kooner, Jaspal S; Stolk, Ronald P; Jukema, J Wouter; Wright, Alan F; Boomsma, Dorret I; Bandinelli, Stefania; Gyllensten, Ulf B; Wilson, James F; Ferrucci, Luigi; Schmidt, Reinhold; Farrall, Martin; Spector, Tim D; Palmer, Lyle J; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Pfeufer, Arne; Gasparini, Paolo; Siscovick, David; Altshuler, David; Loos, Ruth JF; Toniolo, Daniela; Snieder, Harold; Gieger, Christian; Meneton, Pierre; Wareham, Nicholas J; Oostra, Ben A; Metspalu, Andres; Launer, Lenore; Rettig, Rainer; Strachan, David P; Beckmann, Jacques S; Witteman, Jacqueline CM; Erdmann, Jeanette; van Dijk, Ko Willems; Boerwinkle, Eric; Boehnke, Michael; Ridker, Paul M; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Abecasis, Goncalo R; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; Levy, Daniel; Munroe, Patricia B; Psaty, Bruce M; Caulfield, Mark J; Rao, Dabeeru C

    2012-01-01

    Numerous genetic loci influence systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) in Europeans 1-3. We now report genome-wide association studies of pulse pressure (PP) and mean arterial pressure (MAP). In discovery (N=74,064) and follow-up studies (N=48,607), we identified at genome-wide significance (P= 2.7×10-8 to P=2.3×10-13) four novel PP loci (at 4q12 near CHIC2/PDGFRAI, 7q22.3 near PIK3CG, 8q24.12 in NOV, 11q24.3 near ADAMTS-8), two novel MAP loci (3p21.31 in MAP4, 10q25.3 near ADRB1) and one locus associated with both traits (2q24.3 near FIGN) which has recently been associated with SBP in east Asians. For three of the novel PP signals, the estimated effect for SBP was opposite to that for DBP, in contrast to the majority of common SBP- and DBP-associated variants which show concordant effects on both traits. These findings indicate novel genetic mechanisms underlying blood pressure variation, including pathways that may differentially influence SBP and DBP. PMID:21909110

  3. Arsenic toxicity in the water weed Wolffia arrhiza measured using Pulse Amplitude Modulation Fluorometry (PAM) measurements of photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Ritchie, Raymond J; Mekjinda, Nutsara

    2016-10-01

    Accumulation of arsenic in plants is a serious South-east Asian environmental problem. Photosynthesis in the small aquatic angiosperm Wolffia arrhiza is very sensitive to arsenic toxicity, particularly in water below pH 7 where arsenite (As (OH)3) (AsIII) is the dominant form; at pH >7 AsO4(2-) (As(V) predominates). A blue-diode PAM (Pulse Amplitude Fluorometer) machine was used to monitor photosynthesis in Wolffia. Maximum gross photosynthesis (Pgmax) and not maximum yield (Ymax) is the most reliable indicator of arsenic toxicity. The toxicity of arsenite As(III) and arsenate (H2AsO4(2-)) As(V) vary with pH. As(V) was less toxic than As(III) at both pH 5 and pH 8 but both forms of arsenic were toxic (>90% inhibition) at below 0.1molm(-3) when incubated in arsenic for 24h. Arsenite toxicity was apparent after 1h based on Pgmax and gradually increased over 7h but there was no apparent effect on Ymax or photosynthetic efficiency (α0).

  4. PULSE AMPLITUDE DEPENDS ON kHz QPO FREQUENCY IN THE ACCRETING MILLISECOND PULSAR SAX J1808.4-3658

    SciTech Connect

    Bult, Peter; Van der Klis, Michiel

    2015-01-10

    We study the relation between the 300-700 Hz upper kHz quasi-periodic oscillation (QPO) and the 401 Hz coherent pulsations across all outbursts of the accreting millisecond X-ray pulsar SAX J1808.4-3658 observed with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer. We find that the pulse amplitude systematically changes by a factor of ∼2 when the upper kHz QPO frequency passes through 401 Hz: it halves when the QPO moves to above the spin frequency and doubles again on the way back. This establishes for the first time the existence of a direct effect of kHz QPOs on the millisecond pulsations and provides a new clue to the origin of the upper kHz QPO. We discuss several scenarios and conclude that while more complex explanations can not formally be excluded, our result strongly suggests that the QPO is produced by azimuthal motion at the inner edge of the accretion disk, most likely orbital motion. Depending on whether this azimuthal motion is faster or slower than the spin, the plasma then interacts differently with the neutron-star magnetic field. The most straightforward interpretation involves magnetospheric centrifugal inhibition of the accretion flow that sets in when the upper kHz QPO becomes slower than the spin.

  5. Extremum seeking to control the amplitude and frequency of a pulsed jet for bluff body drag reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brackston, Rowan D.; Wynn, Andrew; Morrison, Jonathan F.

    2016-10-01

    Feedback control of fluid flows presents a challenging problem due to nonlinear dynamics and unknown optimal operating conditions. Extremum seeking control presents a suitable method for many flow control situations but involves its own challenges. In this paper, we provide a brief analysis of the extremum seeking method, with attention to modifications that we find to be advantageous. In particular, we present an adaptation for optimisation of the frequency of a harmonic input signal, a common scenario for open-loop flow control systems. We then present results from the experimental implementation of our modified method to the open-loop control system of Oxlade et al. (J Fluid Mech 770:305-318, 2015), an axisymmetric bluff-body wake, forced by a pulsed jet. We find that the system is able to achieve optimal operating conditions in both the amplitude and frequency of the harmonic input signal, and is able to largely reject the disturbances arising from measurements of a highly turbulent flow. We finally show the ability of the extremum seeking system to adapt to changing conditions.

  6. Acute Effects of Continuous Positive Air way Pressure on Pulse Pressure in Chronic Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Quintão, Mônica; Chermont, Sérgio; Marchese, Luana; Brandão, Lúcia; Bernardez, Sabrina Pereira; Mesquita, Evandro Tinoco; Rocha, Nazareth de Novaes; Nóbrega, Antônio Claudio L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Patients with heart failure (HF) have left ventricular dysfunction and reduced mean arterial pressure (MAP). Increased adrenergic drive causes vasoconstriction and vessel resistance maintaining MAP, while increasing peripheral vascular resistance and conduit vessel stiffness. Increased pulse pressure (PP) reflects a complex interaction of the heart with the arterial and venous systems. Increased PP is an important risk marker in patients with chronic HF (CHF). Non-invasive ventilation (NIV) has been used for acute decompensated HF, to improve congestion and ventilation through both respiratory and hemodynamic effects. However, none of these studies have reported the effect of NIV on PP. Objective The objective of this study was to determine the acute effects of NIV with CPAP on PP in outpatients with CHF. Methods Following a double-blind, randomized, cross-over, and placebo-controlled protocol, twenty three patients with CHF (17 males; 60 ± 11 years; BMI 29 ± 5 kg/cm2, NYHA class II, III) underwent CPAP via nasal mask for 30 min in a recumbent position. Mask pressure was 6 cmH2O, whereas placebo was fixed at 0-1 cmH2O. PP and other non invasive hemodynamics variables were assessed before, during and after placebo and CPAP mode. Results CPAP decreased resting heart rate (Pre: 72 ± 9; vs. Post 5 min: 67 ± 10 bpm; p < 0.01) and MAP (CPAP: 87 ± 11; vs. control 96 ± 11 mmHg; p < 0.05 post 5 min). CPAP decreased PP (CPAP: 47 ± 20 pre to 38 ± 19 mmHg post; vs. control: 42 ± 12 mmHg, pre to 41 ± 18 post p < 0.05 post 5 min). Conclusion NIV with CPAP decreased pulse pressure in patients with stable CHF. Future clinical trials should investigate whether this effect is associated with improved clinical outcome. PMID:24676373

  7. Sarcopenia Is Associated with High Pulse Pressure in Older Women

    PubMed Central

    Coelho Júnior, Hélio José; Aguiar, Samuel da Silva; Gonçalves, Ivan de Oliveira; Sampaio, Ricardo Aurélio Carvalho; Uchida, Marco Carlos; Moraes, Milton Rocha; Asano, Ricardo Yukio

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Sarcopenia is a geriatric syndrome associated with impairment of muscle function, metabolism, and cognition in older women. Recent studies have shown a relationship between changes in muscle mass and the cardiovascular system. However, this relationship has not been fully elucidated. Methods. One hundred and thirty community-dwelling Brazilian older women (65.4 ± 6.3 years) were recruited to participate in this study. Data on body composition (via bioelectrical impedance measurements), cardiovascular parameters (using an automatic and noninvasive monitor), and muscle function (using a 3-meter gait speed test) were measured. Results. Sarcopenic older women (n = 43) presented higher levels of pulse pressure (PP) (60.3 ± 2.6 mmHg) and lower muscle function (0.5 ± 0.0 m/s) compared with nonsarcopenic subjects (n = 87) (53.7 ± 1.5 mmHg; 0.9 ± 0.0 m/s) (P < 0.05). Linear regression analysis demonstrated a significantly negative association between skeletal muscle index (SMI) and PP levels (β = −226, P < 0.05). Furthermore, sarcopenic older women showed a 3.1-fold increased risk of having higher PP levels compared with nonsarcopenic women (IC = 1.323–7.506) (P < 0.05). Conclusion. Sarcopenic older women showed lower muscle function and higher cardiovascular risk due to increased PP levels compared with nonsarcopenic subjects. PMID:26346157

  8. Numerical simulation of a ramjet inlet flowfield in response to large amplitude combustor pressure oscillation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsieh, T.; Wardlaw, A. B., Jr.; Coakley, T.

    1984-01-01

    The unsteady flow of a two-dimensional ramjet inlet is studied numerically by solving the Navier-Stokes equation with a two-equation turbulence model. Unsteadiness is introduced by prescribing the pressure disturbance at the inlet exit plane. The case with a sinusoidal exit plane pressure fluctuation of 20 percent of the steady exit pressure is considered. The resulting flow field exhibits a complicated interaction between the terminal shock, separation pockets and core flow. The exit plane properties feature a non-linear response to the imposed sinusoidal pressure variation.

  9. Effect of Fuel Injection and Mixing Characteristics on Pulse-Combustor Performance at High-Pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yungster, Shaye; Paxson, Daniel E.; Perkins, Hugh D.

    2014-01-01

    Recent calculations of pulse-combustors operating at high-pressure conditions produced pressure gains significantly lower than those observed experimentally and computationally at atmospheric conditions. The factors limiting the pressure-gain at high-pressure conditions are identified, and the effects of fuel injection and air mixing characteristics on performance are investigated. New pulse-combustor configurations were developed, and the results show that by suitable changes to the combustor geometry, fuel injection scheme and valve dynamics the performance of the pulse-combustor operating at high-pressure conditions can be increased to levels comparable to those observed at atmospheric conditions. In addition, the new configurations can significantly reduce the levels of NOx emissions. One particular configuration resulted in extremely low levels of NO, producing an emission index much less than one, although at a lower pressure-gain. Calculations at representative cruise conditions demonstrated that pulse-combustors can achieve a high level of performance at such conditions.

  10. Pasteurization of fruit juices by means of a pulsed high pressure process.

    PubMed

    Donsì, Giorgio; Ferrari, Giovanna; Maresca, Paola

    2010-04-01

    The use of pulsed high hydrostatic pressure was investigated as a possible approach to stabilize foodstuffs. The objective of this article was to investigate the effect of the main processing variables (pressure [150 to 300 MPa], temperature levels [25 to 50 degrees C], and pulse number [1 to 10]) on the sanitation of nonpasteurized clear Annurca apple juice as well as freshly-squeezed clear orange juice. The aim of the article was the optimization of the process parameters in step-wise pressure treatment (pressure holding time of each pulse: 60 s, compression rate: 10.5 MPa/s, decompression time: 2 to 5s). The shelf life of the samples, processed at optimized conditions, was evaluated in terms of microbiological stability and quality retention. According to our experimental results, the efficiency of pulsed high pressure processes depends on the combination of pulse holding time and number of pulses. The pulsed high pressure cycles have no additive or synergetic effect on microbial count. The efficacy of the single pulses decreases with the increase of the pulse number and pressure level. Therefore the first pulse cycle is more effective than the following ones. By coupling moderate heating to high pressure, the lethality of the process increases but thermal degradation of the products can be detected. The optimization of the process condition thus results in a compromise between the reduction of the pressure value, due to the synergetic temperature action, and the achievement of quality of the final production. The juices processed under optimal processing conditions show a minimum shelf life of 21 d at a storage temperature of 4 degrees C.

  11. Radial Pulse Character Relationship to Systolic Blood Pressure and Trauma Outcomes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-12-01

    RADIAL PULSE CHARACTER RELATIONSHIPS TO SYSTOLIC BLOOD PRESSURE AND TRAUMA OUTCOMES John McManus, MD, MCR, Andrey L. Yershov, MD, PhD, David Ludwig...pable pulse characteristics in the radial artery would es- timate systolic blood pressure (SBP) and predict outcome in trauma patients. Methods. Data...setting is problematic. The ability to obtain a blood pressure (BP) measurement in an aus- tere environment is often limited by time constraints

  12. Parametric Study of Pulse-Combustor-Driven Ejectors at High-Pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yungster, Shaye; Paxson, Daniel E.; Perkins, Hugh D.

    2015-01-01

    Pulse-combustor configurations developed in recent studies have demonstrated performance levels at high-pressure operating conditions comparable to those observed at atmospheric conditions. However, problems related to the way fuel was being distributed within the pulse combustor were still limiting performance. In the first part of this study, new configurations are investigated computationally aimed at improving the fuel distribution and performance of the pulse-combustor. Subsequent sections investigate the performance of various pulse-combustor driven ejector configurations operating at high pressure conditions, focusing on the effects of fuel equivalence ratio and ejector throat area. The goal is to design pulse-combustor-ejector configurations that maximize pressure gain while achieving a thermal environment acceptable to a turbine, and at the same time maintain acceptable levels of NO(x) emissions and flow non-uniformities. The computations presented here have demonstrated pressure gains of up to 2.8.

  13. Estimation of fracture flow parameters through numerical analysis of hydromechanical pressure pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Cappa, F.; Guglielmi, Y.; Rutqvist, J.; Tsang, C.-F.; Thoraval, A.

    2008-03-16

    The flow parameters of a natural fracture were estimated by modeling in situ pressure pulses. The pulses were generated in two horizontal boreholes spaced 1 m apart vertically and intersecting a near-vertical highly permeable fracture located within a shallow fractured carbonate reservoir. Fracture hydromechanical response was monitored using specialized fiber-optic borehole equipment that could simultaneously measure fluid pressure and fracture displacements. Measurements indicated a significant time lag between the pressure peak at the injection point and the one at the second measuring point, located 1 m away. The pressure pulse dilated and contracted the fracture. Field data were analyzed through hydraulic and coupled hydromechanical simulations using different governing flow laws. In matching the time lag between the pressure peaks at the two measuring points, our hydraulic models indicated that (1) flow was channeled in the fracture, (2) the hydraulic conductivity tensor was highly anisotropic, and (3) the radius of pulse influence was asymmetric, in that the pulse travelled faster vertically than horizontally. Moreover, our parametric study demonstrated that the fluid pressure diffusion through the fracture was quite sensitive to the spacing and orientation of channels, hydraulic aperture, storativity and hydraulic conductivity. Comparison between hydraulic and hydromechanical models showed that the deformation significantly affected fracture permeability and storativity, and consequently, the fluid pressure propagation, suggesting that the simultaneous measurements of pressure and mechanical displacement signals could substantially improve the interpretation of pulse tests during reservoir characterization.

  14. Optimized Shapes of Ocsillating Resonators for Generating High-Amplitude Pressure Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Xiao-Fan; Finkbeiner, Joshua; Daniels, Christopher; Steinetz, Bruce M.

    2003-01-01

    It is well known that the resonator geometry strongly influences the resonant frequencies of an acoustical resonator and the generated nonlinear standing pressure waveform. Maximizing the ratio of maximum to minimum gas pressure at an end of an oscillating resonator by optimizing the cavity contour is investigated numerically. A quasi-Newton type scheme is used to find optimized axisymmetric resonator shapes to achieve the maximum pressure compression ratio. The acoustical field is solved using a one-dimensional model, and the resonance frequency shift and hysteresis effects are obtained through an automation scheme based on continuation methods. Results are presented from optimizing cone, horn-cone, and cosine resonator geometries. Significant performance improvement is found in the optimized shapes over others previously published. Different optimized shapes are found when starting with different initial guesses, indicating multiple local extrema. The numerical model is validated by comparing with the experimental results of a horn-cone shaped resonator.

  15. Parametric Study of Pulse-Combustor-Driven Ejectors at High-Pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yungster, Shaye; Paxson, Daniel E.; Perkins, Hugh D.

    2015-01-01

    Pulse-combustor configurations developed in recent studies have demonstrated performance levels at high-pressure operating conditions comparable to those observed at atmospheric conditions. However, problems related to the way fuel was being distributed within the pulse combustor were still limiting performance. In the first part of this study, new configurations are investigated computationally aimed at improving the fuel distribution and performance of the pulse-combustor. Subsequent sections investigate the performance of various pulse-combustor driven ejector configurations operating at highpressure conditions, focusing on the effects of fuel equivalence ratio and ejector throat area. The goal is to design pulse-combustor-ejector configurations that maximize pressure gain while achieving a thermal environment acceptable to a turbine, and at the same time maintain acceptable levels of NOx emissions and flow non-uniformities. The computations presented here have demonstrated pressure gains of up to 2.8%.

  16. [A calibrated method for blood pressure measurement based on volume pulse wave].

    PubMed

    Youde, Ding; Qinkai, Deng; Feixue, Liang; Jinseng, Guo

    2010-01-01

    Physiology parameters measurement based on volume pulse wave is suitable for the monitoring blood pressure continuously. This paper described that the systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) can be calibrated by measuring the pulse propagation time, just on one point of finger tip. The volume pulse wave was acquired by lighting the red and infrared LED alternately, and after signal processing, an accelerated pulse wave was obtained. Then by measuring the pulse wave propagation time between the progressive wave and reflected wave, we can find the relationship of the time and the blood pressure, and establish the related systolic blood pressure measurement equation. At the same time, based on the relationship between alternating current and direct current components in the volume pulse waveforms and through regression analysising, the relevant diastolic blood pressure measurement equation can be established. 33 clinical experimentation cases have been worked by dividing them into two groups: training group (18 cases) and control group (15 cases), by comparing with the measuring results of the OMRON electronic sphygmomanometer. The results indicated that the two methods had good coherence. The measurement described is simple and reliable, and may be served as a new method for noninvasively and continuously measurement of blood pressure.

  17. Interaction between pulsed discharge and radio frequency discharge burst at atmospheric pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jie; Guo, Ying; Shi, Yuncheng; Zhang, Jing; Shi, J. J.

    2015-08-15

    The atmospheric pressure glow discharges (APGD) with dual excitations in terms of pulsed voltage and pulse-modulation radio frequency (rf) power are studied experimentally between two parallel plates electrodes. Pulse-modulation applied in rf APGD temporally separates the discharge into repetitive discharge bursts, between which the high voltage pulses are introduced to ignite sub-microsecond pulsed discharge. The discharge characteristics and spatio-temporal evolution are investigated by means of current voltage characteristics and time resolved imaging, which suggests that the introduced pulsed discharge assists the ignition of rf discharge burst and reduces the maintain voltage of rf discharge burst. Furtherly, the time instant of pulsed discharge between rf discharge bursts is manipulated to study the ignition dynamics of rf discharge burst.

  18. Dynamic high pressure generation through plasma implosion driven by an intense laser pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, M.; Wang, J. X.; Yuan, T.; Xu, Y. X.; Zhu, W. J.

    2017-03-01

    When an intense laser pulse is loaded upon solids, very high impact pressure can be generated on the surface. In this letter, we simulate this process through one-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation and find that the pressure as high as 0.13 TPa can be generated after the laser pulse with intensity 1015 W/cm2 and 5 picosecond duration is injected upon a nanometer solid-density plasma. The peak pressure is shown to be resulted from an energetic high-density plasma bunch, produced through plasma implosion under extremely high light pressure.

  19. Influence of potential pulses amplitude sequence in a voltammetric electronic tongue (VET) applied to assess antioxidant capacity in aliso.

    PubMed

    Fuentes, Esteban; Alcañiz, Miguel; Contat, Laura; Baldeón, Edwin O; Barat, José M; Grau, Raúl

    2017-06-01

    Four signals configurations were studied, two of them built by small increases of potential and two with bigger increments. The highest current values were obtained when pulses with bigger change of potential were used although the best results were shown by the pulse sequence which included an intermediate pulse before the relevant pulse. A mathematical model based on trolox pattern was developed to predict antioxidant capacity of aliso, employing information obtained from all the electrodes, although model validation could be done only employing the information from gold electrode.

  20. Global Remote Sensing of Precipitating Electron Energies: A Comparison of Substorms and Pressure Pulse Related Intensifications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chua, D.; Parks, G. K.; Brittnacher, M. J.; Germany, G. A.; Spann, J. F.

    2000-01-01

    The Polar Ultraviolet Imager (UVI) observes aurora responses to incident solar wind pressure pulses and interplanetary shocks such its those associated with coronal mass ejections. Previous observations have demonstrated that the arrival of it pressure pulse at the front of the magnetosphere results in highly disturbed geomagnetic conditions and a substantial increase in both dayside and nightside aurora precipitations. Our observations show it simultaneous brightening over bread areas of the dayside and nightside auroral in response to a pressure pulse, indicating that more magnetospheric regions participate as sources for auroral precipitation than during isolate substorm. We estimate the characteristic energies of incident auroral electrons using Polar UVI images and compare the precipitation energies during pressure pulse associated event to those during isolated substorms. We estimate the characteristic energies of incident auroral electrons using Polar UVI images and compare the precipitation energies during pressure pulse associated events to those during isolated auroral substorms. Electron precipitation during substorms has characteristic energies greater than 10 KeV and is structured both in local time and in magnetic latitude. For auroral intensifications following the arrival of'a pressure pulse or interplanetary shock. Electron precipitation is less spatially structured and has greater flux of lower characteristic energy electrons (Echar less than 7 KeV) than during isolated substorm onsets. These observations quantify the differences between global and local auroral precipitation processes and will provide a valuable experimental check for models of sudden storm commencements and magnetospheric response to perturbations in the solar wind.

  1. Elevated Pulse Pressure is Associated with Hemolysis, Proteinuria and Chronic Kidney Disease in Sickle Cell Disease

    PubMed Central

    Novelli, Enrico M.; Hildesheim, Mariana; Rosano, Caterina; Vanderpool, Rebecca; Simon, Marc; Kato, Gregory J.; Gladwin, Mark T.

    2014-01-01

    A seeming paradox of sickle cell disease is that patients do not suffer from a high prevalence of systemic hypertension in spite of endothelial dysfunction, chronic inflammation and vasculopathy. However, some patients do develop systolic hypertension and increased pulse pressure, an increasingly recognized major cardiovascular risk factor in other populations. Hence, we hypothesized that pulse pressure, unlike other blood pressure parameters, is independently associated with markers of hemolytic anemia and cardiovascular risk in sickle cell disease. We analyzed the correlates of pulse pressure in patients (n  =  661) enrolled in a multicenter international sickle cell trial. Markers of hemolysis were analyzed as independent variables and as a previously validated hemolytic index that includes multiple variables. We found that pulse pressure, not systolic, diastolic or mean arterial pressure, independently correlated with high reticulocyte count (beta  =  2.37, p  =  0.02) and high hemolytic index (beta  =  1.53, p = 0.002) in patients with homozygous sickle cell disease in two multiple linear regression models which include the markers of hemolysis as independent variables or the hemolytic index, respectively. Pulse pressure was also independently associated with elevated serum creatinine (beta  =  3.21, p  =  0.02), and with proteinuria (beta  =  2.52, p  =  0.04). These results from the largest sickle cell disease cohort to date since the Cooperative Study of Sickle Cell Disease show that pulse pressure is independently associated with hemolysis, proteinuria and chronic kidney disease. We propose that high pulse pressure may be a risk factor for clinical complications of vascular dysfunction in sickle cell disease. Longitudinal and mechanistic studies should be conducted to confirm these hypotheses. PMID:25478953

  2. A comparison of systolic blood pressure measurement obtained using a pulse oximeter, and direct systolic pressure measurement in anesthetized sows.

    PubMed Central

    Caulkett, N A; Duke, T; Bailey, J V

    1994-01-01

    Systolic blood pressure measurement obtained with a pulse oximeter has been compared to values obtained by other indirect methods in man. Direct pressure measurement is subject to less error than indirect techniques. This study was designed to compare systolic pressure values obtained using a pulse oximeter, with values obtained by direct arterial pressure measurement. The pulse oximeter waveform was used as an indication of perfusion. A blood pressure cuff was applied proximal to the pulse oximeter probe. The cuff was inflated until the oximeter waveform disappeared, this value was recorded as the systolic pressure at the disappearance of the waveform (SPD). The cuff was inflated to a pressure > 200 mmHg, then gradually deflated until the waveform reappeared, this value was recorded as the systolic pressure at reappearance of the waveform (SPR). The average of the two values, SPD and SPR, was calculated and recorded as SPA. The study was performed in sows (n = 21) undergoing cesarean section under epidural anesthesia and IV sedation. A total of 280 measurements were made of SPD, SPR and SPA. Regression analysis of SPA and direct measurement revealed a correlation coefficient (r) of 0.81. Calculation of mean difference (bias) and standard deviation of the bias (precision) for direct pressure--SPA revealed a value of 1.3 +/- 12.1. When compared with direct measurement, the correlation of this technique was similar to that recorded for other indirect techniques used in small animals. This indicates that this technique would be useful for following systolic pressure trends.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8004540

  3. Brachial vs. central systolic pressure and pulse wave transmission indicators: a critical analysis.

    PubMed

    Izzo, Joseph L

    2014-12-01

    This critique is intended to provide background for the reader to evaluate the relative clinical utilities of brachial cuff systolic blood pressure (SBP) and its derivatives, including pulse pressure, central systolic pressure, central augmentation index (AI), and pulse pressure amplification (PPA). The critical question is whether the newer indicators add sufficient information to justify replacing or augmenting brachial cuff blood pressure (BP) data in research and patient care. Historical context, pathophysiology of variations in pulse wave transmission and reflection, issues related to measurement and model errors, statistical limitations, and clinical correlations are presented, along with new comparative data. Based on this overview, there is no compelling scientific or practical reason to replace cuff SBP with any of the newer indicators in the vast majority of clinical situations. Supplemental value for central SBP may exist in defining patients with exaggerated PPA ("spurious systolic hypertension"), managing cardiac and aortic diseases, and in studies of cardiovascular drugs, but there are no current standards for these possibilities.

  4. A method for pressure-pulse suppression in fluid-filled piping

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Y.W.; Bielick, E.F. ); Wiedermann, A.H. ); Ockert, C.E. )

    1989-01-01

    A simple, nondestructive method to suppress pressure pulses in fluid-filled piping was proposed and theoretically analyzed earlier. In this paper, the proposed method is verified experimentally. The results of experiments performed for the range of parameters of practical importance indicated that the attenuation of pressure pulses was in accordance with the theoretical predictions. This paper describes the experimental setup and the test models of the proposed pulse suppression devices and discusses the experimental results. In particular, the measured attenuation factors are presented and compared with the theoretical predictions. 8 ref., 17 fig., 2 tab.

  5. The effects of pulse duration on ablation pressure driven by laser radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Lei; Li, Xiao-Ya Zhu, Wen-Jun; Wang, Jia-Xiang; Tang, Chang-Jian

    2015-03-28

    The effects of laser pulse duration on the ablation pressure induced by laser radiation are investigated using Al target. Numerical simulation results using one dimensional radiation hydro code for laser intensities from 5×10{sup 12}W/cm{sup 2} to 5×10{sup 13}W/cm{sup 2} and pulse durations from 0.5 ns to 20 ns are presented. These results suggest that the laser intensity scaling law of ablation pressure differs for different pulse durations. And the theoretical analysis shows that the effects of laser pulse duration on ablation pressure are mainly caused by two regimes: the unsteady-state flow and the radiative energy loss to vacuum.

  6. Hemodynamic Correlates of Blood Pressure Across the Adult Age Spectrum: Noninvasive Evaluation in the Framingham Heart Study

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Gary F.; Wang, Na; Palmisano, Joseph N.; Larson, Martin G.; Hamburg, Naomi M.; Vita, Joseph A.; Levy, Daniel; Benjamin, Emelia J.; Vasan, Ramachandran S.

    2010-01-01

    Background Systolic blood pressure and pulse pressure are substantially higher in older adults. The relative contributions of increased forward versus reflected pressure wave amplitude or earlier arrival of the reflected wave to elevated pulse pressure remain controversial. Methods and Results We measured proximal aortic pressure and flow, forward pressure wave amplitude, global wave reflection, reflected wave timing and pulse wave velocity noninvasively in 6417 (age range, 19 to 90 years; 53% women) Framingham Heart Study Third Generation and Offspring participants. Variation in forward wave amplitude paralleled pulse pressure throughout adulthood. In contrast, wave reflection and pulse pressure were divergent across adulthood: in younger participants, pulse pressure was lower and wave reflection higher with advancing age whereas in older participants, pulse pressure was higher and wave reflection lower with age. Reflected wave timing differed modestly across age groups despite considerable differences in pulse wave velocity. Forward wave amplitude explained 80% (central) and 66% (peripheral) of the variance in pulse pressure in younger participants (<50 years) and 90% and 84% in the older participants (≥50 years, all P<0.0001). In a stepwise model that evaluated age-pulse pressure relations in the full sample, the late accelerated increases in central and peripheral pulse pressure were markedly attenuated when variation in forward wave amplitude was considered. Conclusions Higher pulse pressure at any age and higher pulse pressure with advancing age is predominantly associated with a larger forward pressure wave. The influence of wave reflection on age-related differences in pulse pressure was minor. PMID:20855656

  7. Associations of apolipoprotein B with pulse pressure and glucose in Chinese families with familial combined hyperlipidemia.

    PubMed

    Pei, Wei-dong; Sun, Yu-hua; Liu, Qun; Zheng, Wei-yue; Zhang, Jian; Zhang, Chao-yang; Gong, Jing; Hopkins, Paul N; Hui, Ru-tai; Liu, Li-sheng; Yang, Yue-jin

    2007-02-14

    Familial combined hyperlipidemia (FCHL), with a marked elevation of apolipoprotein B (apoB), is estimated to cause 10-20% of premature coronary artery disease. However, little data are available to demonstrate the associations of apoB with pulse pressure and glucose levels in FCHL families in China. This study was to investigate the potential influence factors for blood pressure and glucose phenotypes in FCHL families by multiple linear regression analysis. We recruited 147 FCHL relatives and 90 spouses, aged 30 to 60 years, from 42 Chinese families with FCHL. Our results showed that triglyceride and low density lipoprotein cholesterol were associated with fasting glucose levels (all P<0.05). Body mass index and glucose significantly correlated to systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, and mean arterial pressure, respectively (all P<0.05). Furthermore, apoB was significantly related to pulse pressure and glucose in FCHL families (all P<0.05). Thus, this study demonstrates that apoB is significantly associated with pulse pressure and glucose levels in FCHL families. Accordingly, our data suggest that apoB may be a candidate risk marker for pulse pressure and glucose in FCHL populations.

  8. Multiscale cross-approximate entropy analysis as a measurement of complexity between ECG R-R interval and PPG pulse amplitude series among the normal and diabetic subjects.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hsien-Tsai; Lee, Chih-Yuan; Liu, Cyuan-Cin; Liu, An-Bang

    2013-01-01

    Physiological signals often show complex fluctuation (CF) under the dual influence of temporal and spatial scales, and CF can be used to assess the health of physiologic systems in the human body. This study applied multiscale cross-approximate entropy (MC-ApEn) to quantify the complex fluctuation between R-R intervals series and photoplethysmography amplitude series. All subjects were then divided into the following two groups: healthy upper middle-aged subjects (Group 1, age range: 41-80 years, n = 27) and upper middle-aged subjects with type 2 diabetes (Group 2, age range: 41-80 years, n = 24). There are significant differences of heart rate variability, LHR, between Groups 1 and 2 (1.94 ± 1.21 versus 1.32 ± 1.00, P = 0.031). Results demonstrated differences in sum of large scale MC-ApEn (MC-ApEn(LS)) (5.32 ± 0.50 versus 4.74 ± 0.78, P = 0.003). This parameter has a good agreement with pulse-pulse interval and pulse amplitude ratio (PAR), a simplified assessment for baroreflex activity. In conclusion, this study employed the MC-ApEn method, integrating multiple temporal and spatial scales, to quantify the complex interaction between the two physical signals. The MC-ApEn(LS) parameter could accurately reflect disease process in diabetics and might be another way for assessing the autonomic nerve function.

  9. Acute changes in pulse pressure in relation to constituents of particulate air pollution in elderly persons

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, Lotte; Buczynska, Anna; Walgraeve, Christophe; Delcloo, Andy; Potgieter-Vermaak, Sanja; Van Grieken, Rene; Demeestere, Kristof; Dewulf, Jo; Van Langenhove, Herman; De Backer, Hugo; Nemery, Benoit; Nawrot, Tim S.

    2012-08-15

    An increased pulse pressure (difference between systolic and diastolic blood pressure) suggests aortic stiffening. The objective of this study was to examine the acute effects of both particulate matter (PM) mass and composition on blood pressure, among elderly persons. We carried out a panel study in persons living in elderly homes in Antwerp, Belgium. We recruited 88 non-smoking persons, 70% women with a mean age of 83 years (standard deviation: 5.2). Blood pressure was measured and a blood sample was collected on two time points, which were chosen so that there was an exposure contrast in ambient PM exposure. The elemental content of the collected indoor and outdoor PM{sub 2.5} (particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter <2.5 {mu}m) mass concentration was measured. Oxygenated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (oxy-PAHs) on outdoor PM{sub 10} (particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter <10 {mu}m) were measured. Each interquartile range increase of 20.8 {mu}g/m Superscript-Three in 24-h mean outdoor PM{sub 2.5} was associated with an increase in pulse pressure of 4.0 mmHg (95% confidence interval: 1.8-6.2), in persons taking antihypertensive medication (n=57), but not in persons not using antihypertensive medication (n=31) (p for interaction: 0.02). Vanadium, iron and nickel contents of PM{sub 2.5} were significantly associated with systolic blood pressure and pulse pressure, among persons on antihypertensive medication. Similar results were found for indoor concentrations. Of the oxy-PAHs, chrysene-5,6-dione and benzo[a]pyrene-3,6-dione were significantly associated with increases in systolic blood pressure and pulse pressure. In elderly, pulse pressure was positively associated with acute increases in outdoor and indoor air pollution, among persons taking antihypertensive medication. These results might form a mechanistic pathway linking air pollution as a trigger of cardiovascular events.

  10. Tree shoot bending generates hydraulic pressure pulses: a new long-distance signal?

    PubMed

    Lopez, Rosana; Badel, Eric; Peraudeau, Sebastien; Leblanc-Fournier, Nathalie; Beaujard, François; Julien, Jean-Louis; Cochard, Hervé; Moulia, Bruno

    2014-05-01

    When tree stems are mechanically stimulated, a rapid long-distance signal is induced that slows down primary growth. An investigation was carried out to determine whether the signal might be borne by a mechanically induced pressure pulse in the xylem. Coupling xylem flow meters and pressure sensors with a mechanical testing device, the hydraulic effects of mechanical deformation of tree stem and branches were measured. Organs of several tree species were studied, including gymnosperms and angiosperms with different wood densities and anatomies. Bending had a negligible effect on xylem conductivity, even when deformations were sustained or were larger than would be encountered in nature. It was found that bending caused transient variation in the hydraulic pressure within the xylem of branch segments. This local transient increase in pressure in the xylem was rapidly propagated along the vascular system in planta to the upper and lower regions of the stem. It was shown that this hydraulic pulse originates from the apoplast. Water that was mobilized in the hydraulic pulses came from the saturated porous material of the conduits and their walls, suggesting that the poroelastic behaviour of xylem might be a key factor. Although likely to be a generic mechanical response, quantitative differences in the hydraulic pulse were found in different species, possibly related to differences in xylem anatomy. Importantly the hydraulic pulse was proportional to the strained volume, similar to known thigmomorphogenetic responses. It is hypothesized that the hydraulic pulse may be the signal that rapidly transmits mechanobiological information to leaves, roots, and apices.

  11. Pulse Oximeter Derived Blood Pressure Measurement in Patients With a Continuous Flow Left Ventricular Assist Device.

    PubMed

    Hellman, Yaron; Malik, Adnan S; Lane, Kathleen A; Shen, Changyu; Wang, I-Wen; Wozniak, Thomas C; Hashmi, Zubair A; Munson, Sarah D; Pickrell, Jeanette; Caccamo, Marco A; Gradus-Pizlo, Irmina; Hadi, Azam

    2016-10-26

    Currently, blood pressure (BP) measurement is obtained noninvasively in patients with continuous flow left ventricular assist device (LVAD) by placing a Doppler probe over the brachial or radial artery with inflation and deflation of a manual BP cuff. We hypothesized that replacing the Doppler probe with a finger-based pulse oximeter can yield BP measurements similar to the Doppler derived mean arterial pressure (MAP). We conducted a prospective study consisting of patients with contemporary continuous flow LVADs. In a small pilot phase I inpatient study, we compared direct arterial line measurements with an automated blood pressure (ABP) cuff, Doppler and pulse oximeter derived MAP. Our main phase II study included LVAD outpatients with a comparison between Doppler, ABP, and pulse oximeter derived MAP. A total of five phase I and 36 phase II patients were recruited during February-June 2014. In phase I, the average MAP measured by pulse oximeter was closer to arterial line MAP rather than Doppler (P = 0.06) or ABP (P < 0.01). In phase II, pulse oximeter MAP (96.6 mm Hg) was significantly closer to Doppler MAP (96.5 mm Hg) when compared to ABP (82.1 mm Hg) (P = 0.0001). Pulse oximeter derived blood pressure measurement may be as reliable as Doppler in patients with continuous flow LVADs.

  12. Pulse pressure monitoring through non-contact cardiac motion detection using 2.45 GHz microwave Doppler radar.

    PubMed

    Singh, Aditya; Lubecke, Victor; Boric-Lubecke, Olga

    2011-01-01

    The use of a Continuous Wave (CW) quadrature Doppler radar is proposed here for continuous non-invasive Pulse Pressure monitoring. A correspondence between the variation in systemic pulse and variation in the displacement of the chest due to heart is demonstrated, establishing feasibility for the approach. Arctangent demodulation technique was used to process baseband data from radar measurements on two test subjects, in order to determine the absolute cardiac motion. An Omron digital Blood pressure cuff was used to measure the systolic and diastolic blood pressures from which the pulse pressure was calculated. Correlation between pulse pressure and cardiac motion was observed through changes induced due to different postures of the body.

  13. Relationship between radial and central arterial pulse wave and evaluation of central aortic pressure using the radial arterial pulse wave.

    PubMed

    Takazawa, Kenji; Kobayashi, Hideyuki; Shindo, Naohisa; Tanaka, Nobuhiro; Yamashina, Akira

    2007-03-01

    Since a decrease of central aortic pressure contributes to the prevention of cardiovascular events, simple measurement of not only brachial blood pressure but also central aortic pressure may be useful in the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular diseases. In this study, we simultaneously measured radial artery pulse waves non-invasively and ascending aortic pressure invasively, before and after the administration of nicorandil. We then compared changes in central aortic pressure and radial arterial blood pressure calibrated with brachial blood pressure in addition to calculating the augmentation index (AI) at the aorta and radial artery. After nicorandil administration, the reduction in maximal systolic blood pressure in the aorta (Deltaa-SBP) was -14+/-15 mmHg, significantly larger than that in early systolic pressure in the radial artery (Deltar-SBP) (-9+/-12 mmHg). The reduction in late systolic blood pressure in the radial artery (Deltar-SBP2) was -15+/-14 mmHg, significantly larger than Deltar-SBP, but not significantly different from Deltaa-SBP. There were significant relationships between Deltaa-SBP and Deltar-SBP (r=0.81, p<0.001), and between Deltaa-SBP and Deltar-SBP2 (r=0.91, p<0.001). The slope of the correlation regression line with Deltar-SBP2 (0.83) was larger and closer to 1 than that with Deltar-SBP (0.63), showing that the relationship was close to 1:1. Significant correlations were obtained between aortic AI (a-AI) and radial AI (r-AI) (before nicorandil administration: r=0.91, p<0.001; after administration: r=0.70, p<0.001). These data suggest that the measurement of radial artery pulse wave and observation of changes in the late systolic blood pressure in the radial artery (r-SBP2) in addition to the ordinary measurement of brachial blood pressure may enable a more accurate evaluation of changes in maximal systolic blood pressure in the aorta (a-SBP).

  14. Pulse pressure variation to predict fluid responsiveness in spontaneously breathing patients: tidal vs. forced inspiratory breathing.

    PubMed

    Hong, D M; Lee, J M; Seo, J H; Min, J J; Jeon, Y; Bahk, J H

    2014-07-01

    We evaluated whether pulse pressure variation can predict fluid responsiveness in spontaneously breathing patients. Fifty-nine elective thoracic surgical patients were studied before induction of general anaesthesia. After volume expansion with hydroxyethyl starch 6 ml.kg(-1) , patients were defined as responders by a ≥ 15% increase in the cardiac index. Haemodynamic variables were measured before and after volume expansion and pulse pressure variations were calculated during tidal breathing and during forced inspiratory breathing. Median (IQR [range]) pulse pressure variation during forced inspiratory breathing was significantly higher in responders (n = 29) than in non-responders (n = 30) before volume expansion (18.2 (IQR 14.7-18.2 [9.3-31.3])% vs. 10.1 (IQR 8.3-12.6 [4.8-21.1])%, respectively, p < 0.001). The receiver-operating characteristic curve revealed that pulse pressure variation during forced inspiratory breathing could predict fluid responsiveness (area under the curve 0.910, p < 0.0001). Pulse pressure variation measured during forced inspiratory breathing can be used to guide fluid management in spontaneously breathing patients.

  15. Perceived social isolation moderates the relationship between early childhood trauma and pulse pressure in older adults.

    PubMed

    Norman, Greg J; Hawkley, Louise; Ball, Aaron; Berntson, Gary G; Cacioppo, John T

    2013-06-01

    Over a million children are subjected to some form of trauma in the United States every year. Early trauma has been shown to have deleterious effects on cardiovascular health in adulthood. However, the presence of strong social relationships as an adult can buffer an individual against many of the harmful effects of early trauma. Furthermore, the perception of social isolation has been shown to be a significant risk factor for the development of cardiovascular disease and is a strong predictor of all cause mortality. One likely mechanism thought to underlie the influence of perceived isolation on health is changes in arterial stiffness. One of the more widely used measures of arterial stiffness in older individuals is pulse pressure. The goal of the present study was to determine whether early childhood trauma is associated with elevations on pulse pressure. Furthermore, this study sought to determine whether perceived social isolation moderates the relationship between early trauma and pulse pressure. Results revealed that individuals with low perceived social isolation displayed no significant relationship between early trauma and pulse pressure. However, individuals who reported higher levels of perceived isolation showed a significant positive association between early trauma and pulse pressure. Therefore, the detrimental effects of early trauma may be partially dependent upon the quality of social relationships as an adult.

  16. Retrieval of the pulse amplitude and phase from cross-phase modulation spectrograms using the simulated annealing method.

    PubMed

    Honzatko, Pavel; Kanka, J; Vrany, B

    2004-11-29

    The simulated annealing method is used for retrieving the amplitude and phase from cross-phase modulation spectrograms. The method allows us to take into account the birefringence of the measurement fiber and resolution of the optical spectrum analyzer. The influence of the birefringence and analyzer resolution are discussed.

  17. Pulse transit time as a surrogate measure of changes in systolic arterial pressure in children during sleep.

    PubMed

    Vlahandonis, Anna; Biggs, Sarah N; Nixon, Gillian M; Davey, Margot J; Walter, Lisa M; Horne, Rosemary S C

    2014-08-01

    Pulse transit time has been proposed as a surrogate measure of systolic arterial pressure, as it is dependent upon arterial stiffness. Past research has shown that pulse transit time has a significant inverse relationship to systolic arterial pressure in adults; however, studies in children are limited. This study aimed to explore the relationship between systolic arterial pressure and pulse transit time in children during sleep. Twenty-five children (13.1 ± 1.6 years, 48% male) underwent overnight polysomnography (PSG) with a simultaneous recording of continuous systolic arterial pressure and photoplethysmography. Pulse transit time was calculated as the time delay between the R-wave peak of the electrocardiogram (ECG) to the 50% point of the upstroke of the corresponding photoplethysmography waveform; 500 beats of simultaneous systolic arterial pressure and pulse transit time were analysed in each sleep stage for each child. Pulse transit time was normalized to each subject's mean wake pulse transit time. The ability of pulse transit time to predict systolic arterial pressure change was determined by linear mixed-effects modelling. Significant negative correlations between pulse transit time and systolic arterial pressure were found for individual children for each sleep stage [mean correlations for cohort: non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep 1 and 2 r = -0.57, slow wave sleep (SWS) r = -0.76, REM r = -0.65, P < 0.01 for all]. Linear mixed-model analysis demonstrated that changes in pulse transit time were a significant predictor of changes in systolic arterial pressure for each sleep stage (P < 0.001). The model of pulse transit time-predicted systolic arterial pressure closely tracked actual systolic arterial pressure changes over time. This study demonstrated that pulse transit time was accurate in tracking systolic arterial pressure changes over time. Thus, the use of pulse transit time as a surrogate measure of changes in systolic arterial pressure in

  18. Lorentzian amplitude and phase pulse shaping for nonresonant background suppression and enhanced spectral resolution in coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering spectroscopy and microscopy.

    PubMed

    Konorov, Stanislav O; Blades, Michael W; Turner, Robin F B

    2010-07-01

    Femtosecond coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) spectroscopy offers several advantages over spontaneous Raman spectroscopy due to the inherently high sensitivity and low average power deposition in the sample. Femtosecond CARS can be implemented in a collinear pump/probe beam configuration for microspectroscopy applications and has emerged as a powerful technique for chemical imaging of biological specimens. However, one serious limitation of this approach is the presence of a high nonresonant background component that often obscures the resonant signals of interest. We report here an innovative pulse-shaping method based on Lorentzian amplitude and phase spectral modulation of a broadband femtosecond probe pulse that yields spectra with both high spectral resolution and no nonresonant background. No further mathematical analysis is needed to extract Raman spectra. The utility of the proposed method for CARS microscopy is demonstrated using a mixture of polystyrene and latex beads, as well as dry-fixed embryonic stem cells.

  19. Influences of impedance matching network on pulse-modulated radio frequency atmospheric pressure glow discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Huo, W. G.; Xu, K.; Sun, B.; Ding, Z. F.

    2012-08-15

    Pulse-modulated RF atmospheric pressure glow discharges (APDGs) were investigated in recent years to reduce the thermal accumulation and extend the operation region of the stable alpha glow mode. Different pulse-modulated voltage and current waveforms were acquired in previous experiments, but no attention was paid to the interpretation. We investigated this issue and associated phenomenon via positive and negative feedback effects derived from varying the series capacitor in the inversely L-shaped matching network used in our pulse-modulated RF APGD source. The evolutions of pulse-modulated RF waveforms were found to be associated with the feedback region and the pulsed plasma absorbed RF power. In the positive feedback region, pulse-modulated RF APGDs are relatively stable. In the negative feedback region, wide spikes as well as undershoots occur in RF voltage and current waveforms and the plasma absorbed RF power. In case of a high RF power discharge with a low modulation frequency, the pulse-modulated RF APGD is extinguished and re-ignited due to the enhanced undershoot during the initial pulse phase. The pulse-modulated RF APGD can transit from positive to negative feedback region in a range of series capacitance. Experimental results are discussed by the aid of equivalent circuit, negative and positive feedback effects.

  20. Experimental study on the pressure and pulse wave propagation in viscoelastic vessel tubes-effects of liquid viscosity and tube stiffness.

    PubMed

    Ikenaga, Yuki; Nishi, Shohei; Komagata, Yuka; Saito, Masashi; Lagrée, Pierre-Yves; Asada, Takaaki; Matsukawa, Mami

    2013-11-01

    A pulse wave is the displacement wave which arises because of ejection of blood from the heart and reflection at vascular bed and distal point. The investigation of pressure waves leads to understanding the propagation characteristics of a pulse wave. To investigate the pulse wave behavior, an experimental study was performed using an artificial polymer tube and viscous liquid. A polyurethane tube and glycerin solution were used to simulate a blood vessel and blood, respectively. In the case of the 40 wt% glycerin solution, which corresponds to the viscosity of ordinary blood, the attenuation coefficient of a pressure wave in the tube decreased from 4.3 to 1.6 dB/m because of the tube stiffness (Young's modulus: 60 to 200 kPa). When the viscosity of liquid increased from approximately 4 to 10 mPa·s (the range of human blood viscosity) in the stiff tube, the attenuation coefficient of the pressure wave changed from 1.6 to 3.2 dB/m. The hardening of the blood vessel caused by aging and the increase of blood viscosity caused by illness possibly have opposite effects on the intravascular pressure wave. The effect of the viscosity of a liquid on the amplitude of a pressure wave was then considered using a phantom simulating human blood vessels. As a result, in the typical range of blood viscosity, the amplitude ratio of the waves obtained by the experiments with water and glycerin solution became 1:0.83. In comparison with clinical data, this value is much smaller than that seen from blood vessel hardening. Thus, it can be concluded that the blood viscosity seldom affects the attenuation of a pulse wave.

  1. Method and Apparatus for Pressure Pulse Arcjet Starting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sankovic, John M. (Inventor); Curran, Francis M. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    The invention disclosed is directed to a method and apparatus for an arcjet starter. The invention discloses a method of moving an arc from the subsonic region of the thruster to the supersonic region by introducing a pressurized propellant into the casuty of the anode.

  2. Method and Apparatus for Pressure Pulse Arcjet Starting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandkovic, John M. (Inventor); Curran, Francis M. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    The invention disclosed is directed to a model and apparatus for an arcjet starter. The invention discloses a method of moving an arc from the subsonic region of the thruster to the supersonic region by introducing a pressurized propellant into the annular area of the anode.

  3. Method and apparatus for pressure pulse arcjet starting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sankovic, John M. (Inventor); Curran, Francis M. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    The invention disclosed is directed to a method and apparatus for an arcjet starter. The invention discloses a method of moving an arc from the subsonic region of the thruster to the supersonic region by introducing a pressurized propellant into the casuty of the anode.

  4. Experimental verification of the ablation pressure dependence upon the laser intensity at pulsed irradiation of metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasyuk, I. K.; Semenov, A. Yu; Stuchebryukhov, I. A.; Khishchenko, K. V.

    2016-11-01

    Experiments for verification of a functional dependence of the ablation pressure on the irradiated surface of a target upon the laser intensity in a range from 1.2 to 350 TW/cm2 have been carried out. For that, at some intensities of the laser irradiation, time intervals between the laser pulse maximum and the moment of the shock-wave front arrival to the rear surface of the target were measured, which are dependent on the ablation pressure. Two schemes of the measurements were used. At the first scheme, at higher laser intensities, the front arrival moment is determined via an electron-optical camera when the rear surface begins glowing. At the second scheme, the front arrival moment is recorded when a probe laser pulse changes the character of the reflection by the rear surface of the irradiated target. Results of measurements are in agreement with the ablation pressure dependence upon the laser pulse intensity within 20%.

  5. Applications of tunable high energy/pressure pulsed lasers to atmospheric transmission and remote sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hess, R. V.; Seals, R. K.

    1974-01-01

    Atmospheric transmission of high energy C12 O2(16) lasers were improved by pulsed high pressure operation which, due to pressure broadening of laser lines, permits tuning the laser 'off' atmospheric C12 O2(16) absorption lines. Pronounced improvement is shown for horizontal transmission at altitudes above several kilometers, and for vertical transmission through the entire atmosphere. The atmospheric transmission of tuned C12 O2(16) lasers compares favorably with C12 O2(18) isotope lasers and CO lasers. The advantages of tunable, high energy, high pressure pulsed lasers over tunable diode lasers and waveguide lasers, in combining high energies with a large tuning range, are evaluated for certain applications to remote sensing of atmospheric constituents and pollutants. Pulsed operation considerably increases the signal to noise ratio without seriously affecting the high spectral resolution of signal detection obtained with laser heterodyning.

  6. The research of the solar panels-commutator-inverter-load system with the pulse-amplitude control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taissariyeva, K. N.; Issembergenov, N. T.

    2014-11-01

    The system "solar panels-commutator-inverter-load" with amplitude-impulse control was researched. It was shown that if the solar panels are located in a certain way at the input of the inverter, it will be possible to get multilevel voltage close to sine wave with the help of amplitude-impulse control of commutator at the output of inverter. Herewith the effect is saving of solar panels depending on the quantity of voltage level, and also the enhanced voltage distortion coefficient (THD). For instance, with 8-level of voltage 28,2% and THD=4,64%, with 13-level of voltage, 30,5% and THD=2,65%, and with 26-level of voltage 31,7% and THD=1,22%. The given results were obtained through computer modeling and experimental research.

  7. Pulsed laser kinetic studies of liquids under high pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Eyring, E.M.

    1990-11-29

    A high pressure apparatus has been constructed for measuring rates of reactions in liquids under pressures ranging from 1 atm to 2000 atm. This apparatus is being used to test the effect of ligand bulk on the rate of a thermal ring closure reaction. Microphonic photoacoustic signals obtained by illuminating solid samples with synchrotron soft x-rays and with visible laser beams have been successfully correlated with a theory for photoacoustic signal enhancement by volatile liquids. The concentration dependence of the fluorescence and nonradiative quantum yields for cresyl violet dissolved in methanol has been determined. Stability constants for complexes of lithium ion with four different crown ethers dissolved in a low temperature molten salt have been measured.

  8. Ion Based Pressure Sensor for Pulse Detonation Engines

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-03-01

    Chapman - Jouguet Detonation cycles to be 27%, 47%, and 49% respectively [6]. Compared to the constant pressure Brayton cycle, the Humphrey cycle...the wave, according to Chapman - Jouguet theory, travels at supersonic speeds relative to the unburned fuel-air mixture. The PDE takes advantage of...a successful detonation near Chapman - Jouguet predicted speeds, the combustion must produce a strong shock wave that travels down the tube. This

  9. Resonance of the exchange amplitude of a photon by an electron scattering in a pulsed laser field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nedoreshta, V. N.; Roshchupkin, S. P.; Voroshilo, A. I.

    2015-06-01

    Resonant scattering of a photon by an electron in the presence of the field of the low intensity circularly polarized pulsed laser wave is studied theoretically. The approximation used the case in which a laser-pulse duration is significantly greater than the characteristic oscillation time. The resonance conditions of the exchange diagrams by electron and positron intermediate states were determined. The probability of such a process is calculated. It is demonstrated that the resonant probability may be six to ten orders of magnitude higher than the probability of the Compton effect in the absence of the external field. Obtained results can be verified experimentally in the framework of modern research projects (SLAC, FAIR, XFEL, and ELI).

  10. Arterial pulse pressure amplification described by means of a nonlinear wave model: characterization of human aging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alfonso, M.; Cymberknop, L.; Armentano, R.; Pessana, F.; Wray, S.; Legnani, W.

    2016-04-01

    The representation of blood pressure pulse as a combination of solitons captures many of the phenomena observed during its propagation along the systemic circulation. The aim of this work is to analyze the applicability of a compartmental model for propagation regarding the pressure pulse amplification associated with arterial aging. The model was applied to blood pressure waveforms that were synthesized using solitons, and then validated by waveforms obtained from individuals from differentiated age groups. Morphological changes were verified in the blood pressure waveform as a consequence of the aging process (i.e. due to the increase in arterial stiffness). These changes are the result of both a nonlinear interaction and the phenomena present in the propagation of nonlinear mechanic waves.

  11. Arterial Pulse Pressure and Its Association With Reduced Stroke Volume During Progressive Central Hypovolemia

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-09-01

    NM, Joyner MJ. Influence of increased central venous pressure on baroreflex control of sympathetic activity in humans. Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol...Arterial Pulse Pressure and Its Association With Reduced Stroke Volume During Progressive Central Hypovolemia Victor A. Convertino, PhD, William H...reduction of SV and change in MSNA during graded central hypovolemia in humans. Methods: After a 12-minute baseline data collection period, 13 men were

  12. Dissociation of nitrogen in a pulse-periodic dielectric barrier discharge at atmospheric pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Popov, N. A.

    2013-05-15

    Nitrogen molecule dissociation in a pulse-periodic atmospheric-pressure dielectric barrier discharge is numerically analyzed. It is shown that the quenching rate of predissociation states at atmospheric pressure is relatively low and the production of nitrogen atoms in this case can be adequately described using the cross section for electron-impact dissociation of N{sub 2} molecules taken from the paper by P.C. Cosby [J. Chem. Phys. 98, 9544 (1993)].

  13. Propagation of the pulsed electron beam of nanosecond duration in gas composition of high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kholodnaya, G.; Sazonov, R.; Ponomarev, D.; Remnev, G.

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents the results of the investigation of the propagation of an electron beam in the high-pressure gas compositions (50, 300, and 760 Torr): sulfur hexafluoride and hydrogen, sulfur hexafluoride and nitrogen, sulfur hexafluoride and argon. The experiments have been performed using the TEA-500 laboratory accelerator. The main parameters of the accelerator are as follows: an accelerating voltage of 500 kV; an electron beam current of 10 kA; a pulse width at half maximum of 60 ns; a pulse energy of 200 J; a pulse repetition rate of up to 5 pulses per second, a beam diameter of 5 cm. The pulsed electron beam was injected into a 55 cm metal drift tube. The drift tube is equipped with three reverse-current shunts with simultaneous detecting of signals. The obtained results of the investigation make it possible to conclude that the picture of the processes occurring in the interaction of an electron beam in the high-pressure gas compositions is different from that observed in the propagation of the electron beam in the low-pressure gas compositions (1 Torr).

  14. Encoding of the amplitude modulation of pulsatile electrical stimulation in the feline cochlear nucleus by neurons in the inferior colliculus; effects of stimulus pulse rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCreery, Douglas; Han, Martin; Pikov, Victor; Yadav, Kamal; Pannu, Satinderpall

    2013-10-01

    Objectives. Persons without a functional auditory nerve cannot benefit from cochlear implants, but some hearing can be restored by an auditory brainstem implant (ABI) with stimulating electrodes implanted on the surface of the cochlear nucleus (CN). Most users benefit from their ABI, but speech recognition tends to be poorer than for users of cochlear implants. Psychophysical studies suggest that poor modulation detection may contribute to the limited performance of ABI users. In a cat model, we determined how the pulse rate of the electrical stimulus applied within or on the CN affects temporal and rate encoding of amplitude modulation (AM) by neurons in the central nucleus of the inferior colliculus (ICC). Approach. Stimulating microelectrodes were implanted chronically in and on the cats' CN, and multi-site recording microelectrodes were implanted chronically into the ICC. Encoding of AM pulse trains by neurons in the ICC was characterized as vector strength (VS), the synchrony of neural activity with the AM, and as the mean rate of neuronal action potentials (neuronal spike rate (NSR)). Main results. For intranuclear microstimulation, encoding of AM as VS was up to 3 dB greater when stimulus pulse rate was increased from 250 to 500 pps, but only for neuronal units with low best acoustic frequencies, and when the electrical stimulation was modulated at low frequencies (10-20 Hz). For stimulation on the surface of the CN, VS was similar at 250 and 500 pps, and the dynamic range of the VS was reduced for pulse rates greater than 250 pps. Modulation depth was encoded strongly as VS when the maximum stimulus amplitude was held constant across a range of modulation depth. This ‘constant maximum’ protocol allows enhancement of modulation depth while preserving overall dynamic range. However, modulation depth was not encoded as strongly as NSR. Significance. The findings have implications for improved sound processors for present and future ABIs. The performance of

  15. Dissociation of carbon-dioxide at high-pressure using nanosecond-pulsed dielectric barrier discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yong, Taemin; Cappelli, Mark

    2016-10-01

    This study investigates the efficiency of the conversion of CO2 into CO and O2 using nanosecond repetitively pulsed discharges in a high pressure reactor capable of exceeding the supercritical point. The electrode configuration consists of a pin-to-plane geometry with the plane electrode covered by dielectric material (SiO2) . The products of CO2 splitting are measured using mass spectrometry. The energy efficiency is determined for a range of residence times, pulse frequency and energy, and reactor pressures. The extent of CO2 conversion is found to be dependent on the duration of the processing time, reaching an equilibrium level that is linearly-dependent on the discharge pulse energy. The results are compared with our previous experiment conducted in the absence of the dielectric layer.

  16. Isentropic compression of metals, at multi-megabar pressures, using high explosive pulsed power

    SciTech Connect

    Tasker, D. G.; Goforth, J. H.; King, J. C.; Martinez, E. C.; Oona, H.; Sena, F. C.; Reisman, D. B.; Cauble, R. C.

    2001-01-01

    Accurate, ultra-high pressure isentropic equation of state (EOS) data, are required for a variety of applications and materials. Asay reported a new method to obtain these data using pulsed magnetic loading on the Sandia Z-machine. Fast rising current pulses (risetimes from 100 to 30011s) at current densities exceeding many MNcm, create continuous magnetic loading up to a few Mbar. As part of a collaborative effort between the Los Alamos and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories we are adapting our high explosive pulsed power (HEPP) methods to obtain isentropic EOS data with the Asay technique. This year we plan to obtain isentropic EOS data for copper and tantalum at pressures up to -2 Mbar; eventually we hope to reach several tens of Mbar. We will describe the design of the HEPP systems and show out attempts to obtain EOS data to date.

  17. Tree shoot bending generates hydraulic pressure pulses: a new long-distance signal?

    PubMed Central

    Lopez, Rosana; Badel, Eric

    2014-01-01

    When tree stems are mechanically stimulated, a rapid long-distance signal is induced that slows down primary growth. An investigation was carried out to determine whether the signal might be borne by a mechanically induced pressure pulse in the xylem. Coupling xylem flow meters and pressure sensors with a mechanical testing device, the hydraulic effects of mechanical deformation of tree stem and branches were measured. Organs of several tree species were studied, including gymnosperms and angiosperms with different wood densities and anatomies. Bending had a negligible effect on xylem conductivity, even when deformations were sustained or were larger than would be encountered in nature. It was found that bending caused transient variation in the hydraulic pressure within the xylem of branch segments. This local transient increase in pressure in the xylem was rapidly propagated along the vascular system in planta to the upper and lower regions of the stem. It was shown that this hydraulic pulse originates from the apoplast. Water that was mobilized in the hydraulic pulses came from the saturated porous material of the conduits and their walls, suggesting that the poroelastic behaviour of xylem might be a key factor. Although likely to be a generic mechanical response, quantitative differences in the hydraulic pulse were found in different species, possibly related to differences in xylem anatomy. Importantly the hydraulic pulse was proportional to the strained volume, similar to known thigmomorphogenetic responses. It is hypothesized that the hydraulic pulse may be the signal that rapidly transmits mechanobiological information to leaves, roots, and apices. PMID:24558073

  18. Role of Pulse Pressure and Geometry of Primary Entry Tear in Acute Type B Dissection Propagation.

    PubMed

    Peelukhana, Srikara V; Wang, Yanmin; Berwick, Zachary; Kratzberg, Jarin; Krieger, Joshua; Roeder, Blayne; Cloughs, Rachel E; Hsiao, Albert; Chambers, Sean; Kassab, Ghassan S

    2016-08-10

    The hemodynamic and geometric factors leading to propagation of acute Type B dissections are poorly understood. The objective is to elucidate whether geometric and hemodynamic parameters increase the predilection for aortic dissection propagation. A pulse duplicator set-up was used on porcine aorta with a single entry tear. Mean pressures of 100 and 180 mmHg were used, with pulse pressures ranging from 40 to 200 mmHg. The propagation for varying geometric conditions (%circumference of the entry tear: 15-65%, axial length: 0.5-3.2 cm) were tested for two flap thicknesses (1/3rd and 2/3rd of the thickness of vessel wall, respectively). To assess the effect of pulse and mean pressure on flap dynamics, the %true lumen (TL) cross-sectional area of the entry tear were compared. The % circumference for propagation of thin flap (47 ± 1%) was not significantly different (p = 0.14) from thick flap (44 ± 2%). On the contrary, the axial length of propagation for thin flap (2.57 ± 0.15 cm) was significantly different (p < 0.05) from the thick flap (1.56 ± 0.10 cm). TL compression was observed during systolic phase. For a fixed geometry of entry tear (%circumference = 39 ± 2%; axial length = 1.43 ± 0.13 cm), mean pressure did not have significant (p = 0.84) effect on flap movement. Increase in pulse pressure resulted in a significant change (p = 0.02) in %TL area (52 ± 4%). The energy acting on the false lumen immediately before propagation was calculated as 75 ± 9 J/m(2) and was fairly uniform across different specimens. Pulse pressure had a significant effect on the flap movement in contrast to mean pressure. Hence, mitigation of pulse pressure and restriction of flap movement may be beneficial in patients with type B acute dissections.

  19. Elastic moduli of precompressed pyrophyllite used in ultrahigh pressure research. [propagation of ultrasonic pulses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sachse, W.; Ruoff, A. L.

    1974-01-01

    The propagation of ultrasonic pulses in pyrophyllite specimens was studied to determine the effect of specimen precompression on the measured elastic moduli. Measurements were made at room pressure and, for the precompressed specimens, to pressures of 3 kbar. Pyrophyllite was found to be elastically anisotropic, apparently the result of the fabric present in our material. The room pressure adiabatic bulk modulus as measured on specimens made of isostatically compacted powered pyrophyllite was determined to be 96.1 kbar. The wave speeds of ultrasonic pulses in pyrophyllite were found to decrease with increasing specimen precompression. A limiting value of precompression was found, above which no further decrease in wave speed was observed. For the shear wave speeds this occurs at 10 kbar while for the longitudinal wave at 25 kbar. In the limit, the shear waves propagate 20% slower than in the unprecompressed samples; for the longitudinal wave the difference is 30%.

  20. Wave reflection augments central systolic and pulse pressures during facial cooling.

    PubMed

    Edwards, David G; Roy, Matthew S; Prasad, Raju Y

    2008-06-01

    Cardiovascular events are more common in the winter months, possibly because of hemodynamic alterations in response to cold exposure. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of acute facial cooling on central aortic pressure, arterial stiffness, and wave reflection. Twelve healthy subjects (age 23 +/- 3 yr; 6 men, 6 women) underwent supine measurements of carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (PWV), brachial artery blood pressure, and central aortic pressure (via the synthesis of a central aortic pressure waveform by radial artery applanation tonometry and generalized transfer function) during a control trial (supine rest) and a facial cooling trial (0 degrees C gel pack). Aortic augmentation index (AI), an index of wave reflection, was calculated from the aortic pressure waveform. Measurements were made at baseline, 2 min, and 7 min during each trial. Facial cooling increased (P < 0.05) peripheral and central diastolic and systolic pressures. Central systolic pressure increased more than peripheral systolic pressure (22 +/- 3 vs. 15 +/- 2 mmHg; P < 0.05), resulting in decreased pulse pressure amplification ratio. Facial cooling resulted in a robust increase in AI and a modest increase in PWV (AI: -1.4 +/- 3.8 vs. 21.2 +/- 3.0 and 19.9 +/- 3.6%; PWV: 5.6 +/- 0.2 vs. 6.5 +/- 0.3 and 6.2 +/- 0.2 m/s; P < 0.05). Change in mean arterial pressure but not PWV predicted the change in AI, suggesting that facial cooling may increase AI independent of aortic PWV. Facial cooling and the resulting peripheral vasoconstriction are associated with an increase in wave reflection and augmentation of central systolic pressure, potentially explaining ischemia and cardiovascular events in the cold.

  1. Growth of arc in high-pressure, pulsed glow discharge by gas density depletion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imada, Go; Yatsui, Kiyoshi; Masuda, Wataru

    2000-10-01

    Effects of gas density depletion on arc formation of high-pressure, pulsed glow discharge have been investigated by eliminating the other factors which may affect the discharge stability, such as shock waves, residual ions, electrode heating, and discharge products. The gas density depletion has been simulated by utilizing a subsonic gas flow between the curved electrodes combined with a convergent nozzle and a divergent diffuser. A comparison has been made on the discharge in the aerodynamically created gas density depletion with the second discharge in the double-pulse discharge within a stable gas. We have found that the large gas density depletion, Δρ/ρ0˜-3.6% corresponding to a pulse repetition rate (PRR) of ˜50 Hz, tends to cause an arc-like filament or an arc without the shocks, ions, electrode heating, and products. However, the second discharge in the double-pulse discharge becomes an arc in much smaller gas density depletion (Δρ/ρ0˜-1.2% corresponding to PRR ˜3 Hz). Therefore, the collapse of high-pressure, pulsed glow discharge is most likely caused by some factor other than the gas density depletion.

  2. Acoustic pressure waves induced in human heads by RF pulses from high-field MRI scanners.

    PubMed

    Lin, James C; Wang, Zhangwei

    2010-04-01

    The current evolution toward greater image resolution from magnetic resonance image (MRI) scanners has prompted the exploration of higher strength magnetic fields and use of higher levels of radio frequencies (RFs). Auditory perception of RF pulses by humans has been reported during MRI with head coils. It has shown that the mechanism of interaction for the auditory effect is caused by an RF pulse-induced thermoelastic pressure wave inside the head. We report a computational study of the intensity and frequency of thermoelastic pressure waves generated by RF pulses in the human head inside high-field MRI and clinical scanners. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (U.S. FDA) guides limit the local specific absorption rate (SAR) in the body-including the head-to 8 W kg(-1). We present results as functions of SAR and show that for a given SAR the peak acoustic pressures generated in the anatomic head model were essentially the same at 64, 300, and 400 MHz (1.5, 7.0, and 9.4 T). Pressures generated in the anatomic head are comparable to the threshold pressure of 20 mPa for sound perception by humans at the cochlea for 4 W kg(-1). Moreover, results indicate that the peak acoustic pressure in the brain is only 2 to 3 times the auditory threshold at the U.S. FDA guideline of 8 W kg(-1). Even at a high SAR of 20 W kg(-1), where the acoustic pressure in the brain could be more than 7 times the auditory threshold, the sound pressure levels would not be more than 17 db above threshold of perception at the cochlea.

  3. Performance improvement by orthogonal pulse amplitude modulation and discrete multitone modulation signals in hybrid fiber-visible laser light communication system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Fangliu; He, Jing; Deng, Rui; Chen, Qinghui; Chen, Lin

    2016-10-01

    A modulation format, orthogonal pulse amplitude modulation and discrete multitone modulation (O-PAM-DMT), is experimentally demonstrated in a hybrid fiber-visible laser light communication (fiber-VLLC) system using a cost-effective directly modulated laser and blue laser diode. In addition, low overhead is achieved by utilizing only one training sequence to implement synchronization and channel estimation. Through adjusting the ratio of PAM and DMT signal, three types of O-PAM-DMT signals are investigated. After transmission over a 20-km standard single-mode fiber and 5-m free-space VLLC, the receiver sensitivity for 4.36-Gbit/s O-PAM-DMT signals can be improved by 0.4, 1.4, and 2.7 dB, respectively, at a bit error rate of 1×10-3, compared with a conventional DMT signal.

  4. Unconstrained pulse pressure monitoring for health management using hetero-core fiber optic sensor

    PubMed Central

    Nishiyama, Michiko; Sonobe, Masako; Watanabe, Kazuhiro

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we present a pulse pressure waveform sensor that does not constrain a wearer’s daily activity; the sensor uses hetero-core fiber optics. Hetero-core fiber sensors have been found to be sensitive to moderate bending. To detect minute pulse pressure changes from the radial artery at the wrist, we devised a fiber sensor arrangement using three-point bending supports. We analyzed and evaluated the measurement validity using wavelet transformation, which is well-suited for biological signal processing. It was confirmed that the detected pulse waveform had a fundamental mode frequency of around 1.25 Hz over the time-varying waveform. A band-pass filter with a range of frequencies from 0.85 to 1.7 Hz was used to pick up the fundamental mode. In addition, a high-pass filter with 0.85 Hz frequency eliminated arm motion artifacts; consequently, we achieved high signal-to-noise ratio. For unrestricted daily health management, it is desirable that pulse pressure monitoring can be achieved by simply placing a device on the hand without the sensor being noticed. Two types of arrangements were developed and demonstrated in which the pulse sensors were either embedded in a base, such as an armrest, or in a wearable device. A wearable device without cuff pressure using a sensitivity-enhanced fiber sensor was successfully achieved with a sensitivity of 0.07–0.3 dB with a noise floor lower than 0.01 dB for multiple subjects. PMID:27699128

  5. Unconstrained pulse pressure monitoring for health management using hetero-core fiber optic sensor.

    PubMed

    Nishiyama, Michiko; Sonobe, Masako; Watanabe, Kazuhiro

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we present a pulse pressure waveform sensor that does not constrain a wearer's daily activity; the sensor uses hetero-core fiber optics. Hetero-core fiber sensors have been found to be sensitive to moderate bending. To detect minute pulse pressure changes from the radial artery at the wrist, we devised a fiber sensor arrangement using three-point bending supports. We analyzed and evaluated the measurement validity using wavelet transformation, which is well-suited for biological signal processing. It was confirmed that the detected pulse waveform had a fundamental mode frequency of around 1.25 Hz over the time-varying waveform. A band-pass filter with a range of frequencies from 0.85 to 1.7 Hz was used to pick up the fundamental mode. In addition, a high-pass filter with 0.85 Hz frequency eliminated arm motion artifacts; consequently, we achieved high signal-to-noise ratio. For unrestricted daily health management, it is desirable that pulse pressure monitoring can be achieved by simply placing a device on the hand without the sensor being noticed. Two types of arrangements were developed and demonstrated in which the pulse sensors were either embedded in a base, such as an armrest, or in a wearable device. A wearable device without cuff pressure using a sensitivity-enhanced fiber sensor was successfully achieved with a sensitivity of 0.07-0.3 dB with a noise floor lower than 0.01 dB for multiple subjects.

  6. Estimated Pulse Wave Velocity Calculated from Age and Mean Arterial Blood Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Greve, Sara V.; Laurent, Stephan; Olsen, Michael H.

    2017-01-01

    In a recently published paper, Greve et al [J Hypertens 2016;34:1279-1289] investigate whether the estimated carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (ePWV), calculated using an equation derived from the relationship between carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (cfPWV), age, and blood pressure, predicts cardiovascular disease (CVD) as good as the measured cfPWV. Because ePWV predicts CVD as good as cfPWV, some might wonder whether ePWV could be replaced by cfPWV, which is a time-consuming measurement requiring an expensive apparatus. This question is addressed in this mini-review. PMID:28229052

  7. Investigation of the Acoustic Source Characteristics of High Energy Laser Pulses: Models and Experiment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-06-01

    consistent with the expected approximately 1/r relationship for pressure amplitudes under 100MPa. The modeling effort employed AUTODYN , a finite...agreed with Vogel’s measured values. The efficiency, pulse length, pulse shape, and variation of pressure amplitude with range achieved with AUTODYN ...Nonlinear Acoustics, AUTODYN , Acoustic Modeling, Shock Acoustics 16. PRICE CODE 17. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF REPORT Unclassified 18. SECURITY

  8. Propagation of current pulses with an amplitude of up to 85 kA in soil over distances of several tens of meters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, V. P.; Fortov, V. E.; Bykov, Yu. A.; Ermolaev, V. A.; Son, E. E.; Bazelyan, E. M.; Skobarikhin, Yu. V.; Grabovski, E. V.; Oleinik, G. M.; Shishlov, A. O.; Gribov, A. N.; Grigor'yants, V. K.; Goryushin, Yu. A.

    2016-02-01

    Conditions for the propagation in soil of current pulses with an amplitude of up to 85 kA and temporal characteristics typical of a lightning stroke are studied with the help of a specially designed mobile test complex on the basis of a 4-MJ capacitive energy storage with an output voltage of up to 2 MV. In contrast to the conventional opinion that the ionization processes in highly conductive soils are weakly pronounced, a dramatic reduction in the grounding resistance at a resistivity of about 100 Ω m and currents above 10 kA was observed. A time interval in which the grounding resistance is determined by the skin effect in soil is revealed. It is shown that the grounding resistance continues to decrease behind the front of the current pulse due to the continuous growth of spark channels in soil. Time variations in the grounding resistance cannot be related to the formation of a continuous ionization zone near the grounding electrodes and are explained only by the simultaneous growth of several long spark channels extending from the grounding device.

  9. Amplitude- and rise-time-compensated filters

    DOEpatents

    Nowlin, Charles H.

    1984-01-01

    An amplitude-compensated rise-time-compensated filter for a pulse time-of-occurrence (TOOC) measurement system is disclosed. The filter converts an input pulse, having the characteristics of random amplitudes and random, non-zero rise times, to a bipolar output pulse wherein the output pulse has a zero-crossing time that is independent of the rise time and amplitude of the input pulse. The filter differentiates the input pulse, along the linear leading edge of the input pulse, and subtracts therefrom a pulse fractionally proportional to the input pulse. The filter of the present invention can use discrete circuit components and avoids the use of delay lines.

  10. Numerical investigation of the effect of driving voltage pulse shapes on the characteristics of low-pressure argon dielectric barrier discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Eslami, E. Barjasteh, A.; Morshedian, N.

    2015-06-15

    In this work, we numerically compare the effect of a sinusoidal, triangular, and rectangular pulsed voltage profile on the calculated particle production, electric current, and gas voltage in a dielectric barrier discharge. The total argon gas pressure of 400 Pa, the distance between dielectrics of 5 mm, the dielectric thickness of 0.7 mm, and the temperature of T = 300 K were considered as input parameters. The different driving voltage pulse shapes (triangular, rectangular, and sinusoidal) are considered as applied voltage with a frequency of 7 kHz and an amplitude of 700 V peak to peak. It is shown that applying a rectangular voltage, as compared with a sinusoidal or triangle voltage, increases the current peak, while the peak width is decreased. Higher current density is related to high production of charged particles, which leads to the generation of some highly active species, such as Ar* (4s level), and Ar** (4p level) in the gap.

  11. Optical emission spectroscopy of nanosecond repetitively pulsed microplasmas generated in air at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orriere, Thomas; Moreau, Eric; Benard, Nicolas; Pai, David

    2015-09-01

    Nanosecond repetitively pulsed (NRP) microplasmas are generated in room temperature air at atmospheric pressure, in order to investigate the enhanced control of discharge properties via the combined effects of spatial confinement and nanosecond repetitive pulsing. Discharges were generated using high-voltage pulses of 15-ns duration applied to a tungsten pin-to-pin reactor, with inter-electrode gap distances (d) from 2 mm down to 0.2 mm. Optical emission spectroscopy and electrical characterization performed on the discharge indicate that heat transfer and plasma chemistry are influenced by the microplasma geometry. Ultrafast gas heating is observed upon deducing the rotational temperature of N2 from the measured emission spectrum of the N2 (C -->B) (0, 2) and (1, 3) transition bands, but use of the microplasma geometry (d = 0.2 mm) results in lower gas temperatures than in larger discharge gaps (d = 2 mm), including at high pulse repetition frequency (30 kHz) where substantial steady-state gas heating can occur. The measured Stark broadening of the Hα transition is significantly greater than for previously studied NRP discharges in air at atmospheric pressure, indicating that the maximum electron number density may be correspondingly much greater, up to 1018 cm-3. Furthermore, for NRP microplasmas, the intensities of emission from excited atomic ions (O+ and N+) are much higher than those of excited neutral atoms (O and N), in contrast to NRP discharges generated in larger discharge gaps.

  12. Effect of electromagnetic pulse transverse inhomogeneity on ion acceleration by radiation pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Lezhnin, K. V.; Kamenets, F. F.; Beskin, V. S.; Kando, M.; Esirkepov, T. Zh.; Bulanov, S. V.

    2015-03-15

    During ion acceleration by radiation pressure, a transverse inhomogeneity of an electromagnetic pulse leads to an off-axis displacement of the irradiated target, limiting the achievable ion energy. This effect is analytically described within the framework of a thin foil target model and with particle-in-cell simulations showing that the maximum energy of the accelerated ions decreases as the displacement from the axis of the target's initial position increases. The results obtained can be applied to the optimization of ion acceleration by the laser radiation pressure with mass-limited targets.

  13. Modeling of asymmetric pulsed phenomena in dielectric-barrier atmospheric-pressure glow discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Ha Yan; Wang Huijuan; Wang Xiaofei

    2012-01-15

    Asymmetric current pulses in dielectric-barrier atmospheric-pressure glow discharges are investigated by a self-consistent, one-dimensional fluid model. It is found that the glow mode and Townsend mode can coexist in the asymmetric discharge even though the gas gap is rather large. The reason for this phenomenon is that the residual space charge plays the role of anode and reduces the gap width, resulting in the formation of a Townsend discharge.

  14. Development of a Pulsed Pressure-Based Technique for Cavitation Damage Study

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Fei; Wang, Jy-An John; Liu, Yun; Wang, Hong

    2012-01-01

    Cavitation occurs in many fluid systems and can lead to severe material damage. To assist the study of cavitation damage, a novel testing method utilizing pulsed pressure was developed. In this talk, the scientific background and the technical approach of this development are present and preliminary testing results are discussed. It is expected that this technique can be used to evaluate cavitation damage under various testing conditions including harsh environments such as those relevant to geothermal power generation.

  15. A Neural Network for Estimation of Aortic Pressure from the Radial Artery Pressure Pulse

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-10-25

    from periphery to artery: a model based study, American Journal of Physiology, 1998,274:43, pp H1386-92 [9] C. Chen, E. Nevo , B Fetics, P Pak, F, Yin, L...36. [10] B Fetics, E Nevo , C. Chen, D Kass, Parametric model derivation of transfer function for noninvasive estimation of aortic pressure by radial

  16. Amplitude Modulator Chassis

    SciTech Connect

    Erbert, G

    2009-09-01

    The Amplitude Modulator Chassis (AMC) is the final component in the MOR system and connects directly to the PAM input through a 100-meter fiber. The 48 AMCs temporally shape the 48 outputs of the MOR using an arbitrary waveform generator coupled to an amplitude modulator. The amplitude modulation element is a two stage, Lithium Niobate waveguide device, where the intensity of the light passing through the device is a function of the electrical drive applied. The first stage of the modulator is connected to a programmable high performance Arbitrary Waveform Generator (AWG) consisting of 140 impulse generators space 250 ps apart. An arbitrary waveform is generated by independently varying the amplitude of each impulse generator and then summing the impulses together. In addition to the AWG a short pulse generator is also connected to the first stage of the modulator to provide a sub 100-ps pulse used for timing experiments. The second stage of the modulator is connect to a square pulse generator used to further attenuate any pre or post pulse light passing through the first stage of the modulator. The fast rise and fall time of the square pulse generator is also used to produce fast rise and fall times of the AWG by clipping the AWG pulse. For maximum extinction, a pulse bias voltage is applied to each stage of the modulator. A pulse voltage is applied as opposed to a DC voltage to prevent charge buildup on the modulator. Each bias voltage is adjustable to provide a minimum of 50-dB extinction. The AMC is controlled through ICCS to generate the desired temporal pulse shape. This process involves a closed-loop control algorithm, which compares the desired temporal waveform to the produced optical pulse, and iterates the programming of the AWG until the two waveforms agree within an allowable tolerance.

  17. Pressure Dependent Magnetoluminescence of Semiconductor Quantum Wells in CW and Pulsed Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, E. D.; Kim, Y.; Perry, C. H.; Tozer, S.; Rickel, D. G.

    1996-03-01

    We report on low-temperature pressure dependent magnetoluminescence measurements of a In_0.2Ga_0.8As/GaAs 80Åwide n-type single-strained-quantum well in cw (max 18T) and pulsed (max 60T) magnetic fields using a miniture diamond anvil cell. Landau level shifts were studied at 4 and 76 K with pressures ranging from ambient to about 40 kbar. The nc = 0 to nv = 0 Landau level transition was linear in magnetic field for all pressures, but there is evidence of a slope change for fields of about 20T. The pressure coefficients of the bandgap energy are the expected 9-10 meV/kbar. Also observed was the Γ-X pressure induced transition between the InGaAs Γ-point and the GaAs barrier X-point at the highest pressures. The pressure dependence of the conduction- and valence-band masses will also be discussed.

  18. Tubular Cardiac Tissues Derived from Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Generate Pulse Pressure In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Seta, Hiroyoshi; Matsuura, Katsuhisa; Sekine, Hidekazu; Yamazaki, Kenji; Shimizu, Tatsuya

    2017-01-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell-derived cardiac cells provide the possibility to fabricate cardiac tissues for transplantation. However, it remains unclear human bioengineered cardiac tissues function as a functional pump in vivo. Human iPS cells induced to cardiomyocytes in suspension were cultured on temperature-responsive dishes to fabricate cardiac cell sheets. Two pairs of triple-layered sheets were transplanted to wrap around the inferior vena cava (IVC) of nude rats. At 4 weeks after transplantation, inner pressure changes in the IVC were synchronized with electrical activations of the graft. Under 80 pulses per minute electrical stimulation, the inner pressure changes at 8 weeks increased to 9.1 ± 3.2 mmHg, which were accompanied by increases in the baseline inner pressure of the IVC. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that 0.5-mm-thick cardiac troponin T-positive cardiac tissues, which contained abundant human mitochondria, were clearly engrafted lamellar around the IVC and surrounded by von Willebrand factor-positive capillary vessels. The mRNA expression of several contractile proteins in cardiac tissues at 8 weeks in vivo was significantly upregulated compared with those at 4 weeks. We succeeded in generating pulse pressure by tubular human cardiac tissues in vivo. This technology might lead to the development of a bioengineered heart assist pump. PMID:28358136

  19. Application of Pressure Pulse Test Analysis in CO2 Leakage Detection and Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakiba, M.; Hosseini, S. A.

    2015-12-01

    Over the past decade, numerous research and industrial projects have been devoted to investigate the feasibility and efficiency of carbon dioxide capture, storage, and utilization. Besides the studies over the characteristics of candidate formations for CO2 injection, much attention has been paid to answer the environmental concerns regarding the CO2 leak to overlying formations. To first detect and then track a possible CO2 leak, different techniques have been proposed in the literature; however, most of them examine only a small portion of the formation and have a low resolution for early leak detection. To further increase the extent of the investigation zone and to monitor a large section of the formation in more detail, multi-well testing techniques have received a significant attention. Pressure pulse testing is a multi-well test technique in which a pressure signal generated by periods of injection and shut-in from a pulser well is propagated inside the formation, and the corresponding response is recorded at the observer wells. The recorded pressure response is then analyzed to measure the rock and fluid properties and to monitor the possible changes over the time. In this research study, we have applied frequency methods as well as superposition principle to interpret the pressure pulse test data and monitor the changes in transmissibility and storativity of the formation between the well pairs. We have used synthetic reservoir models and numerical reservoir simulations to produce the pressure pulse test data. The analysis of the simulation results indicated that even a small amount of CO2 leak in the investigation zone can have a measurable effect on the calculated storativity and transmissibility factors. This can be of a great importance when an early leak detection is of interest. Moreover, when multiple wells are available in the formation, the distribution of the calculated parameters can visualize the extent of CO2 leak, which has a great

  20. Method for continuous control of composition and doping of pulsed laser deposited films by pressure control

    DOEpatents

    Lowndes, Douglas H.; McCamy, James W.

    1996-01-01

    A method for growing a deposit upon a substrate of semiconductor material involves the utilization of pulsed laser deposition techniques within a low-pressure gas environment. The substrate and a target of a first material are positioned within a deposition chamber and a low-pressure gas atmosphere is developed within the chamber. The substrate is then heated, and the target is irradiated, so that atoms of the target material are ablated from the remainder of the target, while atoms of the gas simultaneously are adsorbed on the substrate/film surface. The ablated atoms build up upon the substrate, together with the adsorbed gas atoms to form the thin-film deposit on the substrate. By controlling the pressure of the gas of the chamber atmosphere, the composition of the formed deposit can be controlled, and films of continuously variable composition or doping can be grown from a single target of fixed composition.

  1. Exhaust pressure and density of various pulsed MPD-Arc thruster systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michels, C. J.

    1973-01-01

    Exhaust flow in a new 155-cm-i.d. vacuum facility is compared with earlier measurements in a small (15.2-cm-i.d.) duct. Reductions in post-transient impact pressure are about 5:1 in the larger facility. Corresponding reduced electron number densities (about 2 x 10 to the 13th power per cu cm) are noted. A new 125-microsec pulse-forming network power source produced no major differences in impact pressure compared to the crowbarred condenser bank used earlier. Comparing a puff gas feed of the arc chamber with a new 10-msec steady gas feed also shows no major difference in impact pressure for 125-microsec powering.

  2. Alleviation of pressure pulse effects for trains entering tunnels. Volume 1: Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dayman, B., Jr.; Hammitt, A. G.; Holway, H. P.; Tucker, C. E., Jr.; Vardy, A. E.

    1979-01-01

    The degree to which it is possible to attenuate the effects of pressure pulses on the passengers in trains entering tunnels by modifying the normally abrupt portal of a constant-diameter single track tunnel was investigated. Although the suggested modifications to the tunnel entrance portal may not appreciably decrease the magnitude of the pressure rise, they are very effective in reducing the discomfort to the human ear by substantially decreasing the rate of pressure rise to that which the normal ear can accommodate. Qualitative comparison was made of this portal modification approach with other approaches: decreasing the train speed or sealing the cars. The optimum approach, which is dependent upon the conditions and requirements of each particular rail system, is likely to be the portal modification one for a rapid rail mass transit system.

  3. AUTOMATIC DETECTION ALGORITHM OF DYNAMIC PRESSURE PULSES IN THE SOLAR WIND

    SciTech Connect

    Zuo, Pingbing; Feng, Xueshang; Wang, Yi; Xie, Yanqiong; Li, Huijun; Xu, Xiaojun E-mail: fengx@spaceweather.ac.cn

    2015-04-20

    Dynamic pressure pulses (DPPs) in the solar wind are a significant phenomenon closely related to the solar-terrestrial connection and physical processes of solar wind dynamics. In order to automatically identify DPPs from solar wind measurements, we develop a procedure with a three-step detection algorithm that is able to rapidly select DPPs from the plasma data stream and simultaneously define the transition region where large dynamic pressure variations occur and demarcate the upstream and downstream region by selecting the relatively quiet status before and after the abrupt change in dynamic pressure. To demonstrate the usefulness, efficiency, and accuracy of this procedure, we have applied it to the Wind observations from 1996 to 2008 by successfully obtaining the DPPs. The procedure can also be applied to other solar wind spacecraft observation data sets with different time resolutions.

  4. Weighing Scale-Based Pulse Transit Time is a Superior Marker of Blood Pressure than Conventional Pulse Arrival Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Stephanie L.-O.; Carek, Andrew M.; Kim, Chang-Sei; Ashouri, Hazar; Inan, Omer T.; Hahn, Jin-Oh; Mukkamala, Ramakrishna

    2016-12-01

    Pulse transit time (PTT) is being widely pursued for cuff-less blood pressure (BP) monitoring. Most efforts have employed the time delay between ECG and finger photoplethysmography (PPG) waveforms as a convenient surrogate of PTT. However, these conventional pulse arrival time (PAT) measurements include the pre-ejection period (PEP) and the time delay through small, muscular arteries and may thus be an unreliable marker of BP. We assessed a bathroom weighing scale-like system for convenient measurement of ballistocardiography and foot PPG waveforms – and thus PTT through larger, more elastic arteries – in terms of its ability to improve tracking of BP in individual subjects. We measured “scale PTT”, conventional PAT, and cuff BP in humans during interventions that increased BP but changed PEP and smooth muscle contraction differently. Scale PTT tracked the diastolic BP changes well, with correlation coefficient of ‑0.80 ± 0.02 (mean ± SE) and root-mean-squared-error of 7.6 ± 0.5 mmHg after a best-case calibration. Conventional PAT was significantly inferior in tracking these changes, with correlation coefficient of ‑0.60 ± 0.04 and root-mean-squared-error of 14.6 ± 1.5 mmHg (p < 0.05). Scale PTT also tracked the systolic BP changes better than conventional PAT but not to an acceptable level. With further development, scale PTT may permit reliable, convenient measurement of BP.

  5. Weighing Scale-Based Pulse Transit Time is a Superior Marker of Blood Pressure than Conventional Pulse Arrival Time

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Stephanie L.-O.; Carek, Andrew M.; Kim, Chang-Sei; Ashouri, Hazar; Inan, Omer T.; Hahn, Jin-Oh; Mukkamala, Ramakrishna

    2016-01-01

    Pulse transit time (PTT) is being widely pursued for cuff-less blood pressure (BP) monitoring. Most efforts have employed the time delay between ECG and finger photoplethysmography (PPG) waveforms as a convenient surrogate of PTT. However, these conventional pulse arrival time (PAT) measurements include the pre-ejection period (PEP) and the time delay through small, muscular arteries and may thus be an unreliable marker of BP. We assessed a bathroom weighing scale-like system for convenient measurement of ballistocardiography and foot PPG waveforms – and thus PTT through larger, more elastic arteries – in terms of its ability to improve tracking of BP in individual subjects. We measured “scale PTT”, conventional PAT, and cuff BP in humans during interventions that increased BP but changed PEP and smooth muscle contraction differently. Scale PTT tracked the diastolic BP changes well, with correlation coefficient of −0.80 ± 0.02 (mean ± SE) and root-mean-squared-error of 7.6 ± 0.5 mmHg after a best-case calibration. Conventional PAT was significantly inferior in tracking these changes, with correlation coefficient of −0.60 ± 0.04 and root-mean-squared-error of 14.6 ± 1.5 mmHg (p < 0.05). Scale PTT also tracked the systolic BP changes better than conventional PAT but not to an acceptable level. With further development, scale PTT may permit reliable, convenient measurement of BP. PMID:27976741

  6. Analysis based on global model of nitrogen plasma produced by pulsed microwave at low pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu, Feng; Yan, Eryan Meng, Fanbao; Ma, Hongge; Liu, Minghai

    2015-07-15

    This paper analyzes certain evolution processes in nitrogen plasmas discharged using pulsed microwaves at low pressure. Comparing the results obtained from the global model incorporating diffusion and the microwave transmission method, the temporal variation of the electron density is analyzed. With a discharge pressure of 300 Pa, the results obtained from experiments and the global model calculation show that when the discharge begins the electron density in the plasma rises quickly, to a level above the critical density corresponding to the discharge microwave frequency, but falls slowly when the discharge microwave pulse is turned off. The results from the global model also show that the electron temperature increases rapidly to a peak, then decays after the electron density reaches the critical density, and finally decreases quickly to room temperature when the discharge microwave pulse is turned off. In the global model, the electron density increases because the high electron temperature induces a high ionization rate. The decay of the electron density mainly comes from diffusion effect.

  7. Characterization of a discontinuous atmospheric pressure interface. Multiple ion introduction pulses for improved performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Liang; Li, Guangtao; Nie, Zongxiu; Duncan, Jason; Ouyang, Zheng; Cooks, R. Graham

    2009-06-01

    Discontinuous atmospheric pressure interfaces (DAPI) are used to match the rate of sample introduction to the pumping capacity of miniature mass spectrometers. In this study, the influence of the interface flow conductance and the mass spectrometer pumping speed on ion introduction into a handheld mass spectrometer is investigated. Results show that an intermediate flow conductance (2.6 × 10-3 L/s) gives the best ion introduction efficiency whereas the pumping speed has no influence in the range studied (0.35-7.1 L/s) except that a minimum pumping speed of 0.35 L/s is required. The linear dynamic range decreases with increasing interface open time, a result that corresponds to observations made using standard electrical gating of ion introduction a method that is not available at the high pressures involved in API into miniature systems where ions are transported through pneumatic flow. However, the mechanical opening of the interface with DAPI can be used for automatic gain control (AGC) using an external ion source. Software modifications to allow the use of multiple ion introduction pulses before mass analysis of the trapped ion population improve the detection limits. This method was validated by comparing the results obtained from the same sample using a single ion introduction pulse and multiple ion introduction pulses. In conjunction with this method, a broad-band waveform can be applied to selectively accumulate analyte ions, allowing essentially the entire ion trapping capacity to be devoted to one or more ions of interest.

  8. Fiber optic based heart-rate and pulse pressure shape monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokkinos, D.; Dehipawala, S.; Holden, T.; Cheung, E.; Musa, M.; Tremberger, G., Jr.; Schneider, P.; Lieberman, D.; Cheung, T.

    2012-01-01

    Macro-bending fiber optic based heart-rate and pulse pressure shape monitors have been fabricated and tested for non-invasive measurement. Study of fiber bending loss and its stability and variations are very important especially for sensor designs based on optical fiber bending. Wavelengths from 1300 nm to 1550 nm have been used with fabrication based on multimode fiber, single mode fiber, and photonic crystal fiber. The smallest studied curvature would demand the use of single mode standard fibers. The collected data series show high quality suitable for random series analysis. Fractal property of optically measured pulse pressure data has been observed to correlate with physical activity. Correlation to EKG signal suggests that the fabricated monitors are capable of measuring the differential time delays at wrist and leg locations. The difference in time delay could be used to formulate a velocity parameter for diagnostics. The pulse shape information collected by the fiber sensor provides additional parameters for the analysis of the fractal nature of the heart. The application to real time measurement of blood vessel stiffness with this optical non-invasive fiber sensor is discussed.

  9. Increased Pre-operative Pulse Pressure Predicts Procedural Complications and Mortality in Patients Undergoing Tibial Interventions for Critical Limb Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Darling, Jeremy D.; Lee, Vanessa; Schermerhorn, Marc L.; Guzman, Raul J.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Pulse pressure is a non-invasive measure of arterial stiffness. Elevated pulse pressure is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular events and death. The effects of pulse pressure on outcomes after endovascular interventions for critical limb ischemia (CLI), however, are unknown. We thus evaluated whether increased pre-operative pulse pressure was associated with adverse outcomes and mortality in patients undergoing endovascular tibial artery intervention. Methods All patients undergoing endovascular tibial intervention for CLI at a single institution from 2004 to 2014 were included in this study. Pre-operative pulse pressure was derived from measurements obtained in the holding area prior to the procedure. Patients were divided into 2 groups based on pulse pressure, < 80 or ≥ 80. Patient demographics and co-morbidities were documented, and outcomes including procedural complications, repeat intervention, amputation, and mortality were recorded. Multivariable logistic regression was utilized to account for patient demographics and comorbidities. Results Of 371 patients, 186 patients had a pre-operative pulse pressure <80 and 185 had a pre-operative pulse pressure ≥80. No significant differences in patient demographics or comorbidities were identified; however there was a trend toward older age in patients with elevated pulse pressure (70 vs. 72, P = 0.07). On univariate analysis, procedural complications (21% vs. 13%, P = 0.02), reinterventions (26% vs. 17%, P < 0.01), and restenosis (32% vs. 23%, P = 0.03) were more common among patients with pulse pressure ≥ 80. Procedural complications remained significant on multivariate analysis (OR 1.8, 95% CI 1.0-3.1, P = 0.04). There was no difference in 30-day mortality; however increased mortality was seen at 5 years of follow-up (OR: 1.6, 95% CI: 1.0-2.5, P = 0.04) following multivariable analysis. Conclusions Increased pre-operative pulse pressure is associated with procedural complications

  10. Diamondoid synthesis by nanosecond pulsed microplasmas generated in He at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stauss, Sven; Shizuno, Tomoki; Oshima, Fumito; Pai, David Z.; Terashima, Kazuo

    2012-10-01

    Diamondoids are sp^3 hybridized carbon nanomaterials that possess interesting properties making them attractive for biotechnology, medicine, and opto- and nanoelectronics. So far, larger diamondoids have been synthesized using the smallest diamondoid (adamantane) as a precursor. For this electric discharges and pulsed laser plasmas generated in supercritical fluids, and hot filament chemical vapor deposition have been used, but these methods are difficult to realize or very time-consuming. We have developed a more convenient approach where diamondoids are synthesized by high-voltage nanosecond pulsed microplasmas (voltage 15 kVp-p, frequency 1 Hz, pulse width 10 ns) generated in He at atmospheric pressure using point-to-plane tungsten electrodes. Adamantane was used as a precursor, and synthesis was conducted for 10^5 pulses at gas temperatures of 297, 373 and 473 K. Energy dispersive X-ray and micro-Raman spectroscopy were conducted to determine the composition of the products, and gas chromatography - mass spectra indicated the formation of diamantane. It was found that synthesis is more efficient at room temperature than at higher temperatures, and time-resolved optical emission spectroscopy suggest that the chemical reactions take place in the afterglow.

  11. A STATISTICAL SURVEY OF DYNAMIC PRESSURE PULSES IN THE SOLAR WIND BASED ON WIND OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Zuo, Pingbing; Feng, Xueshang; Wang, Yi; Xie, Yanqiong; Xu, Xiaojun E-mail: fengx@spaceweather.ac.cn

    2015-07-20

    Solar wind dynamic pressure pulse (DPP) structures, across which the dynamic pressure changes abruptly over timescales from a few seconds to several minutes, are often observed in the near-Earth space environment. The space weather effects of DPPs on the magnetosphere–ionosphere coupling system have been widely investigated in the last two decades. In this study, we perform a statistical survey on the properties of DPPs near 1 AU based on nearly 20 years of observations from the WIND spacecraft. It is found that only a tiny fraction of DPPs (around 4.2%) can be regarded as interplanetary shocks. For most DPPs, the total pressure (the sum of the thermal pressure and magnetic pressure) remains in equilibrium, but there also exists a small fraction of DPPs that are not pressure-balanced. The overwhelming majority of DPPs are associated with solar wind disturbances, including coronal mass ejection-related flows, corotating interaction regions, as well as complex ejecta. The annual variations of the averaged occurrence rate of DPPs are roughly in phase with the solar activity during solar cycle 23, and during the rising phase of solar cycle 24.

  12. Seasonal and diel changes in photosynthetic activity of the snow alga Chlamydomonas nivalis (Chlorophyceae) from Svalbard determined by pulse amplitude modulation fluorometry.

    PubMed

    Stibal, Marek; Elster, Josef; Sabacká, Marie; Kastovská, Klára

    2007-02-01

    The seasonal and diel dynamics of the physiological state and photosynthetic activity of the snow alga Chlamydomonas nivalis were investigated in a snowfield in Svalbard. The snow surface represents an environment with very high irradiation intensities along with stable low temperatures close to freezing point. Photosynthetic activity was measured using pulse amplitude modulation fluorometry. Three types of cell (green biflagellate vegetative cells, orange spores clustered by means of mucilaginous sheaths, and purple spores with thick cell walls) were found, all of them photosynthetically active. The pH of snow ranged between 5.0 and 7.5, and the conductivity ranged between 5 and 75 microS cm(-1). The temperature of snow was stable (-0.1 to +0.1 degrees C), and the incident radiation values ranged from 11 to 1500 micromol photons m(-2) s(-1). The photosynthetic activity had seasonal and diel dynamics. The Fv/Fm values ranged between 0.4 and 0.7, and generally declined over the course of the season. A dynamic response of Fv/Fm to the irradiance was recorded. According to the saturating photon fluence values Ek, the algae may have obtained saturating light as deep as 3 cm in the snow when there were higher-light conditions, whereas they were undersaturated at prevalent low light even if on the surface.

  13. The effects of pulse pressure from seismic water gun technology on Northern Pike

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gross, Jackson A.; Irvine, Kathryn M.; Wilmoth, Siri K.; Wagner, Tristany L.; Shields, Patrick A; Fox, Jeffrey R.

    2013-01-01

    We examined the efficacy of sound pressure pulses generated from a water gun for controlling invasive Northern Pike Esox lucius. Pulse pressures from two sizes of water guns were evaluated for their effects on individual fish placed at a predetermined random distance. Fish mortality from a 5,620.8-cm3 water gun (peak pressure source level = 252 dB referenced to 1 μP at 1 m) was assessed every 24 h for 168 h, and damage (intact, hematoma, or rupture) to the gas bladder, kidney, and liver was recorded. The experiment was replicated with a 1,966.4-cm3 water gun (peak pressure source level = 244 dB referenced to 1 μP at 1 m), but fish were euthanized immediately. The peak sound pressure level (SPLpeak), peak-to-peak sound pressure level (SPLp-p), and frequency spectrums were recorded, and the cumulative sound exposure level (SELcum) was subsequently calculated. The SPLpeak, SPLp-p, and SELcum were correlated, and values varied significantly by treatment group for both guns. Mortality increased and organ damage was greater with decreasing distance to the water gun. Mortality (31%) by 168 h was only observed for Northern Pike exhibiting the highest degree of organ damage. Mortality at 72 h and 168 h postexposure was associated with increasing SELcum above 195 dB. The minimum SELcum calculated for gas bladder rupture was 199 dB recorded at 9 m from the 5,620.8-cm3 water gun and 194 dB recorded at 6 m from the 1,966.4-cm3water gun. Among Northern Pike that were exposed to the large water gun, 100% of fish exposed at 3 and 6 m had ruptured gas bladders, and 86% exposed at 9 m had ruptured gas bladders. Among fish that were exposed to pulse pressures from the smaller water gun, 78% exhibited gas bladder rupture. Results from these initial controlled experiments underscore the potential of water guns as a tool for controlling Northern Pike.

  14. Transient Cavitation Induced by High Amplitude Diagnostic Ultrasound.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayme, Eveline J.

    1988-07-01

    Study of the response of gaseous microbubbles to medical ultrasound is essential to apprehend the potentially dangerous effects of transient cavitation on living tissues. However, the prediction of such response is complicated by the finite -amplitude distortion associated with high amplitude acoustic fields. Through a combination of theoretical developments, computer simulations, and experiments, this dissertation investigates the consequences of the interaction between finite-amplitude distortion and transient cavitation, in the context of a diagnostic ultrasonic field. The theoretical approach is to synthesize the asymmetry between compression and rarefaction half-cycles which characterizes a typical nonlinearly distorted pulse obtained at the focus of a diagnostic transducer immersed in water. The synthetic pulse is used to drive a theoretical model for nonlinear bubble dynamics. Comparison with sinusoidal pulses "equivalent" to the distorted pulse as measured by a selection of descriptive parameters shows that: (i) the peak-positive pressure (P_{+} ) in the distorted pulse is a very poor predictor of transient cavitation, (ii) the peak-negative pressure (P_{-}) is a better indicator but underestimates the actual bubble response, (iii) the best predictor is the pressure amplitude of the fundamental (P_{F}) in a Fourier series representation of the distorted pulse. These predictions are tested experimentally on Drosophila larvae. The larvae are exposed to pulsed, symmetric, sinusoidal fields and to pulsed, asymmetric, distorted fields. The killing ratio of the larvae is plotted as a function of the same selection of descriptive parameters, namely P_{+}, P_{ -}, and P_{F}. The resulting curves are compared with the killing ratio plotted against the peak pressure in the sinusoidal, undistorted pulse (P_{A}). If the distorted pulse is described in terms of P_ {-} or P_{+} , the killing ratios are significantly different; if the distorted pulse is described in terms

  15. Nonlinear response of plates subjected to inplane and lateral pressure pulses.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knapp, L. J.

    1973-01-01

    The nonlinear response of a rectangular plate exposed to a far-field sonic boom disturbance is studied. The plate is subjected to both lateral and in-plane disturbances. The lateral disturbance is in the form of an N-shaped pressure pulse, and the in-plane disturbance is represented by a sinusoidal pulse. The equations of motion are reduced to a set of nonlinear coupled ordinary differential equations using Galerkin's method. These equations are solved numerically using Hamming's (1959) modified predictor-corrector integration method. The effects of in-plane boundary conditions and in-plane inertia are investigated. The nonlinear results, when compared to the linear theory, serve to delineate the realm of validity of the linear theory.

  16. Plasma sterilization of polyethylene terephthalate bottles by pulsed corona discharge at atmospheric pressure.

    PubMed

    Masaoka, Satoshi

    2007-06-01

    A pulsed power supply was used to generate a corona discharge on a polyethylene terephthalate bottle, to conduct plasma sterilization at atmospheric pressure. Before generating such a discharge, minute quantities of water were attached to the inner surface of the bottle and to the surface of a high voltage (HV) electrode inserted into the bottle. Next, high-voltage pulses of electricity were discharged between electrodes for 6.0s, while rotating the bottle. The resulting spore log reduction values of Bacillus subtilis and Aspergillus niger on the inner surface of the bottle were 5.5 and 6 or higher, respectively, and those on the HV electrode surface were each 6 or higher for both strains. The presence of the by-products gaseous ozone, hydrogen peroxide, and nitric ions resulting from the electrical discharge was confirmed.

  17. Transient pressure-pulse decay permeability measurements in the Barnett shale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhandari, A. R.; Reece, J.; Cronin, M. B.; Flemings, P. B.; Polito, P. J.

    2012-12-01

    We conducted transient pressure-pulse decay permeability measurements on core plugs of the Barnett shale using a hydrostatic pressure cell. Core plugs, 3.8 cm in diameter and less than 2.5 cm in length, were prepared from a core obtained at a depth of approximately 2330 m from the Mitchel Energy 2 T. P. Sims well in the Mississippian Barnett Formation (Loucks and Ruppel, 2007). We performed permeability measurements of the core plugs using argon at varying confining pressures in two different directions (perpendicular and parallel to bedding planes). We calculate gas permeability from changes in pressure with time using the analytical solution of the pressure diffusion equation with appropriate boundary conditions for our test setup (Dicker and Smits, 1988). Based on our limited results, we interpret 2 × 10-18 m2 for vertical permeability and 156 × 10-18 m2 for horizontal permeability. We demonstrate an extreme stress dependence of the horizontal flow permeability where permeability decreases from 156 × 10-18 m2 to 2.5 × 10-18 m2 as the confining stress is increased from 3.5 to 35 MPa. These permeability measurements are at the high side of other pulsed permeability measurements in the Barnett shale (Bustin et al. 2008; Vermylen, 2011). Permeabilities calculated from mercury injection capillary pressure curves, using theoretically derived permeability-capillary pressure models based on parallel tubes assumption, are orders of magnitude less than our transient pressure-pulse decay permeability measurements (for example, 3.7×10-21 m2 (this study), 10-21 -10-20 m2 (Sigal, 2007), 10-20 -10-17 m2 (Prince et al., 2010)). We interpret that the high measured permeabilities are due to microfractures in the sample. At this point, we do not know if the microfractures are due to sampling disturbance (stress-relief induced) or represent an in-situ fracture network. Our study illustrates the importance of characterization of microfractures at the core scale to understand

  18. Nanosecond-timescale high-pressure gas discharge in a microwave pulse compressor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shlapakovski, Anatoli; Beilin, Leonid; Krasik, Yakov

    2016-09-01

    The results of experimental and numerical studies of the microwave plasma discharge initiated by a nanosecond laser pulse are presented. The discharge is ignited in the pressurized gas filling the switch, which opens the charged resonant cavity, so that the accumulated microwave energy is rapidly released into a load. Fast-framing optical imaging showed that the plasma in the switch appears as filaments expanding along the RF electric field. The temporal evolution of the plasma density was derived from time-resolved spectroscopic measurements. With increasing microwave energy in the cavity, the plasma appears earlier in time after the laser beam enters the switch and its density rises more steeply reaching values which exceed 1016 cm-3 at a gas pressure of 2 .105 Pa. Numerical simulations were conducted using the gas conductivity model of plasma and representation of discharge origin by setting initial population of seed electrons treated by PIC algorithm. The results showed good agreement with the experiments and explained how the self-consistent dynamics of the plasma and RF fields determines the quality of microwave output pulses. In addition, the dynamics of the microwave energy absorption in the discharge plasma was studied. It was shown that at a high pressure, even with an unlimited rate of ionization, a significant portion of the stored energy, 20%, is lost. This work was partially supported by the BSF Grant No. 2012038.

  19. The 24-hour pulse wave velocity, aortic augmentation index, and central blood pressure in normotensive volunteers.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsova, Tatyana Y; Korneva, Viktoria A; Bryantseva, Evgeniya N; Barkan, Vitaliy S; Orlov, Artemy V; Posokhov, Igor N; Rogoza, Anatoly N

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the pulse wave velocity, aortic augmentation index corrected for heart rate 75 (AIx@75), and central systolic and diastolic blood pressure during 24-hour monitoring in normotensive volunteers. Overall, 467 subjects (206 men and 261 women) were recruited in this study. Participants were excluded from the study if they were less than 19 years of age, had blood test abnormalities, had a body mass index greater than 2 7.5 kg/m(2), had impaired glucose tolerance, or had hypotension or hypertension. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) with the BPLab(®) device was performed in each subject. ABPM waveforms were analyzed using the special automatic Vasotens(®) algorithm, which allows the calculation of pulse wave velocity, AIx@75, central systolic and diastolic blood pressure for "24-hour", "awake", and "asleep" periods. Circadian rhythms and sex differences in these indexes were identified. Pending further validation in prospective outcome-based studies, our data may be used as preliminary diagnostic values for the BPLab ABPM additional index in adult subjects.

  20. Effects of large pressure amplitude low frequency noise in the parotid gland perivasculo-ductal connective tissue.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Pedro; Brito, José; Mendes, João; da Fonseca, Jorge; Águas, Artur; Martins dos Santos, José

    2013-01-01

    Introdução: Em tecidos e órgãos expostos a ruído de baixa frequência de alta amplitude ocorre fibrose na ausência de sinais inflamatórios, que se pensa ser uma resposta protetora. No tecido conjuntivo perivasculo-ductal da glândula parótida seguem artérias, veias e a árvore ductal. Crê-se que o tecido conjuntivo perivasculo-ductal funcione como um estabilizador mecânico do tecido glandular.Material e Métodos: Para quantificar a proliferação de tecido conjuntivo perivasculo-ductal em ratos expostos a ruído de baixafrequência de alta amplitude foram utilizados 60 ratos Wistar igualmente divididos em seis grupos. Um grupo mantido em silêncio, e os restantes 5 expostos a ruído de baixa frequência de alta amplitude continuamente: g1-168h (1 semana); g2-504h (3 semanas); g3-840h (5semanas); g4-1512h (9 semanas) e g5-2184h (13 semanas). Após a exposição, as parótidas foram removidas e o tecido conjuntivo perivasculo-ductal foi medido em todos os grupos. Foi efectuada análise estatística com ANOVA por SPSS 13.0.Resultados: A tendência é um aumento global das áreas do tecido conjuntivo perivasculo-ductal, que se desenvolve de forma linear e significativa com o tempo de exposição (p < 0,001).Discussão: Tem sido sugerido que a resposta biológica à exposição ao ruído de baixa frequência de alta amplitude está associada à necessidade de manter a integridade estrutural. O reforço estrutural seria conseguido através do aumento do tecido conjuntivo perivasculo-ductal.Conclusões: Assim, estes resultados mostram que o tecido conjuntivo perivasculo-ductal aumenta em resposta à exposição ao ruído de baixa frequência de alta amplitude.

  1. Pulse Pressure Relation to Aortic and Left Ventricular Structure in Older People in the AGES-Reykjavik Study

    PubMed Central

    Torjesen, Alyssa A; Sigurđsson, Sigurđur; Westenberg, Jos JM; Gotal, John D; Bell, Vanessa; Aspelund, Thor; Launer, Lenore J; de Roos, Albert; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Harris, Tamara B; Mitchell, Gary F

    2014-01-01

    High pulse pressure, a major cardiovascular risk factor, has been attributed to medial elastic fiber degeneration and aortic dilation, which transfers hemodynamic load to stiffer collagen. However, recent studies suggest higher pulse pressure is instead associated with smaller aortic diameter. Thus, we sought to elucidate relations of pulse pressure with aortic stiffness and aortic and cardiac dimensions. We used magnetic resonance imaging to examine relations of pulse pressure with lumen area and wall stiffness and thickness in the thoracic aorta and left ventricular structure in 526 participants (72 to 94 years of age, 295 women) in the community-based Age, Gene/Environment Susceptibility-Reykjavik Study. In a multivariable model that adjusted for age, sex, height, weight, and standard vascular risk factors, central pulse pressure had a negative relation with aortic lumen area (all effects expressed as mm Hg/SD; B=−8.1±1.2, P<0.001) and positive relations with left ventricular end-diastolic volume (B=3.8±1.0, P<0.001), carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (B=3.6±1.0, P<0.001), and aortic wall area (B=3.0±1.2, P=0.015). Higher pulse pressure in older people is associated with smaller aortic lumen area and greater aortic wall stiffness and thickness and left ventricular volume. Relations of larger ventricular volume and smaller aortic lumen with higher pulse pressure suggest mismatch in hemodynamic load accommodation by the heart and aorta in older people. PMID:25024287

  2. Investigation of the effect of a bend in a transfer line that separates a pulse tube cold head and a pressure wave generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dev, A. A.; Atrey, M. D.; Vanapalli, S.

    2017-02-01

    A transfer line between a pulse tube cold head and a pressure wave generator is usually required to isolate the cold head from the vibrations of the compressor. Although it is a common practice to use a thin and narrow straight tube, a bent tube would allow design flexibility and easy mounting of the cold head, such as in a split Stirling type pulse tube cryocooler. In this paper, we report a preliminary investigation on the effect of the bending of the tube on the flow transfer characteristics. A numerical study using commercial computational fluid dynamics model is performed to gain insight into the flow characteristics in the bent tube. Oscillating flow experiments are performed with a straight and a bent tube at a filling pressure of 15 bar and an operating frequency of 40, 50 and 60 Hz. The data and the corresponding numerical simulations point to the hypothesis that the secondary flow in the bent tube causes a decrease in flow at a fixed pressure amplitude.

  3. Spectroscopic diagnostics of a pulsed discharge in high-pressure argon

    SciTech Connect

    Treshchalov, A B; Lissovskii, A A

    2010-05-26

    Results of investigation of high-pressure argon plasma excited by a high-current pulsed volume discharge are presented. The plasma diagnostics employs spatiotemporal dependences of the emission intensity in the VUV - visible range. A homogenous discharge is observed at pressures up to 10 atm. It is found that the spectrum of the UV - visible photorecombination continuum is sensitive to the discharge constriction. Change in the shape of the spectrum is caused bythe change of the type of positive charge carriers upon passing of the discharge from the uniform phase (molecular Ar{sub 2}{sup +} ions) to the arc phase (atomic Ar{sup +} ions). Experimental data and model calculations show that the electron heating after the main excitation pulse is a highly undesirable process. It slows down the recombination flow in the plasma, which results in stretching of all the kinetic processes for all excited components in time, and hence in a decrease in the peak values of their concentrations. Electron collision-induced mixing effi-ciently converts the reservoir of long-lived Ar{sub 2}* molecules in the triplet state into rapidly emitting singlet excimers. It is this mechanism that dominates the production of singlet Ar{sub 2}* excimer molecules. The threshold concentration needed to obtain lasing at a wavelength of 127 nm on Ar{sub 2}* excimers ({sup 1{Sigma}+}{sub u(v=0)}) was, according to calculations, about 5x10{sup 15} cm{sup -3} for the gain 0.05 cm{sup -1}. This concentration can be achieved in the case of homogeneous pulsed discharge pumping with the peak electron concentration 2.x10{sup 16} cm{sup -3} at the argon pressure 10 atm.

  4. Aerodynamic stability analysis of NASA J85-13/planar pressure pulse generator installation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, K.; Hosny, W. M.; Steenken, W. G.

    1980-01-01

    A digital computer simulation model for the J85-13/Planar Pressure Pulse Generator (P3 G) test installation was developed by modifying an existing General Electric compression system model. This modification included the incorporation of a novel method for describing the unsteady blade lift force. This approach significantly enhanced the capability of the model to handle unsteady flows. In addition, the frequency response characteristics of the J85-13/P3G test installation were analyzed in support of selecting instrumentation locations to avoid standing wave nodes within the test apparatus and thus, low signal levels. The feasibility of employing explicit analytical expression for surge prediction was also studied.

  5. Full-density, net-shape powder consolidation using dynamic magnetic pulse pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chelluri, Bhanu; Barber, John P.

    1999-07-01

    The full-density consolidation of powders into net-shape parts yields high green strength, low shrinkage, short sinter times, superior mechanical properties, and low manufacturing costs. The conventional lowcost, single-press, single-sinter process typically densifies powders at less than 65 percent green density. This article describes the Magnepress™ process, a powder-processing technique wherein pulsed magnetic pressures consolidate powders into full-density parts without admixed lubricants or binders. The Magnepress technique is especially suitable for producing net-shape products with radial symmetry (e.g., rods, cylindrical parts with internal features, tubular shapes, and high aspect-ratio specimens).

  6. Radiation-pressure acceleration of ion beams driven by circularly polarized laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Henig, A; Steinke, S; Schnürer, M; Sokollik, T; Hörlein, R; Kiefer, D; Jung, D; Schreiber, J; Hegelich, B M; Yan, X Q; Meyer-ter-Vehn, J; Tajima, T; Nickles, P V; Sandner, W; Habs, D

    2009-12-11

    We present experimental studies on ion acceleration from ultrathin diamondlike carbon foils irradiated by ultrahigh contrast laser pulses of energy 0.7 J focused to peak intensities of 5x10(19) W/cm2. A reduction in electron heating is observed when the laser polarization is changed from linear to circular, leading to a pronounced peak in the fully ionized carbon spectrum at the optimum foil thickness of 5.3 nm. Two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations reveal that those C6+ ions are for the first time dominantly accelerated in a phase-stable way by the laser radiation pressure.

  7. Spatial and temporal evolutions of ozone in a nanosecond pulse corona discharge at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duten, X.; Redolfi, M.; Aggadi, N.; Vega, A.; Hassouni, K.

    2011-10-01

    This paper deals with the experimental determination of the spatial and temporal evolutions of the ozone concentration in an atmospheric pressure pulsed plasma, working in the nanosecond regime. We observed that ozone was produced in the localized region of the streamer. The ozone transport requires a characteristic time well above the millisecond. The numerical modelling of the streamer expansion confirms that the hydrodynamic expansion of the filamentary discharge region during the streamer propagation does not lead to a significant transport of atomic oxygen and ozone. It appears therefore that only diffusional transport can take place, which requires a characteristic time of the order of 50 ms.

  8. Specific features of the behaviour of targets under negative pressures created by a picosecond laser pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Abrosimov, S A; Bazhulin, A P; Voronov, Valerii V; Geras'kin, A A; Krasyuk, Igor K; Pashinin, Pavel P; Semenov, Andrei Yu; Stuchebryukhov, I A; Khishchenko, K V; Fortov, Vladimir E

    2013-03-31

    New experimental data are obtained concerning the character of spallation and the mechanical strength of targets made of aluminium, aluminium - magnesium alloy (AMg6M), polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA, plexiglass), tantalum, copper, tungsten, palladium, silicon, and lead under the impact of laser radiation with the duration 70 ps. The specific features of the spallation phenomenon, in which the separation of a part of the target substance occurs at the back surface as a result of the effect of negative pressures (tensile stresses) in the substance, are experimentally studied. To determine the time moment of spallation, the electrocontact method of measuring the velocity of the spalled layer is developed and implemented. The obtained results show that the values of spall strength of the studied materials at moderate amplitudes of the shock-wave effect agree with the known literature data, while at higher pressures the growth of spall strength is observed, which is an evidence of the material hardening. The results of the studies demonstrate that the dynamic strength of a substance depends on both the duration and the amplitude of the shock-wave impact on the target. (extreme light fields and their applications)

  9. Specific features of the behaviour of targets under negative pressures created by a picosecond laser pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abrosimov, S. A.; Bazhulin, A. P.; Voronov, Valerii V.; Geras'kin, A. A.; Krasyuk, Igor K.; Pashinin, Pavel P.; Semenov, Andrei Yu; Stuchebryukhov, I. A.; Khishchenko, K. V.; Fortov, Vladimir E.

    2013-03-01

    New experimental data are obtained concerning the character of spallation and the mechanical strength of targets made of aluminium, aluminium - magnesium alloy (AMg6M), polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA, plexiglass), tantalum, copper, tungsten, palladium, silicon, and lead under the impact of laser radiation with the duration 70 ps. The specific features of the spallation phenomenon, in which the separation of a part of the target substance occurs at the back surface as a result of the effect of negative pressures (tensile stresses) in the substance, are experimentally studied. To determine the time moment of spallation, the electrocontact method of measuring the velocity of the spalled layer is developed and implemented. The obtained results show that the values of spall strength of the studied materials at moderate amplitudes of the shock-wave effect agree with the known literature data, while at higher pressures the growth of spall strength is observed, which is an evidence of the material hardening. The results of the studies demonstrate that the dynamic strength of a substance depends on both the duration and the amplitude of the shock-wave impact on the target.

  10. Slow slip pulses driven by thermal pressurization of pore fluid: theory and observational constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garagash, D.

    2012-12-01

    We discuss recently developed solutions for steadily propagating self-healing slip pulses driven by thermal pressurization (TP) of pore fluid [Garagash, 2012] on a fault with a constant sliding friction. These pulses are characterized by initial stage of undrained weakening of the fault (when fluid/heat can not yet escape the frictionally heated shear zone), which gives way to partial restrengthening due to increasing hydrothermal diffusion under conditions of diminished rate of heating, leading to eventual locking of the slip. The rupture speed of these pulses is decreasing function of the thickness (h) of the principal shear zone. We find that "thick" shear zones, h >> hdyna, where hdyna = (μ/τ0) (ρc/fΛ)(4α/cs), can support aseismic TP pulses propagating at a fraction hdyna/h of the shear wave speed cs, while "thin" shear zones, h˜hdyna or thinner, can only harbor seismic slip. (Here μ - shear modulus, τ0 - the nominal fault strength, f - sliding friction, ρc - the heat capacity of the fault gouge, Λ - the fluid thermal pressurization factor, α - hydrothermal diffusivity parameter of the gouge). For plausible range of fault parameters, hdyna is between 10s to 100s of micrometers, suggesting that slow slip transients propagating at 1 to 10 km/day may occur in the form of a TP slip pulse accommodated by a meter-thick shear zone. We verify that this is, indeed, a possibility by contrasting the predictions for aseismic, small-slip TP pulses operating at seismologically-constrained, near-lithostatic pore pressure (effective normal stress ≈ 3 to 10 MPa) with the observations (slip duration at a given fault location ≈ week, propagation speed ≈ 15 km/day, and the inferred total slip ≈ 2 to 3 cm) for along-strike propagation of the North Cascadia slow slip events of '98-99 [Dragert et al., 2001, 2004]. Furthermore, we show that the effect of thermal pressurization on the strength of the subduction interface is comparable to or exceeds that of the rate

  11. High-pressure pulsed avalanche discharges: Formulas for required preionization density and rate for homogeneity

    SciTech Connect

    Brenning, N.; Axnaes, I.; Nilsson, J.O.; Eninger, J.E.

    1997-02-01

    The requirements on preionization for the formation of spatially homogeneous pulsed avalanche discharges are examined. The authors derive two formulas which apply in the case of a slowly rising electric field, one which gives the required preionization density at breakdown, and one which gives the required preionization rate. These quantities are expressed as functions of the electrochemical properties of the gas, the neutral density, and the electric field rise time. They also treat the statistical effect that the electrons tend to form groups, in contrast to being randomly distributed in space, during the prebreakdown phase. This process is found to increase the required preionization rate significantly, typically by a factor of five for a discharge at atmospheric pressure. Homogeneous high-pressure discharges have been used for laser excitation, and have also been proposed for chemical plasma processing (ozone production) because of their good scaling properties and high efficiency.

  12. Cuff-less blood pressure measurement using pulse arrival time and a Kalman filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qiang; Chen, Xianxiang; Fang, Zhen; Xue, Yongjiao; Zhan, Qingyuan; Yang, Ting; Xia, Shanhong

    2017-02-01

    The present study designs an algorithm to increase the accuracy of continuous blood pressure (BP) estimation. Pulse arrival time (PAT) has been widely used for continuous BP estimation. However, because of motion artifact and physiological activities, PAT-based methods are often troubled with low BP estimation accuracy. This paper used a signal quality modified Kalman filter to track blood pressure changes. A Kalman filter guarantees that BP estimation value is optimal in the sense of minimizing the mean square error. We propose a joint signal quality indice to adjust the measurement noise covariance, pushing the Kalman filter to weigh more heavily on measurements from cleaner data. Twenty 2 h physiological data segments selected from the MIMIC II database were used to evaluate the performance. Compared with straightforward use of the PAT-based linear regression model, the proposed model achieved higher measurement accuracy. Due to low computation complexity, the proposed algorithm can be easily transplanted into wearable sensor devices.

  13. Plasma polymerization of ethylene in an atmospheric pressure-pulsed discharge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donohoe, K.; Wydeven, T.

    1979-01-01

    The polymerization of ethylene in an atmospheric pressure-pulsed discharge has been studied. Partial pressures of ethylene up to 4 kN/sq m were used with helium as a diluent. Deposition rates (on glass slides) were the same throughout the discharge volume over a wide range of operating conditions. These rates were in the 1-2 A/sec range. The films were clear, soft, and showed good adhesion to the glass substrates. Oligomers large enough to visibly scatter 637.8-nm light were observed in the gas phase under all conditions in which film deposition occurred. The experimental results suggest that Brownian diffusion of these oligomers was the rate-limiting step in the film deposition process.

  14. Substrate temperature and oxygen pressure dependence of pulsed laser-deposited Sr ferrite films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papakonstantinou, P.; O'Neill, M.; Atkinson, R.; Salter, I. W.; Gerber, R.

    1996-01-01

    The effect of substrate temperature and oxygen pressure on the microstructure, magnetic and magneto-optical properties of Sr ferrite (SrM) films grown on (001) single-crystal sapphire substrates by pulsed laser deposition has been investigated. Polycrystalline SrM films with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy could be prepared under a wide range of oxygen pressures and relatively high temperatures, sufficient to crystallise the material. However, an almost exclusive c-axis orientation normal to the film plane could be attained only at a narrow operational window centered at 0.1 mbar and 840°C. The magneto-optical properties of the films were comparable to those of the bulk barium hexaferrite single-crystal material. In addition, results obtained by atomic force microscopy provide convincing evidence that the growth of Sr ferrite on sapphire takes place by a spiral growth mechanism.

  15. Impact of arterial load on the agreement between pulse pressure analysis and esophageal Doppler

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The reliability of pulse pressure analysis to estimate cardiac output is known to be affected by arterial load changes. However, the contribution of each aspect of arterial load could be substantially different. In this study, we evaluated the agreement of eight non-commercial algorithms of pulse pressure analysis for estimating cardiac output (PPCO) with esophageal Doppler cardiac output (EDCO) during acute changes of arterial load. In addition, we aimed to determine the optimal arterial load parameter that could detect a clinically significant difference between PPCO and the EDCO. Methods We included mechanically ventilated patients monitored with a prototype esophageal Doppler (CardioQ-Combi™, Deltex Medical, Chichester, UK) and an indwelling arterial catheter who received a fluid challenge or in whom the vasoactive medication was introduced or modified. Initial calibration of PPCO was made with the baseline value of EDCO. We evaluated several aspects of arterial load: total systemic vascular resistance (TSVR = mean arterial pressure [MAP]/EDCO * 80), net arterial compliance (C = EDCO-derived stroke volume/pulse pressure), and effective arterial elastance (Ea = 0.9 * systolic blood pressure/EDCO-derived stroke volume). We compared CO values with Bland-Altman analysis, four-quadrant plot and a modified polar plot (with least significant change analysis). Results A total of 16,964-paired measurements in 53 patients were performed (median 271; interquartile range: 180-415). Agreement of all PPCO algorithms with EDCO was significantly affected by changes in arterial load, although the impact was more pronounced during changes in vasopressor therapy. When looking at different parameters of arterial load, the predictive abilities of Ea and C were superior to TSVR and MAP changes to detect a PPCO-EDCO discrepancy ≥ 10% in all PPCO algorithms. An absolute Ea change > 8.9 ± 1.7% was associated with a PPCO-EDCO discrepancy ≥ 10% in most algorithms

  16. Study on the mode-transition of nanosecond-pulsed dielectric barrier discharge between uniform and filamentary by controlling pressures and pulse repetition frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, S.; Pei, X.; Hasnain, Q.; Nie, L.; Lu, X.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, we investigate the temporally resolved evolution of the nanosecond pulsed dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) in a moderate 6 mm discharge gap under various pressures and pulse repetition frequencies (PRFs) by intensified charge-coupled device (ICCD) images, using dry air and its components oxygen and nitrogen. It is found that the pressures are very different when the mode transits between uniform and filamentary in air, oxygen, and nitrogen. The PRFs can also obviously affect the mode-transition. The transition mechanism in the pulsed DBD is not Townsend-to-Streamer, which is dominant in the traditional alternating-voltage DBD. The pulsed DBD in a uniform mode develops in the form of plane ionization wave due to overlap of primary avalanches, while the increase in pressure disturbs the overlap and discharge develops in streamer, corresponding to the filamentary mode. Increasing the initial electron density by pre-ionization may contribute to discharge uniformity at higher pressures. We also found that the dependence of homogeneity upon PRF is a non-monotonic one.

  17. Study on the mode-transition of nanosecond-pulsed dielectric barrier discharge between uniform and filamentary by controlling pressures and pulse repetition frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Sizhe; Lu, Xinpei

    2016-09-01

    We investigate the temporally resolved evolution of the nanosecond pulsed dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) in a moderate 6mm gap under various pressures and pulse repetition frequencies (PRFs) by intensified charge-coupled device (ICCD) images, using synthetic air and its components oxygen and nitrogen. It is found that the pressures are very different when the DBD mode transits between uniform and filamentary in air, oxygen, and nitrogen. The PRFs can also obviously affect the mode-transition. The transition mechanism in the pulsed DBD is not Townsend-to-streamer, which is dominant in the traditional alternating-voltage DBDs. The pulsed DBD in a uniform mode develops in the form of plane ionization wave, due to overlap of primary avalanches, while the increase in pressure disturbs the overlap and DBD develops in streamer instead, corresponding to the filamentary mode. Increasing the initiatory electron density by pre-ionization methods may contribute to discharge uniformity at higher pressures. We also find that the dependence of uniformity upon PRF is non-monotonic.

  18. Plasma density enhancement in atmospheric-pressure dielectric-barrier discharges by high-voltage nanosecond pulse in the pulse-on period: a PIC simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sang, Chaofeng; Sun, Jizhong; Wang, Dezhen

    2010-02-01

    A particle-in-cell (PIC) plus Monte Carlo collision simulation is employed to investigate how a sustainable atmospheric pressure single dielectric-barrier discharge responds to a high-voltage nanosecond pulse (HVNP) further applied to the metal electrode. The results show that the HVNP can significantly increase the plasma density in the pulse-on period. The ion-induced secondary electrons can give rise to avalanche ionization in the positive sheath, which widens the discharge region and enhances the plasma density drastically. However, the plasma density stops increasing as the applied pulse lasts over certain time; therefore, lengthening the pulse duration alone cannot improve the discharge efficiency further. Physical reasons for these phenomena are then discussed.

  19. Tunable time-reversal cavity for high-pressure ultrasonic pulses generation: A tradeoff between transmission and time compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnal, Bastien; Pernot, Mathieu; Fink, Mathias; Tanter, Mickael

    2012-08-01

    This Letter presents a time reversal cavity that has both a high reverberation time and a good transmission factor. A multiple scattering medium has been embedded inside a fluid-filled reverberating cavity. This allows creating smart ultrasonic sources able to generate very high pressure pulses at the focus outside the cavity with large steering capabilities. Experiments demonstrate a 25 dB gain in pressure at the focus. This concept will enable us to convert conventional ultrasonic imaging probes driven by low power electronics into high power probes for therapeutic applications requiring high pressure focused pulses, such as histotripsy or lithotripsy.

  20. Negative response of photosynthesis to natural and projected high seawater temperatures estimated by pulse amplitude modulation fluorometry in a temperate coral

    PubMed Central

    Caroselli, Erik; Falini, Giuseppe; Goffredo, Stefano; Dubinsky, Zvy; Levy, Oren

    2015-01-01

    Balanophyllia europaea is a shallow water solitary zooxanthellate coral, endemic to the Mediterranean Sea. Extensive field studies across a latitudinal temperature gradient highlight detrimental effects of rising temperatures on its growth, demography, and skeletal characteristics, suggesting that depression of photosynthesis at high temperatures might cause these negative effects. Here we test this hypothesis by analyzing, by means of pulse amplitude modulation fluorometry, the photosynthetic efficiency of B. europaea specimens exposed in aquaria to the annual range of temperatures experienced in the field (13, 18, and 28°C), and two extreme temperatures expected for 2100 as a consequence of global warming (29 and 32°C). The indicators of photosynthetic performance analyzed (maximum and effective quantum yield) showed that maximum efficiency was reached at 20.0–21.6°C, slightly higher than the annual mean temperature in the field (18°C). Photosynthetic efficiency decreased from 20.0 to 13°C and even more strongly from 21.6 to 32°C. An unusual form of bleaching was observed, with a maximum zooxanthellae density at 18°C that strongly decreased from 18 to 32°C. Chlorophyll a concentration per zooxanthellae cell showed an opposite trend as it was minimal at 18°C and increased from 18 to 32°C. Since the areal chlorophyll concentration is the product of the zooxanthellae density and its cellular content, these trends resulted in a homogeneous chlorophyll concentration per coral surface across temperature treatments. This confirms that B. europaea photosynthesis is progressively depressed at temperatures >21.6°C, supporting previous hypotheses raised by the studies on growth and demography of this species. This study also confirms the threats posed to this species by the ongoing seawater warming. PMID:26582993

  1. Ion kinetics and self pulsing in DC microplasma discharges at atmospheric and higher pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahamud, Rajib; Farouk, Tanvir I.

    2016-04-01

    Atmospheric pressure microplasma devices have been the subject of considerable interest and research during the last decade. Most of the operation regime of the plasma discharges studied fall in the ‘abnormal’, ‘normal’ and ‘corona’ modes—increasing and a ‘flat’ voltage current characteristics. However, the negative differential resistance regime at atmospheric and high pressures has been less studied and possesses unique characteristics that can be employed for novel applications. In this work, the role of ion kinetics especially associated with trace impurities; on the self pulsing behavior has been investigated. Detailed numerical simulations have been conducted with a validated model for a helium-nitrogen feed gas mixture. Different oscillatory modes were observed where the discharge was found to undergo complete or partial relaxation. Trace amount of nitrogen was found to significantly alter the pulsing characteristics. External parameters influencing these self oscillations are also studied and aspects of the ion kinetics on the oscillatory behavior are discussed.

  2. No influence of lower leg heating on central arterial pulse pressure in young men.

    PubMed

    Kosaki, Keisei; Sugawara, Jun; Akazawa, Nobuhiko; Tanahashi, Koichiro; Kumagai, Hiroshi; Ajisaka, Ryuichi; Maeda, Seiji

    2015-07-01

    Central arterial pulse pressure (PP), a strong predictor of cardiovascular disease, mainly consists of an incident wave generated by left ventricular ejection and a late-arriving reflected wave emanating from the lower body. We have tested the hypothesis that a reduction in leg vascular tone by heat treatment of the lower leg attenuates the central arterial PP. Pressure and wave properties of the peripheral and central arteries were measured in eight young men before and after heat treatment of the lower leg (temperature approx. 43 °C) for 30 and 60 min, respectively. Following the lower leg heat trial, leg (femoral-ankle) pulse wave velocity (PWV) was significantly decreased, but aortic (carotid-femoral) PWV and parameters of wave reflection and carotid arterial PP did not change significantly. No significant changes were observed in these parameters in the control trial. These results suggest that the reduction in leg vascular tone induced by heat treatment of the lower leg may not affect wave reflection and central arterial PP in young men.

  3. Pulse

    MedlinePlus

    ... the underside of the opposite wrist, below the base of the thumb. Press with flat fingers until ... determine if the patient's heart is pumping. Pulse measurement has other uses as well. During or immediately ...

  4. Radial Pressure Pulse and Heart Rate Variability in Heat- and Cold-Stressed Humans

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chin-Ming; Chang, Hsien-Cheh; Kao, Shung-Te; Li, Tsai-Chung; Wei, Ching-Chuan; Chen, Chiachung; Liao, Yin-Tzu; Chen, Fun-Jou

    2011-01-01

    This study aims to explore the effects of heat and cold stress on the radial pressure pulse (RPP) and heart rate variability (HRV). The subjects immersed their left hand into 45°C and 7°C water for 2 minutes. Sixty healthy subjects (age 25 ± 4 yr; 29 men and 31 women) were enrolled in this study. All subjects underwent the supine temperature measurements of the bilateral forearms, brachial arterial blood pressure, HRV and RPP with a pulse analyzer in normothermic conditions, and thermal stresses. The power spectral low-frequency (LF) and high-frequency (HF) components of HRV decreased in the heat test and increased in the cold test. The heat stress significantly reduced radial augmentation index (AIr) (P < .05), but the cold stress significantly increased AIr (P < .01). The spectral energy of RPP did not show any statistical difference in 0 ~ 10 Hz region under both conditions, but in the region of 10 ~ 50 Hz, there was a significant increase (P < .01) in the heat test and a significant decrease in the cold test (P < .01). The changes in AIr induced by heat and cold stress were significantly negatively correlated with the spectral energy in the region of 10 ~ 50 Hz (SE10−50 Hz) but not in the region of 0 ~ 10 Hz (SE0−10 Hz). The results demonstrated that the SE10−50 Hz, which only possessed a small percentage in total pulse energy, presented more physiological characteristics than the SE0−10 Hz under the thermal stresses. PMID:21113292

  5. A method for determining transverse permeability of tight reservoir cores by radial pressure pulse decay measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zehao; Dong, Mingzhe; Zhang, Shaojie; Gong, Houjian; Li, Yajun; Long, Feifei

    2016-10-01

    A transverse pressure pulse decay (TPPD) method is presented to measure transverse permeability of tight reservoir cores in a cell with finite volume. Given appropriate assumptions, a mathematical model based on the specially designed experiment is formulated, and its general solution is proposed. Early-time and late-time techniques are further presented for convenient postprocessing applications of experimental data. Meanwhile, sensitivity analysis of TPPD method is given. It is found that a good TPPD experimental principle can be obtained by adjusting test gas, experimental pressure, dimension of core sample, and volume ratio (λ). The volume ratio error (λerror) analysis reveals the following: (1) a larger λerror results in increased transverse permeability error (kerror); (2) the volume ratio (λ) is better not very close to 0.754; (3) when λ is equal to or greater than 1, the kerror resulting from λerror is monotonic decreasing as the volume ratio increases. In practice, λ is usually equal to or greater than 1 due to the very small pore volume of a tight core. But this does not mean that the volume ratio should be as large as possible. The reason for this is that a pressure transducer with higher resolution is needed to record pressure change. That means experimental apparatus is much more costly. And such a TPPD experiment requires a much longer time to attain the late-time straight line behavior. The best choice is to find an optimal balance point among experimental cost, time, and accuracy.

  6. Pulse pressure is inversely related to aortic root diameter implications for the pathogenesis of systolic hypertension.

    PubMed

    Farasat, S Morteza; Morrell, Christopher H; Scuteri, Angelo; Ting, Chih-Tai; Yin, Frank C P; Spurgeon, Harold A; Chen, Chen-Huan; Lakatta, Edward G; Najjar, Samer S

    2008-02-01

    Hypertension accelerates the age-associated increase in aortic root diameter (AoD), likely because of chronically elevated distending pressures. However, the pulsatile component of blood pressure may have a different relationship with AoD. We sought to assess the relationship between AoD and pulse pressure (PP) while accounting for left ventricular and central arterial structural and functional properties, which are known to influence PP. The study population was composed of 1256 individuals, aged 30 to 79 years (48% women and 48% hypertensive), none of whom were on antihypertensive medications. Blood pressure was measured in the sitting position with conventional sphygmomanometry. PP was calculated as the difference between systolic and diastolic blood pressures. AoD was measured at end diastole at the level of the sinuses of Valsalva with echocardiography. The relationship between AoD and PP was evaluated with multiple regression analyses. PP was 50+/-14 mm Hg in men and 54+/-18 mm Hg in women, and AoD was 31.9+/-3.5 mm in men and 28.9+/-3.5 mm in women. After adjusting for age, age(2), height, weight, and mean arterial pressure, AoD was independently and inversely associated with PP in both sexes. After further adjustments for central arterial stiffness and wall thickness, reflected waves, and left ventricular geometry, AoD remained inversely associated with PP in both men (coefficient=-0.48; P=0.0003; model R(2)=0.51) and women (coefficient=-0.40; P=0.01; model R(2)=0.61). Thus, AoD is inversely associated with PP, suggesting that a small AoD may contribute to the pathogenesis of systolic hypertension. Longitudinal studies are needed to examine this possibility.

  7. Improving pressure robustness, reliability, and versatility of solenoid-pump flow systems using a miniature economic control unit including two simple pressure pulse mathematical models.

    PubMed

    Horstkotte, Burkhard; Ledesma, Erich; Duarte, Carlos M; Cerdà, Víctor

    2010-08-15

    In this work we have systematically studied the behavior of solenoid pumps (SMP) as a function of flow rate and flow resistance. Using a new, economic, and miniature control unit, we achieved improvements of the systems versatility, transportability, and pressure robustness. A further important improvement with respect to pressure resistance was achieved when a flexible pumping tube was inserted between the solenoid pump and the flow resistance acting as a pressure reservoir and pulsation damper. The experimental data were compared with two pressure pulse models for SMP, which were developed during this work and which were well-suited to describe the SMP operation.

  8. The association of 25(OH)D with blood pressure, pulse pressure and carotid-radial pulse wave velocity in African women.

    PubMed

    Kruger, Iolanthé M; Kruger, Marlena C; Doak, Colleen M; Schutte, Aletta E; Huisman, Hugo W; Van Rooyen, Johannes M; Schutte, Rudolph; Malan, Leoné; Malan, Nicolaas T; Fourie, Carla M T; Kruger, Annamarie

    2013-01-01

    High susceptibility of the African population to develop cardiovascular disease obliges us to investigate possible contributing risk factors. Our aim was to determine whether low 25(OH)D status is associated with increased blood pressure and carotid-radial pulse wave velocity in black South African women. We studied 291 urban women (mean age: 57.56±9.00 yrs.). 25(OH)D status was determined by serum 25(OH)D levels. Women were stratified into sufficient (>30 ng/ml), and insufficient/deficient (<30 ng/ml) groups. Cardiovascular variables were compared between groups. Women with low 25(OH)D levels had significantly higher SBP (150.8±27.1 vs. 137.6±21.0), DBP (94.7±14.5 vs. 89.3±12.3) and PP (53.15(50.7;55.7) vs. 46.3(29.4;84.6)) compared to women with sufficient levels. No significant difference was observed with regards to c-rPWV. ANCOVA analyses still revealed significant differences between the two groups with regards to SBP, DBP as well as PP. Partial correlations revealed significant inverse association between SBP and 25(OH)D (p = .04;r = -.12). Women with low 25(OH)D levels were ∼2 times more likely to have high SBP (95% CI: 3.23;1.05). To conclude, women with deficient/insufficient 25(OH)D had significantly higher SBP compared to women with a sufficient 25(OH) status.

  9. Problems in Nonlinear Acoustics: Pulsed Finite Amplitude Sound Beams, Nonlinear Propagation of Sound in Layered Media, Time Domain Solutions for Focused Sound Beams, Focusing of Sound with an Ellipsoidal Mirror, and Modeling Finite Amplitude Propagation in Waveguides.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-08-01

    Introduction of an article by Hamilton and TenCate . 5 In a real ocean environment, however, not only does sound penetrate the ocean bottom, but the...F. Hamilton and J. A. TenCate , "Finite amplitude sound near cutoff in higher-order modes of a rectangular duct," J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 84, 327-334

  10. Nanosecond discharge in air at atmospheric pressure as an x-ray source with high pulse repetition rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasenko, Victor F.

    2006-02-01

    The properties of x-ray radiation and runaway electrons produced using a nanosecond volume discharge are examined. X-ray radiation at a pulse repetition rate of 3kHz was obtained time in a gas diode filled with air at atmospheric pressure. The current pulse width (FWHM) for runaway electrons generated in the gas diode was ˜100ps. A prepulse was observed on an oscilloscope trace of the main runaway electron beam current.

  11. Nanosecond discharge in air at atmospheric pressure as an x-ray source with high pulse repetition rates

    SciTech Connect

    Tarasenko, Victor F.

    2006-02-20

    The properties of x-ray radiation and runaway electrons produced using a nanosecond volume discharge are examined. X-ray radiation at a pulse repetition rate of 3 kHz was obtained time in a gas diode filled with air at atmospheric pressure. The current pulse width (FWHM) for runaway electrons generated in the gas diode was {approx}100 ps. A prepulse was observed on an oscilloscope trace of the main runaway electron beam current.

  12. Very High Pressure Single Pulse Shock Tube Studies of Aromatic Species

    SciTech Connect

    Brezinsky, K.

    2006-11-28

    The principal focus of this research program is aimed at understanding the oxidation and pyrolysis chemistry of primary aromatic molecules and radicals with the goal of developing a comprehensive kinetic model at conditions that are relevant to practical combustion devices. A very high pressure single pulse shock tube is used to obtain experimental data over a wide pressure range in the high pressure regime, 5-1000 bars, at pre-flame temperatures for fuel pyrolysis and oxidation over a broad spectrum of equivalence ratios. Stable species sampled from the shock tube are analyzed using standard chromatographic techniques using GC/MS-PDD and GC/TCD-FID. Experimental data from the HPST (stable species profiles) and data from other laboratories (if available) are simulated using kinetic models (if available) to develop a comprehensive model that can describe aromatics oxidation and pyrolysis over a wide range of experimental conditions. The shock tube has been heated (1000C) recently to minimize effects due to condensation of aromatic, polycyclic and other heavy species. Work during this grant period has focused on 7 main areas summarized in the final technical report.

  13. Radiative heat transfer in plasma of pulsed high pressure caesium discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapshin, V. F.

    2016-01-01

    Two-temperature many component gas dynamic model is used for the analysis of features of radiative heat transfer in pulsed high pressure caesium discharge plasma. It is shown that at a sufficiently high pressure the radial optical thickness of arc column is close to unit (τR (λ) ∼ 1) in most part of spectrum. In this case radiative heat transfer has not local character. In these conditions the photons which are emitted in any point of plasma volume are absorbed in other point remote from an emission point on considerable distance. As a result, the most part of the electric energy put in the discharge mainly near its axis is almost instantly redistributed on all volume of discharge column. In such discharge radial profiles of temperature are smooth. In case of low pressure, when discharge plasma is optically transparent for own radiation in the most part of a spectrum (τR(λ) << 1), the emission of radiation without reabsorption takes place. Radiative heat transfer in plasma has local character and profiles of temperature have considerable gradient.

  14. Effect of the spiral liquid crystals on the amplitude and temporal characteristics of the pressure-sensitive luminophore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zharkova, Galina M.; Petrov, Alexander P.; Kovrizhina, Valentina N.

    2016-10-01

    The article discusses the properties of the coatings based on porphyrin platinum complex and the polymer binder, which are used for measuring the pressure distribution on the model surface. To enhance the emission of the phosphor coating liquid crystals are made with the properties of a photonic crystal. Developed liquid crystal mixture in which the end of the band gap coincides with the peak of the phosphor luminescence. It is shown that the intensity of the luminescence of the phosphor in such a medium is increased in 3 times.

  15. Towards Ubiquitous Blood Pressure Monitoring via Pulse Transit Time: Theory and Practice

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, Jin-Oh; Inan, Omer T.; Mestha, Lalit K.; Kim, Chang-Sei; Töreyin, Hakan; Kyal, Survi

    2015-01-01

    Ubiquitous blood pressure (BP) monitoring is needed to improve hypertension detection and control and is becoming feasible due to recent technological advances such as in wearable sensing. Pulse transit time (PTT) represents a well-known, potential approach for ubiquitous BP monitoring. The goal of this review is to facilitate the achievement of reliable, ubiquitous BP monitoring via PTT. We explain the conventional BP measurement methods and their limitations; present models to summarize the theory of the PTT-BP relationship; outline the approach while pinpointing the key challenges; overview the previous work towards putting the theory to practice; make suggestions for best practice and future research; and discuss realistic expectations for the approach. PMID:26057530

  16. Toward Ubiquitous Blood Pressure Monitoring via Pulse Transit Time: Theory and Practice.

    PubMed

    Mukkamala, Ramakrishna; Hahn, Jin-Oh; Inan, Omer T; Mestha, Lalit K; Kim, Chang-Sei; Töreyin, Hakan; Kyal, Survi

    2015-08-01

    Ubiquitous blood pressure (BP) monitoring is needed to improve hypertension detection and control and is becoming feasible due to recent technological advances such as in wearable sensing. Pulse transit time (PTT) represents a well-known potential approach for ubiquitous BP monitoring. The goal of this review is to facilitate the achievement of reliable ubiquitous BP monitoring via PTT. We explain the conventional BP measurement methods and their limitations; present models to summarize the theory of the PTT-BP relationship; outline the approach while pinpointing the key challenges; overview the previous work toward putting the theory to practice; make suggestions for best practice and future research; and discuss realistic expectations for the approach.

  17. Nanosecond Repetitively Pulsed Discharges in Air at Atmospheric Pressure -- Experiment and Theory of Regime Transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pai, David; Lacoste, Deanna; Laux, Christophe

    2009-10-01

    In atmospheric pressure air preheated from 300 to 1000 K, the Nanosecond Repetitively Pulsed (NRP) method has been used to generate corona, glow, and spark discharges. Experiments have been performed to determine the parameter space (applied voltage, pulse repetition frequency, ambient gas temperature, and inter-electrode gap distance) of each discharge regime. Notably, there is a minimum gap distance for the existence of the glow regime that increases with decreasing gas temperature. A theory is developed to describe the Corona-to-Glow (C-G) and Glow-to-Spark (G-S) transitions for NRP discharges. The C-G transition is shown to depend on the Avalanche-to-Streamer Transition (AST) as well as the electric field strength in the positive column. The G-S transition is due to the thermal ionization instability. The minimum gap distance for the existence of the glow regime can be understood by considering that the applied voltage of the AST must be lower than that of the thermal ionization instability. This is a previously unknown criterion for generating glow discharges, as it does not correspond to the Paschen minimum or to the Meek-Raether criterion.

  18. Designing cyclic pressure pulsing in naturally fractured reservoirs using an inverse looking recurrent neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artun, E.; Ertekin, T.; Watson, R.; Miller, B.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, an inverse looking approach is presented to efficiently design cyclic pressure pulsing (huff 'n' puff) with N 2 and CO 2, which is an effective improved oil recovery method in naturally fractured reservoirs. A numerical flow simulation model with compositional, dual-porosity formulation is constructed. The model characteristics are from the Big Andy Field, which is a depleted, naturally fractured oil reservoir in Kentucky. A set of cyclic pulsing design scenarios is created and run using this model. These scenarios and corresponding performance indicators are fed into the recurrent neural network for training. In order to capture the cyclic, time-dependent behavior of the process, recurrent neural networks are used to develop proxy models that can mimic the reservoir simulation model in an inverse looking manner. Two separate inverse looking proxy models for N 2 and CO 2 injections are constructed to predict the corresponding design scenarios, given a set of desired performance characteristics. Predictive capabilities of developed proxy models are evaluated by comparing simulation outputs with neural-network outputs. It is observed that networks are able to accurately predict the design parameters, such as the injection rate and the duration of injection, soaking and production periods.

  19. 1D simulation of runaway electrons generation in pulsed high-pressure gas discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozhevnikov, V. Yu.; Kozyrev, A. V.; Semeniuk, N. S.

    2015-10-01

    The results of theoretical modelling of runaway electron generation in the high-pressure nanosecond pulsed gas discharge are presented. A novel hybrid model of gas discharge has been successfully built. Hydrodynamic and kinetic approaches are used simultaneously to describe the dynamics of different components of low-temperature discharge plasma. To consider motion of ions and low-energy (plasma) electrons the corresponding equations of continuity with drift-diffusion approximation are used. To describe high-energy (runaway) electrons the Boltzmann kinetic equation is included. As a result of the simulation we obtained spatial and temporal distributions of charged particles and electric field in a pulsed discharge. Furthermore, the energy spectra calculated runaway electrons in different cross-sections, particularly, the discharge gap in the anode plane. It is shown that the average energy of fast electrons (in eV) in the anode plane is usually slightly higher than the instantaneous value of the applied voltage to the gap (in V).

  20. Pulsed laser ablation plasmas generated in CO{sub 2} under high-pressure conditions up to supercritical fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, Toru; Stauss, Sven; Kato, Satoshi; Urabe, Keiichiro; Terashima, Kazuo; Baba, Motoyoshi; Suemoto, Tohru

    2012-11-26

    Pulsed laser ablation of solids in supercritical media has a large potential for nanomaterials fabrication. We investigated plasmas generated by pulsed laser ablation of Ni targets in CO{sub 2} at pressures ranging from 0.1 to 16 MPa at 304.5 K. Plasma species were characterized by optical emission spectroscopy, and the evolution of cavitation bubbles and shockwaves were observed by time-resolved shadowgraph imaging. Ni and O atomic emissions decreased with increasing gas pressure; however, near the critical point the intensities reached local maxima, probably due to the enhancement of the plasma excitation and effective quenching resulting from the large density fluctuation.

  1. Pulse Pressure and Subclinical Cardiovascular Disease in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Brachial pulse pressure (PP) has been found to be associated with markers of subclinical cardiovascular disease, including carotid intima–media thickness and left-ventricular mass index (LVMI), but it is unclear whether these associations are independent of traditional cardiovascular risk factors and of the steady, nonpulsatile component of blood pressure (BP). Moreover, it is unknown whether these associations are modified by gender, age, or race/ethnicity. METHODS We used multivariate linear regression models to assess the relationship between brachial PP and three markers of subclinical cardiovascular disease (CVD) (common carotid intima–media thickness (CC-IMT), internal carotid intima–media thickness (IC-IMT), and LVMI) in four race/ethnic groups in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis. The models were adjusted for traditional Framingham risk factors (age, low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol, diabetes, smoking status), use of lipid-lowering medication, use of antihypertensive medication, study site, and mean arterial pressure (MAP). RESULTS The assessment was done on 6,776 participants (2,612 non-Hispanic white, 1,870 African-American, 1,494 Hispanic, and 800 Chinese persons). The associations between brachial PP and CC-IMT, IC-IMT, and LVMI were significant in fully adjusted models. The three subclinical markers also showed significant interactions with gender (P < 0.0001), with stronger interactions in men. There was an interaction with age for LVMI (P = 0.004) and IC-IMT (P = 0.008). Race/ethnicity modified the association of PP with CC-IMT. CONCLUSIONS Brachial PP was independently associated with subclinical CVD after adjustment for cardiovascular risk factors and mean arterial pressure (MAP). The strength of the association differed significantly for strata of gender, age, and race/ethnicity. PMID:23388832

  2. Pulse pressure variation and stroke volume variation under different inhaled concentrations of isoflurane, sevoflurane and desflurane in pigs undergoing hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Oshiro, Alexandre Hideaki; Otsuki, Denise Aya; Hamaji, Marcelo Waldir M; Rosa, Kaleizu T; Ida, Keila Kazue; Fantoni, Denise T; Auler, José Otavio Costa

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Inhalant anesthesia induces dose-dependent cardiovascular depression, but whether fluid responsiveness is differentially influenced by the inhalant agent and plasma volemia remains unknown. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of isoflurane, sevoflurane and desflurane on pulse pressure variation and stroke volume variation in pigs undergoing hemorrhage. METHODS: Twenty-five pigs were randomly anesthetized with isoflurane, sevoflurane or desflurane. Hemodynamic and echocardiographic data were registered sequentially at minimum alveolar concentrations of 1.00 (M1), 1.25 (M2), and 1.00 (M3). Then, following withdrawal of 30% of the estimated blood volume, these data were registered at a minimum alveolar concentrations of 1.00 (M4) and 1.25 (M5). RESULTS: The minimum alveolar concentration increase from 1.00 to 1.25 (M2) decreased the cardiac index and increased the central venous pressure, but only modest changes in mean arterial pressure, pulse pressure variation and stroke volume variation were observed in all groups from M1 to M2. A significant decrease in mean arterial pressure was only observed with desflurane. Following blood loss (M4), pulse pressure variation, stroke volume variation and central venous pressure increased (p<0.001) and mean arterial pressure decreased in all groups. Under hypovolemia, the cardiac index decreased with the increase of anesthesia depth in a similar manner in all groups. CONCLUSION: The effects of desflurane, sevoflurane and isoflurane on pulse pressure variation and stroke volume variation were not different during normovolemia or hypovolemia. PMID:26735220

  3. An efficient, compact pulsed D2O terahertz super-radiant laser pumped with a fundamental transverse mode transversely excited atmospheric pressure CO2 laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Lijie; Ren, Deming; Zhao, Weijiang; Qu, Yanchen; Chen, Huiying; Du, Jun

    2013-02-01

    An efficient, compact pulsed D2O terahertz (THz) super-radiant laser pumped by a TEA (transversely excited atmospheric pressure) CO2 laser is presented. The pulse energy of the THz laser has been discussed as a function of CO2 laser pump energy, D2O gas pressure, and pump absorption. A pulse width of about 110 ns and the maximum pulse energy of about 1.3 mJ have been achieved at 385 μm, with pumping by a 378 mJ fundamental transverse mode TEA CO2 laser, and the photon conversion efficiency of 29% has been achieved. We have also studied the temporal behavior features such as the decay time, the full width at half-maximum, and the pulse broadening of the THz laser pulse compared with the pump pulse and the residual pump pulse at the optimum pressure.

  4. An in vitro quantification of pressures exerted by earlobe pulse oximeter probes following reports of device-related pressure ulcers in ICU patients .

    PubMed

    Goodell, Teresa T

    2012-11-01

    The earlobe often is used to monitor perfusion when pulse oximeter signal quality is impaired in the fingers and toes. Prompted by intermittent occurrences of roughly circular earlobe pressure ulcers among patients in intensive care units, a convenience sample of seven calibrated pulse oximeter probes was used to quantify earlobe pressure exerted by these devices in vitro. All were tested twice with an electronic load cell, a strain gauge with a transducer that transforms the measured force into a readable numerical signal. The probe was clipped to the load cell just as it is clipped to the earlobe in the clinical setting. The probes exerted an average of 0.24 lb (SD 0.6) of force over an area of 0.3 square inches, equal to an average of 20.7 mm Hg (SD 0.6) pressure on tissue. This value exceeds some empirically derived values of capillary perfusion pressure. The occurrence of device-related pressure ulcers, as well pressure ulcers on the ears, has been documented, but little is known about device-related earlobe pressure ulcers or the actual pressure exerted by these devices. Additional in vitro studies are needed to quantify the pressures exerted by these and other probes, and future prevalence and incidence studies should include more detailed pressure ulcer location and device use documentation. Until more is known about the possible role of these devices in the development of pressure ulcers, clinicians should be cognizant of their potential for causing pressure ulcers, particularly in patients whose conditions can compromise skin integrity.

  5. Improvement of discharge pumping for pulsed high-pressure gas lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velikin, Alexei A.; Galaktionov, Imar I.; Belov, Sergei N.; Kanatenko, Michael A.; Podmoshensky, Ivan V.

    1990-10-01

    This paper presents an upgrading technique using anisotropic-resistive (AR) electrodes and radionucide pre-ionization for discharge pumping of pulsed high-pressure gas lasers. Plutonium-238, polonium-210 and krypton-85 radionucide alpha and beta radiation sources were effectivelyused for pre-ionization in the volumetric discharge setup. These sources feature high stability, versatility and simplicity as compared to traditional UV irradiation and electron beam ionization techniques. The use of AR electrodes makes it possible to suppress efficiently electrode instabilities in volumetric discharges with various power modes of operation and to increase energy input in an active medium by a factor of 2-3 due to extended discharge duration in the volumetric phase. With the use of the AR cathode as an alternative to a metal one, a commercially available photo-ionization 2 laser gained two-fold increase in generation energy. It also showed a stable operation of the volumetric discharge in Ar, Kr, Xe mixtures with He at atmospheric pressure and allowed us to obtain generation in An, Kr!, Xe! spectral lines.

  6. STRONG SOLAR WIND DYNAMIC PRESSURE PULSES: INTERPLANETARY SOURCES AND THEIR IMPACTS ON GEOSYNCHRONOUS MAGNETIC FIELDS

    SciTech Connect

    Zuo, Pingbing; Feng, Xueshang; Wang, Yi; Xie, Yanqiong; Xu, Xiaojun E-mail: fengx@spaceweather.ac.cn

    2015-10-20

    In this investigation, we first present a statistical result of the interplanetary sources of very strong solar wind dynamic pressure pulses (DPPs) detected by WIND during solar cycle 23. It is found that the vast majority of strong DPPs reside within solar wind disturbances. Although the variabilities of geosynchronous magnetic fields (GMFs) due to the impact of positive DPPs have been well established, there appears to be no systematic investigations on the response of GMFs to negative DPPs. Here, we study both the decompression effects of very strong negative DPPs and the compression from strong positive DPPs on GMFs at different magnetic local time sectors. In response to the decompression of strong negative DPPs, GMFs on the dayside near dawn and near dusk on the nightside, are generally depressed. But near the midnight region, the responses of GMF are very diverse, being either positive or negative. For part of the events when GOES is located at the midnight sector, the GMF is found to abnormally increase as the result of magnetospheric decompression caused by negative DPPs. It is known that under certain conditions magnetic depression of nightside GMFs can be caused by the impact of positive DPPs. Here, we find that a stronger pressure enhancement may have a higher probability of producing the exceptional depression of GMF at the midnight region. Statistically, both the decompression effect of strong negative DPPs and the compression effect of strong positive DPPs depend on the magnetic local time, which are stronger at the noon sector.

  7. Characterization of Pressure Transients Generated by Nanosecond Electrical Pulse (nsEP) Exposure.

    PubMed

    Roth, Caleb C; Barnes, Ronald A; Ibey, Bennett L; Beier, Hope T; Christopher Mimun, L; Maswadi, Saher M; Shadaram, Mehdi; Glickman, Randolph D

    2015-10-09

    The mechanism(s) responsible for the breakdown (nanoporation) of cell plasma membranes after nanosecond pulse (nsEP) exposure remains poorly understood. Current theories focus exclusively on the electrical field, citing electrostriction, water dipole alignment and/or electrodeformation as the primary mechanisms for pore formation. However, the delivery of a high-voltage nsEP to cells by tungsten electrodes creates a multitude of biophysical phenomena, including electrohydraulic cavitation, electrochemical interactions, thermoelastic expansion, and others. To date, very limited research has investigated non-electric phenomena occurring during nsEP exposures and their potential effect on cell nanoporation. Of primary interest is the production of acoustic shock waves during nsEP exposure, as it is known that acoustic shock waves can cause membrane poration (sonoporation). Based on these observations, our group characterized the acoustic pressure transients generated by nsEP and determined if such transients played any role in nanoporation. In this paper, we show that nsEP exposures, equivalent to those used in cellular studies, are capable of generating high-frequency (2.5 MHz), high-intensity (>13 kPa) pressure transients. Using confocal microscopy to measure cell uptake of YO-PRO®-1 (indicator of nanoporation of the plasma membrane) and changing the electrode geometry, we determined that acoustic waves alone are not responsible for poration of the membrane.

  8. Characterization of Pressure Transients Generated by Nanosecond Electrical Pulse (nsEP) Exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Caleb C.; Barnes, Ronald A., Jr.; Ibey, Bennett L.; Beier, Hope T.; Christopher Mimun, L.; Maswadi, Saher M.; Shadaram, Mehdi; Glickman, Randolph D.

    2015-10-01

    The mechanism(s) responsible for the breakdown (nanoporation) of cell plasma membranes after nanosecond pulse (nsEP) exposure remains poorly understood. Current theories focus exclusively on the electrical field, citing electrostriction, water dipole alignment and/or electrodeformation as the primary mechanisms for pore formation. However, the delivery of a high-voltage nsEP to cells by tungsten electrodes creates a multitude of biophysical phenomena, including electrohydraulic cavitation, electrochemical interactions, thermoelastic expansion, and others. To date, very limited research has investigated non-electric phenomena occurring during nsEP exposures and their potential effect on cell nanoporation. Of primary interest is the production of acoustic shock waves during nsEP exposure, as it is known that acoustic shock waves can cause membrane poration (sonoporation). Based on these observations, our group characterized the acoustic pressure transients generated by nsEP and determined if such transients played any role in nanoporation. In this paper, we show that nsEP exposures, equivalent to those used in cellular studies, are capable of generating high-frequency (2.5 MHz), high-intensity (>13 kPa) pressure transients. Using confocal microscopy to measure cell uptake of YO-PRO®-1 (indicator of nanoporation of the plasma membrane) and changing the electrode geometry, we determined that acoustic waves alone are not responsible for poration of the membrane.

  9. Characterization of Pressure Transients Generated by Nanosecond Electrical Pulse (nsEP) Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Roth, Caleb C.; Barnes Jr., Ronald A.; Ibey, Bennett L.; Beier, Hope T.; Christopher Mimun, L.; Maswadi, Saher M.; Shadaram, Mehdi; Glickman, Randolph D.

    2015-01-01

    The mechanism(s) responsible for the breakdown (nanoporation) of cell plasma membranes after nanosecond pulse (nsEP) exposure remains poorly understood. Current theories focus exclusively on the electrical field, citing electrostriction, water dipole alignment and/or electrodeformation as the primary mechanisms for pore formation. However, the delivery of a high-voltage nsEP to cells by tungsten electrodes creates a multitude of biophysical phenomena, including electrohydraulic cavitation, electrochemical interactions, thermoelastic expansion, and others. To date, very limited research has investigated non-electric phenomena occurring during nsEP exposures and their potential effect on cell nanoporation. Of primary interest is the production of acoustic shock waves during nsEP exposure, as it is known that acoustic shock waves can cause membrane poration (sonoporation). Based on these observations, our group characterized the acoustic pressure transients generated by nsEP and determined if such transients played any role in nanoporation. In this paper, we show that nsEP exposures, equivalent to those used in cellular studies, are capable of generating high-frequency (2.5 MHz), high-intensity (>13 kPa) pressure transients. Using confocal microscopy to measure cell uptake of YO-PRO®-1 (indicator of nanoporation of the plasma membrane) and changing the electrode geometry, we determined that acoustic waves alone are not responsible for poration of the membrane. PMID:26450165

  10. Pulse blood pressure and cardiovascular mortality in a population-based cohort of elderly Costa Ricans

    PubMed Central

    Rosero-Bixby, L; Coto-Yglesias, F; Dow, W H

    2016-01-01

    We studied the relationships between blood pressure (BP), pulse pressure (PP) and cardiovascular (CV) death in older adults using data from 2346 participants enrolled in the Costa Rican CRELES study, mean age 76 years (s.d. 10.2), 31% qualified as wide PP. All covariates included and analyzed were collected prospectively as part of a 4-year home-based follow-up; mortality was tracked for an additional 3 years, identifying 266 CV deaths. Longitudinal data revealed little change over time in systolic BP (SBP), a decline in diastolic BP, and widening of PP. Wide PP was associated with higher risk of CV death but only among individuals receiving antihypertensive drug therapy. Individuals with both wide PP and receiving therapy had 2.6 hazard rate of CV death relative to people with normal-PP plus not taking treatment (TRT), even adjusting for SBP. Increasing PP between visits was significantly associated to higher CV death independently of TRT status. SBP and DBP were not significantly associated to CV death when the effect of PP was controlled for. Conclusion: elderly hypertensive patients with wide or increasing PP, especially if receiving TRT, are the highest CV risk group, thus must be carefully assessed, monitored and treated with caution. PMID:26674758

  11. Opportunities in pulse combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Brenchley, D.L.; Bomelburg, H.J.

    1985-10-01

    In most pulse combustors, the combustion occurs near the closed end of a tube where inlet valves operate in phase with the pressure amplitude variations. Thus, within the combustion zone, both the temperature and the pressure oscillate around a mean value. However, the development of practical applications of pulse combustion has been hampered because effective design requires the right combination of the combustor's dimensions, valve characteristics, fuel/oxidizer combination, and flow pattern. Pulse combustion has several additional advantages for energy conversion efficiency, including high combustion and thermal efficiency, high combustion intensity, and high convective heat transfer rates. Also, pulse combustion can be self-aspirating, generating a pressure boost without using a blower. This allows the use of a compact heat exchanger that may include a condensing section and may obviate the need for a chimney. In the last decade, these features have revived interest in pulse combustion research and development, which has resulted in the development of a pulse combustion air heater by Lennox, and a pulse combustion hydronic unit by Hydrotherm, Inc. To appraise this potential for energy savings, a systematic study was conducted of the many past and present attempts to use pulse combustion for practical purposes. The authors recommended areas where pulse combustion technology could possibly be applied in the future and identified areas in which additional R and D would be necessary. Many of the results of the study project derived from a special workshop on pulse combustion. This document highlights the main points of the study report, with particular emphasis on pulse combustion application in chemical engineering.

  12. Method specificity of non-invasive blood pressure measurement: oscillometry and finger pulse pressure vs acoustic methods.

    PubMed Central

    De Mey, C; Schroeter, V; Butzer, R; Roll, S; Belz, G G

    1995-01-01

    1. The agreement of blood pressure measurements by stethoscope auscultation (SBPa, DBPa-IV and DBPa-V), oscillometry (Dinamap; SBPo, and DBPo) and digital photoplethysmography (Finapres; SBPf, and DBPf) with the graphical analysis of the analogue microphone signals of vascular wall motion sound (SBPg and DBPg) was evaluated in eight healthy subjects in the presence of responses to the intravenous infusion of 1 microgram min-1 isoprenaline. 2. In general, there was good agreement between the SBP/DBP-measurements based on auscultatory Korotkoff-I- and IV-criteria and the reference method; the average method difference in estimating the isoprenaline responses for SBPa-SBPg was: -1.1, 95% CI: -5.4 to 3.1 mm Hg with a within-subject between-method repeatability coefficient (REP) of 11.6 mm Hg and for DBPa-IV-DBPg: 3.5, 95% CI: -0.5 to 6.5 mm Hg, REP: 11.5 mm Hg. The ausculatation of Korotkoff-V substantially overestimated the isoprenaline induced reduction of DBP: method difference DBPa-V-DBPg: -11.3, 95% CI: -17.8 to -4.7 mm Hg, REP: 31.8 mm Hg. 3. Oscillometry yielded good approximations for the SBP response to isoprenaline (average method difference SBPo-SBPg: -2.9, 95% CI: -9.0 to 3.3 mm Hg, REP: 17.6 mm Hg) but was poorly sensitive with regard to the DBP responses: method difference DBPo-DBPg: 6.5, 95% CI: -1.3 to 14.3 mm Hg, REP: 25.7 mm Hg. 4. Whilst the finger pulse pressure agreed well with regard to DBP (method difference for the DBP responses to isoprenaline: DBPf-DBPg: 1.8, 95% CI: -5.1 to 8.6 mm Hg, REP: 18.5 mm Hg) it was rather unsatisfactory with regard to SBP (method difference SBPf-SBPg: -14.1, 95% CI: -28.2 to -0.1 mm Hg, REP: 49.9 mm Hg).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8554929

  13. Pulsed electron beam propagation in gases under pressure of 6.6 kPa in drift tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kholodnaya, G. E.; Sazonov, R. V.; Ponomarev, D. V.; Remnev, G. E.; Poloskov, A. V.

    2017-02-01

    This paper presents the results of an investigation of pulsed electron beam transport propagated in a drift tube filled with different gases (He, H2, N2, Ar, SF6, and CO2). The total pressure in the drift tube was 6.6 kPa. The experiments were carried out using a TEA-500 pulsed electron accelerator. The electron beam was propagated in the drift tube composed of two sections equipped with reverse current shunts. Under a pressure of 6.6 kPa, the maximum value of the electron beam charge closed on the walls of the drift tube was recorded when the beam was propagated in hydrogen and carbon dioxide. The minimum value of the electron beam charge closed on the walls of the drift tube was recorded for sulfur hexafluoride. The visualization of the pulsed electron beam energy losses onto the walls of the drift chamber was carried out using radiation-sensitive film.

  14. Plasma-chemical reactor based on a low-pressure pulsed arc discharge for synthesis of nanopowders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpov, I. V.; Ushakov, A. V.; Lepeshev, A. A.; Fedorov, L. Yu.

    2017-01-01

    A reactor for producing nanopowders in the plasma of a low-pressure arc discharge has been developed. As a plasma source, a pulsed cold-cathode arc evaporator has been applied. The design and operating principle of the reactor have been described. Experimental data on how the movement of a gaseous mixture in the reactor influences the properties of nanopowders have been presented.

  15. A comparison of the failure times of pulse oximeters during blood pressure cuff-induced hypoperfusion in volunteers.

    PubMed

    Kawagishi, Toshiya; Kanaya, Noriaki; Nakayama, Masayasu; Kurosawa, Saori; Namiki, Akiyoshi

    2004-09-01

    Important information may not be obtained if the pulse oximetry signal is lost during inflation of a cuff for blood pressure measurement, particularly in patients with hemodynamic instability. In the present study, we compared the failure times of pulse oximeters during cuff-induced hypoperfusion in volunteers. A pulse oximeter sensor was attached to the index finger, and a blood pressure cuff was attached to the same arm of each volunteer. MasimoSET Radical (Masimo), Nellcor N-395 (N-395), Nellcor N-20PA, and Nellcor D-25 were tested. To evaluate the failure time of each pulse oximeter, time to peak of cuff pressure, time to loss of signal, time to recovery of signal, and failure interval were measured. All measurements were performed three times for each pulse oximeter and were averaged. There were no differences in hemodynamic measurements among the groups. Time to loss of signal was longer in Masimo than the other pulse oximeters. Masimo and N-395 showed significantly shorter times to recovery of signal than those of the other two pulse oximeters. Failure interval was in the order of Masimo < N-395 < Nellcor D-25 = Nellcor N-20PA. Masimo did not lose a signal as rapidly as the other oximeters studied. Masimo was similar in performance to the N-395 at providing useful data sooner than conventional technology after a loss of the signal. These observations suggest that data will be more available with fewer false-positive alarms when using the Masimo oximeter followed by the N-395 when compared with conventional oximeters.

  16. Flow Control Under Low-Pressure Turbine Conditions Using Pulsed Jets: Experimental Data Archive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volino, Ralph J.; Ibrahim, Mounir B.

    2012-01-01

    This publication is the final report of research performed under an NRA/Cooperative Interagency Agreement, and includes a supplemental CD-ROM with detailed data. It is complemented by NASA/CR-2012-217416 and NASA/CR-2012-217417 which include a Ph.D. Dissertation and an M.S. thesis respectively, performed under this contract. In this study the effects of unsteady wakes and flow control using vortex generator jets (VGJs) were studied experimentally and computationally on the flow over the L1A low pressure turbine (LPT) airfoil. The experimental facility was a six passage linear cascade in a low speed wind tunnel at the U.S. Naval Academy. In parallel, computational work using the commercial code FLUENT (ANSYS, Inc.) was performed at Cleveland State University, using Unsteady Reynolds Averaged Navier Stokes (URANS) and Large Eddy Simulations (LES) methods. In the first phase of the work, the baseline flow was documented under steady inflow conditions without flow control. URANS calculations were done using a variety of turbulence models. In the second phase of the work, flow control was added using steady and pulsed vortex generator jets. The VGJs successfully suppressed separation and reduced aerodynamic losses. Pulsed operation was more effective and mass flow requirements are very low. Numerical simulations of the VGJs cases showed that URANS failed to capture the effect of the jets. LES results were generally better. In the third phase, effects of unsteady wakes were studied. Computations with URANS and LES captured the wake effect and generally predicted separation and reattachment to match the experiments. Quantitatively the results were mixed. In the final phase of the study, wakes and VGJs were combined and synchronized using various timing schemes. The timing of the jets with respect to the wakes had some effect, but in general once the disturbance frequency was high enough to control separation, the timing was not very important. This is the supplemental CD-ROM

  17. Flow Control Under Low-Pressure Turbine Conditions Using Pulsed Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volino, Ralph J.; Ibrahim, Mounir B.

    2012-01-01

    This publication is the final report of research performed under an NRA/Cooperative Interagency Agreement, and includes a supplemental CD-ROM with detailed data. It is complemented by NASA/CR-2012-217416 and NASA/CR-2012-217417 which include a Ph.D. Dissertation and an M.S. thesis respectively, performed under this contract. In this study the effects of unsteady wakes and flow control using vortex generator jets (VGJs) were studied experimentally and computationally on the flow over the L1A low pressure turbine (LPT) airfoil. The experimental facility was a six passage linear cascade in a low speed wind tunnel at the U.S. Naval Academy. In parallel, computational work using the commercial code FLUENT (ANSYS, Inc.) was performed at Cleveland State University, using Unsteady Reynolds Averaged Navier Stokes (URANS) and Large Eddy Simulations (LES) methods. In the first phase of the work, the baseline flow was documented under steady inflow conditions without flow control. URANS calculations were done using a variety of turbulence models. In the second phase of the work, flow control was added using steady and pulsed vortex generator jets. The VGJs successfully suppressed separation and reduced aerodynamic losses. Pulsed operation was more effective and mass flow requirements are very low. Numerical simulations of the VGJs cases showed that URANS failed to capture the effect of the jets. LES results were generally better. In the third phase, effects of unsteady wakes were studied. Computations with URANS and LES captured the wake effect and generally predicted separation and reattachment to match the experiments. Quantitatively the results were mixed. In the final phase of the study, wakes and VGJs were combined and synchronized using various timing schemes. The timing of the jets with respect to the wakes had some effect, but in general once the disturbance frequency was high enough to control separation, the timing was not very important.

  18. Effects of oxygen partial pressure on the ferroelectric properties of pulsed laser deposited Ba0.8Sr0.2TiO3 thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, J. P. B.; Sekhar, K. C.; Almeida, A.; Agostinho Moreira, J.; Pereira, M.; Gomes, M. J. M.

    2013-11-01

    The Ba0.8Sr0.2TiO3 thin films were grown on the Pt-Si substrate at 700 °C by using a pulsed laser deposition technique at different oxygen partial pressure (PO2) in the range of 1-20 Pa and their properties were investigated. It is observed that the PO2 during the deposition plays an important role on the tetragonal distortion ratio, surface morphology, dielectric permittivity, ferroelectric polarization, switching response, and leakage currents of the films. With an increase in PO2, the in-plane strain for the BST films changes from tensile to compressive. The films grown at 7.5 Pa show the optimum dielectric and ferroelectric properties and also exhibit the good polarization stability. It is assumed that a reasonable compressive strain, increasing the ionic displacement, and thus promotes the in-plane polarization in the field direction, could improve the dielectric permittivity. The butterfly features of the capacitance-voltage ( C- V) characteristics and the bell shape curve in polarization current were attributed to the domain reversal process. The effect of pulse amplitude on the polarization reversal behavior of the BST films grown at PO2 of 7.5 Pa was studied. The peak value of the polarization current shows exponential dependence on the electric field.

  19. A comparative study on continuous and pulsed RF argon capacitive glow discharges at low pressure by fluid modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ruiqiang; Liu, Yue; Jia, Wenzhu; Zhou, Yanwen

    2017-01-01

    Based on the plasma fluid theory and using the drift-diffusion approximation, a mathematical model for continuous and pulsed radial frequency (RF) argon capacitive glow discharges at low pressure is established. The model is solved by a finite difference method and the numerical results are reported. Based on the systematic analysis of the results, plasma characteristics of the continuous and pulsed RF discharges are comparatively investigated. It is shown that, under the same condition for the peak value of the driving potential, the cycle-averaged electron density, the current density, and other essential physical quantities in the continuous RF discharge are higher than those from the pulsed RF discharge. On the other hand, similar plasma characteristics are obtained with two types of discharges, by assuming the same deposited power. Consequently, higher driving potential is needed in pulsed discharges in order to maintain the same effective plasma current. Furthermore, it is shown that, in the bulk plasma region, the peak value of the bipolar electric field from the continuous RF discharge is greater than that from the pulsed RF discharge. In the sheath region, the ionization rate has the shape of double-peaking and the explanation is given. Because the plasma input power depends on the driving potential and the plasma current phase, the phase differences between the driving potential and the plasma current are compared between the continuous and the pulsed RF discharges. It is found that this phase difference is smaller in the pulsed RF discharge compared to that of the continuous RF discharge. This means that the input energy coupling in the pulsed RF discharge is less efficient than the continuous counterpart. This comparative study, carried out also under other conditions, thus can provide instructive ideas in applications using the continuous and pulsed RF capacitive glow discharges.

  20. Dependence of the absorption of pulsed CO2-laser radiation by silane on wavenumber, fluence, pulse duration, temperature, optical path length, and pressure of absorbing and nonabsorbing gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bl/aŻejowski, Jerzy; Gruzdiewa, Ludwika; Rulewski, Jacek; Lampe, Frederick W.

    1995-05-01

    The absorption of three lines [P(20), 944.2 cm-1; P(14), 949.2 cm-1; and R(24), 978.5 cm-1] of the pulsed CO2 laser (0001-1000 transition) by SiH4 was measured at various pulse energy, pulse duration, temperature, optical path length, and pressure of the compound and nonabsorbing foreign gases. In addition, low intensity infrared absorption spectrum of silane was compared with high intensity absorption characteristics for all lines of the pulsed CO2 laser. The experimental dependencies show deviations from the phenomenological Beer-Lambert law which can be considered as arising from the high intensity of an incident radiation and collisions of absorbing molecules with surroundings. These effects were included into the expression, being an extended form of the Beer-Lambert law, which reasonably approximates all experimental data. The results, except for extending knowledge on the interaction of a high power laser radiation with matter, can help understanding and planning processes leading to preparation of silicon-containing technologically important materials.

  1. Twenty four hour pulse pressure predicts long term recurrence in acute stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Tsivgoulis, G; Spengos, K; Zakopoulos, N; Manios, E; Xinos, K; Vassilopoulos, D; Vemmos, K

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: The impact of different blood pressure (BP) components during the acute stage of stroke on the risk of recurrent stroke is controversial. The present study aimed to investigate by 24 hour BP monitoring a possible association between acute BP values and long term recurrence. Methods: A total of 339 consecutive patients with first ever acute stroke underwent 24 hour BP monitoring within 24 hours of ictus. Known stroke risk factors and clinical findings on admission were documented. Patients given antihypertensive medication during BP monitoring were excluded. The outcome of interest during the one year follow up was recurrent stroke. The Cox proportional hazard model was used to analyse association of casual and 24 hour BP recordings with one year recurrence after adjusting for stroke risk factors, baseline clinical characteristics, and secondary prevention therapies. Results: The cumulative one year recurrence rate was 9.2% (95% CI 5.9% to 12.3%). Multivariate Cox regression analyses revealed age, diabetes mellitus, and 24 hour pulse pressure (PP) as the only significant predictors for stroke recurrence. The relative risk for one year recurrence associated with every 10 mm Hg increase in 24 hour PP was 1.323 (95% CI 1.019 to 1.718, p = 0.036). Higher casual PP levels were significantly related to an increased risk of one year recurrence on univariate analysis, but not in the multivariate Cox regression model. Conclusions: Elevated 24 hour PP levels in patients with acute stroke are independently associated with higher risk of long term recurrence. Further research is required to investigate whether the risk of recurrent stroke can be reduced to a greater extent by decreasing the pulsatile component of BP in patients with acute stroke. PMID:16170077

  2. Outcome-Driven Thresholds for Ambulatory Pulse Pressure in 9938 People Recruited from 11 Populations

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Yu-Mei; Thijs, Lutgarde; Li, Yan; Asayama, Kei; Boggia, José; Hansen, Tine W.; Liu, Yan-Ping; Ohkubo, Takayoshi; Björklund-Bodegård, Kristina; Jeppesen, Jørgen; Dolan, Eamon; Torp-Pedersen, Christian; Kuznetsova, Tatiana; Stolarz-Skrzypek, Katarzyna; Tikhonoff, Valérie; Malyutina, Sofia; Casiglia, Edoardo; Nikitin, Yuri; Lind, Lars; Sandoya, Edgardo; Kawecka-Jaszcz, Kalina; Imai, Yutaka; Mena, Luis J.; Wang, Jiguang; O’Brien, Eoin; Verhamme, Peter; Filipovský, Jan; Maestre, Gladys E.; Staessen, Jan A.

    2014-01-01

    Evidence-based thresholds for risk stratification based on pulse pressure (PP) are currently unavailable. To derive outcome-driven thresholds for the 24–h ambulatory PP, we analyzed 9938 people randomly recruited from 11 populations (47.3% women). After age stratification (<60 vs. ≥60 years) and using average risk as reference, we computed multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) to assess risk by tenths of the PP distribution or risk associated with stepwise increasing (+1 mm Hg) PP levels. All adjustments included mean arterial pressure. Among 6028 younger participants (68,853 person-years), the risk of cardiovascular (HR, 1.58; P=0.011) or cardiac (HR, 1.52; P=0.056) events increased only in the top PP tenth (mean, 60.6 mm Hg). Using stepwise increasing PP levels, the lower boundary of the 95% confidence interval of the successive thresholds did not cross unity. Among 3910 older participants (39,923 person-years), risk increased (P≤0.028) in the top PP tenth (mean, 76.1 mm Hg). HRs were 1.30 and 1.62 for total and cardiovascular mortality, and 1.52, 1.69 and 1.40 for all cardiovascular, cardiac and cerebrovascular events. The lower boundary of the 95% confidence interval of the HRs associated with stepwise increasing PP levels crossed unity at 64 mm Hg. While accounting for all covariables, the top tenth of PP contributed less than 0.3% (generalized R2 statistic) to the overall risk among elderly. Thus, in randomly recruited people, ambulatory PP does not add to risk stratification below age 60; in the elderly, PP is a weak risk factor with levels below 64 mm Hg probably being innocuous. PMID:24324050

  3. Modelling the relationship between peripheral blood pressure and blood volume pulses using linear and neural network system identification techniques.

    PubMed

    Allen, J; Murray, A

    1999-08-01

    The relationships between peripheral blood pressure and blood volume pulse waveforms can provide valuable physiological data about the peripheral vascular system, and are the subject of this study. Blood pressure and volume pulse waveforms were collected from 12 normal male subjects using non-invasive optical techniques, finger arterial blood pressure (BP, Finapres: Datex-Ohmeda) and photoelectric plethysmography (PPG) respectively, and captured to computer for three equal (1 min) measurement phases: baseline, hand raising and hand elevated. This simple physiological challenge was designed to induce a significant drop in peripheral blood pressure. A simple first order lag transfer function was chosen to study the relationship between blood pressure (system input) and blood volume pulse waveforms (system output), with parameters describing the dynamics (time constant, tau) and input-output gain (K). Tau and K were estimated for each subject using two different system identification techniques: a recursive parameter estimation algorithm which calculated tau and K from a linear auto-regressive with exogenous variable (ARX) model, and an artificial neural network which was trained to learn the non-linear process input-output relationships and then derive a linearized ARX model of the system. The identification techniques allowed the relationship between the blood pressure and blood volume pulses to be described simply, with the neural network technique providing a better model fit overall (p < 0.05, Wilcoxon). The median falls in tau following the hand raise challenge were 26% and 31% for the linear and neural network based techniques respectively (both p < 0.05, Wilcoxon). This preliminary study has shown that the time constant and gain parameters obtained using these techniques can provide physiological data for the clinical assessment of the peripheral circulation.

  4. Using dual-antenna nanosecond pulse near-field sensing technology for non-contact and continuous blood pressure measurement.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hong-Dun; Lee, Yen-Shien; Chuang, Bor-Nian

    2012-01-01

    Long-term and continuous non-invasive blood pressure monitoring has shown that it is the most important to clinical diagnosis of cardiovascular diseases and personal home health care. Currently, there are many preferable non-invasive methods, including optical sensor, pressure-sensitive transducers, and applanation tonometry, to get insight of blood pressure and flow signal detection. However, the operation of traditional monitors is cuff accessories needed, and also the sensing probes needed to exert pressure to the user directly. The measurement procedure is limited by long-term, continuous measurement and also easy to cause discomfort. To improve these issues, the non-pressurized and non-invasive measuring method will become an important innovation improvement. In this paper, the novel nanosecond pulse near-field sensing (NPNS) based screening technology with dual-antenna, which includes radio frequency (RF) pulse transmission and two combined flat antenna connected to transceiver of miniature radar, is proposed to derive relative blood pressure parameters from measured blood flow activity (Pulse Wave Velocity, PWV). A dedicated analysis software is also provided to calculate cardiovascular parameters, including PWV, average systolic time, diastolic and systolic pressure, for clinical and homecare applications. To evaluate the performance, the proposed method was applied on blood pressure measurement at the body site of limbs (brachial and leg). As a result, it shows error of DBP and SBP is 5.18±1.61 and 4.09 ± 1.69 mmHg in average compared with the measurement result from commercial product, and performs the capability of continuous long-term monitoring in real-time.

  5. Photoacoustic effect measurement in aqueous suspensions of gold nanorods caused by low-frequency and low-power near-infrared pulsing laser irradiation.

    PubMed

    López de Pablo, Cristina Sánchez; Ramos Ávila, Julio Alberto; Fernández Cabada, Tamara; del Pozo Guerrero, Francisco; Serrano Olmedo, José Javier

    2013-07-01

    When aqueous suspensions of gold nanorods are irradiated with a pulsing laser (808 nm), pressure waves appear even at low frequencies (pulse repetition rate of 25 kHz). We found that the pressure wave amplitude depends on the dynamics of the phenomenon. For fixed concentration and average laser current intensity, the amplitude of the pressure waves shows a trend of increasing with the pulse slope and the pulse maximum amplitude. We postulate that the detected ultrasonic pressure waves are a sort of shock waves that would be generated at the beginning of each pulse, because the pressure wave amplitude would be the result of the positive interference of all the individual shock waves.

  6. Pulse Pressure Magnifies the Effect of COMT Val158Met on 15 Years Episodic Memory Trajectories

    PubMed Central

    Persson, Ninni; Lavebratt, Catharina; Sundström, Anna; Fischer, Håkan

    2016-01-01

    We investigated whether a physiological marker of cardiovascular health, pulse pressure (PP), and age magnified the effect of the functional COMT Val158Met (rs4680) polymorphism on 15-years cognitive trajectories [episodic memory (EM), visuospatial ability, and semantic memory] using data from 1585 non-demented adults from the Betula study. A multiple-group latent growth curve model was specified to gauge individual differences in change, and average trends therein. The allelic variants showed negligible differences across the cognitive markers in average trends. The older portion of the sample selectively age-magnified the effects of Val158Met on EM changes, resulting in greater decline in Val compared to homozygote Met carriers. This effect was attenuated by statistical control for PP. Further, PP moderated the effects of COMT on 15-years EM trajectories, resulting in greater decline in Val carriers, even after accounting for the confounding effects of sex, education, cardiovascular diseases (diabetes, stroke, and hypertension), and chronological age, controlled for practice gains. The effect was still present after excluding individuals with a history of cardiovascular diseases. The effects of cognitive change were not moderated by any other covariates. This report underscores the importance of addressing synergistic effects in normal cognitive aging, as the addition thereof may place healthy individuals at greater risk for memory decline. PMID:26973509

  7. Pressurized liquid extraction as a sample preparation method for the analysis of isoflavones in pulses.

    PubMed

    Delgado-Zamarreño, María Milagros; Pérez-Martín, Lara; Bustamante-Rangel, Myriam; Carabias-Martínez, Rita

    2012-08-01

    In this work, we describe a rapid and simple analytical method that exploits pressurized liquid extraction (PLE) and liquid chromatography with diode array detection for the determination of isoflavones in samples of Spanish pulses. Confirmation of the analytes present was performed using ion-trap mass spectrometry. To optimize the PLE extraction, variables such as the dispersing agent, type of solvent and sample amount, and the experimental parameters, such as temperature and the number of extraction cycles, were studied. Separation was carried out using a reverse-phase C18 with polar endcapping as the stationary phase and acetonitrile/water with 0.2 % of formic acid, under a gradient regime, as the mobile phase. Optimal extraction of formononetin and biochanin-A from chickpeas with PLE was achieved using Hydromatrix as a dispersant agent, methanol/water (50:50), a temperature of 90 °C, and three cycles. The same optimal conditions-except methanol/water (75:25)-for solvent extraction were obtained for the extraction of daidzin, genistin, and formononetin from lentils. Recoveries ranged from 97 to 110 %, and standard deviations lower than 20 % were obtained. The contents obtained for daidzin in lentils using the proposed method were not significantly different from those obtained using another official method of analysis.

  8. Telomere Length and Pulse Pressure in Newly Diagnosed, Antipsychotic-Naive Patients With Nonaffective Psychosis

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-Egea, Emilio; Bernardo, Miguel; Heaphy, Christopher M.; Griffith, Jeffrey K.; Parellada, Eduard; Esmatjes, Enric; Conget, Ignacio; Nguyen, Linh; George, Varghese; Stöppler, Hubert; Kirkpatrick, Brian

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: Recent studies suggest that in addition to factors such as treatment side effects, suicide, and poor health habits, people with schizophrenia may have an increased risk of diabetes prior to antipsychotic treatment. Diabetes is associated with an increased pulse pressure (PP) and a shortened telomere. We tested the hypothesis that prior to antipsychotic treatment, schizophrenia and related disorders are associated with a shortened telomere, as well as an increased PP. Methods: Telomere content (which is highly correlated with telomere length) and PP were measured in newly diagnosed, antipsychotic-naive patients with schizophrenia and related disorders on first clinical contact and in matched control subjects. Both groups were also administered an oral glucose tolerance test. Results: Compared with control subjects, the patients with psychosis had decreased telomere content and an increased PP. As previously reported, they also had increased glucose concentrations at 2 hours. These differences could not be attributed to differences in age, ethnicity, smoking, gender, body mass index, neighborhood of residence, socioeconomic status, aerobic conditioning, or an increased cortisol concentration in the psychotic subjects. Discussion: These results suggest that prior to antipsychotic use, nonaffective psychosis is associated with reduced telomere content and increased PP, indices that have been linked to an increased risk of diabetes and hypertension. PMID:19279086

  9. Moderation of near-field pressure over a supersonic flight model using laser-pulse energy deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furukawa, D.; Aoki, Y.; Iwakawa, A.; Sasoh, A.

    2016-05-01

    The impact of a thermal bubble produced by energy deposition on the near-field pressure over a Mach 1.7 free-flight model was experimentally investigated using an aeroballistic range. A laser pulse from a transversely excited atmospheric (TEA) CO2 laser was sent into a test chamber with 68 kPa ambient pressure, focused 10 mm below the flight path of a conically nosed cylinder with a diameter of 10 mm. The pressure history, which was measured 150 mm below the flight path along the acoustic ray past the bubble, exhibited precursory pressure rise and round-off peak pressure, thereby demonstrating the proof-of-concept of sonic boom alleviation using energy deposition.

  10. Nonlinear Acoustics: Periodic Waveguide, Finite-Amplitude Propagation in a Medium Having a Distribution of Relaxation Processes, and Production of an Isolated Negative Pulse in Water

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-08-24

    TenCate , "Finite amplitude sound near cutoff in higher order modes of a rectangular duct," J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 84, 327-334 (1988). Gen§ 0 7. D. T...Acoust. Soc. Am. 90, 2339(A) (1991) 1109 0 7. James A. TenCate , "Measurements of nonlinear effects in the sound field radiated from a circular

  11. Improved operation of a microwave pulse compressor with a laser-triggered high-pressure gas plasma switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shlapakovski, A.; Gorev, S.; Krasik, Ya. E.

    2016-08-01

    The influence of laser beam parameters on the output pulses of a resonant microwave compressor with a laser-triggered plasma switch was investigated. The S-band compressor, consisting of a rectangular waveguide-based cavity and H-plane waveguide tee with a shorted side arm, was filled with pressurized dry air and pumped by 1.8-μs-long microwave pulses of up to 450 kW power. A Nd:YAG laser was used to ignite the gas discharge in the tee side arm for output pulse extraction. The laser beam (at 213 nm or 532 nm) was directed along the RF electric field lines. It was found that the compressor operated most effectively when the laser beam was focused at the center of the switch waveguide cross-section. In this case, the power extraction efficiency reached ˜47% at an output power of ˜14 MW, while when the laser beam was not focused the maximal extraction efficiency was only ˜20% at ˜6 MW output power. Focusing the laser beam resulted also in a dramatic decrease (down to <1 ns) in the delay of the output pulses' appearance with respect to the time of the beam's entrance into the switch, and the jitter of the output pulses' appearance was minimized. In addition, the quality of the output pulses' waveform was significantly improved.

  12. Pulsed positive discharges in air at moderate pressures near a dielectric rod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubinova, A.; Trienekens, D.; Ebert, U.; Nijdam, S.; Christen, T.

    2016-10-01

    We study pulsed positive discharges in air in a cylindrically symmetric setup with an electrode needle close (about 1 mm) above the top of a dielectric cylindrical rod of 4 mm in diameter mounted at its bottom on a grounded plate electrode. We present ICCD (intensified charge-coupled device) pictures and evaluations of experiments as well as simulations with a fluid discharge model; the simulations use cylindrical symmetry. In the experiments, there is an initial inception cloud phase, where the cylindrical symmetry is maintained, and later a streamer phase, where it is broken spontaneously. At 75-150 mbar, discharges with cylindrical symmetry are not attracted to the dielectric rod, but move away from it. The dielectric rod plays the sole role of an obstacle that shades (in the context of photoionization) a cone-shaped part of the inception cloud; the cone size is determined by the geometry of the setup. The material properties of the dielectric rod, such as its dielectric permittivity and the efficiency of the photon induced secondary electron emission do not have a noticeable effect. This is due to the abundance of photoionization in air, which supplies a positive discharge with free electrons and allows it to propagate along the electric field lines. Using some simple field calculations, we show that field enhancement due to dielectric polarization does not play a significant role in our geometry as long as the discharge maintains its cylindrical symmetry. The field component towards the rod is insufficiently enhanced to cause the discharge to move towards the rod. Any additional electrons produced by the dielectric surface do not influence this discharge morphology. This interpretation is supported by both experiments and simulations. At higher pressures (400-600 mbar) or for larger gaps between the needle and the dielectric rod, the inception cloud reaches its maximal radius within the gap between needle and rod and destabilizes there. In those cases

  13. Genome-wide association study meta-analysis reveals transethnic replication of mean arterial and pulse pressure loci.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Tanika N; Takeuchi, Fumihiko; Tabara, Yasuharu; Edwards, Todd L; Kim, Young Jin; Chen, Peng; Li, Huaixing; Wu, Ying; Yang, Chi-Fan; Zhang, Yonghong; Gu, Dongfeng; Katsuya, Tomohiro; Ohkubo, Takayoshi; Gao, Yu-Tang; Go, Min Jin; Teo, Yik Ying; Lu, Ling; Lee, Nanette R; Chang, Li-Ching; Peng, Hao; Zhao, Qi; Nakashima, Eitaro; Kita, Yoshikuni; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Kim, Nam Hee; Tai, E Shyong; Wang, Yiqin; Adair, Linda S; Chen, Chien-Hsiun; Zhang, Shihiu; Li, Changwei; Nabika, Toru; Umemura, Satoshi; Cai, Qiuyin; Cho, Yoon Shin; Wong, Tien Yin; Zhu, Jingwen; Wu, Jer-Yuarn; Gao, Xin; Hixson, James E; Cai, Hui; Lee, Juyoung; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Rao, Dabeeru C; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Cho, Myeong-Chan; Han, Bok-Ghee; Wang, Aili; Tsai, Fuu-Jen; Mohlke, Karen; Lin, Xu; Ikram, Mohammad Kamran; Lee, Jong-Young; Zheng, Wei; Tetsuro, Miki; Kato, Norihiro; He, Jiang

    2013-11-01

    We conducted a genome-wide association study meta-analysis of mean arterial pressure and pulse pressure among 26,600 East Asian participants (stage 1) followed by replication study of up to 28,783 participants (stage 2). For novel loci, statistical significance was determined by a P<5.0×10(-8) in joint analysis of stage 1 and stage 2 data. For loci reported by the previous mean arterial and pulse pressure genome-wide association study meta-analysis in Europeans, evidence of transethnic replication was determined by consistency in effect direction and a Bonferroni-corrected P<1.4×10(-3). No novel loci were identified by the current study. Five independent mean arterial pressure variants demonstrated robust evidence for transethnic replication including rs17249754 at ATP2B1 (P=7.5×10(-15)), rs2681492 at ATP2B1 (P=3.4×10(-7)), rs11191593 at NT5C2 (1.1×10(-6)), rs3824755 at CYP17A1 (P=1.2×10(-6)), and rs13149993 at FGF5 (P=2.4×10(-4)). Two additional variants showed suggestive evidence of transethnic replication (consistency in effect direction and P<0.05), including rs319690 at MAP4 (P=0.014) and rs1173771 at NPR3 (P=0.018). For pulse pressure, robust evidence of replication was identified for 2 independent variants, including rs17249754 at ATP2B1 (P=1.2×10(-5)) and rs11191593 at NT5C2 (P=1.1×10(-3)), with suggestive evidence of replication among an additional 2 variants including rs3824755 at CYP17A1 (P=6.1×10(-3)) and rs2681492 at ATP2B1 (P=9.0×10(-3)). Replicated variants demonstrated consistency in effect sizes between East Asian and European samples, with effect size differences ranging from 0.03 to 0.24 mm Hg for mean arterial pressure and from 0.03 to 0.21 mm Hg for pulse pressure. In conclusion, we present the first evidence of transethnic replication of several mean arterial and pulse pressure loci in an East Asian population.

  14. Review of critical flow rate, propagation of pressure pulse, and sonic velocity in two-phase media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, Y.

    1972-01-01

    For single-phase media, the critical discharge velocity, the sonic velocity, and the pressure pulse propagation velocity can be expressed in the same form by assuming isentropic, equilibria processes. In two-phase mixtures, the same concept is not valid due to the existence of interfacial transports of momentum, heat, and mass. Thus, the three velocities should be treated differently and separately for each particular condition, taking into account the various transport processes involved under that condition. Various attempts are reviewed to predict the critical discharge rate or the propagation velocities by considering slip ratio (momentum change), evaporation (mass and heat transport), flow pattern, etc. Experimental data were compared with predictions based on various theorems. The importance is stressed of the time required to achieve equilibrium as compared with the time available during the process, for example, of passing a pressure pulse.

  15. Effect of skin to skin care to neonates on pulse rate, respiratory rate SPO2 and blood pressure in mothers.

    PubMed

    Nimbalkar, Archana; Patel, Dipen; Sethi, Ankur; Nimbalkar, Somashekhar

    2014-01-01

    Physiological benefits of skin to skin care (STS) to newborns are known but there is scarcity of data on changes in physiological parameters like pulse rate, respiratory rate, SPO2 and blood pressure in mothers during STS. We hypothesize that STS is beneficial to mothers with respect to these parameters. Objective of this study was to assess the changes of these parameters in mothers while providing STS for one hour. STS was provided by 52 mothers for a total of 127 times and parameters were recorded at starting of STS, at 15 min, at 30 min, at 60 min of STS and at 5 min rest after stopping STS. There were no significant changes in pulse rate and SPO2 but blood pressure and respiratory rate reduced significantly during STS as compared to rest after stopping STS. Thus STS is physiologically beneficial to mothers.

  16. Remote sensing of atmospheric pressure and sea state from satellites using short-pulse multicolor laser altimeters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, C. S.; Tsai, B. M.; Abshire, J. B.

    1983-01-01

    Short pulse multicolor laser ranging systems are currently being developed for satellite ranging applications. These systems use Q-switched pulsed lasers and streak tube cameras to provide timing accuracies approaching a few picoseconds. Satellite laser ranging systems was used to evaluate many important geophysical phenomena such as fault motion, polar motion and solid earth tides, by measuring the orbital perturbations of retroreflector equipped satellites. Some existing operational systems provide range resolution approaching a few millimeters. There is currently considerable interest in adapting these highly accurate systems for use as airborne and satellite based altimeters. Potential applications include the measurement of sea state, ground topography and atmospheric pressure. This paper reviews recent progress in the development of multicolor laser altimeters for use in monitoring sea state and atmospheric pressure.

  17. Determining fracture orientation from pulse testing

    SciTech Connect

    Tiab, D. ); Abobise, E.O. )

    1989-09-01

    This paper presents a procedure for determining a complex orientation of a vertical fracture and the formation permeability from pulse testing. Generalized correlations relating the quotient of dimensionless response amplitude and dimensionless cycle period ({Delta}rho/sub D//{Delta}tau/sub cycD/) to dimensionless time lag are presented. The correlations can be used for analyzing pulse-test pressure response at an unfractured observation well resulting from pulsing a vertically fractured active well. Detailed procedures for the design and analysis of pulse testing of a vertically fractured well are presented.

  18. Excessive pulse pressure response to standing in community population with orthostatic systolic hypertension.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jingsong; Zhou, Yueying; Cao, Kaiwu; Li, Juxiang; Tao, Xuehua; Zhang, Zhihong; Liu, Xin; Liu, Jiaqi; Su, Hai

    2014-03-01

    The postural change of pulse pressure (PP) in the persons with orthostatic hypertension (OHT) is unclear. This study included 2849 (65.0 ± 9.3 years) community participants. Blood pressures (BPs) in supine and standing positions were measured. The differences between upright and supine BP and PP were recorded as ΔBP and ΔPP. The criteria for OHT was ΔBP ≥10 mm Hg, for orthostatic hypotension (OH) was ≤-10 mm Hg and for orthostatic normotension (ONT) was -9 to 9 mm Hg. Fasting blood lipids and glucose were measured. The supine SBP of the sOHT group were similar to that of sONT group (140.9 ± 20.2 mm Hg vs 138.2 ± 19.7 mm Hg), but significantly lower than that of sOH group (151.9 ± 19.2 mm Hg; P < .05). Their PPs were 65.3 ± 15.9, 62.8 ± 14.7, and 71.1 ± 15.1 mm Hg, respectively, and with the similar group difference like SBP. When the position changed from supine to standing, the sOHT group showed PP rise, while sOH and sONT groups showed PP reduction (3.8 ± 7.1 mm Hg vs -17.0 ± 8.5 mm Hg and -5.8 ± 6.6 mm Hg; both P < .05). Thus, the standing PP in the sOHT group was significantly higher than in the sONT (69.1 ± 18.0 mm Hg vs 57.0 ± 15.8 mm Hg; P < .05) and in the sOH (54.2 ± 15.2 mm Hg; P < .05) groups. The postural PP profile varies with the postural responses of SBP. The sOHT group has obviously increased PP and significantly higher standing PP compared with the sONT group.

  19. Nitriding molybdenum: Effects of duration and fill gas pressure when using 100-Hz pulse DC discharge technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikhlaq, U.; R., Ahmad; Shafiq, M.; Saleem, S.; S. Shah, M.; Hussain, T.; A. Khan, I.; K., Abbas; S. Abbas, M.

    2014-10-01

    Molybdenum is nitrided by a 100-Hz pulsed DC glow discharge technique for various time durations and fill gas pressures to study the effects on the surface properties of molybdenum. X-ray diffractometry (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and atomic force microscopy (AFM) are used for the structural and morphological analysis of the nitrided layers. Vickers' microhardness tester is utilized to investigate surface microhardness. Phase analysis shows the formation of more molybdenum nitride molecules for longer nitriding durations at fill gas pressures of 2 mbar and 3 mbar (1 bar = 105 Pa). A considerable increase in surface microhardness (approximately by a factor of 2) is observed for longer duration (10 h) and 2-mbar pressure. Longer duration (10 h) and 2-mbar fill gas pressure favors the formation of homogeneous, smooth, hard layers by the incorporation of more nitrogen.

  20. Effects of non-thermal atmospheric pressure pulsed plasma on the adhesion and durability of resin composite to dentin.

    PubMed

    Han, Geum-Jun; Kim, Jae-Hoon; Chung, Sung-No; Chun, Bae-Hyeock; Kim, Chang-Keun; Seo, Deog-Gyu; Son, Ho-Hyun; Cho, Byeong-Hoon

    2014-12-01

    This study investigated the effect of low-power, non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma (NT-APP) treatments, in pulsed and conventional modes, on the adhesion of resin composite to dentin and on the durability of the bond between resin composite and dentin. A pencil-type NT-APP jet was applied in pulsed and conventional modes to acid-etched dentin. The microtensile bond strength (MTBS) of resin composite to dentin was evaluated at 24 h and after thermocycling in one control group (no plasma) and in two experimental groups (pulsed plasma and conventional plasma groups) using the Scotchbond Multi-Purpose Plus Adhesive System. Data were analyzed using two-factor repeated-measures anova and Weibull statistics. Fractured surfaces and the bonded interfaces were evaluated using a field-emission scanning electron microscope. Although there were no significant differences between the plasma treatment groups, the plasma treatment improved the MTBS compared with the control group. After thermocycling, the MTBS did not decrease in the control or conventional plasma group but increased in the pulsed plasma group. Thermocycling increased the Weibull moduli of plasma-treated groups. In conclusion, plasma treatment using NT-APP improved the adhesion of resin composite to dentin. Using a pulsed energy source, the energy delivered to the dentin was effectively reduced without any reduction in bond strength or durability.

  1. Pulse pressure and heart rate in patients with metabolic syndrome across Europe: insights from the GOOD survey.

    PubMed

    Perlini, S; Naditch-Brule, L; Farsang, C; Zidek, W; Kjeldsen, S E

    2013-07-01

    The Global Cardiometabolic Risk Profile in Patients with hypertension disease (GOOD) survey investigated the global cardiometabolic risk profile in 3464 adult outpatients with hypertension across 289 sites in 12 European countries. The pulse pressure and heart rate profile of the survey population was evaluated according to the presence or absence of metabolic syndrome and/or type 2 diabetes mellitus. History and treatment of hypertension were not counted as criteria for metabolic syndrome as they applied to all patients. Out of the 3370 recruited patients, 1033 had metabolic syndrome and 1177 had neither metabolic syndrome nor diabetes. When compared with patients with no metabolic syndrome or diabetes, patients with metabolic syndrome had higher pulse pressure (59±14 vs. 55±14 mm Hg) and heart rate (75.2±11.0 vs. 72.5±10.0 beats per min) (P<0.001 for both), independent of the concomitant presence or absence of diabetes, despite a more prevalent use of β-blockers. In conclusion, in hypertensive outpatients the presence of metabolic syndrome is associated with increased heart rate and pulse pressure, which may at least in part reflect increased arterial stiffness and increased sympathetic tone. This may contribute, to some extent, to explaining the increased cardiovascular risk attributed to the presence of metabolic syndrome.

  2. Endogenous ghrelin regulates episodic growth hormone (GH) secretion by amplifying GH Pulse amplitude: evidence from antagonism of the GH secretagogue-R1a receptor.

    PubMed

    Zizzari, P; Halem, H; Taylor, J; Dong, J Z; Datta, R; Culler, M D; Epelbaum, J; Bluet-Pajot, M T

    2005-09-01

    Ghrelin was purified from rat stomach as an endogenous ligand for the GH secretagogue (GHS) receptor. As a GHS, ghrelin stimulates GH release, but it also has additional activities, including stimulation of appetite and weight gain. Plasma GH and ghrelin secretory patterns appear unrelated, whereas many studies have correlated ghrelin variations with food intake episodes. To evaluate the role of endogenous ghrelin, GH secretion and food intake were monitored in male rats infused sc (6 mug/h during 10 h) or intracerebroventricularly (5 microg/h during 48 h) with BIM-28163, a full competitive antagonist of the GHS-R1a receptor. Subcutaneous BIM-28163 infusion significantly decreased GH area under the curve during a 6-h sampling period by 54% and peak amplitude by 46%. Twelve hours after the end of treatment these parameters returned to normal. Central treatment was similarly effective (-37 and -42% for area under the curve and -44 and -49% for peak amplitude on the first and second days of infusion, respectively). Neither peripheral nor central BIM-28163 injection modified GH peak number, GH nadir, or IGF-I levels. In this protocol, food intake is not strongly modified and water intake is unchanged. Subcutaneous infusion of BIM-28163 did not change plasma leptin and insulin levels evaluated at 1200 and 1600 h. On the contrary, central BIM-28163 infusion slightly increased leptin and significantly increased insulin concentrations. Thus, endogenous ghrelin, through GHS-R1a, acts as a strong endogenous amplifier of spontaneous GH peak amplitude. The mechanisms by which ghrelin modifies food intake remain to be defined and may involve a novel GHS receptor.

  3. Steady-state indicators of the intracranial pressure dynamic system using geodesic distance of the ICP pulse waveform.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiao; Gonzalez, Nestor; Bergsneider, Marvin

    2012-12-01

    Normal functioning of the brain depends on the homeostasis (∼ steady state) of its various physiological sub-systems, one of which is the intracranial pressure (ICP) dynamic system. The ICP dynamic system of an injured brain is susceptible to various acute changes that should ideally be detected by ICP monitoring even for comatose patients. However, the status quo of ICP monitoring solely targets mean ICP. We aimed to demonstrate a novel approach to detect acute deviation from steady state of an ICP dynamic system in an absence of significant mean ICP changes. We hypothesized that steady state of ICP dynamic systems is reflected as ICP pulses of similar mean ICP levels resembling each other for a given subject. A general framework was used to derive such a steady-state indicator that can accommodate different metrics of inter-pulse distance and different statistics of the distance histograms. In addition to conventional Euclidean distance and Pearson correlation, geodesic distance between pulses was introduced as a novel metric. These different ways of calculating steady-state indicators under the proposed framework were evaluated on three types of continuous ICP recordings: (1) those between two consecutive brain imaging studies that demonstrated acute ventricular enlargement for slit ventricle syndrome (SVS) patients undergoing a trial of shunt externalization and clamping (SVS+); (2) those between consecutive brain imaging studies from the SVS patients under the same trial but without ventricular enlargement (SVS-); (3) overnight recordings from normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH) patients. It was observed that only the standard deviation of geodesic distance correctly differentiated between SVS+ and SVS- and between SVS+ and NPH while avoiding discriminating between SVS- and NPH. It was also found that 45% SVS+ cases had a multimodal geodesic distance histogram while none of SVS- and 3.8% of NPH cases had such a multimodal histogram. Pulses with a large

  4. Design of a high pressure system for pulse radiolysis studies up to 400 MPa with flow regulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    NGuyen Le, D.-T.; Pin, S.; Anjoure, D.; Chopineau, P.; Baldacchino, G.

    2013-03-01

    This article reports details of a new setup including an optical flow cell and devices which can increase pressure up to 400 MPa by controlling the ramp rate. It is composed of two high pressure syringe pumps which can make liquids flowing up to 4 cm3/mn. The optical flow cell can contains aqueous solutions and allow carry out pulse radiolysis experiments with a pulsed 10-MeV electron beam by performing in situ and time resolved optical analysis, such as transient UV-visible absorption or fluorescence spectroscopy. A Labview-program has been developed to drive and monitor automatons which regulate pressure, make solution flow under pressure, carry out operations such as filling, emptying or cleaning the system under safe conditions. Two results are exhibited: 1/associated to phosphate buffer, the fluorescence spectrum of the fluorescein pH-sensor has been performed under pressure. Phosphate pKa is confirmed to be very sensitive to pressure increase even up to 300 MPa. 2/a time-resolved absorption spectroscopy of hydrated electron in deaerated water has been conducted up to 350 MPa with a continuous flow of sample. In presence of tertio-butanol and bisTris pH7-buffer in solution, the spectral shift of hydrated electron is finely reproduced. BisTris is also confirmed as insensitive buffer under high pressure and its reduction by hydrated electron remains constant with a rate constant of (4.6 ± 0.6) × 108 M-1 s-1.

  5. Small Gas Bubble Experiment for Mitigation of Cavitation Damage and Pressure Waves in Short-pulse Mercury Spallation Targets

    SciTech Connect

    Wendel, Mark W; Felde, David K; Sangrey, Robert L; Abdou, Ashraf A; West, David L; Shea, Thomas J; Hasegawa, Shoichi; Kogawa, Hiroyuki; Naoe, Dr. Takashi; Farny, Dr. Caleb H.; Kaminsky, Andrew L

    2014-01-01

    Populations of small helium gas bubbles were introduced into a flowing mercury experiment test loop to evaluate mitigation of beam-pulse induced cavitation damage and pressure waves. The test loop was developed and thoroughly tested at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) prior to irradiations at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center - Weapons Neutron Research Center (LANSCE-WNR) facility. Twelve candidate bubblers were evaluated over a range of mercury flow and gas injection rates by use of a novel optical measurement technique that accurately assessed the generated bubble size distributions. Final selection for irradiation testing included two variations of a swirl bubbler provided by Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC) collaborators and one orifice bubbler developed at SNS. Bubble populations of interest consisted of sizes up to 150 m in radius with achieved gas void fractions in the 10^-5 to 10^-4 range. The nominal WNR beam pulse used for the experiment created energy deposition in the mercury comparable to SNS pulses operating at 2.5 MW. Nineteen test conditions were completed each with 100 pulses, including variations on mercury flow, gas injection and protons per pulse. The principal measure of cavitation damage mitigation was surface damage assessment on test specimens that were manually replaced for each test condition. Damage assessment was done after radiation decay and decontamination by optical and laser profiling microscopy with damaged area fraction and maximum pit depth being the more valued results. Damage was reduced by flow alone; the best mitigation from bubble injection was between half and a quarter that of flow alone. Other data collected included surface motion tracking by three laser Doppler vibrometers (LDV), loop wall dynamic strain, beam diagnostics for charge and beam profile assessment, embedded hydrophones and pressure sensors, and sound measurement by a suite of conventional and contact microphones.

  6. Numerical and analytical assessment of the influence of blood flow through arterial perforators on the pulse pressure shape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pieniak, Marcin; Piechna, Adam; Cieślicki, Krzysztof

    2015-09-01

    Most of the existing models of cardiovascular system do not take into account the leakage of blood through a number of small vessels branching the main arterial trunks and called perforators. Therefore, the aim of this study is to investigate their influence on the pulse pressure waveform. Linearized, 1D computer model of a minute part of the cardiovascular system has been designed and series of simulations with and without leakage have been conducted. Blood flow in a single segment of the arterial system and pressure in vascular nodes were described by the two first order partial differential equations. A set of boundary conditions on both ends of a single vascular segment and at nodal point have been formulated. To solve the linear set of above equations, a numerical method of characteristic has been used. It was shown that the leakage reduces reflection from the peripheral resistance. The simulations have also shown a decrease of the average pressure value with increase of leakage and modification of the pulse pressure waveform. All these effects depended strongly on the assumed leakage value and practically died out when its value was reduced to about 10% of the main flow.

  7. Production of Hydrogen and Carbon Nanotube by direct decomposition of methane using pulsed corona discharge under th atmospheric pressure.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nath Mishra, Lekha; Shibata, Kanetoshi; Ito, Hiroaki; Yugami, Noboru; Nishida, Yasushi

    2003-10-01

    In future, hydrogen is supposed to play an important role in the worldwide energy supply. It allows a more efficient utilization of fossil fuels and the reduction of noxoous emissions, e.g. by fuel cells or the use of hydrogen enriched fuels in the combustion engines or gas turbines. Plasma methods are expected to allow low temperature and fuel flexible on-site hydrogen generation. Experiments are performed to develop a pulsed corona discharge system for the production of hydrogen and carbon nanotubes by direct methane decomposition under the atmospheric pressure. The corona discharge is energized by 10-20μs wide voltage pulses (≤7kV) at a repetition rate of 0-5000 pulses per second. The spectrum of the gas is carried out by Mass Spectrometer. Experimentally, it is shown that the production of hydrogen gas depends on the pulsed width, input voltage, frequency, current and discharge time. The spectrum noted by the Mass Spectrometer is also presented. The structural geometry of the carbon nanotube is observed by Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) and Scanig Electron Microscopy (SEM). The soot for this purpose is collected from the cathode. Different lengths noted for different soot collected from different parts with the help of TEM are also presented. The present experimental technique could be applicable for the future energy source using hydrogen and the nanoelectronics.

  8. Correlation of streamer current pulses associated with adjacent high voltage needles in atmospheric pressure cold plasma reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wemlinger, Erik; Pedrow, Patrick

    2011-10-01

    We hypothesize that for a 12 needle array in an atmospheric pressure cold plasma reactor there will be correlation between needle corona current pulses. Guaitella et al. have shown in their surface dielectric barrier discharge that synchronous surface streamers are likely triggered by photodesorbed negative charges with binding energy (at the surface of the dielectric) less than 3.5 eV. The reactor used in our work has two rings of axially aligned needles. The current in each needle is measured with broad band current sensors that respond primarily to free electron drift. Digital signal processing will be used to analyze correlation between streamer current pulses. A 60 Hz 10 kVRMS voltage source produces the streamers and concomitantly the cold plasma. The current pulse correlation will be studied between 1 needle and each of the other 11 needles with the expectation that nearest neighbor needles will have the highest correlation. Understanding correlated streamer current pulses will inform reactor modeling and reactor optimization. O. Guaitella, I. Marinov, A. Rousseau, Applied Physics Letters, 98, 2011.

  9. Impact of low-pressure glow-discharge-pulsed plasma polymerization on properties of polyaniline thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jatratkar, Aviraj A.; Yadav, Jyotiprakash B.; Deshmukh, R. R.; Barshilia, Harish C.; Puri, Vijaya; Puri, R. K.

    2016-12-01

    This study reports on polyaniline thin films deposited on a glass substrate using a low-pressure glow-discharge-pulsed plasma polymerization method. The polyaniline thin film obtained by pulsed plasma polymerization has been successfully demonstrated as an optical waveguide with a transmission loss of 3.93 dB cm-1, and has the potential to be employed in integrated optics. An attempt has been made to investigate the effect of plasma OFF-time on the structural, optical as well as surface properties of polyaniline thin film. The plasma ON-time has been kept constant and the plasma OFF-time has been varied throughout the work. The plasma OFF-time strongly influenced the properties of the polyaniline thin film, and a nanostructured and compact surface was revealed in the morphological studies. The plasma OFF-time was found to enhance film thickness, roughness, refractive index and optical transmission loss, whereas it reduced the optical band gap of the polyaniline thin films. Retention in the aromatic structure was confirmed by FTIR results. Optical studies revealed a π-π* electronic transition at about 317 nm as well as the formation of a branched structure. As compared with continuous wave plasma, pulsed plasma polymerization shows better properties. Pulsed plasma polymerization reduced the roughness of the film from 1.2 nm to 0.42 nm and the optical transmission loss from 6.56 dB cm-1 to 3.39 dB cm-1.

  10. A New Fast, Accurate and Non-Oscillatory Numerical Approach for Wave Propagation Problems in Solids Application to High-frequency Pulse Propagation in the Hopkinson Pressure Bar

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-16

    frequency Pulse Propagation in the Hopkinson Pressure Bar Alexander ldesman TEXAS TECH UNIVERSITY SYSTEM 09/ 16/2015 Final Report DISTRIBUTION A...5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) TEXAS TECH UNIVERSITY 2500 BROADWAY...Solids: Application to High-Frequency Pulse Propagation in the Hopkinson Pressure Bar Alexander Idesman Texas Tech University Final report The

  11. Experimental study of propagation characteristics of a pulse-modulated surface-wave argon plasma at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chuan-Jie; Li, Shou-Zhe; Wu, Yue; Li, Zhen-Ye; Zhang, Jialiang; Wang, Yong-Xing

    2016-12-01

    An atmospheric-pressure, pulse-modulated surface wave argon plasma is investigated with respect to its propagation of the ionization front. The time-resolved photographs about the advance of the ionization front are taken using a high speed camera. The ionization front velocity and its rise time when propagating along the discharge tube are measured with respect to a series of values of input power, duty ratio, and the pulse repetition frequency. The interpretations are given on the basis of the ionization and diffusion processes. And it is also found that the reduced electric field and memory effect from previous discharge impose the influence on both the ionization front velocity and its rise time strongly.

  12. Treatment of Severe (Stage III and IV) Chronic Pressure Ulcers Using Pulsed Radio Frequency Energy in a Quadriplegic Patient

    PubMed Central

    Porreca, Eugene G.; Giordano-Jablon, Gina M.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To report an adjuvant treatment to basic wound care of stage III and IV pressure ulcers in a patient with quadriplegia. Methods: Pulsed radio frequency energy was used as an adjunct to basic wound care of 3 large, long-standing (6 years) stage III and IV pressure ulcers that were unresponsive to conventional therapy in a 59-year-old man with quadriplegia. Results: The ulcers (on right foot, left heel, and sacrum) markedly decreased in size (16.7, 28.5, and 13.1 mm2 per day, respectively). The ulcer on the right foot healed within 4 weeks, the left heel ulcer reduced in size by 95% at 7 months, and the large sacral ulcer healed to closure in 11 months. Conclusion: Pulsed radio frequency energy treatment with basic wound care, if administered early in the course of pressure ulcer therapy, might avoid the lengthy hospitalizations and repeated surgical procedures necessary for treatment of uncontrolled ulcers, reducing the overall cost of treatment and improving the quality of life for chronically ill or injured patients. PMID:19008935

  13. R. Lynette & Associates and Pacific Northwest Laboratory staff exchange: Analysis and evaluation of the application of the Pulse Amplitude Synthesis and Control (PASC) converter in a wind power plant

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-31

    The main objective of staff exchanges is to facilitate cooperative activities between PNL staff and U.S. private industry. Funding for the projects is provided by the DOE Office of Energy Research Laboratory Technology Transfer Program. Dr. Matthew Donnelly, a Research Engineer in the Applied Physics Center, Initiated a PNL disclosure for Pulse Amplitude Synthesis and Control (PASC) converter intellectual property protection in 1993. PASC converter research at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has been funded through the ETDI LDRD program. Recent work has centered on building the three-phase 20kW laboratory unit, the development of control algorithms and the study of the application of PASC converters in a 25MW wind power plant (through the staff exchange with RLA reported on here). An overview and description of the PASC converter is included as Appendix A.

  14. Analysis of the scintillation mechanism in a pressurized 4He fast neutron detector using pulse shape fitting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelley, R. P.; Murer, D.; Ray, H.; Jordan, K. A.

    2015-03-01

    An empirical investigation of the scintillation mechanism in a pressurized 4He gas fast neutron detector was conducted using pulse shape fitting. Scintillation signals from neutron interactions were measured and averaged to produce a single generic neutron pulse shape from both a 252Cf spontaneous fission source and a (d,d) neutron generator. An expression for light output over time was then developed by treating the decay of helium excited states in the same manner as the decay of radioactive isotopes. This pulse shape expression was fitted to the measured neutron pulse shape using a least-squares optimization algorithm, allowing an empirical analysis of the mechanism of scintillation inside the 4He detector. A further understanding of this mechanism in the 4He detector will advance the use of this system as a neutron spectrometer. For 252Cf neutrons, the triplet and singlet time constants were found to be 970 ns and 686 ns, respectively. For neutrons from the (d,d) generator, the time constants were found to be 884 ns and 636 ns. Differences were noted in the magnitude of these parameters compared to previously published data, however the general relationships were noted to be the same and checked with expected trends from theory. Of the excited helium states produced from a 252Cf neutron interaction, 76% were found to be born as triplet states, similar to the result from the neutron generator of 71%. The two sources yielded similar pulse shapes despite having very different neutron energy spectra, validating the robustness of the fits across various neutron energies.

  15. Computational study of the afterglow in single and sequential pulsing of an atmospheric-pressure plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasan, M. I.; Bradley, J. W.

    2015-10-01

    The spatial distribution of charged species in the afterglow of a helium plasma jet impinging atmospheric air has been computed using a 2D axisymmetric fluid model. The model is solved for two consecutive pulse periods of a rectangular voltage waveform (duration of 60 ns) and for two different frequencies (25 and 50 kHz). The most abundant ionic species in the afterglow are found to be \\text{O}2+ and \\text{O}2- with their concentrations increasing by about an order of magnitude (up to about 1018 m-3 and 1017 m-3 respectively) in the initial 1 μs. In the first pulse, these species form a halo around the diffusing He+ and electron rich central channel, the shape of the former being strongly correlated with the shape of He-air mixing layer computed using a hydrodynamic model. In the next pulse, this general configuration is also observed; however \\text{O}2+ is more concentrated on the axis of the jet, this being due to influence of residual electrons in the central channel. For \\text{O}2- there is little difference in their spatial distribution compared to the initial pulse. For higher frequency pulsing, the higher concentration of residual electrons lowers the necessary ignition electric field reducing the concentrations (by 25%) of charged species in a period of the applied waveform. This work provides new information on the concentration and distribution of ionic species generated by atmospheric-pressure capillary discharges of interest to those developing such sources for range of applications, particularly in the field of plasma medicine.

  16. Analysis of the scintillation mechanism in a pressurized {sup 4}He fast neutron detector using pulse shape fitting

    SciTech Connect

    Kelley, R.P. Ray, H.; Jordan, K.A.; Murer, D.

    2015-03-15

    An empirical investigation of the scintillation mechanism in a pressurized {sup 4}He gas fast neutron detector was conducted using pulse shape fitting. Scintillation signals from neutron interactions were measured and averaged to produce a single generic neutron pulse shape from both a {sup 252}Cf spontaneous fission source and a (d,d) neutron generator. An expression for light output over time was then developed by treating the decay of helium excited states in the same manner as the decay of radioactive isotopes. This pulse shape expression was fitted to the measured neutron pulse shape using a least-squares optimization algorithm, allowing an empirical analysis of the mechanism of scintillation inside the {sup 4}He detector. A further understanding of this mechanism in the {sup 4}He detector will advance the use of this system as a neutron spectrometer. For {sup 252}Cf neutrons, the triplet and singlet time constants were found to be 970 ns and 686 ns, respectively. For neutrons from the (d,d) generator, the time constants were found to be 884 ns and 636 ns. Differences were noted in the magnitude of these parameters compared to previously published data, however the general relationships were noted to be the same and checked with expected trends from theory. Of the excited helium states produced from a {sup 252}Cf neutron interaction, 76% were found to be born as triplet states, similar to the result from the neutron generator of 71%. The two sources yielded similar pulse shapes despite having very different neutron energy spectra, validating the robustness of the fits across various neutron energies.

  17. High daytime and nighttime ambulatory pulse pressure predict poor cognitive function and mild cognitive impairment in hypertensive individuals

    PubMed Central

    Riba-Llena, Iolanda; Nafría, Cristina; Filomena, Josefina; Tovar, José L; Vinyoles, Ernest; Mundet, Xavier; Jarca, Carmen I; Vilar-Bergua, Andrea; Montaner, Joan

    2016-01-01

    High blood pressure accelerates normal aging stiffness process. Arterial stiffness (AS) has been previously associated with impaired cognitive function and dementia. Our aims are to study how cognitive function and status (mild cognitive impairment, MCI and normal cognitive aging, NCA) relate to AS in a community-based population of hypertensive participants assessed with office and 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure measurements. Six hundred ninety-nine participants were studied, 71 had MCI and the rest had NCA. Office pulse pressure (PP), carotid–femoral pulse wave velocity, and 24-hour ambulatory PP monitoring were collected. Also, participants underwent a brain magnetic resonance to study cerebral small–vessel disease (cSVD) lesions. Multivariate analysis–related cognitive function and cognitive status to AS measurements after adjusting for demographic, vascular risk factors, and cSVD. Carotid–femoral pulse wave velocity and PP at different periods were inversely correlated with several cognitive domains, but only awake PP measurements were associated with attention after correcting for confounders (beta = −0.22, 95% confidence interval (CI) −0.41, −0.03). All ambulatory PP measurements were related to MCI, which was independently associated with nocturnal PP (odds ratio (OR) = 2.552, 95% CI 1.137, 5.728) and also related to the presence of deep white matter hyperintensities (OR = 1.903, 1.096, 3.306). Therefore, higher day and night ambulatory PP measurements are associated with poor cognitive outcomes. PMID:25966945

  18. Enhanced performance of pulsed Q collision induced dissociation-based peptide identification on a dual-pressure linear ion trap.

    PubMed

    Lössner, Christopher; Blackstock, Walter; Gunaratne, Jayantha

    2012-01-01

    Pulsed Q collision induced dissociation (PQD) was introduced for isobaric tag quantification on linear ion traps to circumvent the problem of the low-mass cut-off for collision induced dissociation (CID). Unfortunately, fragmentation efficiency is compromised and PQD has found limited use for identification as well as quantification. We demonstrate that PQD has a comparable peptide identification performance to CID on dual-pressure linear ion traps, opening the potential for wider use of isobaric tag quantification on this new generation of linear ion traps.

  19. Condensation of ablation plumes in the irradiation of metals by high-intensity nanosecond laser pulses at atmospheric pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Kozadaev, K V

    2016-01-31

    The Anisimov–Luk'yanchuk model is adapted for describing the condensation of vapour-plasma plumes produced in the irradiation of metal targets by high-intensity (10{sup 8} – 10{sup 10} W cm{sup -2}) nanosecond (10 – 100 ns) pulses at atmospheric pressure. The resultant data suggest that the initial stages of the development of metal ablation plumes correspond with a high degree of accuracy to the Zel'dovich–Raizer theory of dynamic condensation; however, at the stage of the ablation plume decay, the liquid-droplet phase is formed primarily by coalescence of 'nuclei'. (interaction of laser radiation with matter. laser plasma)

  20. Probing of Fast Chemical Dynamics at High Pressures and Temperatures using Pulsed Laser Techniques

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-17

    and dissociation of ammonia at high pressure and high temperature, The Journal of Chemical Physics, (08 2012): 0. doi: 10.1063/1.4742340 Ross Howie...Alexander Goncharov, Mohammad F. Mahmood, Synthesis of Energetic Nitrogen and Hydrogen Compounds Using High Pressure and Multiphoton Absorption, Poster...27, 2014. Alexander Goncharov, High-pressure synthesis of novel materials with new bonding patterns and unusual stoichiometries, Invited talk

  1. Effect of ambient gas pressure on pulsed laser ablation plume dynamics and ZnTe film growth

    SciTech Connect

    Rouleau, C.M.; Lowndes, D.H.; Geohegan, D.B.; Allard, L.F.; Strauss, M.A.; Cao, S.; Pedraza, A.J.; Puretzky, A.A.

    1995-12-01

    Epitaxial thin films of nitrogen-doped p-ZnTe were grown on single-crystal, semi-insulating Ga-As substrates via pulsed laser ablation of a stoichiometric ZnTe target. Both low pressure nitrogen ambients and high vacuum were used. Results of in situ reflection high energy electron diffraction (RHEED) and time-resolved ion probe measurements have been compared with ex situ Hall effect and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) measurements. A strong correlation was observed between the nature of the film`s surface during growth (2-D vs. 3-D, assessed via RHEED) and the ambient gas pressures employed during deposition. The extended defect content (assessed via cross-sectional TEM) in the region >150 mn from the film/substrate interface was found to increase with the ambient gas pressure during deposition, which could not be explained by lattice mismatch alone. At sufficiently high pressures, misoriented, columnar grains developed which were not only consistent with the RHEED observations but also were correlated with a marked decrease in Hall mobility and a slight decrease in hole concentration. Ion probe measurements, which monitored the attenuation and slowing of the ion current arriving at the substrate surface, indicated that for increasing nitrogen pressure the fast (vacuum) velocity distribution splits into a distinct fast and two collisionally-slowed components or modes. Gas controlled variations in these components mirrored trends in electrical properties and microstructural measurements.

  2. Pressure waves in liquid mercury target from pulsed heat loads and the possible way controlling their effects

    SciTech Connect

    Ni, L.; Skala, K.

    1996-06-01

    In ESS project liquid metals are selected as the main target for the pulsed spallation neutron source. Since the very high instantaneous energy is deposited on the heavy molten target in a very short period time, pressure waves are generated. They travel through the liquid and cause high stress in the container. Also, additional stress should be considered in the wall which is the result of direct heating of the target window. These dynamic processes were simulated with computational codes with the static response being analized first. The total resulting dynamic wall stress has been found to have exceeded the design stress for the selected container material. Adding a small amount of gas bubbles in the liquid could be a possible way to reduce the pressure waves.

  3. Strong Solar Wind Dynamic Pressure Pulses during Solar Cycle 23 and Their Impacts on Geosynchronous Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuo, P.

    2015-12-01

    Solar wind dynamic pressure pulse (DPP) structures, across which the dynamic pressure abruptly changes over timescales from a few seconds to several minutes, are often observed in the near-Earth space environment. In this investigation, we first present a statistical study on the properties of strong dynamic pressure pulses in the solar wind during solar cycle 23. It is found that overwhelming majority of DPPs are associated with the solar wind disturbances including the CME-related flows, the corotating interaction regions, as well as the complex ejecta. The annual variations of the averaged occurrence rate of DPPs are roughly in phase with the solar activities. Although the variabilities of geosynchronous magnetic fields (GMFs) due to the impact of positive DPPs have been well established, there appears no systematic investigations on the response of GMFs to negative DPPs. Here we also study the decompression/compression effects of very strong negative/positive DPPs on GMFs under northward IMFs. In response to the decompression of strong negative DPPs, GMFs on dayside, near the dawn and dusk on nightside are generally depressed. But near the midnight region, the responses of GMF are very diverse, being either positive or negative. For part of events when GOES is located at the midnight sector, GMF is found to abnormally increase as the result of magnetospheric decompression caused by negative DPPs. It is known that on certain conditions magnetic depression of nightside GMFs can be caused by the impact of positive DPPs. Here we found that, a stronger pressure enhancement may have a higher probability of producing the exceptional depression of GMF at midnight region. Statistically, both the decompression effect of strong negative DPPs and the compression effect of strong positive DPPs depend on the magnetic local time, being stronger at the noon sector.

  4. Transitions between corona, glow, and spark regimes of nanosecond repetitively pulsed discharges in air at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pai, David Z.; Lacoste, Deanna A.; Laux, Christophe O.

    2010-05-01

    In atmospheric pressure air preheated from 300 to 1000 K, the nanosecond repetitively pulsed (NRP) method has been used to generate corona, glow, and spark discharges. Experiments have been performed to determine the parameter space (applied voltage, pulse repetition frequency, ambient gas temperature, and interelectrode gap distance) of each discharge regime. In particular, the experimental conditions necessary for the glow regime of NRP discharges have been determined, with the notable result that there exists a minimum and maximum gap distance for its existence at a given ambient gas temperature. The minimum gap distance increases with decreasing gas temperature, whereas the maximum does not vary appreciably. To explain the experimental results, an analytical model is developed to explain the corona-to-glow (C-G) and glow-to-spark (G-S) transitions. The C-G transition is analyzed in terms of the avalanche-to-streamer transition and the breakdown field during the conduction phase following the establishment of a conducting channel across the discharge gap. The G-S transition is determined by the thermal ionization instability, and we show analytically that this transition occurs at a certain reduced electric field for the NRP discharges studied here. This model shows that the electrode geometry plays an important role in the existence of the NRP glow regime at a given gas temperature. We derive a criterion for the existence of the NRP glow regime as a function of the ambient gas temperature, pulse repetition frequency, electrode radius of curvature, and interelectrode gap distance.

  5. Self-consistent fluid modeling and simulation on a pulsed microwave atmospheric-pressure argon plasma jet

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Zhaoquan; Yin, Zhixiang Chen, Minggong; Hong, Lingli; Hu, Yelin; Huang, Yourui; Xia, Guangqing; Liu, Minghai; Kudryavtsev, A. A.

    2014-10-21

    In present study, a pulsed lower-power microwave-driven atmospheric-pressure argon plasma jet has been introduced with the type of coaxial transmission line resonator. The plasma jet plume is with room air temperature, even can be directly touched by human body without any hot harm. In order to study ionization process of the proposed plasma jet, a self-consistent hybrid fluid model is constructed in which Maxwell's equations are solved numerically by finite-difference time-domain method and a fluid model is used to study the characteristics of argon plasma evolution. With a Guass type input power function, the spatio-temporal distributions of the electron density, the electron temperature, the electric field, and the absorbed power density have been simulated, respectively. The simulation results suggest that the peak values of the electron temperature and the electric field are synchronous with the input pulsed microwave power but the maximum quantities of the electron density and the absorbed power density are lagged to the microwave power excitation. In addition, the pulsed plasma jet excited by the local enhanced electric field of surface plasmon polaritons should be the discharge mechanism of the proposed plasma jet.

  6. Experimental Evaluation of Permeability in Wellbore Cements under Elevated Temperatue, Pressure and Salinity Using a Liquid Pressure-Pulse Decay Permeameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bello, K.; Radonjic, M.

    2013-12-01

    Kolawole Bello (kbello1@tigers.lsu.edu) and Mileva Radonjic (mileva@lsu.edu), Craft and Hawkins Department of Petroleum Engineering, 2131 Patrick F. Taylor Hall, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 Geopressured reservoirs in the northern Gulf of Mexico basin along the coast of Louisiana have been determined to be viable source of geothermal energy and also for carbon sequestration. These reservoirs are made of unconsolidated sandstone capped by shale layers and possess temperatures as high as 140°C. In addition, high salinities of 100 g/L are associated with these reservoirs due to the dissolution of surrounding salt domes. In production of geothermal reservoir, cementing cost accounts for 50% of total costs unlike in oil and gas wells where cementing cost is approximately 15%. This difference in cost is caused by the difference in fluid chemistry. In this project, we propose in-situ harvesting of heat energy resulting in differential temperature across the cement. As a result of thermal loading, hydrated cement fractures. In addition, leaching occurs in wellbore cements when exposed to pH less than 13 causing an increase in permeability. This consequently leads to lack of zonal isolation and compromises the mechanical integrity of the cement. This study provides ways of evaluating wellbore cements under conditions experienced in geopressured reservoirs. For the first time, we have state of the art equipment capable of measuring brine permeability of cement using Liquid Pressure-pulse Decay Permeameter (PDPL). Under in-situ confining pressure, brine permeability is more accurate than gas permeability due to the decrease in pore throat diameter. PDPL provides an efficient and accurate way of measuring brine permeability in low permeability materials at reservoir temperature and pressure. This permeability is function of pressure decay over time. Permeability measurements were taken before and after cyclic thermal loading of cement cores at

  7. Electron emission mechanism during the nanosecond high-voltage pulsed discharge in pressurized air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levko, D.; Yatom, S.; Vekselman, V.; Krasik, Ya. E.

    2012-02-01

    A comparison between the results of x-ray absorption spectroscopy of runaway electrons (RAEs) generated during nanosecond timescale high-voltage (HV) gas discharge and the simulated attenuation of the x-ray flux produced by the runaway electron spectrum calculated using particle-in-cell numerical modeling of such a type of discharge is presented. The particle-in-cell simulation considered the field and explosive emissions (EEs) of the electrons from the cathode. It is shown that the field emission is the dominant emission mechanism for the short-duration (<2.5 ns) high-voltage pulses, while for the long-duration (>5 ns) high-voltage pulses, the explosive emission is likely to play a significant role.

  8. Characteristics of the Plasma Environment and Discharge Process in a High-Pressure Pulsed Arc Discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Ricky; Hopkins, Matthew; Barnat, Edward

    2016-09-01

    The characteristics and properties of a plasma generated in a pulsed arc discharge are investigated. Arc discharge plasmas are prevalent in the production and treatment of materials. Photodetectors and optical emission spectroscopy (OES) are used to probe the plasmas and characterize their spectral responses. OES allows for species identification and provides information about the state of the plasma, such as the electron temperature. Discharges generated with inert gas such as argon, as well as with nitrogen and air, are studied and compared. In the case of reactive gases, OES also provides information on the possible reactions that took place. Microwave interferometry is used to measure the electron density to provide spatial information on the discharges. In addition, the measurement is synchronized with the discharge pulse to obtain temporal information, for instance, during the pulse initialization phase to investigate the arc discharge process prior to plasma generation, where optical information is absent. Together, this allows for the characterization of the pre-, during, and post-discharge processes.

  9. Pressure and Thrust Measurements of a High-Frequency Pulsed-Detonation Actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Namtran C.; Cutler, Andrew D.

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a small-scale, high-frequency pulsed detonation actuator. The device utilized a fuel mixture of H2 and air, which was injected into the device at frequencies of up to 1200 Hz. Pulsed detonations were demonstrated in an 8-inch long combustion volume, at approx.600 Hz, for the lambda/4 mode. The primary objective of this experiment was to measure the generated thrust. A mean value of thrust was measured up to 6.0 lb, corresponding to specific impulse of 2611 s. This value is comparable to other H2-fueled pulsed detonation engines (PDEs) experiments. The injection and detonation frequency for this new experimental case was approx.600 Hz, and was much higher than typical PDEs, where frequencies are usually less than 100 Hz. The compact size of the model and high frequency of detonation yields a thrust-per-unit-volume of approximately 2.0 lb/cu in, and compares favorably with other experiments, which typically have thrust-per-unit-volume values of approximately 0.01 lb/cu in.

  10. Pressure and Thrust Measurements of a High-Frequency Pulsed Detonation Tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, N.; Cutler, A. D.

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes measurements of a small-scale, high-frequency pulsed detonation tube. The device utilized a mixture of H2 fuel and air, which was injected into the device at frequencies of up to 1200 Hz. Pulsed detonations were demonstrated in an 8-inch long combustion volume, at about 600 Hz, for the quarter wave mode of resonance. The primary objective of this experiment was to measure the generated thrust. A mean value of thrust was measured up to 6.0 lb, corresponding to H2 flow based specific impulse of 2970 s. This value is comparable to measurements in H2-fueled pulsed detonation engines (PDEs). The injection and detonation frequency for this new experimental case was much higher than typical PDEs, where frequencies are usually less than 100 Hz. The compact size of the device and high frequency of detonation yields a thrust-per-unit-volume of approximately 2.0 pounds per cubic inch, and compares favorably with other experiments, which typically have thrust-per-unit-volume of order 0.01 pound per cubic inch. This much higher volumetric efficiency results in a potentially much more practical device than the typical PDE, for a wide range of potential applications, including high-speed boundary layer separation control, for example in hypersonic engine inlets, and propulsion for small aircraft and missiles.

  11. Continuous cuff-less blood pressure monitoring based on the pulse arrival time approach: the impact of posture.

    PubMed

    Muehlsteff, J; Aubert, X A; Morren, G

    2008-01-01

    There is an unmet need for cuff-less blood pressure (BP) monitoring especially, in personal healthcare applications. The pulse arrival time (PAT) approach might offer a suitable solution to enable comfortable BP monitoring even at beat-level. However, the methodology is based on hemodynamic surrogate measures, which are sensitive to patient activities such as posture changes, not necessarily related to blood pressure variations. In this paper, we analyze the impact of posture on the PAT measure and related hemodynamic parameters such as the pre-ejection period in well-defined procedures. Additionally, the PAT of a monitored subject is investigated in an unsupervised scenario illustrating the complexity of such a measurement. Our results show the failure of blood pressure inference based on simple calibration strategies using the PAT measure only. We discuss opportunities to compensate for the observed effects towards the realization of wearable cuff-less blood pressure monitoring. These findings emphasize the importance of accessing context information in personal healthcare applications, where vital sign monitoring is typically unsupervised.

  12. The Construction of Unsmooth Pulse Images in Traditional Chinese Medicine Based on Wave Intensity Technology

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Si-wei; Cao, Shuang-shuang; Lin, Ning; Ye, Zhen-sheng; Wei, Shi-chao; Zheng, Xing-yu; Guo, Miao-miao; Meng, Xiao-rong; Huang, Fang-meng

    2016-01-01

    Unsmooth pulse is one of the most important pulses in TCM diagnostics. We constructed the wave intensity (WI) images of unsmooth pulse based on the pressure wave (P), flow velocity wave (U), and WI [(dP/dt)(dU/dt)] by ALOKA Prosound α 10 Color Doppler. The characteristic of Cunkou normal pulse could be summarized as follows: compared to Renying pulse, its W1 amplitude is smaller and NA wave is more obvious, while the W2 wave is indistinct or even invisible, and the R-1st is longer than that of Renying pulse. The principal U wave of Renying pulse looks like “Λ” shape, while it looks like an arched blunt “∩” shape in Cunkou pulse, and the amplitude of U wave in Cunkou pulse is smaller. The direction of the principal U wave in Cunkou unsmooth pulse is up, which shows hoof boots “h” shape with high amplitude and a significant notch on declined branch; the amplitude of predicrotic wave in unsmooth pulse P wave is significantly higher, which could be even higher than that of h1, resulting in early appearance of h3 or integrating with h1, which forms a wide and blunt peak. Unsmooth pulse shows poorer vascular elasticity and greater vascular stiffness. PMID:27999604

  13. Dynamic responses of the Earth's radiation belts during periods of solar wind dynamic pressure pulse based on normalized superposed epoch analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Binbin; Xiang, Zheng; Gu, Xudong; Shprits, Yuri Y.; Zhou, Chen; Zhao, Zhengyu; Zhang, Xianguo; Zuo, Pingbing

    2016-09-01

    Using the electron flux measurements obtained from five satellites (GOES 15 and POES 15, 16, 18, and 19), we investigate the flux variations of radiation belt electrons during forty solar wind dynamic pressure pulses identified between September 2012 and December 2014. By utilizing the mean duration of the pressure pulses as the epoch timeline and stretching or compressing the time phases of individual events to normalize the duration by means of linear interpolation, we have performed normalized superposed epoch analysis to evaluate the dynamic responses of radiation belt energetic electrons corresponding to various groups of solar wind and magnetospheric conditions in association with solar wind dynamic pressure pulses. Our results indicate that by adopting the timeline normalization we can reproduce the typical response of the electron radiation belts to pressure pulses. Radiation belt electron fluxes exhibit large depletions right after the Pdyn peak during the periods of northward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) Bz and are more likely to occur during the Pdyn pulse under southward IMF Bz conditions. For the pulse events with large negative values of (Dst)min, radiation belt electrons respond in a manner similar to those with southward IMF Bz, and the corresponding postpulse recovery can extend to L 3 and exceed the prepulse flux levels. Triggered by the solar wind pressure enhancements, deeper earthward magnetopause erosion provides favorable conditions for the prompt electron flux dropouts that extend down to L 5, and the pressure pulses with longer duration tend to produce quicker and stronger electron flux decay. In addition, the events with high electron fluxes before the Pdyn pulse tend to experience more severe electron flux dropouts during the course of the pulse, while the largest rate of electron flux increase before and after the pulse occurs under the preconditioned low electron fluxes. These new results help us understand how electron fluxes

  14. Study of plasma pressure evolution driven by strong picosecond laser pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, M.; Wang, J. X.; Xu, Y. X.; Zhu, W. J.

    2017-01-01

    Through one dimensional relativistic particle-in-cell simulation of strong laser interaction with the solid-density plasma, the evolution of the plasma impact pressure behind a thin foil has been investigated in details. An energy-compression mechanism has been proposed to help optimizing the laser and plasma parameters. It has been found that by using a picosecond laser with intensity 1015 W cm-2, an impact pressure as high as several hundreds of GPa order of magnitude can be obtained. The numerical analysis demonstrates that the peak pressure is mainly resulted from the ion contribution. These results are of potential application to the laser loading upon solids in order to study the material properties under extra-high dynamic pressure.

  15. Chronic Kidney Disease Is Characterized by “Double Trouble” Higher Pulse Pressure plus Night-Time Systolic Blood Pressure and More Severe Cardiac Damage

    PubMed Central

    Fedecostante, Massimiliano; Spannella, Francesco; Cola, Giovanna; Espinosa, Emma; Dessì-Fulgheri, Paolo; Sarzani, Riccardo

    2014-01-01

    Background Hypertension plays a key role in chronic kidney disease (CKD), but CKD itself affects the blood pressure (BP) profile. The aim of this study was to assess the association of BP profile with CKD and the presence of cardiac organ damage. Methods We studied 1805 patients, referred to our Hypertension Centre, in whom ABPM, blood tests, and echocardiography were clinically indicated. The glomerular filtration rate was estimated (eGFR) using the MDRD equation and CKD was defined as eGFR<60 mL/min/1.73 m2. Cardiac organ damage was evaluated by echocardiography. Results Among patients with CKD there were higher systolic blood pressure (SBP) during the night-time, greater prevalence of non-dippers (OR: 1.8) and increased pulse pressure (PP) during 24-hour period, daytime and night-time (all p<0.001). Patients with CKD had a greater LVM/h2.7 index, and a higher prevalence of left ventricular hypertrophy and diastolic dysfunction (all p<0.001). Nocturnal SBP and PP correlated more strongly with cardiac organ damage (p<0.001). Patients with CKD had a greater Treatment Intensity Score (p<0.001) in the absence of a significantly greater BP control. Conclusions CKD patients have an altered night-time pressure profile and higher PP that translate into a more severe cardiac organ damage. In spite of a greater intensity of treatment in most patients with CKD, BP control was similar to patients without CKD. Our findings indicate the need of a better antihypertensive therapy in CKD, better selected drugs, dosages and posology to provide optimal coverage of 24 hours and night-time BP. PMID:24465931

  16. High pulse pressure is not associated with abnormal activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system in repaired aortic coarctation.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, T A L; Pedersen, E B; Munk, K; Hjortdal, V E; Emmertsen, K; Andersen, N H

    2015-04-01

    We investigated the relationship between pulse pressure (PP)--a surrogate marker of arterial stiffness-and activity of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) in adult patients with repaired coarctation and normal left ventricular (LV) function. A total of 114 patients (44 (26-74) years, 13 (0.1-40) years at repair) and 20 healthy controls were examined with 24-h ambulatory blood pressure monitoring, echocardiography, vasoactive hormone levels and magnetic resonance of the thoracic aorta. Forty-one patients (36%) were taking antihypertensives (28 RAAS inhibitors). Fifty-one had mean 24-h blood pressures >130/80 mm Hg. Hypertension was not associated with age at repair (P=0.257). Patients had higher PP and LV mass compared with controls (52±11 vs. 45±5 mm Hg and 221±71 vs. 154±55 g, respectively; both P<0.05). Differences were more pronounced in the presence of recoarctation, but independently of RAA levels. Even normotensive patients had higher LV mass than controls. LV mass and recoarctation were correlated with PP levels. In conclusion, adult patients with repaired coarctation have increased PP and LV mass compared with controls. PP increased with increasing recoarctation. Hypertension was present also in the absence of recoarctation. These changes could not be explained by abnormal activation of the RAAS.

  17. Shock Tube Investigation of Pressure and Ion Sensors Used in Pulse Detonation Engine Research

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-06-01

    30 3. Materials and Method.................................................................................................31 3.1...temperature vulcanizing Standard Symbols a speed of sound M Mach number MW molecular weight P pressure R specific gas constant T temperature V... vulcanizing (RTV) silicone was used to coat the ends of the transducers to insulate them from the heat. In addition, ion sensors were developed from

  18. High-efficiency generation of pulsed Lyman-α radiation by resonant laser wave mixing in low pressure Kr-Ar mixture.

    PubMed

    Saito, Norihito; Oishi, Yu; Miyazaki, Koji; Okamura, Kotaro; Nakamura, Jumpei; Louchev, Oleg A; Iwasaki, Masahiko; Wada, Satoshi

    2016-04-04

    We report an experimental generation of ns pulsed 121.568 nm Lyman-α radiation by the resonant nonlinear four-wave mixing of 212.556 nm and 845.015 nm radiation pulses providing a high conversion efficiency 1.7x10-3 with the output pulse energy 3.6 μJ achieved using a low pressure Kr-Ar mixture. Theoretical analysis shows that this efficiency is achieved due to the advantage of using (i) the high input laser intensities in combination with (ii) the low gas pressure allowing us to avoid the onset of full-scale discharge in the laser focus. In particular, under our experimental conditions the main mechanism of photoionization caused by the resonant 2-photon 212.556 nm radiation excitation of Kr atoms followed by the 1-photon ionization leads to ≈17% loss of Kr atoms and efficiency loss only by the end of the pulse. The energy of free electrons, generated by 212.556 nm radiation via (2 + 1)-photon ionization and accelerated mainly by 845.015 nm radiation, remains during the pulse below the level sufficient for the onset of full-scale discharge by the electron avalanche. Our analysis also suggests that ≈30-fold increase of 845.015 nm pulse energy can allow one to scale up the L-α radiation pulse energy towards the level of ≈100 μJ.

  19. Generation of heavy ion beams using femtosecond laser pulses in the target normal sheath acceleration and radiation pressure acceleration regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, G. M.; McGuffey, C.; Thomas, A. G. R.; Krushelnick, K.; Beg, F. N.

    2016-06-01

    Theoretical study of heavy ion acceleration from sub-micron gold foils irradiated by a short pulse laser is presented. Using two dimensional particle-in-cell simulations, the time history of the laser pulse is examined in order to get insight into the laser energy deposition and ion acceleration process. For laser pulses with intensity 3 × 10 21 W / cm 2 , duration 32 fs, focal spot size 5 μm, and energy 27 J, the calculated reflection, transmission, and coupling coefficients from a 20 nm foil are 80%, 5%, and 15%, respectively. The conversion efficiency into gold ions is 8%. Two highly collimated counter-propagating ion beams have been identified. The forward accelerated gold ions have average and maximum charge-to-mass ratio of 0.25 and 0.3, respectively, maximum normalized energy 25 MeV/nucleon, and flux 2 × 10 11 ions / sr . An analytical model was used to determine a range of foil thicknesses suitable for acceleration of gold ions in the radiation pressure acceleration regime and the onset of the target normal sheath acceleration regime. The numerical simulations and analytical model point to at least four technical challenges hindering the heavy ion acceleration: low charge-to-mass ratio, limited number of ions amenable to acceleration, delayed acceleration, and high reflectivity of the plasma. Finally, a regime suitable for heavy ion acceleration has been identified in an alternative approach by analyzing the energy absorption and distribution among participating species and scaling of conversion efficiency, maximum energy, and flux with laser intensity.

  20. Flexible reduced graphene oxide supercapacitor fabricated using a nitrogen dc-pulse atmospheric-pressure plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Cheng-Han; Kuok, Fei-Hong; Liao, Chen-Yu; Wan, Ting-Hao; Chen, Chieh-Wen; Hsu, Cheng-Che; Cheng, I.-Chun; Chen, Jian-Zhang

    2017-02-01

    We use a nitrogen dc-pulse atmospheric-pressure plasma jet to fabricate a flexible reduced graphene oxide (rGO) supercapacitor with polyvinyl alcohol (PVA)/sulfuric acid (H2SO4) gel electrolyte. An areal capacitance of 47.03 mF · cm‑2 (evaluated using cyclic voltammetry (CV) under a potential scan rate of 2 mV · s‑1) is achieved. The supercapacitor can be operated without apparent degradation under bending with a bending radius of 0.55 cm. After a 1000 cycle CV stability test, the capacitance retention rate is 100% when flat and is 98.6% under bending (bending radius  =  0.55 cm), indicating promising stability of the APPJ-processed flexible supercapacitor.

  1. Researches regarding a pressure pulse generator as a segment of model for a weighing in motion system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mardare, I.; Tiţa, I.; Pelin, R. I.

    2016-08-01

    There are many types of weighing in motion systems: with strain gauges, piezoelectric type, with optical fibre, capacitive etc. Although one of them proved to be reliable, many research teams all over the world are interested in finding new types or improving the existing ones. In this paper is presented a hydraulic Weigh-In-Motion sensor composed of a metal vessel filled with hydraulic oil connected to an accumulator through a pipe. Vehicle tires press on the deformable upper wall and pressure pulses generated in this way provides information about the load. In this paper are presented: a structure for an experimental model, the block diagram for numerical simulation, experimental model and some experimental results.

  2. Effect of oxygen partial pressure on microstructural and optical properties of titanium oxide thin films prepared by pulsed laser deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Balakrishnan, G.; Bandi, Vengala Rao; Rajeswari, S.M.; Balamurugan, N.; Babu, R. Venkatesh; Song, J.I.

    2013-11-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Microstructural and optical properties are studied systematically. • The optical properties are studied by UV–visible and photoluminescence. • The PL spectra shows two peaks correspond to bandgap of anatase and rutile. • The maximum refractive index of 2.73 is obtained for rutile phase of titania. - Abstract: Nanocrystalline titanium oxide (TiO{sub 2}) thin films were deposited on silicon (1 0 0) and quartz substrates at various oxygen partial pressures (1 × 10{sup −5} to 3.5 × 10{sup −1} mbar) with a substrate temperature of 973 K by pulsed laser deposition. The microstructural and optical properties were characterized using Grazing incidence X-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy, UV–visible spectroscopy and photoluminescence. The X-ray diffraction studies indicated the formation of mixed phases (anatase and rutile) at higher oxygen partial pressures (3.5 × 10{sup −2} to 3.5 × 10{sup −1} mbar) and strong rutile phase at lower oxygen partial pressures (1 × 10{sup −5} to 3.5 × 10{sup −3} mbar). The atomic force microscopy studies showed the dense and uniform distribution of nanocrystallites. The root mean square surface roughness of the films increased with increasing oxygen partial pressures. The UV–visible studies showed that the bandgap of the films increased from 3.20 eV to 3.60 eV with the increase of oxygen partial pressures. The refractive index was found to decrease from 2.73 to 2.06 (at 550 nm) as the oxygen partial pressure increased from 1.5 × 10{sup −4} mbar to 3.5 × 10{sup −1} mbar. The photoluminescence peaks were fitted to Gaussian function and the bandgap was found to be in the range ∼3.28–3.40 eV for anatase and 2.98–3.13 eV for rutile phases with increasing oxygen partial pressure from 1 × 10{sup −5} to 3.5 × 10{sup −1} mbar.

  3. Production of extended plasma channels in atmospheric air by amplitude-modulated UV radiation of GARPUN-MTW Ti : sapphire—KrF laser. Part 1. Regenerative amplification of subpicosecond pulses in a wide-aperture electron beam pumped KrF amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zvorykin, V. D.; Ionin, Andrei A.; Levchenko, A. O.; Mesyats, Gennadii A.; Seleznev, L. V.; Sinitsyn, D. V.; Smetanin, Igor V.; Sunchugasheva, E. S.; Ustinovskii, N. N.; Shutov, A. V.

    2013-04-01

    Regenerative amplification of single and multiple ultrashort subpicosecond UV pulses in a wide-aperture KrF amplifier with an unstable confocal resonator was investigated on the GARPUN-MTW hybrid laser system. Amplitude-modulated 100-ns long UV radiation pulses with an energy of several tens of joules were obtained at the output of the system. The pulses were a combination of a quasi-stationary oscillation pulse and a train of amplified ultrashort pulses (USPs) with a peak power of 0.2-0.3 TW, which exceeded the power of free-running lasing pulse by three orders of magnitude. The population inversion recovery time in the active KrF laser medium was estimated: τc <= 2.0 ns. Trains of USPs spaced at an interval Δt ≈ τc were shown to exhibit the highest amplification efficiency. The production of amplitude-modulated UV pulses opens up the way to the production and maintenance of extended plasma channels in atmospheric air.

  4. Production of extended plasma channels in atmospheric air by amplitude-modulated UV radiation of GARPUN-MTW Ti : sapphire-KrF laser. Part 1. Regenerative amplification of subpicosecond pulses in a wide-aperture electron beam pumped KrF amplifier

    SciTech Connect

    Zvorykin, V D; Ionin, Andrei A; Levchenko, A O; Mesyats, Gennadii A; Seleznev, L V; Sinitsyn, D V; Smetanin, Igor V; Sunchugasheva, E S; Ustinovskii, N N; Shutov, A V

    2013-04-30

    Regenerative amplification of single and multiple ultrashort subpicosecond UV pulses in a wide-aperture KrF amplifier with an unstable confocal resonator was investigated on the GARPUN-MTW hybrid laser system. Amplitude-modulated 100-ns long UV radiation pulses with an energy of several tens of joules were obtained at the output of the system. The pulses were a combination of a quasi-stationary oscillation pulse and a train of amplified ultrashort pulses (USPs) with a peak power of 0.2-0.3 TW, which exceeded the power of free-running lasing pulse by three orders of magnitude. The population inversion recovery time in the active KrF laser medium was estimated: {tau}{sub c} {<=} 2.0 ns. Trains of USPs spaced at an interval {Delta}t Almost-Equal-To {tau}{sub c} were shown to exhibit the highest amplification efficiency. The production of amplitude-modulated UV pulses opens up the way to the production and maintenance of extended plasma channels in atmospheric air. (extreme light fields and their applications)

  5. Conduit pressurization pulses at Stromboli volcano revealed by the ground-based InSAR monitoring system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Traglia, Federico; Del Ventisette, Chiara; Rosi, Mauro; Mugnai, Francesco; Intrieri, Emanuele; Moretti, Sandro; Casagli, Nicola

    2013-04-01

    .35 mm h-1), 2 days before the lava outflow from the summit craters (29 March), but the displacement rate of the summit area remained high for the following 2 months, with peaks on 3 April (0.27 mm h-1), 14 April (0.3 mm h-1), 3 May (0.25 mm h-1) and 22 May (0.23 mm h-1). The peak of 3 May corresponds to the displacement related to the major explosion that also was observed in sectors 1 and 2. Displacement rates during the November 2009-January 2010 period were subject to a higher degree of variation than March-May 2009, with some peaks in correspondence with the major explosions and others, which occurred some days before them. In particular, an increase in displacement rate was observed starting from 2 November 2009 (0.56 mm h-1) that ended with the explosion of 8 November (0.6 mm h-1). Similar trends have been observed in the periods between (i) 19 and 23 November (0.25-0.3 mm h-1), (ii) 20 and 28 December (0.25-0.29 mm h-1), (iii) 6 and 9 January (0.24-0.29 mm h-1) and finally, (iv) 16 and 20 January 2010 (0.2-0.3 mm h-1). The GBInSAR revealed that displacements in sectors 1 and 2 occurred only during the 8 November 2009, 24 November 2009 and 21 January 2010 major explosions. Analysing the data before 20 June 2011, an increase in the displacement rate has been detected in sector 3 in the period 9-18 May. Displacements have been observed during the night between 8 and 9 May, with an increase in the displacement rate at the base of the NE crater area up to 0.38 mm h-1. The displacement rate reached its peak during the early morning of 10 May and then gradually decreased. The GBInSAR revealed displacements in the crater area (sectors 1 and 2) only during the 20 June and 5 July explosions. The occurrence of the 1-2 August 2011 lava flow from the NE cone on the SdF and its subsequent remobilization, promoting small-scale instability on the SdF, has also been recognized. Pulses of rapid expansion of sector 3, of variable duration and amplitude, appear in coincidence with

  6. Multidirectional Functionally Graded Plates Exposed to Transient-Type Pressure Pulses

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-17

    during the transition from subsonic speeds to supersonic speeds. Also, ground combat vehicles can experience various types of external excitations from...literature review, a theoretical base which to build upon is found to be nonexistent. A brief synopsis on how to approach and theoretically model ...driving force for their dynamic motion. In the supersonic and hypersonic world, aircraft can experience various types of pressure waves which can

  7. Amplitude-temporal characteristics of a supershort avalanche electron beam generated during subnanosecond breakdown in air and nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasenko, V. F.; Baksht, E. Kh.; Beloplotov, D. V.; Burachenko, A. G.; Lomaev, M. I.

    2016-04-01

    The amplitude-temporal characteristics of a supershort avalanche electron beam (SAEB) with an amplitude of up to 100 A, as well as of the breakdown voltage and discharge current, are studied experimentally with a picosecond time resolution. The waveforms of discharge and SAEB currents are synchronized with those of the voltage pulses. It is shown that the amplitude-temporal characteristics of the SAEB depend on the gap length and the designs of the gas diode and cathode. The mechanism for the generation of runaway electron beams in atmospheric-pressure gases is analyzed on the basis of the obtained experimental data.

  8. Microprocessor Controlled Pulse Amplitude Modulation Decommutator.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-10-28

    821760DAT 5 - LINE I NALOG PARALLEL PARALLEL AAO BCD DATA CONVERTERSTIME PORT Cn ND I CAT R SSEIGAL / - FPU FONETE tKIMIATO ,,,PNE C0 SINA .MCOPO E R FVAEO...Analog to Digital Converter Interface 10 5. BCD Time Code Generator Interface 12 6. Thumbwheel Switch Interface 13 7. Analog Output Latch/DAC 15 8...also appear on analog output No. 1. See Figure 5 for interface wiring. A low on the PB1 line selects the MSD switch and a positive true BCD code

  9. Experimental study of plume induced by nanosecond repetitively pulsed spark microdischarges in air at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orriere, Thomas; Benard, Nicolas; Moreau, Eric; Pai, David

    2016-09-01

    Nanosecond repetitively pulsed (NRP) spark discharges have been widely studied due to their high chemical reactivity, low gas temperature, and high ionization efficiency. They are useful in many research areas: nanomaterials synthesis, combustion, and aerodynamic flow control. In all of these fields, particular attention has been devoted to chemical species transport and/or hydrodynamic and thermal effects for applications. The aim of this study is to generate an electro-thermal plume by combining an NRP spark microdischarge in a pin-to-pin configuration with a third DC-biased electrode placed a few centimeters away. First, electrical characterization and optical emission spectroscopy were performed to reveal important plasma processes. Second, particle image velocimetry was combined with schlieren photography to investigate the main characteristics of the generated flow. Heating processes are measured by using the N2(C ->B) (0,2) and (1,3) vibrational bands, and effects due to the confinement of the discharge are described. Moreover, the presence of atomic ions N+ and O+ is discussed. Finally, the electro-thermal plume structure is characterized by a flow velocity around 1.8 m.s-1, and the thermal kernel has a spheroidal shape.

  10. Pulsed Phase Lock Loop Device for Monitoring Intracranial Pressure During Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ueno, Toshiaki; Macias, Brandon R.; Yost, William T.; Hargens, Alan R.

    2003-01-01

    We have developed an ultrasonic device to monitor ICP waveforms non-invasively from cranial diameter oscillations using a NASA-developed pulsed phase lock loop (PPLL) technique. The purpose of this study was to attempt to validate the PPLL device for reliable recordings of ICP waveforms and analysis of ICP dynamics in vivo. METHODS: PPLL outputs were recorded in patients during invasive ICP monitoring at UCSD Medical Center (n=10). RESULTS: An averaged linear regression coefficient between ICP and PPLL waveform data during one cardiac cycle in all patients is 0.88 +/- 0.02 (mean +/- SE). Coherence function analysis indicated that ICP and PPLL waveforms have high correlation in the lst, 2nd, and 3rd harmonic waves associated with a cardiac cycle. CONCLUSIONS: PPLL outputs represent ICP waveforms in both frequency and time domains. PPLL technology enables in vivo evaluation of ICP dynamics non-invasively, and can acquire continuous ICP waveforms during spaceflight because of compactness and non-invasive nature.

  11. An experimental study on discharge characteristics in a pulsed-dc atmospheric pressure CH3OH/Ar plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Muyang; Liu, Sanqiu; Yang, Congying; Pei, Xuekai; Lu, Xinpei; Zhang, Jialiang; Wang, Dezhen

    2016-10-01

    Recently, C/H/Ar plasma discharges found enormous potential and possibility in carbonaceous compounds conversion and production. In this work, a pulsed-dc CH3OH/Ar plasma jet generated at atmospheric pressure is investigated by means of optical and electrical diagnosis concerning the variation of its basic parameters, absolute concentration of OH radicals, and plasma temperature with different CH3OH/Ar volume ratios, in the core region of discharge with needle-to-ring electrode configuration. The voltage-current characteristics are also measured at different CH3OH/Ar ratios. Laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) results here show that only small amounts of added methanol vapor to argon plasma (about 0.05% CH3OH/Ar volume ratio) is favorable for the production of OH radicals. The optical emission lines of CH, CN, and C2 radicals have been detected in the CH3OH/Ar plasma. And, the plasma temperatures increase with successive amount of added methanol vapor to the growth plasma. Moreover, qualitative discussions are presented regarding the mechanisms for methanol dissociation and effect of the CH3OH component on the Ar plasma discharge at atmospheric pressure.

  12. Pulmonary Capillary Hemorrhage Induced by Fixed-Beam Pulsed Ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Miller, Douglas L; Dou, Chunyan; Raghavendran, Krishnan

    2015-08-01

    The induction of pulmonary capillary hemorrhage (PCH) by pulsed ultrasound was discovered 25 y ago, but early research used fixed-beam systems rather than actual diagnostic ultrasound machines. In this study, results of exposure of rats to fixed-beam focused ultrasound for 5 min at 1.5 and 7.5 MHz were compared with recent research on diagnostic ultrasound. One exposure condition at each frequency used 10-μs pulses delivered at 25-ms intervals. Three conditions involved Gaussian modulation of the pulse amplitudes at 25-ms intervals to simulate diagnostic scanning: 7.5 MHz with 0.3- and 1.5-μs pulses at 100- and 500-μs pulse repetition periods, respectively, and 1.5 MHz with 1.7-μs pulses at 500-μs repetition periods. Four groups were tested for each condition to assess PCH areas at different exposure levels and to determine occurrence thresholds. The conditions with identical pulse timing resulted in smaller PCH areas for the smaller 7.5-MHz beam, but both had thresholds of 0.69-0.75 MPa in situ peak rarefactional pressure amplitude. The Gaussian modulation conditions for both 7.5 MHz with 0.3-μs pulses and 1.5 MHz with 1.7-μs pulses had thresholds of 1.12-1.20 MPa peak rarefactional pressure amplitude, although the relatively long 1.5-μs pulses at 7.5 MHz yielded a threshold of 0.75 MPa. The fixed-beam pulsed ultrasound exposures produced lower thresholds than diagnostic ultrasound. There was no clear tendency for thresholds to increase with increasing ultrasonic frequency when pulse timing conditions were similar.

  13. Source duration of stress and water-pressure induced seismicity derived from experimental analysis of P wave pulse width in granite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuda, K.

    2013-12-01

    Pulse widths of P waves in granite, measured in the laboratory, were analyzed to investigate source durations of rupture processes for water-pressure induced and stress-induced microseismicity. Much evidence suggests that fluids in the subsurface are intimately linked to faulting processes. Studies of seismicity induced by water injection are thus important for understanding the trigger mechanisms of earthquakes as well as for engineering applications such as hydraulic fracturing of rocks at depth for petroleum extraction. Determining the cause of seismic events is very important in seismology and engineering; however, water-pressure induced seismic events are difficult to distinguish from those induced by purely tectonic stress. To investigate this problem, we analyzed the waveforms of acoustic emissions (AEs) produced in the laboratory by both water-pressure induced and stress-induced microseismicity. We used a cylinder (50 mm in diameter and 100 mm in length) of medium-grained granite. We applied a differential stress of about 70% of fracture strength, to the rock sample under 40 MPa confining pressure and held it constant throughout the experiment. When the primary creep stage and acoustic emissions (AEs) caused by the initial loading had ceased, we injected distilled water into the bottom end of the sample at a constant pressure of 17 MPa until macroscopic fracture occurred. We analysed AE waveforms produced by stress-induced AEs which occurred before the water-injection and by water-pressure induced AEs which occurred after the water-injection. Pulse widths were measured from the waveform traces plotted from the digital data. To investigate the source duration of the rupture process, we estimated the pulse width at the source and normalized by event magnitude to obtain a scaled pulse width at the source. After the effects of event size and hypocentral distance were removed from observed pulse widths, the ratio of the scaled source durations of water-pressure

  14. Amplitude sorting of oscillatory burst signals by sampling

    DOEpatents

    Davis, Thomas J.

    1977-01-01

    A method and apparatus for amplitude sorting of oscillatory burst signals is described in which the burst signal is detected to produce a burst envelope signal and an intermediate or midportion of such envelope signal is sampled to provide a sample pulse output. The height of the sample pulse is proportional to the amplitude of the envelope signal and to the maximum burst signal amplitude. The sample pulses are fed to a pulse height analyzer for sorting. The present invention is used in an acoustic emission testing system to convert the amplitude of the acoustic emission burst signals into sample pulse heights which are measured by a pulse height analyzer for sorting the pulses in groups according to their height in order to identify the material anomalies in the test material which emit the acoustic signals.

  15. High-amplitude, ultrashort strain solitons in solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muskens, O. L.

    2004-03-01

    In recent years, pressure pulses of very short (picosecond) time duration have found wide application as a diagnostic tool in the semiconductor industry and in fundamental condensed matter research. Next to their application in the studies of nanometer-sized structures, propagation of these short acoustic pulses over millimeter distances at low temperatures has revealed a new field of picosecond acoustics. It has been shown that, for very short strain pulses, phonon dispersion destroys the internal structure of the coherent wavepacket by pulling apart its different frequency components. However, when strain amplitudes are sufficiently increased, a nonlinear pulse-steepening mechanism emerges, that leads to the formation of shock waves. The combined action of the nonlinear and dispersive effects then results in the formation of stable, highly localized solitary waves. In this thesis, we study the development of picosecond pressure pulses into trains of ultrashort acoustic solitons in a bulk crystal. The high-amplitude, bipolar strain wavepackets are generated by femtosecond optical excitation of a thin chromium film evaporated onto the crystal, using high-power optical pulses from an amplified Ti:sapphire laser. Propagation over millimeter distances at low temperatures is studied by means of two complementary experimental methods. First, the development of low-frequency, gigahertz strain components is monitored using Brillouin light-scattering. By monitoring the scattered intensity against traveled distance of the packets, we demonstrate the breakup of the initial single-cycle pulse into an ultrashort acoustic soliton train, reaching transient pressures up to tens of kilobars and soliton widths less than 0.5 picoseconds, corresponding to only several nanometers in the crystal. Further, we show that the ultrashort strain solitons interact coherently with local electronic two-level systems at terahertz frequency, in optically excited ruby. The strain

  16. Correlation of plume dynamics and oxygen pressure with VO2 stoichiometry during pulsed laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lafane, S.; Kerdja, T.; Abdelli-Messaci, S.; Khereddine, Y.; Kechouane, M.; Nemraoui, O.

    2013-07-01

    Vanadium dioxide thin films have been deposited on Corning glass substrates by a KrF laser ablation of V2O5 target at the laser fluence of 2 J cm-2. The substrate temperature and the target-substrate distance were set to 500 ∘C and 4 cm, respectively. X-ray diffraction analysis showed that pure VO2 is only obtained at an oxygen pressure range of 4×10-3-2×10-2 mbar. A higher optical switching contrast was obtained for the VO2 films deposited at 4×10-3-10-2 mbar. The films properties were correlated to the plume-oxygen gas interaction monitored by fast imaging of the plume.

  17. Magnetic Ignition of Pulsed Gas Discharges in Air of Low Pressure in a Coaxial Plasma Gun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thom, Karlheinz; Norwood, Joseph, Jr.

    1961-01-01

    The effect of an axial magnetic field on the breakdown voltage of a coaxial system of electrodes has been investigated by earlier workers. For low values of gas pressure times electrode spacing, the breakdown voltage is decreased by the application of the magnetic field. The electron cyclotron radius now assumes the role held by the mean free path in nonmagnetic discharges and the breakdown voltage becomes a function of the magnetic flux density. In this paper the dependence of the formative time lag as a function of the magnetic flux density is established and the feasibility of using a magnetic field for igniting high-voltage, high-current discharges is shown through theory and experiment. With a 36 microfarad capacitor bank charged to 48,000 volts, a peak current of 1.3 x 10( exp 6) amperes in a coaxial type of plasma gun was achieved with a current rise time of only 2 microseconds.

  18. Intra-Operative Fluid Management in Adult Neurosurgical Patients Undergoing Intracranial Tumour Surgery: Randomised Control Trial Comparing Pulse Pressure Variance (PPV) and Central Venous Pressure (CVP)

    PubMed Central

    Salins, Serina Ruth; Kumar, Amar Nandha; Korula, Grace

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Fluid management in neurosurgery presents specific challenges to the anaesthesiologist. Dynamic para-meters like Pulse Pressure Variation (PPV) have been used successfully to guide fluid management. Aim To compare PPV against Central Venous Pressure (CVP) in neurosurgical patients to assess hemodynamic stability and perfusion status. Materials and Methods This was a single centre prospective randomised control trial at a tertiary care centre. A total of 60 patients undergoing intracranial tumour excision in supine and lateral positions were randomised to two groups (Group 1, CVP n=30), (Group 2, PPV n=30). Intra-operative fluid management was titrated to maintain baseline CVP in Group 1(5-10cm of water) and in Group 2 fluids were given to maintain PPV less than 13%. Acid base status, vital signs and blood loss were monitored. Results Although intra-operative hypotension and acid base changes were comparable between the groups, the patients in the CVP group had more episodes of hypotension requiring fluid boluses in the first 24 hours post surgery. {CVP group median (25, 75) 2400ml (1850, 3110) versus PPV group 2100ml (1350, 2200) p=0.03} The patients in the PPV group received more fluids than the CVP group which was clinically significant. {2250 ml (1500, 3000) versus 1500ml (1200, 2000) median (25, 75) (p=0.002)}. The blood loss was not significantly different between the groups The median blood loss in the CVP group was 600ml and in the PPV group was 850 ml; p value 0.09. Conclusion PPV can be used as a reliable index to guide fluid management in neurosurgical patients undergoing tumour excision surgery in supine and lateral positions and can effectively augment CVP as a guide to fluid management. Patients in PPV group had better hemodynamic stability and less post operative fluid requirement. PMID:27437329

  19. Generation of subnanosecond electron beams in air at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostyrya, I. D.; Tarasenko, V. F.; Baksht, E. Kh.; Burachenko, A. G.; Lomaev, M. I.; Rybka, D. V.

    2009-11-01

    Optimum conditions for the generation of runaway electron beams with maximum current amplitudes and densities in nanosecond pulsed discharges in air at atmospheric pressure are determined. A supershort avalanche electron beam (SAEB) with a current amplitude of ˜30 A, a current density of ˜20 A/cm2, and a pulse full width at half maximum (FWHM) of ˜100 ps has been observed behind the output foil of an air-filled diode. It is shown that the position of the SAEB current maximum relative to the voltage pulse front exhibits a time shift that varies when the small-size collector is moved over the foil surface.

  20. INTERACTION OF LASER RADIATION WITH MATTER. LASER PLASMA: Dependence of pressure in a compressed condensed matter on parameters of high-power laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebo, A. I.; Lebo, I. G.; Batani, D.

    2008-08-01

    Based on analysis of two-dimensional numerical calculations and experiments performed on the PALS setup, the similarity relations are obtained for determining pressure in a condensed matter irradiated by a short laser pulse of intensity 5×1013-5×1014 W cm-2.

  1. Relation of pulse pressure to long-distance gait speed in community-dwelling older adults: Findings from the LIFE-P study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Reduced long-distance gait speed, a measure of physical function, is associated with falls, late-life disability, hospitalization/institutionalization and cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Aging is also accompanied by a widening of pulse pressure (PP) that contributes to ventricular-vascular ...

  2. Assessment of right ventricular afterload by pressure waveform analysis in acute pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Grignola, Juan C; Domingo, Enric; Devera, Lucía; Ginés, Fernando

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To characterize hydraulic right ventricle (RV) afterload by pulmonary arterial pressure waveform analysis in an acute pulmonary hypertension (PH) model. METHODS: Pulmonary artery (PA) flow and pressure were recorded in six anesthetized sheep. Acute isobaric PH was induced by phenylephrine (active) and PA mechanical constriction (passive). We estimated the amplitude of the forward and reflected pressure waves according to the inflection point. In most cases the inflection pressure was smooth, thus the inflection point was defined as the time at which the first derivative of pulmonary arterial pressure reached its first minimum. We calculated the input and characteristic (ZC, time-domain Li method) impedances, the capacitance index (stroke volume/pulse pressure), the augmentation index (AI) (reflected pressure/pulse pressure), the fractional pulse pressure (pulse pressure/mean pressure) and the wasted energy generated by the RV due to wave reflection during ejection (EW). RESULTS: Pulse pressure, fractional pulse pressure, AI and ZC increased and capacitance index decreased during passive PH with respect to control (P < 0.05). In contrast, ZC and the capacitance index did not change and EW and the AI decreased during active PH. Pulse pressure correlated with EW and ZC and the AI was correlated with EW (r > 0.6, P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: PA pressure waveform analysis allows the quantification of the dynamic RV afterload. Prospective clinical studies will be necessary to validate this time-domain approach to evaluate the dynamic RV afterload in chronic PH. PMID:22053220

  3. Precise and high-speed control of partial pressures of multiple gas species in plasma process chamber using pulse-controlled gas injection

    SciTech Connect

    Morishita, Sadaharu; Goto, Tetsuya; Nagase, Masaaki; Ohmi, Tadahiro

    2009-05-15

    Multiprocesses in a single plasma process chamber with high throughput require precise, sequential, high-speed alteration of partial pressures of multiple gas species. A conventional gas-distribution system cannot realize this because the system seriously overshoots gas pressure immediately following valve operation. Furthermore, chamber volume and conductance of gas piping between the system and chamber should both be considered because they delay the stabilizing time of gas pressure. Therefore, the authors proposed a new gas-distribution system without overshoot by controlling gas flow rate based on pressure measurement, as well as a method of pulse-controlled gas injection immediately following valve operation. Time variation of measured partial pressure agrees well with a calculation based on an equivalent-circuit model that represents the chamber and gas piping between the system and chamber. Using pulse-controlled gas injection, the stabilizing time can be reduced drastically to 0.6 s for HBr added to pure Ar plasma, and 0.7 s for O{sub 2} added to Ar/HBr plasma; without the pulse control, the stabilizing times are 3 and 7 s, respectively. In the O{sub 2} addition case, rapid stabilization can be achieved during the period of line/space pattern etching of poly-Si on a thin SiO{sub 2} film. This occurs without anomalous etching of the underlying SiO{sub 2} film or the Si substrate near the sidewall, thus obtaining a wide process margin with high throughput.

  4. High speed, high current pulsed driver circuit

    DOEpatents

    Carlen, Christopher R.

    2017-03-21

    Various technologies presented herein relate to driving a LED such that the LED emits short duration pulses of light. This is accomplished by driving the LED with short duration, high amplitude current pulses. When the LED is driven by short duration, high amplitude current pulses, the LED emits light at a greater amplitude compared to when the LED is driven by continuous wave current.

  5. Dry Electrodes for ECG and Pulse Transit Time for Blood Pressure: A Wearable Sensor and Smartphone Communication Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shyamkumar, Prashanth

    -invasive, cuff-less Blood pressure estimation based on Pulse Transit Time with multiple synchronized sensor nodes, is implemented with e-nanoflex and the results are discussed.

  6. Feed-forward digital phase and amplitude correction system

    DOEpatents

    Yu, D.U.L.; Conway, P.H.

    1994-11-15

    Phase and amplitude modifications in repeatable RF pulses at the output of a high power pulsed microwave amplifier are made utilizing a digital feed-forward correction system. A controlled amount of the output power is coupled to a correction system for processing of phase and amplitude information. The correction system comprises circuitry to compare the detected phase and amplitude with the desired phase and amplitude, respectively, and a digitally programmable phase shifter and attenuator and digital logic circuitry to control the phase shifter and attenuator. The phase and amplitude of subsequent are modified by output signals from the correction system. 11 figs.

  7. Feed-forward digital phase and amplitude correction system

    DOEpatents

    Yu, David U. L.; Conway, Patrick H.

    1994-01-01

    Phase and amplitude modifications in repeatable RF pulses at the output of a high power pulsed microwave amplifier are made utilizing a digital feed-forward correction system. A controlled amount of the output power is coupled to a correction system for processing of phase and amplitude information. The correction system comprises circuitry to compare the detected phase and amplitude with the desired phase and amplitude, respectively, and a digitally programmable phase shifter and attenuator and digital logic circuitry to control the phase shifter and attenuator. The Phase and amplitude of subsequent are modified by output signals from the correction system.

  8. Optimal frequency ranges for extracting information on cardiovascular autonomic control from the blood pressure and pulse interval spectrograms in mice.

    PubMed

    Baudrie, Véronique; Laude, Dominique; Elghozi, Jean-Luc

    2007-02-01

    The analysis of blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR) variability by spectral methods has proven a useful tool in many animal species for the assessment of the vagal and sympathetic contributions to oscillations of BP and HR. Continuous BP measurements obtained in mice by telemetry were used to characterize the spectral bandwidths of autonomic relevance by using an approach with no a priori. The paradigm was based on the autonomic blockades obtained with conventional drugs (atropine, prazosin, atenolol). The spectral changes were estimated in all of the combinations of spectral bandwidths. The effect of hydralazine was also tested using the same systematic analysis, to detect the zones of sympathetic activation resulting reflexly from the vasodilatory action of the drug. Two zones of interest in the study of the autonomic control of BP and HR were observed. The first zone covered the 0.15-0.60 Hz range of the systolic BP spectrum and corresponds to the low-frequency zone (or Mayer waves). This zone reflects sympathetic control since the power spectral density of this zone was significantly reduced with alpha1-adrenoceptor blockade (prazosin), while it was significantly amplified as a result of a reflex sympathetic activation (hydralazine). The second zone covered the 2.5-5.0 Hz range of the pulse interval spectrum and corresponded to the high-frequency zone (respiratory sinus arrhythmia) under vagal control (blocked by atropine). These zones are recommended for testing the autonomic control of circulation in mice.

  9. Space and time structure of helium pulsed surface-wave discharges at intermediate pressures (5-50 Torr)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamdan, Ahmad; Valade, Fabrice; Margot, Joëlle; Vidal, François; Matte, Jean-Pierre

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, the ignition and development of a plasma created by pulsed surface wave discharges (PSWDs) was experimentally investigated using time-resolved imaging techniques and optical spectroscopy in helium at intermediate gas pressures between 5 and 50 Torr. We found that the ionization front moves at a few km s-1 during the ignition phase and decreases to hundreds of m s-1 after only some tens of µs. Once the plasma has reached a sufficient length, a standing wave pattern is observed in the light emission of the discharge. We attribute its formation to the reflection of the surface wave on the ionization front, which results in a pattern of nodes and antinodes. We have also determined the time and space evolution of the gas temperature. It is shown that the gas temperature increases from the room temperature value to a plateau at several hundreds of degrees over a short time (typically 100 µs). These results supports those obtained by light emission imaging and also show that the standing wave pattern does not affect the gas temperature.

  10. Influence of pulsed nanosecond volume discharge in atmospheric-pressure air on the electrical characteristics of MCT epitaxial films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoryev, Denis V.; Voitsekhovskii, Alexandr V.; Lozovoy, Kirill A.; Nesmelov, Sergey N.; Dzyadukh, Stanislav M.; Tarasenko, Viktor F.; Shulepov, Michail A.; Dvoretskii, Sergei A.

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this paper was investigating the effect of volume nanosecond discharge in air at atmospheric pressure on the electro-physical properties of the HgCdTe (MCT) epitaxial films grown by molecular beam epitaxy. Hall measurements of electro-physical parameters of MCT samples after irradiation have shown that there is a layer of epitaxial films exhibiting n-type conductivity that is formed in the near-surface area. After more than 600 pulses of influence parameters and thickness of the resulting n-layer is such that the measured field dependence of Hall coefficient corresponds to the material of n-type conductivity. Also it is shown that the impact of the discharge leads to significant changes in electro-physical characteristics of MIS structures. This fact is demonstrated by increase in density of positive fixed charge, change in the hysteresis type of the capacitance-voltage characteristic, an increase in density of surface states. The preliminary results show that it is possible to use such actions in the development of technologies of the controlled change in the properties of MCT.

  11. Effects of Oxygen Concentration on Pulsed Dielectric Barrier Discharge in Helium-Oxygen Mixture at Atmospheric Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaolong; Tan, Zhenyu; Pan, Jie; Chen, Xinxian

    2016-08-01

    In this work the effects of O2 concentration on the pulsed dielectric barrier discharge in helium-oxygen mixture at atmospheric pressure have been numerically researched by using a one-dimensional fluid model in conjunction with the chosen key species and chemical reactions. The reliability of the used model has been examined by comparing the calculated discharge current with the reported experiments. The present work presents the following significant results. The dominative positive and negative particles are He2+ and O2-, respectively, the densities of the reactive oxygen species (ROS) get their maxima nearly at the central position of the gap, and the density of the ground state O is highest in the ROS. The increase of O2 concentration results in increasingly weak discharge and the time lag of the ignition. For O2 concentrations below 1.1%, the density of O is much higher than other species, the averaged dissipated power density presents an evident increase for small O2 concentration and then the increase becomes weak. In particular, the total density of the reactive oxygen species reaches its maximums at the O2 concentration of about 0.5%. This characteristic further convinces the experimental observation that the O2 concentration of 0.5% is an optimal O2/He ratio in the inactivation of bacteria and biomolecules when radiated by using the plasmas produced in a helium oxygen mixture. supported by the Fundamental Research Funds of Shandong University, China (No. 2016JC016)

  12. FAST TRACK COMMUNICATION: Contrasting characteristics of sub-microsecond pulsed atmospheric air and atmospheric pressure helium-oxygen glow discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, J. L.; Liu, D. X.; Iza, F.; Rong, M. Z.; Kong, M. G.

    2010-01-01

    Glow discharges in air are often considered to be the ultimate low-temperature atmospheric pressure plasmas for numerous chamber-free applications. This is due to the ubiquitous presence of air and the perceived abundance of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species in air plasmas. In this paper, sub-microsecond pulsed atmospheric air plasmas are shown to produce a low concentration of excited oxygen atoms but an abundance of excited nitrogen species, UV photons and ozone molecules. This contrasts sharply with the efficient production of excited oxygen atoms in comparable helium-oxygen discharges. Relevant reaction chemistry analysed with a global model suggests that collisional excitation of O2 by helium metastables is significantly more efficient than electron dissociative excitation of O2, electron excitation of O and ion-ion recombination. These results suggest different practical uses of the two oxygen-containing atmospheric discharges, with air plasmas being well suited for nitrogen and UV based chemistry and He-O2 plasmas for excited atomic oxygen based chemistry.

  13. Flow Mediated Dilatation, Carotid Intima Media Thickness, Ankle Brachial Pressure Index and Pulse Pressure in Young Male Post Myocardial Infarction Patients in India

    PubMed Central

    Giri, Subhash; Rathi, Vinita; Ranga, Gajender Singh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Due to increase in Coronary Artery Disease (CAD) at a younger age, we should try to diagnose atherosclerotic process and population at risk, at the earliest. Flow Mediated Dilatation (FMD), Carotid Intima-Media Thickness (CIMT) and Ankle-Brachial Pressure Index (ABI) are probable markers for early atherosclerosis and may be useful in coronary risk stratification. Aim To compare and correlate the FMD, CIMT, ABI and Pulse Pressure (PP) in young male patients of Myocardial Infarction (MI) with age and sex matched healthy controls. Materials and Methods Eighty male patients of MI aged ≤45 years, who presented to the Cardiac Care Unit and Department of Medicine of Guru Teg Bahadur Hospital, Delhi, India, from November 2010 to April 2012 were recruited consecutively for this case control study and same number of age and sex matched healthy controls were also analyzed. Six weeks after MI, FMD of the brachial artery, intima media thickness of carotid artery, ABPI and PP were measured in the cases and compared with healthy controls. Results The FMD was lower among young patients of MI than controls (p<0.001). CIMT was higher among cases than controls (p=0.001). ABI was lower among cases than controls (p<0.001). Compared to controls, PP was higher among cases (p=0.001). In all subjects, a negative correlation between FMD and CIMT (r=–0.220, p=0.005) and a positive correlation between FMD and ABPI (r=0.304, p<0.001) was found. A statistically significant negative correlation was found between endothelial dependent FMD and PP among cases and control groups (r=–0.209, p=0.007). Conclusion Biophysical parameters were deranged in young post MI patients. Majority of our young male patients fell in low risk Framingham risk score but still they manifested with CAD. Despite six weeks of treatment among young male patients of MI, various biophysical parameters were still deranged. PMID:27891375

  14. Plasma effects on the generation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species in cancer cells in-vitro exposed by atmospheric pressure pulsed plasma jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sun Ja; Chung, T. H.

    2015-08-01

    Atmospheric pressure pulsed helium plasma jets are utilized for plasma-cell interactions. The effect of operating parameters such as applied voltage, pulse repetition frequency, and duty ratio on the generation of specific reactive oxygen and nitrogen species in gas and liquid phases and within cells is investigated. The apoptotic changes detected by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT)-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling assay in cells caused by plasma exposure are observed to correlate well with the levels of extracellular and intracellular reactive oxygen and nitrogen species.

  15. Phase and amplitude errors in FM radars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffiths, Hugh D.

    The constraints on phase and amplitude errors are determined for various types of FM radar by calculating the range sidelobe levels on the point target response due to the phase and amplitude modulation of the target echo. It is shown that under certain circumstances the constraints on phase linearity appropriate for conventional pulse compression radars are unnecessarily stringent, and quite large phase errors can be tolerated provided the relative delay of the local oscillator with respect to the target echo is small compared with the periodicity of the phase error characteristic. The constraints on amplitude flatness, however, are severe under almost all circumstances.

  16. MULTICHANNEL PULSE-HEIGHT ANALYZER

    DOEpatents

    Russell, J.T.; Lefevre, H.W.

    1958-01-21

    This patent deals with electronic computing circuits and more particularly to pulse-height analyzers used for classifying variable amplitude pulses into groups of different amplitudes. The device accomplishes this pulse allocation by by converting the pulses into frequencies corresponding to the amplitudes of the pulses, which frequencies are filtered in channels individually pretuned to a particular frequency and then detected and recorded in the responsive channel. This circuit substantially overcomes the disadvantages of prior annlyzers incorporating discriminators pre-set to respond to certain voltage levels, since small variation in component values is not as critical to satisfactory circuit operation.

  17. Statistical Investigations on Solar Wind Dynamic Pressure Pulses:Basic features and Their Impacts on Geosynchronous Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuo, Pingbing; Feng, Xueshang

    2016-07-01

    Solar wind dynamic pressure pulse (DPP) structures, across which the dynamic pressure abruptly changes over timescales from a few seconds to several minutes, are often observed in the near-Earth space environment. Recently we have developed a novel procedure that is able to rapidly identify the DPPs from the plasma data stream, and simultaneously define the transition region and smartly select the upstream and downstream region for analysis. The plasma data with high time-resolution from 3DP instrument on board the WIND spacecraft are inspected with this automatic DPP-searching code, and a complete list of solar wind DPPs of historic WIND observations are built up. We perform a statistical survey on the properties of DPPs near 1 AU based on this event list. It is found that overwhelming majority of DPPs are associated with the solar wind disturbances including the CME-related flows, the corotating interaction regions, as well as the complex ejecta. The annual variations of the averaged occurrence rate of DPPs are roughly in phase with the solar activities. Although the variabilities of geosynchronous magnetic fields (GMFs) due to the impact of positive DPPs have been well established, there appears no systematic investigations on the response of GMFs to negative DPPs. Here we also study the decompression/compression effects of very strong negative/positive DPPs on GMFs under northward IMFs. In response to the decompression of strong negative DPPs, GMFs on dayside, near the dawn and dusk on nightside are generally depressed. But near the midnight region, the responses of GMF are very diverse, being either positive or negative. For part of events when GOES is located at the midnight sector, GMF is found to abnormally increase as the result of magnetospheric decompression caused by negative DPPs. It is known that on certain conditions magnetic depression of nightside GMFs can be caused by the impact of positive DPPs. Statistically, both the decompression effect of

  18. Effect of dielectric material on bipolar nanosecond pulse diffuse dielectric barrier discharge in air at atmospheric pressure.

    PubMed

    Tang, Kai; Wang, Wenchun; Yang, Dezheng; Zhang, Shuai; Yang, Yang; Liu, Zhijie

    2013-08-01

    In this paper, dielectric plates made by ceramic, quartz and polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) respectively are employed to generate low gas temperature, diffuse dielectric barrier discharge plasma by using a needle-plate electrode configuration in air at atmospheric pressure. Both discharge images and the optical emission spectra are obtained while ceramic, quartz and PTFE are used as dielectric material. Plasma gas temperature is also calculated by comparing the experimental emission spectra with the best fitted spectra of N2 (C(3)Πu→B(3)Πg 1-3) and N2 (C(3)Πu→B(3)Πg 0-2). The effects of different pulse peak voltages and gas gap distances on the emission intensity of N2 (C(3)Πu→B(3)Πg, 0-0, 337.1 nm) and the plasma area on dielectric surface are investigated while ceramic, quartz and PTFE are used as dielectric material. It is found that the permittivity of dielectric material plays an important role in the discharge homogeneity, plasma gas temperature, emission spectra intensity of the discharge, etc. Dielectric with higher permittivity i.e., ceramic means brighter discharge luminosity and stronger emission spectra intensity of N2 (C(3)Πu→B(3)Πg, 0-0, 337.1 nm) among the three dielectric materials. However, more homogeneous, larger plasma area on dielectric surface and lower plasma gas temperature can be obtained under dielectric with lower permittivity i.e., PTFE. The emission spectra intensity and plasma gas temperature of the discharge while the dielectric plate is made by quartz are smaller than that while ceramic is used as dielectric material and bigger than that when PTFE is used as dielectric material.

  19. Pulse Arrival Time Based Cuff-Less and 24-H Wearable Blood Pressure Monitoring and its Diagnostic Value in Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yali; Poon, Carmen C Y; Yan, Bryan P; Lau, James Y W

    2016-09-01

    Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) has become an essential tool in the diagnosis and management of hypertension. Current standard ABPM devices use an oscillometric cuff-based method which can cause physical discomfort to the patients with repeated inflations and deflations, especially during nighttime leading to sleep disturbance. The ability to measure ambulatory BP accurately and comfortably without a cuff would be attractive. This study validated the accuracy of a cuff-less approach for ABPM using pulse arrival time (PAT) measurements on both healthy and hypertensive subjects for potential use in hypertensive management, which is the first of its kind. The wearable cuff-less device was evaluated against a standard cuff-based device on 24 subjects of which 15 have known hypertension. BP measurements were taken from each subject over a 24-h period by the cuff-less and cuff-based devices every 15 to 30 minutes during daily activities. Mean BP of each subject during daytime, nighttime and over 24-h were calculated. Agreement between mean nighttime systolic BP (SBP) and diastolic (DBP) measured by the two devices evaluated using Bland-Altman plot were -1.4 ± 6.6 and 0.4 ± 6.7 mmHg, respectively. Receiver operator characteristics (ROC) statistics was used to assess the diagnostic accuracy of the cuff-less approach in the detection of BP above the hypertension threshold during nighttime (>120/70 mmHg). The area under ROC curves were 0.975/0.79 for nighttime. The results suggest that PAT-based approach is accurate and promising for ABPM without the issue of sleep disturbances associated with cuff-based devices.

  20. Attenuation of systolic blood pressure and pulse transit time hysteresis during exercise and recovery in cardiovascular patients.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qing; Yan, Bryan P; Yu, Cheuk-Man; Zhang, Yuan-Ting; Poon, Carmen C Y

    2014-02-01

    Pulse transit time (PTT) is a cardiovascular parameter of emerging interest due to its potential to estimate blood pressure (BP) continuously and without a cuff. Both linear and nonlinear equations have been used in the estimation of BP based on PTT. This study, however, demonstrates that there is a hysteresis phenomenon between BP and PTT during and after dynamic exercise. A total of 46 subjects including 16 healthy subjects, 13 subjects with one or more cardiovascular risk factors, and 17 patients with cardiovascular disease underwent graded exercise stress test. PTT was measured from electrocardiogram and photoplethysmogram of the left index finger of the subject, i.e., a pathway that includes predominately aorta, brachial, and radial arteries. The results of this study showed that, for the same systolic BP (SBP), PTT measured during exercise was significantly larger than PTT measured during recovery for all subject groups. This hysteresis was further quantified as both normalized area bounded by the SBP-PTT relationship (AreaN) and SBP difference at PTT during peak exercise plus 20 ms (ΔSBP20). Significant attenuation of both AreaN (p <; 0.05) and ΔSBP20 (p <; 0.01) is observed in cardiovascular patients compared with healthy subjects, independent of resting BP. Since the SBP-PTT relationship are determined by the mechanical properties of arterial wall, which is predominately mediated by the sympathetic nervous system through altered vascular smooth muscle (VSM) tone during exercise, results of this study are consistent with the previous findings of autonomic nervous dysfunction in cardiovascular patients. We further conclude that VSM tone has a nonnegligible influence on the BP-PTT relationship and thus should be considered in the PTT-based BP estimation.

  1. Diagnostics of atmospheric-pressure pulsed-dc discharge with metal and liquid anodes by multiple laser-aided methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urabe, Keiichiro; Shirai, Naoki; Tomita, Kentaro; Akiyama, Tsuyoshi; Murakami, Tomoyuki

    2016-08-01

    The density and temperature of electrons and key heavy particles were measured in an atmospheric-pressure pulsed-dc helium discharge plasma with a nitrogen molecular impurity generated using system with a liquid or metal anode and a metal cathode. To obtain these parameters, we conducted experiments using several laser-aided methods: Thomson scattering spectroscopy to obtain the spatial profiles of electron density and temperature, Raman scattering spectroscopy to obtain the neutral molecular nitrogen rotational temperature, phase-modulated dispersion interferometry to determine the temporal variation of the electron density, and time-resolved laser absorption spectroscopy to analyze the temporal variation of the helium metastable atom density. The electron density and temperature measured by Thomson scattering varied from 2.4  ×  1014 cm-3 and 1.8 eV at the center of the discharge to 0.8  ×  1014 cm-3 and 1.5 eV near the outer edge of the plasma in the case of the metal anode, respectively. The electron density obtained with the liquid anode was approximately 20% smaller than that obtained with the metal anode, while the electron temperature was not significantly affected by the anode material. The molecular nitrogen rotational temperatures were 1200 K with the metal anode and 1650 K with the liquid anode at the outer edge of the plasma column. The density of helium metastable atoms decreased by a factor of two when using the liquid anode.

  2. Method of optical self-mixing for pulse wave transit time in comparison with other methods and correlation with blood pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meigas, Kalju; Lass, Jaanus; Kattai, Rain; Karai, Deniss; Kaik, Juri

    2004-07-01

    This paper is a part of research to develop convenient method for continuous monitoring of arterial blood pressure by non-invasive and non-oscillometric way. A simple optical method, using self-mixing in a diode laser, is used for detection of skin surface vibrations near the artery. These vibrations, which can reveal the pulsate propagation of blood pressure waves along the vasculature, are used for pulse wave registration. The registration of the Pulse Wave Transit Time (PWTT) is based on computing the time delay in different regions of the human body using an ECG as a reference signal. In this study, the comparison of method of optical self-mixing with other methods as photoplethysmographic (PPG) and bioimpedance (BI) for PWTT is done. Also correlation of PWTT, obtained with different methods, with arterial blood pressure is calculated. In our study, we used a group of volunteers (34 persons) who made the bicycle exercise test. The test consisted of cycling sessions of increasing workloads during which the HR changed from 60 to 180 beats per minute. In addition, a blood pressure (NIBP) was registered with standard sphygmomanometer once per minute during the test and all NIBP measurement values were synchronized to other signals to find exact time moments where the systolic blood pressure was detected (Korotkoff sounds starting point). Computer later interpolated the blood pressure signal in order to get individual value for every heart cycle. The other signals were measured continuously during all tests. At the end of every session, a recovery period was included until person's NIBP and heart rate (HR) normalized. As a result of our study it turned out that time intervals that were calculated from plethysmographic (PPG) waveforms were in the best correlation with systolic blood pressure. The diastolic pressure does not correlate with any of the parameters representing PWTT. The pulse wave signals measured by laser and piezoelectric transducer are very similar

  3. Femtosecond-pulsed laser micromachining of a 4H SiC wafer for MEMS pressure sensor diaphragms and via holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Yuanyuan; Nair, Rajeev; Molian, Raathai; Molian, Pal

    2008-03-01

    The challenging issues in conventional microfabrication of SiC pressure sensor diaphragms from bulk wafers are low etch rates, thicker (>40 µm) diaphragms, low spatial resolutions, rough surfaces and substantial contamination. In via hole drilling of SiC, the critical concern is the low drilling speed (nm per minute). In this work, femtosecond (fs)-pulsed laser ablation was conducted to overcome some of these deficiencies. Circular diaphragms (0.5 to 1 mm) by trepanning mode and via holes (30-50 µm) by percussion drilling mode were micromachined in 250 µm thick 4H-SiC single crystals using an 800 nm wavelength, 120 fs, 1 mJ Ti:sapphire laser. Pulse energy, number of pulses and scan rate were varied to obtain a high etch rate and high quality features. Results showed that the etch rates are 2-10 µm per pulse, diaphragm thicknesses are 20-200 µm, surface roughness is 1-2 µm Ra and via hole drilling speeds are up to 25 µm per second. The etch depth control was well within ± 1%. High aspect ratio features with excellent spatial resolutions were obtained due to the absence of thermal damages such as a recast layer and contamination. Thus, femtosecond-pulsed laser ablation by virtue of its unique characteristics such as multiphoton ionization and the absence of lattice heating offers high speed, precision and accuracy in micromachining 4H-SiC wafers.

  4. Absolute atomic oxygen density measurements for nanosecond-pulsed atmospheric-pressure plasma jets using two-photon absorption laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, C.; Carter, C.

    2014-12-01

    Nanosecond-pulsed plasma jets that are generated under ambient air conditions and free from confinement of electrodes have become of great interest in recent years due to their promising applications in medicine and dentistry. Reactive oxygen species that are generated by nanosecond-pulsed, room-temperature non-equilibrium He-O2 plasma jets among others are believed to play an important role during the bactericidal or sterilization processes. We report here absolute measurements of atomic oxygen density in a 1 mm-diameter He/(1%)O2 plasma jet at atmospheric pressure using two-photon absorption laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy. Oxygen number density on the order of 1013 cm-3 was obtained in a 150 ns, 6 kV single-pulsed plasma jet for an axial distance up to 5 mm above the device nozzle. Temporally resolved O density measurements showed that there are two maxima, separated in time by 60-70 µs, and a total pulse duration of 260-300 µs. Electrostatic modeling indicated that there are high-electric-field regions near the nozzle exit that may be responsible for the observed temporal behavior of the O production. Both the field-distribution-based estimation of the time interval for the O number density profile and a pulse-energy-dependence study confirmed that electric-field-dependent, direct and indirect electron-induced processes play important roles for O production.

  5. X-ray and runaway electron generation in repetitive pulsed discharges in atmospheric pressure air with a point-to-plane gap

    SciTech Connect

    Shao Tao; Yan Ping; Tarasenko, Victor F.; Shut'ko, Yuliya V.; Zhang Cheng

    2011-05-15

    In this paper, using two repetitive nanosecond generators, x-rays were detected in atmospheric air with a highly inhomogeneous electric field by a point-to- plane gap. The rise times of the generators were about 15 and 1 ns. The x-rays were directly measured by various dosimeters and a NaI scintillator with a photomultiplier tube. X-rays were detected in the continuous mode at pulse repetition frequency up to 1 kHz and a voltage pulse rise time of {approx}15 ns. It is shown that the maximum x-ray intensity is attainable at different pulse repetition frequencies depending on the voltage pulse parameters and cathode design. In atmospheric pressure air the x-ray intensity is found to increase with increasing the pulse repetition frequency up to 1 kHz. It is confirmed that the maximum x-ray intensity is attained in a diffuse discharge in a point-to-plane gap.

  6. Source-to-sensation level ratio of transmitted biosonar pulses in an echolocating false killer whale.

    PubMed

    Supin, Alexander Ya; Nachtigall, Paul E; Breese, Marlee

    2006-07-01

    Transmitted biosonar pulses, and the brain auditory evoked potentials (AEPs) associated with those pulses, were synchronously recorded in a false killer whale Pseudorca crassidens trained to accept suction-cup EEG electrodes and to detect targets by echolocation. AEP amplitude was investigated as a function of the transmitted biosonar pulse source level. For that, a few thousand of the individual AEP records were sorted according to the spontaneously varied amplitude of synchronously recorded biosonar pulses. In each of the sorting bins (in 5-dB steps) AEP records were averaged to extract AEP from noise; AEP amplitude was plotted as a function of the biosonar pulse source level. For comparison, AEPs were recorded to external (in free field) sound pulses of a waveform and spectrum similar to those of the biosonar pulses; amplitude of these AEPs was plotted as a function of sound pressure level. A comparison of these two functions has shown that, depending on the presence or absence of a target, the sensitivity of the whale's hearing to its own transmitted biosonar pulses was 30 to 45 dB lower than might be expected in a free acoustic field.

  7. Effect of pressure pulses at the interface valve on the stability of second dimension columns in online comprehensive two-dimensional liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Talus, Eric S; Witt, Klaus E; Stoll, Dwight R

    2015-01-23

    Users of online comprehensive two-dimensional liquid chromatography (LCxLC) frequently acknowledge that the mechanical instability of HPLC columns installed in these systems, particularly in the second dimension, is a significant impediment to its use. Such instability is not surprising given the strenuous operating environment to which these columns are subjected, including the large number (thousands per day) of fast and large pressure pulses resulting from interface valve switches (on the timescale of tens of milliseconds) associated with very fast second dimension separations. There appear to be no published reports of systematic studies of the relationship between second dimension column lifetime and any of these variables. In this study we focused on the relationship between the lifetimes of commercially available columns and the pressure pulses observed at the inlet of the second dimension column that occur during the switching of the valve that interfaces the two dimensions of a LCxLC system. We find that the magnitude of the pressure drop at the inlet of the second dimension column during the valve switch, which may vary between 10 and 95% of the column inlet pressure, is dependent on valve switching speed and design, and has a dramatic impact on column lifetime. In the worst case, columns fail within the first few hours of use in an LCxLC system. In the best case, using a valve that exhibits much smaller pressure pulses, the same columns exhibit much improved lifetimes and have been used continuously under LCxLC conditions for several days with no degradation in performance. This result represents a first step in understanding the factors that affect second dimension column lifetime, and will significantly improve the usability of the LCxLC technique in general.

  8. Point source of UV-radiation with a frequency of 1 khz and short pulse duration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baksht, E. Kh.; Tarasenko, V. F.; Shut'ko, Yu. V.; Erofeev, M. V.

    2012-04-01

    Radiation of the discharge plasma from a nanosecond breakdown in a nonuniform electric field of short interelectrode gaps is investigated. Voltage pulses with incident wave amplitude of ~10 kV, pulse duration of ~1 ns (FWHM), and pulse front duration of ~0.2 ns are used. It is demonstrated that for pulsed-periodic breakdown of the gap 0.5 mm long in air at atmospheric pressure, the main contribution to plasma radiation give lines of the electrode material and the continuum, and the maximum radiation intensity is registered in the region of 200-300 nm, where ~40% of total radiation energy is concentrated.

  9. X-ray emission from a nanosecond-pulse discharge in an inhomogeneous electric field at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Cheng; Shao, Tao; Tarasenko, Victor; Ma, Hao; Ren, Chengyan; Kostyrya, Igor D.; Zhang, Dongdong; Yan, Ping

    2012-12-01

    This paper describes experimental studies of the dependence of the X-ray intensity on the anode material in nanosecond high-voltage discharges. The discharges were generated by two nanosecond-pulse generators in atmospheric air with a highly inhomogeneous electric field by a tube-plate gap. The output pulse of the first generator (repetitive pulse generator) has a rise time of about 15 ns and a full width at half maximum of 30-40 ns. The output of the second generator (single pulse generator) has a rise time of about 0.3 ns and a full width at half maximum of 1 ns. The electrical characteristics and the X-ray emission of nanosecond-pulse discharge in atmospheric air are studied by the measurement of voltage-current waveforms, discharge images, X-ray count and dose. Our experimental results showed that the anode material rarely affects electrical characteristics, but it can significantly affect the X-ray density. Comparing the density of X-rays, it was shown that the highest x-rays density occurred in the diffuse discharge in repetitive pulse mode, then the spark discharge with a small air gap, and then the corona discharge with a large air gap, in which the X-ray density was the lowest. Therefore, it could be confirmed that the bremsstrahlung at the anode contributes to the X-ray emission from nanosecond-pulse discharges.

  10. X-ray emission from a nanosecond-pulse discharge in an inhomogeneous electric field at atmospheric pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Cheng; Shao Tao; Ren Chengyan; Zhang Dongdong; Tarasenko, Victor; Kostyrya, Igor D.; Ma Hao; Yan Ping

    2012-12-15

    This paper describes experimental studies of the dependence of the X-ray intensity on the anode material in nanosecond high-voltage discharges. The discharges were generated by two nanosecond-pulse generators in atmospheric air with a highly inhomogeneous electric field by a tube-plate gap. The output pulse of the first generator (repetitive pulse generator) has a rise time of about 15 ns and a full width at half maximum of 30-40 ns. The output of the second generator (single pulse generator) has a rise time of about 0.3 ns and a full width at half maximum of 1 ns. The electrical characteristics and the X-ray emission of nanosecond-pulse discharge in atmospheric air are studied by the measurement of voltage-current waveforms, discharge images, X-ray count and dose. Our experimental results showed that the anode material rarely affects electrical characteristics, but it can significantly affect the X-ray density. Comparing the density of X-rays, it was shown that the highest x-rays density occurred in the diffuse discharge in repetitive pulse mode, then the spark discharge with a small air gap, and then the corona discharge with a large air gap, in which the X-ray density was the lowest. Therefore, it could be confirmed that the bremsstrahlung at the anode contributes to the X-ray emission from nanosecond-pulse discharges.

  11. Aerovalve pulse combustion: Technical note

    SciTech Connect

    Richards, G.A.; Gemmen, R.S.; Narayanaswami, L.

    1994-07-01

    The authors present a mathematical model and an experimental investigation of aerodynamically valved pulse combustion. The model uses a control-volume approach to solve conservation laws in several regions of a pulse combustor. Mixing between the fresh charge and combustion products is modeled as a two-step process, with the mixing occurring slowly for a specified eddy time during each cycle, and then changing to a higher rate. Results of model simulations demonstrate that eddy time plays a significant role in determining the frequency and amplitude of combustion oscillation. The authors show that short eddy times produce steady, rather than pulsating, combustion. And they show that changes to the mixing process alter the temperature-species history of combustion gases in a manner that could prevent or promote the formation of nitrogen oxides, depending on specific mixing rates. The relatively simple control-volume approach used in this model allows rapid investigation of a wide range of geometric and operating parameters, and also defines characteristic length and time scales relevant to aerovalve pulse combustion. Experimental measurements compare favorably to model predictions. The authors place particular emphasis on time-averaged pressure differences through the combustor, which act as an indicator of pressure gain performance. They investigate both operating conditions and combustor geometry, and they show that a complex interaction between the inlet and exit flows of a combustor makes it difficult to produce general correlations among the various parameters. They use a scaling rule to produce a combustor geometry capable of producing pressure gain.

  12. Experimental and numerical investigations of air plasmas induced by multi-MeV pulsed X-ray from low to atmospheric pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maulois, Mélissa; Ribière, Maxime; Eichwald, Olivier; Yousfi, Mohammed; Pouzalgues, Romain; Garrigues, Alain; Delbos, Christophe; Azaïs, Bruno

    2016-09-01

    This research work is devoted to the experimental and theoretical analysis of air plasmas induced by multi-MeV pulsed X-ray for a large pressure range of humid air background gas varying from 20 mbar to atmospheric pressure. The time evolution of the electron density of the air plasma is determined by electromagnetic wave absorption measurements. The measurements have uncertainties of about ±30%, taking into account the precision of the dose measurement and also the shot to shot fluctuations of the generator. The experimental electron density is obtained by comparing the measurements of the transmitted microwave signals to the calculated ones. The calculations need the knowledge of the time evolution of the electron mean energy, which is determined by a chemical kinetic model based on a reaction scheme involving 39 species interacting following 265 reactions. During the X-ray pulse, a good agreement is obtained between time evolution of the electron density obtained from absorption measurements and calculations based on the kinetic model. The relative deviation on the maximum electron density and the corresponding plasma frequency is always lower than 10%. The maximum electron density varies from 4 × 1011 to 3.5 × 1013 cm-3 between 30 mbar to atmospheric pressure, while the peak of the electron mean energy decreases from 5.64 eV to 4.27 eV in the same pressure range.

  13. Early prediction of new-onset diabetes mellitus by fifth-day fasting plasma glucose, pulse pressure, and proteinuria.

    PubMed

    Rodrigo, E; Santos, L; Piñera, C; Quintanar, J A; Ruiz, J C; Fernández-Fresnedo, G; Palomar, R; Gómez-Alamillo, C; Arias, M

    2011-01-01

    Renal transplant recipients are at high risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). New-onset diabetes mellitus after transplantation (NODAT) contributes to the risk of CVD, reducing graft and patient survival. To improve outcome of kidney transplant recipients, it is of great interest to identify those patients who will develop NODAT. The aim of our study was to explore the predictive value of fifth-day fasting plasma glucose (FPG), third-month proteinuria, and pulse pressure (PP) for NODAT development. We analyzed 282 non-previously-diabetic kidney transplants in our center. Fifth-day FPG, PP, and third-month 24-hour proteinuria were collected. NODAT was defined at month 12 according to the "consensus guidelines": symptoms of diabetes plus casual glucose concentrations ≥ 200 mg/dL or FPG ≥ 126 mg/dL. Some 46 patients (16.3%) developed NODAT at month 12. Fifth-day FPG (133 ± 35 vs 108 ± 16 mg/dL, P < .001) and PP (57 ± 17 vs 49 ± 15 mm Hg, P = .007) were significantly higher in patients at risk for NODAT, but there was no difference in third-month proteinuria (652 ± 959 vs 472 ± 1336 mg, P = .390). A multivariate regression model showed an increased risk for NODAT associated with recipient age, body mass index, smoking habit, and a fifth-day FPG ≥ 126 mg/dL (relative risk 4.784, 95% confidence interval 2.121-10.788, P = .0002). The negative predictive value of a fifth-day FPG ≥ 126 mg/dL for predicting 1-year NODAT was 89.4%. Fifth-day FPG was independently related to NODAT development. The detection of a fifth-day FPG ≥ 126 mg/dL increases the risk of suffering NODAT more than 4 times. Fifth-day FPG < 126 mg/dL allows us to identify a transplant population with a low risk (near 10%) for NODAT.

  14. Influence of oxygen pressure and aging on LaAlO{sub 3} films grown by pulsed laser deposition on SrTiO{sub 3} substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Jihwey; Aeppli, Gabriel; Soh, Yeong-Ah; David, Adrian; Lin, Weinan; Wu, Tom

    2014-02-24

    The crystal structures of LaAlO{sub 3} films grown by pulsed laser deposition on SrTiO{sub 3} substrates at oxygen pressure of 10{sup −3} millibars or 10{sup −5} millibars, where kinetics of ablated species hardly depend on oxygen background pressure, are compared. Our results show that the interface between LaAlO{sub 3} and SrTiO{sub 3} is sharper when the oxygen pressure is lower. Over time, the formation of various crystalline phases is observed while the crystalline thickness of the LaAlO{sub 3} layer remains unchanged. X-ray scattering as well as atomic force microscopy measurements indicate three-dimensional growth of such phases, which appear to be fed from an amorphous capping layer present in as-grown samples.

  15. Pressure-Application Device for Testing Pressure Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    A portable pressure-application device has been designed and built for use in testing and calibrating piezoelectric pressure transducers in the field. The device generates pressure pulses of known amplitude. A pressure pulse (in contradistinction to a steady pressure) is needed because in the presence of a steady pressure, the electrical output of a piezoelectric pressure transducer decays rapidly with time. The device includes a stainless- steel compressed-air-storage cylinder of 500 cu cm volume. A manual hand pump with check valves and a pressure gauge are located at one end of the cylinder. A three-way solenoid valve that controls the release of pressurized air is located at the other end of the cylinder. Power for the device is provided by a 3.7-V cordless-telephone battery. The valve is controlled by means of a pushbutton switch, which activates a 5 V to +/-15 V DC-to-DC converter that powers the solenoid. The outlet of the solenoid valve is connected to the pressure transducer to be tested. Before the solenoid is energized, the transducer to be tested is at atmospheric pressure. When the solenoid is actuated by the push button, pressurized air from inside the cylinder is applied to the transducer. Once the pushbutton is released, the cylinder pressure is removed from the transducer and the pressurized air applied to the transducer is vented, bringing the transducer back to atmospheric pressure. Before this device was used for actual calibration, its accuracy was checked with a NIST (National Institute of Standards and Technology) traceable calibrator and commercially calibrated pressure transducers. This work was done by Wanda Solano of Stennis Space Center and Greg Richardson of Lockheed Martin Corp.

  16. Three-electrode low pressure discharge apparatus and method for uniform ionization of gaseous media. [CO/sub 2/ laser oscillator and pulse smoother

    DOEpatents

    McLellan, E.J.

    1980-10-17

    Uniform, transverse electrical discharges are produced in gaseous media without the necessity of switching the main discharge voltage with an external device which carries the entire discharge current. A three-electrode low pressure discharge tube is charged across its anode and cathode to below breakdown voltage using a dc voltage source. An array of resistors or capacitors can be made to discharge to the wire screen anode by means of a low energy high voltage pulse circuit producing sufficient preionization in the region between the anode and cathode to initiate and control the main discharge. The invention has been demonstrated to be useful as a CO/sub 2/ laser oscillator and pulse-smoother. It can be reliably operated in the sealed-off mode.

  17. A Fast Multimodal Ectopic Beat Detection Method Applied for Blood Pressure Estimation Based on Pulse Wave Velocity Measurements in Wearable Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Pflugradt, Maik; Geissdoerfer, Kai; Goernig, Matthias; Orglmeister, Reinhold

    2017-01-01

    Automatic detection of ectopic beats has become a thoroughly researched topic, with literature providing manifold proposals typically incorporating morphological analysis of the electrocardiogram (ECG). Although being well understood, its utilization is often neglected, especially in practical monitoring situations like online evaluation of signals acquired in wearable sensors. Continuous blood pressure estimation based on pulse wave velocity considerations is a prominent example, which depends on careful fiducial point extraction and is therefore seriously affected during periods of increased occurring extrasystoles. In the scope of this work, a novel ectopic beat discriminator with low computational complexity has been developed, which takes advantage of multimodal features derived from ECG and pulse wave relating measurements, thereby providing additional information on the underlying cardiac activity. Moreover, the blood pressure estimations’ vulnerability towards ectopic beats is closely examined on records drawn from the Physionet database as well as signals recorded in a small field study conducted in a geriatric facility for the elderly. It turns out that a reliable extrasystole identification is essential to unsupervised blood pressure estimation, having a significant impact on the overall accuracy. The proposed method further convinces by its applicability to battery driven hardware systems with limited processing power and is a favorable choice when access to multimodal signal features is given anyway. PMID:28098831

  18. PULSED INDICATOR CIRCUIT

    DOEpatents

    Linlor, W.I.; Kerns, Q.A.

    1960-11-15

    A system is given for detecting incremental changes in a transducer impedance terminating a transmission line. Principal novelty resides in the transducer impedance terminating the line in a mismatch and a pulse generator being provided to apply discrete pulses to the input end of the line. The amplitudes of the pulses reflected to the input end of the line from the mismatched transducer impedance are then observed as a very accurate measure of the instantaneous value of the latter.

  19. Real topological string amplitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narain, K. S.; Piazzalunga, N.; Tanzini, A.

    2017-03-01

    We discuss the physical superstring correlation functions in type I theory (or equivalently type II with orientifold) that compute real topological string amplitudes. We consider the correlator corresponding to holomorphic derivative of the real topological amplitude G_{χ } , at fixed worldsheet Euler characteristic χ. This corresponds in the low-energy effective action to N=2 Weyl multiplet, appropriately reduced to the orientifold invariant part, and raised to the power g' = -χ + 1. We show that the physical string correlator gives precisely the holomorphic derivative of topological amplitude. Finally, we apply this method to the standard closed oriented case as well, and prove a similar statement for the topological amplitude F_g.

  20. Shaping Transmitted Pulses To Provide Synchronizing Signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Satorius, Edgar H.; Mulligan, James J.

    1994-01-01

    Report presents theoretical analysis of relationships among: shapes and bandwidths of data pulses in pulse-amplitude modulation (PAM) and quadrature amplitude modulation (QAM); pulse-repetition rates (baud rates); and presence or absence of sinusoidal baud-frequency components in envelopes (magnitudes) of overall received signals.

  1. The influence of oxygen partial pressure on material properties of Eu3+-doped Y2O2S thin film deposited by Pulsed Laser Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, A. G.; Dejene, B. F.; Swart, H. C.

    2016-01-01

    Eu3+-doping has been of interest to improve the luminescent characteristics of thin-film phosphors. Y2O2S:Eu3+ films have been grown on Si (100) substrates by using a Pulsed Laser Deposition technique. The thin films grown under different oxygen deposition pressure conditions have been characterized using structural and luminescent measurements. The X-ray diffraction patterns showed mixed phases of cubic and hexagonal crystal structures. As the oxygen partial pressure increased, the crystallinity of the films improved. Further increase of the O2 pressure to 140 mtorr reduced the crystallinity of the film. Similarly, both scanning electron microscopy and Atomic Force Microscopy confirmed that an increase in O2 pressure affected the morphology of the films. The average band gap of the films calculated from diffuse reflectance spectra using the Kubelka-Munk function was about 4.75 eV. The photoluminescence measurements indicated red emission of Y2O2S:Eu3+ thin films with the most intense peak appearing at 619 nm, which is assigned to the 5D0-7F2 transition of Eu3+. This most intense peak was totally quenched at higher O2 pressures. This phosphor may be a promising material for applications in the flat panel displays.

  2. Response of transonic diffuser flows to abrupt increases of back pressure: Wall pressure measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogar, T. J.; Sajben, M.

    1986-10-01

    The propagation of compression pulses in a supercritically operated transonic diffuser was investigated by use of pressure measurements along the top wall of the model. The pulses were generated at the downstream end of the diffuser by the abrupt injection of a secondary flow of air. Two types of waves were observed: (1) an upstream-traveling acoustic wave and (2) a downstream-traveling convective wave which resulted from the impingement of the acoustic wave on the shock. Wave speeds were determined for a range of diffuser pressure ratios including separated, strong-shock flows and fully attached, weak-shock flows. Streamwise distributions of initial and reflected pulse amplitudes were determined for one weak and one strong-shock case over a 3-to-1 range of initial pulse strengths.

  3. Characterization of chemical contaminants and their spectral properties from an atmospheric pressure ns-pulsed microdischarge in neon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sillerud, Colin H.; Schwindt, Peter D. D.; Moorman, Mathew; Yee, B. T.; Anderson, John; Pfeifer, Nathaniel B.; Hedberg, E. L.; Manginell, Ronald P.

    2017-03-01

    Portable applications of microdischarges, such as the remediation of gaseous wastes or the destruction of volatile organic compounds, will mandate operation in the presence of contaminant species. This paper examines the temporal evolution of microdischarge optical and ultraviolet emissions during pulsed operation by experimental methods. By varying the pulse length of a microdischarge initiated in a 4-hole silicon microcavity array operating in a 655 Torr ambient primarily composed of Ne, we were able to measure the emission growth rates for different contaminant species native to the discharge environment as a function of pulse length. It was found that emission from hydrogen and oxygen impurities demonstrated similar rates of change, while emissions from molecular and atomic nitrogen, measured at 337.1 and 120 nm, respectively, exhibited the lowest rate of change. We conclude that it is likely that O2 undergoes the same resonant energy transfer process between rare gas excimers that has been shown for H2. Further, efficient resonant processes were found to be favored during ignition and extinction phases of the pulse, while emission at the 337.1 nm line from N2 was favored during the intermediate stage of the plasma. In addition to the experimental results, a zero-dimensional analysis is also presented to further understand the nature of the microdischarge.

  4. Quasi-monoenergetic ion generation by hole-boring radiation pressure acceleration in inhomogeneous plasmas using tailored laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Weng, S. M. Murakami, M.; Azechi, H.; Wang, J. W.; Tasoko, N.; Chen, M.; Sheng, Z. M.; Mulser, P.; Yu, W.; Shen, B. F.

    2014-01-15

    It is proposed that laser hole-boring at a steady speed in inhomogeneous overdense plasma can be realized by the use of temporally tailored intense laser pulses, producing high-fluence quasi-monoenergetic ion beams. A general temporal profile of such laser pulses is formulated for arbitrary plasma density distribution. As an example, for a precompressed deuterium-tritium fusion target with an exponentially increasing density profile, its matched laser profile for steady hole-boring is given theoretically and verified numerically by particle-in-cell simulations. Furthermore, we propose to achieve fast ignition by the in-situ hole-boring accelerated ions using a tailored laser pulse. Simulations show that the effective energy fluence, conversion efficiency, energy spread, and collimation of the resulting ion beam can be significantly improved as compared to those found with un-tailored laser profiles. For the fusion fuel with an areal density of 1.5 g cm{sup –2}, simulation indicates that it is promising to realize fast ion ignition by using a tailored driver pulse with energy about 65 kJ.

  5. Effect of oxygen partial pressure on structural and optical properties of pulsed laser deposited CaBi4Ti4O15 thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emani, Sivanagi Reddy; Raju, K. C. James

    2017-03-01

    The influence of oxygen partial pressure (OPP) on the structural and optical properties of CaBi4Ti4O15 (CBTi) thin films deposited by pulsed laser deposition have been investigated in the range of 0.1 mbar to 7.8 × 10-3 mbar. The structural properties show all the films are polycystlline in nature with orthorombic structure. The optical transmission of the films is in the range of 60-90%. A slight shift in transmission threshold towards higher wavelength region with an increase in O2 pressure reveals the systematic reduction in the optical band gap energy (3.69 to 3.59 eV) of the films. Raman studies confirm the phase formation and presence of stresses in the films. It is suggested that the OPP played a key role in controlling crystallinity, morphology, chemical composition and optical properties in CBTi thin films.

  6. Simulations of atmospheric pressure discharge in a high-voltage nanosecond pulse using the particle-in-cell Monte Carlo collision model in noble gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Feng; Wang, Dezhen; Ren, Chunsheng

    2008-06-01

    Atmospheric pressure discharge nonequilibrium plasmas have been applied to plasma processing with modern technology. Simulations of discharge in pure Ar and pure He gases at one atmospheric pressure by a high voltage trapezoidal nanosecond pulse have been performed using a one-dimensional particle-in-cell Monte Carlo collision (PIC-MCC) model coupled with a renormalization and weighting procedure (mapping algorithm). Numerical results show that the characteristics of discharge in both inert gases are very similar. There exist the effects of local reverse field and double-peak distributions of charged particles' density. The electron and ion energy distribution functions are also observed, and the discharge is concluded in the view of ionization avalanche in number. Furthermore, the independence of total current density is a function of time, but not of position.

  7. Pressure dependency of aortic pulse wave velocity in vivo is not affected by vasoactive substances that alter aortic wall tension ex vivo.

    PubMed

    Butlin, Mark; Lindesay, George; Viegas, Kayla D; Avolio, Alberto P

    2015-05-15

    Aortic stiffness, a predictive parameter in cardiovascular medicine, is blood pressure dependent and experimentally requires isobaric measurement for meaningful comparison. Vasoactive drug administration to change peripheral resistance and blood pressure allows such isobaric comparison but may alter large conduit artery wall tension, directly changing aortic stiffness. This study quantifies effects of sodium nitroprusside (SNP, vasodilator) and phenylephrine (PE, vasoconstrictor) on aortic stiffness measured by aortic pulse wave velocity (aPWV) assessed by invasive pressure catheterization in anaesthetized Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 7). This was compared with nondrug-dependent alteration of blood pressure through reduced venous return induced by partial vena cava occlusion. In vivo drug concentration was estimated by modeling clearance rates. Ex vivo responses of excised thoracic and abdominal aortic rings to drugs was measured using myography. SNP administration did not alter aPWV compared with venous occlusion (P = 0.21-0.87). There was a 5% difference in aPWV with PE administration compared with venous occlusion (P < 0.05). The estimated in vivo maximum concentration of PE (7.0 ± 1.8 ×10(-7) M) and SNP (4.2 ± 0.6 ×10(-7) M) caused ex vivo equivalent contraction of 52 mmHg (thoracic) and 112 mmHg (abdominal) and relaxation of 96% (both abdominal and thoracic), respectively, despite having a negligible effect on aPWV in vivo. This study demonstrates that vasoactive drugs administered to alter systemic blood pressure have a negligible effect on aPWV and provide a useful tool to study pressure-normalized and pressure-dependent aPWV in large conduit arteries in vivo. However, similar drug concentrations affect aortic ring wall tension ex vivo. Future studies investigating in vivo and ex vivo kinetics will need to elucidate mechanisms for this marked difference.

  8. Enhancement of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) Detection limit using a low-pressure and short-pulse laser-induced plasma process.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhen Zhen; Deguchi, Yoshihiro; Kuwahara, Masakazu; Yan, Jun Jie; Liu, Ji Ping

    2013-11-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) technology is an appealing technique compared with many other types of elemental analysis because of the fast response, high sensitivity, real-time, and noncontact features. One of the challenging targets of LIBS is the enhancement of the detection limit. In this study, the detection limit of gas-phase LIBS analysis has been improved by controlling the pressure and laser pulse width. In order to verify this method, low-pressure gas plasma was induced using nanosecond and picosecond lasers. The method was applied to the detection of Hg. The emission intensity ratio of the Hg atom to NO (IHg/INO) was analyzed to evaluate the LIBS detection limit because the NO emission (interference signal) was formed during the plasma generation and cooling process of N2 and O2 in the air. It was demonstrated that the enhancement of IHg/INO arose by decreasing the pressure to a few kilopascals, and the IHg/INO of the picosecond breakdown was always much higher than that of the nanosecond breakdown at low buffer gas pressure. Enhancement of IHg/INO increased more than 10 times at 700 Pa using picosecond laser with 35 ps pulse width. The detection limit was enhanced to 0.03 ppm (parts per million). We also saw that the spectra from the center and edge parts of plasma showed different features. Comparing the central spectra with the edge spectra, IHg/INO of the edge spectra was higher than that of the central spectra using the picosecond laser breakdown process.

  9. Multi-satellite simultaneous observations of magnetopause and atmospheric losses of radiation belt electrons during an intense solar wind dynamic pressure pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang, Zheng; Ni, Binbin; Zhou, Chen; Zou, Zhengyang; Gu, Xudong; Zhao, Zhengyu; Zhang, Xianguo; Zhang, Xiaoxin; Zhang, Shenyi; Li, Xinlin; Zuo, Pingbing; Spence, Harlan; Reeves, Geoffrey

    2016-05-03

    Radiation belt electron flux dropouts are a kind of drastic variation in the Earth's magnetosphere, understanding of which is of both scientific and societal importance. We report multi-satellite simultaneous observations of magnetopause and atmospheric losses of radiation belt electrons during an event of intense solar wind dynamic pressure pulse, using electron flux data from a group of 14 satellites. Moreover, when the pulse occurred, magnetopause and atmospheric loss could take effect concurrently contributing to the electron flux dropout. Losses through the magnetopause were observed to be efficient and significant at L ≳ 5, owing to the magnetopause intrusion into L ~6 and outward radial diffusion associated with sharp negative gradient in electron phase space density. Losses to the atmosphere were directly identified from the precipitating electron flux observations, for which pitch angle scattering by plasma waves could be mainly responsible. While the convection and substorm injections strongly enhanced the energetic electron fluxes up to hundreds of keV, they could delay other than avoid the occurrence of electron flux dropout at these energies. Finally, we demonstrate that the pulse-time radiation belt electron flux dropout depends strongly on the specific interplanetary and magnetospheric conditions and that losses through the magnetopause and to the atmosphere and enhancements of substorm injection play an essential role in combination, which should be incorporated as a whole into future simulations for comprehending the nature of radiation belt electron flux dropouts.

  10. Multi-satellite simultaneous observations of magnetopause and atmospheric losses of radiation belt electrons during an intense solar wind dynamic pressure pulse

    DOE PAGES

    Xiang, Zheng; Ni, Binbin; Zhou, Chen; ...

    2016-05-03

    Radiation belt electron flux dropouts are a kind of drastic variation in the Earth's magnetosphere, understanding of which is of both scientific and societal importance. We report multi-satellite simultaneous observations of magnetopause and atmospheric losses of radiation belt electrons during an event of intense solar wind dynamic pressure pulse, using electron flux data from a group of 14 satellites. Moreover, when the pulse occurred, magnetopause and atmospheric loss could take effect concurrently contributing to the electron flux dropout. Losses through the magnetopause were observed to be efficient and significant at L ≳ 5, owing to the magnetopause intrusion into Lmore » ~6 and outward radial diffusion associated with sharp negative gradient in electron phase space density. Losses to the atmosphere were directly identified from the precipitating electron flux observations, for which pitch angle scattering by plasma waves could be mainly responsible. While the convection and substorm injections strongly enhanced the energetic electron fluxes up to hundreds of keV, they could delay other than avoid the occurrence of electron flux dropout at these energies. Finally, we demonstrate that the pulse-time radiation belt electron flux dropout depends strongly on the specific interplanetary and magnetospheric conditions and that losses through the magnetopause and to the atmosphere and enhancements of substorm injection play an essential role in combination, which should be incorporated as a whole into future simulations for comprehending the nature of radiation belt electron flux dropouts.« less

  11. The influence of radiative heat exchange on the character of gasdynamic flows under conditions of pulsed discharge in high-pressure cesium vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baksht, F. G.; Lapshin, V. F.

    2015-01-01

    The gasdynamics of pulse-periodic radiative discharge in high-pressure cesium vapor has been studied in the framework of a two-temperature multifluid model. It is established that, at a limited volume of the gas-discharge tube, the character of gasdynamic flows depends on the conditions of radiative heat exchange in discharge plasma. In cases in which the main contribution to radiative energy losses is related to a spectral region with optical thickness τ R (λ) ˜ 1, there is nonlocal radiative heat exchange in discharge plasma, which is uniformly heated over the entire tube volume and moves from the discharge axis to tube walls during the entire pulse of discharge current. Under the conditions of radiative losses determined by the spectral region where τ R (λ) ≪ 1, the reabsorption of radiation is absent and discharge plasma is nonuniformly heated by the current pulse. This leads to the appearance of reverse motions, so that the heated plasma is partly pushed toward the tube walls and partly returned to the discharge axis.

  12. Cross-Channel Amplitude Sweeps Are Crucial to Speech Intelligibility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prendergast, Garreth; Green, Gary G. R.

    2012-01-01

    Classical views of speech perception argue that the static and dynamic characteristics of spectral energy peaks (formants) are the acoustic features that underpin phoneme recognition. Here we use representations where the amplitude modulations of sub-band filtered speech are described, precisely, in terms of co-sinusoidal pulses. These pulses are…

  13. Effect of modest salt reduction on blood pressure, urinary albumin, and pulse wave velocity in white, black, and Asian mild hypertensives.

    PubMed

    He, Feng J; Marciniak, Maciej; Visagie, Elisabeth; Markandu, Nirmala D; Anand, Vidya; Dalton, R Neil; MacGregor, Graham A

    2009-09-01

    A reduction in salt intake lowers blood pressure. However, most previous trials were in whites with few in blacks and Asians. Salt reduction may also reduce other cardiovascular risk factors (eg, urinary albumin excretion, arterial stiffness). However, few well-controlled trials have studied these effects. We carried out a randomized double-blind crossover trial of salt restriction with slow sodium or placebo, each for 6 weeks, in 71 whites, 69 blacks, and 29 Asians with untreated mildly raised blood pressure. From slow sodium to placebo, urinary sodium was reduced from 165+/-58 (+/-SD) to 110+/-49 mmol/24 hours (9.7 to 6.5 g/d salt). With this reduction in salt intake, there was a significant decrease in blood pressure from 146+/-13/91+/-8 to 141+/-12/88+/-9 mm Hg (P<0.001), urinary albumin from 10.2 (IQR: 6.8 to 18.9) to 9.1 (6.6 to 14.0) mg/24 hours (P<0.001), albumin/creatinine ratio from 0.81 (0.47 to 1.43) to 0.66 (0.44 to 1.22) mg/mmol (P<0.001), and carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity from 11.5+/-2.3 to 11.1+/-1.9 m/s (P<0.01). Subgroup analysis showed that the reductions in blood pressure and urinary albumin/creatinine ratio were significant in all groups, and the decrease in pulse wave velocity was significant in blacks only. These results demonstrate that a modest reduction in salt intake, approximately the amount of the current public health recommendations, causes significant falls in blood pressure in all 3 ethnic groups. Furthermore, it reduces urinary albumin and improves large artery compliance. Although both could be attributable to the falls in blood pressure, they may carry additional benefits on reducing cardiovascular disease above that obtained from the blood pressure falls alone.

  14. Effects of Acupuncture Stimulation on the Radial artery’s Pressure Pulse Wave in Healthy Young Participants: Protocol for a prospective, single-Arm, Exploratory, Clinical Study

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Jae-Young; Lee, Jun-Hwan; Ku, Boncho; Bae, Jang Han; un, Min-Ho; Kim, Jaeuk U.; Kim, Tae-Hun

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: This study aims to investigate the effects of acupuncture stimulation on the radial artery’s pressure pulse wave, along with various hemodynamic parameters, and to explore the possible underlying mechanism of pulse diagnosis in healthy participants in their twenties. Methods and analysis: This study is a prospective, single-arm, exploratory clinical study. A total of 25 healthy participants, without regard to gender, in their twenties will be recruited by physicians. Written informed consent will be obtained from all participants. The participants will receive acupuncture once at ST36 on both sides. The radial arterial pulse waves will be measured on the left arm of the subjects by using an applicable pulse tonometric device (KIOM-PAS). On the right arm (appearing twice), electrocardiogram (ECG), photoplethysmogram (PPG), respiration and cardiac output (CO) signals, will be measured using a physiological data acquisition system (Biopac module), while the velocity of blood flow, and the diameter and the depth of the blood vessel will be measured using an ultrasonogram machine on the right arm (appearing twice). All measurements will be conducted before, during, and after acupuncture. The primary outcome will be the spectral energy at high frequencies above 10 Hz (SE10-30Hz) calculated from the KIOM-PAS device signal. Secondary outcomes will be various variables obtained from the KIOM-PAS device, ECG, PPG, impedance cardiography modules, and an ultrasonogram machine. Discussion: The results of this trial will provide information regarding the physiological and the hemodynamic mechanisms underlying acupuncture stimulation and clinical evidence for the influence of acupuncture on the pressure pulse wave in the radial artery. Ethics and dissemination: This study was approved by the Institutional Review Board (IRB) of Kyung Hee University’s Oriental Medical Center, Seoul, Korea (KOMCIRB-150818-HR-030). The study findings will be published in peer

  15. Protostring scattering amplitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorn, Charles B.

    2016-11-01

    We calculate some tree-level scattering amplitudes for a generalization of the protostring, which is a novel string model implied by the simplest string bit models. These bit models produce a light-cone world sheet which supports s integer moded Grassmann fields. In the generalization we supplement this Grassmann world-sheet system with d =24 -s transverse coordinate world-sheet fields. The protostring corresponds to s =24 and the bosonic string to s =0 . The interaction vertex is a simple overlap with no operator insertions at the break/join point. Assuming that s is even we calculate the multistring scattering amplitudes by bosonizing the Grassmann fields, each pair equivalent to one compactified bosonic field, and applying Mandelstam's interacting string formalism to a system of s /2 compactified and d uncompactified bosonic world-sheet fields. We obtain all amplitudes for open strings with no oscillator excitations and for closed strings with no oscillator excitations and zero winding number. We then study in detail some simple special cases. Multistring processes with maximal helicity violation have much simpler amplitudes. We also specialize to general four-string amplitudes and discuss their high energy behavior. Most of these models are not covariant under the full Lorentz group O (d +1 ,1 ). The exceptions are the bosonic string whose Lorentz group is O (25 ,1 ) and the protostring whose Lorentz group is O (1 ,1 ). The models in between only enjoy an O (1 ,1 )×O (d ) spacetime symmetry.

  16. LDV arterial pulse signal: Evidence for local generation in the carotid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casaccia, Sara; Sirevaag, Erik J.; Richter, Edward J.; Casacanditella, Luigi; Scalise, Lorenzo; Rohrbaugh, John W.

    2016-06-01

    The external blood pressure pulse, recorded on a non-contact basis using the method of laser Doppler vibrometry (LDV), has been shown to be a rich source of information regarding cardiac and vascular dynamics. Considerable attention has been directed specifically to the pulse from the neck, overlying the carotid artery, which is of special interest because the carotid pulse is highly similar to the central aortic pressure pulse. The findings presented here are consistent with an interpretation of the signal at the neck as originating in the carotid artery. A detailed mapping study involving a 35 point matrix over the right neck disclosed a focal zone of maximal signal amplitude, with a course consistent with the tract of the underlying carotid. Appreciable individual differences in the 22 examinees were disclosed, particularly at lower sites. In addition to confirming a local source for the LDV carotid pulse, the data highlight the importance of accurate targeting considerations.

  17. The importance of pressure and mass ratios when depositing multi-element oxide thin films by pulsed laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ojeda-G-P, Alejandro; Schneider, Christof W.; Döbeli, Max; Lippert, Thomas; Wokaun, Alexander

    2016-12-01

    Angle-resolved thickness and compositional analyses of BaTiO3, CaTiO3, La0.4Ca0.6MnO3, EuAlO3, and LiMn2O4 were performed to study the influence of the background gas pressure when depositing multi-elemental oxide materials. With increasing gas pressure the typical forward directed deposition changes to a constant thickness at all angles. Compositional changes with respect to the target show dependencies on (in order of influence): target material, deposition pressure, and angular location (substrate size). A linear relationship was found between target mass-ratios and compositional deviations. This can lead to compositional deviations of up to 70% for large mass-ratios in certain pressure regimes.

  18. Achieving High Pressure Shock Hugoniot Measurements in Cylindrical Geometry Utilizing a High-Explosive Pulsed Power Drive

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-01

    to conduct high velocity material experiments and measure shock velocities at pressures near 1 TPa. The DEMG (Disk Explosive Magnetic Generator ... Explosive Magnetic Generator ) will be able to achieve extremely high currents with as much as 70 MA usable for driving a z-pinch experiment. In this...shock velocities at pressures near 1 TPa. The DEMG (Disk Explosive Magnetic Generator ) is used to drive a >60MA current that accelerates an aluminum

  19. Radar transponder operation with compensation for distortion due to amplitude modulation

    DOEpatents

    Ormesher, Richard C.; Tise, Bertice L.; Axline, Jr., Robert M.

    2011-01-04

    In radar transponder operation, a variably delayed gating signal is used to gate a received radar pulse and thereby produce a corresponding gated radar pulse for transmission back to the source of the received radar pulse. This compensates for signal distortion due to amplitude modulation on the retransmitted pulse.

  20. Coherent combs in ionization by intense and short laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krajewska, K.; Kamiński, J. Z.

    2016-03-01

    Photoionization of positive ions by a train of intense, short laser pulses is investigated within the relativistic strong field approximation, using the velocity gauge. The formation of broad peak structures in the high-energy domain of photoelectrons is observed and interpreted. The emergence of coherent photoelectron energy combs within these structures is demonstrated, and it is interpreted as the consequence of the Fraunhofer-type interference/diffraction of probability amplitudes of ionization from individual pulses comprising the train. Extensions to the coherent angular combs are also studied, and effects related to the radiation pressure are presented.

  1. Pulsed UV and VUV excilamps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasenko, Victor F.; Erofeev, Mikhail V.; Kostyrja, Igor D.; Lomaev, Mikhail I.; Rybka, Dmitri V.

    2008-05-01

    Emission characteristics of a nanosecond discharge in nitrogen, inert gases and its halogenides without preionization of the gap from an auxiliary source have been investigated. A volume discharge, initiated by an avalanche electron beam (VDIAEB) was realized at pressures up to 12 atm. It has been shown that at VDIAEB excitation no less than 90% energy in the 120-850 nm range is emitted by Xe, Kr, Ar dimers. Xenon spectra in the range 120-850 nm and time-amplitude characteristics have been recorded and analyzed for various excitation regimes. In xenon at pressure of 1.2 atm, the energy of spontaneous radiation in the full solid angle was ~ 45 mJ/cm3, and the FWHM of a radiation pulse was ~ 110 ns. The spontaneous radiation power rise in xenon was observed at pressures up to 12 atm. Pulsed power densities of radiation of inert gases halogenides excited by VDIAEB was ~ 4.5 kW/cm2 at efficiency up to 5.5 %.

  2. Irreducible specific energy of new surfaces creation in materials with crack-type macro defects under pulse action

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krivosheev, S. I.; Magazinov, S. G.

    2016-11-01

    The study of destruction of samples with crack-type macro defects in shockwave microsecond duration range mode with amplitude up to 1 GPa was carried out using the magnetic pulse method of pressure pulse creation. The result analysis held on the basis of computer modeling of stressed condition and thermodynamic approach. The relation between the surface fracture energy and the material parameter, such as the energy accumulation time required for destruction, was revealed.

  3. Thermal cracking and amplitude dependent attenuation

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, D.H.; Toksoez, M.N.

    1980-02-10

    The role of crack and grain boundary contacts in determining seismic wave attenuation in rock is investigated by examining Q as a function of thermal cycling (cracking) and wave strain amplitude. Q values are obtained using a longitudinal resonant bar technique in the 10- to 20-kHz range for maximum strain amplitudes varying from roughly 10/sup -8/ to 10/sup -5/. The samples studied include the Berea and Navajo sandstones, Plexiglas, Westerly granite, Solenhofen limestone, and Frederick diabase, the latter two relatively crack free in their virgin state. Measurements were made at room temperature and pressure in air. Q values for both sandstones are constant at low strains (<10/sup -6/) but decrease rapidly with amplitude at higher strains. There is no hysteresis of Q with amplitude. Q values for Plexiglas show no indication of amplitude dependent behavior. The granite, limestone, and diabase are thermally cycled at both fast and slow heating rates in order to induce cracking. Samples slowly cycled at 400/sup 0/C show a marked increase in Q that cannot be entirely explained by outgassing of volatiles. Cycling may also widen thin cracks and grain boundaries, reducing contact areas. Samples heated beyond 400/sup 0/C, or rapidly heated, result in generally decreasing Q values. The amplitude dependence of Q is found to be coupled to the effects of thermal cycling. For rock slowly cycled 400)C or less, the transition from low-amplitude contant Q to high-amplitude variable Q behavior decreases to lower amplitudes as a function of maximum temperature. Above 400/sup 0/C, and possibly in th rapidly heated samples also, the transition moves to higher amplitudes.

  4. Amplitudes of Field Theories

    SciTech Connect

    Feng Bo

    2007-11-20

    In this talk, we will present recent progresses in perturbative calculations of scattering amplitudes at tree and one-loop levels. At tree level, we will discuss MHV-diagram method and on-shell recursion relation. At one-loop level, we will establish the framework of Unitarity cut method.

  5. Reinforcing Saccadic Amplitude Variability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paeye, Celine; Madelain, Laurent

    2011-01-01

    Saccadic endpoint variability is often viewed as the outcome of neural noise occurring during sensorimotor processing. However, part of this variability might result from operant learning. We tested this hypothesis by reinforcing dispersions of saccadic amplitude distributions, while maintaining constant their medians. In a first experiment we…

  6. Planar amplitude ammonia sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karasinski, Pawel; Rogozinski, Roman

    2004-09-01

    The paper presents the results of investigation involving the influence of the change of launching conditions on the characteristics of amplitude ammonia sensors produced with the application of strip waveguides of different refractive profiles. Strip waveguides were produced using ion exchange technique, and the absorption sensitive films were produced using sol-gel technology.

  7. Ultrafast pulse shaping: amplification and characterization.

    PubMed

    Fetterman, M; Goswami, D; Keusters, D; Yang, W; Rhee, J K; Warren, W

    1998-11-09

    We demonstrate high-resolution amplified pulse shaping using an acousto-optic modulator (AOM) at a center-wavelength of 795nm. The output pulses have energy of 200mJ/pulse and a transform-limited pulsewidth of 150fs. A spectral modulation of over 40 features is achieved in a single pulse. We characterize the pulses using the STRUT (Spectrally and Temporally Resolved Upconversion Technique). Using predistortion techniques, we demonstrate that the pulses can be shaped in amplitude and phase. We create a complex pulse shape with hyperbolic secant amplitude and hyperbolic tangent frequency sweep, which is useful for applications in adiabatic rapid passage experiments.

  8. Ultrafast pulse shaping: amplification and characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fetterman, Matthew R.; Goswami, Debabrata; Keusters, Dorine; Yang, Weiguo; Rhee, June-Koo; Warren, Warren S.

    1998-11-01

    We demonstrate high-resolution amplified pulse shaping using an acousto-optic modulator (AOM) at a center-wavelength of 795nm. The output pulses have energy of 200mJ/pulse and a transform-limited pulsewidth of 150fs. A spectral modulation of over 40 features is achieved in a single pulse. We characterize the pulses using the STRUT (Spectrally and Temporally Resolved Upconversion Technique). Using predistortion techniques, we demonstrate that the pulses can be shaped in amplitude and phase. We create a complex pulse shape with hyperbolic secant amplitude and hyperbolic tangent frequency sweep, which is useful for applications in adiabatic rapid passage experiments.

  9. Experimental study on multiple-pulse performance characteristics of ammonium perchlorate/aluminum powder rocket motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yue; Hu, Chunbo; Deng, Zhe; Li, Chao; Sun, Haijun; Cai, Yupeng

    2017-04-01

    The performance characteristics of ammonium perchlorate/aluminum powder rocket motor were investigated experimentally based on a powder rocket testing system. Three-pulse experiment with one hour interval and four-pulse experiment with 15 s interval were conducted with a bi-propellant powder feed system. The experiments demonstrate the feasibility of the powder rocket for the multiple-pulse operation and the synchronization of powder feed method. The multiple-pulse performance characteristics were analyzed accordingly. It shows that the motor initiates steadily with the mass flow rate of 2.5 g/s for oxidizer powder fluidization gas and 2.0 g/s for fuel powder fluidization gas. The relative standard deviation was adopted to describe the repeatability characteristics of the pulses. The relative standard deviation of ammonium perchlorate and aluminum pistons velocity is 0.072 and 0.007, and that of oxidizer-fuel mass feed ratio is 0.052. The motor performed well with good repeatability of combustor pressure, start-up response and combustion efficiency during the multiple-pulse tests. Low frequency combustion pressure oscillations,3.6-4.2 Hz with amplitudes up to 18.7% of mean combustor pressure, were encountered. The phenomenon appeared seriously at first pulse, then alleviated at the following pulses. Further analysis of test results showed that increasing chamber pressure could ameliorate the oscillation.

  10. Slagging retrofit pulsed coal combustor: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-01-01

    A concept for a novel form of slagging retrofit pulsed coal combustor was tested in the laboratory. The combustor is based on controlled use of a form of high pressure amplitude combustion instability. The approach adopted was to resolve, in single pulse experiments, the basic technical issues arising in the development of the combustor. In a cold flow device, the issues of coal spatial distribution were addressed and a combustor and solids disperser configuration was developed to give uniform coal distribution in the combustor. Single pulse ignition experiments were conducted to determine the pressure rise in combustor, pressure rise-decay times, and coal conversion a function of various operating variables. Coal injection, flame propagation, and blowdown times leading to potential combustor size reduction of three times over steady flow combustors were demonstrated. The results give high pressure exhaust leading to potentially improved downstream heat transfer and reduced boiler size. Finally, zero-, one-, and two-dimensional mathematical models were developed in support of the experiments and also to provide design capability. 11 refs., 43 figs.

  11. Control of Reactive Species Generated by Low-frequency Biased Nanosecond Pulse Discharge in Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Effluent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takashima, Keisuke; Kaneko, Toshiro

    2016-09-01

    The control of hydroxyl radical and the other gas phase species generation in the ejected gas through air plasma (air plasma effluent) has been experimentally studied, which is a key to extend the range of plasma treatment. Nanosecond pulse discharge is known to produce high reduced electric field (E/N) discharge that leads to efficient generation of the reactive species than conventional low frequency discharge, while the charge-voltage cycle in the low frequency discharge is known to be well-controlled. In this study, the nanosecond pulse discharge biased with AC low frequency high voltage is used to take advantages of these discharges, which allows us to modulate the reactive species composition in the air plasma effluent. The utilization of the gas-liquid interface and the liquid phase chemical reactions between the modulated long-lived reactive species delivered from the air plasma effluent could realize efficient liquid phase chemical reactions leading to short-lived reactive species production far from the air plasma, which is crucial for some plasma agricultural applications.

  12. Experimental and modeling study of the oxidation of acetaldehyde in an atmospheric-pressure pulsed corona discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klett, C.; Touchard, S.; Vega-Gonzalez, A.; Redolfi, M.; Bonnin, X.; Hassouni, K.; Duten, X.

    2012-08-01

    This paper reports the results obtained for the degradation of acetaldehyde by an atmospheric plasma corona discharge working in a pulsed regime. It was shown that a few hundred ppm of acetaldehyde diluted in a pure N2 gas flow can be removed up to 80% by a discharge fed with an electric power lower than 1 W. Under the same conditions, adding up to 5% of O2 allowed the removal of up to 95% of the initial acetaldehyde. The main identified end products were CO2, CO and methanol. A quasi-homogeneous zero-dimensional chemical model was developed to investigate the respective efficiency of the discharge and post-discharge periods in the global removal of the pollutant. The identified main pathways of acetaldehyde degradation were quenching of N2 metastable states during plasma pulses and oxidation by O and OH radicals during the post-discharge. This latter contribution increased with input power because of ozone accumulation in the gas mixture acting as an additional oxygen reservoir.

  13. Change in amplitude distributions of Doppler spectrograms recorded below the aortic valve in patients with a valvular aortic stenosis.

    PubMed

    Cloutier, G; Lemire, F; Durand, L G; Latour, Y; Jarry, M; Solignac, A; Langlois, Y E

    1991-01-01

    Amplitude distributions of Doppler spectrograms were characterized in a group of 22 patients having no aortic pressure gradient and another group of 26 patients having a stenotic aortic valve. Specifically, for each patient, the ratios of the mean amplitude in three normalized frequency bands (low, middle and high) to the mean amplitude of the Doppler spectrogram computed in selected portions of the systolic period were considered. Pulsed-wave Doppler spectrograms were recorded by positioning the sample volume in the left ventricular outflow tract, approximately 1 cm below the aortic valve. Statistically significant differences were found between the middle (p = 0.041) and high (p = 0.028) frequency bands of Doppler signals recorded from the two groups of patients. The differences observed are believed to be attributed to blood flow eddies generated below the stenotic aortic heart valve and to changes in blood flow orientation.

  14. Phase and amplitude control system for Stanford Linear Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, S.J.

    1983-09-26

    The computer controlled phase and amplitude detection system measures the instantaneous phase and amplitude of a 1 micro-second 2856 MHz rf pulse at a 180 Hz rate. This will be used for phase feedback control, and also for phase and amplitude jitter measurement. The program, which was originally written by John Fox and Keith Jobe, has been modified to improve the function of the system. The software algorithms used in the measurement are described, as is the performance of the prototype phase and amplitude detector system.

  15. Photoacoustic-pulse generation and propagation in a metal vapor.

    PubMed

    Tam, A C; Zapka, W; Chiang, K; Imaino, W

    1982-01-01

    Photoacoustic-pulse generation by breakdown is achieved in dense cesium metal vapors of vapor pressures ranging from 2 to 130 Torr by using a dye laser pulse of energy variable from 10(-6) to 10(-3) J, tuned to the Cs transition at 6010 A. The acoustic-pulse propagation is detected by the transient photorefractive deflection of a cw probe laser beam that is displaced from but parallel to the pulsed laser beam. The temperature-dependent velocity of infinitesimal ultrasonic waves in a corrosive metal vapor is measured for the first time. The supersonic propagation of finite amplitude acoustic pulses (blast waves) obtained with a higher pulse energy is also studied. Our data, with Mach numbers ranging from 2.1 down to below 1.01, agree surprisingly well with the prediction of Vlases and Jones for cylindrical blast waves. This provides a new experimental support for their theoretical trajectory formula for blast waves in the extremely weak amplitude limit.

  16. Pulsed hydrojet

    DOEpatents

    Bohachevsky, I.O.; Torrey, M.D.

    1986-06-10

    An underwater pulsed hydrojet propulsion system is provided for accelerating and propelling a projectile or other vessel. A reactant, such as lithium, is fluidized and injected into a water volume. The resulting reaction produces an energy density in a time effective to form a steam pocket. Thrust flaps or baffles direct the pressure from the steam pocket toward an exit nozzle for accelerating a water volume to create thrust. A control system regulates the dispersion of reactant to control thrust characteristics.

  17. Calibration of oscillometric non-invasive devices for monitoring blood pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doh, Il; Lim, Hyun Kyoon; Ahn, Bongyoung

    2015-04-01

    Blood pressure is one of the most important vital signs used to monitor a patient’s medical condition and is widely measured in hospitals and at home. Automatic, non-invasive blood pressure (NIBP) monitoring devices measure systolic and diastolic blood pressures from the analysis of cuff pressure oscillations caused by periodic variations of blood pressure in an artery. Currently, clinical validation by comparing them to the auscultatory reference has been used to verify the performance of NIBP devices. However, there are presently no calibration methods for NIBP devices. Here, we propose an SI-traceable calibration method for oscillometric NIBP devices. The calibration system generates pressure-pulses at pre-determined cuff pressures, and with pre-determined amplitude, to the device-under-test. The uncertainty of each pulse is analyzed and used for the calculation of blood pressure (BP) uncertainty. The maximum uncertainty for systolic and diastolic BP using the newly developed calibration system is (0.74 and 0.60) mmHg (k = 2) depending on the pressure and amplitude of each pulse, as well as the number of pulses applied. The present method can be used for calibration of oscillometric NIBP devices.

  18. Weak boson production amplitude zeros; equalities of the helicity amplitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamedov, Fizuli

    2002-08-01

    We investigate the radiation amplitude zeros exhibited by many standard model amplitudes for triple weak gauge boson production processes. We show that WZγ production amplitudes have an especially rich structure in terms of zeros; these amplitudes have zeros originating from several different sources. It is also shown that the type-I current null zone is the special case of the equality of the specific helicity amplitudes.

  19. Syzygies probing scattering amplitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Gang; Liu, Junyu; Xie, Ruofei; Zhang, Hao; Zhou, Yehao

    2016-09-01

    We propose a new efficient algorithm to obtain the locally minimal generating set of the syzygies for an ideal, i.e. a generating set whose proper subsets cannot be generating sets. Syzygy is a concept widely used in the current study of scattering amplitudes. This new algorithm can deal with more syzygies effectively because a new generation of syzygies is obtained in each step and the irreducibility of this generation is also verified in the process. This efficient algorithm can also be applied in getting the syzygies for the modules. We also show a typical example to illustrate the potential application of this method in scattering amplitudes, especially the Integral-By-Part(IBP) relations of the characteristic two-loop diagrams in the Yang-Mills theory.

  20. Amplitudes of Spiral Perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grosbol, P.; Patsis, P. A.

    2014-03-01

    It has proven very difficult to estimate the amplitudes of spiral perturbations in disk galaxies from observations due to the variation of mass-to-light ratio and extinction across spiral arms. Deep, near-infrared images of grand-design spiral galaxies obtained with HAWK-I/VLT were used to analyze the azimuthal amplitude and shape of arms, which, even in the K-band may, be significantly biased by the presence of young stellar populations. Several techniques were applied to evaluate the relative importance of young stars across the arms, such as surface brightness of the disk with light from clusters subtracted, number density of clusters detected, and texture of the disk. The modulation of the texture measurement, which correlates with the number density of faint clusters, yields amplitudes of the spiral perturbation in the range 0.1-0.2. This estimate gives a better estimate of the mass perturbation in the spiral arms, since it is dominated by old clusters.

  1. Forward and Backward Pressure Waveform Morphology in Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ye; Gu, Haotian; Fok, Henry; Alastruey, Jordi

    2017-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that increased pulse wave reflection and altered backward waveform morphology contribute to increased pulse pressure in subjects with higher pulse pressure compared with lower pulse pressure and to actions of vasoactive drugs to increase pulse pressure. We examined the relationship of backward to forward wave morphology in 158 subjects who were evaluated for hypertension (including some normotensive subjects) divided into 3 groups by central pulse pressure: group 1, 33±6.5 mm Hg; group 2, 45±4.1 mm Hg; and group 3, 64±12.9 mm Hg (means±SD) and in healthy normotensive subjects during administration of inotropic and vasomotor drugs. Aortic pressure and flow in the aortic root were estimated by carotid tonometry and Doppler sonography, respectively. Morphology of the backward wave relative to the forward wave was similar in subjects in the lowest and highest tertiles of pulse pressure. Similar results were seen with the inotropic, vasopressor and vasodilator drugs, dobutamine, norepinephrine, and phentolamine, with the backward wave maintaining a constant ratio to the forward wave. However, nitroglycerin, a drug with a specific action to dilate muscular conduit arteries, reduced the amplitude of the backward wave relative to the forward wave from 0.26±0.018 at baseline to 0.19±0.019 during nitroglycerin 30 μg/min IV (P<0.01). These results are best explained by an approximately constant amount of reflection of the forward wave from the peripheral vasculature. The amount of reflection can be modified by dilation of peripheral muscular conduit arteries but contributes little to increased pulse pressure in hypertension. PMID:27920128

  2. Mode Transition of Trichel pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kexin, Zhang; Yongjun, Piao; Miao, Tang; Jingfeng, Tang; Liqiu, Wei; Chaohai, Zhang

    2015-11-01

    The trichel pulse is a typical kind of negative corona current observed in electronegative gases. In this work, stochastic behavior of the trichel pulse has been investigated. The experiment is performed in a negative corona reactor consisting of a stainless steel pin and a stainless steel powered by a dc high voltage source. The characteristic parameters distributions of corona current pulses, including the amplitude, rise time, half-wave time, and repetition frequency, are analyzed statistically. The results show there is a mode transition during the period of voltage increasing. This transition process happens in a certain voltage region, and change of pulse amplitude is the main difference between the two modes.

  3. Suppressing longitudinal double-layer oscillations by using elliptically polarized laser pulses in the hole-boring radiation pressure acceleration regime

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Dong; Yan, X. Q.; Zheng, C. Y.; Zhou, C. T.; He, X. T.; Yu, M. Y.

    2013-02-15

    It is shown that well collimated mono-energetic ion beams with a large particle number can be generated in the hole-boring radiation pressure acceleration regime by using an elliptically polarized laser pulse with appropriate theoretically determined laser polarization ratio. Due to the J Multiplication-Sign B effect, the double-layer charge separation region is imbued with hot electrons that prevent ion pileup, thus suppressing the double-layer oscillations. The proposed mechanism is well confirmed by Particle-in-Cell simulations, and after suppressing the longitudinal double-layer oscillations, the ion beams driven by the elliptically polarized lasers own much better energy spectrum than those by circularly polarized lasers.

  4. Cantilever stress measurements for pulsed laser deposition of perovskite oxides at 1000 K in an oxygen partial pressure of 10{sup −4} millibars

    SciTech Connect

    Premper, J.; Sander, D.; Kirschner, J.

    2015-03-15

    An in situ stress measurement setup using an optical 2-beam curvature technique is described which is compatible with the stringent growth conditions of pulsed laser deposition (PLD) of perovskite oxides, which involves high substrate temperatures of 1000 K and oxygen partial pressures of up to 1 × 10{sup −4} millibars. The stress measurements are complemented by medium energy electron diffraction (MEED), Auger electron spectroscopy, and additional growth rate monitoring by a quartz microbalance. A shielded filament is used to allow for simultaneous stress and MEED measurements at high substrate temperatures. A computer-controlled mirror scans an excimer laser beam over a stationary PLD target. This avoids mechanical noise originating from rotating PLD targets, and the setup does not suffer from limited lifetime issues of ultra high vacuum (UHV) rotary feedthroughs.

  5. Generation of quasi-monoenergetic protons from a double-species target driven by the radiation pressure of an ultraintense laser pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pae, Ki Hong; Kim, Chul Min; Nam, Chang Hee

    2016-03-01

    In laser-driven proton acceleration, generation of quasi-monoenergetic proton beams has been considered a crucial feature of the radiation pressure acceleration (RPA) scheme, but the required difficult physical conditions have hampered its experimental realization. As a method to generate quasi-monoenergetic protons under experimentally viable conditions, we investigated using double-species targets of controlled composition ratio in order to make protons bunched in the phase space in the RPA scheme. From a modified optimum condition and three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations, we showed by varying the ion composition ratio of proton and carbon that quasi-monoenergetic protons could be generated from ultrathin plane targets irradiated with a circularly polarized Gaussian laser pulse. The proposed scheme should facilitate the experimental realization of ultrashort quasi-monoenergetic proton beams for unique applications in high field science.

  6. Pulsed plasma ion carburizing in combination with high pressure gas quenching of medium alloy carburizing steels: A review of the metallurgical results

    SciTech Connect

    Pye, D.

    1995-12-31

    Plasma technology was developed along with low temperature nitriding, where it remained until the mid 1960`s. Work then began to develop a commercially viable plasma carburizing system. It was during the 1980`s that plasma carburizing began its entry into modern process technology. Pulsed plasma technology has now been married with high pressure gas quenching systems (up to 20 bar) using gaseous quenching mixtures of helium and nitrogen to complete the transformation to martensite on medium alloy steels. The technology is based upon the control of active ionized soluble carbon formed directly from either methane or metallurgical grade propane as opposed to the dissociative surface reactions found in the gas carburizing process. Further, advantage is taken of the limit of solubility in austenite of carbon (at approximately 1.5% wt carbon) at temperatures in the region of 1,950 F (1,065 C).

  7. Exploring the polymerization of bioactive nano-cones on the inner surface of an organic tube by an atmospheric pressure pulsed micro-plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, H. M.; Yu, J. S.; Chen, G. L.; Qiu, X. P.; Hu, W.; Chen, W. X.; Bai, H. Y.

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, the successful deposition of acrylic acid polymer (PAA) nano-cones on the inner surface of a polyvinyl chloride (PVC) tube using an atmospheric pressure pulsed plasma jet (APPJ) with acrylic acid (AA) monomer is presented. Optical emission spectroscopy (OES) measurements indicated that various reactive radicals, such as rad OH and rad O, existed in the plasma jet. Moreover, the pulsed current proportionally increased with the increase in the applied voltage. The strengthened stretching vibration of the carbonyl group (Cdbnd O) at 1700 cm-1, shown in the ATR-FTIR spectra, clearly indicated that the PAA was deposited on the PVC surface. The maximum height of the PAA nano-cones deposited by this method ranged from 150 to 200 nm. FTIR and XPS results confirmed the enhanced exposure of the carboxyl groups on the modified PVC surface, which was considered highly beneficial for successfully immobilizing a high density of biomolecules. The XPS data showed that the carbon ratios of the Csbnd OH/R and COOH/R groups increased from 7.03% and 2.6% to 18.69% and 6.81%, respectively (more than doubled) when an Ar/O2 plasma with AA monomer was applied to treat the inner surface of the PVC tube. Moreover, the enhanced attachment density of MC3T3-E1 bone cells was observed on the PVC inner surface coated with PAA nano-cones.

  8. Beat-to-Beat Blood Pressure Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Yong Jin

    2012-01-01

    This device provides non-invasive beat-to-beat blood pressure measurements and can be worn over the upper arm for prolonged durations. Phase and waveform analyses are performed on filtered proximal and distal photoplethysmographic (PPG) waveforms obtained from the brachial artery. The phase analysis is used primarily for the computation of the mean arterial pressure, while the waveform analysis is used primarily to obtain the pulse pressure. Real-time compliance estimate is used to refine both the mean arterial and pulse pressures to provide the beat-to-beat blood pressure measurement. This wearable physiological monitor can be used to continuously observe the beat-to-beat blood pressure (B3P). It can be used to monitor the effect of prolonged exposures to reduced gravitational environments and the effectiveness of various countermeasures. A number of researchers have used pulse wave velocity (PWV) of blood in the arteries to infer the beat-to-beat blood pressure. There has been documentation of relative success, but a device that is able to provide the required accuracy and repeatability has not yet been developed. It has been demonstrated that an accurate and repeatable blood pressure measurement can be obtained by measuring the phase change (e.g., phase velocity), amplitude change, and distortion of the PPG waveforms along the brachial artery. The approach is based on comparing the full PPG waveform between two points along the artery rather than measuring the time-of-flight. Minimizing the measurement separation and confining the measurement area to a single, well-defined artery allows the waveform to retain the general shape between the two measurement points. This allows signal processing of waveforms to determine the phase and amplitude changes. Photoplethysmography, which measures changes in arterial blood volume, is commonly used to obtain heart rate and blood oxygen saturation. The digitized PPG signals are used as inputs into the beat-to-beat blood

  9. Optical visualization and electrical characterization of fast-rising pulsed dielectric barrier discharge for airflow control applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benard, Nicolas; Zouzou, Nourredine; Claverie, Alain; Sotton, Julien; Moreau, Eric

    2012-02-01

    Flow control consists of manipulating flows in an effective and robust manner to improve the global performances of transport systems or industrial processes. Plasma technologies, and particularly surface dielectric barrier discharge (DBD), can be a good candidate for such purpose. The present experimental study focuses on optical and electrical characterization of plasma sheet formed by applying a pulse of voltage with rising and falling periods of 50 ns for a typical surface DBD geometry. Positive and negative polarities are compared in terms of current behavior, deposited energy, fast-imaging of the plasma propagation, and resulting modifications of the surrounding medium by using shadowgraphy acquisitions. Positive and negative pulses of voltage produce streamers and corona type plasma, respectively. Both of them result in the production of a localized pressure wave propagating in the air with a speed maintained at 343 m/s (measurements at room temperature of 20 °C). This suggests that the produced pressure wave can be considered as a propagating sound wave. The intensity of the pressure wave is directly connected to the dissipated energy at the dielectric wall with a linear increase with the applied voltage amplitude and a strong dependence toward the rising time. At constant voltage amplitude, the pressure wave is reinforced by using a positive pulse. The present investigation also reveals that rising and decaying periods of a single pulse of voltage result in two distinct pressure waves. As a result, superposition or successive pressure wave can be produced by adjusting the width of the pulse.

  10. Central blood pressure estimation by using N-point moving average method in the brachial pulse wave.

    PubMed

    Sugawara, Rie; Horinaka, Shigeo; Yagi, Hiroshi; Ishimura, Kimihiko; Honda, Takeharu

    2015-05-01

    Recently, a method of estimating the central systolic blood pressure (C-SBP) using an N-point moving average method in the radial or brachial artery waveform has been reported. Then, we investigated the relationship between the C-SBP estimated from the brachial artery pressure waveform using the N-point moving average method and the C-SBP measured invasively using a catheter. C-SBP using a N/6 moving average method from the scaled right brachial artery pressure waveforms using VaSera VS-1500 was calculated. This estimated C-SBP was compared with the invasively measured C-SBP within a few minutes. In 41 patients who underwent cardiac catheterization (mean age: 65 years), invasively measured C-SBP was significantly lower than right cuff-based brachial BP (138.2 ± 26.3 vs 141.0 ± 24.9 mm Hg, difference -2.78 ± 1.36 mm Hg, P = 0.048). The cuff-based SBP was significantly higher than invasive measured C-SBP in subjects with younger than 60 years old. However, the estimated C-SBP using a N/6 moving average method from the scaled right brachial artery pressure waveforms and the invasively measured C-SBP did not significantly differ (137.8 ± 24.2 vs 138.2 ± 26.3 mm Hg, difference -0.49 ± 1.39, P = 0.73). N/6-point moving average method using the non-invasively acquired brachial artery waveform calibrated by the cuff-based brachial SBP was an accurate, convenient and useful method for estimating C-SBP. Thus, C-SBP can be estimated simply by applying a regular arm cuff, which is greatly feasible in the practical medicine.

  11. IDE (rs6583817) Polymorphism and Pulse Pressure are Independently and Interactively Associated with Level and Change in Executive Function in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    McFall, G. Peggy; Wiebe, Sandra A.; Vergote, David; Jhamandas, Jack; Westaway, David; Dixon, Roger A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective We report a gene x environment (health) study focusing on concurrent performance and longitudinal change in a latent-variable executive function (EF) phenotype. Specifically, we tested the independent and interactive effects of a recently identified insulin degrading enzyme genetic polymorphism (IDE rs6583817) and pulse pressure (PP) (one prominent aging-related vascular health indicator) across up to 9 years of EF data in a sample of older adults from the Victoria Longitudinal Study. Both factors vary across a continuum of risk-elevating to risk-reducing and have been recently linked to normal and impaired cognitive aging. Method We assembled a genotyped and typically aging group of older adults (n=599, M age=66 years at baseline), following them for up to three longitudinal waves (M interval=4.4 years). We used confirmatory factor analyses, latent growth modeling, and path analyses to pursue three main research goals. Results First, the EF single factor model was confirmed as comprised of 4 executive function tasks and it demonstrated measurement invariance across the waves. Second, older adults with the major IDE G allele exhibited better EF outcomes than homozygotes for the minor A allele at the centering age of 75 years. Adults with higher PP performed more poorly on EF tasks at age 75 years and exhibited greater EF longitudinal decline. Third, gene x health interaction analyses showed that worsening vascular health (higher PP) differentially affected EF performance in older adults with the IDE G allele. Discussion Genetic interaction analyses can reveal differential and magnifying effects on cognitive phenotypes in aging. In the present case, pulse pressure is confirmed as a risk factor for concurrent and changing cognitive health in aging, but the effects operate differently across the risk and protective allelic distribution of this IDE gene. PMID:24660790

  12. Determining arterial wave transit time from a single aortic pressure pulse in rats: vascular impulse response analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Ru-Wen; Chang, Chun-Yi; Lai, Liang-Chuan; Wu, Ming-Shiou; Young, Tai-Horng; Chen, Yih-Sharng; Wang, Chih-Hsien; Chang, Kuo-Chu

    2017-01-01

    Arterial wave transit time (τw) in the lower body circulation is an effective biomarker of cardiovascular risk that substantially affects systolic workload imposed on the heart. This study evaluated a method for determining τw from the vascular impulse response on the basis of the measured aortic pressure and an assumed triangular flow (Qtri). The base of the unknown Qtri was constructed with a duration set equal to ejection time. The timing of the peak triangle was derived using a fourth-order derivative of the pressure waveform. Values of τws obtained using Qtri were compared with those obtained from the measure aortic flow wave (Qm). Healthy rats (n = 27), rats with chronic kidney disease (CKD; n = 22), and rats with type 1 (n = 22) or type 2 (n = 11) diabetes were analyzed. The cardiovascular conditions in the CKD rats and both diabetic groups were characterized by a decrease in τws. The following significant relation was observed (P < 0.0001): τwtriQ = −1.5709 + 1.0604 × τwmQ (r2 = 0.9641). Our finding indicates that aortic impulse response can be an effective method for the estimation of arterial τw by using a single pressure recording together with the assumed Qtri. PMID:28102355

  13. Determining arterial wave transit time from a single aortic pressure pulse in rats: vascular impulse response analysis.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ru-Wen; Chang, Chun-Yi; Lai, Liang-Chuan; Wu, Ming-Shiou; Young, Tai-Horng; Chen, Yih-Sharng; Wang, Chih-Hsien; Chang, Kuo-Chu

    2017-01-19

    Arterial wave transit time (τw) in the lower body circulation is an effective biomarker of cardiovascular risk that substantially affects systolic workload imposed on the heart. This study evaluated a method for determining τw from the vascular impulse response on the basis of the measured aortic pressure and an assumed triangular flow (Q(tri)). The base of the unknown Q(tri) was constructed with a duration set equal to ejection time. The timing of the peak triangle was derived using a fourth-order derivative of the pressure waveform. Values of τws obtained using Q(tri) were compared with those obtained from the measure aortic flow wave (Q(m)). Healthy rats (n = 27), rats with chronic kidney disease (CKD; n = 22), and rats with type 1 (n = 22) or type 2 (n = 11) diabetes were analyzed. The cardiovascular conditions in the CKD rats and both diabetic groups were characterized by a decrease in τws. The following significant relation was observed (P < 0.0001): τw(triQ) = -1.5709 + 1.0604 × τw(mQ) (r(2) = 0.9641). Our finding indicates that aortic impulse response can be an effective method for the estimation of arterial τw by using a single pressure recording together with the assumed Q(tri).

  14. On the pressure effect in energetic deposition of Cu thin films by modulated pulsed power magnetron sputtering: A global plasma model and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, B. C.; Meng, D.; Che, H. L.; Lei, M. K.

    2015-05-01

    The modulated pulsed power magnetron sputtering (MPPMS) discharge processes are numerically modeled and experimentally investigated, in order to explore the effect of the pressure on MPPMS discharges as well as on the microstructure of the deposited thin films. A global plasma model has been developed based on a volume-averaged global description of the ionization region, considering the loss of electrons by cross-B diffusion. The temporal variations of internal plasma parameters at different pressures from 0.1 to 0.7 Pa are obtained by fitting the model to duplicate the experimental discharge data, and Cu thin films are deposited by MPPMS at the corresponding pressures. The surface morphology, grain size and orientation, and microstructure of the deposited thin films are investigated by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and x-ray diffraction. By increasing the pressure from 0.1 to 0.7 Pa, both the ion bombardment energy and substrate temperature which are estimated by the modeled plasma parameters decrease, corresponding to the observed transition of the deposited thin films from a void free structure with a wide distribution of grain size (zone T) into an underdense structure with a fine fiber texture (zone 1) in the extended structure zone diagram (SZD). The microstructure and texture transition of Cu thin films are well-explained by the extended SZD, suggesting that the primary plasma processes are properly incorporated in the model. The results contribute to the understanding of the characteristics of MPPMS discharges, as well as its correlation with the microstructure and texture of deposited Cu thin films.

  15. On the pressure effect in energetic deposition of Cu thin films by modulated pulsed power magnetron sputtering: A global plasma model and experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, B. C.; Meng, D.; Che, H. L.; Lei, M. K.

    2015-05-28

    The modulated pulsed power magnetron sputtering (MPPMS) discharge processes are numerically modeled and experimentally investigated, in order to explore the effect of the pressure on MPPMS discharges as well as on the microstructure of the deposited thin films. A global plasma model has been developed based on a volume-averaged global description of the ionization region, considering the loss of electrons by cross-B diffusion. The temporal variations of internal plasma parameters at different pressures from 0.1 to 0.7 Pa are obtained by fitting the model to duplicate the experimental discharge data, and Cu thin films are deposited by MPPMS at the corresponding pressures. The surface morphology, grain size and orientation, and microstructure of the deposited thin films are investigated by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and x-ray diffraction. By increasing the pressure from 0.1 to 0.7 Pa, both the ion bombardment energy and substrate temperature which are estimated by the modeled plasma parameters decrease, corresponding to the observed transition of the deposited thin films from a void free structure with a wide distribution of grain size (zone T) into an underdense structure with a fine fiber texture (zone 1) in the extended structure zone diagram (SZD). The microstructure and texture transition of Cu thin films are well-explained by the extended SZD, suggesting that the primary plasma processes are properly incorporated in the model. The results contribute to the understanding of the characteristics of MPPMS discharges, as well as its correlation with the microstructure and texture of deposited Cu thin films.

  16. Fluctuation of intracranial pressure associated with the cardiac cycle.

    PubMed

    Daley, M L; Gallo, A E; Gehling, G F; Isom, J B; Mauch, W; Kingsley, P D

    1982-11-01

    Within the intensive care setting, a portable microcomputer system was used to extract three parameters from the intracranial pressure fluctuation associated with the cardiac cycle. One parameter, the mean of sampled intracranial pressure, was defined as the average value of pressure for a 1.08-second interval following the R wave of the electrocardiogram. Another parameter, the amplitude of intracranial pressure, was defined as the difference between the mean and the peak value of the sampled intracranial pressure for the interval considered. The third parameter, a latent interval, was defined as the time period between the occurrence of the R wave and the occurrence of the peak value of the subsequent intracranial pressure fluctuation. Six adults and one pediatric patient were monitored. Both the amplitude and the mean of sampled pressure tended to vary inversely with the latent interval. For the adult patients, the latent interval varied between 503 and 804 ms; the mean pressure ranged between 2.4 and 19.0 mm Hg and the amplitude pressure ranged between 0.6 and 7.2 mm Hg. The latent interval for the child was much shorter (ranging between 269 and 325 ms), and both the mean and the amplitude pressures were much higher (ranging between 38.4 and 57.3 mm Hg and 14.2 and 16.5 mm Hg, respectively). Statistical correlation between hourly pulse rates and the latent interval among the adult cases revealed little association (r = -0.20). For all patients considered, the correlation between the amplitude and the mean of sampled intracranial pressure was quite high, with an r value of +0.91. These reported observations support a conceptual model in which blood volume changes associated with the cardiac cycle occurring within the semirigid craniospinal sac are assumed to underlie the fluctuation of intracranial pressure.

  17. Image measurement technique on vibration amplitude of ultrasonic horn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yong-bin; Wu, Zhi-qun; Zhu, Jian-ping; He, Jian-guo; Liu, Guang-min

    2013-10-01

    The paper proposes a method to measure vibration amplitude of ultrasonic horn which is a very important component in the spindle for micro-electrical-chemical discharging machining. The method of image measuring amplitude on high frequency vibration is introduced. Non-contact measurement system based on vision technology is constructed. High precision location algorithm on image centroid, quadratic location algorithm, is presented to find the center of little light spot. Measurement experiments have been done to show the effect of image measurement technique on vibration amplitude of ultrasonic horn. In the experiments, precise calibration of the vision system is implemented using a normal graticule to obtain the scale factor between image pixel and real distance. The vibration amplitude of ultrasonic horn is changed by modifying the voltage amplitude of pulse power supply. The image of feature on ultrasonic horn is captured and image processing is carried out. The vibration amplitudes are got at different voltages.

  18. Pressure effect on the magnetization of Sr{sub 2}FeMoO{sub 6} thin films grown by pulsed laser deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Fix, T.; Versini, G.; Loison, J.L.; Colis, S.; Schmerber, G.; Pourroy, G.; Dinia, A.

    2005-01-15

    Thin films of Sr{sub 2}FeMoO{sub 6} (SFMO) are grown on SrTiO{sub 3} (001) substrates by pulsed laser deposition. The best films provide 3.2{mu}{sub B}/f.u. at 5 K, a Curie temperature above 400 K, low roughness, high crystallinity, and low splashing. Therefore, the use of such SFMO electrodes in magnetic tunnel junctions patterned with conventional lithography is promising. Pseudomorphic epitaxial growth is obtained for thicknesses under 50 nm. Above this thickness the films do not relax homogeneously. A coherent and systematic variation of the magnetization with the deposition conditions is obtained, which highlights a high reproducibility. Under a reasonable O{sub 2} partial pressure to avoid parasite phases, the limiting factor for high magnetization is the total pressure or the deposition rate. Therefore, the deposition rate is suspected to have a strong influence on the Fe/Mo ordering. Highly magnetic samples are obtained under a low gas flow of either a 20% O{sub 2}+N{sub 2} or a 0.3% O{sub 2}+Ar.

  19. Beat-to-Beat Blood Pressure Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Yong Jin

    2012-01-01

    This device provides non-invasive beat-to-beat blood pressure measurements and can be worn over the upper arm for prolonged durations. Phase and waveform analyses are performed on filtered proximal and distal photoplethysmographic (PPG) waveforms obtained from the brachial artery. The phase analysis is used primarily for the computation of the mean arterial pressure, while the waveform analysis is used primarily to obtain the pulse pressure. Real-time compliance estimate is used to refine both the mean arterial and pulse pressures to provide the beat-to-beat blood pressure measurement. This wearable physiological monitor can be used to continuously observe the beat-to-beat blood pressure (B3P). It can be used to monitor the effect of prolonged exposures to reduced gravitational environments and the effectiveness of various countermeasures. A number of researchers have used pulse wave velocity (PWV) of blood in the arteries to infer the beat-to-beat blood pressure. There has been documentation of relative success, but a device that is able to provide the required accuracy and repeatability has not yet been developed. It has been demonstrated that an accurate and repeatable blood pressure measurement can be obtained by measuring the phase change (e.g., phase velocity), amplitude change, and distortion of the PPG waveforms along the brachial artery. The approach is based on comparing the full PPG waveform between two points along the artery rather than measuring the time-of-flight. Minimizing the measurement separation and confining the measurement area to a single, well-defined artery allows the waveform to retain the general shape between the two measurement points. This allows signal processing of waveforms to determine the phase and amplitude changes.

  20. Pulse-periodic generation of supershort avalanche electron beams and X-ray emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baksht, E. Kh.; Burachenko, A. G.; Erofeev, M. V.; Tarasenko, V. F.

    2014-05-01

    Pulse-periodic generation of supershort avalanche electron beams (SAEBs) and X-ray emission in nitrogen, as well as the transition from a single-pulse mode to a pulse-periodic mode with a high repetition frequency, was studied experimentally. It is shown that, in the pulse-periodic mode, the full width at halfmaximum of the SAEB is larger and the decrease rate of the gap voltage is lower than those in the single-pulse mode. It is found that, when the front duration of the voltage pulse at a nitrogen pressure of 90 Torr decreases from 2.5 to 0.3 ns, the X-ray exposure dose in the pulse-periodic mode increases by more than one order of magnitude and the number of SAEB electrons also increases. It is shown that, in the pulse-periodic mode of a diffuse discharge, gas heating in the discharge gap results in a severalfold increase in the SAEB amplitude (the number of electrons in the beam). At a generator voltage of 25 kV, nitrogen pressure of 90 Torr, and pulse repetition frequency of 3.5 kHz, a runaway electron beam was detected behind the anode foil.

  1. Pulsed resources and climate-induced variation in the reproductive traits of wild boar under high hunting pressure.

    PubMed

    Sabrina, Servanty; Jean-Michel, Gaillard; Carole, Toïgo; Serge, Brandt; Eric, Baubet

    2009-11-01

    1. Identifying which factors influence age and size at maturity is crucial for a better understanding of the evolution of life-history strategies. In particular, populations intensively harvested, hunted or fished by humans often respond by displaying earlier age and decreased size at first reproduction. 2. Among ungulates wild boar (Sus scrofa scrofa L.) exhibit uncommon life-history traits, such as high fertility and early reproduction, which might increase the demographic impact of varying age at first reproduction. We analysed variation in female reproductive output from a 22-year long study of an intensively hunted population. We assessed how the breeding probability and the onset of oestrus responded to changes of female body mass at different ages under varying conditions of climate and food availability. 3. Wild boar females had to reach a threshold body mass (27-33 kg) before breeding for the first time. This threshold mass was relatively low (33-41% of adult body mass) compared to that reported in most other ungulates (about 80%). 4. Proportions of females breeding peaked when rainfall and temperature were low in spring and high in summer. Climatic conditions might act through the nutritional condition of females. The onset of oestrus varied a lot in relation to resources available at both current and previous years. Between none and up to 90% of females were in oestrus in November depending on the year. 5. Past and current resources accounted for equivalent amount of observed variations in proportions of females breeding. Thus, wild boar rank at an intermediate position along the capital-income continuum rather than close to the capital end where similar-sized ungulates rank. 6. Juvenile females made a major contribution to the yearly reproductive output. Comparisons among wild boar populations facing contrasted hunting pressures indicate that a high demographic contribution of juveniles is a likely consequence of a high hunting pressure rather than a

  2. High amplitude nonlinear acoustic wave driven flow fields in cylindrical and conical resonators.

    PubMed

    Antao, Dion Savio; Farouk, Bakhtier

    2013-08-01

    A high fidelity computational fluid dynamic model is used to simulate the flow, pressure, and density fields generated in a cylindrical and a conical resonator by a vibrating end wall/piston producing high-amplitude standing waves. The waves in the conical resonator are found to be shock-less and can generate peak acoustic overpressures that exceed the initial undisturbed pressure by two to three times. A cylindrical (consonant) acoustic resonator has limitations to the output response observed at one end when the opposite end is acoustically excited. In the conical geometry (dissonant acoustic resonator) the linear acoustic input is converted to high energy un-shocked nonlinear acoustic output. The model is validated using past numerical results of standing waves in cylindrical resonators. The nonlinear nature of the harmonic response in the conical resonator system is further investigated for two different working fluids (carbon dioxide and argon) operating at various values of piston amplitude. The high amplitude nonlinear oscillations observed in the conical resonator can potentially enhance the performance of pulse tube thermoacoustic refrigerators and these conical resonators can be used as efficient mixers.

  3. An integrated instrument for rapidly deforming living cells using rapid pressure pulses and simultaneously monitoring applied strain in near real time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, M. E.; Goforth, P. B.; Satin, L. S.; Love, B. J.

    2010-12-01

    Because many types of living cells are sensitive to applied strain, different in vitro models have been designed to elucidate the cellular and subcellular processes that respond to mechanical deformation at both the cell and tissue level. Our focus was to improve upon an already established strain system to make it capable of independently monitoring the deflection and applied pressure delivered to specific wells of a commercially available, deformable multiwell culture plate. To accomplish this, we devised a custom frame that was capable of mounting deformable 6 or 24 well plates, a pressurization system that could load wells within the plates, and a camera-based imaging system which was capable of capturing strain responses at a sufficiently high frame rate. The system used a user defined program constructed in Labview® to trigger plate pressurization while simultaneously allowing the deflection of the silicone elastomeric plate bottoms to be imaged in near real time. With this system, up to six wells could be pulsed simultaneously using compressed air or nitrogen. Digital image capture allowed near-real time monitoring of applied strain, strain rate, and the cell loading profiles. Although our ultimate goal is to determine how different strain rates applied to neurons modulates their intrinsic biochemical cascades, the same platform technology could be readily applied to other systems. Combining commercially available, deformable multiwell plates with a simple instrument having the monitoring capabilities described here should permit near real time calculations of stretch-induced membrane strain in multiple wells in real time for a wide variety of applications, including high throughput drug screening.

  4. High velocity flyer plates launched by magnetic pressure on pulsed power generator CQ-4 and applied in shock Hugoniot experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xuping; Wang, Guiji; Zhao, Jianheng; Tan, Fuli; Luo, Binqiang; Sun, Chengwei

    2014-05-01

    High velocity flyer plates with good flatness and some thickness have being widely used to the field of shock physics for characterizations of materials under dynamical loading. The techniques of magnetically driven high-velocity flyer plates are further researched based on our pulsed power generators CQ-4 and some good results got on Sandia's Z machine. With large current of several mega-amperes, the loading surface of electrode panel will suffer acute phase transitions caused from magnetic diffusion and Joule heating, and the thickness and flatness of the flyer plates will change with time. In order to obtain the flyer plates with high performances for shock physics, some researches on electrode panels were done by means of LS-DYNA980 software with electro-magnetic package. Two typical configurations for high velocity flyer plates were compared from distribution uniformity of magnetic field in simulation. The results show that the configuration with counter-bore with "notch" and "ear" is better than the other. Then, with the better configuration panels, some experiments were designed and done to validate the simulation results and obtain high velocity flyer plates with good flatness for one-dimensional strain shock experiments on CQ-4. The velocity profiles of the flyer plates were measured by displacement interferometer systems for any reflectors. And the planarity of flyer plates was measured by using the optical fiber pins array for recording the flyer arrival time. The peak velocities of 8.7 km/s with initial dimension of 10 × 7.2 × 0.62 mm for aluminum flyer plates have been achieved. And the flyer plate with initial size of 12 × 9.2 × 0.73 mm was accelerated to velocity of 6.5 km/s with the flatness of less than 11 ns in the central region of 6 mm in diameter and the effective thickness of about 0.220 mm. Based on these work, the symmetrical impact experiments were performed to obtain the high accuracy Hugoniot data of OFHC (oxygen free high conductance

  5. Finishing of AT-cut quartz crystal wafer with nanometric thickness uniformity by pulse-modulated atmospheric pressure plasma etching.

    PubMed

    Yamamura, Kazuya; Ueda, Masaki; Shibahara, Masafumi; Zettsu, Nobuyuki

    2011-04-01

    Quartz resonator is a very important device to generate a clock frequency for information and telecommunication system. Improvement of the productivity of the quartz resonator is always required because a huge amount of the resonator is demanded for installing to various electronic devices. Resonance frequency of the quartz resonator is decided by the thickness of the quartz crystal wafer. Therefore, it is necessary to uniform the thickness distribution of the wafer with nanometric level. We have proposed the improvement technique of the thickness distribution of the quartz crystal wafer by numerically controlled correction using atmospheric pressure plasma which is non-contact and chemical removal technique. Heating effects of the quartz wafer in the removal rate and the correction accuracy were investigated. The heating of the substrate and compensate of the scanning speed of the worktable according to the variation of the surface temperature enabled an increase of 50% in the etching rate and 10-nanometric-level accuracy in the correction of the thickness distribution of the quartz wafer, respectively.

  6. NO density and gas temperature measurements in atmospheric pressure nanosecond repetitively pulsed (NRP) discharges by Mid-IR QCLAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simeni Simeni, Marien; Stancu, Gabi-Daniel; Laux, Christophe

    2014-10-01

    Nitric oxide is a key species for many processes: in combustion, in human skin physiology... Recently, NO-ground state absolute density measurements produced by atmospheric pressure NRP discharges were carried out in air as a function of the discharge parameters, using Quantum Cascade Laser Absorption Spectroscopy. These measurements were space averaged and performed in the post-discharge region in a large gas volume. Here we present radial profiles of NO density and temperature measured directly in the discharge for different configurations. Small plasma volume and species densities, high temperature and EM noise environment make the absorption diagnostic challenging. For this purpose the QCLAS sensitivity was improved using a two-detector system. We conducted lateral absorbance measurements with a spatial resolution of 300 μm for two absorption features at 1900.076 and 1900.517 cm-1. The radial temperature and NO density distributions were obtained from the Abel inverted lateral measurements. Time averaged NO densities of about 1.E16 cm-3 and gas temperature of about 1000K were obtained in the center of the discharge. PLASMAFLAME Project (Grant No ANR-11-BS09-0025).

  7. Amplitude, isobar and grey-scale imaging of ultrasonic shadows behind rigid, elastic and gaseous spheres.

    PubMed

    Filipczyński, L; Kujawska, T; Tymkiewicz, R; Wójcik, J

    1996-01-01

    The theory of wave reflection from spherical obstacles was applied for determination of the cause of the shadow created by plane wave pulses incident on rigid, steel, gaseous spheres and on spheres made of kidney stones. The spheres were immersed in water which was assumed to be a tissue-like medium. Acoustic pressure distributions behind the spheres with the radii of 1 mm, 2.5 mm and 3.5 mm were determined at the frequency of 5 MHz. The use of the exact wave theory enabled us to take into account the diffraction effects. The computed pressure distributions were verified experimentally at the frequency of 5 MHz for a steel sphere with a 2.5-mm radius. The experimental and theoretical pulses were composed of about three ultrasonic frequency periods. Acoustic pressure distributions in the shadow zone of all spheres were shown in the amplitude axonometric projection, in the grey scale and also as acoustic isobar patterns. Our analysis confirmed existing simpler descriptions of the shadow from the point of view of reflection and refraction effects; however, our approach is more general, also including diffraction effects and assuming the pulse mode. The analysis has shown that gaseous spherical inclusions caused shadows with very high dynamics of acoustic pressures that were about 15 dB higher in relation to all the other spheres. The shadow length, determined as the length at which one observes a 6-dB drop of the acoustic pressure, followed the relation r-6dB = 3.7a2/lambda with the accuracy of about 20% independent of the sphere type. lambda denotes the wavelength and a the sphere radius. Thus, a theoretical possibility of differentiating between gaseous and other inclusions and of estimation of the inclusion size in the millimeter range from the shadow was shown. The influence of the frequency-dependent attenuation on the shadow will be considered in the next study.

  8. Dynamic optical arbitrary waveform generation with amplitude controlled by interference of two FBG arrays.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ailing; Li, Changxiu

    2012-10-08

    In this paper, a novel structure of dynamic optical arbitrary waveform generation (O-AWG) with amplitude controlled by interference of two fiber Bragg grating (FBG) arrays is proposed. The FBG array consists of several FBGs and fiber stretchers (FSs). The amplitude is controlled by FSs through interference of two FBG arrays. The phase is controlled by FSs simultaneously. As a result, optical pulse trains with various waveforms as well as pulse trains with nonuniform pulse intensity, pulse spacing and pulse width in each period are obtained via FSs adjustment to change the phase shift of signal in each array.

  9. Influence of surface emission processes on a fast-pulsed dielectric barrier discharge in air at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pechereau, François; Bonaventura, Zdeněk; Bourdon, Anne

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents simulations of an atmospheric pressure air discharge in a point-to-plane geometry with a dielectric layer parallel to the cathode plane. Experimentally, a discharge reignition in the air gap below the dielectrics has been observed. With a 2D fluid model, it is shown that due to the fast rise of the high voltage applied and the sharp point used, a first positive spherical discharge forms around the point. Then this discharge propagates axially and impacts the dielectrics. As the first discharge starts spreading on the upper dielectric surface, in the second air gap with a low preionization density of {{10}4}~\\text{c}{{\\text{m}}-3} , the 2D fluid model predicts a rapid reignition of a positive discharge. As in experiments, the discharge reignition is much slower, a discussion on physical processes to be considered in the model to increase the reignition delay is presented. The limit case with no initial seed charges in the second air gap has been studied. First, we have calculated the time to release an electron from the cathode surface by thermionic and field emission processes for a work function φ \\in ≤ft[3,4\\right] eV and an amplification factor β \\in ≤ft[100,220\\right] . Then a 3D Monte Carlo model has been used to follow the dynamics of formation of an avalanche starting from a single electron emitted at the cathode. Due to the high electric field in the second air gap, we have shown that in a few nanoseconds, a Gaussian cloud of seed charges is formed at a small distance from the cathode plane. This Gaussian cloud has been used as the initial condition of the 2D fluid model in the second air gap. In this case, the propagation of a double headed discharge in the second air gap has been observed and the reignition delay is in rather good agreement with experiments.

  10. On-admission blood pressure and pulse rate in trauma patients and their correlation with mortality: Cushing's phenomenon revisited

    PubMed Central

    Bhandarkar, Prashant; Munivenkatappa, Ashok; Roy, Nobhojit; Kumar, Vineet; Samudrala, Veda Dhruthy; Kamble, Jyoti; Agrawal, Amit

    2017-01-01

    Background: Injury-induced alteration in initial physiological responses such as hypertension and heart rate (HR) has a significant effect on mortality. Research on such associations from our country-India is limited. The present study investigates the injury-induced early blood pressure (BP) and HR changes and their association with mortality. Materials and Methods: The data were selected from Towards Improved Trauma Care Outcomes collected from October 1, 2013, to July 24, 2014. Patients above 18 years of age with documented systolic BP (SBP) and HR were selected. BP was categorized into hypotension (SBP <90 mmHg), hypertension (SBP >140 mmHg), and normal (SBP 90–140 mmHg). HR was categorized into bradycardia (HR <60 beats/min [bpm]), tachycardia (HR >100 bpm), and normal (HR 60–100 bpm). These categories were compared with mortality. Results: A total of 10,200 patients were considered for the study. Mortality rate was 24%. Mortality among females was more than males. Patients with normal BP and HR had 20% of mortality. Mortality in patients with abnormal BP and HR findings was 36%. Mortality was higher among hypotension-bradycardia patients (80%) followed by hypertension-bradycardia patients (58%) and tachycardia hypotension patients (48%). Elderly patients were at higher risk of deaths with an overall mortality of 35% compared to 23% of adults. Conclusion: The study reports that initial combination of hypotension-bradycardia had higher mortality rate. Specific precautions in prehospital care should be given to trauma patients with these findings. Further prospective study in detail should be considered for exploring this abnormality.

  11. Relationship Between Changes in Pulse Pressure and Frequency Domain Components of Heart Rate Variability During Short-Term Left Ventricular Pacing in Patients with Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Urbanek, Bożena; Ruta, Jan; Kudryński, Krzysztof; Ptaszyński, Paweł; Klimczak, Artur; Wranicz, Jerzy Krzysztof

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of the study was to explore the relationship between changes in pulse pressure (PP) and frequency domain heart rate variability (HRV) components caused by left ventricular pacing in patients with implanted cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT). Material/Methods Forty patients (mean age 63±8.5 years) with chronic heart failure (CHF) and implanted CRT were enrolled in the study. The simultaneous 5-minute recording of beat-to-beat arterial systolic and diastolic blood pressure (SBP and DBP) by Finometer and standard electrocardiogram with CRT switched off (CRT/0) and left ventricular pacing (CRT/LV) was performed. PP (PP=SBP-DBP) and low- and high-frequency (LF and HF) HRV components were calculated, and the relationship between these parameters was analyzed. Results Short-term CRT/LV in comparison to CRT/0 caused a statistically significant increase in the values of PP (P<0.05), LF (P<0.05), and HF (P<0.05). A statistically significant correlation between ΔPP and ΔHF (R=0.7384, P<0.05) was observed. The ΔHF of 6 ms2 during short-term CRT/LV predicted a PP increase of ≥10% with 84.21% sensitivity and 85.71% specificity. Conclusions During short-term left ventricular pacing in patients with CRT, a significant correlation between ΔPP and ΔHF was observed. ΔHF ≥6 ms2 may serve as a tool in the selection of a suitable site for placement of a left ventricular lead. PMID:27305349

  12. Correlation between the NPPB gene promoter c.-1298 G/T polymorphism site and pulse pressure in the Chinese Han population.

    PubMed

    Zeng, K; Wu, X D; Cai, H D; Gao, Y G; Li, G; Liu, Q C; Gao, F; Chen, J H; Lin, C Z

    2014-04-29

    The aim of this study was to investigate the correlation between the natriuretic peptide precursor B (NPPB) gene single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) c.-1298 G/T and pulse pressure (PP) of the Chinese Han population and the association between genotype and clinical indicators of hypertension. Peripheral blood was collected from 180 unrelated patients with hypertension and 540 healthy volunteers (control group), and DNA was extracted to amplify the 5'-flanking region and 2 exons of the NPPB gene by polymerase chain reaction; the fragment was sequenced after purification. The clinical data of all subjects were recorded, the distribution of the NPPB gene c.-1298 G/T polymorphism was determined, and differences in clinical indicators between the two groups were evaluated. The mean arterial pressure PP, and creatinine levels were significantly higher in the hypertension group than in the control group (P<0.05), but no other clinical indicators differed between the groups. There were no significant differences in genotype frequency and distribution of the NPPB gene c.-1298 G/T polymorphism between the hypertension group and the control group (P>0.05); in the control group, the mean PP of individuals with the SNP c.-1298 GG genotype was greater than that of individuals with the GT+TT genotype (P<0.05). In conclusion, there was no significant correlation between the NPPB gene c.-1298 G/T polymorphism and the incidence of essential hypertension in the Han population; however, the PP of the SNP c.-1298 GG genotype was greater than that of the GT+TT genotype in the control group.

  13. Reference values of one-point carotid stiffness parameters determined by carotid echo-tracking and brachial pulse pressure in a large population of healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Vriz, Olga; Aboyans, Victor; Minisini, Rosalba; Magne, Julien; Bertin, Nicole; Pirisi, Mario; Bossone, Eduardo

    2017-03-02

    Arterial stiffness can predict cardiovascular events, and the aim of this study was to produce age- and sex-specific reference values for echo-tracking carotid stiffness in healthy subjects. A total of 900 subjects (500 males, mean age 45.8±19 years) were enrolled. Common carotid artery stiffness and compliance, using a high-definition echo-tracking ultrasound system, were evaluated. To compare stiffness parameters across the different age groups, individual scores were transformed into T-scores, indicating how many standard deviation (s.d.) units an individual's score was above or below the mean that was observed in the group including same-sex individuals aged 36 to 44 years. Carotid stiffness was similar among genders, except compliance, which was lower in women (P<0.0001). These characteristics were also maintained when the studied population was divided into seven age groups. Stiffness parameters increased significantly with age, but the opposite occurred for compliance. The T-score was found to increase significantly across all age groups, with a steeper increase in stiffness around the age of 60 years in women. For each T-score s.d., the corresponding carotid absolute values for arterial stiffness and compliance were obtained. In a multivariate model, carotid stiffness parameters were constantly and independently associated with age, mean arterial pressure, pulse pressure, heart rate and body mass index. Our study provides a normogram of carotid arterial stiffness and compliance indices obtained with the echo-tracking method in a large population of healthy subjects stratified by gender and age that can be used in clinical practice.Hypertension Research advance online publication, 2 March 2017; doi:10.1038/hr.2017.24.

  14. Statistical modelling of discharge behavior of atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Tay, W. H.; Kausik, S. S.; Wong, C. S. Yap, S. L.; Muniandy, S. V.

    2014-11-15

    In this work, stochastic behavior of atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) has been investigated. The experiment is performed in a DBD reactor consisting of a pair of stainless steel parallel plate electrodes powered by a 50 Hz ac high voltage source. Current pulse amplitude distributions for different space gaps and the time separation between consecutive current pulses are studied. A probability distribution function is proposed to predict the experimental distribution function for the current pulse amplitudes and the occurrence of the transition regime of the pulse distribution. Breakdown voltage at different positions on the dielectric surface is suggested to be stochastic in nature. The simulated results based on the proposed distribution function agreed well with the experimental results and able to predict the regime of transition voltage. This model would be useful for the understanding of stochastic behaviors of DBD and the design of DBD device for effective operation and applications.

  15. Effect of oral nitrates on