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Sample records for pressure range

  1. Determination of Phonation Instability Pressure and Phonation Pressure Range in Excised Larynges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Yu; Reynders, William J.; Jiang, Jack J.; Tateya, Ichiro

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The present study was a methodological study designed to reveal the dynamic mechanisms of phonation instability pressure (PIP) using bifurcation analysis. Phonation pressure range (PPR) was also proposed for assessing the pressure range of normal vocal fold vibrations. Method: The authors first introduced the concept of bifurcation on the…

  2. Ozone formation in pulsed SDBD in a wide pressure range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starikovskiy, Andrey; Nudnova, Maryia; mipt Team

    2011-10-01

    Ozone concentration in surface anode-directed DBD for wide pressure range (150 - 1300 torr) was experimentally measured. Voltage and pressure effect were investigated. Reduced electric field was measured for anode-directed and cathode-directed SDBD. E/n values in cathode-directed SDBD is higher than in cathode-directed on 50 percent at atmospheric pressure. E/n value increase leads to decrease the rate of oxygen dissociation and Ozone formation at lower pressures. Radiating region thickness of sliding discharge was measured. Typical thickness of radiating zone is 0.4-1.0 mm within pressure range 220-740 torr. It was shown that high-voltage pulsed nanosecond discharge due to high E/n value produces less Ozone with compare to other discharges. Kinetic model was proposed to describe Ozone formation in the pulsed nanosecond SDBD.

  3. Peristaltic pump-based low range pressure sensor calibration system

    SciTech Connect

    Vinayakumar, K. B.; Naveen Kumar, G.; Rajanna, K. E-mail: krajanna2011@gmail.com; Nayak, M. M.; Dinesh, N. S.

    2015-11-15

    Peristaltic pumps were normally used to pump liquids in several chemical and biological applications. In the present study, a peristaltic pump was used to pressurize the chamber (positive as well negative pressures) using atmospheric air. In the present paper, we discuss the development and performance study of an automatic pressurization system to calibrate low range (millibar) pressure sensors. The system includes a peristaltic pump, calibrated pressure sensor (master sensor), pressure chamber, and the control electronics. An in-house developed peristaltic pump was used to pressurize the chamber. A closed loop control system has been developed to detect and adjust the pressure leaks in the chamber. The complete system has been integrated into a portable product. The system performance has been studied for a step response and steady state errors. The system is portable, free from oil contaminants, and consumes less power compared to existing pressure calibration systems. The veracity of the system was verified by calibrating an unknown diaphragm based pressure sensor and the results obtained were satisfactory.

  4. Peristaltic pump-based low range pressure sensor calibration system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinayakumar, K. B.; Naveen Kumar, G.; Nayak, M. M.; Dinesh, N. S.; Rajanna, K.

    2015-11-01

    Peristaltic pumps were normally used to pump liquids in several chemical and biological applications. In the present study, a peristaltic pump was used to pressurize the chamber (positive as well negative pressures) using atmospheric air. In the present paper, we discuss the development and performance study of an automatic pressurization system to calibrate low range (millibar) pressure sensors. The system includes a peristaltic pump, calibrated pressure sensor (master sensor), pressure chamber, and the control electronics. An in-house developed peristaltic pump was used to pressurize the chamber. A closed loop control system has been developed to detect and adjust the pressure leaks in the chamber. The complete system has been integrated into a portable product. The system performance has been studied for a step response and steady state errors. The system is portable, free from oil contaminants, and consumes less power compared to existing pressure calibration systems. The veracity of the system was verified by calibrating an unknown diaphragm based pressure sensor and the results obtained were satisfactory.

  5. Peristaltic pump-based low range pressure sensor calibration system.

    PubMed

    Vinayakumar, K B; Naveen Kumar, G; Nayak, M M; Dinesh, N S; Rajanna, K

    2015-11-01

    Peristaltic pumps were normally used to pump liquids in several chemical and biological applications. In the present study, a peristaltic pump was used to pressurize the chamber (positive as well negative pressures) using atmospheric air. In the present paper, we discuss the development and performance study of an automatic pressurization system to calibrate low range (millibar) pressure sensors. The system includes a peristaltic pump, calibrated pressure sensor (master sensor), pressure chamber, and the control electronics. An in-house developed peristaltic pump was used to pressurize the chamber. A closed loop control system has been developed to detect and adjust the pressure leaks in the chamber. The complete system has been integrated into a portable product. The system performance has been studied for a step response and steady state errors. The system is portable, free from oil contaminants, and consumes less power compared to existing pressure calibration systems. The veracity of the system was verified by calibrating an unknown diaphragm based pressure sensor and the results obtained were satisfactory. PMID:26628178

  6. Peristaltic pump-based low range pressure sensor calibration system.

    PubMed

    Vinayakumar, K B; Naveen Kumar, G; Nayak, M M; Dinesh, N S; Rajanna, K

    2015-11-01

    Peristaltic pumps were normally used to pump liquids in several chemical and biological applications. In the present study, a peristaltic pump was used to pressurize the chamber (positive as well negative pressures) using atmospheric air. In the present paper, we discuss the development and performance study of an automatic pressurization system to calibrate low range (millibar) pressure sensors. The system includes a peristaltic pump, calibrated pressure sensor (master sensor), pressure chamber, and the control electronics. An in-house developed peristaltic pump was used to pressurize the chamber. A closed loop control system has been developed to detect and adjust the pressure leaks in the chamber. The complete system has been integrated into a portable product. The system performance has been studied for a step response and steady state errors. The system is portable, free from oil contaminants, and consumes less power compared to existing pressure calibration systems. The veracity of the system was verified by calibrating an unknown diaphragm based pressure sensor and the results obtained were satisfactory.

  7. The nanogap Pirani—a pressure sensor with superior linearity in an atmospheric pressure range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khosraviani, Kourosh; Leung, Albert M.

    2009-04-01

    We have designed and fabricated a surface micromachined Pirani pressure sensor with an extremely narrow gap between its heater and heatsink (substrate) with superior output linearity in the atmospheric pressure range. The gap size of the device has been reduced to 50 nm by using a layer of PECVD amorphous silicon as a sacrificial layer and a xenon difluoride (XeF2) gas phase etching technique. Such a narrow gap pushes the transition from molecular to continuum heat conduction to pressures beyond 200 kPa. The higher transition pressure increases the measurement range and sensitivity of the gauge in atmospheric pressures. The gas phase etching of the sacrificial layer eliminates stiction problems related to a wet etching process. The active area of the sensor is only a 6 × 50 µm2 microbridge anchored to the substrate at both ends. An innovative fabrication technique was developed which resulted in a virtually flat microbridge with improved mechanical robustness. This process enabled us to have a very well-controlled gap between the microbridge and the substrate. The device was tested in a constant heater temperature mode with pressure ranges from 0.1 to 720 kPa. The heater power was only 3 mW at 101 kPa (atmospheric pressure), which increased to about 8 mW at 720 kPa. The output sensitivity and nonlinearity of the device were 0.55% per kPa at 101 kPa and ±13% of the output full scale, respectively.

  8. A graphene-based resistive pressure sensor with record-high sensitivity in a wide pressure range.

    PubMed

    Tian, He; Shu, Yi; Wang, Xue-Feng; Mohammad, Mohammad Ali; Bie, Zhi; Xie, Qian-Yi; Li, Cheng; Mi, Wen-Tian; Yang, Yi; Ren, Tian-Ling

    2015-02-27

    Pressure sensors are a key component in electronic skin (e-skin) sensing systems. Most reported resistive pressure sensors have a high sensitivity at low pressures (<5 kPa) to enable ultra-sensitive detection. However, the sensitivity drops significantly at high pressures (>5 kPa), which is inadequate for practical applications. For example, actions like a gentle touch and object manipulation have pressures below 10 kPa, and 10-100 kPa, respectively. Maintaining a high sensitivity in a wide pressure range is in great demand. Here, a flexible, wide range and ultra-sensitive resistive pressure sensor with a foam-like structure based on laser-scribed graphene (LSG) is demonstrated. Benefitting from the large spacing between graphene layers and the unique v-shaped microstructure of the LSG, the sensitivity of the pressure sensor is as high as 0.96 kPa(-1) in a wide pressure range (0 ~ 50 kPa). Considering both sensitivity and pressure sensing range, the pressure sensor developed in this work is the best among all reported pressure sensors to date. A model of the LSG pressure sensor is also established, which agrees well with the experimental results. This work indicates that laser scribed flexible graphene pressure sensors could be widely used for artificial e-skin, medical-sensing, bio-sensing and many other areas.

  9. Laboratory investigation of high pressure survival in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 into the gigapascal pressure range.

    PubMed

    Hazael, Rachael; Foglia, Fabrizia; Kardzhaliyska, Liya; Daniel, Isabelle; Meersman, Filip; McMillan, Paul

    2014-01-01

    The survival of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 at up to 1500 MPa was investigated by laboratory studies involving exposure to high pressure followed by evaluation of survivors as the number (N) of colony forming units (CFU) that could be cultured following recovery to ambient conditions. Exposing the wild type (WT) bacteria to 250 MPa resulted in only a minor (0.7 log N units) drop in survival compared with the initial concentration of 10(8) cells/ml. Raising the pressure to above 500 MPa caused a large reduction in the number of viable cells observed following recovery to ambient pressure. Additional pressure increase caused a further decrease in survivability, with approximately 10(2) CFU/ml recorded following exposure to 1000 MPa (1 GPa) and 1.5 GPa. Pressurizing samples from colonies resuscitated from survivors that had been previously exposed to high pressure resulted in substantially greater survivor counts. Experiments were carried out to examine potential interactions between pressure and temperature variables in determining bacterial survival. One generation of survivors previously exposed to 1 GPa was compared with WT samples to investigate survival between 37 and 8°C. The results did not reveal any coupling between acquired high pressure resistance and temperature effects on growth. PMID:25452750

  10. Laboratory investigation of high pressure survival in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 into the gigapascal pressure range

    PubMed Central

    Hazael, Rachael; Foglia, Fabrizia; Kardzhaliyska, Liya; Daniel, Isabelle; Meersman, Filip; McMillan, Paul

    2014-01-01

    The survival of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 at up to 1500 MPa was investigated by laboratory studies involving exposure to high pressure followed by evaluation of survivors as the number (N) of colony forming units (CFU) that could be cultured following recovery to ambient conditions. Exposing the wild type (WT) bacteria to 250 MPa resulted in only a minor (0.7 log N units) drop in survival compared with the initial concentration of 108 cells/ml. Raising the pressure to above 500 MPa caused a large reduction in the number of viable cells observed following recovery to ambient pressure. Additional pressure increase caused a further decrease in survivability, with approximately 102 CFU/ml recorded following exposure to 1000 MPa (1 GPa) and 1.5 GPa. Pressurizing samples from colonies resuscitated from survivors that had been previously exposed to high pressure resulted in substantially greater survivor counts. Experiments were carried out to examine potential interactions between pressure and temperature variables in determining bacterial survival. One generation of survivors previously exposed to 1 GPa was compared with WT samples to investigate survival between 37 and 8°C. The results did not reveal any coupling between acquired high pressure resistance and temperature effects on growth. PMID:25452750

  11. Spatially digitized tactile pressure sensors with tunable sensitivity and sensing range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Eunsuk; Sul, Onejae; Hwang, Soonhyung; Cho, Joonhyung; Chun, Hyunsuk; Kim, Hongjun; Lee, Seung-Beck

    2014-10-01

    When developing an electronic skin with touch sensation, an array of tactile pressure sensors with various ranges of pressure detection need to be integrated. This requires low noise, highly reliable sensors with tunable sensing characteristics. We demonstrate the operation of tactile pressure sensors that utilize the spatial distribution of contact electrodes to detect various ranges of tactile pressures. The device consists of a suspended elastomer diaphragm, with a carbon nanotube thin-film on the bottom, which makes contact with the electrodes on the substrate with applied pressure. The electrodes separated by set distances become connected in sequence with tactile pressure, enabling consecutive electrodes to produce a signal. Thus, the pressure is detected not by how much of a signal is produced but by which of the electrodes is registering an output. By modulating the diaphragm diameter, and suspension height, it was possible to tune the pressure sensitivity and sensing range. Also, adding a fingerprint ridge structure enabled the sensor to detect the periodicity of sub-millimeter grating patterns on a silicon wafer.

  12. Evaluation of an Intervention to Maintain Endotracheal Tube Cuff Pressure Within Therapeutic Range

    PubMed Central

    Sole, Mary Lou; Su, Xiaogang; Talbert, Steve; Penoyer, Daleen Aragon; Kalita, Samar; Jimenez, Edgar; Ludy, Jeffery E.; Bennett, Melody

    2012-01-01

    Background Endotracheal tube cuff pressure must be kept within an optimal range that ensures ventilation and prevents aspiration while maintaining tracheal perfusion. Objectives To test the effect of an intervention (adding or removing air) on the proportion of time that cuff pressure was between 20 and 30 cm H2O and to evaluate changes in cuff pressure over time. Methods A repeated-measure crossover design was used to study 32 orally intubated patients receiving mechanical ventilation for two 12-hour shifts (randomized control and intervention conditions). Continuous cuff pressure monitoring was initiated, and the pressure was adjusted to a minimum of 22 cm H2O. Caregivers were blinded to cuff pressure data, and usual care was provided during the control condition. During the intervention condition, cuff pressure alarm or clinical triggers guided the intervention. Results Most patients were men (mean age, 61.6 years). During the control condition, 51.7% of cuff pressure values were out of range compared with 11.1% during the intervention condition (P < .001). During the intervention, a mean of 8 adjustments were required, mostly to add air to the endotracheal tube cuff (mean 0.28 [SD, 0.13] mL). During the control condition, cuff pressure decreased over time (P < .001). Conclusions The intervention was effective in maintaining cuff pressure within an optimal range, and cuff pressure decreased over time without intervention. The effect of the intervention on outcomes such as ventilator-associated pneumonia and tracheal damage requires further study. PMID:21362715

  13. Development of a piezoelectric vacuum sensing component for a wide pressure range.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bing-Yu; Hsieh, Fan-Chun; Lin, Che-Yu; Chen, Shao-En; Chen, Fong-Zhi; Wu, Chia-Che

    2014-11-21

    In this study, we develop a clamped-clamped beam-type piezoelectric vacuum pressure sensing element. The clamped-clamped piezoelectric beam is composed of a PZT layer and a copper substrate. A pair of electrodes is set near each end. An input voltage is applied to a pair of electrodes to vibrate the piezoelectric beam, and the output voltage is measured at the other pair. Because the viscous forces on the piezoelectric beam vary at different air pressures, the vibration of the beam depends on the vacuum pressure. The developed pressure sensor can sense a wide range of pressure, from 6.5 × 10(-6) to 760 Torr. The experimental results showed that the output voltage is inversely proportional to the gas damping ratio, and thus, the vacuum pressure was estimated from the output voltage.

  14. Development of a Piezoelectric Vacuum Sensing Component for a Wide Pressure Range

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bing-Yu; Hsieh, Fan-Chun; Lin, Che-Yu; Chen, Shao-En; Chen, Fong-Zhi; Wu, Chia-Che

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we develop a clamped–clamped beam-type piezoelectric vacuum pressure sensing element. The clamped–clamped piezoelectric beam is composed of a PZT layer and a copper substrate. A pair of electrodes is set near each end. An input voltage is applied to a pair of electrodes to vibrate the piezoelectric beam, and the output voltage is measured at the other pair. Because the viscous forces on the piezoelectric beam vary at different air pressures, the vibration of the beam depends on the vacuum pressure. The developed pressure sensor can sense a wide range of pressure, from 6.5 × 10−6 to 760 Torr. The experimental results showed that the output voltage is inversely proportional to the gas damping ratio, and thus, the vacuum pressure was estimated from the output voltage. PMID:25421736

  15. Human pressures predict species' geographic range size better than biological traits.

    PubMed

    Di Marco, Moreno; Santini, Luca

    2015-06-01

    Geographic range size is the manifestation of complex interactions between intrinsic species traits and extrinsic environmental conditions. It is also a fundamental ecological attribute of species and a key extinction risk correlate. Past research has primarily focused on the role of biological and environmental predictors of range size, but macroecological patterns can also be distorted by human activities. Here, we analyse the role of extrinsic (biogeography, habitat state, climate, human pressure) and intrinsic (biology) variables in predicting range size of the world's terrestrial mammals. In particular, our aim is to compare the predictive ability of human pressure vs. species biology. We evaluated the ability of 19 intrinsic and extrinsic variables in predicting range size for 4867 terrestrial mammals. We repeated the analyses after excluding restricted-range species and performed separate analyses for species in different biogeographic realms and taxonomic groups. Our model had high predictive ability and showed that climatic variables and human pressures are the most influential predictors of range size. Interestingly, human pressures predict current geographic range size better than biological traits. These findings were confirmed when repeating the analyses on large-ranged species, individual biogeographic regions and individual taxonomic groups. Climatic and human impacts have determined the extinction of mammal species in the past and are the main factors shaping the present distribution of mammals. These factors also affect other vertebrate groups globally, and their influence on range size may be similar as well. Measuring climatic and human variables can allow to obtain approximate range size estimations for data-deficient and newly discovered species (e.g. hundreds of mammal species worldwide). Our results support the need for a more careful consideration of the role of climate change and human impact - as opposed to species biological

  16. High resolution and wide dynamic range pressure sensor based on two-dimensional photonic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olyaee, Saeed; Dehghani, Ali Asghar

    2012-03-01

    The authors present a new design of high resolution and wide dynamic range photonic crystal pressure sensor. This sensor is based on two-dimensional photonic crystal with square array of silicon rods surrounded by air. The sensor consists of a photonic crystal waveguide which is coupled to a photonic crystal nanocavity. The waveguide is configured by removing one row of Si rods and nanocavity is formed by modifying the radius of one Si rod. The sensor is designed for 1300 nm-1400 nm wavelengths. Simulation results show that resonant wavelength of nanocavity is linearly shifted to larger wavelengths by increasing the pressure. The designed sensor has a linear behavior between 0.1 GPa to 10 GPa of applied pressure and 8 nm/GPa of pressure sensitivity.

  17. Normal range for transdiaphragmatic pressures during sniffs with catheter mounted transducers.

    PubMed Central

    Evans, S A; Watson, L; Cowley, A J; Johnston, I D; Kinnear, W J

    1993-01-01

    BACKGROUND--Transdiaphragmatic pressure (sniff PDI) during maximal sniffs is a useful clinical test of inspiratory muscle function. Although a normal range has been established for sniff PDI using air filled balloons, no comparable data are available for catheter mounted pressure transducers. METHODS--Using a single catheter with two pressure transducers 15 cm apart, oesophageal and gastric pressures were recorded in 50 normal volunteers (25 women), five of each sex from each decade between the third and seventh decades of life. Each subject performed 10 maximal sniffs at functional residual capacity. RESULTS--Mean (SD) sniff PDI was 149 (32) cm H2O in men and 127 (22) cm H2O in women. The lower limits of normal for sniff PDI (mean -1.96 x SD) after logarithmic transformation of the data were 95 and 78 cm H2O in men and women respectively. CONCLUSIONS--With this technique transdiaphragmatic pressure can be measured using a single catheter which can easily be cleaned and reused. The values for sniff PDI are similar to those recorded previously with air filled balloons, suggesting that the method of recording pressure does not significantly affect the values obtained. Images PMID:8153926

  18. Pressure gradient sensors for bearing determination in shallow water tracking ranges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, Peter J.; Euerle, Steven E.; Menoche, Richard K.; Janiesch, Robert E.

    1996-04-01

    Underwater acoustic tracking has traditionally used only the arrival time of tracking pings to localize targets. This implies that the ping transmitted from a target must be received at a minimum of three separate nodes (receiver locations) in order to determine the position. For deep water ranges this was acceptable. In shallow water, where propagation ranges are limited, this requires a large number of nodes. This makes shallow water ranges very costly. An effort is underway to use pressure gradient hydrophones as receivers and measure the bearing of the ping arrival along with arrival time, thereby locating the target using only one tracking node. This allows for increased node spacing and greatly reduced cost. However, the accuracy required for training ranges is on the order of 1 degree. Further, the directional receiver must be housed so as to withstand impacts from fishing operations. Research including design, fabrication, and testing of conventional and unconventional pressure gradient hydrophones, the housing, and signal processing methods are discussed. Extensive testing has already been conducted using a 1″ diameter by 5″ long multimode hydrophone. A shallow water tracking test was conducted at the NUWC Lake Seneca test facility. The results demonstrate the feasibility of tracking using a single pressure gradient hydrophone with an accuracy of 50 yds out to 2 kyds. The effects of multiple paths and scattering are also discussed.

  19. Effects of ionic liquid electrode on pulse discharge plasmas in the wide range of gas pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Qiang; Hatakeyama, Rikizo; Kaneko, Toshiro

    2010-11-15

    Gas-liquid interfacial pulse discharge plasmas are generated in the wide range of gas pressures, where an ionic liquid is used as the liquid electrode. By analyzing the characteristics of discharge voltage and current, the discharge mechanisms at low and high pressures are found to be dominated by secondary electron emission and first Townsend ionization, respectively. Therefore, the discharge properties at low and high pressures are mainly determined by the cathode material and the discharge gas type, respectively. Furthermore, the plasma properties are investigated by a double Langmuir probe. The density of the positive pulse plasma is found to be much smaller than that of the negative pulse plasma, although the discharge voltage and current of the negative and positive pulse plasmas are of the same order of magnitude. The positive pulse discharge plasma is considered to quickly diffuse onto the chamber wall from the radially central region due to its high plasma potential compared with that in the peripheral region.

  20. Modified quadrupole mass analyzer RGA-100 for beam plasma research in forevacuum pressure range

    SciTech Connect

    Zolotukhin, D. B.; Tyunkov, A. V.; Yushkov, Yu. G.; Oks, E. M.

    2015-12-15

    The industrial quadrupole RGA-100 residual gas analyzer was modified for the research of electron beam-generated plasma at forevacuum pressure range. The standard ionizer of the RGA-100 was replaced by three electrode extracting unit. We made the optimization of operation parameters in order to provide the maximum values of measured currents of any ion species. The modified analyzer was successfully tested with beam plasma of argon, nitrogen, oxygen, and hydrocarbons.

  1. Modified quadrupole mass analyzer RGA-100 for beam plasma research in forevacuum pressure range.

    PubMed

    Zolotukhin, D B; Tyunkov, A V; Yushkov, Yu G; Oks, E M

    2015-12-01

    The industrial quadrupole RGA-100 residual gas analyzer was modified for the research of electron beam-generated plasma at forevacuum pressure range. The standard ionizer of the RGA-100 was replaced by three electrode extracting unit. We made the optimization of operation parameters in order to provide the maximum values of measured currents of any ion species. The modified analyzer was successfully tested with beam plasma of argon, nitrogen, oxygen, and hydrocarbons.

  2. Modified quadrupole mass analyzer RGA-100 for beam plasma research in forevacuum pressure range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zolotukhin, D. B.; Tyunkov, A. V.; Yushkov, Yu. G.; Oks, E. M.

    2015-12-01

    The industrial quadrupole RGA-100 residual gas analyzer was modified for the research of electron beam-generated plasma at forevacuum pressure range. The standard ionizer of the RGA-100 was replaced by three electrode extracting unit. We made the optimization of operation parameters in order to provide the maximum values of measured currents of any ion species. The modified analyzer was successfully tested with beam plasma of argon, nitrogen, oxygen, and hydrocarbons.

  3. A Liquid Density Standard Over Wide Ranges of Temperature and Pressure Based on Toluene

    PubMed Central

    McLinden, Mark O.; Splett, Jolene D.

    2008-01-01

    The density of liquid toluene has been measured over the temperature range −60 °C to 200 °C with pressures up to 35 MPa. A two-sinker hydrostatic-balance densimeter utilizing a magnetic suspension coupling provided an absolute determination of the density with low uncertainties. These data are the basis of NIST Standard Reference Material® 211d for liquid density over the temperature range −50 °C to 150 °C and pressure range 0.1 MPa to 30 MPa. A thorough uncertainty analysis is presented; this includes effects resulting from the experimental density determination, possible degradation of the sample due to time and exposure to high temperatures, dissolved air, uncertainties in the empirical density model, and the sample-to-sample variations in the SRM vials. Also considered is the effect of uncertainty in the temperature and pressure measurements. This SRM is intended for the calibration of industrial densimeters. PMID:27096111

  4. Mild neurotrauma indicates a range-specific pressure response to low level shock wave exposure.

    PubMed

    Vandevord, Pamela J; Bolander, Richard; Sajja, Venkata Siva Sai Sujith; Hay, Kathryn; Bir, Cynthia A

    2012-01-01

    Identifying the level of overpressure required to create physiological deficits is vital to advance prevention, diagnostic, and treatment strategies for individuals exposed to blasts. In this study, a rodent model of primary blast neurotrauma was employed to determine the pressure at which acute neurological alterations occurred. Rats were exposed to a single low intensity shock wave at a pressure of 0, 97, 117, or 153 kPa. Following exposure, rats were assessed for acute cognitive alterations using the Morris water maze and motor dysfunction using the horizontal ladder test. Subsequently, histological analyses of three brain regions (primary motor cortex, the hippocampal dentate gyrus region, and the posteromedial cortical amygdala) were conducted. Histological parameters included measuring the levels of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) to identify astrocyte activation, cleaved caspase-3 for early apoptosis identification and Fluoro-Jade B (FJB) which labels degenerating neurons within the brain tissue. The results demonstrated that an exposure to a single 117 kPa shock wave revealed a significant change in overall neurological deficits when compared to controls and the other pressures. The animals showed significant alterations in water maze parameters and a histological increase in the number of GFAP, caspase-3, and FJB-positive cells. It is suggested that when exposed to a low level shock wave, there may be a biomechanical response elicited by a specific pressure range which can cause low level neurological deficits within the rat. These data indicate that neurotrauma induced from a shock wave may lead to cognitive deficits in short-term learning and memory of rats. Additional histological evidence supports significant and diffuse glial activation and cellular damage. Further investigation into the biomechanical aspects of shock wave exposure is required to elucidate this pressure range-specific phenomenon. PMID:21994066

  5. High pressure XANES and XMCD in the tender X-ray energy range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilhelm, F.; Garbarino, G.; Jacobs, J.; Vitoux, H.; Steinmann, R.; Guillou, F.; Snigirev, A.; Snigireva, I.; Voisin, P.; Braithwaite, D.; Aoki, D.; Brison, J.-P.; Kantor, I.; Lyatun, I.; Rogalev, A.

    2016-07-01

    We have developed an experimental setup at the ESRF beamline ID12 dedicated to X-ray absorption and magnetic circular dichroism measurements at high pressure adapted for the tender X-ray energy range and compatible with low temperatures and with high magnetic field. The focused incoming X-ray beam passes through a thin diamond disk attached to a fully perforated diamond anvil and X-ray fluorescence photons from the sample are collected in back-scattering geometry through the same diamond disk. The pressure in the cell is measured using the ruby luminescence through a full diamond anvil. The highest pressure attainable with this diamond anvil cell (DAC) depends on the thickness of the diamond disk and it is above 16 GPa for a 80-μm thick plate and exceeds 4.5 GPa in the case of 30-μm diamond disk. Excellent performances of this setup in the tender X-ray range are illustrated with X-ray absorption near-edge structure studies of the phase transitions in KCl at the potassium and chlorine K-edges (3.61 and 2.82 keV, respectively) as well as in CdS at the sulfur K-edge (2.47 keV). This DAC together with a dedicated total fluorescence yield (TFY) detector could be mounted in the main heat exchanger of a cryostat and inserted in a bore of a superconducting magnet, this makes possible to perform X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) experiments at low temperature, high magnetic field and high pressure. Feasibility of this approach is shown with the XMCD results obtained at the U M?-edges in ferromagnetic superconductor UGe?.

  6. Isentropic expansion of copper plasma in Mbar pressure range at “Luch” laser facility

    SciTech Connect

    Bel'kov, S. A.; Derkach, V. N.; Garanin, S. G.; Mitrofanov, E. I.; Voronich, I. N.; Fortov, V. E.; Levashov, P. R.; Minakov, D. V.

    2014-01-21

    We present experimental results on thermodynamic properties of dense copper plasma in Mbar pressure range. The laser facility “Luch” with laser intensity 10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2} is used to compress copper up to ∼8 Mbar by a strong shock wave; subsequent expansion of copper plasma into Al, Ti, Sn allows us to obtain release isentropes of copper by the impedance–matching method. A theoretical analysis and quantum simulations show that in our experiments strongly coupled quantum plasma is generated.

  7. Software for X-Ray Images Calculation of Hydrogen Compression Device in Megabar Pressure Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egorov, Nikolay; Bykov, Alexander; Pavlov, Valery

    2007-06-01

    Software for x-ray images simulation is described. The software is a part of x-ray method used for investigation of an equation of state of hydrogen in a megabar pressure range. A graphical interface that clearly and simply allows users to input data for x-ray image calculation: properties of the studied device, parameters of the x-ray radiation source, parameters of the x-ray radiation recorder, the experiment geometry; to represent the calculation results and efficiently transmit them to other software for processing. The calculation time is minimized. This makes it possible to perform calculations in a dialogue regime. The software is written in ``MATLAB'' system.

  8. Polynomial approximations of thermodynamic properties of arbitrary gas mixtures over wide pressure and density ranges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allison, D. O.

    1972-01-01

    Computer programs for flow fields around planetary entry vehicles require real-gas equilibrium thermodynamic properties in a simple form which can be evaluated quickly. To fill this need, polynomial approximations were found for thermodynamic properties of air and model planetary atmospheres. A coefficient-averaging technique was used for curve fitting in lieu of the usual least-squares method. The polynomials consist of terms up to the ninth degree in each of two variables (essentially pressure and density) including all cross terms. Four of these polynomials can be joined to cover, for example, a range of about 1000 to 11000 K and 0.00001 to 1 atmosphere (1 atm = 1.0133 x 100,000 N/m sq) for a given thermodynamic property. Relative errors of less than 1 percent are found over most of the applicable range.

  9. Thermodynamic and Transport Properties of Real Air Plasma in Wide Range of Temperature and Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chunlin; Wu, Yi; Chen, Zhexin; Yang, Fei; Feng, Ying; Rong, Mingzhe; Zhang, Hantian

    2016-07-01

    Air plasma has been widely applied in industrial manufacture. In this paper, both dry and humid air plasmas' thermodynamic and transport properties are calculated in temperature 300-100000 K and pressure 0.1-100 atm. To build a more precise model of real air plasma, over 70 species are considered for composition. Two different methods, the Gibbs free energy minimization method and the mass action law method, are used to determinate the composition of the air plasma in a different temperature range. For the transport coefficients, the simplified Chapman-Enskog method developed by Devoto has been applied using the most recent collision integrals. It is found that the presence of CO2 has almost no effect on the properties of air plasma. The influence of H2O can be ignored except in low pressure air plasma, in which the saturated vapor pressure is relatively high. The results will serve as credible inputs for computational simulation of air plasma. supported by the National Key Basic Research Program of China (973 Program)(No. 2015CB251002), National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 51521065, 51577145), the Science and Technology Project Funds of the Grid State Corporation (SGTYHT/13-JS-177), the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities, and State Grid Corporation Project (GY71-14-004)

  10. Foot posture, range of motion and plantar pressure characteristics in obese and non-obese individuals.

    PubMed

    Butterworth, Paul A; Urquhart, Donna M; Landorf, Karl B; Wluka, Anita E; Cicuttini, Flavia M; Menz, Hylton B

    2015-02-01

    Obesity is a world-wide health problem and is strongly associated with musculoskeletal disorders of the lower limb. The aim of this study was to evaluate plantar loading patterns in obese and non-obese individuals, while accounting for the contribution of foot structure, range of motion and walking speed. Sixty-eight participants (mean±SD age, 52.6±8.0 years), including 47 females (69%), underwent assessments of body mass index, foot pain and foot structure. Plantar pressures were also obtained, using a floor-mounted resistive sensor mat system. Multiple regression analysis was used to determine which variables were most strongly associated with plantar loading patterns. Obese individuals exhibited flatter feet, reduced inversion-eversion range of motion, and higher peak plantar pressures when walking. After accounting for foot structure and walking speed, bodyweight was found to be significantly associated with elevated loading of the foot, particularly the forefoot and midfoot. These findings suggest that obesity increases the stresses applied to the foot directly, via increased bodyweight, and indirectly, via alterations to foot structure, which may partly explain the link between obesity and the development of foot pain. Clinicians dealing with foot problems should consider the effect of increased bodyweight on plantar loading in obese patients.

  11. A 100 μm diameter capacitive pressure sensor with 50 MPa dynamic range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Xin; Gianchandani, Yogesh B.

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents fully sealed absolute capacitive pressure sensors for high-pressure applications in hydraulic environments. The sensors have a ø100 μm diaphragm and a nominal interelectrode gap of 3 μm. The interiors of the cavities are electrically isolated, allowing the sensors to operate at the high end of the pressure range with the center of the diaphragm in contact with the substrate beneath it. The sensors are monolithically fabricated using a combination of surface micromachining and through-wafer isolated bulk-silicon lead transfer for backside contacts. This structure allows the device footprints to be reduced to about 150  ×  150 μm2, and simplifies system integration. Fabricated sensors with diaphragm thicknesses of 3 μm (C100t3) and 5 μm (C100t5) are tested in an oil environment at pressures up to 20 MPa and 50 MPa, respectively. The average sensitivities are 7200 ppm MPa-1 (3.1 fF MPa-1) for C100t3, and 3400 ppm MPa-1 (1.6 fF MPa-1) for C100t5 in the non-contact mode. In the contact mode, the average sensitivities are 9900 ppm MPa-1 (5.3 fF MPa-1) for C100t3, and 3100 ppm MPa-1 (1.6 fF MPa-1) for C100t5. A multiphysics finite element analysis approach that accommodates contact mode simulations is also presented.

  12. Ultrananocrystalline Diamond Cantilever Wide Dynamic Range Acceleration/Vibration /Pressure Sensor

    DOEpatents

    Krauss, Alan R.; Gruen, Dieter M.; Pellin, Michael J.; Auciello, Orlando

    2003-09-02

    An ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) element formed in a cantilever configuration is used in a highly sensitive, ultra-small sensor for measuring acceleration, shock, vibration and static pressure over a wide dynamic range. The cantilever UNCD element may be used in combination with a single anode, with measurements made either optically or by capacitance. In another embodiment, the cantilever UNCD element is disposed between two anodes, with DC voltages applied to the two anodes. With a small AC modulated voltage applied to the UNCD cantilever element and because of the symmetry of the applied voltage and the anode-cathode gap distance in the Fowler-Nordheim equation, any change in the anode voltage ratio V1/V2 required to maintain a specified current ratio precisely matches any displacement of the UNCD cantilever element from equilibrium. By measuring changes in the anode voltage ratio required to maintain a specified current ratio, the deflection of the UNCD cantilever can be precisely determined. By appropriately modulating the voltages applied between the UNCD cantilever and the two anodes, or limit electrodes, precise independent measurements of pressure, uniaxial acceleration, vibration and shock can be made. This invention also contemplates a method for fabricating the cantilever UNCD structure for the sensor.

  13. Ultrananocrystalline diamond cantilever wide dynamic range acceleration/vibration/pressure sensor

    DOEpatents

    Krauss, Alan R.; Gruen, Dieter M.; Pellin, Michael J.; Auciello, Orlando

    2002-07-23

    An ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) element formed in a cantilever configuration is used in a highly sensitive, ultra-small sensor for measuring acceleration, shock, vibration and static pressure over a wide dynamic range. The cantilever UNCD element may be used in combination with a single anode, with measurements made either optically or by capacitance. In another embodiment, the cantilever UNCD element is disposed between two anodes, with DC voltages applied to the two anodes. With a small AC modulated voltage applied to the UNCD cantilever element and because of the symmetry of the applied voltage and the anode-cathode gap distance in the Fowler-Nordheim equation, any change in the anode voltage ratio V1/N2 required to maintain a specified current ratio precisely matches any displacement of the UNCD cantilever element from equilibrium. By measuring changes in the anode voltage ratio required to maintain a specified current ratio, the deflection of the UNCD cantilever can be precisely determined. By appropriately modulating the voltages applied between the UNCD cantilever and the two anodes, or limit electrodes, precise independent measurements of pressure, uniaxial acceleration, vibration and shock can be made. This invention also contemplates a method for fabricating the cantilever UNCD structure for the sensor.

  14. Methane storage in nanoporous material at supercritical temperature over a wide range of pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Keliu; Chen, Zhangxin; Li, Xiangfang; Dong, Xiaohu

    2016-09-01

    The methane storage behavior in nanoporous material is significantly different from that of a bulk phase, and has a fundamental role in methane extraction from shale and its storage for vehicular applications. Here we show that the behavior and mechanisms of the methane storage are mainly dominated by the ratio of the interaction between methane molecules and nanopores walls to the methane intermolecular interaction, and a geometric constraint. By linking the macroscopic properties of the methane storage to the microscopic properties of a system of methane molecules-nanopores walls, we develop an equation of state for methane at supercritical temperature over a wide range of pressures. Molecular dynamic simulation data demonstrates that this equation is able to relate very well the methane storage behavior with each of the key physical parameters, including a pore size and shape and wall chemistry and roughness. Moreover, this equation only requires one fitted parameter, and is simple, reliable and powerful in application.

  15. Methane storage in nanoporous material at supercritical temperature over a wide range of pressures.

    PubMed

    Wu, Keliu; Chen, Zhangxin; Li, Xiangfang; Dong, Xiaohu

    2016-01-01

    The methane storage behavior in nanoporous material is significantly different from that of a bulk phase, and has a fundamental role in methane extraction from shale and its storage for vehicular applications. Here we show that the behavior and mechanisms of the methane storage are mainly dominated by the ratio of the interaction between methane molecules and nanopores walls to the methane intermolecular interaction, and a geometric constraint. By linking the macroscopic properties of the methane storage to the microscopic properties of a system of methane molecules-nanopores walls, we develop an equation of state for methane at supercritical temperature over a wide range of pressures. Molecular dynamic simulation data demonstrates that this equation is able to relate very well the methane storage behavior with each of the key physical parameters, including a pore size and shape and wall chemistry and roughness. Moreover, this equation only requires one fitted parameter, and is simple, reliable and powerful in application. PMID:27628747

  16. Hollow-Cathode Based Electrical Discharge in Atmospheric Pressure Water Vapor at Wide Range of Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koo, Il Gyo; Lee, Woong Moo

    2006-10-01

    Atmospheric pressure water vapor, in the temperature range from 150 to 700 °C, was used as the carrier gas for DC powered electrical discharge in hollow cathode configuration. The electrode assembly was constructed in usual hollow-cathode configuration by sandwiching a dielectric spacer, 200 μm thick, with two thin metal sheets and boring a micro hole of 300 μm diameter. The current-voltage profile of the discharge showed a positive differential resistivity characterizing an abnormal glow discharge. The power consumption for the water discharge at 700 °C was less than 50% the consumption at 150 °C. The reduction of the power for sustaining the discharge with increase of the gas temperature was partly explained by relating the ionic mobility and the distribution of ionic mean free path to the temperature.

  17. Methane storage in nanoporous material at supercritical temperature over a wide range of pressures

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Keliu; Chen, Zhangxin; Li, Xiangfang; Dong, Xiaohu

    2016-01-01

    The methane storage behavior in nanoporous material is significantly different from that of a bulk phase, and has a fundamental role in methane extraction from shale and its storage for vehicular applications. Here we show that the behavior and mechanisms of the methane storage are mainly dominated by the ratio of the interaction between methane molecules and nanopores walls to the methane intermolecular interaction, and a geometric constraint. By linking the macroscopic properties of the methane storage to the microscopic properties of a system of methane molecules-nanopores walls, we develop an equation of state for methane at supercritical temperature over a wide range of pressures. Molecular dynamic simulation data demonstrates that this equation is able to relate very well the methane storage behavior with each of the key physical parameters, including a pore size and shape and wall chemistry and roughness. Moreover, this equation only requires one fitted parameter, and is simple, reliable and powerful in application. PMID:27628747

  18. Physical characterization of laminar spray flames in the pressure range 0.1-0.9 MPa

    SciTech Connect

    Russo, Stefano; Gomez, Alessandro

    2006-04-15

    An experimental study is reported on the physical characterization of the structure of ethanol/argon/oxygen coflow laminar spray diffusion flames in the pressure range 0.1-0.9 MPa. Diagnostic techniques include phase Doppler anemometry to measure the droplet size distribution and the axial and radial velocity components of the droplets. The gas-phase velocity is determined using measurements from the smallest (low Stokes number) droplets and is corrected for thermophoretic effects. Temperature information is obtained using thin-film pyrometry combined with an infrared camera. All flames present a cold inner core, in which little or no vaporization takes place, surrounded by an envelope flame buried in a thermal boundary layer, where most of the droplet evaporation occurs. The thickness of this thermal boundary layer scales with the inverse of the Peclet number. Especially near the base of the flame, photographic evidence of streaks, which in some case even reveal the presence of soot, suggests that some droplets survive the common envelope flame and burn isolated on the oxidizer side in a mixed regime of internal/external group combustion. The reconstruction of the entire droplet vaporization history confirms this evidence quantitatively. A criterion for droplet survival beyond the envelope flame based on the critical value of a suitably defined vaporization Damkohler number is proposed. The scaling and self-similar behavior of the investigated flames suggest that a mixed regime is established, with a momentum-controlled cold core and a buoyancy-controlled high-temperature boundary layer, the thickness of which varies significantly with pressure, as expected from Peclet number scaling. The growth of this layer and the thickness of the vaporization region are reduced at pressures above atmospheric because of density effects on thermal diffusivity. Some aspects of the design of the combustion chamber and of the atomizer system are discussed in detail since they are

  19. Circadian rhythms in blood pressure in free-ranging three-toed sloths (Bradypus variegatus).

    PubMed

    Duarte, D P F; Silva, V L; Jaguaribe, A M; Gilmore, D P; Da Costa, C P

    2003-02-01

    Blood pressure (BP) profiles were monitored in nine free-ranging sloths (Bradypus variegatus) by coupling one common carotid artery to a BP telemetry transmitter. Animals moved freely in an isolated and temperature-controlled room (24 degrees C) with 12/12-h artificial light-dark cycles and behaviors were observed during resting, eating and moving. Systolic (SBP) and diastolic (DBP) blood pressures were sampled for 1 min every 15 min for 24 h. BP rhythm over 24 h was analyzed by the cosinor method and the mesor, amplitude, acrophase and percent rhythm were calculated. A total of 764 measurements were made in the light cycle and 721 in the dark cycle. Twenty-four-hour values (mean +/- SD) were obtained for SBP (121 +/- 22 mmHg), DBP (86 +/- 17 mmHg), mean BP (MBP, 98 +/- 18 mmHg) and heart rate (73 +/- 16 bpm). The SBP, DBP and MBP were significantly higher (unpaired Student t-test) during the light period (125 +/- 21, 88 +/- 15 and 100 +/- 17 mmHg, respectively) than during the dark period (120 +/- 21, 85 +/- 17 and 97 +/- 17 mmHg, respectively) and the acrophase occurred between 16:00 and 17:45 h. This circadian variation is similar to that observed in cats, dogs and marmosets. The BP decreased during "behavioral sleep" (MBP down from 110 +/- 19 to 90 +/- 19 mmHg at 21:00 to 8:00 h). Both feeding and moving induced an increase in MBP (96 +/- 17 to 119 +/- 17 mmHg at 17:00 h and 97 +/- 19 to 105 +/- 12 mmHg at 15:00 h, respectively). The results show that conscious sloths present biphasic circadian fluctuations in BP levels, which are higher during the light period and are mainly synchronized with feeding.

  20. Respiratory Response of the Deep-Sea Amphipod Stephonyx biscayensis Indicates Bathymetric Range Limitation by Temperature and Hydrostatic Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Alastair; Thatje, Sven

    2011-01-01

    Depth zonation of fauna on continental margins is well documented. Whilst increasing hydrostatic pressure with depth has long been considered a factor contributing significantly to this pattern, discussion of the relative significance of decreasing temperature with depth has continued. This study investigates the physiological tolerances of fed and starved specimens of the bathyal lysianassoid amphipod Stephonyx biscayensis at varying temperature to acute pressure exposure by measuring the rate of oxygen consumption. Acclimation to atmospheric pressure is shown to have no significant interaction with temperature and/or pressure effects. Similarly, starvation is shown to have no significant effect on the interaction of temperature and pressure. Subsequently, the effect of pressure on respiration rate is revealed to be dependent on temperature: pressure equivalent to 2000 m depth was tolerated at 1 and 3°C; pressure equivalent to 2500 m depth was tolerated at 5.5°C; at 10°C pressure equivalent to 3000 m depth was tolerated. The variation in tolerance is consistent with the natural distribution range reported for this species. There are clear implications for hypotheses relating to the observed phenomenon of a biodiversity bottleneck between 2000 and 3000 metres, and for the potential for bathymetric range shifts in response to global climate change. PMID:22174838

  1. The Influence of Fundamental Frequency and Sound Pressure Level Range on Breathing Patterns in Female Classical Singing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collyer, Sally; Thorpe, C. William; Callaghan, Jean; Davis, Pamela J.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This study investigated the influence of fundamental frequency (F0) and sound pressure level (SPL) range on respiratory behavior in classical singing. Method: Five trained female singers performed an 8-s messa di voce (a crescendo and decrescendo on one F0) across their musical F0 range. Lung volume (LV) change was estimated, and…

  2. Pressure distribution on a vectored-thrust V/STOL fighter in the transition-speed range. [wind tunnel tests to measure pressure distribution on body and wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mineck, R. E.; Margason, R. J.

    1974-01-01

    A wind-tunnel investigation has been conducted in the Langley V/STOL tunnel with a vectored-thrust V/STOL fighter configuration to obtain detailed pressure measurements on the body and on the wing in the transition-speed range. The vectored-thrust jet exhaust induced a region of negative pressure coefficients on the lower surface of the wing and on the bottom of the fuselage. The location of the jet exhaust relative to the wing was a major factor in determining the extent of the region of negative pressure coefficients.

  3. SUPPLEMENTARY COMPARISON: Negative gauge pressure comparison: range -95 kPa to +95 kPa (EURAMET Project 1131)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rantanen, Markku; Saxholm, Sari; Altintas, Aykurt; Pavis, Richard; Peterson, Guliko

    2010-01-01

    A pressure comparison in the negative gauge pressure range was arranged in 2009. The participating laboratories were CMI/Czech Republic, FORCE Technology/Denmark, AS Metrosert/Estonia and MIKES/Finland. Negative gauge pressures are a common range for pressure calibrations although uncertainty requirements are generally not very high. The results from the four participating laboratories suggest that calibrations in the negative gauge pressure range are not as easy as expected. Some of the claimed uncertainties were perhaps too optimistic, and the large variation in the results made it difficult to generate consistent reference values. The agreement of the results at positive gauge pressures on the same transfer standard was much better. Obviously there is a need for further comparisons in the negative gauge pressure range. The transfer standard was a multifunction calibrator Beamex MC5 equipped with an internal pressure module for the range -100 kPa to 104 kPa in the gauge mode. The resolution of the display was 0.001 kPa. The stability of the transfer standard was good. The comparison was registered as EURAMET Project No. 1131 and as the supplementary comparison EURAMET.M.P-S8 in the BIPM key comparison database. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by EURAMET, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (MRA).

  4. High quality x-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements with long energy range at high pressure using diamond anvil cell

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, X.; Newville, M.; Prakapenka, V.B.; Rivers, M.L.; Sutton, S.R.

    2009-07-31

    We describe an approach for acquiring high quality x-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy spectra with wide energy range at high pressure using diamond anvil cell (DAC). Overcoming the serious interference of diamond Bragg peaks is essential for combining XAFS and DAC techniques in high pressure research, yet an effective method to obtain accurate XAFS spectrum free from DAC induced glitches has been lacking. It was found that these glitches, whose energy positions are very sensitive to the relative orientation between DAC and incident x-ray beam, can be effectively eliminated using an iterative algorithm based on repeated measurements over a small angular range of DAC orientation, e.g., within {+-}3{sup o} relative to the x-ray beam direction. Demonstration XAFS spectra are reported for rutile-type GeO{sub 2} recorded by traditional ambient pressure and high pressure DAC methods, showing similar quality at 440 eV above the absorption edge. Accurate XAFS spectra of GeO{sub 2} glass were obtained at high pressure up to 53 GPa, providing important insight into the structural polymorphism of GeO{sub 2} glass at high pressure. This method is expected be applicable for in situ XAFS measurements using a diamond anvil cell up to ultrahigh pressures.

  5. High quality x-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements with long energy range at high pressure using diamond anvil cell

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Xinguo; Newville, Matthew; Prakapenka, Vitali B.; Rivers, Mark L.; Sutton, Stephen R.

    2009-01-01

    We describe an approach for acquiring high quality x-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy spectra with wide energy range at high pressure using diamond anvil cell (DAC). Overcoming the serious interference of diamond Bragg peaks is essential for combining XAFS and DAC techniques in high pressure research, yet an effective method to obtain accurate XAFS spectrum free from DAC induced glitches has been lacking. It was found that these glitches, whose energy positions are very sensitive to the relative orientation between DAC and incident x-ray beam, can be effectively eliminated using an iterative algorithm based on repeated measurements over a small angular range of DAC orientation, e.g., within ±3° relative to the x-ray beam direction. Demonstration XAFS spectra are reported for rutile-type GeO2 recorded by traditional ambient pressure and high pressure DAC methods, showing similar quality at 440 eV above the absorption edge. Accurate XAFS spectra of GeO2 glass were obtained at high pressure up to 53 GPa, providing important insight into the structural polymorphism of GeO2 glass at high pressure. This method is expected be applicable for in situ XAFS measurements using a diamond anvil cell up to ultrahigh pressures. PMID:19655966

  6. Refraction index of shock compressed water in the megabar pressure range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batani, D.; Jakubowska, K.; Benuzzi-Mounaix, A.; Cavazzoni, C.; Danson, C.; Hall, T.; Kimpel, M.; Neely, D.; Pasley, J.; Rabec Le Gloahec, M.; Telaro, B.

    2015-11-01

    We compressed water to megabar pressures by laser-driven shock waves and evidenced transparent, opaque and reflecting phases as pressure increases. The refraction index of water in the first two states was measured using a VISAR system. At high compression a sharp increase of the real and imaginary part of the refraction index is observed. Experiments were performed at the LULI and RAL laboratories.

  7. Seismic attenuation in partially saturated Berea sandstone submitted to a range of confining pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, Samuel; Tisato, Nicola; Quintal, Beatriz; Holliger, Klaus

    2016-03-01

    Using the forced oscillation method, we measure the extensional-mode attenuation and Young's modulus of a Berea sandstone sample at seismic frequencies (0.5-50 Hz) for varying levels of water saturation (~0-100%) and confining pressures (2-25 MPa). Attenuation is negligible for dry conditions and saturation levels <80%. For saturation levels between ~91% and ~100%, attenuation is significant and frequency dependent in the form of distinct bell-shaped curves having their maxima between 1 and 20 Hz. Increasing saturation causes an increase of the overall attenuation magnitude and a shift of its peak to lower frequencies. On the other hand, increasing the confining pressure causes a reduction in the attenuation magnitude and a shift of its peak to higher frequencies. For saturation levels above ~98%, the fluid pressure increases with increasing confining pressure. When the fluid pressure is high enough to ensure full water saturation of the sample, attenuation becomes negligible. A second series of comparable experiments reproduces these results satisfactorily. Based on a qualitative analysis of the data, the frequency-dependent attenuation meets the theoretical predictions of mesoscopic wave-induced fluid flow (WIFF) in response to a heterogeneous water distribution in the pore space, so-called patchy saturation. These results show that mesoscopic WIFF can be an important source of seismic attenuation at reservoir conditions.

  8. Carbon at pressures in the range 0.1--1 TPa (10 Mbar)

    SciTech Connect

    Nellis, W. J.; Mitchell, A. C.; McMahan, A. K.

    2001-07-15

    Single-shock (Hugoniot) equation-of-state data of shock-compressed C (graphite) are reported at pressures of 480 and 760 GPa (7.6 Mbar). Graphite is shock-compressed completely into a diamond-like phase at pressures below 80 GPa. At pressures of 80--800 GPa comparison of an ensemble of experimental Hugoniot data for shock-compressed graphite and diamond, and theoretical calculations of the Hugoniots of graphite and diamond, and the 0 K isotherm of diamond suggest diamond melts at {approx}300 GPa on the Hugoniot of graphite and that the diamond phase is the ground-state structure of C up to at least 600 GPa.

  9. Calculation of the density of solutions (sunflower oil + n-hexane) over a wide range of temperatures and pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safarov, M. M.; Abdukhamidova, Z.

    1995-09-01

    We present the results from an experimental investigation of the density of the sunflower oil system as a function of the mass concentration of n-hexane in the ranges of temperatures T=290 520 K and pressures P=0.101 98.1 MPa. A method of hydrostatic weighing was used to measure the density of the solutions under study.

  10. Sample transfer system for surface studies in wide pressure range (10-7-106 Pa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichikawa, Shinichi; Wilson, Mahlon S.

    1987-02-01

    An inexpensive sample transfer system suitable for surface studies with in situ prepared model catalysts is described. Experiments from ultrahigh vacuum to 10 atm and 50-cm travel with negligible pressure spikes were made possible by the use of double-seal glands with spring-loaded Teflon O-rings and a guided rotational transport rod.

  11. Extended pressure range performance of Kaiser/Marquardt 490N thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellison, J. R.; Kreiner, K. B.

    1993-06-01

    The performance of INTELSAT VI Reboost Program Liquid Apogee Motor (LAM) is studied using both ground and flight testing results. Ground testing based on an INTELSAT VI qualification unit, S/N 002A, was performed at the Kaiser Marquardt facility in California in 1991. Data obtained from the F-603 flight show that the R4-D 490 N LAM is susceptible to a dynamic combustion instability mode, called chugging, when operated at a low inlet pressure with helium saturated propellants.

  12. Isothermal compressibility of amino alcohols in the pressure range from 0.1 to 300 MPa at 298 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodnikova, M. N.; Troitskii, V. M.; Solonina, I. A.; Shirokova, E. V.; Kraevskii, S. V.

    2015-01-01

    The isothermal compressibilities of three amino alcohols are measured on a unique setup for direct compression in the pressure range of 0.1 to 300 MPa at 298 K. The lowest baric dependence of isothermal compressibility is found for 3-amino-1-propanol, while 2-amino-1-butanol is characterized by the highest isothermal compressibility. The crystallization of 4-amino-1-butanol is observed at pressures of 200-250 MPa. The resulting data are discussed from the viewpoint of the stability of spatial hydrogen bond networks in amino alcohols and are compared to the similar dependences of liquid diols.

  13. Do current methods for endotracheal tube cuff inflation create pressures above the recommended range? A review of the evidence.

    PubMed

    Grant, Thomas

    2013-12-01

    Inflation and measurement of endotracheal (ET) tube cuff pressure is often not seen as a critical aspect of care in surgical patients. The morbidity associated by an overinflated cuff has been regularly highlighted in literature, for example mucosal ulceration (Combes et al 2001) and vocal cord paralysis (Holley & Gildea 1971). This article will outline techniques for the methods of inflation based on the latest scientific evidence. The author will seek to examine if intraoperative cuff assessment and monitoring should become routine for the anaesthetic practitioner and if current practice for inflating cuffs creates pressures outside the safe range.

  14. Changing the "Normal Range" for Blood Pressure from 140/90 to 130/Any Improves Risk Assessment.

    PubMed

    Fulks, Michael; Stout, Robert L; Dolan, Vera F

    2015-01-01

    Objective .- Redefine the "normal" reference range for blood pressure from <140/90 to one that more effectively identifies individuals with increased mortality risk. Method .- Data from the recently published 2014 CRL blood pressure study was used. It includes 2,472,706 life insurance applicants tested by Clinical Reference Laboratory from 1993 to 2007 with follow-up for vital status using the September 2011 Social Security Death Master File. Various upper limits of blood pressure (BP in mm Hg) were evaluated to determine if any was superior to the current, commonly used limit of 140/90 in identifying individuals with increased mortality risk. Results .- An alternative reference range using a systolic BP (SBP) <130 with any diastolic BP (DBP) included 84% of life insurance applicants. It had a lower mortality rate and narrower range of relative risk than <140/90, including 89% as many applicants but only 68% as many deaths. This pattern of lives and deaths was consistent across age and sex. Conclusion .- Switching to a "normal" reference range of SBP <130 offers superior risk assessment relative to using BP <140/90 while still including a sufficient percentage of the population. PMID:27584806

  15. Changing the "Normal Range" for Blood Pressure from 140/90 to 130/Any Improves Risk Assessment.

    PubMed

    Fulks, Michael; Stout, Robert L; Dolan, Vera F

    2015-01-01

    Objective .- Redefine the "normal" reference range for blood pressure from <140/90 to one that more effectively identifies individuals with increased mortality risk. Method .- Data from the recently published 2014 CRL blood pressure study was used. It includes 2,472,706 life insurance applicants tested by Clinical Reference Laboratory from 1993 to 2007 with follow-up for vital status using the September 2011 Social Security Death Master File. Various upper limits of blood pressure (BP in mm Hg) were evaluated to determine if any was superior to the current, commonly used limit of 140/90 in identifying individuals with increased mortality risk. Results .- An alternative reference range using a systolic BP (SBP) <130 with any diastolic BP (DBP) included 84% of life insurance applicants. It had a lower mortality rate and narrower range of relative risk than <140/90, including 89% as many applicants but only 68% as many deaths. This pattern of lives and deaths was consistent across age and sex. Conclusion .- Switching to a "normal" reference range of SBP <130 offers superior risk assessment relative to using BP <140/90 while still including a sufficient percentage of the population.

  16. Long-range correlations of microseism-band pressure fluctuations in the ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ball, Justin S.; Godin, Oleg A.; Evers, Läslo G.; Lv, Cheng

    2016-08-01

    We investigate the spatial coherence of underwater ambient noise using a yearlong time-series measured off Ascension Island. Qualitative agreement with observed cross-correlations is achieved using a simple range-dependent model, constrained by earlier, active tomographic studies in the area. In particular, the model correctly predicts the existence of two weakly dispersive normal modes in the microseism frequency range, with the group speed of one of the normal modes being smaller than the sound speed in water. The agreement justifies our interpretation of the peaks of the measured cross-correlation function of ambient noise as modal arrivals, with dispersion that is sensitive to crustal velocity structure. Our observations are consistent with Scholte to Moho head wave coupled propagation, with double mode conversion occurring due to the bathymetric variations between receivers. We thus demonstrate the feasibility of interrogating crustal properties using noise interferometry of moored hydrophone data at ranges in excess of 120 km.

  17. APT: An Autonomous Tool for Measuring Acceleration, Pressure, and Temperature with Large Dynamic Range and Bandwidth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heesemann, M.; Davis, E. E.

    2015-12-01

    We describe a new tool developed to facilitate the study of inter-related geodetic, geodynamic, seismic, and oceanographic phenomena. It incorporates a novel tri-axial accelerometer developed by Quartz Seismic Sensors, Inc, a pressure sensor developed by Paroscientific Inc., and a low-power, high-precision frequency counter and data logger built by RBR, Ltd. The sensors, counters, and loggers are housed in a 7 cm o.d., 70 cm long pressure case designed for use in up to 12 km of water. Sampling intervals are programmable from 0.1 s to 1 hr; standard memory can store up to 30 million samples; total power consumption is roughly 115 mW when operating continuously (1 s.p.s. or higher) and proportionately lower when operating intermittently (e.g., 2 mW at 1 sample per min.). Serial and USB communications protocols allow a variety of download and cable-connection options. Measurement precision of the order of 10-8 of full scale (e.g., 4000 m water depth, 1 g) allows observations of pressure and acceleration variations of 0.4 Pa and 0.1 μm s-2. Long-term variations in vertical acceleration are sensitive to displacement through the gravity gradient at a level of roughly 2 cm; long-term variations in horizontal acceleration are sensitive to tilt at a level of 0.01 μRad. With these sensitivities and the broad bandwidth (5 Hz to DC), ground motion associated with microseisms and seismic waves, tidal loading, and slow and rapid geodynamic deformation normally studied by disparate instruments can be observed with a single tool. The first c. 1-year deployment with the instrument connected to the Ocean Networks Canada NEPTUNE observatory cable is underway to study interseismic deformation of the Cascadia subduction zone. It will then be deployed at the Hikurangi subduction zone to study episodic slow slip. Deployment of the tool for the initial test was accomplished by pushing the tool vertically below the seafloor with the remotely operated vehicle Jason, with no profile

  18. Direct Numerical Simulation and Theories of Wall Turbulence with a Range of Pressure Gradients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coleman, G. N.; Garbaruk, A.; Spalart, P. R.

    2014-01-01

    A new Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) of Couette-Poiseuille flow at a higher Reynolds number is presented and compared with DNS of other wall-bounded flows. It is analyzed in terms of testing semi-theoretical proposals for universal behavior of the velocity, mixing length, or eddy viscosity in pressure gradients, and in terms of assessing the accuracy of two turbulence models. These models are used in two modes, the traditional one with only a dependence on the wall-normal coordinate y, and a newer one in which a lateral dependence on z is added. For pure Couette flow and the Couette-Poiseuille case considered here, this z-dependence allows some models to generate steady streamwise vortices, which generally improves the agreement with DNS and experiment. On the other hand, it complicates the comparison between DNS and models.

  19. Contrasting sound velocity and intermediate-range structural order between polymerized and depolymerized silicate glasses under pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakamaki, Tatsuya; Kono, Yoshio; Wang, Yanbin; Park, Changyong; Yu, Tony; Jing, Zhicheng; Shen, Guoyin

    2014-04-01

    X-ray diffraction and ultrasonic velocity measurements of three silicate glasses (in jadeite, albite, and diopside compositions) show a sharp contrast in pressure-induced changes in structure and elasticity. With increasing pressure to around 6 GPa, polymerized glasses (jadeite and albite) display large shift in the first sharp diffraction peak (FSDP) in the structure factor, S(Q), to higher-Q values, indicating rapid shrinkage in the intermediate-range ordered (IRO) structure. Above 6 GPa, the shift of FSDP decelerates, suggesting that shrinkage in the IRO structure has been largely completed and the structure evolution is now dominated by the diminution of the interstitial volume in a more densely packed arrangement. Associated with this structural change, sound velocities increase with pressure above 6 GPa. In contrast, the depolymerized diopside glass exhibits smaller changes in the pressure dependence for both sound velocities and FSDP positions. Compared to the polymerized glasses, the velocities are faster and the positions of FSDP appear at higher-Q under the same experimental conditions. The results suggest that the depolymerized diopside glass has an initially denser IRO structure compared to that of the polymerized glasses, and there are no sufficient interstitial voids to shrink. The different behaviors between polymerized and depolymerized glasses are apparently related to the initial linkage of tetrahedra and the pressure-induced structural reactions. These results suggest that under compression up to 10 GPa, the degree of polymerization is a major factor affecting the IRO network structure and the sound velocity of silicate glasses.

  20. Inertial-range kinetic turbulence in pressure-anisotropic astrophysical plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunz, M. W.; Schekochihin, A. A.; Chen, C. H. K.; Abel, I. G.; Cowley, S. C.

    2015-10-01

    > A theoretical framework for low-frequency electromagnetic (drift-)kinetic turbulence in a collisionless, multi-species plasma is presented. The result generalises reduced magnetohydrodynamics (RMHD) and kinetic RMHD (Schekochihin et al., Astrophys. J. Suppl. Ser., vol. 182, 2009, pp. 310-377) to the case where the mean distribution function of the plasma is pressure-anisotropic and different ion species are allowed to drift with respect to each other - a situation routinely encountered in the solar wind and presumably ubiquitous in hot dilute astrophysical plasmas such as the intracluster medium. Two main objectives are achieved. First, in a non-Maxwellian plasma, the relationships between fluctuating fields (e.g. the Alfvén ratio) are order-unity modified compared to the more commonly considered Maxwellian case, and so a quantitative theory is developed to support quantitative measurements now possible in the solar wind. Beyond these order-unity corrections, the main physical feature of low-frequency plasma turbulence survives the generalisation to non-Maxwellian distributions: Alfvénic and compressive fluctuations are energetically decoupled, with the latter passively advected by the former; the Alfvénic cascade is fluid, satisfying RMHD equations (with the Alfvén speed modified by pressure anisotropy and species drifts), whereas the compressive cascade is kinetic and subject to collisionless damping (and for a bi-Maxwellian plasma splits into three independent collisionless cascades). Secondly, the organising principle of this turbulence is elucidated in the form of a conservation law for the appropriately generalised kinetic free energy. It is shown that non-Maxwellian features in the distribution function reduce the rate of phase mixing and the efficacy of magnetic stresses, and that these changes influence the partitioning of free energy amongst the various cascade channels. As the firehose or mirror instability thresholds are approached, the dynamics

  1. EURAMET.M.P-S9: comparison in the negative gauge pressure range -950 to 0 hPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saxholm, S.; Otal, P.; AltintaS, A.; Bermanec, L. G.; Durgut, Y.; Hanrahan, R.; Kocas, I.; Lefkopoulos, A.; Pražák, D.; Sandu, I.; Åetina, J.; Spohr, I.; Steindl, D.; Tammik, K.; Testa, N.

    2016-01-01

    A comparison in the negative gauge pressure range was arranged in the period 2011 - 2012. A total of 14 laboratories participated in this comparison: BEV (Austria), CMI (Czech Republic), DANIAmet-FORCE (Denmark), EIM (Greece), HMI/FSB-LPM (Croatia), INM (Romania), IPQ (Portugal), LNE (France), MCCAA (Malta), METROSERT (Estonia), MIKES (Finland), MIRS/IMT/LMT (Slovenia), NSAI (Ireland) and UME (Turkey). The project was divided into two loops: Loop1, piloted by MIKES, and Loop2, piloted by LNE. The results of the two loops are reported separately: Loop1 results are presented in this paper. The transfer standard was Beamex MC5 no. 25516865 with internal pressure module INT1C, resolution 0.01 hPa. The nominal pressure range of the INT1C is -1000 hPa to +1000 hPa. The nominal pressure points for the comparison were 0 hPa, -200 hPa, -400 hPa, -600 hPa, -800 hPa and -950 hPa. The reference values and their uncertainties as well as the difference uncertainty between the laboratory results and the reference values were determined from the measurement data by Monte Carlo simulations. Stability uncertainty of the transfer standard was included in the final difference uncertainty. Degrees of equivalences and mutual equivalences between the laboratories were calculated. Each laboratory reported results for all twelve measurement points, which means that there were 168 reported values in total. Some 163 of the 168 values (97 %) agree with the reference values within the expanded uncertainties, with a coverage factor k = 2. Among the laboratories, four different methods were used to determine negative gauge pressure. It is concluded that special attention must be paid to the measurements and methods when measuring negative gauge pressures. There might be a need for a technical guide or a workshop that provides information about details and practices related to the measurements of negative gauge pressure, as well as differences between the different methods. The comparison is

  2. A Computational Fluid Dynamics Study of Transitional Flows in Low-Pressure Turbines under a Wide Range of Operating Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suzen, Y. B.; Huang, P. G.; Ashpis, D. E.; Volino, R. J.; Corke, T. C.; Thomas, F. O.; Huang, J.; Lake, J. P.; King, P. I.

    2007-01-01

    A transport equation for the intermittency factor is employed to predict the transitional flows in low-pressure turbines. The intermittent behavior of the transitional flows is taken into account and incorporated into computations by modifying the eddy viscosity, mu(sub p) with the intermittency factor, gamma. Turbulent quantities are predicted using Menter's two-equation turbulence model (SST). The intermittency factor is obtained from a transport equation model which can produce both the experimentally observed streamwise variation of intermittency and a realistic profile in the cross stream direction. The model had been previously validated against low-pressure turbine experiments with success. In this paper, the model is applied to predictions of three sets of recent low-pressure turbine experiments on the Pack B blade to further validate its predicting capabilities under various flow conditions. Comparisons of computational results with experimental data are provided. Overall, good agreement between the experimental data and computational results is obtained. The new model has been shown to have the capability of accurately predicting transitional flows under a wide range of low-pressure turbine conditions.

  3. Measurement of density, temperature, and electrical conductivity of a shock-compressed nonideal nitrogen plasma in the megabar pressure range

    SciTech Connect

    Mochalov, M. A.; Zhernokletov, M. V.; Il'kaev, R. I.; Mikhailov, A. L.; Fortov, V. E.; Gryaznov, V. K.; Iosilevskiy, I. L.; Mezhevov, A. B.; Kovalev, A. E.; Kirshanov, S. I.; Grigor'eva, Yu. A.; Novikov, M. G.; Shuikin, A. N.

    2010-01-15

    Kinematic and thermodynamic parameters of shock-compressed liquid nitrogen are measured behind the front of a plane shock wave using plane wave and hemispherical shock wave generators. In these experiments, high values of compression parameters (shock-compressed hydrogen density {approx} 3.25 g/cm{sup 3} and temperature T{approx} 56000 K at a pressure of P {approx} 265 GPa) are attained. The density, pressure, temperature, and electrical conductivity of the nonideal plasma of shock-compressed liquid nitrogen are measured. A nearly isochoric behavior of the nitrogen shock adiabat is observed in the pressure range P = 100-300 GPa. The thermodynamics of shock-compressed nitrogen is an alyzed using the model of the equation of state in the quasi-chemical representation (SAHA code) as well as the semiempirical wide-range equation of state developed at the Institute of Experimental Physics. Experimental results are interpreted on the basis of calculations as the fixation of the boundary of transition of shock-compressed nitrogen from the polymer phase to the state of a strongly nonideal plasma at P {approx} 100 GPa, {approx} 3.4 g/cm{sup 3}.

  4. One-dimensional nanoclustering of the Cu(100) surface under CO gas in the mbar pressure range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eren, Baran; Zherebetskyy, Danylo; Hao, Yibo; Patera, Laerte L.; Wang, Lin-Wang; Somorjai, Gabor A.; Salmeron, Miquel

    2016-09-01

    The bulk terminated Cu(100) surface becomes unstable in the presence of CO at room temperature when the pressure reaches the mbar range. Scanning tunneling microscopy images show that above 0.25 mbar the surface forms nanoclusters with CO attached to peripheral Cu atoms. At 20 mbar and above 3-atom wide one-dimensional nanoclusters parallel to < 001 > directions cover the surface, with CO on every Cu atom, increasing in density up to 115 mbar. Density functional theory explains the findings as a result of the detachment of Cu atoms from step edges caused by the stronger binding of CO relative to that on flat terraces.

  5. Bubble pressures and saturated liquid densities of R 22 + R 114 mixtures in the range 310 400 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuizumi, H.; Uematsu, M.

    1991-03-01

    The bubble pressures and saturated liquid densities of mixtures of R 22 and R 114 have been measured with a static and synthetic method with a variable-volume cell. The results for five different compositions (100, 75, 50, 25, and 0 mol% R 22) cover the temperature range from 310 to 400 K. The experimental data for both pure components are compared with literature data, showing the reliability of the present results. The system shows positive deviations from Raoult's law at temperatures below 340 K and the deviations increase with decreasing temperature. The 25 mol % R 22 mixture shows the maximum non-ideality.

  6. The potential for climate-driven bathymetric range shifts: sustained temperature and pressure exposures on a marine ectotherm, Palaemonetes varians

    PubMed Central

    Morris, J. P.; Thatje, S.; Cottin, D.; Oliphant, A.; Brown, A.; Shillito, B.; Ravaux, J.; Hauton, C.

    2015-01-01

    Range shifts are of great importance as a response for species facing climate change. In the light of current ocean-surface warming, many studies have focused on the capacity of marine ectotherms to shift their ranges latitudinally. Bathymetric range shifts offer an important alternative, and may be the sole option for species already at high latitudes or those within enclosed seas; yet relevant data are scant. Hydrostatic pressure (HP) and temperature have wide ranging effects on physiology, importantly acting in synergy thermodynamically, and therefore represent key environmental constraints to bathymetric migration. We present data on transcriptional regulation in a shallow-water marine crustacean (Palaemonetes varians) at atmospheric and high HP following 168-h exposures at three temperatures across the organisms’ thermal scope, to establish the potential physiological limit to bathymetric migration by neritic fauna. We observe changes in gene expression indicative of cellular macromolecular damage, disturbances in metabolic pathways and a lack of acclimation after prolonged exposure to high HP. Importantly, these effects are ameliorated (less deleterious) at higher temperatures, and exacerbated at lower temperatures. These data, alongside previously published behavioural and heat-shock analyses, have important implications for our understanding of the potential for climate-driven bathymetric range shifts PMID:26716003

  7. The study of pressure measurement techniques and devices in the range of 10(exp -1) to 10(exp -5) torr (2 millipsi to 0.2 micropsi)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, John H.

    1990-01-01

    The atmospheric pressure range was studied in a region where conventional pressure sensing devices do not provide meaningful measurements. However, a hot filament gauge was developed and miniaturized which will measure the pressure in the 10(exp -1) to 10(exp -5) torr (2 millipsi to 0.2 micropsi) region, hence the name Micropsi gauge. Laboratory studies were made comparing the currently available devices with the newly developed miniature low power 'Micropsi' pressure sensor.

  8. Pressure dependent stability and structure of carbon dioxide--a density functional study including long-range corrections.

    PubMed

    Gohr, Sebastian; Grimme, Stefan; Söhnel, Tilo; Paulus, Beate; Schwerdtfeger, Peter

    2013-11-01

    First-principles density functional theory (DFT) is used to study the solid-state modifications of carbon dioxide up to pressures of 60 GPa. All known molecular CO2 structures are investigated in this pressure range, as well as three non-molecular modifications. To account for long-range van der Waals interactions, the dispersion corrected DFT method developed by Grimme and co-workers (DFT-D3) is applied. We find that the DFT-D3 method substantially improves the results compared to the uncorrected DFT methods for the molecular carbon dioxide crystals. Enthalpies at 0 K and cohesive energies support only one possibility of the available experimental solutions for the structure of phase IV: the R3c modification, proposed by Datchi and co-workers [Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 185701 (2009)]. Furthermore, comparing bulk moduli with experimental values, we cannot reproduce the quite large--rather typical for covalent crystal structures--experimental values for the molecular phases II and III. PMID:24206310

  9. Transitions between various diffuse discharge modes in atmospheric-pressure helium in the medium-frequency range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boisvert, J.-S.; Margot, J.; Massines, F.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we investigate DBDs in the medium frequency range (MF, 0.3-3 MHz). More precisely, for a 2 inter-dielectric gap in helium at atmospheric pressure, the frequency is varied from 1.0 to 2.7 MHz. The generated discharge shows similarities with both the low-frequency atmospheric-pressure glow discharge (APGD) and the atmospheric pressure capacitively coupled radio-frequency (CCRF) discharge. In the frequency range under investigation, two diffuse discharge modes can be observed depending on the voltage applied between the electrodes. At low applied voltage, the discharge emissions are barely visible and are concentrated in the center of the gas gap similarly to CCRF discharges in the Ω mode where the electron density is concentrated in the bulk. Ohmic heating is the main power transfer mechanism. At higher applied voltage, the discharge emissions are 10 times more intense and are closer to the dielectric surfaces similarly to the more common radio-frequency α mode. These two discharge modes can be observed in the same experimental conditions with the amplitude of the applied voltage as sole control parameter. The gas temperature obtained from N2 impurities rotational spectrum increases from room temperature to about 500 K while the power density rises from 10-1 to 101 W cm-3 when the applied voltage is increased. In addition, when the discharge transits back and forth from the Ω to the α mode, a hysteresis is observed. The transition from the Ω to the α mode occurs abruptly with a large RMS current increase while the transition from the α to the Ω mode is rather smooth with no significant discontinuity in the RMS current.

  10. Transitions between various diffuse discharge modes in atmospheric-pressure helium in the medium-frequency range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boisvert, J.-S.; Margot, J.; Massines, F.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we investigate DBDs in the medium frequency range (MF, 0.3–3 MHz). More precisely, for a 2 inter-dielectric gap in helium at atmospheric pressure, the frequency is varied from 1.0 to 2.7 MHz. The generated discharge shows similarities with both the low-frequency atmospheric-pressure glow discharge (APGD) and the atmospheric pressure capacitively coupled radio-frequency (CCRF) discharge. In the frequency range under investigation, two diffuse discharge modes can be observed depending on the voltage applied between the electrodes. At low applied voltage, the discharge emissions are barely visible and are concentrated in the center of the gas gap similarly to CCRF discharges in the Ω mode where the electron density is concentrated in the bulk. Ohmic heating is the main power transfer mechanism. At higher applied voltage, the discharge emissions are 10 times more intense and are closer to the dielectric surfaces similarly to the more common radio-frequency α mode. These two discharge modes can be observed in the same experimental conditions with the amplitude of the applied voltage as sole control parameter. The gas temperature obtained from N2 impurities rotational spectrum increases from room temperature to about 500 K while the power density rises from 10‑1 to 101 W cm‑3 when the applied voltage is increased. In addition, when the discharge transits back and forth from the Ω to the α mode, a hysteresis is observed. The transition from the Ω to the α mode occurs abruptly with a large RMS current increase while the transition from the α to the Ω mode is rather smooth with no significant discontinuity in the RMS current.

  11. In situ XPS and MS study of methanol decomposition and oxidation on Pd(111) under millibar pressure range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaichev, V. V.; Miller, A. V.; Prosvirin, I. P.; Bukhtiyarov, V. I.

    2012-02-01

    The methanol decomposition and oxidation on a Pd(111) single crystal have been investigated in situ using ambient-pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and mass-spectrometry (MS) in the temperature range of 300-600 K. It was found that even in the oxygen presence the methanol decomposition on palladium proceeds through two competitive routes: fast dehydrogenation to CO and H2, and slow decomposition of methanol via the C-O bond scission. The rate of the second route is significant even in the millibar pressure range, which leads to a blocking of the palladium surface by carbon and to a prevention of the further methanol conversion. As a result, no gas phase products of methanol decomposition were detected by mass-spectrometry at 0.1 mbar CH3OH in the whole temperature range. The methanol C-O bond scission produces CHx species, which fast dehydrogenate to atomic carbon even at room temperature and further partially dissolve in the palladium bulk at 400 K with the formation of the PdCx phase. According to in situ XPS data, the PdCx phase forms even in the oxygen excess. The application of an in situ XPS-MS technique unambiguously shows a good correlation between a decrease in the surface concentration of all carbon-containing species and the rate of methanol conversion. Since these carbon species have a high reactivity towards oxygen, heating of Pd(111) above 450 K in a methanol-oxygen mixture yields CO, CO2, and water. The product distribution indicates that the main route of methanol conversion is the dehydrogenation of methanol to CO and hydrogen. However, under the experimental conditions used, hydrogen is completely oxidized to water, while CO is partially oxidized to CO2. No palladium oxide was detected by XPS in these conditions.

  12. Pressurized ion chamber monitoring system for environmental radiation measurements utilizing a wide-range temperature-compensated electrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Steveninck, William

    1994-08-01

    The performance of a complete pressurized ion chamber (PIC) radiation monitoring system is described. The design incorporates an improved temperature-compensated electrometer which is stable to +/- 3 center-dot 10(sup - 16) A over the environmental range of temperature (- 40 to + 40 C). Using a single 10(sup 11) Omega feed-back resistor, the electrometer accurately measures currents over a range from 3 center-dot 10(sup - 15) A to 3 center-dot 10(sup - 11) A. While retaining the sensitivity of the original PIC system (the instrument responds readily to small background fluctuations on the order of 0.1 mu R h(sup - 1)), the new system measures radiation levels up to the point where the collection efficiency of the ion chamber begins to drop off, typically approximately 27 pA at 1 mR h(sup - 1). A data recorder and system controller was designed using the Tattletale(sup TM) Model 4A computer. Digital data is stored on removable solid-state, credit-card style memory cards.

  13. Pressure-temperature history of the Brooks Range and Seward Peninsula, Alaska HP-LT units and geodynamic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemonnier, N.; Labrousse, L.; Agard, P.; Till, A. B.

    2013-12-01

    Metamorphic rocks in the inner zones of mountain belts constitute a marker of vertical movements within orogenic wedges, themselves controled by balance between boundary conditions and volume forces. They provide key evidence for paleogeographic and tectonic reconstruction of convergence zones. In the Arctic, the Amerasian basin opened in cretaceous time and evolved in the upper plate of the Pacific subduction system. The tectonic evolution of the Brooks Range, northern Alaska, is a key issue for understanding possible coupling between these two dynamics. HP-LT metamorphic rocks, now exposed in the Schist belt, Brooks Range, and the Nome Complex, Seward Peninsula, were brought to the surface during Early Cretaceous to Paleocene time. The processes responsible for their exhumation (syn-collisional nappe-stacking or post-collisional extensional detachment) are still a matter of debate, and have direct implications in terms of orogenic boundary conditions and coupling between subduction processes (to the south) and basin response (to the north; the North Slope). Systematic thermometry via Raman Spectrometry (RSCM) on carbonaceous material from regional transects in the Schist Belt and the Seward Peninsula as well as pseudosections calculations allow the determination of units with contrasting pressure-temperature histories and a comparison of thermal evolution of the two areas. Geodynamic implications of their exhumation is then discussed.

  14. Density measurements of subcooled water in the temperature range of (243 and 283) K and for pressures up to 400 MPa.

    PubMed

    Romeo, Raffaella; Giuliano Albo, P Alberto; Lorefice, Salvatore; Lago, Simona

    2016-02-21

    In this work, accurate density measurements of subcooled water (freshly double-distilled water) were performed along eight constant-mass curves in the temperature range of (243 to 283) K and in the pressure range of (140 to 400) MPa, by a pseudo-isochoric method. The experimental apparatus mainly consisted of a high pressure vessel, especially designed for this experiment, of known volume as a function of temperature and pressure, used to perform measurements in the T-p range under study. The density of subcooled water was obtained by measuring the equilibrium pressure at different temperatures, keeping the mass constant. All terms contributing to the uncertainty of subcooled water density measurements were considered; the estimated relative uncertainty, in the investigated temperature and pressure range, is about 0.07%. The experimental results were compared with the literature densities. In particular, the trend of density versus temperature for a constant mass of sample observed experimentally differs from the trend calculated by the equation provided by the International Association for Properties of Water and Steam (IAPWS-95) outside the range of validity, i.e., in the metastable region. PMID:26896989

  15. Density measurements of subcooled water in the temperature range of (243 and 283) K and for pressures up to 400 MPa.

    PubMed

    Romeo, Raffaella; Giuliano Albo, P Alberto; Lorefice, Salvatore; Lago, Simona

    2016-02-21

    In this work, accurate density measurements of subcooled water (freshly double-distilled water) were performed along eight constant-mass curves in the temperature range of (243 to 283) K and in the pressure range of (140 to 400) MPa, by a pseudo-isochoric method. The experimental apparatus mainly consisted of a high pressure vessel, especially designed for this experiment, of known volume as a function of temperature and pressure, used to perform measurements in the T-p range under study. The density of subcooled water was obtained by measuring the equilibrium pressure at different temperatures, keeping the mass constant. All terms contributing to the uncertainty of subcooled water density measurements were considered; the estimated relative uncertainty, in the investigated temperature and pressure range, is about 0.07%. The experimental results were compared with the literature densities. In particular, the trend of density versus temperature for a constant mass of sample observed experimentally differs from the trend calculated by the equation provided by the International Association for Properties of Water and Steam (IAPWS-95) outside the range of validity, i.e., in the metastable region.

  16. Diamond-anvil cell observations of a new methane hydrate phase in the 100-MPa pressure range

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chou, I.-Ming; Sharma, A.; Burruss, R.C.; Hemley, R.J.; Goncharov, A.F.; Stern, L.A.; Kirby, S.H.

    2001-01-01

    A new high-pressure phase of methane hydrate has been identified based on its high optical relief, distinct pressure-temperature phase relations, and Raman spectra. In-situ optical observations were made in a hydrothermal diamond-anvil cell at temperatures between -40?? and 60 ??C and at pressures up to 900 MPa. Two new invariant points were located at -8.7 ??C and 99 MPa for the assemblage consisting of the new phase, structure I methane hydrate, ice Ih, and water, and at 35.3 ??C and 137 MPa for the new phase-structure I methane hydrate-water-methane vapor. Existence of the new phase is critical for understanding the phase relations among the hydrates at low to moderate pressures, and may also have important implications for understanding the hydrogen bonding in H2O and the behavior of water in the planetary bodies, such as Europa, of the outer solar system.

  17. Final report on APMP.M.P-S4: Results of the bilateral supplementary comparison on pressure measurements in the range (60 to 350) kPa of gauge pressure in gas media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priruenrom, T.; Sabuga, W.; Konczak, T.

    2013-01-01

    The bilateral supplementary comparison APMP.M.P-S4 on pressure measurements in the range (60 to 350) kPa of gauge pressure in gas media was organized by National Institute of Metrology of Thailand, NIMT, as the pilot laboratory, comparing with Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt of Germany, PTB. The objective of this comparison is to check equivalence of gas pressure standards between NIMT and PTB. The period of measurement covered November to December 2012. NIMT provided a transfer standard, which was a WC-WC piston-cylinder assembly (PCA) with a nominal effective area of 10 cm2 manufactured by Fluke Corporation, DHI. The measurements were performed at pressures (60, 100, 150, 200, 250, 300 and 350) kPa. The NIMT laboratory standard used was a pressure balance with a PCA of 10 cm2 manufactured by DHI and identified by serial number 0693. The PTB laboratory standard used was a pressure balance with a PCA of 10 cm2 manufactured by Desgranges et Huot (DH) and identified by serial number 288. The results of this comparison show that the relative difference of the effective area values obtained by NIMT and PTB is not larger than 4.3 ppm, which corresponds to En = 0.26. Therefore, it confirms that the gas pressure standards maintained by the two institutes, NIMT and PTB, in the pressure range (60 to 350) kPa in gauge mode are equivalent under their uncertainties claimed. The result of this comparison is essential to support the calibration and measurement capabilities (CMC) of NIMT in this pressure range. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the APMP, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  18. Large Area One-Step Facile Processing of Microstructured Elastomeric Dielectric Film for High Sensitivity and Durable Sensing over Wide Pressure Range.

    PubMed

    Chen, Sujie; Zhuo, Bengang; Guo, Xiaojun

    2016-08-10

    Once the requirement of sensitivity has been met, to enable a flexible pressure sensor technology to be widely adopted as an economic and convenient way for sensing diverse human body motions, critical factors need to be considered including low manufacturing cost, a large pressure detection range, and low power consumption. In this work, a facile approach is developed for one-step processing of a large area microstructured elastomer film with high density microfeatures of air voids, which can be seamlessly integrated into the process flow for fabricating flexible capacitive sensors. The fabricated sensors exhibit fast response and high sensitivity in the low pressure range to be able to detect very weak pressure down to 1 Pa and perform reliable wrist pulse monitoring. Compared to previous work, more advantageous features of this sensor are relatively high sensitivity being maintained in a wide pressure range up to 250 kPa and excellent durability under heavy load larger than 1 MPa, attributed to the formed dense air voids inside the film. A smart insole made with the sensor can accurately monitor the real-time walking or running behaviors and even a small weight change less than 1 kg under a heavy load of a 70 kg adult. For both application examples of wrist pulse monitoring and smart insole, the sensors are operated in a 3.3 V electronic system powered by a Li-ion battery, showing the potential for power-constrained wearable applications. PMID:27427977

  19. Ozone sonde measurements aboard long-range boundary-layer pressurized balloons over the western Mediterranean basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gheusi, François; Barret, Brice; Verdier, Nicolas; Dulac, François; Durand, Pierre; Jambert, Corinne

    Since few years, the French space agency CNES has developed boundary-layer pressurized balloons (BLPBs) with the capability to transport scientific payloads at isopicnic level over very long distances and durations (up to several weeks in absence of navigation limits). However, the autonomy of conventional electro-chemical cell (ECC) ozone sondes, that are widely used for tropospheric and stratospheric soundings, is limited to few hours due to power consumption and electrolyte evaporation (due to air bubbling in the cathode solution). In collaboration with the French research community, CNES has developed a new ozone payload suited for long duration flights aboard BLPBs. The mechanical elements (Teflon pump and motor) and the electro-chemical cell of conventional ECC sondes have been kept but the electronic implementation is entirely new. The main feature is the possibility of programming periodic measurement sequences -- with possible remote control during the flight. To increase the ozone sonde autonomy, the strategy has been adopted of short measurement sequences (typically 3 min) regularly spaced in time (e.g. every 15 min, which is usually sufficient for air quality studies). The rest of the time, the sonde is left at rest (pump motor off). The response time of an ECC sonde to an ozone concentration step is below one minute. Therefore, the typical measurement sequence is composed of a one-minute spin-up period after the pump has been turned on, followed by a two-minute acquisition period. (Note that the time intervals given here are indicative. All can be adjusted before and during the flight.) Results of a preliminary ground-based test in spring 2012 will be first presented. The sonde provided correct ozone concentrations against a reference UV analyzer every 15 minutes during 4 days. Then, we will illustrate results from 16 BLBP flights launched in the low troposphere over the Mediterranean during the three summer field campaings of the coordinated project

  20. Lightweight, all-metal hose assembly has high flexibility and strength over wide range of temperature and pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bessing, L. L.

    1966-01-01

    Lightweight flexible, metal braid reinforced hose assembly is used in high and low pressure oxygen, helium, and hydrogen systems. These hose assemblies have been successfully used on the Saturn-2 stage to provide joints of sufficient flexibility to absorb movement resulting from temperature variations.

  1. Vapor pressures and calculated heats of vaporization of concentrated nitric acid solutions in the composition range 71 to 89 percent nitrogen dioxide, 1 to 10 percent water, and in the temperature range 10 to 60 degrees C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckeown, A B; Belles, Frank E

    1954-01-01

    Total vapor pressures were measured for 16 acid mixtures of the ternary system nitric acid, nitrogen dioxide, and water within the temperature range 10 degrees to 60 degrees Celsius, and with the composition range 71 to 89 weight percent nitric acid, 7 to 20 weight percent nitrogen dioxide, and 1 to 10 weight percent water. Heats of vaporization were calculated from the vapor pressure measurements for each sample for the temperatures 25, 40, and 60 degrees Celsius. The ullage of the apparatus used for the measurements was 0.46. Ternary diagrams showing isobars as a function of composition of the system were constructed from experimental and interpolated data for the temperatures 25, 40, 45, and 60 degrees C and are presented herein.

  2. Effect of dispersive long-range corrections to the pressure tensor: The vapour-liquid interfacial properties of the Lennard-Jones system revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Martínez-Ruiz, F. J.; Blas, F. J.; Mendiboure, B.; Moreno-Ventas Bravo, A. I.

    2014-11-14

    We propose an extension of the improved version of the inhomogeneous long-range corrections of Janeček [J. Phys. Chem. B 110, 6264–6269 (2006)], presented recently by MacDowell and Blas [J. Chem. Phys. 131, 074705 (2009)] to account for the intermolecular potential energy of spherical, rigid, and flexible molecular systems, to deal with the contributions to the microscopic components of the pressure tensor due to the dispersive long-range corrections. We have performed Monte Carlo simulations in the canonical ensemble to obtain the interfacial properties of spherical Lennard-Jones molecules with different cutoff distances, r{sub c} = 2.5, 3, 4, and 5σ. In addition, we have also considered cutoff distances r{sub c} = 2.5 and 3σ in combination with the inhomogeneous long-range corrections proposed in this work. The normal and tangential microscopic components of the pressure tensor are obtained using the mechanical or virial route in combination with the recipe of Irving and Kirkwood, while the macroscopic components are calculated using the Volume Perturbation thermodynamic route proposed by de Miguel and Jackson [J. Chem. Phys. 125, 164109 (2006)]. The vapour-liquid interfacial tension is evaluated using three different procedures, the Irving-Kirkwood method, the difference between the macroscopic components of the pressure tensor, and the Test-Area methodology. In addition to the pressure tensor and the surface tension, we also obtain density profiles, coexistence densities, vapour pressure, critical temperature and density, and interfacial thickness as functions of temperature, paying particular attention to the effect of the cutoff distance and the long-range corrections on these properties. According to our results, the main effect of increasing the cutoff distance (at fixed temperature) is to sharpen the vapour-liquid interface, to decrease the vapour pressure, and to increase the width of the biphasic coexistence region. As a result, the interfacial

  3. Effect of dispersive long-range corrections to the pressure tensor: the vapour-liquid interfacial properties of the Lennard-Jones system revisited.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Ruiz, F J; Blas, F J; Mendiboure, B; Moreno-Ventas Bravo, A I

    2014-11-14

    We propose an extension of the improved version of the inhomogeneous long-range corrections of Janeček [J. Phys. Chem. B 110, 6264-6269 (2006)], presented recently by MacDowell and Blas [J. Chem. Phys. 131, 074705 (2009)] to account for the intermolecular potential energy of spherical, rigid, and flexible molecular systems, to deal with the contributions to the microscopic components of the pressure tensor due to the dispersive long-range corrections. We have performed Monte Carlo simulations in the canonical ensemble to obtain the interfacial properties of spherical Lennard-Jones molecules with different cutoff distances, r(c) = 2.5, 3, 4, and 5σ. In addition, we have also considered cutoff distances r(c) = 2.5 and 3σ in combination with the inhomogeneous long-range corrections proposed in this work. The normal and tangential microscopic components of the pressure tensor are obtained using the mechanical or virial route in combination with the recipe of Irving and Kirkwood, while the macroscopic components are calculated using the Volume Perturbation thermodynamic route proposed by de Miguel and Jackson [J. Chem. Phys. 125, 164109 (2006)]. The vapour-liquid interfacial tension is evaluated using three different procedures, the Irving-Kirkwood method, the difference between the macroscopic components of the pressure tensor, and the Test-Area methodology. In addition to the pressure tensor and the surface tension, we also obtain density profiles, coexistence densities, vapour pressure, critical temperature and density, and interfacial thickness as functions of temperature, paying particular attention to the effect of the cutoff distance and the long-range corrections on these properties. According to our results, the main effect of increasing the cutoff distance (at fixed temperature) is to sharpen the vapour-liquid interface, to decrease the vapour pressure, and to increase the width of the biphasic coexistence region. As a result, the interfacial thickness

  4. Thermal-Conductivity Measurements of Aqueous Orthophosphoric Acid Solutions in the Temperature Range from (293 to 400) K and at Pressures up to 15 MPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guseinov, G. G.; Abdulagatov, I. M.

    2014-02-01

    A new improved guarded parallel-plate thermal-conductivity cell for absolute measurements of corrosive (chemically aggressive) fluids under pressure has been developed. Using the new modified guarded parallel-plate apparatus the thermal conductivity of aqueous orthophosphoric acid solutions was measured over the temperature range from (293 to 400) K and pressures up to 15 MPa. Measurements were made for three compositions of (8 mass%, 15 mass%, and 50 mass%) along three isobars of (0.101, 5, and 15) MPa. The combined expanded uncertainty of the thermal-conductivity measurements at the 95 % confidence level with a coverage factor of is estimated to be 2 %. The uncertainties of the temperature, pressure, and concentration measurements were 15 mK, 0.05 %, and 0.01 %, respectively. The temperature, concentration, and pressure dependences of the thermal conductivity of the solution were studied. The measured values of thermal conductivity were compared with the available reported data and the values calculated from various correlation and prediction models. A new wide-range correlation model (extended Jones-Dole type equation with pressure-dependent coefficients) for the (aq) solution was developed using the present experimental data.

  5. Structural transformation, intermediate-range order, and dynamical behavior of SiO2 glass at high pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Wei; Kalia, Rajiv K.; Vashishta, Priya; Rino, José P.

    1993-11-01

    Pressure-induced structural transformation in SiO2 glass is investigated with molecular dynamics. At high densities, the height of the first sharp diffraction peak is considerably diminished, its position changes from 1.6 to 2.2 Å-1, and a new peak appears at 2.85 Å-1. At twice the normal density, the Si-O bond length increases, the Si-O coordination changes from 4 to 6, and the O-Si-O band angle changes from 109° to 90°. This is a tetrahedral to octahedral transformation, which was reported recently by Meade, Hemley, and Mao [Phys. Rev. Lett. 69, 1387 (1992)]. Results for phonon density of states also reveal significant changes at high pressures.

  6. Refractive index of r-cut sapphire under shock pressure range 5 to 65 GPa

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Xiuxia; Li, Jiabo; Li, Jun; Li, Xuhai; Xu, Liang; Wang, Yuan; Zhu, Wenjun; Meng, Chuanmin; Zhou, Xianming

    2014-09-07

    High-pressure refractive index of optical window materials not only can provide information on electronic polarizability and band-gap structure, but also is important for velocity correction in particle-velocity measurement with laser interferometers. In this work, the refractive index of r-cut sapphire window at 1550 nm wavelength was measured under shock pressures of 5–65 GPa. The refractive index (n) decreases linearly with increasing shock density (ρ) for shock stress above the Hugoniot elastic limit (HEL): n = 2.0485 (± 0.0197) − 0.0729 (± 0.0043)ρ, while n remains nearly a constant for elastic shocks. This behavior is attributed to the transition from elastic (below HEL) to heterogeneous plastic deformation (above HEL). Based on the obtained refractive index-density relationship, polarizability of the shocked sapphire was also obtained.

  7. Structure of a micro hollow cathode discharge in the normal regime at medium pressure range in pure argon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazzaroni, Claudia; Chabert, Pascal; Rousseau, Antoine; Sadeghi, Nader

    2009-10-01

    A microplasma is generated in the 400 μm diameter micro hole of a molybdenum-alumina-molybdenum sandwich (MHCD type) at medium pressure (30-300Torr) in pure argon. Experiments are performed during the normal regime, when the plasma is not only confined in the hole but also expands on the cathode backside. Imaging and emission spectroscopy allows the discharge structure to be studied and is used to infer the electronic density in the micro-hole via the Stark broadening of the Hβ line. We find strong maxima of the plasma emission in the vicinity of the sheath edge. To explain some of the experimental observations, we use a one dimensional transport model to obtain the radial evolution of the charged-particles densities and fluxes. The result of this model is used as an input parameter of a sheath-model which allows the sheath thickness to be calculated as a function of pressure. The sheath size variation with pressure is well correlated with the maxima of plasma emission.

  8. Expanding the range for predicting critical flow rates of gas wells producing from normally pressured waterdrive reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Upchurch, E.R. )

    1989-08-01

    The critical flow rate of a gas well is the minimum flow rate required to prevent accumulation of liquids in the tubing. Theoretical models currently available for estimating critical flow rates are restricted to wells with water/gas ratios less than 150bbl/MMcf (0.84 X 10/sup -3/ m/sup 3//m/sup 3/). For wells producing at higher water/gas ratios from normally pressured waterdrive reservoirs, a method of estimating critical flow rates is derived through use of an empirical multiphase-flow correlation.

  9. Two successive spin transitions in a wide range of pressure and coexistence of high- and low-spin states in clinoferrosilite FeSiO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyachenko, Alexey A.; Shorikov, Alexey O.; Lukoyanov, Alexey V.; Anisimov, Vladimir I.

    2016-06-01

    We present a theoretical study of spectral and magnetic properties of clinoferrosilite FeSiO3. Within the DFT+DMFT method combining local density approximation with dynamical mean-field theory FeSiO3 was investigated in a wide range of pressure and temperature including the lower Earth's mantle conditions. For clinoferrosilite, which crystallizes in a monoclinic crystal structure, we predict two high-spin to low-spin transitions under pressure in the Fe-3 d shell with a crossover region at moderate temperatures, which becomes much broader at higher temperatures. An analysis of the Fe electronic configurations reveals that in clinoferrosilite the low- and high-spin states are predominantly involved and coexist in the spin crossover region, while a small amount of the intermediate spin states appears only at very high pressures and can be attributed to the distorted crystal structure of clinoferrosilite FeSiO3.

  10. Constraining the Depth of a Martian Magma Ocean through Metal-Silicate Partitioning Experiments: The Role of Different Datasets and the Range of Pressure and Temperature Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Righter, K.; Chabot, N.L.

    2009-01-01

    Mars accretion is known to be fast compared to Earth. Basaltic samples provide a probe into the interior and allow reconstruction of siderophile element contents of the mantle. These estimates can be used to estimate conditions of core formation, as for Earth. Although many assume that Mars went through a magma ocean stage, and possibly even complete melting, the siderophile element content of Mars mantle is consistent with relatively low pressure and temperature (PT) conditions, implying only shallow melting, near 7 GPa and 2073 K. This is a pressure range where some have proposed a change in siderophile element partitioning behavior. We will examine the databases used for parameterization and split them into a low and higher pressure regime to see if the methods used to reach this conclusion agree for the two sets of data.

  11. A Fundamental Equation for Water Covering the Range from the Melting Line to 1273 K at Pressures up to 25 000 MPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saul, A.; Wagner, W.

    1989-10-01

    In order to represent the thermodynamic properties of water (H2O) over an extremely large range of temperature and pressure that is not covered by existing equations of state, a new fundamental equation has been developed. The Helmholtz function was fitted to the following kinds of experimental data: (a) pρT data, (b) thermal properties of the saturation curve (ps,ρ',ρ`), (c) speed of sound w, (d) isobaric heat capacity cp, (e) isochoric heat capacity cv, (f) differences of the internal energy u, (g) differences of the enthalpy h, (h) Joule-Thomson coefficient μ, and (i) the isothermal throttling coefficient δT. A new statistical selection method was used to determine the final form of the equation from a ``bank'' of 630 terms which also contained functional forms that have not been previously used. This 58-coefficient equation covers the entire fluid region from the melting line to 1273 K at pressures up to 25 000 MPa, and represents the data within their experimental accuracy also in the ``difficult'' regions below 0 °C, on the entire saturation curve, in the critical region and at very high pressures. The equation was constrained at the critical point as defined by the parameters internationally recommended by the International Association for the Properties of Steam (IAPS). Besides the 58-coefficient equation for the entire pressure range, a 38-coefficient equation is presented for providing a ``fast'' equation for practical and scientific calculations in the pressure range below 1000 MPa. This equation has, with the exception of the critical region, nearly the same accuracy as the 58-coefficient equation. The quality of the new equations will be illustrated by comparing the values calculated from them with selected experimental data and with the IAPS-84 formulation and the Scaling-Law equation.

  12. The response of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) subjected to large strains, high strain rates, high pressures, a range in temperatures, and variations in the intermediate principal stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmquist, T. J.; Bradley, J.; Dwivedi, A.; Casem, D.

    2016-05-01

    This article presents the response of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) subjected to large strains, high strain rates, high pressures, a range in temperatures, and variations in the intermediate principal stress. Laboratory data from the literature, and new test data provided here, are used in the evaluation. The new data include uniaxial stress compression tests (at various strain rates and temperatures) and uniaxial stress tension tests (at low strain rates and ambient temperatures). The compression tests include experiments at ˙ɛ = 13,000 s-1, significantly extending the range of known strain rate data. The observed behavior of PMMA includes the following: it is brittle in compression at high rates, and brittle in tension at all rates; strength is dependent on the pressure, strain, strain rate, temperature, and the intermediate principal stress; the shear modulus increases as the pressure increases; and it is highly compressible. Also presented are novel, high velocity impact tests (using high-speed imaging) that provide insight into the initiation and evolution of damage. Lastly, computational constitutive models for pressure, strength, and failure are presented that provide responses that are in good agreement with the laboratory data. The models are used to compute several ballistic impact events for which experimental data are available.

  13. Experimental Surface Pressure Data Obtained on 65 deg Delta Wing Across Reynolds Number and Mach Number Ranges. Vol. 4: Large-radius leading edge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, Julio; Luckring, James M.

    1996-01-01

    An experimental wind tunnel test of a 65 deg delta wing model with interchangeable leading edges was conducted in the Langley National Transonic Facility (NTF). The objective was to investigate the effects of Reynolds and Mach numbers on slender-wing leading-edge vortex flows with four values of wing leading-edge bluntness. Experimentally obtained pressure data are presented without analysis in tabulated and graphical formats across a Reynolds number range of 6 x 10(exp 6) to 120 x 10(exp 6) at a Mach number of 0.85 and across a Mach number range of 0.4 to 0.9 at Reynolds numbers of 6 x 10(exp 6) and 60 x 10(exp 6). Normal-force and pitching-moment coefficient plots for these Reynolds number and Mach number ranges are also presented.

  14. Experimental Surface Pressure Data Obtained on 65 deg Delta Wing Across Reynolds Number and Mach Number Ranges. Volume 2; Small-Radius Leading Edge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, Julio; Luckring, James M.

    1996-01-01

    An experimental wind tunnel test of a 65 deg. delta wing model with interchangeable leading edges was conducted in the Langley National Transonic Facility (NTF). The objective was to investigate the effects of Reynolds and Mach numbers on slender-wing leading-edge vortex flows with four values of wing leading-edge bluntness. Experimentally obtained pressure data are presented without analysis in tabulated and graphical formats across a Reynolds number range of 6 x 10(exp 6) to 84 x 10(exp 6) at a Mach number of 0.85 and across a Mach number range of 0.4 to 0.9 at Reynolds numbers of 6 x 10(exp 6) and 60 x 10(exp 6). Normal-force and pitching-moment coefficient plots for these Reynolds number and Mach number ranges are also presented.

  15. Experimental Surface Pressure Data Obtained on 65 deg Delta Wing Across Reynolds Number and Mach Number Ranges. Vol. 3: Medium-radius leading edge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, Julio; Luckring, James M.

    1996-01-01

    An experimental wind tunnel test of a 65 deg delta wing model with interchangeable leading edges was conducted in the Langley National Transonic Facility (NTF). The objective was to investigate the effects of Reynolds and Mach numbers on slender-wing leading-edge vortex flows with four values of wing leading-edge bluntness. Experimentally obtained pressure data are presented without analysis in tabulated and graphical formats across a Reynolds number range of 6 x 10(exp 6) to 120 x 10(exp 6) at a Mach number of 0.85 and across a Mach number range of 0.4 to 0.9 at Reynolds numbers of 6 x 10(exp 6), 60 x 10(exp 6), and 120 x 10(exp 6). Normal-force and pitching-moment coefficient plots for these Reynolds number and Mach number ranges are also presented.

  16. An inexpensive and versatile technique for wide frequency range surface pressure measurements: an application for the study of turbulent buffeting of a square cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbajo Fuertes, Fernando; Cecchi, Enrico; van Beeck, Jeroen; Schram, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    This work presents the development of an inexpensive measurement technique based on miniature microphones for the measurement of pressure fluctuations in a wide frequency range, starting from infrasound up to several kilohertz. Special emphasis has been put on achieving accurate calibration of the system at very low frequencies and good agreement with reference measurements have been achieved at frequencies as low as 1 Hz, therefore opening new low-budget research possibilities in many fields of fluid mechanics. The measurement technique proposed is specially indicated when the number of simultaneous pressure measurements is high since the sensors used are inexpensive, contrarily to common research equipment. One particular area in which this technique results useful is bluff-body aerodynamics. As an example of the potential of the technique, the structural response of a finite-square cylinder immersed in a turbulent flow is studied.

  17. Towards direct realisation of the SI unit of sound pressure in the audible hearing range based on optical free-field acoustic particle measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koukoulas, Triantafillos; Piper, Ben

    2015-04-01

    Since the introduction of the International System of Units (the SI system) in 1960, weights, measures, standardised approaches, procedures, and protocols have been introduced, adapted, and extensively used. A major international effort and activity concentrate on the definition and traceability of the seven base SI units in terms of fundamental constants, and consequently those units that are derived from the base units. In airborne acoustical metrology and for the audible range of frequencies up to 20 kHz, the SI unit of sound pressure, the pascal, is realised indirectly and without any knowledge or measurement of the sound field. Though the principle of reciprocity was originally formulated by Lord Rayleigh nearly two centuries ago, it was devised in the 1940s and eventually became a calibration standard in the 1960s; however, it can only accommodate a limited number of acoustic sensors of specific types and dimensions. International standards determine the device sensitivity either through coupler or through free-field reciprocity but rely on the continuous availability of specific acoustical artefacts. Here, we show an optical method based on gated photon correlation spectroscopy that can measure sound pressures directly and absolutely in fully anechoic conditions, remotely, and without disturbing the propagating sound field. It neither relies on the availability or performance of any measurement artefact nor makes any assumptions of the device geometry and sound field characteristics. Most importantly, the required units of sound pressure and microphone sensitivity may now be experimentally realised, thus providing direct traceability to SI base units.

  18. Towards direct realisation of the SI unit of sound pressure in the audible hearing range based on optical free-field acoustic particle measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Koukoulas, Triantafillos Piper, Ben

    2015-04-20

    Since the introduction of the International System of Units (the SI system) in 1960, weights, measures, standardised approaches, procedures, and protocols have been introduced, adapted, and extensively used. A major international effort and activity concentrate on the definition and traceability of the seven base SI units in terms of fundamental constants, and consequently those units that are derived from the base units. In airborne acoustical metrology and for the audible range of frequencies up to 20 kHz, the SI unit of sound pressure, the pascal, is realised indirectly and without any knowledge or measurement of the sound field. Though the principle of reciprocity was originally formulated by Lord Rayleigh nearly two centuries ago, it was devised in the 1940s and eventually became a calibration standard in the 1960s; however, it can only accommodate a limited number of acoustic sensors of specific types and dimensions. International standards determine the device sensitivity either through coupler or through free-field reciprocity but rely on the continuous availability of specific acoustical artefacts. Here, we show an optical method based on gated photon correlation spectroscopy that can measure sound pressures directly and absolutely in fully anechoic conditions, remotely, and without disturbing the propagating sound field. It neither relies on the availability or performance of any measurement artefact nor makes any assumptions of the device geometry and sound field characteristics. Most importantly, the required units of sound pressure and microphone sensitivity may now be experimentally realised, thus providing direct traceability to SI base units.

  19. Development of acoustically lined ejector technology for multitube jet noise suppressor nozzles by model and engine tests over a wide range of jet pressure ratios and temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atvars, J.; Paynter, G. C.; Walker, D. Q.; Wintermeyer, C. F.

    1974-01-01

    An experimental program comprising model nozzle and full-scale engine tests was undertaken to acquire parametric data for acoustically lined ejectors applied to primary jet noise suppression. Ejector lining design technology and acoustical scaling of lined ejector configurations were the major objectives. Ground static tests were run with a J-75 turbojet engine fitted with a 37-tube, area ratio 3.3 suppressor nozzle and two lengths of ejector shroud (L/D = 1 and 2). Seven ejector lining configurations were tested over the engine pressure ratio range of 1.40 to 2.40 with corresponding jet velocities between 305 and 610 M/sec. One-fourth scale model nozzles were tested over a pressure ratio range of 1.40 to 4.0 with jet total temperatures between ambient and 1088 K. Scaling of multielement nozzle ejector configurations was also studied using a single element of the nozzle array with identical ejector lengths and lining materials. Acoustic far field and near field data together with nozzle thrust performance and jet aerodynamic flow profiles are presented.

  20. An Investigation of the Drag and Pressure Recovery of a Submerged Inlet and a Nose Inlet in the Transonic Flight Range with Free-fall Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Selna, James; Schlaff, Bernard A

    1951-01-01

    The drag and pressure recovery of an NACA submerged-inlet model and an NACA series I nose-inlet model were investigated in the transonic flight range. The tests were conducted over a mass-flow-ratio range of 0.4 to 0.8 and a Mach number range of about 0.8 to 1.10 employing large-scale recoverable free-fall models. The results indicate that the Mach number of drag divergence of the inlet models was about the same as that of a basic model without inlets. The external drag coefficients of the nose-inlet model were less than those of the submerged-inlet model throughout the test range. The difference in drag coefficient based on the maximum cross-sectional area of the models was about 0.02 at supersonic speeds and about 0.015 at subsonic speeds. For a hypothetical airplane with a ratio of maximum fuselage cross-sectional area to wing area of 0.06, the difference in airplane drag coefficient would be relatively small, about 0.0012 at supersonic speeds and about 0.0009 at subsonic speeds. Additional drag comparisons between the two inlet models are made considering inlet incremental and additive drag.

  1. Final report on EURAMET.M.P-K4.2010: Key and supplementary comparison of national pressure standards in the range 1 Pa to 15 kPa of absolute and gauge pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krajíček, Zdeněk; Bergoglio, Mercede; Jousten, Karl; Otal, Pierre; Sabuga, Wladimir; Saxholm, Sari; Pražák, Dominik; Vičar, Martin

    2014-01-01

    This report describes a EURAMET comparison of five European National Metrology Institutes in low gauge and absolute pressure in gas (nitrogen), denoted as EURAMET.M.P-K4.2010. Its main intention is to state equivalence of the pressure standards, in particular those based on the technology of force-balanced piston gauges such as e.g. FRS by Furness Controls, UK and FPG8601 by DHI-Fluke, USA. It covers the range from 1 Pa to 15 kPa, both gauge and absolute. The comparison in absolute mode serves as a EURAMET Key Comparison which can be linked to CCM.P-K4 and CCM.P-K2 via PTB. The comparison in gauge mode is a supplementary comparison. The comparison was carried out from September 2008 till October 2012. The participating laboratories were the following: CMI, INRIM, LNE, MIKES, PTB-Berlin (absolute pressure 1 kPa and below) and PTB-Braunschweig (absolute pressure 1 kPa and above and gauge pressure). CMI was the pilot laboratory and provided a transfer standard for the comparison. This transfer standard was also the laboratory standard of CMI at the same time, which resulted in a unique and logistically difficult star comparison. Both in gauge and absolute pressures all the participating institutes successfully proved their equivalence with respect to the reference value and all also proved mutual bilateral equivalences in all the points. All the participating laboratories are also equivalent with the reference values of CCM.P-K4 and CCM.P-K2 in the relevant points. The comparison also proved the ability of FPG8601 to serve as a transfer standard. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCM, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  2. Shock Tube and Modeling Study of the H + O2 = OH + O Reaction over a Wide Range of Composition, Pressure, and Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryu, Si-Ok; Hwang, Soon Muk; Rabinowitz, Martin Jay

    1995-01-01

    The rate coefficient of the reaction H + 02 = OH + 0 was determined using OH laser absorption spectroscopy behind reflected shock waves over the temperature range 1050-2500 K and the pressure range 0.7-4.0 atm. Eight mixtures and three stoichiometries were used. Two distinct and independent criteria were employed in the evaluation of k(sub 1). Our recommended expression for k(sub 1) is k(sub 1) = 7.13 x 10(exp 13)exp(-6957 K/T) cm(exp 3)mol(exp -1)s(exp -1) with a statistical uncertainty of 6%. A critical review of recent evaluations of k(sub 1) yields a consensus expression given by k(sub 1) = 7.82 x 10(exp 13)exp(-7105 K/7) cm(exp 3)mol(exp -1)s(exp -1) over the temperature range 960-5300 K. We do not support a non-Arrhenius rate coefficient expression, nor do we find evidence of composition dependence upon the determination of k(sub 1).

  3. xMELTS: A thermodynamic model for the estimation of magmatic phase relations over the pressure range 0-30 GPa and at temperatures up to 2500 C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghiorso, M. S.; Hirschmann, M. M.; Grove, T. L.

    2007-12-01

    A thermodynamic model for multicomponent silicate liquids in the system SiO2-TiO2-Al2O3- Fe2O3-Cr2O3-FeO-MgO-CaO-Na2O-K2O-P2O5-H2O is calibrated over the pressure range 0-27.5 GPa and temperature range 700-2500°C from previously published experimental data (LEPR, http://lepr.ofm-research.org) on liquid-solid phase equilibria. The liquid model is combined with thermodynamic models for relevant igneous solid solutions - including a new model for majoritic garnets - to facilitate the calculation of phase relations by minimization of thermodynamic potentials. Extension to high pressures is achieved by adopting the liquid EOS of Ghiorso (2004, AJS 304, 637-838) and the Universal EOS for solid phases. The Gibbs free energy of the liquid is described as a regular associated solution, which permits a more physical description of the configurational entropy. The model includes both the speciation of water as molecular and hydroxyl units and multiple species of oxidized iron. The latter makes possible an internally consistent description of melt redox equilibria over the oxygen fugacity range from the iron- wüstite buffer to air. The model is calibrated from approximately 20000 statements of phase equilibria, including 6100 between endmember components of clinopyroxene and liquid, 3550 between olivine and liquid, 2800 orthopyroxene-liquid, 2750 feldspar-liquid, 2200 spinel-liquid, 950 garnet-liquid, 350 liquid-rhombohedral oxide (largely ilmenitess), 650 statements of water saturation, and a host of miscellaneous phases coexisting with liquid, importantly quartz, leucite, nepheline, (Mg,Fe2+)-perovskite, and (Mg,Fe2+)- wüstite. Calibrant liquids span naturally occurring compositions, but do not include data on simple systems (e.g., CMAS). xMELTS supersedes MELTS (Ghiorso and Sack, 1995, CMP 119, 197-212) and pMELTS (Ghiorso et al., 2002, G3 10.1029/2001GC000217) for the calculation of magmatic phase equilibria from crustal conditions down to the base of the transition

  4. An in situ experimental study of Zr4+ transport capacity of water-rich fluids in the temperature and pressure range of the deep crust and upper mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mysen, Bjorn

    2015-12-01

    Throughout the Earth's history, mass transport involved fluids. In order to address the circumstances under which Zr4+ may have been transported in this manner, its solubility behavior in aqueous fluid with and without NaOH and SiO2 in equilibrium with crystalline ZrO2 was determined from 550 to 950 °C and 60 to 1200 MPa. The measurements were carried out in situ while the samples were at the temperatures and pressures of interest. In ZrO2-H2O and ZrO2-SiO2-H2O fluids, the Zr4+ concentration ranges from ≤10 to ~70 ppm with increasing temperature and pressure. Addition of SiO2 to the ZrO2-H2O system does not affect these values appreciably. In these two environments, Zr4+ forms simple oxide complexes in the H2O fluid with ∆H ~ 40 kJ/mol for the solution equilibrium, ZrO2(solid) = ZrO2(fluid). The Zr4+ concentration in aqueous fluid increases about an order of magnitude upon addition of 1 M NaOH, which reflects the formation of zirconate complexes. The principal solution mechanism is ZrO2 + 4NaOH = Na4ZrO4 + 2H2O with ∆H ~ 200 kJ/mol. Addition of both SiO2 and NaOH to ZrO2-H2O enhances the Zr4+ by an additional factor of about 5 with the formation of partially protonated alkali zircon silicate complexes in the fluid. The principal solution mechanism is 2ZrO2 + 2NaOH + 2SiO2 = Na2Zr2Si2O9 + H2O with ∆H ~ 40 kJ/mol. These results, in combination with other published experimental data, imply that fluid released during high-temperature/high-pressure dehydration of hydrous mineral assemblages in the Earth's interior under some circumstances may carry significant concentrations of Zr and probably other high field strength elements (HFSEs). This suggestion is consistent with the occurrence of Zr-rich veins in high-grade metamorphic eclogite and granulite terranes. Moreover, aqueous fluids transported from dehydrating oceanic crust into overlying mantle source rocks of partial melting also may carry high-abundance HFSE of fluids released from dehydrating slabs and

  5. Report on key comparison COOMET.AUV.A-K5: pressure calibration of laboratory standard microphones in the frequency range 2 Hz to 10 kHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrowolska, D.; Kosterov, A.

    2016-01-01

    This is the final report for regional key comparison COOMET.AUV.A-K5 on the pressure calibration of laboratory standard microphones in the frequency range from 2 Hz to 10 kHz. Two laboratories—Central Office of Measures (GUM)—the national metrology institute for Poland and the State Enterprise Scientific-Research Institute for Metrology of Measurement and Control Systems (DP NDI Systema)— the designated institute for acoustics in Ukraine took part in this comparison with the GUM as a pilot. One travelling type LS1P microphone was circulated to the participants and results in the form of regular calibration certificates were collected. The results of the DP NDI Systema obtained in this comparison were linked to the CCAUV.A-K5 key comparison through the joint participation of the GUM. The degrees of equivalence were computed for DP NDI Systema with respect to the CCAUV.A-K5 key comparison reference value. Main text To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCAUV, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  6. A comparative study on the pulsed UV and the low-pressure UV inactivation of a range of microbial species in water.

    PubMed

    Garvey, Mary; Thokala, Nikhil; Rowan, Neil

    2014-12-01

    Research into alternative methods of disinfecting water and wastewater has proven necessary due to the emergence of chlorine-resistant organisms and the disinfection byproducts associated with chlorine use. The use of UV light to inactivate microbial species has proven effective, however; standard UV lamps have proven to be less effective in their ability to inactivate parasites and bacterial endospores in water treatment settings. Pulsed UV (PUV) light may potentially provide a novel alternative to water and wastewater disinfection. Research outlined in this study assesses the potential of a novel PUV system for the rapid and reproducible inactivation of a range of test species including Bacillus endospores. In comparison to standard low-pressure (LP) UV lamps, this PUV system provided significantly higher levels of inactivation for all test species. Furthermore, there was a remarkable decrease in time needed to obtain significant inactivation rates following treatment with PUV compared to LP-UV. With the PUV system, a 70-second treatment time (7.65 μJ/cm2) resulted in similar inactivation rates of Bacillus endospores to that of the LP-UV inactivation of their vegetative counterpart. Also, at PUV doses exceeding 4.32 J/cm2, there was not a significant difference in the PUV inactivation of Bacillus endospores in the absence or presence of 10 ppm organic matter. However, the presence of organic matter resulted in a significant reduction in microbial inactivation for all treatment doses using the LP-UV system. The findings of this study suggest that PUV technology may provide a rapid effective method for the disinfection of water and wastewater.

  7. Frequency Extension to the THz Range in the High Pressure ESR System and Its Application to the Shastry-Sutherland Model Compound SrCu2(BO3)2.

    PubMed

    Ohta, Hitoshi; Sakurai, Takahiro; Matsui, Ryosuke; Kawasaki, Kohei; Hirao, Yuki; Okubo, Susumu; Matsubayashi, Kazuyuki; Uwatoko, Yoshiya; Kudo, Kazutaka; Koike, Yoji

    2015-10-29

    We have made a survey of ceramics for the inner parts of the transmission-type pressure cell to achieve the high pressure and the high transmission in the THz range. By using the optimal combination of ZrO2-based ceramic and Al2O3 ceramic, we have succeeded in obtaining a pressure up to 1.5 GPa and a frequency region up to 700 GHz simultaneously. We show the high-pressure ESR results of the Shastry-Sutherland compound SrCu2(BO3)2 as an application. We observed the direct ESR transition modes between the singlet ground state and the triplet excited states up to a pressure of 1.51 GPa successfully, and obtained the precise pressure dependence of the gap energy. The gap energy is directly proved to be suppressed by the pressure. Moreover, we found that the system approaches the quantum critical point with pressure by comparing the obtained data with the theory. This result also shows the usefulness of high-pressure ESR measurement in the THz region to study quantum spin systems.

  8. Identification of low and high frequency ranges for heart rate variability and blood pressure variability analyses using pharmacological autonomic blockade with atropine and propranolol in swine.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Understanding autonomic nervous system functioning, which mediates behavioral and physiological responses to stress, offers great potential for evaluation of farm animal stress and welfare. Evaluation of heart rate variability (HRV) and blood pressure variability (BPV), using time and frequency doma...

  9. Aqueous solubility (in the range between 298.15 and 338.15 K), vapor pressures (in the range between 10(-5) and 80 Pa) and Henry's law constant of 1,2,3,4-dibenzanthracene and 1,2,5,6-dibenzanthracene.

    PubMed

    Abou-Naccoul, Ramy; Mokbel, Ilham; Bassil, Georgio; Saab, Joseph; Stephan, Khaled; Jose, Jacques

    2014-01-01

    Aqueous solubility and vapor pressures of 1,2,3,4-dibenzanthracene and 1,2,5,6-dibenzanthracene were determined using dynamic saturation methods. For the two isomers, aqueous solubility is in the range between 10(-10) and 10(-2) in molar fraction corresponding to temperature between 298.15 and 338.15K. Vapor pressures of the pure solutes range from 10(-5) to 80 Pa. Prior to the study of the two dibenzanthracenes and in order to check the experimental procedures, solubility of fluoranthene (between 298 and 338 K) and vapor pressures of phenanthrene and fluoranthene (between 300 and 470 K) were measured. From aqueous solubility data coupled with the vapor pressures of the pure solutes, partition coefficient air-water, KAW, and Henry's constant, KH, of environmental relevance were calculated.

  10. A range-free method to determine antoine vapor-pressure heat transfer-related equation coefficients using the Boubaker polynomial expansion scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koçak, H.; Dahong, Z.; Yildirim, A.

    2011-05-01

    In this study, a range-free method is proposed in order to determine the Antoine constants for a given material (salicylic acid). The advantage of this method is mainly yielding analytical expressions which fit different temperature ranges.

  11. Analytic equation of state and thermodynamic properties for He-H 2 fluid mixtures over a wide range of pressures and temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Xinying; Sun, Jiuxun

    2007-08-01

    The analytical expressions for the equation of state and thermo-physical quantities of Exp-6 fluid are derived based on the Ross variational perturbation theory and with the quantum effect taken into account. The formalism developed is applied to the He-H 2 mixtures. The agreement of numerical results of pressure and internal energy with MC simulations is shown far better than the analytic equation of state developed by [I. Ali, S.M. Osman, N. Sulaiman, R.N. Singh, Phys. Rev. E 69 (2004) 0561045]. The isotherms for pressure, internal energy and packing factor for five concentrations and four temperatures versus volume are calculated and analyzed. The numerical results for excess Gibbs free energy and entropy of mixing are presented. The variation of the excess Gibbs free energy of mixing, and the variation of the excess entropy of mixing versus temperature and pressure are different from and similar to that of Ali et al., respectively.

  12. Polarized and depolarized Raman spectra of liquid carbon disulfide in the pressure range 0-10 kbar. I. Vibration frequencies, C-S bond length, and Fermi resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikawa, S.; Whalley, Edward

    1986-09-01

    The effect of pressure on the polarized and depolarized Raman spectra of liquid carbon disulphide, i.e., the peak frequencies, bandwidths, and relative intensities of both the allowed ν1 and 2ν2 bands and the interaction-induced ν2 and ν3 bands, have been measured at 22 °C up to 10 kbar. This paper discusses the effect of pressure on the frequencies and on the relative isotropic intensity of the ν1 and 2ν2 bands. The frequency of the ν1 band increases linearly with pressure, within the experimental uncertainty, at the rate 0.16±0.01 cm-1 kbar-1, and the frequencies of the ν2, ν3, and 2ν2 bands decrease nonlinearly. The frequency shifts are described by second-order perturbation theory with the molecular anharmonicity and the intermolecular interaction as perturbations. The leading terms of the shifts consist of the same derivative of the interaction potential, multiplied by different anharmonicity constants, and the shifts of the ν1 and 2ν2 bands suggests that the C-S bond length decreases at the rate 2×10-4 Å kbar-1. The relative isotropic intensity of the 2ν2 and ν1 bands increases with pressure at the rate 0.050 kbar-1, whereas the anisotropic 2ν2 intensity relative to the isotropic ν1 intensity is independent of pressure to the experimental precision of ˜0.005. The effect of pressure on the second derivative of the isotropic and anisotropic parts of the polarizability with respect to the bend coordinate was estimated as 1.1×10-43 C m2 V-1 kbar-1 and ˜0, respectively, from these values.

  13. Models for aqueous electrolyte mixtures for systems extending from dilute range to the fused salt: Evaluation of parameters to high temperatures and pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Pabalan, R.T.; Pitzer, K.S.

    1988-09-01

    Models based on general equations for the excess Gibbs energy of the aqueous fluid provide thermodynamically consistent structures for evaluating and predicting aqueous electrolyte properties. These equations yield other quantities upon appropriate differentiation, including osmotic and activity coefficients, excess enthalpies, heat capacities, and volumes. For this reason a wide array of experimental data are available from which model parameters and their temperature or pressure dependence can be evaluated. For systems of moderate concentration, the most commonly used model at present is the ion-interaction approach and coworkers. For more concentrated solutions, including those extending to the fused salt, an alternate model based on a Margules-expansion and commonly used for nonelectrolytes was proposed. We discuss these two models and give examples of parameter evaluations for some geologically relevant systems to high temperatures and pressures; also we show applications of the models to calculations of solubility equilibria.

  14. Pressure activated stability-bypass-control valves to increase the stable airflow range of a Mach 2.5 inlet with 40 percent internal contraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, G. A.; Sanders, B. W.

    1974-01-01

    The throat of a Mach 2.5 inlet with a coldpipe termination was fitted with a stability-bypass system. The inlet stable airflow range provided by various stability-bypass entrance configurations in alternate combination with several stability-bypass exit controls was determined for both steady-state conditions and internal transient pulses. Transient results were also obtained for the inlet with a choke point at the diffuser exit. Instart angles of attack were determined for the various stability-bypass entrance configurations. The response of the inlet-coldpipe system to internal and external oscillating disturbances was determined. Poppet valves at the stability-bypass exit provided an inlet stable airflow range of 28 percent or greater at all static and transient conditions.

  15. The corrosion of etched magnox Al-80 in dry steam at ˜ 10 5 Pa pressure in the temperature range 373-573 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friskney, C. A.

    1981-09-01

    The corrosion of magnox in dry steam has been studied isothermally in the temperature range 373-573 K. Within this range different products dominate the process and there are corresponding rate changes. At ~520 K and above the product is magnesium oxide, whilst below ~ 393 K magnesium hydroxide is produced, the corrosion rate increasing with temperature in both regimes. Although magnesium hydroxide remains the dominant reaction product from 395 to 497 K, the rate of corrosion passes through a maximum at ~ 409 K and then falls rapidly as temperature is increased to ~ 520 K. Above 440 K magnesium hydride is detectable in the corrosion product, the amount increasing with temperature. It is suggested that hydrogen is built up in traps near the metal surface to form hydride and the hydride/hydrogen slows the hydroxide production. Formation of magnesium oxide appears to be a relatively slow process compared with hydroxide formation.

  16. A multipurpose ultra-high vacuum-compatible chamber for in situ X-ray surface scattering studies over a wide range of temperature and pressure environment conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrer, P.; Rubio-Zuazo, J.; Heyman, C.; Esteban-Betegón, F.; Castro, G. R.

    2013-03-01

    A low/high temperature (60-1000K) and pressure (10-10-3x103 mbar) "baby chamber", specially adapted to the grazing-incidence X-ray scattering station, has been designed, developed and installed at the Spanish CRG BM25 SpLine beamline at European Synchrotron Radiation Facility. The chamber has a cylindrical form with 100 mm of diameter, built on a 360° beryllium nipple of 150 mm height. The UHV equipment and a turbo pump are located on the upper part of the chamber to leave a wide solid angle for exploring reciprocal space. The chamber features 4 CF16 and 5 CF40 ports for electrical feed through and leak valves, ion gun, etc. The heat exchanger is a customized compact LN2 (or LHe) continuous flow cryostat. The sample is mounted on a Mo support on the heat exchanger, which has in the back side a BORALECTRIC® Heater Elements. Experiments of surfaces/interfaces/ multilayer materials, thin films or single crystals in a huge variety of environments can be performed, also in situ studies of growth or evolution of the samples. Data measurement can be collected with a punctual and a bi-dimensional detector, being possible to simultaneously use them.

  17. Accurate and stable equal-pressure measurements of water vapor transmission rate reaching the 10−6 g m−2 day−1 range

    PubMed Central

    Nakano, Yoichiro; Yanase, Takashi; Nagahama, Taro; Yoshida, Hajime; Shimada, Toshihiro

    2016-01-01

    The water vapor transmission rate (WVTR) of a gas barrier coating is a critically important parameter for flexible organic device packaging, but its accurate measurement without mechanical stress to ultrathin films has been a significant challenge in instrumental analysis. At the current stage, no reliable results have been reported in the range of 10−6 g m−2 day−1 that is required for organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs). In this article, we describe a solution for this difficult, but important measurement, involving enhanced sensitivity by a cold trap, stabilized temperature system, pumped sealing and calibration by a standard conductance element. PMID:27748431

  18. Accurate and stable equal-pressure measurements of water vapor transmission rate reaching the 10‑6 g m‑2 day‑1 range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakano, Yoichiro; Yanase, Takashi; Nagahama, Taro; Yoshida, Hajime; Shimada, Toshihiro

    2016-10-01

    The water vapor transmission rate (WVTR) of a gas barrier coating is a critically important parameter for flexible organic device packaging, but its accurate measurement without mechanical stress to ultrathin films has been a significant challenge in instrumental analysis. At the current stage, no reliable results have been reported in the range of 10‑6 g m‑2 day‑1 that is required for organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs). In this article, we describe a solution for this difficult, but important measurement, involving enhanced sensitivity by a cold trap, stabilized temperature system, pumped sealing and calibration by a standard conductance element.

  19. Observation of vapor pressure enhancement of rare-earth metal-halide salts in the temperature range relevant to metal-halide lamps

    SciTech Connect

    Curry, J. J.; Henins, A.; Hardis, J. E.; Estupinan, E. G.; Lapatovich, W. P.; Shastri, S. D.

    2012-02-20

    Total vapor-phase densities of Dy in equilibrium with a DyI{sub 3}/InI condensate and Tm in equilibrium with a TmI{sub 3}/TlI condensate have been measured for temperatures between 900 K and 1400 K. The measurements show strong enhancements in rare-earth vapor densities compared to vapors in equilibrium with the pure rare-earth metal-halides. The measurements were made with x-ray induced fluorescence on the sector 1-ID beam line at the Advanced Photon Source. The temperature range and salt mixtures are relevant to the operation of metal-halide high-intensity discharge lamps.

  20. Detection of dimethylamine in the low pptv range using nitrate chemical ionization atmospheric pressure interface time-of-flight (CI-APi-TOF) mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Mario; Heinritzi, Martin; Herzog, Stephan; Leiminger, Markus; Bianchi, Federico; Praplan, Arnaud; Dommen, Josef; Curtius, Joachim; Kürten, Andreas

    2016-05-01

    Amines are potentially important for atmospheric new particle formation, but their concentrations are usually low with typical mixing ratios in the pptv range or even smaller. Therefore, the demand for highly sensitive gas-phase amine measurements has emerged in the last several years. Nitrate chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS) is routinely used for the measurement of gas-phase sulfuric acid in the sub-pptv range. Furthermore, extremely low volatile organic compounds (ELVOCs) can be detected with a nitrate CIMS. In this study we demonstrate that a nitrate CIMS can also be used for the sensitive measurement of dimethylamine (DMA, (CH3)2NH) using the NO3-•(HNO3)1 - 2• (DMA) cluster ion signal. Calibration measurements were made at the CLOUD chamber during two different measurement campaigns. Good linearity between 0 and ˜ 120 pptv of DMA as well as a sub-pptv detection limit of 0.7 pptv for a 10 min integration time are demonstrated at 278 K and 38 % RH.

  1. An inverted metamorphic field gradient in the central Brooks Range, Alaska and implications for exhumation of high-pressure/low-temperature metamorphic rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Patrick, B.; Till, A.B.; Dinklage, W.S.

    1994-01-01

    During exhumation of the Brooks Range internal zone, amphibolite-facies rocks were emplaced atop the blueschist/greenschist facies schist belt. The resultant inverted metamorphic field gradient is mappable as a series of isograds encountered as one traverses up structural section. Amphibolite-facies metamorphism occurred at ??? 110 Ma as determined from 40Ar 39Ar analysis of hornblende. This contrasts with 40Ar 39Ar phengite cooling ages from the uderlying schist belt, which are clearly older (by 17-22 m.y.). Fabrics in both the amphibolite-facies rocks and schist belt are characterized by repeated cycles of N-vergent crenulation and transposition that was likely associated with out-of-sequence ductile thrusting in the internal zone of the Brooks Range orogen. Contractional deformation occurred in an overall environment of foreland-directed tectonic transport, broadly synchronous with exhumation of the internal zone, and shortening within the thin-skinned fold and thrust belt. These data are inconsistent with a recently postulated mid-Cretaceous episode of lithospheric extension in northern Alaska. ?? 1994.

  2. Technical note: Detection of dimethylamine in the low pptv range using nitrate Chemical Ionization-Atmospheric Pressure interface-Time Of Flight (CI-APi-TOF) mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, M.; Heinritzi, M.; Herzog, S.; Leiminger, M.; Bianchi, F.; Praplan, A.; Dommen, J.; Curtius, J.; Kürten, A.

    2015-12-01

    Amines are potentially important for atmospheric new particle formation and therefore the demand for highly sensitive gas phase amine measurements has emerged in the last several years. Nitrate Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry (CIMS) is routinely used for the measurement of gas phase-sulfuric acid in the sub-pptv range. Furthermore, Extremely Low Volatile Organic Compounds (ELVOCs) can be detected with a nitrate CIMS. In this study we demonstrate that a nitrate CIMS can also be used for the sensitive measurement of dimethylamine ((CH3)2NH, DMA) using the NO3-(HNO3)1-2(DMA) cluster ion signals. This observation was made at the CLOUD aerosol chamber, which was also used for calibration measurements. Good linearity between 0 and ~120 pptv of DMA as well as a sub-pptv detection limit of 0.7 pptv for a 10 min integration time are demonstrated at 278 K and 38 % RH.

  3. Experimental Surface Pressure Data Obtained on 65 deg Delta Wing Across Reynolds Number and Mach Number Ranges. Volume 1; Sharp Leading Edge; [conducted in the Langley National Transonic Facility (NTF)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, Julio; Luckring, James M.

    1996-01-01

    An experimental wind tunnel test of a 65 deg delta wing model with interchangeable leading edges was conducted in the Langley National Transonic Facility (NTF). The objective was to investigate the effects of Reynolds and Mach numbers on slender-wing leading-edge vortex flows with four values of wing leading-edge bluntness. Experimentally obtained pressure data are presented without analysis in tabulated and graphical formats across a Reynolds number range of 6 x 10(exp 6) to 36 x 10(exp 6) at a Mach number of 0.85 and across a Mach number range of 0.4 to 0.9 at a Reynolds number of 6 x 10(exp 6). Normal-force and pitching-moment coefficient plots for these Reynolds number and Mach number ranges are also presented.

  4. Absorption coefficients and frequency shifts measurement in the spectral range of 1071.88-1084.62 cm-1 vs. pressure for chlorodifluoromethane (CHClF2) using tunable CW CO2 laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Hawat, Sharif

    2013-02-01

    Infrared (IR) absorption in the spectral range of (1071.88-1084.62 cm-1) vs. pressure in chlorodifluoromethane (CFC-22, F-22, and CHClF2) was studied using a tunable continuous wave (CW) CO2 laser radiation on 9R branch lines with a maximum output power of about 2.12 W, provided with an absorber cell located outside the laser cavity. The absorption coefficients were determined vs. the gas pressure between 0.2 mbar and 170 mbar at lines from 9R branch for CFC-22. The frequency shifts of the absorption lines of CFC-22 in relative to the central frequencies of laser lines were calculated vs. the pressure on the basis of these absorption coefficients. The chosen lines were selected according to IR spectrum of the studied gas given by HITRAN cross section database. So the absorption was achieved for CFC-22 at the spectral lines of 9R branch situated from 9R (10) to 9R (30) emitted by a tunable CW CO2 laser. The absorption cross sections of CFC-22 determined in this work were compared with the relevant data given by HITRAN cross section database and a reasonable agreement was observed.

  5. Final report of supplementary comparison AFRIMETS.AUV.A-S1: primary pressure calibration of LS2aP microphones according to IEC 61094-2, over the frequency range 1 Hz to 31.5 kHz.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nel, R.; Barrera-Figueroa, S.; Dobrowolska, D.; Defilippo Soares, Z. M.; Maina, A. K.; Hof, C.

    2016-01-01

    This is the final report of the AFRIMETS.AUV-S1 comparison of the pressure sensitivity, modulus and phase, of LS2aP microphones in the frequency range 1 Hz to 31.5 kHz in accordance with IEC 61094-2. Six national metrology institutes from three different regional metrology organisations participated in the comparison for which two LS2aP microphones were circulated simultaneously to all the participants in a hybrid-star configuration. The comparison reference values were calculated as the weighted mean for modulus and phase for each individual microphone. Main text To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCAUV, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  6. Dynamic Calibration of Pressure Transducers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hess, R. W.; Davis, W. T.; Davis, P. A.

    1985-01-01

    Sinusoidal calibration signal produced in 4- to 100-Hz range. Portable oscillating-pressure device measures dynamic characteristics of pressure transducers installed in models or aircraft at frequency and oscillating-pressure ranges encountered during unsteady-pressure-measurement tests. Calibration is over range of frequencies and amplitudes not available with commercial acoustic calibration devices.

  7. Reotemp Pressure Indicator Local Pressure Indication to Monitor the SCHE Supply Bottle Pressure

    SciTech Connect

    VAN KATWIJK, C.

    1999-07-01

    These 0-3000 psig range pressure indicators are located in the SCHe helium supply lines at the pressure bottles and upstream of the PRV. These accident monitoring local pressure indicators monitor the SCHe supply bottle pressure. There is one pressure indicator for each SCHe supply (4).

  8. Blood pressure

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... called diastole. Normal blood pressure is considered to be a systolic blood pressure of 115 millimeters of ... pressure reading of 140 over 90, he would be evaluated for having high blood pressure. If left ...

  9. Simplified manual fabrication of cubic-zirconia gem anvils for extended energy-range spectroscopic studies to routine high pressures of 100-150 kbar (10-15 GPa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, N. R.; Erasmus, R. M.; Hearne, G. R.

    2010-07-01

    Methodology has been developed so as to attain routine extreme conditions as high as 10-15 GPa in a gem anvil optical pressure cell using hand (manual) processed gem anvils. The anvils polished by a simplified hand held tool are inexpensive single crystal cubic zirconia (CZ) gems that have various optical advantages over diamond anvils. Appreciable pressures are attained with culet and corresponding sample cavity dimensions that are relatively convenient to load with sample material. Some technical details are provided as regards the simplified manual fabrication process, thus emphasizing the relative ease and cost effectiveness of the hand polishing technique for fabricating such high pressure anvils. Raman spectroscopy measurements, in triple subtractive mode with a confocal pinhole geometry, are used to exemplify the usefulness of the CZ gem anvil cell methodology in pressure tuning experiments. This is particularly convenient for conventional low wave-number (lattice mode regime) Raman high pressure studies, which have not been reported previously in this context. Various other applications of such anvils are suggested.

  10. Dynamic Pressure Calibration Standard

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schutte, P. C.; Cate, K. H.; Young, S. D.

    1986-01-01

    Vibrating columns of fluid used to calibrate transducers. Dynamic pressure calibration standard developed for calibrating flush diaphragm-mounted pressure transducers. Pressures up to 20 kPa (3 psi) accurately generated over frequency range of 50 to 1,800 Hz. System includes two conically shaped aluminum columns one 5 cm (2 in.) high for low pressures and another 11 cm (4.3 in.) high for higher pressures, each filled with viscous fluid. Each column mounted on armature of vibration exciter, which imparts sinusoidally varying acceleration to fluid column. Signal noise low, and waveform highly dependent on quality of drive signal in vibration exciter.

  11. Air pressure measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ballard, H. N.

    1978-01-01

    The pressure measurement was made by a Model 830J Rosemont sensor which utilized the principle of a changing pressure to change correspondingly the capacitance of the pressure sensitive element. The sensor's range was stated to be from zero to 100 Torr (14 km); however, the sensor was not activated until an altitude of 20 km (41 Torr) was reached during the balloon ascent. The resolution of the sensor was specified by the manufacturer as infinitesimal; however, associated electronic and pressure readout systems limit the resolution to .044 Torr. Thus in the vicinity of an altitude of 30 km the pressure resolution corresponded to an altitude resolution of approximately 33 meters.

  12. Force and pressure characteristics for a series of nose inlets at Mach numbers from 1.59 to 1.99 V : analysis and comparison on basis of ram-jet aircraft range and operational characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, E; Luidens, R W; Allen, J L

    1951-01-01

    Performance of four experimentally investigated axially symmetric spike-type nose inlets is compared on basis of ram-jet-engine aircraft range and operational problems. At design conditions, calculated peak engine efficiencies varied 25 percent from the highest value which indicates importance of inlet design. Calculations for a typical supersonic aircraft indicate possible increase in range if engine is flown at moderate angle of attack and result in engine lift utilized. For engines with fixed exhaust nozzle, propulsive thrust increases with increasing heat addition in subcritical flow region in spite of increasing additive drag. For the perforated inlet there is a range of increasing total-temperature ratios in subcritical flow region that does not yield an increase in propulsive thrust. Effects of inlet characteristics on speed stability of a typical aircraft for three types of fuel control is discussed.

  13. Mesoscale Molecular Dynamics of Geomaterials: the Glass Transition, Long-Range Structure of Amorphous Silicates and Relation between Structure, Dynamics and Properties of geomaterials at elevated Temperature and Pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Frank Spera

    2006-07-31

    Objectives: Our aims were (1) Large particle-number Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations of molten silicate and aluminosilicate geomaterials (e.g., CaAl{sub 2}Si{sub 2}O{sub 8}, MgSiO{sub 3}, Mg{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}) with emphasis on understanding the connection between atomic structure and properties at temperatures and pressures characteristic of Earth's mantle (2) Study of the transport properties and equations of state for silicate liquids based on the MD results (3) Development of geochemical models for the evolution of crustal magma bodies undergoing simultaneous assimilation, fractional crystallization, periodic recharge and periodic eruption and application to magmatic systems (4) Study of current-day rates of generation and eruption of magma on earth.

  14. Final report on the supplementary comparison, EURAMET.M.P-S7 (EURAMET project 1040) in the pressure range from 1.10-4 Pa to 0.9 Pa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wüthrich, C.; Alisic, S.; Bergoglio, M.; Saxholm, S.; Lefkopoulos, A.; Pražák, D.; Setina, J.

    2016-01-01

    Many laboratories within EURAMET started a calibration service in medium and high vacuum recently and did not have the opportunity to take part to a comparison before. In order to assess the uncertainty budget and the quality of the measurement of these laboratories, an intercomparison, EURAMET 1040 registered as EURAMET.M.P-S7, from 0.1 mPa to 0.9 Pa has been organised. The participants are the CMI (Czech republic), EIM (Greece), IMT (Slovenia), INRIM (Italy), IMBIH (Bosnia Herzegovinia) and MIKES (Finland) while METAS (Switzerland) is pilot laboratory. Three laboratories (INRIM, CMI and METAS) involved in this work have a primary definition of the pressure. Two spinning rotor gauges and a control electronic are used as transfer standard. The circulation of the transfer standard is organised as a succession of loops with a measurement by the pilot between each participant. A reference value has been determined based on a weighted mean of the results of the primary laboratories. All the participants have demonstrated their equivalence in the definition of the pressure. This comparison has been used as pilot comparison for the CCM.P-K14 project which covers the same scope with similar transfer standards. Main text To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCM, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  15. Pressure Sores

    MedlinePlus

    Pressure sores are areas of damaged skin caused by staying in one position for too long. They ... wheelchair, or are unable to change your position. Pressure sores can cause serious infections, some of which ...

  16. Barometric pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Billings, C. E.

    1973-01-01

    The effects of alterations in barometric pressure on human beings are described. Human tolerances for gaseous environments and low and high barometric pressure are discussed, including effects on specific areas, such as the ear, lungs, teeth, and sinuses. Problems due to trapped gas within the body, high dynamic pressures on the body, and blasts are also considered.

  17. Gas Pressure-Drop Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luyben, William L.; Tuzla, Kemal

    2010-01-01

    Most chemical engineering undergraduate laboratories have fluid mechanics experiments in which pressure drops through pipes are measured over a range of Reynolds numbers. The standard fluid is liquid water, which is essentially incompressible. Since density is constant, pressure drop does not depend on the pressure in the pipe. In addition, flow…

  18. Man Under Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Kidd, D. J.

    1964-01-01

    Current achievements in environments at pressures higher than atmospheric are reviewed, ranging from the uses of hyperbaric oxygen for treatment to the concept of residence at high pressure for extended Continental Shelf exploration and very deep caisson work. A case is made for the use of high oxygen pressures in the treatment of hypoxias of acute onset, of certain infections, and as an adjunct to radiotherapy. Achievement of the desired high tissue tensions of oxygen while avoiding toxicity requires careful choice of both pressure and duration of exposure. Man has successfully dived to 1000 feet in the sea, and has remained for weeks at high pressures. Adequate prophylactic decompression remains a major problem, since current recompression procedures are to a large extent empirically derived. There are grounds for expecting improved prophylactic and therapeutic procedures when present studies are completed. PMID:14217256

  19. RANGE INCREASER FOR PNEUMATIC GAUGES

    DOEpatents

    Fowler, A.H.; Seaborn, G.B. Jr.

    1960-09-27

    An improved pneumatic gage is offered in which the linear range has been increased without excessive air consumption. This has been accomplished by providing an expansible antechamber connected to the nozzle of the gage so that the position of the nozzle with respect to the workpiece is varied automatically by variation in pressure within the antechamber. This arrangement ensures that the nozzle-to-workpiece clearance is maintained within certain limits, thus obtaining a linear relation of air flow to nozzle-to-workpiece clearance over a wider range.

  20. The Effect of Different Materials on the Accuracy of the HYDRA Optical-Fiber-Coupled Coherent Range/Pressure Measurement System and the Development of the Health Care Database System at Old Dominion University

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Kimberly D.

    1995-01-01

    The objective of the first project involving the HYDRA laser system was to determine what effects, if any, could been seen in the system's measurements when testing was done with objects composed of different materials. Ideally we would like to have seen that the range of measurements were all within the accepted 0.4 millimeter accuracy of the system. Unfortunately our results were not as we had hoped, and there did appear to be some significant difference in the measurements made on objects composed of different materials. The second project is a continuing project at Old Dominion University. The ultimate goal is to develop a medical database that allows a doctor or hospital to keep medical records on line. The current data of the system consisted of one patient whose medical data had been hard coded to allow for a demonstration of the potentials of the system. The short term goal for this summer was to add additional patients to the system for testing, and to eliminate the hard coding of data by creating a database where data could be stored and queried to produce the results seen in the current state.

  1. Microbial activity at gigapascal pressures.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Anurag; Scott, James H; Cody, George D; Fogel, Marilyn L; Hazen, Robert M; Hemley, Russell J; Huntress, Wesley T

    2002-02-22

    We observed physiological and metabolic activity of Shewanella oneidensis strain MR1 and Escherichia coli strain MG1655 at pressures of 68 to 1680 megapascals (MPa) in diamond anvil cells. We measured biological formate oxidation at high pressures (68 to 1060 MPa). At pressures of 1200 to 1600 MPa, living bacteria resided in fluid inclusions in ice-VI crystals and continued to be viable upon subsequent release to ambient pressures (0.1 MPa). Evidence of microbial viability and activity at these extreme pressures expands by an order of magnitude the range of conditions representing the habitable zone in the solar system. PMID:11859192

  2. Transglottal pressures in professional singing.

    PubMed

    Schutte, H K; Miller, D G

    1986-01-01

    Using high-frequency miniature pressure transducers, direct measurements of sub- and supra-glottal pressure are taken on two sopranos singing high notes, in a range where F1 is close to F0. When the peak in supraglottal pressure occurs well into the open phase of the glottal cycle, the instantaneous transglottal pressure approaches zero. When this peak occurs later in one of the subjects as a feature of the vibrato modulation, the transglottal pressure even drops appreciably below zero. The implications of these findings for the glottal volume velocity waveform, as well as for the singer's experience of the second "passaggio" point, are discussed. PMID:3751533

  3. Microbial activity at gigapascal pressures.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Anurag; Scott, James H; Cody, George D; Fogel, Marilyn L; Hazen, Robert M; Hemley, Russell J; Huntress, Wesley T

    2002-02-22

    We observed physiological and metabolic activity of Shewanella oneidensis strain MR1 and Escherichia coli strain MG1655 at pressures of 68 to 1680 megapascals (MPa) in diamond anvil cells. We measured biological formate oxidation at high pressures (68 to 1060 MPa). At pressures of 1200 to 1600 MPa, living bacteria resided in fluid inclusions in ice-VI crystals and continued to be viable upon subsequent release to ambient pressures (0.1 MPa). Evidence of microbial viability and activity at these extreme pressures expands by an order of magnitude the range of conditions representing the habitable zone in the solar system.

  4. Nonlinear optomechanical pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conti, Claudio; Boyd, Robert

    2014-03-01

    A transparent material exhibits ultrafast optical nonlinearity and is subject to optical pressure if irradiated by a laser beam. However, the effect of nonlinearity on optical pressure is often overlooked, even if a nonlinear optical pressure may be potentially employed in many applications, such as optical manipulation, biophysics, cavity optomechanics, quantum optics, and optical tractors, and is relevant in fundamental problems such as the Abraham-Minkoswky dilemma or the Casimir effect. Here, we show that an ultrafast nonlinear polarization gives indeed a contribution to the optical pressure that also is negative in certain spectral ranges; the theoretical analysis is confirmed by first-principles simulations. An order-of-magnitude estimate shows that the effect can be observable by measuring the deflection of a membrane made by graphene.

  5. Post-operative cranial pressure monitoring system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fager, C. A., Jr.; Long, L. E.; Trent, R. L.

    1970-01-01

    System for monitoring of fluidic pressures in cranial cavity uses a miniaturized pressure sensing transducer, combined with suitable amplification means, a meter with scale calibrated in terms of pressures between minus 100 and plus 900 millimeters of water, and a miniaturized chart recorder covering similar range of pressures.

  6. Pressure sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Mee, David K.; Ripley, Edward B.; Nienstedt, Zachary C.; Nienstedt, Alex W.; Howell, Jr., Layton N.

    2015-09-29

    Disclosed is a passive, in-situ pressure sensor. The sensor includes a sensing element having a ferromagnetic metal and a tension inducing mechanism coupled to the ferromagnetic metal. The tension inducing mechanism is operable to change a tensile stress upon the ferromagnetic metal based on a change in pressure in the sensing element. Changes in pressure are detected based on changes in the magnetic switching characteristics of the ferromagnetic metal when subjected to an alternating magnetic field caused by the change in the tensile stress. The sensing element is embeddable in a closed system for detecting pressure changes without the need for any penetrations of the system for power or data acquisition by detecting changes in the magnetic switching characteristics of the ferromagnetic metal caused by the tensile stress.

  7. Peer Pressure

    MedlinePlus

    ... and behaviors. This is often positive — it's human nature to listen to and learn from other people ... Responding to peer pressure is part of human nature — but some people are more likely to give ...

  8. Pressure Drop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawson, Mike

    2010-01-01

    Mike Lawson briefly discussed pressure drop for aerospace applications and presented short stories about adventures experienced while working at NASA and General Dynamics, including exposure to technologies like the Crew and Equipment Translation Aid (CETA) cart and the SWME.

  9. Dual range infinitely variable transmission

    SciTech Connect

    Eichenberger, P.

    1989-10-31

    This patent describes in a transaxle assembly comprising an infinitely variably belt and sheave assembly driving sheave portions and driven sheave portions, a housing assembly enclosing the sheave portions. It includes a torque input shaft coaxially disposed with respect to the driving sheave portions, means for drivably connecting the driving sheave portions and the input shaft; a secondary shaft having an axis in spaced parallel relationship with respect to the torque input shaft. The driven sheave portions being mounted for rotation on the axis of the secondary shaft; a flexible drive member driveable connected to the input sheave portions and the output sheave portions. The flexible drive member engaging the input and output sheave portions at an effective pitch diameter for each sheave portion; fluid pressure servo means for adjustable positioning the sheave portions to effect variations in the effective pitch diameters of the driving sheave portions and the driven sheave portions; a countershaft mounted in spaced parallel dispositions with respect to the secondary shaft, a bearing assembly means for journalling the countershaft in the housing assembly, a high speed range gear train connecting the secondary shaft with the countershaft; fluid pressure operated clutch means for activating and deactivating selectively the high speed range gear train and the low speed range gear train; and planetary forward and reverse means disposed concentrically with respect to the countershaft including clutch means.

  10. PRESSURE TRANSDUCER

    DOEpatents

    Sander, H.H.

    1959-10-01

    A pressure or mechanical force transducer particularly adaptable to miniature telemetering systems is described. Basically the device consists of a transistor located within a magnetic field adapted to change in response to mechanical force. The conduction characteristics of the transistor in turn vary proportionally with changes in the magnetic flux across the transistor such that the output (either frequency of amplitude) of the transistor circuit is proportional to mechanical force or pressure.

  11. Pressure regulator

    DOEpatents

    Ebeling, Jr., Robert W.; Weaver, Robert B.

    1979-01-01

    The pressure within a pressurized flow reactor operated under harsh environmental conditions is controlled by establishing and maintaining a fluidized bed of uniformly sized granular material of selected density by passing the gas from the reactor upwardly therethrough at a rate sufficient to fluidize the bed and varying the height of the bed by adding granular material thereto or removing granular material therefrom to adjust the backpressure on the flow reactor.

  12. Low pressure EGR system having full range capability

    DOEpatents

    Easley, Jr. William Lanier; Milam, David Michael; Roozenboom, Stephan Donald; Bond, Michael Steven; Kapic, Amir

    2009-09-22

    An exhaust treatment system for an engine is disclosed and may have an air induction circuit, an exhaust circuit, and an exhaust recirculation circuit. The air induction circuit may be configured to direct air into the engine. The exhaust circuit may be configured to direct exhaust from the engine and include a turbine driven by the exhaust, a particulate filter disposed in series with and downstream of the turbine, and a catalytic device disposed in series with and downstream of the particulate filter. The exhaust recirculation circuit may be configured to selectively redirect at least some of the exhaust from between the particulate filter and the catalytic device to the air induction circuit. The catalytic device is selected to create backpressure within the exhaust circuit sufficient to ensure that, under normal engine operating conditions above low idle, exhaust can flow into the air induction circuit without throttling of the air.

  13. Telemetry Ranging: Concepts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamkins, J.; Kinman, P.; Xie, H.; Vilnrotter, V.; Dolinar, S.

    2015-11-01

    Telemetry ranging is a proposed alternative to conventional two-way ranging for determining the two-way time delay between a Deep Space Station (DSS) and a spacecraft. The advantage of telemetry ranging is that the ranging signal on the uplink is not echoed to the downlink, so that telemetry alone modulates the downlink carrier. The timing information needed on the downlink, in order to determine the two-way time delay, is obtained from telemetry frames. This article describes the phase and timing estimates required for telemetry ranging, and how two-way range is calculated from these estimates. It explains why the telemetry ranging architecture does not require the spacecraft transponder to have a high-frequency or high-quality oscillator, and it describes how a telemetry ranging system can be infused in the Deep Space Network.

  14. Cascade Mountain Range in Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sherrod, David R.

    2016-01-01

    Along its Oregon segment, the Cascade Range is almost entirely volcanic in origin. The volcanoes and their eroded remnants are the visible magmatic expression of the Cascadia subduction zone, where the offshore Juan de Fuca tectonic plate is subducted beneath North America. Subduction occurs as two lithospheric plates collide, and an underthrusted oceanic plate is commonly dragged into the mantle by the pull of gravity, carrying ocean-bottom rock and sediment down to where heat and pressure expel water. As this water rises, it lowers the melting temperature in the overlying hot mantle rocks, thereby promoting melting. The molten rock supplies the volcanic arcs with heat and magma. Cascade Range volcanoes are part of the Ring of Fire, a popular term for the numerous volcanic arcs that encircle the Pacific Ocean.

  15. The vapor pressures of explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Ewing, Robert G.; Waltman, Melanie J.; Atkinson, David A.; Grate, Jay W.; Hotchkiss, Peter

    2013-01-05

    The vapor pressures of many explosive compounds are extremely low and thus determining accurate values proves difficult. Many researchers, using a variety of methods, have measured and reported the vapor pressures of explosives compounds at single temperatures, or as a function of temperature using vapor pressure equations. There are large variations in reported vapor pressures for many of these compounds, and some errors exist within individual papers. This article provides a review of explosive vapor pressures and describes the methods used to determine them. We have compiled primary vapor pressure relationships traceable to the original citations and include the temperature ranges for which they have been determined. Corrected values are reported as needed and described in the text. In addition, after critically examining the available data, we calculate and tabulate vapor pressures at 25 °C.

  16. Abnormal pressure in hydrocarbon environments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Law, B.E.; Spencer, C.W.

    1998-01-01

    Abnormal pressures, pressures above or below hydrostatic pressures, occur on all continents in a wide range of geological conditions. According to a survey of published literature on abnormal pressures, compaction disequilibrium and hydrocarbon generation are the two most commonly cited causes of abnormally high pressure in petroleum provinces. In young (Tertiary) deltaic sequences, compaction disequilibrium is the dominant cause of abnormal pressure. In older (pre-Tertiary) lithified rocks, hydrocarbon generation, aquathermal expansion, and tectonics are most often cited as the causes of abnormal pressure. The association of abnormal pressures with hydrocarbon accumulations is statistically significant. Within abnormally pressured reservoirs, empirical evidence indicates that the bulk of economically recoverable oil and gas occurs in reservoirs with pressure gradients less than 0.75 psi/ft (17.4 kPa/m) and there is very little production potential from reservoirs that exceed 0.85 psi/ft (19.6 kPa/m). Abnormally pressured rocks are also commonly associated with unconventional gas accumulations where the pressuring phase is gas of either a thermal or microbial origin. In underpressured, thermally mature rocks, the affected reservoirs have most often experienced a significant cooling history and probably evolved from an originally overpressured system.

  17. RADIO RANGING DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    Nieset, R.T.

    1961-05-16

    A radio ranging device is described. It utilizes a super regenerative detector-oscillator in which echoes of transmitted pulses are received in proper phase to reduce noise energy at a selected range and also at multiples of the selected range.

  18. SAR ambiguous range suppression.

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2006-09-01

    Pulsed Radar systems suffer range ambiguities, that is, echoes from pulses transmitted at different times arrive at the receiver simultaneously. Conventional mitigation techniques are not always adequate. However, pulse modulation schemes exist that allow separation of ambiguous ranges in Doppler space, allowing easy filtering of problematic ambiguous ranges.

  19. High Blood Pressure

    MedlinePlus

    ... version High Blood Pressure Overview What is blood pressure? Blood pressure is the amount of force that your ... called your blood pressure. What is high blood pressure? High blood pressure (also called hypertension) occurs when your blood ...

  20. Telemetry Ranging: Signal Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamkins, J.; Kinman, P.; Xie, H.; Vilnrotter, V.; Dolinar, S.

    2016-02-01

    This article describes the details of the signal processing used in a telemetry ranging system in which timing information is extracted from the downlink telemetry signal in order to compute spacecraft range. A previous article describes telemetry ranging concepts and architecture, which are a slight variation of a scheme published earlier. As in that earlier work, the telemetry ranging concept eliminates the need for a dedicated downlink ranging signal to communicate the necessary timing information. The present article describes the operation and performance of the major receiver functions on the spacecraft and the ground --- many of which are standard tracking loops already in use in JPL's flight and ground radios --- and how they can be used to provide the relevant information for making a range measurement. It also describes the implementation of these functions in software, and performance of an end-to-end software simulation of the telemetry ranging system.

  1. Telemetry-Based Ranging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamkins, Jon; Vilnrotter, Victor A.; Andrews, Kenneth S.; Shambayati, Shervin

    2011-01-01

    A telemetry-based ranging scheme was developed in which the downlink ranging signal is eliminated, and the range is computed directly from the downlink telemetry signal. This is the first Deep Space Network (DSN) ranging technology that does not require the spacecraft to transmit a separate ranging signal. By contrast, the evolutionary ranging techniques used over the years by NASA missions, including sequential ranging (transmission of a sequence of sinusoids) and PN-ranging (transmission of a pseudo-noise sequence) whether regenerative (spacecraft acquires, then regenerates and retransmits a noise-free ranging signal) or transparent (spacecraft feeds the noisy demodulated uplink ranging signal into the downlink phase modulator) relied on spacecraft power and bandwidth to transmit an explicit ranging signal. The state of the art in ranging is described in an emerging CCSDS (Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems) standard, in which a pseudo-noise (PN) sequence is transmitted from the ground to the spacecraft, acquired onboard, and the PN sequence is coherently retransmitted back to the ground, where a delay measurement is made between the uplink and downlink signals. In this work, the telemetry signal is aligned with the uplink PN code epoch. The ground station computes the delay between the uplink signal transmission and the received downlink telemetry. Such a computation is feasible because symbol synchronizability is already an integral part of the telemetry design. Under existing technology, the telemetry signal cannot be used for ranging because its arrival-time information is not coherent with any Earth reference signal. By introducing this coherence, and performing joint telemetry detection and arrival-time estimation on the ground, a high-rate telemetry signal can provide all the precision necessary for spacecraft ranging.

  2. A dynamic pressure source for the calibration of pressure transducers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vezzetti, C. F.; Hilten, J. S.; Mayo-Wells, J. F.; Lederer, P. S.

    1976-01-01

    A dynamic pressure source is described for producing sinusoidally varying pressures of up to 34 kPa zero to peak, over the frequency range of approximately 50 Hz to 2 kHz. The source is intended for the dynamic calibration of pressure transducers. The transducer to be calibrated is mounted near the base of the thick walled aluminum tube forming the vessel so that the pressure sensitive element is in contact with the liquid in the tube. A section of the tube is filled with small steel balls to damp the motion of the 10-St dimethyl siloxane working fluid in order to extend the useful frquency range to higher frequencies than would be provided by an undamped system. The dynamic response of six transducers provided by the sponsor was evaluated using the pressure sources; the results of these calibrations are given.

  3. Micron Accurate Absolute Ranging System: Range Extension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalley, Larry L.; Smith, Kely L.

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to investigate Fresnel diffraction as a means of obtaining absolute distance measurements with micron or greater accuracy. It is believed that such a system would prove useful to the Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST) as a non-intrusive, non-contact measuring system for use with secondary concentrator station-keeping systems. The present research attempts to validate past experiments and develop ways to apply the phenomena of Fresnel diffraction to micron accurate measurement. This report discusses past research on the phenomena, and the basis of the use Fresnel diffraction distance metrology. The apparatus used in the recent investigations, experimental procedures used, preliminary results are discussed in detail. Continued research and equipment requirements on the extension of the effective range of the Fresnel diffraction systems is also described.

  4. A Microwave Pressure Sounder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flower, D. A.; Peckham, G. E.

    1978-01-01

    An instrument to measure atmospheric pressure at the earth's surface from an orbiting satellite would be a valuable addition to the expanding inventory of remote sensors. The subject of this report is such an instrument - the Microwave Pressure Sounder (MPS). It is shown that global-ocean coverage is attainable with sufficient accuracy, resolution and observational frequency for meteorological, oceanographic and climate research applications. Surface pressure can be deduced from a measurement of the absorption by an atmospheric column at a frequency in the wing of the oxygen band centered on 60 GHz. An active multifrequency instrument is needed to make this measurement with sufficient accuracy. The selection of optimum operating frequencies is based upon accepted models of surface reflection, oxygen, water vapor and cloud absorption. Numerical simulation using a range of real atmospheres defined by radiosonde observations were used to validate the frequency selection procedure. Analyses are presented of alternative system configurations that define the balance between accuracy and achievable resolution.

  5. Fail-Safe Pressure Plug

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Svejkovsky, Paul A.

    1993-01-01

    Protective plug resists slowly built-up pressure or automatically releases itself if pressure rises suddenly. Seals out moisture at pressures ranging from 50 micrometers of mercury to 200 pounds per square inch. Designed to seal throat of 38 Reaction Control Thrusters on Space Shuttle protecting internal components from corrosion. Plug conforms to contour of nozzle throat, where O-ring forms pressure seal. After plug inserted, cover attached by use of cover-fitting assembly. Modified versions useful in protecting engines, pumps, reaction vessels, and other industrial equipment during shipment and maintenance.

  6. Automatic range selector

    DOEpatents

    McNeilly, Clyde E.

    1977-01-04

    A device is provided for automatically selecting from a plurality of ranges of a scale of values to which a meter may be made responsive, that range which encompasses the value of an unknown parameter. A meter relay indicates whether the unknown is of greater or lesser value than the range to which the meter is then responsive. The rotatable part of a stepping relay is rotated in one direction or the other in response to the indication from the meter relay. Various positions of the rotatable part are associated with particular scales. Switching means are sensitive to the position of the rotatable part to couple the associated range to the meter.

  7. Pressure versus flow in biological pumps.

    PubMed

    Vogel, S

    1995-01-01

    The pumps with which organisms move fluids span nearly a ten-million-fold pressure range. As in human technology, positive displacement pumps (osmotic, valve-and-chamber, peristaltic, etc.) are used for high-pressure applications and fluid dynamic pumps (using hydrofoils, cilia, aspirators, etc.) for low pressures. But while pressure capability or system resistance dichotomizes pumps by operative mechanism, the values of a dimensionless pressure-flow index prove more relevant to their biological roles; this index is a ratio of overall pressure drop in the system to pressure drop due to viscous resistance to flow.

  8. Pressure Ulcer Prevention

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Executive Summary In April 2008, the Medical Advisory Secretariat began an evidence-based review of the literature concerning pressure ulcers. Please visit the Medical Advisory Secretariat Web site, http://www.health.gov.on.ca/english/providers/program/mas/tech/tech_mn.html to review these titles that are currently available within the Pressure Ulcers series. Pressure ulcer prevention: an evidence based analysis The cost-effectiveness of prevention strategies for pressure ulcers in long-term care homes in Ontario: projections of the Ontario Pressure Ulcer Model (field evaluation) Management of chronic pressure ulcers: an evidence-based analysis (anticipated pubicstion date - mid-2009) Purpose A pressure ulcer, also known as a pressure sore, decubitus ulcer, or bedsore, is defined as a localized injury to the skin/and or underlying tissue occurring most often over a bony prominence and caused by pressure, shear, or friction, alone or in combination. (1) Those at risk for developing pressure ulcers include the elderly and critically ill as well as persons with neurological impairments and those who suffer conditions associated with immobility. Pressure ulcers are graded or staged with a 4-point classification system denoting severity. Stage I represents the beginnings of a pressure ulcer and stage IV, the severest grade, consists of full thickness tissue loss with exposed bone, tendon, and or muscle. (1) In a 2004 survey of Canadian health care settings, Woodbury and Houghton (2) estimated that the prevalence of pressure ulcers at a stage 1 or greater in Ontario ranged between 13.1% and 53% with nonacute health care settings having the highest prevalence rate (Table 1). Executive Summary Table 1: Prevalence of Pressure Ulcers* Setting Canadian Prevalence,% (95% CI) Ontario Prevalence,Range % (n) Acute care 25 (23.8–26.3) 23.9–29.7 (3418) Nonacute care† 30 (29.3–31.4) 30.0–53.3 (1165) Community care 15 (13.4–16.8) 13.2 (91) Mixed health care‡ 22 (20.9

  9. Pressurized hopper

    SciTech Connect

    Densley, P.J.; Goldmann, L.H. Jr.

    1980-04-01

    A Secure Automated Fuel Fabrication Line is being developed to reduce personnel exposure and to improve safeguards. Fertile and fissile fuel powders are blended in the line for making fuel pellets. A pressurized hopper was developed for use not only as a blender, but also as a storage and feeding device. It works with or without injection tubes to produce a well-blended powder with reduced agglomerate population. Results of blending experiments using dry Kaolin clay and Tempra pigment are given. (DLC)

  10. Pressure transducer

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, T.T.; Roop, C.J.; Schmidt, K.J.; Gunchin, E.R.

    1987-02-13

    A pressure transducer suitable for use in high temperature environments includes two pairs of induction coils, each pair being bifilarly wound together, and each pair of coils connected as opposite arms of a four arm circuit; an electrically conductive target moveably positioned between the coil pairs and connected to a diaphragm such that deflection of the diaphragm causes axial movement of the target and an unbalance in the bridge output. 7 figs.

  11. Pressure transducer

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Thomas T.; Roop, Conard J.; Schmidt, Kenneth J.; Gunchin, Elmer R.

    1989-01-01

    A pressure transducer suitable for use in high temperature environments includes two pairs of induction coils, each pair being bifilarly wound together, and each pair of coils connected as opposite arms of a four arm circuit; an electrically conductive target moveably positioned between the coil pairs and connected to a diaphragm such that deflection of the diaphragm causes axial movement of the target and an unbalance in the bridge output.

  12. Range Scheduling Aid (RSA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Logan, J. R.; Pulvermacher, M. K.

    1991-01-01

    Range Scheduling Aid (RSA) is presented in the form of the viewgraphs. The following subject areas are covered: satellite control network; current and new approaches to range scheduling; MITRE tasking; RSA features; RSA display; constraint based analytic capability; RSA architecture; and RSA benefits.

  13. Home range and travels

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stickel, L.F.; King, John A.

    1968-01-01

    The concept of home range was expressed by Seton (1909) in the term 'home region,' which Burr (1940, 1943) clarified with a definition of home range and exemplified in a definitive study of Peromyscus in the field. Burt pointed out the ever-changing characteristics of home-range area and the consequent absence of boundaries in the usual sense--a finding verified by investigators thereafter. In the studies summarized in this paper, sizes of home ranges of Peromyscus varied within two magnitudes, approximately from 0.1 acre to ten acres, in 34 studies conducted in a variety of habitats from the seaside dunes of Florida to the Alaskan forests. Variation in sizes of home ranges was correlated with both environmental and physiological factors; with habitat it was conspicuous, both in the same and different regions. Food supply also was related to size of home range, both seasonally and in relation to habitat. Home ranges generally were smallest in winter and largest in spring, at the onset of the breeding season. Activity and size also were affected by changes in weather. Activity was least when temperatures were low and nights were bright. Effects of rainfall were variable. Sizes varied according to sex and age; young mice remained in the parents' range until they approached maturity, when they began to travel more widely. Adult males commonly had larger home ranges than females, although there were a number of exceptions. An inverse relationship between population density and size of home range was shown in several studies and probably is the usual relationship. A basic need for activity and exploration also appeared to influence size of home range. Behavior within the home range was discussed in terms of travel patterns, travels in relation to home sites and refuges, territory, and stability of size of home range. Travels within the home range consisted of repeated use of well-worn trails to sites of food, shelter, and refuge, plus more random exploratory travels

  14. Steam Oxidation at High Pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, Gordon R.; Carney, Casey

    2013-07-19

    A first high pressure test was completed: 293 hr at 267 bar and 670{degrees}C; A parallel 1 bar test was done for comparison; Mass gains were higher for all alloys at 267 bar than at 1 bar; Longer term exposures, over a range of temperatures and pressures, are planned to provide information as to the commercial implications of pressure effects; The planned tests are at a higher combination of temperatures and pressures than in the existing literature. A comparison was made with longer-term literature data: The short term exposures are largely consistent with the longer-term corrosion literature; Ferritic steels--no consistent pressure effect; Austenitic steels--fine grain alloys less able to maintain protective chromia scale as pressure increases; Ni-base alloys--more mass gains above 105 bar than below. Not based on many data points.

  15. Blood pressure measurement

    MedlinePlus

    Diastolic blood pressure; Systolic blood pressure; Blood pressure reading; Measuring blood pressure ... your health care provider will wrap the blood pressure cuff snugly around your upper arm. The lower ...

  16. Blood Pressure Quiz

    MedlinePlus

    ... page please turn Javascript on. Feature: High Blood Pressure Blood Pressure Quiz Past Issues / Fall 2011 Table of Contents ... About High Blood Pressure / Treatment: Types of Blood Pressure Medications / Blood Pressure Quiz Fall 2011 Issue: Volume 6 Number ...

  17. Understanding Blood Pressure Readings

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Understanding Blood Pressure Readings Updated:Aug 17,2016 Blood pressure is typically ... Your doctor should evaluate unusually low blood pressure readings. How is high blood pressure diagnosed? Your healthcare ...

  18. SNOWY RANGE WILDERNESS, WYOMING.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Houston, Robert S.; Bigsby, Philip R.

    1984-01-01

    A mineral survey of the Snowy Range Wilderness in Wyoming was undertaken and was followed up with more detailed geologic and geochemical surveys, culminating in diamond drilling of one hole in the Snowy Range Wilderness. No mineral deposits were identified in the Snowy Range Wilderness, but inasmuch as low-grade uranium and associated gold resources were identified in rocks similar to those of the northern Snowy Range Wilderness in an area about 5 mi northeast of the wilderness boundary, the authors conclude that the northern half of the wilderness has a probable-resource potential for uranium and gold. Closely spaced drilling would be required to completely evaluate this mineral potential. The geologic terrane precludes the occurrence of fossil fuels.

  19. Mu-2 ranging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, W. L.; Zygielbaum, A. I.

    1977-01-01

    The Mu-II Dual-Channel Sequential Ranging System designed as a model for future Deep Space Network ranging equipment is described. A list of design objectives is followed by a theoretical explanation of the digital demodulation techniques first employed in this machine. Hardware and software implementation are discussed, together with the details relating to the construction of the device. Two appendixes are included relating to the programming and operation of this equipment to yield the maximum scientific data.

  20. Management of Chronic Pressure Ulcers

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Executive Summary In April 2008, the Medical Advisory Secretariat began an evidence-based review of the literature concerning pressure ulcers. Please visit the Medical Advisory Secretariat Web site, http://www.health.gov.on.ca/english/providers/program/mas/tech/tech_mn.html to review these titles that are currently available within the Pressure Ulcers series. Pressure ulcer prevention: an evidence based analysis The cost-effectiveness of prevention strategies for pressure ulcers in long-term care homes in Ontario: projections of the Ontario Pressure Ulcer Model (field evaluation) Management of chronic pressure ulcers: an evidence-based analysis Objective The Medical Advisory Secretariat (MAS) conducted a systematic review on interventions used to treat pressure ulcers in order to answer the following questions: Do currently available interventions for the treatment of pressure ulcers increase the healing rate of pressure ulcers compared with standard care, a placebo, or other similar interventions? Within each category of intervention, which one is most effective in promoting the healing of existing pressure ulcers? Background A pressure ulcer is a localized injury to the skin and/or underlying tissue usually over a bony prominence, as a result of pressure, or pressure in conjunction with shear and/or friction. Many areas of the body, especially the sacrum and the heel, are prone to the development of pressure ulcers. People with impaired mobility (e.g., stroke or spinal cord injury patients) are most vulnerable to pressure ulcers. Other factors that predispose people to pressure ulcer formation are poor nutrition, poor sensation, urinary and fecal incontinence, and poor overall physical and mental health. The prevalence of pressure ulcers in Ontario has been estimated to range from a median of 22.1% in community settings to a median of 29.9% in nonacute care facilities. Pressure ulcers have been shown to increase the risk of mortality among geriatric patients by

  1. A dynamic pressure calibration standard

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schutte, P. C.; Cate, K. H.; Young, S. D.

    1985-01-01

    A dynamic pressure calibration standard has been developed for calibrating flush diaphragm mounted pressure transducers. Pressures up to 20 kPa (3 psi) have been accurately generated over a frequency range of 50 to 1800 hz. The uncertainty of the standard is +/-5 pct to 5kPa (.75 psi) and +/-10 pct from 5 kPa (.75 psi) to 20 kPa (3 psi). The system consists of two conically shaped, aluminum columns, one 5 cm (2 in.) high for low pressures and another 11 cm (4.3 in.) high for higher pressures, each filled with a viscous fluid. A column is mounted on the armature of a vibration exciter which imparts a sinusoidally varying acceleration to the fluid column. Two pressure transducers mounted at the base of the column sense the sinusoidally varying pressure. This pressure is determined from measurements of the density of the fluid, the height of the fluid, and the acceleration of the column. A section of the taller column is filled with steel balls to control the damping of the fluid to extend its useful frequency range.

  2. Laser Ranging Simulation Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piazolla, Sabino; Hemmati, Hamid; Tratt, David

    2003-01-01

    Laser Ranging Simulation Program (LRSP) is a computer program that predicts selected aspects of the performances of a laser altimeter or other laser ranging or remote-sensing systems and is especially applicable to a laser-based system used to map terrain from a distance of several kilometers. Designed to run in a more recent version (5 or higher) of the MATLAB programming language, LRSP exploits the numerical and graphical capabilities of MATLAB. LRSP generates a graphical user interface that includes a pop-up menu that prompts the user for the input of data that determine the performance of a laser ranging system. Examples of input data include duration and energy of the laser pulse, the laser wavelength, the width of the laser beam, and several parameters that characterize the transmitting and receiving optics, the receiving electronic circuitry, and the optical properties of the atmosphere and the terrain. When the input data have been entered, LRSP computes the signal-to-noise ratio as a function of range, signal and noise currents, and ranging and pointing errors.

  3. Reconfigurable laser ranging instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneiter, John

    1994-03-01

    This paper describes the design and operation of a fast, flexible, non-contact, eye-safe laser ranging instrument useful in a variety of industrial metrology situations, such as in-process machining control and part inspection. The system has variable computer-controlled standoff and depth of field, and can obtain 3-D images of surfaces within a range of from 1.5 ft to almost 10 ft from the final optical element. The minimum depth of field is about 3.5 in. at 1.5 ft and about 26 in. at the far range. The largest depth of field for which useful data are available is about 41 in. Resolution, with appropriate averaging, is about one part in 4000 of the depth of field, which implies a best case resolution for this prototype of 0.00075 in. System flexibility is achieved by computer controlled relative positioning of optical components.

  4. The range scheduling aid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halbfinger, Eliezer M.; Smith, Barry D.

    1991-01-01

    The Air Force Space Command schedules telemetry, tracking and control activities across the Air Force Satellite Control network. The Range Scheduling Aid (RSA) is a rapid prototype combining a user-friendly, portable, graphical interface with a sophisticated object-oriented database. The RSA has been a rapid prototyping effort whose purpose is to elucidate and define suitable technology for enhancing the performance of the range schedulers. Designing a system to assist schedulers in their task and using their current techniques as well as enhancements enabled by an electronic environment, has created a continuously developing model that will serve as a standard for future range scheduling systems. The RSA system is easy to use, easily ported between platforms, fast, and provides a set of tools for the scheduler that substantially increases his productivity.

  5. Electronic structure of Ca, Sr, and Ba under pressure.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Animalu, A. O. E.; Heine, V.; Vasvari, B.

    1967-01-01

    Electronic band structure calculations phase of Ca, Sr and Ba over wide range of atomic volumes under pressure electronic band structure calculations for fcc phase of Ca, Sr and Ba over wide range of atomic volumes under pressure electronic band structure calculations for fcc phase of Ca, Sr and Ba over wide range of atomic volumes under pressure

  6. Western Aeronautical Test Range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakahara, Robert D.

    2008-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the work of the Western Aeronautical Test Range (WATR). NASA's Western Aeronautical Test Range is a network of facilities used to support aeronautical research, science missions, exploration system concepts, and space operations. The WATR resides at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center located at Edwards Air Force Base, California. The WATR is a part of NASA's Corporate Management of Aeronautical Facilities and funded by the Strategic Capability Asset Program (SCAP). Maps show the general location of the WATR area that is used for aeronautical testing and evaluation. The products, services and facilities of WATR are discussed,

  7. Himalayan Mountain Range, India

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Snow is present the year round in most of the high Himalaya Mountain Range (33.0N, 76.5E). In this view taken at the onset of winter, the continuous snow line can be seen for hundreds of miles along the south face of the range in the Indian states of Punjab and Kashmir. The snow line is at about 12,000 ft. altitude but the deep Cenab River gorge is easily delineated as a break along the south edge of the snow covered mountains. '

  8. Satellite Laser Ranging operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearlman, Michael R.

    1994-01-01

    Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) is currently providing precision orbit determination for measurements of: 1) Ocean surface topography from satellite borne radar altimetry, 2) Spatial and temporal variations of the gravity field, 3) Earth and ocean tides, 4) Plate tectonic and regional deformation, 5) Post-glacial uplift and subsidence, 6) Variations in the Earth's center-of-mass, and 7) Variations in Earth rotation. SLR also supports specialized programs in time transfer and classical geodetic positioning, and will soon provide precision ranging to support experiments in relativity.

  9. Satellite laser ranging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osorio, J. P.

    1992-03-01

    Laser ranging to satellites is one of the most precise methods for positio ning on the surface of the Earth. Reference is made to the need for precise posi tioning and to the improvement brought by the use of space techniques. Satellite Laser Ranging system is then described and in view of the high precision of the results derived from its measurements comments are made to some of the more important applications: high precision networks tectonic plate motion polar motion and earth''s rotation. Finally plans for system improvement in the near future are also presented.

  10. Pressure Ulcer Prevention

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Executive Summary In April 2008, the Medical Advisory Secretariat began an evidence-based review of the literature concerning pressure ulcers. Please visit the Medical Advisory Secretariat Web site, http://www.health.gov.on.ca/english/providers/program/mas/tech/tech_mn.html to review these titles that are currently available within the Pressure Ulcers series. Pressure ulcer prevention: an evidence based analysis The cost-effectiveness of prevention strategies for pressure ulcers in long-term care homes in Ontario: projections of the Ontario Pressure Ulcer Model (field evaluation) Management of chronic pressure ulcers: an evidence-based analysis (anticipated pubicstion date - mid-2009) Purpose A pressure ulcer, also known as a pressure sore, decubitus ulcer, or bedsore, is defined as a localized injury to the skin/and or underlying tissue occurring most often over a bony prominence and caused by pressure, shear, or friction, alone or in combination. (1) Those at risk for developing pressure ulcers include the elderly and critically ill as well as persons with neurological impairments and those who suffer conditions associated with immobility. Pressure ulcers are graded or staged with a 4-point classification system denoting severity. Stage I represents the beginnings of a pressure ulcer and stage IV, the severest grade, consists of full thickness tissue loss with exposed bone, tendon, and or muscle. (1) In a 2004 survey of Canadian health care settings, Woodbury and Houghton (2) estimated that the prevalence of pressure ulcers at a stage 1 or greater in Ontario ranged between 13.1% and 53% with nonacute health care settings having the highest prevalence rate (Table 1). Executive Summary Table 1: Prevalence of Pressure Ulcers* Setting Canadian Prevalence,% (95% CI) Ontario Prevalence,Range % (n) Acute care 25 (23.8–26.3) 23.9–29.7 (3418) Nonacute care† 30 (29.3–31.4) 30.0–53.3 (1165) Community care 15 (13.4–16.8) 13.2 (91) Mixed health care‡ 22 (20.9

  11. Estimating central pressures of oceanic midlatitude cyclones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, R. A.; Zeng, Lixin

    1994-01-01

    A method of determining surface pressures in oceanic storm systems using Earth Remote-Sensing Satellite (ERS-1) scatterometer data is employed to determine the lowest pressure in 25 storms. This method uses the surface winds as a lower boundary condition on a planetary boundary layer model to determine gradient winds and, thereby, pressure gradients. An optimization scheme referenced to a pressure outside the storm provides a pressure field and an estimate of the low pressure. The values are compared to European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) analyses in each case; there is good agreement, with some expected differences.

  12. RADIO RANGING DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    Bogle, R.W.

    1960-11-22

    A description is given of a super-regenerative oscillator ranging device provided with radiating and receiving means and being capable of indicating the occurrence of that distance between itself and a reflecting object which so phases the received echo of energy of a preceding emitted oscillation that the intervals between oscillations become uniform.

  13. Agriculture, forest, and range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The findings and recommendations of the panel for developing a satellite remote-sensing global information system in the next decade are reported. User requirements were identified in five categories: (1) cultivated crops, (2) land resources, (3)water resources, (4)forest management, and (5) range management. The benefits from the applications of satellite data are discussed.

  14. Agriculture, forestry, range resources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crea, W. J.

    1974-01-01

    In the area of crop specie identification, it has been found that temporal data analysis, preliminary stratification, and unequal probability analysis were several of the factors that contributed to high identification accuracies. Single data set accuracies on fields of greater than 80,000 sq m (20 acres) are in the 70- to 90-percent range; however, with the use of temporal data, accuracies of 95 percent have been reported. Identification accuracy drops off significantly on areas of less than 80,000 sq m (20 acres) as does measurement accuracy. Forest stratification into coniferous and deciduous areas has been accomplished to a 90- to 95-percent accuracy level. Using multistage sampling techniques, the timber volume of a national forest district has been estimated to a confidence level and standard deviation acceptable to the Forest Service at a very favorable cost-benefit time ratio. Range specie/plant community vegetation mapping has been accomplished at various levels of success (69- to 90-percent accuracy). However, several investigators have obtained encouraging initial results in range biomass (forage production) estimation and range readiness predictions. Soil association map correction and soil association mapping in new area appear to have been proven feasible on large areas; however, testing in a complex soil area should be undertaken.

  15. Agriculture, forestry, range resources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macdonald, R. B.

    1974-01-01

    The necessary elements to perform global inventories of agriculture, forestry, and range resources are being brought together through the use of satellites, sensors, computers, mathematics, and phenomenology. Results of ERTS-1 applications in these areas, as well as soil mapping, are described.

  16. Institutional Long Range Planning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caldwell Community Coll. and Technical Inst., Lenoir, NC.

    Long-range institutional planning has been in effect at Caldwell Community College and Technical Institute since 1973. The first step in the process was the identification of planning areas: administration, organization, educational programs, learning resources, student services, faculty, facilities, maintenance/operation, and finances. The major…

  17. STDN ranging equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, C. E.

    1975-01-01

    Final results of the Spaceflight Tracking and Data Network (STDN) Ranging Equipment program are summarized. Basic design concepts and final design approaches are described. Theoretical analyses which define requirements and support the design approaches are presented. Design verification criteria are delineated and verification test results are specified.

  18. Laser ranging data analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Center for Space Research efforts have focused on the near real-time analysis of Lageos laser ranging data and on the production of predictive ephemerides. The data are analyzed in terms of range bias, time bias, and internal precision, and estimates for the Earth orientation parameters X(sub p), Y(sub p) and UT1 are obtained. The results of these analyses are reported in a variety of formats. In addition several additional stations began sending not only quick-look observations but also normal points created on-site with new software. These normal points are transmitted in a new standard format different from either current quick-look or MERIT-II full-rate formats. Thus new preprocessing software was written and successfully tested on these data. Inspection of the Bendix produced Lageos full-rate normal points continued, with detailed analyses and filtering of all 1991 A and B release normal points for Lageos through the beginning of 1992. A summary of the combined full-rate and quick-look normal point data set created for 1991 is provided. New long-term ephemerides for Lageos satellite, as well as for Etalon-1 and Etalon-2 (the so-called high satellites used for laser ranging) were produced and distributed to the network stations in cooperation with the Crustal Dynamics Project and Eurolas. These predictions are used by essentially every laser ranging site obtaining regular returns from any of these three satellites.

  19. Front Range Branch Officers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The Front Range Branch of AGU has installed officers for 1990: Ray Noble, National Center for Atmospheric Research, chair; Sherry Oaks, U.S. Geological Survey, chair-elect; Howard Garcia, NOAA, treasurer; Catharine Skokan, Colorado School of Mines, secretary. JoAnn Joselyn of NOAA is past chair. Members at large are Wallace Campbell, NOAA; William Neff, USGS; and Stephen Schneider, NCAR.

  20. Fact Sheet: Range Complex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cornelson, C.; Fretter, E.

    2004-01-01

    NASA Ames has a long tradition in leadership with the use of ballistic ranges and shock tubes for the purpose of studying the physics and phenomena associated with hypervelocity flight. Cutting-edge areas of research run the gamut from aerodynamics, to impact physics, to flow-field structure and chemistry. This legacy of testing began in the NACA era of the 1940's with the Supersonic Free Flight Tunnel, and evolved dramatically up through the late 1950s with the pioneering work in the Ames Hypersonic Ballistic Range. The tradition continued in the mid-60s with the commissioning of the three newest facilities: the Ames Vertical Gun Range (AVGR) in 1964, the Hypervelocity Free Flight Facility (HFFF) in 1965 and the Electric Arc Shock Tube (EAST) in 1966. Today the Range Complex continues to provide unique and critical testing in support of the Nation's programs for planetary geology and geophysics; exobiology; solar system origins; earth atmospheric entry, planetary entry, and aerobraking vehicles; and various configurations for supersonic and hypersonic aircraft.

  1. Electric vehicles: Driving range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kempton, Willett

    2016-09-01

    For uptake of electric vehicles to increase, consumers' driving-range needs must be fulfilled. Analysis of the driving patterns of personal vehicles in the US now shows that today's electric vehicles can meet all travel needs on almost 90% of days from a single overnight charge.

  2. Mobile satellite ranging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silverberg, E. C.

    1978-01-01

    A brief review of the constraints which have limited satellite ranging hardware and an outline of the steps which are underway to improve the status of the equipment in this area are given. In addition, some suggestions are presented for the utilization of newer instruments and for possible future research and development work in this area.

  3. Very small ionization pressure gauge

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, D. Jr.

    1982-01-01

    A very small ionization pressure gauge has been developed to operate in the pressure range 10/sup -6/ Torr to 100..mu... A metal construction and external cooling fins result in a very rugged device with exceptionally small outgassing properties. The gauge also incorporates a replaceable filament-grid assembly on a single plug which allows the simple replacement of both the filament and the grid when needed.

  4. Precision ozone vapor pressure measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, D.; Mauersberger, K.

    1985-01-01

    The vapor pressure above liquid ozone has been measured with a high accuracy over a temperature range of 85 to 95 K. At the boiling point of liquid argon (87.3 K) an ozone vapor pressure of 0.0403 Torr was obtained with an accuracy of + or - 0.7 percent. A least square fit of the data provided the Clausius-Clapeyron equation for liquid ozone; a latent heat of 82.7 cal/g was calculated. High-precision vapor pressure data are expected to aid research in atmospheric ozone measurements and in many laboratory ozone studies such as measurements of cross sections and reaction rates.

  5. Low Power, Wide Dynamic Range Carbon Nanotube Vacuum Gauges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaul, Anupama B.; Manohara, Harish M.

    2008-01-01

    This slide presentation presents carbon nanotube vacuum pressure sensor gauges that operate at low power and exhibit a wide-dynamic range based on microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) technology. The fabrication facility, and the formation process are shown. Pressure sensitivity was found to increase rapidly as the bias power was increased. In addition, by etching part of the thermal SiO2 beneath the tubes and minimizing heat conduction through the substrate, pressure sensitivity was extended toward lower pressures. Results are compared to a conventional thin film meander resistor, which was fabricated and whose pressure response was also measured for comparative purposes.

  6. Light beam range finder

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, T.E.

    1998-06-16

    A ``laser tape measure`` for measuring distance is disclosed which includes a transmitter such as a laser diode which transmits a sequence of electromagnetic pulses in response to a transmit timing signal. A receiver samples reflections from objects within the field of the sequence of visible electromagnetic pulses with controlled timing, in response to a receive timing signal. The receiver generates a sample signal in response to the samples which indicates distance to the object causing the reflections. The timing circuit supplies the transmit timing signal to the transmitter and supplies the receive timing signal to the receiver. The receive timing signal causes the receiver to sample the reflection such that the time between transmission of pulses in the sequence in sampling by the receiver sweeps over a range of delays. The transmit timing signal causes the transmitter to transmit the sequence of electromagnetic pulses at a pulse repetition rate, and the received timing signal sweeps over the range of delays in a sweep cycle such that reflections are sampled at the pulse repetition rate and with different delays in the range of delays, such that the sample signal represents received reflections in equivalent time. The receiver according to one aspect of the invention includes an avalanche photodiode and a sampling gate coupled to the photodiode which is responsive to the received timing signal. The transmitter includes a laser diode which supplies a sequence of visible electromagnetic pulses. A bright spot projected on to the target clearly indicates the point that is being measured, and the user can read the range to that point with precision of better than 0.1%. 7 figs.

  7. Light beam range finder

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, Thomas E.

    1998-01-01

    A "laser tape measure" for measuring distance which includes a transmitter such as a laser diode which transmits a sequence of electromagnetic pulses in response to a transmit timing signal. A receiver samples reflections from objects within the field of the sequence of visible electromagnetic pulses with controlled timing, in response to a receive timing signal. The receiver generates a sample signal in response to the samples which indicates distance to the object causing the reflections. The timing circuit supplies the transmit timing signal to the transmitter and supplies the receive timing signal to the receiver. The receive timing signal causes the receiver to sample the reflection such that the time between transmission of pulses in the sequence in sampling by the receiver sweeps over a range of delays. The transmit timing signal causes the transmitter to transmit the sequence of electromagnetic pulses at a pulse repetition rate, and the received timing signal sweeps over the range of delays in a sweep cycle such that reflections are sampled at the pulse repetition rate and with different delays in the range of delays, such that the sample signal represents received reflections in equivalent time. The receiver according to one aspect of the invention includes an avalanche photodiode and a sampling gate coupled to the photodiode which is responsive to the received timing signal. The transmitter includes a laser diode which supplies a sequence of visible electromagnetic pulses. A bright spot projected on to the target clearly indicates the point that is being measured, and the user can read the range to that point with precision of better than 0.1%.

  8. Low Blood Pressure

    MedlinePlus

    ... High Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Low Blood Pressure Updated:Aug 30,2016 To know if you ... to learn more about blood pressure . If my blood pressure stays around 85/55, do I have a ...

  9. Gas cooking range

    SciTech Connect

    Narang, R.K.; Narang, K.

    1984-02-14

    An energy-efficient gas cooking range features an oven section with improved heat circulation and air preheat, a compact oven/broiler burner, a smoke-free drip pan, an efficient piloted ignition, flame-containing rangetop burner rings, and a small, portable oven that can be supported on the burner rings. Panels spaced away from the oven walls and circulation fans provide very effective air flow within the oven. A gas shutoff valve automatically controls the discharge of heated gases from the oven so that they are discharged only when combustion is occurring.

  10. Western Aeronautical Test Range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakahara, Robert D.

    2008-01-01

    NASA's Western Aeronautical Test Range (WATR) is a network of facilities used to support aeronautical research, science missions, exploration system concepts, and space operations. The WATR resides at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center located at Edwards Air Force Base, California. The WATR is a part of NASA's Corporate Management of Aeronautical Facilities and funded by the Strategic Capability Asset Program (SCAP). It is managed by the Aeronautics Test Program (ATP) of the Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate (ARMD) to provide the right facility at the right time. NASA is a tenant on Edwards Air Force Base and has an agreement with the Air Force Flight Test Center to use the land and airspace controlled by the Department of Defense (DoD). The topics include: 1) The WATR supports a variety of vehicles; 2) Dryden shares airspace with the AFFTC; 3) Restricted airspace, corridors, and special use areas are available for experimental aircraft; 4) WATR Products and Services; 5) WATR Support Configuration; 6) Telemetry Tracking; 7) Time Space Positioning; 8) Video; 9) Voice Communication; 10) Mobile Operations Facilities; 11) Data Processing; 12) Mission Control Center; 13) Real-Time Data Analysis; and 14) Range Safety.

  11. Monocular visual ranging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witus, Gary; Hunt, Shawn

    2008-04-01

    The vision system of a mobile robot for checkpoint and perimeter security inspection performs multiple functions: providing surveillance video, providing high resolution still images, and providing video for semi-autonomous visual navigation. Mid-priced commercial digital cameras support the primary inspection functions. Semi-autonomous visual navigation is a tertiary function whose purpose is to reduce the burden of teleoperation and free the security personnel for their primary functions. Approaches to robot visual navigation require some form of depth perception for speed control to prevent the robot from colliding with objects. In this paper present the initial results of an exploration of the capabilities and limitations of using a single monocular commercial digital camera for depth perception. Our approach combines complementary methods in alternating stationary and moving behaviors. When the platform is stationary, it computes a range image from differential blur in the image stack collected at multiple focus settings. When the robot is moving, it extracts an estimate of range from the camera auto-focus function, and combines this with an estimate derived from angular expansion of a constellation of visual tracking points.

  12. Range Process Simulation Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, Dave; Haas, William; Barth, Tim; Benjamin, Perakath; Graul, Michael; Bagatourova, Olga

    2005-01-01

    Range Process Simulation Tool (RPST) is a computer program that assists managers in rapidly predicting and quantitatively assessing the operational effects of proposed technological additions to, and/or upgrades of, complex facilities and engineering systems such as the Eastern Test Range. Originally designed for application to space transportation systems, RPST is also suitable for assessing effects of proposed changes in industrial facilities and large organizations. RPST follows a model-based approach that includes finite-capacity schedule analysis and discrete-event process simulation. A component-based, scalable, open architecture makes RPST easily and rapidly tailorable for diverse applications. Specific RPST functions include: (1) definition of analysis objectives and performance metrics; (2) selection of process templates from a processtemplate library; (3) configuration of process models for detailed simulation and schedule analysis; (4) design of operations- analysis experiments; (5) schedule and simulation-based process analysis; and (6) optimization of performance by use of genetic algorithms and simulated annealing. The main benefits afforded by RPST are provision of information that can be used to reduce costs of operation and maintenance, and the capability for affordable, accurate, and reliable prediction and exploration of the consequences of many alternative proposed decisions.

  13. Reotemp Pressure Indicator Local Pressure Indication in the 15 PSIG SCHe System

    SciTech Connect

    MISKA, C.R.

    2000-09-03

    These 0-30 psig range pressure indicators are located in the SCHe supply piping after PCV 5*23 and before PCV 5*27. The pressure indicators provide information on the pressure being maintained between the two PCVs. This design is used for each of the SCHe supply lines.

  14. Range imaging laser radar

    DOEpatents

    Scott, M.W.

    1990-06-19

    A laser source is operated continuously and modulated periodically (typically sinusoidally). A receiver imposes another periodic modulation on the received optical signal, the modulated signal being detected by an array of detectors of the integrating type. Range to the target determined by measuring the phase shift of the intensity modulation on the received optical beam relative to a reference. The receiver comprises a photoemitter for converting the reflected, periodically modulated, return beam to an accordingly modulated electron stream. The electron stream is modulated by a local demodulation signal source and subsequently converted back to a photon stream by a detector. A charge coupled device (CCD) array then averages and samples the photon stream to provide an electrical signal in accordance with the photon stream. 2 figs.

  15. Range imaging laser radar

    DOEpatents

    Scott, Marion W.

    1990-01-01

    A laser source is operated continuously and modulated periodically (typicy sinusoidally). A receiver imposes another periodic modulation on the received optical signal, the modulated signal being detected by an array of detectors of the integrating type. Range to the target determined by measuring the phase shift of the intensity modulation on the received optical beam relative to a reference. The receiver comprises a photoemitter for converting the reflected, periodically modulated, return beam to an accordingly modulated electron stream. The electron stream is modulated by a local demodulation signal source and subsequently converted back to a photon stream by a detector. A charge coupled device (CCD) array then averages and samples the photon stream to provide an electrical signal in accordance with the photon stream.

  16. Long-range connectomics.

    PubMed

    Jbabdi, Saad; Behrens, Timothy E

    2013-12-01

    Decoding neural algorithms is one of the major goals of neuroscience. It is generally accepted that brain computations rely on the orchestration of neural activity at local scales, as well as across the brain through long-range connections. Understanding the relationship between brain activity and connectivity is therefore a prerequisite to cracking the neural code. In the past few decades, tremendous technological advances have been achieved in connectivity measurement techniques. We now possess a battery of tools to measure brain activity and connections at all available scales. A great source of excitement are the new in vivo tools that allow us to measure structural and functional connections noninvasively. Here, we discuss how these new technologies may contribute to deciphering the neural code.

  17. Organic electronics based pressure sensor towards intracranial pressure monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rai, Pratyush; Varadan, Vijay K.

    2010-04-01

    The intra-cranial space, which houses the brain, contains cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) that acts as a fluid suspension medium for the brain. The CSF is always in circulation, is secreted in the cranium and is drained out through ducts called epidural veins. The venous drainage system has inherent resistance to the flow. Pressure is developed inside the cranium, which is similar to a rigid compartment. Normally a pressure of 5-15 mm Hg, in excess of atmospheric pressure, is observed at different locations inside the cranium. Increase in Intra-Cranial Pressure (ICP) can be caused by change in CSF volume caused by cerebral tumors, meningitis, by edema of a head injury or diseases related to cerebral atrophy. Hence, efficient ways of monitoring ICP need to be developed. A sensor system and monitoring scheme has been discussed here. The system architecture consists of a membrane less piezoelectric pressure sensitive element, organic thin film transistor (OTFT) based signal transduction, and signal telemetry. The components were fabricated on flexible substrate and have been assembled using flip-chip packaging technology. Material science and fabrication processes, subjective to the device performance, have been discussed. Capability of the device in detecting pressure variation, within the ICP pressure range, is investigated and applicability of measurement scheme to medical conditions has been argued for. Also, applications of such a sensor-OTFT assembly for logic sensor switching and patient specific-secure monitoring system have been discussed.

  18. Effect of ambient pressure on Leidenfrost temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orejon, Daniel; Sefiane, Khellil; Takata, Yasuyuki

    2014-11-01

    The accurate prediction and control of the interaction of liquids with hot surfaces is paramount in numerous areas, including cooling applications. We present results illustrating the effect of ambient pressure on the temperature required for a droplet to levitate over a hot surface, i.e., the Leidenfrost temperature. In the present study the dependence of wetting and levitating temperatures on ambient pressure in a range of subatmospheric pressures is reported. Experimental data indicate that the Leidenfrost temperature decreases with decreasing pressure at subatmospheric pressures. A physical approach for the dependence of Leidenfrost temperature on ambient pressure, based on an analogy with saturation pressure dependence, is proposed. Furthermore, previous literature data for pressures above atmospheric are also included in the analysis to support and validate the proposed approach. In addition, the effect of substrate material, substrate roughness, and type of fluid on the Leidenfrost temperature is discussed.

  19. High pressure hollow electrode discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Schoenbach, K.H.; El-Habachi, A.; Shi, W.; Ciocca, M.

    1997-12-31

    Reduction of the cathode hole diameter into the submillimeter range has allowed the authors to extend the pressure range for hollow electrode discharge operation to values on the order of 50 Torr. In recent experiments with cathode holes of 0.2 mm diameter they obtained stable glow discharge operation up to approximately 900 Torr in argon. The current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of these discharges (with currents ranging from the ten`s of {micro}A to ten mA) show three distinct discharge modes: at low current, a discharge with positive differential resistivity, followed by a range with strong increase in current and reduction in voltage, and, at high current, again a resistive discharge mode. For low pressure (< 100 Torr) these modes correspond to the predischarge, hollow cathode discharge (sustained by pendulum electrons), and abnormal glow discharge, respectively. At higher pressure the discharge in the short gap system (anode-cathode distance: 0.25 mm) changes from a hollow cathode discharge to, what seems to be a pulseless partial glow discharge. In hollow cathode discharges operated in the torr range the electron energy distribution is known to be strongly non-maxwellian with a large concentration of electrons at energies greater than 30 eV. This holds also for hollow cathode discharge at high pressure and for partial discharges as indicated by the presence of strong excimer lines in the VUV spectrum of Ar-discharges at 128 nm and Xe-discharges at 172 nm. The resistive characteristic of high pressure hollow electrode discharges over a large range of current allows them to generate arrays of these discharges for use as flat panel, direct current, excimer lamps.

  20. Neutron range spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Manglos, Stephen H.

    1989-06-06

    A neutron range spectrometer and method for determining the neutron energy spectrum of a neutron emitting source are disclosed. Neutrons from the source are collimnated along a collimation axis and a position sensitive neutron counter is disposed in the path of the collimated neutron beam. The counter determines positions along the collimation axis of interactions between the neutrons in the neutron beam and a neutron-absorbing material in the counter. From the interaction positions, a computer analyzes the data and determines the neutron energy spectrum of the neutron beam. The counter is preferably shielded and a suitable neutron-absorbing material is He-3. The computer solves the following equation in the analysis: ##EQU1## where: N(x).DELTA.x=the number of neutron interactions measured between a position x and x+.DELTA.x, A.sub.i (E.sub.i).DELTA.E.sub.i =the number of incident neutrons with energy between E.sub.i and E.sub.i +.DELTA.E.sub.i, and C=C(E.sub.i)=N .sigma.(E.sub.i) where N=the number density of absorbing atoms in the position sensitive counter means and .sigma. (E.sub.i)=the average cross section of the absorbing interaction between E.sub.i and E.sub.i +.DELTA.E.sub.i.

  1. Main tank injection pressurization program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cady, E. C.; Kendle, D. W.

    1972-01-01

    Computer program predicts performance of fluorine-hydrogen main tank injection pressurization system for full range of liquid-hydrogen-fueled space vehicles. Analytical model includes provisions for heat transfer, injectant jet penetration, and ullage gas mixing. Analysis predicts GF2 usage, ullage gas and tank wall temperatures, and LH2 evaporation.

  2. Pressure-Sensitive Resistor Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Du Fresne, E. R.

    1986-01-01

    Low-conductivity particles in rubber offer wide dynamic range. Sensor consists of particles of relatively low conductivity embedded in rubber. Resistance of sensor decreases by about 100 times as pressure on it increases from zero to 0.8 MN/M to the second power. Resistor promising candidate as tactile sensor for robots and remote manipulators.

  3. Eddy current technique for predicting burst pressure

    DOEpatents

    Petri, Mark C.; Kupperman, David S.; Morman, James A.; Reifman, Jaques; Wei, Thomas Y. C.

    2003-01-01

    A signal processing technique which correlates eddy current inspection data from a tube having a critical tubing defect with a range of predicted burst pressures for the tube is provided. The method can directly correlate the raw eddy current inspection data representing the critical tubing defect with the range of burst pressures using a regression technique, preferably an artificial neural network. Alternatively, the technique deconvolves the raw eddy current inspection data into a set of undistorted signals, each of which represents a separate defect of the tube. The undistorted defect signal which represents the critical tubing defect is related to a range of burst pressures utilizing a regression technique.

  4. High pressure synthesis gas conversion. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    The purpose of this research project is to build and test a high pressure fermentation system for the production of ethanol from synthesis gas. The fermenters, pumps, controls, and analytical system were procured or fabricated and assembled in our laboratory. This system was then used to determine the effects of high pressure on growth and ethanol production by Clostridium ljungdahlii. The limits of cell concentration and mass transport relationships were found in CSTR and immobilized cell reactors (ICR). The minimum retention times and reactor volumes were found for ethanol production in these reactors. A maximum operating pressure of 150 psig has been shown to be possible for C. ljungdahlli with the medium of Phillips et al. This medium was developed for atmospheric pressure operation in the CSTR to yield maximum ethanol concentrations and thus is not best for operation at elevated pressures. It is recommended that a medium development study be performed for C. ljungdahlii at increased pressure. Cell concentration, gas conversion and product concentration profiles were presented for C. ljungdahlii as a function of gas flow rate, the variable which affects bacterium performance the most. This pressure was chosen as a representative pressure over the 0--150 psig operating pressure range for the bacterium. Increased pressure negatively affected ethanol productivity probably due to the fact that medium composition was designed for atmospheric pressure operation. Medium development at increased pressure is necessary for high pressure development of the system.

  5. Development of the seafloor acoustic ranging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osada, Y.; Kido, M.; Fujimoto, H.

    2007-12-01

    We have developed a seafloor acoustic ranging system, which simulates an operation with the DONET (Development of Dense Ocean-floor Network System for Earthquake and Tsunami) cable, to monitor seafloor crustal movement. The seafloor acoustic ranging system was based on the precise acoustic transponder (PXP). We have a few problems for the improvement of the resolution. One thing is the variation of sound speed. Another is the bending of ray path. A PXP measures horizontal distances on the seafloor from the round trip travel times of acoustic pulses between pairs of PXP. The PXP was equipped with the pressure, temperature gauge and tilt-meter. The variation of sound speed in seawater has a direct effect on the measurement. Therefore we collect the data of temperature and pressure. But we don't collect the data of salinity because of less influence than temperature and pressure. Accordingly a ray path of acoustic wave tends to be bent upward in the deep sea due to the Snell's law. As the acoustic transducer of each PXPs held about 3.0m above the seafloor, the baseline is too long for altitude from the seafloor. In this year we carried out the experiment for the seafloor acoustic ranging system. We deployed two PXPs at about 750m spacing on Kumano-nada. The water depth is about 2050m. We collected the 660 data in this experiment during one day. The round trip travel time show the variation with peak-to-peak amplitude of about 0.03msec. It was confirmed to explain the majority in this change by the change in sound speed according to the temperature and pressure. This results shows the resolution of acoustic measurements is +/-2mm. Acknowledgement This study is supported by 'DONET' of Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology.

  6. Flowmeter for pressure-driven chromatography systems

    DOEpatents

    Paul, Phillip H.; Arnold, Don W.

    2002-01-01

    A flowmeter for accurately measuring the flowrate of fluids in high pressure chromatography systems. The flowmeter is a porous bed of a material, the porous bed having a porosity in the range of about 0.1 to 0.6 and a pore size in the range of about 50 nm to 1 .mu.m, disposed between a high pressure pumping means and a chromatography column. The flowmeter is provided with pressure measuring means at both the inlet and outlet of the porous bed for measuring the pressure drop through the porous bed. This flowmeter system provides not only the ability to measure accurately flowrates in the range of .mu.L/min to nL/min but also to provide a signal that can be used for a servo loop or feedback control system for high pressure pumping systems.

  7. Flowmeter for pressure-driven chromatography systems

    DOEpatents

    Paul, Phillip H.; Arnold, Don W.

    2003-01-01

    A flowmeter for accurately measuring the flowrate of fluids in high pressure chromatography systems. The flowmeter is a porous bed of a material, the porous bed having a porosity in the range of about 0.1 to 0.6 and a pore size in the range of about 50 nm to 1 .mu.m, disposed between a high pressure pumping means and a chromatography column. The flowmeter is provided with pressure measuring means at both the inlet and outlet of the porous bed for measuring the pressure drop through the porous bed. This flowmeter system provides not only the ability to measure accurately flowrates in the range of .mu.L/min to nL/min but also to provide a signal that can be used for a servo loop or feedback control system for high pressure pumping systems.

  8. Selected studies of magnetism at high pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Hearne, G.R.; Pasternak, M.P.; Taylor, R.D.

    1995-09-01

    Most previous studies of magnetism in various compounds under extreme conditions have been conducted over a wide pressure range at room temperature or over a wide range of cryogenic temperatures at pressures below 20 GPa (200 kbar). We present some of the most recent studies of magnetism over an extended range of temperatures and pressures far beyond 20 GPa, i.e., in regions of pressure-temperature (P-T) where magnetism has been largely unexplored. Recent techniques have permitted investigations of magnetism in selected 3d transition metal compounds in regions of P-T where physical properties may be drastically modified; related effects have often been seen in selected doping studies at ambient pressures.

  9. Intracranial pressure monitoring

    MedlinePlus

    ICP monitoring; CSF pressure monitoring ... There are 3 ways to monitor pressure in the skull (intracranial pressure). INTRAVENTRICULAR CATHETER The intraventricular catheter is the most accurate monitoring method. To insert an intraventricular catheter, a ...

  10. Dealing with Peer Pressure

    MedlinePlus

    ... Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes Dealing With Peer Pressure KidsHealth > For Kids > Dealing With Peer Pressure ... Let's talk about how to handle it. Defining Peer Pressure Peers influence your life, even if you ...

  11. Skin (Pressure) Sores

    MedlinePlus

    ... Topic Skin dryness Next Topic Sleep problems Skin (pressure) sores A skin or pressure sore develops when the blood supply to an ... is bedridden or always in a wheelchair puts pressure on the same places much of the time. ...

  12. High blood pressure medicines

    MedlinePlus

    Hypertension - medicines ... blood vessel diseases. You may need to take medicines to lower your blood pressure if lifestyle changes ... blood pressure to the target level. WHEN ARE MEDICINES FOR HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE USED Most of the ...

  13. High Blood Pressure (Hypertension)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Print Page Text Size: A A A Listen High Blood Pressure (Hypertension) Nearly 1 in 3 American adults has high ... weight. How Will I Know if I Have High Blood Pressure? High blood pressure is a silent problem — you ...

  14. Blood Pressure Problems During Pregnancy, Heart Trouble Later?

    MedlinePlus

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_159580.html Blood Pressure Problems During Pregnancy, Heart Trouble Later? Spotting risk ... 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Pregnant women who have blood pressure in the high-normal range may have an ...

  15. High-Pressure Research in Mineral Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazen, Robert M.

    Advances in high-pressure science and technology have transformed solid Earth geophysics. In the last decade, high-pressure researchers have reproduced the full range of Earth pressure and temperature conditions in the laboratory, and they have synthesized single crystals of dense silicate phases, unknown at the Earth's surface yet suspected to comprise most of the Earth's volume. These and other extraordinary accomplishments are chronicled in High-Pressure Research in Mineral Physics, an outgrowth of the third U.S.-Japan High-Pressure seminar, held in Kahuku, Hawaii, January, 13-16, 1986. The well produced and reasonably priced volume is dedicated to Syun-iti Akimoto, dean of Japanese high-pressure research, who recently retired from the University of Tokyo. Akimoto's fascinating historical account of pressure research at the Institute for Solid State Physics at the University of Tokyo is the leadoff article.

  16. A Pressure Regulator for Vacuum Distillation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sommer, Toby J.

    1989-01-01

    Develops a manostat which is simple and inexpensive to construct and operate, compact and rugged in design, useful over a wide pressure range, and well adapted for practical usage. Provides methodology, a diagram, and some operating suggestions. (MVL)

  17. Particle-based optical pressure sensors for 3D pressure mapping.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Niladri; Xie, Yan; Chalaseni, Sandeep; Mastrangelo, Carlos H

    2015-10-01

    This paper presents particle-based optical pressure sensors for in-flow pressure sensing, especially for microfluidic environments. Three generations of pressure sensitive particles have been developed- flat planar particles, particles with integrated retroreflectors and spherical microballoon particles. The first two versions suffer from pressure measurement dependence on particles orientation in 3D space and angle of interrogation. The third generation of microspherical particles with spherical symmetry solves these problems making particle-based manometry in microfluidic environment a viable and efficient methodology. Static and dynamic pressure measurements have been performed in liquid medium for long periods of time in a pressure range of atmospheric to 40 psi. Spherical particles with radius of 12 μm and balloon-wall thickness of 0.5 μm are effective for more than 5 h in this pressure range with an error of less than 5%.

  18. Microplasma jet at atmospheric pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Yong Cheol; Uhm, Han Sup

    2006-11-27

    A nitrogen microplasma jet operated at atmospheric pressure was developed for treating thermally sensitive materials. For example, the plasma sources in treatment of vulnerable biological materials must operate near the room temperature at the atmospheric pressure, without any risk of arcing or electrical shock. The microplasma jet device operated by an electrical power less than 10 W exhibited a long plasma jet of about 6.5 cm with temperature near 300 K, not causing any harm to human skin. Optical emission measured at the wide range of 280-800 nm indicated various reactive species produced by the plasma jet.

  19. Pressure effect on dissimilatory sulfate reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williamson, A. J.; Carlson, H. K.; Coates, J. D.

    2015-12-01

    Biosouring is the production of H2S by sulfate reducing microorganisms (SRM) in-situ or in the produced fluids of oil reservoirs. Sulfide is explosive, toxic and corrosive which can trigger equipment and transportation failure, leading to environmental catastrophe. As oil exploration and reservoir development continue, subsequent enhanced recovery is occurring in progressively deeper formations and typical oil reservoir pressures range from 10-50 MPa. Therefore, an understanding of souring control effects will require an accurate understanding of the influence of pressure on SRM metabolism and the efficacy of souring control treatments at high pressure. Considerable work to date has focussed on souring control at ambient pressure; however, the influence of pressure on biogeochemical processes and souring treatments in oil reservoirs is poorly understood. To explore the impact of pressure on SRM, wild type Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20 (isolated from a producing oil well in Ventura County, California) was grown under a range of pressures (0.1-14 MPa) at 30 °C. Complete sulfate reduction occurred in all pressures tested within 3 days, but microbial growth was inhibited with increasing pressure. Bar-seq identified several genes associated with flagella biosynthesis (including FlhB) and assembly as important for survival at elevated pressure and fitness was confirmed using individual transposon mutants. Flagellar genes have previously been implicated with biofilm formation and confocal microscopy on glass slides incubated with wild type D. alaskensis G20 showed more biomass associated with surfaces under pressure, highlighting the link between pressure, flagellar and biofilm formation. To determine the effect of pressure on the efficacy of SRM inhibitors, IC50 experiments were conducted and D. alaskensis G20 showed a greater resistance to nitrate and the antibiotic chloramphenicol, but a lower resistance to perchlorate. These results will be discussed in the context of

  20. Pressure polymerization of polyester

    DOEpatents

    Maurer, Charles J.; Shaw, Gordon; Smith, Vicky S.; Buelow, Steven J.; Tumas, William; Contreras, Veronica; Martinez, Ronald J.

    2000-08-29

    A process is disclosed for the preparation of a polyester polymer or polyester copolymer under superatmospheric pressure conditions in a pipe or tubular reaction under turbannular flow conditions. Reaction material having a glycol equivalents to carboxylic acid equivalents mole ratio of from 1.0:1 to 1.2:1, together with a superatmospheric dense gaseous medium are fed co-currently to the reactor. Dicarboxylic acid and/or diol raw materials may be injected into any of the reaction zones in the process during operation to achieve the overall desired mole ratio balance. The process operates at temperatures of from about 220.degree. C. to about 320.degree. C., with turbannular flow achieved before the polymer product and gas exit the reactor process. The pressure in the reaction zones can be in the range from 15 psia to 2500 psia. A polymer product having a DP of a greater than 40, more preferably at least about 70, is achieved by the transfer of water from the reacting material polymer melt to the gaseous medium in the reactor.

  1. High pressure ices

    PubMed Central

    Hermann, Andreas; Ashcroft, N. W.; Hoffmann, Roald

    2012-01-01

    H2O will be more resistant to metallization than previously thought. From computational evolutionary structure searches, we find a sequence of new stable and meta-stable structures for the ground state of ice in the 1–5 TPa (10 to 50 Mbar) regime, in the static approximation. The previously proposed Pbcm structure is superseded by a Pmc21 phase at p = 930 GPa, followed by a predicted transition to a P21 crystal structure at p = 1.3 TPa. This phase, featuring higher coordination at O and H, is stable over a wide pressure range, reaching 4.8 TPa. We analyze carefully the geometrical changes in the calculated structures, especially the buckling at the H in O-H-O motifs. All structures are insulating—chemistry burns a deep and (with pressure increase) lasting hole in the density of states near the highest occupied electronic levels of what might be component metallic lattices. Metallization of ice in our calculations occurs only near 4.8 TPa, where the metallic C2/m phase becomes most stable. In this regime, zero-point energies much larger than typical enthalpy differences suggest possible melting of the H sublattice, or even the entire crystal. PMID:22207625

  2. Cradle and pressure grippers

    DOEpatents

    Muniak, John E.

    2001-01-01

    A gripper that is designed to incorporate the functions of gripping, supporting and pressure tongs into one device. The gripper has two opposing finger sections with interlocking fingers that incline and taper to form a wedge. The interlocking fingers are vertically off-set so that the opposing finger sections may close together allowing the inclined, tapered tips of the fingers to extend beyond the plane defined by the opposing finger section's engagement surface. The range of motion defined by the interlocking relationship of the finger sections allows the gripper to grab, lift and support objects of varying size and shape. The gripper has one stationary and one moveable finger section. Power is provided to the moveable finger section by an actuating device enabling the gripper to close around an object to be lifted. A lifting bail is attached to the gripper and is supported by a crane that provides vertical lift.

  3. Range optimization for a supersonic aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seywald, Hans; Cliff, Eugene M.; Well, Klaus H.

    1991-01-01

    Range optimal trajectories for an aircraft flying in the vertical plane are obtained from Pontryagin's Minimum Principle. Control variables are load factor n which appears nonlinearly in the equations of motion and throttle setting eta, which appears only linearly. Both controls are subject to fixed bounds, namely eta between values of 0 and 1 and absolute value of n not greater than n(max). Additionally, a dynamic pressure limit is imposed, which represents a first-order state-inequality constraint. For fixed flight time, fixed initial coordinates, and partially fixed final coordinates, the effect of the load factor limit absolute value of n not greater than n(max) is studied. Upon varying n(max), six different switching structures are obtained. All trajectories involve singular control along arcs with active dynamic pressure limit.

  4. Space-Based Range Safety and Future Space Range Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whiteman, Donald E.; Valencia, Lisa M.; Simpson, James C.

    2005-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Space-Based Telemetry and Range Safety (STARS) study is a multiphase project to demonstrate the performance, flexibility and cost savings that can be realized by using space-based assets for the Range Safety [global positioning system (GPS) metric tracking data, flight termination command and range safety data relay] and Range User (telemetry) functions during vehicle launches and landings. Phase 1 included flight testing S-band Range Safety and Range User hardware in 2003 onboard a high-dynamic aircraft platform at Dryden Flight Research Center (Edwards, California, USA) using the NASA Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS) as the communications link. The current effort, Phase 2, includes hardware and packaging upgrades to the S-band Range Safety system and development of a high data rate Ku-band Range User system. The enhanced Phase 2 Range Safety Unit (RSU) provided real-time video for three days during the historic Global Flyer (Scaled Composites, Mojave, California, USA) flight in March, 2005. Additional Phase 2 testing will include a sounding rocket test of the Range Safety system and aircraft flight testing of both systems. Future testing will include a flight test on a launch vehicle platform. This paper discusses both Range Safety and Range User developments and testing with emphasis on the Range Safety system. The operational concept of a future space-based range is also discussed.

  5. Space-Based Range Safety and Future Space Range Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whiteman, Donald E.; Valencia, Lisa M.; Simpson, James C.

    2005-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration Space-Based Telemetry and Range Safety study is a multiphase project to demonstrate the performance, flexibility and cost savings that can be realized by using space-based assets for the Range Safety (global positioning system metric tracking data, flight termination command and range safety data relay) and Range User (telemetry) functions during vehicle launches and landings. Phase 1 included flight testing S-band Range Safety and Range User hardware in 2003 onboard a high-dynamic aircraft platform at Dryden Flight Research Center (Edwards, California) using the NASA Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System as the communications link. The current effort, Phase 2, includes hardware and packaging upgrades to the S-band Range Safety system and development of a high data rate Ku-band Range User system. The enhanced Phase 2 Range Safety Unit provided real-time video for three days during the historic GlobalFlyer (Scaled Composites, Mojave, California) flight in March, 2005. Additional Phase 2 testing will include a sounding rocket test of the Range Safety system and aircraft flight testing of both systems. Future testing will include a flight test on a launch vehicle platform. This report discusses both Range Safety and Range User developments and testing with emphasis on the Range Safety system. The operational concept of a future space-based range is also discussed.

  6. Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus Information Page Synonym(s): Hydrocephalus - Normal Pressure Table ... Español Additional resources from MedlinePlus What is Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus? Normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH) is an abnormal ...

  7. High Blood Pressure

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. High Blood Pressure What Is High Blood Pressure? High blood pressure is a common disease in ... the heart, kidneys, brain, and eyes. Types of High Blood Pressure There are two main types of high blood ...

  8. High Blood Pressure

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. Description of High Blood Pressure Español High blood pressure is a common disease ... defines high blood pressure severity levels. Stages of High Blood Pressure in Adults Stages Systolic (top number) Diastolic (bottom ...

  9. Melting of Ice under Pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Schwegler, E; Sharma, M; Gygi, F; Galli, G

    2008-07-31

    The melting of ice under pressure is investigated with a series of first principles molecular dynamics simulations. In particular, a two-phase approach is used to determine the melting temperature of the ice-VII phase in the range of 10 to 50 GPa. Our computed melting temperatures are consistent with existing diamond anvil cell experiments. We find that for pressures between 10 to 40 GPa, ice melts as a molecular solid. For pressures above {approx}45 GPa there is a sharp increase in the slope of the melting curve due to the presence of molecular dissociation and proton diffusion in the solid, prior to melting. The onset of significant proton diffusion in ice-VII as a function of increasing temperature is found to be gradual and bears many similarities to that of a type-II superionic solid.

  10. Determination of extremely high pressure tolerance of brine shrimp larvae by using a new pressure chamber system.

    PubMed

    Seo, Mihye; Koyama, Sumihiro; Toyofuku, Takashi; Kojima, Shigeaki; Watanabe, Hiromi

    2013-11-01

    Hydrostatic pressure is the only one of a range of environmental parameters (water temperature, salinity, light availability, and so on) that increases in proportion with depth. Pressure tolerance is therefore essential to understand the foundation of populations and current diversity of faunal compositions at various depths. In the present study, we used a newly developed pressure chamber system to examine changes in larval activity of the salt-lake crustacean, Artemia franciscana, in response to a range of hydrostatic pressures. We showed that A. franciscana larvae were able to survive for a short period at pressures of ≤ 60 MPa (approximately equal to the pressure of 6000 m deep). At a pressure of > 20 MPa, larval motor ability was suppressed, but not lost. Meanwhile, at a pressure of > 40 MPa, some of the larval motor ability was lost without recovery after decompression. For all experiments, discordance of movement and timing between right and left appendages, was observed at pressures of > 20 MPa. Our results indicate that the limit of pressure for sustaining active behavior of A. franciscana larvae is ∼20 MPa, whereas the limit of pressure for survival is within the range 30-60 MPa. Thus, members of the genus Artemia possess the ability to resist a higher range of pressures than their natural habitat depth. Our findings demonstrated an example of an organism capable of invading deeper environment in terms of physical pressure tolerance, and indicate the need and importance of pressure study as an experimental method. PMID:24224473

  11. Fuel distributions from pressure-swirl atomizers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefebvre, A. H.; Ortman, J.

    1985-02-01

    Measurements are made of the radial fuel distributions obtained with various types of pressure-swirl (simplex) atomizers, using a 'patternator' which comprises 29 sampling tubes placed 4.5 deg apart on an arc of 10 cm. The patternator is mounted in a pressure vessel 10 cm below the fuel nozzle with the nozzle axis located at the center of curvature. The volume of fuel collected in each tube is proportional to the fuel flow at the sampling point. The results of tests performed over wide ranges of fuel injection pressure and ambient pressure show that spray angles diminish with increases in ambient gas pressure up to around 0.69 MPa (100 psia), above which they remain sensibly constant. Changes in the fuel injection pressure have differing effects on spray-cone angle depending on the ambient pressure. At normal atmospheric pressure an increase in fuel injection pressure causes the spray angle to first widen and then contract. At ambient pressures above around 2 atm the spray contracts continuously with increase in fuel injection pressure. Measurements of circumferential fuel distribution show that some nozzle designs possess a high degree of uniformity, while others exhibit significant deviations from the mean value.

  12. Preliminary results of MUNDO high altitude pressure measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Banister, J.R.; Hereford, W.V.; Solomon, O.M.

    1987-01-01

    Four high altitude pressure measurement canisters were deployed for the MUNDO event. All canister parachutes deployed and the placement of instruments was quite satisfactory in spite of an unusual wind change. Fouled leak plugs caused the two intermediate pressure transducers to be driven out of range but a new and reasonably successful procedure was developed for recovering the pressure histories of these canisters from acceleration histories. The measurements bridged across from the central radiation cone to the transition region. Pressure levels and pressure histories at outer stations are atypical with the unexpected appearances of shock fronts. Pressure histories were more complicated with peak pressures lower than observed on RUMMY.

  13. Pressure Dome for High-Pressure Electrolyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norman, Timothy; Schmitt, Edwin

    2012-01-01

    A high-strength, low-weight pressure vessel dome was designed specifically to house a high-pressure [2,000 psi (approx. = 13.8 MPa)] electrolyzer. In operation, the dome is filled with an inert gas pressurized to roughly 100 psi (approx. = 690 kPa) above the high, balanced pressure product oxygen and hydrogen gas streams. The inert gas acts to reduce the clamping load on electrolyzer stack tie bolts since the dome pressure acting axially inward helps offset the outward axial forces from the stack gas pressure. Likewise, radial and circumferential stresses on electrolyzer frames are minimized. Because the dome is operated at a higher pressure than the electrolyzer product gas, any external electrolyzer leak prevents oxygen or hydrogen from leaking into the dome. Instead the affected stack gas stream pressure rises detectably, thereby enabling a system shutdown. All electrical and fluid connections to the stack are made inside the pressure dome and require special plumbing and electrical dome interfaces for this to be accomplished. Further benefits of the dome are that it can act as a containment shield in the unlikely event of a catastrophic failure. Studies indicate that, for a given active area (and hence, cell ID), frame outside diameter must become ever larger to support stresses at higher operating pressures. This can lead to a large footprint and increased costs associated with thicker and/or larger diameter end-plates, tie-rods, and the frames themselves. One solution is to employ rings that fit snugly around the frame. This complicates stack assembly and is sometimes difficult to achieve in practice, as its success is strongly dependent on frame and ring tolerances, gas pressure, and operating temperature. A pressure dome permits an otherwise low-pressure stack to operate at higher pressures without growing the electrolyzer hardware. The pressure dome consists of two machined segments. An O-ring is placed in an O-ring groove in the flange of the bottom

  14. Combustion of liquid sprays at high pressures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shearer, A. J.; Faeth, G. M.

    1977-01-01

    The combustion of pressure atomized fuel sprays in high pressure stagnant air was studied. Measurements were made of flame and spray boundaries at pressures in the range 0.1-9 MPa for methanol and n-pentane. At the higher test pressure levels, critical phenomena are important. The experiments are compared with theoretical predictions based on a locally homogeneous two-phase flow model. The theory correctly predicted the trends of the data, but underestimates flame and spray boundaries by 30-50 percent, indicating that slip is still important for the present experiments (Sauter mean diameters of 30 microns at atmospheric pressure under cold flow conditions). Since the sprays are shorter at high pressures, slip effects are still important even though the density ratio of the phases approach one another as the droplets heat up. The model indicates the presence of a region where condensed water is present within the spray and provides a convenient means of treating supercritical phenomena.

  15. Laser techniques in high-pressure geophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hemley, R. J.; Bell, P. M.; Mao, H. K.

    1987-01-01

    Laser techniques in conjunction with the diamond-anvil cell can be used to study high-pressure properties of materials important to a wide range of problems in earth and planetary science. Spontaneous Raman scattering of crystalline and amorphous solids at high pressure demonstrates that dramatic changes in structure and bonding occur on compression. High-pressure Brillouin scattering is sensitive to the pressure variations of single-crystal elastic moduli and acoustic velocities. Laser heating techniques with the diamond-anvil cell can be used to study phase transitions, including melting, under deep-earth conditions. Finally, laser-induced ruby fluorescence has been essential for the development of techniques for generating the maximum pressures now possible with the diamond-anvil cell, and currently provides a calibrated in situ measure of pressure well above 100 gigapascals.

  16. Range of motion and cervical myofascial pain.

    PubMed

    Wilke, J; Niederer, D; Fleckenstein, J; Vogt, L; Banzer, W

    2016-01-01

    Several studies investigating myofascial pain syndrome include assessments of range of motion (ROM) as a diagnostic criterion. However, the value of ROM in this context has not yet been evaluated in controlled clinical studies. We aimed to examine whether patients with myofascial pain syndrome display alterations of ROM when compared to healthy subjects. Twenty-two individuals (13 females, 9 males; aged 33.4 ± 13.9 yrs) afflicted with active myofascial trigger points in the upper trapezius muscle as well as 22 age and sex matched healthy controls were included. All subjects underwent an examination of maximal active cervical ROM in flexion/extension assessed by means of a 3D ultrasonic movement analysis system (30 Hz; Zebris CMS 70). In the patients group, pressure pain threshold (PPT) of the trigger points was determined using a pressure algometer. Maximum range of motion in the sagittal plane did not differ between individuals with MTrP (125.9 ± 23.2°, 95% CI: 116.2-135.6°) and asymptomatic subjects (128.2 ± 20.4°, 95% CI: 119.7-136.7°; p > .05). In patients, PPT (1.7 ± .6, 95% CI: 1.5-1.9) was not correlated with cervical mobility (r = -.13; p > .05). Based on these pilot data, range of motion in flexion/extension is not a valid criterion for the detection of myofascial trigger points. Additional research incorporating movement amplitudes in other anatomical planes and additional afflicted muscles should be conducted in order to further delineate the relative impact of MTrP on range of motion.

  17. Sequential ranging: How it works

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baugh, Harold W.

    1993-01-01

    This publication is directed to the users of data from the Sequential Ranging Assembly (SRA), and to others who have a general interest in range measurements. It covers the hardware, the software, and the processes used in acquiring range data; it does not cover analytical aspects such as the theory of modulation, detection, noise spectral density, and other highly technical subjects. In other words, it covers how ranging is done, but not the details of why it works. The publication also includes an appendix that gives a brief discussion of PN ranging, a capability now under development.

  18. High Blood Pressure in Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... The Health Information Center High Blood Pressure in Pregnancy What Is High Blood Pressure? Blood pressure is ... Are the Effects of High Blood Pressure in Pregnancy? Although many pregnant women with high blood pressure ...

  19. Laser Ranging Experiment on Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter: Clocks and Ranges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, D.; Rowlands, D. D.; McGarry, J.; Zuber, M. T.; Smith, D. E.; Torrence, M. H.; Neumann, G. A.; Mazarico, E.; Sun, X.; Zagwodzki, T. W.; Cavanaugh, J. F.; Ramos-Izquierdo, L.

    2010-12-01

    Accurate ranges from Earth to the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) spacecraft Laser Ranging (LR) system supplement the precision orbit determination (POD) of LRO. LRO is tracked by ten LR stations from the International Laser Ranging Service (ILRS), using H-maser, GPS steered Rb, and Cs standard oscillators as reference clocks. The LR system routinely makes one-way range measurements via laser time-of-flight from Earth to LRO. Uplink photons are received by a telescope mounted on the high-gain antenna on LRO , transferred through a fiber optic cable to the Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA), and timed-tagged by the spacecraft clock. The range from the LR Earth station to LRO is derived from paired outgoing and received times. Accurate ranges can only be obtained after solving for both the spacecraft and ground station clock errors. The drift rate and aging rate of the LRO clock are calculated from data provided by the primary LR station, NASA's Next Generation Satellite Laser Ranging System (NGSLR) in Greenbelt, Maryland. The results confirm the LRO clock oscillator mid to long term stability measured during ground testing. These rates also agree well with those determined through POD. Simultaneous and near-simultaneous ranging to LRO from multiple LR stations in America, Europe, and Australia has been successfully achieved within a 10 hour window. Data analysis of these ranging experiments allows for precision modeling of the clock behaviors of each LR ground station and characterization of the station ground fire times.

  20. Blood Pressure Medicines

    MedlinePlus

    High blood pressure, also called hypertension, usually has no symptoms. But it can cause serious problems such as stroke, heart failure, ... failure. If you cannot control your high blood pressure through lifestyle changes such as losing weight and ...

  1. Low blood pressure

    MedlinePlus

    Hypotension; Blood pressure - low; Postprandial hypotension; Orthostatic hypotension; Neurally mediated hypotension; NMH ... Blood pressure varies from one person to another. A drop as little as 20 mmHg, can cause problems for ...

  2. High Blood Pressure

    MedlinePlus

    Blood pressure is the force of your blood pushing against the walls of your arteries. Each time your heart ... it pumps blood into the arteries. Your blood pressure is highest when your heart beats, pumping the ...

  3. Flange weld pressure testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holden, C. F.

    1977-01-01

    Device allows localized high-pressure proof test. Use of tool eliminates need to block off far end of pipe; only small amount of pressurizing gas is needed; only small area needs to be cleared of personnel for proof test.

  4. Low Blood Pressure

    MedlinePlus

    ... the walls of your arteries. Each time your heart beats, it pumps out blood into the arteries. Your blood pressure is highest when your heart beats, pumping the blood. This is called systolic pressure. ...

  5. Pressure surge attenuator

    DOEpatents

    Christie, Alan M.; Snyder, Kurt I.

    1985-01-01

    A pressure surge attenuation system for pipes having a fluted region opposite crushable metal foam. As adapted for nuclear reactor vessels and heads, crushable metal foam is disposed to attenuate pressure surges.

  6. High blood pressure - infants

    MedlinePlus

    Hypertension - infants ... and blood vessels The health of the kidneys High blood pressure in infants may be due to kidney or ... blood vessel of the kidney) In newborn babies, high blood pressure is often caused by a blood clot in ...

  7. Atmospheric Pressure Indicator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salzsieder, John C.

    1995-01-01

    Discusses observable phenomena related to air pressure. Describes a simple, unobtrusive, semiquantitative device to monitor the changes in air pressure that are associated with altitude, using a soft-drink bottle and a balloon. (JRH)

  8. Hypertension (High Blood Pressure)

    MedlinePlus

    ... pressure to live. Without it, blood can't flow through our bodies and carry oxygen to our vital organs. But when blood pressure gets too high — a condition called hypertension — it can lead to ...

  9. Pressure Sensitive Paints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Tianshu; Bencic, T.; Sullivan, J. P.

    1999-01-01

    This article reviews new advances and applications of pressure sensitive paints in aerodynamic testing. Emphasis is placed on important technical aspects of pressure sensitive paint including instrumentation, data processing, and uncertainty analysis.

  10. The Root Pressure Phenomenon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marsh, A. R.

    1972-01-01

    Describes experiments demonstrating that root pressure in plants is probably controlled by a circadian rhythm (biological clock). Root pressure phenomenon plays significant part in water transport in contradiction with prevalent belief. (PS)

  11. Hypertension (High Blood Pressure)

    MedlinePlus

    ... blood pressure with the development of a practical method to measure it. Physicians began to note associations between hypertension and risk of heart failure, stroke, and kidney failure. Although scientists had yet to prove that lowering blood pressure ...

  12. Pressure-sensitive optrode

    DOEpatents

    Hirschfeld, Tomas B.

    1986-01-01

    An apparatus is provided for sensing changes in pressure and for generating optical signals related to said changes in pressure. Light from a fiber optic illuminates a fluorescent composition causing it to fluoresce. The fluorescent composition is caused to more relative to the end of the fiber optic in response to changes in pressure so that the intensity of fluorescent emissions collected by the same fiber optic used for illumination varies monotonically with pressure.

  13. Pressure-sensitive optrode

    DOEpatents

    Hirschfeld, T.B.

    1986-07-15

    An apparatus is provided for sensing changes in pressure and for generating optical signals related to said changes in pressure. Light from a fiber optic illuminates a fluorescent composition causing it to fluoresce. The fluorescent composition is caused to fluoresce more relative to the end of the fiber optic in response to changes in pressure so that the intensity of fluorescent emissions collected by the same fiber optic used for illumination varies monotonically with pressure. 10 figs.

  14. Relative microvascular pressure sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Min; Zemp, Roger

    2016-03-01

    Microcirculation may be characterized by the vascular pressure as it is influenced by pressure-driven perfusion. Crosssections of blood vessels can be visualized by photoacoustic imaging and compressing on vessels causes deformation. The photoacoustic signals of blood, when compressed to the point of vessel collapse, may or may not vanish depending on the buckling process it undergoes. We form relative pressure images of microvessels by tracking vessel collapse as a function of externally applied pressure using photoacoustic imaging.

  15. PRESSURE SYSTEM CONTROL

    DOEpatents

    Esselman, W.H.; Kaplan, G.M.

    1961-06-20

    The control of pressure in pressurized liquid systems, especially a pressurized liquid reactor system, may be achieved by providing a bias circuit or loop across a closed loop having a flow restriction means in the form of an orifice, a storage tank, and a pump connected in series. The subject invention is advantageously utilized where control of a reactor can be achieved by response to the temperature and pressure of the primary cooling system.

  16. Inertia diaphragm pressure transducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seegmiller, H. L. B.

    1971-01-01

    Transducer measures gas pressure profiles in high temperature, short duration, gas flows usually found in devices where pressure pulses may have durations of few microseconds to several milliseconds. Assembly includes fluid delay line, delay chamber, and flow restrictor for equalizing steady state pressure on diaphragm's sides

  17. A soundproof pressure chamber.

    PubMed

    Kitahara, M; Kodama, A; Ozawa, H; Inoue, S

    1994-01-01

    For neurotological research we designed a soundproof pressure chamber in which pressure can be adjusted +/- 1000 mmH2O at the rate of less than 100 mmH2O per second. Noise in the chamber can be maintained under 30-35 dB while pressure is kept at a given level.

  18. High Blood Pressure (Hypertension)

    MedlinePlus

    ... For Consumers Consumer Information by Audience For Women High Blood Pressure (Hypertension) Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... En Español Who is at risk? How is high blood pressure treated? Understanding your blood pressure: What do the ...

  19. Brain Pressure Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A transducer originally used to measure air pressure in aircraft wind tunnel tests is the basis for a development important in diagnosis and treatment of certain types of brain damage. A totally implantable device, tbe intracranial pressure monitor measures and reports brain pressure by telemetry.

  20. Fiber optic pressure catheter for cardiovascular applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yuping; Sawatari, Takeo; Hartley, Craig J.

    1998-07-01

    We developed a fiber optic pressure catheter which has the potential to exceed the performance and cost-effectiveness of any currently available pressure measurement system in cardiovascular applications. Our design is based on a movable metallic ribbon, which works as a reflector, to transform the pressure into a light signal. The sensor has a diameter of 0.8 mm and is covered by medical grade polyurethane. In the laboratory tests, our sensors consistently showed high sensitivity and low noise (about 1 mmHg) over the pressure range of 0 to 300 mmHg. The time constant of the sensor, which is limited by the current software is about 20 mseconds (50 Hz). Using a mechanical heart simulator to generate pressure pulses, the pressure reading was independent of temperature change over a 30 degree Celsius range, and the drift was minimal during the 72-hour pressure pulse tests. A preliminary animal test was carried out with our sensors inserted into the artery of a dog. The comparison with an external reference sensor showed basic sensor performance. The sensor can also be used in brain, lung, and bladder pressure measurement applications.

  1. Measuring Pressure Has a New Standard

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The Force-Balanced Piston Gauge (FPG) tests and calibrates instrumentation operating in the low pressure range. The system provides a traceable, primary calibration standard for measuring pressures in the range of near 0 to 15 kPa (2.2 psi) in both gauge and absolute measurement modes. The hardware combines a large area piston-cylinder with a load cell measuring the force resulting from pressures across the piston. The mass of the piston can be tared out, allowing measurement to start from zero. A pressure higher than the measured pressure, which keeps the piston centered, lubricates an innovative conical gap located between the piston and the cylinder, eliminating the need for piston rotation. A pressure controller based on the control of low gas flow automates the pressure control. DHI markets the FPG as an automated primary standard for very low-gauge and absolute pressures. DHI is selling the FPG to high-end metrology laboratories on a case by case basis, with a full commercial release to follow.

  2. Microfluidic pressure sensing using trapped air compression.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Nimisha; Burns, Mark A

    2007-05-01

    We have developed a microfluidic method for measuring the fluid pressure head experienced at any location inside a microchannel. The principal component is a microfabricated sealed chamber with a single inlet and no exit; the entrance to the single inlet is positioned at the location where pressure is to be measured. The pressure measurement is then based on monitoring the movement of a liquid-air interface as it compresses air trapped inside the microfabricated sealed chamber and calculating the pressure using the ideal gas law. The method has been used to measure the pressure of the air stream and continuous liquid flow inside microfluidic channels (d approximately 50 microm). Further, a pressure drop has also been measured using multiple microfabricated sealed chambers. For air pressure, a resolution of 700 Pa within a full-scale range of 700-100 kPa was obtained. For liquids, pressure drops as low as 70 Pa were obtained in an operating range from 70 Pa to 10 kPa. Since the method primarily uses a microfluidic sealed chamber, it does not require additional fabrication steps and may easily be incorporated in several lab-on-a-chip fluidic applications for laminar as well as turbulent flow conditions. PMID:17476384

  3. Microfluidic pressure sensing using trapped air compression.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Nimisha; Burns, Mark A

    2007-05-01

    We have developed a microfluidic method for measuring the fluid pressure head experienced at any location inside a microchannel. The principal component is a microfabricated sealed chamber with a single inlet and no exit; the entrance to the single inlet is positioned at the location where pressure is to be measured. The pressure measurement is then based on monitoring the movement of a liquid-air interface as it compresses air trapped inside the microfabricated sealed chamber and calculating the pressure using the ideal gas law. The method has been used to measure the pressure of the air stream and continuous liquid flow inside microfluidic channels (d approximately 50 microm). Further, a pressure drop has also been measured using multiple microfabricated sealed chambers. For air pressure, a resolution of 700 Pa within a full-scale range of 700-100 kPa was obtained. For liquids, pressure drops as low as 70 Pa were obtained in an operating range from 70 Pa to 10 kPa. Since the method primarily uses a microfluidic sealed chamber, it does not require additional fabrication steps and may easily be incorporated in several lab-on-a-chip fluidic applications for laminar as well as turbulent flow conditions.

  4. High pressure and anesthesia: pressure stimulates or inhibits bacterial bioluminescence depending upon temperature.

    PubMed

    Nosaka, S; Kamaya, H; Ueda, I

    1988-10-01

    Although high pressure is often viewed as a nonspecific stimulus counteracting anesthesia, pressure can either excite or inhibit biological activity depending on the temperature at application. Temperature and pressure are two independent variables that determine equilibrium quantity, e.g., the state of organisms in terms of activity and anesthesia depth. We used the light intensity of luminous bacteria (Vibrio fischeri) as an activity parameter, and studied the effects of pressure and anesthetics on the bacteria's light intensity at various temperatures. The light intensity was greatest at about 30 degrees C at ambient pressure. When the system was pressurized up to 204 atm, the temperature for maximum light intensity was shifted to higher temperatures. Above the optimal temperature for the maximal light intensity, high pressure increased the light intensity. Below the optimal temperature, pressure decreased light intensity. Pressure only shifts the reaction equilibrium to the lower volume state (Le Chatelier's principle). When the volume of the excited state is larger than the resting state, high pressure inhibits excitation, and vice versa. Halothane 0.008 atm and isoflurane 0.021 atm inhibited the light intensity both above and below the optimal temperature. When pressurized, the light intensity increased in the high temperature range but decreased in the low temperature range, as in the control. Thus, high pressure seemingly potentiated the anesthetic action at low temperatures. When the ratio of the light intensity in bacteria exposed to anesthesia and those not exposed to anesthesia was plotted against the pressure, however, the value approached unity in proportion to the pressure increase.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3421502

  5. Pressure ulcer prevention.

    PubMed

    Edlich, Richard F; Winters, Kathryne L; Woodard, Charles R; Buschbacher, Ralph M; Long, William B; Gebhart, Jocelynn H; Ma, Eva K

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this collective review is to outline the predisposing factors in the development of pressure ulcers and to identify a pressure ulcer prevention program. The most frequent sites for pressure ulcers are areas of skin overlying bony prominences. There are four critical factors contributing to the development of pressure ulcers: pressure, shearing forces, friction, and moisture. Pressure is now viewed as the single most important etiologic factor in pressure ulcer formation. Prolonged immobilization, sensory deficit, circulatory disturbances, and poor nutrition have been identified as important risk factors in the development of pressure ulcer formation. Among the clinical assessment scales available, only two, the Braden Scale and Norton Scale, have been tested extensively for reliability and/or validity. The most commonly used risk assessment tools for pressure ulcer formation are computerized pressure monitoring and measurement of laser Doppler skin blood flow. Pressure ulcers can predispose the patient to a variety of complications that include bacteremia, osteomyelitis, squamous cell carcinoma, and sinus tracts. The three components of pressure ulcer prevention that must be considered in any patient include management of incontinence, nutritional support, and pressure relief. The pressure relief program must be individualized for non-weight-bearing individuals as well as those that can bear weight. For those that can not bear weight and passively stand, the RENAISSANCE Mattress Replacement System is recommended for the immobile patient who lies supine on the bed, the stretcher, or operating room table. This alternating pressure system is unique because it has three separate cells that are not interconnected. It is specifically designed so that deflation of each individual cell will reach a ZERO PRESSURE during each alternating pressure cycle. The superiority of this system has been documented by comprehensive clinical studies in which this system

  6. Ranging Behaviour of Commercial Free-Range Laying Hens.

    PubMed

    Chielo, Leonard Ikenna; Pike, Tom; Cooper, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the range use and behaviour of laying hens in commercial free-range flocks was explored. Six flocks were each visited on four separate days and data collected from their outdoor area (divided into zones based on distance from shed and available resources). These were: apron (0-10 m from shed normally without cover or other enrichments); enriched belt (10-50 m from shed where resources such as manmade cover, saplings and dust baths were provided); and outer range (beyond 50 m from shed with no cover and mainly grass pasture). Data collection consisted of counting the number of hens in each zone and recording behaviour, feather condition and nearest neighbour distance (NND) of 20 birds per zone on each visit day. In addition, we used techniques derived from ecological surveys to establish four transects perpendicular to the shed, running through the apron, enriched belt and outer range. Number of hens in each 10 m × 10 m quadrat was recorded four times per day as was the temperature and relative humidity of the outer range. On average, 12.5% of hens were found outside. Of these, 5.4% were found in the apron; 4.3% in the enriched zone; and 2.8% were in the outer range. This pattern was supported by data from quadrats, where the density of hens sharply dropped with increasing distance from shed. Consequently, NND was greatest in the outer range, least in the apron and intermediate in the enriched belt. Hens sampled in outer range and enriched belts had better feather condition than those from the apron. Standing, ground pecking, walking and foraging were the most commonly recorded activities with standing and pecking most likely to occur in the apron, and walking and foraging more common in the outer range. Use of the outer range declined with lower temperatures and increasing relative humidity, though use of apron and enriched belt was not affected by variation in these measures. These data support previous findings that outer range areas tend to be

  7. Pressure Relief Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manha, William D.

    2010-09-01

    Pressure relief devices are used in pressure systems and on pressure vessels to prevent catastrophic rupture or explosion from excessive pressure. Pressure systems and pressure vessels have manufacturers maximum rated operating pressures or maximum design pressures(MDP) for which there are relatively high safety factors and minimum risk of rupture or explosion. Pressure systems and pressure vessels that have a potential to exceed the MDP by being connected to another higher pressure source, a compressor, or heat to water(boiler) are required to have over-pressure protecting devices. Such devices can be relief valves and/or burst discs to safely relieve potentially excessive pressure and prevent unacceptable ruptures and explosions which result in fail-safe pressure systems and pressure vessels. Common aerospace relief valve and burst disc requirements and standards will be presented. This will include the NASA PSRP Interpretation Letter TA-88-074 Fault Tolerance of Systems Using Specially Certified Burst Disks that dictates burst disc requirements for payloads on Shuttle. Two recent undesirable manned space payloads pressure relief devices and practices will be discussed, as well as why these practices should not be continued. One example for discussion is the use of three burst discs that have been placed in series to comply with safety requirements of three controls to prevent a catastrophic hazard of the over-pressurization and rupture of pressure system and/or vessels. The cavities between the burst discs are evacuated and are the reference pressures for activating the two upstream burst discs. If the upstream burst disc leaks into the reference cavity, the reference pressure increases and it can increase the burst disc activating pressure and potentially result in the burst disc assembly being ineffective for over pressure protection. The three burst discs-in-series assembly was found acceptable because the burst discs are designed for minimum risk(DFMR) of

  8. Combustion pressure sensor arrangement

    SciTech Connect

    Sawamoto, K.; Nagaishi, H.; Takeuchi, K.

    1986-07-29

    A combustion pressure sensor arrangement in an internal combustion engine having a cylinder head, comprising: a plug seating formed in the cylinder head; an annular pressure sensor; an ignition plug screwed into the cylinder head in such a manner that the pressure sensor is clamped between the ignition plug and the plug seating; an ignition plug accommodation hole formed in the cylinder head for accommodating therein the ignition plug; and a guide sleeve joined at one end thereof to the outer periphery of the pressure sensor and fitted in the ignition plug accommodation hole, wherein the one end of the guide sleeve is fitted on the outer periphery of the pressure sensor.

  9. Ranging Behaviour of Commercial Free-Range Laying Hens

    PubMed Central

    Chielo, Leonard Ikenna; Pike, Tom; Cooper, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Simple Summary Commercial free-range production has become a significant sector of the fresh egg market due to legislation banning conventional cages and consumer preference for products perceived as welfare friendly, as access to outdoor range can lead to welfare benefits such as greater freedom of movement and enhanced behavioural opportunities. This study investigated dispersal patterns, feather condition and activity of laying hens in three distinct zones of the range area; the apron area near shed; enriched zone 10–50 m from shed; and outer range beyond 50 m, in six flocks of laying hens under commercial free-range conditions varying in size between 4000 and 24,000 hens. Each flock was visited for four days to record number of hens in each zone, their behaviour, feather condition and nearest neighbour distances (NND), as well as record temperature and relative humidity during the visit. Temperature and relative humidity varied across the study period in line with seasonal variations and influenced the use of range with fewer hens out of shed as temperature fell or relative humidity rose. On average, 12.5% of the hens were observed on the range and most of these hens were recorded in the apron zone as hen density decreased rapidly with increasing distance from the shed. Larger flocks appeared to have a lower proportion of hens on range. The hens used the range more in the early morning followed by a progressive decrease through to early afternoon. The NND was greatest in the outer range and decreased towards the shed. Feather condition was generally good and hens observed in the outer range had the best overall feather condition. Standing, pecking, walking and foraging were the most commonly recorded behaviours and of these, standing occurred most in the apron whereas walking and foraging behaviours were recorded most in the outer range. This study supported the findings of previous studies that reported few hens in the range and greater use of areas closer

  10. Pressure reducing regulator

    DOEpatents

    Whitehead, J.C.; Dilgard, L.W.

    1995-10-10

    A pressure reducing regulator that controls its downstream or outlet pressure to a fixed fraction of its upstream or inlet pressure is disclosed. The regulator includes a housing which may be of a titanium alloy, within which is located a seal or gasket at the outlet end which may be made of annealed copper, a rod, and piston, each of which may be made of high density graphite. The regulator is insensitive to temperature by virtue of being without a spring or gas sealed behind a diaphragm, and provides a reference for a system in which it is being used. The rod and piston of the regulator are constructed, for example, to have a 1/20 ratio such that when the downstream pressure is less than 1/20 of the upstream pressure the regulator opens and when the downstream pressure exceeds 1/20 of the upstream pressure the regulator closes. 10 figs.

  11. Pressure reducing regulator

    DOEpatents

    Whitehead, John C.; Dilgard, Lemoyne W.

    1995-01-01

    A pressure reducing regulator that controls its downstream or outlet pressure to a fixed fraction of its upstream or inlet pressure. The regulator includes a housing which may be of a titanium alloy, within which is located a seal or gasket at the outlet end which may be made of annealed copper, a rod, and piston, each of which may be made of high density graphite. The regulator is insensitive to temperature by virtue of being without a spring or gas sealed behind a diaphragm, and provides a reference for a system in which it is being used. The rod and piston of the regulator are constructed, for example, to have a 1/20 ratio such that when the downstream pressure is less than 1/20 of the upstream pressure the regulator opens and when the downstream pressure exceeds 1/20 of the upstream pressure the regulator closes.

  12. Miniaturized pressurization system

    DOEpatents

    Whitehead, John C.; Swink, Don G.

    1991-01-01

    The invention uses a fluid stored at a low pressure and provides the fluid at a high pressure. The invention allows the low pressure fluid to flow to a fluid bore of a differential pump and from the pump to a fluid pressure regulator. After flowing through the regulator the fluid is converted to a gas which is directed to a gas bore of the differential pump. By controlling the flow of gas entering and being exhausted from the gas bore, the invention provides pressure to the fluid. By setting the regulator, the high pressure fluid can be set at predetermined values. Because the invention only needs a low pressure fluid, the inventive apparatus has a low mass, and therefore would be useful in rocket propulsion systems.

  13. Current Testing Capabilities at the NASA Ames Ballistic Ranges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramsey, Alvin; Tam, Tim; Bogdanoff, David; Gage, Peter

    1999-01-01

    Capabilities for designing and performing ballistic range tests at the NASA Ames Research Center are presented. Computational tools to assist in designing and developing ballistic range models and to predict the flight characteristics of these models are described. A CFD code modeling two-stage gun performance is available, allowing muzzle velocity, maximum projectile base pressure, and gun erosion to be predicted. Aerodynamic characteristics such as drag and stability can be obtained at speeds ranging from 0.2 km/s to 8 km/s. The composition and density of the test gas can be controlled, which allows for an assessment of Reynolds number and specific heat ratio effects under conditions that closely match those encountered during planetary entry. Pressure transducers have been installed in the gun breech to record the time history of the pressure during launch, and pressure transducers have also been installed in the walls of the range to measure sonic boom effects. To illustrate the testing capabilities of the Ames ballistic ranges, an overview of some of the recent tests is given.

  14. Pressure (Or No Royal Road)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradley, J.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses how difficult the various problems of pressure, partial pressure, gas laws, and vapor pressure are for students. Outlines the evolution of the concept of pressure, the gas equation for a perfect gas, partial pressures, saturated vapor pressure, Avogadro's hypothesis, Raoult's law, and the vapor pressure of ideal solutions. (JR)

  15. Pressure locking test results

    SciTech Connect

    DeWall, K.G.; Watkins, J.C.; McKellar, M.G.; Bramwell, D.

    1996-12-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, is funding the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) in performing research to provide technical input for their use in evaluating responses to Generic Letter 95-07, {open_quotes}Pressure Locking and Thermal Binding of Safety-Related Power-Operated Gate Valves.{close_quotes} Pressure locking and thermal binding are phenomena that make a closed gate valve difficult to open. This paper discusses only the pressure locking phenomenon in a flexible-wedge gate valve; the authors will publish the results of their thermal binding research at a later date. Pressure locking can occur when operating sequences or temperature changes cause the pressure of the fluid in the bonnet (and, in most valves, between the discs) to be higher than the pressure on the upstream and downstream sides of the disc assembly. This high fluid pressure presses the discs against both seats, making the disc assembly harder to unseat than anticipated by the typical design calculations, which generally consider friction at only one of the two disc/seat interfaces. The high pressure of the bonnet fluid also changes the pressure distribution around the disc in a way that can further contribute to the unseating load. If the combined loads associated with pressure locking are very high, the actuator might not have the capacity to open the valve. The results of the NRC/INEL research discussed in this paper show that the relationship between bonnet pressure and pressure locking stem loads appears linear. The results also show that for this valve, seat leakage affects the bonnet pressurization rate when the valve is subjected to thermally induced pressure locking conditions.

  16. Pressure locking test results

    SciTech Connect

    DeWall, K.G.; Watkins, J.C.; McKellar, M.G.; Bramwell, D.

    1996-06-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, is funding the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) in performing research to provide technical input for their use in evaluating responses to Generic Letter 95-07, {open_quotes}Pressure Locking and Thermal Binding of Safety-Related Power-Operated Gate Valves.{close_quotes} Pressure locking and thermal binding are phenomena that make a closed gate valve difficult to open. This paper discusses only the pressure locking phenomenon in a flexible-wedge gate valve; we will publish the results of our thermal binding research at a later date. Pressure locking can occur when operating sequences or temperature changes cause the pressure of the fluid in the bonnet (and, in most valves, between the discs) to be higher than the pressure on the upstream and downstream sides of the disc assembly. This high fluid pressure presses the discs against both seats, making the disc assembly harder to unseat than anticipated by the typical design calculations, which generally consider friction at only one of the two disc/seat interfaces. The high pressure of the bonnet fluid also changes the pressure distribution around the disc in a way that can further contribute to the unseating load. If the combined loads associated with pressure locking are very high, the actuator might not have the capacity to open the valve. The results of the NRC/INEL research discussed in this paper show that the relationship between bonnet pressure and pressure locking stem loads appears linear. The results also show that for this valve, seat leakage affects the bonnet pressurization rate when the valve is subjected to thermally induced pressure locking conditions.

  17. Fuel droplet burning rates at high pressures.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canada, G. S.; Faeth, G. M.

    1973-01-01

    Combustion of methanol, ethanol, propanol-1, n-pentane, n-heptane, and n-decane was observed in air under natural convection conditions, at pressures up to 100 atm. The droplets were simulated by porous spheres, with diameters in the range from 0.63 to 1.90 cm. The pressure levels of the tests were high enough so that near-critical combustion was observed for methanol and ethanol. Due to the high pressures, the phase-equilibrium models of the analysis included both the conventional low-pressure approach as well as high-pressure versions, allowing for real gas effects and the solubility of combustion-product gases in the liquid phase. The burning-rate predictions of the various theories were similar, and in fair agreement with the data. The high-pressure theory gave the best prediction for the liquid-surface temperatures of ethanol and propanol-1 at high pressure. The experiments indicated the approach of critical burning conditions for methanol and ethanol at pressures on the order of 80 to 100 atm, which was in good agreement with the predictions of both the low- and high-pressure analysis.

  18. PN ranging/telemetry transmission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deerkoski, L. F.

    1977-01-01

    System can transmit range-indicating pseudonoise (PN) codes and simultaneously transmit auxiliary information as binary data at a rate at least on order of pseudonoise chipping rate. PN code is modulated by data stream with relatively low bit rate. Data stream with high bit rate can be transmitted in same frequency band as PN ranging code.

  19. Extended range chemical sensing apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Hughes, Robert C.; Schubert, W. Kent

    1994-01-01

    An apparatus for sensing chemicals over extended range of concentrations. In particular, first and second sensors each having separate, but overlapping ranges for sensing concentrations of hydrogen are provided. Preferably, the first sensor is a MOS solid state device wherein the metal electrode or gate is a nickel alloy. The second sensor is a chemiresistor comprising a nickel alloy.

  20. Institutional Long-Range Planning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bolin, John G.

    This booklet presents a general outline for conducting a long-range planning study that can be adapted for use by any institution of higher education. The basic components of an effective long-range plan should include: (1) purposes of the plan, which define the scope of the study and provide the setting in which it will be initiated; (2) a set of…

  1. A cryogenic multichannel electronically scanned pressure module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shams, Qamar A.; Fox, Robert L.; Adcock, Edward E.; Kahng, Seun K.

    1992-01-01

    Consideration is given to a cryogenic multichannel electronically scanned pressure (ESP) module developed and tested over an extended temperature span from -184 to +50 C and a pressure range of 0 to 5 psig. The ESP module consists of 32 pressure sensor dice, four analog 8 differential-input multiplexers, and an amplifier circuit, all of which are packaged in a physical volume of 2 x 1 x 5/8 in with 32 pressure and two reference ports. Maximum nonrepeatability is measured at 0.21 percent of full-scale output. The ESP modules have performed consistently well over 15 times over the above temperature range and continue to work without any sign of degradation. These sensors are also immune to repeated thermal shock tests over a temperature change of 220 C/sec.

  2. Ranging Behaviour of Commercial Free-Range Laying Hens

    PubMed Central

    Chielo, Leonard Ikenna; Pike, Tom; Cooper, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Simple Summary Commercial free-range production has become a significant sector of the fresh egg market due to legislation banning conventional cages and consumer preference for products perceived as welfare friendly, as access to outdoor range can lead to welfare benefits such as greater freedom of movement and enhanced behavioural opportunities. This study investigated dispersal patterns, feather condition and activity of laying hens in three distinct zones of the range area; the apron area near shed; enriched zone 10–50 m from shed; and outer range beyond 50 m, in six flocks of laying hens under commercial free-range conditions varying in size between 4000 and 24,000 hens. Each flock was visited for four days to record number of hens in each zone, their behaviour, feather condition and nearest neighbour distances (NND), as well as record temperature and relative humidity during the visit. Temperature and relative humidity varied across the study period in line with seasonal variations and influenced the use of range with fewer hens out of shed as temperature fell or relative humidity rose. On average, 12.5% of the hens were observed on the range and most of these hens were recorded in the apron zone as hen density decreased rapidly with increasing distance from the shed. Larger flocks appeared to have a lower proportion of hens on range. The hens used the range more in the early morning followed by a progressive decrease through to early afternoon. The NND was greatest in the outer range and decreased towards the shed. Feather condition was generally good and hens observed in the outer range had the best overall feather condition. Standing, pecking, walking and foraging were the most commonly recorded behaviours and of these, standing occurred most in the apron whereas walking and foraging behaviours were recorded most in the outer range. This study supported the findings of previous studies that reported few hens in the range and greater use of areas closer

  3. Range indices of geomagnetic activity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stuart, W.F.; Green, A.W.

    1988-01-01

    The simplest index of geomagnetic activity is the range in nT from maximum to minimum value of the field in a given time interval. The hourly range R was recommended by IAGA for use at observatories at latitudes greater than 65??, but was superceded by AE. The most used geomagnetic index K is based on the range of activity in a 3 h interval corrected for the regular daily variation. In order to take advantage of real time data processing, now available at many observatories, it is proposed to introduce a 1 h range index and also a 3 h range index. Both will be computed hourly, i.e. each will have a series of 24 per day, the 3 h values overlapping. The new data will be available as the range (R) of activity in nT and also as a logarithmic index (I) of the range. The exponent relating index to range in nT is based closely on the scale used for computing K values. The new ranges and range indices are available, from June 1987, to users in real time and can be accessed by telephone connection or computer network. Their first year of production is regarded as a trial period during which their value to the scientific and commercial communities will be assessed, together with their potential as indicators of regional and global disturbances' and in which trials will be conducted into ways of eliminating excessive bias at quiet times due to the rate of change of the daily variation field. ?? 1988.

  4. Foraging optimally for home ranges

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mitchell, Michael S.; Powell, Roger A.

    2012-01-01

    Economic models predict behavior of animals based on the presumption that natural selection has shaped behaviors important to an animal's fitness to maximize benefits over costs. Economic analyses have shown that territories of animals are structured by trade-offs between benefits gained from resources and costs of defending them. Intuitively, home ranges should be similarly structured, but trade-offs are difficult to assess because there are no costs of defense, thus economic models of home-range behavior are rare. We present economic models that predict how home ranges can be efficient with respect to spatially distributed resources, discounted for travel costs, under 2 strategies of optimization, resource maximization and area minimization. We show how constraints such as competitors can influence structure of homes ranges through resource depression, ultimately structuring density of animals within a population and their distribution on a landscape. We present simulations based on these models to show how they can be generally predictive of home-range behavior and the mechanisms that structure the spatial distribution of animals. We also show how contiguous home ranges estimated statistically from location data can be misleading for animals that optimize home ranges on landscapes with patchily distributed resources. We conclude with a summary of how we applied our models to nonterritorial black bears (Ursus americanus) living in the mountains of North Carolina, where we found their home ranges were best predicted by an area-minimization strategy constrained by intraspecific competition within a social hierarchy. Economic models can provide strong inference about home-range behavior and the resources that structure home ranges by offering falsifiable, a priori hypotheses that can be tested with field observations.

  5. Calculating Mass Diffusion in High-Pressure Binary Fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bellan, Josette; Harstad, Kenneth

    2004-01-01

    A comprehensive mathematical model of mass diffusion has been developed for binary fluids at high pressures, including critical and supercritical pressures. Heretofore, diverse expressions, valid for limited parameter ranges, have been used to correlate high-pressure binary mass-diffusion-coefficient data. This model will likely be especially useful in the computational simulation and analysis of combustion phenomena in diesel engines, gas turbines, and liquid rocket engines, wherein mass diffusion at high pressure plays a major role.

  6. Home range analysis using a mechanistic home range model

    SciTech Connect

    Moorcroft, P.R. . Dept. of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology); Lewis, M.A. . Dept. of Mathematics) Crabtree, R.L. . Dept. of Fish and Wildlife Resources)

    1999-07-01

    The traditional models used to characterize animal home ranges have no mechanistic basis underlying their descriptions of space use, and as a result, the analysis of animal home ranges has primarily been a descriptive endeavor. In this paper, the authors characterize coyote (Canis latrans) home range patterns using partial differential equations for expected space use that are formally derived from underlying descriptions of individual movement behavior. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first time that mechanistic models have been used to characterize animal home ranges. The results provide empirical support for a model formulation of movement response to scent marks, and suggest that having relocation data for individuals in adjacent groups is necessary to capture the spatial arrangement of home range boundaries. The authors then show how the model fits can be used to obtain predictions for individual movement and scent marking behavior and to predict changes in home range patterns. More generally, the findings illustrate how mechanistic models permit the development of a predictive theory for the relationship between movement behavior and animal spatial distribution.

  7. Air circulation under reduced atmospheric pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillhouse, Lendell E.

    The control of heat exchange is vital for plant life in off-world, low pressure, greenhouses. The ability to control this process was limited by methodology and technology. Mathematical models, based on classical mechanics are created to enhance our control capabilities. Data is collected using various sensors placed inside the Low Pressure Test Bed (LPTB) Chamber at Kennedy Space Center. Data from those sensors became non-linear at various pressures below 25 kPa. We introduced mathematical calibration corrections and found that sensor data linearity could be extended to a greater range of pressures. These calibration corrections allow for sensor calibration corrections in operational environments that differ from the environment of calibration (normal Earth atmospheric pressure).

  8. Variable pressure ionization detector for gas chromatography

    DOEpatents

    Buchanan, Michelle V.; Wise, Marcus B.

    1988-01-01

    Method and apparatus for differentiating organic compounds based on their electron affinity. An electron capture detector cell (ECD) is operated at pressures ranging from atmospheric to less than 1 torr. Through variation of the pressure within the ECD cell, the organic compounds are induced to either capture or emit electrons. Differentiation of isomeric compounds can be obtianed when, at a given pressure, one isomer is in the emission mode and the other is in the capture mode. Output of the ECD is recorded by chromatogram. The invention also includes a method for obtaining the zero-crossing pressure of a compound, defined as the pressure at which the competing emission and capture reactions are balanced and which may be correlated to the electron affinity of a compound.

  9. Outwardly Propagating Flames at Elevated Pressures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Law, C. K.; Rozenchan, G.; Tse, S. D.; Zhu, D. L.

    2001-01-01

    Spherical, outwardly-propagating flames of CH4-O2-inert and H2-O2-inert mixtures were experimentally studied in a high pressure apparatus. Stretch-free flame speeds and Markstein lengths were extracted for a wide range of pressures and equivalence ratios for spherically-symmetric, smooth flamefronts and compared to numerical computations with detailed chemistry and transport, as well as existing data in the literature. Wrinkle development was examined for propagating flames that were unstable under our experimental conditions. Hydrodynamic cells developed for most H2-air and CH4-air flames at elevated pressures, while thermal-diffusive instabilities were also observed for lean and near-stoichiometric hydrogen flames at pressures above atmospheric. Strategies in suppressing or delaying the onset of cell formation have been assessed. Buoyancy effects affected sufficiently off-stoichiometric CH4 mixtures at high pressures.

  10. EDC-37 Deflagration Rates at Elevated Pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Maienschein, J L; Koerner, J G

    2008-01-31

    We report deflagration rates on EDC-37 at high pressures. Experiments are conducted using the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory High Pressure Strand Burner (HPSB) apparatus. The HPSB contains a deflagrating sample in a small volume, high pressure chamber. The sample consists of nine, 6.35 mm diameter, 6.35 mm length cylinders stacked on end, with burn wires placed between cylinders. Sample deflagration is limited to the cross-sectional surface of the cylinder by coating the cylindrical surface of the tower with Halthane 88-2 epoxy. Sample deflagration is initiated on one end of the tower by a B/KNO{sub 3} and HNS igniter train. Simultaneous temporal pressure history and burn front time of arrival measurements yield the laminar deflagration rate for a range of pressures and provide insight into deflagration uniformity. These measurements are one indicator of overall thermal explosion violence. Specific details of the experiment and the apparatus can be found in the literature.

  11. Discontinuity stresses in metallic pressure vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    The state of the art, criteria, and recommended practices for the theoretical and experimental analyses of discontinuity stresses and their distribution in metallic pressure vessels for space vehicles are outlined. The applicable types of pressure vessels include propellant tanks ranging from main load-carrying integral tank structure to small auxiliary tanks, storage tanks, solid propellant motor cases, high pressure gas bottles, and pressurized cabins. The major sources of discontinuity stresses are discussed, including deviations in geometry, material properties, loads, and temperature. The advantages, limitations, and disadvantages of various theoretical and experimental discontinuity analysis methods are summarized. Guides are presented for evaluating discontinuity stresses so that pressure vessel performance will not fall below acceptable levels.

  12. High pressure processing for food safety.

    PubMed

    Fonberg-Broczek, Monika; Windyga, B; Szczawiński, J; Szczawińska, M; Pietrzak, D; Prestamo, G

    2005-01-01

    Food preservation using high pressure is a promising technique in food industry as it offers numerous opportunities for developing new foods with extended shelf-life, high nutritional value and excellent organoleptic characteristics. High pressure is an alternative to thermal processing. The resistance of microorganisms to pressure varies considerably depending on the pressure range applied, temperature and treatment duration, and type of microorganism. Generally, Gram-positive bacteria are more resistant to pressure than Gram-negative bacteria, moulds and yeasts; the most resistant are bacterial spores. The nature of the food is also important, as it may contain substances which protect the microorganism from high pressure. This article presents results of our studies involving the effect of high pressure on survival of some pathogenic bacteria -- Listeria monocytogenes, Aeromonas hydrophila and Enterococcus hirae -- in artificially contaminated cooked ham, ripening hard cheese and fruit juices. The results indicate that in samples of investigated foods the number of these microorganisms decreased proportionally to the pressure used and the duration of treatment, and the effect of these two factors was statistically significant (level of probability, P pressure treatment than L. monocytogenes and A. hydrophila. Mathematical methods were applied, for accurate prediction of the effects of high pressure on microorganisms. The usefulness of high pressure treatment for inactivation of microorganisms and shelf-life extention of meat products was also evaluated. The results obtained show that high pressure treatment extends the shelf-life of cooked pork ham and raw smoked pork loin up to 8 weeks, ensuring good micro-biological and sensory quality of the products.

  13. Fiber bundle model under fluid pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amitrano, David; Girard, Lucas

    2016-03-01

    Internal fluid pressure often plays an important role in the rupture of brittle materials. This is a major concern for many engineering applications and for natural hazards. More specifically, the mechanisms through which fluid pressure, applied at a microscale, can enhance the failure at a macroscale and accelerate damage dynamics leading to failure remains unclear. Here we revisit the fiber bundle model by accounting for the effect of fluid under pressure that contributes to the global load supported by the fiber bundle. Fluid pressure is applied on the broken fibers, following Biot's theory. The statistical properties of damage avalanches and their evolution toward macrofailure are analyzed for a wide range of fluid pressures. The macroscopic strength of the new model appears to be strongly controlled by the action of the fluid, particularly when the fluid pressure becomes comparable with the fiber strength. The behavior remains consistent with continuous transition, i.e., second order, including for large pressure. The main change concerns the damage acceleration toward the failure that is well modeled by the concept of sweeping of an instability. When pressure is increased, the exponent β characterizing the power-law distribution avalanche sizes significantly decreases and the exponent γ characterizing the cutoff divergence when failure is approached significantly increases. This proves that fluid pressure plays a key role in failure process acting as destabilization factor. This indicates that macrofailure occurs more readily under fluid pressure, with a behavior that becomes progressively unstable as fluid pressure increases. This may have considerable consequences on our ability to forecast failure when fluid pressure is acting.

  14. Fiber bundle model under fluid pressure.

    PubMed

    Amitrano, David; Girard, Lucas

    2016-03-01

    Internal fluid pressure often plays an important role in the rupture of brittle materials. This is a major concern for many engineering applications and for natural hazards. More specifically, the mechanisms through which fluid pressure, applied at a microscale, can enhance the failure at a macroscale and accelerate damage dynamics leading to failure remains unclear. Here we revisit the fiber bundle model by accounting for the effect of fluid under pressure that contributes to the global load supported by the fiber bundle. Fluid pressure is applied on the broken fibers, following Biot's theory. The statistical properties of damage avalanches and their evolution toward macrofailure are analyzed for a wide range of fluid pressures. The macroscopic strength of the new model appears to be strongly controlled by the action of the fluid, particularly when the fluid pressure becomes comparable with the fiber strength. The behavior remains consistent with continuous transition, i.e., second order, including for large pressure. The main change concerns the damage acceleration toward the failure that is well modeled by the concept of sweeping of an instability. When pressure is increased, the exponent β characterizing the power-law distribution avalanche sizes significantly decreases and the exponent γ characterizing the cutoff divergence when failure is approached significantly increases. This proves that fluid pressure plays a key role in failure process acting as destabilization factor. This indicates that macrofailure occurs more readily under fluid pressure, with a behavior that becomes progressively unstable as fluid pressure increases. This may have considerable consequences on our ability to forecast failure when fluid pressure is acting. PMID:27078437

  15. Scientific analysis of satellite ranging data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, David E.

    1994-01-01

    A network of satellite laser ranging (SLR) tracking systems with continuously improving accuracies is challenging the modelling capabilities of analysts worldwide. Various data analysis techniques have yielded many advances in the development of orbit, instrument and Earth models. The direct measurement of the distance to the satellite provided by the laser ranges has given us a simple metric which links the results obtained by diverse approaches. Different groups have used SLR data, often in combination with observations from other space geodetic techniques, to improve models of the static geopotential, the solid Earth, ocean tides, and atmospheric drag models for low Earth satellites. Radiation pressure models and other non-conservative forces for satellite orbits above the atmosphere have been developed to exploit the full accuracy of the latest SLR instruments. SLR is the baseline tracking system for the altimeter missions TOPEX/Poseidon, and ERS-1 and will play an important role in providing the reference frame for locating the geocentric position of the ocean surface, in providing an unchanging range standard for altimeter calibration, and for improving the geoid models to separate gravitational from ocean circulation signals seen in the sea surface. However, even with the many improvements in the models used to support the orbital analysis of laser observations, there remain systematic effects which limit the full exploitation of SLR accuracy today.

  16. The eclipse of species ranges.

    PubMed

    Hemerik, Lia; Hengeveld, Rob; Lippe, Ernst

    2006-01-01

    This paper distinguishes four recognisably different geographical processes in principle causing species to die out. One of these processes, the one we dub "range eclipse", holds that one range expands at the expense of another one, thereby usurping it. Channell and Lomolino (2000a, Journal of Biogeography 27: 169-179; 2000b, Nature 403: 84-87; see also Lomolino and Channell, 1995, Journal of Mammalogy 76: 335-347) measured the course of this process in terms of the proportion of the total range remaining in its original centre, thereby essentially assuming a homogeneous distribution of animals over the range. However, part of their measure seems mistaken. By giving a general, analytical formulation of eclipsing ranges, we estimate the exact course of this process. Also, our formulation does not partition a range into two spatially equal parts, its core and its edge, but it assumes continuity. For applying this model to data on the time evolution of species, individual time series should be available for each of them. For practical purposes we give an alternative way of plotting and interpreting such time series. Our approach, being more sensitive than Channell and Lomolino's, gives a less optimistic indication of range eclipses than theirs once these have started. PMID:17318329

  17. Effect of pressure ratio and inlet pressure on performance of experimental gas turbine at inlet temperature of 800 R

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kohl, Robert C; Larkin, Robert G

    1948-01-01

    An experimental gas turbine was operated over a range of blade-jet speed ratios, total pressure ratios, and inlet total pressures at a constant inlet temperature of 800 R. Peak over-all efficiencies were obtained at blade-jet speed ratios from 0.525 to 0.575 for all runs. The variation in peak efficiency with inlet pressure and pressure ratio was of small magnitude for the conditions investigated.

  18. Alternative wavelengths for laser ranging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamal, Karel

    1993-01-01

    The following are considered to be necessary to accomplish multicolor laser ranging: the nature of the atmospheric dispersion and absorption, the satellite/lunar/ground retro-array characteristics, and ground/satellite ranging machine performance. The energy balance and jitter budget have to be considered as well. It is concluded that the existing satellite/laser retroreflectors seem inadequate for future experiments. The Raman Stokes/Anti-Stokes (0.68/0.43 micron) plus solid state detector appear to be promising instrumentation that satisfy the ground/satellite and satellite/ground ranging machine requirements on the precision, compactness, and data processing.

  19. GPS test range mission planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Iris P.; Hancock, Thomas P.

    The principal features of the Test Range User Mission Planner (TRUMP), a PC-resident tool designed to aid in deploying and utilizing GPS-based test range assets, are reviewed. TRUMP features time history plots of time-space-position information (TSPI); performance based on a dynamic GPS/inertial system simulation; time history plots of TSPI data link connectivity; digital terrain elevation data maps with user-defined cultural features; and two-dimensional coverage plots of ground-based test range assets. Some functions to be added during the next development phase are discussed.

  20. Makran Mountain Range, Indus River Valley, Pakistan, India

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The enormous geologic pressures exerted by continental drift can be very well illustrated by the long northward curving parallel folded mountain ridges and valleys of the coastal Makran Range of Pakistan (27.0N, 66.0E). As a result of the collision of the northward bound Indian sub-continent into the Asian Continent, the east/west parallel range has been bent in a great northward arc and forming the Indus River valley at the interface of the collision.

  1. A Micromachined Pressure Sensor with Integrated Resonator Operating at Atmospheric Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Sen; Yuan, Weizheng; Qiao, Dayong; Deng, Jinjun; Sun, Xiaodong

    2013-01-01

    A novel resonant pressure sensor with an improved micromechanical double-ended tuning fork resonator packaged in dry air at atmospheric pressure is presented. The resonator is electrostatically driven and capacitively detected, and the sensor is designed to realize a low cost resonant pressure sensor with medium accuracy. Various damping mechanisms in a resonator that is vibrating at atmospheric pressure are analyzed in detail, and a formula is developed to predict the overall quality factor. A trade-off has been reached between the quality factor, stress sensitivity and drive capability of the resonator. Furthermore, differential sense elements and the method of electromechanical amplitude modulation are used for capacitive detection to obtain a large signal-to-noise ratio. The prototype sensor chip is successfully fabricated using a micromachining process based on a commercially available silicon-on-insulator wafer and is hermetically encapsulated in a custom 16-pin Kovar package. Preliminary measurements show that the fundamental frequency of the resonant pressure sensor is approximately 34.55 kHz with a pressure sensitivity of 20.77 Hz/kPa. Over the full scale pressure range of 100–400 kPa and the whole temperature range of −20–60 °C, high quality factors from 1,146 to 1,772 are obtained. The characterization of the prototype sensor reveals the feasibility of a resonant pressure sensor packaged at atmospheric pressure.

  2. Yield strength of molybdenum at high pressures.

    PubMed

    Jing, Qiumin; Bi, Yan; Wu, Qiang; Jing, Fuqian; Wang, Zhigang; Xu, Jian; Jiang, Sheng

    2007-07-01

    In the diamond anvil cell technology, the pressure gradient approach is one of the three major methods in determining the yield strength for various materials at high pressures. In the present work, by in situ measuring the thickness of the sample foil, we have improved the traditional technique in this method. Based on this modification, the yield strength of molybdenum at pressures has been measured. Our main experimental conclusions are as follows: (1) The measured yield strength data for three samples with different initial thickness (100, 250, and 500 microm) are in good agreement above a peak pressure of 10 GPa. (2) The measured yield strength can be fitted into a linear formula Y=0.48(+/-0.19)+0.14(+/-0.01)P (Y and P denote the yield strength and local pressure, respectively, both of them are in gigapascals) in the local pressure range of 8-21 GPa. This result is in good agreement with both Y=0.46+0.13P determined in the pressure range of 5-24 GPa measured by the radial x-ray diffraction technique and the previous shock wave data below 10 GPa. (3) The zero-pressure yield strength of Mo is 0.5 GPa when we extrapolate our experimental data into the ambient pressure. It is close to the tensile strength of 0.7 GPa determined by Bridgman [Phys. Rev. 48, 825 (1934)] previously. The modified method described in this article therefore provides the confidence in determination of the yield strength at high pressures. PMID:17672772

  3. Centrifugal pump inlet pressure site affects measurement.

    PubMed

    Augustin, Simon; Horton, Alison; Butt, Warwick; Bennett, Martin; Horton, Stephen

    2010-09-01

    During extracorporeal life support (ECLS), blood is exposed to a myriad of unphysiological factors that can affect outcome. One aspect of this is the sub-atmospheric pressure generated by the ECLS pump and imparted to blood elements along the pump inlet line. This pressure can be measured on the inlet line close to the pump head by adding a connector, or at the venous cannula connection site. We compared the two measurement sites located at both points; between the venous cannula-inlet tubing and inlet tubing-pump, with a range of cannulae and flows. We also investigated the effects on inlet pressure from pump afterload and increasing inlet tubing length.

  4. Measurement of endolymphatic pressure.

    PubMed

    Mom, T; Pavier, Y; Giraudet, F; Gilain, L; Avan, P

    2015-04-01

    Endolymphatic pressure measurement is of interest both to researchers in the physiology and pathophysiology of hearing and ENT physicians dealing with Menière's disease or similar conditions. It is generally agreed that endolymphatic hydrops is associated with Menière's disease and is accompanied by increased hydrostatic pressure. Endolymphatic pressure, however, cannot be measured precisely without endangering hearing, making the association between hydrops and increased endolymphatic pressure difficult to demonstrate. Several integrated in vivo models have been developed since the 1960s, but only a few allow measurement of endolymphatic hydrostatic pressure. Models associating measurement of hydrostatic pressure and endolymphatic potential and assessment of cochlear function are of value to elucidate the pathophysiology of endolymphatic hydrops. The present article presents the main types of models and discusses their respective interest.

  5. Blade pressure measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chivers, J. W. H.

    Three measurement techniques which enable rotating pressures to be measured during the normal operation of a gas turbine or a component test rig are described. The first technique was developed specifically to provide steady and transient blade surface pressure data to aid both fan flutter research and general fan performance development. This technique involves the insertion of miniature high frequency response pressure transducers into the fan blades of a large civil gas turbine. The other two techniques were developed to measure steady rotating pressures inside and on the surface of engine or rig turbine blades and also rotating pressures in cooling feed systems. These two low frequency response systems are known as the "pressure pineapple' (a name which resulted from the shape of the original prototype) and the rotating scanivalve.

  6. Pressure pulse detection apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Claycomb, J.R.

    1981-04-14

    A pressure pulse detection apparatus is disclosed which is adapted to receive small signals from downhole measuring while drilling apparatus which signals are propogated as pressure pulses traveling upstream in a column of drilling mud, which signals are obscured by mud pump pressure and velocity variations traveling downstream and which are significantly larger. The preferred embodiment incorporates a transient pressure transducer and an ultrasonic fluid velocity detector, the two forming output signals which are conditioned, amplified and offset against one another. They cancel (When properly calibrated) so that pressure and velocity variations from the mud pump upstream are nulled to zero. They reinforce so that pressure and velocity variations from the downhole signal generator are enhanced, thereby forming an output signal of downhole variations of interest.

  7. Airborne 2 color ranging experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Millar, Pamela S.; Abshire, James B.; Mcgarry, Jan F.; Zagwodzki, Thomas W.; Pacini, Linda K.

    1993-01-01

    Horizontal variations in the atmospheric refractivity are a limiting error source for many precise laser and radio space geodetic techniques. This experiment was designed to directly measure horizontal variations in atmospheric refractivity, for the first time, by using 2 color laser ranging measurements to an aircraft. The 2 color laser system at the Goddard Optical Research Facility (GORF) ranged to a cooperative laser target package on a T-39 aircraft. Circular patterns which extended from the southern edge of the Washington D.C. Beltway to the southern edge of Baltimore, MD were flown counter clockwise around Greenbelt, MD. Successful acquisition, tracking, and ranging for 21 circular paths were achieved on three flights in August 1992, resulting in over 20,000 two color ranging measurements.

  8. 46 CFR 197.462 - Pressure vessels and pressure piping.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Pressure vessels and pressure piping. 197.462 Section... Diving Equipment § 197.462 Pressure vessels and pressure piping. (a) The diving supervisor shall ensure that each pressure vessel, including each volume tank, cylinder and PVHO, and each pressure...

  9. 46 CFR 197.462 - Pressure vessels and pressure piping.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Pressure vessels and pressure piping. 197.462 Section... Diving Equipment § 197.462 Pressure vessels and pressure piping. (a) The diving supervisor shall ensure that each pressure vessel, including each volume tank, cylinder and PVHO, and each pressure...

  10. 46 CFR 197.462 - Pressure vessels and pressure piping.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Pressure vessels and pressure piping. 197.462 Section... Diving Equipment § 197.462 Pressure vessels and pressure piping. (a) The diving supervisor shall ensure that each pressure vessel, including each volume tank, cylinder and PVHO, and each pressure...

  11. 46 CFR 197.462 - Pressure vessels and pressure piping.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Pressure vessels and pressure piping. 197.462 Section... Diving Equipment § 197.462 Pressure vessels and pressure piping. (a) The diving supervisor shall ensure that each pressure vessel, including each volume tank, cylinder and PVHO, and each pressure...

  12. 46 CFR 197.462 - Pressure vessels and pressure piping.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Pressure vessels and pressure piping. 197.462 Section... Diving Equipment § 197.462 Pressure vessels and pressure piping. (a) The diving supervisor shall ensure that each pressure vessel, including each volume tank, cylinder and PVHO, and each pressure...

  13. Management of Chronic Pressure Ulcers

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Executive Summary In April 2008, the Medical Advisory Secretariat began an evidence-based review of the literature concerning pressure ulcers. Please visit the Medical Advisory Secretariat Web site, http://www.health.gov.on.ca/english/providers/program/mas/tech/tech_mn.html to review these titles that are currently available within the Pressure Ulcers series. Pressure ulcer prevention: an evidence based analysis The cost-effectiveness of prevention strategies for pressure ulcers in long-term care homes in Ontario: projections of the Ontario Pressure Ulcer Model (field evaluation) Management of chronic pressure ulcers: an evidence-based analysis Objective The Medical Advisory Secretariat (MAS) conducted a systematic review on interventions used to treat pressure ulcers in order to answer the following questions: Do currently available interventions for the treatment of pressure ulcers increase the healing rate of pressure ulcers compared with standard care, a placebo, or other similar interventions? Within each category of intervention, which one is most effective in promoting the healing of existing pressure ulcers? Background A pressure ulcer is a localized injury to the skin and/or underlying tissue usually over a bony prominence, as a result of pressure, or pressure in conjunction with shear and/or friction. Many areas of the body, especially the sacrum and the heel, are prone to the development of pressure ulcers. People with impaired mobility (e.g., stroke or spinal cord injury patients) are most vulnerable to pressure ulcers. Other factors that predispose people to pressure ulcer formation are poor nutrition, poor sensation, urinary and fecal incontinence, and poor overall physical and mental health. The prevalence of pressure ulcers in Ontario has been estimated to range from a median of 22.1% in community settings to a median of 29.9% in nonacute care facilities. Pressure ulcers have been shown to increase the risk of mortality among geriatric patients by

  14. High temperature pressure gauge

    DOEpatents

    Echtler, J. Paul; Scandrol, Roy O.

    1981-01-01

    A high temperature pressure gauge comprising a pressure gauge positioned in fluid communication with one end of a conduit which has a diaphragm mounted in its other end. The conduit is filled with a low melting metal alloy above the diaphragm for a portion of its length with a high temperature fluid being positioned in the remaining length of the conduit and in the pressure gauge.

  15. Internationalization and migration pressure.

    PubMed

    Kultalahti, O

    1994-01-01

    The author first develops the concept of migration pressure, which is defined as the growth in the number of people wishing to migrate and the barriers preventing them from so doing. Both macro- and micro-level factors affecting migration pressure are identified. Historical trends in migration pressure in Finland are then discussed. The author then applies this concept to the analysis of current Finnish migration trends. The primary focus is on international migration.

  16. Bag pressure monitor

    DOEpatents

    Vaughn, Mark Roy; Miller, Alva Keith

    2000-01-01

    An inexpensive mechanical indicator for measuring low pressure in an inflating bag includes a pair of sides connected to each other at one edge and pivotally connected at spaced parallel locations on the bag. A spring biases the sides towards each other in opposition to tension in the inflating bag. The distance between the sides is indicative of the pressure in the bag. The device is accurate at pressures below 0.05 psi.

  17. Pressure cryocooling protein crystals

    DOEpatents

    Kim, Chae Un; Gruner, Sol M.

    2011-10-04

    Preparation of cryocooled protein crystal is provided by use of helium pressurizing and cryocooling to obtain cryocooled protein crystal allowing collection of high resolution data and by heavier noble gas (krypton or xenon) binding followed by helium pressurizing and cryocooling to obtain cryocooled protein crystal for collection of high resolution data and SAD phasing simultaneously. The helium pressurizing is carried out on crystal coated to prevent dehydration or on crystal grown in aqueous solution in a capillary.

  18. Nonequilibrium thermodynamics of pressure solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehner, F. K.; Bataille, J.

    1984-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the thermodynamic theory of solution and precipitation processes in wet crustal rocks and with the mechanism of steady pressure-solution slip in ‘contact zones,’ such as grain-to-grain contacts, fracture surfaces, and permeable gouge layers, that are infiltrated by a mobile aqueous solution phase. A local dissipation jump condition at the phase boundary is fundamental to identifying the thermodynamic force driving the solution and precipitation process and is used here in setting up linear phenomenological relations to model near-equilibrium phase transformation kinetics. The local thermodynamic equilibrium of a stressed pure solid in contact with its melt or solution phase is governed by Gibbs's relation, which is rederived here, in a manner emphasizing its independence of constitutive assumptions for the solid while neglecting surface tension and diffusion in the solid. Fluid-infiltrated contact zones, such as those formed by rough surfaces, cannot generally be in thermodynamic equilibrium, especially during an ongoing process of pressure-solution slip, and the existing equilibrium formulations are incorrect in overlooking dissipative processes tending to eliminate fluctuations in superficial free energies due to stress concentrations near asperities, defects, or impurities. Steady pressure-solution slip is likely to exhibit a nonlinear dependence of slip rate on shear stress and effective normal stress, due to a dependence of the contact-zone state on the latter. Given that this dependence is negligible within some range, linear relations for pressure-solution slip can be derived for the limiting cases of diffusion-controlled and interface-reaction-controlled rates. A criterion for rate control by one of these mechanisms is set by the magnitude of the dimensionless quantity kδ/2C pD, where k is the interfacial transfer coefficient, δ is the mean diffusion path length, C p is the solubility at pressure p, and D is the mass

  19. Portable dynamic pressure generator for static and dynamic calibration of in situ pressure transducers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bolt, P. A.; Hess, R. W.; Davis, W. T.

    1983-01-01

    A portable dynamic pressure generator was developed to meet the requirements of determining the dynamic sensitivities of in situ pressure transducers at low frequencies. The device is designed to operate in a frequency range of 0 to 100 Hz, although it was only tested up to 30 Hz, and to generate dynamic pressures up to 13.8 kPa (2 psi). A description of the operating characteristics and instrumentation used for pressure, frequency, and displacement measurements is given. The pressure generator was used to statically and dynamically calibrate transducers. Test results demonstrated that a difference an exist between the static and dynamic sensitivity of a transducer, confirming the need for dynamic calibrations of in situ pressure transducers.

  20. Pressure-sensitive optrode

    DOEpatents

    Hirschfeld, T.B.

    1985-04-09

    An apparatus and method are disclosed for sensing changes in pressure and for generating optical signals related to changes in pressure. Light from a fiber optic is directed to a movable surface which is coated with a light-responsive material, and which moves relative to the end of the fiber optic in response to changes in pressure. The same fiber optic collects a portion of the reflected or emitted light from the movable surface. Changes in pressure are determined by measuring changes in the amount of light collected. 5 figs.

  1. Pressure-sensitive optrode

    DOEpatents

    Hirschfeld, Tomas B.

    1985-01-01

    Apparatus and method for sensing changes in pressure and for generating optical signals related to changes in pressure. Light from a fiber optic is directed to a movable surface which is coated with a light-responsive material, and which moves relative to the end of the fiber optic in response to changes in pressure. The same fiber optic collects a portion of the reflected or emitted light from the movable surface. Changes in pressure are determined by measuring changes in the amount of light collected.

  2. Pressure-sensitive optrode

    DOEpatents

    Hirschfeld, T.B.

    1982-09-30

    Apparatus and method for sensing changes in pressure and for generating optical signals related to changes in pressure. Light from a fiber optic is directed to a movable surface which is coated with a light-responsive material, and which moves relative to the end of the fiber optic in response to changes in pressure. The same fiber optic collects a portion of the reflected or emitted light from the movable surface. Changes in pressure are determined by measuring changes in the amount of light collected.

  3. Pressurized fluidized bed reactor

    DOEpatents

    Isaksson, J.

    1996-03-19

    A pressurized fluid bed reactor power plant includes a fluidized bed reactor contained within a pressure vessel with a pressurized gas volume between the reactor and the vessel. A first conduit supplies primary gas from the gas volume to the reactor, passing outside the pressure vessel and then returning through the pressure vessel to the reactor, and pressurized gas is supplied from a compressor through a second conduit to the gas volume. A third conduit, comprising a hot gas discharge, carries gases from the reactor, through a filter, and ultimately to a turbine. During normal operation of the plant, pressurized gas is withdrawn from the gas volume through the first conduit and introduced into the reactor at a substantially continuously controlled rate as the primary gas to the reactor. In response to an operational disturbance of the plant, the flow of gas in the first, second, and third conduits is terminated, and thereafter the pressure in the gas volume and in the reactor is substantially simultaneously reduced by opening pressure relief valves in the first and third conduits, and optionally by passing air directly from the second conduit to the turbine. 1 fig.

  4. Pressurized fluidized bed reactor

    DOEpatents

    Isaksson, Juhani

    1996-01-01

    A pressurized fluid bed reactor power plant includes a fluidized bed reactor contained within a pressure vessel with a pressurized gas volume between the reactor and the vessel. A first conduit supplies primary gas from the gas volume to the reactor, passing outside the pressure vessel and then returning through the pressure vessel to the reactor, and pressurized gas is supplied from a compressor through a second conduit to the gas volume. A third conduit, comprising a hot gas discharge, carries gases from the reactor, through a filter, and ultimately to a turbine. During normal operation of the plant, pressurized gas is withdrawn from the gas volume through the first conduit and introduced into the reactor at a substantially continuously controlled rate as the primary gas to the reactor. In response to an operational disturbance of the plant, the flow of gas in the first, second, and third conduits is terminated, and thereafter the pressure in the gas volume and in the reactor is substantially simultaneously reduced by opening pressure relief valves in the first and third conduits, and optionally by passing air directly from the second conduit to the turbine.

  5. Blood Pressure Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    Engineering Development Laboratory developed a system for the cardiovascular study of weightless astronauts. This was designed to aid people with congestive heart failure and diabetes. While in space, astronauts' blood pressure rises, heart rate becomes unstable, and there are sometimes postflight lightheadedness or blackouts. The Baro-Cuff studies the resetting of blood pressure. When a silicone rubber chamber is strapped to the neck, the Baro-Cuff stimulates the carotid arteries by electronically controlled pressure application. Blood pressure controls in patients may be studied.

  6. Sapphire tube pressure vessel

    DOEpatents

    Outwater, John O.

    2000-01-01

    A pressure vessel is provided for observing corrosive fluids at high temperatures and pressures. A transparent Teflon bag contains the corrosive fluid and provides an inert barrier. The Teflon bag is placed within a sapphire tube, which forms a pressure boundary. The tube is received within a pipe including a viewing window. The combination of the Teflon bag, sapphire tube and pipe provides a strong and inert pressure vessel. In an alternative embodiment, tie rods connect together compression fittings at opposite ends of the sapphire tube.

  7. Blood Pressure vs. Heart Rate

    MedlinePlus

    ... High Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Blood Pressure vs. Heart Rate Updated:Aug 30,2016 Blood ... last reviewed on 08/04/2014. High Blood Pressure • Home • About High Blood Pressure (HBP) Introduction What ...

  8. Attachment Fitting for Pressure Vessel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smeltzer, Stanley S., III (Inventor); Carrigan, Robert W. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    This invention provides sealed access to the interior of a pressure vessel and consists of a tube. a collar, redundant seals, and a port. The port allows the seals to be pressurized and seated before the pressure vessel becomes pressurized.

  9. Multilayer Composite Pressure Vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLay, Tom

    2005-01-01

    A method has been devised to enable the fabrication of lightweight pressure vessels from multilayer composite materials. This method is related to, but not the same as, the method described in gMaking a Metal- Lined Composite-Overwrapped Pressure Vessel h (MFS-31814), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 29, No. 3 (March 2005), page 59. The method is flexible in that it poses no major impediment to changes in tank design and is applicable to a wide range of tank sizes. The figure depicts a finished tank fabricated by this method, showing layers added at various stages of the fabrication process. In the first step of the process, a mandrel that defines the size and shape of the interior of the tank is machined from a polyurethane foam or other suitable lightweight tooling material. The mandrel is outfitted with metallic end fittings on a shaft. Each end fitting includes an outer flange that has a small step to accommodate a thin layer of graphite/epoxy or other suitable composite material. The outer surface of the mandrel (but not the fittings) is covered with a suitable release material. The composite material is filament- wound so as to cover the entire surface of the mandrel from the step on one end fitting to the step on the other end fitting. The composite material is then cured in place. The entire workpiece is cut in half in a plane perpendicular to the axis of symmetry at its mid-length point, yielding two composite-material half shells, each containing half of the foam mandrel. The halves of the mandrel are removed from within the composite shells, then the shells are reassembled and bonded together with a belly band of cured composite material. The resulting composite shell becomes a mandrel for the subsequent steps of the fabrication process and remains inside the final tank. The outer surface of the composite shell is covered with a layer of material designed to be impermeable by the pressurized fluid to be contained in the tank. A second step on the outer flange of

  10. Droplet vaporization in supercritical pressure environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrell, Patrick V.; Peters, Bruce D.

    For most liquid-fueled combustion systems the behavior of the fuel as it is introduced to the combustion zone, often by spray injection, will have a significant impact on combustion. The subsequent combustion may be affected to a considerable degree by the initial spread of the liquid, break-up of larger fuel sheets and droplets into droplets of various sizes, droplet vaporization, and diffusion of gaseous fuel. Among the many factors which affect spray break-up and droplet vaporization are the environmental conditions into which the spray is introduced. For both diesel engines and rockets the environment pressure and temperature may be above the critical pressure and temperature of the injected fuel. In a compression-ignition internal combustion engine, the environment consists primarily of air, at pressures from 20 to 100 atmospheres and temperatures ranging from 900 to 1500 K. Even higher pressures are encountered in turbocharged diesels. A typical diesel reference fuel, dodecane, has a thermodynamic critical pressure of about 17 atmospheres, and a critical temperature of 600 K. Fuel is injected into a diesel engine environment in which ambient pressures exceed the critical pressure. While droplet temperatures are subcritical at first, they may rise to the critical temperature or higher. This paper will survey current understanding of supercritical pressure droplet vaporization. Specifically, the topics covered will include: liquid phase behavior; vapor phase behavior; thermodynamic and transport properties; droplet distribution and break-up; micro-explosions; and effects of microgravity.

  11. Abnormally high formation pressures, Potwar Plateau, Pakistan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Law, B.E.; Shah, S.H.A.; Malik, M.A.

    1998-01-01

    Abnormally high formation pressures in the Potwar Plateau of north-central Pakistan are major obstacles to oil and gas exploration. Severe drilling problems associated with high pressures have, in some cases, prevented adequate evaluation of reservoirs and significantly increased drilling costs. Previous investigations of abnormal pressure in the Potwar Plateau have only identified abnormal pressures in Neogene rocks. We have identified two distinct pressure regimes in this Himalayan foreland fold and thrust belt basin: one in Neogene rocks and another in pre-Neogene rocks. Pore pressures in Neogene rocks are as high as lithostatic and are interpreted to be due to tectonic compression and compaction disequilibrium associated with high rates of sedimentation. Pore pressure gradients in pre-Neogene rocks are generally less than those in Neogene rocks, commonly ranging from 0.5 to 0.7 psi/ft (11.3 to 15.8 kPa/m) and are most likely due to a combination of tectonic compression and hydrocarbon generation. The top of abnormally high pressure is highly variable and doesn't appear to be related to any specific lithologic seal. Consequently, attempts to predict the depth to the top of overpressure prior to drilling are precluded.

  12. Pressure sensitivity of low permeability sandstones

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kilmer, N.H.; Morrow, N.R.; Pitman, J.K.

    1987-01-01

    Detailed core analysis has been carried out on 32 tight sandstones with permeabilities ranging over four orders of magnitude (0.0002 to 4.8 mD at 5000 psi confining pressure). Relationships between gas permeability and net confining pressure were measured for cycles of loading and unloading. For some samples, permeabilities were measured both along and across bedding planes. Large variations in stress sensitivity of permeability were observed from one sample to another. The ratio of permeability at a nominal confining pressure of 500 psi to that at 5000 psi was used to define a stress sensitivity ratio. For a given sample, confining pressure vs permeability followed a linear log-log relationship, the slope of which provided an index of pressure sensitivity. This index, as obtained for first unloading data, was used in testing relationships between stress sensitivity and other measured rock properties. Pressure sensitivity tended to increase with increase in carbonate content and depth, and with decrease in porosity, permeability and sodium feldspar. However, scatter in these relationships increased as permeability decreased. Tests for correlations between pressure sensitivity and various linear combinations of variables are reported. Details of pore structure related to diagenetic changes appears to be of much greater significance to pressure sensitivity than mineral composition. ?? 1987.

  13. Improved high pressure turbine shroud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bessen, I. I.; Rigney, D. V.; Schwab, R. C.

    1977-01-01

    A new high pressure turbine shroud material has been developed from the consolidation of prealloyed powders of Ni, Cr, Al and Y. The new material, a filler for cast turbine shroud body segments, is called Genaseal. The development followed the identification of oxidation resistance as the primary cause of prior shroud deterioration, since conversion to oxides reduces erosion resistance and increases spalling under thermal cycled engine conditions. The NICrAlY composition was selected in preference to NIAL and FeCRALY alloys, and was formulated to a prescribed density range that offers suitable erosion resistance, thermal conductivity and elastic modulus for improved behavior as a shroud.

  14. Optical range and range rate estimation for teleoperator systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shields, N. L., Jr.; Kirkpatrick, M., III; Malone, T. B.; Huggins, C. T.

    1974-01-01

    Range and range rate are crucial parameters which must be available to the operator during remote controlled orbital docking operations. A method was developed for the estimation of both these parameters using an aided television system. An experiment was performed to determine the human operator's capability to measure displayed image size using a fixed reticle or movable cursor as the television aid. The movable cursor was found to yield mean image size estimation errors on the order of 2.3 per cent of the correct value. This error rate was significantly lower than that for the fixed reticle. Performance using the movable cursor was found to be less sensitive to signal-to-noise ratio variation than was that for the fixed reticle. The mean image size estimation errors for the movable cursor correspond to an error of approximately 2.25 per cent in range suggesting that the system has some merit. Determining the accuracy of range rate estimation using a rate controlled cursor will require further experimentation.

  15. Neural network/acoustic emission burst pressure prediction for impact damaged composite pressure vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, J.L.; Workman, G.L.; Russell, S.S.; Hill, E.V.K.

    1997-08-01

    Acoustic emission signal analysis has been used to measure the effect impact damage has on the burst pressure of 146 mm (5.75 in.) diameter graphite/epoxy and the organic polymer, Kevlar/epoxy filament wound pressure vessels. Burst pressure prediction models were developed by correlating the differential acoustic emission amplitude distribution collected during low level hydroproof tests to known burst pressures using backpropagation artificial neural networks. Impact damage conditions ranging from barely visible to obvious fiber breakage, matrix cracking, and delamination were included in this work. A simulated (inert) propellant was also cast into a series of the vessels from each material class, before impact loading, to provide boundary conditions during impact that would simulate those found on solid rocket motors. The results of this research effort demonstrate that a quantitative assessment of the effects that impact damage has on burst pressure can be made for both organic polymer/epoxy and graphite/epoxy pressure vessels. Here, an artificial neural network analysis of the acoustic emission parametric data recorded during low pressure hydroproof testing is used to relate burst pressure to the vessel`s acoustic signature. Burst pressure predictions within 6.0% of the actual failure pressure are demonstrated for a series of vessels.

  16. Dual shell pressure balanced vessel

    DOEpatents

    Fassbender, Alexander G.

    1992-01-01

    A dual-wall pressure balanced vessel for processing high viscosity slurries at high temperatures and pressures having an outer pressure vessel and an inner vessel with an annular space between the vessels pressurized at a pressure slightly less than or equivalent to the pressure within the inner vessel.

  17. Geographic range limits: achieving synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Gaston, Kevin J.

    2009-01-01

    Understanding of the determinants of species' geographic range limits remains poorly integrated. In part, this is because of the diversity of perspectives on the issue, and because empirical studies have lagged substantially behind developments in theory. Here, I provide a broad overview, drawing together many of the disparate threads, considering, in turn, how influences on the terms of a simple single-population equation can determine range limits. There is theoretical and empirical evidence for systematic changes towards range limits under some circumstances in each of the demographic parameters. However, under other circumstances, no such changes may take place in particular parameters, or they may occur in a different direction, with limitation still occurring. This suggests that (i) little about range limitation can categorically be inferred from many empirical studies, which document change in only one demographic parameter, (ii) there is a need for studies that document variation in all of the parameters, and (iii) in agreement with theoretical evidence that range limits can be formed in the presence or absence of hard boundaries, environmental gradients or biotic interactions, there may be few general patterns as to the determinants of these limits, with most claimed generalities at least having many exceptions. PMID:19324809

  18. High Temperature Dynamic Pressure Measurements Using Silicon Carbide Pressure Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okojie, Robert S.; Meredith, Roger D.; Chang, Clarence T.; Savrun, Ender

    2014-01-01

    Un-cooled, MEMS-based silicon carbide (SiC) static pressure sensors were used for the first time to measure pressure perturbations at temperatures as high as 600 C during laboratory characterization, and subsequently evaluated in a combustor rig operated under various engine conditions to extract the frequencies that are associated with thermoacoustic instabilities. One SiC sensor was placed directly in the flow stream of the combustor rig while a benchmark commercial water-cooled piezoceramic dynamic pressure transducer was co-located axially but kept some distance away from the hot flow stream. In the combustor rig test, the SiC sensor detected thermoacoustic instabilities across a range of engine operating conditions, amplitude magnitude as low as 0.5 psi at 585 C, in good agreement with the benchmark piezoceramic sensor. The SiC sensor experienced low signal to noise ratio at higher temperature, primarily due to the fact that it was a static sensor with low sensitivity.

  19. Brillouin scattering of H2O ice to megabar pressures.

    PubMed

    Ahart, Muhtar; Somayazulu, Maddury; Gramsch, Stephen A; Boehler, Reinhard; Mao, Ho-kwang; Hemley, Russell J

    2011-03-28

    The sound velocity in polycrystalline ice was measured as a function of pressure at room temperature to 100 GPa, through the phase field of ice VII and crossing the ice X transition, by Brillouin scattering in order to examine the elasticity, compression mechanism, and structural transitions in this pressure range. In particular, we focused on previously proposed phase transitions below 60 GPa. Throughout this pressure range, we find no evidence for anomalous changes in compressibility, and the sound velocities and elastic moduli do not exhibit measurable discontinuous shifts with pressure. Subtle changes in the pressure dependence of the bulk modulus at intermediate pressures can be attributed to high shear stresses at these compressions. The C(11) and C(12) moduli are consistent with previously reported results to 40 GPa and increase monotonically at higher pressures.

  20. Design, fabrication and metrological evaluation of wearable pressure sensors.

    PubMed

    Goy, C B; Menichetti, V; Yanicelli, L M; Lucero, J B; López, M A Gómez; Parodi, N F; Herrera, M C

    2015-04-01

    Pressure sensors are valuable transducers that are necessary in a huge number of medical application. However, the state of the art of compact and lightweight pressure sensors with the capability of measuring the contact pressure between two surfaces (contact pressure sensors) is very poor. In this work, several types of wearable contact pressure sensors are fabricated using different conductive textile materials and piezo-resistive films. The fabricated sensors differ in size, the textile conductor used and/or the number of layers of the sandwiched piezo-resistive film. The intention is to study, through the obtaining of their calibration curves, their metrological properties (repeatability, sensitivity and range) and determine which physical characteristics improve their ability for measuring contact pressures. It has been found that it is possible to obtain wearable contact pressure sensors through the proposed fabrication process with satisfactory repeatability, range and sensitivity; and that some of these properties can be improved by the physical characteristics of the sensors.

  1. APOLLO: millimeter lunar laser ranging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, T. W., Jr.; Adelberger, E. G.; Battat, J. B. R.; Hoyle, C. D.; Johnson, N. H.; McMillan, R. J.; Stubbs, C. W.; Swanson, H. E.

    2012-09-01

    Lunar laser ranging (LLR) has for decades stood at the forefront of tests of gravitational physics, including tests of the equivalence principle (EP). Current LLR results on the EP achieve a sensitivity of Δa/a ≈ 10-13 based on few-centimeter data/model fidelity. A recent push in LLR, called APOLLO (the Apache Point Observatory Lunar Laser-ranging Operation) produces millimeter-quality data. This paper demonstrates the few-millimeter range precision achieved by APOLLO, leading to an expectation that LLR will be able to extend EP sensitivity by an order-of-magnitude to Δa/a ˜ 10-14, once modeling efforts improve to this level.

  2. Pressure vessel flex joint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, Jon B. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    An airtight, flexible joint is disclosed for the interfacing of two pressure vessels such as between the Space Station docking tunnel and the Space Shuttle Orbiter bulkhead adapter. The joint provides for flexibility while still retaining a structural link between the two vessels required due to the loading created by the internal/external pressure differential. The joint design provides for limiting the axial load carried across the joint to a specific value, a function returned in the Orbiter/Station tunnel interface. The flex joint comprises a floating structural segment which is permanently attached to one of the pressure vessels through the use of an inflatable seal. The geometric configuration of the joint causes the tension between the vessels created by the internal gas pressure to compress the inflatable seal. The inflation pressure of the seal is kept at a value above the internal/external pressure differential of the vessels in order to maintain a controlled distance between the floating segment and pressure vessel. The inflatable seal consists of either a hollow torus-shaped flexible bladder or two rolling convoluted diaphragm seals which may be reinforced by a system of straps or fabric anchored to the hard structures. The joint acts as a flexible link to allow both angular motion and lateral displacement while it still contains the internal pressure and holds the axial tension between the vessels.

  3. Telemetry of intracranial pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fryer, T. B.; Corbin, S. D.; Silverberg, G. D.; Schmidt, E. V.; Ream, A. K.

    1978-01-01

    A completely implantable epidural pressure telemetry system designed for accurate measurement of intracranial pressure (ICP) is described. The implant device is batteryless, providing unlimited operating life. The described system uses a capacitive pressure transducer with excellent long-term stability. Once detected with the transducer and converted to a frequency with the oscillator electronics, the pressure signal is digitized. It is then telemetered without the possibility of further degradation. After detection with the small external module, the data can be retransmitted by a radio link for complete patient mobility or the energizer signal pickup module can be wired to a bedside readout unit. Continuous data are available from the system so that the dynamic ICP changes reflecting arterial blood pressure can be observed and used for diagnosis.

  4. Summing pressure compensation control

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, H.A.

    1988-04-26

    This patent describes a summing pressure compensator control for hydraulic loads with at least one of the hydraulic loads being a variable displacement motor having servo means for controlling the displacement thereof, first hydraulic means responsive to the supply of fluid to the variable displacement motor to provide a first pressure signal, second hydraulic means responsive to the supply of fluid to a second hydraulic load to provide a second pressure signal, summing means for receiving the first and second pressure signals and providing a control signal proportional to the sum of the first and second pressure signals, the control signal being applied to the servo means to increase the displacement of the variable displacement motor.

  5. High pressure melt ejection

    SciTech Connect

    Tarbell, W.W.; Brockmann, J.E.; Pilch, M.

    1983-01-01

    Recent probabilistic risk assessments have identified the potential for reactor pressure vessel failure while the reactor coolant system is at elevated pressure. The analyses postulate that the blowdown of steam and hydrogen into the reactor cavity will cause the core material to be swept from the cavity region into the containment building. The High Pressure Melt Streaming (HIPS) program is an experimental study of the high pressure ejection of molten material and subsequent interactions within a concrete cavity. The program focuses on using prototypic system conditions and scaled models of reactor geometries to accurately simulate the ex-vessel processes during high-pressure accident sequences. Scaling analyses of the experiment show that the criteria established for core debris removal from the cavity are met or exceeded. Tests are performed at two scales, representing 1/10th and 1/20th linear reproductions of the Zion reactor plant. Results of the 1/20th scale tests are presented.

  6. PRESSURE ACTIVATED SEALANT TECHNOLOGY

    SciTech Connect

    Michael A. Romano

    2004-04-01

    The objective of this project is to develop new, efficient, cost effective methods of internally sealing natural gas pipeline leaks through the application of differential pressure activated sealants. In researching the current state of the art for gas pipeline sealing technologies we concluded that if the project was successful, it appeared that pressure activated sealant technology would provide a cost effective alternative to existing pipeline repair technology. From our analysis of current field data for a 13 year period from 1985 to 1997 we were able to identify 205 leaks that were candidates for pressure activated sealant technology, affirming that pressure activated sealant technology is a viable option to traditional external leak repairs. The data collected included types of defects, areas of defects, pipe sizes and materials, incident and operating pressures, ability of pipeline to be pigged and corrosion states. This data, and subsequent analysis, was utilized as a basis for constructing applicable sealant test modeling.

  7. Application of solar energy for the generation and supply of industrial-process low-to intermediate-pressure steam ranging from 300/sup 0/F-550/sup 0/F (high-temperature steam). Final report, September 30, 1978-June 30, 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Matteo, M.; Kull, J.; Luddy, W.; Youngblood, S.

    1980-12-01

    A detailed design was developed for a solar industrial process heat system to be installed at the ERGON, Inc. Bulk Oil Storage Terminal in Mobile, Alabama. The 1874 m/sup 2/ (20160 ft/sup 2/) solar energy collector field will generate industrial process heat at temperatures ranging from 150 to 290/sup 0/C (300 to 550/sup 0/F). The heat will be used to reduce the viscosity of stored No. 6 fuel oil, making it easier to pump from storage to transport tankers. Heat transfer oil is circulated in a closed system, absorbing heat in the collector field and delivering it through immersed heat exchangers to the stored fuel oil. The solar energy system will provide approximately 44 percent of the process heat required.

  8. Atmospheric effects and ultimate ranging accuracy for lunar laser ranging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Currie, Douglas G.; Prochazka, Ivan

    2014-10-01

    The deployment of next generation lunar laser retroreflectors is planned in the near future. With proper robotic deployment, these will support single shot single photo-electron ranging accuracy at the 100 micron level or better. There are available technologies for the support at this accuracy by advanced ground stations, however, the major question is the ultimate limit imposed on the ranging accuracy due to the changing timing delays due to turbulence and horizontal gradients in the earth's atmosphere. In particular, there are questions of the delay and temporal broadening of a very narrow laser pulse. Theoretical and experimental results will be discussed that address estimates of the magnitudes of these effects and the issue of precision vs. accuracy.

  9. Anatomy of a Mountain Range.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chew, Berkeley

    1993-01-01

    Provides written tour of Colorado Rockies along San Juan Skyway in which the geological features and formation of the mountain range is explored. Discusses evidence of geologic forces and products such as plate tectonic movement and the Ancestral Rockies; subduction and the Laramide Orogeny; volcanism and calderas; erosion, faulting, land…

  10. Back Home on the Range.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Breining, Greg

    1992-01-01

    Presents the history of the buffalo's demise and reemergence in the United States and Canada. Discusses the problems facing herds today caused by a small genetic pool, disease, range concerns, lack of predation, and culling. Points out the benefits of buffalo raising as compared to cattle raising, including the marketing advantages. (MCO)

  11. Relativity in Satellite Laser Ranging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ries, John C.

    2009-05-01

    Satellite laser ranging (SLR) is the measurement of the round-trip light time of ultra-short laser pulses to satellites deploying specifically designed retroreflectors. The ranging data are used to determine cm-precision satellite orbits, temporal variations in the Earth's gravity field, mm/yr accuracy determinations of station motion on a global scale, and fundamental physical constants. The SLR stations form an important part of the international network of space geodetic observatories that define and maintain the International Terrestrial Reference System. Starting in 1964, the precision of satellite laser ranging has improved from a few meters to a few mm for the better stations. With a measurement accuracy better than the part-per-billion level, the effects General Relativity must be considered. These include additional perturbations to the orbit dynamics, corrections to the round-trip light-time computation, and fundamental aspects of space-time in the definition of the geocentric reference frame. While these effects are significant, they are generally not large enough to provide useful tests of General Relativity. An important exception, however, is the relativistic prediction of the Lense-Thirring orbit precession, i.e the effect of `frame-dragging’ on the satellite orbit due to the spinning Earth's mass. While the signal is large enough to be easily observed with satellite laser ranging, the Lense-Thirring measurement uncertainty is limited by the knowledge of the even zonal harmonics of the Earth's gravity field that also produce Newtonian secular orbit precessions. However, this problem has been overcome with the dramatically improved models resulting from the joint NASA-DLR Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) mission. Using laser ranging to the LAGEOS satellites, it is possible to confirm the General Relativity prediction of the Lense-Thirring precession with an uncertainty better than 15%. This research was supported by the National

  12. A silicon carbide pressure sensor for harsh environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shams, Qamar A.; Kahng, Seun; Mitchell, Michael; Kuhn, Theodore

    2002-01-01

    Glenn Research Center and Kulite Semiconductor Products have demonstrated, through their preliminary work, applicability of SiC for high-temperature pressure sensing. These experiments conducted on a non-hermetic package have shown survivability and stability up to 500 °C in a turbine engine environment. These pressure sensors have been fabricated for an upper limit pressure of 1000 psia. For space applications such as Mars Missions, the pressure sensor requirements are stringent in accuracy at a lower range of pressure (25 psia), temperature requirements up to 1000 °C, and tolerance to radiation. To achieve this goal, new SiC sensors are being developed which will operate at low pressures, 25 psia maximum. This paper will describe the developmental efforts of the low pressure SiC pressure sensor and its preliminary performance characteristics. .

  13. Pressurizer tank upper support

    DOEpatents

    Baker, Tod H.; Ott, Howard L.

    1994-01-01

    A pressurizer tank in a pressurized water nuclear reactor is mounted between structural walls of the reactor on a substructure of the reactor, the tank extending upwardly from the substructure. For bearing lateral loads such as seismic shocks, a girder substantially encircles the pressurizer tank at a space above the substructure and is coupled to the structural walls via opposed sway struts. Each sway strut is attached at one end to the girder and at an opposite end to one of the structural walls, and the sway struts are oriented substantially horizontally in pairs aligned substantially along tangents to the wall of the circular tank. Preferably, eight sway struts attach to the girder at 90.degree. intervals. A compartment encloses the pressurizer tank and forms the structural wall. The sway struts attach to corners of the compartment for maximum stiffness and load bearing capacity. A valve support frame carrying the relief/discharge piping and valves of an automatic depressurization arrangement is fixed to the girder, whereby lateral loads on the relief/discharge piping are coupled directly to the compartment rather than through any portion of the pressurizer tank. Thermal insulation for the valve support frame prevents thermal loading of the piping and valves. The girder is shimmed to define a gap for reducing thermal transfer, and the girder is free to move vertically relative to the compartment walls, for accommodating dimensional variation of the pressurizer tank with changes in temperature and pressure.

  14. Pressurizer tank upper support

    DOEpatents

    Baker, T.H.; Ott, H.L.

    1994-01-11

    A pressurizer tank in a pressurized water nuclear reactor is mounted between structural walls of the reactor on a substructure of the reactor, the tank extending upwardly from the substructure. For bearing lateral loads such as seismic shocks, a girder substantially encircles the pressurizer tank at a space above the substructure and is coupled to the structural walls via opposed sway struts. Each sway strut is attached at one end to the girder and at an opposite end to one of the structural walls, and the sway struts are oriented substantially horizontally in pairs aligned substantially along tangents to the wall of the circular tank. Preferably, eight sway struts attach to the girder at 90[degree] intervals. A compartment encloses the pressurizer tank and forms the structural wall. The sway struts attach to corners of the compartment for maximum stiffness and load bearing capacity. A valve support frame carrying the relief/discharge piping and valves of an automatic depressurization arrangement is fixed to the girder, whereby lateral loads on the relief/discharge piping are coupled directly to the compartment rather than through any portion of the pressurizer tank. Thermal insulation for the valve support frame prevents thermal loading of the piping and valves. The girder is shimmed to define a gap for reducing thermal transfer, and the girder is free to move vertically relative to the compartment walls, for accommodating dimensional variation of the pressurizer tank with changes in temperature and pressure. 10 figures.

  15. The Thermal Pressure in Low Metallicity Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfire, Mark; McKee, Christopher; Ostriker, Eve C.; Bolatto, Alberto; Jenkins, Edward

    2015-08-01

    The thermal pressure in the diffuse interstellar medium (ISM) is a relatively small fraction of the total ISM pressure yet it is extremely important for the evolution of the ISM phases. A multi-phase medium can exist between a range of thermal pressures Pmin < Pth < Pmax. The phase separation is driven by thermal instability and produces a cold (T ˜ 100 K) neutral atomic gas and a warm (T ˜ 8000 K) neutral atomic gas separated by thermally unstable gas. At thermal pressures greater than Pmax only the cold phase can exist and at thermal pressures less than Pmin only the warm phase can exist. The ISM is also highly turbulent and turbulence can both initiate the thermal phase transition and be produced in a rapid phase transition. Hydrodynamic modeling also points to a strong two-phase distribution (.e.g., Kim et al. 2011; Audit & Hennebelle 2010) with a median thermal pressure in the cold gas very near the expected two-phase pressure. Global, theoretical models including star-formation feedback have been developed for the molecular fraction in galactic disks using, at their core, the paradigm that thermal pressure determines the phase transitions to warm, cold, or multiphase medium (e.g., Krumholz et al. 2009; Ostriker et al. 2010).Here we present a phase diagram for a low metallicity galaxy using the Small Magellanic Clouds as an example. We find that although the heating rates and metallicities can differ by factors of 5 to 10 from the Milky Way, the resulting two-phase pressure and physical conditions of the phases are not very different from Galactic. We also confirm that a widely used fitting function for Pmin presented in Wolfire et al. 2003 provides an accurate prediction for the new results. We demonstrate how the variation in input parameters determine the final pressures and physical conditions.

  16. Voltage-To-Frequency Converter For Pressure Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sealey, Bradley S.; Mitchell, Michael

    1993-01-01

    Measurements of pressures on walls of wind tunnels and on surfaces of models in wind tunnels made with help of electronically scanned pressure-measurement (ESP) system. Voltage-to-frequency converter circuit, designed to convert 0- to 5-Vdc analog output voltage from high-line-pressure, low-differential-pressure standard to required frequency range. Enables selection of wider variety of high-accuracy pressure standards to enhance accuracy of measurement of ESP instrumentation while requiring little modification of manufacturer's system and no modification of operating software of system. Useful primarily in wind-tunnel instrumentation and readily adaptable to commercial instruments currently in use.

  17. Development of a high temperature capacitive pressure transducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Egger, R. L.

    1977-01-01

    High temperature pressure transducers capable of continuous operation while exposed to 650 C were developed and evaluated over a full-scale differential pressure range of + or - 69 kPa. The design of the pressure transducers was based on the use of a diaphragm to respond to pressure, variable capacitive elements arranged to operate as a differential capacitor to measure diaphragm response and on the use of fused silica for the diaphragm and its supporting assembly. The uncertainty associated with measuring + or - 69 kPa pressures between 20C and 650C was less than + or - 6%.

  18. SENSITIVE PRESSURE GAUGE

    DOEpatents

    Ball, W.P.

    1961-01-01

    An electron multiplier device is described. It has a plurality of dynodes between an anode and cathode arranged to measure pressure, temperature, or other environmental physical conditions that proportionately iinfuences the quantity of gas molecules between the dynodes. The output current of the device is influenced by the reduction in electron multiplication at the dynodes due to energy reducing collisions of the electrons with the gas molecules between the dynodes. More particularly, the current is inversely proportional to the quantity of gas molecules, viz., the gas pressure. The device is, hence, extremely sensitive to low pressures.

  19. Atmospheric Pressure During Landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This figure shows the variation with time of pressure (dots) measured by the Pathfinder MET instrument during the landing period shown in image PIA00797. The two diamonds indicate the times of bridal cutting and 1st impact. The overall trend in the data is of pressure increasing with time. This is almost certainly due to the lander rolling downhill by roughly 10 m. The spacing of the horizontal dotted lines indicates the pressure change expected from 10 m changes in altitude. Bounces may also be visible in the data.

  20. Pancreas tumor interstitial pressure catheter measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieskoski, Michael D.; Gunn, Jason; Marra, Kayla; Trembly, B. Stuart; Pogue, Brian W.

    2016-03-01

    This paper highlights the methodology in measuring interstitial pressure in pancreatic adenocarcinoma tumors. A Millar Mikrotip pressure catheter (SPR-671) was used in this study and a system was built to amplify and filter the output signal for data collection. The Millar pressure catheter was calibrated prior to each experiment in a water column at 37°C, range of 0 to 60 inH2O (112 mmHg), resulting in a calibration factor of 33 mV / 1 inH2O. The interstitial pressures measured in two orthotopically grown pancreatic adenocarcinoma tumor were 57 mmHg and 48 mmHg, respectively. Verteporfin uptake into the pancreatic adenocarcinoma tumor was measured using a probe-based experimental dosimeter.

  1. Fabrication of a Flexible Graphene Pressure Sensor.

    PubMed

    Jung, Hyojin; Chun, Sungwoo; Kim, Youngjun; Oh, Hyeong Sik; Bae, Gi Yoon; Bae, Giyeol; Park, Wanjun

    2015-11-01

    The electromechanical properties of single-layer graphene have inspired specific application to force sensors, sinceit is capable of sensing within the range of human pressure perception. In this study, we present a pressure sensor for vertical force that is flexible and transparent by introducing a single graphene layer on a polyethylene naphthalate substrate. This substrate is commonly used as a force absorber in sensors. By employing it with a pressure amplifying structure, the performance of the sensor shows a reliable resistance change of 0.15% per 1 kPa of applied vertical pressure. Detection for the motion of the finger joint and touching are demonstrated with the sensor equipped on the human body.

  2. Pressure-induced metallization of silane

    SciTech Connect

    Chen,X.; Struzhkin, V.; Song, Y.; Goncharov, A.; Ahart, M.; Liu, Z.; Mao, H.; Hemley, R.

    2008-01-01

    There is a great interest in electronic transitions in hydrogen-rich materials under extreme conditions. It has been recently suggested that the group IVa hydrides such as methane (CH4), silane (SiH4), and germane (GeH4) become metallic at far lower pressures than pure hydrogen at equivalent densities because the hydrogen is chemically compressed in group IVa hydride compounds. Here we report measurements of Raman and infrared spectra of silane under pressure. We find that SiH4 undergoes three phase transitions before becoming opaque at 27-30 GPa. The vibrational spectra indicate the material transforms to a polymeric (framework) structure in this higher pressure range. Room-temperature infrared reflectivity data reveal that the material exhibits Drude-like metallic behavior above 60 GPa, indicating the onset of pressure-induced metallization.

  3. Graphane sheets and crystals under pressure

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Xiao-Dong; Hand, Louis; Labet, Vanessa; Yang, Tao; Hoffmann, Roald; Ashcroft, N. W.; Oganov, Artem R.; Lyakhov, Andriy O.

    2011-01-01

    Eight isomeric two-dimensional graphane sheets are found in a theoretical study. Four of these nets—two built on chair cyclohexanes, two on boat—are more stable thermodynamically than the isomeric benzene, or polyacetylene. Three-dimensional crystals are built up from the two-dimensional sheets, and their hypothetical behavior under pressure (up to 300 GPa) is explored. While the three-dimensional graphanes remain, as expected, insulating or semiconducting in this pressure range, there is a remarkable inversion in stability of the five crystals studied. Two stacking polytypes that are not the most stable at ambient pressure (one based on an unusual chair cyclohexane net, the other on a boat) are significantly stabilized with increasing pressure relative to stackings of simple chair sheets. The explanation may lie in the balance on intra and intersheet contacts in the extended arrays.

  4. Graphanes: Sheets and stacking under pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Wen, Xiao-Dong; Hand, Louis; Labet, Vanessa; Yang, Tao; Hoffmann, Roald; Ashcroft, N. W.; Oganov, Artem R.; Lyakhov, Andriy O.

    2011-04-26

    Eight isomeric two-dimensional graphane sheets are found in a theoretical study. Four of these nets—two built on chair cyclohexanes, two on boat—are more stable thermodynamically than the isomeric benzene, or polyacetylene. Three-dimensional crystals are built up from the two-dimensional sheets, and their hypothetical behavior under pressure (up to 300 GPa) is explored. While the three-dimensional graphanes remain, as expected, insulating or semiconducting in this pressure range, there is a remarkable inversion in stability of the five crystals studied. Two stacking polytypes that are not the most stable at ambient pressure (one based on an unusual chair cyclohexane net, the other on a boat) are significantly stabilized with increasing pressure relative to stackings of simple chair sheets. The explanation may lie in the balance on intra and intersheet contacts in the extended arrays.

  5. Long range handheld thermal imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seibel, Edward; Struckhoff, Andrew; McDaniel, Robert; Shamai, Shlomo

    2006-05-01

    Today's warfighter requires a lightweight, high performance thermal imager for use in night and reduced visibility conditions. To fill this need, the United States Marine Corps issued requirements for a Thermal Binocular System (TBS) Long Range Thermal Imager (LRTI). The requirements dictated that the system be lightweight, but still have significant range capabilities and extended operating time on a single battery load. Kollsman, Inc. with our partner Electro-Optics Industries, Ltd. (ElOp) responded to this need with the CORAL - a third-generation, Military Off-the-Shelf (MOTS) product that required very little modification to fully meet the LRTI specification. This paper will discuss the LRTI, a successful result of size, weight and power (SWaP) tradeoffs made to ensure a lightweight, but high performance thermal imager.

  6. Contrails reduce daily temperature range.

    PubMed

    Travis, David J; Carleton, Andrew M; Lauritsen, Ryan G

    2002-08-01

    The potential of condensation trails (contrails) from jet aircraft to affect regional-scale surface temperatures has been debated for years, but was difficult to verify until an opportunity arose as a result of the three-day grounding of all commercial aircraft in the United States in the aftermath of the terrorist attacks on 11 September 2001. Here we show that there was an anomalous increase in the average diurnal temperature range (that is, the difference between the daytime maximum and night-time minimum temperatures) for the period 11-14 September 2001. Because persisting contrails can reduce the transfer of both incoming solar and outgoing infrared radiation and so reduce the daily temperature range, we attribute at least a portion of this anomaly to the absence of contrails over this period. PMID:12167846

  7. Contrails reduce daily temperature range.

    PubMed

    Travis, David J; Carleton, Andrew M; Lauritsen, Ryan G

    2002-08-01

    The potential of condensation trails (contrails) from jet aircraft to affect regional-scale surface temperatures has been debated for years, but was difficult to verify until an opportunity arose as a result of the three-day grounding of all commercial aircraft in the United States in the aftermath of the terrorist attacks on 11 September 2001. Here we show that there was an anomalous increase in the average diurnal temperature range (that is, the difference between the daytime maximum and night-time minimum temperatures) for the period 11-14 September 2001. Because persisting contrails can reduce the transfer of both incoming solar and outgoing infrared radiation and so reduce the daily temperature range, we attribute at least a portion of this anomaly to the absence of contrails over this period.

  8. Design guide for high pressure oxygen systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bond, A. C.; Pohl, H. O.; Chaffee, N. H.; Guy, W. W.; Allton, C. S.; Johnston, R. L.; Castner, W. L.; Stradling, J. S.

    1983-01-01

    A repository for critical and important detailed design data and information, hitherto unpublished, along with significant data on oxygen reactivity phenomena with metallic and nonmetallic materials in moderate to very high pressure environments is documented. This data and information provide a ready and easy to use reference for the guidance of designers of propulsion, power, and life support systems for use in space flight. The document is also applicable to designs for industrial and civilian uses of high pressure oxygen systems. The information presented herein are derived from data and design practices involving oxygen usage at pressures ranging from about 20 psia to 8000 psia equal with thermal conditions ranging from room temperatures up to 500 F.

  9. Hammersley Range, northern Western Australia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The oval shaped basin of the sedimentary rocks of the Hammersley Range, northern Western Australia (23.0S, 119.0E) dominates the center of this near nadir view. The Fortescue River is the remarkably straight, fault controlled feature bordering the Hammersley on the north. Sand dunes are the main surface features in the northeast and southwest. Many dry lakebeds can be seen to the east as light grey colored patches along the watercourses.

  10. Propagator for finite range potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Cacciari, Ilaria; Moretti, Paolo

    2006-12-15

    The Schroedinger equation in integral form is applied to the one-dimensional scattering problem in the case of a general finite range, nonsingular potential. A simple expression for the Laplace transform of the transmission propagator is obtained in terms of the associated Fredholm determinant, by means of matrix methods; the particular form of the kernel and the peculiar aspects of the transmission problem play an important role. The application to an array of delta potentials is shown.

  11. Range determination for scannerless imaging

    DOEpatents

    Muguira, Maritza Rosa; Sackos, John Theodore; Bradley, Bart Davis; Nellums, Robert

    2000-01-01

    A new method of operating a scannerless range imaging system (e.g., a scannerless laser radar) has been developed. This method is designed to compensate for nonlinear effects which appear in many real-world components. The system operates by determining the phase shift of the laser modulation, which is a physical quantity related physically to the path length between the laser source and the detector, for each pixel of an image.

  12. Range expansion of heterogeneous populations.

    PubMed

    Reiter, Matthias; Rulands, Steffen; Frey, Erwin

    2014-04-11

    Risk spreading in bacterial populations is generally regarded as a strategy to maximize survival. Here, we study its role during range expansion of a genetically diverse population where growth and motility are two alternative traits. We find that during the initial expansion phase fast-growing cells do have a selective advantage. By contrast, asymptotically, generalists balancing motility and reproduction are evolutionarily most successful. These findings are rationalized by a set of coupled Fisher equations complemented by stochastic simulations. PMID:24766021

  13. Range Expansion of Heterogeneous Populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiter, Matthias; Rulands, Steffen; Frey, Erwin

    2014-04-01

    Risk spreading in bacterial populations is generally regarded as a strategy to maximize survival. Here, we study its role during range expansion of a genetically diverse population where growth and motility are two alternative traits. We find that during the initial expansion phase fast-growing cells do have a selective advantage. By contrast, asymptotically, generalists balancing motility and reproduction are evolutionarily most successful. These findings are rationalized by a set of coupled Fisher equations complemented by stochastic simulations.

  14. Short-range communication system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alhorn, Dean C. (Inventor); Howard, David E. (Inventor); Smith, Dennis A. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A short-range communication system includes an antenna, a transmitter, and a receiver. The antenna is an electrical conductor formed as a planar coil with rings thereof being uniformly spaced. The transmitter is spaced apart from the plane of the coil by a gap. An amplitude-modulated and asynchronous signal indicative of a data stream of known peak amplitude is transmitted into the gap. The receiver detects the coil's resonance and decodes same to recover the data stream.

  15. The International Laser Ranging Service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearlman, M. R.; Degnan, J. J.; Bosworth, J. M.

    2002-07-01

    The International Laser Ranging Service (ILRS) was established in September 1998 to support programs in geodetic, geophysical, and lunar research activities and to provide the International Earth Rotation Service (IERS) with products important to the maintenance of an accurate International Terrestrial Reference Frame (ITRF). Now in operation for nearly two years, the ILRS develops (1) the standards and specifications necessary for product consistency, and (2) the priorities and tracking strategies required to maximize network efficiency. The Service collects, merges, analyzes, archives and distributes satellite and lunar laser ranging data to satisfy a variety of scientific, engineering, and operational needs and encourages the application of new technologies to enhance the quality, quantity, and cost effectiveness of its data products. The ILRS works with (1) new satellite missions in the design and building of retroreflector targets to maximize data quality and quantity, and (2) science programs to optimize scientific data yield. The ILRS is organized into permanent components: (1) a Governing Board, (2) a Central Bureau, (3) Tracking Stations and Subnetworks, (4) Operations Centers, (5) Global and Regional Data Centers, and (6) Analysis, Lunar Analysis, and Associate Analysis Centers. The Governing Board, with broad representation from the international Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) and Lunar Laser Ranging (LLR) community, provides overall guidance and defines service policies, while the Central Bureau oversees and coordinates the daily service activities, maintains scientific and technological data bases, and facilitates communications. Active Working Groups in (1) Missions, (2) Networks and Engineering, (3) Data Formats and Procedures, (4) Analysis, and (5) Signal Processing provide key operational and technical expertise to better exploit current capabilities and to challenge the ILRS participants to keep pace with evolving user needs. The ILRS currently

  16. Pressurized Lunar Rover (PLR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Creel, Kenneth; Frampton, Jeffrey; Honaker, David; Mcclure, Kerry; Zeinali, Mazyar; Bhardwaj, Manoj; Bulsara, Vatsal; Kokan, David; Shariff, Shaun; Svarverud, Eric

    1992-01-01

    The objective of this project was to design a manned pressurized lunar rover (PLR) for long-range transportation and for exploration of the lunar surface. The vehicle must be capable of operating on a 14-day mission, traveling within a radius of 500 km during a lunar day or within a 50-km radius during a lunar night. The vehicle must accommodate a nominal crew of four, support two 28-hour EVA's, and in case of emergency, support a crew of six when near the lunar base. A nominal speed of ten km/hr and capability of towing a trailer with a mass of two mt are required. Two preliminary designs have been developed by two independent student teams. The PLR 1 design proposes a seven meter long cylindrical main vehicle and a trailer which houses the power and heat rejection systems. The main vehicle carries the astronauts, life support systems, navigation and communication systems, lighting, robotic arms, tools, and equipment for exploratory experiments. The rover uses a simple mobility system with six wheels on the main vehicle and two on the trailer. The nonpressurized trailer contains a modular radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) supplying 6.5 kW continuous power. A secondary energy storage for short-term peak power needs is provided by a bank of lithium-sulfur dioxide batteries. The life support system is partly a regenerative system with air and hygiene water being recycled. A layer of water inside the composite shell surrounds the command center allowing the center to be used as a safe haven during solar flares. The PLR 1 has a total mass of 6197 kg. It has a top speed of 18 km/hr and is capable of towing three metric tons, in addition to the RTG trailer. The PLR 2 configuration consists of two four-meter diameter, cylindrical hulls which are passively connected by a flexible passageway, resulting in the overall vehicle length of 11 m. The vehicle is driven by eight independently suspended wheels. The dual-cylinder concept allows articulated as well as double

  17. Pressurized Lunar Rover (PLR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creel, Kenneth; Frampton, Jeffrey; Honaker, David; McClure, Kerry; Zeinali, Mazyar; Bhardwaj, Manoj; Bulsara, Vatsal; Kokan, David; Shariff, Shaun; Svarverud, Eric

    The objective of this project was to design a manned pressurized lunar rover (PLR) for long-range transportation and for exploration of the lunar surface. The vehicle must be capable of operating on a 14-day mission, traveling within a radius of 500 km during a lunar day or within a 50-km radius during a lunar night. The vehicle must accommodate a nominal crew of four, support two 28-hour EVA's, and in case of emergency, support a crew of six when near the lunar base. A nominal speed of ten km/hr and capability of towing a trailer with a mass of two mt are required. Two preliminary designs have been developed by two independent student teams. The PLR 1 design proposes a seven meter long cylindrical main vehicle and a trailer which houses the power and heat rejection systems. The main vehicle carries the astronauts, life support systems, navigation and communication systems, lighting, robotic arms, tools, and equipment for exploratory experiments. The rover uses a simple mobility system with six wheels on the main vehicle and two on the trailer. The nonpressurized trailer contains a modular radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) supplying 6.5 kW continuous power. A secondary energy storage for short-term peak power needs is provided by a bank of lithium-sulfur dioxide batteries. The life support system is partly a regenerative system with air and hygiene water being recycled. A layer of water inside the composite shell surrounds the command center allowing the center to be used as a safe haven during solar flares. The PLR 1 has a total mass of 6197 kg. It has a top speed of 18 km/hr and is capable of towing three metric tons, in addition to the RTG trailer. The PLR 2 configuration consists of two four-meter diameter, cylindrical hulls which are passively connected by a flexible passageway, resulting in the overall vehicle length of 11 m. The vehicle is driven by eight independently suspended wheels. The dual-cylinder concept allows articulated as well as double

  18. Range gated strip proximity sensor

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, Thomas E.

    1996-01-01

    A range gated strip proximity sensor uses one set of sensor electronics and a distributed antenna or strip which extends along the perimeter to be sensed. A micro-power RF transmitter is coupled to the first end of the strip and transmits a sequence of RF pulses on the strip to produce a sensor field along the strip. A receiver is coupled to the second end of the strip, and generates a field reference signal in response to the sequence of pulse on the line combined with received electromagnetic energy from reflections in the field. The sensor signals comprise pulses of radio frequency signals having a duration of less than 10 nanoseconds, and a pulse repetition rate on the order of 1 to 10 MegaHertz or less. The duration of the radio frequency pulses is adjusted to control the range of the sensor. An RF detector feeds a filter capacitor in response to received pulses on the strip line to produce a field reference signal representing the average amplitude of the received pulses. When a received pulse is mixed with a received echo, the mixing causes a fluctuation in the amplitude of the field reference signal, providing a range-limited Doppler type signature of a field disturbance.

  19. Range gated strip proximity sensor

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, T.E.

    1996-12-03

    A range gated strip proximity sensor uses one set of sensor electronics and a distributed antenna or strip which extends along the perimeter to be sensed. A micro-power RF transmitter is coupled to the first end of the strip and transmits a sequence of RF pulses on the strip to produce a sensor field along the strip. A receiver is coupled to the second end of the strip, and generates a field reference signal in response to the sequence of pulse on the line combined with received electromagnetic energy from reflections in the field. The sensor signals comprise pulses of radio frequency signals having a duration of less than 10 nanoseconds, and a pulse repetition rate on the order of 1 to 10 MegaHertz or less. The duration of the radio frequency pulses is adjusted to control the range of the sensor. An RF detector feeds a filter capacitor in response to received pulses on the strip line to produce a field reference signal representing the average amplitude of the received pulses. When a received pulse is mixed with a received echo, the mixing causes a fluctuation in the amplitude of the field reference signal, providing a range-limited Doppler type signature of a field disturbance. 6 figs.

  20. The effect of pressure on annular flow pressure drop in a small pipe

    SciTech Connect

    de Bertodano, M.A.L.; Beus, S.G.; Shi, Jian-Feng

    1996-09-01

    New experimental data was obtained for pressure drop and entrainment for annular up-flow in a vertical pipe. The 9.5 mm. pipe has an L/D ratio of 440 to insure fully developed annular flow. The pressure ranged from 140 kPa to 660 kPa. Therefore the density ratio was varied by a factor of four approximately. This allows the investigation of the effect of pressure on the interfacial shear models. Gas superficial velocities between 25 and 126 m/s were tested. This extends the range of previous data to higher gas velocities. The data were compared with well known models for interfacial shear that represent the state of the art. Good results were obtained when the model by Asali, Hanratty and Andreussi was modified for the effect of pressure. Furthermore an equivalent model was obtained based on the mixing length theory for rough pipes. It correlates the equivalent roughness to the film thickness.

  1. Toward an internally consistent pressure scale

    PubMed Central

    Fei, Yingwei; Ricolleau, Angele; Frank, Mark; Mibe, Kenji; Shen, Guoyin; Prakapenka, Vitali

    2007-01-01

    Our ability to interpret seismic observations including the seismic discontinuities and the density and velocity profiles in the earth's interior is critically dependent on the accuracy of pressure measurements up to 364 GPa at high temperature. Pressure scales based on the reduced shock-wave equations of state alone may predict pressure variations up to 7% in the megabar pressure range at room temperature and even higher percentage at high temperature, leading to large uncertainties in understanding the nature of the seismic discontinuities and chemical composition of the earth's interior. Here, we report compression data of gold (Au), platinum (Pt), the NaCl-B2 phase, and solid neon (Ne) at 300 K and high temperatures up to megabar pressures. Combined with existing experimental data, the compression data were used to establish internally consistent thermal equations of state of Au, Pt, NaCl-B2, and solid Ne. The internally consistent pressure scales provide a tractable, accurate baseline for comparing high pressure–temperature experimental data with theoretical calculations and the seismic observations, thereby advancing our understanding fundamental high-pressure phenomena and the chemistry and physics of the earth's interior. PMID:17483460

  2. Wall pressure fluctuations in rectangular partial enclosures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagliaroli, T.; Camussi, R.

    2015-04-01

    Wall pressure fluctuations generated within rectangular partial enclosures (RPEs) have been studied experimentally for a broad range of geometrical parameters. The geometry represents a simplified version of a new generation trapped vortex combustor and consisted of a rectangular cavity connected to a neck of smaller size. Wall pressure fluctuations have been measured through wall mounted microphones providing single and multi-variate pressure statistics both in the physical space and in the Fourier domain. In order to interpret the pressure signals, aerodynamic and acoustic investigations have been carried out as well for several cavity-neck ratios. The analysis of the acoustic response of the cavity has been conducted both numerically and experimentally and a simple theoretical model has been proposed to predict the frequency of the acoustic resonances. The aerodynamic study has been carried out through PIV measurements that provided characterization in terms of the geometrical parameters of both the large-scale vortex generated within the cavity and the recirculation zone formed upstream of the neck. The use of the POD decomposition permitted us to correlate the dynamics of the recirculation with the observed pressure statistics. The aerodynamic and acoustic investigations allowed us to interpret exhaustively the wall pressure cross-statistics and to separate contributions induced by hydrodynamic and purely acoustic pressure fluctuations.

  3. Magnetic and Superconducting Materials at High Pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Struzhkin, Viktor V.

    2015-03-24

    transitions from magnetic to nonmagnetic phases in a broad pressure-temperature range; using X-ray methods including the newly developed RIXS high-pressure technique to explore pressure-tuned electronic excitations in strongly correlated 3d-materials; and advancing transport and magnetic techniques for measurements on small samples at very high pressures in a wide temperature range, with the application of focused ion beam technology and photolithography tailored to the design of microcircuits down to a nanoscale size, thus expanding the horizon in the search for novel physical phenomena at ultrahigh pressures. Apply new optical magnetic sensing techniques with NV- centers in diamond to detect superconductivity and magnetic transitions with unprecedented spatial resolution.

  4. Internal pressure sensor

    DOEpatents

    Dowalo, James A [Blackfoot, ID

    2010-03-16

    A pressure sensor for sensing changes in pressure in an enclosed vessel may include a first chamber having at least one expandable section therein that allows that first chamber to change in length. A reference member mounted within the first chamber moves as a result of changes in length of the first chamber. A second chamber having an expandable section therein allows the second chamber to change in length in response to changes in pressure in the enclosed vessel. The second chamber is operatively associated with the first chamber so that changes in length of the second chamber result in changes in length of the first chamber. A sensor operatively associated with the reference member detects changes in position of the reference member. Changes in position of the reference member are related to changes in pressure in the enclosed vessel.

  5. Blood Pressure Checker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    An estimated 30 million people in the United States have high blood pressure, or hypertension. But a great many of them are unaware of it because hypertension, in its initial stages, displays no symptoms. Thus, the simply-operated blood pressure checking devices now widely located in public places are useful health aids. The one pictured above, called -Medimax 30, is a direct spinoff from NASA technology developed to monitor astronauts in space. For manned space flights, NASA wanted a compact, highly-reliable, extremely accurate method of checking astronauts' blood pressure without the need for a physician's interpretive skill. NASA's Johnson Space Center and Technology, Inc., a contractor, developed an electronic sound processor that automatically analyzes blood flow sounds to get both systolic (contracting arteries) and diastolic (expanding arteries) blood pressure measurements. NASA granted a patent license for this technology to Advanced Life Sciences, Inc., New York City, manufacturers of Medimax 30.

  6. On Time Performance Pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, Linda; Wichner, David; Jakey, Abegael

    2013-01-01

    Within many operations, the pressures for on-time performance are high. Each month, on-time statistics are reported to the Department of Transportation and made public. There is a natural tendency for employees under pressure to do their best to meet these objectives. As a result, pressure to get the job done within the allotted time may cause personnel to deviate from procedures and policies. Additionally, inadequate or unavailable resources may drive employees to work around standard processes that are seen as barriers. However, bypassing practices to enable on-time performance may affect more than the statistics. ASRS reports often highlight on-time performance pressures which may result in impact across all workgroups in an attempt to achieve on-time performance. Reporters often provide in-depth insights into their experiences which can be used by industry to identify and focus on the implementation of systemic fixes.

  7. Pressurized Vessel Slurry Pumping

    SciTech Connect

    Pound, C.R.

    2001-09-17

    This report summarizes testing of an alternate ''pressurized vessel slurry pumping'' apparatus. The principle is similar to rural domestic water systems and ''acid eggs'' used in chemical laboratories in that material is extruded by displacement with compressed air.

  8. Preventing Pressure Sores

    MedlinePlus

    ... how is it treated? What's the most important thing to do to prevent pressure sores? A spinal cord injury affects the entire family FacingDisability is designed to provide Internet-based information and support for people with spinal ...

  9. Stable hydraulic pressure regulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gold, H.

    1979-01-01

    Neither sensing line restrictors nor frictional dampers are required for stability. Analysis presents method by which stability margin, response, and droop magnitude can be incorporated during design of direct-acting hydraulic pressure regulators.

  10. Capacitance pressure sensor

    DOEpatents

    Eaton, William P.; Staple, Bevan D.; Smith, James H.

    2000-01-01

    A microelectromechanical (MEM) capacitance pressure sensor integrated with electronic circuitry on a common substrate and a method for forming such a device are disclosed. The MEM capacitance pressure sensor includes a capacitance pressure sensor formed at least partially in a cavity etched below the surface of a silicon substrate and adjacent circuitry (CMOS, BiCMOS, or bipolar circuitry) formed on the substrate. By forming the capacitance pressure sensor in the cavity, the substrate can be planarized (e.g. by chemical-mechanical polishing) so that a standard set of integrated circuit processing steps can be used to form the electronic circuitry (e.g. using an aluminum or aluminum-alloy interconnect metallization).

  11. Blood pressure check (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... more often referred to as a blood pressure cuff. The cuff is wrapped around your upper arm and inflated ... flow of blood in your artery. As the cuff is slowly deflated, your doctor uses a stethoscope ...

  12. Critical CRBR core pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Ju, F.D.

    1980-06-01

    The conditions are detailed under which gas pressure will cause or initiate failure in the structural containment of the fuel core. The Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant is the prototype structure. Two general classes of problems have been studied, representing two entirely distinct configurations of containment failure. The first model determines the minimum pressure to lift a portion or the entire core from its containment. The second model estimates the critical pressure above which the fuel rods interior to the hexagonal fuel can warp, leading to blockage of the gas passages. Such blockage might cause further buildup of the gas pressure to a level causing the failure of the fuel rod containment in the hexagonal fuel container.

  13. Normal pressure hydrocephalus

    MedlinePlus

    Hydrocephalus - occult; Hydrocephalus - idiopathic; Hydrocephalus - adult; Hydrocephalus - communicating; Dementia - hydrocephalus; NPH ... Ferri FF. Normal pressure hydrocephalus. In: Ferri FF, ed. ... Elsevier; 2016:chap 648. Rosenberg GA. Brain edema and disorders ...

  14. Local adaptation at range edges: comparing elevation and latitudinal gradients.

    PubMed

    Halbritter, A H; Billeter, R; Edwards, P J; Alexander, J M

    2015-10-01

    Local adaptation at range edges influences species' distributions and how they respond to environmental change. However, the factors that affect adaptation, including gene flow and local selection pressures, are likely to vary across different types of range edge. We performed a reciprocal transplant experiment to investigate local adaptation in populations of Plantago lanceolata and P. major from central locations in their European range and from their latitudinal and elevation range edges (in northern Scandinavia and Swiss Alps, respectively). We also characterized patterns of genetic diversity and differentiation in populations using molecular markers. Range-centre plants of P. major were adapted to conditions at the range centre, but performed similarly to range-edge plants when grown at the range edges. There was no evidence for local adaptation when comparing central and edge populations of P. lanceolata. However, plants of both species from high elevation were locally adapted when compared with plants from high latitude, although the reverse was not true. This asymmetry was associated with greater genetic diversity and less genetic differentiation over the elevation gradient than over the latitudinal gradient. Our results suggest that adaptation in some range-edge populations could increase their performance following climate change. However, responses are likely to differ along elevation and latitudinal gradients, with adaptation more likely at high-elevation. Furthermore, based upon these results, we suggest that gene flow is unlikely to constrain adaptation in range-edge populations of these species.

  15. Local adaptation at range edges: comparing elevation and latitudinal gradients.

    PubMed

    Halbritter, A H; Billeter, R; Edwards, P J; Alexander, J M

    2015-10-01

    Local adaptation at range edges influences species' distributions and how they respond to environmental change. However, the factors that affect adaptation, including gene flow and local selection pressures, are likely to vary across different types of range edge. We performed a reciprocal transplant experiment to investigate local adaptation in populations of Plantago lanceolata and P. major from central locations in their European range and from their latitudinal and elevation range edges (in northern Scandinavia and Swiss Alps, respectively). We also characterized patterns of genetic diversity and differentiation in populations using molecular markers. Range-centre plants of P. major were adapted to conditions at the range centre, but performed similarly to range-edge plants when grown at the range edges. There was no evidence for local adaptation when comparing central and edge populations of P. lanceolata. However, plants of both species from high elevation were locally adapted when compared with plants from high latitude, although the reverse was not true. This asymmetry was associated with greater genetic diversity and less genetic differentiation over the elevation gradient than over the latitudinal gradient. Our results suggest that adaptation in some range-edge populations could increase their performance following climate change. However, responses are likely to differ along elevation and latitudinal gradients, with adaptation more likely at high-elevation. Furthermore, based upon these results, we suggest that gene flow is unlikely to constrain adaptation in range-edge populations of these species. PMID:26201435

  16. Experimental investigation on pressurization performance of cryogenic tank during high-temperature helium pressurization process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Wang; Yanzhong, Li; Yonghua, Jin; Yuan, Ma

    2015-03-01

    Sufficient knowledge of thermal performance and pressurization behaviors in cryogenic tanks during rocket launching period is of importance to the design and optimization of a pressurization system. In this paper, ground experiments with liquid oxygen (LO2) as the cryogenic propellant, high-temperature helium exceeding 600 K as the pressurant gas, and radial diffuser and anti-cone diffuser respectively at the tank inlet were performed. The pressurant gas requirements, axial and radial temperature distributions, and energy distributions inside the propellant tank were obtained and analyzed to evaluate the comprehensive performance of the pressurization system. It was found that the pressurization system with high-temperature helium as the pressurant gas could work well that the tank pressure was controlled within a specified range and a stable discharging liquid rate was achieved. For the radial diffuser case, the injected gas had a direct impact on the tank inner wall. The severe gas-wall heat transfer resulted in about 59% of the total input energy absorbed by the tank wall. For the pressurization case with anti-cone diffuser, the direct impact of high-temperature gas flowing toward the liquid surface resulted in a greater deal of energy transferred to the liquid propellant, and the percentage even reached up to 38%. Moreover, both of the two cases showed that the proportion of energy left in ullage to the total input energy was quite small, and the percentage was only about 22-24%. This may indicate that a more efficient diffuser should be developed to improve the pressurization effect. Generally, the present experimental results are beneficial to the design and optimization of the pressurization system with high-temperature gas supplying the pressurization effect.

  17. Pressure multiplying dispenser

    DOEpatents

    DeFord, Henry S.; Moss, Owen R.

    1986-01-01

    A pressure multiplying dispenser for delivering fluid, preferably as a spray to the atmosphere, from a source of fluid, preferably a spray bottle, is described. The dispenser includes in combination a hollow cylindrical member, a nozzle delivery tube within the cylindrical member and a hollow actuator piston slideable within the cylindrical member which acts to multiply the pressure of a squeeze applied to the spray bottle.

  18. Radial pressure flange seal

    DOEpatents

    Batzer, Thomas H.; Call, Wayne R.

    1989-01-01

    This invention provides an all metal seal for vacuum or pressure vessels or systems. This invention does not use gaskets. The invention uses a flange which fits into a matching groove. Fluid pressure is applied in a chamber in the flange causing at least one of the flange walls to radially press against a side of the groove creating the seal between the flange wall and the groove side.

  19. Laser Scanning System for Pressure and Temperature Paints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, John

    1997-01-01

    Acquiring pressure maps of aerodynamic surfaces is very important for improving and validating the performance of aerospace vehicles. Traditional pressure measurements are taken with pressure taps embedded in the model surface that are connected to transducers. While pressure taps allow highly accurate measurements to be acquired, they do have several drawbacks. Pressure taps do not give good spatial resolution due to the need for individual pressure tubes, compounded by limited space available inside models. Also, building a model proves very costly if taps are needed because of the large amount of labor necessary to drill, connect and test each one. The typical cost to install one tap is about $200. Recently, a new method for measuring pressure on aerodynamic surfaces has been developed utilizing a technology known as pressure sensitive paints (PSP). Using PSP, pressure distributions can be acquired optically with high spatial resolution and simple model preparation. Flow structures can be easily visualized using PSP, but are missed using low spatial resolution arrays of pressure taps. PSP even allows pressure distributions to be found on rotating machinery where previously this has been extremely difficult or even impossible. The goal of this research is to develop a laser scanning system for use with pressure sensitive paints that allows accurate pressure measurements to be obtained on various aerodynamic surfaces ranging from wind tunnel models to high speed jet engine compressor blades.

  20. Mechanistic investigation on pressure dependency of Heckel parameter.

    PubMed

    Patel, Sarsvatkumar; Kaushal, Aditya Mohan; Bansal, Arvind Kumar

    2010-04-15

    This work proposed to study the influence of varying compaction pressure on the plastic energy, elasticity (Young's modulus), particle yield strength, strain hardening, and applied pressures on derived Heckel parameter using material with different densification and deformation mechanisms: ibuprofen (IBN), paracetamol (PCM) (elastic behavior), methyl cellulose (Me-Cel), microcrystalline cellulose (MCC), sodium chloride (NaCl) (plastic behavior), and dicalcium phosphate (DCP) (brittle fracture). Force-displacement data were captured during in-die compaction for all materials having different deformation behavior. The apparent mean yield pressure (Py), plastic energy, Young's moduli, strain hardening parameter and rate of increase in Py were calculated from force-displacement compaction profiles obtained across a pressure range of 65-260 MPa. Materials under confined compression loading showed pressure dependent biphasic behavior in Py upon increasing pressure from 65 MPa to 260 MPa. IBN and PCM showed pressure dependency due to simultaneous elasticity and strain hardening upon increasing applied pressure. Me-Cel, MCC, and NaCl showed lower pressure dependency while DCP showed higher change in Py upon increasing pressure as a result of higher yield strength of DCP particles. Apparent mean yield pressure from Heckel analysis was significantly affected by the applied pressure, viscoelastic behavior, particle yield strength, and strain hardening. The simultaneously occurring events of elastic deformation and strain hardening give a false increase in Py at higher applied pressures.

  1. What Is High Blood Pressure?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More What is High Blood Pressure? Updated:Aug 26,2016 High blood pressure, also ... content was last reviewed on 08/04/2014. High Blood Pressure • Home • About High Blood Pressure (HBP) Introduction What ...

  2. OPTIMAL AIRCRAFT TRAJECTORIES FOR SPECIFIED RANGE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, H.

    1994-01-01

    cruise cost is specified, an optimum trajectory can easily be generated; however, the range obtained for a particular optimum cruise cost is not known a priori. For short range flights, the program iteratively varies the optimum cruise cost until the computed range converges to the specified range. For long-range flights, iteration is unnecessary since the specified range can be divided into a cruise segment distance and full climb and descent distances. The user must supply the program with engine fuel flow rate coefficients and an aircraft aerodynamic model. The program currently includes coefficients for the Pratt-Whitney JT8D-7 engine and an aerodynamic model for the Boeing 727. Input to the program consists of the flight range to be covered and the prevailing flight conditions including pressure, temperature, and wind profiles. Information output by the program includes: optimum cruise tables at selected weights, optimal cruise quantities as a function of cruise weight and cruise distance, climb and descent profiles, and a summary of the complete synthesized optimal trajectory. This program is written in FORTRAN IV for batch execution and has been implemented on a CDC 6000 series computer with a central memory requirement of approximately 100K (octal) of 60 bit words. This aircraft trajectory optimization program was developed in 1979.

  3. High-pressure microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hjort, K.

    2015-03-01

    When using appropriate materials and microfabrication techniques, with the small dimensions the mechanical stability of microstructured devices allows for processes at high pressures without loss in safety. The largest area of applications has been demonstrated in green chemistry and bioprocesses, where extraction, synthesis and analyses often excel at high densities and high temperatures. This is accessible through high pressures. Capillary chemistry has been used since long but, just like in low-pressure applications, there are several potential advantages in using microfluidic platforms, e.g., planar isothermal set-ups, large local variations in geometries, dense form factors, small dead volumes and precisely positioned microstructures for control of reactions, catalysis, mixing and separation. Other potential applications are in, e.g., microhydraulics, exploration, gas driven vehicles, and high-pressure science. From a review of the state-of-art and frontiers of high pressure microfluidics, the focus will be on different solutions demonstrated for microfluidic handling at high pressures and challenges that remain.

  4. ECN Pressure Test

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, K.; /Fermilab

    1991-07-18

    This note describes: the rationale for the test pressure of the inner ECN cryostat vessel, the equipment to be used in this test, the test procedure, the status of the vessel prior to the test, the actual test results, and a schematic diagram of the testing set up and the pressure testing permit. The test, performed in the evening of July 17, 1991, was a major success. Based on a neglible pressure drop indicated on the pressure gages (1/4 psi), the vessel appeared to be structurally sound throughout the duration of the test (approx. 1.5 hrs.). No pressure increases were observed on the indicators looking at the beam tube bellows volumes. There was no indication of bubbles form the soap test on the welds and most of the fittings that were checked. There were some slight deviations in the actual procedure used. The UO filter was removed after the vessel had bled down to about 18 psig in order to speed up that aspect of the test. The rationale was that the higher velocity gas had already passed through at the higher pressures and there was no visible traces of the black uo particles. The rate of 4 psi/10 minutes seemed incredibly slow and often that time was reduced to just over half that rate. The testing personnel was allowed to stay in the pit throughout the duration of the test; this was a slight relaxation of the rules.

  5. Pressure Core Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santamarina, J. C.

    2014-12-01

    Natural gas hydrates form under high fluid pressure and low temperature, and are found in permafrost, deep lakes or ocean sediments. Hydrate dissociation by depressurization and/or heating is accompanied by a multifold hydrate volume expansion and host sediments with low permeability experience massive destructuration. Proper characterization requires coring, recovery, manipulation and testing under P-T conditions within the stability field. Pressure core technology allows for the reliable characterization of hydrate bearing sediments within the stability field in order to address scientific and engineering needs, including the measurement of parameters used in hydro-thermo-mechanical analyses, and the monitoring of hydrate dissociation under controlled pressure, temperature, effective stress and chemical conditions. Inherent sampling effects remain and need to be addressed in test protocols and data interpretation. Pressure core technology has been deployed to study hydrate bearing sediments at several locations around the world. In addition to pressure core testing, a comprehensive characterization program should include sediment analysis, testing of reconstituted specimens (with and without synthetic hydrate), and in situ testing. Pressure core characterization technology can be used to study other gas-charged formations such as deep sea sediments, coal bed methane and gas shales.

  6. Fluctuating shells under pressure

    PubMed Central

    Paulose, Jayson; Vliegenthart, Gerard A.; Gompper, Gerhard; Nelson, David R.

    2012-01-01

    Thermal fluctuations strongly modify the large length-scale elastic behavior of cross-linked membranes, giving rise to scale-dependent elastic moduli. Whereas thermal effects in flat membranes are well understood, many natural and artificial microstructures are modeled as thin elastic shells. Shells are distinguished from flat membranes by their nonzero curvature, which provides a size-dependent coupling between the in-plane stretching modes and the out-of-plane undulations. In addition, a shell can support a pressure difference between its interior and its exterior. Little is known about the effect of thermal fluctuations on the elastic properties of shells. Here, we study the statistical mechanics of shape fluctuations in a pressurized spherical shell, using perturbation theory and Monte Carlo computer simulations, explicitly including the effects of curvature and an inward pressure. We predict novel properties of fluctuating thin shells under point indentations and pressure-induced deformations. The contribution due to thermal fluctuations increases with increasing ratio of shell radius to thickness and dominates the response when the product of this ratio and the thermal energy becomes large compared with the bending rigidity of the shell. Thermal effects are enhanced when a large uniform inward pressure acts on the shell and diverge as this pressure approaches the classical buckling transition of the shell. Our results are relevant for the elasticity and osmotic collapse of microcapsules. PMID:23150558

  7. High Precision Laser Range Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dubovitsky, Serge (Inventor); Lay, Oliver P. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    The present invention is an improved distance measuring interferometer that includes high speed phase modulators and additional phase meters to generate and analyze multiple heterodyne signal pairs with distinct frequencies. Modulation sidebands with large frequency separation are generated by the high speed electro-optic phase modulators, requiring only a single frequency stable laser source and eliminating the need for a fist laser to be tuned or stabilized relative to a second laser. The combination of signals produced by the modulated sidebands is separated and processed to give the target distance. The resulting metrology apparatus enables a sensor with submicron accuracy or better over a multi- kilometer ambiguity range.

  8. Long range planning at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bekey, Ivan

    1987-01-01

    NASA's current plans for the U.S. space program are described. Consideration is given to the debate between manned or unmanned exploration of space, missions to the moon versus missions to Mars, and the exploration of space applications or science. NASA has created the Office of Policy and Planning and the Office of Exploration in order to improve the planning of future space activities. Long-range trends such as second-generation Shuttles, cargo launch vehicles with large capacity systems, an advanced Space Station, the use of robotics, closed cycle life support, health maintenance techniques, and the processing of extraterrestrial materials are considered.

  9. Extended-range tiltable micromirror

    DOEpatents

    Allen, James J.; Wiens, Gloria J.; Bronson, Jessica R.

    2009-05-05

    A tiltable micromirror device is disclosed in which a micromirror is suspended by a progressive linkage with an electrostatic actuator (e.g. a vertical comb actuator or a capacitive plate electrostatic actuator) being located beneath the micromirror. The progressive linkage includes a pair of torsion springs which are connected together to operate similar to a four-bar linkage with spring joints. The progressive linkage provides a non-linear spring constant which can allow the micromirror to be tilted at any angle within its range substantially free from any electrostatic instability or hysteretic behavior.

  10. Wide-range CCD spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolova, Elena A.; Reyes Cortes, Santiago D.

    1996-08-01

    The utilization of wide range spectrometers is a very important feature for the design of optical diagnostics. This paper describes an innovative approach, based on charged coupled device, which allows to analyze different spectral intervals with the same diffraction grating. The spectral interval is varied by changing the position of the entrance slit when the grating is stationary. The optical system can also include a spherical mirror. In this case the geometric position of the mirror is calculated aiming at compensating the first order astigmatism and the meridional coma of the grating. This device is planned to be used in Thomson scattering diagnostic of the TOKAMAK of Instituto Superior Tecnico, Lisbon (ISTTOK).

  11. BENTON RANGE ROADLESS AREA, CALIFORNIA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McKee, Edwin H.; Rains, Richard L.

    1984-01-01

    On the basis of a mineral survey, two parts of the Benton Range Roadless Area, California are considered to have mineral-resource potential. The central and southern part of the roadless area, near several nonoperating mines, has a probable potential for tungsten and gold-silver mineralization in tactite zones. The central part of the area has a substantiated resource potential for gold and silver in quartz veins. Detailed mapping and geochemical sampling for tungsten, gold, and silver in the central and southern part of the roadless area might indicate targets for shallow drilling exploration.

  12. Wide-ranging sensor applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    The next time you sip a glass of wine from California's Napa Valley, you may want to offer a toast to NASA and the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA). A new partnership between the two agencies could help to improve the management of vineyards there. The partnership, which will apply remote-sensing data from satellites to 13 initial research issues, also could improve scientists' understanding of wildfires, range management, floodplain drainage, and other resources.The goal of the research, according to NASA, is to accelerate the movement of remote sensing research results and data into the operational arena.

  13. Acoustic interpretation of the voice range profile (phonetogram).

    PubMed

    Titze, I R

    1992-02-01

    The voice range profile (VRP) is a display of vocal intensity range versus fundamental frequency (F0). Past measurements have shown that the intensity range is reduced at the extremes of the F0 range, that there is a gradual upward tilt of the high- and low-intensity boundaries with increasing F0, and that a ripple exists at the boundaries. The intensity ripple, which results from tuning of source harmonics to the formants, is more noticeable at the upper boundary than the lower boundary because higher harmonics are not energized as effectively near phonation threshold as at maximum lung pressure. The gradual tilt of the intensity boundaries results from more effective transmission and radiation of acoustic energy at higher fundamental frequencies. This depends on the spectral distribution of the source power, however, At low F0, a smaller spectral slope (more harmonic energy) produces greater intensity. At high F0, on the other hand, a shift of energy toward the fundamental results in greater intensity. This dependence of intensity on spectral distribution of source power seems to explain the reduced intensity range at higher F0. An unrelated problem of reduced intensity range at low F0 stems from the inherent difficulty of keeping F0 from rising when subglottal pressure is increased.

  14. The "pressures" of being a ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleeman, K.; Scott, J. L.; Barton, M.

    2015-12-01

    As part of a larger project aimed at understanding the magma plumbing systems and magmatic processes responsible for crust formation at divergent plate margins, we have begun a study of the Galapagos Spreading Center (GSC), an intermediate spreading ridge off the west coast of South America and connected to the East Pacific Rise. This ridge is of interest because it passes close to the Galapagos Islands, allowing the effects of a mantle plume on sub-ridge processes and magma plumbing systems to be examined. In addition, the effects of ridge-ridge intersection, ridge propagation, and ridge offsets by transform faults on magma evolution can be examined. Published compositional data for glasses collected along the ridge were used to calculate pressures of partial crystallization and to examine variations in magma chemistry along the ridge. To aid interpretation of the results, the ridge was divided into 12 segments based on sample distribution and the occurrence of ridge offsets. Calculated pressures for most segments range from 100 and 300 MPa, and indicate depths of partial crystallization of ~3-9 km. This suggests that accretion occurs mostly near the base of the crust. However, the range of pressures for some segments is relatively large with maximum calculated values of 500-750 MPa. For example, near the major transform fault at ~85OW, the calculated maximum pressure is 741 MPa and the average pressure is ~ 300 MPa. We consider it unlikely that the calculated high pressures represent the true pressure of partial crystallization, and suggest that the compositions of some magmas result from processes other than simple crystallization. Correlations between Pressure and MgO, between Na2O and MgO, P2O5 and K2O, and between Na8 and longitude suggest that the processes operating beneath this ridge are complex. Near the transform fault for example, MgO vs Pressure shows a negative correlation with an R2 value of 0.546. Such trends are inconsistent with magma evolution

  15. Pressure derivatives of elastic moduli of fused quartz to 10 kb

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peselnick, L.; Meister, R.; Wilson, W.H.

    1967-01-01

    Measurements of the longitudinal and shear moduli were made on fused quartz to 10 kb at 24??5??C. The anomalous behavior of the bulk modulus K at low pressure, ???K ???P 0, at higher pressures. The pressure derivative of the rigidity modulus ???G ???P remains constant and negative for the pressure range covered. A 15-kb hydrostatic pressure vessel is described for use with ultrasonic pulse instrumentation for precise measurements of elastic moduli and density changes with pressure. The placing of the transducer outside the pressure medium, and the use of C-ring pressure seals result in ease of operation and simplicity of design. ?? 1967.

  16. Novel fabric pressure sensors: design, fabrication, and characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yangyong; Hua, Tao; Zhu, Bo; Li, Qiao; Yi, Weijing; Tao, Xiaoming

    2011-06-01

    Soft and pliable pressure sensors are essential elements in wearable electronics which have wide applications in modern daily lives. This paper presents a family of fabric pressure sensors made by sandwiching a piece of resistive fabric strain sensing element between two tooth-structured layers of soft elastomers. The pressure sensors are capable of measuring pressure from 0 to 2000 kPa, covering the whole range of human-machine interactions. A pressure sensitivity of up to 2.98 × 10 - 3 kPa - 1 was obtained. Theoretical modeling was conducted based on an energy method to predict the load-displacement relationship for various sensor configurations. By adjusting the Young's modulus of the two conversion layers, as well as the geometrical dimensions, the measurement ranges, and sensitivities of the sensors can be quantitatively determined. The sensors are being used for pressure measurements between the human body and garments, shoes, beds, and chairs.

  17. The Ames Vertical Gun Range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karcz, J. S.; Bowling, D.; Cornelison, C.; Parrish, A.; Perez, A.; Raiche, G.; Wiens, J.-P.

    2016-01-01

    The Ames Vertical Gun Range (AVGR) is a national facility for conducting laboratory- scale investigations of high-speed impact processes. It provides a set of light-gas, powder, and compressed gas guns capable of accelerating projectiles to speeds up to 7 km s(exp -1). The AVGR has a unique capability to vary the angle between the projectile-launch and gravity vectors between 0 and 90 deg. The target resides in a large chamber (diameter approximately 2.5 m) that can be held at vacuum or filled with an experiment-specific atmosphere. The chamber provides a number of viewing ports and feed-throughs for data, power, and fluids. Impacts are observed via high-speed digital cameras along with investigation-specific instrumentation, such as spectrometers. Use of the range is available via grant proposals through any Planetary Science Research Program element of the NASA Research Opportunities in Space and Earth Sciences (ROSES) calls. Exploratory experiments (one to two days) are additionally possible in order to develop a new proposal.

  18. Range-Measuring Video Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Richard T.; Briscoe, Jeri M.; Corder, Eric L.; Broderick, David

    2006-01-01

    Optoelectronic sensors of a proposed type would perform the functions of both electronic cameras and triangulation- type laser range finders. That is to say, these sensors would both (1) generate ordinary video or snapshot digital images and (2) measure the distances to selected spots in the images. These sensors would be well suited to use on robots that are required to measure distances to targets in their work spaces. In addition, these sensors could be used for all the purposes for which electronic cameras have been used heretofore. The simplest sensor of this type, illustrated schematically in the upper part of the figure, would include a laser, an electronic camera (either video or snapshot), a frame-grabber/image-capturing circuit, an image-data-storage memory circuit, and an image-data processor. There would be no moving parts. The laser would be positioned at a lateral distance d to one side of the camera and would be aimed parallel to the optical axis of the camera. When the range of a target in the field of view of the camera was required, the laser would be turned on and an image of the target would be stored and preprocessed to locate the angle (a) between the optical axis and the line of sight to the centroid of the laser spot.

  19. Live Fire Range Environmental Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    1993-08-01

    The Central Training Academy (CTA) is a DOE Headquarters Organization located in Albuquerque, New Mexico, with the mission to effectively and efficiently educate and train personnel involved in the protection of vital national security interests of DOE. The CTA Live Fire Range (LFR), where most of the firearms and tactical training occurs, is a complex separate from the main campus. The purpose of the proposed action is to expand the LFR to allow more options of implementing required training. The Department of Energy has prepared this Environmental Assessment (EA) for the proposed construction and operation of an expanded Live Fire Range Facility at the Central Training Academy in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Based on the analysis in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an environmental impact statement is not required and DOE is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

  20. Pressure Safety Program Implementation at ORNL

    SciTech Connect

    Lower, Mark; Etheridge, Tom; Oland, C. Barry

    2013-01-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is a US Department of Energy (DOE) facility that is managed by UT-Battelle, LLC. In February 2006, DOE promulgated worker safety and health regulations to govern contractor activities at DOE sites. These regulations, which are provided in 10 CFR 851, Worker Safety and Health Program, establish requirements for worker safety and health program that reduce or prevent occupational injuries, illnesses, and accidental losses by providing DOE contractors and their workers with safe and healthful workplaces at DOE sites. The regulations state that contractors must achieve compliance no later than May 25, 2007. According to 10 CFR 851, Subpart C, Specific Program Requirements, contractors must have a structured approach to their worker safety and health programs that at a minimum includes provisions for pressure safety. In implementing the structured approach for pressure safety, contractors must establish safety policies and procedures to ensure that pressure systems are designed, fabricated, tested, inspected, maintained, repaired, and operated by trained, qualified personnel in accordance with applicable sound engineering principles. In addition, contractors must ensure that all pressure vessels, boilers, air receivers, and supporting piping systems conform to (1) applicable American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (2004) Sections I through XII, including applicable code cases; (2) applicable ASME B31 piping codes; and (3) the strictest applicable state and local codes. When national consensus codes are not applicable because of pressure range, vessel geometry, use of special materials, etc., contractors must implement measures to provide equivalent protection and ensure a level of safety greater than or equal to the level of protection afforded by the ASME or applicable state or local codes. This report documents the work performed to address legacy pressure vessel deficiencies and comply

  1. Range Imaging without Moving Parts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blair, J. Bryan; Scott, V. Stanley, III; Ramos-Izquierdo, Luis

    2008-01-01

    Range-imaging instruments of a type now under development are intended to generate the equivalent of three-dimensional images from measurements of the round-trip times of flight of laser pulses along known directions. These instruments could also provide information on characteristics of targets, including roughnesses and reflectivities of surfaces and optical densities of such semi-solid objects as trees and clouds. Unlike in prior range-imaging instruments based on times of flight along known directions, there would be no moving parts; aiming of the laser beams along the known directions would not be accomplished by mechanical scanning of mirrors, prisms, or other optical components. Instead, aiming would be accomplished by using solid-state devices to switch input and output beams along different fiber-optic paths. Because of the lack of moving parts, these instruments could be extraordinarily reliable, rugged, and long-lasting. An instrument of this type would include an optical transmitter that would send out a laser pulse along a chosen direction to a target. An optical receiver coaligned with the transmitter would measure the temporally varying intensity of laser light reflected from the target to determine the distance and surface characteristics of the target. The transmitter would be a combination of devices for generating precise directional laser illumination. It would include a pulsed laser, the output of which would be coupled into a fiber-optic cable with a fan-out and solid-state optical switches that would enable switching of the laser beam onto one or more optical fibers terminated at known locations in an array on a face at the focal plane of a telescope. The array would be imaged by the telescope onto the target space. The receiver optical system could share the aforementioned telescope with the transmitter or could include a separate telescope aimed in the same direction as that of the transmitting telescope. In either case, light reflected

  2. Diagnosis of High Blood Pressure

    MedlinePlus

    ... the NHLBI on Twitter. Diagnosis of High Blood Pressure For most patients, health care providers diagnose high ... 140/90 mmHg or above. Confirming High Blood Pressure A blood pressure test is easy and painless ...

  3. Prevention of High Blood Pressure

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. Prevention of High Blood Pressure Healthy lifestyle habits, proper use of medicines, and ... prevent high blood pressure or its complications. Preventing High Blood Pressure Onset Healthy lifestyle habits can help prevent high ...

  4. Blood pressure monitors for home

    MedlinePlus

    ... type of blood pressure monitor for home use. DIGITAL BLOOD PRESSURE MONITORS A digital device will also have a cuff that wraps ... on its own. The screen will show a digital readout of your systolic and diastolic blood pressure. ...

  5. Wind dynamic range video camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craig, G. D. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A television camera apparatus is disclosed in which bright objects are attenuated to fit within the dynamic range of the system, while dim objects are not. The apparatus receives linearly polarized light from an object scene, the light being passed by a beam splitter and focused on the output plane of a liquid crystal light valve. The light valve is oriented such that, with no excitation from the cathode ray tube, all light is rotated 90 deg and focused on the input plane of the video sensor. The light is then converted to an electrical signal, which is amplified and used to excite the CRT. The resulting image is collected and focused by a lens onto the light valve which rotates the polarization vector of the light to an extent proportional to the light intensity from the CRT. The overall effect is to selectively attenuate the image pattern focused on the sensor.

  6. Explosives characterization in terahertz range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maestrojuán, I.; Palacios, I.; Etayo, D.; Iriarte, J. C.; Teniente, J.; Ederra, I.; Gonzalo, R.

    2011-11-01

    A Thz spectral characterization of the behaviour of different explosives is presented in this paper. This characterization will be done in the frequency range from 20 GHz to 4 THz using a Teraview Spectra 3000. This system has a capacity of measuring from 20 GHz to 4 THz fed by a laser source. With the Teraview Spectra 3000 equipment will be possible to calculate the refractive index, the absorbance and other important parameters of the explosive samples. With this study it will be possible to characterize some of the most common used explosives, i.e., gun explosive, gunpowder mine, pent, TNT, RDX, etc, and it will allow to determine their electromagnetic peculiarities in order to design a future imaging system that allow detecting them in security and defense sectors.

  7. Extended range tankless water heater

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, J.A.

    1993-04-18

    In this research program, a laboratory test facility was built for the purpose of testing a gas-fired water heating appliance. This test facility can be used to examine the important performance characteristics of efficiency, dynamic response, and quality of combustion. An innovative design for a tankless water heater was built and then tested to determine its performance characteristics. This unit was tested over a 5:1 range in input (20,000 to 100,000 btuh heat input). The unit was then configured as a circulating hot water boiler, and a specially designed heat exchanger was used with it to generate domestic hot water. This unit was also tested, and was found to offer performance advantages with regard to low flow and temperature stability.

  8. Wide Range SET Pulse Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shuler, Robert L.; Chen, Li

    2012-01-01

    A method for measuring a wide range of SET pulses is demonstrated. Use of dynamic logic, faster than ordinary CMOS, allows capture of short pulses. A weighted binning of SET lengths allows measurement of a wide range of pulse lengths with compact circuitry. A pulse-length-conservative pulse combiner tree routes SETs from combinational logic to the measurement circuit, allowing SET measurements in circuits that cannot easily be arranged in long chains. The method is applied to add-multiplex combinational logic, and to an array of NFET routing switches, at .35 micron. Pulses are captured in a chain of Domino Logic AND gates. Propagation through the chain is frozen on the trailing edge by dropping low the second "enable" input to the AND gates. Capacitive loading is increased in the latter stages to create an approximately logarithmic weighted binning, so that a broad range of pulse lengths can be captured with a 10 stage capture chain. Simulations show pulses can be captured which are 1/5th the length of those typically captured with leading edge triggered latch methods, and less than the length of those captured with a trailing edge latch method. After capture, the pulse pattern is transferred to an SEU protected shift register for readout. 64 instances of each of two types of logic are used as targets. One is a full adder with a 4 to 1 mux on its inputs. The other is a 4 x 4 NFET routing matrix. The outputs are passed through buffered XNOR comparators to identify pulses, which are merged in a buffered not-nand (OR) tree designed to avoid pulse absorption as much as possible. The output from each of the two test circuits are input into separate pulse measurement circuits. Test inputs were provided so that the circuit could be bench tested and calibrated. A third SET measurement circuit with no inputs was used to judge the contribution from direct hits on the measurement circuit. Heavy ions were used with an LET range from 12 to 176. At LET of 21 and below, the very

  9. Space - The long range future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Von Puttkamer, J.

    1985-01-01

    Space exploration goals for NASA in the year 2000 time frame are examined. A lunar base would offer the opportunity for continuous earth viewing, further cosmogeochemical exploration and rudimentary steps at self-sufficiency in space. The latter two factors are also compelling reasons to plan a manned Mars base. Furthermore, competition and cooperation in a Mars mission and further interplanetary exploration is an attractive substitute for war. The hardware requirements for various configurations of Mars missions are briefly addressed, along with other, unmanned missions to the asteroid belt, Mercury, Venus, Jupiter and the moons of Jupiter and Saturn. Finally, long-range technological requirements for providing adequate living/working facilities for larger human populations in Space Station environments are summarized.

  10. Understanding synthesis imaging dynamic range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, R.

    2013-03-01

    We develop a general framework for quantifying the many different contributions to the noise budget of an image made with an array of dishes or aperture array stations. Each noise contribution to the visibility data is associated with a relevant correlation timescale and frequency bandwidth so that the net impact on a complete observation can be assessed when a particular effect is not captured in the instrumental calibration. All quantities are parameterised as function of observing frequency and the visibility baseline length. We apply the resulting noise budget analysis to a wide range of existing and planned telescope systems that will operate between about 100 MHz and 5 GHz to ascertain the magnitude of the calibration challenges that they must overcome to achieve thermal noise limited performance. We conclude that calibration challenges are increased in several respects by small dimensions of the dishes or aperture array stations. It will be more challenging to achieve thermal noise limited performance using 15 m class dishes rather than the 25 m dishes of current arrays. Some of the performance risks are mitigated by the deployment of phased array feeds and more with the choice of an (alt,az,pol) mount, although a larger dish diameter offers the best prospects for risk mitigation. Many improvements to imaging performance can be anticipated at the expense of greater complexity in calibration algorithms. However, a fundamental limitation is ultimately imposed by an insufficient number of data constraints relative to calibration variables. The upcoming aperture array systems will be operating in a regime that has never previously been addressed, where a wide range of effects are expected to exceed the thermal noise by two to three orders of magnitude. Achieving routine thermal noise limited imaging performance with these systems presents an extreme challenge. The magnitude of that challenge is inversely related to the aperture array station diameter.

  11. Wide speed range turboshaft study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dangelo, Martin

    1995-01-01

    NASA-Lewis and NASA-Ames have sponsored a series of studies over the last few years to identify key high speed rotorcraft propulsion and airframe technologies. NASA concluded from these studies that for near term aircraft with cruise speeds up to 450 kt, tilting rotor rotorcraft concepts are the most economical and technologically viable. The propulsion issues critical to tilting rotor rotorcraft are: (1) high speed cruise propulsion system efficiency and (2) adequate power to hover safely with one engine inoperative. High speed cruise propeller efficiency can be dramatically improved by reducing rotor speed, yet high rotor speed is critical for good hover performance. With a conventional turboshaft, this wide range of power turbine operating speeds would result in poor engine performance at one or more of these critical operating conditions. This study identifies several wide speed range turboshaft concepts, and analyzes their potential to improve performance at the diverse cruise and hover operating conditions. Many unique concepts were examined, and the selected concepts are simple, low cost, relatively low risk, and entirely contained within the power turbine. These power turbine concepts contain unique, incidence tolerant airfoil designs that allow the engine to cruise efficiently at 51 percent of the hover rotor speed. Overall propulsion system efficiency in cruise is improved as much as 14 percent, with similar improvements in engine weight and cost. The study is composed of a propulsion requirement survey, a concept screening study, a preliminary definition and evaluation of selected concepts, and identification of key technologies and development needs. In addition, a civil transport tilting rotor rotorcraft mission analysis was performed to show the benefit of these concepts versus a conventional turboshaft. Other potential applications for this technology are discussed.

  12. Expansion-based passive ranging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barniv, Yair

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes a new technique of passive ranging which is based on utilizing the image-plane expansion experienced by every object as its distance from the sensor decreases. This technique belongs in the feature/object-based family. The motion and shape of a small window, assumed to be fully contained inside the boundaries of some object, is approximated by an affine transformation. The parameters of the transformation matrix are derived by initially comparing successive images, and progressively increasing the image time separation so as to achieve much larger triangulation baseline than currently possible. Depth is directly derived from the expansion part of the transformation. To a first approximation, image-plane expansion is independent of image-plane location with respect to the focus of expansion (FOE) and of platform maneuvers. Thus, an expansion-based method has the potential of providing a reliable range in the difficult image area around the FOE. In areas far from the FOE the shift parameters of the affine transformation can provide more accurate depth information than the expansion alone, and can thus be used similarly to the way they have been used in conjunction with the Inertial Navigation Unit (INU) and Kalman filtering. However, the performance of a shift-based algorithm, when the shifts are derived from the affine transformation, would be much improved compared to current algorithms because the shifts--as well as the other parameters--can be obtained between widely separated images. Thus, the main advantage of this new approach is that, allowing the tracked window to expand and rotate, in addition to moving laterally, enables one to correlate images over a very long time span which, in turn, translates into a large spatial baseline resulting in a proportionately higher depth accuracy.

  13. Expansion-based passive ranging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barniv, Yair

    1993-01-01

    A new technique of passive ranging which is based on utilizing the image-plane expansion experienced by every object as its distance from the sensor decreases is described. This technique belongs in the feature/object-based family. The motion and shape of a small window, assumed to be fully contained inside the boundaries of some object, is approximated by an affine transformation. The parameters of the transformation matrix are derived by initially comparing successive images, and progressively increasing the image time separation so as to achieve much larger triangulation baseline than currently possible. Depth is directly derived from the expansion part of the transformation. To a first approximation, image-plane expansion is independent of image-plane location with respect to the focus of expansion (FOE) and of platform maneuvers. Thus, an expansion-based method has the potential of providing a reliable range in the difficult image area around the FOE. In areas far from the FOE the shift parameters of the affine transformation can provide more accurate depth information than the expansion alone, and can thus be used similarly to the way they were used in conjunction with the Inertial Navigation Unit (INU) and Kalman filtering. However, the performance of a shift-based algorithm, when the shifts are derived from the affine transformation, would be much improved compared to current algorithms because the shifts - as well as the other parameters - can be obtained between widely separated images. Thus, the main advantage of this new approach is that, allowing the tracked window to expand and rotate, in addition to moving laterally, enables one to correlate images over a very long time span which, in turn, translates into a large spatial baseline - resulting in a proportionately higher depth accuracy.

  14. Passive blast pressure sensor

    DOEpatents

    King, Michael J.; Sanchez, Roberto J.; Moss, William C.

    2013-03-19

    A passive blast pressure sensor for detecting blast overpressures of at least a predetermined minimum threshold pressure. The blast pressure sensor includes a piston-cylinder arrangement with one end of the piston having a detection surface exposed to a blast event monitored medium through one end of the cylinder and the other end of the piston having a striker surface positioned to impact a contact stress sensitive film that is positioned against a strike surface of a rigid body, such as a backing plate. The contact stress sensitive film is of a type which changes color in response to at least a predetermined minimum contact stress which is defined as a product of the predetermined minimum threshold pressure and an amplification factor of the piston. In this manner, a color change in the film arising from impact of the piston accelerated by a blast event provides visual indication that a blast overpressure encountered from the blast event was not less than the predetermined minimum threshold pressure.

  15. Flow compensating pressure regulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baehr, E. F. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    An apparatus for regulating pressure of treatment fluid during ophthalmic procedures is described. Flow sensing and pressure regulating diaphragms are used to modulate a flow control valve. The pressure regulating diaphragm is connected to the flow control valve to urge the valve to an open position due to pressure being applied to the diaphragm by bias means such as a spring. The flow sensing diaphragm is mechanically connected to the flow control valve and urges it to an opened position because of the differential pressure on the diaphragm generated by a flow of incoming treatment fluid through an orifice in the diaphragm. A bypass connection with a variable restriction is connected in parallel relationship to the orifice to provide for adjusting the sensitivity of the flow sensing diaphragm. A multiple lever linkage system is utilized between the center of the second diaphragm and the flow control valve to multiply the force applied to the valve by the other diaphragm and reverse the direction of the force.

  16. Donor solvent coal liquefaction with bottoms recycle at elevated pressure

    DOEpatents

    Bauman, Richard F.; Taunton, John W.; Anderson, George H.; Trachte, Ken L.; Hsia, Steve J.

    1982-01-01

    An improved process for liquefying solid carbonaceous materials wherein increased naphtha yields are achieved by effecting the liquefaction at a pressure within the range from about 1750 to about 2800 psig in the presence of recycled bottoms and a hydrogen-donor solvent containing at least 0.8 wt % donatable hydrogen. The liquefaction is accomplished at a temperature within the range from about 700.degree. to about 950.degree. F. The coal:bottoms ratio in the feed to liquefaction will be within the range from about 1:1 to about 5:1 and the solvent or diluent to total solids ratio will be at least 1.5:1 and preferably within the range from about 1.6:1 to about 3:1. The yield of naphtha boiling range materials increases as the pressure increases but generally reaches a maximum at a pressure within the range from about 2000 to about 2500 psig.

  17. Evolvable Cryogenics (ECRYO) Pressure Transducer Calibration Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diaz, Carlos E., Jr.

    2015-01-01

    This paper provides a summary of the findings of recent activities conducted by Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC) In-Space Propulsion Branch and MSFC's Metrology and Calibration Lab to assess the performance of current "state of the art" pressure transducers for use in long duration storage and transfer of cryogenic propellants. A brief historical narrative in this paper describes the Evolvable Cryogenics program and the relevance of these activities to the program. This paper also provides a review of three separate test activities performed throughout this effort, including: (1) the calibration of several pressure transducer designs in a liquid nitrogen cryogenic environmental chamber, (2) the calibration of a pressure transducer in a liquid helium Dewar, and (3) the calibration of several pressure transducers at temperatures ranging from 20 to 70 degrees Kelvin (K) using a "cryostat" environmental chamber. These three separate test activities allowed for study of the sensors along a temperature range from 4 to 300 K. The combined data shows that both the slope and intercept of the sensor's calibration curve vary as a function of temperature. This homogeneous function is contrary to the linearly decreasing relationship assumed at the start of this investigation. Consequently, the data demonstrates the need for lookup tables to change the slope and intercept used by any data acquisition system. This ultimately would allow for more accurate pressure measurements at the desired temperature range. This paper concludes with a review of a request for information (RFI) survey conducted amongst different suppliers to determine the availability of current "state of the art" flight-qualified pressure transducers. The survey identifies requirements that are most difficult for the suppliers to meet, most notably the capability to validate the sensor's performance at temperatures below 70 K.

  18. The low-cost and precise piston gas pressure regulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudasik, Mateusz; Skoczylas, Norbert

    2016-03-01

    The present paper discusses the concept and functioning of an innovative instrument for precise stabilization of gas pressure. The piston gas pressure regulator was constructed at the Strata Mechanics Research Institute of the Polish Academy of Sciences. The tests to which the instrument was subjected involved observing the values of stabilized pressure at the level of 10 bar and 3 bar, for various gas flow rates at the outlet of the instrument. The piston gas pressure regulator operates within the range of 0-10 bar and the gas flow range of 0-240 cm3 min-1. The precision of the process of stabilizing the initial pressure is  ±0.005 bar, regardless of the gas pressure value and the flow rate observed at the outlet of the instrument. Although the pressure transducer’s accuracy is 0.25% of the full range, the conducted tests of the regulator demonstrated that the obtained changeability of the stabilized pressure is at least two times lower. Unlike some other gas pressure regulators available on the market, the instrument constructed by the authors of the present paper is highly precise when it comes to the process of stabilization, and inexpensive to build.

  19. Diaphragm size and sensitivity for fiber optic pressure sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    He, Gang; Cuomo, Frank W.; Zuckerwar, Allan J.

    1991-01-01

    A mechanism which leads to a significant increase in sensitivity and linear operating range in reflective type fiber optic pressure transducers with minute active dimensions is studied. A general theoretical formalism is presented which is in good agreement with the experimental data. These results are found useful in the development of small pressure sensors used in turbulent boundary layer studies and other applications.

  20. Measurement of cochlear acoustic pressure in guinea pigs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franke, R.; Dancer, A.

    1983-10-01

    Guinea pig cochlear acoustic pressure was measured in the 3 to 200 Hz range. The cochlear microphonic potential was recorded. The experimental results agree with the Peterson and Bogert model. The pressure transducers and the calibrating device are confirmed to be excellent tools for this type of research.

  1. Prediction of performance of centrifugal pumps during starts under pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rostafinski, W.

    1969-01-01

    Method which calculates start-up characteristics of centrifugal pumps reveals a capacity to predict pressure drop characteristics of pumps with vaned diffusers. Calculations are based on pump geometry, design-point flow, speed, and pressure rise, and the pump characteristic within range of approximately ten percent of the design-point flow.

  2. The epidemiology of blood pressure and its worldwide management.

    PubMed

    Rahimi, Kazem; Emdin, Connor A; MacMahon, Stephen

    2015-03-13

    Despite the vast amount of evidence on the benefits of blood pressure lowering accumulated to date, elevated blood pressure is still the leading risk factor for disease and disability worldwide. The purpose of this review is to summarize the epidemiological evidence underpinning the association between blood pressure and a range of conditions. This review focuses on the association between systolic and diastolic blood pressures and the risk of cardiovascular and renal disease. Evidence for and against the existence of a J-shaped curve association between blood pressure and cardiovascular risk, and differences in the predictive power of systolic, diastolic, and pulse pressure, are described. In addition, global and regional trends in blood pressure levels and management of hypertension are reviewed.

  3. Test for pressure control capacity of the Eustachian tube.

    PubMed

    Kitahara, M; Kodama, A; Ozawa, H; Izukura, H; Inoue, S

    1994-01-01

    Because of Eustachian tube controls middle ear pressure to maintain the best hearing level, we tested the equilibration capacity of the Eustachian tube by measuring hearing levels in a soundproof pressure chamber. The number of swallows to recover normal hearing after the chamber pressure reached -200 mm H2O (an index of equilibration capacity for the static pressure differences across the eardrum) was less than 9 in normal subjects. The worst level of hearing and the time required to recover normal hearing from the beginning of alteration in the chamber pressure to -700 mm H2O (indexes of equilibration capacity for dynamic pressure differences across the eardrum) were 0-17 dB and within 120s in normal subjects. It was difficult to determine definitive normal ranges of the equilibrium capacity of the Eustachian tube when positive pressure was applied.

  4. Direct measurement of capillary blood pressure in the human lip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parazynski, S. E.; Tucker, B. J.; Aratow, M.; Crenshaw, A.; Hargens, A. R.

    1993-01-01

    In this study, we developed and tested a new procedure for measuring microcirculatory blood pressures above heart level in humans. Capillary and postcapillary venule blood pressures were measured directly in 13 human subjects by use of the servonulling micropressure technique adapted for micropuncture of lip capillaries. Pressure waveforms were recorded in 40 separate capillary vessels and 14 separate postcapillary venules over periods ranging from 5 to 64 s. Localization and determination of capillary and postcapillary vessels were ascertained anatomically before pressure measurements. Capillary pressure was 33.2 +/- 1.5 (SE) mm Hg in lips of subjects seated upright. Repeated micropunctures of the same vessel gave an average coefficient of variation of 0.072. Postcapillary venule pressure was 18.9 +/- 1.6 mm Hg. This procedure produces a direct and reproducible means of measuring microvascular blood pressures in a vascular bed above heart level in humans.

  5. Magnetostrictive Pressure Regulating System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richard, James A. (Inventor); Pickens, Herman L. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A magnetostrictive pressure regulating system includes a magnetostrictive valve that incorporates a magnetostrictive actuator with at least one current-carrying coil disposed thereabout. A pressure force sensor, in fluid communication with the fluid exiting the valve, includes (i) a magnetostrictive material, (ii) a magnetic field generator in proximity to the magnetostrictive material for inducing a magnetic field in and surrounding the magnetostrictive material wherein lines of magnetic flux passing through the magnetostrictive material are defined, and (iii) a sensor positioned adjacent to the magnetostrictive material and in the magnetic field for measuring changes in at least one of flux angle and flux density when the magnetostrictive material experiences an applied force that is aligned with the lines of magnetic flux. The pressure of the fluid exiting the valve causes the applied force. A controller coupled to the sensor and to the current-carrying coil adjusts a current supplied to the current-carrying coil based on the changes so-measured.

  6. [Intraocular pressure in phacoemulsification].

    PubMed

    Synek, S; Synková, M; Skorkovská, S

    2002-01-01

    The authors investigated changes of the intraocular pressure after non-complicated phacoemulsification with implantation of an intraocular lens of different types (OMMA, silicone, Acrysof) in 40 patients. From the results it is obvious that in some patients already 4 hours after surgery the intraocular pressure rises to an average of 31 +/- 17 mm Hg. The magnitude of the intraocular pressure was not influenced by the size of the surgical wound nor the type of intraocular lens. In values below 30 mm Hg the authors recommend merely follow up of the patients as they assume that these values have a positive impact on closure of the tunnel incision. In the differential diagnosis it is important to consider the post-operative inflammatory reaction, the absorption reaction of residual viscoelastic material, pupillary block while the lenticular capsule is intact and undiagnosed glaucoma. In values above 30 mm Hg the authors recommend administration of beta-blockers, Diluran and antiphlogistics.

  7. Pressure suppression containment system

    DOEpatents

    Gluntz, Douglas M.; Townsend, Harold E.

    1994-03-15

    A pressure suppression containment system includes a containment vessel surrounding a reactor pressure vessel and defining a drywell therein containing a non-condensable gas. An enclosed wetwell pool is disposed inside the containment vessel, and a gravity driven cooling system (GDCS) pool is disposed above the wetwell pool in the containment vessel. The wetwell pool includes a plenum for receiving the non-condensable gas carried with steam from the drywell following a loss-of coolant-accident (LOCA). The wetwell plenum is vented to a plenum above the GDCS pool following the LOCA for suppressing pressure rise within the containment vessel. A method of operation includes channeling steam released into the drywell following the LOCA into the wetwell pool for cooling along with the non-condensable gas carried therewith. The GDCS pool is then drained by gravity, and the wetwell plenum is vented into the GDCS plenum for channeling the non-condensable gas thereto.

  8. Pressure suppression containment system

    DOEpatents

    Gluntz, D.M.; Townsend, H.E.

    1994-03-15

    A pressure suppression containment system includes a containment vessel surrounding a reactor pressure vessel and defining a drywell therein containing a non-condensable gas. An enclosed wetwell pool is disposed inside the containment vessel, and a gravity driven cooling system (GDCS) pool is disposed above the wetwell pool in the containment vessel. The wetwell pool includes a plenum for receiving the non-condensable gas carried with steam from the drywell following a loss-of-coolant-accident (LOCA). The wetwell plenum is vented to a plenum above the GDCS pool following the LOCA for suppressing pressure rise within the containment vessel. A method of operation includes channeling steam released into the drywell following the LOCA into the wetwell pool for cooling along with the non-condensable gas carried therewith. The GDCS pool is then drained by gravity, and the wetwell plenum is vented into the GDCS plenum for channeling the non-condensable gas thereto. 6 figures.

  9. HIGH PRESSURE GAS REGULATOR

    DOEpatents

    Ramage, R.W.

    1962-05-01

    A gas regulator operating on the piston and feedback principle is described. The device is particularly suitable for the delicate regulation of high pressure, i.e., 10,000 psi and above, gas sources, as well as being perfectly adaptable for use on gas supplies as low as 50 psi. The piston is adjustably connected to a needle valve and the movement of the piston regulates the flow of gas from the needle valve. The gas output is obtained from the needle valve. Output pressure is sampled by a piston feedback means which, in turn, regulates the movement of the main piston. When the output is other than the desired value, the feedback system initiates movement of the main piston to allow the output pressure to be corrected or to remain constant. (AEC)

  10. Oxygen partial pressure sensor

    DOEpatents

    Dees, D.W.

    1994-09-06

    A method for detecting oxygen partial pressure and an oxygen partial pressure sensor are provided. The method for measuring oxygen partial pressure includes contacting oxygen to a solid oxide electrolyte and measuring the subsequent change in electrical conductivity of the solid oxide electrolyte. A solid oxide electrolyte is utilized that contacts both a porous electrode and a nonporous electrode. The electrical conductivity of the solid oxide electrolyte is affected when oxygen from an exhaust stream permeates through the porous electrode to establish an equilibrium of oxygen anions in the electrolyte, thereby displacing electrons throughout the electrolyte to form an electron gradient. By adapting the two electrodes to sense a voltage potential between them, the change in electrolyte conductivity due to oxygen presence can be measured. 1 fig.

  11. Oxygen partial pressure sensor

    DOEpatents

    Dees, Dennis W.

    1994-01-01

    A method for detecting oxygen partial pressure and an oxygen partial pressure sensor are provided. The method for measuring oxygen partial pressure includes contacting oxygen to a solid oxide electrolyte and measuring the subsequent change in electrical conductivity of the solid oxide electrolyte. A solid oxide electrolyte is utilized that contacts both a porous electrode and a nonporous electrode. The electrical conductivity of the solid oxide electrolyte is affected when oxygen from an exhaust stream permeates through the porous electrode to establish an equilibrium of oxygen anions in the electrolyte, thereby displacing electrons throughout the electrolyte to form an electron gradient. By adapting the two electrodes to sense a voltage potential between them, the change in electrolyte conductivity due to oxygen presence can be measured.

  12. PRESSURE SENSING DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    Pope, K.E.

    1959-12-15

    This device is primarily useful as a switch which is selectively operable to actuate in response to either absolute or differential predetermined pressures. The device generally comprises a pressure-tight housing divided by a movable impermeable diaphragm into two chambers, a reference pressure chamber and a bulb chamber containing the switching means and otherwise filled with an incompressible non-conducting fluid. The switch means comprises a normally collapsed bulb having an electrically conductive outer surface and a vent tube leading to the housing exterior. The normally collapsed bulb is disposed such that upon its inflation, respensive to air inflow from the vent, two contacts fixed within the bulb chamber are adapted to be electrically shorted by the conducting outer surface of the bulb.

  13. Pressure gradient influence in turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reuther, Nico; Kaehler, Christian J.

    2015-11-01

    Understanding wall-bounded turbulence is still an ongoing process. Although remarkable progress has been made in the last decades, many challenges still remain. Mean flow statistics are well understood in case of zero pressure gradient flows. However, almost all turbulent boundary layers in technical applications, such as aircrafts, are subjected to a streamwise pressure gradient. When subjecting turbulent boundary layers to adverse pressure gradients, significant changes in the statistical behavior of the near-wall flow have been observed in experimental studies conducted however the details dynamics and characteristics of these flows has not been fully resolved. The sensitivity to Reynolds number and the dependency on several parameters, including the dependence on the pressure gradient parameter, is still under debate and very little information exists about statistically averaged quantities such as the mean velocity profile or Reynolds stresses. In order to improve the understanding of wall-bounded turbulence, this work experimentally investigates turbulent boundary layer subjected to favorable and adverse pressure gradients by means of Particle Image Velocimetry over a wide range of Reynolds numbers, 4200 pressure gradient.

  14. Graphene Membranes for Atmospheric Pressure Photoelectron Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Weatherup, Robert S; Eren, Baran; Hao, Yibo; Bluhm, Hendrik; Salmeron, Miquel B

    2016-05-01

    Atmospheric pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) is demonstrated using single-layer graphene membranes as photoelectron-transparent barriers that sustain pressure differences in excess of 6 orders of magnitude. The graphene serves as a support for catalyst nanoparticles under atmospheric pressure reaction conditions (up to 1.5 bar), where XPS allows the oxidation state of Cu nanoparticles and gas phase species to be simultaneously probed. We thereby observe that the Cu(2+) oxidation state is stable in O2 (1 bar) but is spontaneously reduced under vacuum. We further demonstrate the detection of various gas-phase species (Ar, CO, CO2, N2, O2) in the pressure range 10-1500 mbar including species with low photoionization cross sections (He, H2). Pressure-dependent changes in the apparent binding energies of gas-phase species are observed, attributable to changes in work function of the metal-coated grids supporting the graphene. We expect atmospheric pressure XPS based on this graphene membrane approach to be a valuable tool for studying nanoparticle catalysis.

  15. Monitoring Air Circulation Under Reduced Pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rygalov, Vadim

    Adequate air circulation is required for controlled environments to maintain uniform temperature and humidity control, and hence the ability to measure air flow accurately is important. Human and associated life support habitats (e.g.,. plant production systems) for future space missions will likely be operated at pressures less than 100 kPa to minimize gas leakage and structural mass. Under such reduced pressures, the outputs from conventional anemometers for monitoring air flow can change and require re-calibration. These effects of atmospheric pressure on different types of air flow measurements are not completely understood; hence we compared the performance of several air flow sensors across a range of hypobaric pressures. Sensors included a propeller type anemometer, a hot-wire anemometer, and a Pitot-tube based device. Theoretical schematics (including mathematical models) underlying these measurements were developed. Results demonstrated that changes in sensor outputs were predictable based on their operating principles, and that corrections could be developed for sensors calibrated under normal Earth atmosphere pressure ( 100 kPa) and then used at different pressures. The potential effects of hypobaric atmospheres and their altered air flows on plant physiology are also discussed.

  16. Performance of a cascade in an annular vortex-generating tunnel over range of Reynolds numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thurston, Sidney; Brunk, Ralph E

    1951-01-01

    Total-pressure deficiency for an annular cascade of 65-(12)10 blades was measured at three radial stations over a range of Reynolds numbers from 50,000 to 250,000 and at angles of attack of 15 degrees and 25 degrees. The variation of turning angle and shape of static pressure distribution at these stations is also shown.

  17. Gasdynamics/Mechanical Hybrid Sabot Separation Method Rectangular-Bore Ballistic Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imaizumi, T.; Toyoda, A.; Sasoh, Akihiro

    Aeroballistic range is a great facility for measuring a near field pressure around a supersonic free flight model. Commonly-used wind tunnel experiments enable to measure the pressure data under well controlled attitude conditions. However the obtained data are influenced by a sting and boundary layer.

  18. Laboratory evaluation of the pressure water level data logger manufactured by Infinities USA, Inc.: results of pressure and temperature tests

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carnley, Mark V.

    2015-01-01

    The Pressure Water Level Data Logger manufactured by Infinities USA, Inc., was evaluated by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Hydrologic Instrumentation Facility for conformance with the manufacturer’s stated accuracy specifications for measuring pressure throughout the device’s operating temperature range and with the USGS accuracy requirements for water-level measurements. The Pressure Water Level Data Logger (Infinities Logger) is a submersible, sealed, water-level sensing device with an operating pressure range of 0 to 11.5 feet of water over a temperature range of −18 to 49 degrees Celsius. For the pressure range tested, the manufacturer’s accuracy specification of 0.1 percent of full scale pressure equals an accuracy of ±0.138 inch of water. Three Infinities Loggers were evaluated, and the testing procedures followed and results obtained are described in this report. On the basis of the test results, the device is poorly compensated for temperature. For the three Infinities Loggers, the mean pressure differences varied from –4.04 to 5.32 inches of water and were not within the manufacturer’s accuracy specification for pressure measurements made within the temperature-compensated range. The device did not meet the manufacturer’s stated accuracy specifications for pressure within its temperature-compensated operating range of –18 to 49 degrees Celsius or the USGS accuracy requirements of no more than 0.12 inch of water (0.01 foot of water) or 0.10 percent of reading, whichever is larger. The USGS accuracy requirements are routinely examined and reported when instruments are evaluated at the Hydrologic Instrumentation Facility. The estimated combined measurement uncertainty for the pressure cycling test was ±0.139 inch of water, and for temperature, the cycling test was ±0.127 inch of water for the three Infinities Loggers.

  19. Mechanisms of endospore inactivation under high pressure.

    PubMed

    Reineke, Kai; Mathys, Alexander; Heinz, Volker; Knorr, Dietrich

    2013-06-01

    It is well known that spore germination and inactivation can be achieved within a broad temperature and pressure range. The existing literature, however, reports contradictory results concerning the effectiveness of different pressure-temperature combinations and the underlying inactivation mechanism(s). Much of the published kinetic data are prone to error as a result of unstable process conditions or an incomplete investigation of the entire inactivation pathway. Here, we review this field of research, and also discuss an inactivation mechanism of at least two steps and propose an inactivation model based on current data. Further, spore resistance properties and matrix interactions are linked to spore inactivation effectiveness.

  20. High pressure water jet cutting and stripping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoppe, David T.; Babai, Majid K.

    1991-01-01

    High pressure water cutting techniques have a wide range of applications to the American space effort. Hydroblasting techniques are commonly used during the refurbishment of the reusable solid rocket motors. The process can be controlled to strip a thermal protective ablator without incurring any damage to the painted surface underneath by using a variation of possible parameters. Hydroblasting is a technique which is easily automated. Automation removes personnel from the hostile environment of the high pressure water. Computer controlled robots can perform the same task in a fraction of the time that would be required by manual operation.

  1. Pressure Sensor Calibration using VIPA Hardware

    SciTech Connect

    Suarez, Reynold; Heimbigner, Tom R.; Forrester, Joel B.; Hayes, James C.; Lidey, Lance S.

    2008-10-08

    The VIPA hardware uses a series of modules to control the system. One of the modules that the VIPA hardware uses is a 16-bit analog input module. The main purpose of this module is to read in a voltage. The inputs of these modules are connected directly to the voltage outputs of all the pressure sensors in the system. Because the sensors have different pressure and voltage output ranges, it is necessary to calibrate and scale the sensors so that the values make sense to the operator of the system.

  2. Elastic properties of solids at high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vekilov, Yu Kh; Krasilnikov, O. M.; Lugovskoy, A. V.

    2015-11-01

    This review examines the elastic response of solids under load. The definitions of isothermal and adiabatic elastic constants of ( n≥2) for a loaded crystal are given. For the case of hydrostatic pressure, two techniques are proposed for calculating the second-, third-, and fourth-order elastic constants from the energy-strain and stress-strain relations. As an example, using the proposed approach within the framework of the density functional theory, the second- to fourth-order elastic constants of bcc tungsten are calculated for the pressure range of 0-600 GPa.

  3. Climate change-driven species' range shifts filtered by photoperiodism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saikkonen, Kari; Taulavuori, Kari; Hyvönen, Terho; Gundel, Pedro E.; Hamilton, Cyd E.; Vänninen, Irene; Nissinen, Anne; Helander, Marjo

    2012-04-01

    Forecasts of species range shifts as a result of climate change are essential, because invasions by exotic species shape biodiversity and therefore ecosystem functions and services. Ecologists have focused on propagule pressure (for example, the number of individuals and invasion events), the characteristics of an invading species, and its new abiotic and biotic environment to predict the likelihood of range expansion and invasion. Here, we emphasize the role of photoperiodic response on the range expansion of species. Unlike temperature, the latitudinal gradient of seasonal changes in day length is a stable, abiotic environmental factor that does not change with local or global climate. Predicting range expansions across latitudes and the subsequent consequences for native communities requires a more comprehensive understanding of how species use day length to coordinate seasonal growth, reproduction, physiology and synchronization of life cycles with interacting individuals and species.

  4. Domestic atmospheric pressure thermal deaerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egorov, P. V.; Gimmelberg, A. S.; Mikhailov, V. G.; Baeva, A. N.; Chuprakov, M. V.; Grigoriev, G. V.

    2016-04-01

    Based on many years of experience and proven technical solutions, modern atmospheric pressure deaerators of the capacity of 0.4 to 800 t/h were designed and developed. The construction of such deaerators is based on known and explored technical solutions. A two-stage deaeration scheme is applied where the first stage is a jet dripping level (in a column) and the second one is a bubble level (in a tank). In the design of deaeration columns, low-pressure hydraulic nozzles (Δ p < 0.15 MPa) and jet trays are used, and in deaerator tank, a developed "flooded" sparger is applied, which allows to significantly increase the intensity of the heat and mass exchange processes in the apparatus. The use of the two efficient stages in a column and a "flooded" sparger in a tank allows to reliably guarantee the necessary water heating and deaeration. Steam or "superheated" water of the temperature of t ≥ 125°C can be used as the coolant in the deaerators. The commissioning tests of the new deaerator prototypes of the capacity of 800 and 500 t/h in the HPP conditions showed their sustainable, reliable, and efficient work in the designed range of hydraulic and thermal loads. The content of solved oxygen and free carbon dioxide in make-up water after deaerators meets the requirements of State Standard GOST 16860-88, the operating rules and regulations, and the customer's specifications. Based on these results, the proposals were developed on the structure and the design of deaerators of the productivity of more than 800 t/h for the use in circuits of large heating systems and the preparation of feed water to the TPP at heating and industrial-heating plants. The atmospheric pressure thermal deaerators developed at NPO TsKTI with consideration of the current requirements are recommended for the use in water preparation schemes of various power facilities.

  5. Methods of Blood Pressure Measurement in the ICU

    PubMed Central

    Lehman, Li-wei H.; Saeed, Mohammed; Talmor, Daniel; Mark, Roger; Malhotra, Atul

    2013-01-01

    Objective Minimal clinical research has investigated the significance of different blood pressure monitoring techniques in the ICU and whether systolic vs. mean blood pressures should be targeted in therapeutic protocols and in defining clinical study cohorts. The objectives of this study are to compare real-world invasive arterial blood pressure with noninvasive blood pressure, and to determine if differences between the two techniques have clinical implications. Design We conducted a retrospective study comparing invasive arterial blood pressure and noninvasive blood pressure measurements using a large ICU database. We performed pairwise comparison between concurrent measures of invasive arterial blood pressure and noninvasive blood pressure. We studied the association of systolic and mean invasive arterial blood pressure and noninvasive blood pressure with acute kidney injury, and with ICU mortality. Setting Adult intensive care units at a tertiary care hospital. Patients Adult patients admitted to intensive care units between 2001 and 2007. Interventions None. Measurements and Main Results Pairwise analysis of 27,022 simultaneously measured invasive arterial blood pressure/noninvasive blood pressure pairs indicated that noninvasive blood pressure overestimated systolic invasive arterial blood pressure during hypotension. Analysis of acute kidney injury and ICU mortality involved 1,633 and 4,957 patients, respectively. Our results indicated that hypotensive systolic noninvasive blood pressure readings were associated with a higher acute kidney injury prevalence (p = 0.008) and ICU mortality (p < 0.001) than systolic invasive arterial blood pressure in the same range (≤70 mm Hg). Noninvasive blood pressure and invasive arterial blood pressure mean arterial pressures showed better agreement; acute kidney injury prevalence (p = 0.28) and ICU mortality (p = 0.76) associated with hypotensive mean arterial pressure readings (≤60 mm Hg) were independent of

  6. Krypton oxides under pressure

    PubMed Central

    Zaleski-Ejgierd, Patryk; Lata, Pawel M.

    2016-01-01

    Under high pressure, krypton, one of the most inert elements is predicted to become sufficiently reactive to form a new class of krypton compounds; krypton oxides. Using modern ab-initio evolutionary algorithms in combination with Density Functional Theory, we predict the existence of several thermodynamically stable Kr/O species at elevated pressures. In particular, our calculations indicate that at approx. 300 GPa the monoxide, KrO, should form spontaneously and remain thermo- and dynamically stable with respect to constituent elements and higher oxides. The monoxide is predicted to form non-molecular crystals with short Kr-O contacts, typical for genuine chemical bonds. PMID:26830129

  7. Krypton oxides under pressure.

    PubMed

    Zaleski-Ejgierd, Patryk; Lata, Pawel M

    2016-02-02

    Under high pressure, krypton, one of the most inert elements is predicted to become sufficiently reactive to form a new class of krypton compounds; krypton oxides. Using modern ab-initio evolutionary algorithms in combination with Density Functional Theory, we predict the existence of several thermodynamically stable Kr/O species at elevated pressures. In particular, our calculations indicate that at approx. 300 GPa the monoxide, KrO, should form spontaneously and remain thermo- and dynamically stable with respect to constituent elements and higher oxides. The monoxide is predicted to form non-molecular crystals with short Kr-O contacts, typical for genuine chemical bonds.

  8. Blood Pressure Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Engineering Development Lab., Inc.'s E-2000 Neck Baro Reflex System was developed for cardiovascular studies of astronauts. It is regularly used on Space Shuttle Missions, and a parallel version has been developed as a research tool to facilitate studies of blood pressure reflex controls in patients with congestive heart failure, diabetes, etc. An advanced version, the PPC-1000, was developed in 1991, and the technology has been refined substantially. The PPC provides an accurate means of generating pressure for a broad array of laboratory applications. An improved version, the E2010 Barosystem, is anticipated.

  9. Krypton oxides under pressure.

    PubMed

    Zaleski-Ejgierd, Patryk; Lata, Pawel M

    2016-01-01

    Under high pressure, krypton, one of the most inert elements is predicted to become sufficiently reactive to form a new class of krypton compounds; krypton oxides. Using modern ab-initio evolutionary algorithms in combination with Density Functional Theory, we predict the existence of several thermodynamically stable Kr/O species at elevated pressures. In particular, our calculations indicate that at approx. 300 GPa the monoxide, KrO, should form spontaneously and remain thermo- and dynamically stable with respect to constituent elements and higher oxides. The monoxide is predicted to form non-molecular crystals with short Kr-O contacts, typical for genuine chemical bonds. PMID:26830129

  10. Wellbore pressure transducer

    DOEpatents

    Shuck, Lowell Z.

    1979-01-01

    Subterranean earth formations containing energy values are subjected to hydraulic fracturing procedures to enhance the recovery of the energy values. These fractures are induced in the earth formation by pumping liquid into the wellbore penetrating the earth formation until the pressure of the liquid is sufficient to fracture the earth formation adjacent to the wellbore. The present invention is directed to a transducer which is positionable within the wellbore to generate a signal indicative of the fracture initiation useful for providing a timing signal to equipment for seismic mapping of the fracture as it occurs and for providing a measurement of the pressure at which the fracture is initiated.

  11. A Resonant Pressure Microsensor Capable of Self-Temperature Compensation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yinan; Wang, Junbo; Luo, Zhenyu; Chen, Deyong; Chen, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Resonant pressure microsensors are widely used in the fields of aerospace exploration and atmospheric pressure monitoring due to their advantages of quasi-digital output and long-term stability, which, however, requires the use of additional temperature sensors for temperature compensation. This paper presents a resonant pressure microsensor capable of self-temperature compensation without the need for additional temperature sensors. Two doubly-clamped “H” type resonant beams were arranged on the pressure diaphragm, which functions as a differential output in response to pressure changes. Based on calibration of a group of intrinsic resonant frequencies at different pressure and temperature values, the functions with inputs of two resonant frequencies and outputs of temperature and pressure under measurement were obtained and thus the disturbance of temperature variations on resonant frequency shifts was properly addressed. Before compensation, the maximal errors of the measured pressure values were over 1.5% while after compensation, the errors were less than 0.01% of the full pressure scale (temperature range of −40 °C to 70 °C and pressure range of 50 kPa to 110 kPa). PMID:25938197

  12. Wide-range voltage modulation

    SciTech Connect

    Rust, K.R.; Wilson, J.M.

    1992-06-01

    The Superconducting Super Collider`s Medium Energy Booster Abort (MEBA) kicker modulator will supply a current pulse to the abort magnets which deflect the proton beam from the MEB ring into a designated beam stop. The abort kicker will be used extensively during testing of the Low Energy Booster (LEB) and the MEB rings. When the Collider is in full operation, the MEBA kicker modulator will abort the MEB beam in the event of a malfunction during the filling process. The modulator must generate a 14-{mu}s wide pulse with a rise time of less than 1 {mu}s, including the delay and jitter times. It must also be able to deliver a current pulse to the magnet proportional to the beam energy at any time during ramp-up of the accelerator. Tracking the beam energy, which increases from 12 GeV at injection to 200 GeV at extraction, requires the modulator to operate over a wide range of voltages (4 kV to 80 kV). A vacuum spark gap and a thyratron have been chosen for test and evaluation as candidate switches for the abort modulator. Modulator design, switching time delay, jitter and pre-fire data are presented.

  13. Nonlinear effective pressure law for permeability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, M.; Xiao, W.-L.; Bernabé, Y.; Zhao, J.-Z.

    2014-01-01

    The permeability k of porous rocks is known to vary with confining pressure pc and pore fluid pressure pf. But it is, in principle, possible to replace the two-variable function k(pf, pc) by a function k(peff) of a single variable, peff(pf, pc), called the effective pressure. Our goal in this paper is to establish an experimental method for determining a possibly nonlinear, effective pressure law (EPL) for permeability, i.e., find the function κs(pf, pc) such that the effective pressure is given by peff = pc - κs(pf, pc) pf. We applied this method to a set of 26 sandstone cores from various hydrocarbon reservoirs in China. We found that κs greatly varied, from sample to sample, in magnitude and range, sometimes even reaching theoretically prohibited values (i.e., greater than 1 or lower than porosity). One interesting feature of κs(pf, pc) is that it could be approximately described in all rocks but one as a decreasing function κs(pc - pf) of Terzaghi's differential pressure. We also investigated the dependence of permeability on peff for each of our samples. Three models from the literature, i.e., exponential (E), power law (P), and the Walsh model (W), were tested. The (W) model was more likely to fit the experimental data of cores with a high pressure dependence of permeability whereas (E) occurred more frequently in low-pressure-sensitive rocks. Finally, we made various types of two- and three-dimensional microstructural observations that generally supported the trend mentioned above.

  14. Vapor pressures of acetylene at low temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masterson, C. M.; Allen, John E., Jr.; Kraus, G. F.; Khanna, R. K.

    1990-01-01

    The atmospheres of many of the outer planets and their satellites contain a large number of hydrocarbon species. In particular, acetylene (C2H2) has been identified at Jupiter, Saturn and its satellite Titan, Uranus and Neptune. In the lower atmospheres of these planets, where colder temperatures prevail, the condensation and/or freezing of acetylene is probable. In order to obtain accurate models of the acetylene in these atmospheres, it is necessary to have a complete understanding of its vapor pressures at low temperatures. Vapor pressures at low temperatures for acetylene are being determined. The vapor pressures are measured with two different techniques in order to cover a wide range of temperatures and pressures. In the first, the acetylene is placed in a sample tube which is immersed in a low temperature solvent/liquid nitrogen slush bath whose temperature is measured with a thermocouple. The vapor pressure is then measured directly with a capacitance manometer. For lower pressures, a second technique which was called the thin-film infrared method (TFIR) was developed. It involves measuring the disappearance rate of a thin film of acetylene at a particular temperature. The spectra are then analyzed using previously determined extinction coefficient values, to determine the disappearance rate R (where R = delta n/delta t, the number of molecules that disappear per unit time). This can be related to the vapor pressure directly. This technique facilitates measurement of the lower temperatures and pressures. Both techniques have been calibrated using CO2, and have shown good agreement with the existing literature data.

  15. Pressure effects on metabolism in tissues from mice (Mus muscalis) and freshwater mussel (Elliptio complanata).

    PubMed

    Cheney, M A; Hansen, L D; Breidenbach, R W; Wilhelmsen, E; Criddle, R S

    1996-05-01

    Metabolic rates of tissue sections from freshwater mussel gills and mouse brain and lung tissue were measured by calorimetry in ampules pressurized with gas mixtures. Increasing partial pressure of oxygen or total pressure with constant partial pressure of O2 does not affect the respiratory quotient but increases rates of tissue metabolism. Changes in metabolic activity occur over pressure and Po2 ranges commonly encountered by humans engaged in SCUBA diving.

  16. Reactor pressure vessel nozzle

    DOEpatents

    Challberg, Roy C.; Upton, Hubert A.

    1994-01-01

    A nozzle for joining a pool of water to a nuclear reactor pressure vessel includes a tubular body having a proximal end joinable to the pressure vessel and a distal end joinable in flow communication with the pool. The body includes a flow passage therethrough having in serial flow communication a first port at the distal end, a throat spaced axially from the first port, a conical channel extending axially from the throat, and a second port at the proximal end which is joinable in flow communication with the pressure vessel. The inner diameter of the flow passage decreases from the first port to the throat and then increases along the conical channel to the second port. In this way, the conical channel acts as a diverging channel or diffuser in the forward flow direction from the first port to the second port for recovering pressure due to the flow restriction provided by the throat. In the backflow direction from the second port to the first port, the conical channel is a converging channel and with the abrupt increase in flow area from the throat to the first port collectively increase resistance to flow therethrough.

  17. Putting oysters under pressure

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    High pressure processing (HPP) is the most commercially important food processing technology in use now and is anticipated to remain of equal or greater importance during the next five to 10 years. This month’s column reviews the theory and current applications of HPP for oysters to improve their sa...

  18. Reactor pressure vessel nozzle

    DOEpatents

    Challberg, R.C.; Upton, H.A.

    1994-10-04

    A nozzle for joining a pool of water to a nuclear reactor pressure vessel includes a tubular body having a proximal end joinable to the pressure vessel and a distal end joinable in flow communication with the pool. The body includes a flow passage therethrough having in serial flow communication a first port at the distal end, a throat spaced axially from the first port, a conical channel extending axially from the throat, and a second port at the proximal end which is joinable in flow communication with the pressure vessel. The inner diameter of the flow passage decreases from the first port to the throat and then increases along the conical channel to the second port. In this way, the conical channel acts as a diverging channel or diffuser in the forward flow direction from the first port to the second port for recovering pressure due to the flow restriction provided by the throat. In the backflow direction from the second port to the first port, the conical channel is a converging channel and with the abrupt increase in flow area from the throat to the first port collectively increase resistance to flow therethrough. 2 figs.

  19. Characteristics of pressure waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Air blast characteristics generated by most types of explosions are discussed. Data cover both negative and positive blast load phases and net transverse pressure as a function of time. The effects of partial or total confinement, atmospheric propagation, absorption of energy by ground shock or cratering, and transmission over irregular terrain on blast wave properties were also considered.

  20. Barometric pressure variations

    SciTech Connect

    Crippen, M.D.

    1993-06-01

    This report presents Hanford Site barometric data that can be used to determine the breathing rate of Hanford Site tanks and details the derivation of the data. The barometric pressure data recorded at the Hanford Weather Station were used for this analysis. Data for 1988, 1989, 1990, and 1991 were used.