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Sample records for pressure sensitive adhesives

  1. Tackifier Dispersions to Make Pressure Sensitive Adhesives

    SciTech Connect

    2003-02-01

    Development of new processes for tackifier dispersion could improve the production of pressure sensitive adhesives. Pressure sensitive adhesives (PSAs) have the ability to adhere to different surfaces with manual or finger pressure.

  2. New pressure-sensitive silicone adhesive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leiffer, J. L.; Stoops, W. E., Jr.; St. Clair, T. L.; Watkins, V. E., Jr.; Kelly, T. P.

    1981-01-01

    Adhesive for high or low temperatures does not stretch severely under load. It is produced by combining intermediate-molecular-weight pressure sensitive adhesive which does not cure with silicone resin that cures with catalyst to rubbery tack-free state. Blend of silicone tackifier and cured rubbery silicone requires no solvents in either atmospheric or vacuum environments. Ratio of ingredients varies for different degrees of tack, creep resistance, and tensile strength.

  3. Contribution from pressure-sensitive adhesives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunningham, Gilbert

    1996-03-01

    The successful use of many security papers, foils and films depends on the technology of chemical fastening systems -- especially pressure sensitive adhesives. These are adhesives activated not by heat or by the evaporation of water or some other solvent, but simply by the act of application -- by pressure. These adhesives provide the means whereby laminations, substrates and seals are made effective. In addition to their physical properties these adhesives are often required to possess optical properties to allow the security materials to be visibly active and indeed the adhesive system may itself contribute as a carrier for a variety of security materials. Recent advances in adhesives chemistry have made it possible to achieve virtually all the required physical performance characteristics combined with a choice of optical properties ranging from total opacity to invisibility and including controlled translucency and tinting. The implications for security printing and packaging are important. Opacity is easy to achieve, for example by loading the adhesive with aluminum powder, by the selection of totally opaque materials like metallized film or by various printing processes. But achieving transparency is a different matter, and transparency is mandatory for applications involving the protection of documents, photographs, etc. with a clear film over-laminate. Obvious examples would be for passports, visas and other personal identification. But some security devices may themselves require protection; for example holograms or embossings. And transparency in the test laboratory is not enough. The Australian driving licence is stuck to the windshield, so the transparency of the adhesive must be sustained over long periods without deterioration due to prolonged u/v exposure, climatic conditions or aging. The commercial label market has helped to push the technology forward. There is a strong demand for the 'no-label look' for packaging of clear plastic and glass

  4. Development of Screenable Pressure Sensitive Adhesives

    SciTech Connect

    Steven J. Severtson

    2003-11-29

    An industrial research area of high activity in recent years has been the development of pressure sensitive adhesive (PSA) products that do not interfere with the processing of post-consumer waste. The problem of PSA contamination is arguably the most important technical challenge in expanding the use of recycled fiber. The presence of PSAs in recovered paper creates problems that reduce the efficiency of recycling and papermaking operations and diminish product quality. The widespread use of PSAs engineered to avoid these problems, often referred to as environmentally benign PSAs, could greatly increase the commercial viability of utilizing secondary fiber. Much of the research efforts in this area have focused on the development of PSAs that are designed for enhanced removal with cleaning equipment currently utilized by recycling plants. Most removal occurs at the pressure screens with the size and shape of residual contaminants in the process being the primary criteria for their separation. A viable approach for developing environmentally benign PSAs is their reformulation to inhibit fragmentation. The reduction of adhesives to small particles occurs almost exclusively during repulping; a process in which water and mechanical energy are used to swell and reduce paper products to their constituent fiber. Engineering PSA products to promote the formation of larger adhesive particles during repulping will greatly enhance their removal and reduce or eliminate their impact on the recycling process.

  5. Effect of inorganic fillers in paper on the adhesion of pressure-sensitive adhesives

    Treesearch

    Weixu Chen; Xiaoyan Tang; John Considine; Kevin T. Turner

    2011-01-01

    Inorganic fillers are inexpensive materials used to increase the density, smoothness and other properties of paper that are important for printing. In the current study, the adhesion of pressure-sensitive adhesives (PSAs), a common type of adhesive used in labels and tapes, to papers containing varying amounts and types of fillers is investigated. Papers with three...

  6. Controlled Release in Transdermal Pressure Sensitive Adhesives using Organosilicate Nanocomposites

    PubMed Central

    Shaikh, Sohel; Birdi, Anil; Qutubuddin, Syed; Lakatosh, Eric; Baskaran, Harihara

    2010-01-01

    Polydimethyl siloxane (PDMS) based pressure sensitive adhesives (PSA) incorporating organo-clays at different loadings were fabricated via solution casting. Partially exfoliated nanocomposites were obtained for the hydroxyl terminated PDMS in ethyl acetate solvent as determined by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Drug release studies showed that the initial burst release was substantially reduced and the drug release could be controlled by the addition of organo-clay. Shear strength and shear adhesion failure temperature (SAFT) measurements indicated substantial improvement in adhesive properties of the PSA nanocomposite adhesives. Shear strength showed more than 200 % improvement at the lower clay loadings and the SAFT increased by about 21% due to the reinforcement provided by the nano-dispersed clay platelets. It was found that by optimizing the level of the organosilicate additive to the polymer matrix, superior control over drug release kinetics and simultaneous improvements in adhesive properties could be attained for a transdermal PSA formulation. PMID:17786555

  7. Compatibility of pressure sensitive adhesives with recycling unit operations

    Treesearch

    David. Bormett; Carl. Houtman; Said. Abubakr; Joseph. Peng

    1999-01-01

    Removal of pressure sensitive adhesives (PSAs) from recovered paper is a major problem facing the paper recycling industry. As a result of a United States Postal Service (USPS) initiative, which currently purchases about 12% of domestic PSA production, a team was formed consisting of representatives from the USPS, the Forest Products Laboratory, Springborn Testing and...

  8. Fracto-emission from the peeling of pressure sensitive adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickinson, J. T.; Shen, X. A.; Jensen, L. C.

    1985-01-01

    The electron emission, positive ion emission, photon emission, and long wavelength electromagnetic radiation accompanying the peeling of pressure sensitive adhesives in vacuum are examined. These results are interpreted in terms of a previously presented model involving fracture-induced microdischarges which excite the fracture surfaces by particle bombardment.

  9. Acrylic Triblock Copolymers Incorporating Isosorbide for Pressure Sensitive Adhesives

    SciTech Connect

    Gallagher, James J.; Hillmyer, Marc A.; Reineke, Theresa M.

    2016-05-10

    A new monomer acetylated acrylic isosorbide (AAI) was prepared in two steps using common reagents without the need for column chromatography. Free radical polymerization of AAI afforded poly(acetylated acrylic isosorbide) (PAAI), which exhibited a glass transition temperature (Tg) = 95 °C and good thermal stability (Td, 5% weight loss; N2 = 331 °C, air = 291 °C). A series of ABA triblock copolymers with either poly(n-butyl acrylate) (PnBA) or poly(2-ethylhexyl acrylate) (PEHA) as the low Tg midblocks and PAAI as the high Tg end blocks were prepared using Reversible Addition–Fragmentation chain Transfer (RAFT) polymerization. The triblock copolymers ranging from 8–24 wt % PAAI were evaluated as pressure sensitive adhesives by 180° peel, loop tack, and static shear testing. While the PAAI-PEHA-PAAI series exhibited poor adhesive qualities, the PAAI-PnBA-PAAI series of triblock copolymers demonstrated peel forces up to 2.9 N cm–1, tack forces up to 3.2 N cm–1, and no shear failure up to 10000 min. Dynamic mechanical analysis indicated that PAAI-PEHA-PAAI lacked the dissipative qualities needed to form an adhesive bond with the substrate, while the PAAI-PnBA-PAAI series exhibited a dynamic mechanical response consistent with related high performing PSAs.

  10. Development of Recycling Compatible Pressure-Sensitive Adhesives and Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Steven J. Severtson

    2010-02-15

    The objective of this project was the design of new water-based pressure-sensitive adhesive (PSA) products and coatings engineered for enhanced removal during the processing of recycled fiber. Research included the formulation, characterization, and performance measurements of new screenable coatings, testing of modified paper and board substrates and the design of test methods to characterize the inhibition of adhesive and coating fragmentation and relative removal efficiencies of developed formulations. This project was operated under the requirements that included commercially viable approaches be the focus, that findings be published in the open literature and that new strategies could not require changes in the methods and equipment used to produce PSA and PS labels or in the recycling process. The industrial partners benefited through the building of expertise in their company that they would not, and likely could not, have pursued if it had not been for the partnership. Results of research on water-based PSAs clearly identifies which PSA and paper facestock properties govern the fragmentation of the adhesive and provide multiple strategies for making (pressure-sensitive) PS labels for which the PSA is removed at very high efficiencies from recycling operations. The application of these results has led to the identification of several commercial products in Franklin International’s (industrial partner) product line that are recycling compatible. Several new formulations were also designed and are currently being scaled-up. Work on recycling compatible barrier coatings for corrugated containers examined the reinforcement of coatings using a small amount of exfoliated organically modified montmorillonite (OMMT). These OMMT/paraffin wax nanocomposites demonstrated significantly improved mechanical properties. Paraffin waxes containing clay were found to have significantly higher Young’s moduli and yield stress relative to the wax matrix, but the most

  11. Electron-beam cured emulsion pressure-sensitive adhesives

    SciTech Connect

    Mallya, P.; Plamthottam, S.S.; Ozari, Y.

    1993-08-03

    A cured pressure-sensitive adhesive is described which comprises a branched chain emulsion polymer having a glass transition temperature of at least 20 C below the use temperature, and formed by emulsion polymerization of at least one first monomer which, when homo polymerized, has a glass transition temperature less than [minus]25 C and at least one second monomer which, when homo polymerized, has a glass transition temperature greater than [minus]25 C., and said emulsion polymer being cured in the presence of from about 0.2 to about 10% by weight based on the weight of the emulsion-polymer of a multifunctional additive and exposure to electron beam radiation at a dosage of up to 100 kGy and sufficient to provide a 70 C shear of at least 10 kiloseconds and a 180 C peel of at least about 250 N/m, and a loop tack of at least about 200 N/m at a coat weight of from about 40 to 60 g/m[sup 2].

  12. Pressure sensitive microparticle adhesion through biomimicry of the pollen-stigma interaction.

    PubMed

    Lin, Haisheng; Qu, Zihao; Meredith, J Carson

    2016-03-21

    Many soft biomimetic synthetic adhesives, optimized to support macroscopic masses (∼kg), have been inspired by geckos, insects and other animals. Far less work has investigated bioinspired adhesion that is tuned to micro- and nano-scale sizes and forces. However, such adhesive forces are extremely important in the adhesion of micro- and nanoparticles to surfaces, relevant to a wide range of industrial and biological systems. Pollens, whose adhesion is critical to plant reproduction, are an evolutionary-optimized system for biomimicry to engineer tunable adhesion between particles and micro-patterned soft matter surfaces. In addition, the adhesion of pollen particles is relevant to topics as varied as pollinator ecology, transport of allergens, and atmospheric phenomena. We report the first observation of structurally-derived pressure-sensitive adhesion of a microparticle by using the sunflower pollen and stigma surfaces as a model. This strong, pressure-sensitive adhesion results from interlocking between the pollen's conical spines and the stigma's receptive papillae. Inspired by this behavior, we fabricated synthetic polymeric patterned surfaces that mimic the stigma surface's receptivity to pollen. These soft mimics allow the magnitude of the pressure-sensitive response to be tuned by adjusting the size and spacing of surface features. These results provide an important new insight for soft material adhesion based on bio-inspired principles, namely that ornamented microparticles and micro-patterned surfaces can be designed with complementarity that enable a tunable, pressure-sensitive adhesion on the microparticle size and length scale.

  13. Properties of pressure sensitive adhesives found in paper recycling operations

    Treesearch

    Ryan F. Verhulst; Steven J. Severtson; Jihui Guo; Carl J. Houtman

    2006-01-01

    Hot melt and water-based adhesives are very different materials with similar physical properties. Their ability to act as adhesives is due to physical bonds and mechanical interlocks which form as adhesive flows into topographical features on the substrate surface. Hot-melt adhesives are based on soft, rubbery polymers while water-based adhesives are usually acrylic...

  14. Investigations on the viscoelastic performance of pressure sensitive adhesives in drug-in-adhesive type transdermal films.

    PubMed

    Wolff, Hans-Michael; Irsan; Dodou, Kalliopi

    2014-08-01

    We aimed to investigate the effect of solubility parameter and drug concentration on the rheological behaviour of drug-in-adhesive films intended for transdermal application. Films were prepared over a range of drug concentrations (5%, 10% and 20% w/w) using ibuprofen, benzoic acid, nicotinic acid and lidocaine as model drugs in acrylic (Duro-Tak 87-4287 and Duro-Tak 87900A) or silicone (Bio-PSA 7-4301 and Bio-PSA 7-4302) pressure sensitive adhesives (PSAs). Saturation status of films was determined using light microscopy. Viscoelastic parameters were measured in rheology tests at 32°C. Subsaturated films had lower viscoelastic moduli whereas saturated films had higher moduli than the placebo films and/or a concentration-dependent increase in their modulus. Saturation concentration of each drug in the films was reflected by decreasing/increasing viscoelastic patterns. The viscoelastic windows (VWs) of the adhesive and drug-in-adhesive films clearly depicted the effect of solubility parameter differences, molar concentration of drug in the adhesive film and differences in PSA chemistry. Drug solubility parameters and molar drug concentrations have an impact on rheological patterns and thus on the adhesive performance of tested pressure sensitive adhesives intended for use in transdermal drug delivery systems. Use of the Flory equation in its limiting form was appropriate to predict drug solubility in the tested formulations.

  15. [Application of thermoplastic elastomer in hot-melt pressure sensitive adhesives for transtermal drug delivery].

    PubMed

    Yan, Xiaoping; Zheng, Rui; Guan, Shijie; Yi, Bowen

    2009-06-01

    Development of drug dosage forms to a great extent depends on the development of drug auxiliary materials. The development of a new type of polymeric drug auxiliary materials will bring on the developing of a novel dosage forms technology and a flood of new drug dosage forms. Thermoplastic elastomer is a new type of drug polymeric auxiliary materials, at present, which has a broad application in the field of hot-melt pressure sensitive adhesives. This review mainly discussed a new transtermal Chinese drug delivery system, including matrix composition of the formula, modified thermoplastic elastomer for hot-melt pressure sensitive adhesives and their development prospects in the traditional Chinese drug delivery system. It suggested that thermoplastic elastomer of hot-melt pressure sensitive adhesives has broad development prospects in the field of the transtermal drug delivery system for traditional Chinese medicine.

  16. 21 CFR 175.125 - Pressure-sensitive adhesives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... levels not to exceed 1.0 percent by weight of the adhesive formulation. Chlorinated natural rubber.... Rubber hydrochloride. Rubber (natural latex solids or crepe, smoked or unsmoked). Terpene resins (α- and.... Butyl rubber. Butylated reaction product of p-cresol and dicyclopentadiene produced by reacting...

  17. Nanomechanical Study of Model Pressure Sensitive Adhesives by Scanning Probe Microscopy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-06-20

    September 1, 2000. 5.) Mark D. Foster, ""Studying Pressure Sensitive Adhesives by Scanning Probe Microscopy," Avery Dennison , Painesville, OH, May 12, 2000... Adhesives and Coatings dept. Dr. Hubertus von Voithenberg, Vice President, Research and Development tesa Dr. Yuan Yuan Zhang, Avery Dennison Dr...academics, or industry to whom at least one annual report was sent and/or this year’s report will be sent: Dr. Ken Chuang, Research Associate, Avery Dennison

  18. Environmental Research Brief: Pollution prevention assessment for a Manufacturer of pressure-sensitive adhesive tape

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, H.W.; Kostrzewa, M.F.; Looby, G.P.

    1995-08-01

    The Waste Minimization Assessment Center at Colorado State University performed an assessment at a plant that manufactures three varieties of pressure-sensitive tape. The team report indicated that waste natural rubber adhesive is shipped offsite for disposal in large quantities, and that singificant cost savings could be achieved by redesigning the adhesive applicator on the coater for natural rubber adhesive. This research brief discusses the manufacturing process, existing waste management practices, pollution prevention opportunities, and gives additional recommendations. Tables summarize current waste generation and recommended pollution prevention opportunity.

  19. Rheological studies on pressure-sensitive silicone adhesives and drug-in-adhesive layers as a means to characterise adhesive performance.

    PubMed

    Ho, Kwong Yat; Dodou, Kalliopi

    2007-03-21

    Pressure-sensitive adhesives are viscoelastic polymers used in the formulation of transdermal patches that allow attachment of a patch onto the skin. Established criteria exist that correlate viscoelastic parameters with adhesive performance. In this study, fulfillment of the adhesive performance criteria was examined using two silicone adhesives with different tack properties. The viscoelastic parameters of high and low tack silicone adhesives (BIO-PSA High Tack 7-4302 and BIO-PSA Low Tack 7-4102) were determined and compared with the criteria described by Chu and Dahlquist. Drug-in-adhesive layers were prepared using the high tack adhesive combined with nortriptyline HCl or paracetamol. The effect of drug addition on the viscoelastic properties of the adhesive was examined. The high tack adhesive showed congruence with the established criteria although with a modified range of viscoelastic moduli to that described by Chu. Examination of the low tack adhesive showed that it did not possess the appropriate viscoelastic properties for bonding onto the skin. The addition of the drugs into the high tack adhesive caused a concentration-dependent increase in its cohesive strength. This effect was independent of the physicochemical properties of the drugs tested.

  20. Recyclability of mixed office waste papers containing pressure sensitive adhesives and silicone release liners

    Treesearch

    Julie Hess; Roberta Sena-Gomes; Lisa Davie; Marguerite Sykes

    2001-01-01

    Increased use of pressure sensitive adhesives for labels and stamps has introduced another contaminant into the office paper stream: silicone- coated release liners. This study examines methods and conditions for removal of contaminants, including these liners, from a typical batch of discarded office papers. Removal of contaminants contained in the furnish were...

  1. Polyacrylates with High Biomass Contents for Pressure-Sensitive Adhesives Prepared via Mini-emulsion Polymerization

    Treesearch

    Gang Pu; Matthew R. Dubay; Jiguang Zhang; Steven J. Severtson; Carl J. Houtman

    2012-01-01

    n-Butyl acrylate and other acrylic monomers were copolymerized with an acrylated macromonomer to produce polymers for pressure-sensitive adhesive (PSA) applications. Macromonomers were generated through the ring-opening copolymerization of L-lactide and ε-caprolactone with 2-hydroxyethyl...

  2. Role of pressure-sensitive adhesives in transdermal drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Lobo, Shabbir; Sachdeva, Sameer; Goswami, Tarun

    2016-01-01

    Transdermal drug delivery systems (TDDS) are employed for the delivery of drugs across skin into the systemic circulation. Pressure-sensitive adhesive (PSA) is one of the most critical components used in a TDDS. The primary function of PSA is to help in adhesion of patch to skin, but more importantly it acts as a matrix for the drug and other excipients. Hence, apart from adhesion of the patch, PSA also affects other critical quality attributes of the TDDS such as drug delivery, flux through skin and physical and chemical stability of the finished product. This review article provides a summary of the adhesives used in various types of TDDS. In particular, this review will cover the design types of TDDS, categories of PSAs and their evaluation and regulatory aspects.

  3. Breathability studies of electron beam curable polyurethane pressure sensitive adhesive for bio-medical application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Anil Kumar; Mehra, Dayal Singh; Niyogi, Utpal Kumar; Sabharwal, Sunil; Singh, Gurdeep

    2014-10-01

    Polyurethane (PU) based pressure sensitive adhesive (PSA) commonly used in surgical dressing has been made by electron beam (e-beam) irradiation. In contact with biological substrate like skin, PSAs generally lose their adhesive strength due to very low moisture vapor transmission rate (MVTR). In the present study, effects of varying e-beam dose and different crosslinkers on the MVTR of the PU-PSA have been investigated. A comparative study of effects of different crosslinkers showed that PU-PSA with IPDI has the least while that with TAC has the highest gel content and crystallinity and a reverse trend was observed for the MVTR.

  4. MoS₂ nanoplatelet fillers for enhancement of the properties of waterborne pressure-sensitive adhesives.

    PubMed

    Daniloska, Vesna; Keddie, Joseph L; Asua, José M; Tomovska, Radmila

    2014-12-24

    Nanocomposite pressure-sensitive adhesives (PSAs) composed of polyurethane (PU)/(meth)acrylates reinforced with MoS2 nanoplatelets were prepared by blending aqueous dispersions. MoS2 crystals were exfoliated by sonication in water in the presence of poly(vinylpyrrolidone) (PVP, molecular weight of 10,000 g mol(-1)) to prepare an aqueous dispersion. Waterborne colloidal polymer particles (latex) were synthesized by miniemulsion photopolymerization in a continuous tubular reactor. The adhesive and mechanical properties from the resulting nanocomposite films were determined as the MoS2 fraction was increased. A superior balance of viscoelastic properties was achieved with 0.25 wt % loading of the MoS2 nanoplatelets, leading to a tack adhesion energy that was three times greater than that for the original PSA.

  5. Atomic force microscopic investigation of commercial pressure sensitive adhesives for forensic analysis.

    PubMed

    Canetta, Elisabetta; Adya, Ashok K

    2011-07-15

    Pressure sensitive adhesive (PSA), such as those used in packaging and adhesive tapes, are very often encountered in forensic investigations. In criminal activities, packaging tapes may be used for sealing packets containing drugs, explosive devices, or questioned documents, while adhesive and electrical tapes are used occasionally in kidnapping cases. In this work, the potential of using atomic force microscopy (AFM) in both imaging and force mapping (FM) modes to derive additional analytical information from PSAs is demonstrated. AFM has been used to illustrate differences in the ultrastructural and nanomechanical properties of three visually distinguishable commercial PSAs to first test the feasibility of using this technique. Subsequently, AFM was used to detect nanoscopic differences between three visually indistinguishable PSAs. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Printable microfluidic systems using pressure sensitive adhesive material for biosensing devices.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin; Nilsson, David; Norberg, Petronella

    2013-09-01

    In biosensors with a fluid analyte, the integration of a microfluidic system, which guides the analyte into the sensing area, is critical. Quicker and economical ways to build up microfluidic systems will make point of care diagnostics viable. Printing is a low-cost technology that is increasingly used in emerging organic and flexible electronics and biosensors. In this paper, we present printed fluidic systems on flexible substrates made with pressure sensitive adhesive materials. Printable pressure sensitive adhesive materials have been used for making microfluidic systems. Flexible substrates have been used, and two types of adhesive materials, one thermally dried and another UV curable, have been tested. Top sealing layer was laminated directly on top of the printed microfluidic structure. Flow tests were done with deionized water. Flow tests with deionized water show that both adhesive materials are suitable for capillary flow driven fluidic devices. Flow test using water as dielectric material was also done successfully on a printed electrolyte gated organic field effect transistor with an integrated microfluidic system. Due to its ease of process and low cost, printed microfluidic system is believed to find more applications in biosensing devices. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Organic Bioelectronics-Novel Applications in Biomedicine. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Combined Effect of Chain Extension and Supramolecular Interactions on Rheological and Adhesive Properties of Acrylic Pressure-Sensitive Adhesives.

    PubMed

    Callies, Xavier; Herscher, Olivier; Fonteneau, Cécile; Robert, Alexis; Pensec, Sandrine; Bouteiller, Laurent; Ducouret, Guylaine; Creton, Costantino

    2016-12-07

    A new approach for the elaboration of low molecular weight pressure-sensitive adhesives based on supramolecular chemistry is explored. The synthesis of model systems coupled with probe-tack tests and rheological experiments highlights the influence of the transient network formed by supramolecular bonds on the adhesion energy. The first step of our approach consists of synthesizing poly(butyl acrylate-co-glycidyl methacrylate) copolymers from a difunctional initiator able to self-associate by four hydrogen bonds between urea groups. Linear copolymers with a low dispersity (Mn = 10 kg/mol, Ip < 1.4) have been synthesized via atom transfer radical polymerization. Films of the copolymers were then partially cross-linked through reaction of the epoxy functions with a diamine. The systematic variation of the average ratio of glycidyl methacrylate and diamine per copolymer shed light on the respective role played by the supramolecular interactions (between bis-urea groups and with the side chains) and by the chain extension and branching induced by the diamine/epoxy reaction. In this strategy, the adhesive performance can be optimized by modifying the strength of "stickers" (via the structure of the supramolecular initiator, for instance) and the polymer network (e.g., via the length and level of branching of the copolymer chains) in order to approach commercial PSA-like properties (high debonding energy and clean removal).

  8. Rate-dependent elastic hysteresis during the peeling of pressure sensitive adhesives.

    PubMed

    Villey, Richard; Creton, Costantino; Cortet, Pierre-Philippe; Dalbe, Marie-Julie; Jet, Thomas; Saintyves, Baudouin; Santucci, Stéphane; Vanel, Loïc; Yarusso, David J; Ciccotti, Matteo

    2015-05-07

    The modelling of the adherence energy during peeling of Pressure Sensitive Adhesives (PSA) has received much attention since the 1950's, uncovering several factors that aim at explaining their high adherence on most substrates, such as the softness and strong viscoelastic behaviour of the adhesive, the low thickness of the adhesive layer and its confinement by a rigid backing. The more recent investigation of adhesives by probe-tack methods also revealed the importance of cavitation and stringing mechanisms during debonding, underlining the influence of large deformations and of the related non-linear response of the material, which also intervenes during peeling. Although a global modelling of the complex coupling of all these ingredients remains a formidable issue, we report here some key experiments and modelling arguments that should constitute an important step forward. We first measure a non-trivial dependence of the adherence energy on the loading geometry, namely through the influence of the peeling angle, which is found to be separable from the peeling velocity dependence. This is the first time to our knowledge that such adherence energy dependence on the peeling angle is systematically investigated and unambiguously demonstrated. Secondly, we reveal an independent strong influence of the large strain rheology of the adhesives on the adherence energy. We complete both measurements with a microscopic investigation of the debonding region. We discuss existing modellings in light of these measurements and of recent soft material mechanics arguments, to show that the adherence energy during peeling of PSA should not be associated to the propagation of an interfacial stress singularity. The relevant deformation mechanisms are actually located over the whole adhesive thickness, and the adherence energy during peeling of PSA should rather be associated to the energy loss by viscous friction and by rate-dependent elastic hysteresis.

  9. Acoustic damping of honeycomb-construction plates by pressure-sensitive adhesives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knight, D. J. E.; Pharaoh, K. I.

    1991-04-01

    Materials available as pressure sensitive adhesives in tape form are found to have suitable properties for damping acoustic vibrations in the 200 to 1000 Hz range. Comparative experiments were made to damp small honeycomb construction base plates, of length about 1 m and of thickness 50 mm, which are used for mounting lasers. Added masses bonded to the edge of the plate with the lossy adhesives are most effective in damping out of plane motion when placed where the edge has parallel rather than torsional motion for the particular Chladni's figure mode. A reduction of Q from about 100 to about 10 for modes between 218 and 800 Hz was achieved by an added 10 mass loading. When the lowest frequency mode is damped in this way the impact response sounds dead to the ear.

  10. Influence of large strain rheology on the peeling performances of Pressure Sensitive Adhesives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villey, Richard; Ciccotti, Matteo; Creton, Costantino; Cortet, Pierre-Philippe; Yarusso, David J.

    2015-03-01

    The dependence of adhesion energy of Pressure Sensitive Adhesives (PSA) on peeling velocity reduces to a master curve using a time-temperature superposition principle, usually verified by the linear rheology of polymers. This result has guided models predicting peeling energy of PSA to consider the small strain rheology of the glue only, despite it can experience very large strains before debonding. The argument of the time-temperature superposition principle can actually also be applied to large strains and is thus not a stringent one. To clarify the role of large strain rheology during the peeling of PSA, we present experiments on commercial and custom-made tapes supplied by 3M Company. Small and large strain rheology differences are obtained by changing the glass transition temperature, the cross-linking density and the density of entanglements, yet remaining close to commercial PSA. The rheology influence is decoupled from geometrical effects, by examining the nontrivial dependence of the adhesion energy on the peeling angle. Finally, adhesion energy measurements and visualizations of the process zone, over a large range of peeling velocities, are discussed, in the perspective of building a model for the adherence considering the complete rheology of the glue.

  11. Preparation and characterization of PEG-modified polyurethane pressure-sensitive adhesives for transdermal drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xuemei; Liu, Wei; Zhao, Yanbing; Jiang, Lingyu; Xu, Huibi; Yang, Xiangliang

    2009-06-01

    The purpose of this work was to develop novel pressure-sensitive adhesives (PSAs) for transdermal drug-delivery systems (TDDS) with proper adhesive properties, hydrophilicity, biocompatibility and high drug loading. Polyethyleneglycol-modified polyurethane PSAs (PEG-PU-PSAs) were synthesized by prepolymerization method with PEG-modified co-polyether and hexamethylene diisocyanate. The effects of reaction temperature, catalyst, ratios of NCO/OH, co-polyether composition, and chain extender were investigated. Drug loading was studied by using thiamazole (hydrophilic drug), diclofenac sodium (slightly hydrophilic drug), and ibuprofen (lipophilic drug) as model drugs. In vitro drug-release kinetics obtained with Franz diffusion cell and dialysis membrane. The results showed that when reaction temperature at 80 degrees C, weight percentage of stannous octoate as catalyst at 0.05%, ratio of NCO/OH at 2.0-2.2, ratio of PEG/polypropylene glycol (PPG)/polytetramethylene ether glycol (PTMG) at 30/25-30/50-55, and weight percentage of glycol as chain extender at 4.5%, PEGPU-PSAs synthesized performed well on adhesive properties. Actually, PEG on the main chain of the PU could improve the hydrophilicity of PSAs, whereas PPG and PTMG could offer proper adhesive properties. Skin compatibility test on volunteers indicated that PEG-PU-PSAs would not cause any skin irritations. All the model drugs had excellent stabilizations in PEG-PU-PSAs. In vitro drug-release kinetics demonstrated that the drug release depended on drug-loading level and solubility of the drug. These experimental results indicated that PEG-PU-PSAs have good potential for applications in TDDS.

  12. Waterborne polyurethane-acrylic hybrid nanoparticles by miniemulsion polymerization: applications in pressure-sensitive adhesives.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Aitziber; Degrandi-Contraires, Elise; Canetta, Elisabetta; Creton, Costantino; Keddie, Joseph L; Asua, José M

    2011-04-05

    Waterborne polyurethane-acrylic hybrid nanoparticles for application as pressure-sensitive adhesives (PSAs) were prepared by one-step miniemulsion polymerization. The addition of polyurethane to a standard waterborne acrylic formulation results in a large increase in the cohesive strength and hence a much higher shear holding time (greater than seven weeks at room temperature), which is a very desirable characteristic for PSAs. However, with the increase in cohesion, there is a decrease in the relative viscous component, and hence there is a decrease in the tack energy. The presence of a small concentration of methyl methacrylate (MMA) in the acrylic copolymer led to phase separation within the particles and created a hemispherical morphology. The tack energy was particularly low in the hybrid containing MMA because of the effects of lower energy dissipation and greater cross-linking. These results highlight the great sensitivity of the viscoelastic and adhesive properties to the details of the polymer network architecture and hence to the precise composition and synthesis conditions.

  13. Adherence performances of pressure sensitive adhesives on a model viscoelastic synthetic film: a tool for the understanding of adhesion on the human skin.

    PubMed

    Renvoise, Julien; Burlot, Delphine; Marin, Gérard; Derail, Christophe

    2009-02-23

    This work deals with the rheological behavior and adherence properties of pressure sensitive adhesive formulations dedicated to medical applications. We have developed a specific viscoelastic substrate which mimics adhesion on human skin to measure the adherence properties of PSAs when they are stuck on the human skin. By comparing peeling results of PSAs, dedicated to medical applications, stuck on human skin and on this viscoelastic substrate we show that this substrate, based on a blend of natural proteins, presents a better representation of the interactions occurring at the skin/adhesive interface than conventional substrates used for peel test (i.e. glass and steel).

  14. Quantification of pressure sensitive adhesive, residual ink, and other colored process contaminants using dye and color image analysis

    Treesearch

    Roy R. Rosenberger; Carl J. Houtman

    2000-01-01

    The USPS Image Analysis (IA) protocol recommends the use of hydrophobic dyes to develop contrast between pressure sensitive adhesive (PSA) particles and cellulosic fibers before using a dirt counter to detect all contaminants that have contrast with the handsheet background. Unless the sample contains no contaminants other than those of interest, two measurement steps...

  15. Surface Enrichment by Conventional and Polymerizable Sulfated Nonylphenol Ethoxylate Emulsifiers in Water-Based Pressure-Sensitive Adhesive

    Treesearch

    Jilin Zhang; Yuxi Zhao; Matthew R. Dubay; Steven J. Severtson; Larry E. Gwin; Carl J. Houtman

    2013-01-01

    Comparisons of properties are made for pressure-sensitive adhesives (PSAs) generated via emulsion polymerization using both conventional and reactive emulsifiers. The emulsifiers are ammonium salts of sulfated nonylphenol ethoxylates with similar chemical structures and hydrophilic−lipophilic balances. The polymerizable surfactant possesses a reactive double...

  16. Effect of amphiphilic additives on the behavior of water-based acrylic pressure-sensitive adhesives during paper recycling

    Treesearch

    Jihui Guo; Steven J. Severtson; Larry E. Gwin; Carl J. Houtman

    2008-01-01

    Pressure-sensitive adhesives (PSAs) in recovered paper reduce efficiency and increase operating costs for paper recycling mills. Increased PSA fragmentation during pulping and the corresponding reduction in screening efficiency are indications that a PSA will likely interfere with paper recycling. Water-based PSAs, which dominate the label market, have complex...

  17. Energy Efficienct Processes for Making Tackifier Dispersions used to make Pressure Sensitive Adhesives

    SciTech Connect

    Rakesh Gupta

    2006-07-26

    The primary objective of this project was to develop an energy efficient, environmentally friendly and low cost process (compared to the current process) for making tackifier dispersions that are used to make pressure-sensitive adhesives. These adhesives are employed in applications such as self-adhesive postage stamps and disposable diapers and are made by combining the tackifier dispersion with a natural or synthetic rubber latex. The current process for tackifier dispersion manufacture begins by melting a (plastic) resin and adding water to it in order to form a water-in-oil emulsion. This is then converted to an oil-in-water emulsion by phase inversion in the presence of continuous stirring. The resulting emulsion is the tackifier dispersion, but it is not concentrated and the remaining excess water has to be transported and removed. The main barrier that has to be overcome in the development of commercial quality tackifier dispersions is the inability to directly emulsify resin in water due to the very low viscosity of water as compared to the viscosity of the molten resin. In the present research, a number of solutions were proposed to overcome this barrier, and these included use of different mixer types to directly form the emulsion from the molten resin but without going through a phase inversion, the idea of forming a solid resin-in-water suspension having the correct size and size distribution but without melting of the resin, and the development of techniques of making a colloidal powder of the resin that could be dispersed in water just prior to use. Progress was made on each of these approaches, and each was found to be feasible. The most appealing solution, though, is the last one, since it does not require melting of the resin. Also, the powder can be shipped in dry form and then mixed with water in any proportion depending on the needs of the process. This research was conducted at Argonne National Laboratory, and it was determined the new process

  18. A measurement system analysis with design of experiments: Investigation of the adhesion performance of a pressure sensitive adhesive with the probe tack test.

    PubMed

    Michaelis, Marc; Leopold, Claudia S

    2015-12-30

    The tack of a pressure sensitive adhesive (PSA) is not an inherent material property and strongly depends on the measurement conditions. Following the concept of a measurement system analysis (MSA), influencing factors of the probe tack test were investigated by a design of experiments (DoE) approach. A response surface design with 38 runs was built to evaluate the influence of detachment speed, dwell time, contact force, adhesive film thickness and API content on tack, determined as the maximum of the stress strain curve (σmax). It could be shown that all investigated factors have a significant effect on the response and that the DoE approach allowed to detect two-factorial interactions between the dwell time, the contact force, the adhesive film thickness and the API content. Surprisingly, it was found that tack increases with decreasing and not with increasing adhesive film thickness.

  19. Isothermal crystallization kinetics of lidocaine in supersaturated lidocaine/polyacrylate pressure sensitive adhesive systems.

    PubMed

    Cui, Yong; Frank, Sylvan G

    2005-09-01

    Isothermal crystallization of lidocaine (LC) in supersaturated LC/Duro-Tak 87-2287 (DT2287) polyacrylate pressure sensitive adhesive (PSA) systems has been studied by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). It was found that crystallization of LC in supersaturated LC/DT2287 systems was governed by the nucleation process, which in turn was dependent on temperature and composition of the systems. A critical temperature T(crit) was found at approximately 26 degrees C, above which the crystallization of LC in LC/DT2287 systems becomes slow. The lack of dependence of T(crit) on the composition of the mixtures indicates that the presence of the PSA affected the kinetics (diffusion) rather than the thermodynamics of the nucleation process. A critical degree of saturation S(crit) of approximately 4 was also found, above which the nucleation rate sharply increases. Kinetic analysis based on the classical theory of nucleation indicates that nucleation of LC in the PSA medium is a diffusion-controlled process. The activation energy of crystallization had a two-phase dependence on temperature suggesting that the mechanism of crystallization may change at the transition temperatures. As the weight fraction of LC increased in the systems, the activation energy of crystallization, DeltaG(c), was minimal at approximately 15 degrees C, indicating that the nucleation of LC in the LC/DT2287 systems is at its fastest rate around this temperature. These fundamental analyses of nucleation and crystallization mechanisms are of practical significance in the design of supersaturated drug delivery systems.

  20. Characterization of supersaturated lidocaine/polyacrylate pressure sensitive adhesive systems: thermal analysis and FT-IR.

    PubMed

    Cui, Yong; Frank, Sylvan G

    2006-03-01

    Supersaturated and crystallized lidocaine (LC)/pressure sensitive adhesive (PSA) systems have been studied by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and FT-IR with the objective of characterizing the thermodynamic states and compatibility of the two-component systems. Analysis of the phase behavior of LC/DT2287 systems indicates that LC and DT2287 are thermodynamically miscible within the composition range containing less than approximately 20% w/w LC, beyond which LC may crystallize from the blends forming a separated crystalline phase. The composition dependence of the glass transition temperature (T(g)) was used to characterize the physical and thermodynamic states of the supersaturated systems. The Fox, Gordon-Taylor, Kwei, Kovacs, and Brekner, Schneider and Cantow (BSC) equations were employed to conduct the analysis. It was found that the PSA in the supersaturated LC/PSA systems underwent significant entropic relaxation upon mixing. LC in the miscible systems is absorbed into and swells the polymer network of the PSA, thereby exhibiting reduced molecular mobility, while the PSA attains significant molecular conformation relaxation and entropy increase. It was also found that LC molecules extensively participate in molecular relaxation of the PSA throughout the composition range studied. The molecular mobility of LC is inhibited as the volume fraction of DT2287 increases, suggesting that the PSA molecular network reduces the molecular mobility of LC by closely involving LC molecules in its relaxation, and thereby may enhancing the physical stability of the systems. No strong intermolecular interactions between the two components were found based upon the results of T(g)-composition analysis, and was confirmed by FT-IR studies. This indicates that the analysis based on the BSC equation provides more precise characterization of polymer systems than the T(g) -composition analysis based on other equations cited. Copyright 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc. and the American

  1. Effect of skin surface lipid on the skin permeation of lidocaine from pressure sensitive adhesives.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Y H; Hosoya, O; Sugibayashi, K; Morimoto, Y

    1994-12-01

    Pressure sensitive adhesives (PSA) tapes containing different concentrations of lidocaine were prepared by a general casting method using styrene-isoprene-styrene block copolymer, and the in vitro skin permeation of lidocaine from each tape was evaluated using diffusion cell and excised hairless rat skin. The skin permeation was proportionally increased by up to 40% lidocaine in the PSA tape and did not change after this concentration. Although the bending point of the steady-state flux via skin concentration curve was found at 40%, saturated concentration or solubility of lidocaine in the tape was estimated to be about 20% by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) measurement. In addition, the steady-state flux of lidocaine through skin from water or silicone fluid suspension (92 or 120 micrograms/cm2.h, respectively) was very similar to those of 40, 50 and 60% tapes (105, 101 and 112 micrograms/cm2.h, respectively). Decrease in the concentration in tapes during the permeation experiment explained only part of these phenomena. To analyze them further, the drug free PSA tape with or without (control) skin surface lipid was affixed to 50% lidocaine PSA tape for 48 h, and the amount of lidocaine crystal in the layered tapes was measured by DSC. The amount was found to be lower in the lipid-containing tape than in the lipid-free tape, suggesting that skin surface lipid can dissolve lidocaine crystal or solid in PSA tape to decrease its thermodynamic activity. Thus it is important to follow the concentration and thermodynamic activity of lidocaine in PSA tape, skin and the interface between the two layers to exactly assess its skin permeation flux.

  2. A mechanics approach to the study of pressure sensitive adhesives and human skin for transdermal drug delivery applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taub, Marc Barry

    Transdermal drug delivery is an alternative approach to the systemic delivery of pharmaceuticals where drugs are administered through the skin and absorbed percutaneously. This method of delivery offers several advantages over more traditional routes; most notably, the avoidance of the fast-pass metabolism of the liver and gut, the ability to offer controlled release rates, and the possibility for novel devices. Pressure sensitive adhesives (PSAs) are used to bond transdermal drug delivery devices to the skin because of their good initial and long-term adhesion, clean removability, and skin and drug compatibility. However, an understanding of the mechanics of adhesion to the dermal layer, together with quantitative and reproducible test methods for measuring adhesion, have been lacking. This study utilizes a mechanics-based approach to quantify the interfacial adhesion of PSAs bonded to selected substrates, including human dermal tissue. The delamination of PSA layers is associated with cavitation in the PSA followed by the formation of an extensive cohesive zone behind the debond tip. A quantitative metrology was developed to assess the adhesion and delamination of PSAs, such that it could be possible to easily distinguish between the adhesive characteristics of different PSA compositions and to provide a quantitative basis from which the reliability of adhesive layers bonded to substrates could be studied. A mechanics-based model was also developed to predict debonding in terms of the relevant energy dissipation mechanisms active during this process. As failure of transdermal devices may occur cohesively within the PSA layer, adhesively at the interface between the PSA and the skin, or cohesively between the corneocytes that comprise the outermost layer of the skin, it was also necessary to explore the mechanical and fracture properties of human skin. The out-of-plane delamination of corneocytes was studied by determining the strain energy release rate during

  3. Dietary carbohydrate restriction improves insulin sensitivity, blood pressure, microvascular function, and cellular adhesion markers in individuals taking statins.

    PubMed

    Ballard, Kevin D; Quann, Erin E; Kupchak, Brian R; Volk, Brittanie M; Kawiecki, Diana M; Fernandez, Maria Luz; Seip, Richard L; Maresh, Carl M; Kraemer, William J; Volek, Jeff S

    2013-11-01

    Statins positively impact plasma low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, inflammation and vascular endothelial function (VEF). Carbohydrate restricted diets (CRD) improve atherogenic dyslipidemia, and similar to statins, have been shown to favorably affect markers of inflammation and VEF. No studies have examined whether a CRD provides additional benefit beyond that achieved by habitual statin use. We hypothesized that a CRD (<50 g carbohydrate/d) for 6 weeks would improve lipid profiles and insulin sensitivity, reduce blood pressure, decrease cellular adhesion and inflammatory biomarkers, and augment VEF (flow-mediated dilation and forearm blood flow) in statin users. Participants (n = 21; 59.3 ± 9.3 y, 29.5 ± 3.0 kg/m(2)) decreased total caloric intake by approximately 415 kcal at 6 weeks (P < .001). Daily nutrient intakes at baseline (46/36/17% carb/fat/pro) and averaged across the intervention (11/58/28% carb/fat/pro) demonstrated dietary compliance, with carbohydrate intake at baseline nearly 5-fold greater than during the intervention (P < .001). Compared to baseline, both systolic and diastolic blood pressure decreased after 3 and 6 weeks (P < .01). Peak forearm blood flow, but not flow-mediated dilation, increased at week 6 compared to baseline and week 3 (P ≤ .03). Serum triglyceride, insulin, soluble E-Selectin and intracellular adhesion molecule-1 decreased (P < .01) from baseline at week 3, and this effect was maintained at week 6. In conclusion, these findings demonstrate that individuals undergoing statin therapy experience additional improvements in metabolic and vascular health from a 6 weeks CRD as evidenced by increased insulin sensitivity and resistance vessel endothelial function, and decreased blood pressure, triglycerides, and adhesion molecules.

  4. Encapsulation of a pressure-sensitive adhesive by spray-drying: microparticles preparation and evaluation of their crushing strength.

    PubMed

    Gavory, Cécile; Abderrahmen, Robin; Valour, Jean-Pierre; Chaussy, Didier; Belgacem, Mohamed Naceur; Fessi, Hatem; Briançon, Stéphanie

    2012-01-01

    An industrial pressure-sensitive adhesive was microencapsulated by spray-drying using an aqueous colloidal ethylcellulose dispersion (Aquacoat® ECD) plasticised by triacetin to form the wall material. Unloaded (0:100) and adhesive-loaded (25:75) particles were produced in a Büchi B-191 mini spray-dryer with product yields of 62% and 57%, respectively. Microparticles were spherical and narrow sized with mean D₃,₂ diameters of 3.165 ± 0.001 and 5.544 ± 0.105 µm, respectively. The microparticles were found to redisperse well in water and exhibit enough stability in neutral and alkaline aqueous media to be further used in a coating slip. Crush tests on single microparticles with diameters ranging from 2 to 12 µm were performed using a nanoindenter. They revealed that the crushing force of both kinds of microparticles increased linearly with their diameter and that the adhesive loading reduced the mechanical strength of the prepared microparticles.

  5. Development of Screenable Wax Coatings and Water-Based Pressure Sensitive Adhesives

    SciTech Connect

    2006-10-01

    This factsheet describes a research project whose goal is to design new formulations and production processes for water-based adhesives and wax coatings that can be easily screened from recycling operations.

  6. Effect of pressure sensitive adhesive and vehicles on permeation of terbinafine across porcine hoof membrane.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Tai Sang; Lee, Jung-Phil; Kim, Juhyun; Oh, Seaung Youl; Chun, Myung-Kwan; Choi, Hoo-Kyun

    2013-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate characteristics of transungual drug delivery and the feasibility of developing a drug-in-adhesive formulation of terbinafine. The permeation of terbinafine from a PSA matrix across porcine hoof membrane was determined using a plate containing poloxamer gel. The permeation rate of terbinafine across hairless mouse skin was evaluated using a flow-through diffusion cell system. The permeation of terbinafine across the hoof membranes was the highest from the silicone adhesive matrix, followed by PIB, and most of the acrylic adhesives, SIS, and SBS. The rank order of permeation rate across mice skin was different from the rank order across porcine hooves. The amount of terbinafine permeated across the porcine hoof membranes poorly correlated with the amount of terbinafine remaining inside the hooves after 20 days, however, the ratio between rate of terbinafine partitioning into the hoof membrane and its rate of diffusion across the membrane was relatively constant within the same type of PSA. For influence of various vehicles in enhancing permeation of terbinafine across the hoof membrane, all vehicles except Labrasol(®) showed tendency to improve permeation rate. However, the enhancement ratio of a given vehicle differed from one adhesive to another with a moderate correlation between them. The infrared spectrum of the hoof treated with NMP, PPG 400 or PEG 200 indicated that the conformation of keratin changed from a non-helical to a helical structure.

  7. pH dependence of the properties of waterborne pressure-sensitive adhesives containing acrylic acid.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao; Canetta, Elisabetta; Weerakkody, Tecla G; Keddie, Joseph L; Rivas, Urko

    2009-03-01

    Polymer colloids are often copolymerized with acrylic acid monomers in order to impart colloidal stability. Here, the effects of the pH on the nanoscale and macroscopic adhesive properties of waterborne poly(butyl acrylate-co-acrylic acid) films are reported. In films cast from acidic colloidal dispersions, hydrogen bonding between carboxylic acid groups dominates the particle-particle interactions, whereas ionic dipolar interactions are dominant in films cast from basic dispersions. Force spectroscopy using an atomic force microscope and macroscale mechanical measurements show that latex films with hydrogen-bonding interactions have lower elastic moduli and are more deformable. They yield higher adhesion energies. On the other hand, in basic latex, ionic dipolar interactions increase the moduli of the dried films. These materials are stiffer and less deformable and, consequently, exhibit lower adhesion energies. The rate of water loss from acidic latex is slower, perhaps because of hydrogen bonding with the water. Therefore, although acid latex offers greater adhesion, there is a limitation in the film formation.

  8. Innovative approach to solving "stickies" problem and developing environmentally benign pressure sensitive adhesives through partnerships

    Treesearch

    Said M. Abubakr; Joe. Peng

    1999-01-01

    As a result of a United States Postal Service (USPS) initiative, a work team consisting of the USPS, the Forest Products Laboratory (FPL),Springborn Testing and Research (STR), and industry representatives wasformed. The industry representatives include papermakers, paper recyclers,paper collectors, equipment manufacturers, paper users, and adhesive and chemical...

  9. Recycling evaluation of new-generation environmentally benign pressure sensitive adhesives

    Treesearch

    Said M. Abubakr; Carl. Houtman; Dave. Bormett; Nancy Ross. Sutherland; Joe. Peng

    1999-01-01

    As a result of a United States Postal Service (USPS) initiative, a work team was formed consisting of representatives from USPS, Forest Products Laboratory (FPL), Specialized Technology Resources, Inc. (STR), and industry. The industries represented included papermakers, paper recyclers, paper collectors, equipment manufacturers, paper users, adhesive manufacturers and...

  10. Development and production of a flame retardant, general purpose, pressure sensitive adhesive tape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monaghan, P. B.; Doggett, R. H.

    1977-01-01

    The specification results for the finished tape properties were as follows: (1) adhesive strength (180 deg peel) on aluminum from 107 to 143 grams per centimeter (0.6 to 0.8 pounds per inch); (2) adhesive strength (180 deg peel) on stainless steel from 71 to 107 grams per centimeter (0.4 to 0.6 pounds per inch); (3) unwind resistance of 536 to 714 grams per centimeter (3 to 4 pounds per inch); (4) tensile strength minimum of 7143 grams per centimeter (40 pounds per inch); (5) elongation from 5 to 10% at break; (6) tear strength, Elmendorf from 200 to 350 grams (0.44 to 0.77 pounds); and (7) tear strength, tongue from 363 to 408 grams (0.8 to 0.9) pounds).

  11. Characterizing acrylic pressure-sensitive adhesive tapes favoring diverse biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alhijji, Saleh Mohammed S.

    Strong, self-adhesive acrylic polymer-based tapes have been identified as FDA-approved medical device construction components that might also serve in diverse biological locations as artificial muscles, ligaments, or compressive support discs. After assuring that the tapes themselves were not cytotoxic, they were evaluated as possible low-tension muscle substitutes for eyelids, jaws, and other modest body re-closing needs, and well as for higher-tension applications as artificial ligaments. Self-adhesion of the tapes to representative biomaterials, before and after radio-frequency glow discharge treatment for surface energy modification, illustrated the conditions for maximum attachment strength to nonphysiologic substances. Attachment to bony host parts was challenging but apparently met by the application of acrylic-composite-to-dentin bonding systems that has shown good long-term experience in the mouth. Above all, the compression-relaxation properties of the tape materials were superior and their uses in potential Nucleus Pulposus applications for spinal disc repair were most completely explored. Tests included tape-disc performance longevity, both dry and wet, for over 5000 load-relaxation cycles, with no apparent changes in results for the most dense of the tapes evaluated. Direct abrasion was avoided by insertion of rigid polymeric layers. It is recommended that the compressive loading properties of acrylic tapes be further evaluated for spine repair applications.

  12. Photon and radiowave emission from peeling pressure sensitive adhesives in air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donaldson, E. E.; Shen, X. A.; Dickinson, J. T.

    1985-01-01

    During separation of an adhesive from a polymer substrate in air, intense bursts of photons ('phE', for photon emission) and long wavelength electromagnetic radiation ('RE', for radiowave emission), similar to those reported earlier by Deryagin, et al. (1978) have been observed. In this paper, careful measurements of the phE time distributions, as well as time correlations between bursts of phE and RE, are reported. These results support the view that patches of electrical charge produced by charge separation between dissimilar materials lead to microdischarges in and near the crack tip. The role of these discharges in producing sustained phE after the discharge has been extinguished is also discussed.

  13. Photon and radiowave emission from peeling pressure sensitive adhesives in air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donaldson, E. E.; Shen, X. A.; Dickinson, J. T.

    1985-01-01

    During separation of an adhesive from a polymer substrate in air, intense bursts of photons ('phE', for photon emission) and long wavelength electromagnetic radiation ('RE', for radiowave emission), similar to those reported earlier by Deryagin, et al. (1978) have been observed. In this paper, careful measurements of the phE time distributions, as well as time correlations between bursts of phE and RE, are reported. These results support the view that patches of electrical charge produced by charge separation between dissimilar materials lead to microdischarges in and near the crack tip. The role of these discharges in producing sustained phE after the discharge has been extinguished is also discussed.

  14. Synthesis, Characterization, to application of water soluble and easily removable cationic pressure sensitive adhesives

    SciTech Connect

    Institute of Paper Science Technology

    2004-01-30

    In recent years, the world has expressed an increasing interest in the recycling of waste paper to supplement the use of virgin fiber as a way to protect the environment. Statistics show that major countries are increasing their use of recycled paper. For example, in 1991 to 1996, the U.S. increased its recovered paper utilization rate from 31% to 39%, Germany went from 50% to 60%, the UK went from 60% to 70%, France increased from 46% to 49%, and China went from 32% to 35% [1]. As recycled fiber levels and water system closures both increase, recycled product quality will need to improve in order for recycled products to compete with products made from virgin fiber [2]. The use of recycled fiber has introduced an increasing level of metal, plastic, and adhesive contamination into the papermaking process which has added to the complexity of the already overwhelming task of providing a uniform and clean recycle furnish. The most harmful of these contaminates is a mixture of adhesives and polymeric substances that are commonly known as stickies. Stickies, which enter the mill with the pulp furnish, are not easily removed from the repulper and become more difficult the further down the system they get. This can be detrimental to the final product quality. Stickies are hydrophobic, tacky, polymeric materials that are introduced into the papermaking system from a mixture of recycled fiber sources. Properties of stickies are very similar to the fibers used in papermaking, viz. size, density, hydrophobicity, and electrokinetic charge. This reduces the probability of their removal by conventional separation processes, such as screening and cleaning, which are based on such properties. Also, their physical and chemical structure allows for them to extrude through screens, attach to fibers, process equipment, wires and felts. Stickies can break down and then reagglomerate and appear at seemingly any place in the mill. When subjected to a number of factors including changes

  15. Pressure sensitive adhesive using light color, low softening point petroleum hydrocarbon resins

    SciTech Connect

    Ahner, M.E.

    1987-07-28

    This patent describes an adhesive composition comprising from about 20% to about 80% by weight of a copolymer and, correspondingly, from about 80% to about 20% by weight of a tackifying petroleum hydrocarbon resin having a softening point of from 0/sup 0/C to about 40/sup 0/C. It has a number average molecular weight of from about 100 to about 600, and a Gardner color less than about 7 prepared by the aluminum chloride catalyzed Friedel Crafts polymerization of a hydrocarbon feed comprising: (a) from about 5% to about 75% by weight of C/sub 8/ to C/sub 10/ vinyl aromatic hydrocarbon stream; (b) from about 10% to about 35% by weight of a piperylene concentrate; and (c) from about 25% to about 70% by weight of a C/sub 4/ to C/sub 8/ monoolefin chain transfer agent of the formula RR'C=CHR'' where R and R' are C/sub 1/ to C/sub 5/ alkyl, and R'' is H or C/sub 1/ to C/sub 4/ alkyl group.

  16. In vitro percutaneous absorption of tenoxicam from pressure-sensitive adhesive matrices across the hairless mouse skin.

    PubMed

    Gwak, H S; Chun, I K

    2001-12-01

    To investigate the feasibility of developing a new tenoxicam plaster, the effects of vehicles and penetration enhancers on the in vitro permeation of tenoxicam from a pressure-sensitive adhesive (PSA) matrices across the dorsal hairless mouse skin were studied. Vehicles employed in this study were propylene glycol (PG)-oleyl alcohol (OAI), PG-oleic acid (OA), and diethylene glycol monoethyl ether (DGME)-propylene glycol monolaurate (PGML) cosolvents with/without fatty acids. In this study, amines such as triethanolamine (TEA) and tromethamine (TM) were additionally used as a solubilizer. Among PSAs used, Duro-Tak 87-2510 showed much higher release rate than either Duro-Tak 87-2100 or Duro-Tak 87-2196. The relatively high flux rate was obtained with the formulation of DGME-PGML (40:60, v/v) with 3% OA and 5% TM, and the flux increased as a function of the dose; the initial flux up to 12 h was 4.98 +/- 1.38 microg/cm2/h at the tenoxicam dose of 50 mg/70 cm2. This flux was much higher than that of a commercial piroxicam patch (Trast) (1.24 +/- 0.73 microg/ cm2/hr) with almost only one-third that of the commercial patch. Therefore, these observations indicated that these composition of tenoxicam plaster may be practically applicable.

  17. Mechanical properties of a waterborne pressure-sensitive adhesive with a percolating poly(acrylic acid)-based diblock copolymer network: effect of pH.

    PubMed

    Gurney, Robert S; Morse, Andrew; Siband, Elodie; Dupin, Damien; Armes, Steven P; Keddie, Joseph L

    2015-06-15

    Copolymerizing an acrylic acid comonomer is often beneficial for the adhesive properties of waterborne pressure-sensitive adhesives (PSAs). Here, we demonstrate a new strategy in which poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) is distributed as a percolating network within a PSA film formed from a polymer colloid. A diblock copolymer composed of PAA and poly(n-butyl acrylate) (PBA) blocks was synthesized using reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization and adsorbed onto soft acrylic latex particles prior to their film formation. The thin adsorbed shells on the particles create a percolating network that raises the elastic modulus, creep resistance and tensile strength of the final film. When the film formation occurs at pH 10, ionomeric crosslinking occurs, and high tack adhesion is obtained in combination with high creep resistance. The results show that the addition of an amphiphilic PAA-b-PBA diblock copolymer (2.0 wt.%) to a soft latex provides a simple yet effective means of adjusting the mechanical and adhesive properties of the resulting composite film. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Pressure Sensitive Paints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Tianshu; Bencic, T.; Sullivan, J. P.

    1999-01-01

    This article reviews new advances and applications of pressure sensitive paints in aerodynamic testing. Emphasis is placed on important technical aspects of pressure sensitive paint including instrumentation, data processing, and uncertainty analysis.

  19. Comparison of Surfactant Distributions in Pressure-Sensitive Adhesive Films Dried from Dispersion under Lab-Scale and Industrial Drying Conditions.

    PubMed

    Baesch, S; Siebel, D; Schmidt-Hansberg, B; Eichholz, C; Gerst, M; Scharfer, P; Schabel, W

    2016-03-01

    Film-forming latex dispersions are an important class of material systems for a variety of applications, for example, pressure-sensitive adhesives, which are used for the manufacturing of adhesive tapes and labels. The mechanisms occurring during drying have been under intense investigations in a number of literature works. Of special interest is the distribution of surfactants during the film formation. However, most of the studies are performed at experimental conditions very different from those usually encountered in industrial processes. This leaves the impact of the drying conditions and the resulting influence on the film properties unclear. In this work, two different 2-ethylhexyl-acrylate (EHA)-based adhesives with varying characteristics regarding glass transition temperature, surfactants, and particle size distribution were investigated on two different substrates. The drying conditions, defined by film temperature and mass transfer in the gas phase, were varied to emulate typical conditions encountered in the laboratory and industrial processes. Extreme conditions equivalent to air temperatures up to 250 °C in a belt dryer and drying rates of 12 g/(m(2)·s) were realized. The surfactant distributions were measured by means of 3D confocal Raman spectroscopy in the dry film. The surfactant distributions were found to differ significantly with drying conditions at moderate film temperatures. At elevated film temperatures the surfactant distributions are independent of the investigated gas side transport coefficients: the heat and mass transfer coefficient. Coating on substrates with significantly different surface energies has a large impact on surfactant concentration gradients, as the equilibrium between surface and bulk concentration changes. Dispersions with higher colloidal stability showed more homogeneous lateral surfactant distributions. These results indicate that the choice of the drying conditions, colloidal stability, and substrates is crucial

  20. Characterizing the distribution of nonylphenol ethoxylate surfactants in water-based pressure-sensitive adhesive films using atomic-force and confocal Raman microscopy.

    PubMed

    Xu, Guizhen H; Dong, Jinping; Zhang, Jiguang; Severtson, Steven J; Houtman, Carl J; Gwin, Larry E

    2008-09-25

    Surfactant distributions in model pressure-sensitive adhesive (PSA) films were investigated using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and confocal Raman microscopy (CRM). The PSAs are water-based acrylics synthesized with n-butyl acrylate, vinyl acetate, and methacrylic acid and two commercially available surfactants, disodium (nonylphenoxypolyethoxy)ethyl sulfosuccinate (anionic) and nonylphenoxypoly(ethyleneoxy) ethanol (nonionic). The ratio of these surfactants was varied, while the total surfactant content was held constant. AFM images demonstrate the tendency of anionic surfactant to accumulate at the film surfaces and retard latex particle coalescence. CRM, which was introduced here as a means of providing quantitative depth profiling of surfactant concentration in latex adhesive films, confirms that the anionic surfactant tends to migrate to the film interfaces. This is consistent with its greater water solubility, which causes it to be transported by convective flow during the film coalescence process. The behavior of the nonionic surfactant is consistent with its greater compatibility with the polymer, showing little enrichment at film interfaces and little lateral variability in concentration measurements made via CRM. Surfactant distributions near film interfaces determined via CRM are well fit by an exponential decay model, in which concentrations drop from their highs at interfaces to plateau values in the film bulk. It was observed that decay constants are larger at the film-air interface compared with those obtained at the film-substrate side indicating differences in the mechanism involved. In general, it is shown here that CRM acts as a powerful compliment to AFM in characterizing the distribution of surfactant species in PSA film formation.

  1. Qualitative analysis of tackifier resins in pressure sensitive adhesives using direct analysis in real time time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Mess, Aylin; Vietzke, Jens-Peter; Rapp, Claudius; Francke, Wittko

    2011-10-01

    Tackifier resins play an important role as additives in pressure sensitive adhesives (PSAs) to modulate their desired properties. With dependence on their origin and processing, tackifier resins can be multicomponent mixtures. Once they have been incorporated in a polymer matrix, conventional chemical analysis of tackifiers usually tends to be challenging because a suitable sample pretreatment and/or separation is necessary and all characteristic components have to be detected for an unequivocal identification of the resin additive. Nevertheless, a reliable analysis of tackifiers is essential for product quality and safety reasons. A promising approach for the examination of tackifier resins in PSAs is the novel direct analysis in real time mass spectrometry (DART-MS) technique, which enables screening analysis without time-consuming sample preparation. In the present work, four key classes of tackifier resins were studied (rosin, terpene phenolic, polyterpene, and hydrocarbon resins). Their corresponding complex mass spectra were interpreted and used as reference spectra for subsequent analyses. These data were used to analyze tackifier additives in synthetic rubber and acrylic adhesive matrixes. To prove the efficiency of the developed method, complete PSA products containing two or three different tackifiers were analyzed. The tackifier resins were successfully identified, while measurement time and interpretation took less than 10 mins per sample. Determination of resin additives in PSAs can be performed down to 0.1% (w/w, limit of detection) using the three most abundant signals for each tackifier. In summary, DART-MS is a rapid and efficient screening method for the analysis of various tackifiers in PSAs.

  2. Usefulness of pressure-sensitive adhesives as a pretreatment material before application of topical drug formulations and a peeling tape for excess stratum corneum layers.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Keisuke; Todo, Hiroaki; Sugibayashi, Kenji

    2014-01-01

    Two unique pressure-sensitive adhesive (PSA) tapes (PSA-A, -B) with different adhesive properties of commercial PSAs were prepared and evaluated for their usefulness as a pretreatment material prior to the application of transdermal therapeutic systems or topical drug formulations and also as a peeling agent against excess layers of the stratum corneum. In the present study, in vitro permeation experiments were conducted using vertical type diffusion cells and excised hairless rat or porcine skin from which the stratum corneum had been stripped several times with PSAs. The results obtained revealed that PSA-A and -B had higher stripping or peeling effects than those of the marketed PSAs. Marked changes were observed in skin barrier function before and after stripping using PSAs, and the enhancement effect on the skin permeation of drugs achieved by stripping the stratum corneum was markedly different between the PSAs. PSA-A, in particular, markedly improved skin permeation and the skin concentration of topically applied chemical compounds because it removed many layers of the stratum corneum when skin was stripped only a few times. In contrast, when PSA-B was used to pretreat the skin surface, the extent of skin permeation and concentration of drugs was safely increased because only a few layers of the stratum corneum were removed, even with repeated stripping. The enhancement effect achieved by PSA-B was not as high as that by PSA-A. Thus, stripping with PSA-A can be used as a penetration enhancement tool, whereas PSA-B can be used as a peeling material against excess layers of the stratum corneum.

  3. Effect of drug physicochemical properties on drug release and their relationship with drug skin permeation behaviors in hydroxyl pressure sensitive adhesive.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chao; Quan, Peng; Fang, Liang

    2016-10-10

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of drug physicochemical properties on drug release behaviors and their relationship with skin permeation behaviors, which provided transdermal enhancement strategies for the design of transdermal drug delivery system. Six model drugs with different physicochemical properties were selected and hydroxyl pressure sensitive adhesive (PSA) was synthesized. Horizontal diffusion cell was used to evaluate drug release and skin permeation behaviors. The relationship between physicochemical properties and release behaviors was conducted with regression analysis. Release behavior of 0.25% drug loading was linear related with polar surface area, which represented the hydrogen bond. Release behavior of 2.0% drug loading was dependent on the polarizability and log P, which represented dipole-dipole interaction and lipophilicity, respectively. According to the results of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, it was inferred that hydrogen bond was limited in controlling release of drug due to the limited quantity of bonding site, thus dipole-dipole interaction and log P became dominate control factors. Combining the drug release study and drug skin permeation study, it was concluded that drugs with different physicochemical properties should be applied with different transdermal enhancement strategies, which was useful for the design of transdermal drug delivery system. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Pressure-sensitive adhesive properties of poly(N-vinyl pyrrolidone)/D,L-lactic acid oligomer/glycerol/water blends for TDDS.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianhua; Deng, Liandong; Zhao, Hujia; Liu, Mei; Jin, Hongjian; Li, Jingqing; Dong, Anjie

    2010-01-01

    In order to develop a new type of pressure-sensitive adhesive (PSA) for a transdermal drug-delivery system (TDDS), a quaternary blend (PDGW) composed of poly(N-vinyl pyrrolidone) (PVP), D,L-lactic acid oligomer (DLLAO), glycerol and water was prepared, in which glycerol and water were used as plasticizer. The effects of the number-average molecular weight (M(n)) of DLLAO and the contents of DLLAO and plasticizer on the PSA properties were studied. The results suggest that PDGW exhibits excellent PSA properties when M(n) of DLLAO is in the range of about 200-400 and the contents of DLLAO, glycerol and water are in the range of 5-20, 15-25 and 20-35 wt%, respectively. The miscibility between PVP and DLLAO was investigated via DSC, TGA and FT-IR, and all results indicate that PVP has good miscibility with DLLAO due to strong hydrogen-bond interaction. The storage stability of PDGW also was studied and the results show that the PDGW matrix possesses stable properties over time. In addition, in vivo skin irritation of PDGW was investigated using rabbit as model animal, and the results show that the PDGW does not cause irritation to skin after topical application for 120 h. Therefore, the PDGW possesses excellent PSA properties and presents potential application in TDDS.

  5. Assessment of a five-layer laminate technique to measure the saturation solubility of drug in pressure-sensitive adhesive film.

    PubMed

    Reismann, Simone; Lee, Geoffrey

    2012-07-01

    A five-layer laminate technique is used to determine the saturation solubility of a drug in a thin polymer film, c(p)(s), of pressure-sensitive adhesive (PSA) used to prepare transdermal patches. A drug-loaded donor polymer film is attached via a separating membrane to an initially drug-free acceptor polymer film. Diffusion of drug occurs into the acceptor up to saturation solubility equilibrium. This systematic study of the technique using the drug tamsulosin and the PSA Duro Tak 87-4098 was a kinetic analysis of the diffusion process. It was found that the technique gives an equilibrium value for c(p)(s) in a PSA polymer film in the presence of crystalline phase of the drug in the donor. A highly permeable Perthese-separating membrane caused overshoot in the acceptor, most likely induced by initial supersaturation of the donor. Change to a less-permeable ethylene-vinyl-acetate-separating membrane avoided overshoot, but gave a prolonged time, >300 days, to equilibrium. Preloading the acceptor accelerated the equilibration process to approximately 50 days with the Perthese. Suitable experimental conditions are identified that, if performed correctly, allow the technique to give an equilibrium value for c(p)(s).

  6. SENSITIVE PRESSURE GAUGE

    DOEpatents

    Ball, W.P.

    1961-01-01

    An electron multiplier device is described. It has a plurality of dynodes between an anode and cathode arranged to measure pressure, temperature, or other environmental physical conditions that proportionately iinfuences the quantity of gas molecules between the dynodes. The output current of the device is influenced by the reduction in electron multiplication at the dynodes due to energy reducing collisions of the electrons with the gas molecules between the dynodes. More particularly, the current is inversely proportional to the quantity of gas molecules, viz., the gas pressure. The device is, hence, extremely sensitive to low pressures.

  7. Pressure-sensitive optrode

    DOEpatents

    Hirschfeld, Tomas B.

    1986-01-01

    An apparatus is provided for sensing changes in pressure and for generating optical signals related to said changes in pressure. Light from a fiber optic illuminates a fluorescent composition causing it to fluoresce. The fluorescent composition is caused to more relative to the end of the fiber optic in response to changes in pressure so that the intensity of fluorescent emissions collected by the same fiber optic used for illumination varies monotonically with pressure.

  8. Pressure-sensitive optrode

    DOEpatents

    Hirschfeld, T.B.

    1986-07-15

    An apparatus is provided for sensing changes in pressure and for generating optical signals related to said changes in pressure. Light from a fiber optic illuminates a fluorescent composition causing it to fluoresce. The fluorescent composition is caused to fluoresce more relative to the end of the fiber optic in response to changes in pressure so that the intensity of fluorescent emissions collected by the same fiber optic used for illumination varies monotonically with pressure. 10 figs.

  9. Pressure-sensitive optrode

    DOEpatents

    Hirschfeld, Tomas B.

    1985-01-01

    Apparatus and method for sensing changes in pressure and for generating optical signals related to changes in pressure. Light from a fiber optic is directed to a movable surface which is coated with a light-responsive material, and which moves relative to the end of the fiber optic in response to changes in pressure. The same fiber optic collects a portion of the reflected or emitted light from the movable surface. Changes in pressure are determined by measuring changes in the amount of light collected.

  10. Pressure-sensitive optrode

    DOEpatents

    Hirschfeld, T.B.

    1982-09-30

    Apparatus and method for sensing changes in pressure and for generating optical signals related to changes in pressure. Light from a fiber optic is directed to a movable surface which is coated with a light-responsive material, and which moves relative to the end of the fiber optic in response to changes in pressure. The same fiber optic collects a portion of the reflected or emitted light from the movable surface. Changes in pressure are determined by measuring changes in the amount of light collected.

  11. Pressure-sensitive optrode

    DOEpatents

    Hirschfeld, T.B.

    1985-04-09

    An apparatus and method are disclosed for sensing changes in pressure and for generating optical signals related to changes in pressure. Light from a fiber optic is directed to a movable surface which is coated with a light-responsive material, and which moves relative to the end of the fiber optic in response to changes in pressure. The same fiber optic collects a portion of the reflected or emitted light from the movable surface. Changes in pressure are determined by measuring changes in the amount of light collected. 5 figs.

  12. Biocompatible Adhesives

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-03-01

    pressure sensitive elastomer, polyisobutylene. with water soluble adhesives such as carboxy methyl ceiiulose, pectin and gelatin for adhesion to... cellulose and nylon films, were most often used in 180 peel adhesion tests on the adhesives. Films were cast on one substrate and the other was moistened...irritation. 4. Peel adhesion to hydrated cellulose , nylon and cotton cloth substrates was satisfactory. So too was the peel adhesion as a function of

  13. Postoperative sensitivity of self etch versus total etch adhesive.

    PubMed

    Yousaf, Ajmal; Aman, Nadia; Manzoor, Manzoor Ahmed; Shah, Jawad Ali; Dilrasheed

    2014-06-01

    To compare postoperative sensitivity following composite restoration placed in supra gingival class-V cavities using self etch adhesive and total etch adhesive. A randomized clinical trial. Operative Dentistry Department of Armed Forces Institute of Dentistry, Rawalpindi, from July to December 2009. A total of 70 patients having class-V supra gingival carious lesions were divided into two groups. Classes-V cavities not exceeding 3 mm were prepared. One treatment group was treated with self etch adhesive (adhe SE one Ivoclar) and the control group was treated with total-etch adhesive (Eco-Etch Ivoclar) after acid etching with 37% phosphoric acid. Light cured composite (Te-Econom Ivoclar) restoration was placed for both groups and evaluated for postoperative sensitivity immediately after restoration, after 24 hours and after one week. Data was recorded on visual analogue scale. Comparison of sensitivity between the two treatment groups on application cold stimulus after 24 hours of restoration showed significant difference; however, no statistically significant difference was observed at baseline, immediately after restoration and at 1 week follow-up with cold stimulus or compressed air application. Less postoperative sensitivity was observed at postoperative 24 hours assessment in restoration placed using SE adhesives compared to TE adhesives. Thus, the use of SE adhesives may be helpful in reducing postoperative sensitivity during 24 hours after restoration placement.

  14. Accuracy of Pressure Sensitive Paint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Tianshu; Guille, M.; Sullivan, J. P.

    2001-01-01

    Uncertainty in pressure sensitive paint (PSP) measurement is investigated from a standpoint of system modeling. A functional relation between the imaging system output and luminescent emission from PSP is obtained based on studies of radiative energy transports in PSP and photodetector response to luminescence. This relation provides insights into physical origins of various elemental error sources and allows estimate of the total PSP measurement uncertainty contributed by the elemental errors. The elemental errors and their sensitivity coefficients in the error propagation equation are evaluated. Useful formulas are given for the minimum pressure uncertainty that PSP can possibly achieve and the upper bounds of the elemental errors to meet required pressure accuracy. An instructive example of a Joukowsky airfoil in subsonic flows is given to illustrate uncertainty estimates in PSP measurements.

  15. Accuracy of Pressure Sensitive Paint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Tianshu; Guille, M.; Sullivan, J. P.

    2001-01-01

    Uncertainty in pressure sensitive paint (PSP) measurement is investigated from a standpoint of system modeling. A functional relation between the imaging system output and luminescent emission from PSP is obtained based on studies of radiative energy transports in PSP and photodetector response to luminescence. This relation provides insights into physical origins of various elemental error sources and allows estimate of the total PSP measurement uncertainty contributed by the elemental errors. The elemental errors and their sensitivity coefficients in the error propagation equation are evaluated. Useful formulas are given for the minimum pressure uncertainty that PSP can possibly achieve and the upper bounds of the elemental errors to meet required pressure accuracy. An instructive example of a Joukowsky airfoil in subsonic flows is given to illustrate uncertainty estimates in PSP measurements.

  16. Pressure sensitive conductive rubber blends

    SciTech Connect

    Hassan, H.H. ); Abdel-Bary, E.M. ); El-Mansy, M.K.; Khodair, H.A. )

    1989-12-01

    Butadiene-acrylonitrile rubber (NBR) was blended with polychloroprene (CR) according to standard techniques. The blend was mixed with different concentrations of ZnO. The vulcanized sample was subjected to electrical conductivity ({sigma}) measurements while different values of static pressure were applied on the sample. It was found that samples containing 7.5 phr ZnO showed a reasonable pressure sensitive increase of {sigma}. Furthermore, the {sigma} vs pressure relationship of rubber blend mixed with different concentrations of Fast Extrusion Furnace black (FEF) was investigated. It was found that rubber vulcanizate containing 40 phr FEF resulted in a negative value of the pressure coefficient of conductivity {approx equal} {minus} 4.5 KPa{sup {minus}1}.

  17. Development of transdermal therapeutic formulation of CNS5161, a novel NMDA receptor antagonist, by utilizing pressure-sensitive adhesives II: improved transdermal absorption and evaluation of efficacy and safety.

    PubMed

    Naruse, Mamoru; Ogawara, Ken-ichi; Kimura, Toshikiro; Konishi, Ryoji; Higaki, Kazutaka

    2014-02-14

    The aim of this study was to prepare a transdermal therapeutic formulation of CNS5161, an NMDA receptor antagonist developed as a drug for neuropathic pain. Since a silicone pressure-sensitive adhesive (PSA) was found to be the best PSA for CNS5161 among six different PSAs examined in our previous study, the effects of the loading concentration of CNS5161 on release and rat skin permeability were investigated using silicone PSAs. The release of CNS5161 was elevated with an increase in the drug concentration from 1% to 14%. The transdermal flux at the steady state reached a plateau at 8% and over, while crystallization of CNS5161 was not observed for any formulation even at high drug concentrations. The drug concentration in rat skin at the steady state was also saturated at 8% and over, which correlated well with the transdermal flux at the steady state. Therefore, skin permeation clearance defined to the skin concentration at the steady state was almost constant at 0.21/h from 2% to 14% of CNS5161, which suggests that drug concentrations in the skin would be a driving force for transport of the drug to the receptor side. Since increasing the concentration of CNS5161 in the PSA patch was not able to elevate the transdermal flux, 12 formulations containing several permeation enhancers were examined to improve the transdermal transport of CNS5161. Among them, the formulation containing propylene glycol, diisopropyl adipate, and polyvinylpyrrolidone significantly increased the transdermal flux by approximately 1.8-fold by improving the diffusivity of CNS5161 in the skin, and also significantly enhanced the analgesic effect of CNS5161. This formulation caused only slight skin irritation, which indicated that it would be a promising transdermal therapeutic system for CNS5161.

  18. Recycling Pressure-Sensitive Products

    Treesearch

    Jihui Guo; Larry Gwin; Carl Houtman; Mark Kroll; Steven J. Severtson

    2012-01-01

    The efficient control of contaminants such as metals, plastics, inks and adhesives during the processing of recovered paper products determines the profitability of recycling mills. In fact, it is arguably the most important technical obstacle in expanding the use of recycled paper.1-4 An especially challenging category of contaminants to manage...

  19. Graphene blisters with switchable shapes controlled by pressure and adhesion.

    PubMed

    Boddeti, Narasimha G; Liu, Xinghui; Long, Rong; Xiao, Jianliang; Bunch, J Scott; Dunn, Martin L

    2013-01-01

    We created graphene blisters that cover and seal an annular cylinder-shaped microcavity in a SiO2 substrate filled with a gas. By controlling the pressure difference between the gas inside and outside of the microcavity, we switch the graphene membrane between multiple stable equilibrium configurations. We carried out experiments starting from the situation where the pressure of the gas inside and outside of the microcavity is set equal to a prescribed charging pressure, p0 and the graphene membrane covers the cavity like an annular drum, adhered to the central post and the surrounding substrate due to van der Waals forces. We decrease the outside pressure to a value, pe which causes it to bulge into an annular blister. We systematically increase the charging pressure by repeating this procedure causing the annular blister to continue to bulge until a critical charging pressure pc(i) is reached. At this point the graphene membrane delaminates from the post in an unstable manner, resulting in a switch of graphene membrane shape from an annular to a spherical blister. Continued increase of the charging pressure results in the spherical blister growing with its height increasing, but maintaining a constant radius until a second critical charging pressure pc(o) is reached at which point the blister begins to delaminate from the periphery of the cavity in a stable manner. Here, we report a series of experiments as well as a mechanics and thermodynamic model that demonstrate how the interplay among system parameters (geometry, graphene stiffness (number of layers), pressure, and adhesion energy) results in the ability to controllably switch graphene blisters among different shapes. Arrays of these blisters can be envisioned to create pressure-switchable surface properties where the difference between patterns of annular versus spherical blisters will impact functionalities such as wettability, friction, adhesion, and surface wave characteristics.

  20. Optimization of measurements with pressure sensitive paints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oglesby, Donald M.; Puram, Chith K.; Upchurch, Billy T.

    1995-01-01

    Use of luminescent paints for the measurement of global pressures on wind tunnel model surfaces requires a full understanding of the inherent accuracy of the technique. Theoretical emission of the paint luminophor follows the well known Stern-Volmer relation. Inherent in this relation are fundamental limits to achievable sensitivity and accuracy. Equations for relative error in pressure as a function of relative signal intensity (emittance), relative error in pressure as a function of pressure, and the relationship between sensitivity and pressure are derived and represented graphically.

  1. Pressure sensitivity of low permeability sandstones

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kilmer, N.H.; Morrow, N.R.; Pitman, J.K.

    1987-01-01

    Detailed core analysis has been carried out on 32 tight sandstones with permeabilities ranging over four orders of magnitude (0.0002 to 4.8 mD at 5000 psi confining pressure). Relationships between gas permeability and net confining pressure were measured for cycles of loading and unloading. For some samples, permeabilities were measured both along and across bedding planes. Large variations in stress sensitivity of permeability were observed from one sample to another. The ratio of permeability at a nominal confining pressure of 500 psi to that at 5000 psi was used to define a stress sensitivity ratio. For a given sample, confining pressure vs permeability followed a linear log-log relationship, the slope of which provided an index of pressure sensitivity. This index, as obtained for first unloading data, was used in testing relationships between stress sensitivity and other measured rock properties. Pressure sensitivity tended to increase with increase in carbonate content and depth, and with decrease in porosity, permeability and sodium feldspar. However, scatter in these relationships increased as permeability decreased. Tests for correlations between pressure sensitivity and various linear combinations of variables are reported. Details of pore structure related to diagenetic changes appears to be of much greater significance to pressure sensitivity than mineral composition. ?? 1987.

  2. Influence of different intrapulpal pressure simulation liquids on the microtensile bond strength of adhesive systems to dentin.

    PubMed

    Mobarak, Enas H; El-Deeb, Heba A; Yousry, Mai M

    2013-12-01

    To evaluate the effect of three different liquids used for intrapulpal pressure (IPP) simulation on the microtensile bond strength (µTBS) of three adhesive systems to dentin. The occlusal surfaces of sound human molars were ground flat down to mid-dentin depth. The teeth were bonded under 15 mmHg simulated IPP using distilled water, phosphate buffered saline, or human plasma as a simulating liquid. Three adhesive systems were tested: a single-bottle etch-and-rinse adhesive (SingleBond, 3M ESPE), and two single-step self-etching adhesives (G-Bond, GC) and (iBond, Heraeus Kulzer). Resin composite (Tetric EvoCeram, Ivoclar Vivadent) buildups were made in 2 increments, each 2 mm in height. Specimens were stored in artificial saliva under 20 mmHg IPP at 37°C for 24 h prior to testing. µTBS (n = 15) was tested using a universal testing machine, and failure modes were determined. Data were statistically analyzed using ANOVA and Bonferroni post-hoc tests at p <= 0.05. With SingleBond adhesive, distilled water showed significantly higher µTBS compared to plasma and phosphate buffered saline. With G-Bond, no significant difference was found between distilled water and phosphate buffered saline, whereas plasma showed significantly lower µTBS values. In contrast, no significant difference was encountered between the three IPP liquids for iBond adhesive. Predominant modes of failure were adhesive and mixed. A difference in intrapulpal pressure simulating liquids influences the bonding of adhesives to dentin. Etch-and-rinse adhesives are more sensitive to intrapulpal simulating liquids than are self-etching adhesives. Adhesives containing protein-coagulating components perform better with plasma perfusion than those lacking such components.

  3. Pressure-Sensitive Paint: Effect of Substrate

    PubMed Central

    Quinn, Mark Kenneth; Yang, Leichao; Kontis, Konstantinos

    2011-01-01

    There are numerous ways in which pressure-sensitive paint can be applied to a surface. The choice of substrate and application method can greatly affect the results obtained. The current study examines the different methods of applying pressure-sensitive paint to a surface. One polymer-based and two porous substrates (anodized aluminum and thin-layer chromatography plates) are investigated and compared for luminescent output, pressure sensitivity, temperature sensitivity and photodegradation. Two luminophores [tris-Bathophenanthroline Ruthenium(II) Perchlorate and Platinum-tetrakis (pentafluorophenyl) Porphyrin] will also be compared in all three of the substrates. The results show the applicability of the different substrates and luminophores to different testing environments. PMID:22247685

  4. A no adhesive and temperature-insensitive package design of fiber Bragg grating pressure sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hui; Zhu, Jun; Yin, Hao; Zhang, Zhao; Tang, Haiyu; Yu, Benli

    2012-11-01

    In this study, an innovative temperature-insensitive and no adhesive package for FBG pressure sensor was designed. We presents an package construction to compensate for temperature deviation of a FBG by mechanical properties of different metal materials; the package realize no adhesive utilizing combined technique of electroless plating NI-P and electroplating NI and laser spot welding technology. On the basis of the study on the Material structural properties and the compensation principles analysis of the FBG, the finite element method is used to analysis of the feasibility of the construction and optimize the construction parameters. The results show that this compensation construction can effectively reduce the temperature sensitivity of the FBG.

  5. Water-Based Pressure-Sensitive Paints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, Jeffrey D.; Watkins, A. Neal; Oglesby, Donald M.; Ingram, JoAnne L.

    2006-01-01

    Water-based pressure-sensitive paints (PSPs) have been invented as alternatives to conventional organic-solvent-based pressure-sensitive paints, which are used primarily for indicating distributions of air pressure on wind-tunnel models. Typically, PSPs are sprayed onto aerodynamic models after they have been mounted in wind tunnels. When conventional organic-solvent-based PSPs are used, this practice creates a problem of removing toxic fumes from inside the wind tunnels. The use of water-based PSPs eliminates this problem. The waterbased PSPs offer high performance as pressure indicators, plus all the advantages of common water-based paints (low toxicity, low concentrations of volatile organic compounds, and easy cleanup by use of water).

  6. Pressure and Temperature Sensitive Paint Field System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sprinkle, Danny R.; Obara, Clifford J.; Amer, Tahani R.; Faulcon, Nettie D.; Carmine, Michael T.; Burkett, Cecil G.; Pritchard, Daniel W.; Oglesby, Donald M.

    2004-01-01

    This report documents the Pressure and Temperature Sensitive Paint Field System that is used to provide global surface pressure and temperature measurements on models tested in Langley wind tunnels. The system was developed and is maintained by Global Surface Measurements Team personnel of the Data Acquisition and Information Management Branch in the Research Facilities Services Competency. Descriptions of the system hardware and software are presented and operational procedures are detailed.

  7. Low-Speed Pressure Sensitive Paint Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owen, Brown; Mehta, Rabindra; Nixon, David (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    A series of low speed (M less than 0.2) experiments using University of Washington Fib-07 Pressure Sensitive Paint (PSP) have been conducted at NASA Ames on a NACA 0012 airfoil. Significant improvements in results have been shown: PSP calibration errors of the improved data (with pressure taps as a reference) now agree with theoretical error limits. Additional measurements on the 0012 airfoil using Temperature Sensitive Paint have been made. These TSP measurements now fully quantify the impact of temporal temperature changes on model surfaces on PSP measurements. Finally, simultaneous PSP - TSP measurements have been performed, allowing in-situ temperature correction of PSP data with good results.

  8. Sensitive force technique to probe molecular adhesion and structural linkages at biological interfaces.

    PubMed

    Evans, E; Ritchie, K; Merkel, R

    1995-06-01

    Adhesion and cytoskeletal structure are intimately related in biological cell function. Even with the vast amount of biological and biochemical data that exist, little is known at the molecular level about physical mechanisms involved in attachments between cells or about consequences of adhesion on the material structure. To expose physical actions at soft biological interfaces, we have combined an ultrasensitive transducer and reflection interference microscopy to image submicroscopic displacements of probe contact with a test surface under minuscule forces. The transducer is a cell-size membrane capsule pressurized by micropipette suction where displacement normal to the membrane under tension is proportional to the applied force. Pressure control of the tension tunes the sensitivity in operation over four orders of magnitude through a range of force from 0.01 pN up to the strength of covalent bonds (approximately 1000 pN)! As the surface probe, a microscopic bead is biochemically glued to the transducer with a densely-bound ligand that is indifferent to the test surface. Movements of the probe under applied force are resolved down to an accuracy of approximately 5 nm from the interference fringe pattern created by light reflected from the bead. With this arrangement, we show that local mechanical compliance of a cell surface can be measured at a displacement resolution set by structural fluctuations. When desired, a second ligand is bound sparsely to the probe for focal adhesion to specific receptors in the test surface. We demonstrate that monitoring fluctuations in probe position at low transducer stiffness enhances detection of molecular adhesion and activation of cytoskeletal structure. Subsequent loading of an attachment tests mechanical response of the receptor-substrate linkage throughout the force-driven process of detachment.

  9. Improved secondary caries resistance via augmented pressure displacement of antibacterial adhesive

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Wei; Niu, Li-na; Huang, Li; Fang, Ming; Chang, Gang; Shen, Li-juan; Tay, Franklin R.; Chen, Ji-hua

    2016-01-01

    The present in vitro study evaluated the secondary caries resistance potential of acid-etched human coronal dentin bonded using augmented pressure adhesive displacement in conjunction with an experimental antibacterial adhesive. One hundred and twenty class I cavities were restored with a commercial non-antibacterial etch-and-rinse adhesive (N) or an experimental antibacterial adhesive (A) which was displaced by gentle air-blow (G) or augmented pressure air-blow (H). After bonding and restoration with resin composite, the resulted 4 groups (N-G, N-H, A-G and A-H) were exposed to Streptococcus mutans biofilm for 4, 8, 15, 20 or 25 days. The development of secondary caries in the bonding interface was then examined by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Data acquired from 15, 20 and 25 days of artificial caries induction were analyzed with three-way ANOVA at α = 0.05. The depth of the artificial carious lesions was significantly affected by “adhesive type” (Single Bond 2 vs experimental antibacterial adhesive p = 0.003), “intensity of adhesive displacement” (gentle vs augmented-pressure adhesive displacement; p < 0.001), as well as “artificial caries induction time” (p < 0.001). The combined use of augmented pressure adhesive displacement and experimental antibacterial adhesive reduces the progression of secondary caries. PMID:26928742

  10. A high-salt diet enhances leukocyte adhesion in association with kidney injury in young dahl salt-sensitive rats.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Hidenori; Nakagawa, Suguru; Wu, Yaqiong; Kawabata, Yukari; Numabe, Atsushi; Yanagi, Yasuo; Tamaki, Yasuhiro; Uehara, Yoshio; Araie, Makoto

    2017-03-16

    Salt-sensitive hypertension is associated with severe organ damage. Generating oxygen radicals is an integral component of salt-induced kidney damage, and activated leukocytes are important in oxygen radical biosynthesis. We hypothesized that a high-salt diet causes the upregulation of immune-related mechanisms, thereby contributing to the susceptibility of Dahl salt-sensitive rats to hypertensive kidney damage. For verifying the hypothesis, we investigated leukocytes adhering to retinal vessels when Dahl salt-sensitive rats were challenged with a high-salt (8% NaCl) diet using acridine orange fluoroscopy and a scanning laser ophthalmoscope. The high-salt diet increased leukocyte adhesion after 3 days and was associated with a significant increase in mRNA biosynthesis of monocyte chemotactic protein-1 and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) -related molecules in the kidney. Losartan treatment did not affect increased leukocyte adhesion during the early, pre-hypertensive phase of high salt loading; however, losartan attenuated the adhesion of leukocytes during the hypertensive stage. Moreover, the inhibition of leukocyte adhesion in the pre-hypertensive stage by anti-CD18 antibodies decreased tethering of leukocytes and was associated with the attenuation of functional and morphological kidney damage without affecting blood pressure elevation. In conclusion, a high-salt challenge rapidly increased leukocyte adhesion through the over-expression of ICAM-1. Increased leukocyte adhesion in the pre-hypertensive stage is responsible for subsequent kidney damage in Dahl salt-sensitive rats. Immune system involvement may be a key component that initiates kidney damage in a genetic model of salt-induced hypertension.Hypertension Research advance online publication, 16 March 2017; doi:10.1038/hr.2017.31.

  11. Application of atmospheric pressure plasma in polymer and composite adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Hang

    An atmospheric pressure helium and oxygen plasma was used to investigate surface activation and bonding in polymer composites. This device was operated by passing 1.0-3.0 vol% of oxygen in helium through a pair of parallel plate metal electrodes powered by 13.56 or 27.12 MHz radio frequency power. The gases were partially ionized between the capacitors where plasma was generated. The reactive species in the plasma were carried downstream by the gas flow to treat the substrate surface. The temperature of the plasm gas reaching the surface of the substrate did not exceed 150 °C, which makes it suitable for polymer processing. The reactive species in the plasma downstream includes ~ 1016-1017 cm-3 atomic oxygen, ~ 1015 cm-3 ozone molecule, and ~ 10 16 cm-3 metastable oxygen molecule (O2 1Deltag). The substrates were treated at 2-5 mm distance from the exit of the plasma. Surface properties of the substrates were characterized using water contact angle (WCA), atomic force microscopy (AFM), infrared spectroscopy (IR), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Subsequently, the plasma treated samples were bonded adhesively or fabricated into composites. The increase in mechanical strength was correlated to changes in the material composition and structure after plasma treatment. The work presented hereafter establishes atmospheric pressure plasma as an effective method to activate and to clean the surfaces of polymers and composites for bonding. This application can be further expanded to the activation of carbon fibers for better fiber-resin interactions during the fabrication of composites. Treating electronic grade FR-4 and polyimide with the He/O2 plasma for a few seconds changed the substrate surface from hydrophobic to hydrophilic, which allowed complete wetting of the surface by epoxy in underfill applications. Characterization of the surface by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy shows formation of oxygenated functional groups, including hydroxyl, carbonyl, and

  12. The Pressure Sensitive Paint Method: An Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McLachlan, B. G.; Bell, J. H.; George, Michael W. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Pressure sensitive paint (PSP) is a relatively new aerodynamic measurement method with the unique capability of providing a field measurement of pressure over a test surface. This presentation provides an introductory description of this technology based on a review of the open literature. It confines itself to the application of the method to aircraft development wind tunnel testing, at present the primary application area and thus research focus of the method. Described are PSP fundamentals, the various technology elements comprising PSP technology, and current limitations and considerations in applying the technology. Experimental results are presented to illustrate the present capability of the method.

  13. High blood pressure and visual sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eisner, Alvin; Samples, John R.

    2003-09-01

    The study had two main purposes: (1) to determine whether the foveal visual sensitivities of people treated for high blood pressure (vascular hypertension) differ from the sensitivities of people who have not been diagnosed with high blood pressure and (2) to understand how visual adaptation is related to standard measures of systemic cardiovascular function. Two groups of middle-aged subjects-hypertensive and normotensive-were examined with a series of test/background stimulus combinations. All subjects met rigorous inclusion criteria for excellent ocular health. Although the visual sensitivities of the two subject groups overlapped extensively, the age-related rate of sensitivity loss was, for some measures, greater for the hypertensive subjects, possibly because of adaptation differences between the two groups. Overall, the degree of steady-state sensitivity loss resulting from an increase of background illuminance (for 580-nm backgrounds) was slightly less for the hypertensive subjects. Among normotensive subjects, the ability of a bright (3.8-log-td), long-wavelength (640-nm) adapting background to selectively suppress the flicker response of long-wavelength-sensitive (LWS) cones was related inversely to the ratio of mean arterial blood pressure to heart rate. The degree of selective suppression was also related to heart rate alone, and there was evidence that short-term changes of cardiovascular response were important. The results suggest that (1) vascular hypertension, or possibly its treatment, subtly affects visual function even in the absence of eye disease and (2) changes in blood flow affect retinal light-adaptation processes involved in the selective suppression of the flicker response from LWS cones caused by bright, long-wavelength backgrounds.

  14. Large deformation contact mechanics of a pressurized long rectangular membrane. II. Adhesive contact

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Abhishek; Hui, Chung-Yuen

    2013-01-01

    In part I of this work, we presented a theory for adhesionless contact of a pressurized neo-Hookean plane-strain membrane to a rigid substrate. Here, we extend our theory to include adhesion using a fracture mechanics approach. This theory is used to study contact hysteresis commonly observed in experiments. Detailed analysis is carried out to highlight the differences between frictionless and no-slip contact. Membrane detachment is found to be strongly dependent on adhesion: for low adhesion, the membrane ‘pinches-off’, whereas for large adhesions, it detaches unstably at finite contact (‘pull-off’). Expressions are derived for the critical adhesion needed for pinch-off to pull-off transition. Above a threshold adhesion, the membrane exhibits bistability, two stable states at zero applied pressure. The condition for bistability for both frictionless and no-slip boundary conditions is obtained explicitly. PMID:24353472

  15. Blade Tip Pressure Measurements Using Pressure Sensitive Paint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, Oliver D.; Watkins, Anthony Neal; Goodman, Kyle Z.; Crafton, James; Forlines, Alan; Goss, Larry; Gregory, James W.; Juliano, Thomas J.

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses the application of pressure sensitive paint using laser-based excitation for measurement of the upper surface pressure distribution on the tips of rotor blades in hover and simulated forward flight. The testing was conducted in the Rotor Test Cell and the 14- by 22-ft Subsonic Tunnel at the NASA Langley Research Center on the General Rotor Model System (GRMS) test stand. The Mach-scaled rotor contained three chordwise rows of dynamic pressure transducers for comparison with PSP measurements. The rotor had an 11 ft 1 in. diameter, 5.45 in. main chord and a swept, tapered tip. Three thrust conditions were examined in hover, C(sub T) = 0.004, 0.006 and 0.008. In forward flight, an additional thrust condition, C(sub T) = 0.010 was also examined. All four thrust conditions in forward flight were conducted at an advance ratio of 0.35.

  16. Combined Pressure-Shear Ignition Sensitivity Test

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-07-01

    anrCIDB* propellant showing that sensitivity increase ( from TNT to Comp B to CMDB . The maximum pressure an~d shear velocity were around 1.0 GPa and 60...shear velocity required for ignition. * CMDB is an acronyin for Composite Modified Double Base. S IA I S i-A2 TABLE OF CONTENTS Page LIST OF FIGURES...Reaction ...................... 15 IOA.CMDB slid against CKDB. No reaction ....................... 17 10B.CMDB slid againbt CMDB . Reaction

  17. Two methods to simulate intrapulpal pressure: effects upon bonding performance of self-etch adhesives.

    PubMed

    Feitosa, V P; Gotti, V B; Grohmann, C V; Abuná, G; Correr-Sobrinho, L; Sinhoreti, M A C; Correr, A B

    2014-09-01

    To evaluate the effects of two methods to simulate physiological pulpal pressure on the dentine bonding performance of two all-in-one adhesives and a two-step self-etch silorane-based adhesive by means of microtensile bond strength (μTBS) and nanoleakage surveys. The self-etch adhesives [G-Bond Plus (GB), Adper Easy Bond (EB) and silorane adhesive (SIL)] were applied to flat deep dentine surfaces from extracted human molars. The restorations were constructed using resin composites Filtek Silorane or Filtek Z350 (3M ESPE). After 24 h using the two methods of simulated pulpal pressure or no pulpal pressure (control groups), the bonded teeth were cut into specimens and submitted to μTBS and silver uptake examination. Results were analysed with two-way anova and Tukey's test (P < 0.05). Both methods of simulated pulpal pressure led statistically similar μTBS for all adhesives. No difference between control and pulpal pressure groups was found for SIL and GB. EB led significant drop (P = 0.002) in bond strength under pulpal pressure. Silver impregnation was increased after both methods of simulated pulpal pressure for all adhesives, and it was similar between the simulated pulpal pressure methods. The innovative method to simulate pulpal pressure behaved similarly to the classic one and could be used as an alternative. The HEMA-free one-step and the two-step self-etch adhesives had acceptable resistance against pulpal pressure, unlike the HEMA-rich adhesive. © 2013 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. The Bagautdinov dressing method: negative pressure wound therapy in a patient with an allergy to acrylate adhesive.

    PubMed

    Daar, David A; Wirth, Garrett A; Evans, Gregory Rd; Carmean, Melissa; Gordon, Ian L

    2017-02-01

    Current embodiments of negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) create a hermetically sealed chamber at the surface of the body using polyurethane foam connected to a vacuum pump, which is then covered by a flexible adhesive drape. Commercially available NPWT systems routinely use flexible polyethylene films that have a sticky side, coated with the same acrylate adhesives used in other medical devices such as ECG leads and grounding pads. Severe reactions to the acrylate adhesives in these other devices, although uncommon, have been reported. We describe the case of a 63-year-old woman with an intractable leg ulcer resulting from external-beam radiotherapy (XRT). Treatment with a standard commercial NPWT system induced severe inflammation of the skin in direct contact with drape adhesive. We successfully administered prolonged, outpatient NPWT to the patient using an alternative method (first described by Bagautdinov in 1986), using plain polyethylene film and petrolatum. The necessary hermetic seal is achieved by smearing the skin with petrolatum before applying the polyethylene film and activating the vacuum pump. The Bagautdinov method is a practical solution to the problem of adapting NPWT to patients with contact sensitivity or skin tears related to the adhesive compounds in the flexible drapes. Its use of a circumferential elastic wrap to maintain constant pressure on the seal probably limits the Bagautdinov technique to the extremities. © 2016 Medicalhelplines.com Inc and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Adhesion

    MedlinePlus

    ... the intestines, adhesions can cause partial or complete bowel obstruction . Adhesions inside the uterine cavity, called Asherman syndrome , ... 1. Read More Appendicitis Asherman syndrome Glaucoma Infertility Intestinal obstruction Review Date 4/5/2016 Updated by: Irina ...

  20. Adhesions

    MedlinePlus

    Adhesions are bands of scar-like tissue. Normally, internal tissues and organs have slippery surfaces so they can shift easily as the body moves. Adhesions cause tissues and organs to stick together. They ...

  1. Water-Based Pressure Sensitive Paint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oglesby, Donald M.; Ingram, JoAnne L.; Jordan, Jeffrey D.; Watkins, A. Neal; Leighty, Bradley D.

    2004-01-01

    Preparation and performance of a water-based pressure sensitive paint (PSP) is described. A water emulsion of an oxygen permeable polymer and a platinum porphyrin type luminescent compound were dispersed in a water matrix to produce a PSP that performs well without the use of volatile, toxic solvents. The primary advantages of this PSP are reduced contamination of wind tunnels in which it is used, lower health risk to its users, and easier cleanup and disposal. This also represents a cost reduction by eliminating the need for elaborate ventilation and user protection during application. The water-based PSP described has all the characteristics associated with water-based paints (low toxicity, very low volatile organic chemicals, and easy water cleanup) but also has high performance as a global pressure sensor for PSP measurements in wind tunnels. The use of a water-based PSP virtually eliminates the toxic fumes associated with the application of PSPs to a model in wind tunnels.

  2. Are conformational changes, induced by osmotic pressure variations, the underlying mechanism of controlling the adhesive activity of mussel adhesive proteins?

    PubMed

    van der Leeden, Mieke C

    2005-11-22

    The mussel adhesive protein Mefp-1, under physiological conditions, presumably has a self-avoiding random walk conformation with helix-like or turned deca-peptide segments. Such a conformation may coil up under osmotic pressure induced by surrounding macromolecules. As a consequence, the orientation of the 3,4-dihydroxy-phenylalanine groups (dopa), essential for the adhesive strength as well as the cohesive strength in Mefp-1, will be altered. Changing the concentration of the protein itself or of different-type surrounding macromolecules may therefore be a tool to control the protein's adhesive activity. The effect of osmotic pressure on the conformation and dopa reactivity of Mefp-1 is studied by the addition of (poly)ethylene oxide (PEO) as a model macromolecule (Mw = 100 kD). From UV-spectroscopy measurements, it can be concluded that dopa reactivity in Mefp-1 changes with increasing PEO concentration. Fitting of the measured absorbance intensity data of the oxidation product dopaquinone versus time with a kinetic model points to the decreased accessibility of dopa groups in the Mefp-1 structure, a faster oxidation, and diminished cross linking under the influence of increasing PEO concentration up to 2.4 g/L, corresponding to an osmotic pressure of approximately 73 Pa. At higher PEO concentrations, the accessibility of the dopa groups for oxidation as well as cross-link formation decreases until about 20% of the dopa groups are oxidized at a PEO concentration of 3.8 g/L, corresponding to an osmotic pressure of approximately 113 Pa. FTIR measurements on the basis of amide I shifts qualitatively point to a transition to a more continuously turned structure of Mefp-1 in the presence of PEO. Therefore, it seems that conformational changes caused by variations of osmotic pressure determine the extent of steric hindrance of the dopa groups and hence the adhesive reactivity of Mefp-1.

  3. An automated pressure data acquisition system for evaluation of pressure sensitive paint chemistries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sealey, Bradley S.; Mitchell, Michael; Burkett, Cecil G.; Oglesby, Donald M.

    1993-01-01

    An automated pressure data acquisition system for testing of pressure sensitive phosphorescent paints was designed, assembled, and tested. The purpose of the calibration system is the evaluation and selection of pressure sensitive paint chemistries that could be used to obtain global aerodynamic pressure distribution measurements. The test apparatus and setup used for pressure sensitive paint characterizations is described. The pressure calibrations, thermal sensitivity effects, and photodegradation properties are discussed.

  4. The effect of the air-blowing step on the technique sensitivity of four different adhesive systems.

    PubMed

    Spreafico, Diego; Semeraro, Stefano; Mezzanzanica, Dario; Re, Dino; Gagliani, Massimo; Tanaka, Toru; Sano, Hidehiko; Sidhu, Sharanbir K

    2006-03-01

    To evaluate the technique sensitivity of four different adhesive systems using different air-blowing pressure. Four adhesive systems were employed: Clearfil SE Bond [SE] (Kuraray, Japan), G-Bond [GB] (GC Corporation, Japan), Adper Prompt L-Pop [LP] (3M ESPE, USA) and an experimental adhesive, SSB-200 [SSB] (Kuraray, Japan). Twenty-four extracted molars were used. After grinding the coronal enamel surface, the teeth were divided into two equal groups. The first group's teeth were randomly assigned for bonding with the different adhesives using gentle air-blowing (g). For the teeth of the second group, the four adhesive systems were applied using strong air-blowing (s). After storage overnight in 37 degrees C water, the bonded specimens were sectioned into sticks (1 mm x 1 mm wide), which were subjected to microtensile bond strength testing (microTBS) at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. The load at failure of each specimen was recorded and the data were analyzed by one-way ANOVA and Tukey HSD tests. The surfaces of the fractured specimens were observed using SEM to determine the failure mode. The results of the microTBS test showed that the highest bond strengths tended to be with SE for both gentle and strong air-blowing, and the significantly lowest for SSB with strong air streaming. Comparing the two techniques, significant differences were noted only for SSB-200 (P < 0.05). For each material, the SEM evaluation did not show distinct differences in the nature of the fractures between the two techniques, except for SSB-200. The adhesives tested are not technique sensitive, except SSB-200, with regards to the air-blowing step.

  5. 75 FR 14628 - Pressure Sensitive Plastic Tape From Italy; Determination

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-26

    ... COMMISSION Pressure Sensitive Plastic Tape From Italy; Determination On the basis of the record \\1\\ developed... antidumping duty finding on pressure sensitive plastic tape from Italy would be likely to lead to continuation... Commission are contained in USITC Publication 4128 (March 2010), entitled Pressure Sensitive Plastic...

  6. Prestress and Adhesion Site Dynamics Control Cell Sensitivity to Extracellular Stiffness

    PubMed Central

    Féréol, S.; Fodil, R.; Laurent, V.M.; Balland, M.; Louis, B.; Pelle, G.; Hénon, S.; Planus, E.; Isabey, D.

    2009-01-01

    This study aims at improving the understanding of mechanisms responsible for cell sensitivity to extracellular environment. We explain how substrate mechanical properties can modulate the force regulation of cell sensitive elements primarily adhesion sites. We present a theoretical and experimental comparison between two radically different approaches of the force regulation of adhesion sites that depends on their either stationary or dynamic behavior. The most classical stationary model fails to predict cell sensitivity to substrate stiffness whereas the dynamic model predicts extracellular stiffness dependence. This is due to a time dependent reaction force in response to actomyosin traction force exerted on cell sensitive elements. We purposely used two cellular models, i.e., alveolar epithelial cells and alveolar macrophages exhibiting respectively stationary and dynamic adhesion sites, and compared their sensitivity to theoretical predictions. Mechanical and structural results show that alveolar epithelial cells exhibit significant prestress supported by evident stress fibers and lacks sensitivity to substrate stiffness. On the other hand, alveolar macrophages exhibit low prestress and exhibit sensitivity to substrate stiffness. Altogether, theory and experiments consistently show that adhesion site dynamics and cytoskeleton prestress control cell sensitivity to extracellular environment with an optimal sensitivity expected in the intermediate range. PMID:19254561

  7. 21 CFR 175.125 - Pressure-sensitive adhesives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...-acrylonitrile-styrene copolymer. Butadiene-styrene copolymer. Butyl rubber. Butylated reaction product of p... ratio of 1.5 to 1.0, respectively, followed by alkylation with isobutylene so that the butyl content of... (natural latex solids or crepe, smoked or unsmoked). Terpene resins (α- and β-pinene), homopolymers...

  8. 21 CFR 175.125 - Pressure-sensitive adhesives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    .... Butyl rubber. Butylated reaction product of p-cresol and dicyclopentadiene produced by reacting p-cresol... with isobutylene so that the butyl content of the final product is not less than 18 percent, for use at.... Rubber hydrochloride. Rubber (natural latex solids or crepe, smoked or unsmoked). Terpene resins (α- and...

  9. 21 CFR 175.125 - Pressure-sensitive adhesives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    .... Butyl rubber. Butylated reaction product of p-cresol and dicyclopentadiene produced by reacting p-cresol... with isobutylene so that the butyl content of the final product is not less than 18 percent, for use at.... Rubber hydrochloride. Rubber (natural latex solids or crepe, smoked or unsmoked). Terpene resins (α- and...

  10. 21 CFR 175.125 - Pressure-sensitive adhesives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    .... Butyl rubber. Butylated reaction product of p-cresol and dicyclopentadiene produced by reacting p-cresol... with isobutylene so that the butyl content of the final product is not less than 18 percent, for use at.... Rubber hydrochloride. Rubber (natural latex solids or crepe, smoked or unsmoked). Terpene resins (α- and...

  11. Investigation Of Adhesion Formation In New Stainless Steel Trim Spring Operated Pressure Relief Valves

    SciTech Connect

    Gross, Robert E.; Bukowski, Julia V.; Goble, William M.

    2013-04-16

    Examination of proof test data for new (not previously installed) stainless steel (SS) trim spring operated pressure relief valves (SOPRV) reveals that adhesions form between the seat and disc in about 46% of all such SOPRV. The forces needed to overcome these adhesions can be sufficiently large to cause the SOPRV to fail its proof test (FPT) prior to installation. Furthermore, a significant percentage of SOPRV which are found to FPT are also found to ''fail to open'' (FTO) meaning they would not relief excess pressure in the event of an overpressure event. The cases where adhesions result in FTO or FPT appear to be confined to SOPRV with diameters < 1 in and set pressures < 150 psig and the FTO are estimated to occur in 0.31% to 2.00% of this subpopulation of SS trim SOPRV. The reliability and safety implications of these finding for end-users who do not perform pre-installation testing of SOPRV are discussed.

  12. Alpha-actinin-1 phosphorylation modulates pressure-induced colon cancer cell adhesion through regulation of focal adhesion kinase-Src interaction.

    PubMed

    Craig, David H; Haimovich, Beatrice; Basson, Marc D

    2007-12-01

    Physical forces including pressure, strain, and shear can be converted into intracellular signals that regulate diverse aspects of cell biology. Exposure to increased extracellular pressure stimulates colon cancer cell adhesion by a beta(1)-integrin-dependent mechanism that requires an intact cytoskeleton and activation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and Src. alpha-Actinin facilitates focal adhesion formation and physically links integrin-associated focal adhesion complexes with the cytoskeleton. We therefore hypothesized that alpha-actinin may be necessary for the mechanical response pathway that mediates pressure-stimulated cell adhesion. We reduced alpha-actinin-1 and alpha-actinin-4 expression with isoform-specific small interfering (si)RNA. Silencing of alpha-actinin-1, but not alpha-actinin-4, blocked pressure-stimulated cell adhesion in human SW620, HT-29, and Caco-2 colon cancer cell lines. Cell exposure to increased extracellular pressure stimulated alpha-actinin-1 tyrosine phosphorylation and alpha-actinin-1 interaction with FAK and/or Src, and enhanced FAK phosphorylation at residues Y397 and Y576. The requirement for alpha-actinin-1 phosphorylation in the pressure response was investigated by expressing the alpha-actinin-1 tyrosine phosphorylation mutant Y12F in the colon cancer cells. Expression of Y12F blocked pressure-mediated adhesion and inhibited the pressure-induced association of alpha-actinin-1 with FAK and Src, as well as FAK activation. Furthermore, siRNA-mediated reduction of alpha-actinin-1 eliminated the pressure-induced association of alpha-actinin-1 and Src with beta(1)-integrin receptor, as well as FAK-Src complex formation. These results suggest that alpha-actinin-1 phosphorylation at Y12 plays a crucial role in pressure-activated cell adhesion and mechanotransduction by facilitating Src recruitment to beta(1)-integrin, and consequently the association of FAK with Src, to enhance FAK phosphorylation.

  13. Effect of different adhesive strategies on the post-operative sensitivity of class I composite restorations.

    PubMed

    Sancakli, Hande Sar; Yildiz, Esra; Bayrak, Isil; Ozel, Sevda

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the post-operative sensitivity of occlusal restorations using different dentin adhesives performed by an undergraduate and a post-doctorate dentist. One hundred and eighty-eight molar occlusal restorations were placed in 39 patients (ages between 18 and 30) using 3 different kind of adhesive systems; Optibond FL (OBF), Clearfil Protect Bond (CPB), and iBond (IB) by a post-doctorate dentist or a fifth-year dental student according to the manufacturers' instructions. Post-operative sensitivity to cold and air was evaluated using a Visual Analog Scale (VAS) after 24 hours, 30, 90, and 180 days. Data were analyzed using the Mann-Whitney U and Friedman tests (P < 0.05). Post-operative sensitivity scores for OBF and CPB were higher for the dental student (P < 0.05), while IB scores did not differ statistical significantly according to the operator (P > 0.05). Operator skill and experience appears to play a role in determining the outcome of post-operative sensitivity of multi-step adhesive systems although the post-operative sensitivity was low. It is suggested that the less experienced clinicians (rather than experienced clinicians) should better use the self-etching dentin bonding systems with reduced application steps to minimize the potential risk of post-operative sensitivity of dental adhesives.

  14. Effect of different adhesive strategies on the post-operative sensitivity of class I composite restorations

    PubMed Central

    Sancakli, Hande Sar; Yildiz, Esra; Bayrak, Isil; Ozel, Sevda

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the post-operative sensitivity of occlusal restorations using different dentin adhesives performed by an undergraduate and a post-doctorate dentist. Materials and Methods: One hundred and eighty-eight molar occlusal restorations were placed in 39 patients (ages between 18 and 30) using 3 different kind of adhesive systems; Optibond FL (OBF), Clearfil Protect Bond (CPB), and iBond (IB) by a post-doctorate dentist or a fifth-year dental student according to the manufacturers’ instructions. Post-operative sensitivity to cold and air was evaluated using a Visual Analog Scale (VAS) after 24 hours, 30, 90, and 180 days. Data were analyzed using the Mann-Whitney U and Friedman tests (P < 0.05). Results: Post-operative sensitivity scores for OBF and CPB were higher for the dental student (P < 0.05), while IB scores did not differ statistical significantly according to the operator (P > 0.05). Conclusion: Operator skill and experience appears to play a role in determining the outcome of post-operative sensitivity of multi-step adhesive systems although the post-operative sensitivity was low. It is suggested that the less experienced clinicians (rather than experienced clinicians) should better use the self-etching dentin bonding systems with reduced application steps to minimize the potential risk of post-operative sensitivity of dental adhesives. PMID:24966741

  15. Effects of a Temperature-Sensitive, Anti-Adhesive Agent on the Reduction of Adhesion in a Rabbit Laminectomy Model

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jeong Woo; Cho, Tae Koo; Chun, Hyoung-Joon; Ryu, Je Il

    2016-01-01

    Objective A common cause of failure in laminectomy surgery is when epidural, peridural, or perineural adhesion occurs postoperatively. The purpose of this study is to examine the efficacy of a temperature-sensitive, anti-adhesive agent (TSAA agent), Guardix-SG®, as a mechanical barrier for the prevention or reduction of peridural scar adhesion in a rabbit laminectomy model. Methods Twenty-six mature rabbits were used for this study. Each rabbit underwent two separate laminectomies at lumbar vertebrae L3 and L6, left empty (the control group) and applied 2 mL of the TSAA agent (the experimental group), respectively. Invasive scar formation or inflammation after laminectomy was quantitatively evaluated by measuring the thickness of the dura, the distance from the surface of dura to the scar tissues, the number of inflammatory cells in the scar tissues at the laminectomy site, and the concentration of collagen in histological sections. Results At 6 weeks postsurgery, the dura was significantly thinner and the distance from the surface of dura to the scar tissues was greater in the experimental group than in the control group (p=0.04 and p=0.01). The number of inflammatory cells was not significantly different in the two groups (p=0.08), although the mean number of inflammatory cells was relatively lower in the experimental group than in the control group. Conclusion The current study suggests that the TSAA agent, Guardix-SG®, could be useful as an interpositional physical barrier after laminectomy for the prevention or reduction of adhesion. PMID:27226857

  16. Durability of solvent-free one-step self-etch adhesive under simulated intrapulpal pressure

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background There are different solvents presented in simplified adhesives. Bond-1 SF has been developed, which contains neither water nor organic solvents, in order to eliminate technical issues in terms of evaporation of solvents and concerns for the durability of resin-dentin bond. Thus this study was conducted to evaluate the microtensile bond strength (?TBS) of solvent-free and ethanol-based one-step self-etch adhesives to dentin under simulated intrapulpal pressure (IPP). Material and Methods Occlusal surfaces of human molars were prepared to expose mid-dentin depth. Bond-1SF Solvent-Free SE [SF] and AdperTM easy one adhesives [AE] were applied on dentin specimens. Resin composite build up was done in increments. Then specimens were stored under simulated IPP 20 mmHg, immersed in artificial saliva at 37 ºC for 24 hours (24h) and 6 months (6m). Specimens were sectioned into sticks of (1 mm²) to be tested for (?TBS) using a universal testing machine. Both fractured sections of each stick were inspected using a stereomicroscope at 40× magnification to determine the mode of failure. Data were statistically analyzed by Two-way ANOVA of Variance. Results There was no statistically significant difference between the mean ?TBS of both [SF] and [AE] adhesives at both aging periods, 24h and 6m (p< 0.1103) and (p< 0.7148) respectively. Only for [AE] there was statistical significance for aging periods (p< 0.0057*). The most represented modes of failure were adhesive failure at tooth side. Conclusions Under simulated IPP solvent-free adhesive [SF] had comparable performance as ethanol-based adhesive [AE] when bonded to dentin substrate. Key words:Bond strength, dentin, simulated intrapulpal pressure, self-etch adhesives, solvents. PMID:26535091

  17. Blood pressure change with age in salt-sensitive teenagers.

    PubMed

    Ye, Tao; Liu, Zhi-quan; Mu, Jian-jun; Fu, Xi-han; Yang, Jun; Gao, Bao-lin; Zhang, Xiao-hong

    2004-12-01

    To observe blood pressure change with age in salt-sensitive teenagers whose salt sensitivity were determined by repeated testing. Salt sensitivity was determined through intravenous infusion of normal saline combined with volume-depletion by oral diuretic furosemide in 55 teenagers. After five years, salt sensitivity was re-examined and subject blood pressure was followed up. Blood pressure changes in salt-sensitive teenagers were compared to that of non-salt sensitive teenagers over five years. After 5 years, the repetition rate of salt sensitivity determined by intravenous saline loading is 92.7%. In teenagers with salt sensitivity on the baseline, both the systolic blood pressure increments and increment rates were much higher than non-salt sensitive teenagers (12.7 +/- 12.1 mmHg vs. 2.8 +/- 5.2 mmHg, P < 0.01; 12.2% +/- 12.0% vs. 2.5% +/- 4.4%, P < 0.001, respectively). There was a similar trend for diastolic blood pressure (8.4 +/- 6.4 mmHg vs. 3.7 +/- 6.4 mmHg, P = 0.052; 13.2% +/- 10.6% vs. 6.8% +/- 10.1%, P = 0.053, respectively). Salt sensitivity determined by intravenous saline loading showed good reproducibility. Blood pressure increments with age were much higher in salt-sensitive teenagers than non-salt sensitive teenagers, especially in terms of systolic blood pressure.

  18. Adhesion Force Measurements Using an Atomic Force Microscope Upgraded with a Linear Position Sensitive Detector

    PubMed Central

    Pierce, M.; Stuart, J.; Pungor, A.; Dryden, P.

    2012-01-01

    The atomic force microscope (AFM), in addition to providing images on an atomic scale, can be used to measure the forces between surfaces and the AFM probe. The potential uses of mapping the adhesive forces on the surface include a spatial determination of surface energy and a direct identification of surface proteins through specific protein–ligand binding interactions. The capabilities of the AFM to measure adhesive forces can be extended by replacing the four-quadrant photodiode detection sensor with an external linear position sensitive detector and by utilizing a dedicated user-programmable signal generator and acquisiton system. Such an upgrade enables the microscope to measure in the larger dynamic range of adhesion forces, improves the sensitivity and linearity of the measurement, and eliminates the problems inherent to the multiple repetitious contacts between the AFM probe and the specimen surface. PMID:25125792

  19. Pressure effect on the sensitivity of quartz Bourdon tube gauges.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szaniszlo, A. J.

    1972-01-01

    The sensitivity change for a commercial fused quartz Bourdon tube precision pressure gauge, due to a change in absolute pressure level, has been analytically computed and experimentally confirmed. The computed differential pressure error is 2.5% of full scale at a 100 atm absolute pressure level. The experimental method compared the fused quartz Bourdon tube gauge digital output to the results obtained from a nitrogen gas pressure system which had a high pressure, well-type mercury manometer as the differential pressure reference.

  20. Rotor Blade Pressure Measurement in a Rotating Machinery Using Pressure and Temperature Sensitive Paints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torgerson, S.; Liu, T.; Sullivan, J.

    1998-01-01

    Pressure and temperature sensitive paints have been utilized for the measurement of blade surface pressure and temperature distributions in a high speed axial compressor and an Allied Signal F109 gas turbine engine. Alternate blades were painted with temperature sensitive paints and then pressure sensitive paint. This combination allows temperature distributions to be accounted for when determining the blade suction surface pressure distribution. Measurements were taken and pressure maps on the suction surface of a blade were obtained over a range of rotational speeds. Pressure maps of the suction surface show-strong shock waves at the higher speeds.

  1. Rotor Blade Pressure Measurement in a Rotating Machinery Using Pressure and Temperature Sensitive Paints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torgerson, S.; Liu, T.; Sullivan, J.

    1998-01-01

    Pressure and temperature sensitive paints have been utilized for the measurement of blade surface pressure and temperature distributions in a high speed axial compressor and an Allied Signal F109 gas turbine engine. Alternate blades were painted with temperature sensitive paints and then pressure sensitive paint. This combination allows temperature distributions to be accounted for when determining the blade suction surface pressure distribution. Measurements were taken and pressure maps on the suction surface of a blade were obtained over a range of rotational speeds. Pressure maps of the suction surface show-strong shock waves at the higher speeds.

  2. Applications of Temperature and Pressure Sensitive Paints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Tian-Shu; Sullivan, John P.

    1998-01-01

    Luminescent molecular probes imbedded in a polymer binder form a temperature or pressure paint. On excitation by light of the proper wavelength, the luminescence, which is quenched either thermally or by oxygen, is detected by a camera or photodetector. From the detected luminescent intensity, temperature and pressure can be determined. The basic photophysics, calibration, accuracy and time response of a luminescent paint is described followed by applications in low speed, transonic, supersonic and cryogenic wind tunnels and in rotating machinery.

  3. Multimode fiber tip Fabry-Perot cavity for highly sensitive pressure measurement.

    PubMed

    Chen, W P; Wang, D N; Xu, Ben; Zhao, C L; Chen, H F

    2017-03-23

    We demonstrate an optical Fabry-Perot interferometer fiber tip sensor based on an etched end of multimode fiber filled with ultraviolet adhesive. The fiber device is miniature (with diameter of less than 60 μm), robust and low cost, in a convenient reflection mode of operation, and has a very high gas pressure sensitivity of -40.94 nm/MPa, a large temperature sensitivity of 213 pm/°C within the range from 55 to 85 °C, and a relatively low temperature cross-sensitivity of 5.2 kPa/°C. This device has a high potential in monitoring environment of high pressure.

  4. Monitoring the Contact Stress Distribution of Gecko-Inspired Adhesives Using Mechano-Sensitive Surface Coatings.

    PubMed

    Neubauer, Jens W; Xue, Longjian; Erath, Johann; Drotlef, Dirk-M; Campo, Aránzazu Del; Fery, Andreas

    2016-07-20

    The contact geometry of microstructured adhesive surfaces is of high relevance for adhesion enhancement. Theoretical considerations indicate that the stress distribution in the contact zone is crucial for the detachment mechanism, but direct experimental evidence is missing so far. In this work, we propose a method that allows, for the first time, the detection of local stresses at the contact area of biomimetic adhesive microstructures during contact formation, compression and detachment. We use a mechano-sensitive polymeric layer, which turns mechanical stresses into changes of fluorescence intensity. The biomimetic surface is brought into contact with this layer in a well-defined fashion using a microcontact printer, while the contact area is monitored with fluorescence microscopy in situ. Thus, changes in stress distribution across the contact area during compression and pull-off can be visualized with a lateral resolution of 1 μm. We apply this method to study the enhanced adhesive performance of T-shaped micropillars, compared to flat punch microstructures. We find significant differences in the stress distribution of the both differing contact geometries during pull-off. In particular, we find direct evidence for the suppression of crack nucleation at the edge of T-shaped pillars, which confirms theoretical models for the superior adhesive properties of these structures.

  5. Pressure sensitivity of the vapor-cell atomic clock.

    PubMed

    Iyanu, Gebriel; Wang, He; Camparo, James

    2009-06-01

    Although atomic clocks have very low levels of frequency instability, they are nonetheless sensitive (albeit slightly) to various environmental parameters, including temperature, power supply voltage, and dc magnetic fields. In the terrestrial environment, however, atmospheric pressure (i.e., the air's molecular density) is not generally included in this list, because the air's density variations near the surface of the earth will typically have a negligible effect on the clock's performance. The situation is different, however, for clocks onboard satellites like Galileo, where manufacturing and testing are done at atmospheric pressure, while operation is in vacuum. The pressure sensitivity of atomic clocks, in particular vapor-cell atomic clocks, can therefore be of significance. Here, we discuss some of the ways in which changes in atmospheric pressure affect vapor-cell atomic clocks, and we demonstrate that, for one device, the pressure-sensitivity traces back to a pressure-induced change in the temperature of the clock's filter and resonance cells.

  6. [Orofacial touch and pressure sensitivity in children].

    PubMed

    Miura, Seiko

    2004-06-01

    This study assessed the thresholds of orofacial touch and pressure sensation in children and compared them with those in adults. Child subjects who were outpatients of TMDU Dental Hospital and who had no particular systemic diseases other than dental problems, were classified into 4 groups: preschool children (4-5 y, n=26), lower-grade elementary school pupils (6-9 y, n=100), higher-grade elementary school pupils (10-12 y, n=36), and junior high school pupils (13-15 y, n=26). Adult subjects were TMDU students (23-31 y, n=37). The thresholds of touch and pressure sensation were measured with a Semmes-Weinstein pressure aesthesiometer which consisted of 20 filaments with different marking values (Fm). Stimulation was applied with the thinner 10 filaments with lower values ranging from 1.65 to 4.31 Fm (0.0045-2.052 gw). The measurements were carried out on the following 10 points in the orofacial area in all the subjects: the upper lip, gingiva of upper anterior teeth, palate, lower lip, gingiva of lower anterior teeth, buccal mucous membrane, tongue tip, skin above eyebrow, cheek skin and mentum skin. The thresholds in the child subjects were not different from those in the adult subjects on most measurement points, but were significantly different on the gingiva and palate. The lower the age, the lower the thresholds on the gingiva. Since these measurement points are located in the chewing mucous membrane, it is considered that the threshold changes occurred due to histological alterations with growth. It is suggested that the threshold values of orofacial touch and pressure sensation obtained from this study could be used as the standard values for an indicator of the development of oral function and structure in children.

  7. FAITH Pressure-Sensitive Paint and Surface Oil Flow Visualizations

    NASA Image and Video Library

    Pressure-sensitive paint and surface oil flow visualization experiments are performed on a three dimensional model of a small hill. This experiment was part of a series of measurements of the compl...

  8. 75 FR 8114 - Pressure Sensitive Plastic Tape From Italy

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-23

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION Pressure Sensitive Plastic Tape From Italy AGENCY: United States International Trade Commission. ACTION: Revised schedule for the subject review. DATES: Effective Date: February 16, 2010. FOR...

  9. Pressure Sensitivity of Streptococcal Growth in Relation to Catabolism

    PubMed Central

    Marquis, Robert E.; Brown, William P.; Fenn, Wallace O.

    1971-01-01

    The sensitivity of Streptococcus faecalis growth to hydrostatic pressures ranging up to 550 atm was found to depend on the source of adenosine triphosphate for growth. Barotolerance of cultures growing in a complex medium with ribose as major catabolite appeared to be determined primarily by the pressure sensitivity of ribose-degrading enzymes. Apparent activation volumes for growth were nearly identical to those for lactate production from ribose, and yield coefficients per mole of ribose degraded were relatively independent of pressure. In contrast, cultures with glucose as main catabolite were less sensitive to pressure; glycolysis was less severely restricted under high pressure than was growth, and yield coefficients declined with pressure, especially above 400 atm. Thus, two distinct types of barotolerance could be defined—one dominated by catabolic reactions and one dominated by noncatabolic reactions. The results of experiments with a series of other catabolites further supported the view that catabolic reactions can determine streptococcal barotolerance. We also found that growing, glucose-degrading cultures increased in volume under pressure in the same manner that they do at 1 atm. Thus, it appeared that the bacterium has no alternative means of carrying out glycolysis under pressure without dilatation. Also, the observation that cultures grown under pressure did not contain abnormally large or morphologically deformed cells suggested that pressure did not inhibit cell division more than cell growth. PMID:4925191

  10. Diaphragm size and sensitivity for fiber optic pressure sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    He, Gang; Cuomo, Frank W.; Zuckerwar, Allan J.

    1991-01-01

    A mechanism which leads to a significant increase in sensitivity and linear operating range in reflective type fiber optic pressure transducers with minute active dimensions is studied. A general theoretical formalism is presented which is in good agreement with the experimental data. These results are found useful in the development of small pressure sensors used in turbulent boundary layer studies and other applications.

  11. Silver Adhesive Layer for Enhanced Pressure-Free Bonding Using Copper Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satoh, Toshikazu; Ishizaki, Toshitaka; Akedo, Kunio

    2017-02-01

    Pressure-free Cu nanoparticle bonding between two Cu plates with an Ag adhesive layer was examined. Insertion of the Ag adhesive layer considerably enhanced the bonding strength at firing temperatures between 523 K and 673 K. The bonding strength generally increased with the firing temperature. The strength enhancement of the Ag adhesive layer was observed even for a very thin (3 nm) Ag layer, and there was no obvious dependence of the thickness of the Ag layer on the bonding strength for Ag layers of thickness up to 200 nm. Ag atoms from the adhesive layer diffused away to the bonding layer with an increase in the firing temperature. The elemental mapping images showed that the Ag had two morphologies: thin Ag layers existing between particulate Cu grains, and fine Ag particles dispersed in coarse Cu crystals. The microstructure near the interface between the Cu nanoparticle bonding layer and Cu plate used as the substrate suggests that the enhancement effect of the Ag layer originates in the active migration of the Ag layer itself.

  12. Pressure-sensitive paint as a distributed optical microphone array.

    PubMed

    Gregory, James W; Sullivan, John P; Wanis, Sameh S; Komerath, Narayanan M

    2006-01-01

    Pressure-sensitive paint is presented and evaluated in this article as a quantitative technique for measurement of acoustic pressure fluctuations. This work is the culmination of advances in paint technology which enable unsteady measurements of fluctuations over 10 kHz at pressure levels as low as 125 dB. Pressure-sensitive paint may be thought of as a nano-scale array of optical microphones with a spatial resolution limited primarily by the resolution of the imaging device. Thus, pressure-sensitive paint is a powerful tool for making high-amplitude sound pressure measurements. In this work, the paint was used to record ensemble-averaged, time-resolved, quantitative measurements of two-dimensional mode shapes in an acoustic resonance cavity. A wall-mounted speaker generated nonlinear, standing acoustic waves in a rigid enclosure measuring 216 mm wide, 169 mm high, and 102 mm deep. The paint recorded the acoustic surface pressures of the (1,1,0) mode shape at approximately 1.3 kHz and a sound pressure level of 145.4 dB. Results from the paint are compared with data from a Kulite pressure transducer, and with linear acoustic theory. The paint may be used as a diagnostic technique for ultrasonic tests where high spatial resolution is essential, or in nonlinear acoustic applications such as shock tubes.

  13. Pressure-sensitive paint technique for surface pressure measurements in a low-density wind tunnel.

    PubMed

    Anyoji, M; Numata, D; Nagai, H; Asai, K

    A low-density wind tunnel called the Mars wind tunnel, has been developed at Tohoku University that can produce a high subsonic flow at low pressures for aerodynamic measurements of low-Reynolds-number aircraft wings aimed at developing aircraft applicable to the atmosphere on the planet Mars. Accurate surface pressure measurements on the wing are essential for analysis of not only aerodynamic performance, including lift and drag, but also the flow fields around the wing. This paper presents a surface pressure measurement technique using pressure-sensitive paint (PSP) applicable for Mars wind tunnel tests under low-pressure conditions. The results show that a PSP composed of palladium tetra(pentafluorophenyl) porphyrin (PdTFPP) and poly[1-(trimethylsilyl)-propyne] [poly(TMSP)] exhibits a high-pressure sensitivity at pressures as low as 1 kPa, and the absolute values of the static pressures measured by the PSP accorded well with the values derived from static pressure sensors used as a reference. A calibration methodology for the non-uniform pressure sensitivity on the test model, including a temperature calibration, is also established. The PSP technique clearly demonstrated pressure sensitivity over a distinctive low-pressure region inside a leading edge separation bubble on a flat plate at low Reynolds numbers.

  14. Application of Pressure Sensitive Paint in Hypersonic Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jules, Kenol; Carbonaro, Mario; Zemsch, Stephan

    1995-01-01

    It is well known in the aerodynamic field that pressure distribution measurement over the surface of an aircraft model is a problem in experimental aerodynamics. For one thing, a continuous pressure map can not be obtained with the current experimental methods since they are discrete. Therefore, interpolation or CFD methods must be used for a more complete picture of the phenomenon under study. For this study, a new technique was investigated which would provide a continuous pressure distribution over the surface under consideration. The new method is pressure sensitive paint. When pressure sensitive paint is applied to an aerodynamic surface and placed in an operating wind-tunnel under appropriate lighting, the molecules luminesce as a function of the local pressure of oxygen over the surface of interest during aerodynamic flow. The resulting image will be brightest in the areas of low pressure (low oxygen concentration), and less intense in the areas of high pressure (where oxygen is most abundant on the surface). The objective of this investigation was to use pressure sensitive paint samples from McDonnell Douglas (MDD) for calibration purpose in order to assess the response of the paint under appropriate lighting and to use the samples over a flat plate/conical fin mounted at 75 degrees from the center of the plate in order to study the shock/boundary layer interaction at Mach 6 in the Von Karman wind-tunnel. From the result obtained it was concluded that temperature significantly affects the response of the paint and should be given the uppermost attention in the case of hypersonic flows. Also, it was found that past a certain temperature threshold, the paint intensity degradation became irreversible. The comparison between the pressure tap measurement and the pressure sensitive paint showed the right trend. However, there exists a shift when it comes to the actual value. Therefore, further investigation is under way to find the cause of the shift.

  15. Development and characterization of fast responding pressure sensitive microspheres.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Fletcher; Rodriguez, Miguel; McCann, Jesse; Carlson, Brenden; Dabiri, Dana; Khalil, Gamal E; Callis, James B; Xia, Younan; Gouterman, Martin

    2008-07-01

    The response times of pressure sensitive paint (PSP) and pressure sensitive microspheres to passing shockwaves were measured to investigate their ability to accurately determine pressure changes in unsteady flows. The PSPs tested used platinum tetra(pentafluorophenyl)porphine (PtTFPP), platinum octaethylporphine (PtOEP), and a novel set of osmium-based organometallic complexes as pressure sensitive luminophors incorporated into polymer matrices of dimethylsiloxane bisphenol A-polycarbonate block copolymer or polystyrene. Two types of pressure sensitive microspheres were used, the first being PtOEP-doped polystyrene microspheres (PSBeads) and the second being porous silicon dioxide microspheres containing the novel, pressure sensitive osmium complexes. Response times for the platinum-based PSPs ranged from 47.2 to 53.0 micros, while the osmium-based PSPs ranged between 37.6 and 58.9 micros. For the microspheres, 2.5 microm diameter PSBeads showed a response time of 3.15 ms, while the osmium-based silicon dioxide microspheres showed a response time ranging between 13.6 and 18.9 micros.

  16. Development and characterization of fast responding pressure sensitive microspheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Fletcher; Rodriguez, Miguel; McCann, Jesse; Carlson, Brenden; Dabiri, Dana; Khalil, Gamal E.; Callis, James B.; Xia, Younan; Gouterman, Martin

    2008-07-01

    The response times of pressure sensitive paint (PSP) and pressure sensitive microspheres to passing shockwaves were measured to investigate their ability to accurately determine pressure changes in unsteady flows. The PSPs tested used platinum tetra(pentafluorophenyl)porphine (PtTFPP), platinum octaethylporphine (PtOEP), and a novel set of osmium-based organometallic complexes as pressure sensitive luminophors incorporated into polymer matrices of dimethylsiloxane bisphenol A-polycarbonate block copolymer or polystyrene. Two types of pressure sensitive microspheres were used, the first being PtOEP-doped polystyrene microspheres (PSBeads) and the second being porous silicon dioxide microspheres containing the novel, pressure sensitive osmium complexes. Response times for the platinum-based PSPs ranged from 47.2to53.0μs, while the osmium-based PSPs ranged between 37.6 and 58.9μs. For the microspheres, 2.5μm diameter PSBeads showed a response time of 3.15ms, while the osmium-based silicon dioxide microspheres showed a response time ranging between 13.6 and 18.9μs.

  17. A pressure sensitive ionic gel FET for tactile sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, S.; Sato, T.; Toshiyoshi, H.

    2017-06-01

    Field-effect-transistor (FET) is combined with an ionic gel to realize a pressure sensitive ionic-gel field-effect-transistor (PSG-FET) of high sensitivity and low operational voltage. The ionic gels form a layer of charge accumulation in a nanometric scale called the electrical double layer (EDL) on each electrode upon voltage application and exhibit quite high capacitance. The source-drain current through the ZnO channel increases from the initial 44 nA (without pressure) to 783 μA (with pressure, 7 kPa), yielding an ON/OFF contrast as large as 1.7 × 104, due to EDLs, which is interpreted as a pressure sensitivity of 2.2 × 103 kPa-1. Judging from the drain current and the gate voltage properties, the threshold voltage is calculated to be 2.8 V owing the large capacitance created by the ionic gel.

  18. Switchable Adhesion in Vacuum Using Bio-Inspired Dry Adhesives

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Suction based attachment systems for pick and place handling of fragile objects like glass plates or optical lenses are energy-consuming and noisy and fail at reduced air pressure, which is essential, e.g., in chemical and physical vapor deposition processes. Recently, an alternative approach toward reversible adhesion of sensitive objects based on bioinspired dry adhesive structures has emerged. There, the switching in adhesion is achieved by a reversible buckling of adhesive pillar structures. In this study, we demonstrate that these adhesives are capable of switching adhesion not only in ambient air conditions but also in vacuum. Our bioinspired patterned adhesive with an area of 1 cm2 provided an adhesion force of 2.6 N ± 0.2 N in air, which was reduced to 1.9 N ± 0.2 N if measured in vacuum. Detachment was induced by buckling of the structures due to a high compressive preload and occurred, independent of air pressure, at approximately 0.9 N ± 0.1 N. The switch in adhesion was observed at a compressive preload between 5.6 and 6.0 N and was independent of air pressure. The difference between maximum adhesion force and adhesion force after buckling gives a reasonable window of operation for pick and place processes. High reversibility of the switching behavior is shown over 50 cycles in air and in vacuum, making the bioinspired switchable adhesive applicable for handling operations of fragile objects. PMID:26457864

  19. Switchable Adhesion in Vacuum Using Bio-Inspired Dry Adhesives.

    PubMed

    Purtov, Julia; Frensemeier, Mareike; Kroner, Elmar

    2015-11-04

    Suction based attachment systems for pick and place handling of fragile objects like glass plates or optical lenses are energy-consuming and noisy and fail at reduced air pressure, which is essential, e.g., in chemical and physical vapor deposition processes. Recently, an alternative approach toward reversible adhesion of sensitive objects based on bioinspired dry adhesive structures has emerged. There, the switching in adhesion is achieved by a reversible buckling of adhesive pillar structures. In this study, we demonstrate that these adhesives are capable of switching adhesion not only in ambient air conditions but also in vacuum. Our bioinspired patterned adhesive with an area of 1 cm(2) provided an adhesion force of 2.6 N ± 0.2 N in air, which was reduced to 1.9 N ± 0.2 N if measured in vacuum. Detachment was induced by buckling of the structures due to a high compressive preload and occurred, independent of air pressure, at approximately 0.9 N ± 0.1 N. The switch in adhesion was observed at a compressive preload between 5.6 and 6.0 N and was independent of air pressure. The difference between maximum adhesion force and adhesion force after buckling gives a reasonable window of operation for pick and place processes. High reversibility of the switching behavior is shown over 50 cycles in air and in vacuum, making the bioinspired switchable adhesive applicable for handling operations of fragile objects.

  20. Gigaseal mechanics: creep of the gigaseal under the action of pressure, adhesion, and voltage.

    PubMed

    Slavchov, Radomir I; Nomura, Takeshi; Martinac, Boris; Sokabe, Masahiro; Sachs, Frederick

    2014-11-06

    Patch clamping depends on a tight seal between the cell membrane and the glass of the pipet. Why does the seal have such high electric resistance? Why does the patch adhere so strongly to the glass? Even under the action of strong hydrostatic, adhesion, and electrical forces, it creeps at a very low velocity. To explore possible explanations, we examined two physical models for the structure of the seal zone and the adhesion forces and two respective mechanisms of patch creep and electric conductivity. There is saline between the membrane and glass in the seal, and the flow of this solution under hydrostatic pressure or electroosmosis should drag a patch. There is a second possibility: the lipid core of the membrane is liquid and should be able to flow, with the inner monolayer slipping over the outer one. Both mechanisms predict the creep velocity as a function of the properties of the seal and the membrane, the pipet geometry, and the driving force. These model predictions are compared with experimental data for azolectin liposomes with added cholesterol or proteins. It turns out that to obtain experimentally observed creep velocities, a simple viscous flow in the seal zone requires ~10 Pa·s viscosity; it is unclear what structure might provide that because that viscosity alone severely constrains the electric resistance of the gigaseal. Possibly, it is the fluid bilayer that allows the motion. The two models provide an estimate of the adhesion energy of the membrane to the glass and membrane's electric characteristics through the comparison between the velocities of pressure-, adhesion-, and voltage-driven creep.

  1. Gigaseal Mechanics: Creep of the Gigaseal under the Action of Pressure, Adhesion, and Voltage

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Patch clamping depends on a tight seal between the cell membrane and the glass of the pipet. Why does the seal have such high electric resistance? Why does the patch adhere so strongly to the glass? Even under the action of strong hydrostatic, adhesion, and electrical forces, it creeps at a very low velocity. To explore possible explanations, we examined two physical models for the structure of the seal zone and the adhesion forces and two respective mechanisms of patch creep and electric conductivity. There is saline between the membrane and glass in the seal, and the flow of this solution under hydrostatic pressure or electroosmosis should drag a patch. There is a second possibility: the lipid core of the membrane is liquid and should be able to flow, with the inner monolayer slipping over the outer one. Both mechanisms predict the creep velocity as a function of the properties of the seal and the membrane, the pipet geometry, and the driving force. These model predictions are compared with experimental data for azolectin liposomes with added cholesterol or proteins. It turns out that to obtain experimentally observed creep velocities, a simple viscous flow in the seal zone requires ∼10 Pa·s viscosity; it is unclear what structure might provide that because that viscosity alone severely constrains the electric resistance of the gigaseal. Possibly, it is the fluid bilayer that allows the motion. The two models provide an estimate of the adhesion energy of the membrane to the glass and membrane’s electric characteristics through the comparison between the velocities of pressure-, adhesion-, and voltage-driven creep. PMID:25295693

  2. A highly sensitive and flexible pressure sensor with electrodes and elastomeric interlayer containing silver nanowires.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun; Jiu, Jinting; Nogi, Masaya; Sugahara, Tohru; Nagao, Shijo; Koga, Hirotaka; He, Peng; Suganuma, Katsuaki

    2015-02-21

    The next-generation application of pressure sensors is gradually being extended to include electronic artificial skin (e-skin), wearable devices, humanoid robotics and smart prosthetics. In these advanced applications, high sensing capability is an essential feature for high performance. Although surface patterning treatments and some special elastomeric interlayers have been applied to improve sensitivity, the process is complex and this inevitably raises the cost and is an obstacle to large-scale production. In the present study a simple printing process without complex patterning has been used for constructing the sensor, and an interlayer is employed comprising elastomeric composites filled with silver nanowires. By increasing the relative permittivity, εr, of the composite interlayer induced by compression at high nanowire concentration, it has been possible to achieve a maximum sensitivity of 5.54 kPa(-1). The improvement in sensitivity did not sacrifice or undermine the other features of the sensor. Thanks to the silver nanowire electrodes, the sensor is flexible and stable after 200 cycles at a bending radius of 2 mm, and exhibits outstanding reproducibility without hysteresis under similar pressure pulses. The sensor has been readily integrated onto an adhesive bandage and has been successful in detecting human movements. In addition to measuring pressure in direct contact, non-contact pressures such as air flow can also be detected.

  3. Increased adhesion of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) to acrylic adhesive tape for medical use by surface treatment with an atmospheric pressure rotating plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jofre-Reche, José Antonio; Pulpytel, Jérôme; Arefi-Khonsari, Farzaneh; Martín-Martínez, José Miguel

    2016-08-01

    The surface properties of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) were modified by treatment with an atmospheric pressure rotating plasma jet (APPJ) and the surface modifications were studied to assess its hydrophilicity and adhesion to acrylic adhesive tape intended for medical applications. Furthermore, the extent of hydrophobic recovery under different storage conditions was studied. The surface treatment of PDMS with the APPJ under optimal conditions noticeably increased the oxygen content and most of the surface silicon species were fully oxidized. A brittle silica-like layer on the outermost surface was created showing changes in topography due to the formation of grooves and cracks. A huge improvement in T-peel and the shear adhesive strength of the APPJ-treated PDMS surface/acrylic tape joints was obtained. On the other hand, the hydrophilicity of the PDMS surface increased noticeably after the APPJ treatment, but 24 h after treatment almost 80% hydrophobicity was recovered and the adhesive strength was markedly reduced with time after the APPJ treatment. However, the application of an acrylic adhesive layer on the just-APPJ-treated PDMS surface retained the adhesive strength, limiting the extent of hydrophobic recovery.

  4. Pressure Sensitive Paint Applied to Flexible Models Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schairer, Edward T.; Kushner, Laura Kathryn

    2014-01-01

    One gap in current pressure-measurement technology is a high-spatial-resolution method for accurately measuring pressures on spatially and temporally varying wind-tunnel models such as Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerators (IADs), parachutes, and sails. Conventional pressure taps only provide sparse measurements at discrete points and are difficult to integrate with the model structure without altering structural properties. Pressure Sensitive Paint (PSP) provides pressure measurements with high spatial resolution, but its use has been limited to rigid or semi-rigid models. Extending the use of PSP from rigid surfaces to flexible surfaces would allow direct, high-spatial-resolution measurements of the unsteady surface pressure distribution. Once developed, this new capability will be combined with existing stereo photogrammetry methods to simultaneously measure the shape of a dynamically deforming model in a wind tunnel. Presented here are the results and methodology for using PSP on flexible surfaces.

  5. Controlling adhesive behavior during recycling

    Treesearch

    Carl Houtman; Karen Scallon; Jihui Guo; XinPing Wang; Steve Severtson; Mark Kroll; Mike Nowak

    2004-01-01

    Adhesives can be formulated to facilitate their removal by typical paper recycling unit operations. The investigations described in this paper are focused on determining fundamental properties that control particle size during pulping. While pressure-sensitive adhesives (PSAs) with high elastic moduli tend to survive pulping with larger particles, facestock and...

  6. A Stretchable Pressure-Sensitive Array Based on Polymer Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Yuanzheng; Xiao, Qi; Li, Buyin

    2017-01-01

    Herein, a flexible 6 × 6 pressure-sensitive array (based on the PDMS (Polydimethylsiloxane) porous substrate) was designed. We have developed a facile method to fabricate the porous substrate, by a single-step operation using the sugar-template method. This strategy effectively diminishes the complexity of the preparation process, as well as the device structure. The electrical resistivity of the stretchable array demonstrates the negative piezo resistive coefficient (NPRC) under 0–100 kpa. Moreover, the pressure-sensitive array reveals a high sensitivity and low delay time (<0.5 s) to the applied forces. Therefore, the pressure distribution could be easily recognized by testing its conductivity changes. Besides, these signal data can be collected into the upper computer, with the purpose of tracking and analyzing the azimuth of the applied loading. This cost-effective micro array has a broad application prospect for fabricating the tactile sensor, artificial skin, and human-computer interfaces. PMID:28678181

  7. Highly sensitive flexible pressure sensors with microstructured rubber dielectric layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mannsfeld, Stefan C. B.; Tee, Benjamin C.-K.; Stoltenberg, Randall M.; Chen, Christopher V. H.-H.; Barman, Soumendra; Muir, Beinn V. O.; Sokolov, Anatoliy N.; Reese, Colin; Bao, Zhenan

    2010-10-01

    The development of an electronic skin is critical to the realization of artificial intelligence that comes into direct contact with humans, and to biomedical applications such as prosthetic skin. To mimic the tactile sensing properties of natural skin, large arrays of pixel pressure sensors on a flexible and stretchable substrate are required. We demonstrate flexible, capacitive pressure sensors with unprecedented sensitivity and very short response times that can be inexpensively fabricated over large areas by microstructuring of thin films of the biocompatible elastomer polydimethylsiloxane. The pressure sensitivity of the microstructured films far surpassed that exhibited by unstructured elastomeric films of similar thickness, and is tunable by using different microstructures. The microstructured films were integrated into organic field-effect transistors as the dielectric layer, forming a new type of active sensor device with similarly excellent sensitivity and response times.

  8. Low-pressure and atmospheric pressure plasma polymerized silica-like films as primers for adhesive bonding of aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Munish

    2007-12-01

    Plasma processes, including plasma etching and plasma polymerization, were investigated for the pretreatment of aluminum prior to structural adhesive bonding. Since native oxides of aluminum are unstable in the presence of moisture at elevated temperature, surface engineering processes must usually be applied to aluminum prior to adhesive bonding to produce oxides that are stable. Plasma processes are attractive for surface engineering since they take place in the gas phase and do not produce effluents that are difficult to dispose off. Reactive species that are generated in plasmas have relatively short lifetimes and form inert products. The objective of this work was to develop plasma etching and plasma polymerization as environmentally compatible processes for surface engineering of aluminum. Plasma polymerized silica-like films of thickness less than 200 nm were deposited on pretreated aluminum substrates using hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO) as the "monomer" and oxygen as a "co-reactant" in low-pressure RF-powered (13.6 MHz) reactor. Recently, plasma deposition at atmospheric pressure has become a promising technology because they do not require vacuum systems, can be applied to large objects with complex shapes, and adapted easily for continuous processing. Therefore, atmospheric pressure plasma processes were investigated and compared with their more traditional counterparts, low-pressure plasmas. Molecular structure and morphology of the plasma polymerized films were determined using surface analysis techniques such as X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The effectiveness of plasma etching and plasma polymerization as surface engineering processes for aluminum were probed by determining the initial strength and durability of aluminum/epoxy lap joints prepared from substrates that were plasma pretreated, coated with silica-like film, and

  9. Enhanced sensitivity of piezoelectric pressure sensor with microstructured polydimethylsiloxane layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Wook; Lee, Junwoo; Kyoung Yoo, Yong; Kang, Sungchul; Kim, Jinseok; Hoon Lee, Jeong

    2014-03-01

    Highly sensitive detection tools that measure pressure and force are essential in palpation as well as real-time pressure monitoring in biomedical applications. So far, measurement has mainly been done by force sensing resistors and field effect transistor (FET) sensors for monitoring biological pressure and force sensing. We report a pressure sensor by the combination of a piezoelectric sensor layer integrated with a microstructured Polydimethylsiloxane (μ-PDMS) layer. We propose an enhanced sensing tool to be used for analyzing gentle touches without the external voltage source that is used in FET sensors, by incorporating a microstructured PDMS layer in a piezoelectric sensor. By measuring the directly induced electrical charge from the microstructure-enhanced piezoelectric signal, we observed a 3-fold increased sensitivity in a signal response. Both fast signal relaxation from force removal and wide dynamic range from 0.23 to 10 kPa illustrate the good feasibility of the thin film piezoelectric sensor for mimicking human skin.

  10. Forced and Moment Measurements with Pressure-Sensitive Paint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, James H.

    1999-01-01

    The potential of pressure-sensitive paint (PSP) to provide aerodynamic loads measurements has been a driving force behind the development of this measurement technique. To demonstrate the suitability of PSP for this purpose, it is necessary to show that PSP-derived pressures can be accurately integrated over the model surface. This cannot be done simply by demonstrating the accuracy of PSP as compared to pressure taps. PSP errors due to misregistration or temperature sensitivity may be high near model edges, where they will have a strong effect on moment measurements, but where pressure taps are rarely installed. A more suitable technique is to compare integrated PSP data over the entire model surface with balance and/or CFD results. This paper presents results from three experiments in which integrated PSP data is compared with balance and/or CFD data. This allows the usefulness of PSP for force and moment measurements, and by implication for loads measurements, to be assessed.

  11. Measurement of unsteady surface pressure on rotor blades of fans by pressure-sensitive paint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoyama, Hiroshi; Miura, Kouhei; Iida, Akiyoshi

    2017-01-01

    To clarify the unsteady pressure distributions on the rotor blades of an axial fan, a pressure-sensitive paint (PSP) technique was used. To capture the image of the rotating fan as a static image, an optical derotator method with a dove prism was adopted. It was confirmed by preliminary experiments with a resonator and a speaker that the pressure fluctuations with 347 Hz can be measured by the present PSP. The measured mean pressure distributions were compared with the predicted results based on large-eddy simulations. The measured instantaneous surface pressure is instrumental to identify acoustic source of fan noise in the design stage.

  12. Akt directly regulates focal adhesion kinase through association and serine phosphorylation: implication for pressure-induced colon cancer metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shouye

    2011-01-01

    Although focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is typically considered upstream of Akt, extracellular pressure stimulates cancer cell adhesion via Akt-dependent FAK activation. How Akt regulates FAK is unknown. We studied Akt-FAK interaction in colon cancer cells under 15 mmHg increased extracellular pressure. Pressure enhanced Akt-FAK association, blocked by inhibiting FAK or silencing Akt1 but not Akt2, and stimulated FAK serine phosphorylation in Caco-2 and human colon cancer cells from surgical specimens Akt1-dependently. FAK includes three serine (S517/601/695) and one threonine (T600)-containing consensus sequences for Akt phosphorylation. Studying S–>A nonphosphorylatable point mutants suggests that these sites coordinately upregulate FAK Y397 tyrosine phosphorylation, which conventionally initiates FAK activation, and mediate pressure-induced cancer cell adhesion. FAK(T600A) mutation did not prevent pressure-induced FAK(Y397) phosphorylation or adhesion. Akt1 appeared to directly bind FAK, and this binding did not depend on the FAK autophosphorylation site (Y397). In addition, our results demonstrated that Akt phosphorylated FAK at three novel serine phosphorylation sites, which were also not required for FAK-Akt binding. This novel interaction suggests that FAK and Akt may be dual kinase targets to prevent cancer cell adhesion and metastasis. PMID:21209368

  13. Pressure Sensitive Mats as Safety Devices in Danger Zones.

    PubMed

    Dąbrowski, Stanisław; Brański, Zygfryd

    1998-01-01

    Developing prototypes of pressure sensitive mats and testing their practical application were the aims of this study. Two contact plate mats were designed and constructed: rubber-rubber (R) and metal-metal (M). A recipe for rubber mixes and the production technology were prepared. Two laboratory test stands for measuring the actuating force, response time, static pressure resistance, and the durability of the mats were constructed. Computer software was written to control the operation of those test stands. Methods of testing pressure sensitive mats were based on PrDIN 31 006 (Deutsches Institut fur Normung [DIN], 1990) and EN 1760-1 (Comite Europeen de Normalisation [CEN], 1997). Both prototypes of contact plate mats were tested under laboratory and industrial conditions. The test results proved that the design was correct, the setup requirements were fulfilled, and the mats were efficient and reliable in the industrial environment.

  14. Dynamic Mode Decomposition of Fast Pressure Sensitive Paint Data

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Mohd Y.; Pandey, Anshuman; Gregory, James W.

    2016-01-01

    Fast-response pressure sensitive paint (PSP) is used in this work to measure and analyze the acoustic pressure field in a rectangular cavity. The high spatial resolution and fast frequency response of PSP effectively captures the spatial and temporal detail of surface pressure resulting in the acoustic pressure field. In this work, a high-speed camera is used to generate a continuous time record of the acoustic pressure fluctuations with PSP. Since the level of the acoustic pressure is near the resolution limit of the sensor system, advanced analysis techniques are used to extract the spatial modes of the pressure field. Both dynamic mode decomposition (DMD) and proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) are compared with phase averaging for data analysis. While all three techniques effectively extract the pressure field and reduce the impact of sensor noise, DMD and POD are more robust techniques that can be applied to aperiodic or multi-frequency signals. Furthermore, DMD is better than POD at suppressing noise in particular regions of the spectrum and at effectively separating spectral energy when multiple acoustic excitation frequencies are present. PMID:27294939

  15. Temperature Correction of Pressure-Sensitive Paints Simplified

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bencic, Timothy J.

    2000-01-01

    Pressure-sensitive paint (PSP) has become a useful tool to augment conventional pressure taps in measuring the surface pressure distribution of aerodynamic components in wind tunnel testing. Although PSP offers the advantage of nonintrusive global mapping of the surface pressure, one prominent drawback to the accuracy of this technique is the inherent temperature sensitivity of PSP's luminescent intensity. Typical aerodynamic surface PSP tests rely on the coated surface to be both spatially and temporally isothermal, along with conventional instrumentation, to yield the highest accuracy pressure mappings. In some tests, however, spatial and temporal thermal gradients are generated by the nature of the test, as in a blowing jet impinging on a surface. In these cases, high accuracy and reliable data cannot be obtained unless the temperature variations on the painted surface are accounted for. A new temperature-correction technique was developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field to collapse a "family" of PSP calibration curves to a single curve of intensity ratio versus pressure. This correction allows a streamlined procedure to be followed whether or not temperature information is used in the data reduction of the PSP.

  16. Characterization of multi-dye pressure-sensitive microbeads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacroix, Daniel; Viraye-Chevalier, Teddy; Seiter, Guillaume; Howard, Jonathan; Dabiri, Dana; Khalil, Gamal E.; Xia, Younan; Zhu, Cun

    2013-11-01

    The response times of pressure-sensitive particles to passing shockwaves were measured to investigate their ability to accurately determine pressure changes in unsteady flows. The particles tested were loaded with novel pressure-sensitive dyes such as Pt (II) meso-tetra(pentafluorophenyl)porphine, Pt(II) octaethylporphine, bis(3,5-difluoro-2-(2-pyridyl)phenyl-(2-carboxypyridyl))iridium III, and iridium(III) bis(4-phenylthieno[3,2-c] pyridinato-N,C2')acetylacetonate. For this work, porous silicon dioxide pressure-sensitive beads (PSBeads) were used. Two synthetic procedures were used to fabricate the particles. In the first, a one-step method loaded dyes during the synthesis of microbeads, in the second a two-step method synthesized the microbeads first, then loaded the dyes. The shock tube facility was used to measure the response times of microbeads to fast pressure jumps. The study involved testing multiple luminophors loaded in microbeads with various size distributions. Response times for the silica-based microbeads ranged between 26 μs and 462 μs (at 90% of the amplitude response), which are much faster than previously reported polystyrene-based microbead response times, which range from 507 μs to 1582 μs (at 90% of the amplitude response) [F. Kimura, M. Rodriguez, J. McCann, B. Carlson, D. Dabiri, G. Khalil, J. B. Callis, Y. Xia, and M. Gouterman, "Development and characterization of fast responding pressure sensitive microspheres," Rev. Sci. Instrum. 79, 074102 (2008)].

  17. Pressure sensitivity analysis of fiber Bragg grating sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mrad, Nezih; Sridharan, Vasant; Kazemi, Alex

    2014-09-01

    Recent development in fiber optic sensing technology has mainly focused on discrete sensing, particularly, sensing systems with potential multiplexing and multi-parameter capabilities. Bragg grating fiber optic sensors have emerged as the non-disputed champion for multiplexing and simultaneous multi-parameter sensing for emerging high value structural components, advanced processing and manufacturing capabilities and increased critical infrastructure resilience applications. Although the number of potential applications for this sensing technology is large and spans the domains of medicine, manufacturing, aerospace, and public safety; critical issues such as fatigue life, sensitivity, accuracy, embeddability, material/sensor interface integrity, and universal demodulation systems still need to be addressed. The purpose of this paper is to primarily evaluate Commercial-Of-The-Shelf (COTS) Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) sensors' sensitivity to pressure, often neglected in several applications. The COTS fiber sensitivity to pressure is further evaluated for two types of coatings (Polyimide and Acrylate), and different arrangements (arrayed and single).

  18. Pressure-Sensitive Paint Measurements of Transient Shock Phenomena

    PubMed Central

    Quinn, Mark Kenneth; Kontis, Konstantinos

    2013-01-01

    Measurements of the global pressure field created by shock wave diffraction have been captured optically using a porous pressure-sensitive paint. The pressure field created by a diffracting shock wave shows large increases and decreases in pressure and can be reasonably accurately captured using CFD. The substrate, a thin-layer chromatography (TLC) plate, has been dipped in a luminophore solution. TLC plates are readily available and easy to prepare. Illumination comes from two high-intensity broadband Xenon arc light sources with short-pass filters. The sample is imaged at 100 kHz using a Vision Research Phantom V710 in conjunction with a pair of long and short pass filters, creating a band. The PSP results are compared with numerical simulations of the flow using the commercial CFD package Fluent as part of ANSYS 13 for two Mach numbers. PMID:23549365

  19. High Speed Pressure Sensitive Paint for Dynamic Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pena, Carolina; Chism, Kyle; Hubner, Paul

    2016-11-01

    Pressure sensitive paint (PSP) allows engineers to obtain accurate, high-spatial-resolution measurements of pressure fields over a structure. The pressure is directly related to the luminescence emitted by the paint due to oxygen quenching. Fast PSP has a higher surface area due to its porosity compared to conventional PSP, which enables faster diffusion and measurements to be acquired three orders of magnitude faster than with conventional PSP. A fast time response is needed when testing vibrating structures due to fluid-structure interaction. The goal of this summer project was to set-up, test and analyze the pressure field of an impinging air jet on a vibrating cantilever beam using Fast PSP. Software routines were developed for the processing of the emission images, videos of a static beam coated with Fast PSP were acquired with the air jet on and off, and the intensities of these two cases were ratioed and calibrated to pressure. Going forward, unsteady pressures on a vibrating beam will be measured and presented. Eventually, the long-term goal is to integrate luminescent pressure and strain measurement techniques, simultaneously using Fast PSP and a luminescent photoelastic coating on vibrating structures. Funding from NSF REU site Grant EEC 1358991 is greatly appreciated.

  20. Pressure to be Thin and Insulin Sensitivity among Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Schvey, Natasha A.; Shomaker, Lauren B.; Kelly, Nichole R.; Pickworth, Courtney K.; Cassidy, Omni; Galescu, Ovidiu; Demidowich, Andrew P.; Brady, Sheila M.; Tanofsky-Kraff, Marian; Yanovski, Jack A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Extant research indicates that some of the comorbidities associated with adult obesity may be adversely affected by the stress resulting from negative body image and weight-related teasing. This study examined the association between weight-related pressure and insulin sensitivity in adolescents, who are vulnerable to both weight-based teasing and the onset of metabolic dysregulation. Methods Participants were 215 adolescent healthy volunteers (55% female; 59% White; 35% overweight/obese; M±SD age = 15.4±1.4y), who completed a self-report measure of pressure to be thin from parents, friends, and romantic partners. Fasting blood samples were obtained to assess serum insulin and glucose, which were used to calculate insulin sensitivity; fat mass (kg) and fat-free mass (%) were measured with air displacement plethysmography. Pubertal stage was determined by physical examination. Results Pressure to be thin was positively associated with fasting insulin (p = .01) and negatively associated with insulin sensitivity (p = .02), after controlling for pubertal stage, sex, race, height, fat-free mass, and adiposity. Pressure to be thin was associated with a greater odds of having hyperinsulinemia (fasting insulin ≥ 15 µIU/mL; Odds Ratio (95% CI): 1.65 (1.08–2.50), p = .02), adjusting for the same covariates. Conclusions Results indicate that adolescents perceiving more pressure to be thin have greater elevations of fasting insulin and poorer insulin sensitivity above and beyond the effect of fat mass. Future research is warranted to elucidate the mechanisms responsible for this relationship. PMID:26707232

  1. Effect of Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Treatment on Surface Characteristics and Adhesive Bond Quality of Peel Ply Prepared Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tracey, Ashley C.

    The purpose of this research was to investigate if atmospheric pressure plasma treatment could modify peel ply prepared composite surfaces to create strong adhesive bonds. Two peel ply surface preparation composite systems previously shown to create weak bonds (low fracture energy and adhesion failure) that were potential candidates for plasma treatment were Toray T800/3900-2 carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) prepared with Precision Fabrics Group, Inc. (PFG) 52006 nylon peel ply and Hexcel T300/F155 CFRP prepared with PFG 60001 polyester peel ply. It was hypothesized that atmospheric pressure plasma treatment could functionalize and/or remove peel ply remnants left on the CFRP surfaces upon peel ply removal. Surface characterization measurements and double cantilever beam (DCB) testing were used to determine the effects of atmospheric pressure plasma treatment on surface characteristics and bond quality of peel ply prepared CFRP composites. Previous research showed that Toray T800/3900-2 carbon fiber reinforced epoxy composites prepared with PFG 52006 peel ply and bonded with Cytec MetlBond 1515-3M structural film adhesive failed in adhesion at low fracture energies when tested in the DCB configuration. Previous research also showed that DCB samples made of Hexcel T300/F155 carbon fiber reinforced epoxy composites prepared with PFG 60001 peel ply and bonded with Henkel Hysol EA 9696 structural film adhesive failed in adhesion at low fracture energies. Recent research suggested that plasma treatment could be able to activate these "un-bondable" surfaces and result in good adhesive bonds. Nylon peel ply prepared 177 °C cure and polyester peel ply prepared 127 °C cure CFRP laminates were treated with atmospheric pressure plasma after peel ply removal prior to bonding. Atmospheric pressure plasma treatment was capable of significantly increasing fracture energies and changing failure modes. For Toray T800/3900-2 laminates prepared with PFG 52006 and bonded with

  2. Applying Pressure Sensitive Paint Technology to Rotor Blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watkins, A. Neal; Leighty, Bradley D.; Lipford, William E.; Goodman, Kyle Z.; Crafton, Jim; Gregory, James W.

    2014-01-01

    This report will present details of a Pressure Sensitive Paint (PSP) system for measuring global surface pressures on rotorcrtaft blades in simulated forward flight at the 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel at the NASA Langley Research Center. The basics of the PSP method will be discussed and the modifications that were needed to extend this technology for use on rotor blades. Results from a series of tests will also be presented as well as several areas of improvement that have been identified and are currently being developed for future testing.

  3. Langley 16- Ft. Transonic Tunnel Pressure Sensitive Paint System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sprinkle, Danny R.; Obara, Clifford J.; Amer, Tahani R.; Leighty, Bradley D.; Carmine, Michael T.; Sealey, Bradley S.; Burkett, Cecil G.

    2001-01-01

    This report describes the NASA Langley 16-Ft. Transonic Tunnel Pressure Sensitive Paint (PSP) System and presents results of a test conducted June 22-23, 2000 in the tunnel to validate the PSP system. The PSP system provides global surface pressure measurements on wind tunnel models. The system was developed and installed by PSP Team personnel of the Instrumentation Systems Development Branch and the Advanced Measurement and Diagnostics Branch. A discussion of the results of the validation test follows a description of the system and a description of the test.

  4. Imperfection sensitivity of pressured buckling of biopolymer spherical shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lei; Ru, C. Q.

    2016-06-01

    Imperfection sensitivity is essential for mechanical behavior of biopolymer shells [such as ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) and spherical viruses] characterized by high geometric heterogeneity. In this work, an imperfection sensitivity analysis is conducted based on a refined shell model recently developed for spherical biopolymer shells of high structural heterogeneity and thickness nonuniformity. The influence of related parameters (including the ratio of radius to average shell thickness, the ratio of transverse shear modulus to in-plane shear modulus, and the ratio of effective bending thickness to average shell thickness) on imperfection sensitivity is examined for pressured buckling. Our results show that the ratio of effective bending thickness to average shell thickness has a major effect on the imperfection sensitivity, while the effect of the ratio of transverse shear modulus to in-plane shear modulus is usually negligible. For example, with physically realistic parameters for typical imperfect spherical biopolymer shells, the present model predicts that actual maximum external pressure could be reduced to as low as 60% of that of a perfect UCA spherical shell or 55%-65% of that of a perfect spherical virus shell, respectively. The moderate imperfection sensitivity of spherical biopolymer shells with physically realistic imperfection is largely attributed to the fact that biopolymer shells are relatively thicker (defined by smaller radius-to-thickness ratio) and therefore practically realistic imperfection amplitude normalized by thickness is very small as compared to that of classical elastic thin shells which have much larger radius-to-thickness ratio.

  5. Imperfection sensitivity of pressured buckling of biopolymer spherical shells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Ru, C Q

    2016-06-01

    Imperfection sensitivity is essential for mechanical behavior of biopolymer shells [such as ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) and spherical viruses] characterized by high geometric heterogeneity. In this work, an imperfection sensitivity analysis is conducted based on a refined shell model recently developed for spherical biopolymer shells of high structural heterogeneity and thickness nonuniformity. The influence of related parameters (including the ratio of radius to average shell thickness, the ratio of transverse shear modulus to in-plane shear modulus, and the ratio of effective bending thickness to average shell thickness) on imperfection sensitivity is examined for pressured buckling. Our results show that the ratio of effective bending thickness to average shell thickness has a major effect on the imperfection sensitivity, while the effect of the ratio of transverse shear modulus to in-plane shear modulus is usually negligible. For example, with physically realistic parameters for typical imperfect spherical biopolymer shells, the present model predicts that actual maximum external pressure could be reduced to as low as 60% of that of a perfect UCA spherical shell or 55%-65% of that of a perfect spherical virus shell, respectively. The moderate imperfection sensitivity of spherical biopolymer shells with physically realistic imperfection is largely attributed to the fact that biopolymer shells are relatively thicker (defined by smaller radius-to-thickness ratio) and therefore practically realistic imperfection amplitude normalized by thickness is very small as compared to that of classical elastic thin shells which have much larger radius-to-thickness ratio.

  6. Process Sensitivity, Performance, and Direct Verification Testing of Adhesive Locking Features

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golden, Johnny L.; Leatherwood, Michael D.; Montoya, Michael D.; Kato, Ken A.; Akers, Ed

    2012-01-01

    Phase I: The use of adhesive locking features or liquid locking compounds (LLCs) (e.g., Loctite) as a means of providing a secondary locking feature has been used on NASA programs since the Apollo program. In many cases Loctite was used as a last resort when (a) self-locking fasteners were no longer functioning per their respective drawing specification, (b) access was limited for removal & replacement, or (c) replacement could not be accomplished without severe impact to schedule. Long-term use of Loctite became inevitable in cases where removal and replacement of worn hardware was not cost effective and Loctite was assumed to be fully cured and working. The NASA Engineering & Safety Center (NESC) and United Space Alliance (USA) recognized the need for more extensive testing of Loctite grades to better understand their capabilities and limitations as a secondary locking feature. These tests, identified as Phase I, were designed to identify processing sensitivities, to determine proper cure time, the correct primer to use on aerospace nutplate, insert and bolt materials such as A286 and MP35N, and the minimum amount of Loctite that is required to achieve optimum breakaway torque values. The .1900-32 was the fastener size tested, due to wide usage in the aerospace industry. Three different grades of Loctite were tested. Results indicate that, with proper controls, adhesive locking features can be successfully used in the repair of locking features and should be considered for design. Phase II: Threaded fastening systems used in aerospace programs typically have a requirement for a redundant locking feature. The primary locking method is the fastener preload and the traditional redundant locking feature is a self-locking mechanical device that may include deformed threads, non-metallic inserts, split beam features, or other methods that impede movement between threaded members. The self-locking resistance of traditional locking features can be directly verified

  7. Enhancement of low pressure cold sprayed copper coating adhesion by laser texturing on aluminum substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knapp, Wolfgang; Gillet, Vincent; Courant, Bruno; Aubignat, Emilie; Costil, Sophie; Langlade, Cécile

    2017-02-01

    Surface pre-treatment is fundamental in thermal spraying processes to obtain a sufficient bonding strength between substrate and coating. Different pre-treatments can be used, mostly grit-blasting for current industrial applications. This study is focused on Cu-Al2O3 coatings obtained by Low Pressure Cold Spray on AW5083 aluminum alloy substrate. Bonding strength is measured by tensile adhesion test, while deposition efficiency is measured. Substrates are textured by laser, using a pattern of equally spaced grooves with almost constant diameter and variations of depth. Results show that bonding strength is improved up to +81% compared to non-treated substrate, while deposition efficiency remains constant. The study of the samples after rupture reveals a modification of the failure mode, from mixed failure to cohesive failure. A modification of crack propagation is also noticed, the shape of laser textured grooves induces a deviation of cracks inside the coating instead of following the interface between the layers.

  8. Pressure, velocity, and temperature sensitivities of a bleed-type pressure sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giovanangeli, J. P.; Chambaud, P.

    1987-07-01

    This paper presents the results of a complete series of tests and calibrations of a bleed-type pressure sensor used in order to determine in-stream static pressure fluctuations in a turbulent boundary layer just above a pure laboratory wind-wave field. The static calibrations show that for air flow mean velocities lower than 15 m/s, the sensor response depends not only upon the pressure but also upon the velocity and the temperature of the air flow. Dynamic calibrations prove that the temperature and velocity sensitivities depend strongly upon the frequency. They are important for low frequencies and equal to zero only for frequencies greater than 0.1 Hz if the sensor is operated in an isothermal turbulent flow and greater than 1 Hz for a nonisothermal flow. Pressure sensitivity does not depend upon frequency for a range from dc to 600 Hz.

  9. A novel high-sensitivity FBG pressure sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Zhenhua; Fu, Tao; Leng, Jinsong

    2007-07-01

    A novel pressure sensor based on FBG is designed in this paper. Not only in normal environment, also does it accurately work in water and petrol where other conventional sensors can not work normally. In this paper, the principle of the novel sensor is introduced, and two experiments are further performed: One is keeping the sensor flatly in the gastight silo whose pressure is supplied by an air compressing engine, and the other one is keeping the sensor in liquid. The analysis of the result data demonstrates that the sensor possesses high sensitivity, high linearity, high precision and repeatability. Its experimental linearity and sensitivity approach 0.99858 and 5.35×10 -3MPa -1, respectively. It is also discussed using the sensor to measure the volume in tank.

  10. Polymer-Particle Pressure-Sensitive Paint with High Photostability.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Yu; Uchida, Kenta; Egami, Yasuhiro; Yamaguchi, Hiroki; Niimi, Tomohide

    2016-04-16

    We propose a novel fast-responding and paintable pressure-sensitive paint (PSP) based on polymer particles, i.e. polymer-particle (pp-)PSP. As a fast-responding PSP, polymer-ceramic (PC-)PSP is widely studied. Since PC-PSP generally consists of titanium (IV) oxide (TiO₂) particles, a large reduction in the luminescent intensity will occur due to the photocatalytic action of TiO₂. We propose the usage of polymer particles instead of TiO₂ particles to prevent the reduction in the luminescent intensity. Here, we fabricate pp-PSP based on the polystyrene particle with a diameter of 1 μm, and investigate the pressure- and temperature-sensitives, the response time, and the photostability. The performances of pp-PSP are compared with those of PC-PSP, indicating the high photostability with the other characteristics comparable to PC-PSP.

  11. Polymer-Particle Pressure-Sensitive Paint with High Photostability

    PubMed Central

    Matsuda, Yu; Uchida, Kenta; Egami, Yasuhiro; Yamaguchi, Hiroki; Niimi, Tomohide

    2016-01-01

    We propose a novel fast-responding and paintable pressure-sensitive paint (PSP) based on polymer particles, i.e. polymer-particle (pp-)PSP. As a fast-responding PSP, polymer-ceramic (PC-)PSP is widely studied. Since PC-PSP generally consists of titanium (IV) oxide (TiO2) particles, a large reduction in the luminescent intensity will occur due to the photocatalytic action of TiO2. We propose the usage of polymer particles instead of TiO2 particles to prevent the reduction in the luminescent intensity. Here, we fabricate pp-PSP based on the polystyrene particle with a diameter of 1 μm, and investigate the pressure- and temperature-sensitives, the response time, and the photostability. The performances of pp-PSP are compared with those of PC-PSP, indicating the high photostability with the other characteristics comparable to PC-PSP. PMID:27092511

  12. Exposed Dentin: Influence of Cleaning Procedures and Simulated Pulpal Pressure on Bond Strength of a Universal Adhesive System

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To compare various pre-treatments serving as cleaning procedures of dentin on the bond strength of resin composite promoted by a universal adhesive system applied either in the absence or presence of simulated pulpal pressure. Materials and Methods Prior to application of the adhesive system (Scotchbond Universal) and resin composite (Filtek Z250), ground dentin surfaces were given one of five pre-treatments either without or with simulated pulpal pressure: 1) no pre-treatment, adhesive system in “self-etch” mode, 2) phosphoric acid etching, adhesive system in “total-etch” mode, 3) polishing with pumice on prophylaxis cup, 4) air abrasion with AIR-FLOW PLUS powder, 5) air abrasion with AIR-FLOW PERIO powder; n = 20/group of pre-treatment. After storage (37°C, 100% humidity, 24 h), micro shear bond strength was measured and data analyzed with parametric ANOVA including Bonferroni-Holm correction for multiple testing followed by Student’s t tests (significance level: α = 0.05). Results The ANOVA found type of pre-treatment and simulated pulpal pressure to have no significant effect on dentin bond strength. The explorative post-hoc tests showed a negative effect of simulated pulpal pressure for phosphoric acid etching (adhesive system in “total-etch” mode; p = 0.020), but not for the other four pre-treatments (all p = 1.000). Conclusion Air abrasion with powders containing either erythritol and chlorhexidine (AIR-FLOW PLUS) or glycine (AIR-FLOW PERIO) yielded dentin bond strengths similar to no pre-treatment, phosphoric acid etching, or polishing with pumice. Simulated pulpal pressure reduced the bond strength only when the self-etch adhesive system was used in total-etch mode. PMID:28081572

  13. Adhesion improvement of electroless copper plating on phenolic resin matrix composite through a tin-free sensitization process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yong; Bian, Cheng; Jing, Xinli

    2013-04-01

    In order to improve the adhesion of electroless copper plating on phenolic resin matrix composite (PRMC), a new and efficient tin-free sensitization process has been developed. Electroless copper plating could be achieved in three steps, namely: (i) chemical etching with potassium permanganate solution; (ii) sensitization and activation with glucose and silver nitrate solution respectively; and (iii) electroless copper plating. Compared with the sample sensitized with stannous chloride (SnCl2), the copper plating obtained in the tin-free process showed excellent adhesion with the PRMC substrate, but had lower plating rate and conductivity. Additionally, the morphology of the copper plating was affected by the sensitization process, and the tin-free process was conducive to the formation of the large spherical copper polycrystal. Although the process is slightly complicated, the new sensitization process is so low-cost and environment-friendly that it is of great significance and could be applied into large-scale commercial manufacturing.

  14. Pressure sensitivity kernels applied to time-reversal acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raghukumar, Kaustubha

    Time-reversal is a method of focusing sound in the ocean that has found a variety of applications in recent years, ranging from underwater communications to biological stone destruction. In order to produce a focal spot, the time-reversal process first needs to acquire the Green's function between source and receiver. This Green's function is time-reversed and retransmitted in order to produce a spatio-temporal focal spot at the original source location. If the medium properties in between the source and receiver change between the acquisition of the Green's function and the subsequent retransmission, the quality of the focal spot can degrade or even disappear. However, the time-reversal focal spot has been found to be surprisingly robust to changes in medium properties, which are chiefly sound speed fluctuations in underwater acoustics. At 445 Hz, the focal spot was seen to persist for a week, while at 3.5 kHz, the focal spot persists for about an hour. Sensitivity kernels have the ability to linearly map sound speed perturbations to a perturbation of an acoustic parameter such as travel-time or pressure. Sensitivity kernels have a Fresnel-like interference pattern with regions of positive and negative sensitivities in the medium. Time-reversal, which causes different arrival paths to arrive at the same time, results in overlapping sensitivity kernels that leads to a net reduction in pressure sensitivity at the focal spot. Upon expressing the pressure at the focal spot in terms of sensitivity kernels, source transmissions are derived that are even more robust than time-reversal. The theory developed using pressure sensitivity kernels is tested on experimental data, along with an internal wave model, using various metrics. The linear limitations of the kernels are explored in the context of time-evolving Green's functions. The optimized source functions are then tested using experimental Green's functions and their behavior is seen to be in the right sense. Finally

  15. Applications of pressure-sensitive dielectric elastomer sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böse, Holger; Ocak, Deniz; Ehrlich, Johannes

    2016-04-01

    Dielectric elastomer sensors for the measurement of compression loads with high sensitivity are described. The basic design of the sensors exhibits two profiled surfaces between which an elastomer film is confined. All components of the sensor were prepared with silicone whose stiffness can be varied in a wide range. Depending on details of the sensor design, various effects contribute to the enhancement of the capacitance. The intermediate elastomer film is stretched upon compression and electrode layers on the elastomer profiles and in the elastomer film approach each other. Different designs of the pressure sensor give rise to very different sensor characteristics in terms of the dependence of electric capacitance on compression force. Due to their inherent flexibility, the pressure sensors can be used on compliant substrates such as seats or beds or on the human body. This gives rise to numerous possible applications. The contribution describes also some examples of possible sensor applications. A glove was equipped with various sensors positioned at the finger tips. When grabbing an object with the glove, the sensors can detect the gripping forces of the individual fingers with high sensitivity. In a demonstrator of the glove equipped with seven sensors, the capacitances representing the gripping forces are recorded on a display. In another application example, a lower limb prosthesis was equipped with a pressure sensor to detect the load on the remaining part of the leg and the load is displayed in terms of the measured capacitance. The benefit of such sensors is to detect an eventual overload in order to prevent possible pressure sores. A third example introduces a seat load sensor system based on four extended pressure sensor mats. The sensor system detects the load distribution of a person on the seat. The examples emphasize the high performance of the new pressure sensor technology.

  16. A highly sensitive and flexible pressure sensor with electrodes and elastomeric interlayer containing silver nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jun; Jiu, Jinting; Nogi, Masaya; Sugahara, Tohru; Nagao, Shijo; Koga, Hirotaka; He, Peng; Suganuma, Katsuaki

    2015-02-01

    The next-generation application of pressure sensors is gradually being extended to include electronic artificial skin (e-skin), wearable devices, humanoid robotics and smart prosthetics. In these advanced applications, high sensing capability is an essential feature for high performance. Although surface patterning treatments and some special elastomeric interlayers have been applied to improve sensitivity, the process is complex and this inevitably raises the cost and is an obstacle to large-scale production. In the present study a simple printing process without complex patterning has been used for constructing the sensor, and an interlayer is employed comprising elastomeric composites filled with silver nanowires. By increasing the relative permittivity, εr, of the composite interlayer induced by compression at high nanowire concentration, it has been possible to achieve a maximum sensitivity of 5.54 kPa-1. The improvement in sensitivity did not sacrifice or undermine the other features of the sensor. Thanks to the silver nanowire electrodes, the sensor is flexible and stable after 200 cycles at a bending radius of 2 mm, and exhibits outstanding reproducibility without hysteresis under similar pressure pulses. The sensor has been readily integrated onto an adhesive bandage and has been successful in detecting human movements. In addition to measuring pressure in direct contact, non-contact pressures such as air flow can also be detected.The next-generation application of pressure sensors is gradually being extended to include electronic artificial skin (e-skin), wearable devices, humanoid robotics and smart prosthetics. In these advanced applications, high sensing capability is an essential feature for high performance. Although surface patterning treatments and some special elastomeric interlayers have been applied to improve sensitivity, the process is complex and this inevitably raises the cost and is an obstacle to large-scale production. In the present

  17. Development of a Pressure Sensitive Paint System for Measuring Global Surface Pressures on Rotorcraft Blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watkins, A. Neal; Leighty, Bradley D.; Lipford, William E.; Wong, Oliver D.; Oglesby, Donald M.; Ingram, JoAnne L.

    2007-01-01

    This paper will describe the results from a proof of concept test to examine the feasibility of using Pressure Sensitive Paint (PSP) to measure global surface pressures on rotorcraft blades in hover. The test was performed using the U.S. Army 2-meter Rotor Test Stand (2MRTS) and 15% scale swept rotor blades. Data were collected from five blades using both the intensity- and lifetime-based approaches. This paper will also outline several modifications and improvements that are underway to develop a system capable of measuring pressure distributions on up to four blades simultaneously at hover and forward flight conditions.

  18. The Use of Luminescent Molecular Probes for Pressure Measurement -Pressure Sensitive Paint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, John

    1998-04-01

    Traditionally, pressure taps have been used to obtain surface pressure distributions on wind tunnel models, flight vehicles and other fluid flow rigs. This technique can be very labor-intensive and model preparation costs are high when detailed maps of pressure are desired. Further, the spatial resolution is limited by the number of instrumentation locations chosen. By comparison, the pressure sensitive paint (PSP) technique provides a way to obtain simple, inexpensive, full-field measurements of pressure with much higher spatial resolution. Luminescent molecular probes are imbedded in a binder to form a pressure sensitive paint. On excitation by light of the proper wavelength, the luminescence, which is quenched by oxygen, is detected by a camera or photodetector. From the detected luminescent intensity or time decay and a calibration curve, pressure can be determined. The basic photophysics, calibration, accuracy and time response of luminescent paints will be described followed by applications in low speed, transonic, supersonic and cryogenic wind tunnels and in rotating machinery.

  19. Pressure Sensitive Tape in the Manufacture of Reusable Solid Rocket Motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Champneys, Jeff

    2007-01-01

    ATK Launch Systems Inc. manufactures the reusable solid rocket motor (RSRM) for NASA's Space Shuttle program. They are used in pairs to launch the Space Shuttle. Pressure sensitive tape (PST) is used throughout the RSRM manufacturing process. A few PST functions are: 1) Secure labels; 2) Provide security seals; and 3) Protect tooling and flight hardware during various inert and live operations. Some of the PSTs used are: Cloth, Paper, Reinforced Teflon, Double face, Masking, and Vinyl. Factors given consideration for determining the type of tape to be used are: 1) Ability to hold fast; 2) Ability to release easily; 3) Ability to endure abuse; 4) Strength; and 5) Absence of adhesive residue after removal.

  20. Characteristics of Pressure Sensitive Paint Intrusiveness Effects on Aerodynamic Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amer, Tahani R.; Liu, Tianshu; Oglesby, Donald M.

    2001-01-01

    One effect of using pressure sensitive paint (PSP) is the potential intrusiveness to the aerodynamic characteristics of the model. The paint thickness and roughness may affect the pressure distribution, and therefore, the forces and moments on the wind tunnel model. A study of these potential intrusive effects was carried out at NASA Langley Research Center where a series of wind tunnel tests were conducted using the Modem Design of Experiments (MDOE) test approach. The PSP effects on the integrated forces were measured on two different models at different test conditions in both the Low Turbulence Pressure Tunnel (LTPT) and the Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel (UPWT) at Langley. The paint effect was found to be very small over a range of Reynolds numbers, Mach numbers and angles of attack. This is due to the very low surface roughness of the painted surface. The surface roughness, after applying the NASA Langley developed PSP, was lower than that of the clean wing. However, the PSP coating had a localized effects on the pressure taps, which leads to an appreciable decrease in the pressure tap reading.

  1. Characterization of Pressure Sensitive Paint Intrusiveness Effects on Aerodynamic Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amer, Tahani R.; Liu, Tianshu; Oglesby, Donald M.

    2001-01-01

    One effect of using pressure sensitive paint (PSP) is the potential intrusiveness to the aerodynamic characteristics of the model. The paint thickness and roughness may affect the pressure distribution. and therefore, the forces and moments on the wind tunnel model. A study of these potential intrusive effects was carried out at NASA Langley Research Center where a series of wind tunnel tests were conducted using the Modem Design of Experiments (MDOE) test approach. The PSP effects on the integrated forces were measured on two different models at different test conditions in both the Low Turbulence Pressure Tunnel (LTPT) and the Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel (UPWT) at Langley. The paint effect was found to be very small over a range of Reynolds numbers, Mach numbers and angles of attack. This is due to the very low surface roughness of the painted surface. The surface roughness, after applying the NASA Langley developed PSP, was lower than that of the clean wing. However, the PSP coating had a localized effects on the pressure taps, which leads to an appreciable decrease in the pressure tap reading.

  2. Characterization of Pressure Sensitive Paint Intrusiveness Effects on Aerodynamic Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amer, Tahani R.; Liu, Tianshu; Oglesby, Donald M.

    2001-01-01

    One effect of using pressure sensitive paint (PSP) is the potential intrusiveness to the aerodynamic characteristics of the model. The paint thickness and roughness may affect the pressure distribution. and therefore, the forces and moments on the wind tunnel model. A study of these potential intrusive effects was carried out at NASA Langley Research Center where a series of wind tunnel tests were conducted using the Modem Design of Experiments (MDOE) test approach. The PSP effects on the integrated forces were measured on two different models at different test conditions in both the Low Turbulence Pressure Tunnel (LTPT) and the Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel (UPWT) at Langley. The paint effect was found to be very small over a range of Reynolds numbers, Mach numbers and angles of attack. This is due to the very low surface roughness of the painted surface. The surface roughness, after applying the NASA Langley developed PSP, was lower than that of the clean wing. However, the PSP coating had a localized effects on the pressure taps, which leads to an appreciable decrease in the pressure tap reading.

  3. Continuum modeling of a porous solid with pressure-sensitive dilatant matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, T. F.; Faleskog, J.; Shih, C. F.

    The pressure-sensitive plastic response of a material has been studied in terms of the intrinsic sensitivity of its yield stress to pressure and the presence and growth of cavities. This work focuses on the interplay between these two distinctly different mechanisms and the attendant material behavior. To this end, a constitutive model is proposed taking both mechanisms into account. Using Gurson's homogenization, an upper bound model is developed for a voided solid with a plastically dilatant matrix material. This model is built around a three-parameter axisymmetric velocity field for a unit sphere containing a spherical void. The void is also subjected to internal pressure; this can be relevant for polymeric adhesives permeated by moisture that vaporizes at elevated temperatures. The plastic response of the matrix material is described by Drucker-Prager's yield criterion and an associated flow rule. The resulting yield surface and porosity evolution law of the homogenized constitutive model are presented in parametric form. Using the solutions to special cases as building blocks, approximate models with explicit forms are proposed. The parametric form and an approximate explicit form are compared against full-field solutions obtained from finite element analysis. They are also studied for loading under generalized tension conditions. These computational simulations shed light on the interplay between the two mechanisms and its enhanced effect on yield strength and plastic flow. Among other things, the tensile yield strength of the porous solid is greatly reduced by the internal void pressure, particularly when a liquid/vapor phase is the source of the internal pressure.

  4. Effect of a new method to simulate pulpal pressure on bond strength and nanoleakage of dental adhesives to dentin.

    PubMed

    Feitosa, Victor Pinheiro; Correr, Américo Bortolazzo; Correr-Sobrinho, Lourenço; Sinhoreti, Mário Alexandre

    2012-12-01

    To evaluate a new method of simulated pulpal pressure in vitro in comparison with the conventional one. Four adhesives were analyzed: a three-step etch-and-rinse (Scotchbond Multi-Purpose [SBMP]), a two-step etch-and-rinse (Single Bond 2 [SB]), a two-step self-etching (Clearfil SE Bond [SE]), and a one-step self-etching (Clearfil S3 [S3]) system. Restorations were built up in flat, deep dentin from extracted molars. After two methods of simulated pulpal pressure or no pulpal pressure (control groups), the samples were cut into sticks and submitted to microtensile bond strength (µTBS) testing and nanoleakage evaluation. Results were analyzed with two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (p < 0.05). In general, statistical analysis of µTBS showed SBMP>SB=SE>S3. For both methods of simulated pulpal pressure, the µTBS of SB and S3 was lower than in control groups. For SBMP and SE, the µTBS remained stable with simulated pulpal pressure. Conventional and experimental methods of simulating pulpal pressure resulted in similar µTBS (p = 1.00) and nanoleakage patterns. Silver impregnation was higher with SB and S3, especially after simulated pulpal pressure with both methods. The experimental simulated pulpal-pressure method tested here was similar to the conventional method and can be an alternative to it. The simplified adhesives show reduction in bond strength after simulated pulpal pressure. The multistep adhesives have stable bond strengths under simulated pulpal pressure. Therefore, the separate application of hydrophobic resin can achieve resistance to bonding deterioration after hydrostatic pressure.

  5. Comparison of unsteady pressure fields on turrets with different surface features using pressure-sensitive paint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordeyev, Stanislav; De Lucca, Nicholas; Jumper, Eric J.; Hird, Kyle; Juliano, Thomas J.; Gregory, James W.; Thordahl, James; Wittich, Donald J.

    2014-01-01

    Spatially temporally resolved unsteady pressure fields on a surface of a hemisphere-on-cylinder turret with either a flat or a conformal window with realistic features such as gaps and "smile" cutouts were characterized using fast-response pressure-sensitive paint at M = 0.33 for several window viewing angles. Various statistical properties of pressure fields were computed, and geometry effects on the unsteady pressure fields were analyzed and discussed. Proper orthogonal decomposition was also used to extract dominant pressure modes and corresponding temporal coefficients and to analyze and compare instantaneous pressure structures for different turret geometric features and the window viewing angles. An unsteady separation off the turret and a recirculation region downstream of the turret were identified as dominant sources of the unsteady pressure. It was found that while all geometric features affected the unsteady pressure field, the "smiles," positioned spanwise-symmetrically on both sides of the turret, were the leading cause of these changes, followed by the looking forward flat window. The gaps, the side- and the back-looking flat window introduced only small local changes.

  6. A highly sensitive fiber Bragg grating diaphragm pressure transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allwood, Gary; Wild, Graham; Lubansky, Alex; Hinckley, Steven

    2015-10-01

    In this work, a novel diaphragm based pressure transducer with high sensitivity is described, including the physical design structure, in-depth analysis of optical response to changes in pressure, and a discussion of practical implementation and limitations. A flat circular rubber membrane bonded to a cylinder forms the body of the transducer. A fiber Bragg grating bonded to the center of the diaphragm structure enables the fractional change in pressure to be determined by analyzing the change in Bragg wavelength of the reflected spectra. Extensive evaluation of the physical properties and optical characteristics of the transducer has been performed through experimentation, and modeling using small deformation theory. The results show the transducer has a sensitivity of 0.116 nm/kPa, across a range of 15 kPa. Ultra-low cost interrogation of the optical signal was achieved through the use of an optically mismatched Bragg grating acting as an edge filter to convert the spectral change into an intensity change. A numerical model of the intensity based interrogation was implemented in order to validate the experimental results. Utilizing this interrogation technique and housing both the sensing and reference Bragg gratings within the main body of the transducer means it is effectively temperature insensitive and easily connected to electronic systems.

  7. A technique for measuring absolute toe pressures: evaluation of pressure-sensitive film techniques.

    PubMed

    Tuckman, A S; Werner, F W; Fortino, M D; Spadaro, J A

    1992-05-01

    Although a number of pathologies of the forefoot in ballet dancers on pointe have been described, pressures and deforming forces have not been adequately measured. To evaluate the possible use of pressure-sensitive film (PSF) in measuring the pressures on the external soft tissues in such a confined space as the dancer's toe shoe, it was tested and calibrated with 20 cadaver toes. Each cadaver toe was internally stabilized and loaded longitudinally against PSF on a flat surface. The resultant films were analyzed with a video imaging system and the pressures and total forces were determined. Results showed that the linearity of the PSF to pressure had a regression value of 0.98. By using two sensitivity ranges of films, the total force measured by the PSF was found to be within 10% of the known applied force on each toe. The PSF, therefore, may very well be a useful and accurate method of measuring external soft tissue pressures on the forefoot.

  8. Promotion of adhesive penetration and resin bond strength to dentin using non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae-Hoon; Han, Geum-Jun; Kim, Chang-Keun; Oh, Kyu-Hwan; Chung, Sung-No; Chun, Bae-Hyeock; Cho, Byeong-Hoon

    2016-02-01

    Non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasmas (NT-APPs) have been shown to improve the bond strength of resin composites to demineralized dentin surfaces. Based on a wet-bonding philosophy, it is believed that a rewetting procedure is necessary after treatment with NT-APP because of its air-drying effect. This study investigated the effect of 'plasma-drying' on the bond strength of an etch-and-rinse adhesive to dentin by comparison with the wet-bonding technique. Dentin surfaces of human third molars were acid-etched and divided into four groups according to the adhesion procedure: wet bonding, plasma-drying, plasma-drying/rewetting, and dry bonding. In plasma treatment groups, the demineralized dentin surfaces were treated with a plasma plume generated using a pencil-type low-power plasma torch. After the adhesion procedures, resin composite/dentin-bonded specimens were subjected to a microtensile bond-strength test. The hybrid layer formation was characterized by micro-Raman spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The plasma-drying group presented significantly higher bond strength than the wet-bonding and dry-bonding groups. Micro-Raman spectral analysis indicated that plasma-drying improved the penetration and polymerization efficacy of the adhesive. Plasma-drying could be a promising method to control the moisture of demineralized dentin surfaces and improve the penetration of adhesive and the mechanical property of the adhesive/dentin interface.

  9. Sensitivity of pressure sensors enhanced by doping silver nanowires.

    PubMed

    Li, Baozhang; Xu, Chengyi; Zheng, Jianming; Xu, Chunye

    2014-06-04

    We have developed a highly sensitive flexible pressure sensor based on a piezopolymer and silver nanowires (AgNWs) composite. The composite nanofiber webs are made by electrospinning mixed solutions of poly(inylidene fluoride) (PVDF) and Ag NWs in a cosolvent mixture of dimethyl formamide and acetone. The diameter of the fibers ranges from 200 nm to 500 nm, as demonstrated by SEM images. FTIR and XRD results reveal that doping Ag NWs into PVDF greatly enhances the content of β phase in PVDF. This β phase increase can be attributed to interactions between the Ag NWs and the PVDF matrix, which forces the polymer chains to be embedded into the β phase crystalline. The sensitivity of the pressure sensors agrees well with the FTIR and XRD characteristics. In our experiments, the measured sensitivity reached up to 30 pC/N for the nanofiber webs containing 1.5 wt% Ag NWs, which is close to that of poly(vinylidene fluoride-trifluoroethylene) [P(VDF-TrFE), (77/23)]. This study may provide a new method of fabricating high performance flexible sensors at relatively low cost compared with sensors based on [P(VDF-TrFE), (77/23)].

  10. Sensitivity of Pressure Sensors Enhanced by Doping Silver Nanowires

    PubMed Central

    Li, Baozhang; Xu, Chengyi; Zheng, Jianming; Xu, Chunye

    2014-01-01

    We have developed a highly sensitive flexible pressure sensor based on a piezopolymer and silver nanowires (AgNWs) composite. The composite nanofiber webs are made by electrospinning mixed solutions of poly(inylidene fluoride) (PVDF) and Ag NWs in a cosolvent mixture of dimethyl formamide and acetone. The diameter of the fibers ranges from 200 nm to 500 nm, as demonstrated by SEM images. FTIR and XRD results reveal that doping Ag NWs into PVDF greatly enhances the content of β phase in PVDF. This β phase increase can be attributed to interactions between the Ag NWs and the PVDF matrix, which forces the polymer chains to be embedded into the β phase crystalline. The sensitivity of the pressure sensors agrees well with the FTIR and XRD characteristics. In our experiments, the measured sensitivity reached up to 30 pC/N for the nanofiber webs containing 1.5 wt% Ag NWs, which is close to that of poly(vinylidene fluoride-trifluoroethylene) [P(VDF-TrFE), (77/23)]. This study may provide a new method of fabricating high performance flexible sensors at relatively low cost compared with sensors based on [P(VDF-TrFE), (77/23)]. PMID:24901980

  11. Superconducting Accelerating Cavity Pressure Sensitivity Analysis and Stiffening

    SciTech Connect

    Rodnizki, J; Ben Aliz, Y; Grin, A; Horvitz, Z; Perry, A; Weissman, L; Davis, G Kirk; Delayen, Jean R.

    2014-12-01

    The Soreq Applied Research Accelerator Facility (SARAF) design is based on a 40 MeV 5 mA light ions superconducting RF linac. Phase-I of SARAF delivers up to 2 mA CW proton beams in an energy range of 1.5 - 4.0 MeV. The maximum beam power that we have reached is 5.7 kW. Today, the main limiting factor to reach higher ion energy and beam power is related to the HWR sensitivity to the liquid helium coolant pressure fluctuations. The HWR sensitivity to helium pressure is about 60 Hz/mbar. The cavities had been designed, a decade ago, to be soft in order to enable tuning of their novel shape. However, the cavities turned out to be too soft. In this work we found that increasing the rigidity of the cavities in the vicinity of the external drift tubes may reduce the cavity sensitivity by a factor of three. A preliminary design to increase the cavity rigidity is presented.

  12. A Graphene-Based Resistive Pressure Sensor with Record-High Sensitivity in a Wide Pressure Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, He; Shu, Yi; Wang, Xue-Feng; Mohammad, Mohammad Ali; Bie, Zhi; Xie, Qian-Yi; Li, Cheng; Mi, Wen-Tian; Yang, Yi; Ren, Tian-Ling

    2015-02-01

    Pressure sensors are a key component in electronic skin (e-skin) sensing systems. Most reported resistive pressure sensors have a high sensitivity at low pressures (<5 kPa) to enable ultra-sensitive detection. However, the sensitivity drops significantly at high pressures (>5 kPa), which is inadequate for practical applications. For example, actions like a gentle touch and object manipulation have pressures below 10 kPa, and 10-100 kPa, respectively. Maintaining a high sensitivity in a wide pressure range is in great demand. Here, a flexible, wide range and ultra-sensitive resistive pressure sensor with a foam-like structure based on laser-scribed graphene (LSG) is demonstrated. Benefitting from the large spacing between graphene layers and the unique v-shaped microstructure of the LSG, the sensitivity of the pressure sensor is as high as 0.96 kPa-1 in a wide pressure range (0 ~ 50 kPa). Considering both sensitivity and pressure sensing range, the pressure sensor developed in this work is the best among all reported pressure sensors to date. A model of the LSG pressure sensor is also established, which agrees well with the experimental results. This work indicates that laser scribed flexible graphene pressure sensors could be widely used for artificial e-skin, medical-sensing, bio-sensing and many other areas.

  13. A Graphene-Based Resistive Pressure Sensor with Record-High Sensitivity in a Wide Pressure Range

    PubMed Central

    Tian, He; Shu, Yi; Wang, Xue-Feng; Mohammad, Mohammad Ali; Bie, Zhi; Xie, Qian-Yi; Li, Cheng; Mi, Wen-Tian; Yang, Yi; Ren, Tian-Ling

    2015-01-01

    Pressure sensors are a key component in electronic skin (e-skin) sensing systems. Most reported resistive pressure sensors have a high sensitivity at low pressures (<5 kPa) to enable ultra-sensitive detection. However, the sensitivity drops significantly at high pressures (>5 kPa), which is inadequate for practical applications. For example, actions like a gentle touch and object manipulation have pressures below 10 kPa, and 10–100 kPa, respectively. Maintaining a high sensitivity in a wide pressure range is in great demand. Here, a flexible, wide range and ultra-sensitive resistive pressure sensor with a foam-like structure based on laser-scribed graphene (LSG) is demonstrated. Benefitting from the large spacing between graphene layers and the unique v-shaped microstructure of the LSG, the sensitivity of the pressure sensor is as high as 0.96 kPa−1 in a wide pressure range (0 ~ 50 kPa). Considering both sensitivity and pressure sensing range, the pressure sensor developed in this work is the best among all reported pressure sensors to date. A model of the LSG pressure sensor is also established, which agrees well with the experimental results. This work indicates that laser scribed flexible graphene pressure sensors could be widely used for artificial e-skin, medical-sensing, bio-sensing and many other areas. PMID:25721159

  14. The postoperative sensitivity of fixed partial dentures cemented with self-adhesive resin cements: a clinical study.

    PubMed

    Saad, Diaa El-Din; Atta, Osama; El-Mowafy, Omar

    2010-12-01

    The authors investigated the postcementation sensitivity associated with self-adhesive resin cements used with fixed partial dentures (FPDs). The authors recruited 20 patients who needed posterior porcelain-fused-to-metal FPDs and divided them randomly into three groups. They prepared 50 abutments, then cemented FPDs with one of two self-adhesive resin cements (Breeze Self-Adhesive Resin Cement, Pentron Clinical Technologies, Wallingford, Conn., and RelyX Unicem Self-Adhesive Universal Resin Cement, 3M ESPE, Seefeld, Germany) or an etch-and-rinse resin cement (RelyX ARC Adhesive Resin Cement, 3M ESPE, St. Paul, Minn.). The authors measured participants' tooth sensitivity to cold water, air blast and biting at 24 hours and at two, six and 12 weeks after FPD cementation by using a continuous visual analog scale (VAS). Data were analyzed statistically by means of the Mann-Whitney test. For cold tests, the highest VAS scores occurred 24 hours after cementation. The mean VAS scores associated with RelyX ARC were significantly higher than those associated with Breeze and RelyX Unicem (P < .001) at all test intervals. The mean cold-test VAS scores associated with Breeze and RelyX Unicem were not significantly different (P > .05). With all cements, sensitivity to cold decreased significantly after two to six weeks; however, with RelyX ARC, VAS scores stayed above the 30 percent level even after 12 weeks. The biting sensitivity associated with RelyX ARC was significantly higher than that associated with Breeze and RelyX Unicem (P < .001), and it remained above the 20 percent level even after 12 weeks. Those with Breeze-cemented FPDs had no sensitivity to biting, whereas those with RelyX Unicem-cemented FPDs had a mean biting sensitivity value of less than 5 percent at two weeks only. and Breeze and RelyX Unicem were associated with significantly lower postoperative tooth sensitivity values than was RelyX ARC. With Breeze and RelyX Unicem, postoperative tooth sensitivity

  15. Nanorod-Based Fast-Response Pressure-Sensitive Paints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bencic, Timothy; VanderWal, Randall

    2007-01-01

    forms, by use of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and wet chemical processes, respectively. The rods would be coated with a PSP dye, and the resulting PSP signals would be compared with those obtained from PSP dye coats on conventional support materials. Another aspect of the proposed development would be to seek to exploit the quantum properties of nanorods of a suitable semiconductor (possibly GaN), which would be synthesized by CVD. These quantum properties of semiconductor nanorods include narrow-wavelength-band optical absorption and emission characteristics that vary with temperature. The temperature sensitivity might enable simultaneous measurement of fluctuating temperature and pressure and to provide a temperature correction for the PSP response.

  16. Measuring Surface Pressure on Rotating Compressor Blades Using Pressure Sensitive Paint

    PubMed Central

    Pastuhoff, Markus; Tillmark, Nils; Alfredsson, P. Henrik

    2016-01-01

    Pressure sensitive paint (PSP) was used to measure pressure on the blades of a radial compressor with a 51 mm inlet diameter rotating at speeds up to 50 krpm using the so called lifetime method. A diode laser with a scanning-mirror system was used to illuminate the paint and the luminescent lifetime was registered using a photo multiplier. With the described technique the surface-pressure fields were acquired for eight points in the compressor map, useful for general understanding of the flow field and for CFD validation. The PSP was of so called fast type, which makes it possible to observe pressure variations with frequencies up to several kHz. Through frequency spectrum analysis we were able to detect the pulsating flow frequency when the compressor was driven to surge. PMID:27005623

  17. Measuring Surface Pressure on Rotating Compressor Blades Using Pressure Sensitive Paint.

    PubMed

    Pastuhoff, Markus; Tillmark, Nils; Alfredsson, P Henrik

    2016-03-08

    Pressure sensitive paint (PSP) was used to measure pressure on the blades of a radial compressor with a 51 mm inlet diameter rotating at speeds up to 50 krpm using the so called lifetime method. A diode laser with a scanning-mirror system was used to illuminate the paint and the luminescent lifetime was registered using a photo multiplier. With the described technique the surface-pressure fields were acquired for eight points in the compressor map, useful for general understanding of the flow field and for CFD validation. The PSP was of so called fast type, which makes it possible to observe pressure variations with frequencies up to several kHz. Through frequency spectrum analysis we were able to detect the pulsating flow frequency when the compressor was driven to surge.

  18. Quantifying the Effect of Pressure Sensitive Paint On Aerodynamic Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amer, T. R.; Obara, C. J.; Liu, T.

    2003-01-01

    A thin pressure sensitive paint (PSP) coating can slightly modify the overall shape of a wind-tunnel model and produce surface roughness or smoothness that does not exist on the unpainted model. These undesirable changes in model geometry may alter flow over the model, and affect the pressure distribution and aerodynamic forces and moments on the model. This study quantifies the effects of PSP on three models in low-speed, transonic and supersonic flow regimes. At a 95% confidence level, the PSP effects on the integrated forces are insignificant for a slender arrow-wing-fuselage model and delta wing model with two different paints at Mach 0.2, 1.8, and 2.16 relative to the total balance accuracy limit. The data displayed a repeatability of 2.5 drag counts, while the balance accuracy limit was about 5.5 drag counts. At transonic speeds, the paint has a localized effect at high angles of attack and has a resolvable effect on the normal force, which is significant relative to the balance accuracy limit. For low speeds, the PSP coating has a localized effect on the pressure tap measurements, which leads to an appreciable decrease in the pressure tap reading. Moreover, the force and moment measurements had a poor precision, which precluded the ability to measure the PSP effect for this particular test.

  19. Diffusion Time-Scale of Porous Pressure-Sensitive Paint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Tianshu; Teduka, Norikazu; Kameda, Masaharu; Asai, Keisuke

    2001-01-01

    Pressure-sensitive paint (PSP) is an optical pressure sensor that utilizes the oxygen quenching of luminescence. PSP measurements in unsteady aerodynamic flows require fast time response of the paint. There are two characteristic time-scales that are related to the time response of PSP. One is the luminescent lifetime representing an intrinsic physical limit for the achievable temporal resolution of PSP. Another is the time-scale of oxygen diffusion across the PSP layer. When the time-scale of oxygen diffusion is much larger than the luminescent lifetime, the time response of PSP is controlled by oxygen diffusion. In a thin homogenous polymer layer where diffusion is Fickian, the oxygen concentration 1021 can be described by the diffusion equation in one-dimension.

  20. Detection Angle Calibration of Pressure-Sensitive Paints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bencic, Timothy J.

    2000-01-01

    Uses of the pressure-sensitive paint (PSP) techniques in areas other than external aerodynamics continue to expand. The NASA Glenn Research Center has become a leader in the application of the global technique to non-conventional aeropropulsion applications including turbomachinery testing. The use of the global PSP technique in turbomachinery applications often requires detection of the luminescent paint in confined areas. With the limited viewing usually available, highly oblique illumination and detection angles are common in the confined areas in these applications. This paper will describe the results of pressure, viewing and excitation angle dependence calibrations using three popular PSP formulations to get a better understanding of the errors associated with these non-traditional views.

  1. Vibration isolation and pressure compensation apparatus for sensitive instrumentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Averill, R. D. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A system for attenuating the inherent vibration associated with a mechanical refrigeration unit employed to cryogenically cool sensitive instruments used in measuring chemical constituents of the atmosphere is described. A modular system including an instrument housing and a reaction bracket with a refrigerator unit floated there between comprise the instrumentation system. A pair of evacuated bellows that "float' refrigerator unit and provide pressure compensation at all levels of pressure from seal level to the vacuum of space. Vibration isolators and when needed provide additional vibration damping for the refrigerator unit. A flexible thermal strap (20 K) serves to provide essentially vibration free thermal contact between cold tip of the refrigerator unit and the instrument component mounted on the IDL mount. Another flexible strap (77 K) serves to provide vibration free thermal contact between the TDL mount thermal shroud and a thermal shroud disposed about the thermal shaft.

  2. Nucleation and decay initiation are the stiffness-sensitive phases of focal adhesion maturation.

    PubMed

    Walcott, Sam; Kim, Dong-Hwee; Wirtz, Denis; Sun, Sean X

    2011-12-21

    A cell plated on a two-dimensional substrate forms adhesions with that surface. These adhesions, which consist of aggregates of various proteins, are thought to be important in mechanosensation, the process by which the cell senses and responds to the mechanical properties of the substrate (e.g., stiffness). On the basis of experimental measurements, we model these proteins as idealized molecules that can bind to the substrate in a strain-dependent manner and can undergo a force-dependent state transition. The model forms molecular aggregates that are similar to adhesions. Substrate stiffness affects whether a simulated adhesion is initially formed and how long it grows, but not how that adhesion grows or shrinks. Our own experimental tests support these predictions, suggesting that the mechanosensitivity of adhesions is an emergent property of a simple molecular-mechanical system.

  3. Wavenumber-frequency Spectra of Pressure Fluctuations Measured via Fast Response Pressure Sensitive Paint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panda, J.; Roozeboom, N. H.; Ross, J. C.

    2016-01-01

    The recent advancement in fast-response Pressure-Sensitive Paint (PSP) allows time-resolved measurements of unsteady pressure fluctuations from a dense grid of spatial points on a wind tunnel model. This capability allows for direct calculations of the wavenumber-frequency (k-?) spectrum of pressure fluctuations. Such data, useful for the vibro-acoustics analysis of aerospace vehicles, are difficult to obtain otherwise. For the present work, time histories of pressure fluctuations on a flat plate subjected to vortex shedding from a rectangular bluff-body were measured using PSP. The light intensity levels in the photographic images were then converted to instantaneous pressure histories by applying calibration constants, which were calculated from a few dynamic pressure sensors placed at selective points on the plate. Fourier transform of the time-histories from a large number of spatial points provided k-? spectra for pressure fluctuations. The data provides first glimpse into the possibility of creating detailed forcing functions for vibro-acoustics analysis of aerospace vehicles, albeit for a limited frequency range.

  4. Pressure-Sensitive Paints Advance Rotorcraft Design Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2013-01-01

    The rotors of certain helicopters can spin at speeds as high as 500 revolutions per minute. As the blades slice through the air, they flex, moving into the wind and back out, experiencing pressure changes on the order of thousands of times a second and even higher. All of this makes acquiring a true understanding of rotorcraft aerodynamics a difficult task. A traditional means of acquiring aerodynamic data is to conduct wind tunnel tests using a vehicle model outfitted with pressure taps and other sensors. These sensors add significant costs to wind tunnel testing while only providing measurements at discrete locations on the model's surface. In addition, standard sensor solutions do not work for pulling data from a rotor in motion. "Typical static pressure instrumentation can't handle that," explains Neal Watkins, electronics engineer in Langley Research Center s Advanced Sensing and Optical Measurement Branch. "There are dynamic pressure taps, but your costs go up by a factor of five to ten if you use those. In addition, recovery of the pressure tap readings is accomplished through slip rings, which allow only a limited amount of sensors and can require significant maintenance throughout a typical rotor test." One alternative to sensor-based wind tunnel testing is pressure sensitive paint (PSP). A coating of a specialized paint containing luminescent material is applied to the model. When exposed to an LED or laser light source, the material glows. The glowing material tends to be reactive to oxygen, explains Watkins, which causes the glow to diminish. The more oxygen that is present (or the more air present, since oxygen exists in a fixed proportion in air), the less the painted surface glows. Imaged with a camera, the areas experiencing greater air pressure show up darker than areas of less pressure. "The paint allows for a global pressure map as opposed to specific points," says Watkins. With PSP, each pixel recorded by the camera becomes an optical pressure

  5. Insulin resistance reduces sensitivity to Cis-platinum and promotes adhesion, migration and invasion in HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Lin-Jing; Li, Guang-Di; Wei, Hu-Lai; Chen, Jing; Liu, Yu-Mei; Li, Fei; Xie, Bei; Wang, Bei; Li, Cai-Li

    2014-01-01

    The liver is normally the major site of glucose metabolism in intact organisms and the most important target organ for the action of insulin. It has been widely accepted that insulin resistance (IR) is closely associated with postoperative recurrence of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). However, the relationship between IR and drug resistance in liver cancer cells is unclear. In the present study, IR was induced in HepG2 cells via incubation with a high concentration of insulin. Once the insulin-resistant cell line was established, the instability of HepG2/ IR cells was further tested via incubation in insulin-free medium for another 72h. Afterwards, the biological effects of insulin resistance on adhesion, migration, invasion and sensitivity to cis-platinum (DDP) of cells were determined. The results indicated that glucose consumption was reduced in insulin-resistant cells. In addition, the expression of the insulin receptor and glucose transportor-2 was downregulated. Furthermore, HepG2/IR cells displayed markedly enhanced adhesion, migration, and invasion. Most importantly, these cells exhibited a lower sensitivity to DDP. By contrast, HepG2/IR cells exhibited decreased adhesion and invasion after treatment with the insulin sensitizer pioglitazone hydrochloride. The results suggest that IR is closely related to drug resistance as well as adhesion, migration, and invasion in HepG2 cells. These findings may help explain the clinical observation of limited efficacy for chemotherapy on a background of IR, which promotes the invasion and migration of cancer cells.

  6. Application of Pressure-Sensitive Paint to Rotorcraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schairer, Edward T.; Hand, Lawrence A.; Bell, James H.; Mehta, Rabindra D.; Nixon, David (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    In this presentation, a plan to develop methods for applying pressure-sensitive paint to rotorcraft will be described. These methods are needed because flows over rotor blades are typically very complex and poorly understood and because conventional methods for measuring unsteady pressures on rotor blades (using unsteady pressure transducers provide grossly inadequate spatial resolution. Since PSP is a surface, rather than a point, measurement technique, it has the potential to significantly increase the spatial resolution )f pressure measurements on rotor blades. PSP techniques currently in use at Ames were developed for measuring steady pressures on rigid, complex airplane configurations in large, production wind tunnels. Applying PSP to rotorcraft requires a significant departure from these techniques. First and most importantly new, fast-responding and self-referencing pressure paints are required. The paints must be fast (98% response in 1-5 msec) to resolve flow unsteadiness; they must be self-referencing (or "binary") to account for changes in incident light intensity due to deflection of flexible rotors. Self-referencing paints have been used at Ames for some time; however, these paints have response times that are far too long for unsteady applications. Flash illumination is required to resolve flow unsteadiness and to minimize image blurring due to relative motion between the model and the camera. Current practice at Ames is to use continuous illumination Finally, "in situ" paint calibration versus measurements by pressure transducers, which is current Ames practice, is not practical because of the difficulty and expense of installing transducers in rotor blades. Instead, the paint must be calibrated "a priori" in a calibration chamber. A sequence of five experiments that systematically isolates and addresses the problems involved in making PSP measurements on rotor blades has been planned. These are: (1) measurements on a rigid rotor in hover; (2

  7. Effect of atmospheric pressure plasma treatment condition on adhesion of ramie fibers to polypropylene for composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ying; Manolache, Sorin; Qiu, Yiping; Sarmadi, Majid

    2016-02-01

    In order to improve the interfacial adhesion between hydrophilic ramie fibers and hydrophobic polypropylene (PP) matrices, ramie fibers are modified by atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma with our continuous ethanol flow technique in helium environment. A central composite design of experiments with different plasma processing parameter combinations (treatment current, treatment time and ethanol flow rate) is applied to find the most influential parameter and to obtain the best modification effect. Field emission scanning electron microscope (SEM) shows the roughened surfaces of ramie fibers from the treated groups due to plasma etching effect. Dynamic contact angle analysis (DCAA) demonstrates that the wettability of the treated fibers drastically decreases. Microbond pullout test shows that the interfacial shear strength (IFSS) between treated ramie fibers and PP matrices increases significantly. Residual gas analysis (RGA) confirms the creation of ethyl groups during plasma treatment. This study shows that our continuous ethanol flow technique is effective in the plasma modification process, during which the ethanol flow rate is the most influential parameter but all parameters have simultaneous influence on plasma modification effect of ramie fibers.

  8. Pressure-Sensitive Paint Applied to Ice Accretions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bencic, Timothy J.

    1999-01-01

    Aircraft icing occurs when a plane flies through a cloud of supercooled water droplets. When the droplets impinge on aircraft components, ice starts to form and accumulate. This accumulation of ice severely increases the drag and lift of the aircraft, and can ultimately lead to catastrophic failures and even loss of life. Knowledge of the air pressures on the surfaces of ice and models in wind tunnels allows researchers to better predict the effects that different icing conditions will have on the performance of real aircraft. The use of pressure-sensitive paint (PSP) has provided valuable information on similar problems in conventional wind tunnel testing. In NASA Lewis Research Center Icing Research Tunnel, Lewis researchers recently demonstrated the world s first application of PSP on actual ice formed on a wind tunnel model. This proof-of-concept test showed that a new paint formulation developed under a grant by the University of Washington adheres to both the ice shapes and cold aluminum models, provides a uniform coating that preserves the detailed ice shape structure, and responds to simulated pressure changes.

  9. Evaluation of a new miniature pressure-sensitive radio transmitter

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beeman, J.W.; Haner, P.V.; Maule, A.G.

    1998-01-01

    A miniature pressure-sensitive radio transmitter (tag) was evaluated and field tested as a tool for determining the depths of juvenile salmonids. The tag had an effective radiated power of −19.7 decibels (1 mW reference), dimensions of 23 mm × 7 mm, and a weight of 2.2 g in air. The pulse rate of the tag increased with pressure, resulting in an expected tag life of approximately 11 d at the water surface and 7.5 d at 10.5 m. The tags were accurate to within 16 mm with 95% of observations within ±0.32 m of the true depth. The resolution of the tags was 0.2 m. Errors in indicated depth resulting from differences between the calibration and operating temperatures were minimized by means of a correction factor. Tags surgically implanted in juvenile steelhead Oncorhynchus mykiss indicated a depth 0.2 m less than the same tags in water. This difference was not affected by pressure or temperature and was rectified by adjusting data from tags in fish. A test tag in a Columbia River reservoir was detected from distances of 1,133 m at a depth of 2 m and 148 m at a depth of 14 m. Results ind

  10. Development of a directional sensitive pressure and shear sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei-Chih; Dee, Jeffrey; Ledoux, William; Sangeorzan, Bruce; Reinhall, Per G.

    2002-06-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a disease that impacts the lives of millions of people around the world. Lower limb complications associated with diabetes include the development of plantar ulcers that can lead to infection and subsequent amputation. Shear stress is thought to be a major contributing factor to ulcer development, but due in part to technical difficulties with transducing shear stress, there is no widely used shear measurement sensor. As such, we are currently developing a directionally sensitive pressure/shear sensor based on fiber optic technology. The pressure/shear sensor consists of an array of optical fibers lying in perpendicular rows and columns separated by elastomeric pads. A map of pressure and shear stress is constructed based on observed macro bending through the intensity attenuation from the physical deformation of two adjacent perpendicular fibers. The sensor has been shown to have low noise and responded linearly to applied loads. The smallest detectable force on each sensor element based on the current setup is ~0.1 lbs. (0.4N). The smallest area we have resolved in our mesh sensor is currently ~1 cm2.

  11. An endoscopic imaging system for turbine engine pressure sensitive paint measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alaruri, Sami; Bonsett, Tom; Smith, Donald; Macri, Frank; Brewington, Andy; Wildman, Durell

    2001-09-01

    A fiber-optic endoscopic imaging system for mapping the surface pressure of turbine engine parts coated with pressure sensitive paint has been developed. Fluorescence intensity measurements collected from a ruthenium bathophenanthroline pressure sensitive paint sample under different pressure and temperature settings are presented. Moreover, a simple analysis for the errors resulting from the shift in the pressure sensitive paint fluorescence intensity due to temperature artifacts is given.

  12. 75 FR 8925 - Pressure Sensitive Plastic Tape from Italy: Preliminary Results of Antidumping Duty Changed...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-26

    ... International Trade Administration Pressure Sensitive Plastic Tape from Italy: Preliminary Results of... pressure sensitive plastic tape from Italy pursuant to section 751(b) of the Tariff Act of 1930, as amended... review request. See Pressure Sensitive Plastic Tape from Italy: Notice of Initiation of Antidumping...

  13. Combined effect of smear layer characteristics and hydrostatic pulpal pressure on dentine bond strength of HEMA-free and HEMA-containing adhesives.

    PubMed

    Mahdan, Mohd Haidil Akmal; Nakajima, Masatoshi; Foxton, Richard M; Tagami, Junji

    2013-10-01

    This study evaluated the combined effect of smear layer characteristics with hydrostatic pulpal pressure (PP) on bond strength and nanoleakage expression of HEMA-free and -containing self-etch adhesives. Flat dentine surfaces were obtained from extracted human molars. Smear layers were created by grinding with #180- or #600-SiC paper. Three HEMA-free adhesives (Xeno V, G Bond Plus, Beautibond Multi) and two HEMA-containing adhesives (Bond Force, Tri-S Bond) were applied to the dentine surfaces under hydrostatic PP or none. Dentine bond strengths were determined using the microtensile bond test (μTBS). Data were statistically analyzed using three- and two-way ANOVA with Tukey post hoc comparison test. Nanoleakage evaluation was carried out under a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Coarse smear layer preparation and hydrostatic PP negatively affected the μTBS of HEMA-free and -containing adhesives, but there were no significant differences. The combined experimental condition significantly reduced μTBS of the HEMA-free adhesives, while the HEMA-containing adhesives exhibited no significant differences. Two-way ANOVA indicated that for HEMA-free adhesives, there were significant interactions in μTBS between smear layer characteristics and pulpal pressure, while for HEMA-containing adhesives, there were no significant interactions between them. Nanoleakage formation within the adhesive layers of both adhesive systems distinctly increased in the combined experimental group. The combined effect of coarse smear layer preparation with hydrostatic PP significantly reduced the μTBS of HEMA-free adhesives, while in HEMA-containing adhesives, these effects were not obvious. Smear layer characteristics and hydrostatic PP would additively compromise dentine bonding of self-etch adhesives, especially HEMA-free adhesives. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Anti-adhesive effect of poloxamer-based thermo-sensitive sol-gel in rabbit laminectomy model.

    PubMed

    Shin, Sung Joon; Lee, Jae Hyup; So, Jungwon; Min, Kyungdan

    2016-11-01

    Poloxamer-based thermo-sensitive sol-gel has been developed to reduce the incidence of postoperative scar formation at the laminectomy site. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the anti-adhesive effect of poloxamer based thermo-sensitive sol-gel compared to hyaluronate based solution after laminectomy, using a rabbit model. A thermo-sensitive anti-adhesive with a property of sol-gel transition was manufactured by a physical mixture of Poloxamer188/407, Chitosan and Gelatin. The viscosity in different temperatures was assessed. 72 adult New Zealand rabbits underwent lumbar laminectomy and were randomly divided into experimental (treated with the newly developed agent), positive (treated with hyaluronate based solution), and negative control groups. Each group was subdivided into 1 and 4-week subgroups. Gross and histological evaluations were performed to assess the extent of epidural adhesion. The experimental group showed significantly higher viscosity compared to the positive control group and showed a significant increase of viscosity as the temperature increased. Gross evaluation showed no statistically significant differences between the 1- and 4-week subgroups. However, histologic evaluation showed significant differences both in 1- and 4-week subgroups. Although the 4-week histologic results of the experimental and the positive control subgroups showed no significant difference, both subgroups revealed higher value compared to the negative control subgroup with regard to the ratio of adhesion less than 50 %. The new poloxamer based thermo-sensitive agent showed superior efficacy over the hyaluronate based agent at 1 week postoperatively. At 4 weeks postoperatively, there were no statistically significant differences between the two agents, although both showed efficacy over the sham group.

  15. Validation of a Finite Element Humeroradial Joint Model of Contact Pressure Using Fuji Pressure Sensitive Film.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sunghwan; Carl Miller, Mark

    2016-01-01

    A finite element (FE) elbow model was developed to predict the contact stress and contact area of the native humeroradial joint. The model was validated using Fuji pressure sensitive film with cadaveric elbows for which axial loads of 50, 100, and 200 N were applied through the radial head. Maximum contact stresses ranged from 1.7 to 4.32 MPa by FE predictions and from 1.34 to 3.84 MPa by pressure sensitive film measurement while contact areas extended from 39.33 to 77.86 mm2 and 29.73 to 83.34 mm2 by FE prediction and experimental measurement, respectively. Measurements from cadaveric testing and FE predictions showed the same patterns in both the maximum contact stress and contact area, as another demonstration of agreement. While measured contact pressures and contact areas validated the FE predictions, computed maximum stresses and contact area tended to overestimate the maximum contact stress and contact area.

  16. Pressurized thermal shock probabilistic fracture mechanics sensitivity analysis for Yankee Rowe reactor pressure vessel

    SciTech Connect

    Dickson, T.L.; Cheverton, R.D.; Bryson, J.W.; Bass, B.R.; Shum, D.K.M.; Keeney, J.A.

    1993-08-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) requested Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to perform a pressurized-thermal-shock (PTS) probabilistic fracture mechanics (PFM) sensitivity analysis for the Yankee Rowe reactor pressure vessel, for the fluences corresponding to the end of operating cycle 22, using a specific small-break-loss- of-coolant transient as the loading condition. Regions of the vessel with distinguishing features were to be treated individually -- upper axial weld, lower axial weld, circumferential weld, upper plate spot welds, upper plate regions between the spot welds, lower plate spot welds, and the lower plate regions between the spot welds. The fracture analysis methods used in the analysis of through-clad surface flaws were those contained in the established OCA-P computer code, which was developed during the Integrated Pressurized Thermal Shock (IPTS) Program. The NRC request specified that the OCA-P code be enhanced for this study to also calculate the conditional probabilities of failure for subclad flaws and embedded flaws. The results of this sensitivity analysis provide the NRC with (1) data that could be used to assess the relative influence of a number of key input parameters in the Yankee Rowe PTS analysis and (2) data that can be used for readily determining the probability of vessel failure once a more accurate indication of vessel embrittlement becomes available. This report is designated as HSST report No. 117.

  17. Shuttle active thermal control system development testing. Volume 7: Improved radiator coating adhesive tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, M. W.

    1973-01-01

    Silver/Teflon thermal control coatings have been tested on a modular radiator system projected for use on the space shuttle. Seven candidate adhesives have been evaluated in a thermal vacuum test on radiator panels similar to the anticipated flight hardware configuration. Several classes of adhesives based on polyester, silicone, and urethane resin systems were tested. These included contact adhesives, heat cured adhesives, heat and pressure cured adhesives, pressure sensitive adhesives, and two part paint on or spray on adhesives. The coatings attached with four of the adhesives, two silicones and two urethanes, had no changes develop during the thermal vacuum test. The two silicone adhesives, both of which were applied to the silver/Teflon as transfer laminates to form a tape, offered the most promise based on application process and thermal performance. Each of the successful silicone adhesives required a heat and pressure cure to adhere during the cryogenic temperature excursion of the thermal-vacuum test.

  18. Effect of the applied power of atmospheric pressure plasma on the adhesion of composite resin to dental ceramic.

    PubMed

    Han, Geum-Jun; Chung, Sung-No; Chun, Bae-Hyeock; Kim, Chang-Keun; Oh, Kyu-Hwan; Cho, Byeong-Hoon

    2012-08-01

    To evaluate the effect of applied power on dental ceramic bonding of composite resin using nonthermal atmospheric pressure plasma (APP). A pencil-type APP torch was used to modify the surface chemical composition and hydrophilicity of dental ceramic and to improve the adhesion of composite resin to the surface. The effect of the applied power on chemical changes of the plasma polymer on a ceramic surface and the adhesive strength between the composite resin and feldspathic porcelain were examined. Adhesion was evaluated by comparing shear bond strengths (SBS) using the iris method. The chemical composition of the plasma polymer deposited on the ceramic surface was evaluated using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Hydrophilicity was evaluated by contact angle measurements. The fracture mode at the interface was also evaluated. The APP treatment was effective and the SBS of the experimental groups were significantly higher than those of the negative control group (p < 0.05). Moreover, the SBS obtained with the APP treatment at the highest input voltage was statistically similar to the gold standard of HF etching and silane coupling-agent coating. Two-thirds of the fractures observed in the specimens bonded with application of APP were mixed and cohesive fractures. Application of APP enhanced adhesion by producing carboxyl groups on the ceramic surface and as a result by improving surface hydrophilicity. The carboxyl group contents in the plasma polymer on the ceramic surface increased as the applied power increased.

  19. Degradation of adhesion molecules of G361 melanoma cells by a non-thermal atmospheric pressure microplasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, H. J.; Shon, C. H.; Kim, Y. S.; Kim, S.; Kim, G. C.; Kong, M. G.

    2009-11-01

    Increased expression of integrins and focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is important for the survival, growth and metastasis of melanoma cells. Based on this well-established observation in oncology, we propose to use degradation of integrin and FAK proteins as a potential strategy for melanoma cancer therapy. A low-temperature radio-frequency atmospheric microplasma jet is used to study their effects on the adhesion molecules of G361 melanoma cells. Microplasma treatment is shown to (1) cause significant cell detachment from the bottom of microtiter plates coated with collagen, (2) induce the death of human melanoma cells, (3) inhibit the expression of integrin α2, integrin α4 and FAK on the cell surface and finally (4) change well-stretched actin filaments to a diffuse pattern. These results suggest that cold atmospheric pressure plasmas can strongly inhibit the adhesion of melanoma cells by reducing the activities of adhesion proteins such as integrins and FAK, key biomolecules that are known to be important in malignant transformation and acquisition of metastatic phenotypes.

  20. Measuring Global Surface Pressures on a Circulation Control Concept Using Pressure Sensitive Paint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watkins, Anthony N.; Lipford, William E.; Leighty, Bradley D.; Goodman, Kyle Z.; Goad, William K.

    2012-01-01

    This report will present the results obtained from the Pressure Sensitive Paint (PSP) technique on a circulation control concept model. This test was conducted at the National Transonic Facility (NTF) at the NASA Langley Research Center. PSP was collected on the upper wing surface while the facility was operating in cryogenic mode at 227 K (-50 oF). The test envelope for the PSP portion included Mach numbers from 0.7 to 0.8 with angle of attack varying between 0 and 8 degrees and a total pressure of approximately 168 kPa (24.4 psi), resulting in a chord Reynolds number of approximately 15 million. While the PSP results did exhibit high levels of noise in certain conditions (where the oxygen content of the flow was very small), some conditions provided good correlation between the PSP and pressure taps, showing the ability of the PSP technique. This work also served as a risk reduction opportunity for future testing in cryogenic conditions at the NTF.

  1. High frame-rate imaging of surface pressure distribution using a porous pressure-sensitive paint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakamura, Y.; Matsumoto, M.; Suzuki, T.

    2005-03-01

    The aim of the present work is to demonstrate the feasibility of a porous pressure-sensitive paint (PSP) for time-resolved surface pressure measurements in unsteady high-speed flows. The porous PSP was composed of bathophenanthroline ruthenium(II) complex, Ru(Ph2-phen) and a silica-gel thin-layer chromatography aluminium plate. The dynamic response of the porous PSP was characterized by a point-wise luminescence intensity measurement conducted in a shock tube facility. The result showed that the time constant of the porous PSP was 13.6 µs. The porous PSP was then applied to the surface pressure distribution imaging of an unsteady flow induced in a two-dimensional Laval nozzle by using a fast-framing complementary metal oxide semiconductor camera. It was clearly shown that the porous PSP well captured the shock-wave motion of the order of kilohertz during the starting process of the supersonic nozzle in a qualitative manner.

  2. Racial differences in sensitivity of blood pressure to aldosterone.

    PubMed

    Tu, Wanzhu; Eckert, George J; Hannon, Tamara S; Liu, Hai; Pratt, Linda M; Wagner, Mary Anne; Dimeglio, Linda A; Jung, Jeesun; Pratt, J Howard

    2014-06-01

    Blacks in comparison with whites are at risk for a more serious form of hypertension with high rates of complications. Greater sodium retention is thought to underlie the blood pressure (BP)-determining physiology of blacks, but specific mechanisms have not been identified. In a prospective observational study of BP, 226 black children and 314 white children (mean age, 10.6 years) were enrolled initially. Assessments were repeated in 85 blacks and 136 whites after reaching adulthood (mean age, 31 years). The relationship of BP to plasma aldosterone concentration in the context of the prevailing level of plasma renin activity was studied in blacks and whites. In a secondary interventional study, 9-α fludrocortisone was administered for 2 weeks to healthy adult blacks and whites to simulate hyperaldosteronism. BP responses in the 2 race groups were then compared. Although black children had lower levels of plasma renin activity and plasma aldosterone, their BP was positively associated with the plasma aldosterone concentration, an effect that increased as plasma renin activity decreased (P=0.004). Data from black adults yielded similar results. No similar relationship was observed in whites. In the interventional study, 9-α fludrocortisone increased BP in blacks but not in whites. In conclusion, aldosterone sensitivity is a significant determinant of BP in young blacks. Although its role in establishing the risk of hypertension is not known, it could be as relevant as the actual level of aldosterone.

  3. Characterization of large-area pressure sensitive robot skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saadatzi, Mohammad Nasser; Baptist, Joshua R.; Wijayasinghe, Indika B.; Popa, Dan O.

    2017-05-01

    Sensorized robot skin has considerable promise to enhance robots' tactile perception of surrounding environments. For physical human-robot interaction (pHRI) or autonomous manipulation, a high spatial sensor density is required, typically driven by the skin location on the robot. In our previous study, a 4x4 flexible array of strain sensors were printed and packaged onto Kapton sheets and silicone encapsulants. In this paper, we are extending the surface area of the patch to larger arrays with up to 128 tactel elements. To address scalability, sensitivity, and calibration challenges, a novel electronic module, free of the traditional signal conditioning circuitry was created. The electronic design relies on a software-based calibration scheme using high-resolution analog-to-digital converters with internal programmable gain amplifiers. In this paper, we first show the efficacy of the proposed method with a 4x4 skin array using controlled pressure tests, and then perform procedures to evaluate each sensor's characteristics such as dynamic force-to-strain property, repeatability, and signal-to-noise-ratio. In order to handle larger sensor surfaces, an automated force-controlled test cycle was carried out. Results demonstrate that our approach leads to reliable and efficient methods for extracting tactile models for use in future interaction with collaborative robots.

  4. Intraocular pressure is sensitive to cumulative and instantaneous mental workload.

    PubMed

    Vera, Jesús; Jiménez, Raimundo; García, José Antonio; Cárdenas, David

    2017-04-01

    We used a repeated-measures design to assess the impact of mental-task complexity on intraocular pressure (IOP). Fourteen participants performed three continuous 11-min blocks of a mental-workload task (3-back) and an oddball version of this task. Also, heart-rate variability (HRV), cognitive-performance scores, and subjective measure of mental load (NASA-TLX) were determined. IOP was taken before each block and afterwards as well as after recovery from mental tasks. We found that IOP increased during heavy mental workloads (p < 0.01). Consistent with this finding, the autonomic control (HRV) and the cognitive performance were significantly lower (p < 0.045, and p < 0.01, respectively), and the NASA-TLX scores were higher during the 3-back task (p < 0.01). We conclude that IOP is sensitive to mental workload, and it could provide a novel neuroergonomic tool to assess mental workload. Our study highlights a potential association between IOP and the nervous system's state of activation.

  5. Soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase-1 and endothelial adhesion molecules (intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1 and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1) as predictive markers for blood pressure reduction after renal sympathetic denervation.

    PubMed

    Dörr, Oliver; Liebetrau, Christoph; Möllmann, Helge; Gaede, Luise; Troidl, Christian; Rixe, Johannes; Hamm, Christian; Nef, Holger

    2014-05-01

    Renal sympathetic denervation (RSD) is a treatment option for patients with resistant arterial hypertension, but in some patients it is not successful. Predictive parameters on the success of RSD remain unknown. The angiogenic factors soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase-1 (sFLT-1), intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) are known to be associated with endothelial dysfunction, vascular remodeling, and hypertension. We evaluated whether sFLT-1, ICAM-1, and VCAM-1 are predictive markers for blood pressure reduction after RSD. Consecutive patients (n=55) undergoing renal denervation were included. Venous serum samples for measurement of sFlt-1, ICAM-1, and VCAM-1 were collected before and 6 months after RSD. A therapeutic response was defined as an office systolic blood pressure reduction of >10 mm Hg 6 months after RSD. A significant mean office systolic blood pressure reduction of 31.2 mm Hg was observed in 46 patients 6 months after RSD. Nine patients were classified as nonresponders, with a mean systolic blood pressure reduction of 4.6 mm Hg. At baseline, sFLT-1 levels were significantly higher in responders than in nonresponders (P<0.001) as were ICAM-1 (P<0.001) and VCAM-1 levels (P<0.01). The areas under the curve for sFLT-1, ICAM-1, and VCAM-1 were 0.82 (interquartile range, 0.718-0.921; P<0.001), 0.754 (0.654-0.854; P<0.001), and 0.684 (0.564-804; P=0.01), respectively, demonstrating prediction of an RSD response. Responders showed significantly higher serum levels of sFLT-1, ICAM-1, and VCAM-1 at baseline compared with nonresponders. Thus, this study identified for the first time potential biomarkers with a predictive value indicating a responder or nonresponder before renal denervation.

  6. A Versatile pH Sensitive Chondroitin Sulfate-PEG Tissue Adhesive and Hydrogel**

    PubMed Central

    Strehin, Iossif; Nahas, Zayna; Arora, Karun; Nguyen, Thao

    2012-01-01

    We developed a chondroitin sulfate - polyethylene glycol (CS-PEG) adhesive hydrogel with numerous potential biomedical applications. The carboxyl groups on chondroitin sulfate (CS) chains were functionalized with N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) to yield chondroitin sulfate succinimidyl succinate (CS-NHS). Following purification, the CS-NHS molecule can react with primary amines to form amide bonds. Hence, using six arm polyethylene glycol amine PEG-(NH2)6 as a crosslinker we formed a hydrogel which was covalently bound to proteins in tissue via amide bonds. By varying the initial pH of the precursor solutions, the hydrogel stiffness, swelling properties, and kinetics of gelation could be controlled. The sealing/adhesive strength could also be modified by varying the damping and storage modulus properties of the material. The adhesive strength of the material with cartilage tissue was shown to be ten times higher than that of fibrin glue. Cells encapsulated or in direct contact with the material remained viable and metabolically active. Furthermore, CS-PEG material produced minimal inflammatory response when implanted subcutaneously in a rat model and enzymatic degradation was demonstrated in vitro. This work establishes an adhesive hydrogel derived from biological and synthetic components with potential application in wound healing and regenerative medicine. PMID:20047758

  7. Babesia bovis expresses a neutralization-sensitive antigen that contains a microneme adhesive repeat (MAR) domain

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A gene coding for a protein with sequence similarity to the Toxoplasma gondii micronemal 1 (MIC1) protein that contains a copy of a domain described as a sialic acid-binding micronemal adhesive repeat was identified in the Babesia bovis genome. The single copy gene, located in chromosome 3, contains...

  8. Macroalgal assemblage type affects predation pressure on sea urchins by altering adhesion strength.

    PubMed

    Gianguzza, P; Bonaviri, C; Milisenda, G; Barcellona, A; Agnetta, D; Vega Fernández, T; Badalamenti, F

    2010-07-01

    In the Mediterranean, sea breams are the most effective Paracentrotus lividus and Arbacia lixula predators. Generally, seabreams dislodge adult urchins from the rocky substrate, turn them upside down and crush their tests. Sea urchins may respond to fish attacks clinging tenaciously to the substratum. This study is the first attempt to investigate sea urchin adhesion strength in two alternative algal assemblages of the rocky infralittoral and valuated its possible implication for fish predation. We hypothesized that (1) sea urchin adhesion strength is higher in rocky shores dominated by encrusting macroalgae (ECA) than in erected macroalgae (EMA); (2) predation rates upon sea urchins are lower in ECA than in EMA; and (3) predation rate on A. lixula is lower than that on P. lividus. We observed that attachment tenacity of both sea urchins was higher in ECA than EMA and that A. lixula exhibited a stronger attachment tenacity than P. lividus in ECA. Results supported the importance of adhesion strength, as efficient defence against sea bream attacks, only for, P. lividus. A. lixula adhesion strength does not seem to be an important factor in avoiding fish predation, possibly because of the low palatability of the species. These patterns may deserve particular interest in understanding the processes responsible for the maintenance of sea urchin barrens that are dominated by ECA assemblage.

  9. Surface modification of polyester fabrics by atmospheric-pressure air/He plasma for color strength and adhesion enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chunming; Zhao, Meihua; Wang, Libing; Qu, Lijun; Men, Yajing

    2017-04-01

    Surface properties of water-based pigmented inks for ink-jet printed polyester fabrics were modified with atmospheric-pressure air/He plasma to improve the color strength and pigment adhesion of the treated surfaces. The influence of various parameters, including the surface morphology, chemical compositions, surface energy and dynamic contact angles of the control and plasma treated samples was studied. Color strength and edge definition were used to evaluate the ink-jet printing performance of fabrics. The change in pigment adhesion to polyester fibers was analyzed by SEM (scanning electron microscopy). AFM (Atomic force microscope) and XPS (X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy) analyses indicated the increase in surface roughness and the oxygen-containing polar groups(Cdbnd O, Csbnd OH and COOH) reinforced the fixation of pigments on the fiber surface. The result from this study suggested that the improved pigment color yield was clearly affected by alteration of pigment adhesion enhanced by plasma surface modification. Polyester fabrics exhibited better surface property and ink-jet printing performance after the air/He mixture plasma treatment comparing with those after air plasma treatment.

  10. Effects of non-thermal atmospheric pressure pulsed plasma on the adhesion and durability of resin composite to dentin.

    PubMed

    Han, Geum-Jun; Kim, Jae-Hoon; Chung, Sung-No; Chun, Bae-Hyeock; Kim, Chang-Keun; Seo, Deog-Gyu; Son, Ho-Hyun; Cho, Byeong-Hoon

    2014-12-01

    This study investigated the effect of low-power, non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma (NT-APP) treatments, in pulsed and conventional modes, on the adhesion of resin composite to dentin and on the durability of the bond between resin composite and dentin. A pencil-type NT-APP jet was applied in pulsed and conventional modes to acid-etched dentin. The microtensile bond strength (MTBS) of resin composite to dentin was evaluated at 24 h and after thermocycling in one control group (no plasma) and in two experimental groups (pulsed plasma and conventional plasma groups) using the Scotchbond Multi-Purpose Plus Adhesive System. Data were analyzed using two-factor repeated-measures anova and Weibull statistics. Fractured surfaces and the bonded interfaces were evaluated using a field-emission scanning electron microscope. Although there were no significant differences between the plasma treatment groups, the plasma treatment improved the MTBS compared with the control group. After thermocycling, the MTBS did not decrease in the control or conventional plasma group but increased in the pulsed plasma group. Thermocycling increased the Weibull moduli of plasma-treated groups. In conclusion, plasma treatment using NT-APP improved the adhesion of resin composite to dentin. Using a pulsed energy source, the energy delivered to the dentin was effectively reduced without any reduction in bond strength or durability.

  11. Modeling flow in a pressure-sensitive, heterogeneous medium

    SciTech Connect

    Vasco, Donald W.; Minkoff, Susan E.

    2009-06-01

    Using an asymptotic methodology, including an expansion in inverse powers of {radical}{omega}, where {omega} is the frequency, we derive a solution for flow in a medium with pressure dependent properties. The solution is valid for a heterogeneous medium with smoothly varying properties. That is, the scale length of the heterogeneity must be significantly larger then the scale length over which the pressure increases from it initial value to its peak value. The resulting asymptotic expression is similar in form to the solution for pressure in a medium in which the flow properties are not functions of pressure. Both the expression for pseudo-phase, which is related to the 'travel time' of the transient pressure disturbance, and the expression for pressure amplitude contain modifications due to the pressure dependence of the medium. We apply the method to synthetic and observed pressure variations in a deforming medium. In the synthetic test we model one-dimensional propagation in a pressure-dependent medium. Comparisons with both an analytic self-similar solution and the results of a numerical simulation indicate general agreement. Furthermore, we are able to match pressure variations observed during a pulse test at the Coaraze Laboratory site in France.

  12. Design and Application of a High Sensitivity Piezoresistive Pressure Sensor for Low Pressure Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Huiyang; Huang, Jianqiu

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a pressure sensor for low pressure detection (0.5 kPa–40 kPa) is proposed. In one structure (No. 1), the silicon membrane is partly etched to form a crossed beam on its top for stress concentration. An aluminum layer is also deposited as part of the beam. Four piezoresistors are fabricated. Two are located at the two ends of the beam. The other two are located at the membrane periphery. Four piezoresistors connect into a Wheatstone bridge. To demonstrate the stress concentrate effect of this structure, two other structures were designed and fabricated. One is a flat membrane structure (No. 2), the other is a structure with the aluminum beam, but without etched silicon (No. 3). The measurement results of these three structures show that the No.1 structure has the highest sensitivity, which is about 3.8 times that of the No. 2 structure and 2.7 times that of the No. 3 structure. They also show that the residual stress in the beam has some backside effect on the sensor performance. PMID:26371001

  13. Superior canal dehiscence: mechanisms of pressure sensitivity in a chinchilla model.

    PubMed

    Hirvonen, T P; Carey, J P; Liang, C J; Minor, L B

    2001-11-01

    Patients with superior canal dehiscence syndrome may experience vertigo and nystagmus when pressure changes occur in the external auditory canal, the middle ear, or the intracranial space. The cause is a defect in the bone of the superior canal. To study the mechanisms of pressure sensitivity of the labyrinth in superior canal dehiscence syndrome and its surgical repair in a chinchilla model. We investigated the changes in firing rates of vestibular nerve afferents in the chinchilla in response to changes in external auditory canal pressure before and after fenestration of the superior canal, and after repair of the fenestra. Before superior canal fenestration, external auditory canal pressure changes caused no responses in horizontal canal or otolith afferents, and only 1 of 9 superior canal afferents responded to pressure. After fenestration, all superior canal afferents were excited by positive pressure and inhibited by negative pressure. Half of 18 otolith and most (21 of 33) horizontal canal afferents were unaffected by pressure. The superior canal afferents had higher pressure gain than the horizontal canal afferents (P =.03). Pressure responses could be abolished only by applying a rigid seal to the fenestra. Fenestration of the superior canal rendered all superior canal afferents sensitive to pressure, whereas less than half of the other afferents became pressure sensitive. The direction of the superior canal afferent responses agreed with the predictions of our model of endolymph flow within the superior canal. A rigid seal applied to the fenestra abolished pressure sensitivity while maintaining physiologic rotational sensitivity.

  14. Development of a Pressure Sensitive Paint System with Correction for Temperature Variation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simmons, Kantis A.

    1995-01-01

    Pressure Sensitive Paint (PSP) is known to provide a global image of pressure over a model surface. However, improvements in its accuracy and reliability are needed. Several factors contribute to the inaccuracy of PSP. One major factor is that luminescence is temperature dependent. To correct the luminescence of the pressure sensing component for changes in temperature, a temperature sensitive luminophore incorporated in the paint allows the user to measure both pressure and temperature simultaneously on the surface of a model. Magnesium Octaethylporphine (MgOEP) was used as a temperature sensing luminophore, with the pressure sensing luminophore, Platinum Octaethylporphine (PtOEP), to correct for temperature variations in model surface pressure measurements.

  15. Subarachnoid pressure-dependent change in syrinx size in a patient with syringomyelia associated with adhesive arachnoiditis. Case report.

    PubMed

    Chang, Han Soo; Joko, Masahiro; Matsuo, Naoki; Kim, Sang Don; Nakagawa, Hiroshi

    2005-02-01

    The pathophysiology of syringomyelia is still not well understood. Current prevailing theories involve the assumption that cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flows into the syrinx from the subarachnoid space through the perivascular space of Virchow-Robin. Reported here is the case of a patient with syringomyelia in which this course is clearly contradicted. This patient with a holocord syrinx associated with adhesive arachnoiditis was treated 3 years previously with insertion of a subarachnoid-peritoneal shunt and had recently experienced worsening myelopathy. On surgical exploration, the shunt system was functioning normally. The medium-pressure shunt valve was replaced with an adjustable valve with a higher closing pressure setting, thus increasing the CSF pressure in the subarachnoid space. Contrary to prevailing theories, this procedure markedly reduced the size of the syrinx. This case provides direct evidence that the syrinx size is inversely related to subarachnoid CSF pressure and supports the hypothesis that the pressure gradient across the spinal cord parenchyma is the force that generates syringes in syringomyelia.

  16. 75 FR 17124 - Pressure Sensitive Plastic Tape from Italy: Notice of Continuation of Antidumping Duty Finding

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-05

    ... International Trade Administration Pressure Sensitive Plastic Tape from Italy: Notice of Continuation of... plastic tape (PSP Tape) from Italy would be likely to lead to continuation or recurrence of dumping and of... to be revoked. See Pressure Sensitive Plastic Tape from Italy: Final Results of Expedited...

  17. Pressure and Temperature Sensitive Paint Measurements on Rotors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, John

    1999-01-01

    Luminescent molecular probes imbedded in a polymer binder form a temperature or pressure paint. On excitation by light of the proper wavelength, the luminescence, which is quenched either thermally or by oxygen, is detected by a camera or photodetector. From the detected luminescent intensity, temperature and pressure can be determined. The basic photophysics, calibration, accuracy and time response of luminescent paints is described followed by applications in wind tunnels and in rotating machinery.

  18. Surface Measurement Techniques Temperature and Pressure Sensitive Paints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, John P.; Liu, Tian-Shu

    1999-01-01

    Luminescent molecular probes imbedded in a polymer binder form a temperature or pressure paint. On excitation by light of the proper wavelength, the luminescence,which is quenched either thermally or by oxygen, is detected by a camera or photodetector. From the detected luminescent intensity, temperature and pressure can be determined. Tl e basic photophysics, calibration, accuracy and the response of a luminescent paints is described followed by applications in wind tunnels and in rotating machinery.

  19. Application of the Polymer Based Pressure Sensitive Paint for Qualitative and Quantitative Flow Visualisation in a Transonic Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, K. H.; Zare-Behtash, H.; Kontis, K.; Qin, N.

    Surface pressure measurement by Pressure Sensitive Paint (PSP) becomes an active area of research in the engineering industry. Conventional pressure measurement techniques require to incoporate pressure taps within the model.

  20. Application of the pressure sensitive paint technique to steady and unsteady flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shimbo, Y.; Mehta, R.; Cantwell, B.

    1996-01-01

    Pressure sensitive paint is a newly-developed optical measurement technique with which one can get a continuous pressure distribution in much shorter time and lower cost than a conventional pressure tap measurement. However, most of the current pressure sensitive paint applications are restricted to steady pressure measurement at high speeds because of the small signal-to-noise ratio at low speed and a slow response to pressure changes. In the present study, three phases of work have been completed to extend the application of the pressure sensitive paint technique to low-speed testing and to investigate the applicability of the paint technique to unsteady flow. First the measurement system using a commercially available PtOEP/GP-197 pressure sensitive paint was established and applied to impinging jet measurements. An in-situ calibration using only five pressure tap data points was applied and the results showed good repeatability and good agreement with conventional pressure tap measurements on the whole painted area. The overall measurement accuracy in these experiments was found to be within 0.1 psi. The pressure sensitive paint technique was then applied to low-speed wind tunnel tests using a 60 deg delta wing model with leading edge blowing slots. The technical problems encountered in low-speed testing were resolved by using a high grade CCD camera and applying corrections to improve the measurement accuracy. Even at 35 m/s, the paint data not only agreed well with conventional pressure tap measurements but also clearly showed the suction region generated by the leading edge vortices. The vortex breakdown was also detected at alpha=30 deg. It was found that a pressure difference of 0.2 psi was required for a quantitative pressure measurement in this experiment and that temperature control or a parallel temperature measurement is necessary if thermal uniformity does not hold on the model. Finally, the pressure sensitive paint was applied to a periodically

  1. Highly sensitive, self-powered and wearable electronic skin based on pressure-sensitive nanofiber woven fabric sensor.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yuman; He, Jianxin; Wang, Hongbo; Qi, Kun; Nan, Nan; You, Xiaolu; Shao, Weili; Wang, Lidan; Ding, Bin; Cui, Shizhong

    2017-10-11

    The wearable electronic skin with high sensitivity and self-power has shown increasing prospects for applications such as human health monitoring, robotic skin, and intelligent electronic products. In this work, we introduced and demonstrated a design of highly sensitive, self-powered, and wearable electronic skin based on a pressure-sensitive nanofiber woven fabric sensor fabricated by weaving PVDF electrospun yarns of nanofibers coated with PEDOT. Particularly, the nanofiber woven fabric sensor with multi-leveled hierarchical structure, which significantly induced the change in contact area under ultra-low load, showed combined superiority of high sensitivity (18.376 kPa(-1), at ~100 Pa), wide pressure range (0.002-10 kPa), fast response time (15 ms) and better durability (7500 cycles). More importantly, an open-circuit voltage signal of the PPNWF pressure sensor was obtained through applying periodic pressure of 10 kPa, and the output open-circuit voltage exhibited a distinct switching behavior to the applied pressure, indicating the wearable nanofiber woven fabric sensor could be self-powered under an applied pressure. Furthermore, we demonstrated the potential application of this wearable nanofiber woven fabric sensor in electronic skin for health monitoring, human motion detection, and muscle tremor detection.

  2. Development of Pressure Sensitive Molecular Film as a Measurement Technique for Micro-Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuda, Y.; Mori, H.; Sakazaki, Y.; Uchida, T.; Suzuki, S.; Yamaguchi, H.; Niimi, T.

    2008-12-01

    The pressure-sensitive paint (PSP) has potential as a diagnostic tool for pressure measurement in the high Knudsen number regime because it works as a so-called "molecular sensor." However, there are few reports concerning application of the PSP to micro devices, because the conventional PSP is too thick owing to the use of polymer binder. In our previous work, we have adopted Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) technique to fabricate pressure sensitive molecular films (PSMFs) using Pd(II) Mesoporphyrin IX (PdMP). The PSMF based on PdMP has pressure sensitivity only at low pressure range (below 3 kPa). In this study, we have constructed PSMF composed of Pt(II) Mesoporphyrin IX (PtMP) to be applied to pressure measurement near atmospheric pressure. The pressure sensitivity of PSMF based on PtMP has been tested, and it is clarified that the PSMF of PtMP has equivalent pressure sensitivity of polymer PSP. Moreover, we have applied PSMF to measurement of pressure distribution of micro-channel gas flow, showing its usefulness.

  3. Pressure sensitivity of adiabatic shear banding in metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanina, E.; Rittel, D.; Rosenberg, Z.

    2007-01-01

    Adiabatic shear banding (ASB) is a dynamic failure mode characterized by large plastic strains in a narrow localized band. ASB occurs at high strain rates (ɛ˙⩾103s-1), under adiabatic conditions leading to a significant temperature rise inside the band [H. Tresca, Annales du Conservatoire des Arts et Métiers 4, (1879); Y. L. Bai and B. Dodd, Adiabatic Shear Localization-Occurrence, Theories, and Applications (Pergamon, Oxford, 1992); M. A. Meyers, Dynamic Behavior of Materials (Wiley, New York, 1994).; and J. J. Lewandowski and L. M. Greer, Nat. Mater. 5, 15 (2006)]. Large hydrostatic pressures are experienced in many dynamic applications involving ASB formation (e.g., ballistic penetration, impact, and machining). The relationship between hydrostatic pressure and ASB development remains an open question, although its importance has been often noted. This letter reports original experimental results indicating a linear relationship between the (normalized) dynamic deformation energy and the (normalized) hydrostatic pressure.

  4. Enhancement of carbon-steel peel adhesion to rubber blend using atmospheric pressure plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kršková, Jana; Skácelová, Dana; Kováčik, Dušan; Ráhel', Jozef; Pret'o, Jozef; Černák, Mirko

    2016-08-01

    The surface of carbon-steel plates was modified by non-equilibrium plasma of diffuse coplanar surface barrier discharge (DCSBD) in order to improve the adhesive properties to the NR (natural rubber) green rubber compound. The effect of different treatment times as well as different input power and frequency of supplied high voltage was investigated. The samples were characterized using contact angle and surface free energy measurement, measurement of adhesive properties, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Surface chemical composition was studied by energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). Significant increase in wettability was observed even after 2 s of plasma exposure. The surface modification was confirmed also by peel test, where the best results were obtained for 6 s of plasma treatment. In addition the ageing effect was studied to investigate the durability of modification, which is crucial for the industrial applications. Contribution to the topical issue "6th Central European Symposium on Plasma Chemistry (CESPC-6)", edited by Nicolas Gherardi, Ester Marotta and Cristina Paradisi

  5. Graphene based polyurethane material: As highly pressure sensitive composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodlur, R. M.; Rabinal, M. K.

    2012-06-01

    In our present work, we describe a simple method for uniform coating of Graphite oxide (GO) onto flexible polyurethane (PU) foams. These PU foams loaded with GO were made electrically conducting by converting insulating GO to conducting graphene by chemical reduction process without damaging the foam properties. These PU foams loaded with graphene were characterized by SEM and TGA. The morphology, thermal properties and pressure dependent electrical conductivity of these foams was studied. The electric current increased by five orders of magnitude due to applied pressure.

  6. A flexible and highly pressure-sensitive graphene-polyurethane sponge based on fractured microstructure design.

    PubMed

    Yao, Hong-Bin; Ge, Jin; Wang, Chang-Feng; Wang, Xu; Hu, Wei; Zheng, Zhi-Jun; Ni, Yong; Yu, Shu-Hong

    2013-12-10

    A fractured microstructure design: A new type of piezoresistive sensor with ultra-high-pressure sensitivity (0.26 kPa(-1) ) in low pressure range (<2 kPa) and minimum detectable pressure of 9 Pa has been fabricated using a fractured microstructure design in a graphene-nanosheet-wrapped polyurethane (PU) sponge. This low-cost and easily scalable graphene-wrapped PU sponge pressure sensor has potential application in high-spatial-resolution, artificial skin without complex nanostructure design.

  7. Variable high pressure processing sensitivities for GII human noroviruses

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Human norovirus (HuNoV) is the leading cause of foodborne diseases worldwide. High pressure processing (HPP) is one of the most promising non-thermal technologies for decontamination of viral pathogens in foods. However, the survival of HuNoVs by HPP is poorly understood because these viruses cann...

  8. Design and fabrication of gecko-inspired adhesives.

    PubMed

    Jin, Kejia; Tian, Yu; Erickson, Jeffrey S; Puthoff, Jonathan; Autumn, Kellar; Pesika, Noshir S

    2012-04-03

    Recently, there has been significant interest in developing dry adhesives mimicking the gecko adhesive system, which offers several advantages compared to conventional pressure-sensitive adhesives. Specifically, gecko adhesive pads have anisotropic adhesion properties; the adhesive pads (spatulae) stick strongly when sheared in one direction but are non-adherent when sheared in the opposite direction. This anisotropy property is attributed to the complex topography of the array of fine tilted and curved columnar structures (setae) that bear the spatulae. In this study, we present an easy, scalable method, relying on conventional and unconventional techniques, to incorporate tilt in the fabrication of synthetic polymer-based dry adhesives mimicking the gecko adhesive system, which provides anisotropic adhesion properties. We measured the anisotropic adhesion and friction properties of samples with various tilt angles to test the validity of a nanoscale tape-peeling model of spatular function. Consistent with the peel zone model, samples with lower tilt angles yielded larger adhesion forces. The tribological properties of the synthetic arrays were highly anisotropic, reminiscent of the frictional adhesion behavior of gecko setal arrays. When a 60° tilt sample was actuated in the gripping direction, a static adhesion strength of ~1.4 N/cm(2) and a static friction strength of ~5.4 N/cm(2) were obtained. In contrast, when the dry adhesive was actuated in the releasing direction, we measured an initial repulsive normal force and negligible friction.

  9. Visualization of turbulent wedges under favorable pressure gradients using shear-sensitive and temperature-sensitive liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Chong, Tze-Pei; Zhong, Shan; Hodson, Howard P

    2002-10-01

    Turbulent wedges induced by a three-dimensional surface roughness placed on a flat plate were studied using both shear sensitive and temperature sensitive liquid crystals, respectively denoted by SSLC and TSLC. The experiments were carried out at a free-stream velocity of 28 m/sec at three different favorable pressure gradients. The purpose of this investigation was to examine the spreading angles of the turbulent wedges, as indicated by their associated surface shear stresses and heat transfer characteristics, and to obtain more insight about the behavior of transitional momentum and thermal boundary layers when a streamwise pressure gradient exists. It was shown that under a zero pressure gradient the spreading angles indicated by the two types of liquid crystals are the same, but the difference increases as the level of the favorable pressure gradient increases. The result from the present study is important for modelling the transition of thermal boundary layers over gas turbine blades.

  10. Highly Sensitive, Flexible MEMS Based Pressure Sensor with Photoresist Insulation Layer.

    PubMed

    Liang, Binghao; Chen, Wenjun; He, Zhongfu; Yang, Rongliang; Lin, Zhiqiang; Du, Huiwei; Shang, Yuanyuan; Cao, Anyuan; Tang, Zikang; Gui, Xuchun

    2017-09-29

    Pressure sensing is a crucial function for flexible and wearable electronics, such as artificial skin and health monitoring. Recent progress in material and device structure of pressure sensors has brought breakthroughs in flexibility, self-healing, and sensitivity. However, the fabrication process of many pressure sensors is too complicated and difficult to integrate with traditional silicon-based Micro-Electro-Mechanical System(MEMS). Here, this study demonstrates a scalable and integratable contact resistance-based pressure sensor based on a carbon nanotube conductive network and a photoresist insulation layer. The pressure sensors have high sensitivity (95.5 kPa(-1) ), low sensing threshold (16 Pa), fast response speed (<16 ms), and zero power consumption when without loading pressure. The sensitivity, sensing threshold, and dynamic range are all tunable by conveniently modifying the hole diameter and thickness of insulation layer. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Piezoresistive pressure sensor with high sensitivity for medical application using peninsula-island structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Tingzhong; Wang, Hongyan; Xia, Yong; Zhao, Zhiming; Huang, Mimi; Wang, Jiuhong; Zhao, Libo; Zhao, Yulong; Jiang, Zhuangde

    2017-07-01

    A novel micro-electromechanical systems piezoresistive pressure sensor with a diagonally positioned peninsula-island structure has high sensitivity for ultralow- pressure measurement. The pressure sensor was designed with a working range of 0-500 Pa and had a high sensitivity of 0.06 mV·V-1·Pa-1. The trade-off between high sensitivity and linearity was alleviated. Moreover, the influence of the installation angle on the sensing chip output was analyzed, and an application experiment of the sensor was conducted using the built pipettor test platform. Findings indicated that the proposed pressure sensor had sufficient resolution ability and accuracy to detect the pressure variation in the pipettor chamber. Therefore, the proposed pressure sensor has strong potential for medical equipment application.

  12. Impact sensitivity of materials in contact with liquid and gaseous oxygen at high pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwinghamer, R. J.

    1972-01-01

    As a result of the Apollo 13 incident, increased emphasis is being placed on materials compatibility in a high pressure GOX environment. It is known that in addition to impact sensitivity of materials, approximately adiabatic compression conditions can contrive to induce materials reactivity. Test runs at high pressure using the ABMA tester indicate the following: (1) The materials used in the tests showed an inverse relationship between thickness and impact sensitivity. (2) Several materials tested exhibited greater impact sensitivity in GOX than in LOX. (3) The impact sensitivity of the materials tested in GOX, at the pressures tested, showed enhanced impact sensitivity with higher pressure. (4) The rank ordering of the materials tested in LOX up to 1000 psia is the same as the rank ordering resulting from tests in LOX at 14.7 psia.

  13. A photostable bi-luminophore pressure-sensitive paint measurement system developed with mesoporous silica nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Mochizuki, Dai; Tamura, Shinichi; Yasutake, Hiroaki; Kataoka, Tomoharu; Mitsuo, Kazunori; Wada, Yuji

    2013-04-01

    The accurate and high-resolution measurement of surface pressure is achieved by a pressure/ temperature-sensitive composite paint (bi-PSP), whereas the pressure-sensitive dye photodegraded the temperature sensitive dye in close arrangement of both dyes. In the present study, an attempt was made to synthesize a homogeneous bi-PSP membrane without light-induced degradation of the dye using mesoporous silica. Mesoporous silica as a molecular sieve was the separation of pressure- and temperature-sensitive dyes. Both achievement of control of photodegradation in temperature-sensitive paints with molecule-screening capacity and macroscopically uniform placement of insoluble pigments in the respective solvent, was accomplished using the mesoporous silica nanoparticles in a compound PSP.

  14. Oxygen sensitivity of photoluminescence intensity of Pt complex dispersed in fluorinated acrylate for pressure sensitive paint applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwak, Jae Su; Choi, Yong Gyu

    2014-09-01

    Oxygen-sensitive photoluminescence intensity of a new combination of luminophore and matrix has been investigated for use in pressure sensitive paint applications. In consideration of oxygen permeability as well as optical transparency and structural stability, a fluorinated acrylate polymer is chosen as matrix in this study, where PtTFPP complex is dispersed and acts as luminophore responsible for the oxygen quenching. Processing conditions as to spin-coat films of the fluorinated acrylate doped with the PtTFPP are described. Pressure dependence of the photoluminescence emission of such spin-coat films is explained in connection with luminophore concentration, film thickness and types of substrate.

  15. Numerical analysis of a side-hole birefringent photonic crystal fiber with high-pressure sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Duanming; Zhang, Wei; Zhou, Guiyao

    2016-09-01

    A birefringent structured side-holes photonic crystal fiber (PCF) with high sensitivity is designed for pressure sensing. Simulation results show that the birefringence and relevant sensitivity are strongly influenced by the air-holes' sizes and the distance between the fiber core and side-hole. The modal birefringence and the polarimetric pressure sensitivity can be up to 3.943×10-3 and -3.67×10-5 MPa-1 at 1.55 μm, respectively. The proposed side-holes PCF possesses promising applications for pressure sensing.

  16. Effects of pre-strain on the intrinsic pressure sensitivity of polymer optical fiber Bragg gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedersen, Jens Kristian Mølgaard; Woyessa, Getinet; Nielsen, Kristian; Bang, Ole

    2017-04-01

    We experimentally demonstrate a scheme for improving the intrinsic pressure sensitivity of fiber Bragg-gratings (FBGs) inscribed in polymer optical fibers by applying pre-strain in order to suppress the pressure induced mechanical contraction of the fiber. This contraction would otherwise contribute to a blueshift of the Brag-wavelength, counteracting the dominant redshift caused by the stress-optic effect, which effectively reduces the pressure sensitivity of the FBG. By applying this technique we are able to improve the sensitivity of the FBG from 2.8 pm/bar to 7.3 pm/bar.

  17. Pressure Effects on the Temperature Sensitivity of Fiber Bragg Gratings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Meng-Chou

    2012-01-01

    A 3-dimensional physical model was developed to relate the wavelength shifts resulting from temperature changes of fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) to the thermal expansion coefficients, Young s moduli of optical fibers, and thicknesses of coating polymers. Using this model the Bragg wavelength shifts were calculated and compared with the measured wavelength shifts of FBGs with various coating thickness for a finite temperature range. There was a discrepancy between the calculated and measured wavelength shifts. This was attributed to the refractive index change of the fiber core by the thermally induced radial pressure. To further investigate the pressure effects, a small diametric load was applied to a FBG and Bragg wavelength shifts were measured over a temperature range of 4.2 to 300K.

  18. Pressure-Sensitive System for Gas-Temperature Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cesaro, Richard S; Matz, Norman

    1948-01-01

    A thermodynamic relation is derived and simplified for use as a temperature-limiting control equation involving measurement of gas temperature before combustion and gas pressures before and after combustion. For critical flow in the turbine nozzles of gas-turbine engines, the control equation is further simplified to require only measurements upstream of the burner. Hypothetical control systems are discussed to illustrate application of the control equations.

  19. High-sensitivity Fabry-Perot interferometric pressure sensor based on a nanothick silver diaphragm.

    PubMed

    Xu, Feng; Ren, Dongxu; Shi, Xiaolong; Li, Can; Lu, Weiwei; Lu, Lu; Lu, Liang; Yu, Benli

    2012-01-15

    We present a fiber-optic extrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometer pressure sensor based on a nanothick silver diaphragm. The sensing diaphragm, with a thickness measured in a few hundreds of nanometers, is fabricated by the electroless plating method, which provides a simple fabrication process involving a high-quality diaphragm at a low cost. The sensor exhibits a relatively linear response within the pressure variation range of 0-50 kPa, with a high pressure sensitivity of 70.5 nm/kPa. This sensor is expected to have potential applications in the field of highly sensitive pressure sensors.

  20. Efficacy of temperature-sensitive Guardix-SG for adhesiolysis in experimentally induced eyelid adhesion in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Sohn, Eun Jung; Ahn, Hee Bae; Roh, Mi Sook; Ryu, Won Yeol; Kwon, Yoon Hyung

    2013-01-01

    To determine the efficacy of a temperature-sensitive poloxamer/alginate mixture (Guardix-SG) for reducing adhesions after blepharoplasty in rabbit models. Thirty-six intact eyes of 18 rabbits were randomly designated to 2 groups, and primary blepharoplasty was performed on both the upper eyelids of the 18 rabbits. Sterile cotton soaked in 1 N NaOH was used to produce chemical tissue damage to experimentally induce eyelid adhesion, which was followed by adhesiolysis in 2 weeks. During adhesiolysis, Guardix-SG was applied to the OD of rabbits in the experimental group, while adhesiolysis alone was performed on the OS of rabbits in the control group. Both sides were compared by gross examination 1 day, 1 week, and 4 weeks after surgery, and the degrees of inflammation and fibrosis were examined with hematoxylin-eosin (H&E) and Masson's trichrome (MT) stains. The expression of α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) antibody was also immunohistochemically examined. The gross examinations performed after adhesiolysis yielded results that were not significantly different between the experimental and the control groups, and no prevalent complications, such as eyelid traction or distorted eyelids, were observed. One day (p = 0.028), 1 week (p = 0.028), and 4 weeks (p = 0.028) after surgery, the experimental group had a lower infiltration rate of inflammatory cells than the control group, as shown by H&E staining. The MT staining and α-SMA staining also showed that the collagen deposition and fibrosis (1 week, p = 0.059; 4 weeks, p = 0.034) and the degree of myofibroblast differentiation were significantly lower in the experimental group than in the controls (1 week, p = 0.027; 4 weeks, p = 0.024). The temperature-sensitive poloxamer/alginate mixture (Guardix-SG) decreased inflammation and fibrosis after blepharoplasty and histopathologically prevented the readhesion of secondary blepharoplasty in rabbit models. Therefore, additional clinical studies are needed for other

  1. Differences in foot sensitivity and plantar pressure between young adults and elderly.

    PubMed

    Machado, Álvaro S; Bombach, Gabriéli D; Duysens, Jacques; Carpes, Felipe P

    2016-01-01

    The understanding of foot sensitivity and plantar pressure contributes to the design of insoles, shoes, as well as to guide therapeutic interventions. Here we investigate differences in plantar pressure and foot sensitivity between young adults and community-dwelling elderly. Thirty-eight participants (19 young adults and 19 elderly) underwent clinical assessment of foot sensitivity and upright standing with eyes open and closed for measurement of plantar pressure in each foot. Data were compared between feet, groups, and visual conditions. Foot sensitivity was lower in the elderly and, in contrast to young adults, differed between the foot regions (loss of sensitivity was primarily seen at the heel). Elderly shift plantar pressure to more distal foot zones, namely towards midfoot and forefoot. Asymmetries in foot sensitivity and plantar pressure were not observed. Visual condition did not influence plantar pressure distribution. The forward shift in plantar pressure (away from the insensitive heel) constitutes a strategy of elderly to maintain balance. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Printing transferable components using microstructured elastomeric surfaces with pressure modulated reversible adhesion

    SciTech Connect

    Menard, Etienne; Rogers, John A.; Kim, Seok; Carlson, Andrew

    2016-08-09

    In a method of printing a transferable component, a stamp including an elastomeric post having three-dimensional relief features protruding from a surface thereof is pressed against a component on a donor substrate with a first pressure that is sufficient to mechanically deform the relief features and a region of the post between the relief features to contact the component over a first contact area. The stamp is retracted from the donor substrate such that the component is adhered to the stamp. The stamp including the component adhered thereto is pressed against a receiving substrate with a second pressure that is less than the first pressure to contact the component over a second contact area that is smaller than the first contact area. The stamp is then retracted from the receiving substrate to delaminate the component from the stamp and print the component onto the receiving substrate. Related apparatus and stamps are also discussed.

  3. Marine Bioinspired Underwater Contact Adhesion.

    PubMed

    Clancy, Sean K; Sodano, Antonio; Cunningham, Dylan J; Huang, Sharon S; Zalicki, Piotr J; Shin, Seunghan; Ahn, B Kollbe

    2016-05-09

    Marine mussels and barnacles are sessile biofouling organisms that adhere to a number of surfaces in wet environments and maintain remarkably strong bonds. Previous synthetic approaches to mimic biological wet adhesive properties have focused mainly on the catechol moiety, present in mussel foot proteins (mfps), and especially rich in the interfacial mfps, for example, mfp-3 and -5, found at the interface between the mussel plaque and substrate. Barnacles, however, do not use Dopa for their wet adhesion, but are instead rich in noncatecholic aromatic residues. Due to this anomaly, we were intrigued to study the initial contact adhesion properties of copolymerized acrylate films containing the key functionalities of barnacle cement proteins and interfacial mfps, for example, aromatic (catecholic or noncatecholic), cationic, anionic, and nonpolar residues. The initial wet contact adhesion of the copolymers was measured using a probe tack testing apparatus with a flat-punch contact geometry. The wet contact adhesion of an optimized, bioinspired copolymer film was ∼15.0 N/cm(2) in deionized water and ∼9.0 N/cm(2) in artificial seawater, up to 150 times greater than commercial pressure-sensitive adhesive (PSA) tapes (∼0.1 N/cm(2)). Furthermore, maximum wet contact adhesion was obtained at ∼pH 7, suggesting viability for biomedical applications.

  4. Surface energy and viscoelasticity influence caramel adhesiveness.

    PubMed

    Wagoner, Ty B; Foegeding, Edward Allen

    2017-08-26

    Adhesion is an important textural attribute that directs consumer eating patterns and behaviors and can be a negative attribute during food processing. The objectives of this study were to modify caramel formulation and compare adhesion to different materials to quantify the influence of surface energetics and viscoelasticity on caramel adhesiveness. Mechanical adhesion was viewed in the context of pressure sensitive tack theory, where adhesion is controlled by viscoelasticity of the adhesive material and the surface energy relationship of material and probe. Caramel samples varied in total amount of fat and protein, and mechanical adhesion was measured using a series of materials with total surface energies of 39.7-53.2 mJ/m(2) . Adhesiveness decreased as fat and protein content increased, with a significant effect of total surface energy. Viscoelasticity was modeled using creep recovery data fit to a four-element Burger mechanistic model. Burger model parameters representing retarded elasticity correlated strongly with adhesiveness. The results suggest two zones of adhesion based on formulation, one driven by both surface energy relationships-most notably dispersive and total surface energy-and viscoelasticity, and the other driven solely by viscoelasticity. Relationships between mechanical properties and adhesion have been explored but are still not well understood, and could aid in the design of food products with a controlled level of adhesion. The results of this study indicate the importance of considering material surface energy when measuring mechanical adhesion or texture profile analysis. Understanding the relationships between viscoelastic behavior and adhesion can be used to make inferences on perceived texture. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Single-shot, lifetime-based pressure-sensitive paint for rotating blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juliano, Thomas J.; Kumar, Pradeep; Peng, Di; Gregory, James W.; Crafton, Jim; Fonov, Sergey

    2011-08-01

    A single-shot, lifetime-based pressure-sensitive paint (PSP) technique is proposed as a pressure sensor for applications requiring high pressure sensitivity on a moving model such as a rotor blade. The method is based on a single pulse of high-energy excitation light and a double-frame exposure on an interline transfer charge-coupled device camera for recording luminescent lifetime. Small pressures can be measured on surfaces that are moving in an aperiodic manner (which precludes phase averaging). Measurements in environments having overall surface pressure gradients as small as 1 kPa show that the technique is capable of accurately resolving small pressure fluctuations. The pressure sensitivity to the oxygen concentration of some commonly available PSP formulations has been investigated with respect to capabilities and limitations of the paints for this single-shot lifetime application. A system with ruthenium-based pressure-sensitive paint, 532 nm wavelength laser and a CCD camera is demonstrated on a 0.126 m diameter propeller rotating at 70 Hz. Pressure data are acquired within a single pulse of excitation light energy, with no image averaging required.

  6. Tonic blood pressure modulates the relationship between baroreceptor cardiac reflex sensitivity and cognitive performance.

    PubMed

    Del Paso, Gustavo A Reyes; González, M Isabel; Hernández, José Antonio; Duschek, Stefan; Gutiérrez, Nicolás

    2009-09-01

    This study explored the effects of tonic blood pressure on the association between baroreceptor cardiac reflex sensitivity and cognitive performance. Sixty female participants completed a mental arithmetic task. Baroreceptor reflex sensitivity was assessed using sequence analysis. An interaction was found, indicating that the relationship between baroreceptor reflex sensitivity and cognitive performance is modulated by blood pressure levels. Reflex sensitivity was inversely associated to performance indices in the subgroup of participants with systolic blood pressure above the mean, whereas the association was positive in participants with systolic values below the mean. These results are in accordance with the findings in the field of pain perception and suggest that tonic blood pressure modulates the inhibitory effects of baroreceptor stimulation on high central nervous functions.

  7. Reverse-micelle-induced porous pressure-sensitive rubber for wearable human-machine interfaces.

    PubMed

    Jung, Sungmook; Kim, Ji Hoon; Kim, Jaemin; Choi, Suji; Lee, Jongsu; Park, Inhyuk; Hyeon, Taeghwan; Kim, Dae-Hyeong

    2014-07-23

    A novel method to produce porous pressure-sensitive rubber is developed. For the controlled size distribution of embedded micropores, solution-based procedures using reverse micelles are adopted. The piezosensitivity of the pressure sensitive rubber is significantly increased by introducing micropores. Using this method, wearable human-machine interfaces are fabricated, which can be applied to the remote control of a robot. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Silicon/Porous Silicon Composite Membrane for High Sensitivity Pressure Sensor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-07-21

    new applications. In this project, we focus on the mechanical and piezoelectric properties of PS to improve the sensitivity of MEMS pressure sensors...electrochemical etching of silicon in HF based electrolyte and consists of silicon filaments and voids. It is not a new material and was discovered in ...of Porous Silicon (PS) in improving the sensitivity of Silicon based piezoresistive MEMS pressure sensors. Visible research output: 1. L. Sujatha

  9. Stabilizing Protein Effects on the Pressure Sensitivity of Fluorescent Gold Nanoclusters

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-01-13

    ARL-TR-7572 ● JAN 2016 US Army Research Laboratory Stabilizing Protein Effects on the Pressure Sensitivity of Fluorescent Gold ...JAN 2016 US Army Research Laboratory Stabilizing Protein Effects on the Pressure Sensitivity of Fluorescent Gold Nanoclusters by Abby...Fluorescent Gold Nanoclusters 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Abby L West, Mark H Griep

  10. Flexible, highly sensitive pressure sensor with a wide range based on graphene-silk network structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ying; Tao, Lu-Qi; Wang, Dan-Yang; Zhang, Tian-Yu; Yang, Yi; Ren, Tian-Ling

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, a flexible, simple-preparation, and low-cost graphene-silk pressure sensor based on soft silk substrate through thermal reduction was demonstrated. Taking silk as the support body, the device had formed a three-dimensional structure with ordered multi-layer structure. Through a simple and low-cost process technology, graphene-silk pressure sensor can achieve the sensitivity value of 0.4 kPa - 1 , and the measurement range can be as high as 140 kPa. Besides, pressure sensor can have a good combination with knitted clothing and textile product. The signal had good reproducibility in response to different pressures. Furthermore, graphene-silk pressure sensor can not only detect pressure higher than 100 kPa, but also can measure weak body signals. The characteristics of high-sensitivity, good repeatability, flexibility, and comfort for skin provide the high possibility to fit on various wearable electronics.

  11. Low-Speed Flow Studies Using the Pressure Sensitive Paint Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, O. C.; Mehta, R. D.; Cantwell, B. J.

    1998-01-01

    Optical pressure measurements have been made on a NACA 0012 airfoil coated with Pressure Sensitive Paint (PSP) at very low flow speeds (less than 50 m/s). Angle of attack was limited to 5 deg. for most measurements. Effects of temperature gradients and mis-registration errors on PSP response have been established and minimized. By reducing measurement error caused by these effects. PSP sensitivity has been enhanced. Acceptable aerodynamic data at flow speeds down to 20 m/s have been obtained and valid pressure paint response was observed down to 10 m/s. Measurement errors (in terms of pressure and pressure coefficient) using PSP with pressure taps as a reference are provided for the range of flow speeds from 50 m/s to 10 m/s.

  12. Ultrafast Time Response Pressure-Sensitive Paint for Unsteady Shock-Wave Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Numata, Daiju; Asai, Keisuke

    Pressure-Sensitive Paint (PSP) is an optical pressure measurement technique widely used in aerodynamic experiments, and has been applied to unsteady shock-wave phenomena [1, 2]. However, one of the largest problems to apply PSP to high-speed and unsteady phenomena is the response time of PSP.

  13. An endoscopic shearography system with radial sensitivity for inner inspection of adhesion faults in composite material pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benedet, M. E.; Macedo, F. J.; Fantin, A. V.; Willemann, D. P.; Silva, F. A. A.; Soares, S. D.; Albertazzi, A.

    2017-06-01

    This work presents the development of a special shearography system with radial sensitivity and explores its applicability for detecting adhesion flaws on internal surfaces of joints of composite material pipes. The system uses two conical mirrors to achieve radial sensitivity. A primary 45° conical mirror is responsible for promoting the inspection of the internal surface all way around 360°. A special Michelson-like interferometer is formed replacing one of the plane mirrors by a conical mirror. The image reflected by this conical mirror is shifted away from the image center in a radial way and a radial shear is produced on the images. The concept was developed and tested. Two tubular steel specimens internally coated with composite materials and having known artificial defects were analyzed to test the ability of the system to detect the flaws. The system presented very good results on all inspected specimens. The experimental results obtained in this work are promising and open a new front for inspections of inner surfaces of composite pipes with shearography.

  14. Sensitivity of protein adsorption to architectural variations in a protein-resistant polymer brush containing engineered nanoscale adhesive sites.

    PubMed

    Gon, Saugata; Santore, Maria M

    2011-12-20

    Patchy polymer brushes contain nanoscale (5-15 nm) adhesive elements, such as polymer coils or nanoparticles, embedded at their base at random positions on the surface. The competition between the brush's steric (protein resistant) repulsions and the attractions from the discrete adhesive elements provides a precise means to control bioadhesion. This differs from the classical approach, where functionality is placed on the brush's periphery. The current study demonstrates the impact of poly(etheylene glycol) (PEG) brush architecture and ionic strength on fibrinogen adsorption on brushes containing embedded poly-l-lysine (PLL, 20K MW) coils or "patches". The consistent appearance of a fibrinogen adsorption threshold, a minimum loading of patches on the surface, below which protein adsorption does not occur, suggests multivalent protein capture: Adsorbing proteins simultaneously engage several patches. The surface composition (patch loading) at the threshold is extremely sensitive to the brush height and ionic strength, varying up to a factor of 5 in the surface loading of the PLL patches (~50% of the range of possible surfaces). Variations in ionic strength have a similar effect, with the smallest thresholds seen for the largest Debye lengths. While trends with brush height were the clearest and most dominant, consideration of the PEG loading within the brush or its persistence length did not reveal a critical brush parameter for the onset of adsorption. The lack of straightforward correlation on brush physics was likely a result of multivalent binding, (producing an additional dependence on patch loading), and might be resolved for univalent adsorption onto more strongly binding patches. While studies with similar brushes placed uniformly on a surface revealed that the PEG loading within the brush is the best indicator of protein resistance, the current results suggest that brush height is more important for patchy brushes. Likely the interactions producing brush

  15. Acquisition of cell-adhesion capability of the surface of crosslinked albumin films irradiated with atmospheric-pressure plasma jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirafuji, Tatsuru; Iwamura, Mami; Taga, Ryosuke; Kashiwagi, Yukiyasu; Nakajima, Kota; Ogata, Yuji; Tanaka, Kenji; Tachibana, Akira; Tanabe, Toshizumi

    2016-07-01

    Crosslinked albumin films, to which L929 cells do not attach by nature, acquire the L929-cell-adhesion capability by irradiation of an atmospheric-pressure plasma jet (APPJ) of He gas. The number of attached cells was 2.6 × 104 cells/cm2 after the APPJ irradiation for 180 s, while conventional UV photolithography, which was performed in our previous work, required 2 h to obtain the same order of magnitude of the number of attached cells. The contact angle of samples decreased steeply from 105 to 38° in the first 10 s irradiation, but decreased quite gradually from 38 to 32° with increasing irradiation time from 10 to 180 s. In contrast to the nonlinear variation in the contact angles, the number of attached cells almost linearly increased from 4.5 × 103 to 2.6 × 104 cells/cm2 with increasing treatment time. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of the samples indicated that hydrophilic functional groups of C-C=O gradually formed with increasing APPJ irradiation time up to 180 s. These results suggest that the cell-adhesion capability of the crosslinked albumin films is not simply explained by the decrease in contact angle but also by the formation of oxidized functional groups on the surface. The effects of UV and vacuum UV light from APPJ were negligible, which indicates that the formation of oxidized functional groups on the surface is not caused by photon-assisted surface reactions but by reactions involving chemically active species supplied from APPJ.

  16. Fenofibrate lowers blood pressure in salt-sensitive but not salt-resistant hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Kimberly; Nian, Hui; Yu, Chang; Luther, James M.; Brown, Nancy J.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α agonists reduce blood pressure in rodents, but clinical trials provide conflicting data regarding their effects in humans. We tested the hypothesis that the effect of fenofibrate on blood pressure depends on salt sensitivity. Methods Thirty-one hypertensive volunteers (17 salt-resistant, 14 salt-sensitive) completed a randomized, crossover, double-blind protocol with three dietary phases: low salt diet (10 mmol/day) followed by two consecutive high salt diets (200 mmol/day), each for 6 days. During high salt, volunteers were randomized to fenofibrate 160 mg/day or placebo. Hemodynamic and metabolic parameters were measured on the last morning of each treatment arm. Results Fenofibrate reduced triglycerides similarly in salt-sensitive and salt-resistant volunteers. Fenofibrate did not affect blood pressure in salt-resistant volunteers. In salt-sensitive volunteers, fenofibrate significantly decreased diastolic (P =0.02 versus placebo) and mean arterial (P = 0.04 versus placebo) blood pressure during high salt. In all volunteers, the decrease in systolic pressure during fenofibrate correlated inversely with the salt sensitivity of mean arterial pressure as a continuous variable. Fenofibrate significantly decreased heart rate, plasma renin activity, and renal vascular resistance during high salt in salt-sensitive volunteers, but not salt-resistant volunteers. Fenofibrate did not affect sodium excretion or weight gain during high salt. The effect of salt intake and fenofibrate on plasma and urine epoxyeicosatrienoic acid concentrations differed in salt-resistant and salt-sensitive volunteers. Conclusion Fenofibrate reduces blood pressure, heart rate and renal vasoconstriction in salt-sensitive volunteers, but not in salt-resistant volunteers. These findings have implications for the treatment of hyperlipidemia in hypertensive individuals. PMID:23385647

  17. Tongue adhesion in the horned frog Ceratophrys sp.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleinteich, Thomas; Gorb, Stanislav N.

    2014-06-01

    Frogs are well-known to capture elusive prey with their protrusible and adhesive tongues. However, the adhesive performance of frog tongues and the mechanism of the contact formation with the prey item remain unknown. Here we measured for the first time adhesive forces and tongue contact areas in living individuals of a horned frog (Ceratophrys sp.) against glass. We found that Ceratophrys sp. generates adhesive forces well beyond its own body weight. Surprisingly, we found that the tongues adhered stronger in feeding trials in which the coverage of the tongue contact area with mucus was relatively low. Thus, besides the presence of mucus, other features of the frog tongue (surface profile, material properties) are important to generate sufficient adhesive forces. Overall, the experimental data shows that frog tongues can be best compared to pressure sensitive adhesives (PSAs) that are of common technical use as adhesive tapes or labels.

  18. Tongue adhesion in the horned frog Ceratophrys sp.

    PubMed

    Kleinteich, Thomas; Gorb, Stanislav N

    2014-06-12

    Frogs are well-known to capture elusive prey with their protrusible and adhesive tongues. However, the adhesive performance of frog tongues and the mechanism of the contact formation with the prey item remain unknown. Here we measured for the first time adhesive forces and tongue contact areas in living individuals of a horned frog (Ceratophrys sp.) against glass. We found that Ceratophrys sp. generates adhesive forces well beyond its own body weight. Surprisingly, we found that the tongues adhered stronger in feeding trials in which the coverage of the tongue contact area with mucus was relatively low. Thus, besides the presence of mucus, other features of the frog tongue (surface profile, material properties) are important to generate sufficient adhesive forces. Overall, the experimental data shows that frog tongues can be best compared to pressure sensitive adhesives (PSAs) that are of common technical use as adhesive tapes or labels.

  19. Tongue adhesion in the horned frog Ceratophrys sp.

    PubMed Central

    Kleinteich, Thomas; Gorb, Stanislav N.

    2014-01-01

    Frogs are well-known to capture elusive prey with their protrusible and adhesive tongues. However, the adhesive performance of frog tongues and the mechanism of the contact formation with the prey item remain unknown. Here we measured for the first time adhesive forces and tongue contact areas in living individuals of a horned frog (Ceratophrys sp.) against glass. We found that Ceratophrys sp. generates adhesive forces well beyond its own body weight. Surprisingly, we found that the tongues adhered stronger in feeding trials in which the coverage of the tongue contact area with mucus was relatively low. Thus, besides the presence of mucus, other features of the frog tongue (surface profile, material properties) are important to generate sufficient adhesive forces. Overall, the experimental data shows that frog tongues can be best compared to pressure sensitive adhesives (PSAs) that are of common technical use as adhesive tapes or labels. PMID:24921415

  20. Amine Enrichment of Thin-Film Composite Membranes via Low Pressure Plasma Polymerization for Antimicrobial Adhesion.

    PubMed

    Reis, Rackel; Dumée, Ludovic F; He, Li; She, Fenghua; Orbell, John D; Winther-Jensen, Bjorn; Duke, Mikel C

    2015-07-15

    Thin-film composite membranes, primarily based on poly(amide) (PA) semipermeable materials, are nowadays the dominant technology used in pressure driven water desalination systems. Despite offering superior water permeation and salt selectivity, their surface properties, such as their charge and roughness, cannot be extensively tuned due to the intrinsic fabrication process of the membranes by interfacial polymerization. The alteration of these properties would lead to a better control of the materials surface zeta potential, which is critical to finely tune selectivity and enhance the membrane materials stability when exposed to complex industrial waste streams. Low pressure plasma was employed to introduce amine functionalities onto the PA surface of commercially available thin-film composite (TFC) membranes. Morphological changes after plasma polymerization were analyzed by SEM and AFM, and average surface roughness decreased by 29%. Amine enrichment provided isoelectric point changes from pH 3.7 to 5.2 for 5 to 15 min of plasma polymerization time. Synchrotron FTIR mappings of the amine-modified surface indicated the addition of a discrete 60 nm film to the PA layer. Furthermore, metal affinity was confirmed by the enhanced binding of silver to the modified surface, supported by an increased antimicrobial functionality with demonstrable elimination of E. coli growth. Essential salt rejection was shown minimally compromised for faster polymerization processes. Plasma polymerization is therefore a viable route to producing functional amine enriched thin-film composite PA membrane surfaces.

  1. Atmospheric pressure plasma polymers for tuned QCM detection of protein adhesion.

    PubMed

    Rusu, G B; Asandulesa, M; Topala, I; Pohoata, V; Dumitrascu, N; Barboiu, M

    2014-03-15

    Our efforts have been concentrated in preparing plasma polymeric thin layers at atmospheric pressure grown on Quartz Crystal Microbalance-QCM electrodes for which the non-specific absorption of proteins can be efficiently modulated, tuned and used for QCM biosensing and quantification. Plasma polymerization reaction at atmospheric pressure has been used as a simple and viable method for the preparation of QCM bioactive surfaces, featuring variable protein binding properties. Polyethyleneglycol (ppEG), polystyrene (ppST) and poly(ethyleneglycol-styrene) (ppST-EG) thin-layers have been grown on QCM electrodes. These layers were characterized by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), Contact angle measurements, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The plasma ppST QCM electrodes present a higher adsorption of Concanavalin A (ConA) and Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA) proteins when compared with the commercial coated polystyrene (ppST) ones. The minimum adsorption was found for ppEG, surface, known by their protein anti-fouling properties. The amount of adsorbed proteins can be tuned by the introduction of PEG precursors in the plasma discharge during the preparation of ppST polymers.

  2. Fabrication of highly sensitive capacitive pressure sensors with electrospun polymer nanofibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yeongjun; Jang, Shin; Kang, Byung Ju; Oh, Je Hoon

    2017-08-01

    Highly sensitive capacitive pressure sensors with poly(vinylidenefluoride-co-trifluoroethylene) (P(VDF-TrFE)) dielectric layers were prepared. The dielectric layers were directly produced by electrospinning P(VDF-TrFE) nanofibers for various spinning times. A longer spinning time enhanced the deformability of the electrospun P(VDF-TrFE) layers, resulting in higher sensitivity owing to larger changes in the deformation of the dielectric layer. One of the capacitive pressure sensors showed a high sensitivity of 2.81 kPa-1 at a pressure ≤ 0.12 kPa, a good response time of 42 ms, and small hysteresis. The sensitivity of the sensor was five times higher than that of a typical capacitive pressure sensor. The fabricated pressure sensor could detect a tiny water droplet as light as 7 mg. It is expected that the electrospun P(VDF-TrFE) nanofibers can be used as sensing materials for highly sensitive pressure sensors in wearable electronics applications.

  3. A highly sensitive pressure sensor using conductive composite elastomers with wavy structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Rujie; Zhang, Xiao-Chong; Rossiter, Jonathan; Scarpa, Fabrizio

    2016-05-01

    Flexible pressure sensors are crucial components for the next generation wearable devices to monitor human physiological conditions. In this paper, we present a novel resistive pressure sensor based on hybrid composites made from carbon nanotube (CNT) for the conductive coating layer and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) elastomers as the substrate. The high sensitivity of these sensors is attributed to the change of contact resistance caused by the variation of the contact areas between the wavy film and the electrodes. Porous electrodes were designed to increase the roughness of the interfaces, thus further enhancing the pressure sensitivity. The developed device was verified through a series of tests, and the sensor exhibited a high sensitivity of 2.05 kPa-1 under a low pressure of 35.6 Pa.

  4. Design and fabrication of polymer based dry adhesives inspired by the gecko adhesive system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Kejia

    There has been significant interest in developing dry adhesives mimicking the gecko adhesive system, which offers several advantages compared to conventional pressure sensitive adhesives. Specifically, gecko adhesive pads have anisotropic adhesion properties: the adhesive pads (spatulae) stick strongly when sheared in one direction but are non-adherent when sheared in the opposite direction. This anisotropy property is attributed to the complex topography of the array of fine tilted and curved columnar structures (setae) that bear the spatulae. In this thesis, easy, scalable methods, relying on conventional and unconventional techniques are presented to incorporate tilt in the fabrication of synthetic polymer-based dry adhesives mimicking the gecko adhesive system, which provide anisotropic adhesion properties. In the first part of the study, the anisotropic adhesion and friction properties of samples with various tilt angles to test the validity of a nanoscale tape-peeling model of spatular function are measured. Consistent with the Peel Zone model, samples with lower tilt angles yielded larger adhesion forces. Contact mechanics of the synthetic array were highly anisotropic, consistent with the frictional adhesion model and gecko-like. Based on the original design, a new design of gecko-like dry adhesives was developed which showed superior tribological properties and furthermore showed anisotropic adhesive properties without the need for tilt in the structures. These adhesives can be used to reversibly suspend weights from vertical surfaces (e.g., walls) and, for the first time to our knowledge, horizontal surfaces (e.g., ceilings) by simultaneously and judiciously activating anisotropic friction and adhesion forces. Furthermore, adhesion properties between artificial gecko-inspired dry adhesives and rough substrates with varying roughness are studied. The results suggest that both adhesion and friction forces on a rough substrate depends significantly on the

  5. The pressure sensitivity of wrinkled B-doped nanocrystalline diamond membranes

    PubMed Central

    Drijkoningen, S.; Janssens, S. D.; Pobedinskas, P.; Koizumi, S.; Van Bael, M. K.; Haenen, K.

    2016-01-01

    Nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) membranes are promising candidates for use as sensitive pressure sensors. NCD membranes are able to withstand harsh conditions and are easily fabricated on glass. In this study the sensitivity of heavily boron doped NCD (B:NCD) pressure sensors is evaluated with respect to different types of supporting glass substrates, doping levels and membrane sizes. Higher pressure sensing sensitivities are obtained for membranes on Corning Eagle 2000 glass, which have a better match in thermal expansion coefficient with diamond compared to those on Schott AF45 glass. In addition, it is shown that larger and more heavily doped membranes are more sensitive. After fabrication of the membranes, the stress in the B:NCD films is released by the emergence of wrinkles. A better match between the thermal expansion coefficient of the NCD layer and the underlying substrate results in less stress and a smaller amount of wrinkles as confirmed by Raman spectroscopy and 3D surface imaging. PMID:27767048

  6. The pressure sensitivity of wrinkled B-doped nanocrystalline diamond membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drijkoningen, S.; Janssens, S. D.; Pobedinskas, P.; Koizumi, S.; van Bael, M. K.; Haenen, K.

    2016-10-01

    Nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) membranes are promising candidates for use as sensitive pressure sensors. NCD membranes are able to withstand harsh conditions and are easily fabricated on glass. In this study the sensitivity of heavily boron doped NCD (B:NCD) pressure sensors is evaluated with respect to different types of supporting glass substrates, doping levels and membrane sizes. Higher pressure sensing sensitivities are obtained for membranes on Corning Eagle 2000 glass, which have a better match in thermal expansion coefficient with diamond compared to those on Schott AF45 glass. In addition, it is shown that larger and more heavily doped membranes are more sensitive. After fabrication of the membranes, the stress in the B:NCD films is released by the emergence of wrinkles. A better match between the thermal expansion coefficient of the NCD layer and the underlying substrate results in less stress and a smaller amount of wrinkles as confirmed by Raman spectroscopy and 3D surface imaging.

  7. High-pressure studies on the calcium-ion-sensitive fluorophore Fluo-4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frey, Eric W.; Urayama, Paul

    2007-10-01

    Fluorescence-based methods for intracellular calcium ion sensing are well established at ambient pressure. Because calcium ions play a ubiquitous role in cellular signaling, extending techniques of intracellular calcium-sensing to high pressures would play an important role in understanding the large variety of piezophysiologic effects. Here, we characterize the intracellular calcium-ion-sensitive fluorophore Fluo-4 under hydrostatic pressures up to 500 atm (50 MPa). Using an EGTA/MOPS solution as a calcium-buffer reference, we investigate the pressure dependence of the reaction pK and determine the thermodynamic volume change associated with the Fluo-4 calcium-binding reaction.

  8. Polymer Claw: Instant Underwater Adhesive

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-23

    technology is the use of pressure sensitive microcapsules , which release reactive amine crosslinkers into an adhesive putty when pressed against the...PROIECT GOALS AND OBIECTIVES 2 2 KEY ACCOMPLISHMENTS 2 3.1 KICKOFF MEETING 3 3.2 AMINE MICROENCAPSULATION 3 3.3 CAUSTIC CLEANING AGENT 5 3.4...caustic, and the abrasive brush. We successfully synthesized amine-filled microcapsules and a dry mixture of caustic ingredients that only activate when

  9. Flexible suspended gate organic thin-film transistors for ultra-sensitive pressure detection

    PubMed Central

    Zang, Yaping; Zhang, Fengjiao; Huang, Dazhen; Gao, Xike; Di, Chong-an; Zhu, Daoben

    2015-01-01

    The utilization of organic devices as pressure-sensing elements in artificial intelligence and healthcare applications represents a fascinating opportunity for the next-generation electronic products. To satisfy the critical requirements of these promising applications, the low-cost construction of large-area ultra-sensitive organic pressure devices with outstanding flexibility is highly desired. Here we present flexible suspended gate organic thin-film transistors (SGOTFTs) as a model platform that enables ultra-sensitive pressure detection. More importantly, the unique device geometry of SGOTFTs allows the fine-tuning of their sensitivity by the suspended gate. An unprecedented sensitivity of 192 kPa−1, a low limit-of-detection pressure of <0.5 Pa and a short response time of 10 ms were successfully realized, allowing the real-time detection of acoustic waves. These excellent sensing properties of SGOTFTs, together with their advantages of facile large-area fabrication and versatility in detecting various pressure signals, make SGOTFTs a powerful strategy for spatial pressure mapping in practical applications. PMID:25872157

  10. Graphene ``microdrums'' on a freestanding perforated thin membrane for high sensitivity MEMS pressure sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiugu; Hong, Wei; Dong, Liang

    2016-03-01

    We present a microelectromechanical system (MEMS) graphene-based pressure sensor realized by transferring a large area, few-layered graphene on a suspended silicon nitride thin membrane perforated by a periodic array of micro-through-holes. Each through-hole is covered by a circular drum-like graphene layer, namely a graphene ``microdrum''. The uniqueness of the sensor design is the fact that introducing the through-hole arrays into the supporting nitride membrane allows generating an increased strain in the graphene membrane over the through-hole array by local deformations of the holes under an applied differential pressure. Further reasons contributing to the increased strain in the devised sensitive membrane include larger deflection of the membrane than that of its imperforated counterpart membrane, and direct bulging of the graphene microdrum under an applied pressure. Electromechanical measurements show a gauge factor of 4.4 for the graphene membrane and a sensitivity of 2.8 × 10-5 mbar-1 for the pressure sensor with a good linearity over a wide pressure range. The present sensor outperforms most existing MEMS-based small footprint pressure sensors using graphene, silicon, and carbon nanotubes as sensitive materials, due to the high sensitivity.

  11. Pressure-Sensitive Paint Measurements on Surfaces with Non-Uniform Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bencic, Timothy J.

    1999-01-01

    Pressure-sensitive paint (PSP) has become a useful tool to augment conventional pressure taps in measuring the surface pressure distribution of aerodynamic components in wind tunnel testing. While the PSP offers the advantage of a non-intrusive global mapping of the surface pressure, one prominent drawback to the accuracy of this technique is the inherent temperature sensitivity of the coating's luminescent intensity. A typical aerodynamic surface PSP test has relied on the coated surface to be both spatially and temporally isothermal, along with conventional instrumentation for an in situ calibration to generate the highest accuracy pressure mappings. In some tests however, spatial and temporal thermal gradients are generated by the nature of the test as in a blowing jet impinging on a surface. In these cases, the temperature variations on the painted surface must be accounted for in order to yield high accuracy and reliable data. A new temperature correction technique was developed at NASA Lewis to collapse a "family" of PSP calibration curves to a single intensity ratio versus pressure curve. This correction allows a streamlined procedure to be followed whether or not temperature information is used in the data reduction of the PSP. This paper explores the use of conventional instrumentation such as thermocouples and pressure taps along with temperature-sensitive paint (TSP) to correct for the thermal gradients that exist in aeropropulsion PSP tests. Temperature corrected PSP measurements for both a supersonic mixer ejector and jet cavity interaction tests are presented.

  12. Hsd11b2 haploinsufficiency in mice causes salt sensitivity of blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Matthew A; Craigie, Eilidh; Livingstone, Dawn E W; Kotelevtsev, Yuri V; Al-Dujaili, Emad A S; Kenyon, Christopher J; Mullins, John J

    2011-03-01

    Salt sensitivity of blood pressure is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular morbidity. Mechanistically, abnormal mineralocorticoid action and subclinical renal impairment may blunt the natriuretic response to high sodium intake, causing blood pressure to rise. 11β-Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2 (11βHSD2) controls ligand access to the mineralocorticoid receptor, and ablation of the enzyme causes severe hypertension. Polymorphisms in HSD11B2 are associated with salt sensitivity of blood pressure in normotensives. In this study, we used mice heterozygote for a null mutation in Hsd11b2 (Hsd11b2(+/-)) to define the mechanisms linking reduced enzyme activity to salt sensitivity of blood pressure. A high-sodium diet caused a rapid and sustained increase in blood pressure in Hsd11b2(+/-) mice but not in wild-type littermates. During the adaptation to high-sodium diet, heterozygotes displayed impaired sodium excretion, a transient positive sodium balance, and hypokalemia. After 21 days of high-sodium feeding, Hsd11b2(+/-) mice had an increased heart weight. Mineralocorticoid receptor antagonism partially prevented the increase in heart weight but not the increase in blood pressure. Glucocorticoid receptor antagonism prevented the rise in blood pressure. In Hsd11b2(+/-) mice, high-sodium feeding caused suppression of aldosterone and a moderate but sustained increase in corticosterone. This study demonstrates an inverse relationship among 11βHSD2 activity, heart weight, and blood pressure in a clinically important context. Reduced activity causes salt sensitivity of blood pressure, but this does not reflect illicit activation of mineralocorticoid receptors by glucocorticoids. Instead, we have identified a novel interaction among 11βHSD2, dietary salt, and circulating glucocorticoids.

  13. A highly sensitive pressure sensor using a double-layered graphene structure for tactile sensing.

    PubMed

    Chun, Sungwoo; Kim, Youngjun; Oh, Hyeong-Sik; Bae, Giyeol; Park, Wanjun

    2015-07-21

    In this paper, we propose a graphene sensor using two separated single-layered graphenes on a flexible substrate for use as a pressure sensor, such as for soft electronics. The working pressure corresponds to the range in which human perception recognizes surface morphologies. A specific design of the sensor structure drives the piezoresistive character due to the contact resistance between two graphene layers and the electromechanical properties of graphene itself. Accordingly, sensitivity in resistance change is given by two modes for low pressure (-0.24 kPa(-1)) and high pressure (0.039 kPa(-1)) with a crossover pressure (700 Pa). This sensor can detect infinitesimal pressure as low as 0.3 Pa with uniformly applied vertical force. With the attachment of the artificial fingerprint structure (AFPS) on the sensor, the detection ability for both the locally generated shear force and actual human touch confirms recognition of the surface morphology constructed by periodic structures.

  14. Wood : adhesives

    Treesearch

    A.H. Conner

    2001-01-01

    This chapter on wood adhesives includes: 1) Classification of wood adhesives 2) Thermosetting wood adhesives 3) Thermoplastic adhesives, 4) Wood adhesives based on natural sources 5) Nonconventional bonding of wood 6) Wood bonding.

  15. Effects of inner materials on the sensitivity and phase depth of wireless inductive pressure sensors for monitoring intraocular pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Cheol-In; Shin, Kyeong-Sik; Kim, Mi Jeung; Yun, Kwang-Seok; Park, Ki Ho; Kang, Ji Yoon; Lee, Soo Hyun

    2016-03-01

    In this research, we developed wireless, inductive, pressure sensors with high sensitivity and investigated the effects of the inner materials (copper or ferrite) on the performance of the sensors. The proposed sensor is comprised of two parts, i.e., the top and the bottom parts. The top part includes a micro coil and a capacitor for the wireless transfer of data, and the bottom part includes the inner materials and a thick or thin flexible membrane to induce changes in the inductance. An anchor is used to assemble the top and bottom parts. The behavior of the sensor with copper was based on the eddy current effect, and, as the pressure increased, its resonance frequency increased, while its phase depth decreased exponentially. The principle of the sensor with ferrite was related to the effective permeability between a ferrite and a coil, and its response was the opposite of that with copper, i.e., as the pressure increased, the resonance frequency decreased linearly, and the phase depth increased linearly. These different operational mechanisms can be explained by the changes in the equations of inductance presented in this paper. After characterizing four different types of inductive pressure sensors in ambient air, one type of inductive pressure sensor was used to monitor the intraocular pressure (IOP) of a rabbit's eye as a biomedical application. The results showed that, in the animal tests, the measured responsivity and sensitivity were 16.7 kHz/mmHg and 1340 ppm/mmHg, respectively. These data indicate that the proposed sensor is a good candidate for monitoring IOP.

  16. In Situ Growth of Highly Adhesive Surface Layer on Titanium Foil as Durable Counter Electrodes for Efficient Dye-sensitized Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wantao; Xu, Peng; Guo, Yanjun; Lin, Yuan; Yin, Xiong; Tang, Guangshi; He, Meng

    2016-10-03

    Counter electrodes (CEs) of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs) are usually fabricated by depositing catalytic materials on substrates. The poor adhesion of the catalytic material to the substrate often results in the exfoliation of catalytic materials, and then the deterioration of cell performance or even the failure of DSCs. In this study, a highly adhesive surface layer is in situ grown on the titanium foil via a facile process and applied as CEs for DSCs. The DSCs applying such CEs demonstrate decent power conversion efficiencies, 6.26% and 4.37% for rigid and flexible devices, respectively. The adhesion of the surface layer to the metal substrate is so strong that the photovoltaic performance of the devices is well retained even after the CEs are bended for 20 cycles and torn twice with adhesive tape. The results reported here indicate that the in situ growth of highly adhesive surface layers on metal substrate is a promising way to prepare durable CEs for efficient DSCs.

  17. In Situ Growth of Highly Adhesive Surface Layer on Titanium Foil as Durable Counter Electrodes for Efficient Dye-sensitized Solar Cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wantao; Xu, Peng; Guo, Yanjun; Lin, Yuan; Yin, Xiong; Tang, Guangshi; He, Meng

    2016-01-01

    Counter electrodes (CEs) of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs) are usually fabricated by depositing catalytic materials on substrates. The poor adhesion of the catalytic material to the substrate often results in the exfoliation of catalytic materials, and then the deterioration of cell performance or even the failure of DSCs. In this study, a highly adhesive surface layer is in situ grown on the titanium foil via a facile process and applied as CEs for DSCs. The DSCs applying such CEs demonstrate decent power conversion efficiencies, 6.26% and 4.37% for rigid and flexible devices, respectively. The adhesion of the surface layer to the metal substrate is so strong that the photovoltaic performance of the devices is well retained even after the CEs are bended for 20 cycles and torn twice with adhesive tape. The results reported here indicate that the in situ growth of highly adhesive surface layers on metal substrate is a promising way to prepare durable CEs for efficient DSCs. PMID:27694905

  18. In Situ Growth of Highly Adhesive Surface Layer on Titanium Foil as Durable Counter Electrodes for Efficient Dye-sensitized Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wantao; Xu, Peng; Guo, Yanjun; Lin, Yuan; Yin, Xiong; Tang, Guangshi; He, Meng

    2016-10-01

    Counter electrodes (CEs) of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs) are usually fabricated by depositing catalytic materials on substrates. The poor adhesion of the catalytic material to the substrate often results in the exfoliation of catalytic materials, and then the deterioration of cell performance or even the failure of DSCs. In this study, a highly adhesive surface layer is in situ grown on the titanium foil via a facile process and applied as CEs for DSCs. The DSCs applying such CEs demonstrate decent power conversion efficiencies, 6.26% and 4.37% for rigid and flexible devices, respectively. The adhesion of the surface layer to the metal substrate is so strong that the photovoltaic performance of the devices is well retained even after the CEs are bended for 20 cycles and torn twice with adhesive tape. The results reported here indicate that the in situ growth of highly adhesive surface layers on metal substrate is a promising way to prepare durable CEs for efficient DSCs.

  19. Reliable prediction of electric spark sensitivity of nitramines: a general correlation with detonation pressure.

    PubMed

    Keshavarz, Mohammad Hossein; Pouretedal, Hamid Reza; Semnani, Abolfazl

    2009-08-15

    For nitramines, a general correlation has been introduced to predict electric spark sensitivity through detonation pressure. New method uses maximum obtainable detonation pressure as a fundamental relation so that it can be corrected for some nitramines which have some specific molecular structure. There is no need to use crystal density and heat of formation of nitramine explosives for predicting detonation pressure and electric spark sensitivity. The predicted electric spark sensitivities are compared with calculated results on the basis of quantum mechanical computations for some nitramines that latter can be applied. The root mean square (rms) deviations from experiment for new method and the predicted results of complicated quantum mechanical method are 1.18 and 3.49J, respectively.

  20. Characterization and optimization of polymer-ceramic pressure-sensitive paint by controlling polymer content.

    PubMed

    Sakaue, Hirotaka; Kakisako, Takuma; Ishikawa, Hitoshi

    2011-01-01

    A pressure-sensitive paint (PSP) with fast response characteristics that can be sprayed on a test article is studied. This PSP consists of a polymer for spraying and a porous particle for providing the fast response. We controlled the polymer content (%) from 10 to 90% to study its effects on PSP characteristics: the signal level, pressure sensitivity, temperature dependency, and time response. The signal level and temperature dependency shows a peak in the polymer content around 50 to 70%. The pressure sensitivity was fairly constant in the range between 0.8 and 0.9 %/kPa. The time response is improved by lowering the polymer content. The variation of the time response is shown to be on the order of milliseconds to ten seconds. A weight coefficient is introduced to optimize the resultant PSPs. By setting the weight coefficient, we can optimize the PSP for sensing purposes.

  1. Bi-stability of micro-plates: A sensitive mechanism for differential pressure measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sajadi, Banafsheh; Goosen, Johannes Hans; van Keulen, Fred

    2017-09-01

    The electrostatic instability (pull-in) of a flat electrode in a parallel plate capacitor has been shown to be highly sensitive to external mechanical loads such as pressure. In this paper, we substantiate the possibility of prompting additional unstable configurations in such a system, with a remarkable sensitivity to the applied pressure. This additional instability has significant advantageous properties for sensing purposes. In addition to the high sensitivity and robustness of the pull-in voltage measurements, it can be adjusted so that after the unstable configuration is met, a snap-through to a new stable configuration occurs. As a result of this bi-stable behavior, the contact between the electrodes, which is the main drawback of pull-in phenomena, will be easily avoided. The results of this paper particularly suggest the suitability of this mechanism for two different methods of pressure measurements.

  2. Highly Sensitive and Patchable Pressure Sensors Mimicking Ion-Channel-Engaged Sensory Organs.

    PubMed

    Chun, Kyoung-Yong; Son, Young Jun; Han, Chang-Soo

    2016-04-26

    Biological ion channels have led to much inspiration because of their unique and exquisite operational functions in living cells. Specifically, their extreme and dynamic sensing abilities can be realized by the combination of receptors and nanopores coupled together to construct an ion channel system. In the current study, we demonstrated that artificial ion channel pressure sensors inspired by nature for detecting pressure are highly sensitive and patchable. Our ion channel pressure sensors basically consisted of receptors and nanopore membranes, enabling dynamic current responses to external forces for multiple applications. The ion channel pressure sensors had a sensitivity of ∼5.6 kPa(-1) and a response time of ∼12 ms at a frequency of 1 Hz. The power consumption was recorded as less than a few μW. Moreover, a reliability test showed stability over 10 000 loading-unloading cycles. Additionally, linear regression was performed in terms of temperature, which showed no significant variations, and there were no significant current variations with humidity. The patchable ion channel pressure sensors were then used to detect blood pressure/pulse in humans, and different signals were clearly observed for each person. Additionally, modified ion channel pressure sensors detected complex motions including pressing and folding in a high-pressure range (10-20 kPa).

  3. All-fiber high-sensitivity pressure sensor with SiO2 diaphragm.

    PubMed

    Donlagic, Denis; Cibula, Edvard

    2005-08-15

    The design and fabrication of a miniature fiber Fabry-Perot pressure sensor with a diameter of 125 microm are presented. The essential element in the process is a thin SiO2 diaphragm that is fusion spliced at the hollow end of an optical fiber. Good repeatability and high sensitivity of the sensor are achieved by on-line tuning of the diaphragm thickness during the sensor fabrication process. Various sensor prototypes were fabricated, demonstrating pressure ranges of from 0 to 40 kPa to 0 to 1 MPa. The maximum achieved sensitivity was 1.1 rad/40 kPa at 1550 nm, and a pressure resolution of 300 Pa was demonstrated in practice. The presented design and fabrication technique offers a means of simple and low-cost disposable pressure sensor production.

  4. High-sensitivity pressure sensor based on fiber Mach–Zehnder interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yue; Xu, Yao; Yang, Yuguang; Jin, Wenxing; Jiang, Youchao; Shen, Ya; Jian, Shuisheng

    2017-10-01

    In this paper we propose and experimentally demonstrate an optical fiber structure sensor based on a Mach–Zehnder interferometer for pressure measurement. The fiber sensor is composed of a single-mode-no-core-single-mode structure, a section of capillary pure silica tube and refractive index matching fluid (RIMF). As the pressure decreases, the sealed air in the tube expands and the liquid level of the RIMF increases, which causes a wavelength shift of the interferometer. The measurement of the pressure variation can thus be achieved by monitoring the wavelength shift. The experimental results agree well with the numerical simulation, and a maximum pressure sensitivity of 266.6 nm Mpa-1 is achieved experimentally. Furthermore, the proposed fiber sensor has the potential to obtain higher sensitivity by enlarging the length of the air cavity.

  5. Female SHR have greater blood pressure sensitivity and renal T cell infiltration following chronic NOS inhibition than males.

    PubMed

    Brinson, Krystal N; Elmarakby, Ahmed A; Tipton, Ashlee J; Crislip, G Ryan; Yamamoto, Tatsuo; Baban, Babak; Sullivan, Jennifer C

    2013-10-01

    Nitric oxide is a critical regulator of blood pressure (BP) and inflammation, and female spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) have higher renal nitric oxide bioavailability than males. We hypothesize that female SHR will have a greater rise in BP and renal T cell infiltration in response to nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibition than males. Both male and female SHR displayed a dose-dependent increase in BP to the nonspecific NOS inhibitor N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME: 2, 5, and 7 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1) for 4 days each); however, females exhibited a greater increase in BP than males. Treatment of male and female SHR with 7 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1) L-NAME for 2 wk significantly increased BP in both sexes; however, prior exposure to L-NAME only increased BP sensitivity to chronic NOS inhibition in females. L-NAME-induced hypertension increased renal T cell infiltration and indices of renal injury in both sexes, yet female SHR exhibited greater increases in Th17 cells and greater decreases in regulatory T cells than males. Chronic L-NAME was also associated with larger increases in renal cortical adhesion molecule expression in female SHR. The use of triple therapy to block L-NAME-mediated increases in BP attenuated L-NAME-induced increases in renal T cell counts and normalized adhesion molecule expression in SHR, suggesting that L-NAME-induced increases in renal T cells were dependent on both increases in BP and NOS inhibition. Our data suggest that NOS is critical in the ability of SHR, females in particular, to maintain BP and limit a pro-inflammatory renal T cell profile.

  6. High-sensitivity fiber-tip pressure sensor with graphene diaphragm.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jun; Jin, Wei; Ho, Hoi Lut; Dai, Ji Yan

    2012-07-01

    A miniature fiber-tip pressure sensor was built by using an extremely thin graphene film as the diaphragm. The graphene also acts as a light reflector, which, in conjunction with the reflection at the fiber end-air interface, forms a low finesse Fabry-Perot interferometer. The graphene based sensor demonstrated pressure sensitivity over 39.4 nm/kPa with a diaphragm diameter of 25 μm. The use of graphene as diaphragm material would allow highly sensitive and compact fiber-tip sensors.

  7. Urinary exosome miRNome analysis and its applications to salt sensitivity of blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Gildea, John J; Carlson, Julia M; Schoeffel, Cynthia D; Carey, Robert M; Felder, Robin A

    2013-08-01

    To investigate microRNAs (miRNAs) in urinary exosomes and their association with an individual's blood pressure response to dietary salt intake. Human urinary exosomal miRNome was examined by microarray. Of 1898 probes tested, 194 miRNAs were found in all subjects tested. 45 miRNAs had significant associations with salt sensitivity or inverse salt sensitivity. The expression of 45 urinary exosomal miRNAs associates with an individual's blood pressure response to sodium. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Deployment of a Pressure Sensitive Paint System for Measuring Global Surface Pressures on Rotorcraft Blades in Simulated Forward Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watkins, A. Neal; Leighty, Bradley; Lipford, William E.; Wong, Oliver D.; Goodman, Kyle Z.; Crafton, Jim; Forlines, Alan; Goss, Larry P.; Gregory, James W.; Juliano, Thomas J.

    2012-01-01

    This paper will present details of a Pressure Sensitive Paint (PSP) system for measuring global surface pressures on the tips of rotorcraft blades in simulated forward flight at the 14- x 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel at the NASA Langley Research Center. The system was designed to use a pulsed laser as an excitation source and PSP data was collected using the lifetime-based approach. With the higher intensity of the laser, this allowed PSP images to be acquired during a single laser pulse, resulting in the collection of crisp images that can be used to determine blade pressure at a specific instant in time. This is extremely important in rotorcraft applications as the blades experience dramatically different flow fields depending on their position in the rotor disk. Testing of the system was performed using the U.S. Army General Rotor Model System equipped with four identical blades. Two of the blades were instrumented with pressure transducers to allow for comparison of the results obtained from the PSP. Preliminary results show that the PSP agrees both qualitatively and quantitatively with both the expected results as well as with the pressure taps. Several areas of improvement have been indentified and are currently being developed.

  9. A Flexible and Highly Sensitive Pressure Sensor Based on a PDMS Foam Coated with Graphene Nanoplatelets

    PubMed Central

    Rinaldi, Andrea; Tamburrano, Alessio; Fortunato, Marco; Sarto, Maria Sabrina

    2016-01-01

    The demand for high performance multifunctional wearable devices is more and more pushing towards the development of novel low-cost, soft and flexible sensors with high sensitivity. In the present work, we describe the fabrication process and the properties of new polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) foams loaded with multilayer graphene nanoplatelets (MLGs) for application as high sensitive piezoresistive pressure sensors. The effective DC conductivity of the produced foams is measured as a function of MLG loading. The piezoresistive response of the MLG-PDMS foam-based sensor at different strain rates is assessed through quasi-static pressure tests. The results of the experimental investigations demonstrated that sensor loaded with 0.96 wt.% of MLGs is characterized by a highly repeatable pressure-dependent conductance after a few stabilization cycles and it is suitable for detecting compressive stresses as low as 10 kPa, with a sensitivity of 0.23 kPa−1, corresponding to an applied pressure of 70 kPa. Moreover, it is estimated that the sensor is able to detect pressure variations of ~1 Pa. Therefore, the new graphene-PDMS composite foam is a lightweight cost-effective material, suitable for sensing applications in the subtle or low and medium pressure ranges. PMID:27999251

  10. A Flexible and Highly Sensitive Pressure Sensor Based on a PDMS Foam Coated with Graphene Nanoplatelets.

    PubMed

    Rinaldi, Andrea; Tamburrano, Alessio; Fortunato, Marco; Sarto, Maria Sabrina

    2016-12-16

    The demand for high performance multifunctional wearable devices is more and more pushing towards the development of novel low-cost, soft and flexible sensors with high sensitivity. In the present work, we describe the fabrication process and the properties of new polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) foams loaded with multilayer graphene nanoplatelets (MLGs) for application as high sensitive piezoresistive pressure sensors. The effective DC conductivity of the produced foams is measured as a function of MLG loading. The piezoresistive response of the MLG-PDMS foam-based sensor at different strain rates is assessed through quasi-static pressure tests. The results of the experimental investigations demonstrated that sensor loaded with 0.96 wt.% of MLGs is characterized by a highly repeatable pressure-dependent conductance after a few stabilization cycles and it is suitable for detecting compressive stresses as low as 10 kPa, with a sensitivity of 0.23 kPa(-1), corresponding to an applied pressure of 70 kPa. Moreover, it is estimated that the sensor is able to detect pressure variations of ~1 Pa. Therefore, the new graphene-PDMS composite foam is a lightweight cost-effective material, suitable for sensing applications in the subtle or low and medium pressure ranges.

  11. A Solution-Processable, Omnidirectionally Stretchable, and High-Pressure-Sensitive Piezoresistive Device.

    PubMed

    Roh, Eun; Lee, Han-Byeol; Kim, Do-Il; Lee, Nae-Eung

    2017-09-27

    The development of omnidirectionally stretchable pressure sensors with high performance without stretching-induced interference has been hampered by many challenges. Herein, an omnidirectionally stretchable piezoresistive pressure-sensing device is demonstrated by combining an omniaxially stretchable substrate with a 3D micropattern array and solution-printing of electrode and piezoresistive materials. A unique substrate structural design and materials mean that devices that are highly sensitive are rendered, with a stable out-of-plane pressure response to both static (sensitivity of 0.5 kPa(-1) and limit of detection of 28 Pa) and dynamic pressures and the minimized in-plane stretching responsiveness (a small strain gauge factor of 0.17), achieved through efficient strain absorption of the electrode and sensing materials. The device can detect human-body tremors, as well as measure the relative elastic properties of human skin. The omnidirectionally stretchable pressure sensor with a high pressure sensitivity and minimal stretch-responsiveness yields great potential to skin-attachable wearable electronics, human-machine interfaces, and soft robotics applications. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. FBG based high sensitive pressure sensor and its low-cost interrogation system with enhanced resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pachava, Vengal Rao; Kamineni, Srimannarayana; Madhuvarasu, Sai Shankar; Putha, Kishore; Mamidi, Venkata Reddy

    2015-12-01

    A fiber Bragg grating (FBG) pressure sensor with high sensitivity and resolution has been designed and demonstrated. The sensor is configured by firmly fixing the FBG with a metal bellows structure. The sensor works by means of measuring the Bragg wavelength shift of the FBG with respect to pressure change. From the experimental results, the pressure sensitivity of the sensor is found to be 90.6 pm/psi, which is approximately 4000 times as that of a bare fiber Bragg grating. A very good linearity of 99.86% is observed between the Bragg wavelength of the FBG and applied pressure. The designed sensor shows good repeatability with a negligible hysteresis error of ± 0.29 psi. A low-cost interrogation system that includes a long period grating (LPG) and a photodiode (PD) accompanied with simple electronic circuitry is demonstrated for the FBG sensor, which enables the sensor to attain high resolution of up to 0.025 psi. Thermal-strain cross sensitivity of the FBG pressure sensor is compensated using a reference FBG temperature sensor. The designed sensor can be used for liquid level, specific gravity, and static/dynamic low pressure measurement applications.

  13. High-sensitivity gas pressure sensors based on in-fiber devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yiping; Liao, Changrui; Liu, Shen; Sun, Bing; Li, Zhengyong; Zhong, Xiaoyong; Yin, Guolu

    2015-07-01

    We proposed and experimentally demonstrated four kinds of high-sensitivity gas pressure sensors based on in-fiber devices, including a sub-micron silica diaphragm-based fiber-tip, a polymer-capped Fabry-Perot interferometer, an inflated long period fiber grating and a twin core fiber-based Mach-Zehnder interferometer, which have sensitivities of 1036, 1130, 1680, 9600 pm/MPa, respectively.

  14. Quantification aspects of constant pressure (ultra) high pressure liquid chromatography using mass-sensitive detectors with a nebulizing interface.

    PubMed

    Verstraeten, M; Broeckhoven, K; Lynen, F; Choikhet, K; Landt, K; Dittmann, M; Witt, K; Sandra, P; Desmet, G

    2013-01-25

    The present contribution investigates the quantitation aspects of mass-sensitive detectors with nebulizing interface (ESI-MSD, ELSD, CAD) in the constant pressure gradient elution mode. In this operation mode, the pressure is controlled and maintained at a set value and the liquid flow rate will vary according to the inverse mobile phase viscosity. As the pressure is continuously kept at the allowable maximum during the entire gradient run, the average liquid flow rate is higher compared to that in the conventional constant flow rate operation mode, thus shortening the analysis time. The following three mass-sensitive detectors were investigated: mass spectrometry detector (MS), evaporative light scattering detector (ELSD) and charged aerosol detector (CAD) and a wide variety of samples (phenones, polyaromatic hydrocarbons, wine, cocoa butter) has been considered. It was found that the nebulizing efficiency of the LC-interfaces of the three detectors under consideration changes with the increasing liquid flow rate. For the MS, the increasing flow rate leads to a lower peak area whereas for the ELSD the peak area increases compared to the constant flow rate mode. The peak area obtained with a CAD is rather insensitive to the liquid flow rate. The reproducibility of the peak area remains similar in both modes, although variation in system permeability compromises the 'long-term' reproducibility. This problem can however be overcome by running a flow rate program with an optimized flow rate and composition profile obtained from the constant pressure mode. In this case, the quantification remains reproducibile, despite any occuring variations of the system permeability. Furthermore, the same fragmentation pattern (MS) has been found in the constant pressure mode compared to the customary constant flow rate mode.

  15. Women's finger pressure sensitivity at rest and recalled body awareness during partnered sexual activity.

    PubMed

    Costa, R M; Pestana, José; Costa, David; Wittmann, Marc

    2017-07-01

    Greater vibrotactile sensitivity has been related to better erectile function in men, and vibrotactile and pressure tactile sensitivity have been related to better sexual function in women. Our previous study found that, for both sexes, greater recalled body awareness during last sexual relation correlated with greater recalled desire and arousal. Using the same sample of that study (68 women and 48 men, recruited in the Lisbon area, Portugal), we tested if greater recalled body awareness during last sexual relation correlates with tactile pressure sensitivity, as assessed by von Frey microfilaments. In simple and partial correlations controlling for social desirability and smoking before last sex, the hypothesis was confirmed for women, but not for men. Greater tactile sensitivity might enhance sexual arousal through greater awareness of the body during sex, and/or more frequent and pleasant body sensations during sex might lead to greater tactile sensitivity in nonsexual situations. Pressure sensitivity might be more closely linked to sexual arousal in women than in men.

  16. Sensitivity of stress inversion of focal mechanisms to pore pressure changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Garzón, Patricia; Vavryčuk, Václav; Kwiatek, Grzegorz; Bohnhoff, Marco

    2016-08-01

    We investigate the sensitivity of stress inversion from focal mechanisms to pore pressure changes. Synthetic tests reveal that pore pressure variations can cause apparent changes in the retrieved stress ratio R relating the magnitude of the intermediate principal stress with respect to the maximum and minimum principal stresses. Pore pressure and retrieved R are negatively correlated when R is low (R < 0.6). The spurious variations in retrieved R are suppressed when R > 0.6. This observation is independent of faulting style, and it may be related to different performance of the fault plane selection criterion and variability in orientation of activated faults under different pore pressures. Our findings from synthetic data are supported by results obtained from induced seismicity at The Geysers geothermal field. Therefore, the retrieved stress ratio variations can be utilized for monitoring pore pressure changes at seismogenic depth in stress domains with overall low R.

  17. Highly Sensitive Flexible Pressure Sensor Based on Silver Nanowires-Embedded Polydimethylsiloxane Electrode with Microarray Structure.

    PubMed

    Shuai, Xingtian; Zhu, Pengli; Zeng, Wenjin; Hu, Yougen; Liang, Xianwen; Zhang, Yu; Sun, Rong; Wong, Ching-Ping

    2017-08-09

    Flexible pressure sensors have attracted increasing research interest because of their potential applications for wearable sensing devices. Herein, a highly sensitive flexible pressure sensor is exhibited based on the elastomeric electrodes and a microarray architecture. Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) substrate, coated with silver nanowires (AgNWs), is used as the top electrode, while polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) as the dielectric layer. Several transfer processes are applied on seeking facile strategy for the preparation of the bottom electrode via embedding AgNWs into the PDMS film of microarray structure. The flexible pressure sensor integrates the top electrode, dielectric layer, and microarray electrode in a sandwich structure. It is demonstrated that such sensors possess the superiorities of high sensitivity (2.94 kPa(-1)), low detection limit (<3 Pa), short response time (<50 ms), excellent flexibility, and long-term cycle stability. This simple process for preparing such sensors can also be easily scaled up to construct pressure sensor arrays for detecting the intensity and distribution of the loaded pressure. In addition, this flexible pressure sensor exhibits good performance even in a noncontact way, such as detecting voice vibrations and air flow. Due to its superior performance, this designed flexible pressure sensor demonstrates promising potential in the application of electronic skins, as well as wearable healthcare monitors.

  18. Free-stream static pressure measurements in the Longshot hypersonic wind tunnel and sensitivity analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossir, Guillaume; Van Hove, Bart; Paris, Sébastien; Rambaud, Patrick; Chazot, Olivier

    2016-05-01

    The performance of fast-response slender static pressure probes is evaluated in the short-duration, cold-gas, VKI Longshot hypersonic wind tunnel. Free-stream Mach numbers range between 9.5 and 12, and unit Reynolds numbers are within 3-10 × 106/m. Absolute pressure sensors are fitted within the probes, and an inexpensive calibration method, suited to low static pressure environments (200-1000 Pa), is described. Transfer functions relating the probe measurements p w to the free-stream static pressure p ∞ are established for the Longshot flow conditions based on numerical simulations. The pressure ratios p w / p ∞ are found to be close to unity for both laminar and turbulent boundary layers. Weak viscous effects characterized by small viscous interaction parameters {bar{χ }}<1.5 are confirmed experimentally for probe aspect ratios of L/ D > 16.5 by installing multiple pressure sensors in a single probe. The effect of pressure orifice geometry is also evaluated experimentally and found to be negligible for either straight or chamfered holes, 0.6-1 mm in diameter. No sensitivity to probe angle of attack could be evidenced for α < 0.33°. Pressure measurements are compared to theoretical predictions assuming an isentropic nozzle flow expansion. Significant deviations from this ideal case and the Mach 14 contoured nozzle design are uncovered. Validation of the static pressure measurements is obtained by comparing shock wave locations on Schlieren photographs to numerical predictions using free-stream properties derived from the static pressure probes. While these results apply to the Longshot wind tunnel, the present methodology and sensitivity analysis can guide similar investigations for other hypersonic test facilities.

  19. Influence of Partial O₂ Pressure on the Adhesion, Proliferation, and Osteogenic Differentiation of Human Dental Pulp Stem Cells on β-Tricalcium Phosphate Scaffold.

    PubMed

    Viña-Almunia, Jose; Mas-Bargues, Cristina; Borras, Consuelo; Gambini, Juan; El Alami, Marya; Sanz-Ros, Jorge; Peñarrocha, Miguel; Vina, Jose

    2017-09-22

    To analyze, in vitro, the influence of O₂ pressure on the adhesion, proliferation, and osteogenic differentiation of human dental pulp stem cells (DPSC) on β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) scaffold. DPSC, positive for the molecular markers CD133, Oct4, Nestin, Stro-1, and CD34, and negative for CD45, were isolated from extracted third molars. Experiments were started by seeding 200,000 cells on β-TCP cultured under 3% or 21% O₂ pressure. No osteogenic medium was used. Eight different cultures were performed at each time point under each O₂ pressure condition. Cell adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation over the biomaterial were evaluated at 7, 13, 18, and 23 days of culture. Cell adhesion was determined by light microscopy, proliferation by DNA quantification, and osteogenic differentiation by alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity analysis. DPSC adhered to β-TCP with both O₂ conditions. Cell proliferation was found from day 7 of culture. Higher values were recorded at 3% O₂ in each time point. Statistically significant differences were recorded at 23 days of culture (P = .033). ALP activity was not detectable at 7 days. There was, however, an increase in ALP activity over time in both groups. At 13, 18, and 23 days of culture, higher ALP activity was recorded under 3% O₂ pressure. Statistical differences were found at day 23 (P = .014). DPSC display capacity of adhering to β-TCP under 3% or 21% O₂ pressure conditions. Cell proliferation on β-TCP phosphate is significantly higher at 3% than at 21% O₂ pressure, the most frequently used O₂ tension. β-TCP can itself promote osteogenic differentiation of DPSC and is enhanced under 3% O₂ compared with 21%.

  20. Effect of Temperature-Sensitive Poloxamer Solution/Gel Material on Pericardial Adhesion Prevention: Supine Rabbit Model Study Mimicking Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Hyun; Chung, Yoon Sang; Kim, Sang Wook; Choi, Geun Joo; Kim, Beom Gyu; Park, Suk Won; Seok, Ju Won; Hong, Joonhwa

    2015-01-01

    Objective We investigated the mobility of a temperature-sensitive poloxamer/Alginate/CaCl2 mixture (PACM) in relation to gravity and cardiac motion and the efficacy of PACM on the prevention of pericardial adhesion in a supine rabbit model. Methods A total of 50 rabbits were randomly divided into two groups according to materials applied after epicardial abrasion: PACM and dye mixture (group PD; n = 25) and saline as the control group (group CO; n = 25). In group PD, rabbits were maintained in a supine position with appropriate sedation, and location of mixture of PACM and dye was assessed by CT scan at the immediate postoperative period and 12 hours after surgery. The grade of adhesions was evaluated macroscopically and microscopically two weeks after surgery. Results In group PD, enhancement was localized in the anterior pericardial space, where PACM and dye mixture was applied, on immediate post-surgical CT scans. However, the volume of the enhancement was significantly decreased at the anterior pericardial space 12 hours later (P < .001). Two weeks after surgery, group PD had significantly lower macroscopic adhesion score (P = .002) and fibrosis score (P = .018) than did group CO. Inflammation score and expression of anti-macrophage antibody in group PD were lower than those in group CO, although the differences were not significant. Conclusions In a supine rabbit model study, the anti-adhesion effect was maintained at the area of PACM application, although PACM shifted with gravity and heart motion. For more potent pericardial adhesion prevention, further research and development on the maintenance of anti-adhesion material position are required. PMID:26580394

  1. Comparison of the sensitivity of mass spectrometry atmospheric pressure ionization techniques in the analysis of porphyrinoids.

    PubMed

    Swider, Paweł; Lewtak, Jan P; Gryko, Daniel T; Danikiewicz, Witold

    2013-10-01

    The porphyrinoids chemistry is greatly dependent on the data obtained in mass spectrometry. For this reason, it is essential to determine the range of applicability of mass spectrometry ionization methods. In this study, the sensitivity of three different atmospheric pressure ionization techniques, electrospray ionization, atmospheric pressure chemical ionization and atmospheric pressure photoionization, was tested for several porphyrinods and their metallocomplexes. Electrospray ionization method was shown to be the best ionization technique because of its high sensitivity for derivatives of cyanocobalamin, free-base corroles and porphyrins. In the case of metallocorroles and metalloporphyrins, atmospheric pressure photoionization with dopant proved to be the most sensitive ionization method. It was also shown that for relatively acidic compounds, particularly for corroles, the negative ion mode provides better sensitivity than the positive ion mode. The results supply a lot of relevant information on the methodology of porphyrinoids analysis carried out by mass spectrometry. The information can be useful in designing future MS or liquid chromatography-MS experiments.

  2. Optimization of Anodized-Aluminum Pressure-Sensitive Paint by Controlling Luminophore Concentration

    PubMed Central

    Sakaue, Hirotaka; Ishii, Keiko

    2010-01-01

    Anodized-aluminum pressure-sensitive paint (AA-PSP) has been used as a global pressure sensor for unsteady flow measurements. We use a dipping deposition method to apply a luminophore on a porous anodized-aluminum surface, controlling the luminophore concentration of the dipping method to optimize AA-PSP characteristics. The concentration is varied from 0.001 to 10 mM. Characterizations include the pressure sensitivity, the temperature dependency, and the signal level. The pressure sensitivity shows around 60 % at a lower concentration up to 0.1 mM. Above this concentration, the sensitivity reduces to a half. The temperature dependency becomes more than a half by setting the luminophore concentration from 0.001 to 10 mM. There is 3.6-fold change in the signal level by varying the concentration. To discuss an optimum concentration, a weight coefficient is introduced. We can arbitrarily change the coefficients to create an optimized AA-PSP for our sensing purposes. PMID:22163579

  3. Step Response Characteristics of Polymer/Ceramic Pressure-Sensitive Paint.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Anshuman; Gregory, James W

    2015-09-03

    Experiments and numerical simulations have been used in this work to understand the step response characteristics of Polymer/Ceramic Pressure-Sensitive Paint (PC-PSP). A recently developed analytical model describing the essential physics in PC-PSP quenching kinetics is used, which includes the effect of both diffusion time scale and luminescent lifetime on the net response of PC-PSP. Step response simulations using this model enables an understanding of the effects of parameters, such as the diffusion coefficient of O₂ in the polymer/ceramic coating, attenuation of excitation light, ambient luminescent lifetime, sensitivity, and the magnitude and direction of pressure change on the observed response time scales of PC-PSP. It was found that higher diffusion coefficient and greater light attenuation lead to faster response, whereas longer ambient lifetime and larger sensitivity lead to slower response characteristics. Due to the inherent non-linearity of the Stern-Volmer equation, response functions also change with magnitude and direction of the pressure change. Experimental results from a shock tube are presented where the effects of varying the roughness, pressure jump magnitude and luminophore probe have been studied. Model parameters have been varied to obtain a good fit to experimental results and this optimized model is then used to obtain the response time for a step decrease in pressure, an estimate of which is currently not obtainable from experiments.

  4. A nanofiber based artificial electronic skin with high pressure sensitivity and 3D conformability.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Weibin; Liu, Qiongzhen; Wu, Yongzhi; Wang, Yuedan; Qing, Xing; Li, Mufang; Liu, Ke; Wang, Wenwen; Wang, Dong

    2016-06-16

    Pressure sensors with 3D conformability are highly desirable components for artificial electronic skin or e-textiles that can mimic natural skin, especially for application in real-time monitoring of human physiological signals. Here, a nanofiber based electronic skin with ultra-high pressure sensitivity and 3D conformability is designed and built by interlocking two elastic patterned nanofibrous membranes. The patterned membrane is facilely prepared by casting conductive nanofiber ink into a silicon mould to form an array of semi-spheroid-like protuberances. The protuberances composed of intertwined elastic POE nanofibers and PPy@PVA-co-PE nanofibers afford a tunable effective elastic modulus that is capable of capturing varied strains and stresses, thereby contributing to a high sensitivity for pressure sensing. This electronic skin-like sensor demonstrates an ultra-high sensitivity (1.24 kPa(-1)) below 150 Pa with a detection limit as low as about 1.3 Pa. The pixelated sensor array and a RGB-LED light are then assembled into a circuit and show a feasibility for visual detection of spatial pressure. Furthermore, a nanofiber based proof-of-concept wireless pressure sensor with a bluetooth module as a signal transmitter is proposed and has demonstrated great promise for wireless monitoring of human physiological signals, indicating a potential for large scale wearable electronic devices or e-skin.

  5. Step Response Characteristics of Polymer/Ceramic Pressure-Sensitive Paint

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Anshuman; Gregory, James W.

    2015-01-01

    Experiments and numerical simulations have been used in this work to understand the step response characteristics of Polymer/Ceramic Pressure-Sensitive Paint (PC-PSP). A recently developed analytical model describing the essential physics in PC-PSP quenching kinetics is used, which includes the effect of both diffusion time scale and luminescent lifetime on the net response of PC-PSP. Step response simulations using this model enables an understanding of the effects of parameters, such as the diffusion coefficient of O2 in the polymer/ceramic coating, attenuation of excitation light, ambient luminescent lifetime, sensitivity, and the magnitude and direction of pressure change on the observed response time scales of PC-PSP. It was found that higher diffusion coefficient and greater light attenuation lead to faster response, whereas longer ambient lifetime and larger sensitivity lead to slower response characteristics. Due to the inherent non-linearity of the Stern-Volmer equation, response functions also change with magnitude and direction of the pressure change. Experimental results from a shock tube are presented where the effects of varying the roughness, pressure jump magnitude and luminophore probe have been studied. Model parameters have been varied to obtain a good fit to experimental results and this optimized model is then used to obtain the response time for a step decrease in pressure, an estimate of which is currently not obtainable from experiments. PMID:26404294

  6. A highly sensitive, low-cost, wearable pressure sensor based on conductive hydrogel spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tai, Yanlong; Mulle, Matthieu; Aguilar Ventura, Isaac; Lubineau, Gilles

    2015-08-01

    Wearable pressure sensing solutions have promising future for practical applications in health monitoring and human/machine interfaces. Here, a highly sensitive, low-cost, wearable pressure sensor based on conductive single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT)/alginate hydrogel spheres is reported. Conductive and piezoresistive spheres are embedded between conductive electrodes (indium tin oxide-coated polyethylene terephthalate films) and subjected to environmental pressure. The detection mechanism is based on the piezoresistivity of the SWCNT/alginate conductive spheres and on the sphere-electrode contact. Step-by-step, we optimized the design parameters to maximize the sensitivity of the sensor. The optimized hydrogel sensor exhibited a satisfactory sensitivity (0.176 ΔR/R0/kPa-1) and a low detectable limit (10 Pa). Moreover, a brief response time (a few milliseconds) and successful repeatability were also demonstrated. Finally, the efficiency of this strategy was verified through a series of practical tests such as monitoring human wrist pulse, detecting throat muscle motion or identifying the location and the distribution of an external pressure using an array sensor (4 × 4).Wearable pressure sensing solutions have promising future for practical applications in health monitoring and human/machine interfaces. Here, a highly sensitive, low-cost, wearable pressure sensor based on conductive single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT)/alginate hydrogel spheres is reported. Conductive and piezoresistive spheres are embedded between conductive electrodes (indium tin oxide-coated polyethylene terephthalate films) and subjected to environmental pressure. The detection mechanism is based on the piezoresistivity of the SWCNT/alginate conductive spheres and on the sphere-electrode contact. Step-by-step, we optimized the design parameters to maximize the sensitivity of the sensor. The optimized hydrogel sensor exhibited a satisfactory sensitivity (0.176 ΔR/R0/kPa-1) and a low

  7. Topographical pressure and thermal pain sensitivity mapping in patients with unilateral lateral epicondylalgia.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Ruiz, Beatriz; Fernández-de-Las-Peñas, César; Ortega-Santiago, Ricardo; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Madeleine, Pascal

    2011-10-01

    Our aim was to quantify spatial differences in pressure and thermal pain sensitivity maps between patients with unilateral lateral epicondylalgia (LE) and age- and sex-matched controls. Pressure (PPT), cold (CPT), and heat (HPT) pain thresholds were assessed over 12 points forming a 3 × 4 matrix (4 points in the superior part, 4 points in the middle, and 4 points in the lower part around the lateral epicondyle) bilaterally in 16 subjects with strictly unilateral LE and 16 age- and sex-matched controls in a blinded design. Topographical pain sensitivity maps to pressure and thermal stimulation over the elbow in patients with LE and healthy controls were calculated. A multilevel 3-way ANCOVA test was applied to detect differences in topographical maps between groups. Subjects with LE showed bilateral lower PPT, higher CPT (pain at higher temperature) and lower HPT (pain at lower temperature) at all the measurement points as compared to controls (all, P < .01). PPT were lower at points over the extensor carpi radialis brevis (ECRB) muscle as compared to points over the extensor digitorum communis muscle (P < .01) and over the extensor carpi ulnaris muscle (P < .001). CPT and HPT were not significantly different between points (P > .05). Topographical pressure and thermal pain sensitivity maps revealed bilateral hyperalgesia in patients with strictly unilateral LE. LE patients exhibited heterogeneously distributed pressure pain hyperalgesia while cold or heat maps were homogenous. The most sensitive localizations for PPT assessment corresponded to the muscle belly of the ECRB. Our results confirm the role of ECRB muscle in LE and argue for evidence of peripheral and central sensitization mechanisms in patients with strictly unilateral symptoms. Topographical pressure and thermal sensitivity maps revealed bilateral hyperalgesia in patients with strictly unilateral lateral epicondylalgia (LE). LE patients exhibited heterogeneously distributed pressure pain hyperalgesia

  8. Compressible fiber optic micro-Fabry-Pérot cavity with ultra-high pressure sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Wang, D N; Wang, Chao; Hu, Tianyi

    2013-06-17

    We propose and demonstrate a pressure sensor based on a micro air bubble at the end facet of a single mode fiber fusion spliced with a silica tube. When immersed into the liquid such as water, the air bubble essentially acts as a Fabry-Pérot interferometer cavity. Such a cavity can be compressed by the environmental pressure and the sensitivity obtained is >1000 nm/kPa, at least one order of magnitude higher than that of the diaphragm-based fiber-tip sensors reported so far. The compressible Fabry-Pérot interferometer cavity developed is expected to have potential applications in highly sensitive pressure and/or acoustic sensing.

  9. Cheap color evaluation of dye-based pressure sensitive films for plantar studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeong, W. K.; Ng, Tuck Wah

    2005-04-01

    Dye-based pressure sensitive films are advantageous in plantar pressure studies due to their of ease of use, costeffectiveness, and ability to produce measurements within the shoe. To circumvent the use of proprietary equipment and software to relate the dye stained film to load, an alternative approach of using a conventional flatbed scanner and generic image processing software is attempted here instead. The technique revealed high linear increasing and decreasing trends for the respective red and blue normalized intensities (correlation coefficient > 0.95) and low standard deviation in all readings (< 0.06) overall. By subtracting the blue from the red normalized intensity, it was discovered that the measurement sensitivity could be doubled. The results here confirm the viability of using a conventional flatbed scanner and generic image processing software to relate the dye stained pressure films to load. The adoption of this approach promises substantial cost savings.

  10. The Design and Optimization of a Highly Sensitive and Overload-Resistant Piezoresistive Pressure Sensor.

    PubMed

    Meng, Xiawei; Zhao, Yulong

    2016-03-09

    A piezoresistive pressure sensor with a beam-membrane-dual-island structure is developed for micro-pressure monitoring in the field of aviation, which requires great sensitivity and overload resistance capacity. The design, fabrication, and test of the sensor are presented in this paper. By analyzing the stress distribution of sensitive elements using the finite element method, a novel structure incorporating sensitive beams with a traditional bossed diaphragm is built up. The proposed structure proved to be advantageous in terms of high sensitivity and high overload resistance compared with the conventional bossed diaphragm and flat diaphragm structures. Curve fittings of surface stress and deflection based on ANSYS simulation results are performed to establish the sensor equations. Fabricated on an n-type single crystal silicon wafer, the sensor chips are wire-bonded to a printed circuit board (PCB) and packaged for experiments. The static and dynamic characteristics are tested and discussed. Experimental results show that the sensor has a sensitivity as high as 17.339 μV/V/Pa in the range of 500 Pa at room temperature, and a high overload resistance of 200 times overpressure. Due to the excellent performance, the sensor can be applied in measuring micro-pressure lower than 500 Pa.

  11. Use of Pressure Sensitive Paint for Diagnostics in Turbomachinery Flows With Shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lepicovsky, Jan; Bencic, Timothy J.

    2001-01-01

    The technology of pressure sensitive paint (PSP) is well established in external aerodynamics. In internal flows in narrow channels and in turbomachinery cascades, however, there are still unresolved problems. In particular, the internal flows with complex shock structures inside highly curved channels present a challenge. It is not always easy and straightforward to distinguish between true signals and "ghost" images due to multiple internal reflections in narrow channels. To address some of the problems, investigations were first carried out in a narrow supersonic channel of Mach number 2.5. A single wedge or a combination of two wedges were used to generate a complex shock wave structure in the flow. The experience gained in a small supersonic channel was used for surface pressure measurements on the stator vane of a supersonic throughflow fan. The experimental results for several fan operating conditions are shown in a concise form, including performance map points, midspan static tap pressure distributions, and vane suction side pressure fields. Finally, the PSP technique was used in the NASA transonic flutter cascade to compliment flow visualization data and to acquire backwall pressure fields to assess the cascade flow periodicity. A summary of shortcomings of the pressure sensitive paint technology for internal flow application and lessons learned are presented in the conclusion of the paper.

  12. [Baroreflex sensitivity: diagnostic importance, methods of determination and a model of baroreflex blood-pressure regulation].

    PubMed

    Svacinová, J; Moudr, J; Honzíková, N

    2013-01-01

    Baroreflex regulation of blood pressure primarily moderates its fluctuations and also affects mean blood pressure. Heart rate baroreflex sensitivity is described as changes of the inter-beat interval induced by a change of blood pressure of 1 mmHg (BRS). BRS is decreased in many cardiovascular diseases (hypertension, diabetes mellitus, obesity, cardiac failure, etc.). Decreased BRS in disposed individuals, especially after myocardial infarction, increases the risk of sudden cardiac death. Therefore, early diagnosis of BRS decrease gains in importance. This article describes different methods of determination of baroreflex sensitivity. The methods are based on evaluation of the spontaneous fluctuation of heart rate and blood pressure (spectral, sequential or nonlinear methods), or of primary changes of blood pressure induced by a vasoactive substance or a physiological manoeuvre and corresponding changes of cardiac intervals (Valsalva manoeuvre, phenylephrine administration). Each method has its advantages and disadvantages resulting from a different difficulty of calculation or from inclusion of different deviations in the results, which are not directly linked with baroreflex. Baroreflex regulating total peripheral resistance is less described. A mathematical model of baroreflex blood pressure regulation by fluctuation of heart rate and peripheral resistance is presented in this paper.

  13. Increased Perfusion Pressure Drives Renal T-Cell Infiltration in the Dahl Salt-Sensitive Rat.

    PubMed

    Evans, Louise C; Petrova, Galina; Kurth, Theresa; Yang, Chun; Bukowy, John D; Mattson, David L; Cowley, Allen W

    2017-09-01

    Renal T-cell infiltration is a key component of salt-sensitive hypertension in Dahl salt-sensitive (SS) rats. Here, we use an electronic servo-control technique to determine the contribution of renal perfusion pressure to T-cell infiltration in the SS rat kidney. An aortic balloon occluder placed around the aorta between the renal arteries was used to maintain perfusion pressure to the left kidney at control levels, ≈128 mm Hg, during 7 days of salt-induced hypertension, whereas the right kidney was exposed to increased renal perfusion pressure that averaged 157±4 mm Hg by day 7 of high-salt diet. The number of infiltrating T cells was compared between the 2 kidneys. Renal T-cell infiltration was significantly blunted in the left servo-controlled kidney compared with the right uncontrolled kidney. The number of CD3(+), CD3(+)CD4(+), and CD3(+)CD8(+) T cells were all significantly lower in the left servo-controlled kidney. This effect was not specific to T cells because CD45R(+) (B cells) and CD11b/c(+) (monocytes and macrophages) cell infiltrations were all exacerbated in the hypertensive kidneys. Increased renal perfusion pressure was also associated with augmented renal injury, with increased protein casts and glomerular damage in the hypertensive kidney. Levels of norepinephrine were comparable between the 2 kidneys, suggestive of equivalent sympathetic innervation. Renal infiltration of T cells was not reversed by the return of renal perfusion pressure to control levels after 7 days of salt-sensitive hypertension. We conclude that increased pressure contributes to the initiation of renal T-cell infiltration during the progression of salt-sensitive hypertension in SS rats. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  14. Cold-induced limb pain decreases sensitivity to pressure-pain sensations in the ipsilateral forehead.

    PubMed

    Knudsen, Lone; Drummond, Peter D

    2009-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of unilateral limb pain on sensitivity to pain on each side of the forehead. In the first experiment, pressure-pain thresholds and sharpness sensations were assessed on each side of the forehead in 45 healthy volunteers before and after a 10 degrees C cold pressor of the hand and in 18 controls who were not subjected to the cold pressor. In a second experiment, forehead sensitivity was assessed in 32 healthy volunteers before and after a 2 degrees C cold pressor. The assessments were repeated without the cold pressor, and before and after six successive 4 degrees C cold pressor tests. The 10 degrees C cold pressor did not influence forehead sensitivity, whereas the 2 degrees C cold pressor and the 4 degrees C cold pressor tests resulted in bilateral analgesia to sharpness and pressure. The analgesia to pressure was greater in the ipsilateral forehead. Stress-induced analgesia and diffuse noxious inhibitory controls may have contributed to the analgesia to pressure-pain and sharpness sensations bilaterally after the most painful cold pressor tests. The locus coeruleus inhibits ipsilateral nociceptive activity in dorsal horn neurons during limb inflammation, and thus may have mediated the ipsilateral component of analgesia. Pain-evoked changes in forehead sensitivity differed for sharpness and pressure, possibly due to separate thalamic or cortical representations of cutaneous and deep tissue sensibility. These findings suggest that several mechanisms act concurrently to influence pain sensitivity at sites distant from a primary site of painful stimulation.

  15. Pressure- and Temperature-Sensitive Paint at 0.3-m Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watkins, A. Neal; Leighty, Bradley D.; Lipford, William E.; Goodman, Kyle Z.

    2015-01-01

    Recently both Pressure- and Temperature-Sensitive Paint experiments were conducted at cryogenic conditions in the 0.3-m Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel at NASA Langley Research Center. This represented a re-introduction of the techniques to the facility after more than a decade, and provided a means to upgrade the measurements using newer technology as well as demonstrate that the techniques were still viable in the facility. Temperature-Sensitive Paint was employed on a laminar airfoil for transition detection and Pressure-Sensitive Paint was employed on a supercritical airfoil. This report will detail the techniques and their unique challenges that need to be overcome in cryogenic environments. In addition, several optimization strategies will also be discussed.

  16. Photocuring Kinetics for Polyfurfurylmethacrylate Doped with Fullerene: The Influence of Oxygen Partial Pressure on Sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arai, Hisayoshi; Tajima, Yusuke; Takeuchi, Kazuo

    2001-11-01

    A new photosensitive resin, photo-oxidation induced polycondensation (POP) resin, was successfully prepared from poly(furfuryl methacrylate) (PFMA) and fullerene C60. The influence of oxygen supplied from ambient air into the POP resin on the photocuring was studied. The characteristic curves for the PFMA containing C60 film showed that the curing sensitivity was enhanced with increased partial pressure of oxygen. The relationship between sensitivity and oxygen partial pressure for low light intensity was explained reasonably well with a simple kinetic model. On the other hand, the sensitivity decreased for high light intensity. The numerical simulation indicated that the small oxygen solubility and small diffusivity were the cause of insufficient oxygen when the oxygen in PFMA was consumed promptly by high-intensity irradiation.

  17. A pressure-sensitive fiber optic connector for loss analysis of physical contact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Zhenfeng; Chen, Ke; Wang, Wei; Yang, Yang; Peng, Wei; Yu, Qingxu; Zhou, Xinlei

    2017-07-01

    We design and fabricate a physical contact (PC) type pressure-sensitive fiber optic connector (FOC), which can be used to measure the contact force and analyze the contact loss caused by the contact force between two PC type FOCs. A fiber Bragg grating (FBG) is wrote on the fiber tip of the connector. The relationship between the Bragg wavelength of the FBG and the contact force exerted on the connector head is got by experiment with a stress sensitivity of 5.4 pm/N. We use this pressure-sensitive FOC for loss analysis of PC type FOCs. The relationships between contact force and insertion loss (IL) of three PC type FOCs have been got experimentally. Finally, finite element simulation results demonstrate the effectiveness of the system.

  18. Inhibition of focal adhesion kinase suppresses the adverse phenotype of endocrine-resistant breast cancer cells and improves endocrine response in endocrine-sensitive cells.

    PubMed

    Hiscox, Stephen; Barnfather, Peter; Hayes, Edd; Bramble, Pamela; Christensen, James; Nicholson, Robert I; Barrett-Lee, Peter

    2011-02-01

    Acquired resistance to endocrine therapy in breast cancer is a major clinical problem. Previous reports have demonstrated that cell models of acquired endocrine resistance have altered cell-matrix adhesion and a highly migratory phenotype, features which may impact on tumour spread in vivo. Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is an intracellular kinase that regulates signalling pathways central to cell adhesion, migration and survival and its expression is frequently deregulated in breast cancer. In this study, we have used the novel FAK inhibitor PF573228 to address the role of FAK in the development of endocrine resistance. Whilst total-FAK expression was similar between endocrine-sensitive and endocrine-resistant MCF7 cells, FAK phosphorylation status (Y397 or Y861) was altered in resistance. PF573228 promoted a dose-dependent inhibition of FAK phosphorylation at Y397 but did not affect other FAK activation sites (pY407, pY576 and pY861). Endocrine-resistant cells were more sensitive to these inhibitory effects versus MCF7 (mean IC(50) for FAK pY397 inhibition: 0.43 μM, 0.05 μM and 0.13 μM for MCF7, TamR and FasR cells, respectively). Inhibition of FAK pY397 was associated with a reduction in TamR and FasR adhesion to, and migration over, matrix components. PF573228 as a single agent (0-1 μM) did not affect the growth of MCF7 cells or their endocrine-resistant counterparts. However, treatment of endocrine-sensitive cells with PF573228 and tamoxifen combined resulted in greater suppression of proliferation versus single agent treatment. Together these data suggest the importance of FAK in the process of endocrine resistance, particularly in the development of an aggressive, migratory cell phenotype and demonstrate the potential to improve endocrine response through combination treatment.

  19. Sensitivity enhancement using annealed polymer optical-fibre-based sensors for pressure sensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pospori, A.; Marques, C. A. F.; Sáez-Rodríguez, D.; Nielsen, K.; Bang, O.; Webb, D. J.

    2016-05-01

    Thermal annealing can be used to induce a permanent negative Bragg wavelength shift for polymer fibre grating sensors and it was originally used for multiplexing purposes. Recently, researchers showed that annealing can also provide additional benefits, such as strain and humidity sensitivity enhancement and augmented temperature operational range. The annealing process can change both the optical and mechanical properties of the fibre. In this paper, the annealing effects on the stress and force sensitivities of PMMA fibre Bragg grating sensors are investigated. The incentive for that investigation was an unexpected behaviour observed in an array of sensors which were used for liquid level monitoring. One sensor exhibited much lower pressure sensitivity and that was the only one that was not annealed. To further investigate the phenomenon, additional sensors were photo-inscribed and characterised with regard their stress and force sensitivities. Then, the fibres were annealed by placing them in hot water, controlling with that way the humidity factor. After annealing, stress and force sensitivities were measured again. The results show that the annealing can improve the stress and force sensitivity of the devices. This can provide better performing sensors for use in stress, force and pressure sensing applications.

  20. Salt sensitivity of blood pressure is associated with polymorphisms in the sodium-bicarbonate cotransporter.

    PubMed

    Carey, Robert M; Schoeffel, Cynthia D; Gildea, John J; Jones, John E; McGrath, Helen E; Gordon, Lindsay N; Park, Min Jeong; Sobota, Rafal S; Underwood, Patricia C; Williams, Jonathan; Sun, Bei; Raby, Benjamin; Lasky-Su, Jessica; Hopkins, Paul N; Adler, Gail K; Williams, Scott M; Jose, Pedro A; Felder, Robin A

    2012-11-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the sodium-bicarbonate co-transporter gene (SLC4A5) are associated with hypertension. We tested the hypothesis that SNPs in SLC4A5 are associated with salt sensitivity of blood pressure in 185 whites consuming an isocaloric constant diet with a randomized order of 7 days of low Na(+) (10 mmol/d) and 7 days of high Na(+) (300 mmol/d) intake. Salt sensitivity was defined as a ≥ 7-mm Hg increase in mean arterial pressure during a randomized transition between high and low Na(+) diet. A total of 35 polymorphisms in 17 candidate genes were assayed, 25 of which were tested for association. Association analyses with salt sensitivity revealed 3 variants that associated with salt sensitivity, 2 in SLC4A5 (P<0.001) and 1 in GRK4 (P=0.020). Of these, 2 SNPs in SLC4A5 (rs7571842 and rs10177833) demonstrated highly significant results and large effects sizes, using logistic regression. These 2 SNPs had P values of 1.0 × 10(-4) and 3.1 × 10(-4) with odds ratios of 0.221 and 0.221 in unadjusted regression models, respectively, with the G allele at both sites conferring protection. These SNPs remained significant after adjusting for body mass index and age (P=8.9 × 10(-5) and 2.6 × 10(-4) and odds ratios 0.210 and 0.286, respectively). Furthermore, the association of these SNPs with salt sensitivity was replicated in a second hypertensive population. Meta-analysis demonstrated significant associations of both SNPs with salt sensitivity (rs7571842 [P=1.2 × 10(-5)]; rs1017783 [P=1.1 × 10(-4)]). In conclusion, SLC4A5 variants are strongly associated with salt sensitivity of blood pressure in 2 separate white populations.

  1. Kinetics of adhesion of IgE-sensitized rat basophilic leukemia cells to surface-immobilized antigen in Couette flow.

    PubMed Central

    Swift, D G; Posner, R G; Hammer, D A

    1998-01-01

    Antigen-antibody systems provide the flexibility of varying the kinetics and affinity of molecular interaction and studying the resulting effect on adhesion. In a parallel-plate flow chamber, we measured the extent and rate of adhesion of rat basophilic leukemia cells preincubated with anti-dinitrophenyl IgE clones SPE-7 or H1 26. 82 to dinitrophenyl-coated polyacrylamide gel substrates in a linear shear field. Both of these IgEs bind dinitrophenyl, but H1 26.82 has a 10-fold greater on rate and a 30-fold greater affinity. Adhesion was found to be binary; cells either arrested irreversibly or continued at their unencumbered hydrodynamic velocity. Under identical conditions, more adhesion was seen with the higher affinity (higher on rate) IgE clone. At some shear rates, adhesion was robust with H1 26.82, but negligible with SPE-7. Reduction in receptor number or ligand density reduced the maximum level of adhesion seen at any shear rate, but did not decrease the shear rate at which adhesion was first observed. The spatial pattern of adhesion for both IgE clones is well represented by the first-order kinetic rate constant kad, and we have determined how kad depends on ligand and receptor densities and shear rate. The rate constant kad found with H1 26.82 was approximately fivefold greater than with SPE-7. The dependence of kad on site density and shear rate for SPE-7 is complex: kad increases linearly with antigen site density at low to moderate shear rates, but is insensitive to site density at high shear. kad increases with shear rate at low site density but decreases with shear at high site density. With H1 26.82, the functional dependence of kad with shear rate was similar. Although these data are consistent with the hypothesis that we have sampled both transport and reaction-limited adhesion regimes, they point out deficiencies in current theories describing cell attachment under flow. PMID:9788956

  2. Abdominal Adhesions

    MedlinePlus

    ... Syndrome The Digestive System & How it Works Abdominal Adhesions What are abdominal adhesions? Abdominal adhesions are bands of fibrous tissue that ... or stool through the intestines. What causes abdominal adhesions? Abdominal surgery is the most frequent cause of ...

  3. Pressure-Sensitive Paint Investigation of Double-Delta Wing Vortex Flow Manipulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, Gary E.; Gonzalez, Hugo A.

    2004-01-01

    A pressure-sensitive paint (PSP) technique was applied in a wind tunnel experiment in the NASA Langley Research Center 8-Foot Transonic Pressure Tunnel to quantify the effect of wing fillets on the global vortex-induced surface static pressure field about a sharp leading-edge 76o/40o double delta wing, or strake-wing, model at subsonic and transonic speeds. Global calibrations of the PSP were obtained at M = 0.50, 0.70, 0.85, 0.95, and 1.20, a Reynolds number per unit length of 2.0 million, and angles of attack from 10 degrees to 20 degrees using an in-situ method featuring the simultaneous acquisition of electronically-scanned pressures (ESP) at discrete locations on the model. The mean error in the PSP measurements relative to the ESP data was approximately 2 percent or less at M = 0.50 to 0.85 but increased to several percent at M =0.95 and 1.20. The PSP pressure distributions and pseudo-colored planform view pressure maps clearly revealed the vortex-induced pressure signatures at all Mach numbers and angles of attack. Small fillets having a parabolic or diamond planform situated at the strake-wing intersection were designed to manipulate the vortical flows by, respectively, removing the leading-edge discontinuity or introducing additional discontinuities. The fillets caused global changes in the vortex-dominated surface pressure field that were effectively captured in the PSP measurements. The vortex surface pressure signatures were compared to available off-surface vortex cross-flow structures obtained using a laser vapor screen (LVS) flow visualization technique. The fillet effects on the PSP pressure distributions and the observed leading-edge vortex flow characteristics were consistent with the trends in the measured lift, drag, and pitching moment coefficients.

  4. Pressure-Sensitive Paint Investigation of Double-Delta Wing Vortex Flow Manipulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, Gary E.; Gonzalez, Hugo A.

    2005-01-01

    A pressure-sensitive paint (PSP) technique was applied in a wind tunnel experiment in the NASA Langley Research Center 8-Foot Transonic Pressure Tunnel to quantify the effect of wing fillets on the global vortex-induced surface static pressure field about a sharp leading-edge 76 deg/40 deg double delta wing, or strake-wing, model at subsonic and transonic speeds. Global calibrations of the PSP were obtained at M = 0.50, 0.70, 0.85, 0.95, and 1.20, a Reynolds number per unit length of 2.0 million, and angles of attack from 10 degrees to 30 degrees using an in-situ method featuring the simultaneous acquisition of electronically-scanned pressures (ESP) at discrete locations on the model. The mean error in the PSP measurements relative to the ESP data was approximately 2 percent or less at M = 0.50 to 0.85 but increased to several percent at M = 0.95 and 1.20. The PSP pressure distributions and pseudo-colored planform view pressure maps clearly revealed the vortex-induced pressure signatures at all Mach numbers and angles of attack. Small fillets having a parabolic or diamond planform situated at the strake-wing intersection were designed to manipulate the vortical flows by, respectively, removing the leading-edge discontinuity or introducing additional discontinuities. The fillets caused global changes in the vortex-dominated surface pressure field that were effectively captured in the PSP measurements. The vortex surface pressure signatures were compared to available off-surface vortex cross-flow structures obtained using a laser vapor screen (LVS) flow visualization technique. The fillet effects on the PSP pressure distributions and the observed leading-edge vortex flow characteristics were consistent with the trends in the measured lift, drag, and pitching moment coefficients.

  5. A highly sensitive pressure sensor using a double-layered graphene structure for tactile sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chun, Sungwoo; Kim, Youngjun; Oh, Hyeong-Sik; Bae, Giyeol; Park, Wanjun

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, we propose a graphene sensor using two separated single-layered graphenes on a flexible substrate for use as a pressure sensor, such as for soft electronics. The working pressure corresponds to the range in which human perception recognizes surface morphologies. A specific design of the sensor structure drives the piezoresistive character due to the contact resistance between two graphene layers and the electromechanical properties of graphene itself. Accordingly, sensitivity in resistance change is given by two modes for low pressure (-0.24 kPa-1) and high pressure (0.039 kPa-1) with a crossover pressure (700 Pa). This sensor can detect infinitesimal pressure as low as 0.3 Pa with uniformly applied vertical force. With the attachment of the artificial fingerprint structure (AFPS) on the sensor, the detection ability for both the locally generated shear force and actual human touch confirms recognition of the surface morphology constructed by periodic structures.In this paper, we propose a graphene sensor using two separated single-layered graphenes on a flexible substrate for use as a pressure sensor, such as for soft electronics. The working pressure corresponds to the range in which human perception recognizes surface morphologies. A specific design of the sensor structure drives the piezoresistive character due to the contact resistance between two graphene layers and the electromechanical properties of graphene itself. Accordingly, sensitivity in resistance change is given by two modes for low pressure (-0.24 kPa-1) and high pressure (0.039 kPa-1) with a crossover pressure (700 Pa). This sensor can detect infinitesimal pressure as low as 0.3 Pa with uniformly applied vertical force. With the attachment of the artificial fingerprint structure (AFPS) on the sensor, the detection ability for both the locally generated shear force and actual human touch confirms recognition of the surface morphology constructed by periodic structures. Electronic

  6. Neural control of blood pressure: focusing on capsaicin-sensitive sensory nerves.

    PubMed

    Wang, Youping; Wang, Donna H

    2007-03-01

    Hypertension is a major risk factor leading to devastating cardiovascular events such as myocardial infarction, stroke, heart failure, and renal failure. Despite intensive research in this area, mechanisms underlying essential hypertension remain to be defined. Accumulating evidence indicates that neural components including both sympathetic and sensory nerves innervating the cardiovascular and renal tissues play a key role in regulating water and sodium homeostasis and blood pressure, and that abnormalities in these nervous systems contribute to increased salt sensitivity and development of hypertension. In contrast to relatively well-defined sympathetic nervous system, the role of sensory nerves in the control of cardiovascular homeostasis is largely unknown. Data from our laboratory show that degeneration of capsaicin-sensitive sensory nerves renders a rat salt sensitive in terms of blood pressure regulation. Evidence is also available indicating that sensory nerves, in interacting with other neurohormonal systems including the sympathetic nervous system, the renin-angiotensin aldosterone system, the endothelin system, and superoxide, regulate cardiovascular and renal function in such that they play a counter-balancing role in preventing salt-induced increases in blood pressure under pathophysiological conditions. Altered activity of the sensory nervous system, a condition existed in both genetic and experimental models of hypertension, contributes to the development of hypertension. This article focuses on reviewing the current knowledge regarding the possible role of sensory nerves in regulating blood pressure homeostasis as well as the function and regulation of novel molecules expressed in sensory nerves.

  7. Highly sensitive integrated pressure sensor with horizontally oriented carbon nanotube network.

    PubMed

    Mohammad Haniff, Muhammad Aniq Shazni; Lee, Hing Wah; Bien, Daniel Chia Sheng; Teh, Aun Shih; Azid, Ishak Abdul

    2014-01-28

    This paper presents a functionalized, horizontally oriented carbon nanotube network as a sensing element to enhance the sensitivity of a pressure sensor. The synthesis of horizontally oriented nanotubes from the AuFe catalyst and their deposition onto a mechanically flexible substrate via transfer printing are studied. Nanotube formation on thermally oxidized Si (100) substrates via plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition controls the nanotube coverage and orientation on the flexible substrate. These nanotubes can be simply transferred to the flexible substrate without changing their physical structure. When tested under a pressure range of 0 to 50 kPa, the performance of the fabricated pressure sensor reaches as high as approximately 1.68%/kPa, which indicates high sensitivity to a small change of pressure. Such sensitivity may be induced by the slight contact in isolated nanotubes. This nanotube formation, in turn, enhances the modification of the contact and tunneling distance of the nanotubes upon the deformation of the network. Therefore, the horizontally oriented carbon nanotube network has great potential as a sensing element for future transparent sensors.

  8. A highly sensitive, low-cost, wearable pressure sensor based on conductive hydrogel spheres.

    PubMed

    Tai, Yanlong; Mulle, Matthieu; Aguilar Ventura, Isaac; Lubineau, Gilles

    2015-09-21

    Wearable pressure sensing solutions have promising future for practical applications in health monitoring and human/machine interfaces. Here, a highly sensitive, low-cost, wearable pressure sensor based on conductive single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT)/alginate hydrogel spheres is reported. Conductive and piezoresistive spheres are embedded between conductive electrodes (indium tin oxide-coated polyethylene terephthalate films) and subjected to environmental pressure. The detection mechanism is based on the piezoresistivity of the SWCNT/alginate conductive spheres and on the sphere-electrode contact. Step-by-step, we optimized the design parameters to maximize the sensitivity of the sensor. The optimized hydrogel sensor exhibited a satisfactory sensitivity (0.176 ΔR/R0/kPa(-1)) and a low detectable limit (10 Pa). Moreover, a brief response time (a few milliseconds) and successful repeatability were also demonstrated. Finally, the efficiency of this strategy was verified through a series of practical tests such as monitoring human wrist pulse, detecting throat muscle motion or identifying the location and the distribution of an external pressure using an array sensor (4 × 4).

  9. Estimation of spontaneous baroreflex sensitivity using transfer function analysis: effects of positive pressure ventilation.

    PubMed

    Glos, Martin; Romberg, Dietrich; Endres, Susanne; Fietze, Ingo

    2007-02-01

    To determine the short-term effects of non-invasive positive pressure ventilation (PPV) on spontaneous baroreflex sensitivity, we acquired time series of RR interval and beat-to-beat blood pressure in 55 healthy volunteers (mean age 46.5+/-10.5 years), who performed breathing tests on four occasions at frequencies of 12 and 15/min, with application of PPV of 5 mbar, and without positive pressure (control). Using spectral and transfer function analysis, we estimated RR interval variability (HRV) and systolic blood pressure variability (SBPV), as well as the gain (alpha-index) and phase shift (Phi) of the baroreceptor reflex for low- (LF) and high-frequency (HF) bands. Compared to control breathing, PPV at 12 and 15/min led to an increase in mean RR (p<0.001) and blood pressure (p<0.05). The alpha-index in the HF band increased significantly due to PPV for both respiratory frequencies (p<0.05). Phase shifts did not show significant changes in response to pressure ventilation. These results indicate that short-term administration of PPV in normal subjects elicits significant enhancement in the HF index of baroreflex gain. These findings may contribute to understanding the mechanisms, indications, and effectiveness of positive pressure breathing strategies in treating cardiorespiratory and other disease conditions.

  10. Sympathoexcitation by oxidative stress in the brain mediates arterial pressure elevation in salt-sensitive hypertension.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Megumi; Ando, Katsuyuki; Nagae, Ai; Fujita, Toshiro

    2007-08-01

    Central sympathoexcitation is involved in the pathogenesis of salt-sensitive hypertension. We have suggested that oxidative stress in the brain modulates the sympathetic regulation of arterial pressure. Thus, we investigated whether oxidative stress could mediate central sympathoexcitation in salt-sensitive hypertension. Five- to 6-week-old male Dahl salt-sensitive rats and salt-resistant rats were fed with a normal (0.3%) or high- (8%) salt diet for 4 weeks. In urethane-anesthetized and artificially ventilated rats, arterial pressure, renal sympathetic nerve activity, and heart rate decreased in a dose-dependent fashion, when 20 or 40 micromol of tempol, a membrane-permeable superoxide dismutase mimetic, was infused into the lateral cerebral ventricle. The same degree of reduction was noted in salt-sensitive and salt-resistant rats without salt loading. Salt loading significantly increased central tempol-induced reductions in arterial pressure (-29.1+/-4.8% versus -10.6+/-3.3% at 40 micromol; P<0.01), sympathetic nerve activity (-18.7+/-2.0% versus -7.1+/-1.8%; P<0.01), and heart rate (-10.7+/-2.8% versus -2.0+/-0.7%; P<0.05) in salt-sensitive rats but not in salt-resistant rats. Intracerebroventricular diphenyleneiodonium, a reduced nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase inhibitor, also elicited significantly greater reduction in each parameter in salt-loaded salt-sensitive rats. Moreover, salt loading increased reduced nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide phosphate-dependent superoxide production in the hypothalamus in salt-sensitive rats but not in salt-resistant rats. In addition, reduced nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase subunits p22(phox), p47(phox), and gp91(phox) mRNA expression significantly increased in the hypothalamus of salt-loaded salt-sensitive rats. In conclusion, in salt-sensitive hypertension, increased oxidative stress in the brain, possibly via activation of reduced nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase

  11. Smart monitoring of fluid intake and bladder voiding using pressure sensitive mats.

    PubMed

    Cohen-McFarlane, Madison; Green, James R; Knoefel, Frank; Goubran, Rafik

    2016-08-01

    Pressure sensitive mats have been used in noninvasive smart monitoring for a variety of problems including breathing rate monitoring, sleep monitoring, mobility, and weight. This paper describes a proof of concept application of pressure mats to monitor fluid intake/output (fluid cycle) events during the night. The ability to more accurately track such events has potential implications for monitoring those individuals who have nocturia, a condition where a person wakes at night to urinate. Data were collected from a healthy young female subject instructed to drink as much water as was comfortable (700mL) and lie in a supine position on a mattress located directly on three pressure mats. This was compared to an initial data set collected immediately after voiding but before drinking, 30 minutes after drinking, 60 minutes after drinking and a final data set after again voiding the bladder. The additional pressure from the 700mL of water was detectible and tracked over the course of the hour-long testing session under idealized conditions. This provides a proof-of-concept that nocturnal fluid intake and bladder voiding events can be tracked using non-invasive pressure-sensitive mats, however additional testing and development is required to achieve a deployable monitoring system.

  12. A subambient pressure ionization with nanoelectrospray (SPIN) source and interface for improved sensitivity in mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Page, Jason S.; Tang, Keqi; Kelly, Ryan T.; Smith, Richard D.

    2008-01-01

    An electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) source and interface has been designed that enables efficient ion production and transmission in a 30 Torr pressure environment using solvents compatible with typical reversed-phase liquid chromatography (RPLC) separations. In this design, the electrospray emitter is located inside the mass spectrometer in the same region as an electrodynamic ion funnel. This avoids the use of a conductance limit ion inlet, as required by a conventional atmospheric pressure ESI source, and allows more efficient ion transmission to the mass analyzer. The new source, titled Subambient Pressure Ionization with Nanoelectrospray (SPIN), improves instrument sensitivity, increases the understanding of the electrospray process, and enables new electrospray interface designs. Performance of the SPIN source was evaluated by electrospraying standard solutions at 300 nL/min, and comparing results with those obtained from a standard atmospheric pressure ESI source that used a heated capillary inlet. The importance of desolvation was also investigated by electrospraying at different flow rates, which showed that the ion funnel provided an effective desolvation region to aid the creation of gas phase analyte ions. This initial study demonstrated a ∼ 5-fold improvement in sensitivity when the SPIN source was used compared to a standard atmospheric pressure ESI source. PMID:18237189

  13. Development of pressure-sensitive dosage forms with a core liquefying at body temperature.

    PubMed

    Wilde, Lisa; Bock, Mona; Wolf, Marieke; Glöckl, Gunnar; Garbacz, Grzegorz; Weitschies, Werner

    2014-04-01

    Pressure-sensitive dosage forms have been developed that are intended for pulsatile delivery of drugs to the proximal small intestine. The novel dosage forms are composed of insoluble shell and either a hard fat W32 or polyethylene glycol (PEG) 1000 core that are both liquidizing at body temperature. The release is triggered by predominant pressure waves such as contractions of the pylorus causing rupture of the shell and an immediate emptying of the liquefied filling containing the active ingredient. In consequence immediately after the trigger has been effective the total amount of the drug is intended to be available for absorption in the upper small intestine. Both core types were coated with a cellulose acetate film that creates a pressure-sensitive shell in which mechanical resistance is depending on the coating thickness. Results of the texture analysis confirmed a correlation between the polymer load of the coating and the mechanical resistance. The dissolution test performed under conditions of physiological meaningful mechanical stress showed that the drug release is triggered by pressure waves of ⩾300 mbar which are representing the maximal pressure occurring during the gastric emptying. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Variants in striatin gene are associated with salt-sensitive blood pressure in mice and humans.

    PubMed

    Garza, Amanda E; Rariy, Chevon M; Sun, Bei; Williams, Jonathan; Lasky-Su, Jessica; Baudrand, Rene; Yao, Tham; Moize, Burhanuddin; Hafiz, Wan M; Romero, Jose R; Adler, Gail K; Ferri, Claudio; Hopkins, Paul N; Pojoga, Luminita H; Williams, Gordon H

    2015-01-01

    Striatin is a novel protein that interacts with steroid receptors and modifies rapid, nongenomic activity in vitro. We tested the hypothesis that striatin would in turn affect mineralocorticoid receptor function and consequently sodium, water, and blood pressure homeostasis in an animal model. We evaluated salt sensitivity of blood pressure in novel striatin heterozygote knockout mice. Compared with wild type, striatin heterozygote exhibited a significant increase in blood pressure when sodium intake was increased from restricted (0.03%) to liberal (1.6%) sodium. Furthermore, renal expression of mineralocorticoid receptor and its genomic downstream targets serum/glucocorticoid-regulated kinase 1, and epithelial sodium channel was increased in striatin heterozygote versus wild-type mice on liberal sodium intake while the pAkt/Akt ratio, readout of mineralocorticoid receptor's rapid, nongenomic pathway, was reduced. To determine the potential clinical relevance of these findings, we tested the association between single nucleotide polymorphic variants of striatin gene and salt sensitivity of blood pressure in 366 white hypertensive subjects. HapMap-derived tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms identified an association of rs2540923 with salt sensitivity of blood pressure (odds ratio, 6.25; 95% confidence interval, 1.7-20; P=0.01). These data provide the first in vivo evidence in humans and rodents that associates striatin with markers of mineralocorticoid receptor activity. The data also support the hypothesis that the rapid, nongenomic mineralocorticoid receptor pathway (mediated via striatin) has a role in modulating the interaction between salt intake and blood pressure. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  15. Muscle Trigger Points and Pressure Pain Sensitivity Maps of the Feet in Women with Fibromyalgia Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tornero-Caballero, Maria C; Salom-Moreno, Jaime; Cigarán-Méndez, Margarita; Morales-Cabezas, Matilde; Madeleine, Pascal; Fernández-de-Las-Peñas, César

    2016-10-01

    OBJECTIVE : To investigate the presence of trigger points (TrPs) in feet musculature and topographical pressure sensitivity maps of the feet as well as the relationship between TrPs, pressure pain maps, and clinical variables in women with fibromyalgia (FMS). METHODS : Fifty-one FMS women and 24 comparable healthy women participated. TrPs within the flexor hallucis brevis, adductor hallucis, dorsal interossei, extensor digitorum brevis, and quadratus plantae, as well as external and internal gastrocnemius, were explored. Pressure pain thresholds (PPTs) were assessed in a blind manner over seven locations on each foot. Topographical pressure sensitivity maps of the plantar region were generated using the averaged PPT of each location. RESULTS : The prevalence rate of foot pain was 63% (n = 32). The number of active TrPs for each FMS woman with foot pain was 5 ± 1.5 without any latent TrPs. Women with FMS without foot pain and healthy controls had only latent TrPs (2.2 ± 0.8 and 1.5 ± 1.3, respectively). Active TrPs in the flexor hallucis brevis and adductor hallucis muscles were the most prevalent. Topographical pressure pain sensitivity maps revealed that FMS women with foot pain had lower PPT than FMS women without pain and healthy controls, and higher PPT on the calcaneus bone (P < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS : The presence of foot pain in women with FMS is high. The referred pain elicited by active TrPs in the foot muscles reproduced the symptoms in these patients. FMS women suffering foot pain showed higher pressure hypersensitivity in the plantar region than those FMS women without pain.

  16. Method development for compensating temperature effects in pressure sensitive paint measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demandante, Carlo Greg N.

    1994-01-01

    Pressure sensitive luminescent paints (PSP) have recently emerged as a viable technique for aerodynamic pressure measurements. The technique uses a surface coating which contains probe molecules that luminesce when excited by light of an appropriate wavelength. The photoluminescence of these materials is known to be quenched by the presence of molecular oxygen. Since oxygen is a fixed mole fraction of the air, the coating's luminescence intensity varies inversely with air pressure. Digital imaging of the luminescence varying across a coated surface produces a pressure distribution map over that surface. One difficulty encountered with this technique is the temperature effect on the luminescence intensity. Present PSP formulations have significant sensitivity to temperature. At the moment, the most practical way of correcting for temperature effects is to calibrate the paint in place at the operating temperatures by using a few well-placed pressure taps. This study is looking at development of temperature indicating coatings that can be applied and measured concurrently with PSP, and use the temperature measurement to compute the correct pressure. Two methods for this dual paint formulation are proposed. One method will use a coating that consists of temperature sensitive phosphors in a polymer matrix. This is similar in construction to PSP, except that the probe molecules used are selected primarily for their temperature sensitivity. Both organic phosphors (e.g., europium thenoyltrifluoroacetonate, bioprobes) and inorganic phosphors (e.g., Mg4(F)GeO6:Mn, La2O2S:Eu, Radelin Type phosphors, Sylvania Type phosphors) will be evaluated for their temperature sensing potential. The next method will involve a novel coating composing of five membered heterocyclic conducting polymers which are known to show temperature dependent luminescence (e.g., poly(3-alkylthiopene), poly(3-alkylselenophene), poly(3-alkylfuran)). Both methods will involve applying a bottom layer of

  17. Pressure Sensitive Paint Measurements on 15% Scale Rotor Blades in Hover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, Oliver D.; Watkins, Anthony Neal; Ingram, JoAnne L.

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes a proof of concept test to examine the feasibility of using pressure sensitive paint (PSP) to measure the pressure distributions on a rotor in hover. The test apparatus consisted of the US Army 2-meter Rotor Test Stand (2MRTS) and 15% scale swept tip rotor blades. Two camera/rotor separations were examined: 0.76 and 1.35 radii. The outer 15% of each blade was painted with PSP. Intensity and lifetime based PSP measurement techniques were attempted. Data were collected from all blades at thrust coefficients ranging from 0.004 to 0.009.

  18. Wood adhesion and adhesives

    Treesearch

    Charles R. Frihart

    2005-01-01

    An appreciation of rheology, material science, organic chemistry, polymer science, and mechanics leads to better understanding of the factors controlling the performance of the bonded assemblies. Given the complexity of wood as a substrate, it is hard to understand why some wood adhesives work better than other wood adhesives, especially when under the more severe...

  19. Ultra-sensitive Pressure sensor based on guided straight mechanical cracks

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yong Whan; Kang, Daeshik; Pikhitsa, Peter V.; Lee, Taemin; Kim, Sang Moon; Lee, Gunhee; Tahk, Dongha; Choi, Mansoo

    2017-01-01

    Recently, a mechanical crack-based strain sensor with high sensitivity was proposed by producing free cracks via bending metal coated film with a known curvature. To further enhance sensitivity and controllability, a guided crack formation is needed. Herein, we demonstrate such a ultra-sensitive sensor based on the guided formation of straight mechanical cracks. The sensor has patterned holes on the surface of the device, which concentrate the stress near patterned holes leading to generate uniform cracks connecting the holes throughout the surface. We found that such a guided straight crack formation resulted in an exponential dependence of the resistance against the strain, overriding known linear or power law dependences. Consequently, the sensors are highly sensitive to pressure (with a sensitivity of over 1 × 105 at pressures of 8–9.5 kPa range) as well as strain (with a gauge factor of over 2 × 106 at strains of 0–10% range). A new theoretical model for the guided crack system has been suggested to be in a good agreement with experiments. Durability and reproducibility have been also confirmed. PMID:28059136

  20. Effect of aerobic exercise training on blood pressure sensitivity to dietary sodium in older hypertensives.

    PubMed

    Dengel, D R; Brown, M D; Reynolds, T H; Kuskowski, M A; Supiano, M A

    2006-05-01

    Although aerobic exercise training has been shown to lower blood pressure (BP) in older adults, its effect on BP sensitivity to dietary sodium (Na(+)) is unknown. Therefore, the present study was undertaken to examine the effect of aerobic exercise training on BP sensitivity to dietary Na(+) in older hypertensive individuals. Blood pressure was measured after 8 days of low (20 mEq) and high (200 mEq) Na(+) diets in 31 older (63+/-7 years, mean+/-standard deviation), hypertensive (152+/-11/88+/-5 mm Hg) individuals at baseline and following 6 months of aerobic exercise training (at 75% VO(2)max, 3 times/week, 40 min/session). Subjects were grouped on the basis of the difference in mean arterial BP (MAP) between diets (Na(+) sensitive: >or=5 mm Hg increase in MAP on high Na(+), n=20; Na(+) resistant: <5 mm Hg increase in MAP on the high Na(+) diet, n=11). Following 6 months of aerobic exercise training, there was a significant increase in maximal aerobic capacity (VO(2)max: 18.3+/-3.8 vs 20.7+/-4.2 ml/kg/min, P<0.017). Aerobic exercise training had a significant (P=0.02) effect on Na(+) sensitivity status, with the proportion of Na(+)-resistant individuals increasing from 35% at baseline to 61% following the 6-month aerobic exercise training programme. This study demonstrates the importance of physical activity on BP sensitivity to dietary Na(+).

  1. Ultra-sensitive Pressure sensor based on guided straight mechanical cracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Yong Whan; Kang, Daeshik; Pikhitsa, Peter V.; Lee, Taemin; Kim, Sang Moon; Lee, Gunhee; Tahk, Dongha; Choi, Mansoo

    2017-01-01

    Recently, a mechanical crack-based strain sensor with high sensitivity was proposed by producing free cracks via bending metal coated film with a known curvature. To further enhance sensitivity and controllability, a guided crack formation is needed. Herein, we demonstrate such a ultra-sensitive sensor based on the guided formation of straight mechanical cracks. The sensor has patterned holes on the surface of the device, which concentrate the stress near patterned holes leading to generate uniform cracks connecting the holes throughout the surface. We found that such a guided straight crack formation resulted in an exponential dependence of the resistance against the strain, overriding known linear or power law dependences. Consequently, the sensors are highly sensitive to pressure (with a sensitivity of over 1 × 105 at pressures of 8–9.5 kPa range) as well as strain (with a gauge factor of over 2 × 106 at strains of 0–10% range). A new theoretical model for the guided crack system has been suggested to be in a good agreement with experiments. Durability and reproducibility have been also confirmed.

  2. The Role of Uric Acid in Hypertension of Adolescents, Prehypertension and Salt Sensitivity of Blood Pressure.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yang; Hu, Jia-Wen; Lv, Yong-Bo; Chu, Chao; Wang, Ke-Ke; Zheng, Wen-Ling; Cao, Yu-Meng; Yuan, Zu-Yi; Mu, Jian-Jun

    2017-02-13

    Uric acid is the end product of purine metabolism. Metabolic disorders of uric acid are associated with many disease states. Substantial evidence suggests the possible role of uric acid as a mediator of high blood pressure. Elevated uric acid is closely associated with new onset essential hypertension in adolescents and prehypertension; and urate-lowering agents can significantly improve these early stages of hypertension. Uric acid also influences salt sensitivity of blood pressure through two phases. Local renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system activation initiates renal damage, arteriolopathy, and endothelium dysfunction, which is followed by the dysregulation of sodium homeostasis, thereby leading to increased salt sensitivity. In this review we summarize the available evidence to contribute to a better understanding of the casual relationship between uric acid and early or intermediate stages of hypertension. We hope our review can contribute to the prevention of hypertension or provide new insights into a treatment that would slow the progression of hypertension.

  3. The Role of Uric Acid in Hypertension of Adolescents, Prehypertension and Salt Sensitivity of Blood Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yang; Hu, Jia-Wen; Lv, Yong-Bo; Chu, Chao; Wang, Ke-Ke; Zheng, Wen-Ling; Cao, Yu-Meng; Yuan, Zu-Yi; Mu, Jian-Jun

    2017-01-01

    Uric acid is the end product of purine metabolism. Metabolic disorders of uric acid are associated with many disease states. Substantial evidence suggests the possible role of uric acid as a mediator of high blood pressure. Elevated uric acid is closely associated with new onset essential hypertension in adolescents and prehypertension; and urate-lowering agents can significantly improve these early stages of hypertension. Uric acid also influences salt sensitivity of blood pressure through two phases. Local renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system activation initiates renal damage, arteriolopathy, and endothelium dysfunction, which is followed by the dysregulation of sodium homeostasis, thereby leading to increased salt sensitivity. In this review we summarize the available evidence to contribute to a better understanding of the casual relationship between uric acid and early or intermediate stages of hypertension. We hope our review can contribute to the prevention of hypertension or provide new insights into a treatment that would slow the progression of hypertension. PMID:28190873

  4. Behavior of plant plasma membranes under hydrostatic pressure as monitored by fluorescent environment-sensitive probes.

    PubMed

    Roche, Yann; Klymchenko, Andrey S; Gerbeau-Pissot, Patricia; Gervais, Patrick; Mély, Yves; Simon-Plas, Françoise; Perrier-Cornet, Jean-Marie

    2010-08-01

    We monitored the behavior of plasma membrane (PM) isolated from tobacco cells (BY-2) under hydrostatic pressures up to 3.5kbar at 30 degrees C, by steady-state fluorescence spectroscopy using the newly introduced environment-sensitive probe F2N12S and also Laurdan and di-4-ANEPPDHQ. The consequences of sterol depletion by methyl-beta-cyclodextrin were also studied. We found that application of hydrostatic pressure led to a marked decrease of hydration as probed by F2N12S and to an increase of the generalized polarization excitation (GPex) of Laurdan. We observed that the hydration effect of sterol depletion was maximal between 1 and 1.5 kbar but was much less important at higher pressures (above 2 kbar) where both parameters reached a plateau value. The presence of a highly dehydrated gel state, insensitive to the sterol content, was thus proposed above 2.5 kbar. However, the F2N12S polarity parameter and the di-4-ANEPPDHQ intensity ratio showed strong effect on sterol depletion, even at very high pressures (2.5-3.5 kbar), and supported the ability of sterols to modify the electrostatic properties of membrane, notably its dipole potential, in a highly dehydrated gel phase. We thus suggested that BY-2 PM undergoes a complex phase behavior in response to the hydrostatic pressure and we also emphasized the role of phytosterols to regulate the effects of high hydrostatic pressure on plant PM.

  5. Novel highly sensitive and wearable pressure sensors from conductive three-dimensional fabric structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jianfeng; Xu, Bingang

    2015-12-01

    Pressure sensors based on three-dimensional fabrics have all the excellent properties of the textile substrate: excellent compressibility, good air permeability and moisture transmission ability, which will find applications ranging from the healthcare industry to daily usage. In this paper, novel pressure sensors based on 3D spacer fabrics have been developed by a proposed multi-coating method. By this coating method, carbon black can be coated uniformly on the silicon elastomer which is attached and slightly cured on the 3D fabric surface beforehand. The as-made pressure sensors have good conductivity and can measure external pressure up to 283 kPa with an electrical conductivity range of 9.8 kΩ. The sensitivity of 3D fabric pressure sensors can be as high as 50.31×10-3 kPa-1, which is better than other textile based pressure sensors. When the as-made sensors are pressed, their electrical resistance will decrease because of more conductive connections and bending of fibers in the spacer layer. The sensing mechanism related to fiber bending has been explored by using an equivalent resistance model. The newly developed 3D sensor devices can be designed to exhibit different sensing performances by simply changing the structures of fabric substrate, which endows this kind of device more flexibility in related applications.

  6. A nanofiber based artificial electronic skin with high pressure sensitivity and 3D conformability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Weibin; Liu, Qiongzhen; Wu, Yongzhi; Wang, Yuedan; Qing, Xing; Li, Mufang; Liu, Ke; Wang, Wenwen; Wang, Dong

    2016-06-01

    Pressure sensors with 3D conformability are highly desirable components for artificial electronic skin or e-textiles that can mimic natural skin, especially for application in real-time monitoring of human physiological signals. Here, a nanofiber based electronic skin with ultra-high pressure sensitivity and 3D conformability is designed and built by interlocking two elastic patterned nanofibrous membranes. The patterned membrane is facilely prepared by casting conductive nanofiber ink into a silicon mould to form an array of semi-spheroid-like protuberances. The protuberances composed of intertwined elastic POE nanofibers and PPy@PVA-co-PE nanofibers afford a tunable effective elastic modulus that is capable of capturing varied strains and stresses, thereby contributing to a high sensitivity for pressure sensing. This electronic skin-like sensor demonstrates an ultra-high sensitivity (1.24 kPa-1) below 150 Pa with a detection limit as low as about 1.3 Pa. The pixelated sensor array and a RGB-LED light are then assembled into a circuit and show a feasibility for visual detection of spatial pressure. Furthermore, a nanofiber based proof-of-concept wireless pressure sensor with a bluetooth module as a signal transmitter is proposed and has demonstrated great promise for wireless monitoring of human physiological signals, indicating a potential for large scale wearable electronic devices or e-skin.Pressure sensors with 3D conformability are highly desirable components for artificial electronic skin or e-textiles that can mimic natural skin, especially for application in real-time monitoring of human physiological signals. Here, a nanofiber based electronic skin with ultra-high pressure sensitivity and 3D conformability is designed and built by interlocking two elastic patterned nanofibrous membranes. The patterned membrane is facilely prepared by casting conductive nanofiber ink into a silicon mould to form an array of semi-spheroid-like protuberances. The

  7. A bioinspired wet/dry microfluidic adhesive for aqueous environments.

    PubMed

    Majumder, Abhijit; Sharma, Ashutosh; Ghatak, Animangsu

    2010-01-05

    A pressure-sensitive, nonreacting and nonfouling adhesive which can perform well both in air and underwater is very desirable because of its potential applications in various settings such as biomedical, marine, and automobile. Taking a clue from nature that many natural adhesive pads have complex structures underneath the outer adhesive layer, we have prepared thin elastic adhesive films with subsurface microstructures using PDMS (poly(dimethylsiloxane)) and investigated their performance underwater. The presence of embedded structure enhances the energy of adhesion considerably both in air and underwater. Furthermore, filling the channels with liquid of suitable surface tension modifies the internal stress profile, resulting into significant enhancement in adhesive performance. As this increase in adhesion is mediated by mechanics and not by surface chemistry, the presence of water does not alter its performance much. For the same reason, this adhesion mechanism works with both hydrophobic and hydrophilic surfaces. The adhesive can be reused because of its elastic surface. Moreover, unlike many other present-day adhesives, its performance does not decrease with time.

  8. Mechanically sensitive Aδ nociceptors that innervate bone marrow respond to changes in intra-osseous pressure.

    PubMed

    Nencini, Sara; Ivanusic, Jason

    2017-07-01

    Sensory neurons that innervate the bone marrow provide the CNS with information about pain associated with bone disease and pathology, but little is known of their function. Here we use a novel in vivo bone-nerve electrophysiological preparation to study how they respond to noxious mechanical stimulation delivered by increasing intra-osseous pressure. We provide evidence that sensory neurons that innervate the bone marrow respond to high threshold noxious mechanical stimulation, have response properties consistent with a role in nociception, provide information about different features of an intra-osseous pressure stimulus and express the Piezo2 mechano-transducer molecule. Our findings show how some bone marrow nociceptors signal pain in bony diseases and pathologies that involve a mechanical disturbance or increased intra-osseous pressure, and that the Piezo2 mechano-transducer may be involved. Whilst the sensory neurons and nerve terminals that innervate bone marrow have a morphology and molecular phenotype consistent with a role in nociception, little is known about their physiology or the mechanisms that generate and maintain bone pain. In the present study, we provide evidence that Aδ nociceptors that innervate the bone marrow respond to high threshold noxious mechanical stimulation, exhibit fatigue in response to prior stimulation and in some cases can be sensitized by capsaicin. They can be classified on the basis of their response properties as either phasic-tonic units that appear to code for different intensities of intra-osseous pressure, or phasic units that code for the rate of change in intra-osseous pressure. Three different subclasses of mechanically sensitive Aδ units were observed: phasic units that were sensitized by capsaicin, phasic units that were not sensitized by capsaicin and phasic-tonic units (that were not sensitized by capsaicin). These could also, in part, be distinguished by differences in their thresholds for activation, mean

  9. High sensitivity detection of trace gases at atmospheric pressure using tunable diode lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, J.; Sinclair, R. L.; Grant, W. B.; Menzies, R. T.

    1985-01-01

    A detailed study of the detection of trace gases at atmospheric pressure using tunable diode lasers is described. The influence of multipass cells, retroreflectors and topographical targets is examined. The minimum detectable infrared absorption ranges from 0.1 percent for a pathlength of 1.2 km to 0.01 percent over short pathlengths. The factors which limit this sensitivity are discussed, and the techniques are illustrated by monitoring atmospehric CO2 and CH4.

  10. A Fiber Optic Sensor Sensitive To Normal Pressure And Shear Stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuomo, Frank W.; Kidwell, Robert S.; Hu, Andong

    1986-11-01

    A fiber optic lever sensing technique that can be used to measure normal pressure as well as shear stresses is discussed. This method uses three unequal fibers combining small size and good sensitivity. Static measurements appear to confirm the theoretical models predicted by geometrical optics and dynamic tests performed at frequencies up to 10 kHz indicate a flat response within this frequency range. These sensors are intended for use in a low speed wind tunnel environment.

  11. High sensitivity detection of trace gases at atmospheric pressure using tunable diode lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, J.; Sinclair, R. L.; Grant, W. B.; Menzies, R. T.

    1985-01-01

    A detailed study of the detection of trace gases at atmospheric pressure using tunable diode lasers is described. The influence of multipass cells, retroreflectors and topographical targets is examined. The minimum detectable infrared absorption ranges from 0.1 percent for a pathlength of 1.2 km to 0.01 percent over short pathlengths. The factors which limit this sensitivity are discussed, and the techniques are illustrated by monitoring atmospehric CO2 and CH4.

  12. Interpretation of Helioseismic Travel Times. Sensitivity to Sound Speed, Pressure, Density, and Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burston, Raymond; Gizon, Laurent; Birch, Aaron C.

    2015-12-01

    Time-distance helioseismology uses cross-covariances of wave motions on the solar surface to determine the travel times of wave packets moving from one surface location to another. We review the methodology to interpret travel-time measurements in terms of small, localised perturbations to a horizontally homogeneous reference solar model. Using the first Born approximation, we derive and compute 3D travel-time sensitivity (Fréchet) kernels for perturbations in sound-speed, density, pressure, and vector flows. While kernels for sound speed and flows had been computed previously, here we extend the calculation to kernels for density and pressure, hence providing a complete description of the effects of solar dynamics and structure on travel times. We treat three thermodynamic quantities as independent and do not assume hydrostatic equilibrium. We present a convenient approach to computing damped Green's functions using a normal-mode summation. The Green's function must be computed on a wavenumber grid that has sufficient resolution to resolve the longest lived modes. The typical kernel calculations used in this paper are computer intensive and require on the order of 600 CPU hours per kernel. Kernels are validated by computing the travel-time perturbation that results from horizontally-invariant perturbations using two independent approaches. At fixed sound-speed, the density and pressure kernels are approximately related through a negative multiplicative factor, therefore implying that perturbations in density and pressure are difficult to disentangle. Mean travel-times are not only sensitive to sound-speed, density and pressure perturbations, but also to flows, especially vertical flows. Accurate sensitivity kernels are needed to interpret complex flow patterns such as convection.

  13. Blood pressure and heart rate variability and baroreflex sensitivity before and after brain death

    PubMed Central

    Conci, F; Di, R; Castiglioni, P

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—To evaluate spontaneous blood pressure and heart rate variability and spontaneous baroreflex sensitivity before and after brain death.
METHODS—Spontaneous variability of arterial blood pressure and heart rate—estimated by power spectra of systolic (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) and pulse interval (PI)—and spontaneous baroreflex sensitivity (BRS)—estimated by the alpha index and the sequence technique—were evaluated in 11 patients twice: shortly before and 1 hour after the onset of brain death.
RESULTS—Significant spectral changes occurred after brain death: a general power reduction in PI spectra; a shift of SBP, DBP and PI powers toward the lower frequencies, resulting in a greater slope of the "1/f" spectral trends; and a marked reduction of SBP and DBP powers (-93%) and of SBP-PI coherence (−63%) at 0.1Hz. The estimated average BRS was relatively high before brain death (around 11 ms/mm Hg), and fell close to 0 or even was not detectable at all after brain death.
CONCLUSIONS—Parameters describing spontaneous blood pressure and heart rate variability and indexes reflecting the baroreflex function, which were relatively normal up to a few hours before brain death, underwent marked changes with the onset of brain death. All the changes found are likely to reflect the cessation of activity of the cardiovascular brain stem centres. These findings indicate that techniques of blood pressure and heart rate spectral analysis and of dynamic assessment of baroreflex sensitivity may be useful to complement the diagnosis of brain stem death.

 PMID:11606674

  14. Giant dielectric constant and resistance-pressure sensitivity in carbon nanotubes/rubber nanocomposites with low percolation threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Mei-Juan; Dang, Zhi-Min; Xu, Hai-Ping

    2007-01-01

    Nanocomposites consisting of methylvinyl silicone rubber (VMQ) with excellent elasticity as polymer matrix and multiwall carbon nanotube (MWNT) with large slenderness ratio and high conductivity as filler were fabricated by a solution method and subsequently hot pressing technology. Studies on dielectric property and resistance-pressure sensitivity of the MWNT/VMQ composites showed that there was a giant dielectric constant and significant resistance-pressure sensitivity as the concentration of MWNT was near a low percolation threshold, fc≈0.012. After the composite applied an enough pressure for long time, the resistance-pressure sensitivity still shows an excellent reproducibility due to the good dispersion and low loading of MWNT.

  15. Luminophore Application Study of Polymer-Ceramic Pressure-Sensitive Paint

    PubMed Central

    Sakaue, Hirotaka; Hayashi, Tatsunori; Ishikawa, Hitoshi

    2013-01-01

    A polymer-ceramic pressure-sensitive paint (PC-PSP) is a fast responding and sprayable PSP which has been applied for capturing global unsteady flows. The luminophore application process is studied to enhance the characterization of the PC-PSP. A dipping deposition method is used to apply a luminophore on a polymer-ceramic coating. The method selects a solvent by its polarity index. The characterization includes the signal level, pressure sensitivity, temperature dependency, and response time. It is found that the luminophore application process affects the steady-state characterizations, such as the signal level, pressure sensitivity, and temperature dependency. A range of change for each characterization, which is based on the minimum quantity, is a factor of 4.7, 9, and 3.8, respectively. A response time on the order of ten microseconds is shown. The application process is not a dominant factor for changing the response time, which is within the uncertainty of the thickness variation. Comparisons of the effects on the luminophore application process and the polymer content are made to discuss the PC-PSP characterization results. PMID:23760088

  16. Single-shot temperature- and pressure-sensitive paint measurements on an unsteady helicopter blade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Disotell, Kevin J.; Peng, Di; Juliano, Thomas J.; Gregory, James W.; Crafton, Jim W.; Komerath, Narayanan M.

    2014-02-01

    Unsteady pressure-sensitive paint (PSP) measurements were acquired on an articulated model helicopter rotor of 0.26 m diameter in edgewise flow to simulate forward flight conditions. The rotor was operated at advance ratios (free stream velocity normalized by hover tip speed) of 0.15 and 0.30 at a cycle-averaged tip chord Reynolds number of 1.1 × 105, with collective and longitudinal cyclic pitch inputs of 10° and 2.5°, respectively. A single-shot data acquisition technique allowed a camera to record the paint luminescence after a single pulse of high-energy laser excitation, yielding sufficient signal-to-noise ratio to avoid image averaging. Platinum tetra(pentafluorophenyl) porphyrin (PtTFPP) in a porous polymer/ceramic binder served as the PSP. To address errors caused by image blurring and temperature sensitivity, a previously reported motion deblurring algorithm was implemented and the temperature correction was made using temperature-sensitive paint measurements on a second rotor blade. Instantaneous, unsteady surface pressure maps at a rotation rate of 82 Hz captured different aerodynamic responses between the two sides of the rotor disk and were compared to the nominally steady hover case. Cycle-to-cycle variations in tip unsteadiness on the retreating blade were also observed, causing oblique pressure features which may be linked to three-dimensional stall.

  17. Salt sensitivity of blood pressure in non-dialysis patients with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Meng, Lin; Fu, Bin; Zhang, Tongyan; Han, Zunmin; Yang, Meijuan

    2014-04-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a world-wide public health problem. Hypertension is both a cause and a complication of CKD, and a risk factor for progression of kidney disease. The effect of salt intake on blood pressure (BP) and the salt sensitivity in non-dialysis patients with CKD were studied. One hundred and thirty non-dialysis patients with CKD were enrolled in the present study. Daily urinary excretion of sodium (representative of daily sodium intake) and BP was monitored in conditions of original eating habits. Estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was measured by the creatinine clearance (Ccr). There was a linear positive relationship between the salt intake and systolic blood pressure (SBP) (β = 0.250, p = 0.004). It had been found that the log of BP/24-h urinary sodium (salt sensitivity index) had linear relationship with the log of eGFR (βsyst = -0.364, p = 0.000, βdiast = -0.345, p = 0.000, respectively). Multi-stepwise regression analysis showed SBP was mainly influenced by salt intake and eGFR. There was a negative correlation between diastolic blood pressure (DBP) and age. These results demonstrated a linear relationship between the salt intake and SBP in non-dialysis patients with CKD. The salt sensitivity of BP rose with the decline of renal function.

  18. Functionally Different Pads on the Same Foot Allow Control of Attachment: Stick Insects Have Load-Sensitive “Heel” Pads for Friction and Shear-Sensitive “Toe” Pads for Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Labonte, David; Federle, Walter

    2013-01-01

    Stick insects (Carausius morosus) have two distinct types of attachment pad per leg, tarsal “heel” pads (euplantulae) and a pre-tarsal “toe” pad (arolium). Here we show that these two pad types are specialised for fundamentally different functions. When standing upright, stick insects rested on their proximal euplantulae, while arolia were the only pads in surface contact when hanging upside down. Single-pad force measurements showed that the adhesion of euplantulae was extremely small, but friction forces strongly increased with normal load and coefficients of friction were 1. The pre-tarsal arolium, in contrast, generated adhesion that strongly increased with pulling forces, allowing adhesion to be activated and deactivated by shear forces, which can be produced actively, or passively as a result of the insects' sprawled posture. The shear-sensitivity of the arolium was present even when corrected for contact area, and was independent of normal preloads covering nearly an order of magnitude. Attachment of both heel and toe pads is thus activated partly by the forces that arise passively in the situations in which they are used by the insects, ensuring safe attachment. Our results suggest that stick insect euplantulae are specialised “friction pads” that produce traction when pressed against the substrate, while arolia are “true” adhesive pads that stick to the substrate when activated by pulling forces. PMID:24349156

  19. Functionally different pads on the same foot allow control of attachment: stick insects have load-sensitive "heel" pads for friction and shear-sensitive "toe" pads for adhesion.

    PubMed

    Labonte, David; Federle, Walter

    2013-01-01

    Stick insects (Carausius morosus) have two distinct types of attachment pad per leg, tarsal "heel" pads (euplantulae) and a pre-tarsal "toe" pad (arolium). Here we show that these two pad types are specialised for fundamentally different functions. When standing upright, stick insects rested on their proximal euplantulae, while arolia were the only pads in surface contact when hanging upside down. Single-pad force measurements showed that the adhesion of euplantulae was extremely small, but friction forces strongly increased with normal load and coefficients of friction were [Formula: see text] 1. The pre-tarsal arolium, in contrast, generated adhesion that strongly increased with pulling forces, allowing adhesion to be activated and deactivated by shear forces, which can be produced actively, or passively as a result of the insects' sprawled posture. The shear-sensitivity of the arolium was present even when corrected for contact area, and was independent of normal preloads covering nearly an order of magnitude. Attachment of both heel and toe pads is thus activated partly by the forces that arise passively in the situations in which they are used by the insects, ensuring safe attachment. Our results suggest that stick insect euplantulae are specialised "friction pads" that produce traction when pressed against the substrate, while arolia are "true" adhesive pads that stick to the substrate when activated by pulling forces.

  20. Referenced dual pressure- and temperature-sensitive paint for digital color camera read out.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Lorenz H; Karakus, Cüneyt; Meier, Robert J; Risch, Nikolaus; Wolfbeis, Otto S; Holder, Elisabeth; Schäferling, Michael

    2012-12-03

    The first fluorescent material for the referenced simultaneous RGB (red green blue) imaging of barometric pressure (oxygen partial pressure) and temperature is presented. This sensitive coating consists of two platinum(II) complexes as indicators and a reference dye, each of which is incorporated in appropriate polymer nanoparticles. These particles are dispersed in a polyurethane hydrogel and spread onto a solid support. The emission of the (oxygen) pressure indicator, PtTFPP, matches the red channel of a RGB color camera, whilst the emission of the temperature indicator [Pt(II) (Br-thq)(acac)] matches the green channel. The reference dye, 9,10-diphenylanthracene, emits in the blue channel. In contrast to other dual-sensitive materials, this new coating allows for the simultaneous imaging of both indicator signals, as well as the reference signal, in one RGB color picture without having to separate the signals with additional optical filters. All of these dyes are excitable with a 405 nm light-emitting diode (LED). With this new composite material, barometric pressure can be determined with a resolution of 22 mbar; the temperature can be determined with a resolution of 4.3 °C. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Pressure Pain Sensitivity Maps of the Neck-Shoulder Region in Breast Cancer Survivors.

    PubMed

    Caro-Morán, Elena; Fernández-Lao, Carolina; Díaz-Rodríguez, Lourdes; Cantarero-Villanueva, Irene; Madeleine, Pascal; Arroyo-Morales, Manuel

    2016-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to report pressure pain sensitivity topographical maps of the frontal and dorsal parts of the shoulder region, and locate the pressure pain sensitive areas in breast cancer survivors compared with matched healthy control subjects. Twenty-two breast cancer survivors (BCS) and 22 matched control subjects participated. A numeric pain rating scale of the neck-shoulder area and pressure pain thresholds (PPTs) was assessed bilaterally over 28 points in the frontal and dorsal neck-shoulder area. Topographical pain sensitivity maps of the upper trapezius, pectoral, and anterior deltoid areas were computed. A three-way analysis of variance was carried out to evaluate the differences in PPTs. The BCS reported spontaneous neck pain (mean ± SD 3.6 ± 2.8), pain in the affected shoulder (4.3 ± 2.7), and pain in the non-affected shoulder (0.9 ± 1.8). Additionally, the BCS exhibited bilaterally lower PPTs in all the measurement points as compared with the control subjects (P < 0.05). The PPTs were lower at the superior part of the trapezius muscle (P < 0.001), the musculotendinous insertion, the anterior part of the deltoid muscle (P < 0.001), and the tendon of the pectoral muscle (P < 0.001) as compared with the control subjects. The results suggest the sensitization processes in the BCS and give preliminary evidence to most sensitive areas in the superior part of the upper trapezius and musculotendinous insertion of the pectoral muscle. © 2016 American Academy of Pain Medicine. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Assessment of baroreflex sensitivity by continuous noninvasive monitoring of peripheral and central aortic pressure.

    PubMed

    Kouchaki, Zahra; Butlin, Mark; Qasem, Ahmed; Avolio, Alberto P

    2014-01-01

    Noninvasive assessment of baroreceptor sensitivity (BRS) facilitates clinical investigation of autonomic function. The spontaneous sequence method estimates BRS using the continuous measurement of arterial pressure in the finger. Since the baroreceptors are centrally located (aortic arch, carotid arteries), this study assessed the use of a continuous aortic pressure signal derived from the peripheral pressure pulse to compute the BRS from changes in systolic pressure (SBP) and pulse interval (PI). BRS computed from central aortic (cBRS) and peripheral pressure (pBRS) was calculated in 12 healthy subjects (25-62 years, 7 females). The difference between pBRS and cBRS was calculated for four levels of pulse lags between changes in SBP and PI. For each lag and for the pooled data for all lags, cBRS was significantly correlated with pBRS (r(2)=0.82). The within subject difference ranged from -41.2% to 59.2%. This difference was not related to age, gender of hemodynamic parameters (systolic or diastolic pressure, heart rate, aortic pulse wave velocity). However 18.2% of the variance was due to the difference in the number of spontaneous pulse sequences used to determine values of cBRS and pBRS. The differences between pBRS and cBRS are in the range of values of BRS as those found, in other studies, to discriminate between patient groups with different levels of autonomic function. Findings of this study suggest that, given the heart rate dependent amplification of the arterial pressure pulse between the central aorta and the peripheral limbs, BRS determined from central aortic pressure derived from the peripheral pulse may provide an improved method for noninvasive assessment of baroreceptor function.

  3. Application of Pressure Sensitive Paint to Confined Flow at Mach Number 2.5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lepicovsky, J.; Bencic, T. J.; Bruckner, R. J.

    1998-01-01

    Pressure sensitive paint (PSP) is a novel technology that is being used frequently in external aerodynamics. For internal flows in narrow channels, and applications at elevated nonuniform temperatures, however, there are still unresolved problems that complicate the procedures for calibrating PSP signals. To address some of these problems, investigations were carried out in a narrow channel with supersonic flows of Mach 2.5. The first set of tests focused on the distribution of the wall pressure in the diverging section of the test channel downstream of the nozzle throat. The second set dealt with the distribution of wall static pressure due to the shock/wall interaction caused by a 25 deg. wedge in the constant Mach number part of the test section. In addition, the total temperature of the flow was varied to assess the effects of temperature on the PSP signal. Finally, contamination of the pressure field data, caused by internal reflection of the PSP signal in a narrow channel, was demonstrated. The local wall pressures were measured with static taps, and the wall pressure distributions were acquired by using PSP. The PSP results gave excellent qualitative impressions of the pressure field investigated. However, the quantitative results, specifically the accuracy of the PSP data in narrow channels, show that improvements need to be made in the calibration procedures, particularly for heated flows. In the cases investigated, the experimental error had a standard deviation of +/- 8.0% for the unheated flow, and +/- 16.0% for the heated flow, at an average pressure of 11 kpa.

  4. Incorporation of beams into bossed diaphragm for a high sensitivity and overload micro pressure sensor.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhongliang; Zhao, Yulong; Sun, Lu; Tian, Bian; Jiang, Zhuangde

    2013-01-01

    The paper presents a piezoresistive absolute micro pressure sensor, which is of great benefits for altitude location. In this investigation, the design, fabrication, and test of the sensor are involved. By analyzing the stress distribution of sensitive elements using finite element method, a novel structure through the introduction of sensitive beams into traditional bossed diaphragm is built up. The proposed configuration presents its advantages in terms of high sensitivity and high overload resistance compared with the conventional bossed diaphragm and flat diaphragm structures. Curve fittings of surface stress and deflection based on ANSYS simulation results are performed to establish the equations about the sensor. Nonlinear optimization by MATLAB is carried out to determine the structure dimensions. The output signals in both static and dynamic environments are evaluated. Silicon bulk micromachining technology is utilized to fabricate the sensor prototype, and the fabrication process is discussed. Experimental results demonstrate the sensor features a high sensitivity of 11.098 μV/V/Pa in the operating range of 500 Pa at room temperature, and a high overload resistance of 200 times overpressure to promise its survival under atmosphere. Due to the excellent performance above, the sensor can be applied in measuring the absolute micro pressure lower than 500 Pa.

  5. Organo-Chlorinated Thin Films Deposited by Atmospheric Pressure Plasma-Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition for Adhesion Enhancement between Rubber and Zinc-Plated Steel Monofilaments.

    PubMed

    Vandenabeele, Cédric; Bulou, Simon; Maurau, Rémy; Siffer, Frederic; Belmonte, Thierry; Choquet, Patrick

    2015-07-08

    A continuous-flow plasma process working at atmospheric pressure is developed to enhance the adhesion between a rubber compound and a zinc-plated steel monofilament, with the long-term objective to find a potential alternative to the electrolytic brass plating process, which is currently used in tire industry. For this purpose, a highly efficient tubular dielectric barrier discharge reactor is built to allow the continuous treatment of "endless" cylindrical substrates. The best treatment conditions found regarding adhesion are Ar/O2 plasma pretreatment, followed by the deposition from dichloromethane of a 75 nm-thick organo-chlorinated plasma polymerized thin film. Ar/O2 pretreatment allows the removal of organic residues, coming from drawing lubricants, and induces external growth of zinc oxide. The plasma layer has to be preferably deposited at low power to conserve sufficient hydrocarbon moieties. Surface analyses reveal the complex chemical mechanism behind the establishment of strong adhesion levels, more than five times higher after the plasma treatment. During the vulcanization step, superficial ZnO reacts with the chlorinated species of the thin film and is converted into porous and granular bump-shaped ZnwOxHyClz nanostructures. Together, rubber additives diffuse through the plasma layer and lead to the formation of zinc sulfide on the substrate surface. Hence, two distinct interfaces, rubber/thin film and thin film/substrate, are established. On the basis of these observations, hypotheses explaining the high bonding strength results are formulated.

  6. High-sensitivity NMR beyond 200,000 atmospheres of pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier, T.; Reichardt, S.; Haase, J.

    2015-08-01

    Pressure-induced changes in the chemical or electronic structure of solids require pressures well into the Giga-Pascal (GPa) range due to the strong bonding. Anvil cell designs can reach such pressures, but their small and mostly inaccessible sample chamber has severely hampered NMR experiments in the past. With a new cell design that has a radio frequency (RF) micro-coil in the high pressure chamber, NMR experiments beyond 20 Giga-Pascal are reported for the first time. 1 H NMR of water shows sensitivity and resolution obtained with the cells, and 63 Cu NMR on a cuprate superconductor (YBa2Cu3O7-δ) demonstrates that single-crystals can be investigated, as well. 115 In NMR of the ternary chalcogenide AgInTe2 discovers an insulator-metal transition with shift and relaxation measurements. The pressure cells can be mounted easily on standard NMR probes that fit commercial wide-bore magnets with regular cryostats for field- and temperature-dependent measurements ready for many applications in physics and chemistry.

  7. Use of pressure-sensitive paint for diagnostics in turbomachinery flows with shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lepicovsky, J.; Bencic, T. J.

    2002-07-01

    The technology of pressure-sensitive paint (PSP) is well established in external aerodynamics. In internal flows in narrow channels and in turbomachinery cascades, however, there are still unresolved problems. In particular, the internal flows with complex shock structures inside highly curved channels present a challenge. It is not always easy and straightforward to distinguish between true signals and 'ghost' images due to multiple internal reflections in narrow channels. To address some of the problems, investigations were first carried out in a narrow supersonic channel of Mach number 2.5. A single wedge or a combination of two wedges was used to generate a complex shock wave structure in the flow. The experience gained in a small supersonic channel was used for surface pressure measurements on the stator vane of a supersonic throughflow fan. The experimental results for several fan operating conditions are shown in a concise form, including performance map test points, midspan static tap pressure distributions, and vane suction side pressure fields. Finally, the PSP technique was used in the NASA transonic flutter cascade to compliment flow visualization data and to acquire backwall pressure fields to assess the cascade flow periodicity. Lessons learned from this investigation and shortcomings of the PSP technology for internal flow application are presented in the conclusion of the paper.

  8. Application of Pressure-Sensitive Paint to Ice-Accreted Wind Tunnel Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bencic, Timothy J.

    2000-01-01

    Pressure-sensitive paint (PSP) has been successfully used to measure global surface pressures on an ice-accreted model in an icing wind tunnel at NASA Glenn Research Center. Until now, the PSP technique has been limited to use in normal wind tunnels and clear flight environments. This is the first known application of PSP directly to ice in subfreezing conditions. Several major objectives were achieved in these tests. The procedure for applying the coating in the subfreezing tunnel environment was verified. Inspection of the painted ice surface revealed that the paint did not alter the original ice shape and adhered well over the entire coated area. Several procedures were used to show that the paint responded to changes in air pressure and that a repeatable pressure-dependent calibration could be achieved on the PSP-coated surfaces. Differences in pressure measurements made simultaneously on the ice and the metal test model are not yet fully understood, and techniques to minimize or correct them are being investigated.

  9. An ultra-sensitive resistive pressure sensor based on hollow-sphere microstructure induced elasticity in conducting polymer film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Lijia; Chortos, Alex; Yu, Guihua; Wang, Yaqun; Isaacson, Scott; Allen, Ranulfo; Shi, Yi; Dauskardt, Reinhold; Bao, Zhenan

    2014-01-01

    Pressure sensing is an important function of electronic skin devices. The development of pressure sensors that can mimic and surpass the subtle pressure sensing properties of natural skin requires the rational design of materials and devices. Here we present an ultra-sensitive resistive pressure sensor based on an elastic, microstructured conducting polymer thin film. The elastic microstructured film is prepared from a polypyrrole hydrogel using a multiphase reaction that produced a hollow-sphere microstructure that endows polypyrrole with structure-derived elasticity and a low effective elastic modulus. The contact area between the microstructured thin film and the electrodes increases with the application of pressure, enabling the device to detect low pressures with ultra-high sensitivity. Our pressure sensor based on an elastic microstructured thin film enables the detection of pressures of less than 1 Pa and exhibits a short response time, good reproducibility, excellent cycling stability and temperature-stable sensing.

  10. Pressure Pain Sensitivity in Patients With Suspected Opioid-Induced Hyperalgesia

    PubMed Central

    Wasserman, Ronald A.; Hassett, Afton L.; Harte, Steven E.; Goesling, Jenna; Malinoff, Herbert L.; Berland, Daniel W.; Zollars, Jennifer; Moser, Stephanie E.; Brummett, Chad M.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives This study was designed to test whether a brief quantitative sensory testing (QST) assessment could be used to detect hyperalgesia in patients with suspected opioid-induced hyperalgesia. Methods Twenty patients on long-term opioid therapy with suspected opioid-induced hyperalgesia were recruited along with and 20 healthy controls. Pressure pain threshold, Pain50, a measure of intermediate suprathreshold pressure pain sensitivity, and tolerance levels, were evaluated. As a secondary outcome, changes in pressure pain sensitivity following intravenous administration of placebo (saline) and fentanyl (1.5 μg/kg) were assessed. Results There were no significant differences in pain measures between healthy controls and patients. However, there was an association between higher doses of opioids and having a lower pain tolerance (r= -0.46, P=0.041) and lower Pain50 (r=-0.46, P = 0.044), which was consistent with the hypothesis. Patients on >100 mg oral morphine equivalents (OME) displayed decreased pressure pain tolerance compared to patients taking <100 mg OME (P = 0.042). In addition, male patients showed a hyperalgesic response to fentanyl administration, which was significant for the Pain50 measure (P=0.002). Conclusions Whereas there were no differences between patients suspected of having opioid-induced hyperalgesia and the healthy controls, the finding that higher doses of opioids were associated with more sensitivity suggests that dose might be an important factor in the development of hyperalgesia. In addition, male patients demonstrated a hyperalgesic response after a bolus of fentanyl. Future studies are needed to develop better diagnostics for detecting hyperalgesia in the clinical setting. PMID:26469365

  11. The estimated sensitivity and specificity of compartment pressure monitoring for acute compartment syndrome.

    PubMed

    McQueen, Margaret M; Duckworth, Andrew D; Aitken, Stuart A; Court-Brown, Charles M

    2013-04-17

    The aim of our study was to document the estimated sensitivity and specificity of continuous intracompartmental pressure monitoring for the diagnosis of acute compartment syndrome. From our prospective trauma database, we identified all patients who had sustained a tibial diaphyseal fracture over a ten-year period. A retrospective analysis of 1184 patients was performed to record and analyze the documented use of continuous intracompartmental pressure monitoring and the use of fasciotomy. A diagnosis of acute compartment syndrome was made if there was escape of muscles at fasciotomy and/or color change in the muscles or muscle necrosis intraoperatively. A diagnosis of acute compartment syndrome was considered incorrect if it was possible to close the fasciotomy wounds primarily at forty-eight hours. The absence of acute compartment syndrome was confirmed by the absence of neurological abnormality or contracture at the time of the latest follow-up. Of 979 monitored patients identified, 850 fit the inclusion criteria with a mean age of thirty-eight years (range, twelve to ninety-four years), and 598 (70.4%) were male (p < 0.001). A total of 152 patients (17.9%) underwent fasciotomy for the treatment of acute compartment syndrome: 141 had acute compartment syndrome (true positives), six did not have it (false positives), and five underwent fasciotomy despite having a normal differential pressure reading, with subsequent operative findings consistent with acute compartment syndrome (false negatives). Of the 698 patients (82.1%) who did not undergo fasciotomy, 689 had no evidence of any late sequelae of acute compartment syndrome (true negatives) at a mean follow-up time of fifty-nine weeks. The estimated sensitivity of intracompartmental pressure monitoring for suspected acute compartment syndrome was 94%, with an estimated specificity of 98%, an estimated positive predictive value of 93%, and an estimated negative predictive value of 99%. The estimated sensitivity and

  12. Vibration Sensitivity of a Wide-Temperature Electronically Scanned Pressure Measurement (ESP) Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuckerwar, Allan J.; Garza, Frederico R.

    2001-01-01

    A vibration sensitivity test was conducted on a Wide-Temperature ESP module. The test object was Module "M4," a 16-channel, 4 psi unit scheduled for installation in the Arc Sector of NTF. The module was installed on a vibration exciter and loaded to positive then negative full-scale pressures (+/-2.5 psid). Test variables were the following: Vibration frequencies: 20, 55, 75 Hz. Vibration level: 1 g. Vibration axes: X, Y, Z. The pressure response was measured on each channel, first without and then with the vibration turned on, and the difference analyzed by means of the statistical t-test. The results show that the vibration sensitivity does not exceed 0.01% Full Scale Output per g (with the exception of one channel on one axis) to a 95 percent confidence level. This specification, limited by the resolution of the pressure source, lies well below the total uncertainty specification of 0.1 percent Full Scale Output.

  13. Flexible polymer transistors with high pressure sensitivity for application in electronic skin and health monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, Gregor; Tee, Benjamin C.-K.; Mei, Jianguo; Appleton, Anthony L.; Kim, Do Hwan; Wang, Huiliang; Bao, Zhenan

    2013-05-01

    Flexible pressure sensors are essential parts of an electronic skin to allow future biomedical prostheses and robots to naturally interact with humans and the environment. Mobile biomonitoring in long-term medical diagnostics is another attractive application for these sensors. Here we report the fabrication of flexible pressure-sensitive organic thin film transistors with a maximum sensitivity of 8.4 kPa-1, a fast response time of <10 ms, high stability over >15,000 cycles and a low power consumption of <1 mW. The combination of a microstructured polydimethylsiloxane dielectric and the high-mobility semiconducting polyisoindigobithiophene-siloxane in a monolithic transistor design enabled us to operate the devices in the subthreshold regime, where the capacitance change upon compression of the dielectric is strongly amplified. We demonstrate that our sensors can be used for non-invasive, high fidelity, continuous radial artery pulse wave monitoring, which may lead to the use of flexible pressure sensors in mobile health monitoring and remote diagnostics in cardiovascular medicine.

  14. A wearable and highly sensitive pressure sensor with ultrathin gold nanowires.

    PubMed

    Gong, Shu; Schwalb, Willem; Wang, Yongwei; Chen, Yi; Tang, Yue; Si, Jye; Shirinzadeh, Bijan; Cheng, Wenlong

    2014-01-01

    Ultrathin gold nanowires are mechanically flexible yet robust, which are novel building blocks with potential applications in future wearable optoelectronic devices. Here we report an efficient, low-cost fabrication strategy to construct a highly sensitive, flexible pressure sensor by sandwiching ultrathin gold nanowire-impregnated tissue paper between two thin polydimethylsiloxane sheets. The entire device fabrication process is scalable, enabling facile large-area integration and patterning for mapping spatial pressure distribution. Our gold nanowires-based pressure sensors can be operated at a battery voltage of 1.5 V with low energy consumption (<30 μW), and are able to detect pressing forces as low as 13 Pa with fast response time (<17 ms), high sensitivity (>1.14 kPa(-1)) and high stability (>50,000 loading-unloading cycles). In addition, our sensor can resolve pressing, bending, torsional forces and acoustic vibrations. The superior sensing properties in conjunction with mechanical flexibility and robustness enabled real-time monitoring of blood pulses as well as detection of small vibration forces from music.

  15. Flexible polymer transistors with high pressure sensitivity for application in electronic skin and health monitoring.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Gregor; Tee, Benjamin C-K; Mei, Jianguo; Appleton, Anthony L; Kim, Do Hwan; Wang, Huiliang; Bao, Zhenan

    2013-01-01

    Flexible pressure sensors are essential parts of an electronic skin to allow future biomedical prostheses and robots to naturally interact with humans and the environment. Mobile biomonitoring in long-term medical diagnostics is another attractive application for these sensors. Here we report the fabrication of flexible pressure-sensitive organic thin film transistors with a maximum sensitivity of 8.4 kPa(-1), a fast response time of <10 ms, high stability over >15,000 cycles and a low power consumption of <1 mW. The combination of a microstructured polydimethylsiloxane dielectric and the high-mobility semiconducting polyisoindigobithiophene-siloxane in a monolithic transistor design enabled us to operate the devices in the subthreshold regime, where the capacitance change upon compression of the dielectric is strongly amplified. We demonstrate that our sensors can be used for non-invasive, high fidelity, continuous radial artery pulse wave monitoring, which may lead to the use of flexible pressure sensors in mobile health monitoring and remote diagnostics in cardiovascular medicine.

  16. A wearable and highly sensitive pressure sensor with ultrathin gold nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Shu; Schwalb, Willem; Wang, Yongwei; Chen, Yi; Tang, Yue; Si, Jye; Shirinzadeh, Bijan; Cheng, Wenlong

    2014-02-01

    Ultrathin gold nanowires are mechanically flexible yet robust, which are novel building blocks with potential applications in future wearable optoelectronic devices. Here we report an efficient, low-cost fabrication strategy to construct a highly sensitive, flexible pressure sensor by sandwiching ultrathin gold nanowire-impregnated tissue paper between two thin polydimethylsiloxane sheets. The entire device fabrication process is scalable, enabling facile large-area integration and patterning for mapping spatial pressure distribution. Our gold nanowires-based pressure sensors can be operated at a battery voltage of 1.5 V with low energy consumption (<30 μW), and are able to detect pressing forces as low as 13 Pa with fast response time (<17 ms), high sensitivity (>1.14 kPa-1) and high stability (>50,000 loading-unloading cycles). In addition, our sensor can resolve pressing, bending, torsional forces and acoustic vibrations. The superior sensing properties in conjunction with mechanical flexibility and robustness enabled real-time monitoring of blood pulses as well as detection of small vibration forces from music.

  17. Increased salt sensitivity of ambulatory blood pressure in women with a history of severe preeclampsia.

    PubMed

    Martillotti, Gabriella; Ditisheim, Agnès; Burnier, Michel; Wagner, Ghislaine; Boulvain, Michel; Irion, Olivier; Pechère-Bertschi, Antoinette

    2013-10-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are the principal cause of death in women in developed countries and are importantly promoted by hypertension. The salt sensitivity of blood pressure (BP) is considered as an important cardiovascular risk factor at any BP level. Preeclampsia is a hypertensive disorder of pregnancy that arises as a risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. This study measured the salt sensitivity of BP in women with a severe preeclampsia compared with women with no pregnancy hypertensive complications. Forty premenopausal women were recruited 10 years after delivery in a case-control study. Salt sensitivity was defined as an increase of >4 mm Hg in 24-hour ambulatory BP on a high-sodium diet. The ambulatory BP response to salt was significantly increased in women with a history of preeclampsia compared with that of controls. The mean (95% confidence interval) daytime systolic/diastolic BP increased significantly from 115 (109-118)/79 (76-82) mm Hg on low-salt diet to 123 (116-130)/80 (76-84) on a high-salt diet in women with preeclampsia, but not in the control group (from 111 [104-119]/77 [72-82] to 111 [106-116]/75 [72-79], respectively, P<0.05). The sodium sensitivity index (SSI=Δmean arterial pressure/Δurinary Na excretion×1000) was 51.2 (19.1-66.2) in women with preeclampsia and 6.6 (5.8-18.1) mm Hg/mol per day in controls (P=0.015). The nocturnal dip was blunted on a high-salt diet in women with preeclampsia. Our study shows that women who have developed preeclampsia are salt sensitive before their menopause, a finding that may contribute to their increased cardiovascular risk. Women with a history of severe preeclampsia should be targeted at an early stage for preventive measures of cardiovascular diseases.

  18. Preparation of an adhesive in emulsion for maxillofacial prosthetic.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-García, Judith A; Ortega, Alejandra; Barceló-Santana, Federico H; Palacios-Alquisira, Joaquín

    2010-10-13

    Maxillofacial prostheses is a dental medicine specialty aimed at restoring anatomical facial defects caused by cancer, trauma or congenital malformations through an artificial device, which is commonly attached to the skin with the help of an adhesive. The purpose of our research was to develop a pressure-sensitive adhesive (PSA) based on acrylic monomers, characterizing and determining its drying kinetics, that is to say the time it takes to lose 50 to 90% of its moisture. The adhesive synthesis was realized by means of emulsion polymerization; the composition of formulations was: (AA-MMA-EA) and (AA-MMA-2EHA) with different molar ratios. The formulation based on (AA-MMA-2EHA) with 50 w% of solids, presented good adhesive properties such as tack, bond strength, and short drying time. We propose this formulation as a PSA, because it offers an alternative for systemically compromised patients, by less irritation compared to organic solvent-based adhesives.

  19. Preparation of an Adhesive in Emulsion for Maxillofacial Prosthetic

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-García, Judith A.; Ortega, Alejandra; Barceló-Santana, Federico H.; Palacios-Alquisira, Joaquín

    2010-01-01

    Maxillofacial prostheses is a dental medicine specialty aimed at restoring anatomical facial defects caused by cancer, trauma or congenital malformations through an artificial device, which is commonly attached to the skin with the help of an adhesive. The purpose of our research was to develop a pressure-sensitive adhesive (PSA) based on acrylic monomers, characterizing and determining its drying kinetics, that is to say the time it takes to lose 50 to 90% of its moisture. The adhesive synthesis was realized by means of emulsion polymerization; the composition of formulations was: (AA-MMA-EA) and (AA-MMA-2EHA) with different molar ratios. The formulation based on (AA-MMA-2EHA) with 50 w% of solids, presented good adhesive properties such as tack, bond strength, and short drying time. We propose this formulation as a PSA, because it offers an alternative for systemically compromised patients, by less irritation compared to organic solvent-based adhesives. PMID:21152308

  20. High Sensitivity Combined with Extended Structural Coverage of Labile Compounds via Nanoelectrospray Ionization at Subambient Pressures

    DOE PAGES

    Cox, Jonathan T.; Kronewitter, Scott R.; Shukla, Anil K.; ...

    2014-09-15

    Subambient pressure ionization with nanoelectrospray (SPIN) has proven to be effective in producing ions with high efficiency and transmitting them to low pressures for high sensitivity mass spectrometry (MS) analysis. Here we present evidence that not only does the SPIN source improve MS sensitivity but also allows for gentler ionization conditions. The gentleness of a conventional heated capillary electrospray ionization (ESI) source and the SPIN source was compared by the liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS) analysis of colominic acid. Colominic acid is a mixture of sialic acid polymers of different lengths containing labile glycosidic linkages between monomer units necessitating amore » gentle ion source. By coupling the SPIN source with high resolution mass spectrometry and using advanced data processing tools, we demonstrate much extended coverage of sialic acid polymer chains as compared to using the conventional ESI source. Additionally we show that SPIN-LC-MS is effective in elucidating polymer features with high efficiency and high sensitivity previously unattainable by the conventional ESI-LC-MS methods.« less

  1. High sensitive/wide dynamic range, field emission pressure sensor based on fully embedded CNTs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taak, S.; Rajabali, S.; Darbari, S.; Mohajerzadeh, S.

    2014-01-01

    The formation of high sensitivity-wide dynamic range field emission pressure sensors based on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is reported. In this work, CNTs are grown inside an array of micromachined holes in order to ensure a high sensitivity and a wide dynamic range by allowing anode-cathode proximity while preventing anode-cathode direct contact simultaneously. External pressure is applied to a Si-based flexible anode, which results in consequent variations in emission current, due to electric field changes. Microcavities in this structure have been formed by a Si deep vertical etching process, while the CNTs have been grown by direct current plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition. Also, it is demonstrated that a similar fabrication process can be applied to implement a device with an electrically controllable emission current. A high sensitivity of 1.5-13.7 µA kPa-1 (with Vanode/cathode < 100 V) within a dynamic range from around 0.1 to 1 GPa, is measured in this experiment.

  2. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilm Inactivation: Decreased Cell Culturability, Adhesiveness to Surfaces, and Biofilm Thickness Upon High-Pressure Nonthermal Plasma Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Zelaya, Anna J.; Stough, Gregory; Rad, Navid; Vandervoort, Kurt; Brelles-Mariño, Graciela

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms are more resilient to standard killing methods than free-living bacteria. Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 biofilms grown on borosilicate coupons were treated with gas-discharge plasma for various exposure times. Almost 100% of the cells were inactivated after a 5-min plasma exposure. Atomic force microscopy was used to image the biofilms and study their micromechanical properties. Results show that the adhesiveness to borosilicate and the thickness of the Pseudomonas biofilms are reduced upon plasma treatment. PMID:21544254

  3. Elevated intraocular pressure decreases response sensitivity of inner retinal neurons in experimental glaucoma mice

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Ji-Jie; Frankfort, Benjamin J.; Gross, Ronald L.; Wu, Samuel M.

    2015-01-01

    Glaucoma is the second leading cause of blindness in the United States and the world, characterized by progressive degeneration of the optic nerve and retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). Glaucoma patients exhibit an early diffuse loss of retinal sensitivity followed by focal loss of RGCs in sectored patterns. Recent evidence has suggested that this early sensitivity loss may be associated with dysfunctions in the inner retina, but detailed cellular and synaptic mechanisms underlying such sensitivity changes are largely unknown. In this study, we use whole-cell voltage-clamp techniques to analyze light responses of individual bipolar cells (BCs), AII amacrine cells (AIIACs), and ON and sustained OFF alpha-ganglion cells (ONαGCs and sOFFαGCs) in dark-adapted mouse retinas with elevated intraocular pressure (IOP). We present evidence showing that elevated IOP suppresses the rod ON BC inputs to AIIACs, resulting in less sensitive AIIACs, which alter AIIAC inputs to ONαGCs via the AIIAC→cone ON BC→ONαGC pathway, resulting in lower ONαGC sensitivity. The altered AIIAC response also reduces sOFFαGC sensitivity via the AIIAC→sOFFαGC chemical synapses. These sensitivity decreases in αGCs and AIIACs were found in mice with elevated IOP for 3–7 wk, a stage when little RGC or optic nerve degeneration was observed. Our finding that elevated IOP alters neuronal function in the inner retina before irreversible structural damage occurs provides useful information for developing new diagnostic tools and treatments for glaucoma in human patients. PMID:25675503

  4. Effects of dynamic shear and transmural pressure on wall shear stress sensitivity in collecting lymphatic vessels.

    PubMed

    Kornuta, Jeffrey A; Nepiyushchikh, Zhanna; Gasheva, Olga Y; Mukherjee, Anish; Zawieja, David C; Dixon, J Brandon

    2015-11-01

    Given the known mechanosensitivity of the lymphatic vasculature, we sought to investigate the effects of dynamic wall shear stress (WSS) on collecting lymphatic vessels while controlling for transmural pressure. Using a previously developed ex vivo lymphatic perfusion system (ELPS) capable of independently controlling both transaxial pressure gradient and average transmural pressure on an isolated lymphatic vessel, we imposed a multitude of flow conditions on rat thoracic ducts, while controlling for transmural pressure and measuring diameter changes. By gradually increasing the imposed flow through a vessel, we determined the WSS at which the vessel first shows sign of contraction inhibition, defining this point as the shear stress sensitivity of the vessel. The shear stress threshold that triggered a contractile response was significantly greater at a transmural pressure of 5 cmH2O (0.97 dyne/cm(2)) than at 3 cmH2O (0.64 dyne/cm(2)). While contraction frequency was reduced when a steady WSS was applied, this inhibition was reversed when the applied WSS oscillated, even though the mean wall shear stresses between the conditions were not significantly different. When the applied oscillatory WSS was large enough, flow itself synchronized the lymphatic contractions to the exact frequency of the applied waveform. Both transmural pressure and the rate of change of WSS have significant impacts on the contractile response of lymphatic vessels to flow. Specifically, time-varying shear stress can alter the inhibition of phasic contraction frequency and even coordinate contractions, providing evidence that dynamic shear could play an important role in the contractile function of collecting lymphatic vessels. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  5. Effects of dynamic shear and transmural pressure on wall shear stress sensitivity in collecting lymphatic vessels

    PubMed Central

    Kornuta, Jeffrey A.; Nepiyushchikh, Zhanna; Gasheva, Olga Y.; Mukherjee, Anish; Zawieja, David C.

    2015-01-01

    Given the known mechanosensitivity of the lymphatic vasculature, we sought to investigate the effects of dynamic wall shear stress (WSS) on collecting lymphatic vessels while controlling for transmural pressure. Using a previously developed ex vivo lymphatic perfusion system (ELPS) capable of independently controlling both transaxial pressure gradient and average transmural pressure on an isolated lymphatic vessel, we imposed a multitude of flow conditions on rat thoracic ducts, while controlling for transmural pressure and measuring diameter changes. By gradually increasing the imposed flow through a vessel, we determined the WSS at which the vessel first shows sign of contraction inhibition, defining this point as the shear stress sensitivity of the vessel. The shear stress threshold that triggered a contractile response was significantly greater at a transmural pressure of 5 cmH2O (0.97 dyne/cm2) than at 3 cmH2O (0.64 dyne/cm2). While contraction frequency was reduced when a steady WSS was applied, this inhibition was reversed when the applied WSS oscillated, even though the mean wall shear stresses between the conditions were not significantly different. When the applied oscillatory WSS was large enough, flow itself synchronized the lymphatic contractions to the exact frequency of the applied waveform. Both transmural pressure and the rate of change of WSS have significant impacts on the contractile response of lymphatic vessels to flow. Specifically, time-varying shear stress can alter the inhibition of phasic contraction frequency and even coordinate contractions, providing evidence that dynamic shear could play an important role in the contractile function of collecting lymphatic vessels. PMID:26333787

  6. Adhesives, silver amalgam.

    PubMed

    1995-09-01

    The most recent advancement in silver amalgam is use of resin formulations to bond metal to tooth both chemically &/or physically, Since, historically, amalgam has been used successfully without adhesion to tooth, obvious clinical question is: Why is bonding now desirable? Two major clinical reasons to bond are: (1) Adhesive can increase fracture resistance of amalgam restored teeth & decrease cusp fractures; & (2) Seal provided by adhesive can greatly decrease, & often eliminate post-operative sensitivity. Following report summarizes CRA laboratory study of shear bond strength & sealing capability of 23 commercial adhesives used to bond 2 types of silver amalgam to tooth structure.

  7. Atmospheric pressure glow discharge deposition of thermo-sensitive poly (N-isopropylacrylamide)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, M.; Tang, X. L.; Wen, D.; Chen, Y.; Qiu, G.

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, a self-made atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge reactor on intermediate frequency is brought forward and developed, which is equipped with power supply of 1-20 KHz, and the working gas is argon. The experimental results show that is a very stable and uniform atmospheric pressure glow discharge (APGD). Through a series of experiments, the waveforms of single pulse and multi-pulse glow discharge were both obtained. The voltage amplitude, discharge gap and dielectric material are studied, and the conditions of multi-pulse glow discharge are discussed as well. The novel methods of depositing poly (N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm) coatings on the surface of glass slides and PS petri dish are provided by atmospheric pressure plasma polymerization. PNIPAAm can be obtained by plasma polymerization of N-isopropylacrylamide using the self-made equipment of atmospheric pressure plasma vapor treatment. The samples were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and water contact angle. SEM analysis has revealed that the PNIPAAm coatings were formed on the surface of the smooth glass slides. Further evaluation by using XPS, it has shown the presence of PNIPAAm. The wettability can be significantly modified by changing of the temperatures at above and below of the lower critical solution temperature (LCST) from the data of the contact angle test. These results have advantage for further application on the thermo-sensitive textile materials.

  8. The Development and Implementation of a Cryogenic Pressure Sensitive Paint System in the National Transonic Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watkins, A. Neal; Leighty, Bradley D.; Lipford, William E.; Oglesby, Donald M.; Goodman, Kyle Z.; Goad, William K.; Goad, Linda R.; Massey, Edward A.

    2009-01-01

    The Pressure Sensitive Paint (PSP) method was used to measure global surface pressures on a model at full-scale flight Reynolds numbers. In order to achieve these conditions, the test was carried out at the National Transonic Facility (NTF) operating under cryogenic conditions in a nitrogen environment. The upper surface of a wing on a full-span 0.027 scale commercial transport was painted with a porous PSP formulation and tested at 120K. Data was acquired at Mach 0.8 with a total pressure of 200 kPa, resulting in a Reynolds number of 65 x 106/m. Oxygen, which is required for PSP operation, was injected using dry air so that the oxygen concentration in the flow was approximately 1535 ppm. Results show qualitative agreement with expected results. This preliminary test is the first time that PSP has been successfully deployed to measure global surface pressures at cryogenic condition in the NTF. This paper will describe the system as installed, the results obtained from the test, as well as proposed upgrades and future tests.

  9. Quantitative visualization of asymmetric gas flow in constricted microchannels by using pressure-sensitive paint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chih-Yung; Chen, Ying-Hsuan; Wan, Shaw-An; Wang, Yu-Chuan

    2016-10-01

    Asymmetric flow in constricted microchannel devices was quantitatively investigated using a pressure-sensitive paint (PSP) technique. For microchannel devices with constriction ratios of 2 : 1 and 5 : 1, detailed pressure maps for the region around the constriction structure were obtained and enabled visualization of the flow field. Symmetric flow was observed in the microchannel device with a constriction ratio of 2 : 1 at the Reynolds number range 2-165. In the microchannel with a constriction ratio of 5 : 1, a deflected flow pattern was clearly identified from PSP measurements at Reynolds numbers exceeding 107. Furthermore, PSP measurements showed a pressure difference of up to 2.5 kPa between the two lateral locations corresponding to y  =  ±0.15 W (W is the microchannel width) downstream of the constriction at a Reynolds number of 279. The pressure difference resulted from asymmetric bifurcation of the flow.

  10. Investigation of impinging jet resonant modes using unsteady pressure-sensitive paint measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Timothy; Edstrand, Adam; Alvi, Farrukh; Cattafesta, Louis; Yorita, Daisuke; Asai, Keisuke

    2015-05-01

    At given nozzle to plate spacings, the flow field of high-speed impinging jets is known to be characterized by a resonance phenomenon. Large coherent structures that convect downstream and impinge on the surface create strong acoustic waves that interact with the inherently unstable shear layer at the nozzle exit. This feedback mechanism, driven by the coherent structures in the jet shear layer, can either be axisymmetric or helical in nature. Fast-response pressure-sensitive paint (PSP) is applied to the impingement surface to map the unsteady pressure distribution associated with these resonant modes. Phase-averaged results acquired at several kHz are obtained using a flush mounted unsteady pressure transducer on the impingement plate as a reference signal. Tests are conducted on a Mach 1.5 jet at nozzle to plate spacings of . The resulting phase-averaged distribution reveals dramatically different flow fields at the corresponding impingement heights. The existence of a purely axisymmetric mode with a frequency of 6.3 kHz is identified at and is characterized by concentric rings of higher/lower pressure that propagate radially with increasing phase. Two simultaneous modes are observed at with one being a dominant symmetric mode at 7.1 kHz and the second a sub-dominant helical mode at 4.3 kHz. Complimentary phase-conditioned Schlieren images are also obtained visualizing the flow structures associated with each mode and are consistent with the PSP results.

  11. Measuring Spatial and Temporal Heterogeneity of Dissolved Oxygen in Streambed Sediments Using Pressure Sensitive Paint (PSP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huynh, K. T.; Salus, A.; Xie, M.; Roche, K. R.; Packman, A. I.

    2014-12-01

    Pressure sensitive paints (PSP) have been largely used in aerodynamic applications to measure pressure distributions on complex bodies such as aircraft. One common family of PSPs employ fluorescent pigments that are quenched in the presence of oxygen, yielding an inverse relationship between fluorescence intensity and oxygen concentration that is used to measure pressure in aerodynamic applications through the partial pressure of oxygen. These PSPs offer unexplored potential for visualizing dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration distributions on surfaces underwater. PSP was used to measure dissolved oxygen concentrations in streambed sediments in a laboratory flume. Two PSP-coated 2.5 cm diameter spheres were emplaced in a bed of similar material, and imaged under varying DO concentrations. Calibration curves relating fluorescence intensity to dissolved oxygen concentration were developed on a pixel-by-pixel basis, enabling spatial patterns of oxygen to be resolved in the sediment bed. This method of measuring dissolved oxygen concentration is advantageous because of its fast response time and ability to measure heterogeneous oxygen distributions in sediments. Future work will explore the combined effects of stream flow and biofilm growth on oxygen distributions in streambed sediments.

  12. Low pressure gas study for a direction-sensitive dark matter search experiment with MPGD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, K.; Miuchi, K.; Iwaki, S.; Kubo, H.; Mizumoto, T.; Nishimura, H.; Parker, J. D.; Sawano, T.; Takada, A.; Tanimori, T.; Sekiya, H.; Takeda, A.

    2012-02-01

    The NEWAGE project (NEw generation WIMP search with an Advanced Gaseous tracking device Experiment) is a direction-sensitive dark matter search experiment, searching for WIMPs (Weakly Interacting Massive Particle) via nuclear recoil. The NEWAGE detector, a micro time-projection-chamber with a 400μm pitch read out, detects three-dimensional nuclear tracks. A low-pressure gas study (76 torr) was performed in order to lower the energy threshold, one of the most effective improvements for the next underground measurement. We measured the gas gain, the angular resolution and the detection efficiency. We have consequently lowered the energy threshold from 100 keV to 50 keV by decreasing the gas pressure.

  13. Flow Visualization at Cryogenic Conditions Using a Modified Pressure Sensitive Paint Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watkins, A. Neal; Goad, William K.; Obara, Clifford J.; Sprinkle, Danny R.; Campbell, Richard L.; Carter, Melissa B.; Pendergraft, Odis C., Jr.; Bell, James H.; Ingram, JoAnne L.; Oglesby, Donald M.

    2005-01-01

    A modification to the Pressure Sensitive Paint (PSP) method was used to visualize streamlines on a Blended Wing Body (BWB) model at full-scale flight Reynolds numbers. In order to achieve these conditions, the tests were carried out in the National Transonic Facility operating under cryogenic conditions in a nitrogen environment. Oxygen is required for conventional PSP measurements, and several tests have been successfully completed in nitrogen environments by injecting small amounts (typically < 3000 ppm) of oxygen into the flow. A similar technique was employed here, except that air was purged through pressure tap orifices already existent on the model surface, resulting in changes in the PSP wherever oxygen was present. The results agree quite well with predicted results obtained through computational fluid dynamics analysis (CFD), which show this to be a viable technique for visualizing flows without resorting to more invasive procedures such as oil flow or minitufts.

  14. Motion-deblurred, fast-response pressure-sensitive paint on a rotor in forward flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juliano, Thomas J.; Disotell, Kevin J.; Gregory, James W.; Crafton, Jim; Fonov, Sergey

    2012-04-01

    A pressure-sensitive paint (PSP) system capable of measuring the global, unsteady pressure distribution on a rotating surface without resorting to phase averaging is applied to a two-bladed model propeller in edgewise freestream flow. A gated lifetime-based technique captures the paint luminescence after a single pulse of high-energy laser excitation, yielding a signal-to-noise ratio sufficient to avoid image averaging. The selection of a porous polymer/ceramic matrix base with platinum tetra(pentafluorophenyl) porphyrin (PtTFPP) as the luminophore afforded high frequency response and pressure sensitivity, but the long lifetime of PtTFPP caused blurring in the long-exposure image of the rotating blade. An approach to deblurring based on the lifetime of the paint and surface motion is described and validated by results obtained from a disc of 17.8 cm diameter spinning at 70 Hz. An infrared camera recorded wind-on and -off temperature maps to provide a temperature correction for the PSP. The single-shot PSP technique with motion deblurring and temperature correction is then applied to a vertically mounted model propeller with a 25.4 cm diameter and 10.2 cm pitch. Surface pressure maps for the advancing and retreating blades are presented for a spin rate of 70 Hz and advance ratio of 0.3. The higher suction peak and other features on the advancing blade due to its larger effective velocity are detected by the paint system, while the retreating blade shows a qualitatively different distribution.

  15. High calcium diet reduces blood pressure in Dahl salt-sensitive rats by neural mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Peuler, J D; Morgan, D A; Mark, A L

    1987-06-01

    We tested the hypothesis that high dietary calcium attenuates hypertension in Dahl salt-sensitive rats by neural as opposed to vascular mechanisms. Four-week-old Dahl salt-sensitive rats were fed a high salt diet (3.3% sodium) with either high (4.0%; n = 21) or normal (0.4%; n = 21) calcium content until they were 10 to 11 weeks old. Total plasma calcium concentration was increased and plasma phosphorus concentration was decreased by the high calcium diet. At 10 weeks, food intake and intestinal absorption of sodium were not altered by the high calcium diet. There were three major observations. First, mean arterial pressure was lower in awake rats fed a high versus normal calcium diet (137 +/- 7, n = 11, vs 165 +/- 6 mm Hg, n = 10, respectively; p less than 0.05). This pressure difference was dependent on intact autonomic transmission, since ganglionic blockade eliminated the significant difference between pressures in rats fed high (78 +/- 5 mm Hg) and normal (85 +/- 6 mm Hg) calcium diets. Second, high calcium intake augmented baroreceptor reflex inhibition of renal sympathetic nerve activity and heart rate during ramp increase in arterial pressure produced by infusion of phenylephrine. Reflex suppression of renal sympathetic nerve activity was twofold greater in rats fed the high (vs normal) calcium diet (-2.79 +/- 0.25 vs -1.34 +/- 0.14% delta/delta mm Hg, respectively; n = 9 rats per group; p less than 0.05). Third, high calcium intake did not attenuate vascular responsiveness, since pressor responses to norepinephrine and angiotensin II did not differ between rats fed high and normal calcium diets after ganglionic blockade.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  16. Women with Chronic and Episodic Migraine Exhibit Similar Widespread Pressure Pain Sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Palacios-Ceña, María; Lima Florencio, Lidiane; Natália Ferracini, Gabriela; Barón, Johanna; Guerrero, Ángel L; Ordás-Bandera, Carlos; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Fernández-de-Las-Peñas, César

    2016-11-01

    To investigate widespread pressure hyperalgesia in the trigemino-cervical and extra-trigeminal (distant pain-free) regions in women with episodic and chronic migraine. Fifty-one women with episodic migraine, 52 women with chronic migraine, and 52 healthy women without headache history were recruited. Pressure pain thresholds (PPT) were bilaterally assessed over the trigeminal area (i.e., temporalis muscle), cervical area (i.e., C5/C6 zygapophyseal joint), and two extra-trigeminal areas (i.e., second metacarpal, tibialis anterior muscle) in a blinded design. Clinical features of migraine and anxiety/depression (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, HADS) were also assessed. The multivariate analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) revealed that PPTs were significantly decreased bilaterally over trigeminal and extra-trigeminal points in migraine patients compared to healthy women (all sites, P < 0.001). No differences between episodic and chronic migraine were observed (all, P > 0.919). The presence of neck pain (all, P > 0.282), anxiety (P > 0.425) or depression (all, P > 0.316) did not influence the results. The intensity of migraine pain was negatively associated with widespread pressure pain sensitivity: The greater the intensity of migraine attacks, the lower the widespread PPT levels, i.e., the greater the widespread sensitization. This study found similar widespread pressure hypersensitivity in women with episodic or chronic migraine suggesting that central manifestations are involved both in episodic and chronic migraine. © 2016 American Academy of Pain Medicine. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. The Effect of Gaseous Additives on Dynamic Pressure Output and Ignition Sensitivity of Nanothermites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puszynski, Jan; Doorenbos, Zac; Walters, Ian; Redner, Paul; Kapoor, Deepak; Swiatkiewicz, Jacek

    2011-06-01

    This contribution addresses important combustion characteristics of nanothermite systems. In this research the following nanothermites were investigated: a) Al-Bi2O3, b)Al-Fe2O3 and c)Al-Bi2O3-Fe2O3. The effect of various gasifying additives (such as nitrocellulose (NC) and cellulose acetate butyrate (CAB)) as well as reactant stoichiometry, reactant particle size and shape on processability, ignition delay time and dynamic pressure outputs at different locations in a combustion chamber will be presented. In addition, this contribution will report electrostatic and friction sensitivities of standard and modified nanothermites.

  18. Effect of topical anesthesia on evaluation of corneal sensitivity and intraocular pressure in rats and dogs.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jury; Kim, Nam-Soo; Lee, Ki-Chang; Lee, Hae-Beom; Kim, Min-Su; Kim, Hyung-Seop

    2013-01-01

    To determine the effect of 0.5% proparacaine in tonometry by evaluating corneal touch threshold (CTT) and intraocular pressure (IOP).   Nine rats (18 eyes, Sprague-Dawley) and 10 dogs (20 eyes, Beagle) The IOP and CTT were measured in each eye before and after topical anesthesia with 0.5% proparacaine. The IOP was evaluated using Tonopen for dogs and Tonolab for rats. The corneal sensitivity was evaluated by CTT through a Cochet-Bonnet aesthesiometer. The mean IOP was not significantly changed in rats or dogs before and after topical anesthesia. However, after application of proparacaine, CTT was significantly increased in both animal groups compared with that before application of proparacaine.   From this study, topical anesthesia was found to significantly lower the corneal sensitivity but have little effect on IOP measurements. In ophthalmologic examination, topical anesthesia can be used to reduce corneal sensation without an effect on IOP. © 2012 American College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists.

  19. Magnetic field switchable dry adhesives.

    PubMed

    Krahn, Jeffrey; Bovero, Enrico; Menon, Carlo

    2015-02-04

    A magnetic field controllable dry adhesive device is manufactured. The normal adhesion force can be increased or decreased depending on the presence of an applied magnetic field. If the magnetic field is present during the entire normal adhesion test cycle which includes both applying a preloading force and measuring the pulloff pressure, a decrease in adhesion is observed when compared to when there is no applied magnetic field. Similarly, if the magnetic field is present only during the preload portion of the normal adhesion test cycle, a decrease in adhesion is observed because of an increased stiffness of the magnetically controlled dry adhesive device. When the applied magnetic field is present during only the pulloff portion of the normal adhesion test cycle, either an increase or a decrease in normal adhesion is observed depending on the direction of the applied magnetic field.

  20. Abnormal Pressure Pain, Touch Sensitivity, Proprioception, and Manual Dexterity in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Riquelme, Inmaculada; Hatem, Samar M.

    2016-01-01

    Children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) often display an abnormal reactivity to tactile stimuli, altered pain perception, and lower motor skills than healthy children. Nevertheless, these motor and sensory deficits have been mostly assessed by using clinical observation and self-report questionnaires. The present study aims to explore somatosensory and motor function in children with ASD by using standardized and objective testing procedures. Methods. Tactile and pressure pain thresholds in hands and lips, stereognosis, proprioception, and fine motor performance of the upper limbs were assessed in high-functioning children with ASD (n = 27) and compared with typically developing peers (n = 30).  Results. Children with ASD showed increased pain sensitivity, increased touch sensitivity in C-tactile afferents innervated areas, and diminished fine motor performance and proprioception compared to healthy children. No group differences were observed for stereognosis. Conclusion. Increased pain sensitivity and increased touch sensitivity in areas classically related to affective touch (C-tactile afferents innervated areas) may explain typical avoiding behaviors associated with hypersensitivity. Both sensory and motor impairments should be assessed and treated in children with ASD. PMID:26881091

  1. Contact angle hysteresis, adhesion, and marine biofouling.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Donald L; Brady, Robert F; Lam, Karen; Schmidt, Dale C; Chaudhury, Manoj K

    2004-03-30

    Adhesive and marine biofouling release properties of coatings containing surface-oriented perfluoroalkyl groups were investigated. These coatings were prepared by cross-linking a copolymer of 1H,1H,2H,2H-heptadecafluorodecyl acrylate and acrylic acid with a copolymer of poly(2-isopropenyl-2-oxazoline) and methyl methacrylate at different molar ratios. The relationships between contact angle, contact angle hysteresis, adhesion, and marine biofouling were studied. Adhesion was determined by peel tests using pressure-sensitive adhesives. The chemical nature of the surfaces was studied by using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Resistance to marine biofouling of an optimized coating was studied by immersion in seawater and compared to previous, less optimized coatings. The adhesive release properties of the coatings did not correlate well with the surface energies of the coatings estimated from the static and advancing contact angles nor with the amount of fluorine present on the surface. The adhesive properties of the surfaces, however, show a correlation with water receding contact angles and contact angle hysteresis (or wetting hysteresis) resulting from surface penetration and surface reconstruction. Coatings having the best release properties had both the highest cross-link density and the lowest contact angle hysteresis. An optimized coating exhibited unprecedented resistance to marine biofouling. Water contact angle hysteresis appears to correlate with marine biofouling resistance.

  2. Controlled Adhesion of Silicone Elastomer Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owen, Michael

    2000-03-01

    Opportunities exist for controllably enhancing the adhesion of silicone surfaces, ranging from modest enhancement of release force levels of pressure-sensitive adhesive (PSA) release liners by incorporation of adhesion promoters known as high release additives (HRA), to permanent bonding of silicone elastomers using surface modification techniques such as plasma or corona treatment. Although only a part of the complex interaction of factors contributing to adhesion, surface properties such as wettability are a critical component in the understanding and control of release and adhesion phenomena. Surface characterization studies of low-surface-energy silicones before and after various adhesion modification strategies are reviewed. The silicones include polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and fluorosiloxane elastomers and coatings. Techniques used include contact angle, the Johnson, Kendall and Roberts (JKR) contact mechanics approach, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Topics addressed are: use of HRA in PDMS release liners, the interaction of PDMS PSAs with polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), and the effect of plasma treatment on PDMS and fluorosiloxane surfaces.

  3. Legato: Personal Computer Software for Analyzing Pressure-Sensitive Paint Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schairer, Edward T.

    2001-01-01

    'Legato' is personal computer software for analyzing radiometric pressure-sensitive paint (PSP) data. The software is written in the C programming language and executes under Windows 95/98/NT operating systems. It includes all operations normally required to convert pressure-paint image intensities to normalized pressure distributions mapped to physical coordinates of the test article. The program can analyze data from both single- and bi-luminophore paints and provides for both in situ and a priori paint calibration. In addition, there are functions for determining paint calibration coefficients from calibration-chamber data. The software is designed as a self-contained, interactive research tool that requires as input only the bare minimum of information needed to accomplish each function, e.g., images, model geometry, and paint calibration coefficients (for a priori calibration) or pressure-tap data (for in situ calibration). The program includes functions that can be used to generate needed model geometry files for simple model geometries (e.g., airfoils, trapezoidal wings, rotor blades) based on the model planform and airfoil section. All data files except images are in ASCII format and thus are easily created, read, and edited. The program does not use database files. This simplifies setup but makes the program inappropriate for analyzing massive amounts of data from production wind tunnels. Program output consists of Cartesian plots, false-colored real and virtual images, pressure distributions mapped to the surface of the model, assorted ASCII data files, and a text file of tabulated results. Graphical output is displayed on the computer screen and can be saved as publication-quality (PostScript) files.

  4. Legato: Personal Computer Software for Analyzing Pressure-Sensitive Paint Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schairer, Edward T.

    2001-01-01

    'Legato' is personal computer software for analyzing radiometric pressure-sensitive paint (PSP) data. The software is written in the C programming language and executes under Windows 95/98/NT operating systems. It includes all operations normally required to convert pressure-paint image intensities to normalized pressure distributions mapped to physical coordinates of the test article. The program can analyze data from both single- and bi-luminophore paints and provides for both in situ and a priori paint calibration. In addition, there are functions for determining paint calibration coefficients from calibration-chamber data. The software is designed as a self-contained, interactive research tool that requires as input only the bare minimum of information needed to accomplish each function, e.g., images, model geometry, and paint calibration coefficients (for a priori calibration) or pressure-tap data (for in situ calibration). The program includes functions that can be used to generate needed model geometry files for simple model geometries (e.g., airfoils, trapezoidal wings, rotor blades) based on the model planform and airfoil section. All data files except images are in ASCII format and thus are easily created, read, and edited. The program does not use database files. This simplifies setup but makes the program inappropriate for analyzing massive amounts of data from production wind tunnels. Program output consists of Cartesian plots, false-colored real and virtual images, pressure distributions mapped to the surface of the model, assorted ASCII data files, and a text file of tabulated results. Graphical output is displayed on the computer screen and can be saved as publication-quality (PostScript) files.

  5. Dynamic and Steady Characteristics of Polymer-Ceramic Pressure-Sensitive Paint with Variation in Layer Thickness

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Tatsunori; Sakaue, Hirotaka

    2017-01-01

    Polymer-ceramic pressure-sensitive paint (PC-PSP) has been investigated as a surface-pressure sensor for unsteady aerodynamics and short duration measurements. This PSP provides a fast response to a change in pressures with a spray-coating ability. Because it is sprayed onto an aerodynamic surface, the thickness of PC-PSP may play an important role in determining the performance of this sensor. The thickness of other fast PSPs, such as anodized aluminum pressure-sensitive paint, is a major factor in determining its performance. We vary the thickness of PC-PSP from 10 to 240 μm in order to study its effects on PSP measurement characteristics including time response, signal level, pressure sensitivity, and temperature dependency. It is found that the thickness does affect these characteristics. However, a thickness over 80 μm provides uniform performance in these characteristics. PMID:28505122

  6. High-sensitivity Cryogenic Temperature Sensors using Pressurized Fiber Bragg Gratings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Meng-Chou; DeHaven, Stanton L.

    2006-01-01

    Cryogenic temperature sensing was studied using a pressurized fiber Bragg grating (PFBG). The PFBG was obtained by simply applying a small diametric load to a regular fiber Bragg grating (FBG), which was coated with polyimide of a thickness of 11 micrometers. The Bragg wavelength of the PFBG was measured at temperatures from 295 to 4.2 K. A pressure-induced transition occurred at 200 K during the cooling cycle. As a result the temperature sensitivity of the PFBG was found to be nonlinear but reach 24 pm/K below 200 K, more than three times the regular FBG. For the temperature change from 80 K to 10 K, the PFBG has a total Bragg wavelength shift of about 470 pm, 10 times more than the regular FBG. From room temperature to liquid helium temperature the PFBG gives a total wavelength shift of 3.78 nm, compared to the FBG of 1.51 nm. The effect of the coating thickness on the temperature sensitivity of the gratings is also discussed.

  7. High-sensitivity cryogenic temperature sensors using pressurized fiber Bragg gratings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Meng-Chou; DeHaven, Stanton L.

    2006-01-01

    Cryogenic temperature sensing was studied using a pressurized fiber Bragg grating (PFBG). The PFBG was obtained by simply applying a small diametric load to a regular fiber Bragg grating (FBG), which was coated with polyimide of a thickness of 11 micrometers. The Bragg wavelength of the PFBG was measured at temperatures from 295 to 4.2 K. A pressure-induced transition occurred at 200 K during the cooling cycle. As a result the temperature sensitivity of the PFBG was found to be nonlinear but reach 24 pm/K below 200 K, more than three times the regular FBG. For the temperature change from 80 K to 10 K, the PFBG has a total Bragg wavelength shift of about 470 pm, 10 times more than the regular FBG. From room temperature to liquid helium temperature the PFBG gives a total wavelength shift of 3.78 nm, compared to the FBG of 1.51 nm. The effect of the coating thickness on the temperature sensitivity of the gratings is also discussed.

  8. Silver nanowire-embedded PDMS with a multiscale structure for a highly sensitive and robust flexible pressure sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joo, Yunsik; Byun, Junghwan; Seong, Narkhyeon; Ha, Jewook; Kim, Hyunjong; Kim, Sangwoo; Kim, Taehoon; Im, Hwarim; Kim, Donghyun; Hong, Yongtaek

    2015-03-01

    The development of highly sensitive pressure sensors with a low-cost and facile fabrication technique is desirable for electronic skins and wearable sensing devices. Here a low-cost and facile fabrication strategy to obtain multiscale-structured elastomeric electrodes and a highly sensitive and robust flexible pressure sensor is presented. The principles of spontaneous buckle formation of the PDMS surface and the embedding of silver nanowires are used to fabricate the multiscale-structured elastomeric electrode. By laminating the multiscale-structured elastomeric electrode onto the dielectric layer/bottom electrode template, the pressure sensor can be obtained. The pressure sensor is based on the capacitive sensing mechanism and shows high sensitivity (>3.8 kPa-1), fast response and relaxation time (<150 ms), high bending stability and high cycle stability. The fabrication process can be easily scaled up to produce pressure sensor arrays and they can detect the spatial distribution of the applied pressure. It is also demonstrated that the fingertip pressure sensing device can sense the pressure distribution of each finger, when grabbing an object.The development of highly sensitive pressure sensors with a low-cost and facile fabrication technique is desirable for electronic skins and wearable sensing devices. Here a low-cost and facile fabrication strategy to obtain multiscale-structured elastomeric electrodes and a highly sensitive and robust flexible pressure sensor is presented. The principles of spontaneous buckle formation of the PDMS surface and the embedding of silver nanowires are used to fabricate the multiscale-structured elastomeric electrode. By laminating the multiscale-structured elastomeric electrode onto the dielectric layer/bottom electrode template, the pressure sensor can be obtained. The pressure sensor is based on the capacitive sensing mechanism and shows high sensitivity (>3.8 kPa-1), fast response and relaxation time (<150 ms), high bending

  9. Bio-Inspired Pressure Sensitive Foam Arrays for use in Hydrodynamic Sensing Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dusek, Jeff; Triantafyllou, Michael; Lang, Jeffrey

    2015-11-01

    Shallow, turbid, and highly dynamic coastal waters provide a challenging environment for safe and reliable operation of marine vehicles faced with a distinct environmentally driven perceptual deficit. In nature, fish have solved this perplexing sensory problem and exhibit an intimate knowledge of the near-body flow field. This enhanced perception is mediated by the ability to discern and interpret hydrodynamic flow structures through the velocity and pressure sensing capabilities of the fish's lateral line. Taking cues from biological sensory principles, highly conformal pressure sensor arrays have been developed utilizing a novel piezoresistive carbon black-PDMS foam active material. By leveraging the low Young's modulus and watertight structure of closed-cell PDMS (silicone) foam, the sensor arrays are well suited for hydrodynamic sensing applications and prolonged exposure to fluid environments. Prototype arrays were characterized experimentally using hydrodynamic stimuli inspired by biological flows, and were found to exhibit a high degree of sensitivity while improving on the flexibility, robustness, and cost of existing pressure sensors.

  10. Explicit modelling of SOA formation from α-pinene photooxidation: sensitivity to vapour pressure estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valorso, R.; Aumont, B.; Camredon, M.; Raventos-Duran, T.; Mouchel-Vallon, C.; Ng, N. L.; Seinfeld, J. H.; Lee-Taylor, J.; Madronich, S.

    2011-07-01

    The sensitivity of the formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) to the estimated vapour pressures of the condensable oxidation products is explored. A highly detailed reaction scheme was generated for α-pinene photooxidation using the Generator for Explicit Chemistry and Kinetics of Organics in the Atmosphere (GECKO-A). Vapour pressures (Pvap) were estimated with three commonly used structure activity relationships. The values of Pvap were compared for the set of secondary species generated by GECKO-A to describe α-pinene oxidation. Discrepancies in the predicted vapour pressures were found to increase with the number of functional groups borne by the species. For semi-volatile organic compounds (i.e. organic species of interest for SOA formation), differences in the predicted Pvap range between a factor of 5 to 200 on average. The simulated SOA concentrations were compared to SOA observations in the Caltech chamber during three experiments performed under a range of NOx conditions. While the model captures the qualitative features of SOA formation for the chamber experiments, SOA concentrations are systematically overestimated. For the conditions simulated, the modelled SOA speciation appears to be rather insensitive to the Pvap estimation method.

  11. Explicit modelling of SOA formation from α-pinene photooxidation: sensitivity to vapour pressure estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valorso, R.; Aumont, B.; Camredon, M.; Raventos-Duran, T.; Mouchel-Vallon, C.; Ng, N. L.; Seinfeld, J. H.; Lee-Taylor, J.; Madronich, S.

    2011-03-01

    The sensitivity of the formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) to the estimated vapour pressures of the condensable oxidation products is explored. A highly detailed reaction scheme was generated for α-pinene photooxidation using the Generator for Explicit Chemistry and Kinetics of Organics in the Atmosphere (GECKO-A). Vapour pressures (Pvap) were estimated with three commonly used structure activity relationships. The values of Pvap were compared for the set of secondary species generated by GECKO-A to describe α-pinene oxidation. Discrepancies in the predicted vapour pressures were found to increase with the number of functional groups borne by the species. For semi-volatile organic compounds (i.e. organic species of interest for SOA formation), differences in the predicted Pvap range between a factor of 5 to 200 in average. The simulated SOA concentrations were compared to SOA observations in the Caltech chamber during three experiments performed under a range of NOx conditions. While the model captures the qualitative features of SOA formation for the chamber experiments, SOA concentrations are systematically overestimated. For the conditions simulated, the modelled SOA speciation appears to be rather insensitive to the Pvap estimation method.

  12. The Effect of Micrite on Velocity, Its Sensitivity to Pressure, and Dissolution of Carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Husseiny, A.; Vanorio, T.

    2014-12-01

    This study investigates the effect of micrite on the acoustic properties of well-controlled microstructures created in the laboratory to closely mimic carbonate rocks. In particular, we examine the effect of micrite content on the elastic stiffness rock, its sensitivity to pressure, and induced dissolution upon saturation with a reactive fluid. We followed Dunham's classification and fabricated the samples by mixing coarse (sand size) and very fine (micrite size) calcite grains in different ratios, with the addition of cement and then cold-compressing the mixture. The acoustic velocities were measured under bench-top conditions and as functions of confining pressure before and after the injection of a CO2aqueous solution. Our bench-top measurements indicated that micrite makes the frame of the carbonate samples stiffer. Since the sensitivity of the elastic stiffness to pressure decreases as the content of micrite increases (see figure 1), we hypothesize a stiffer pore structure (i.e., rounder pores) in micrite-richer fabrics. Furthermore, the presence of micrite makes the carbonate sample more reactive upon dissolution. The concentration of Ca+2 cations in the fluid measured at the outlet after the injection of the CO2 aqueous solution shows larger dissolution in the micrite-rich samples likely due to the higher surface area of the micrite aggregates. The content of micrite also seems to affect the evolution of stiffness as dissolution proceeds. As the content of micrite increases, the enhanced dissolution translates into a marked softening of the rock frame. We conclude that the content of micrite can play an important role in the complex rock-fluid interaction of carbonates as well as when comparing Gassmann's predictions to velocity measurements of saturated carbonates.

  13. Comparing the effect of a desensitizing material and a self-etch adhesive on dentin sensitivity after periodontal surgery: a randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Hajizadeh, Hila; Nemati-Karimooy, Atefeh; Majidinia, Sara; Moeintaghavi, Amir; Ghavamnasiri, Marjaneh

    2017-08-01

    This double-blind randomized placebo-controlled clinical trial evaluated the ability of a desensitizing agent and a self-etch adhesive on cervical dentin sensitivity (CDS) after periodontal surgery. Ninety hypersensitive teeth of 13 subjects were included in the study. After periodontal surgery, the teeth of each posterior sextant treated with one of the following materials: G1: Clearfil S(3) Bond (Kuraray Dental), G2: Gluma Desensitizer (Heraeus Kulzer), and G3: placebo (water). The sensitivity was assessed using evaporative stimuli before treatment (baseline, T0), 1 day after treatment (T1), after 1 week (T2), and after 1 month (T3) according to visual analog scale (VAS). Following the treatment, all the 3 groups showed significant reduction of CDS in T1 compared to T0. Reduction of CDS between T1 and T2 was observed only in G1 but there was no significant difference between T2 and T3 in this group. Although we observed a significant difference in T3 compared to T1 and T2 in G2 and G3, comparison of treatment groups in each assessment time showed a significant difference only in T3. According to paired comparison, this was due to the difference between G2 and G3. Dentin sensitivity following periodontal surgery will decrease spontaneously over time, but treating the sensitive teeth with Gluma Desensitizer and Clearfil S(3) Bond can have some benefits.

  14. Extremely sensitive CWA analyzer based on a novel optical pressure sensor in photoacoustic gas analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kauppinen, Jyrki K.; Koskinen, Vesa; Uotila, Juho; Kauppinen, Ismo K.

    2004-12-01

    Major improvement into the sensitivity of broadband Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometers, used in gas analysis, can be achieved by a photoacoustic detection system, which bases on a recently introduced optical pressure sensor. The sensor is a cantilever-type microphone with interferometric measurement of its free end displacement. By using a preliminary prototype of the photoacoustic gas detector, equipped with the proposed sensor and a black body radiation source, a detection limit in the sub-ppb range was obtained for e.g. methane gas. The limit, obtained in non-resonant operation mode, is very close to the best photoacoustic results achieved with powerfull laser sources and by exploiting the cell resonances. It is also orders of magnitude better than any measurement with a black body radiation source. Furthermore, the ultimate sensitivity leads on to very small detection limits also for several chemical warfare agents (CWA) e.g. sarin, tabun and mustard. The small size of the sensor and its great thermal stability enables the construction of an extremely sensitive portable CWA analyzer in the near future.

  15. Reliability and validity of pressure and temporal parameters recorded using a pressure-sensitive insole during running.

    PubMed

    Mann, Robert; Malisoux, Laurent; Brunner, Roman; Gette, Paul; Urhausen, Axel; Statham, Andrew; Meijer, Kenneth; Theisen, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Running biomechanics has received increasing interest in recent literature on running-related injuries, calling for new, portable methods for large-scale measurements. Our aims were to define running strike pattern based on output of a new pressure-sensitive measurement device, the Runalyser, and to test its validity regarding temporal parameters describing running gait. Furthermore, reliability of the Runalyser measurements was evaluated, as well as its ability to discriminate different running styles. Thirty-one healthy participants (30.3 ± 7.4 years, 1.78 ± 0.10 m and 74.1 ± 12.1 kg) were involved in the different study parts. Eleven participants were instructed to use a rearfoot (RFS), midfoot (MFS) and forefoot (FFS) strike pattern while running on a treadmill. Strike pattern was subsequently defined using a linear regression (R(2)=0.89) between foot strike angle, as determined by motion analysis (1000 Hz), and strike index (SI, point of contact on the foot sole, as a percentage of foot sole length), as measured by the Runalyser. MFS was defined by the 95% confidence interval of the intercept (SI=43.9-49.1%). High agreement (overall mean difference 1.2%) was found between stance time, flight time, stride time and duty factor as determined by the Runalyser and a force-measuring treadmill (n=16 participants). Measurements of the two devices were highly correlated (R ≥ 0.80) and not significantly different. Test-retest intra-class correlation coefficients for all parameters were ≥ 0.94 (n=14 participants). Significant differences (p<0.05) between FFS, RFS and habitual running were detected regarding SI, stance time and stride time (n=24 participants). The Runalyser is suitable for, and easily applicable in large-scale studies on running biomechanics.

  16. A Comparison of an AEDC and a Russian Developed Pressure Sensitive Paint in the AEDC Propulsion Wind Tunnel 16T

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-12-01

    at AEDC uses platinum octaethylporphyrin ( PtOEP ) for the pressure sensitive luminescent molecule and is very sensitive to changes in temperature...luminescent molecule ( PtOEP or other) absorbs a photon of appropriate energy, the molecule enters an excited state. From this state, the molecule

  17. Insulin sensitivity is related to physical fitness and exercise blood pressure to structural vascular properties in young men.

    PubMed

    Fossum, E; Høieggen, A; Moan, A; Rostrup, M; Kjeldsen, S E

    1999-03-01

    Insulin resistance is related to physical inactivity, which is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease and death. Moreover, blood pressure responses during the first 6 minutes of an exercise test (600 kilo/pound/meter [kpm] per min) are more predictive for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality than blood pressure at rest, which could reflect that exercise blood pressure correlates more closely to peripheral structural vascular changes than casual blood pressure. We have recently shown a correlation between insulin resistance and minimal forearm vascular resistance (MFVR) in young men recruited from the highest blood pressure percentiles during a military draft session. In the present study, we tested the hypotheses that insulin sensitivity relates to physical fitness and that blood pressure responses during an exercise test relate to peripheral structural vascular changes in these men; we also tested whether these findings were interrelated. We assessed insulin sensitivity and physical fitness in 27 young men randomly selected from the cohort having a blood pressure of 140/90 mm Hg or higher during the compulsory military draft session in Oslo. Insulin sensitivity correlated with physical fitness (r=0.58, P=0.002). Systolic blood pressure after 6 minutes of exercise (600 kpm/min) correlated with MFVR (r=0.46, P=0.015). MFVR and physical fitness independently explained 60% of the variation in insulin sensitivity, and MFVR independently explained 19% of the variation of systolic blood pressure after 6 minutes of exercise. In conclusion, insulin sensitivity is related to physical fitness and exercise blood pressure to structural vascular properties in these young men.

  18. Chlorine-trapped CVD bilayer graphene for resistive pressure sensor with high detection limit and high sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phuong Pham, Viet; Triet Nguyen, Minh; Park, Jin Woo; Kwak, Sung Soo; Nguyen, Dieu Hien Thi; Kyeom Mun, Mu; Danh Phan, Hoang; San Kim, Doo; Kim, Ki Hyun; Lee, Nae-Eung; Yeom, Geun Young

    2017-06-01

    Pressure sensing is one of the key functions for smart electronics. Considerably more effort is required to achieve the fabrication of pressure sensors that can imitate and overcome the sophisticated pressure sensing characteristics in nature and industry, especially in the innovation of materials and structures. Almost all of the pressure sensors reported until now have a high sensitivity at a low-pressure detection limit (<10 kPa). While the exploration of a pressure sensor with a high sensitivity and a high responsivity at a high-pressure is challenging, it is required for next generation smart electronics. Here, we report an exotic heterostructure pressure sensor based on ZnO/chlorine radical-trap doped bilayer graphene (ZGClG) as an ideal channel for pressure sensors. Using this ZGClG as the channel, this study shows the possibility of forming a pressure sensor with a high sensitivity (0.19 kPa-1) and a high responsivity (0.575 s) at V  =  1 V on glass substrate. Further, the pressure detection limit of this device was as high as 98 kPa. The investigation of the sensing mechanism under pressure has revealed that the significant improved sensing effect is related to the heavy p-type chlorine trap doping in the channel graphene with chlorine radicals without damaging the graphene. This work indicates that the ZGClG channel used for the pressure sensing device could also provide a simple and essential sensing platform for chemical-, medical-, and biological-sensing for future smart electronics.

  19. Experimental demonstration of the utility of pressure sensitivity kernels in time-reversal.

    PubMed

    Raghukumar, Kaustubha; Cornuelle, Bruce D; Hodgkiss, William S; Kuperman, William A

    2010-09-01

    Pressure sensitivity kernels were recently applied to time-reversal acoustics in an attempt to explain the enhanced stability of the time-reversal focal spot [Raghukumar et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 124, 98-112 (2008)]. The theoretical framework developed was also used to derive optimized source functions, closely related to the inverse filter. The use of these optimized source functions results in an inverse filter-like focal spot which is more robust to medium sound speed fluctuations than both time-reversal and the inverse filter. In this paper the theory is applied to experimental data gathered during the Focused Acoustic Fields experiment, conducted in 2005, north of Elba Island in Italy. Sensitivity kernels are calculated using a range-independent sound-speed profile, for a geometry identical to that used in the experiment, and path sensitivities are identified with observed arrivals. The validity of the kernels in tracking time-evolving Green's functions is studied, along with limitations that result from a linearized analysis. An internal wave model is used to generate an ensemble of sound speed profiles, which are then used along with the calculated sensitivity kernels to derive optimized source functions. Focal spots obtained using the observed Green's functions with these optimized source functions are then compared to those obtained using time-reversal and the inverse-filter. It is shown that these functions are able to provide a focal spot superior to time-reversal while being more robust to sound speed fluctuations than the inverse filter or time-reversal.

  20. Elevated pressure, a novel cancer therapeutic tool for sensitizing cisplatin-mediated apoptosis in A549

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, Sangnam; Kim, Yanghee; Kim, Joonhee; Kwon, Daeho; Lee, Eunil

    2010-08-13

    Research highlights: {yields} Sensitized apoptosis in cancer cells stimulated by EP precondition with p53 dependence. {yields} EP attenuates several CDDP-resistance mechanisms. {yields} No harmful effect of EP on normal fibroblasts. -- Abstract: Intensive cancer therapy strategies have thus far focused on sensitizing cancer cells to anticancer drug-mediated apoptosis to overcome drug resistance, and this strategy has led to more effective cancer therapeutics. Cisplatin (cis-diamminedichloroplatinum(II), CDDP) is an effective anticancer drug used to treat many types of cancer, including non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC), and can be used in combination with various chemicals to enhance cancer cell apoptosis. Here, we introduce the use of elevated pressure (EP) in combination with CDDP for cancer treatment and explore the effects of EP on CDDP-mediated apoptosis in NSCLC cells. Our findings demonstrate that preconditioning NSCLC cells with EP sensitizes cells for CDDP-induced apoptosis. Enhanced apoptosis was dependent on p53 and HO-1 expression, and was associated with increased DNA damage and down-regulation of genes involved in nucleotide excision repair. The transcriptional levels of transporter proteins indicated that the mechanism by which EP-induced CDDP sensitization was intracellular drug accumulation. The protein levels of some antioxidants, such as hemeoxygenase-1 (HO-1), glutathione (GSH) and glutathione peroxidase (Gpx), were decreased in A549 cells exposed to EP via the down-regulation of the transcription factor nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf-2). Furthermore, normal human fibroblasts were resistant to EP treatment, with no elevated DNA damage or apoptosis. Collectively, these data show that administration of EP is a potential adjuvant tool for CDDP-based chemosensitivity of lung cancer cells that may reduce drug resistance.

  1. Improving the Sensitivity of Mass Spectrometry by Using a New Sheath Flow Electrospray Emitter Array at Subambient Pressures

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Jonathan T.; Marginean, Ioan; Kelly, Ryan T.; Smith, Richard D.; Tang, Keqi

    2014-01-01

    Arrays of chemically etched emitters with individualized sheath gas capillaries were developed to enhance electrospray ionization (ESI) efficiency at subambient pressures. By incorporating the new emitter array in a subambient pressure ionization with nanoelectrospray (SPIN) source, both ionization efficiency and ion transmission efficiency were significantly increased, providing enhanced sensitivity in mass spectrometric analyses. The SPIN source eliminates the major ion losses of conventional ESI-mass spectrometry (MS) interfaces by placing the emitter in the first reduced pressure region of the instrument. The new ESI emitter array design developed in this study allows individualized sheath gas around each emitter in the array making it possible to generate an array of uniform and stable electrosprays in the subambient pressure (10 to 30 Torr) environment for the first time. The utility of the new emitter arrays was demonstrated by coupling the emitter array/SPIN source with a time of flight (TOF) mass spectrometer. The instrument sensitivity was compared under different ESI source and interface configurations including a standard atmospheric pressure single ESI emitter/heated capillary, single emitter/SPIN and multi-emitter/SPIN configurations using an equimolar solution of 9 peptides. The highest instrument sensitivity was observed using the multi-emitter/SPIN configuration in which the sensitivity increased with the number of emitters in the array. Over an order of magnitude MS sensitivity improvement was achieved using multi-emitter/SPIN as compared to using the standard atmospheric pressure single ESI emitter/heated capillary interface. PMID:24676894

  2. A High-Sensitive Pressure Sensor Using a Single-Mode Fiber Embedded Microbubble with Thin Film Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guanjun; Liu, Xinglin; Gui, Zhiguo; An, Yongquan; Gu, Jinyu; Zhang, Meiqin; Yan, Lu; Wang, Gao; Wang, Zhibin

    2017-01-01

    A new fiber pressure sensor is proposed and analyzed in this paper. A commercial arc fusion splicer and pressure-assisted arc discharge technology are used here to fabricate a silica hollow microbubble from a common glass tube with the characteristics of a thin film. Then the single mode fiber is embedded into the microbubble to form a fiber Fabry–Perot interferometer by measuring the reflected interference spectrum from the fiber tip and microbubble end. As the wall thickness of the micro-bubble can reach up to several micrometers, it can then be used for measuring the outer pressure with high sensitivity. The fabrication method has the merits of being simple, low in cost, and is easy to control. Experimental results show that its pressure sensitivity can reach 164.56 pm/kPa and the temperature sensitivity can reach 4 pm/°C. Therefore, it also has the advantage of being insensitive to temperature fluctuation. PMID:28545235

  3. A High-Sensitive Pressure Sensor Using a Single-Mode Fiber Embedded Microbubble with Thin Film Characteristics.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guanjun; Liu, Xinglin; Gui, Zhiguo; An, Yongquan; Gu, Jinyu; Zhang, Meiqin; Yan, Lu; Wang, Gao; Wang, Zhibin

    2017-05-23

    A new fiber pressure sensor is proposed and analyzed in this paper. A commercial arc fusion splicer and pressure-assisted arc discharge technology are used here to fabricate a silica hollow microbubble from a common glass tube with the characteristics of a thin film. Then the single mode fiber is embedded into the microbubble to form a fiber Fabry-Perot interferometer by measuring the reflected interference spectrum from the fiber tip and microbubble end. As the wall thickness of the micro-bubble can reach up to several micrometers, it can then be used for measuring the outer pressure with high sensitivity. The fabrication method has the merits of being simple, low in cost, and is easy to control. Experimental results show that its pressure sensitivity can reach 164.56 pm/kPa and the temperature sensitivity can reach 4 pm/°C. Therefore, it also has the advantage of being insensitive to temperature fluctuation.

  4. Development of fast response bi-luminophore pressure-sensitive paint by means of an inkjet printing technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egami, Y.; Ueyama, J.; Furukawa, S.; Kameya, T.; Matsuda, Y.; Yamaguchi, H.; Niimi, T.

    2015-06-01

    A novel fast response bi-luminophore pressure-sensitive paint (PSP) by inkjet printing of sensor-dot arrays on an anodized aluminum (AA) substrate has been developed for unsteady flow measurements. A bi-luminophore AA-PSP, which is a combination of PSP and temperature-sensitive paint (TSP), is essential for precise pressure measurements, because the PSP result needs the temperature correction. However, a conventional bi-luminophore AA-PSP prepared by a dipping method does not work well due to the interference between the PSP and TSP luminophores. To overcome this problem, we have developed isolated dot arrays of PSP and TSP formed on an anodized aluminum substrate by an inkjet printing method. In this study, platinum tetrakis (pentafluorophenyl) porphyrin (PtTFPP) and ZnS-AgInS2 (ZAIS) were employed as pressure- and temperature-sensitive dyes, respectively. A suitable solvent was chosen for each dye to form the dots with uniform, high luminescence intensity, and high sensitivity. The developed bi-luminophore AA-PSP could simultaneously measure pressure and temperature and could reduce the temperature effect of the PSP from -0.97%/K (without temperature correction) to -0.01%/K (with temperature correction). It showed a pressure response time of 17.8  ±  0.8 μs at 90% pressure rise to a step change of pressure, which is in the same range as a conventional AA-PSP.

  5. The clinical performance of adhesives.

    PubMed

    Van Meerbeek, B; Perdigão, J; Lambrechts, P; Vanherle, G

    1998-01-01

    Traditional mechanical methods of retaining restorative materials have been replaced to a large extent by tooth conserving adhesive restorative techniques. Because adhesives have been evolving so rapidly for the last few years, the timing is right for evaluating the clinical status of present day adhesives. Current literature with regard to the clinical performance of adhesives has been reviewed. An overview of currently available adhesive systems is provided and a categorization of these adhesives according to their clinical application procedure and their intended mechanism of adhesion is proposed. Parameters of direct relevance to the clinical effectiveness of adhesives are discussed in relation to the clinical effectiveness of today's adhesives. The clinical performance of present day adhesives has significantly improved, allowing adhesive restorations to be placed with a high predictable level of clinical success. Most modern adhesive systems are superior to their predecessors, especially in terms of retention that is no longer the main cause of premature clinical failure. Recent adhesives also appear less sensitive to substrate and other clinical co-variables. As the remaining major shortcoming of modern adhesives, none of these modern systems however appears yet to be able to guarantee hermetically sealed restorations with margins free of discoloration for a long time.

  6. Stretchable Array of Highly Sensitive Pressure Sensors Consisting of Polyaniline Nanofibers and Au-Coated Polydimethylsiloxane Micropillars.

    PubMed

    Park, Heun; Jeong, Yu Ra; Yun, Junyeong; Hong, Soo Yeong; Jin, Sangwoo; Lee, Seung-Jung; Zi, Goangseup; Ha, Jeong Sook

    2015-10-27

    We report on the facile fabrication of a stretchable array of highly sensitive pressure sensors. The proposed pressure sensor consists of the top layer of Au-deposited polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) micropillars and the bottom layer of conductive polyaniline nanofibers on a polyethylene terephthalate substrate. The sensors are operated by the changes in contact resistance between Au-coated micropillars and polyaniline according to the varying pressure. The fabricated pressure sensor exhibits a sensitivity of 2.0 kPa(-1) in the pressure range below 0.22 kPa, a low detection limit of 15 Pa, a fast response time of 50 ms, and high stability over 10000 cycles of pressure loading/unloading with a low operating voltage of 1.0 V. The sensor is also capable of noninvasively detecting human-pulse waveforms from carotid and radial artery. A 5 × 5 array of the pressure sensors on the deformable substrate, which consists of PDMS islands for sensors and the mixed thin film of PDMS and Ecoflex with embedded liquid metal interconnections, shows stable sensing of pressure under biaxial stretching by 15%. The strain distribution obtained by the finite element method confirms that the maximum strain applied to the pressure sensor in the strain-suppressed region is less than 0.04% under a 15% biaxial strain of the unit module. This work demonstrates the potential application of our proposed stretchable pressure sensor array for wearable and artificial electronic skin devices.

  7. Miniaturisation of Pressure-Sensitive Paint Measurement Systems Using Low-Cost, Miniaturised Machine Vision Cameras

    PubMed Central

    Spinosa, Emanuele; Roberts, David A.

    2017-01-01

    Measurements of pressure-sensitive paint (PSP) have been performed using new or non-scientific imaging technology based on machine vision tools. Machine vision camera systems are typically used for automated inspection or process monitoring. Such devices offer the benefits of lower cost and reduced size compared with typically scientific-grade cameras; however, their optical qualities and suitability have yet to be determined. This research intends to show relevant imaging characteristics and also show the applicability of such imaging technology for PSP. Details of camera performance are benchmarked and compared to standard scientific imaging equipment and subsequent PSP tests are conducted using a static calibration chamber. The findings demonstrate that machine vision technology can be used for PSP measurements, opening up the possibility of performing measurements on-board small-scale model such as those used for wind tunnel testing or measurements in confined spaces with limited optical access. PMID:28757553

  8. Ultra-sensitive flow measurement in individual nanopores through pressure--driven particle translocation.

    PubMed

    Gadaleta, Alessandro; Biance, Anne-Laure; Siria, Alessandro; Bocquet, Lyderic

    2015-05-07

    A challenge for the development of nanofluidics is to develop new instrumentation tools, able to probe the extremely small mass transport across individual nanochannels. Such tools are a prerequisite for the fundamental exploration of the breakdown of continuum transport in nanometric confinement. In this letter, we propose a novel method for the measurement of the hydrodynamic permeability of nanometric pores, by diverting the classical technique of Coulter counting to characterize a pressure-driven flow across an individual nanopore. Both the analysis of the translocation rate, as well as the detailed statistics of the dwell time of nanoparticles flowing across a single nanopore, allow us to evaluate the permeability of the system. We reach a sensitivity for the water flow down to a few femtoliters per second, which is more than two orders of magnitude better than state-of-the-art alternative methods.

  9. Posterior rat eye during acute intraocular pressure elevation studied using polarization sensitive optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Fialová, Stanislava; Augustin, Marco; Fischak, Corinna; Schmetterer, Leopold; Handschuh, Stephan; Glösmann, Martin; Pircher, Michael; Hitzenberger, Christoph K.; Baumann, Bernhard

    2016-01-01

    Polarization sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT) operating at 840 nm with axial resolution of 3.8 µm in tissue was used for investigating the posterior rat eye during an acute intraocular pressure (IOP) increase experiment. IOP was elevated in the eyes of anesthetized Sprague Dawley rats by cannulation of the anterior chamber. Three dimensional PS-OCT data sets were acquired at IOP levels between 14 mmHg and 105 mmHg. Maps of scleral birefringence, retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) retardation and relative RNFL/retina reflectivity were generated in the peripapillary area and quantitatively analyzed. All investigated parameters showed a substantial correlation with IOP. In the low IOP range of 14-45 mmHg only scleral birefringence showed statistically significant correlation. The polarization changes observed in the PS-OCT imaging study presented in this work suggest that birefringence of the sclera may be a promising IOP-related parameter to investigate. PMID:28101419

  10. Posterior rat eye during acute intraocular pressure elevation studied using polarization sensitive optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Fialová, Stanislava; Augustin, Marco; Fischak, Corinna; Schmetterer, Leopold; Handschuh, Stephan; Glösmann, Martin; Pircher, Michael; Hitzenberger, Christoph K; Baumann, Bernhard

    2017-01-01

    Polarization sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT) operating at 840 nm with axial resolution of 3.8 µm in tissue was used for investigating the posterior rat eye during an acute intraocular pressure (IOP) increase experiment. IOP was elevated in the eyes of anesthetized Sprague Dawley rats by cannulation of the anterior chamber. Three dimensional PS-OCT data sets were acquired at IOP levels between 14 mmHg and 105 mmHg. Maps of scleral birefringence, retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) retardation and relative RNFL/retina reflectivity were generated in the peripapillary area and quantitatively analyzed. All investigated parameters showed a substantial correlation with IOP. In the low IOP range of 14-45 mmHg only scleral birefringence showed statistically significant correlation. The polarization changes observed in the PS-OCT imaging study presented in this work suggest that birefringence of the sclera may be a promising IOP-related parameter to investigate.

  11. Miniaturisation of Pressure-Sensitive Paint Measurement Systems Using Low-Cost, Miniaturised Machine Vision Cameras.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Mark Kenneth; Spinosa, Emanuele; Roberts, David A

    2017-07-25

    Measurements of pressure-sensitive paint (PSP) have been performed using new or non-scientific imaging technology based on machine vision tools. Machine vision camera systems are typically used for automated inspection or process monitoring. Such devices offer the benefits of lower cost and reduced size compared with typically scientific-grade cameras; however, their optical qualities and suitability have yet to be determined. This research intends to show relevant imaging characteristics and also show the applicability of such imaging technology for PSP. Details of camera performance are benchmarked and compared to standard scientific imaging equipment and subsequent PSP tests are conducted using a static calibration chamber. The findings demonstrate that machine vision technology can be used for PSP measurements, opening up the possibility of performing measurements on-board small-scale model such as those used for wind tunnel testing or measurements in confined spaces with limited optical access.

  12. Variable High-Pressure-Processing Sensitivities for Genogroup II Human Noroviruses

    PubMed Central

    Lou, Fangfei; DiCaprio, Erin; Li, Xinhui; Dai, Xianjun; Ma, Yuanmei; Hughes, John; Chen, Haiqiang; Kingsley, David H.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human norovirus (HuNoV) is a leading cause of foodborne diseases worldwide. High-pressure processing (HPP) is one of the most promising nonthermal technologies for the decontamination of viral pathogens in foods. However, the survival of HuNoVs after HPP is poorly understood because these viruses cannot be propagated in vitro. In this study, we estimated the survival of different HuNoV strains within genogroup II (GII) after HPP treatment using viral receptor-binding ability as an indicator. Four HuNoV strains (one GII genotype 1 [GII.1] strain, two GII.4 strains, and one GII.6 strain) were treated at high pressures ranging from 200 to 600 MPa. After treatment, the intact viral particles were captured by porcine gastric mucin-conjugated magnetic beads (PGM-MBs) that contained histo-blood group antigens, the functional receptors for HuNoVs. The genomic RNA copies of the captured HuNoVs were quantified by real-time reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR). Two GII.4 HuNoVs had similar sensitivities to HPP. The resistance of HuNoV strains against HPP ranked as follows: GII.1 > GII.6 > GII.4, with GII.4 being the most sensitive. Evaluation of temperature and matrix effects on HPP-mediated inactivation of HuNoV GII.4, GII.1, and GII.6 strains showed that HuNoV was more easily inactivated at lower temperatures and at a neutral pH. In addition, phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) and minimal essential medium (MEM) can provide protective effects against HuNoV inactivation compared to H2O. Collectively, this study demonstrated that (i) different HuNoV strains within GII exhibited different sensitivities to high pressure, and (ii) HPP is capable of inactivating HuNoV GII strains by optimizing pressure parameters. IMPORTANCE Human norovirus (HuNoV) is a leading cause of foodborne disease worldwide. Noroviruses are highly diverse, both antigenically and genetically. Genogroup II (GII) contains the majority of HuNoVs, with GII genotype 4 (GII.4) being the most prevalent

  13. Variable High-Pressure-Processing Sensitivities for Genogroup II Human Noroviruses.

    PubMed

    Lou, Fangfei; DiCaprio, Erin; Li, Xinhui; Dai, Xianjun; Ma, Yuanmei; Hughes, John; Chen, Haiqiang; Kingsley, David H; Li, Jianrong

    2016-10-01

    Human norovirus (HuNoV) is a leading cause of foodborne diseases worldwide. High-pressure processing (HPP) is one of the most promising nonthermal technologies for the decontamination of viral pathogens in foods. However, the survival of HuNoVs after HPP is poorly understood because these viruses cannot be propagated in vitro In this study, we estimated the survival of different HuNoV strains within genogroup II (GII) after HPP treatment using viral receptor-binding ability as an indicator. Four HuNoV strains (one GII genotype 1 [GII.1] strain, two GII.4 strains, and one GII.6 strain) were treated at high pressures ranging from 200 to 600 MPa. After treatment, the intact viral particles were captured by porcine gastric mucin-conjugated magnetic beads (PGM-MBs) that contained histo-blood group antigens, the functional receptors for HuNoVs. The genomic RNA copies of the captured HuNoVs were quantified by real-time reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR). Two GII.4 HuNoVs had similar sensitivities to HPP. The resistance of HuNoV strains against HPP ranked as follows: GII.1 > GII.6 > GII.4, with GII.4 being the most sensitive. Evaluation of temperature and matrix effects on HPP-mediated inactivation of HuNoV GII.4, GII.1, and GII.6 strains showed that HuNoV was more easily inactivated at lower temperatures and at a neutral pH. In addition, phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) and minimal essential medium (MEM) can provide protective effects against HuNoV inactivation compared to H2O. Collectively, this study demonstrated that (i) different HuNoV strains within GII exhibited different sensitivities to high pressure, and (ii) HPP is capable of inactivating HuNoV GII strains by optimizing pressure parameters. Human norovirus (HuNoV) is a leading cause of foodborne disease worldwide. Noroviruses are highly diverse, both antigenically and genetically. Genogroup II (GII) contains the majority of HuNoVs, with GII genotype 4 (GII.4) being the most prevalent. Recently, GII.1 and GII.6

  14. Drug and radiation sensitivity measurements of successful primary monolayer culturing of human tumor cells using cell-adhesive matrix and supplemented medium

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, F.L.; Spitzer, G.; Ajani, J.A.; Brock, W.A.; Lukeman, J.; Pathak, S.; Tomasovic, B.; Thielvoldt, D.; Williams, M.; Vines, C.

    1986-03-01

    The limitations of the agar suspension culture method for primary culturing of human tumor cells prompted development of a monolayer system optimized for cell adhesion and growth. This method grew 83% of fresh human tumor cell biopsy specimens, cultured and not contaminated, from a heterogeneous group of 396 tumors including lung cancer (93 of 114, 82%); melanoma (54 of 72, 75%); sarcoma (46 of 59, 78%); breast cancer (35 of 39, 90%); ovarian cancer (16 of 21, 76%); and a miscellaneous group consisting of gastrointestinal, genitourinary, mesothelioma, and unknown primaries (78 of 91, 86%). Cell growth was characterized morphologically with Papanicolaoustained coverslip cultures and cytogenetically with Giemsastained metaphase spreads. Morphological features such as nuclear pleomorphism, chromatin condensation, basophilic cytoplasm, and melanin pigmentation were routinely seen. Aneuploid metaphases were seen in 90% of evaluable cultures, with 15 of 28 showing 70% or more aneuploid metaphases. Colony-forming efficiency ranged between 0.01 and 1% of viable tumor cells, with a median efficiency of 0.2%. This culture system uses a low inoculum of 25,000 viable cells per well which permitted chemosensitivity testing of nine drugs at four doses in duplicate from 2.2 X 10(6) viable tumor cells and radiation sensitivity testing at five doses in quadruplicate from 0.6 X 10(6) cells. Cultures were analyzed for survival by computerized image analysis of crystal violet-stained cells. Drug sensitivity studies showed variability in sensitivity and in survival curve shape with exponential cell killing for cisplatin, Adriamycin, and etoposide, and shouldered survival curves for 5-fluorouracil frequently seen. Radiation sensitivity studies also showed variability in both sensitivity and survival curve shape. Many cultures showed exponential cell killing, although others had shouldered survival curves.

  15. Quantitative and sensitive analysis of CN molecules using laser induced low pressure He plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Pardede, Marincan; Hedwig, Rinda; Abdulmadjid, Syahrun Nur; Lahna, Kurnia; Idris, Nasrullah; Ramli, Muliadi; Jobiliong, Eric; Suyanto, Hery; Marpaung, Alion Mangasi; Suliyanti, Maria Margaretha; Tjia, May On

    2015-03-21

    We report the results of experimental study on CN 388.3 nm and C I 247.8 nm emission characteristics using 40 mJ laser irradiation with He and N{sub 2} ambient gases. The results obtained with N{sub 2} ambient gas show undesirable interference effect between the native CN emission and the emission of CN molecules arising from the recombination of native C ablated from the sample with the N dissociated from the ambient gas. This problem is overcome by the use of He ambient gas at low pressure of 2 kPa, which also offers the additional advantages of cleaner and stronger emission lines. The result of applying this favorable experimental condition to emission spectrochemical measurement of milk sample having various protein concentrations is shown to yield a close to linear calibration curve with near zero extrapolated intercept. Additionally, a low detection limit of 5 μg/g is found in this experiment, making it potentially applicable for quantitative and sensitive CN analysis. The visibility of laser induced breakdown spectroscopy with low pressure He gas is also demonstrated by the result of its application to spectrochemical analysis of fossil samples. Furthermore, with the use of CO{sub 2} ambient gas at 600 Pa mimicking the Mars atmosphere, this technique also shows promising applications to exploration in Mars.

  16. Testing the threat-sensitive predator avoidance hypothesis: physiological responses and predator pressure in wild rabbits.

    PubMed

    Monclús, Raquel; Palomares, Francisco; Tablado, Zulima; Martínez-Fontúrbel, Ana; Palme, Rupert

    2009-01-01

    Predation is a strong selective force with both direct and indirect effects on an animal's fitness. In order to increase the chances of survival, animals have developed different antipredator strategies. However, these strategies have associated costs, so animals should assess their actual risk of predation and shape their antipredator effort accordingly. Under a stressful situation, such as the presence of predators, animals display a physiological stress response that might be proportional to the risk perceived. We tested this hypothesis in wild European rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus), subjected to different predator pressures, in Doñana National Park (Spain). We measured the concentrations of fecal corticosterone metabolites (FCM) in 20 rabbit populations. By means of track censuses we obtained indexes of mammalian predator presence for each rabbit population. Other factors that could modify the physiological stress response, such as breeding status, food availability and rabbit density, were also considered. Model selection based on information theory showed that predator pressure was the main factor triggering the glucocorticoid release and that the physiological stress response was positively correlated with the indexes of the presence of mammalian carnivore predators. Other factors, such as food availability and density of rabbits, were considerably less important. We conclude that rabbits are able to assess their actual risk of predation and show a threat-sensitive physiological response.

  17. A position-sensitive neutron spectrometer/dosimeter based on pressurized superheated drop (bubble) detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    d'Errico, F.; Nath, R.; Holland, S. K.; Lamba, M.; Patz, S.; Rivard, M. J.

    2002-01-01

    A position-sensitive, superheated emulsion chamber (SEC) is introduced for three-dimensional (3D) spectrometry and dosimetry of fast neutrons. The detector is based on a fine suspension of octafluorocyclobutane droplets emulsified in a tissue-equivalent gel. This gel is highly viscous and immobilizes the bubbles at the location of their formation. At an operating temperature of 35°C, the droplets are moderately superheated and their evaporation is nucleated by the densely ionizing products of fast neutron interactions, with no response to sparsely ionizing radiations. Thus, when a neutron emitter such as a 252Cf brachytherapy source is inserted in the SEC, a bubble distribution forms around the source and makes the neutron field visible. The SEC is operated at different externally applied pressures that correspond to different response thresholds. These responses form a virtually orthogonal matrix which is suitable for spectrometry and allows the use of effective few channel unfolding procedures, yielding the spatial dependence of absorbed dose and neutron energy spectra in-tissue. Bubble spatial distributions in the chamber can be determined through optical tomography or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). A 3D, steady-state MRI method has proven particularly effective for this purpose. After the imaging, the SEC can be pressurized above the halocarbon vapor tension in order to recondense the bubbles to the liquid phase. Within a few minutes, the device is annealed and ready to be used again for repeated measurements improving the bubble counting statistics.

  18. Is pressure pain sensitivity over the cervical musculature associated with neck disability in individuals with migraine?

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Maria Claudia; Chaves, Thaís Cristina; Florencio, Lidiane Lima; Carvalho, Gabriela Ferreira; Dach, Fabíola; Fernández-De-Las-Penãs, Cesar; Bevilaqua-Grossi, Débora

    2015-01-01

    The objective was to determine if disability due to neck pain is correlated with pressure pain sensitivity in the cervical muscles in patients with migraine. Thirty-two volunteers with migraine completed the Neck Disability Index (NDI). Pressure pain thresholds (PPT) over the sternocleidomastoid, upper trapezius and suboccipital muscles were also assessed. Data were analyzed using the Spearman correlation coefficient (rs) and linear regression models (α < 0.05). Moderate negative correlations between NDI and PPT were obtained for the sternocleidomastoid (rs = -0.42; p = 0.001), upper trapezius (rs = -0.33; p = 0.001) and suboccipital muscles (rs = -0.41; p = 0.001). The linear regression revealed no association between NDI and PPT of sternocleidomastoid (β = 0.01; R(2) = 0.17), upper trapezius (β = 0.01; R(2) = 0.11) and suboccipital muscles (β = 0.02; R(2) = 0.17). NDI scores and PPT of the cervical muscles correlated moderately and was inversely proportional in patients with migraine, but the association was not linear, so both outcomes should be considered in the assessment of this population.

  19. Quantitative and sensitive analysis of CN molecules using laser induced low pressure He plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pardede, Marincan; Hedwig, Rinda; Abdulmadjid, Syahrun Nur; Lahna, Kurnia; Idris, Nasrullah; Jobiliong, Eric; Suyanto, Hery; Marpaung, Alion Mangasi; Suliyanti, Maria Margaretha; Ramli, Muliadi; Tjia, May On; Lie, Tjung Jie; Lie, Zener Sukra; Kurniawan, Davy Putra; Kurniawan, Koo Hendrik; Kagawa, Kiichiro

    2015-03-01

    We report the results of experimental study on CN 388.3 nm and C I 247.8 nm emission characteristics using 40 mJ laser irradiation with He and N2 ambient gases. The results obtained with N2 ambient gas show undesirable interference effect between the native CN emission and the emission of CN molecules arising from the recombination of native C ablated from the sample with the N dissociated from the ambient gas. This problem is overcome by the use of He ambient gas at low pressure of 2 kPa, which also offers the additional advantages of cleaner and stronger emission lines. The result of applying this favorable experimental condition to emission spectrochemical measurement of milk sample having various protein concentrations is shown to yield a close to linear calibration curve with near zero extrapolated intercept. Additionally, a low detection limit of 5 μg/g is found in this experiment, making it potentially applicable for quantitative and sensitive CN analysis. The visibility of laser induced breakdown spectroscopy with low pressure He gas is also demonstrated by the result of its application to spectrochemical analysis of fossil samples. Furthermore, with the use of CO2 ambient gas at 600 Pa mimicking the Mars atmosphere, this technique also shows promising applications to exploration in Mars.

  20. Assessment of baroreflex sensitivity from spontaneous oscillations of blood pressure and heart rate: proven clinical value?

    PubMed

    Pinna, Gian Domenico; Maestri, Roberto; La Rovere, Maria Teresa

    2015-04-01

    The baroreceptor-heart rate reflex (baroreflex sensitivity, BRS) is a key mechanism contributing to the neural regulation of the cardiovascular system. Several methods have been proposed so far to assess BRS by analyzing the spontaneous beat-to-beat fluctuations of arterial blood pressure and heart rate. These methods are inherently simple, non-invasive and low-cost. This study is an attempt to address the question of whether spontaneous baroreflex methods have proven to be of value in the clinical setting. In the first part of this article, we critically review most representative clinical studies using spontaneous BRS techniques either for risk stratification or treatment evaluation, these being major issues in the clinical management of the patients. In the second part, we address two important aspects of spontaneous BRS measurements: measurability and reliability. Estimation of BRS in the studies selected for the review was performed according to the sequence, transfer function, alpha-index and phase-rectified signal averaging method. Arterial blood pressure was recorded non-invasively during supine, short-term (<30 min) laboratory recordings. The conclusion from this review is that spontaneous BRS techniques have been shown to be of great value in clinical practice but further work is needed to confirm the validity of previous findings and to widen the field of clinical applications. Measurability and reliability can be a major issue in the measurement of spontaneous BRS, particularly in some patient populations like post-myocardial infarction and heart failure patents. Main causes of poor measurability are: non-sinus rhythm, a high rate of ectopic beats and the need for recorded time series of RR interval and arterial blood pressure to satisfy the constraints of the different BRS estimation algorithms. As for reliability, within-subject variability is rather high in the measurements of spontaneous BRS and, therefore, should be carefully taken into account

  1. The relationship between resting blood pressure and acute pain sensitivity: effects of chronic pain and alpha-2 adrenergic blockade.

    PubMed

    Bruehl, Stephen; Chung, Ok Y; Diedrich, Laura; Diedrich, André; Robertson, David

    2008-02-01

    This study tested for alpha-2 adrenergic mediation of the inverse relationship between resting blood pressure and acute pain sensitivity in healthy individuals. It also replicated limited prior work suggesting this inverse blood pressure/pain association is altered in chronic pain, and provided the first test of whether chronic pain-related changes in alpha-2 adrenergic function contribute to these alterations. Resting blood pressure was assessed in 32 healthy controls and 24 chronic low back pain participants prior to receiving placebo or an intravenous alpha-2 adrenergic receptor antagonist (yohimbine hydrochloride, 0.4 mg/kg) in a randomized crossover design. Participants experienced three acute pain tasks during both sessions. A significant Systolic Blood Pressure x Participant Type x Drug interaction on finger pressure McGill Pain Questionnaire-Sensory ratings (P < .05) reflected significant hyperalgesic effects of yohimbine in chronic pain participants with lower systolic blood pressures (P < .05) but not those with higher systolic pressures, and no significant effects of yohimbine in controls regardless of blood pressure level. A Drug x Systolic Blood Pressure interaction on finger pressure visual analog scale unpleasantness indicated the inverse blood pressure/pain association was significantly stronger under yohimbine relative to placebo (P < .05). Significant Participant Type x Systolic Blood Pressure interactions (P's < .05) were noted for finger pressure visual analog scale pain intensity and unpleasantness, ischemic pain threshold, and heat pain threshold, reflecting absence or reversal of inverse blood pressure/pain associations in chronic pain participants. Results suggest that blood pressure-related hypoalgesia can occur even when alpha-2 adrenergic systems are blocked. The possibility of upregulated alpha-2 adrenergic inhibitory function in chronic pain patients with lower blood pressure warrants further evaluation.

  2. Stomatal sensitivity to vapor pressure deficit and its relationship to hydraulic conductance in Pinus palustris.

    PubMed

    Addington, Robert N; Mitchell, Robert J; Oren, Ram; Donovan, Lisa A

    2004-05-01

    We studied the response of stomatal conductance at leaf (gS) and canopy (GS) scales to increasing vapor pressure deficit (D) in mature Pinus palustris Mill. (longleaf pine) growing in a sandhill habitat in the coastal plain of the southeastern USA. Specifically, we determined if variation in the stomatal response to D was related to variation in hydraulic conductance along the soil-to-leaf pathway (KL) over the course of a growing season. Reductions in KL were associated with a severe growing season drought that significantly reduced soil water content (theta) in the upper 90-cm soil profile. Although KL recovered partially following the drought, it never reached pre-drought values. Stomatal sensitivity to D was well correlated with maximum gS at low D at both leaf and canopy scales, and KL appeared to influence this response by controlling maximum gS. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that stomatal response to D occurs to regulate minimum leaf water potential, and that the sensitivity of this response is related to changes in whole-plant hydraulics.

  3. SOLVENT-BASED TO WATERBASED ADHESIVE-COATED SUBSTRATE RETROFIT - VOLUME IV: FILM AND LABEL MANUFACTURING CASE STUDY: FLEXCON COMPANY, INC.

    EPA Science Inventory

    This volume discusses a visit to a site operated by FLEXcon Company, Inc., a pressure-sensitive adhesive coater, to collect information on the pollution prevention opportunities and barriers associated with waterbased adhesives. The purpose of the visit to FLEXcon was to gather i...

  4. SOLVENT-BASED TO WATERBASED ADHESIVE-COATED SUBSTRATE RETROFIT - VOLUME IV: FILM AND LABEL MANUFACTURING CASE STUDY: FLEXCON COMPANY, INC.

    EPA Science Inventory

    This volume discusses a visit to a site operated by FLEXcon Company, Inc., a pressure-sensitive adhesive coater, to collect information on the pollution prevention opportunities and barriers associated with waterbased adhesives. The purpose of the visit to FLEXcon was to gather i...

  5. The sensitivity of the northwest European continental shelf ecosystem to anthropogenic pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakelin, Sarah; Artioli, Yuri; Holt, Jason; Butenschön, Momme

    2013-04-01

    Anthropogenic pressure is exerted on ecosystems in several ways, through direct drivers such as eutrophication and levels of fishing effort and by changes in the physical environment brought about by climate change. Changes in water temperature, the timing and duration of seasonal stratification, circulation patterns and ocean-shelf exchange all impact on shelf-sea primary production. We use a coupled hydrodynamics-ecosystem model (POLCOMS-ERSEM) to study ecosystem sensitivity to climate change and the anthropogenic drivers of river nutrient loads, impacting on eutrophication, and trawling effort on the northwest European continental shelf, with an emphasis on changes in the North Sea. To force the model we use data from a coupled ocean-atmosphere global model (IPSL-CM4) representative of conditions in the recent past (1983-2000) and possible conditions in the near future (2030-2040) under a business as usual emissions scenario SRES A1B. To study ecosystem sensitivity to direct anthropogenic forcing, we adopt two scenarios impacting on river nutrient loads and trawling effort - one where there is rapid economic growth and limited environmental policies and a second where economic growth is constrained by environmental objectives. The sensitivity of the system to each single driver: climate change, increase in river nutrient loads, decrease in river nutrient loads and reduction in trawling effort is explored. The response of the ecosystem to the combined effects of changes in multiple drivers under the two scenarios of economic growth is also studied. The results are relevant to the Marine Strategy Framework Directive descriptors on marine food webs, eutrophication and biodiversity.

  6. Stomatal sensitivity to vapour pressure deficit relates to climate of origin in Eucalyptus species.

    PubMed

    Bourne, Aimee E; Haigh, Anthony M; Ellsworth, David S

    2015-03-01

    Selecting plantation species to balance water use and production requires accurate models for predicting how species will tolerate and respond to environmental conditions. Although interspecific variation in water use occurs, species-specific parameters are rarely incorporated into physiologically based models because often the appropriate species parameters are lacking. To determine the physiological control over water use in Eucalyptus, five stands of Eucalyptus species growing in a common garden were measured for sap flux rates and their stomatal response to vapour pressure deficit (D) was assessed. Maximal canopy conductance and whole-canopy stomatal sensitivity to D and reduced water availability were lower in species originating from more arid climates of origin than those from humid climates. Species from humid climates showed a larger decline in maximal sap flux density (JSmax) with reduced water availability, and a lower D at which stomatal closure occurred than species from more arid climates, implying larger sensitivity to water availability and D in these species. We observed significant (P < 0.05) correlations of species climate of origin with mean vessel diameter (R(2) = 0.90), stomatal sensitivity to D (R(2) = 0.83) and the size of the decline in JSmax to restricted water availability (R(2) = 0.94). Thus aridity of climate of origin appears to have a selective role in constraining water-use response among the five Eucalyptus plantation species. These relationships emphasize that within this congeneric group of species, climate aridity constrains water use. These relationships have implications for species choices for tree plantation success against drought-induced losses and the ability to manage Eucalyptus plantations against projected changes in water availability and evaporation in the future. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Development and characterization of a pressure-sensitive luminescent coating based on Pt(II)-porphyrin self-assembled monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakamura, Y.; Suzuki, T.; Kawabata, S.

    2015-06-01

    A pressure-sensitive luminescent coating (PSLC) applicable to the visualization of pressure distributions in micro-scale flow devices was developed. Pt(II)-porphyrin was synthesized and covalently attached to the surface of indium tin oxide (ITO) glass plates by a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) process. The UV-visible absorption spectrum, pressure and temperature sensitivities and photostability of the PSLC were then measured to characterize the developed PSLC. It was found that (a) the chemisorption of the porphyrin did not greatly perturb the molecular orbitals of the porphyrin responsible for its photophysics, (b) the pressure dependency of the luminescent intensity of the PSLC obeyed a power function curve and the pressure sensitivities at 273, 293, 313 and 333 K were obtained in the pressure range from 5 to 120 kPa, (c) the luminescent intensity of the PSLC almost linearly decreased with temperature and the temperature sensitivities at 5, 40, 100 and 120 kPa evaluated in the temperature range from 273 to 333 K were -0.67, -0.72, -0.75 and -0.78%/K, respectively and (d) the decrease in the luminescent intensity of the PSLC after a 30 min exposure to an excitation light was 1.23% of its initial intensity and much smaller than that of Pt(II)-porphyrin absorbed on a TLC (thin-layer chromatography) sheet.

  8. Direct Growth of Graphene Films on 3D Grating Structural Quartz Substrates for High-Performance Pressure-Sensitive Sensors.

    PubMed

    Song, Xuefen; Sun, Tai; Yang, Jun; Yu, Leyong; Wei, Dacheng; Fang, Liang; Lu, Bin; Du, Chunlei; Wei, Dapeng

    2016-07-06

    Conformal graphene films have directly been synthesized on the surface of grating microstructured quartz substrates by a simple chemical vapor deposition process. The wonderful conformality and relatively high quality of the as-prepared graphene on the three-dimensional substrate have been verified by scanning electron microscopy and Raman spectra. This conformal graphene film possesses excellent electrical and optical properties with a sheet resistance of <2000 Ω·sq(-1) and a transmittance of >80% (at 550 nm), which can be attached with a flat graphene film on a poly(dimethylsiloxane) substrate, and then could work as a pressure-sensitive sensor. This device possesses a high-pressure sensitivity of -6.524 kPa(-1) in a low-pressure range of 0-200 Pa. Meanwhile, this pressure-sensitive sensor exhibits super-reliability (≥5000 cycles) and an ultrafast response time (≤4 ms). Owing to these features, this pressure-sensitive sensor based on 3D conformal graphene is adequately introduced to test wind pressure, expressing higher accuracy and a lower background noise level than a market anemometer.

  9. Bilateral pressure pain hypersensitivity over the hand as potential sign of sensitization mechanisms in individuals with thumb carpometacarpal osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Chiarotto, Alessandro; Fernandez-de-Las-Peñas, Cesar; Castaldo, Matteo; Villafañe, Jorge Hugo

    2013-10-01

    To investigate whether bilateral deep tissue pressure hyperalgesia exists in individuals with unilateral thumb carpometacarpal osteoarthritis (CMC OA). A total of 32 patients with CMC OA (29 females and 3 males, aged 69-90 years old) and 32 healthy matched controls (29 females and 3 males, aged 70-90 years) were recruited. Pressure pain thresholds (PPTs) were bilaterally assessed over the first CMC joint, the hamate bone and the lateral epicondyle in a blinded design. Mixed models analyses of variance were conducted to determine the differences in pressure pain sensitivity between groups and sides. The results showed that PPTs were significantly decreased over the first CMC joint (F = 6.551, P = 0.012) and the hamate bone (F = 9.783, P = 0.002) but not over the lateral epicondyle (F = 2.712, P = 0.102) in patients with thumb CMC OA as compared with healthy controls; patients with unilateral thumb CMC OA exhibited bilateral pressure pain hyperalgesia in both hands compared with healthy people. PPTs were not significantly associated to the intensity of pain (all, P > 0.05). This study revealed bilateral localized pressure pain hypersensitivity over the hand in individuals with unilateral thumb CMC OA, suggesting spinal cord sensitization mechanisms in this population. Future studies should analyze the presence of widespread pressure pain sensitivity in patients with thumb CMC OA to further determine the presence of central sensitization mechanisms. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. A multi-center, randomized, clinical trial comparing adhesive polyurethane foam dressing and adhesive hydrocolloid dressing in patients with grade II pressure ulcers in primary care and nursing homes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Pressure ulcers (PrUs) are ischemic wounds in the skin and underlying tissues caused by long-standing pressure force over an external bone or cartilaginous surface. PrUs are an important challenge for the overall health system because can prolong patient hospitalization and reduce quality of life. Moreover, 95% of PrUs are avoidable, suggesting they are caused by poor quality care assistance. PrUs are also costly, increasing national costs. For example, they represent about 5% of overall annual health expenses in Spain. Stages I and II PrUs have a combined prevalence of 65%. According main clinical guidelines, stage II PrUs (PrU-IIs) are usually treated by applying special dressings (polyurethane or hydrocolloid). However, little scientific evidence regarding their efficacy has been identified in scientific literature. Our aim is to assess the comparative efficacy of adhesive polyurethane foam and hydrocolloid dressings in the treatment of PrU-IIs in terms of healed ulcer after 8 weeks of follow-up. Methods/design This paper describes the development and evaluation protocol of a randomized clinical trial of two parallel treatment arms. A total of 820 patients with at least 1 PrU-II will be recruited from primary health care and home care centers. All patients will receive standardized healing procedures and preventive measures (e.g. positional changes and pressure-relieving support surfaces), following standardized procedures. The main outcome will be the percentage of wounds healed after 8 weeks. Secondary outcomes will include cost-effectiveness, as evaluated by cost per healed ulcer and cost per treated patient and safety evaluated by adverse events. Discussion This trial will address the hypothesis that hydrocolloid dressings will heal at least 10% more stage II PrUs and be more cost-effective than polyurethane foam dressings after 8 weeks. Trial registration This trial has been registered with controlled-trials number ISCRCTN57842461 and Eudra

  11. Highly-sensitive gas pressure sensor using twin-core fiber based in-line Mach-Zehnder interferometer.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhengyong; Liao, Changrui; Wang, Yiping; Xu, Lei; Wang, Dongning; Dong, Xiaopeng; Liu, Shen; Wang, Qiao; Yang, Kaiming; Zhou, Jiangtao

    2015-03-09

    A Mach-Zehnder interferometer based on a twin-core fiber was proposed and experimentally demonstrated for gas pressure measurements. The in-line Mach-Zehnder interferometer was fabricated by splicing a short section of twin-core fiber between two single mode fibers. A micro-channel was created to form an interferometer arm by use of a femtosecond laser to drill through one core of the twin-core fiber. The other core of the fiber was remained as the reference arm. Such a Mach-Zehnder interferometer exhibited a high gas pressure sensitivity of -9.6 nm/MPa and a low temperature cross-sensitivity of 4.4 KPa/°C. Moreover, ultra-compact device size and all-fiber configuration make it very suitable for highly-sensitive gas pressure sensing in harsh environments.

  12. Structural Engineering for High Sensitivity, Ultrathin Pressure Sensors Based on Wrinkled Graphene and Anodic Aluminum Oxide Membrane.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wenjun; Gui, Xuchun; Liang, Binghao; Yang, Rongliang; Zheng, Yongjia; Zhao, Chengchun; Li, Xinming; Zhu, Hai; Tang, Zikang

    2017-07-19

    Nature-motivated pressure sensors have been greatly important components integrated into flexible electronics and applied in artificial intelligence. Here, we report a high sensitivity, ultrathin, and transparent pressure sensor based on wrinkled graphene prepared by a facile liquid-phase shrink method. Two pieces of wrinkled graphene are face to face assembled into a pressure sensor, in which a porous anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) membrane with the thickness of only 200 nm was used to insulate the two layers of graphene. The pressure sensor exhibits ultrahigh operating sensitivity (6.92 kPa(-1)), resulting from the insulation in its inactive state and conduction under compression. Formation of current pathways is attributed to the contact of graphene wrinkles through the pores of AAO membrane. In addition, the pressure sensor is also an on/off and energy saving device, due to the complete isolation between the two graphene layers when the sensor is not subjected to any pressure. We believe that our high-performance pressure sensor is an ideal candidate for integration in flexible electronics, but also paves the way for other 2D materials to be involved in the fabrication of pressure sensors.

  13. Does the adhesive strategy influence the post-operative sensitivity in adult patients with posterior resin composite restorations?: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Reis, Alessandra; Dourado Loguercio, Alessandro; Schroeder, Marcos; Luque-Martinez, Issis; Masterson, Danielle; Cople Maia, Lucianne

    2015-09-01

    A systematic review and meta-analysis were performed on the risk and intensity of postoperative sensitivity (POS) in posterior resin composite restorations bonded with self-etch (SE) and etch-and-rinse (ER) adhesives. A comprehensive search was performed in the MEDLINE via PubMeb, Scopus, Web of Science, LILACS, BBO and Cochrane Library and SIGLE without restrictions. The abstracts of the annual conference of the IADR (1990-2014), unpublished and ongoing trials registry were also searched. Dissertations and theses were searched using the ProQuest Dissertations and Periodicos Capes Theses databases. We included randomized clinical trials that compared the clinical effectiveness of SE and ER used for direct resin composite restorations in permanent dentition of adult patients. The risk/intensity of POS was the primary outcome. The risk of bias tool of the Cochrane Collaboration was used. The meta-analysis was performed on the studies considered 'low' risk of bias. After duplicates removal, 2600 articles were identified but only 29 remained in the qualitative synthesis. Five were considered to be 'high' risk of bias and eleven were considered to be 'unclear' in the key domains, yielding 13 studies for meta-analysis. The overall relative risk of the spontaneous POS was 0.63 (95% CI 0.35 to 1.15), while the stimuli-induced POS was 0.99 (95% CI 0.63 to 1.56). The overall standardized mean difference was 0.08 (95%CI -0.19 to 0.35). No overall effect was revealed in the meta-analyses, meaning that no influence of the ER or SE strategy on POS. The type of adhesive strategy (ER or SE) for posterior resin composite restorations does not influence the risk and intensity of POS. CRD42014006617. Copyright © 2015 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Hydrogen sulfide augments neutrophil migration through enhancement of adhesion molecule expression and prevention of CXCR2 internalization: role of ATP-sensitive potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Dal-Secco, Daniela; Cunha, Thiago M; Freitas, Andressa; Alves-Filho, José Carlos; Souto, Fabrício O; Fukada, Sandra Y; Grespan, Renata; Alencar, Nylane M N; Neto, Alberto F; Rossi, Marcos A; Ferreira, Sérgio H; Hothersall, John S; Cunha, Fernando Q

    2008-09-15

    In this study, we have addressed the role of H(2)S in modulating neutrophil migration in either innate (LPS-challenged naive mice) or adaptive (methylated BSA (mBSA)-challenged immunized mice) immune responses. Treatment of mice with H(2)S synthesis inhibitors, dl-propargylglycine (PAG) or beta-cyanoalanine, reduced neutrophil migration induced by LPS or methylated BSA (mBSA) into the peritoneal cavity and by mBSA into the femur/tibial joint of immunized mice. This effect was associated with decreased leukocyte rolling, adhesion, and P-selectin and ICAM-1 expression on endothelium. Predictably, treatment of animals with the H(2)S donors, NaHS or Lawesson's reagent, enhanced these parameters. Moreover, the NaHS enhancement of neutrophil migration was not observed in ICAM-1-deficient mice. Neither PAG nor NaHS treatment changed LPS-induced CD18 expression on neutrophils, nor did the LPS- and mBSA-induced release of neutrophil chemoattractant mediators TNF-alpha, keratinocyte-derived chemokine, and LTB(4). Furthermore, in vitro MIP-2-induced neutrophil chemotaxis was inhibited by PAG and enhanced by NaHS treatments. Accordingly, MIP-2-induced CXCR2 internalization was enhanced by PAG and inhibited by NaHS treatments. Moreover, NaHS prevented MIP-2-induced CXCR2 desensitization. The PAG and NaHS effects correlated, respectively, with the enhancement and inhibition of MIP-2-induced G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 expression. The effects of NaHS on neutrophil migration both in vivo and in vitro, together with CXCR2 internalization and G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 expression were prevented by the ATP-sensitive potassium (K(ATP)(+)) channel blocker, glybenclamide. Conversely, diazoxide, a K(ATP)(+) channel opener, increased neutrophil migration in vivo. Together, our data suggest that during the inflammatory response, H(2)S augments neutrophil adhesion and locomotion, by a mechanism dependent on K(ATP)(+) channels.

  15. A sensitive pressure sensor for diamond anvil cell experiments up to 2 GPa: FluoSpheres[reg

    SciTech Connect

    Picard, Aude; Oger, Phil M.; Daniel, Isabelle; Cardon, Herve; Montagnac, Gilles; Chervin, Jean-Claude

    2006-08-01

    We present an optical pressure sensor suitable for experiments in diamond anvil cell in the 0.1 MPa-2 GPa pressure range, for temperatures between ambient and 323 K. It is based on the pressure-dependent fluorescence spectrum of FluoSpheres[reg], which are commercially available fluorescent microspheres commonly used to measure blood flow in experimental biology. The fluorescence of microspheres is excited by the 514.5 nm line of an Ar{sup +} laser, and the resulting spectrum displays three very intense broad bands at 534, 558, and 598 nm, respectively. The reference wavelength and pressure gauge is that of the first inflection point of the spectrum, located at 525.6{+-}0.2 nm at ambient pressure. It is characterized by an instantaneous and large linear pressure shift of 9.93({+-}0.08) nm/GPa. The fluorescence of the FluoSpheres[reg] has been investigated as a function of pressure (0.1-4 GPa), temperature (295-343 K), pH (3-12), salinity, and pressure transmitting medium. These measurements show that, for pressures comprised between 0.1 MPa and 2 GPa, at temperatures not exceeding 323 K, at any pH, in aqueous pressure transmitting media, pressure can be calculated from the wavelength shift of two to three beads, according to the relation P=0.100 ({+-}0.001) {delta}{lambda}{sub i}(P) with {delta}{lambda}{sub i}(P)={lambda}{sub i}(P)-{lambda}{sub i}(0) and {lambda}{sub i}(P) as the wavelength of the first inflection point of the spectrum at the pressure P. This pressure sensor is approximately thirty times more sensitive than the ruby scale and responds instantaneously to pressure variations.

  16. A sensitive pressure sensor for diamond anvil cell experiments up to 2 GPa: FluoSpheres®

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picard, Aude; Oger, Phil M.; Daniel, Isabelle; Cardon, Hervé; Montagnac, Gilles; Chervin, Jean-Claude

    2006-08-01

    We present an optical pressure sensor suitable for experiments in diamond anvil cell in the 0.1MPa-2GPa pressure range, for temperatures between ambient and 323K. It is based on the pressure-dependent fluorescence spectrum of FluoSpheres®, which are commercially available fluorescent microspheres commonly used to measure blood flow in experimental biology. The fluorescence of microspheres is excited by the 514.5nm line of an Ar+ laser, and the resulting spectrum displays three very intense broad bands at 534, 558, and 598nm, respectively. The reference wavelength and pressure gauge is that of the first inflection point of the spectrum, located at 525.6±0.2nm at ambient pressure. It is characterized by an instantaneous and large linear pressure shift of 9.93(±0.08)nm/GPa. The fluorescence of the FluoSpheres® has been investigated as a function of pressure (0.1-4GPa), temperature (295-343K), pH (3-12), salinity, and pressure transmitting medium. These measurements show that, for pressures comprised between 0.1MPa and 2GPa, at temperatures not exceeding 323K, at any pH, in aqueous pressure transmitting media, pressure can be calculated from the wavelength shift of two to three beads, according to the relation P =0.100 (±0.001) Δλi(P ) with Δλi(P )=λi(P)-λi(0) and λi(P) as the wavelength of the first inflection point of the spectrum at the pressure P. This pressure sensor is approximately thirty times more sensitive than the ruby scale and responds instantaneously to pressure variations.

  17. Ecological traits affect the sensitivity of bees to land-use pressures in European agricultural landscapes.

    PubMed

    De Palma, Adriana; Kuhlmann, Michael; Roberts, Stuart P M; Potts, Simon G; Börger, Luca; Hudson, Lawrence N; Lysenko, Igor; Newbold, Tim; Purvis, Andy

    2015-12-01

    Bees are a functionally important and economically valuable group, but are threatened by land-use conversion and intensification. Such pressures are not expected to affect all species identically; rather, they are likely to be mediated by the species' ecological traits.Understanding which types of species are most vulnerable under which land uses is an important step towards effective conservation planning.We collated occurrence and abundance data for 257 bee species at 1584 European sites from surveys reported in 30 published papers (70 056 records) and combined them with species-level ecological trait data. We used mixed-effects models to assess the importance of land use (land-use class, agricultural use-intensity and a remotely-sensed measure of vegetation), traits and trait × land-use interactions, in explaining species occurrence and abundance.Species' sensitivity to land use was most strongly influenced by flight season duration and foraging range, but also by niche breadth, reproductive strategy and phenology, with effects that differed among cropland, pastoral and urban habitats. Synthesis and applications. Rather than targeting particular species or settings, conservation actions may be more effective if focused on mitigating situations where species' traits strongly and negatively interact with land-use pressures. We find evidence that low-intensity agriculture can maintain relatively diverse bee communities; in more intensive settings, added floral resources may be beneficial, but will require careful placement with respect to foraging ranges of smaller bee species. Protection of semi-natural habitats is essential, however; in particular, conversion to urban environments could have severe effects on bee diversity and pollination services. Our results highlight the importance of exploring how ecological traits mediate species responses to human impacts, but further research is needed to enhance the predictive ability of such analyses.

  18. Calcium Sensitive Fluorescent Dyes Fluo-4 and Fura Red under Pressure: Behaviour of Fluorescence and Buffer Properties under Hydrostatic Pressures up to 200 MPa.

    PubMed

    Schneidereit, D; Vass, H; Reischl, B; Allen, R J; Friedrich, O

    2016-01-01

    The fluorescent Ca2+ sensitive dyes Fura Red (ratiometric) and Fluo-4 (non-ratiometric) are widely utilized for the optical assessment of Ca2+ fluctuations in vitro as well as in situ. The fluorescent behavior of these dyes is strongly depends on temperature, pH, ionic strength and pressure. It is crucial to understand the response of these dyes to pressure when applying calcium imaging technologies in the field of high pressure bioscience. Therefore, we use an optically accessible pressure vessel to pressurize physiological Ca2+-buffered solutions at different fixed concentrations of free Ca2+ (1 nM to 25.6 μM) and a specified dye concentration (12 μM) to pressures of 200 MPa, and record dye fluorescence intensity. Our results show that Fluo-4 fluorescence intensity is reduced by 31% per 100 MPa, the intensity of Fura Red is reduced by 10% per 100 MPa. The mean reaction volume for the dissociation of calcium from the dye molecules [Formula: see text] is determined to -17.8 ml mol-1 for Fluo-4 and -21.3 ml mol-1 for Fura Red. Additionally, a model is presented that is used to correct for pressure-dependent changes in pH and binding affinity of Ca2+ to EGTA, as well as to determine the influence of these changes on dye fluorescence.

  19. Calcium Sensitive Fluorescent Dyes Fluo-4 and Fura Red under Pressure: Behaviour of Fluorescence and Buffer Properties under Hydrostatic Pressures up to 200 MPa

    PubMed Central

    Vass, H.; Reischl, B.; Allen, R. J.; Friedrich, O.

    2016-01-01

    The fluorescent Ca2+ sensitive dyes Fura Red (ratiometric) and Fluo-4 (non-ratiometric) are widely utilized for the optical assessment of Ca2+ fluctuations in vitro as well as in situ. The fluorescent behavior of these dyes is strongly depends on temperature, pH, ionic strength and pressure. It is crucial to understand the response of these dyes to pressure when applying calcium imaging technologies in the field of high pressure bioscience. Therefore, we use an optically accessible pressure vessel to pressurize physiological Ca2+-buffered solutions at different fixed concentrations of free Ca2+ (1 nM to 25.6 μM) and a specified dye concentration (12 μM) to pressures of 200 MPa, and record dye fluorescence intensity. Our results show that Fluo-4 fluorescence intensity is reduced by 31% per 100 MPa, the intensity of Fura Red is reduced by 10% per 100 MPa. The mean reaction volume for the dissociation of calcium from the dye molecules Δdv¯ is determined to -17.8 ml mol-1 for Fluo-4 and -21.3 ml mol-1 for Fura Red. Additionally, a model is presented that is used to correct for pressure-dependent changes in pH and binding affinity of Ca2+ to EGTA, as well as to determine the influence of these changes on dye fluorescence. PMID:27764134

  20. Differences in mechanisms between weight loss-sensitive and -resistant blood pressure reduction in obese subjects.

    PubMed

    Masuo, K; Mikami, H; Ogihara, T; Tuck, M L

    2001-07-01

    This study was conducted to clarify the mechanisms involved in the sensitivity for blood pressure (BP) reduction in response to weight loss. In particular, we focused on the contributions of sympathetic nervous system activity and fasting plasma leptin and insulin levels to BP levels during weight loss in obese subjects with weight loss-sensitive and -resistant BP reduction. Sixty-one young, obese untreated hypertensive men (HT) and 52 obese normotensive men (NT) were enrolled in a weight loss program consisting of a low caloric diet and aerobic exercise over a 24-week period. At entry and at week 24, body mass index (BMI), BP, plasma norepinephrine (NE), leptin and insulin were measured. Successful weight loss and BP reduction were respectively defined as a more than a 10% reduction in BMI or mean BP from baseline at week 24. More than 60% of subjects in either group successfully achieved weight loss by this definition. The percentage of subjects who successfully achieved BP reduction was higher (64%) among those subjects who achieved weight loss than among those who did not (22%). Plasma NE level at entry in subjects who failed to achieve BP reduction despite weight loss was significantly higher than that in subjects who succeeded in BP reduction. Plasma leptin and insulin levels were similar between subjects with and without BP reduction. In addition, the absolute decrement and percent decrement in plasma NE in subjects who succeeded in BP reduction were significantly greater than those in subjects who failed to reduce their BP. Absolute and percent decrements in plasma leptin and insulin were similar in both groups. These results suggest that individuals who are resistant to weight loss-induced BP reduction have more sympathetic overactivity both at the outset of and during weight loss.

  1. Biomechanics of shear-sensitive adhesion in climbing animals: peeling, pre-tension and sliding-induced changes in interface strength

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Many arthropods and small vertebrates use adhesive pads for climbing. These biological adhesives have to meet conflicting demands: attachment must be strong and reliable, yet detachment should be fast and effortless. Climbing animals can rapidly and reversibly control their pads' adhesive strength by shear forces, but the mechanisms underlying this coupling have remained unclear. Here, we show that adhesive forces of stick insect pads closely followed the predictions from tape peeling models when shear forces were small, but strongly exceeded them when shear forces were large, resulting in an approximately linear increase of adhesion with friction. Adhesion sharply increased at peel angles less than ca 30°, allowing a rapid switch between attachment and detachment. The departure from classic peeling theory coincided with the appearance of pad sliding, which dramatically increased the peel force via a combination of two mechanisms. First, partial sliding pre-stretched the pads, so that they were effectively stiffer upon detachment and peeled increasingly like inextensible tape. Second, pad sliding reduces the thickness of the fluid layer in the contact zone, thereby increasing the stress levels required for peeling. In combination, these effects can explain the coupling between adhesion and friction that is fundamental to adhesion control across all climbing animals. Our results highlight that control of adhesion is not solely achieved by direction-dependence and morphological anisotropy, suggesting promising new routes for the development of controllable bio-inspired adhesives. PMID:27605165

  2. Highly Sensitive Piezocapacitive Sensor for Detecting Static and Dynamic Pressure Using Ion-Gel Thin Films and Conductive Elastomeric Composites.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Sun Geun; Park, Byoung Joon; Chang, Suk Tai

    2017-10-06

    A new class of simple and highly sensitive piezocapacitive sensors that are capable of detecting static and dynamic pressure changes is reported. The pressure sensor structure is formed by vertically sandwiching a sandpaper-molded carbon nanotube/poly(dimethylsiloxane) composite (CPC) dielectric layer between two ion-gel thin film electrodes. Such a capacitive sensor system enables the distinguishable detection of directional movement of applied pressure as well as static pressure variation by modulating ion distribution in the ion-gel thin films. The resulting capacitive pressure sensors exhibit high sensitivity (9.55 kPa(-1)), high durability, and low operating voltage (0.1 V). Our proposed pressure sensors are successfully applied as potential platforms for monitoring human physiological signals and finger sliding motions in order to demonstrate their capability for practical usage. The outstanding sensor performance of the pressure sensors can permit applications in wearable electronic devices for human-machine connecting platforms, health care monitoring systems, and artificial skin.

  3. Differential Effect of Renal Cortical and Medullary Interstitial Fluid Calcium on Blood Pressure Regulation in Salt-Sensitive Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Eley, Shaleka; Anderson, Lauren; Waters, Brittany; Royall, Brittany; Nichols, Sheena; Wells, Candace

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Hypercalciuria is a frequent characteristic of hypertension. In this report we extend our earlier studies investigating the role of renal interstitial fluid calcium (ISFCa)2+ as a link between urinary calcium excretion and blood pressure in the Dahl salt-sensitive (DS) hypertensive model. METHODS Dahl salt-sensitive and salt-resistant (DR) rats were placed on control (0.45%) and high (8%) salt diets to determine if changes in renal cortical and medullary ISFCa 2+correlated with changes in urinary calcium excretion and blood pressure. RESULTS We observed that renal ISFCa 2+ was predicted by urinary calcium excretion (P < 0.05) in DS rats but not DR rats. Renal cortical ISFCa 2+ was negatively associated with blood pressure (P < 0.03) while renal medullary ISFCa 2+ was positively associated with blood pressure in DS rats (P < 0.04). In contrast, neither urinary calcium excretion nor renal ISFCa 2+ was associated with blood pressure in the DR rats under the conditions of this study. CONCLUSION We interpret these findings to suggest that decreased renal cortical ISFCa 2+ plays a role in the increase in blood pressure following a high salt diet in salt hypertension perhaps by mediating renal vasoconstriction; the role of medullary calcium remains to be fully understood. Further studies are needed to determine the mechanism of the altered renal ISFCa 2+ and its role in blood pressure regulation. PMID:25552516

  4. Heart rate variability, blood pressure variability, and baroreflex sensitivity in overtrained athletes.

    PubMed

    Baumert, Mathias; Brechtel, Lars; Lock, Jürgen; Hermsdorf, Mario; Wolff, Roland; Baier, Vico; Voss, Andreas

    2006-09-01

    To assess the effects of abruptly intensified physical training on cardiovascular control. Retrospective longitudinal study. Research laboratory. Ten healthy athletes (5 men and 5 women) from track and field as well as triathlon. A 2-week training camp, including daily stepwise increasing cycling tests, running of 40 minutes, and additional cycling of 60 minutes. Time and frequency domain parameters of resting heart rate and blood pressure variability (HRV and BPV) and baroreflex sensitivity (BRS), before, during, and after the training camp. We found significantly reduced HRV during the training camp (mean beat-to-beat interval: 1042 [937 to 1194] ms vs. 933 [832 to 1103] ms vs. 1055 [947 to 1183] ms, P < 0.01; root-mean-square of beat-to-beat interval differences: 68 [52 to 95] ms vs. 52 [38 to 71] ms vs. 61 [48 to 78] ms, P < 0.05). Further, BRS was significantly reduced: 25.2 (20.4 to 40.4) ms/mmHg vs. 17.0 (12.9 to 25.7) ms/mmHg vs. 25.7 (18.8 to 29.1) ms/mmHg, P < 0.05. These effects disappeared at a large degree after 3 to 4 days of recovery. Abruptly intensified physical training results in an altered autonomic cardiovascular activity towards parasympathetic inhibition and sympathetic activation that can be monitored by means of HRV and BRS analyses and might provide useful markers to avoid the overtraining syndrome.

  5. Use of statistical design of experiments in the optimization of Ar-O2 low-pressure plasma treatment conditions of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) for increasing polarity and adhesion, and inhibiting hydrophobic recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butrón-García, María Isabel; Jofre-Reche, José Antonio; Martín-Martínez, José Miguel

    2015-03-01

    Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) film was treated with RF low-pressure plasmas (LPPs) made of mixtures of oxygen and argon for increasing surface polarity, minimizing hydrophobic recovery (i.e. retard ageing) and increasing adhesion to acrylic adhesive tape for medical use. Statistical design of experiments has been used for determining the most influencing experimental parameters of the LPP treatment of PDMS. Water contact angle values (measured 24 h after treatment) and the O/C ratio obtained from XPS experiments were used as response variables. Working pressure was the most influencing parameter in LPP treatment of PDMS, and the duration of the treatment, the power and the oxygen-argon mixture composition determined noticeably its effectiveness. The optimal surface properties in PDMS and inhibited hydrophobic recovery were achieved by treatment with 93 vol% oxygen + 7 vol% argon LLP at low working pressure (300 mTorr), low power (25 W) and long duration of treatment (120 s).

  6. Micropatterned atmospheric pressure discharge surface modification of fluorinated polymer films for mammalian cell adhesion and protein binding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graz, Ingrid; Ebner, Andreas; Bauer, Siegfried; Romanin, Christoph; Gruber, Hermann

    2008-08-01

    Micropatterning by an easily accessible atmospheric pressure discharge setup was performed on fluorinated polymer surfaces. Two conductively-coated glass slides are employed, together with the polymer foils to be modified and shadow masks for defining the microstructures. Surface angle measurements indicated the presence of charged groups in the surface of the fluoropolymer, enabling the growth of mammalian cells on arrays of spots with 600 μm diameter. XPS and FTIR spectra revealed the incorporation of oxygen in the surface, while the generation of aldehyde groups on the surface of fluorinated polymer films was demonstrated by selective coupling of fluorescence-labeled aminodextrane to the activated spots. The described method paves the way for producing protein microarray chips on flexible fluoropolymer substrates with standard laboratory equipment.

  7. The role of glottal surface adhesion on vocal folds biomechanics.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Pinaki; Siegmund, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    The airway surface liquid (ASL) is a very thin mucus layer and covers the vocal fold (VF) surface. Adhesion mediated by the ASL occurs during phonation as the VFs separate after collision. Such adhesion is hypothesized to determine voice quality and health. However, biomechanical insights into the adhesive processes during VF oscillation are lacking. Here, a computational study is reported on self-sustained VF vibration involving contact and adhesion. The VF structural model and the glottal airflow are considered fully three-dimensional. The mechanical behavior of the ASL is described through a constitutive traction-separation law where mucosal cohesive strength, cohesive energy, and rupture length enter. Cohesive energy values considered are bound below by the cohesive energy of water at standard temperature and pressure. Cohesive strength values considered are bound above by prior reported data on the adhesive strength of mucosal surface of rat small intestine. This model introduces a mechanical length scale into the analysis. The sensitivity of various aspects of VF dynamics such as flow-declination rate, VF separation under adhesive condition, and formation of multiple local fluid bridges is determined in relation to specific ASL adhesive properties. It is found that for the ASL considered here, the characteristics of the VF separation process are of debond type. Instabilities lead to the breakup of the bond area into several smaller bond patches. Such finding is consistent with in vivo observations.

  8. The Role of Glottal Surface Adhesion on Vocal Folds Biomechanics

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Pinaki; Siegmund, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The airway surface liquid (ASL) is a very thin mucus layer and covers the vocal fold (VF) surface. Adhesion mediated by the ASL occurs during phonation as the VFs separate after collision. Such adhesion is hypothesized to determine voice quality and health. However, biomechanical insights into the adhesive processes during VF oscillation are lacking. Here, a computational study is reported on self-sustained VF vibration involving contact and adhesion. The VF structural model and the glottal airflow are considered fully three-dimensional. The mechanical behavior of the ASL is described through a constitutive traction–separation law where mucosal cohesive strength, cohesive energy and rupture length enter. Cohesive energy values considered are bound below by the cohesive energy of water at standard temperature and pressure. Cohesive strength values considered are bound above by prior reported data on the adhesive strength of mucosal surface of rat small intestine. This model introduces a mechanical length scale into the analysis. The sensitivity of various aspects of VF dynamics such as flow-declination rate, VF separation under adhesive condition and formation of multiple local fluid bridges is determined in relation to specific ASL adhesive properties. It is found that for the ASL considered he