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Sample records for pressure temperature deformation

  1. High-pressure and high temperature deformation studies of polycrystalline diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Xiaohui

    2011-03-01

    With Vicker's hardness 120 GPa, shear modulus 535 GPa, diamond is the hardest material known to mankind. However, because diamond is difficult to deform, little is known with regard to its constitutive properties such as yield strength. In this work, we present results obtained at NSLS using deformation-DIA on polycrystalline diamond at different P-T conditions. As expected, even at total strains up to 20%, we did not observe the yield point of diamond at room temperature and a confining pressure of 4 GPa. However, for deformation at 1000 and 1200& circ; C, we observed an plastic flow of diamond at total strains of 10% and 5%, respectively, indicating that diamond weakens rapidly when temperature is over 1000& circ; C. We further derived the micro stress of diamond from peak width analysis, and found that the micro and macro stresses show similar variations with total strain at both room temperature and 1000& circ; C. However, at 1200& circ; C, the micro stress remains constant in entire deformation, indicating that stress is uniformly distributed within diamond particles at 1200& circ; C. We also carried out SEM studies on the recovered samples to investigate the miscrostructures, and find that the grain size of diamond decreases substantially during the deformation, from the initial microns to sub-microns for the room temperature deformation, however, almost doesn't change for the 1200& circ; C.

  2. High-pressure and high temperature deformation studies of polycrystalline diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, X.; Zhang, J.; Xu, H.; Wang, L.; Zhao, Y.

    2010-12-01

    With a Vicker’s hardness up to 120 GPa, diamond is the hardest material known to mankind. Diamond also has the highest bulk modulus (443 GPa) and the highest shear modulus (535 GPa) among all materials. However, because diamond is difficult to deform, little is known to date with regard to its constitutive properties such as yield strength and flow stress. In this work, we present results obtained at X17B2 of NSLS using the deformation-DIA (D-DIA) on cylindrical polycrystalline diamond at different pressure and temperature conditions. As expected, even at total axial strains up to 30%, we did not observe the yield point of diamond at room temperature and a confining pressure of 4 GPa. However, for deformation at 1000 and 1200 C, we observed an ultimate plastic flow of diamond at total axial strains of 10% and 5%, respectively, indicating that diamond weakens rapidly when temperature is over 1000 C. We further derived the microscopic stress of diamond during the deformation from the peak profile analysis, and we found that the microscopic and macroscopic stresses show similar variations with the total axial strain at both room temperature and 1000 C. However, at 1200 C, the microscopic stress remains fairly constant in the entire course of deformation, indicating that the stress at this higher temperature is uniformly distributed within polycrystalline diamond particles during the deformation. We also carried out SEM and TEM studies on the recovered samples to investigate their miscrostructures, and we find that the grain size of diamond decreases substantially during the deformation, from the initial 4-6 microns to sub-microns. More details of the experimental results will be presented and discussed.

  3. In-situ Phase Transformation and Deformation of Iron at High Pressure andTemperature

    SciTech Connect

    Miyagi, Lowell; Kunz, Martin; Knight, Jason; Nasiatka, James; Voltolini, Marco; Wenk, Hans-Rudolf

    2008-07-01

    With a membrane based mechanism to allow for pressure change of a sample in aradial diffraction diamond anvil cell (rDAC) and simultaneous infra-red laser heating, itis now possible to investigate texture changes during deformation and phasetransformations over a wide range of temperature-pressure conditions. The device isused to study bcc (alpha), fcc (gamma) and hcp (epislon) iron. In bcc iron, room temperature compression generates a texture characterized by (100) and (111) poles parallel to the compression direction. During the deformation induced phase transformation to hcp iron, a subset of orientations are favored to transform to the hcp structure first and generate a texture of (01-10) at high angles to the compression direction. Upon further deformation, the remaining grains transform, resulting in a texture that obeys the Burgers relationship of (110)bcc // (0001)hcp. This is in contrast to high temperature results that indicate that texture is developed through dominant pyramidal {2-1-12}<2-1-13> and basal (0001)-{2-1-10} slip based on polycrystal plasticity modeling. We also observe that the high temperature fcc phase develops a 110 texture typical for fcc metals deformed in compression.

  4. Deformation mechanisms in granodiorite at effective pressures to 100 MPa and temperatures to partial melting

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, M.; Handin, J.; Bauer, S.J.

    1981-01-01

    Deformation mechanisms in room-dry and water-saturated specimens of Charcoal Granodiorite, shortened at 10/sup -4/s/sup -1/, at effective pressures (Pe) to 100 MPa and temperatures to partial melting (less than or equal to 1050/sup 0/C) are documented with a view toward providing criteria to recognize and characterize the deformation for geological and engienering applications. Above 800/sup 0/C strength decreases dramatically at effective pressures greater than or equal to 50 MPa and water-weakening reduces strength an additional 30 to 40% at Pe = 100 MPa. Strains at failure are only 0.1 to 2.2% with macroscopic ductility (within this range) increasing as the effective pressures are increased and in wet versus dry tests. Shattering (multiple faulting) gives way to faulting along a single zone to failure without macroscopic faulting as ductility increases. Microscopically, cataclasis (extension microfracturing and thermal cracking with rigid-body motions) predominates at all conditions. Dislocation gliding contributes little to the strain. Precursive extension microfractures coalesce to produce the throughgoing faults with gouge zones exhibiting possible Riedel shears. Incipient melting, particularly in wet tests, produces a distinctive texture along feldspar grain boundaries that suggests a grain-boundary-softening effect contributes to the weakening. In addition, it is demonstrated that the presence of water does not lead to more microfractures, but to a reduction in the stresses required to initiate and propagate them.

  5. Experimental deformation of a synthetic dunite at high temperature and pressure. I. Mechanical behavior, optical microstructure and deformation mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeuch, David H.; Green, H. W.

    1984-12-01

    We have performed a series of 27 deformation experiments on a very dry synthetic dunite, using the Griggs solid medium apparatus. Strain rates ranged from 1 × 10 4 to 1 × 10 7 sec 1, temperatures varied from 1100° to 1300 °C, and the confining pressure was maintained at 10 or (more usually) 15 kbar. MACOR IM, a commercially available, anhydrous, machinable glass ceramic with a low melting point, was used in many of the experiments. We find that strength measurements performed using macor as a confining medium are similar to results obtained using sodium chloride as the confining solid. Tests performed in undried sample assemblies using air-dried dunite specimens resulted in creep strengths greater than those found in any earlier studies except those of Post (1973. 1977). A single test on a sample for which both sample and assembly were dried at a temperature sufficiently high to drive off any adsorbed water resulted in a creep strength comparable to that determined by Post (1973, 1977) for very dry Mt. Burnett dunite. Despite our experimental difficulties, we are led to believe that our synthetic dunite exhibits mechanical behavior consistent with that determined in other experimental studies in which natural dunites and peridotites were used. Furthermore, we conclude that dry dunite is very probably as strong as the oft-disputed results of Post earlier indicated. Finally, we show that the optical textures of our highly recrystallized experimental specimens are essentially identical to naturally produced porphyroclastic textures and that the deformation mechanism in both the experimental and natural specimens is probably dislocation creep with recovery by dynamic recrystallization.

  6. Micromechanics of Shear Localization under Elevated Temperature and Pore Pressure in Experimentally Deformed Quartz Sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanaya, T.; Hirth, G.

    2014-12-01

    Triaxial compression experiments were conducted on a permeable quartz sandstone under argon pore fluid and vented conditions at temperatures to 900°C and effective pressures to 175 MPa. Vented tests exhibit a transition from brittle faulting towards thermally-activated cataclastic flow. Microfracture density and acoustic emissions indicate that the transition corresponds to a change in mechanism from rate-insensitive fracture to subcritical cracking. We conclude that the transition occurs when shear microfracture propagation and macroscopic shear localization are suppressed under increased grain-scale fracture energy and reduced dilatancy. A comparison of the two tests shows that pore fluid has little influence on the failure behavior at low temperatures. Conversely, pore fluid tests exhibit substantially smaller strengths and enhanced ductility than those of vented tests at high temperatures and pressures, similar to weakening induced by decreasing strain rate in the water-saturated sandstone at room temperature. We infer that the observed weakening results from an enhancement in intergranular frictional slip involving subcritical cracking where retained intracrystalline water reduced fracture energy. We are characterizing detailed microstructures and finite strain fields in samples deformed at varied strains, as well as evolution in volume strain and other inelastic properties, to further constrain the pore fluid effects on shear localization processes.

  7. Transmission electron microscopy of dislocations in cementite deformed at high pressure and high temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mussi, A.; Cordier, P.; Ghosh, S.; Garvik, N.; Nzogang, B. C.; Carrez, Ph.; Garruchet, S.

    2016-06-01

    Polycrystalline aggregates of cementite (Fe3C) and (Fe,Ni)3C have been synthesised at 10 GPa and 1250 °C in the multianvil apparatus. Further, deformation of the carbides by stress relaxation has been carried out at temperature of 1250 °C and for 8 h at the same pressure. Dislocations have been characterised by transmission electron microscopy. They are of the [1 0 0] and [0 0 1] type, [1 0 0] being the most frequent. [1 0 0] dislocations are dissociated and glide in the (0 1 0) plane. [0 0 1] dislocations glide in (1 0 0) and (0 1 0). Given the plastic anisotropy of cementite, the morphology of the lamellae in pearlitic steels appears to have a major role in the strengthening role played by this phase, since activation of easy slip systems is geometrically inhibited in most cases.

  8. Utilization of temperature and pressure simulator for ocean-bottom and bore-hole observatories for quantitative crustal deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machida, Y.; Matsumoto, H.; Araki, E.; Kimura, T.; Nishida, S.; Kawaguchi, K.

    2015-12-01

    JAMSTEC has developed temperature and pressure simulator for ocean-bottom and bore-hole observatories in 2010, which is mainly composed of temperature chamber and hydraulic pressure standard. We call this equipment "environment simulator". Temperature chamber is capable to control its target temperature from -10 to 180 ℃, hence it is supposed for ocean-bottom to bore-hole environment. Pressure standard in which the dead weight is mounded on the piston-cylinder module produces the reference pressure up to 100 MPa (ca. 10,000 meters deep), which makes it possible to apply the constant pressure to the pressure sensors via the hydraulic pressure tube. Thus, our environment simulator can demonstrate ocean-bottom or bore-hole environment in the laboratory. The main purpose of the pressure simulator is to evaluate long-term pressure sensor's stability, i.e., sensor's drift by applying the constant pressure under the constant temperature. Here, we introduce two applications of our environment simulator. The first application is to evaluate the initial behavior of pressure sensors to be used in the Dense Ocean-floor Network system for Earthquakes and Tsunamis (DONET) in the Nankai Trough, Japan. DONET pressure sensors have been deployed in order for detection of not only tsunami but also crustal deformation. We applied 20 MPa pressure under 2 ℃ temperature to the pressure sensors for one month before deploying into the deep-sea. As a result, the initial sensor drift of 5 hPa per month in maximum was measured. The second application is to provide the reference pressure to the mobile pressure sensor which is designed for the in-situ calibration for the pressure sensors being in operation. We have developed the in-situ pressure calibration tool equipped with the high precision pressure sensor. The concept is that we carry the reference pressure to the on-site to calibrate the pressure sensor. Before carrying it to the deep-sea, the reference pressure is given to the mobile

  9. In situ observation of crystallographic preferred orientation of deforming olivine at high pressure and high temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohuchi, Tomohiro; Nishihara, Yu; Seto, Yusuke; Kawazoe, Takaaki; Nishi, Masayuki; Maruyama, Genta; Hashimoto, Mika; Higo, Yuji; Funakoshi, Ken-ichi; Suzuki, Akio; Kikegawa, Takumi; Irifune, Tetsuo

    2015-06-01

    Simple-shear deformation experiments on polycrystalline olivine and olivine single-crystal were conducted at pressures of 1.3-3.8 GPa and temperatures of 1223-1573 K to understand the achievement of steady-state fabric strength and the process of dynamic recrystallization. Development of crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO) of olivine was evaluated from two-dimensional X-ray diffraction patterns, and shear strain was measured from X-ray radiographs. The steady-state fabric strength of the A-type fabric was achieved within total shear strain of γ = 2. At strains higher than γ = 1, an increase in concentration of the [0 1 0] axes mainly contributes to an increase in fabric strength. At strains higher than γ = 2, the magnitude of VSH/VSV (i.e., ratio of horizontally and vertically polarized shear wave velocities) scarcely increased in most of the runs. The VSH/VSV of peridotite (70 vol.% olivine + 30 vol.% minor phases) having the steady-state A-type olivine fabric coincides with that of recent global one-dimensional models under the assumption of horizontal flow, suggesting that the seismic anisotropy observed in the shallow upper mantle is mostly explained by the development of A-type olivine fabric. Experimental results on the deformation of single-crystal olivine showed that the CPO of olivine is influenced by the initial orientation of the starting single crystal because strain is concentrated in the recrystallized areas and the relic of the starting single crystal remains. In the upper mantle, the old CPO of olivine developed in the past may affect the olivine CPO developed in the present.

  10. High-pressure and high-temperature deformation experiments on polycrystalline wadsleyite using the rotational Drickamer apparatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farla, Robert; Amulele, George; Girard, Jennifer; Miyajima, Nobuyoshi; Karato, Shun-ichiro

    2015-07-01

    High-pressure, torsional deformation experiments on polycrystalline wadsleyite were carried out using the rotational Drickamer apparatus (RDA). The experimental conditions ranged between temperatures of 2000-2200 K at pressures of 20 ± 1 GPa. Prior to deformation, the fine-grained (1-5 µm) wadsleyite specimens were synthesized from San Carlos olivine in a Kawai-type multi-anvil apparatus. The samples were loaded in the RDA, pressurized and heated, and deformed at stepped strain rates of 5-60 × 10-6 s-1. The stress was determined through the analysis of the orientation dependence on changes in lattice spacing for the (141), (240) and (040) planes. The strain was determined from the orientation of a molybdenum strain marker. Most stepped strain-rate tests reveal the stress exponent n to be 4.7 ± 0.5, suggesting power-law dislocation creep operated. Various samples exhibit grain-size reduction (to 0.1-0.6 µm), possibly associated with dynamic recrystallization or with partial phase transformation to ringwoodite. Transmission electron microscopy and electron backscatter diffraction analyses provide information on the dominant slip system in wadsleyite as 1/2<111> slip on {101} planes, as well as slip in the [100] direction. Dislocation density, even in recrystallized grains, is very high (likely >1014 m-2), reflecting the final high stresses in the samples during deformation. The results provide greater constraints on the regimes of various deformation mechanisms in wadsleyite at various experimental conditions.

  11. Shock temperatures in silica glass - Implications for modes of shock-induced deformation, phase transformation, and melting with pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitt, Douglas R.; Ahrens, Thomas J.

    1989-01-01

    Observations of shock-induced radiative thermal emissions are used to determine the gray body temperatures and emittances of silica glass under shock compression between 10 and 30 GPa. The results suggest that fused quartz deforms heterogeneously in this shock pressure range. It is shown that the 10-16 GPa range coincides with the permanent densification region, while the 16-30 GPa range coincides with the inferred mixed phase region along the silica glass Hugoniot. Low emittances in the mixed phase region are thought to represent the melting temperature of the high-pressure phase, stishovite. Also, consideration is given to the effects of pressure on melting relations for the system SiO2-Mg2SiO4.

  12. Plastic Deformation of Wadsleyite and Olivine at High-Pressure and High-Temperature using a Rotational Drickamer Apparatus (RDA)

    SciTech Connect

    Nishihara, Y.; Tiner, D; Kawazoe, T; Xu, Y; Jing, Z; Matsukage, K; Karato, S

    2008-01-01

    Large-strain plastic deformation experiments of wadsleyite and olivine were conducted using a rotational Drickamer apparatus (RDA) up to pressure and temperature conditions corresponding to the Earth's mantle transition zone. Sintered ring-shaped (Mg,Fe)2SiO4 wadsleyite and olivine samples were deformed at P not, vert, similar 16 GPa and T = 1600 and 1800 K, and P not, vert, similar 11 GPa and T = 1800 K, respectively, with equivalent strain rate of View the MathML source. In situ observations of deforming samples were carried out using the synchrotron radiation facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory, NSLS, X17B2. Stress was measured by X-ray diffraction at six different angles with respect to the compression axis. The stress estimated by X-ray diffraction was in good agreement with the stress estimated from dislocation density (for olivine). Strain was determined using X-ray radiographs of a strain marker (Re or Mo foil). Deformation of samples with a RDA involves both uniaxial compression and simple shear. A new formulation is developed to analyze both components to determine the rheological properties of a sample. Stress-strain curves show strain-hardening up to the equivalent strain of var epsilonE not, vert, similar 0.2 followed by the quasi-steady state deformation. Wadsleyite is found to be stronger than olivine compared at similar conditions and the creep strength of olivine at P not, vert, similar 11 GPa is much higher than those at lower pressures.

  13. Pressure-temperature-deformation-time of the ductile Alpine shearing in Corsica: From orogenic construction to collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossetti, Federico; Glodny, Johannes; Theye, Thomas; Maggi, Matteo

    2015-03-01

    Definition of the Tertiary tectono-metamorphic history of Alpine Corsica is a key task to decipher the space-time linkage between the Alpine and Apennine subduction systems in the Mediterranean region. Alpine Corsica exposes a nappe stack of oceanic- and continental-derived units, structurally juxtaposed onto the former European continental margin (Hercynian Corsica). Still uncertain is the timing of involvement of the continental-derived units in orogenic construction and shift to regional extension. This paper focuses on reconstruction of the pressure-temperature-deformation-time evolution of selected ductile shear zones activated during transition from the tectonic underplating to the extensional reworking stages. New Rb-Sr mineral age data, integrated with structural and thermobarometric investigations constrain the waning stages of the high-pressure (from blueschist to greenschist facies metamorphic conditions) top-to-the-W thrusting of the HP, oceanic-derived realm (Schistes Lustrés Complex) onto the Hercynian Corsica along the East Tenda Shear Zone in the early Oligocene (from ~ 32 to ~ 27 Ma). This early compressional evolution is overprinted by a major phase of retrogressive, syn-greenschist top-to-the-E extensional shearing in the Schistes Lustrés Complex with the last episode of deformation-related ductile recrystallization recorded during the early Miocene at ~ 20-21 Ma, in a continuum transition from ductile to brittle shearing. The same early Miocene Rb-Sr deformation ages are recovered from the ductile-to-brittle top-to-the-E reactivation domains within the East Tenda Shear Zone, documenting that transition from compression to extension in Alpine Corsica occurred during the late Oligocene-early Miocene time lapse. Implications of these data are discussed in the broader context of the Tertiary geodynamic evolution of the Central Mediterranean region.

  14. The Deformation-DIA: A Novel Apparatus for Measuring the Strength of Materials at High Strain to Pressures at Elevated Temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Durham, W

    2004-03-10

    The primary focus of this 3-year project was to develop and put to use an instrument to test experimentally the effect of pressure on body centered cubic (BCC) metals and other materials of interest to the Stockpile Stewardship program. Well-resolved materials testing requires measurements of load and deformation rate be measured at separable conditions of temperature, pressure, and plastic strain. The new apparatus at the heart of this work, the Deformation-DIA (D-DIA), began the project as a design concept. Its principal feature would be the capability to extend the conditions for such controlled materials testing from the current pressure limit of about 3 to almost 15 GPa, a factor of 5 increase. Once constructed and successfully tested, the plan of the project was to deform samples of BCC metals at arbitrary temperature and high pressures in order to provide preliminary measurements of strength and to prove its worth to the Stockpile Stewardship program. The project has been a stunning success. Progress toward demonstrating the worth of the D-DIA as a workhorse instrument for materials strength measurement at high pressure was given a huge boost by the fact that the machine itself functioned flawlessly from the very start, allowing the investigators to focus on measurement quality rather than technical operational issues. By the end of the project, we had deformed several samples of polycrystalline molybdenum (Mo) and tantalum (Ta) under very precisely controlled conditions, and for the Ta, had produced the first rudimentary measurements of strength to pressures of 8 GPa.

  15. Creep strength of ringwoodite measured at pressure-temperature conditions of the lower part of the mantle transition zone using a deformation-DIA apparatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawazoe, Takaaki; Nishihara, Yu; Ohuchi, Tomohiro; Miyajima, Nobuyoshi; Maruyama, Genta; Higo, Yuji; Funakoshi, Ken-ichi; Irifune, Tetsuo

    2016-11-01

    Creep strength of ringwoodite is important for understanding complicated patterns of the mantle convection in and around the mantle transition zone. To determine the creep strength of ringwoodite, we expanded pressure-temperature conditions of in situ stress-strain measurements in a deformation-DIA apparatus combined with synchrotron X-ray to those of the lower part of the mantle transition zone. The expansion of the pressure-temperature conditions was made by shrinking anvil truncation to 2.0 mm and the development of a cell assembly for in situ deformation experiments up to 1700 K. Utilizing the developed technique, creep-strength measurements on polycrystalline ringwoodite were performed at 16.9-18.0 GPa and 1300-1700 K during axial deformation with strain rates of 1.48- 3.59 ×10-5 s-1 to strains of 13.2-24.9%. Based on mechanical and microstructural observations, we infer that ringwoodite deformed by exponential dislocation creep through the Peierls mechanism at 1300-1400 K and power-law dislocation creep at 1500-1700 K. The creep strength of ringwoodite is apparently lower than that of bridgmanite, wadsleyite and olivine. The present result implies the possibility that the lower mantle transition zone is a low-viscosity layer. Further creep-strength data of these minerals are necessary to be determined above 13.5 GPa and high temperatures to determine viscosity structure in and around the lower mantle transition zone at strain rates relevant to the mantle convection.

  16. The large volume press facility at ID06 beamline of the European synchrotron radiation facility as a High Pressure-High Temperature deformation apparatus.

    PubMed

    Guignard, Jeremy; Crichton, Wilson A

    2015-08-01

    We report here the newly developed deformation setup offered by the 20MN (2000T) multi-anvil press newly installed at sector 7 of the European synchrotron radiation facility, on the ID06 beamline. The press is a Deformation-DIA (D-DIA) type apparatus, and different sets of primary anvils can be used for deformation experiments, from 6 mm to 3 mm truncations, according to the target pressure needed. Pressure and temperature calibrations and gradients show that the central zone of the assemblies is stable. Positions of differential RAMs are controlled with a sub-micron precision allowing strain rate from 10(-4) to 10(-6) s(-1). Moreover, changing differential RAM velocity is immediately visible on sample, making faster reaching of steady state. Lattice stresses are determined by the shifting of diffraction peak with azimuth angle using a linear detector covering typically a 10° solid-angle in 2θ mounted on rotation perpendicular to the beam. Acquisition of diffraction pattern, at a typical energy of 55 keV, is less than a minute to cover the whole azimuth-2θ space. Azimuth and d-spacing resolution are respectively better than 1° and 10(-3) Å making it possible to quantify lattice stresses with a precision of ±20 MPa (for silicates, which have typically high values of elastic properties), in pure or simple shear deformation measurements. These mechanical data are used to build fully constrained flow laws by varying P-T-σ-ε̇ conditions with the aim to better understanding the rheology of Earth's mantle. Finally, through texture analysis, it is also possible to determine lattice preferred orientation during deformation by quantifying diffraction peak intensity variation with azimuth angle. This press is therefore included as one of the few apparatus that can perform such experiments combining with synchrotron radiation. PMID:26329238

  17. The large volume press facility at ID06 beamline of the European synchrotron radiation facility as a High Pressure-High Temperature deformation apparatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guignard, Jeremy; Crichton, Wilson A.

    2015-08-01

    We report here the newly developed deformation setup offered by the 20MN (2000T) multi-anvil press newly installed at sector 7 of the European synchrotron radiation facility, on the ID06 beamline. The press is a Deformation-DIA (D-DIA) type apparatus, and different sets of primary anvils can be used for deformation experiments, from 6 mm to 3 mm truncations, according to the target pressure needed. Pressure and temperature calibrations and gradients show that the central zone of the assemblies is stable. Positions of differential RAMs are controlled with a sub-micron precision allowing strain rate from 10-4 to 10-6 s-1. Moreover, changing differential RAM velocity is immediately visible on sample, making faster reaching of steady state. Lattice stresses are determined by the shifting of diffraction peak with azimuth angle using a linear detector covering typically a 10° solid-angle in 2θ mounted on rotation perpendicular to the beam. Acquisition of diffraction pattern, at a typical energy of 55 keV, is less than a minute to cover the whole azimuth-2θ space. Azimuth and d-spacing resolution are respectively better than 1° and 10-3 Å making it possible to quantify lattice stresses with a precision of ±20 MPa (for silicates, which have typically high values of elastic properties), in pure or simple shear deformation measurements. These mechanical data are used to build fully constrained flow laws by varying P-T- σ - ɛ ˙ conditions with the aim to better understanding the rheology of Earth's mantle. Finally, through texture analysis, it is also possible to determine lattice preferred orientation during deformation by quantifying diffraction peak intensity variation with azimuth angle. This press is therefore included as one of the few apparatus that can perform such experiments combining with synchrotron radiation.

  18. Deformation of (Mg,Fe)O Ferropericlase to Temperatures of 1150 K and Pressures of 96 GPa: Implications for Mantle Flow and Seismic Anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marquardt, H.; Miyagi, L. M.; Speziale, S.; Liermann, H. P.; Merkel, S.; Tomé, C.

    2014-12-01

    Ferropericlase (Mg,Fe)O is thought to be the second most abundant mineral in Earth's lower mantle. Due to its potentially weak rheological behavior it may play a key role in controlling rheology of the lower mantle and in generating seismic anisotropy [1]. At pressures between approximately 40 GPa and 70 GPa at 300 K, the ferrous iron in ferropericlase undergoes a spin crossover from high-spin to low-spin state [2]. Our understanding of the deformation behavior of both high- and low-spin ferropericlase is incomplete, particularly at high-temperatures. The only published deformation study on (Mg,Fe)O through the spin transition pressure region has limited pressure resolution and was measured at 300 K [3]. Here, we present new results from synchrotron radial x-ray diffraction measurements on the deformation behavior of (Mg,Fe)O at high-pressures, covering the spin crossover pressure range, and high-temperatures. One set of experiments was performed on (Mg0.8-0.9Fe0.1-0.2)O at the Advanced Light Source (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory) up to 96 GPa at 300 K. A second suite of data were collected at the Extreme Conditions Beamline of PETRA III (DESY), where (Mg0.8Fe0.2)O was compressed at constant temperature to 70 GPa (at 850 K) and 40 GPa (at 1150 K). In all experiments, pressure was remotely increased using a gas membrane system, which allows for obtaining a very fine pressure resolution. From our data, we calculate the yield strength of ferropericlase, which we find to increase by a factor of about three throughout the lower mantle. Furthermore, we infer likely slip system activities of ferropericlase in Earth's lower mantle based on our experimental data and elastic viscoplastic self-consistent (EVPSC) modelling. We will discuss the effect of the increase of ferropericlase strength on the fate of subducting slabs and we will show potential implications for seismic anisotropy observations in D``, where low-spin ferropericlase is characterized by very large

  19. High temperature pressure gauge

    DOEpatents

    Echtler, J. Paul; Scandrol, Roy O.

    1981-01-01

    A high temperature pressure gauge comprising a pressure gauge positioned in fluid communication with one end of a conduit which has a diaphragm mounted in its other end. The conduit is filled with a low melting metal alloy above the diaphragm for a portion of its length with a high temperature fluid being positioned in the remaining length of the conduit and in the pressure gauge.

  20. Plastic deformation and sintering of alumina under high pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Fangming; Liu, Pingping; Wang, Haikuo; Xu, Chao; Yin, Shuai; Yin, Wenwen; Li, Yong; He, Duanwei

    2013-12-21

    Plastic deformation of alumina (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) under high pressure was investigated by observing the shape changes of spherical particles, and the near fully dense transparent bulks were prepared at around 5.5 GPa and 900 °C. Through analyzing the deformation features, densities, and residual micro-strain of the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} compacts prepared under high pressures and temperatures (2.0–5.5 GPa and 600–1200 °C), the effects of plastic deformation on the sintering behavior of alumina have been demonstrated. Under compression, the microscopic deviatoric stress caused by grain-to-grain contact could initiate the plastic deformation of individual particles, eliminate pores of the polycrystalline samples, and enhance the local atomic diffusion at the grain boundaries, thus produced transparent alumina bulks.

  1. Pressure-temperature-time-deformation path of kyanite-bearing migmatitic paragneiss in the Kali Gandaki valley (Central Nepal): Investigation of Late Eocene-Early Oligocene melting processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iaccarino, Salvatore; Montomoli, Chiara; Carosi, Rodolfo; Massonne, Hans-Joachim; Langone, Antonio; Visonà, Dario

    2015-08-01

    Kyanite-bearing migmatitic paragneiss of the lower Greater Himalayan Sequence (GHS) in the Kali Gandaki transect (Central Himalaya) was investigated. In spite of the intense shearing, it was still possible to obtain many fundamental information for understanding the processes active during orogenesis. Using a multidisciplinary approach, including careful meso- and microstructural observations, pseudosection modelling (with PERPLE_X), trace element thermobarometry and in situ monazite U-Th-Pb geochronology, we constrained the pressure-temperature-time-deformation path of the studied rock, located in a structural key position. The migmatitic gneiss has experienced protracted prograde metamorphism after the India-Asia collision (50-55 Ma) from ~ 43 Ma to 28 Ma. During the late phase (36-28 Ma) of this metamorphism, the gneiss underwent high-pressure melting at "near peak" conditions (710-720 °C/1.0-1.1 GPa) leading to kyanite-bearing leucosome formation. In the time span of 25-18 Ma, the rock experienced decompression and cooling associated with pervasive shearing reaching P-T conditions of 650-670 °C and 0.7-0.8 GPa, near the sillimanite-kyanite transition. This time span is somewhat older than previously reported for this event in the study area. During this stage, additional, but very little melt was produced. Taking the migmatitic gneiss as representative of the GHS, these data demonstrate that this unit underwent crustal melting at about 1 GPa in the Eocene-Early Oligocene, well before the widely accepted Miocene decompressional melting related to its extrusion. In general, kyanite-bearing migmatite, as reported here, could be linked to the production of the high-Ca granitic melts found along the Himalayan belt.

  2. Temperature dependent deformation mechanisms in pure amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Kiran, M. S. R. N. Haberl, B.; Williams, J. S.; Bradby, J. E.

    2014-03-21

    High temperature nanoindentation has been performed on pure ion-implanted amorphous silicon (unrelaxed a-Si) and structurally relaxed a-Si to investigate the temperature dependence of mechanical deformation, including pressure-induced phase transformations. Along with the indentation load-depth curves, ex situ measurements such as Raman micro-spectroscopy and cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy analysis on the residual indents reveal the mode of deformation under the indenter. While unrelaxed a-Si deforms entirely via plastic flow up to 200 °C, a clear transition in the mode of deformation is observed in relaxed a-Si with increasing temperature. Up to 100 °C, pressure-induced phase transformation and the observation of either crystalline (r8/bc8) end phases or pressure-induced a-Si occurs in relaxed a-Si. However, with further increase of temperature, plastic flow rather than phase transformation is the dominant mode of deformation. It is believed that the elevated temperature and pressure together induce bond softening and “defect” formation in structurally relaxed a-Si, leading to the inhibition of phase transformation due to pressure-releasing plastic flow under the indenter.

  3. Deformation of Olivine at Mantle Pressure using D-DIA

    SciTech Connect

    Li,L.

    2006-01-01

    Knowledge of the rheological properties of mantle materials is critical in modeling the dynamics of the Earth. The high-temperature flow law of olivine defined at mantle conditions is especially important since the pressure dependence of rheology may affect our estimation of the strength of olivine in the Earth's interior. In this study, steady-state high-temperature (up to 1473 K) deformation experiments of polycrystalline olivine (average grain size ? 10 ?m) at pressure up to 9.6 GPa, were conducted using a Deformation-DIA (D-DIA) high-pressure apparatus and synchrotron X-ray radiation. The oxygen fugacity (fo2) during the runs was in-between the iron-wustite and the Ni/NiO buffers' fo2. The water content of the polycrystalline samples was generally about 150 to 200 wt. ppm but was as low as 35 wt ppm. Typically, 30 % strain was generated during the uniaxial compression. Sample lengths during the deformation process as well as the differential stresses were monitored in situ by X-ray radiography and diffraction, respectively. The strain rate was derived with an accuracy of 10?6 s?1. Differential stress was measured at constant strain rate (?10?5 s?1) using a multi-element solid-state detector combined with a conical slit. Recovered specimens were investigated by optical and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). TEM shows that dislocation glide was the dominant deformation mechanism throughout the experiment. Evidence of dislocation climb and cross-slip as active mechanisms are also reported. Deformation data show little or no dependence of the dislocation creep flow with pressure, yielding to an activation volume V* of 0 {+-} 5 cm3/mol. These new data are consistent with the high-temperature rheological laws at lower pressures, as reported previously.

  4. High-Temperature Deformation of Enstatite Aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bystricky, M.; Lawlis, J.; Mackwell, S. J.; Heidelbach, F.; Raterron, P. C.

    2011-12-01

    Although enstatite is a significant component of the upper mantle, its rheology is still poorly understood. We have performed an experimental investigation of the mechanical properties of enstatite at high pressure and temperature in the proto- and ortho-enstatite stability fields. Synthetic enstatite powders were produced by reacting San Carlos olivine powders with lab-grade quartz. Powders were hot-pressed at high PT, and were then baked at 1000°C under controlled oxygen fugacity conditions to remove all hydrous defect species. The polycrystalline enstatite samples were deformed in a Paterson gas-medium apparatus at temperatures of 1200-1300°C, an oxygen fugacity buffered at Ni/NiO, and confining pressures of 300 or 450 MPa. Under these conditions, samples were in the orthoenstatite field at 450 MPa and likely mainly in the protoenstatite field at 300 MPa. At both confining pressures, the mechanical data display a progressive increase of the stress exponent n from 1 to 3 as a function of differential stress, suggesting a transition from diffusional to dislocation creep. Non-linear least-square fits to the high-stress data yielded flow laws with n=3 and activation energies of 600 and 720 kJ/mol for ortho- and proto-enstatite, respectively. The measured strengths are significantly higher than those derived from Raleigh et al. (1971) and Ross and Nielsen (1978), due to the influence of water on the mechanical behavior of their samples. Deformed samples were analysed using optical microscopy, SEM and TEM. Because enstatite reverts to clinoenstatite during quenching, the microstructures present highly twinned grains composed of thin alternating domains of clino- and ortho-pyroxene. Nevertheless, the microstructures show evidence of dislocation processes in the form of undulatory extinction and kink bands. Crystallographic preferred orientations measured by EBSD are axisymmetric and indicate preferential slip on (100)[001]. High resolution TEM indicates that for

  5. Deformation of Diopside Single Crystal at Mantle Pressure 2 TEM Characterization of Deformation Microstructures

    SciTech Connect

    E Amiguet; P Cordier; P Raterron

    2011-12-31

    The dislocation microstructures of diopside single crystals deformed at high-pressure (4 {<=} P {<=} 9 GPa), high-temperature (1100{sup o} {<=} T {<=} 1400 {sup o}C) using a Deformation-DIA high-pressure apparatus (D-DIA) have been characterized by transmission electron microscopy using weak-beam dark-field (WBDF), precession electron diffraction (PED), large-angle convergent-beam electron diffraction (LACBED) and the thickness-fringe method. Dislocation glide is the dominant deformation mechanism under these conditions. The 1/2<110>{l_brace}110{r_brace} glide is controlled by lattice friction on the edge segments and shows extensive cross-slip. The [001] glide occurs mostly on {l_brace}110{r_brace}; no evidence for [001](010) glide has been found. The [100] dislocations bear a strong lattice friction probably due to complex (out of glide) core structures.

  6. Deformation of rock: A pressure-sensitive, dilatant material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ord, A.

    1991-12-01

    Permanent (plastic) deformation of rock materials in the brittle regime (cataclastic flow) is modelled here in terms of Mohr-Coulomb behaviour in which all three of the parameters cohesion, friction angle and dilation angle follow hardening (or softening) evolution laws with both plastic straining and increases in confining pressure. The physical basis for such behaviour is provided by a sequence of uniaxial shortening experiments performed by Edmond and Paterson (1972) at confining pressures up to 800 MPa on a variety of materials including Gosford sandstone and Carrara marble. These triaxial compression experiments are important for the large range of confining pressures covered, and for the careful recording of data during deformation, particularly volume change of the specimens. Both materials are pressure-sensitive and dilatant. It is therefore possible to derive from these experiments a set of material parameters which allow a preliminary description of the deformation behaviour in terms of a non-associated, Mohr-Coulomb constitutive model, thus providing the first constitutive modelling of geological materials in the brittle-ductile regime. These parameters are used as input to a finite difference, numerical code (FLAC) with the aim of investigating how closely this numerical model simulates real material behaviour upon breakdown of homogeneous deformation. The mechanical and macrostructural behaviour exhibited by the numerical model is in close agreement with the physical results in that the stress-strain curves are duplicated together with localization behaviour. The results of the modelling illustrate how the strength of the upper-crust may be described by two different but still pressure-dependent models: the linear shear stress/normal stress relationship of Amontons (that is, Byerlee's Law), and a non-linear, Mohr-Coulomb constitutive model. Both include parameters of friction and both describe brittle deformation behaviour. Consideration of the non

  7. Experimental deformation of polycrystalline H2O ice at high pressure and low temperature - Preliminary results. [implications for Ganymede and Callisto

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durham, W. B.; Heard, H. C.; Kirby, S. H.

    1983-01-01

    A preliminary study is carried out of involving 70 constant strain deformation tests on pure polycrystalline H2O ice under conditions covering most of the stability field of ice I sub h. Brittle failure of I sub h is found to be promoted by lower P, lower T, and higher strain rates. Ductile flow is found to be promoted by higher P, higher T, and lower strain rates. The brittle failure of ice I sub h is found to be most unusual. The fracture strength is a positive function of P only below 50 MPa. At pressures greater than this, the fracture strength is independent of P, and the fracture plane lies approximately 45 deg from the load axis. It is believed that existing extrapolation based on existing experimental data to Ganymede and Callisto may be badly in error.

  8. DEFORMATION OF SCORIA CONE BY CONDUIT PRESSURIZATION

    SciTech Connect

    E.S. Gaffney; B. Damjanac; D. Krier; G. Valentine

    2005-08-26

    A simplified mechanical model is used to simulate the deformation of a scoria cone due to pressurization of magma in a feeder conduit. The scoria cone is modeled as consisting of a cone of stabilized scoria with an axial region of loose scoria (height h{sub 1}), all overlying a vertically oriented cylindrical conduit intruded into rhyolite tuff country rock. For our analyses, the conduit is filled with basalt magma, usually with the upper length (h{sub 2}) solidified. The style of deformation of the cone depends on both h{sub 1} and h{sub 2}. If magma is prevented from hydrofracturing out of the conduit (as, for example, might be the case if the magma is surrounded by a solidified, but plastically deformable layer acting as a gasket backed up by the brittle country rock) pressures in the magma can build to 10s of MPa. When h{sub 1} is 100 m, not unusual for a small isolated basaltic cinder cone, the magma pressure needed to destabilize the cone when molten magma extends all the way to the original ground surface (h{sub 2} = 0) is only about one-third of the pressure when the upper part of the conduit is solidified (h{sub 2} = 25m). In the former case, almost the entire upper third of the cone is at failure in tension when the configuration becomes unstable. In the latter case, small portions of the surface of the cone are failing in tension when instability occurs, but a large volume in the central core of the cone is failing in shear or compressions. These results may provide insight into the status of volcanic plumbing, either past or present, beneath scoria cones. Field observations at the Lathrop Wells volcano in southern Nevada identify structures at the outer edge just below the crater rim that appear to be inward-dipping listric normal faults. This may indicate that, near the end of its active stage, the cone was close to failing in this fashion. A companion paper suggests that such a failure could have been quite energetic had it occurred.

  9. Elevated temperature deformation of TD-nickel.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petrovic, J. J.; Ebert, L. J.

    1973-01-01

    Sensitivity of the elevated temperature (above 0.5 Tm) deformation of TD-nickel to grain size and shape was examined in both tension and creep. Elevated temperature strength increased with increasing grain diameter and increasing L/D ratio. Temperature sensitivity of the yield stress, as well as high (compared to self diffusion) apparent tensile activation enthalpies were the result of the internal stress not being proportional to the shear modulus. Creep activation enthalpies increased with increasing L/D ratio and, to a lesser extent, increasing grain diameter, reaching high values which may be apparent values. The thoria particle dispersion may have been altered by elevated temperature tensile and creep deformation.

  10. Transition in the deformation mode of nanocrystalline tantalum processed by high-pressure torsion

    SciTech Connect

    Ligda, J.P.; Schuster, B.E.; Wei, Q.

    2012-10-11

    We present quasi-static room temperature compression and nanoindentation data for nanocrystalline and ultrafine grained tantalum processed by high-pressure torsion. Because bulk samples possess an inherent gradient in properties, microstructures were characterized using site-specific transmission electron microscopy and synchrotron X-ray diffraction. Nanocrystalline Ta shows appreciable homogeneous plastic deformation in compression; however, specimens with the smallest grain sizes exhibit localized plastic deformation via shear bands. Microstructural changes associated with this transition in deformation mode are discussed.

  11. High-pressure, high-temperature deformation of CaGeO3 (perovskite)±MgO aggregates: Elasto-ViscoPlastic Self-Consistent modeling and implications for multi-phase rheology of the lower mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilairet, N.; Tomé, C.; Wang, H.; Merkel, S.; Wang, Y.; Nishiyama, N.

    2014-12-01

    As the largest rocky layer in the Earth, the lower mantle plays a critical role in controlling convective patterns in our planet. Current mineralogical mantle models suggest that the lower mantle is dominated by (Mg,Fe)SiO3 perovskite (SiPv; about 70 - 90% in volume fraction) and (Mg,Fe)O ferropericlase (Fp). Knowledge of rheological properties of the major constituent minerals and stress/strain partitioning among these phases during deformation is critical in understanding dynamic processes of the deep Earth. For the lower mantle, the strength contrast between SiPv and Fp has been estimated [1], the former being much stronger than the latter. However fundamental issues of stress-strain interactions among the major phases still remain to be properly addressed. Here we examine rheological properties of a two-phase polycrystal consisting of CaGeO3 perovskite (GePv) and MgO, deformed in the D-DIA at controlled speed ~1 - 3×10-5 s-1 at high pressures and temperatures (between 3 to 10 GPa and 300 to 1200 K), with bulk axial strains up to ~20% [2]. We use Elasto-ViscoPlastic Self-Consistent modeling (EVPSC) [3] to reproduce lattice strains and textures measured in-situ with synchrotron X-ray diffraction. We compare the results to those on an identical deformation experiment with a single phase (GePv) polycrystal. We will discuss stress distributions between the two phases in the composite, textural developments, relationships with active slip systems, and finally the potential implications for rheological properties of the lower mantle. [1] Yamazaki, D., and S. Karato (2002), Fabric development in (Mg,Fe)O during large strain, shear deformation: implications for seismic anisotropy in Earth's lower mantle, Physics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors, 131(3-4), 251-267. [2] Wang, Y., N. Hilairet, N. Nishiyama, N. Yahata, T. Tsuchiya, G. Morard, and G. Fiquet (2013), High-pressure, high-temperature deformation of CaGeO3 (perovskite)+/- MgO aggregates: Implications for

  12. Deformation Twinning of a Silver Nanocrystal under High Pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Xiaojing; Yang, Wenge; Harder, Ross; Sun, Yugang; Liu, Ming; Chu, Yong S.; Robinson, Ian K.; Mao, Ho-kwang

    2015-11-01

    Within a high-pressure environment, crystal deformation is controlled by complex processes such as dislocation motion, twinning, and phase transitions, which change materials' microscopic morphology and alter their properties. Understanding a crystal's response to external stress provides a unique opportunity for rational tailoring of its functionalities. It is very challenging to track the strain evolution and physical deformation from a single nanoscale crystal under high-pressure stress. Here, we report an in situ three-dimensional mapping of morphology and strain evolutions in a single-crystal silver nanocube within a high-pressure environment using the Bragg Coherent Diffractive Imaging (CDI) method. We observed a continuous lattice distortion, followed by a deformation twining process at a constant pressure. The ability to visualize stress-introduced deformation of nanocrystals with high spatial resolution and prominent strain sensitivity provides an important route for interpreting and engineering novel properties of nanomaterials.

  13. Deformation Twinning of a Silver Nanocrystal under High Pressure.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiaojing; Yang, Wenge; Harder, Ross; Sun, Yugang; Lu, Ming; Chu, Yong S; Robinson, Ian K; Mao, Ho-Kwang

    2015-11-11

    Within a high-pressure environment, crystal deformation is controlled by complex processes such as dislocation motion, twinning, and phase transitions, which change materials' microscopic morphology and alter their properties. Understanding a crystal's response to external stress provides a unique opportunity for rational tailoring of its functionalities. It is very challenging to track the strain evolution and physical deformation from a single nanoscale crystal under high-pressure stress. Here, we report an in situ three-dimensional mapping of morphology and strain evolutions in a single-crystal silver nanocube within a high-pressure environment using the Bragg Coherent Diffractive Imaging (CDI) method. We observed a continuous lattice distortion, followed by a deformation twining process at a constant pressure. The ability to visualize stress-introduced deformation of nanocrystals with high spatial resolution and prominent strain sensitivity provides an important route for interpreting and engineering novel properties of nanomaterials. PMID:26484941

  14. Elevated and Low Temperature Deformation of Cast Depleted Uranium

    SciTech Connect

    Vogel, Sven C.

    2015-02-20

    Goals: Understand crystal structure and micro-structure changes during high and low temperature deformation of uranium, in particular texture, and develop constitutive micro-structure based model for uranium deformation. Deliverables achieved: Completed texture measures for 11 pre- and post-dU compression samples, quantified texture pre- and post-deformation, and provided data to constrain deformation models.

  15. Temperature dependence of optically induced cell deformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritsch, Anatol; Kiessling, Tobias R.; Stange, Roland; Kaes, Josef A.

    2012-02-01

    The mechanical properties of any material change with temperature, hence this must be true for cellular material. In biology many functions are known to undergo modulations with temperature, like myosin motor activity, mechanical properties of actin filament solutions, CO2 uptake of cultured cells or sex determination of several species. As mechanical properties of living cells are considered to play an important role in many cell functions it is surprising that only little is known on how the rheology of single cells is affected by temperature. We report the systematic temperature dependence of single cell deformations in Optical Stretcher (OS) measurements. The temperature is changed on a scale of about 20 minutes up to hours and compared to defined temperature shocks in the range of milliseconds. Thereby, a strong temperature dependence of the mechanics of single suspended cells is revealed. We conclude that the observable differences arise rather from viscosity changes of the cytosol than from structural changes of the cytoskeleton. These findings have implications for the interpretation of many rheological measurements, especially for laser based approaches in biological studies.

  16. Structural transformations in single-crystalline titanium under high-pressure cold and cryogenic deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilyugin, V. P.; Khlebnikova, Yu. V.; Egorova, L. Yu.; Suaridze, T. R.; Resnina, N. N.; Patselov, A. M.

    2015-12-01

    The structure of an iodide titanium pseudo-single crystal subjected to severe plastic deformation in Bridgman anvils under a pressure of 8 GPa at room (293 K) and cryogenic (80 K) temperatures has been examined using methods of X-ray diffraction analysis and electron microscopy. It has been shown that, in the course of deformation, the original α titanium pseudo-single crystal undergoes the α→ ω transition. A decrease in the temperature of deformation to 80 K leads to the activation of twinning. At degrees of deformation lower than e = 6 titanium deformed at 293 K experiences more substantial strain hardening. In the course of subsequent deformation at 293 K, when e > 6, dynamic recrystallization begins, which is accompanied by the softening of the titanium. A decrease in the temperature of deformation to 80 K suppresses the recrystallization; therefore, the titanium deformed in liquid nitrogen shows a higher increase in the microhardness at degrees of deformation 6 < e < 10.

  17. Deformation of Single Crystal Molybdenum at High Pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Bonner, B P; Aracne, C; Farber, D L; Boro, C O; Lassila, D H

    2004-02-24

    Single crystal samples of micron dimensions oriented in the [001] direction were shortened 10 to 40% in uniaxial compression with superposed hydrostatic pressure to begin investigation of how the onset of yielding evolves with pressure. A testing machine based on opposed anvil geometry with precision pneumatic control of the applied force and capability to measure sub micron displacements was developed to produce shape changing deformation at pressure. The experiments extend observations of pressure dependent deformation to {approx}5Gpa at shortening rates of {approx}2*10{sup -4}. Samples have been recovered for post run characterization and analysis to determine if deformation mechanisms are altered by pressure. Experiments under hydrostatic pressure provide insight into the nature of materials under extreme conditions, and also provide a means for altering deformation behavior in a controlled fashion. The approach has a long history demonstrating that pressure enhances ductility in general, and produces enhanced hardening relative to that expected from normal cold work in the BCC metals Mo, Ta and Nb{sup 2}. The pressure hardening is in excess of that predicted from the measured increase in shear modulus at pressure, and therefore is likely due to a dislocation mechanism, such as suppression of kink pair formation or the interaction of forest dislocation cores, and not from lattice resistance. The effect has not been observed in FCC metals, suggesting a fundamental difference between deformation mechanisms at pressure for the two classes. The purpose of this letter is to investigate the origin of pressure hardening with new experiments that extend the pressure range beyond 3 GPa, the upper limit of conventional large sample (1cm{sup 3}) testing methods. Most previous high pressure deformation studies have been on poly crystals, relying on model dependent analysis to infer the maximum deviatoric stress that a deformed sample can support. In one experiment, a

  18. High-pressure, high-temperature deformation of CaGeO3 (perovskite)±MgO aggregates: Elasto-ViscoPlastic Self-Consistent modeling and dynamics in the lower mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilairet, Nadège; Tomé, Carlos; Wang, Huamiao; Merkel, Sébastien; Wang, Yanbin; Gasc, Julien; Feng, Shi; Nishiyama, Norimasa

    2016-04-01

    As the largest rocky layer in the Earth, the lower mantle plays a critical role in controlling convective patterns in our planet. Current mineralogical models suggest that the lower mantle is dominated by (Mg,Fe)SiO3 perovskite (SiPv; about 70 - 90% in volume fraction) and (Mg,Fe)O ferropericlase (Fp). Knowledge of rheological properties and textures of the major constituent minerals is critical in understanding dynamic processes of the deep Earth, and relating seismic observations to mineralogy. While individual properties of these phases have been studied, fewer informations on polyphase aggregates are available. Fundamental understanding about the stress-strain interactions among the phases and their effect on the bulk rheology still remains to be properly addressed. We examine stress/strain partitioning and rheological properties of a two-phase polycrystal CaGeO3 perovskite (GePv) and MgO, deformed in the D-DIA at controlled speed ~1 - 3×10-5 s-1 at high pressures and temperatures (between 3 to 10 GPa and 300 to 1200 K), with bulk axial strains up to ~30%. We use Elasto-Visco Plastic Self-Consistent modeling (EVPSC) to reproduce lattice strains and textures measured in-situ with synchrotron X-ray diffraction. We compare the results to those on an identical deformation experiment with a single phase (GePv) polycrystal. We will discuss stress distributions between the two phases in the composite, texture developments, relationships with active slip systems, and finally the implications for rheological and seismic properties of the lower mantle.

  19. Sessile dislocations by reactions in NiAl severely deformed at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Geist, D.; Gammer, C.; Rentenberger, C.; Karnthaler, H. P.

    2015-02-05

    B2 ordered NiAl is known for its poor room temperature (RT) ductility; failure occurs in a brittle like manner even in ductile single crystals deforming by single slip. In the present study NiAl was severely deformed at RT using the method of high pressure torsion (HPT) enabling the hitherto impossible investigation of multiple slip deformation. Methods of transmission electron microscopy were used to analyze the dislocations formed by the plastic deformation showing that as expected dislocations with Burgers vector a(100) carry the plasticity during HPT deformation at RT. In addition, we observe that they often form a(110) dislocations by dislocation reactions; the a(110) dislocations are considered to be sessile based on calculations found in the literature. It is therefore concluded that the frequently encountered 3D dislocation networks containing sessile a(110) dislocations are pinned and lead to deformation-induced embrittlement. In spite of the severe deformation, the chemical order remains unchanged.

  20. Can the multianvil apparatus really be used for high-pressure deformation experiments?

    SciTech Connect

    Durham, W.B.; Rubie, D.C.

    1996-04-24

    Past claims of the suitability of the MA-8 multianvil press as a deformation apparatus may have been overstated. On the basis of measurements of final octahedron size and of guide block displacement as a function of time, using the 10/5, 14/8, and 18/11 assemblies (octahedron edge length in mm/truncation edge length in mm) with MgO octahedra and pyrophyllite gasketing, it appears that at run conditions of interest to most researchers there is no appreciable time-dependent creep of gaskets and octahedra. All inelastic deformation occurs at rather low pressures: below about 10 GPa for the 10/5, 7 GPa for the 14/8, and 6 GPa for the 18/11 assemblies, with substantial uncertainties in these pressures. Above these limits all deformation of the pressure medium is elastic. Pressure stepping as a means of increasing the inelastic deformation rate of a sample is probably ineffective. Displacement measured at the guide blocks, previously believed to indicate deformation of the gaskets and octahedron, appears now to be unrelated to creep of these components. The calibrations have not been exhaustive and there is considerable scatter in some of the size measurements, so the above conclusions are not unequivocal. The calibrations do not exclude the possibility of deformation of a few tens of microns after the attainment of high pressure. Efforts to impose permanent shape change to samples at high pressure and temperature simply by relying on long run durations must be viewed with skepticism. There may be possibilities for deformation in the multianvil apparatus if materials of contrasting elastic modulus are used to differentially load a sample during pressure stepping.

  1. Influence of impurities and deformation temperature on the saturation microstructure and ductility of HPT-deformed nickel.

    PubMed

    Rathmayr, Georg B; Pippan, Reinhard

    2011-11-01

    Ni with different purities between 99.69 and 99.99 wt.% was deformed by high-pressure torsion (HPT) to high strains, where no further refinement of the microstructure is observed. The HPT deformation temperature varied between -196 and 400 °C. Both impurities and temperature significantly affect the lower limit of the grain size obtained by HPT. In the investigated samples, carbon was the most important impurity element in controlling the limit of grain refinement. The decrease in grain size due to an increase in the carbon content from 0.008 to 0.06 wt.% for HPT-deformed Ni samples at room temperature enhanced the ultimate tensile strength from 1000 to 1700 MPa. Surprisingly, the carbon content did not deteriorate the ductility, defined as the reduction in area, which is mainly limited by the total amount of impurities besides carbon. Furthermore, the deformation temperature dependency on ductility was not very pronounced and only visible for deformation temperatures above 200 °C. PMID:22163380

  2. Structural Deformation of Sm@C88 under High Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Jinxing; Yao, Mingguang; Yang, Hua; Liu, Ziyang; Ma, Fengxian; Li, Quanjun; Liu, Ran; Zou, Bo; Cui, Tian; Liu, Zhenxian; Sundqvist, Bertil; Liu, Bingbing

    2015-01-01

    We have studied the structural transformation of Sm@C88 under pressure up to 18 GPa by infrared spectroscopy combined with theoretical simulations. The infrared-active vibrational modes of Sm@C88 at ambient conditions have been assigned for the first time. Pressure-induced blue and red shifts of the corresponding vibrational modes indicate an anisotropic deformation of the carbon cage upon compression. We propose that the carbon cage changes from ellipsoidal to approximately spherical around 7 GPa. A smaller deformation of the carbon bonds in the area close to the Sm atom in the cage suggests that the trapped Sm atom plays a role in minimizing the compression of the adjacent bonds. Pressure induced a significant reduction of the band gap of the crystal. The HOMO-LUMO gap of the Sm@C88 molecule decreases remarkably at 7 GPa as the carbon cage is deformed. Also, compression enhances intermolecular interactions and causes a widening of the energy bands. Both effects decrease the band gap of the sample. The carbon cage deforms significantly above 7 GPa, from spherical to a peanut-like shape and collapses at 18 GPa. PMID:26303867

  3. Structural Deformation of Sm@C88 under High Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Jinxing; Yao, Mingguang; Yang, Hua; Liu, Ziyang; Ma, Fengxian; Li, Quanjun; Liu, Ran; Zou, Bo; Cui, Tian; Liu, Zhenxian; Sundqvist, Bertil; Liu, Bingbing

    2015-08-01

    We have studied the structural transformation of Sm@C88 under pressure up to 18 GPa by infrared spectroscopy combined with theoretical simulations. The infrared-active vibrational modes of Sm@C88 at ambient conditions have been assigned for the first time. Pressure-induced blue and red shifts of the corresponding vibrational modes indicate an anisotropic deformation of the carbon cage upon compression. We propose that the carbon cage changes from ellipsoidal to approximately spherical around 7 GPa. A smaller deformation of the carbon bonds in the area close to the Sm atom in the cage suggests that the trapped Sm atom plays a role in minimizing the compression of the adjacent bonds. Pressure induced a significant reduction of the band gap of the crystal. The HOMO-LUMO gap of the Sm@C88 molecule decreases remarkably at 7 GPa as the carbon cage is deformed. Also, compression enhances intermolecular interactions and causes a widening of the energy bands. Both effects decrease the band gap of the sample. The carbon cage deforms significantly above 7 GPa, from spherical to a peanut-like shape and collapses at 18 GPa.

  4. Structural Deformation of Sm@C88 under High Pressure.

    PubMed

    Cui, Jinxing; Yao, Mingguang; Yang, Hua; Liu, Ziyang; Ma, Fengxian; Li, Quanjun; Liu, Ran; Zou, Bo; Cui, Tian; Liu, Zhenxian; Sundqvist, Bertil; Liu, Bingbing

    2015-08-25

    We have studied the structural transformation of Sm@C88 under pressure up to 18 GPa by infrared spectroscopy combined with theoretical simulations. The infrared-active vibrational modes of Sm@C88 at ambient conditions have been assigned for the first time. Pressure-induced blue and red shifts of the corresponding vibrational modes indicate an anisotropic deformation of the carbon cage upon compression. We propose that the carbon cage changes from ellipsoidal to approximately spherical around 7 GPa. A smaller deformation of the carbon bonds in the area close to the Sm atom in the cage suggests that the trapped Sm atom plays a role in minimizing the compression of the adjacent bonds. Pressure induced a significant reduction of the band gap of the crystal. The HOMO-LUMO gap of the Sm@C88 molecule decreases remarkably at 7 GPa as the carbon cage is deformed. Also, compression enhances intermolecular interactions and causes a widening of the energy bands. Both effects decrease the band gap of the sample. The carbon cage deforms significantly above 7 GPa, from spherical to a peanut-like shape and collapses at 18 GPa.

  5. Ultrahigh Temperature Capacitive Pressure Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harsh, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    Robust, miniaturized sensing systems are needed to improve performance, increase efficiency, and track system health status and failure modes of advanced propulsion systems. Because microsensors must operate in extremely harsh environments, there are many technical challenges involved in developing reliable systems. In addition to high temperatures and pressures, sensing systems are exposed to oxidation, corrosion, thermal shock, fatigue, fouling, and abrasive wear. In these harsh conditions, sensors must be able to withstand high flow rates, vibration, jet fuel, and exhaust. In order for existing and future aeropropulsion turbine engines to improve safety and reduce cost and emissions while controlling engine instabilities, more accurate and complete sensor information is necessary. High-temperature (300 to 1,350 C) capacitive pressure sensors are of particular interest due to their high measurement bandwidth and inherent suitability for wireless readout schemes. The objective of this project is to develop a capacitive pressure sensor based on silicon carbon nitride (SiCN), a new class of high-temperature ceramic materials, which possesses excellent mechanical and electric properties at temperatures up to 1,600 C.

  6. Deformation Experiments at Very High Pressure: What Would Goetze Think?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durham, W. B.

    2002-12-01

    New deformation machines such as the deformation-DIA (D-DIA) and rotational Drickamer apparatus (RDA), which operate at confining pressures well in excess of 5 GPa, hold the promise of directly characterizing rock rheology well into the transition zone. Until a few years ago, a sense of rock strength at such depths could be reached only by very large extrapolations based on tenuous measurements of activation volume. The D-DIA and RDA owe their creation directly to the development of bright synchrotron x radiation as an analytical tool for measuring stress and plastic strain inside pressure vessels, replacing traditional load cells and displacement transducers. The D-DIA is a 6-anvil device with the capability of independent movement of certain anvils such that pressure and maximum stress can be controlled independently. It is not unlike cubic deformation devices developed earlier (e.g., Griggs' cubic anvil [Carter et al., J. Geol., 72, 687-733, 1964]), except that it is based on the more stable single-actuator hydrostatic DIA design and therefore capable of reaching pressures of 15 GPa, sufficient to cover the full pressure stability range of olivine, for example. The RDA is also an adaptation, of the 25-GPa, 2-anvil hydrostatic Drickamer cell, wherein rotary deformation is imparted by twisting one of the anvils about its axis. Both differ from all other multi-anvil, Bridgman-anvil, and diamond-anvil cells in that they are generically deformation machines: they impart strain without changing confining pressure. The D-DIA geometry is suited for measuring the state of stress in a sample; the RDA will be able to impart very high strains and will thus allow us to study the effect of pressure on fabric and texture development in the mantle. Goetze had an eye for expeditious measurement and high-quality, high-impact data, a sure recipe for advancement of science when it can be achieved. His are probably the best standards for gauging the success of the new machines. Both

  7. Deformation T-Cup: A new multi-anvil apparatus for controlled strain-rate deformation experiments at pressures above 18 GPa

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, Simon A. McCormack, Richard J.; Bailey, Edward; Dobson, David P.; Weidner, Donald J.; Whitaker, Matthew L.; Li, Li; Vaughan, Michael T.

    2014-08-15

    A new multi-anvil deformation apparatus, based on the widely used 6-8 split-cylinder, geometry, has been developed which is capable of deformation experiments at pressures in excess of 18 GPa at room temperature. In 6-8 (Kawai-type) devices eight cubic anvils are used to compress the sample assembly. In our new apparatus two of the eight cubes which sit along the split-cylinder axis have been replaced by hexagonal cross section anvils. Combining these anvils hexagonal-anvils with secondary differential actuators incorporated into the load frame, for the first time, enables the 6-8 multi-anvil apparatus to be used for controlled strain-rate deformation experiments to high strains. Testing of the design, both with and without synchrotron-X-rays, has demonstrated the Deformation T-Cup (DT-Cup) is capable of deforming 1–2 mm long samples to over 55% strain at high temperatures and pressures. To date the apparatus has been calibrated to, and deformed at, 18.8 GPa and deformation experiments performed in conjunction with synchrotron X-rays at confining pressures up to 10 GPa at 800 °C.

  8. Deformation T-Cup: a new multi-anvil apparatus for controlled strain-rate deformation experiments at pressures above 18 GPa.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Simon A; Weidner, Donald J; McCormack, Richard J; Whitaker, Matthew L; Bailey, Edward; Li, Li; Vaughan, Michael T; Dobson, David P

    2014-08-01

    A new multi-anvil deformation apparatus, based on the widely used 6-8 split-cylinder, geometry, has been developed which is capable of deformation experiments at pressures in excess of 18 GPa at room temperature. In 6-8 (Kawai-type) devices eight cubic anvils are used to compress the sample assembly. In our new apparatus two of the eight cubes which sit along the split-cylinder axis have been replaced by hexagonal cross section anvils. Combining these anvils hexagonal-anvils with secondary differential actuators incorporated into the load frame, for the first time, enables the 6-8 multi-anvil apparatus to be used for controlled strain-rate deformation experiments to high strains. Testing of the design, both with and without synchrotron-X-rays, has demonstrated the Deformation T-Cup (DT-Cup) is capable of deforming 1-2 mm long samples to over 55% strain at high temperatures and pressures. To date the apparatus has been calibrated to, and deformed at, 18.8 GPa and deformation experiments performed in conjunction with synchrotron X-rays at confining pressures up to 10 GPa at 800 °C .

  9. Deformation T-Cup: A new multi-anvil apparatus for controlled strain-rate deformation experiments at pressures above 18 GPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, Simon A.; Weidner, Donald J.; McCormack, Richard J.; Whitaker, Matthew L.; Bailey, Edward; Li, Li; Vaughan, Michael T.; Dobson, David P.

    2014-08-01

    A new multi-anvil deformation apparatus, based on the widely used 6-8 split-cylinder, geometry, has been developed which is capable of deformation experiments at pressures in excess of 18 GPa at room temperature. In 6-8 (Kawai-type) devices eight cubic anvils are used to compress the sample assembly. In our new apparatus two of the eight cubes which sit along the split-cylinder axis have been replaced by hexagonal cross section anvils. Combining these anvils hexagonal-anvils with secondary differential actuators incorporated into the load frame, for the first time, enables the 6-8 multi-anvil apparatus to be used for controlled strain-rate deformation experiments to high strains. Testing of the design, both with and without synchrotron-X-rays, has demonstrated the Deformation T-Cup (DT-Cup) is capable of deforming 1-2 mm long samples to over 55% strain at high temperatures and pressures. To date the apparatus has been calibrated to, and deformed at, 18.8 GPa and deformation experiments performed in conjunction with synchrotron X-rays at confining pressures up to 10 GPa at 800 °C .

  10. High-pressure creep of serpentine, interseismic deformation and initiation of subduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynard, B.; Hilairet, N.; Wang, Y.; Daniel, I.; Merkel, S.; Petitgirard, S.; Nishiyama, N.

    2007-12-01

    Serpentines, phyllosilicates resulting from mantle hydration, have a low viscosity compared with other mantle and slab materials within subduction zones. They have a global geodynamic importance on the timescale of mantle convection because a serpentinite layer may decouple the mantle wedge from the subducting slab, therefore influencing plate tectonics regime on the Earth. The seismic implications are far reaching as serpentinite rheology may govern stress build-up and downdip relaxation over the slab surface, which are critical parameters for earthquake triggering and for the downdip extent of major ruptures. However, limitation of apparatus has restricted previous high temperature deformation experiments on serpentinites to pressures below 0.7 GPa, and the lack of data at relevant P-T impeded quantification of serpentine rheology influence on subduction zones dynamics. We present in situ deformation experiments on the high-pressure variety antigorite, at low strain rates and pressure-temperature (P-T) of 1 and 4 GPa and 200 to 500C, respectively, i.e. over most of the antigorite stability field, using the Deformation-DIA (D-DIA) apparatus coupled with synchrotron X-ray at 13-BM-D at GSE-CARS (Advanced Photo Source). Strain rates and stresses were obtained respectively from in-situ monitoring the sample length with X-ray radiographs, and azimuthal dependence of d-spacings on diffraction patterns. The determined stress-strain curves were fitted to a power-law equation including both temperature and pressure dependence. Regardless of the temperature, serpentinized mantle at the slab surface has a low viscosity that allows localizing the deformation and impeding stress build-up. The consequences of such a rheology for subduction zones dynamics at short and long term include limitation of the downdip propagation of large earthquakes and viscous relaxation as an origin of post-seismic deformations and slow earthquakes. The low viscosity of serpentinized faults in the

  11. Surface deformation from a pressurized subsurface fracture: Problem description

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Pengcheng

    2014-09-15

    This document speci es a set of problems that entail the calculation of ground surface deformation caused by a pressurized subsurface fracture. The solid medium is assumed to be isotropic-homogeneous where linear elasticity applies. The e ects of the uid in the fracture is represented by a uniform pressure applied onto the two fracture walls. The fracture is assumed to be rectangular in shape and various dipping angles are considered. In addition to the full 3D solution, we reduce the 3D problem to a plane-strain geometry, so that 2D codes can participate in the comparison and results can be compared with those available in the literature.

  12. Significance of geometrical relationships between low-temperature intracrystalline deformation microstructures in naturally deformed quartz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derez, T.; Pennock, G.; Drury, M. R.; Sintubin, M.

    2013-12-01

    Although quartz is one of the most studied minerals in the Earth's crust when it comes to its rheology, the interpretation of intracrystalline deformation microstructures with respect to deformation conditions and mechanisms, remains highly contentious. Moreover, inconsistent use of terminology for both deformation microstructures and mechanisms makes a correct assessment of observations and interpretations in published material very difficult. With respect to low-temperature intracrystalline deformation microstructures in quartz, different conflicting genetic models have been proposed. Most probably, the lack of consensus means that there is no unique interpretation for these microstructures, primarily because their initiation and development depend on many ambient conditions. We extensively studied these intracrystalline deformation microstructures by means of optical microscopy, Hot-Cathodoluminescence, SEM-Cathodoluminescence and Electron Backscatter Diffraction Orientation Imaging, in vein quartz of the High-Ardenne slate belt (Belgium, France, Luxemburg, Germany), (de)formed in a low-temperature regime. Firstly, we propose a new, purely descriptive terminology for the low-temperature intracrystalline deformation microstructures in naturally deformed quartz: fine extinction bands (FEB), wide extinction bands (WEB) and strings. The strings can be further subdivided into blocky (BS), straight (SS) and recrystallised (RS) morphological types. FEBs have consistently been called deformation lamellae in quartz and planar slip bands in metals. WEBs have been called deformation bands, prismatic kink bands or type II kink bands. Strings have formerly been called shear bands, deformation bands or type I kink bands. No distinction between blocky and straight morphological string types had ever been made. Secondly, a survey of the pre-recrystallisation stages in the history of the intracrystalline deformation microstructures reveals that the different types of low-temperature

  13. Tantalum alloys resist creep deformation at elevated temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckman, R. W., Jr.

    1966-01-01

    Dispersion-strengthened tantalum-base alloys possess high strength and good resistance to creep deformation at elevated temperatures in high vacuum environments. They also have ease of fabrication, good weldability, and corrosion resistance to molten alkali metals.

  14. An asperity-deformation model for effective pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gangi, Anthony F.; Carlson, Richard L.

    1996-05-01

    Variations of the mechanical and transport properties of cracked and/or porous rocks under isotropic stress depend on both the confining pressure ( Pc) and the pore-fluid pressure ( Pp). To a first approximation, these rock properties are functions of the differential pressure, Pd = Pc - Pp; at least for low differential pressures. However, at higher differential pressures, the properties depend in a more complicated way upon the two pressures. The concept of effective pressure, Pe, is used to denote this variation and it is defined as Pe( Pc, Pp) = Pc - n( Pc, Pp) Pp. If n = 1 (and therefore, is independent of Pc and Pp), the effective pressure is just the differential pressure. We have used an asperity-deformation model and a force-balance equation to derive expressions for the effective pressure. We equate the total external force (in one direction), Fc, to the total force on the asperities, Fa, and the force of the fluid, Fp, acting in that same direction. The fluid force, Fp, acts only on the parts of the crack (or pore-volume) faces which are not in contact. Then, the asperity pressure, Pa, is the average force per unit area acting on the crack (or grain) contacts P a = {F a}/{A} = {F c}/{A} - {F p}/{A} = P c - (1 - {A c}/{A})P p, where A is the total area over which Fc acts and Ac is the area of contact of the crack asperities or the grains. Thus, the asperity pressure, Pa, is greater than the differential pressure, Pd, because Pp acts on a smaller area, A- Ac, than the total area, A. For elastic asperities, the area of contact Ac and the strain (e.g., crack and pore openings) remain the same, to a high degree of approximation, at constant asperity pressure. Therefore, transport properties such as permeability, resistivity, thermal conductivity, etc. are constant, to the same degree of approximation, at constant asperity pressure. For these properties, the asperity pressure is, very accurately, the effective pressure, Pc. Using this model, we find that the

  15. Surface Deformation Caused by Pressure Changes in the Fluid Core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fang, Ming; Hager, Bradford H.; Herring, Thomas A.

    1995-01-01

    Pressure load Love numbers are presented for the mantle deformation induced by the variation of the pressure field at the core mantle boundary (CNB). We find that the CMB geostrophic pressure fields, derived from 'frozen-flux' core surface flow estimates at epochs 1965 and 1975, produce a relative radial velocity (RRV) field in the range of 3mm/decade with uplift near the equator and subsidence near the poles. The contribution of this mechanism to the change in the length of day (l.o.d) is small --- about 2.3 x 10(exp -2) ms/decade. The contribution to the time variation of the ellipticity coefficient is more important --- -1.3 x 10(exp -11)/yr.

  16. Carbon nanotube temperature and pressure sensors

    DOEpatents

    Ivanov, Ilia N.; Geohegan, David B.

    2016-10-25

    The present invention, in one embodiment, provides a method of measuring pressure or temperature using a sensor including a sensor element composed of a plurality of carbon nanotubes. In one example, the resistance of the plurality of carbon nanotubes is measured in response to the application of temperature or pressure. The changes in resistance are then recorded and correlated to temperature or pressure. In one embodiment, the present invention provides for independent measurement of pressure or temperature using the sensors disclosed herein.

  17. Carbon nanotube temperature and pressure sensors

    DOEpatents

    Ivanov, Ilia N; Geohegan, David Bruce

    2013-10-29

    The present invention, in one embodiment, provides a method of measuring pressure or temperature using a sensor including a sensor element composed of a plurality of carbon nanotubes. In one example, the resistance of the plurality of carbon nanotubes is measured in response to the application of temperature or pressure. The changes in resistance are then recorded and correlated to temperature or pressure. In one embodiment, the present invention provides for independent measurement of pressure or temperature using the sensors disclosed herein.

  18. Method for compensating bellows pressure loads while accommodating thermal deformations

    SciTech Connect

    Woodle, M.H.

    1985-01-01

    Many metal bellows are used on storage ring vacuum chambers. They allow the ring to accommodate deformations associated with alignment, mechanical assembly and thermal expansion. The NSLS has two such electron storage rings, the vuv ring and the x-ray ring. Both rings utilize a number of welded metal bellows within the ring and at every beam port. There are provisions for 16 beam ports on the vuv and 28 ports in the x-ray ring. At each of these locations the bellows are acted on by an external pressure of 1 atmosphere, which causes a 520 lb reaction at the vacuum chamber beam port and at the beamline flange downstream of the bellows. The use of rigid tie rods across the bellows flanges to support this load is troublesome because most storage ring vacuum chambers are baked in situ to achieve high internal vacuum. Significant forces can develop on components if thermal deformation is restrained and damage could occur.

  19. Effect of ambient pressure on Leidenfrost temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orejon, Daniel; Sefiane, Khellil; Takata, Yasuyuki

    2014-11-01

    The accurate prediction and control of the interaction of liquids with hot surfaces is paramount in numerous areas, including cooling applications. We present results illustrating the effect of ambient pressure on the temperature required for a droplet to levitate over a hot surface, i.e., the Leidenfrost temperature. In the present study the dependence of wetting and levitating temperatures on ambient pressure in a range of subatmospheric pressures is reported. Experimental data indicate that the Leidenfrost temperature decreases with decreasing pressure at subatmospheric pressures. A physical approach for the dependence of Leidenfrost temperature on ambient pressure, based on an analogy with saturation pressure dependence, is proposed. Furthermore, previous literature data for pressures above atmospheric are also included in the analysis to support and validate the proposed approach. In addition, the effect of substrate material, substrate roughness, and type of fluid on the Leidenfrost temperature is discussed.

  20. Elevated temperature deformation of TD-nickel base alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petrovic, J. J.; Kane, R. D.; Ebert, L. J.

    1972-01-01

    Sensitivity of the elevated temperature deformation of TD-nickel to grain size and shape was examined in both tension and creep. Elevated temperature strength increased with increasing grain diameter and increasing L/D ratio. Measured activation enthalpies in tension and creep were not the same. In tension, the internal stress was not proportional to the shear modulus. Creep activation enthalpies increased with increasing L/D ratio and increasing grain diameter, to high values compared with that of the self diffusion enthalpy. It has been postulated that two concurrent processes contribute to the elevated temperature deformation of polycrystalline TD-nickel: (1) diffusion controlled grain boundary sliding, and (2) dislocation motion.

  1. Simultaneous Luminescence Pressure and Temperature Mapping System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buck, Gregory M. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A simultaneous luminescence pressure and temperature mapping system is developed including improved dye application techniques for surface temperature and pressure measurements from 5 torr to 1000 torr with possible upgrade to from 0.5 torr to several atmospheres with improved camera resolution. Adsorbed perylene dye on slip-cast silica is pressure (oxygen) sensitive and reusable to relatively high temperatures (approximately 150 C). Adsorbed luminescence has an approximately linear color shift with temperature, which can be used for independent temperature mapping and brightness pressure calibration with temperature.

  2. Simultaneous Luminescence Pressure and Temperature Mapping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buck, Gregory M. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A simultaneous luminescence pressure and temperature mapping system is developed including improved dye application techniques for surface temperature and pressure measurements from 5 torr to 1000 torr with possible upgrade to from 0.5 torr to several atmospheres with improved camera resolution. Adsorbed perylene dye on slip-cast silica is pressure (oxygen) sensitive and reusable to relatively high temperatures (-150 C). Adsorbed luminescence has an approximately linear color shift with temperature, which can be used for independent temperature mapping and brightness pressure calibration with temperature.

  3. Time temperature-stress dependence of boron fiber deformation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dicarlo, J. A.

    1976-01-01

    Flexural stress relaxation (FSR) and flexural internal friction (FIF) techniques were employed to measure the time-dependent deformation of boron fibers from -190 to 800 C. The principal specimens were 203 micrometers diameter fibers commercially produced by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) on a 13 micrometer tungsten substrate. The observation of complete creep strain recovery with time and temperature indicated that CVD boron fibers deform flexurally as anelastic solids with no plastic component.

  4. Plastic Deformation of Micromachined Silicon Diaphragms with a Sealed Cavity at High Temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Juan; Ward, Michael; Kinnell, Peter; Craddock, Russell; Wei, Xueyong

    2016-01-01

    Single crystal silicon (SCS) diaphragms are widely used as pressure sensitive elements in micromachined pressure sensors. However, for harsh environments applications, pure silicon diaphragms are hardly used because of the deterioration of SCS in both electrical and mechanical properties. To survive at the elevated temperature, the silicon structures must work in combination with other advanced materials, such as silicon carbide (SiC) or silicon on insulator (SOI), for improved performance and reduced cost. Hence, in order to extend the operating temperatures of existing SCS microstructures, this work investigates the mechanical behavior of pressurized SCS diaphragms at high temperatures. A model was developed to predict the plastic deformation of SCS diaphragms and was verified by the experiments. The evolution of the deformation was obtained by studying the surface profiles at different anneal stages. The slow continuous deformation was considered as creep for the diaphragms with a radius of 2.5 mm at 600 °C. The occurrence of plastic deformation was successfully predicted by the model and was observed at the operating temperature of 800 °C and 900 °C, respectively. PMID:26861332

  5. Plastic Deformation of Micromachined Silicon Diaphragms with a Sealed Cavity at High Temperatures.

    PubMed

    Ren, Juan; Ward, Michael; Kinnell, Peter; Craddock, Russell; Wei, Xueyong

    2016-01-01

    Single crystal silicon (SCS) diaphragms are widely used as pressure sensitive elements in micromachined pressure sensors. However, for harsh environments applications, pure silicon diaphragms are hardly used because of the deterioration of SCS in both electrical and mechanical properties. To survive at the elevated temperature, the silicon structures must work in combination with other advanced materials, such as silicon carbide (SiC) or silicon on insulator (SOI), for improved performance and reduced cost. Hence, in order to extend the operating temperatures of existing SCS microstructures, this work investigates the mechanical behavior of pressurized SCS diaphragms at high temperatures. A model was developed to predict the plastic deformation of SCS diaphragms and was verified by the experiments. The evolution of the deformation was obtained by studying the surface profiles at different anneal stages. The slow continuous deformation was considered as creep for the diaphragms with a radius of 2.5 mm at 600 °C. The occurrence of plastic deformation was successfully predicted by the model and was observed at the operating temperature of 800 °C and 900 °C, respectively. PMID:26861332

  6. Optical calibration of pressure sensors for high pressures and temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Goncharov, A F; Gregoryanz, E; Zaug, J M; Crowhurst, J C

    2004-10-04

    We present the results of Raman scattering measurements of diamond ({sup 12}C) and of cubic boron nitride (cBN), and fluorescence measurements of ruby, Sm:YAG, and SrB{sub 4}O{sub 7}:Sm{sup 2+} in the diamond anvil cell (DAC) at high pressures and temperatures. These measurements were accompanied by synchrotron x-ray diffraction measurements on gold. We have extended the room-temperature calibration of Sm:YAG in a quasihydrostatic regime up to 100 GPa. The ruby scale is shown to systematically underestimate pressure at high pressures and temperatures compared with all other sensors. On this basis, we propose a new high-temperature ruby pressure scale that should be valid to at least 100 GPa and 850 K. Historically, the accurate determination of pressure at high temperature and ultrahigh pressure has been extremely difficult. In fact, the lack of a general pressure scale nullifies, to a significant extent, the great innovations that have been made in recent years in DAC experimental techniques [1]. Now, more than ever a scale is required whose accuracy is comparable with that of the experimental data. Since pressure in the DAC is dependent on temperature (due to thermal pressure and also to changes in the properties of the materials that constitute the DAC) such a scale requires quantitative, and separate measurements of pressure and temperature.

  7. Micromechanics of high temperature deformation and failure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nasser, S. N.; Weertman, J. R.

    1985-01-01

    The micromechanics of the constitutive behavior of elastoplastic materials at high temperatures was examined. The experimental work focused on the development of microscopic defects in superalloys (Waspaloy), especially the formation of voids at grain boundary carbides, and slip induced surface cracks within grains upon cyclic loading at high temperatures. The influence of these defects on the life expectancy of the material was examined. The theoretical work consists of two parts: (1) analytical description of the mechanisms that lead to defects observed experimentally; and (2) development of macroscopic elastoplastic nonlinear constitutive relations based on mechanical modeling.

  8. Water Pressure Effects on Strength and Deformability of Fractured Rocks Under Low Confining Pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noorian Bidgoli, Majid; Jing, Lanru

    2015-05-01

    The effect of groundwater on strength and deformation behavior of fractured crystalline rocks is one of the important issues for design, performance and safety assessments of surface and subsurface rock engineering problems. However, practical difficulties make the direct in situ and laboratory measurements of these properties of fractured rocks impossible at present, since effects of complex fracture system hidden inside the rock masses cannot be accurately estimated. Therefore, numerical modeling needs to be applied. The overall objective of this paper is to deepen our understanding on the validity of the effective stress concept, and to evaluate the effects of water pressure on strength and deformation parameters. The approach adopted uses discrete element methods to simulate the coupled stress-deformation-flow processes in a fractured rock mass with model dimensions at a representative elementary volume (REV) size and realistic representation of fracture system geometry. The obtained numerical results demonstrate that water pressure has significant influence on the strength, but with minor effects on elastic deformation parameters, compared with significant influence by the lateral confining pressure. Also, the classical effective stress concept to fractured rock can be quite different with that applied in soil mechanics. Therefore, one should be cautious when applying the classical effective stress concept to fractured rock media.

  9. Air separation with temperature and pressure swing

    DOEpatents

    Cassano, Anthony A.

    1986-01-01

    A chemical absorbent air separation process is set forth which uses a temperature swing absorption-desorption cycle in combination with a pressure swing wherein the pressure is elevated in the desorption stage of the process.

  10. Method for compensating bellows pressure loads while accommodating thermal deformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodle, M. H.

    1985-05-01

    Many metal bellows are used on storage ring vacuum chambers. They allow the ring to accommodate deformations with alignment, mechanical assembly and thermal expansion. The national synchrotron light source (NSLS) has two such electron storage rings, the VUV ring and the X-ray ring. Both rings utilize a number of welded metal bellows within the ring and at every beam port. There are provisions for 16 beam ports on the VUV and 28 ports in the X-ray ring. At each of these locations the bellows are acted on by an external pressure of 1 atmosphere, which causes a 520 lb reaction at the vacuum chamber beam port and at the beamline flange downstream of the bellows. The use of rigid tie rods across the bellows flanges to support this load is troublesome because most storage ring vacuum chambers are baked in situ to achieve high internal vacuum. Significant forces can develop on components if thermal deformation is restrained and damage could occur.

  11. Longitudinal Impedance Tomography for Blood Pressure Characterization of Valve Deformation

    PubMed Central

    Vahabi, Zahra; Amirfattahi, Rasool

    2015-01-01

    Aorta is formed in a dynamic environment which gives rise to imbalances between many forces that tend to extend the diameter and length. Furthermore, internal forces tend to resist this extension. Impedance tomography can show this imbalance to stimulate the stenosis of aortic valve, growth of the elastic, collagen and to effectively reduce the stresses in the underlying tissue. In blood flow, auscultation noises occurred and in the echocardiography decrease in left ventricular ejection speed can be observed. In this paper, we have modeled an aorta based on anatomical studies to simulate natural, 20% and 30% stenosis as usual heart disease to early diagnosis. Valve deformation causes different impedance tomography in 3D mesh of aorta as blood pressure. Remodeling of aorta and its flow is found when a cylindrical slice of the fully retracted blood aorta is cut longitudinally through the wall. PMID:26120568

  12. High-temperature deformation and diffusion in oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Routbort, J.L.

    1992-06-01

    High-temperature, steady-state deformation is usually controlled by diffusion of the slowest moving ion along its fastest diffusion path. Therefore, measurements of steady-state deformation can, in principle, be used to obtain information concerning diffusion. This paper will briefly review the assumptions that relate creep, defect chemistry, and diffusion. Steady-state deformation of the NaCI-structured oxides, Co{sub 1-x}O and Mn{sub l-x}O, and the perovskite-structured high-temperature superconductors YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}0{sub x} and Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}0{sub x} will be discussed, emphasizing diffusion of the minority defects.

  13. Measurement Corner: Volume, Temperature and Pressure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teates, Thomas G.

    1977-01-01

    Boyle's Law and basic relationships between volume and pressure of a gas at constant temperature are presented. Suggests two laboratory activities for demonstrating the effect of temperature on the volume of a gas or liquid. (CS)

  14. Temperature-strain rate deformation conditions of aluminum alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitaeva, D. A.; Pazylov, Sh. T.; Rudaev, Ya. I.

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents the results of an experimental study of the deformation and structural parameters of 1561 anisotropic alloy. It has been found that the lowest anisotropy factor corresponds to the formation of an ultrafine-grained equiaxed structure under temperature-strain rate conditions of superplasticity.

  15. Sessile dislocations by reactions in NiAl severely deformed at room temperature

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Geist, D.; Gammer, C.; Rentenberger, C.; Karnthaler, H. P.

    2015-02-05

    B2 ordered NiAl is known for its poor room temperature (RT) ductility; failure occurs in a brittle like manner even in ductile single crystals deforming by single slip. In the present study NiAl was severely deformed at RT using the method of high pressure torsion (HPT) enabling the hitherto impossible investigation of multiple slip deformation. Methods of transmission electron microscopy were used to analyze the dislocations formed by the plastic deformation showing that as expected dislocations with Burgers vector a(100) carry the plasticity during HPT deformation at RT. In addition, we observe that they often form a(110) dislocations by dislocationmore » reactions; the a(110) dislocations are considered to be sessile based on calculations found in the literature. It is therefore concluded that the frequently encountered 3D dislocation networks containing sessile a(110) dislocations are pinned and lead to deformation-induced embrittlement. In spite of the severe deformation, the chemical order remains unchanged.« less

  16. High temperature tensile deformation behavior of Grade 92 steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsagabi, Sultan; Shrestha, Triratna; Charit, Indrajit

    2014-10-01

    Candidate structural materials for advanced reactors need to have superior high temperature strength and creep-rupture properties among other characteristics. The ferritic-martensitic Grade 92 steel (Fe-9Cr-2W-0.5Mo, wt.%) is considered such a candidate structural material. Tensile tests were performed at temperatures of 600, 650 and 700 °C in the strain rate range of 10-5-10-3 s-1. After analyzing the tensile results using the Bird-Mukherjee-Dorn (BMD) equation, a stress exponent of about 9.5 and an activation energy of about 646 kJ/mol were obtained. In the light of high values of the stress exponent and activation energy, the threshold stress concept was used to elucidate the operating high temperature deformation mechanism. As a result of this modification, the true activation energy and stress exponent of the high temperature deformation in Grade 92 steel were found to be about 245 kJ/mol and 5, respectively. Thus, the dominant high temperature deformation mechanism was identified as the high temperature climb of edge dislocations and the appropriate constitutive equation was developed.

  17. Laboratory Studies of High Temperature Deformation and Fracture of Lava Domes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, R.; Sammonds, P.; Tuffen, H.; Meredith, P.

    2007-12-01

    The high temperature fracture mechanics of magma at high temperatures exerts a fundamental control on the stability of lava domes and the timing and style of eruptions at andesitic to dacitic volcanoes. This is evidenced in the pervasive fracturing seen in both ancient and active magma conduits and lava domes; in addition to the volcanic earthquakes that occur before and during episodes of dome growth and dome collapse. Uniaxial and triaxial deformation experiments have been performed on crystal rich and crystal free magmas (andesite from Ancestral Mount Shasta, California, USA and a rhyolitic obsidian from Krafla, Iceland) at a range of temperatures (up to 900°C), confining pressures (up to 50 MPa) and strain rates (10-5s-1) to 10-3s-1) whilst recording acoustic emissions (AE). Results from these experiments provide useful inputs into models of lava dome stability, extrusion mechanisms, and source mechanisms for volcanic earthquakes. However, the large sample sizes used to ensure valid results (25mm diameter and 75mm length) made it difficult to maintain stable high temperatures under confined conditions. Also, only rudimentary AE data could be obtained, due to the distance of the transducers from the samples to keep them away from the high temperatures. Here, we present modifications to this apparatus, which include a new furnace, improved loading system, additional pore pressure and permeability measurement capability, and vastly improved acoustic monitoring. This allows (1)stable higher temperatures (up to 1000°C) to be achieved under confined conditions, (2) high temperature and moderate pressure (up to 70 MPa) hydrostatic measurements of permeability and acoustic velocities, (3) high temperature triaxial deformation under different pore fluid and pressure conditions, and (4) full waveform AE monitoring for all deformation experiments. This system can thus be used to measure the physical properties and strength of rocks under volcanic conditions and to

  18. Deformation-induced dissolution of the intermetallics Ni3Ti and Ni3Al in austenitic steels at cryogenic temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagaradze, V. V.; Shabashov, V. A.; Kataeva, N. V.; Zavalishin, V. A.; Kozlov, K. A.; Kuznetsov, A. R.; Litvinov, A. V.; Pilyugin, V. P.

    2016-06-01

    An anomalous deformation-induced dissolution of the intermetallics Ni3Al and Ni3Ti in the matrix of austenitic Fe-Ni-Al(Ti) alloys has been revealed in experiment at cryogenic temperatures (down to 77 K) under rolling and high pressure torsion. The observed phenomenon is explained as the result of migration of deformation-stipulated interstitial atoms from a particle into the matrix in the stress field of moving dislocations. With increasing the temperature of deformation, the dissolution is replaced by the deformation-induced precipitation of the intermetallics, which is accelerated due to a sufficient amount of point defects in the matrix, gained as well in the course of deformation at lower temperatures.

  19. New Developments in Deformation Experiments at High Pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Durham, W B; Weidner, D J; Karato, S; Wang, Y

    2004-01-09

    Although the importance of rheological properties in controlling the dynamics and evolution of the whole mantle of Earth is well-recognized, experimental studies of rheological properties and deformation-induced microstructures have mostly been limited to low-pressure conditions. This is mainly a result of technical limitations in conducting quantitative rheological experiments under high-pressure conditions. A combination of factors is changing this situation. Increased resolution of composition and configuration of Earth's interior has created a greater demand for well-resolved laboratory measurement of the effects of pressure on the behavior of materials. Higher-strength materials have become readily available for containing high-pressure research devices, and new analytical capabilities--in particular very bright synchrotron X-ray sources--are now readily available to high-pressure researchers. One of the biggest issues in global geodynamics is the style of mantle convection and the nature of chemical differentiation associated with convectional mass transport. Although evidence for deep mantle circulation has recently been found through seismic tomography (e.g., van der Hilst et al. (1997)), complications in convection style have also been noted. They include (1) significant modifications of flow geometry across the mantle transition zone as seen from high resolution tomographic studies (Fukao et al. 1992; Masters et al. 2000; van der Hilst et al. 1991) and (2) complicated patterns of flow in the deep lower mantle ({approx}1500-2500 km), perhaps caused by chemical heterogeneity (Kellogg et al. 1999; van der Hilst and Karason 1999). These studies indicate that while large-scale circulation involving the whole mantle no doubt occurs, significant deviations from simple flow geometry are also present. Two mineral properties have strong influence on convection: (1) density and (2) viscosity (rheology) contrasts. In the past, the effects of density contrast have

  20. Deformation mechanisms of NiAl cyclicly deformed near the brittle-to-ductile transformation temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antolovich, Stephen D.; Saxena, Ashok; Cullers, Cheryl

    1992-01-01

    One of the ongoing challenges of the aerospace industry is to develop more efficient turbine engines. Greater efficiency entails reduced specific strength and larger temperature gradients, the latter of which means higher operating temperatures and increased thermal conductivity. Continued development of nickel-based superalloys has provided steady increases in engine efficiency and the limits of superalloys have probably not been realized. However, other material systems are under intense investigation for possible use in high temperature engines. Ceramic, intermetallic, and various composite systems are being explored in an effort to exploit the much higher melting temperatures of these systems. NiAl is considered a potential alternative to conventional superalloys due to its excellent oxidation resistance, low density, and high melting temperature. The fact that NiAl is the most common coating for current superalloy turbine blades is a tribute to its oxidation resistance. Its density is one-third that of typical superalloys and in most temperature ranges its thermal conductivity is twice that of common superalloys. Despite these many advantages, NiAl requires more investigation before it is ready to be used in engines. Binary NiAl in general has poor high-temperature strength and low-temperature ductility. On-going research in alloy design continues to make improvements in the high-temperature strength of NiAl. The factors controlling low temperature ductility have been identified in the last few years. Small, but reproducible ductility can now be achieved at room temperature through careful control of chemical purity and processing. But the mechanisms controlling the transition from brittle to ductile behavior are not fully understood. Research in the area of fatigue deformation can aid the development of the NiAl system in two ways. Fatigue properties must be documented and optimized before NiAl can be applied to engineering systems. More importantly though

  1. Temperature Dependent Cyclic Deformation Mechanisms in Haynes 188 Superalloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, K. Bhanu Sankara; Castelli, Michael G.; Allen, Gorden P.; Ellis, John R.

    1995-01-01

    The cyclic deformation behavior of a wrought cobalt-base superalloy, Haynes 188, has been investigated over a range of temperatures between 25 and 1000 C under isothermal and in-phase thermomechanical fatigue (TMF) conditions. Constant mechanical strain rates (epsilon-dot) of 10(exp -3)/s and 10(exp -4)/s were examined with a fully reversed strain range of 0.8%. Particular attention was given to the effects of dynamic strain aging (DSA) on the stress-strain response and low cycle fatigue life. A correlation between cyclic deformation behavior and microstructural substructure was made through detailed transmission electron microscopy. Although DSA was found to occur over a wide temperature range between approximately 300 and 750 C the microstructural characteristics and the deformation mechanisms responsible for DSA varied considerably and were dependent upon temperature. In general, the operation of DSA processes led to a maximum of the cyclic stress amplitude at 650 C and was accompanied by pronounced planar slip, relatively high dislocation density, and the generation of stacking faults. DSA was evidenced through a combination of phenomena, including serrated yielding, an inverse dependence of the maximum cyclic hardening with epsilon-dot, and an instantaneous inverse epsilon-dot sensitivity verified by specialized epsilon-dot -change tests. The TMF cyclic hardening behavior of the alloy appeared to be dictated by the substructural changes occuring at the maximum temperature in the TMF cycle.

  2. Elevated temperature deformation of thoria dispersed nickel-chromium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kane, R. D.; Ebert, L. J.

    1974-01-01

    The deformation behavior of thoria nickel-chromium (TD-NiCr) was examined over the temperature range 593 C (1100 F) to 1260 C (2300 F) in tension and compression and at 1093 C (2000 F) in creep. Major emphasis was placed on: (1) the effects of the material and test related variables (grain size, temperature, stress and strain rate) on the deformation process; and (2) the evaluation of single crystal TD-NiCr material produced by a directional recrystallization process. Elevated temperature yield strength levels and creep activation enthalpies were found to increase with increasing grain size reaching maximum values for the single crystal TD-NiCr. Stress exponent of the steady state creep rate was also significantly higher for the single crystal TD-NiCr as compared to that determined for the polycrystalline materials. The elevated temperature deformation of TD-NiCr was analyzed in terms of two concurrent, parallel processes: diffusion controlled grain boundary sliding, and dislocation motion.

  3. Plastic Deformation of Aluminum Single Crystals at Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, R D; Young, A P; Schwope, A D

    1956-01-01

    This report describes the results of a comprehensive study of plastic deformation of aluminum single crystals over a wide range of temperatures. The results of constant-stress creep tests have been reported for the temperature range from 400 degrees to 900 degrees F. For these tests, a new capacitance-type extensometer was designed. This unit has a range of 0.30 inch over which the sensitivity is very nearly linear and can be varied from as low a sensitivity as is desired to a maximum of 20 microinches per millivolt with good stability. Experiments were carried out to investigate the effect of small amounts of prestraining, by two different methods, on the creep and tensile properties of these aluminum single crystals. From observations it has been concluded that plastic deformation takes place predominantly by slip which is accompanied by the mechanisms of kinking and polygonization.

  4. Temperature Dependence of Internal Deformation Field in Zeolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cha, Wonsuk; Song, Sanghoon; Jeong, Nak Cheon; Pham, Tung; Harder, Ross; Xiong, Gang; Yoon, Kyung Byung; Robinson, Ian K.; Kim, Hyunjung

    2011-03-01

    We studied temperature dependent internal deformation field distributions in zeolite microcrystals using coherent x-ray diffraction. We measured the coherent x-ray diffraction patterns around (200) and (020) Bragg peaks of the crystals. The three-dimensional real space images were obtained by phasing and inverting the oversampled diffraction patterns using the phase retrieval algorithm combined with error reduction and hybrid input-output method. The internal deformation fields show unusual temperature dependent behaviors which might be originated from the synthesis and calcination process. This work was supported by National Research Foundation of Korea (Nos. 2010-0000112 and R15-2008-006-01001-0), Seoul Research and Business Development Program (10816), and Sogang University Research Grant (2010).

  5. Low-temperature intracrystalline deformation microstructures in quartz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derez, Tine; Pennock, Gill; Drury, Martyn; Sintubin, Manuel

    2015-02-01

    A review of numerous genetic interpretations of the individual low-temperature intracrystalline deformation microstructures in quartz shows that there is no consensus concerning their formation mechanisms. Therefore, we introduce a new, purely descriptive terminology for the three categories of intracrystalline deformation microstructures formed in the low-quartz stability field: fine extinction bands (FEB), wide extinction bands (WEB) and localised extinction bands (LEB). The localised extinction bands are further subdivided into blocky (bLEB), straight (sLEB) and granular (gLEB) morphological types. A detailed polarised light microscopy study of vein-quartz from the low-grade metamorphic High-Ardenne slate belt (Belgium) further reveals a series of particular geometric relationships between these newly defined intracrystalline deformation microstructures. These geometric relationships are largely unrecognised or underemphasised in the literature and need to be taken into account in any future genetic interpretation. Based on our observations and a critical assessment of the current genetic models, we argue that the interpretation of the pertinent microstructures in terms of ambient conditions and deformation history should be made with care, as long as the genesis of these microstructures is not better confined.

  6. Vapor pressures of acetylene at low temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masterson, C. M.; Allen, John E., Jr.; Kraus, G. F.; Khanna, R. K.

    1990-01-01

    The atmospheres of many of the outer planets and their satellites contain a large number of hydrocarbon species. In particular, acetylene (C2H2) has been identified at Jupiter, Saturn and its satellite Titan, Uranus and Neptune. In the lower atmospheres of these planets, where colder temperatures prevail, the condensation and/or freezing of acetylene is probable. In order to obtain accurate models of the acetylene in these atmospheres, it is necessary to have a complete understanding of its vapor pressures at low temperatures. Vapor pressures at low temperatures for acetylene are being determined. The vapor pressures are measured with two different techniques in order to cover a wide range of temperatures and pressures. In the first, the acetylene is placed in a sample tube which is immersed in a low temperature solvent/liquid nitrogen slush bath whose temperature is measured with a thermocouple. The vapor pressure is then measured directly with a capacitance manometer. For lower pressures, a second technique which was called the thin-film infrared method (TFIR) was developed. It involves measuring the disappearance rate of a thin film of acetylene at a particular temperature. The spectra are then analyzed using previously determined extinction coefficient values, to determine the disappearance rate R (where R = delta n/delta t, the number of molecules that disappear per unit time). This can be related to the vapor pressure directly. This technique facilitates measurement of the lower temperatures and pressures. Both techniques have been calibrated using CO2, and have shown good agreement with the existing literature data.

  7. Pressure and temperature measurement devices - liquid

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmed, S.

    1995-12-01

    The need to measure temperature and pressure has become a fundamental and essential requirement in the process industry. This paper reviews the various pressure and temperature measurement devices used for liquid service. It looks at the principles of measurement, the types of instruments available, selection and suitability of each and also at the broad applications of these measurements for liquid service. Finally, this paper briefly discusses the future trend in instrumentation for measurements of this kind.

  8. Pressure and Temperature Sensitive Paint Field System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sprinkle, Danny R.; Obara, Clifford J.; Amer, Tahani R.; Faulcon, Nettie D.; Carmine, Michael T.; Burkett, Cecil G.; Pritchard, Daniel W.; Oglesby, Donald M.

    2004-01-01

    This report documents the Pressure and Temperature Sensitive Paint Field System that is used to provide global surface pressure and temperature measurements on models tested in Langley wind tunnels. The system was developed and is maintained by Global Surface Measurements Team personnel of the Data Acquisition and Information Management Branch in the Research Facilities Services Competency. Descriptions of the system hardware and software are presented and operational procedures are detailed.

  9. Plastic Deformation of Transition Zone Minerals: Effect of Temperature on Dislocation Mobility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritterbex, S.; Carrez, P.; Gouriet, K.; Cordier, P.

    2014-12-01

    Mantle convection is the fundamental process by which the Earth expels its internal heat. It is controlled at the microscopic scale by the motion of crystal defects responsable for plastic deformation at high temperature and pressure conditions of the deep Earth. In this study we focus on dislocations which are usually considered as the most efficient defects contributing to intracrystalline deformation. The influence of temperature is a key parameter in determining the behaviour of dislocations. We propose a model to describe the temperature-dependent mobility of dislocations based on a computational materials science approach, connecting the atomic to the grain scale. This provides elementary knowledge to both interpret seismic anisotropy and to improve geodynamic modelling. Here we focus on plastic deformation of the transition zone minerals wadsleyite and ringwoodite, dominating the boundary separating the upper from the lower mantle, a region over which the viscosity is thought to increase rapidly. Using the Peierls-Nabarro-Galerkin model enabled us to select potential glide planes, to predict the dislocation core structures and fundamental properties of both Mg2SiO4 high-pressure polymorphs integrating the non-elastic nature of dislocations from atomic scale based calculations. Macroscopic deformation results from the mobility of these distinct dislocations. High finite mantle temperatures activates unstable double-kink configurations on the dislocation line which allow the dislocation to move under stress. The original contribution of the present work is the formulation of a mobility law for dissociated dislocations as they occur in wadsleyite and ringwoodite. This permits us to predict the critical activation enthalpy required to overcome lattice friction associated to the onset of glide. From this, the effective glide velocities can be derived as a function of stress and temperature leading to the first lower bound estimates of transition zone viscosities

  10. Evolution of interphase and intergranular strain in zirconium-niobium alloys during deformation at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Song

    Zr-2.5Nb is currently used for pressure tubes in the CANDU (CANada Deuterium Uranium) reactor. A complete understanding of the deformation mechanism of Zr-2.5Nb is important if we are to accurately predict the in-reactor performance of pressure tubes and guarantee normal operation of the reactors. This thesis is a first step in gaining such an understanding; the deformation mechanism of ZrNb alloys at room temperature has been evaluated through studying the effect of texture and microstructure on deformation. In-situ neutron diffraction was used to monitor the evolution of the lattice strain of individual grain families along both the loading and Poisson's directions and to track the development of interphase and intergranular strains during deformation. The following experiments were carried out with data interpreted using elasto-plastic modeling techniques: (1) Compression tests of a 100%betaZr material at room temperature. (2) Tension and compression tests of hot rolled Zr-2.5Nb plate material. (3) Compression of annealed Zr-2.5Nb. (4) Cyclic loading of the hot rolled Zr-2.5Nb. (5) Compression tests of ZrNb alloys with different Nb and oxygen contents. The experimental results were interpreted using a combination of finite element (FE) and elasto-plastic self-consistent (EPSC) models. The phase properties and phase interactions well represented by the FE model, the EPSC model successfully captured the evolution of intergranular constraint during deformation and provided reasonable estimates of the critical resolved shear stress and hardening parameters of different slip systems under different conditions. The consistency of the material parameters obtained by the EPSC model allows the deformation mechanism at room temperature and the effect of textures and microstructures of ZrNb alloys to be understood. This work provides useful information towards manufacturing of Zr-2.5Nb components and helps in producing ideal microstructures and material properties for

  11. Mössbauer analysis of the magnetic structure of a high-carbon austenitic steel upon deformation and under pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shabashov, V. A.; Korshunov, L. G.; Zamatovskii, A. E.; Litvinov, A. V.

    2007-10-01

    A large plastic deformation of Hadfield steel (frictional action, shear under pressure, filing, and rolling) leads to the growth of an internal effective field at 57Fe nuclei, magnetic-degeneracy removal in the spectra, and delay of the paraprocess up to room temperature. In the Mössbauer spectrum of the 120G13 Hadfield steel, the reversible formation of a hyperfine structure, which is supposedly connected with magnetic ordering, has been detected in situ upon quasi-hydrostatic compression to 26 GPa. The observed growth of magnetic characteristics upon deformation and under high pressure is explained by the deformation-induced redistribution of carbon with the formation of short-range ordering of oxygen and manganese.

  12. A high-temperature wideband pressure transducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuckerwar, A. J.

    1975-01-01

    Progress in the development of a pressure transducer for measurement of the pressure fluctuations in the high temperature environment of a jet exhaust is reported. A condenser microphone carrier system was adapted to meet the specifications. A theoretical analysis is presented which describes the operation of the condenser microphone in terms of geometry, materials, and other physical properties. The analysis was used as the basis for design of a prototype high temperature microphone. The feasibility of connecting the microphone to a converter over a high temperature cable operating as a half-wavelength transmission line was also examined.

  13. Tantalum strength model incorporating temperature, strain rate and pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Hojun; Battaile, Corbett; Brown, Justin; Lane, Matt

    Tantalum is a body-centered-cubic (BCC) refractory metal that is widely used in many applications in high temperature, strain rate and pressure environments. In this work, we propose a physically-based strength model for tantalum that incorporates effects of temperature, strain rate and pressure. A constitutive model for single crystal tantalum is developed based on dislocation kink-pair theory, and calibrated to measurements on single crystal specimens. The model is then used to predict deformations of single- and polycrystalline tantalum. In addition, the proposed strength model is implemented into Sandia's ALEGRA solid dynamics code to predict plastic deformations of tantalum in engineering-scale applications at extreme conditions, e.g. Taylor impact tests and Z machine's high pressure ramp compression tests, and the results are compared with available experimental data. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  14. Kinetics of Deformation of Alloys by Pulsed Pressure of an Electric Discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chebotnyagin, L. M.; Potapov, V. V.; Lopatin, V. V.

    2015-05-01

    Stepped kinetics of deformation of alloys by pulsed pressure from an expanding plasma channel has been observed. On the deformation curves there are time intervals during which deformation does not vary, and these intervals shorten closer to the central cross sections of the wave source. This is explained by the shockwave nature of pressure transfer. A connection between the parameters of the discharge circuit and the pulsed pressure at the wave front of the expanding plasma channel is established enabling a quantitative estimate with allowance for the dynamic viscosity of the metal.

  15. Kinetics of low-temperature discontinuous deformation of metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorob'ev, E. V.; Anpilogova, T. V.

    2015-06-01

    Kinetic characteristics of discontinuous yielding at a temperature of 4 K as functions of a number of factors are obtained using numerical simulation and experimental data for austenitic steel and aluminum alloy. During the development of a strain jump, the deformation rate and acceleration are 19 s-1 and 5000 s-2, respectively, for steel specimens and are much lower for aluminum alloy. The jump duration is mainly determined by the characteristics of the loading system. An equation relating the strain jump and the critical stress for low-temperature ductile materials is derived. The energy balance and the mechanism of low-temperature discontinuous yielding of metals are discussed. Its dynamic and thermally activated components are estimated taking into account the strain hardening of the material.

  16. High temperature inelastic deformation under uniaxial loading - Theory and experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, K. S.; Lindholm, U. S.; Bodner, S. R.; Walker, K. P.

    1989-01-01

    The elevated-temperature uniaxial inelastic deformation behavior of an Ni-base alloy, B1900 + Hf, is investigated by performing isothermal tensile, creep, cyclic, stress relaxation, and thermomechanical fatigue tests. The range of strain rates examined is from 10 to the -7th to 100 per sec, while the test temperatures range from 25 to 1093 C. This extensive constitutive data base has been used for evaluating the unified constitutive models of Bodner and Partom (1972) and of Walker (1972) which apply for the small-strain regime. Comparison of test results with independent model predictions indicates good agreement over a broad range of loading conditions, demonstrating the applicability of the unified-constitutive-equation approach for describing the strongly nonlinear and temperature-dependent response of meals under a wide range of deformation and thermal histories. Thus the results give confidence that the unified approach is an effective and efficient approach in which complex history-dependent thermoviscoplastic flow can be represented within a single inelastic strain-rate term.

  17. The influence of severe plastic deformation by high pressure torsion on structure and mechanical properties of Hadfield steel single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharova, G. G.; Astafurova, E. G.

    2010-07-01

    Hadfield steel single crystals have been deformed by high pressure torsion at room temperature (P=5GPa) for 1, 2, 3 revolutions. The resulting microstructure has been studied by means of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray analysis. The size of fragments decreases with increasing number of revolutions due to interaction of slip dislocations, microbands and thin twins. As a result of severe plastic deformation, the microhardness of the Hadfield steel has been increased, and a portion of epsilon, α' martensite has been found.

  18. The deformation of flexible PDMS microchannels under a pressure driven flow.

    PubMed

    Hardy, Brian S; Uechi, Kawika; Zhen, Janet; Pirouz Kavehpour, H

    2009-04-01

    Poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) microchannels are commonly used microfluidic structures that have a wide variety of biological testing applications, including the simulation of blood vessels to study the mechanics of vascular disease. In these studies in particular, the deformation of the channel due to the pressure inside is a critical parameter. We describe a method for using fluorescence microscopy to quantify the deformation of such channels under pressure driven flow. Additionally, the relationship between wall thickness and channel deformation is investigated. PDMS microchannels of varying top wall thickness were created using a soft lithography process. A solution of fluorescent dye is pumped through the channels at constant volume flow rates and illuminated. Pressure and fluorescence intensity are measured at five positions along the length of the channel. Fluorescence measurements are then used to determine deformation, using the linear relationship of dye layer thickness and intensity. A linear relationship between pressure and microchannel deformation is measured. Pressure drops and deformations closely correspond to values predicted by the model in most cases. Additionally, measured pressure drops are found to be up to 35% less than the pressure drop in a rigid-walled channel, and channel wall thickness is found to have an increasing effect as the channel wall thickness decreases. PMID:19294304

  19. Deformation twinning of a silver nanocrystal under high pressure. Supplementary materials

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, X. J.; Yang, W. G.; Harder, R.; Sun, Y.; Lu, M.; Chu, Y. S.; Robinson, I. K.; Mao, H. K.

    2015-10-20

    Within a high-pressure environment, crystal deformation is controlled by complex processes such as dislocation motion, twinning, and phase transitions, which change materials’ microscopic morphology and alter their properties. Likewise, understanding a crystal’s response to external stress provides a unique opportunity for rational tailoring of its functionalities. It is very challenging to track the strain evolution and physical deformation from a single nanoscale crystal under high-pressure stress. Here, we report an in situ three-dimensional mapping of morphology and strain evolutions in a single-crystal silver nanocube within a high-pressure environment using the Bragg Coherent Diffractive Imaging (CDI) method. We also observed a continuous lattice distortion, followed by a deformation twining process at a constant pressure. The ability to visualize stress-introduced deformation of nanocrystals with high spatial resolution and prominent strain sensitivity provides an important route for interpreting and engineering novel properties of nanomaterials.

  20. Deformation twinning of a silver nanocrystal under high pressure. Supplementary materials

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Huang, X. J.; Yang, W. G.; Harder, R.; Sun, Y.; Lu, M.; Chu, Y. S.; Robinson, I. K.; Mao, H. K.

    2015-10-20

    Within a high-pressure environment, crystal deformation is controlled by complex processes such as dislocation motion, twinning, and phase transitions, which change materials’ microscopic morphology and alter their properties. Likewise, understanding a crystal’s response to external stress provides a unique opportunity for rational tailoring of its functionalities. It is very challenging to track the strain evolution and physical deformation from a single nanoscale crystal under high-pressure stress. Here, we report an in situ three-dimensional mapping of morphology and strain evolutions in a single-crystal silver nanocube within a high-pressure environment using the Bragg Coherent Diffractive Imaging (CDI) method. We also observed amore » continuous lattice distortion, followed by a deformation twining process at a constant pressure. The ability to visualize stress-introduced deformation of nanocrystals with high spatial resolution and prominent strain sensitivity provides an important route for interpreting and engineering novel properties of nanomaterials.« less

  1. Filament networks attached to membranes: cytoskeletal pressure and local bilayer deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auth, Thorsten; Safran, S. A.; Gov, Nir S.

    2007-11-01

    Several cell types, among them red blood cells, have a cortical, two-dimensional (2D) network of filaments sparsely attached to their lipid bilayer. In many mammalian cells, this 2D polymer network is connected to an underlying 3D, more rigid cytoskeleton. In this paper, we consider the pressure exerted by the thermally fluctuating, cortical network of filaments on the bilayer and predict the bilayer deformations that are induced by this pressure. We treat the filaments as flexible polymers and calculate the pressure that a network of such linear chains exerts on the bilayer; we then minimize the bilayer shape in order to predict the resulting local deformations. We compare our predictions with membrane deformations observed in electron micrographs of red blood cells. The polymer pressure along with the resulting membrane deformation can lead to compartmentalization, regulate in-plane diffusion and may influence protein sorting as well as transmit signals to the polymerization of the underlying 3D cytoskeleton.

  2. Pressure sensor for high-temperature liquids

    DOEpatents

    Forster, George A.

    1978-01-01

    A pressure sensor for use in measuring pressures in liquid at high temperatures, especially such as liquid sodium or liquid potassium, comprises a soft diaphragm in contact with the liquid. The soft diaphragm is coupled mechanically to a stiff diaphragm. Pressure is measured by measuring the displacment of both diaphragms, typically by measuring the capacitance between the stiff diaphragm and a fixed plate when the stiff diaphragm is deflected in response to the measured pressure through mechanical coupling from the soft diaphragm. Absolute calibration is achieved by admitting gas under pressure to the region between diaphragms and to the region between the stiff diaphragm and the fixed plate, breaking the coupling between the soft and stiff diaphragms. The apparatus can be calibrated rapidly and absolutely.

  3. The formation, structure, and properties of the Au-Co alloys produced by severe plastic deformation under pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolmachev, T. P.; Pilyugin, V. P.; Ancharov, A. I.; Chernyshov, E. G.; Patselov, A. M.

    2016-02-01

    The mechanical alloying of Au-Co mixtures, which are systems with high positive mixing enthalpy, is studied following high-pressure torsion deformation at room and cryogenic temperatures. X-ray diffractometry in synchrotron radiation and scanning microscopy are used to investigate the sequence of structural changes in the course of deforming the mixtures up to the end state of the fcc substitutional solid solution based on gold. The mechanical properties of the alloys are measured both during mixture processing and after mechanical alloying. Microfractographic studies are performed. Factors that facilitate the solubility of Co in Au, namely, increased processing pressure, cobalt concentration in a charge mixture, true strain, and temperature decreased to cryogenic level have been identified.

  4. Time-temperature-stress dependence of boron fiber deformation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dicarlo, J. A.

    1976-01-01

    The time-dependent deformation of boron fibers over the temperature range from -190 to 800 C is studied by flexural stress relaxation and flexural internal friction techniques on 203-micron diam specimen fibers commercially produced by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) on a 13-micron tungsten substrate. It is shown that up to at least 800 C all nonelastic behavior observed during axial deformation of CVD boron fibers can be explained solely by anelastic mechanisms and that although creep strains are small, boron fiber anelasticity can produce significant mechanical effects which would otherwise be neglected under the elastic approximation. Relations are obtained to demonstrate the considerable effects of anelasticity on such fiber/composite properties as modulus, creep, creep recovery, stress relaxation, and damping capacity. For an elastic-core/anelastic-sheath model, boron fibers on tungsten substrates are shown to have predictable fracture stresses for time-temperature conditions ranging from impact to long-time stress rupture. Possible techniques for altering these stresses are discussed.

  5. Reversibility of Lpo in Olivine during Deformation at High Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, L.; Weidner, D. J.

    2014-12-01

    Olivine texture has been reported as an important contributor to the seismic anisotropy in the upper mantle. Experimental studies of deformation of olivine have also shown flow-driven lattice preferred orientation. In this study, we focus on in situ control and monitoring of LPO formation of olivine using synchrotron X-ray radiation coupled with DDIA multi-anvil deformation device. Using an energy-dispersive X-ray coupled a 10-element SSD detector; we apply a sinusoidal stress on the sample, which allows identification of growth of LPO in the specimen with relative robust signal even with small strain fields. Our data show palpable correlations among stress, strain and LPO as well as the variations among sub-grains marked by individual (hkl). This study is to demonstrate the versatile functions of X-ray for characterizing the deformation study of minerals.

  6. Influence of stress, temperature, and strain on calcite twins constrained by deformation experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rybacki, E.; Evans, B.; Janssen, C.; Wirth, R.; Dresen, G.

    2013-08-01

    A series of low-strain triaxial compression and high-strain torsion experiments were performed on marble and limestone samples to examine the influence of stress, temperature, and strain on the evolution of twin density, the percentage of grains with 1, 2, or 3 twin sets, and the twin width—all parameters that have been suggested as either paleopiezometers or paleothermometers. Cylindrical and dog-bone-shaped samples were deformed in the semibrittle regime between 20 °C and 350 °C, under confining pressures of 50-400 MPa, and at strain rates of 10- 4-10- 6 s- 1. The samples sustained shear stresses, τ, up to 280 MPa, failing when deformed to shear strains γ > 1. The mean width of calcite twins increased with both temperature and strain, and thus, measurement of twin width provides only a rough estimation of peak temperature, unless additional constraints on deformation are known. In Carrara marble, the twin density, NL (no of twins/mm), increased as the rock hardened with strain and was approximately related to the peak differential stress, σ (MPa), by the relation σ=19.5±9.8√{N}. Dislocation tangles occurred along twin boundaries, resulting in a complicated cell structure, which also evolved with stress. As previously established, the square root of dislocation density, observed after quench, also correlated with peak stress. Apparently, both twin density and dislocation cell structure are important state variables for describing the strength of these rocks.

  7. Note: A novel method to measure the deformation of diamond anvils under high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shenggang; Li, Zeren; Jing, Qiuming; Zhang, Yi; Ma, Heli; Tao, Tianjiong; Wang, Xiang; Bi, Yan; Weng, Jidong; Xu, Ji-an

    2014-04-01

    A novel and simple method based on optical-fiber frequency domain interferometer to measure the deformation of diamond anvils under high pressure is presented. The working principle and application examples are given in this paper. The deformation of diamond anvils is obtained up to 37.7 GPa, our results verify that the deformation has an obvious difference between uploading and downloading at a given pressure, the maximum difference is up to 4.5 μm at 18.8 GPa, and the cupping effect is observed directly.

  8. High temperature pressure coupled ultrasonic waveguide

    DOEpatents

    Caines, Michael J.

    1983-01-01

    A pressure coupled ultrasonic waveguide is provided to which one end may be attached a transducer and at the other end a high temperature material for continuous ultrasonic testing of the material. The ultrasonic signal is coupled from the waveguide into the material through a thin, dry copper foil.

  9. Students' Investigations in Temperature and Pressure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Patrick L.; Concannon, James; Hansert, Bernhard; Frederick, Ron; Frerichs, Glen

    2015-01-01

    Why does a balloon deflate when it is left in a cold car; or why does one have to pump up his or her bike tires in the spring after leaving them in the garage all winter? To answer these questions, students must understand the relationships among temperature, pressure, and volume of a gas. The purpose of the Predict, Share, Observe, and Explain…

  10. High pressure and high temperature apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Voronov, Oleg A.

    2005-09-13

    A design for high pressure/high temperature apparatus and reaction cell to achieve .about.30 GPa pressure in .about.1 cm volume and .about.100 GPa pressure in .about.1 mm volumes and 20-5000.degree. C. temperatures in a static regime. The device includes profiled anvils (28) action on a reaction cell (14, 16) containing the material (26) to be processed. The reaction cell includes a heater (18) surrounded by insulating layers and screens. Surrounding the anvils are cylindrical inserts and supporting rings (30-48) whose hardness increases towards the reaction cell. These volumes may be increased considerably if applications require it, making use of presses that have larger loading force capability, larger frames and using larger anvils.

  11. Effects of strain rate and confining pressure on the deformation and failure of shale

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, J.M. ); Sheppard, M.C. ); Houwen, O.H. )

    1991-06-01

    Previous work on shale mechanical properties has focused on the slow deformation rates appropriate to wellbore deformation. Deformation of shale under a drill bit occurs at a very high rate, and the failure properties of the rock under these conditions are crucial in determining bit performance and in extracting lithology and pore-pressure information from drilling parameters. Triaxial tests were performed on two nonswelling shales under a wide range of strain rates and confining and pore pressures. At low strain rates, when fluid is relatively free to move within the shale, shale deformation and failure are governed by effective stress or pressure (i.e., total confining pressure minus pore pressure), as is the case for ordinary rock. If the pore pressure in the shale is high, increasing the strain rate beyond about 0.1%/sec causes large increases in the strength and ductility of the shale. Total pressure begins to influence the strength. At high stain rates, the influence of effective pressure decreases, except when it is very low (i.e., when pore pressure is very high); ductility then rises rapidly. This behavior is opposite that expected in ordinary rocks. This paper briefly discusses the reasons for these phenomena and their impact on wellbore and drilling problems.

  12. Recent Advances in High Pressure and Temperature Rheological Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yanbin; Hilairet, Nadege; Dera, Przemyslaw

    2012-01-20

    Rheological studies at high pressure and temperature using in-situ X-ray diffraction and imaging have made significant progresses in recent years, thanks to a combination of recent developments in several areas: (1) advances in synchrotron X-ray techniques, (2) advances in deformation devices and the abilities to control pressure, temperature, stress, strain and strain rates, (3) theoretical and computational advances in stress determination based on powder and single crystal diffraction, (4) theoretical and computational advances in modeling of grain-level micromechanics based on elasto-plastic and visco-plastic self-consistent formulations. In this article, we briefly introduce the experimental techniques and theoretical background for in-situ high pressure, high temperature rheological studies, and then review recent studies of rheological properties of major mantle materials. Some currently encountered issues have prompted developments in single-crystal quasi-Laue diffraction for complete stress tensor determination and textural evolution of poly-phased composites based on X-ray microtomography. Future prospects are discussed.

  13. How stress and temperature conditions affect rock-fluid chemistry and mechanical deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nermoen, Anders; Korsnes, Reidar; Aursjø, Olav; Madland, Merete; Kjørslevik, Trygve Alexander; Østensen, Geir

    2016-02-01

    We report the results from a series of chalk flow-through-compaction experiments performed at three effective stresses (0.5 MPa, 3.5 MPa and 12.3 MPa) and two temperatures (92° and and 130°). The results show that both stress and temperature are important to both chemical alteration and mechanical deformation. The experiments were conducted on cores drilled from the same block of outcrop chalks from the Obourg quarry within the Saint Vast formation (Mons, Belgium). The pore pressure was kept at 0.7 MPa for all experiments with a continuous flow of 0.219 M MgCl2 brine at a constant flow rate; 1 original pore volume (PV) per day. The experiments have been performed in tri-axial cells with independent control of the external stress (hydraulic pressure in the confining oil), pore pressure, temperature, and the injected flow rate. Each experiment consists of two phases; a loading phase where stress-strain dependencies are investigated (approx. 2 days), and a creep phase that lasts for more than 150-160 days. During creep, the axial deformation was logged, and the effluent samples were collected for ion chromatography analyses. Any difference between the injected and produced water chemistry gives insight into the rock-fluid interactions that occur during flow through of the core. The observed effluent concentration shows a reduction in Mg2+, while the Ca2+ concentration is increased. This, together with SEM-EDS analysis, indicates that magnesium-bearing mineral phases are precipitated leading to dissolution of calcite, an observation . This is in-line with other flow-through experiments reported earlier. The observed dissolution and precipitation are sensitive to the effective stress and test temperature. Typically. H, higher stress and temperature lead to increased concentration differences of Mg2+ and Ca2+ concentration changes.. The observed strain can be partitioned additively into a mechanical and chemical driven component.

  14. Review of deformation behavior of tungsten at temperature less than 0.2 absolute melting temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, J. R.

    1972-01-01

    The deformation behavior of tungsten at temperatures 0.2 T sub m is reviewed, with primary emphasis on the temperature dependence of the yield stress and the ductile-brittle transition temperature. It appears that a model based on the high Peierls stress of tungsten best accounts for the observed mechanical behavior at low temperatures. Recent research is discussed which suggests an important role of electron concentration and bonding on the mechanical behavior of tungsten. It is concluded that future research on tungsten should include studies to define more clearly the correlation between electron concentration and mechanical behavior of tungsten alloys and other transition metal alloys.

  15. High Temperature Dynamic Pressure Measurements Using Silicon Carbide Pressure Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okojie, Robert S.; Meredith, Roger D.; Chang, Clarence T.; Savrun, Ender

    2014-01-01

    Un-cooled, MEMS-based silicon carbide (SiC) static pressure sensors were used for the first time to measure pressure perturbations at temperatures as high as 600 C during laboratory characterization, and subsequently evaluated in a combustor rig operated under various engine conditions to extract the frequencies that are associated with thermoacoustic instabilities. One SiC sensor was placed directly in the flow stream of the combustor rig while a benchmark commercial water-cooled piezoceramic dynamic pressure transducer was co-located axially but kept some distance away from the hot flow stream. In the combustor rig test, the SiC sensor detected thermoacoustic instabilities across a range of engine operating conditions, amplitude magnitude as low as 0.5 psi at 585 C, in good agreement with the benchmark piezoceramic sensor. The SiC sensor experienced low signal to noise ratio at higher temperature, primarily due to the fact that it was a static sensor with low sensitivity.

  16. PREFACE: Rheology and Elasticity Studies at Ultra-High Pressures and Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Haozhe; Wenk, Hans-Rudolf; Duffy, Thomas S.

    2006-06-01

    One of the major goals of geophysical research is to understand deformation in the deep Earth. The COMPRES (Consortium for Materials Properties Research in Earth Sciences) workshop on `Rheology and Elasticity Studies at Ultra-High Pressures and Temperatures' was held on 21-23 October 2005 at the Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, organized by Haozhe Liu, Hans-Rudolf Wenk and Thomas S Duffy, and provided an opportunity to assemble more than 50 scientists from six countries. Experts in diamond anvil cell (DAC) design, large-volume high-pressure apparatus and data analysis defined the current state of ultra-high pressure deformation studies and explored initiatives to push the technological frontier. The DAC, when used in radial diffraction geometry, emerges as a powerful tool for investigation of plasticity and elasticity of materials at high pressures. More information regarding this workshop can be found at the website: http://www.hpcat.aps.anl.gov/Hliu/Workshop/Index1.htm. In this special issue of Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter, 17 manuscripts review the state-of-the-art and we hope they will stimulate researchers to participate in this field and take it forward to a new level. A major incentive for high-pressure research has been the need of geophysicists to understand composition, physical properties and deformation in the deep Earth in order to interpret the macroscopically observed seismic anisotropy. In the mantle and core, materials deform largely in a ductile manner at low stresses and strain rates. From observational inferences and experiments at lower pressures, it is considered plausible that deformation occurs in the field of dislocation creep or diffusion creep and deformation mechanisms depend in a complex way on stress, strain rate, pressure, temperature, grain size and hydration state. With novel apparatus such as the rotational Drickamer press or deformation DIA (D-DIA) multianvil apparatus, large volumes (approximately 10

  17. Ultrahigh temperature deformation microstructures in felsic granulites of the Napier Complex, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lund, Majbritt D.; Piazolo, Sandra; Harley, Simon L.

    2006-12-01

    Detailed electron microscope and microstructural analysis of two ultrahigh temperature felsic granulites from Tonagh Island, Napier Complex, Antarctica show deformation microstructures produced at ˜ 1000 °C at 8-10 kbar. High temperature orthopyroxene (Al ˜7 wt.% and ˜ 11 wt.%), exhibits crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO) and frequent subgrain boundaries which point to dislocation creep as the dominating deformation mechanism within opx. Two different main slip systems are observed: in opx bands with exclusively opx grains containing subgrain boundaries with traces parallel to [010] and a strong coupling of low angle misorientations (2.5°-5°) with rotation axes parallel to [010] the dominating slip system is (100)[001]. Isolated opx grains and grain clusters of 2-5 grains embedded in a qtz-fsp matrix show an additional slip system of (010)[001]. The latter slip system is harder to activate. We suggest that differences in the activation of these slip systems is a result of higher differential stresses imposed onto the isolated opx grains and grain clusters. In contrast to opx, large qtz grains (up to 200 μm) show random crystallographic orientation. This together with their elongate and cuspate shape and the lack of systematic in the rotation axes associated with the subgrain boundaries is consistent with diffusion creep as the primary deformation mechanism in quartz. Our first time detailed microstructural observations of ultrahigh temperature and medium to high pressure granulites and their interpretation in terms of active deformation mechanisms give some insight into the type of rheology that can be expect at lower crustal conditions. If qtz is the mineral phase governing the rock rheology, Newtonian flow behaviour is expected and only low differential stress can be supported. However, if the stress supporting mineral phase is opx, the flow law resulting from dislocation creep will govern the rheology of the rock unit; hence, an exponential

  18. A symmetrical low temperature pressure transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helvensteijn, B. P. M.; VanSciver, S. W.

    1990-03-01

    The design and operating characteristics of a fully differential pressure transducer are described. The device is intended for use with He II heat transfer experiments where it operates in vacuum and at low temperatures (T<4.2 K). A movable electrode is attached to two sets of miniature bellows such that the electrode position is determined by the differential pressure across the device. The movable electrode is located between two fixed electrodes, thus forming a pair of variable capacitors. A dedicated charge amplifier is used to convert the pressure induced capacitance change to an ac output voltage. The sensitivity is roughly 5 μV/Pa. For the present application, the capacitor and electronics have acceptable performance, with a mean noise level of ±5 Pa.

  19. Mechanisms of deformation-induced grain growth of a two-dimensional nanocrystal at different deformation temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korznikova, E. A.; Dmitriev, S. V.

    2014-06-01

    This work discloses the evolution of a two-dimensional nanocrystalline aggregate in the process of shear deformation under the conditions of hydrostatic compression of the material in the deformation-temperature range T = 0.5-0.7 T m. It has been shown that grain growth by the mechanism of mutual rotation with subsequent coalescence is characteristic of deformation temperatures T = 0.6 T m and below, whereas at T = 0.65 and 0.7 T m one of grains with predominant orientation grows at the expense of other grains. In all instances, the growth of the degree of shear deformation leads to the disappearance of all grain boundaries in the calculated cell under consideration.

  20. Features of the temperature dependence of pressure of solid helium at low temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisunov, A. A.; Maidanov, V. A.; Rubanskii, V. Y.; Rubets, S. P.; Rudavskii, E. Y.; Rybalko, A. S.; Syrkin, E. S.

    2012-06-01

    A series of experiments has been performed to investigate the conditions of formation of a disordered (glass-like) state in crystals of 3He. With the help of precise measurements of pressure at constant volume it has been established that a glass phase is formed easily in rapidly cooled crystals grown under homogeneous temperature conditions in the presence of large numbers of nucleation centers. This phase can be removed only by careful annealing. This result has been found in both 3He and 4He, and is independent of type of quantum statistics and determined mainly by crystal growth conditions. An analysis of similar measurements has been performed using a different cell where during the crystal growth a directed temperature gradient was created. In this case, additional defects created as a result of deformation of the crystal were necessary to form a glass-like phase. The degree of deformation of a crystal, achievable in the experiment, was sufficient to form a glass-like phase in solid 4He, but not in a crystal of 3He where the atoms have a large amplitude of zero-point oscillations. Analyzing a temperature dependence of pressure, a study of the features of a phonon contribution to the pressure was also carried out. It was found that in both crystals 3He and 4He at different thicknesses of samples the phonon pressure differs by several times. This effect is qualitatively explained by that that in thin samples an interaction among layers of atoms becomes stronger. This leads to decreasing the phonon contribution to the thermodynamic properties of the helium crystal at low temperatures.

  1. Dynamic aging in an Fe-Ni-Al alloy upon megaplastic deformation. Effect of the temperature and deformation rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shabashov, V. A.; Sagaradze, V. V.; Zamatovskii, A. E.; Pilyugin, V. P.; Kozlov, K. A.; Litvinov, A. V.; Kataeva, N. V.

    2016-08-01

    The method of Mössbauer spectroscopy has been used to investigate the effect of the temperature and the rate of megaplastic deformation on the processes of dissolution-precipitation of intermetallic compounds in aging austenitic alloy with a composition of Fe-36Ni-9Al. It has been established that, upon deformation in revolving Bridgman anvils, in the temperature range of cryogenic temperatures (liquid nitrogen) up to 573 K, a change occurs in the character of phase transitions from atomic disordering and the dissolution of intermetallic compounds to their additional accelerated precipitation. The factor that affects the kinetics of the processes of dissolution-precipitation of intermetallic compounds in the metallic matrix is dynamic aging. Dynamic aging is activated with an increase in the temperature and a decrease in the deformation rate.

  2. Precision pressure/temperature logging tool

    SciTech Connect

    Henfling, J.A.; Normann, R.A.

    1998-01-01

    Past memory logging tools have provided excellent pressure/temperature data when used in a geothermal environment, and they are easier to maintain and deploy than tools requiring an electric wireline connection to the surface. However, they are deficient since the tool operator is unaware of downhole conditions that could require changes in the logging program. Tools that make ``decisions`` based on preprogrammed scenarios can partially overcome this difficulty, and a suite of such memory tools has been developed at Sandia National Laboratories. The first tool, which forms the basis for future instruments, measures pressure and temperature. Design considerations include a minimization of cost while insuring quality data, size compatibility with diamond-cored holes, operation in holes to 425 C (800 F), transportability by ordinary passenger air service, and ease of operation. This report documents the development and construction of the pressure/temperature tool. It includes: (1) description of the major components; (2) calibration; (3) typical logging scenario; (4) tool data examples; and (5) conclusions. The mechanical and electrical drawings, along with the tool`s software, will be furnished upon request.

  3. High-pressure deformation of calcite marble and its transformation to aragonite under non-hydrostatic conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hacker, B.R.; Kirby, S.H.

    1993-01-01

    We conducted deformation experiments on Carrara marble in the aragonite and calcite stability fields to observe the synkinematic transformation of calcite to aragonite, and to identify any relationships between transformation and deformation or sample strength. Deformation-induced microstructures in calcite crystals varied most significantly with temperature, ranging from limited slip and twinning at 400??C, limited recrystallization at 500??C, widespread recrystallization at 600 and 700??C, to grain growth at 800-900??C. Variations in confining pressure from 0.3 to 2.0 GPa have no apparent effect on calcite deformation microstructures. Aragonite grew in 10-6-10-7 s-1strain rate tests conducted for 18-524 h at confining pressures of 1.7-2.0 GPa and temperatures of 500-600??C. As in our previously reported hydrostatic experiments on this same transformation, the aragonite nucleated on calcite grain boundaries. The extent of transformation varied from a few percent conversion near pistons at 400??C, 2.0 GPa and 10-4 s-1 strain rate in a 0.8 h long experiment, to 98% transformation in a 21-day test at a strain rate of 10-7 s-7, a temperature of 600??C and a pressure of 2.0 GPa. At 500??C, porphyroblastic 100-200 ??m aragonite crystals grew at a rate faster than 8 ?? 10-1m s-1. At 600??C, the growth of aragonite neoblasts was slower, ???6 ?? 10-1 m s -1, and formed 'glove-and-finger' cellularprecipitation-like textures identical to those observed in hydrostatic experiments. The transformation to aragonite is not accompanied by a shear instability or anisotropic aragonite growth, consistent with its relatively small volume change and latent heat in comparison with compounds that do display those features. ?? 1993.

  4. Energy Dissipation of Materials at High Pressure and High Temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Li,L.; Weidner, D.

    2007-01-01

    We report an experimental method to study the anelastic properties of materials at high pressure and high temperature. The multianvil high pressure deformation device, used to apply a cyclic loading force onto the sample, can reach 15 GPa and 2000 K. A synchrotron x-ray radiation source provides time resolved images of the sample and reference material. The images yield stress and strain as a function of time; stresses are derived from the reference material, and strains from the sample. This method has been tested by applying a sinusoidal stress at megahertz to hertz frequency on a San Carlos olivine specimen at 5 GPa and up to 2000 K. Strain as small as 10{sup -5} can be resolved. We have obtained experimental results which exhibit resolvable attenuation factor (Q{sup -1}) and shear modulus (M) at deep Earth conditions. These results are in quantitative agreement with previously reported lower pressure data and suggest that temperature and grain size have dominating effect on these properties.

  5. Deformation of a Volcanic Edifice by Pore Pressurization: An Analog Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyman, D.; Bursik, M. I.

    2015-12-01

    Volcanic flank destabilization, preceded by pressurization-induced surface deformation or weakening, presents a significant hazard at stratovolcanoes with ample supply of magmatic volatiles or preexisting hydrothermal systems as in Bezymianny- and Bandai-type eruptions, respectively. Deformation is also an important sign of the nature of unrest at large calderas such as Long Valley, USA. Previous studies of volcanic inflation have focused primarily on the role of ascending magma. Relatively few studies have centered on surface deformation caused by pressurization from other volcanic fluids, including exsolved volatiles and pressurized hydrothermal systems. Most investigations of pore-pressurization have focused on numerical modelling of pore pressure transients. In analog experiments presented here, pore-filling fluids are injected into the base of a damp sand medium without exceeding dike propagating pressures, simulating the pressurization and bulk-permeable flow of volatile fluids through volcanic systems. The experiments examine surface deformation from a range of source depths and pressures as well as edifice geometries. 3D imaging is possible through use of the Microsoft® Kinect™ sensor, which allows for the generation of high-resolution, high frame rate, lab-scale Digital Elevation Models (DEMs). After initial processing to increase signal-to-noise ratio, surface deformation is measured using the DEM time-series generated by the Kinect™. Analysis of preliminary experiments suggests that inflation is possible up to approx. 10 % of pressure source depth. We also show that the Kinect™ sensor is useful in analog volcanological studies, an environment to which it is well-suited.

  6. Deformation of drop due to radiation pressure of acoustic standing wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamanaka, T.; Saito, M.; Kamimura, H.

    To investigate the deformation of a liquid drop due to radiation pressure of acoustic standing waves, an analytical and experimental study was carried out. An approximate axisymmetric figure of equilibrium is obtained. The experimental study was carried out in the laboratory by using a triaxial acoustic chamber. An injection syringe was placed at the center of the triaxial acoustic resonance chamber. Holding a small liquid drop at the pointed end of the syringe, deformations of the liquid drop were measured. Assuming an oblate spheroid for the deformation, the experimental results were compared with theory.

  7. Influence of thermally activated processes on the deformation behavior during low temperature ECAP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritsch, S.; Scholze, M.; F-X Wagner, M.

    2016-03-01

    High strength aluminum alloys are generally hard to deform. Therefore, the application of conventional severe plastic deformation methods to generate ultrafine-grained microstructures and to further increase strength is considerably limited. In this study, we consider low temperature deformation in a custom-built, cooled equal channel angular pressing (ECAP) tool (internal angle 90°) as an alternative approach to severely plastically deform a 7075 aluminum alloy. To document the maximum improvement of mechanical properties, these alloys are initially deformed from a solid solution heat-treated condition. We characterize the mechanical behavior and the microstructure of the coarse grained initial material at different low temperatures, and we analyze how a tendency for the PLC effect and the strain-hardening rate affect the formability during subsequent severe plastic deformation at low temperatures. We then discuss how the deformation temperature and velocity influence the occurrence of PLC effects and the homogeneity of the deformed ECAP billets. Besides the mechanical properties and these microstructural changes, we discuss technologically relevant processing parameters (such as pressing forces) and practical limitations, as well as changes in fracture behavior of the low temperature deformed materials as a function of deformation temperature.

  8. A high-temperature wideband pressure transducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuckerwar, A. J.

    1977-01-01

    A condenser microphone AM carrier system, which has been developed to measure pressure fluctuations at elevated temperatures, consists of the following components: a condenser microphone designed for operation at elevated temperatures; existing carrier electronics developed under two previous research grants but adapted to meet present requirements; a 6 m cable operating as a half-wavelength transmission line between the microphone and carrier electronics; and a voltage-controlled oscillator used in a feedback loop for automatic tuning control. Both theoretical and practical aspects of the development program are considered. The three predominant effects of temperature changes are changes in the membrane-backplate gap, membrane tension, and air viscosity. The microphone is designed so that changes in gap and membrane tension tend to have compensating effects upon the microphone sensitivity.

  9. Surface deformation effects induced by radiation pressure and electrostriction forces in dielectric solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astrath, N. G. C.; Lukasievicz, G. V. B.; Malacarne, L. C.; Bialkowski, S. E.

    2013-06-01

    The surface displacement produced by radiation pressure and electrostriction forces is investigated considering the commonly accepted theories proposed by Minkowski and Abraham for the energy-momentum tensor. The contributions are modeled considering each effect separately assuming non-absorbing and absorbing solids and the thermoelastic deformation equations are solved numerically. We show that the surface deformation profiles as calculated by the Minkowski or Abraham momenta give different surface curvature, which could in principle be detected by measuring the surface displacement. Finally, an all-optical pump-probe photothermal method to detect the radiation pressure and electrostriction forces in transparent dielectric solids is proposed.

  10. Physically-based strength model of tantalum incorporating effects of temperature, strain rate and pressure

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Lim, Hojun; Battaile, Corbett C.; Brown, Justin L.; Weinberger, Christopher R.

    2016-06-14

    In this work, we develop a tantalum strength model that incorporates e ects of temperature, strain rate and pressure. Dislocation kink-pair theory is used to incorporate temperature and strain rate e ects while the pressure dependent yield is obtained through the pressure dependent shear modulus. Material constants used in the model are parameterized from tantalum single crystal tests and polycrystalline ramp compression experiments. It is shown that the proposed strength model agrees well with the temperature and strain rate dependent yield obtained from polycrystalline tantalum experiments. Furthermore, the model accurately reproduces the pressure dependent yield stresses up to 250 GPa.more » The proposed strength model is then used to conduct simulations of a Taylor cylinder impact test and validated with experiments. This approach provides a physically-based multi-scale strength model that is able to predict the plastic deformation of polycrystalline tantalum through a wide range of temperature, strain and pressure regimes.« less

  11. Thermal deformation of concentrators in an axisymmetric temperature field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bairamov, R.; Machuev, Y. I.; Nazarov, A.; Sokolov, Y. V.; Solodovnikova, L. A.; Fokin, V. G.

    1985-01-01

    Axisymmetric thermal deformations of paraboloid mirrors, due to heating, are examined for a mirror with a optical axis oriented toward the Sun. A governing differential equation is derived using Mushtari-Donnel-Vlasov simplifications, and a solution is presented which makes it possible to determine the principal deformation characteristics.

  12. Effects of elevated temperature and pore pressure on the mechanical behavior of Bullfrog tuff

    SciTech Connect

    Olsson, W.A.

    1982-02-01

    Samples of the Bullfrog Member of the Crater Flat Tuff from the depth interval 758.9 to 759.2 m in hole USW-G1 on the Nevada Test Site were tested in triaxial compression. Test conditions were: (1) effective confining pressure to 20 MPa; (2) temperature of 200{sup 0}C; (3) both dry and with pore water pressures from 3.4 to 5 MPa; and (4) a strain-rate of 10{sup -4}/s. The results suggest that the presence of water causes the strength to decrease. In addition, the brittle-ductile transition pressure for this rock was found to be about 15 MPa, regardless of saturation. Below this pressure deformation is characterized by unstable stress drops and the development of a single fracture, and above this pressure deformation is stable and distributed more uniformly throughout the sample.

  13. F/NAS/Pressure Temperature Retrieval Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poularikas. Alexander

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation is to study methods and ways for rapid inversion programs involving the correlated k-method, and to modify the existing programs so that the rapid analysis of data can be accomplished. Extensive modifications of the software programs were introduced. These modifications were imposed on the radiative transfer models and inversion methods and resulted in incorporating some important atmospheric processes not previously considered. The software also was improved to handle several toxic gases, gases that were observed in Saturn's atmosphere, and to retrieve pressure-temperature profiles from infrared solar absorption spectra.

  14. Volumetric deformation of live cells induced by pressure-activated cross-membrane ion transport.

    PubMed

    Hui, T H; Zhou, Z L; Qian, J; Lin, Y; Ngan, A H W; Gao, H

    2014-09-12

    In this work, we developed a method that allows precise control over changes in the size of a cell via hydrostatic pressure changes in the medium. Specifically, we show that a sudden increase, or reduction, in the surrounding pressure, in the physiologically relevant range, triggers cross-membrane fluxes of sodium and potassium ions in leukemia cell lines K562 and HL60, resulting in reversible volumetric deformation with a characteristic time of around 30 min. Interestingly, healthy leukocytes do not respond to pressure shocks, suggesting that the cancer cells may have evolved the ability to adapt to pressure changes in their microenvironment. A model is also proposed to explain the observed cell deformation, which highlights how the apparent viscoelastic response of cells is governed by the microscopic cross-membrane transport.

  15. Volumetric Deformation of Live Cells Induced by Pressure-Activated Cross-Membrane Ion Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hui, T. H.; Zhou, Z. L.; Qian, J.; Lin, Y.; Ngan, A. H. W.; Gao, H.

    2014-09-01

    In this work, we developed a method that allows precise control over changes in the size of a cell via hydrostatic pressure changes in the medium. Specifically, we show that a sudden increase, or reduction, in the surrounding pressure, in the physiologically relevant range, triggers cross-membrane fluxes of sodium and potassium ions in leukemia cell lines K562 and HL60, resulting in reversible volumetric deformation with a characteristic time of around 30 min. Interestingly, healthy leukocytes do not respond to pressure shocks, suggesting that the cancer cells may have evolved the ability to adapt to pressure changes in their microenvironment. A model is also proposed to explain the observed cell deformation, which highlights how the apparent viscoelastic response of cells is governed by the microscopic cross-membrane transport.

  16. Rheology of phase A at high pressure and high temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilairet, N.; Amiguet, E.; Wang, Y.; Merkel, S.

    2013-12-01

    Subduction zones are locations where a tectonic plate slides and bends under another one. Materials there undergo large and heterogeneous deformations and stresses which are released through seismicity, occasionally. Thus plasticity of minerals filling faults and shear zones is a critical parameter for understanding the stress balance of whole subduction zones. We present a deformation study on a hexagonal hydrous phase that can exist in shear zones within subducting slabs, phase A, after dehydration of serpentine into pyroxene + phase A. Pure phase A samples were synthesized at 11 GPa and ca. 1100K, in the multi-anvil facility in Clermont-Ferrand, France, with N. Bolfan and D. Andrault. Three samples were deformed at 11 GPa confining pressure, and 673K or 973K, using a D-DIA apparatus [1] at 13B-MD at GSE-CARS, APS, in uniaxial shortening up to -0.24 strain and at 5.10-5 s-1. Lattice strains (a proxy for macro-stress), texture and strain were measured in-situ, using synchrotron radiation. Results from lattice strain and texture analysis show a decrease in flow stress and a change in deformation mechanisms with temperature, coherent with the findings in transmission electron microscopy on samples recovered in relaxation experiments from [2]. The slip systems involved during deformation were further analyzed using Visco-Plastic Self-Consistent (VPSC) simulations [3]. The model inputs were known slip systems for hexagonal materials, including the ones observed by [2], with tunable strengths, the strain rate, final strain, and either a random texture or the starting experimental texture. The final experimental textures could be reproduced. The slip systems that had to be activated for matching the experimental texture confirm the observations by [2]: at 673K, the most active slip systems are prismatic and pyramidal, with the requirement of a smaller activity on the basal system, and at 973K the basal system is the main slip system activated. [1] Wang et al, Review for

  17. Very high temperature silicon on silicon pressure transducers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurtz, Anthony D.; Nunn, Timothy A.; Briggs, Stephen A.; Ned, Alexander

    1992-01-01

    A silicon on silicon pressure sensor has been developed for use at very high temperatures (1000 F). The design principles used to fabricate the pressure sensor are outlined and results are presented of its high temperature performance.

  18. 40 CFR 1065.315 - Pressure, temperature, and dewpoint calibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Pressure, temperature, and dewpoint... Parameters and Ambient Conditions § 1065.315 Pressure, temperature, and dewpoint calibration. (a) Calibrate instruments for measuring pressure, temperature, and dewpoint upon initial installation. Follow the...

  19. 40 CFR 1065.315 - Pressure, temperature, and dewpoint calibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Pressure, temperature, and dewpoint... Parameters and Ambient Conditions § 1065.315 Pressure, temperature, and dewpoint calibration. (a) Calibrate instruments for measuring pressure, temperature, and dewpoint upon initial installation. Follow the...

  20. Room Temperature Deformation Mechanisms of Alumina Particles Observed from In Situ Micro-compression and Atomistic Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarobol, Pylin; Chandross, Michael; Carroll, Jay D.; Mook, William M.; Bufford, Daniel C.; Boyce, Brad L.; Hattar, Khalid; Kotula, Paul G.; Hall, Aaron C.

    2016-01-01

    Aerosol deposition (AD) is a solid-state deposition technology that has been developed to fabricate ceramic coatings nominally at room temperature. Sub-micron ceramic particles accelerated by pressurized gas impact, deform, and consolidate on substrates under vacuum. Ceramic particle consolidation in AD coatings is highly dependent on particle deformation and bonding; these behaviors are not well understood. In this work, atomistic simulations and in situ micro-compressions in the scanning electron microscope, and the transmission electron microscope (TEM) were utilized to investigate fundamental mechanisms responsible for plastic deformation/fracture of particles under applied compression. Results showed that highly defective micron-sized alumina particles, initially containing numerous dislocations or a grain boundary, exhibited no observable shape change before fracture/fragmentation. Simulations and experimental results indicated that particles containing a grain boundary only accommodate low strain energy per unit volume before crack nucleation and propagation. In contrast, nearly defect-free, sub-micron, single crystal alumina particles exhibited plastic deformation and fracture without fragmentation. Dislocation nucleation/motion, significant plastic deformation, and shape change were observed. Simulation and TEM in situ micro-compression results indicated that nearly defect-free particles accommodate high strain energy per unit volume associated with dislocation plasticity before fracture. The identified deformation mechanisms provide insight into feedstock design for AD.

  1. Room temperature deformation mechanisms of alumina particles observed from in situ micro-compression and atomistic simulations.

    SciTech Connect

    Sarobol, Pylin; Chandross, Michael E.; Carroll, Jay D.; Mook, William M.; Bufford, Daniel Charles; Boyce, Brad L.; Hattar, Khalid Mikhiel; Kotula, Paul G.; Hall, Aaron Christopher

    2015-09-22

    Aerosol deposition (AD) is a solid-state deposition technology that has been developed to fabricate ceramic coatings nominally at room temperature. Sub-micron ceramic particles accelerated by pressurized gas impact, deform, and consolidate on substrates under vacuum. Ceramic particle consolidation in AD coatings is highly dependent on particle deformation and bonding; these behaviors are not well understood. In this work, atomistic simulations and in situ micro-compressions in the scanning electron microscope, and the transmission electron microscope (TEM) were utilized to investigate fundamental mechanisms responsible for plastic deformation/fracture of particles under applied compression. Results showed that highly defective micron-sized alumina particles, initially containing numerous dislocations or a grain boundary, exhibited no observable shape change before fracture/fragmentation. Simulations and experimental results indicated that particles containing a grain boundary only accommodate low strain energy per unit volume before crack nucleation and propagation. In contrast, nearly defect-free, sub-micron, single crystal alumina particles exhibited plastic deformation and fracture without fragmentation. Dislocation nucleation/motion, significant plastic deformation, and shape change were observed. Simulation and TEM in situ micro-compression results indicated that nearly defect-free particles accommodate high strain energy per unit volume associated with dislocation plasticity before fracture. As a result, the identified deformation mechanisms provide insight into feedstock design for AD.

  2. Room temperature deformation mechanisms of alumina particles observed from in situ micro-compression and atomistic simulations.

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sarobol, Pylin; Chandross, Michael E.; Carroll, Jay D.; Mook, William M.; Bufford, Daniel Charles; Boyce, Brad L.; Hattar, Khalid Mikhiel; Kotula, Paul G.; Hall, Aaron Christopher

    2015-09-22

    Aerosol deposition (AD) is a solid-state deposition technology that has been developed to fabricate ceramic coatings nominally at room temperature. Sub-micron ceramic particles accelerated by pressurized gas impact, deform, and consolidate on substrates under vacuum. Ceramic particle consolidation in AD coatings is highly dependent on particle deformation and bonding; these behaviors are not well understood. In this work, atomistic simulations and in situ micro-compressions in the scanning electron microscope, and the transmission electron microscope (TEM) were utilized to investigate fundamental mechanisms responsible for plastic deformation/fracture of particles under applied compression. Results showed that highly defective micron-sized alumina particles, initially containingmore » numerous dislocations or a grain boundary, exhibited no observable shape change before fracture/fragmentation. Simulations and experimental results indicated that particles containing a grain boundary only accommodate low strain energy per unit volume before crack nucleation and propagation. In contrast, nearly defect-free, sub-micron, single crystal alumina particles exhibited plastic deformation and fracture without fragmentation. Dislocation nucleation/motion, significant plastic deformation, and shape change were observed. Simulation and TEM in situ micro-compression results indicated that nearly defect-free particles accommodate high strain energy per unit volume associated with dislocation plasticity before fracture. As a result, the identified deformation mechanisms provide insight into feedstock design for AD.« less

  3. Deformation behavior in reactor pressure vessel steels as a clue to understanding irradiation hardening.

    SciTech Connect

    DiMelfi, R. J.; Alexander, D. E.; Rehn, L. E.

    1999-10-25

    In this paper, we examine the post-yield true stress vs true strain behavior of irradiated pressure vessel steels and iron-based alloys to reveal differences in strain-hardening behavior associated with different irradiating particles (neutrons and electrons) and different alloy chernky. It is important to understand the effects on mechanical properties caused by displacement producing radiation of nuclear reactor pressure steels. Critical embrittling effects, e.g. increases in the ductile-to-brittle-transition-temperature, are associated with irradiation-induced increases in yield strength. In addition, fatigue-life and loading-rate effects on fracture can be related to the post-irradiation strain-hardening behavior of the steels. All of these properties affect the expected service life of nuclear reactor pressure vessels. We address the characteristics of two general strengthening effects that we believe are relevant to the differing defect cluster characters produced by neutrons and electrons in four different alloys: two pressure vessel steels, A212B and A350, and two binary alloys, Fe-0.28 wt%Cu and Fe-0.74 wt%Ni. Our results show that there are differences in the post-irradiation mechanical behavior for the two kinds of irradiation and that the differences are related both to differences in damage produced and alloy chemistry. We find that while electron and neutron irradiations (at T {le} 60 C) of pressure vessel steels and binary iron-based model alloys produce similar increases in yield strength for the same dose level, they do not result in the same post-yield hardening behavior. For neutron irradiation, the true stress flow curves of the irradiated material can be made to superimpose on that of the unirradiated material, when the former are shifted appropriately along the strain axis. This behavior suggests that neutron irradiation hardening has the same effect as strain hardening for all of the materials analyzed. For electron irradiated steels, the

  4. Temperature dependence of the deformation behavior of 316 stainless steel after low temperature neutron irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Pawel-Robertson, J.E.; Rowcliffe, A.F.; Grossbeck, M.L.

    1996-10-01

    The effects of low temperature neutron irradiation on the tensile behavior of 316 stainless steel have been investigated. A single heat of solution annealed 316 was irradiated to 7 and 18 dpa at 60, 200, 330, and 400{degrees}C. The tensile properties as a function of dose and as a function of temperature were examined. Large changes in yield strength, deformation mode, strain to necking, and strain hardening capacity were seen in this irradiation experiment. The magnitudes of the changes are dependent on both irradiation temperature and neutron dose. Irradiation can more than triple the yield strength over the unirradiated value and decrease the strain to necking (STN) to less than 0.5% under certain conditions. A maximum increase in yield strength and a minimum in the STN occur after irradiation at 330{degrees}C but the failure mode remains ductile.

  5. In situ analysis of texture development from sinusoidal stress at high pressure and temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Li; Weidner, Donald J.

    2015-12-15

    Here, we present a new experimental protocol to investigate the relationship between texture, plastic strain, and the mechanisms of plastic deformation at high pressure and temperature. The method utilizes synchrotron X-ray radiation as the probing tool, coupled with a large-volume high pressure deformation device (D-DIA). The intensity of X-ray diffraction peaks within the spectrum of the sample is used for sampling texture development in situ. The unique feature of this study is given by the sinusoidal variation of the intensity when a sinusoidal strain is applied to the sample. For a sample of magnesium oxide at elevated pressure and temperature, we demonstrate observations that are consistent with elasto-plastic models for texture development and for diffraction-peak measurements of apparent stress. The sinusoidal strain magnitude was 3%.

  6. In situ analysis of texture development from sinusoidal stress at high pressure and temperature.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Weidner, Donald J

    2015-12-01

    Here, we present a new experimental protocol to investigate the relationship between texture, plastic strain, and the mechanisms of plastic deformation at high pressure and temperature. The method utilizes synchrotron X-ray radiation as the probing tool, coupled with a large-volume high pressure deformation device (D-DIA). The intensity of X-ray diffraction peaks within the spectrum of the sample is used for sampling texture development in situ. The unique feature of this study is given by the sinusoidal variation of the intensity when a sinusoidal strain is applied to the sample. For a sample of magnesium oxide at elevated pressure and temperature, we demonstrate observations that are consistent with elasto-plastic models for texture development and for diffraction-peak measurements of apparent stress. The sinusoidal strain magnitude was 3%. PMID:26724072

  7. Flow rate-pressure drop relation for deformable shallow microfluidic channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christov, Ivan C.; Cognet, Vincent; Stone, Howard A.

    2013-11-01

    Laminar flow in devices fabricated from PDMS causes deformation of the passage geometry, which affects the flow rate-pressure drop relation. Having an accurate flow rate-pressure drop relation for deformable microchannels is of importance given that the flow rate for a given pressure drop can be as much as 500% of the flow rate predicted by Poiseuille's law for a rigid channel. proposed a successful model of the latter phenomenon by heuristically coupling linear elasticity with the lubrication approximation for Stokes flow. However, their model contains a fitting parameter that must be found for each channel shape by performing an experiment. We present a perturbative derivation of the flow rate-pressure drop relation in a shallow deformable microchannel using Kirchoff-Love theory of isotropic quasi-static plate bending and Stokes' equations under a ``double lubrication'' approximation (i.e., the ratio of the channel's height to its width and of the channel's width to its length are both assumed small). Our result contains no free parameters and confirms Gervais et al.'s observation that the flow rate is a quartic polynomial of the pressure drop. ICC was supported by NSF Grant DMS-1104047 and the U.S. DOE through the LANL/LDRD Program; HAS was supported by NSF Grant CBET-1132835.

  8. Effect of test temperature on the dynamical torsional deformation behavior of two aluminium-lithium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, C.G.; Kim, K.J.; Lee, S.; Cho, K.

    1998-02-01

    The objective of the present study is to investigate the effect of test temperature on the dynamic torsional deformation behavior of two Al-Li alloys, i.e., 2090 and 8090 alloys. Dynamic torsional tests were conducted using a torsional Kolsky bar at room temperature and a low temperature ({minus}196 C), and the torsionally deformed regions and the fracture surfaces of the tested specimens were examined. The dynamic properties of the two Al-Li alloys at the low temperature were improved, owing to the modification of the deformation behavior. The dynamic deformation behavior at room temperature was dominated by intergranular cracks due to planar slips and by crack propagation along the grain boundaries. At the low temperature, plastic deformation proceeded more homogeneously as planar slip was prevented. These results indicated that the overall deformation mode of both the Al-Li alloys changed from planar slip to homogeneous deformation with decreasing temperature, resulting in the improvement of cryogenic properties under dynamic torsional loading.

  9. High Pressure Study on High Temperature Superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jauyn Grace

    In spite of the progress on the understanding of high-temperature superconductivity (HTS), there is still not sufficient evidence to differentiate one theoretical model from the others. In an attempt to relate the crystal structures of high-temperature superconductors (HTS's) to the mechanism of HTS, we have adopted a chemico-physical approach by examining the pressure-effect on the superconducting and transport properties of superconducting compound systems. Without exception, all compounds exhibiting superconductivity above 77 K, the boiling point of liquid nitrogen, are anisotropic structures consisting of layers of CuO_2 , metal element (R's; where R is R being Ca, Y or rare-earth element) and metal-oxide (MO's; where M is Ca, Ba, Sr, Cu, Hg, Tl, Bi or Pb). We have investigated under pressure the electrical and superconducting properties of four highly related systems with different R's, different numbers of MO layers, different numbers of CuO _2 layers and various anion dopings. The specific systems studied were: RBa_2Cu _3O_7 (R = Y, Yb, Tm, Ho, Dy, Gd, Sm and Nd), R_{1 -x}Pr_{x}Ba _2Cu_3O _7 (R = Yb and Dy), Y_2Ba _4Cu_{5 + m} O_{13 + m} (m = 1, 2 and 3), and Tl_2Ba _2Ca_{L-1}Cu _{2L-1}O_ {4 + 2L-delta} (L= 1,2 and 3, and 0 <= delta <= 0.1). We found that: (1) in R-123, R affects T _{c} due to its chemical pressure which, in turn, can lead to a modification in the electronic structure of HTS's, in contrast to the general belief that R is isolated from the superconducting CuO_2 layers and hence has no influence on T _{c}; (2) the absence of superconductivity in PrBa_2Cu_3O _7 may be due to the low carrier concentration and hole-localization, in contrast to the suggestion of pair-breaking; (3) there may exist a common optimal T_{c} for all members of the homologous series Y_2Ba _4Cu_{5 + m} O_{13 + m}, raising the possibility of a similar situation in other compound families; and (4) We have observed a universal T _{c}-behavior for HTS's. We believe that these

  10. Deformation and fracture characteristics of Inconel X-750 at room temperature and elevated temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Mills, W.J.

    1980-06-01

    Electron fractographic and thin foil electron metallographic techniques were used to evaluate the deformation and fracture characteristics of Inconel X-750 at temperatures ranging from 24 to 816/sup 0/C. Operative dislocation mechanisms and fracture surface morphologies were related to the overall tensile response of this nickel-base superalloy. At room temperature, failure occurred primarily by an intergranular dimple rupture mechanism associated with microvoid coalescence along grain boundary denuded regions. A fairly high density of dislocations throughout the matrix resulted in relatively high ductility levels even though failure occurred by an intergranular mechanism. Under intermediate temperature conditions (316 to 427/sup 0/C), increased transgranular fracture coupled with extensive dislocation activity within the Inconel X-750 matrix caused a slight increase in ductility. At progressively higher temperatures, 538 to 704/sup 0/C, all dislocation activity was channeled through narrow slip bands which subsequently initiated localized separation and resulted in a very faceted fracture surface appearance. The absence of a homogeneous dislocation substructure in this temperature regime resulted in a severe degradation in ductility levels. At the highest test temperature (816/sup 0/C), a uniform dislocation network throughout the Inconel X-750 matrix coupled with intense dislocation activity in the grain boundary denuded zone resulted in a marked improvement in ductility. Furthermore, the extensive dislocation activity along grain boundary regions ultimately resulted in an intergranular fracture morphology.

  11. Mechanical and transport properties of rocks at high temperatures and pressures. Task II: fracture permeability of crystalline rocks as a function of temperature, pressure, and hydrothermal alteration

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-01-01

    The primary objective is to measure and understand the variation of the fracture permeability of quartzite subjected to hydrothermal conditions. Pore fluids will consist of distilled water and aqueous Na/sub 2/CO/sub 3/ solutions at temperatures to 250/sup 0/C, fluid pressures to 20 MPa and effective normal stresses to 70 MPa. Fluid flow rates will be controllable to rates at least as small as 0.2 ml/day (approx. 4 fracture volumes). Experiments are designed to assess what role, if any, pressure solution may play at time scales of those of the experiments (less than or equal to 2 weeks). Secondary objectives are: (1) continue simulated fracture studies, incorporating inelastic deformation into model and characterize the nature of inelastic deformation occurring on loaded tensile fractures in quartzite; (2) continue dissolution experiment, with emphasis on dissolution modification of tensile fracture surfaces on quartzite; and (3) study natural fractures in a quartzite exhibiting hydrothermal dissolution features.

  12. Carbonates in thrust faults: High temperature investigations into deformation processes in calcite-dolomite systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kushnir, A.; Kennedy, L.; Misra, S.; Benson, P.

    2012-04-01

    The role of dolomite on the strength and evolution of calcite-dolomite fold and thrust belts and nappes (as observed in the Canadian Rockies, the Swiss Alps, the Italian Apennines, and the Naukluft Nappe Complex) is largely unknown. Field investigations indicate that strain in natural systems is localized in calcite, resulting in a ductile response, while dolomite deforms in a dominantly brittle manner. To date, experimental studies on polymineralic carbonate systems are limited to homogeneous, fine-grained, calcite-dolomite composites of relatively low dolomite content. The effect of dolomite on limestone rheology, the onset of crystal-plastic deformation in dolomite in composites, and the potential for strain localization in composites have not yet been fully quantified. Constant displacement rate (3x10-4 s-1and 10-4 s-1), high confining pressure (300 MPa) and high temperature (750° C and 800° C) torsion experiments were conducted to address the role of dolomite on the strength of calcite-dolomite composites. Experiments were performed on samples produced by hot isostatic pressing (HIP) amalgams of a natural, pure dolomite and a reagent, pure calcite. We performed experiments on the following mixtures (given as dolomite%): 25%, 35%, 50%, and 75%. These synthetic HIP products eliminated concerns of mineralogical impurities and textural anomalies due to porosity, structural fabrics (e.g., foliation) and fossil content. The samples were deformed up to a maximum finite shear strain of 5.0 and the experimental set up was unvented to inhibit sample decarbonation. Mechanical data shows a considerable increase in sample yield strength with increasing dolomite content. Experimental products with low starting dolomite content (dol%: 25% and 35%) display macroscopic strain localization along compositionally defined foliation. Experimental products with high dolomite content (dol%: 50% and 75%) demonstrate no macroscopic foliation. Post-deformation microstructure analysis

  13. Experimental Deformation of Olivine Single Crystal at Mantle P and T: Pressure Effect on Olivine Dislocation Slip-System Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, R.; Girard, J.; Chen, J.; Amiguet, E.

    2008-12-01

    Seismic velocity anisotropies observed in the upper mantle are interpreted from lattice preferred orientations (LPO) produced experimentally in olivine, which depends on the dominant dislocation slip systems. At low pressure P<3 GPa, mantle temperature (T) and in dry conditions, olivine [100] dislocation slip dominates the less active [001] slip. This tends to align crystal fast velocity [100] axis with the principal shear direction. Yet recent high-pressure deformation experiments (Couvy et al., 2004, EJM, 16, 877; Raterron et al., 2007, Am. Min., 92, 1436; Raterron et al., 2008, Phys. Earth Planet. Int., doi:10.1016/j.pepi.2008.07.026) show that [001](010) slip system dominates [100](010) system in the (P,T) range of the deep upper mantle. This may promote a shear-parallel slow-velocity [001] axis and may explain the seismic-velocity attenuation observed at depth >200 km (Mainprice et al., 2005, Nature, 433, 731). In order to further constrain the effect of P on olivine slip system activities, which is classically quantified by the activation volume V* in power creep laws, deformation experiments were carried out in poor water condition, at P>5 GPa and T=1400°C, on pure forsterite (Fo100) and San Carlos olivine crystals, using the Deformation-DIA apparatus at the X17B2 beamline of the NSLS (Upton, NY). Ten crystals were oriented in order to active either [100] slip alone or [001] slip alone in (010) plane, or both [100](001) and [001](100) systems together. Constant applied stress σ <300 MPa and specimen strain rates were monitored in situ using time-resolved x-ray diffraction and radiography, respectively, for a total of 27 investigated steady state conditions. The obtained rheological data were compared with data previously obtained in comparable T and σ conditions, but at room P, by Darot and Gueguen (1981, JGR, 86, 6219) for Fo100 and by Bai et al. (1991, JGR, 96, 2441) for San Carlos olivine. This new set of data confirms previous deformation data

  14. Isolating Gas Sensor From Pressure And Temperature Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sprinkle, Danny R.; Chen, Tony T. D.; Chaturvedi, Sushi K.

    1994-01-01

    Two-stage flow system enables oxygen sensor in system to measure oxygen content of low-pressure, possibly-high-temperature atmosphere in test environment while protecting sensor against possibly high temperature and fluctuations in pressure of atmosphere. Sensor for which flow system designed is zirconium oxide oxygen sensor sampling atmospheres in high-temperature wind tunnels. Also adapted to other gas-analysis instruments that must be isolated from pressure and temperature effects of test environments.

  15. Thermodynamic Pressure/Temperature Transducer Health Check

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Immer, Christopher D. (Inventor); Eckhoff, Anthony (Inventor); Medelius, Pedro J. (Inventor); Deyoe, Richard T. (Inventor); Starr, Stanley O. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A device and procedure for checking the health of a pressure transducer in situ is provided. The procedure includes measuring a fixed change in pressure above ambient pressure and a fixed change in pressure below ambient pressure. This is done by first sealing an enclosed volume around the transducer with a valve. A piston inside the sealed volume is increasing the pressure. A fixed pressure below ambient pressure is obtained by opening the valve, driving the piston The output of the pressure transducer is recorded for both the overpressuring and the underpressuring. By comparing this data with data taken during a preoperative calibration, the health of the transducer is determined from the linearity, the hysteresis, and the repeatability of its output. The further addition of a thermometer allows constant offset error in the transducer output to be determined.

  16. An Electrical Micro-Heater Technique for High-Pressure and High-Temperature Diamond Anvil Cell Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Weir, S T; Jackson, D D; Falabella, S; Samudrala, G; Vohra, Y K

    2008-10-10

    Small electrical heating elements have been lithographically fabricated onto the culets of 'designer' diamond anvils for the purpose of performing high-pressure and high-temperature experiments on metals. The thin-film geometry of the heating elements makes them very resistant to plastic deformation during high pressure loading, and their small cross-sectional area enables them to be electrically heated to very high temperatures with relatively modest currents ({approx}1 Amp). The technique also offers excellent control and temporal stability of the sample temperature. Test experiments on gold samples have been performed for pressures up to 21 GPa and temperatures of nearly 2000K.

  17. Using altimetry and seafloor pressure data to estimate vertical deformation offshore: Vanuatu case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballu, V.; Bonnefond, P.; Calmant, S.; Bouin, M.-N.; Pelletier, B.; Laurain, O.; Crawford, W. C.; Baillard, C.; de Viron, O.

    2013-04-01

    Measuring ground deformation underwater is essential for understanding Earth processes at many scales. One important example is subduction zones, which can generate devastating earthquakes and tsunamis, and where the most important deformation signal related to plate locking is usually offshore. We present an improved method for making offshore vertical deformation measurements, that involve combining tide gauge and altimetry data. We present data from two offshore sites located on either side of the plate interface at the New Hebrides subduction zone, where the Australian plate subducts beneath the North Fiji basin. These two sites have been equipped with pressure gauges since 1999, to extend an on-land GPS network across the plate interface. The pressure series measured at both sites show that Wusi Bank, located on the over-riding plate, subsides by 11 ± 4 mm/yr with respect to Sabine Bank, which is located on the down-going plate. By combining water depths derived from the on-bottom pressure data with sea surface heights derived from altimetry data, we determine variations of seafloor heights in a global reference frame. Using altimetry data from TOPEX/Poseidon, Jason-1, Jason-2 and Envisat missions, we find that the vertical motion at Sabine Bank is close to zero and that Wusi Bank subsides by at least 3 mm/yr and probably at most 11 mm/yr.This paper represents the first combination of altimetry and pressure data to derive absolute vertical motions offshore. The deformation results are obtained in a global reference frame, allowing them to be integrated with on-land GNSS data.

  18. Deformation of a Step Composite Beam in a Temperature Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starovoitov, É. I.; Pleskachevskii, Yu. M.; Leonenko, D. V.; Tarlakovskii, D. V.

    2015-07-01

    Consideration is given to thermal force deformation of an elastic three-layer beam with a stepwise thickness of one supporting layer. To describe the kinematics of a rod that is asymmetric across the bundle, the hypotheses of a broken normal are adopted. A system of equilibrium equations is derived and its general analytical solution in displacements is obtained. A numerical parametric analysis of the stressed-strained state of a metal-polymer threelayer beam is carried out.

  19. Structure and microhardness of Al-Si-Cu-Ni alloy after severe plastic deformation and high-temperature annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shvets, Karina; Khalikova, Gulnara; Korznikova, Elena; Trifonov, Vadim

    2015-10-01

    The effect of severe plastic deformation by high-pressure torsion (HPT) and subsequent annealing on the microstructure and microhardness of squeeze casting Al-22%Si-3%Cu-1.7%Ni alloy was investigated. HPT was performed at room temperature with 5 rotations under the pressure of 4 GPa. Annealing temperature range varied from 300 to 500°C for 5 min. HPT resulted in refinement and partial dissolution of the primary silicon and intermetallic particles in aluminum matrix and structure fragmentation that caused the microhardness increase. Subsequent annealing lead to the decomposition of the supersaturated solid solution that took place simultaneously with recovery and recrystallization of the fragmented structure. Increase of annealing temperature resulted in decrease of microhardness values.

  20. Time, temperature and water pressure dependent reheating of volcanic plugs, conduits and domes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, B. M.; Jellinek, M.; Russell, K.

    2009-12-01

    Active lava domes show periodic magma supply and are frequently re-intruded and reheated. We propose that the timescale, temperature, and water pressure of reheating control whether crack and bubble networks open or close, and whether or not gas can escape. Interpretations of historic eruptions indicate open, permeable magmatic systems favour degassing and non-explosive eruptions, whereas, closed impermeable systems favour pressure build up and explosive eruptions. Despite the observations and interpretations mentioned above, the evolution of open and closed systems during reheating remains poorly understood. We reheated rhyolite dome and pumice samples under open (atmospheric pressure and dry) and closed (pressurized and wet) conditions. Open and closed porosity was measured before and after experiments by helium pycnometry, textures were examined with the Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), and bulk water contents were measured by infrared spectroscopy during loss on ignition. Open (atmospheric pressure, 200-1100°C) experiments show that (1) short timescales and low temperatures allow degassing without deformation, (2) intermediate timescales and temperatures favour bubble and crack growth, and (3) longer timescales and higher temperatures produce bubble collapse and crack healing. Closed experiments at (450C-750°C and 2-10 MPa) show that, (1) low temperatures and high pressures promote rehydration (regassing) without deformation, and (2) high temperatures at all pressures allow degassing with bubble collapse. Our results indicate that during reheating of an open silicic volcanic plug residual water will degas with little deformation, unless mafic magma temperatures and longer timescales occur. Bubble collapse in remelted enclaves of rhyolite supports that the explosivity of the 1886 basaltic eruption of Mt. Tarawera, New Zealand, may have been enhanced by extreme reheating and sealing of the rhyolite plug by reheating from hot basaltic magma. In contrast, our

  1. Microplastic deformation of submicrocrystalline and coarse-grained titanium at room and elevated temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudarev, E. F.; Pochivalova, G. P.; Kolobov, Yu. R.; Bakach, G. P.; Skosyrskii, A. B.; Zhorovkov, M. F.

    2012-12-01

    Results obtained from a comparison study on the deformation behavior of submicrocrystalline and coarsegrained titanium in the temperature interval 295-773 K are presented. The microplastic strain mechanisms underlying a change in the deformation behavior of submicrocrystalline titanium in the melting temperature interval 0.35-0.40 Т m and a reduction in the strain hardening effect due to formation of submicrocrystalline structure of the material are examined. A multiscale model for development of microplastic deformation in submicrocrystalline metals and alloys is offered.

  2. 40 CFR 1065.315 - Pressure, temperature, and dewpoint calibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... or stirred-liquid temperature calibrators, with data logging capabilities to minimize transcription... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Pressure, temperature, and dewpoint... Parameters and Ambient Conditions § 1065.315 Pressure, temperature, and dewpoint calibration. (a)...

  3. 40 CFR 1065.315 - Pressure, temperature, and dewpoint calibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... or stirred-liquid temperature calibrators, with data logging capabilities to minimize transcription... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Pressure, temperature, and dewpoint... Parameters and Ambient Conditions § 1065.315 Pressure, temperature, and dewpoint calibration. (a)...

  4. The temperature and pressure in the plasma parallel plate accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koníček, P.; Maloch, J.

    1993-06-01

    This paper presents the results of plasma temperature and pressure calculations in the parallel plate accelerator during the accelerating process. The plasma pressure is calculated by means in Dalton's law.

  5. The unexpected stability of multiwall nanotubes under high pressure and shear deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pashkin, E. Y.; Pankov, A. M.; Kulnitskiy, B. A.; Perezhogin, I. A.; Karaeva, A. R.; Mordkovich, V. Z.; Popov, M. Y.; Sorokin, P. B.; Blank, V. D.

    2016-08-01

    The behavior of multiwall carbon nanotubes under a high pressure (up to 55 GPa) combined with shear deformation was studied by experimental and theoretical methods. The unexpectedly high stability of the nanotubes' structure under high stresses was observed. After the pressure was released, we observed that the nanotubes had restored their shapes. Atomistic simulations show that the hydrostatic and shear stresses affect the nanotubes' structure in a different way. It was found that the shear stress load in the multiwall nanotubes' outer walls can induce their connection and formation of an amorphized sp3-hybridized region but internal core keeps the tubular structure.

  6. Analysis of Tensile Deformation and Failure in Austenitic Stainless Steels: Part I- Temperature Dependence

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jin Weon; Byun, Thak Sang

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the temperature dependence of deformation and failure behaviors in the austenitic stainless steels (annealed 304, 316, 316LN, and 20% cold-worked 316LN) in terms of equivalent true stress-true strain curves. The true stress-true strain curves up to the final fracture were calculated from the tensile test data obtained at -150 ~ 450oC using an iterative technique of finite element simulation. Analysis was largely focused on the necking deformation and fracture: Key parameters such as the strain hardening rate, equivalent fracture stress, fracture strain, and tensile fracture energy were evaluated, and their temperature dependencies were investigated. It was shown that a significantly high strain hardening rate was still retained during unstable deformation although overall strain hardening rate beyond the onset of necking was lower than that of the uniform deformation. The values of the parameters except for fracture strain decreased with temperature up to 200oC and were saturated as the temperature came close to the maximum test temperature 450oC. The fracture strain increased and had a maximum at -50oC to 20oC before decreasing with temperature. It was explained that these temperature dependencies of fracture properties were associated with a change in the dominant strain hardening mechanism with test temperature. Also, it was seen that the pre-straining of material has little effect on the strain hardening rate during necking deformation and on fracture properties.

  7. High-temperature deformation and microstructural analysis for silicon nitride-scandium(III) oxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheong, Deock-Soo; Sanders, William A.

    1992-01-01

    It was indicated that Si3N4 doped with Sc2O3 may exhibit high temperature mechanical properties superior to Si3N4 systems with various other oxide sintered additives. High temperature deformation of samples was studied by characterizing the microstructures before and after deformation. It was found that elements of the additive, such as Sc and O, exist in small amounts at very thin grain boundary layers and most of them stay in secondary phases at tripple and multiple grain boundary junctions. These secondary phases are devitrified as crystalline Sc2Si2O7. Deformation of the samples was dominated by cavitational processes rather than movements of dislocations. Thus the excellent deformation resistance of the samples at high temperature can be attributed to the very small thickness of the grain boundary layers and the crystalline secondary phase.

  8. High-temperature deformation and microstructural analysis for Si3N4-Sc2O3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheong, Deock-Soo; Sanders, William A.

    1990-01-01

    It was indicated that Si3N4 doped with Sc2O3 may exhibit high temperature mechanical properties superior to Si3N4 systems with various other oxide sintered additives. High temperature deformation of samples was studied by characterizing the microstructures before and after deformation. It was found that elements of the additive, such as Sc and O, exist in small amounts at very thin grain boundary layers and most of them stay in secondary phases at triple and multiple grain boundary junctions. These secondary phases are devitrified as crystalline Sc2Si2O7. Deformation of the samples was dominated by cavitational processes rather than movements of dislocations. Thus the excellent deformation resistance of the samples at high temperature can be attributed to the very small thickness of the grain boundary layers and the crystalline secondary phase.

  9. The fate of fluid inclusions during high-temperature experimental deformation of olivine aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, Matthew J.; Zimmerman, Mark E.; Teyssier, Christian

    2015-05-01

    Torsion experiments on initially wet and dry olivine aggregates at equivalent deformation conditions investigated the fate of fluid inclusions (FIs) during high-temperature deformation. Wet samples were produced by adding water to San Carlos olivine powders before hot pressing; those hot pressed without water are considered dry. After hot pressing, wet and dry aggregates have comparable grain sizes, but wet aggregates have more abundant primary FIs. Talc jackets were fitted around some wet and dry samples prior to deformation to hydrate samples during deformation via talc dehydration at elevated temperature, whereas other samples were deformed without talc. At similar strain rates (~1.0 × 10-4 s-1), the peak shear stress for the dry sample (no talc) was 190-220 MPa, whereas all other samples reached 180 MPa; the strengths of wet (± talc) and dry (+ talc) specimens appear similar. Deformed samples reveal abundant FIs, reduced grain size, shape preferred orientation of olivine, and a pervasive low-angle fabric (C') to the shear plane defined by aligned FIs. Samples deformed with talc have FI-rich and FI-depleted domains; where FIs are abundant, the C' fabric is better developed and grain size is smaller. Electron backscatter diffraction pole figures suggest that olivine deformed in the dislocation creep regime via the (010)[100] slip system. Results of these experiments suggest that FIs are redistributed during dislocation creep, leading to the development of grain-scale, high-diffusivity pathways.

  10. A Resonant Pressure Microsensor Capable of Self-Temperature Compensation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yinan; Wang, Junbo; Luo, Zhenyu; Chen, Deyong; Chen, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Resonant pressure microsensors are widely used in the fields of aerospace exploration and atmospheric pressure monitoring due to their advantages of quasi-digital output and long-term stability, which, however, requires the use of additional temperature sensors for temperature compensation. This paper presents a resonant pressure microsensor capable of self-temperature compensation without the need for additional temperature sensors. Two doubly-clamped “H” type resonant beams were arranged on the pressure diaphragm, which functions as a differential output in response to pressure changes. Based on calibration of a group of intrinsic resonant frequencies at different pressure and temperature values, the functions with inputs of two resonant frequencies and outputs of temperature and pressure under measurement were obtained and thus the disturbance of temperature variations on resonant frequency shifts was properly addressed. Before compensation, the maximal errors of the measured pressure values were over 1.5% while after compensation, the errors were less than 0.01% of the full pressure scale (temperature range of −40 °C to 70 °C and pressure range of 50 kPa to 110 kPa). PMID:25938197

  11. Evaluation of microstructure anisotropy on room and medium temperature ECAP deformed F138 steel

    SciTech Connect

    De Vincentis, N.S.; Kliauga, A.; Ferrante, M.; Avalos, M.; Brokmeier, H.-G.; Bolmaro, R.E.

    2015-09-15

    The microstructure developed during severe plastic deformation results in improved mechanical properties because of the decrease in domain sizes and accumulation of defects, mainly dislocation arrays. The characteristic deformation stages observed in low stacking fault energy (SFE) face centered cubic (FCC) materials are highly influenced by the development of the primary and secondary twinning that compete with dislocation glide. In this paper, a low SFE F138 stainless steel is deformed by equal channel angular pressing (ECAP) up to 4 passes at room temperature (RT) and at 300 °C to compare the grain refinement and twin boundary development with increasing deformation. Tensile tests were performed to determine the deformation stages reached by the material before and after ECAP deformation, and the resulting microstructure was observed by TEM. X-ray diffraction and EBSD, average technique the first and local the second one, were used to quantify the microstructural changes, allowing the determination of diffraction domain sizes, dislocation and stacking fault densities and misorientation indices, which lead to a complete analysis of the deformation introduced in the material, with comparative correlations between various microstructural parameters. - Highlights: • The microstructure of ECAP pressed F138 steel was studied using TEM, EBSD and XRD. • Increasing deformation reduced domain sizes and increased dislocation densities. • Dislocation array compactness and misorientation increased with higher deformation. • Largest dislocation densities, mostly screw, match with simultaneous activation of twins. • Several correlations among microstructural features and parameters have been disclosed.

  12. Bacillus spore inactivation differences after combined mild temperature and high pressure processing using two pressurizing fluids.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Rosalind E; Carroll, Tim; Pearce, Lindsay E

    2008-06-01

    Spores of six species (28 strains) of dairy Bacillus isolates were added to sterile reconstituted skim milk and pressure processed (600 MPa for 60 s at 75 degrees C) using either a water-based pressurizing fluid or silicon oil. Processing temperatures peaked at 88 and 90 degrees C, respectively, for both fluids. For all strains, the log inactivation was consistently higher in the silicon oil than in the water-based fluid. This has potential implications for food safety assessment of combined pressure-temperature processes. High pressure processing causes mild heating during pressurization of both the target sample (i.e., spores) and the pressurizing fluid used for pressure delivery. Primarily, the adiabatic heat of compression of the fluids as well as other heat-transfer properties of the fluids and equipment determines the magnitude of this heating. Pressure cycles run with silicon oil were 7 to 15 degrees C higher in temperature during pressurization than pressure cycles run with the water-based pressurizing fluid, due to the greater adiabatic heat of compression of silicon oil. At and around the target pressure, however, the temperatures of both pressurizing fluids were similar, and they both dropped at the same rate during the holding time at the target pressure. We propose that the increased spore inactivation in the silicon oil system can be attributed to additional heating of the spore preparation when pressurized in oil. This could be explained by the temperature difference between the silicon oil and the aqueous spore preparation established during the pressurization phase of the pressure cycle. These spore-inactivation differences have practical implications because it is common practice to develop inactivation kinetic data on small, jacketed laboratory systems pressurized in oil, with extensive heat loss. However, commercial deployment is invariably on large industrial systems pressurized in water, with limited heat loss. Such effects should be

  13. Anistotropic yielding of rocks at high temperatures and pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Kronenberg, A.K.; Russell, J.E.; Carter, N.L.

    1990-10-14

    The anisotropic deformation of foliated and linealed rocks has been investigated, primarily to predict the mechanical response of rocks surrounding buried magma chambers to the stress fields generated by deep drilling. The principal application in this regard has been to evaluate, the scientific feasibility of extracting geothermal energy from buried magma chambers. Our approach has been to perform triaxial extension and compression tests at temperatures and pressures representative of the borehole environment on samples cored along six selected orientations and to fit the data to an orthohombric yield criterion. We have investigated Four-Mile gneiss (a strongly layered gneiss with well defined lineation), a biotite-rich schist, and Westerly granite (using a block oriented with respect to the granite's rift, grain, and hardway). Progress has been made in three areas: the experimental determination of strength anisotropies for the three starting materials, theoretical treatment and modeling of the results, and characterization of fabrics surrounding magma bodies resulting from their diaperic emplacement into shallow portions of the Earth's crust. In addition, results have been obtained for the tensile fracture of quartzite, basal slip and anisotropy of biotite single crystals, and anisotropic flow of bedded rocksalt.

  14. Optimizing the temperature compensation of an electronic pressure measurement system

    SciTech Connect

    Maxey, L.C.; Blalock, T.V.

    1990-08-01

    In an effort to minimize temperature sensitivity, the pressure measurement channels in the sensor/electronics modules of a high-resolution multiplexed pressure measurement system were analyzed. The pressure sensor (a silicon diaphragm strain gage) was known to have two temperature-dependent parameters. Component testing revealed that the current source driving the pressure sensor was also temperature sensitive. Although the transducer manufacturer supplies empirically selected temperature compensation resistors with each transducer, it was determined that the temperature sensitivity compensation could be optimized for this application by changing one of these resistors. By modifying the value of the sensitivity compensation resistor to optimize performance in this application, the temperature sensitivity of the pressure measurement channels was reduced by more than 60%.

  15. High pressure and anesthesia: pressure stimulates or inhibits bacterial bioluminescence depending upon temperature.

    PubMed

    Nosaka, S; Kamaya, H; Ueda, I

    1988-10-01

    Although high pressure is often viewed as a nonspecific stimulus counteracting anesthesia, pressure can either excite or inhibit biological activity depending on the temperature at application. Temperature and pressure are two independent variables that determine equilibrium quantity, e.g., the state of organisms in terms of activity and anesthesia depth. We used the light intensity of luminous bacteria (Vibrio fischeri) as an activity parameter, and studied the effects of pressure and anesthetics on the bacteria's light intensity at various temperatures. The light intensity was greatest at about 30 degrees C at ambient pressure. When the system was pressurized up to 204 atm, the temperature for maximum light intensity was shifted to higher temperatures. Above the optimal temperature for the maximal light intensity, high pressure increased the light intensity. Below the optimal temperature, pressure decreased light intensity. Pressure only shifts the reaction equilibrium to the lower volume state (Le Chatelier's principle). When the volume of the excited state is larger than the resting state, high pressure inhibits excitation, and vice versa. Halothane 0.008 atm and isoflurane 0.021 atm inhibited the light intensity both above and below the optimal temperature. When pressurized, the light intensity increased in the high temperature range but decreased in the low temperature range, as in the control. Thus, high pressure seemingly potentiated the anesthetic action at low temperatures. When the ratio of the light intensity in bacteria exposed to anesthesia and those not exposed to anesthesia was plotted against the pressure, however, the value approached unity in proportion to the pressure increase.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3421502

  16. Temperature and pressure influence on explosion pressures of closed vessel propane-air deflagrations.

    PubMed

    Razus, Domnina; Brinzea, Venera; Mitu, Maria; Oancea, Dumitru

    2010-02-15

    An experimental study on pressure evolution during closed vessel explosions of propane-air mixtures was performed, for systems with various initial concentrations and pressures ([C(3)H(8)]=2.50-6.20 vol.%, p(0)=0.3-1.2 bar). The explosion pressures and explosion times were measured in a spherical vessel (Phi=10 cm), at various initial temperatures (T(0)=298-423 K) and in a cylindrical vessel (Phi=10 cm; h=15 cm), at ambient initial temperature. The experimental values of explosion pressures are examined against literature values and compared to adiabatic explosion pressures, computed by assuming chemical equilibrium within the flame front. The influence of initial pressure, initial temperature and fuel concentration on explosion pressures and explosion times are discussed. At constant temperature and fuel/oxygen ratio, the explosion pressures are linear functions of total initial pressure, as reported for other fuel-air mixtures. At constant initial pressure and composition, both the measured and calculated (adiabatic) explosion pressures are linear functions of reciprocal value of initial temperature. Such correlations are extremely useful for predicting the explosion pressures of flammable mixtures at elevated temperatures and/or pressures, when direct measurements are not available.

  17. Stability of the flow in a soft tube deformed due to an applied pressure gradient.

    PubMed

    Verma, M K S; Kumaran, V

    2015-04-01

    A linear stability analysis is carried out for the flow through a tube with a soft wall in order to resolve the discrepancy of a factor of 10 for the transition Reynolds number between theoretical predictions in a cylindrical tube and the experiments of Verma and Kumaran [J. Fluid Mech. 705, 322 (2012)]. Here the effect of tube deformation (due to the applied pressure difference) on the mean velocity profile and pressure gradient is incorporated in the stability analysis. The tube geometry and dimensions are reconstructed from experimental images, where it is found that there is an expansion and then a contraction of the tube in the streamwise direction. The mean velocity profiles at different downstream locations and the pressure gradient, determined using computational fluid dynamics, are found to be substantially modified by the tube deformation. The velocity profiles are then used in a linear stability analysis, where the growth rates of perturbations are calculated for the flow through a tube with the wall modeled as a neo-Hookean elastic solid. The linear stability analysis is carried out for the mean velocity profiles at different downstream locations using the parallel flow approximation. The analysis indicates that the flow first becomes unstable in the downstream converging section of the tube where the flow profile is more pluglike when compared to the parabolic flow in a cylindrical tube. The flow is stable in the upstream diverging section where the deformation is maximum. The prediction for the transition Reynolds number is in good agreement with experiments, indicating that the downstream tube convergence and the consequent modification in the mean velocity profile and pressure gradient could reduce the transition Reynolds number by an order of magnitude. PMID:25974574

  18. Stability of the flow in a soft tube deformed due to an applied pressure gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, M. K. S.; Kumaran, V.

    2015-04-01

    A linear stability analysis is carried out for the flow through a tube with a soft wall in order to resolve the discrepancy of a factor of 10 for the transition Reynolds number between theoretical predictions in a cylindrical tube and the experiments of Verma and Kumaran [J. Fluid Mech. 705, 322 (2012), 10.1017/jfm.2011.55]. Here the effect of tube deformation (due to the applied pressure difference) on the mean velocity profile and pressure gradient is incorporated in the stability analysis. The tube geometry and dimensions are reconstructed from experimental images, where it is found that there is an expansion and then a contraction of the tube in the streamwise direction. The mean velocity profiles at different downstream locations and the pressure gradient, determined using computational fluid dynamics, are found to be substantially modified by the tube deformation. The velocity profiles are then used in a linear stability analysis, where the growth rates of perturbations are calculated for the flow through a tube with the wall modeled as a neo-Hookean elastic solid. The linear stability analysis is carried out for the mean velocity profiles at different downstream locations using the parallel flow approximation. The analysis indicates that the flow first becomes unstable in the downstream converging section of the tube where the flow profile is more pluglike when compared to the parabolic flow in a cylindrical tube. The flow is stable in the upstream diverging section where the deformation is maximum. The prediction for the transition Reynolds number is in good agreement with experiments, indicating that the downstream tube convergence and the consequent modification in the mean velocity profile and pressure gradient could reduce the transition Reynolds number by an order of magnitude.

  19. Deformation- and temperature-responsive elastomer composites for smart device applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chellappa, V.; Zhao, L.; Jang, B. Z.

    1995-05-01

    the electrical behavior of conducting carbon whisker reinforced thermoplastic elastomer (TPE) composites was investigated. The carbon whiskers were produced by a catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CCVC) process. The electrical properties of the composite were characterized as a function of temperature and deformation. The electrical resistivity of the composite can be varied by uniaxial deformation and by temperature. The temperature-resistivity studies indicated that the resistivity of these composites were influenced by the glass transition temperature of the TPE. the resistivity v. 1/T curves exhibited two distinctive negative slopes that intersected at the Tg of the elastomer. This as correlated to the Tg of the rigid segments in the TPE as obtained by the dynamic mechanical thermal analysis. Further, uniaxial deformation studies at room temperature demonstrated that the resistivity increased exponentially with the deformation. Mechanical and electrical properties of the composites indicated that CCVD carbon whiskers can be used to improve the strength and electrical conductivity of TPEs. The change is resistivity (up to 5 orders of magnitude) of the composites with respect to deformation and/or temperature can find use in electromechanical and electrothermal applications.

  20. Deformation mechanisms of NiAl cyclicly deformed near the brittle-to-ductile transition temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cullers, Cheryl L.; Antolovich, Stephen D.

    1993-01-01

    The intermetallic compound NiAl is one of many advanced materials which is being scrutinized for possible use in high temperature, structural applications. Stoichiometric NiAl has a high melting temperature, excellent oxidation resistance, and good thermal conductivity. Past research has concentrated on improving monotonic properties. The encouraging results obtained on binary and micro-alloyed NiAl over the past ten years have led to the broadening of NiAl experimental programs. The purpose of this research project was to determine the low cycle fatigue properties and dislocation mechanisms of stoichiometric NiAl at temperatures near the monotonic brittle-to-ductile transition. The fatigue properties were found to change only slightly in the temperature range of 600 to 700 K; a temperature range over which monotonic ductility and fracture strength increase markedly. The shape of the cyclic hardening curves coincided with the changes observed in the dislocation structures. The evolution of dislocation structures did not appear to change with temperature.

  1. Surface loading affects internal pressure source characteristics derived from volcano deformation signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grapenthin, Ronni; Sigmundsson, Freysteinn; Ofeigsson, Benedikt; Sturkell, Erik

    2010-05-01

    Deformation of the Earth's surface provides critical information about the migration of material beneath a volcano. The resulting displacements, recorded by geodetic techniques such as GPS or InSAR, are used to infer characteristics of the volcanic plumbing system which are critical for hazard mitigation in volcanic regions. Given some deformation data, we search for the source model that explains the data best. Discussions of the results usually focus on the validity of the chosen model and the underlying assumptions regarding crustal composition, e.g. the level of inhomogeneity, elastic versus plastic deformation, thermal effects, depth vs. volume trade offs of the applied analytical models, or the (in-)compressibility of materials. Surface loads such as lava flows, however, provide an additional source of deformation. The initial elastic response due to a load on the surface of the Earth is followed by a visco-elastic response of the ductile crust below the uppermost elastic layer. Thus, a deformation signal recorded in the vicinity of a volcano is often composed of at least two contributors: an internal pressure source (the magma chamber) and a surface load (e.g., a composition of previously erupted lava flows) - at the extreme the volcanic edifice and its glaciers. A test case for a circular lava flow on top of a deflating magma chamber shows that the crust will adjust to the load towards final relaxed response. During this relaxation process gradual subsidence occurs that may mistakenly be interpreted as due to pressure decrease in a magma chamber since the deformation pattern of both processes are very similar. This poses a problem when characteristics of a magma chamber are to be derived. Based on the ratio of horizontal and vertical displacement and a combination of model results (Green's functions and Mogi model), we can estimate the composition of observed deformation signals. This method is applied to the Icelandic volcano Mt. Hekla where we investigate

  2. Concrete floor-bovine claw contact pressures related to floor roughness and deformation of the claw.

    PubMed

    Franck, A; De Belie, N

    2006-08-01

    The intention of this research was to study the impact of concrete floor surface roughness on a bovine claw model and to assess the deformation of the bovine claw model under load. The pressure distribution between the floor and the claw is the key method in this research. Monitoring foot-to-ground pressure distributions may provide insight into the relation between high local pressures and foot lesions. Concrete floor samples were made with 5 different finishing methods. Their roughness was determined by measuring the heights of the "peaks and the valleys" of the surface with a high-precision laser beam. The smoothest surface was the sample finished with a metal float (surface roughness R(a) = 0.062 mm) and the roughest surface occurred with the heavily sandblasted sample (surface roughness R(a) = 0.488 mm). The roughness of the concrete floor samples was related to the mean and peak contact pressures that can occur in a laboratory test bench between floor and bovine claw. It was found that the claw itself has approximately 2 times more effect on these contact pressures than the surface roughness. Peak pressures found were high enough (up to 111 MPa) to cause damage to the bovine claw sole horn. The strains occurring in the horn wall were measured and related to the floor-finishing method and the load. Strain gauge measurements indicated that it is difficult to predict what kind of deformation of the claw wall will occur at a certain location. Different strains will occur for different floor-finishing methods. The corresponding stresses in the horn wall did not exceed the yield stress (14 and 11 MPa for dorsal and abaxial wall horn, respectively).

  3. A method for reducing pressure-induced deformation in silicone microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Inglis, David W

    2010-01-01

    Poly(dimethylsiloxane) or PDMS is an excellent material for replica molding, widely used in microfluidics research. Its low elastic modulus, or high deformability, assists its release from challenging molds, such as those with high feature density, high aspect ratios, and even negative sidewalls. However, owing to the same properties, PDMS-based microfluidic devices stretch and change shape when fluid is pushed or pulled through them. This paper shows how severe this change can be and gives a simple method for limiting this change that sacrifices few of the desirable characteristics of PDMS. A thin layer of PDMS between two rigid glass substrates is shown to drastically reduce pressure-induced shape changes while preserving deformability during mold separation and gas permeability. PMID:20697573

  4. Data Fusion in Wind Tunnel Testing; Combined Pressure Paint and Model Deformation Measurements (Invited)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, James H.; Burner, Alpheus W.

    2004-01-01

    As the benefit-to-cost ratio of advanced optical techniques for wind tunnel measurements such as Video Model Deformation (VMD), Pressure-Sensitive Paint (PSP), and others increases, these techniques are being used more and more often in large-scale production type facilities. Further benefits might be achieved if multiple optical techniques could be deployed in a wind tunnel test simultaneously. The present study discusses the problems and benefits of combining VMD and PSP systems. The desirable attributes of useful optical techniques for wind tunnels, including the ability to accommodate the myriad optical techniques available today, are discussed. The VMD and PSP techniques are briefly reviewed. Commonalties and differences between the two techniques are discussed. Recent wind tunnel experiences and problems when combining PSP and VMD are presented, as are suggestions for future developments in combined PSP and deformation measurements.

  5. Effects of pressure and temperature on gate valve unwedging

    SciTech Connect

    Damerell, P.S.; Harrison, D.H.; Hayes, P.W.; Simons, J.W.; Walker, T.A.

    1996-12-01

    The stem thrust required to unwedge a gate valve is influenced by the pressure and temperature when the valve is closed and by the changes in these conditions between closure and opening. {open_quotes}Pressure locking{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}thermal binding{close_quotes} refer to situations where pressure and temperature effects cause the unwedging load to be much higher than normal. A model of these phenomena has been developed. Wedging (closure) is modeled as developing an {open_quotes}interference{close_quotes} between the disk and its seat rings in the valve. The effects of pressure and temperature are analyzed to determine the change in this disk-to-seat {open_quotes}interference{close_quotes}. Flexibilities, of the disk, body, stem and yoke strongly influence the unwedging thrust. Calculations and limited comparisons to data have been performed for a range of valve designs and scenarios. Pressure changes can increase the unwedging load when there is either a uniform pressure decrease, or a situation where the bonnet pressure exceeds the pressures in the adjacent piping. Temperature changes can increase the unwedging load when: (1) valve closure at elevated system temperature produces a delayed stem expansion, (2) a temperature increase after closure produces a bonnet pressure increase, or (3) a temperature change after closure produces an increase in the disk-to-seat {open_quotes}interference{close_quotes} or disk-to-seat friction.

  6. Homogeneous deformation of Au-based metallic glass micropillars in compression at elevated temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Song, S. X.; Nieh, T. G.; Lai, Y. H.; Huang, J. C.

    2009-02-09

    We performed high-temperature microcompression tests on micron-sized pillar samples fabricated from Au{sub 49}Ag{sub 5.5}Pd{sub 2.3}Cu{sub 26.9}Si{sub 16.3} metallic glass near the glass transition temperature to investigate the homogeneous deformation behavior. Samples were invariably deformed uniformly. The strength was observed to decrease with increasing temperature and decreasing strain rate. Plastic flow behavior can be described by a shear transition zone model. The activation energy and the size of the basic flow unit were both deduced and compared favorably with the theory.

  7. High pressure and high temperature behaviour of ZnO

    SciTech Connect

    Thakar, Nilesh A.; Bhatt, Apoorva D.; Pandya, Tushar C.

    2014-04-24

    The thermodynamic properties with the wurtzite (B4) and rocksalt (B1) phases of ZnO under high pressures and high temperatures have been investigated using Tait's Equation of state (EOS). The effects of pressures and temperatures on thermodynamic properties such as bulk modulus, thermal expansivity and thermal pressure are explored for both two structures. It is found that ZnO material gradually softens with increase of temperature while it hardens with the increment of the pressure. Our predicted results of thermodynamics properties for both the phases of ZnO are in overall agreement with the available data in the literature.

  8. Optical Pressure-Temperature Sensor for a Combustion Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiley, John; Korman, Valentin; Gregory, Don

    2008-01-01

    A compact sensor for measuring temperature and pressure in a combusti on chamber has been proposed. The proposed sensor would include two optically birefringent, transmissive crystalline wedges: one of sapph ire (Al2O3) and one of magnesium oxide (MgO), the optical properties of both of which vary with temperature and pressure. The wedges wou ld be separated by a vapor-deposited thin-film transducer, which wou ld be primarily temperaturesensitive (in contradistinction to pressur e- sensitive) when attached to a crystalline substrate. The sensor w ould be housed in a rugged probe to survive the extreme temperatures and pressures in a combustion chamber.

  9. Variation of Azeotropic Composition and Temperature with Pressure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibbard, H. Frank; Emptage, Michael R.

    1975-01-01

    Describes an undergraduate physical chemistry experiment in which an azeotropic mixture is studied using the vapor pressures of the components as functions of temperature and the azeotropic composition and temperature at one pressure. Discusses in detail the mathematical treatment of obtained thermodynamic data. (MLH)

  10. The high-pressure-high-temperature behavior of bassanite

    SciTech Connect

    Comodi, Paola; Nazzareni, Sabrina; Dubrovinsky, Leonid; Merlini, Marco

    2010-02-11

    The pressure evolution of bassanite (CaSO{sub 4} {center_dot} 1/2 H{sub 2}O) was investigated by synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction along three isotherms: at room temperature up to 33 GPa, at 109 C up to 22 GPa, and at 200 C up to 12 GPa. The room-temperature cell-volume data, from 0.001 to 33 GPa, were fitted to a third-order Birch-Murnaghan equation-of-state, and a bulk modulus K{sub 0} = 86(7) GPa with K' = 2.5(3) was obtained. The axial compressibility values are {beta}{sub a} = 3.7(2), {beta}{sub b} = 3.6(1), and {beta}{sub c} = 2.8(1) GPa{sup -1} (x10{sup -3}) showing a slightly anisotropic behavior, with the least compressible direction along c axis. The strain tensor analysis shows that the main deformation occurs in the (010) plane in a direction 18{sup o} from the a axis. The bulk moduli for isotherms 109 and 200 C, were obtained by fitting cell-volume data with a second-order Birch-Murnaghan equation-of-state, with K' fixed at 4, and were found to be K{sub 109} = 79(4) GPa and K{sub 200} = 63(7) GPa, respectively. The axial compressibility values for isotherm 109 C are {beta}{sub a} = 2.4(1), {beta}{sub b} = 3.0(1), {beta}{sub c} = 2.5(1) (x10{sup -3}) GPa{sup -1}, and for isotherm 200 C they are {beta}{sub a} = 3.5(3), {beta}{sub b} = 3.4(3), {beta}{sub c} = 2.6(4) (x10{sup -3}) GPa{sup -1}. These two bulk moduli and the 20 C bulk modulus, K{sub 0,20} = 69(8) recalculated to a second-order Birch-Murnaghan EoS to be consistent, as well as the axial compressibilities, are similar for the three isotherms indicating that the thermal effect on the bulk moduli is not significant up to 200 C. The size variation of the pseudo-hexagonal channel with pressure and temperature indicates that the sulfate 'host' lattice and the H{sub 2}O 'guest' molecule in bassanite do not undergo strong change up to 33 GPa and 200 C.

  11. Predictive Model for Temperature-Induced Deformation of Robot Mechanical Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poonyapak, Pranchalee

    The positioning accuracy and repeatability of a robot are critical for many industrial applications. Drift in repeatability can occur with changes in environmental and internal conditions, such as those seen with temperature-induced deformation. Thermal instability causes dimensional deformation, and a warm-up cycle is typically required to bring the robot to a thermally stable working condition. The elimination of warm-up cycles will ultimately enhance the positioning accuracy of the robots, their productivity, and reduce unnecessary energy consumption. The main objective of this research was to develop a robot controller algorithm that would provide, a priori, compensation for temperature-induced deformation associated with warm-up in robot mechanical systems. The research started at the fundamental stage of gaining insight into the thermal behaviour and corresponding temperature-induced deformation of simplified, i.e., one-dimensional, robot mechanical systems consisting of slender links and heat sources. The systems were studied using concomitant experimental, numerical and analytical models to provide cross-checking of the results. For the experimental model, the deformation was measured by tracking the drift of a laser diode spot across a charge-coupled device (CCD) camera chip. A non-contact measurement system consisting of an infrared camera, a CCD camera and a laser diode was developed to provide high accuracy measurement for the deformation. The numerical model was generated with a coupled thermal-mechanical finite element analysis incorporating thermal effects due to conduction and convection. The models were tested with the analytical model that was further extended using a finite difference technique. Once the three models showed excellent agreement, it was possible to develop a controller algorithm. Deformations predicted by the finite difference model were used as input for a validation experiment of the compensation algorithm. Results of the

  12. Effects of confining pressure, pore pressure and temperature on absolute permeability. SUPRI TR-27

    SciTech Connect

    Gobran, B.D.; Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Brigham, W.E.

    1981-10-01

    This study investigates absolute permeability of consolidated sandstone and unconsolidated sand cores to distilled water as a function of the confining pressure on the core, the pore pressure of the flowing fluid and the temperature of the system. Since permeability measurements are usually made in the laboratory under conditions very different from those in the reservoir, it is important to know the effect of various parameters on the measured value of permeability. All studies on the effect of confining pressure on absolute permeability have found that when the confining pressure is increased, the permeability is reduced. The studies on the effect of temperature have shown much less consistency. This work contradicts the past Stanford studies by finding no effect of temperature on the absolute permeability of unconsolidated sand or sandstones to distilled water. The probable causes of the past errors are discussed. It has been found that inaccurate measurement of temperature at ambient conditions and non-equilibrium of temperature in the core can lead to a fictitious permeability reduction with temperature increase. The results of this study on the effect of confining pressure and pore pressure support the theory that as confining pressure is increased or pore pressure decreased, the permeability is reduced. The effects of confining pressure and pore pressure changes on absolute permeability are given explicitly so that measurements made under one set of confining pressure/pore pressure conditions in the laboratory can be extrapolated to conditions more representative of the reservoir.

  13. Temperature impacts on the set pressure of soft seated pressure relief valves

    SciTech Connect

    Engel, J.J.; Zirps, G.T.; Gleason, R.B.

    1995-11-01

    From a safety standpoint, regardless of plant or facility type, the most important pieces of equipment are the pressure relief devices. The most critical characteristics of a pressure relief device are its set pressure and the related relieving capacity. The Set Pressure of a pressure relief device is defined as that value of increasing inlet static pressure at which the discharge becomes continuous (ASME PTC 25-1994, Performance Test Codes). To preclude an unsafe overpressure situation, the set pressure of the pressure relief device must not exceed the maximum allowable working pressure of the equipment or system being protected. Because of testing facility limitations, size or pressure, pressure relief valves intended for elevated temperature service are often set using ambient temperature air. Adjustments are made to the ambient valve opening pressures to compensate for the temperature differences. The extent of the adjustments to the pressure relief valve set pressure is important to ensure the valve will provide the required overpressure protection at the elevated in-service temperature.

  14. High temperature deformation of friction stir processed 7075 aluminium alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Cavaliere, P. . E-mail: pasquale.cavaliere@unile.it; Squillace, A.

    2005-08-15

    The mechanical and microstructural properties of 7075 aluminium alloy resulting from Friction Stir Processing (FSP), into sheets of 7 mm thickness, were analysed in the present study. The sheets were processed perpendicularly to the rolling direction; the tensile mechanical properties were evaluated at room temperature in the transverse and longitudinal directions with respect to the processing one. Tensile tests were also performed at higher temperatures and different strain rates in the nugget zone, in order to analyse the superplastic properties of the recrystallized material and to observe the differences from the parent material as a function of the strong grain refinement due to the Friction Stir Process. The high temperature behaviour of the material was studied, in the parallel direction, by means of tensile tests in the temperature and strain rate ranges of 150-500 deg. C and 10{sup -} {sup 2}-10{sup -} {sup 4} s{sup -} {sup 1} respectively, electron microscopy (FEGSEM) observations were carried out to investigate more closely the fracture surfaces of the specimens tested at different temperatures and strain rates.

  15. Effects of microstructure and temperature on the plastic deformation mechanisms of synthetic halite : a micromechanical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourcier, M.; Dimanov, A.; Héripré, E.; Bornert, M.; Raphanel, J.

    2012-04-01

    Halite is a rock forming mineral with geotechnical applications for storage in underground caverns (hydrocarbons, compressed air, wastes...). Halite is also a convenient analog polycristalline material, used to study deformation mechanisms (crystal plasticity, recrystallization, pressure solution ...). In this work we present an investigation of intragranular plastic deformation and grain boundary sliding in pure synthetic NaCl polycrystals produced by hot isostatic pressing. Uniaxial compression tests are performed in a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) at two temperatures, 20°C and 400 °C, on cm - sized samples. The displacement rate is kept constant at 1µm/s and the maximum axial strain is between 5 and 10 %. The surface of the samples is marked by gold micro-spheres and analyzed by 2D digital image correlation (DIC) using the CorrelManuV software, which provides full field measures of surface displacements and strains. The dominant mechanism is intracrystalline plasticity, as revealed by the direct observation of slip lines and by DIC results showing intragranular deformation bands. Using crystal orientation mapping, the latter are related to the traces of crystallographic slip planes. However, limited grain boundary sliding (GBS) also occurs, as a secondary but necessary mechanism for accommodation of local strain incompatibilities. The relative contribution of each mechanism clearly depends on the microstructure, i.e. grain size and grain size distribution. At room temperature the strain is more heterogeneous than at high temperature, at both the aggregate scale and within individual grains, where the local activity of slip systems strongly depends on the relative crystalline and interfacial orientations. In particular, the easy glide planes ({110} planes) are not the only active ones. In some instance, wavy slip bands clearly indicate cross slip. The above kinematic analysis should be complemented by the knowledge of the local stress states in order to

  16. Wastewater temperature decrease in pressure sewers.

    PubMed

    Sallanko, Jarmo; Pekkala, Mari

    2008-12-01

    The centralization of wastewater treatment in large central treatment plants and the connection of sparsely populated areas to sewerage systems have increased the time wastewater is retained in sewers. These retention times lead to a decrease in wastewater temperature and affect wastewater treatment, especially the removal of nitrogen. In this study, temperature changes in long transfer sewers were examined. The temperature change was greatest at the end of winter and in the front part of the sewer. Temperature changes in the front parts of the sewers ranged from 0.16 to 0.27 degree C/km, and in the end parts from 0.02 to 0.10 degree C/km. When expressed in terms of the retention time for wastewater in the sewer, the temperature changes ranged from 0.12 to 0.17 degree C per retention hour.

  17. Temperature deformations of the mirror of a radio telescope antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Avdeyev, V. I.; Grach, S. A.; Kozhakhmetov, K. K.; Kostenko, F. I.

    1979-01-01

    The stress informed state of the mirror of an antenna, with a diameter of 3 m, for a radio interferometer used in space, and located in a temperature field is examined. The mirror represents a parabolic shell, consisting of 19 identical parts. The problem is based on representations of the thermoelasticity of thin shells.

  18. Viscoelastoplastic Deformation and Damage Response of Titanium Alloy, Ti-6Al-4V, at Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, Steven M.; Lerch, Bradley A.; Saleeb, Atef F.; Kasemer, Matthew P.

    2013-01-01

    Time-dependent deformation and damage behavior can significantly affect the life of aerospace propulsion components. Consequently, one needs an accurate constitutive model that can represent both reversible and irreversible behavior under multiaxial loading conditions. This paper details the characterization and utilization of a multi-mechanism constitutive model of the GVIPS class (Generalized Viscoplastic with Potential Structure) that has been extended to describe the viscoelastoplastic deformation and damage of the titanium alloy Ti-6Al-4V. Associated material constants were characterized at five elevated temperatures where viscoelastoplastic behavior was observed, and at three elevated temperatures where damage (of both the stiffness reduction and strength reduction type) was incurred. Experimental data from a wide variety of uniaxial load cases were used to correlate and validate the proposed GVIPS model. Presented are the optimized material parameters, and the viscoelastoplastic deformation and damage responses at the various temperatures.

  19. Temperature effects on deformation and serration behavior of high-entropy alloys (HEAs)

    SciTech Connect

    Antonaglia, J.; Xie, X.; Tang, Z.; Tsai, C. -W.; Qiao, J. W.; Zhang, Y.; Laktionova, M. O.; Tabachnikova, E. D.; Yeh, J. W.; Senkov, O. N.; Gao, M. C.; Uhl, J. T.; Liaw, P. K.; Dahmen, K. A.

    2014-09-16

    Many materials are known to deform under shear in an intermittent way with slip avalanches detected as acoustic emission and serrations in the stress–strain curves. Similar serrations have recently been observed in a new class of materials, called high-entropy alloys (HEAs). Here, we discuss the serration behaviors of several HEAs from cryogenic to elevated temperatures. The experimental results of slow compression and tension tests are compared with the predictions of a slip-avalanche model for the deformation of a broad range of solids. The results shed light on the deformation processes in HEAs. Temperature effects on the distributions of stress drops and the decrease of the cutoff (i.e., of the largest observed slip size) for increasing temperature qualitatively agree with the model predictions. As a result, the model is used to quantify the serration characteristics of HEAs, and pertinent implications are discussed.

  20. Temperature effects on deformation and serration behavior of high-entropy alloys (HEAs)

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Antonaglia, J.; Xie, X.; Tang, Z.; Tsai, C. -W.; Qiao, J. W.; Zhang, Y.; Laktionova, M. O.; Tabachnikova, E. D.; Yeh, J. W.; Senkov, O. N.; et al

    2014-09-16

    Many materials are known to deform under shear in an intermittent way with slip avalanches detected as acoustic emission and serrations in the stress–strain curves. Similar serrations have recently been observed in a new class of materials, called high-entropy alloys (HEAs). Here, we discuss the serration behaviors of several HEAs from cryogenic to elevated temperatures. The experimental results of slow compression and tension tests are compared with the predictions of a slip-avalanche model for the deformation of a broad range of solids. The results shed light on the deformation processes in HEAs. Temperature effects on the distributions of stress dropsmore » and the decrease of the cutoff (i.e., of the largest observed slip size) for increasing temperature qualitatively agree with the model predictions. As a result, the model is used to quantify the serration characteristics of HEAs, and pertinent implications are discussed.« less

  1. Temperature control for high pressure processes up to 1400 MPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reineke, K.; Mathys, A.; Heinz, V.; Knorr, D.

    2008-07-01

    Pressure- assisted sterilisation is an emerging technology. Hydrostatic high pressure can reduce the thermal load of the product and this allows quality retention in food products. To guarantee the safety of the sterilisation process it is necessary to investigate inactivation kinetics especially of bacterial spores. A significant roll during the inactivation of microorganisms under high pressure has the thermodynamic effect of the adiabatic heating. To analyse the individual effect of pressure and temperature on microorganism inactivation an exact temperature control of the sample to reach ideal adiabatic conditions and isothermal dwell times is necessary. Hence a heating/cooling block for a high pressure unit (Stansted Mini-Food-lab; high pressure capillary with 300 μL sample volume) was constructed. Without temperature control the sample would be cooled down during pressure built up, because of the non-adiabatic heating of the steel made vessel. The heating/cooling block allows an ideal adiabatic heat up and cooling of the pressure vessel during compression and decompression. The high pressure unit has a pressure build-up rate up to 250 MPa s-1 and a maximum pressure of 1400 MPa. Sebacate acid was chosen as pressure transmitting medium because it had no phase shift over the investigate pressure and temperature range. To eliminate the temperature difference between sample and vessel during compression and decompression phase, the mathematical model of the adiabatic heating/cooling of water and sebacate acid was implemented into a computational routine, written in Test Point. The calculated temperature is the setpoint of the PID controller for the heating/cooling block. This software allows an online measurement of the pressure and temperature in the vessel and the temperature at the outer wall of the vessel. The accurate temperature control, including the model of the adiabatic heating opens up the possibility to realise an ideal adiabatic heating and cooling as

  2. The influence of deformation height on estimating the center of pressure during level and cross-slope walking on sand.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hang; Wang, Yi; Greenland, Kasey; Bloswick, Donald; Merryweather, Andrew

    2015-07-01

    Force plates are frequently used to collect the ground reaction forces (GRF) and center of pressure (COP) during gait. The calculated COP is affected by the material type and thickness covering the top surface. If the surface is deformable, these effects can be significant. The purpose of this study is to simulate and evaluate the effects of deformation height when calculating the COP in a deformable surface during gait. The GRF and COP data during normal gait were collected from 20 healthy adult males on sand in two conditions (level and cross-slope of 10°). The COP differences in the anteroposterior (AP) and mediolateral (ML) directions were modeled for constant deformation heights (10-50 mm, 10 mm increments). The results showed the magnitude of COP changes in the AP and ML directions were different in both level and cross-slope conditions. A significantly larger COPML difference was shown for the cross-slope condition than level condition for the same deformation height. The COP was more sensitive to the deformation height for the downhill limb than uphill limb in the cross-slope condition. The results of this study suggest that the maximum allowable deformation height before a correction for surface deformation is needed is 20mm for level condition and 10mm for cross-slope condition, where 3mm difference in COP is considered as the tolerance limit. Surface deformations beyond these thresholds may lead to an inaccurate interpretation and evaluation of joint kinetics during gait on deformable surfaces.

  3. Compliant Foil Journal Bearing Performance at Alternate Pressures and Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruckner, Robert J.; Puleo, Bernadette J.

    2008-01-01

    An experimental test program has been conducted to determine the highly loaded performance of current generation gas foil bearings at alternate pressures and temperatures. Typically foil bearing performance has been reported at temperatures relevant to turbomachinery applications but only at an ambient pressure of one atmosphere. This dearth of data at alternate pressures has motivated the current test program. Two facilities were used in the test program, the ambient pressure rig and the high pressure rig. The test program utilized a 35 mm diameter by 27 mm long foil journal bearing having an uncoated Inconel X-750 top foil running against a shaft with a PS304 coated journal. Load capacity tests were conducted at 3, 6, 9, 12, 15, 18, and 21 krpm at temperatures from 25 to 500 C and at pressures from 0.1 to 2.5 atmospheres. Results show an increase in load capacity with increased ambient pressure and a reduction in load capacity with increased ambient temperature. Below one-half atmosphere of ambient pressure a dramatic loss of load capacity is experienced. Additional lightly loaded foil bearing performance in nitrogen at 25 C and up to 48 atmospheres of ambient pressure has also been reported. In the lightly loaded region of operation the power loss increases for increasing pressure at a fixed load. Knowledge of foil bearing performance at operating conditions found within potential machine applications will reduce program development risk of future foil bearing supported turbomachines.

  4. Temperature-dependent mechanical deformation of silicon at the nanoscale: Phase transformation versus defect propagation

    SciTech Connect

    Kiran, M. S. R. N. Tran, T. T.; Smillie, L. A.; Subianto, D.; Williams, J. S.; Bradby, J. E.; Haberl, B.

    2015-05-28

    This study uses high-temperature nanoindentation coupled with in situ electrical measurements to investigate the temperature dependence (25–200 °C) of the phase transformation behavior of diamond cubic (dc) silicon at the nanoscale. Along with in situ indentation and electrical data, ex situ characterizations, such as Raman and cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy, have been used to reveal the indentation-induced deformation mechanisms. We find that phase transformation and defect propagation within the crystal lattice are not mutually exclusive deformation processes at elevated temperature. Both can occur at temperatures up to 150 °C but to different extents, depending on the temperature and loading conditions. For nanoindentation, we observe that phase transformation is dominant below 100 °C but that deformation by twinning along (111) planes dominates at 150 °C and 200 °C. This work, therefore, provides clear insight into the temperature dependent deformation mechanisms in dc-Si at the nanoscale and helps to clarify previous inconsistencies in the literature.

  5. Fluids at high dynamic pressures and temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Nellis, W.J.; Hamilton, D.C.; Trainor, R.J.; Radousky, H.B.; Mitchell, A.C.; Holmes, N.C.

    1985-06-01

    Electrical conductivity data for shocked liquid nitrogen, Hugoniot data for liquid air, shock temperatures for liquid ammonia, and double-shock equation-of-state data for Al are discussed. 15 refs., 2 figs.

  6. Ultra-smooth metal surfaces generated by pressure-induced surface deformation of thin metal films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Logeeswaran, V. J.; Chan, M.-L.; Bayam, Y.; Saif Islam, M.; Horsley, D. A.; Li, X.; Wu, W.; Wang, S. Y.; Williams, R. S.

    2007-05-01

    We present a mechanical pressing technique for generating ultra-smooth surfaces on thin metal films by flattening the bumps, asperities, rough grains and spikes of a freshly vacuum deposited metal film. The method was implemented by varying the applied pressure from 100 MPa to 600 MPa on an e-beam evaporated silver film of thickness 1000 Å deposited on double-polished (100)-oriented silicon surfaces, resulting in a varying degree of film smoothness. The surface morphology of the thin film was studied using atomic force microscopy. Notably, at a pressure of ˜600 MPa an initial silver surface with 13-nm RMS roughness was plastically deformed and transformed to an ultra-flat plane with better than 0.1 nm RMS. Our demonstration with the e-beam evaporated silver thin film exhibits the potential for applications in decreasing the scattering-induced losses in optical metamaterials, plasmonic nanodevices and electrical shorts in molecular-scale electronic devices.

  7. The intermediate temperature deformation of Ni-based superalloys: Importance of reordering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovarik, L.; Unocic, R. R.; Li, J.; Mills, M. J.

    2009-02-01

    A number of planar deformation mechanisms, such as microtwinning, a[112] dislocation ribbon, and superlattice intrinsic and superlattice extrinsic stacking fault formation, can operate during the intermediate temperature deformation of nickle-based superalloys. The fundamental, rate-limiting processes controlling these deformation mechanisms are not fully understood. It has been recently postulated that reordering of atoms in the wake of the gliding partial dislocations as they shear the γ'precipitates within the γ/γ'microstructure is the limiting process. Experimental evidence that substantiates the validity of the reordering model for the microtwinning mechanism is provided. A conceptual approach to study reordering at the atomic scale using ab-initio calculation methods is also presented. The results of this approach provide a clear conceptualization of the energetics and kinetics of the reordering process, which may be generically important for the aforementioned planar deformation modes.

  8. A novel fabrication technique to minimize poly(dimethylsiloxane)-microchannels deformation under high-pressure operation.

    PubMed

    Madadi, Hojjat; Mohammadi, Mahdi; Casals-Terré, Jasmina; López, Roberto Castilla

    2013-12-01

    PDMS is one of the most common materials used for the flow delivery in the microfluidics chips, since it is clear, inert, nontoxic, and nonflammable. Its inexpensiveness, straightforward fabrication, and biological compatibility have made it a favorite material in the exploratory stages of the bio-microfluidic devices. If small footprint assays want to be performed while keeping the throughput, high pressure-rated channels should be used, but PDMS flexibility causes an important issue since it can generate a large variation of microchannel geometry. In this work, a novel fabrication technique based on the prevention of PDMS deformation is developed. A photo-sensible thiolene resin (Norland Optical Adhesive 63, NOA 63) is used to create a rigid coating layer over the stiff PDMS micropillar array, which significantly reduces the pressure-induced shape changes. This method uses the exact same soft lithography manufacturing equipment. The verification of the presented technique was investigated experimentally and numerically and the manufactured samples showed a deformation 70% lower than PDMS conventional samples. PMID:24114728

  9. Multimodal optical measurement in vitro of surface deformations and wall thickness of the pressurized aortic arch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genovese, Katia; Humphrey, Jay D.

    2015-04-01

    Computational modeling of arterial mechanics continues to progress, even to the point of allowing the study of complex regions such as the aortic arch. Nevertheless, most prior studies assign homogeneous and isotropic material properties and constant wall thickness even when implementing patient-specific luminal geometries obtained from medical imaging. These assumptions are not due to computational limitations, but rather to the lack of spatially dense sets of experimental data that describe regional variations in mechanical properties and wall thickness in such complex arterial regions. In this work, we addressed technical challenges associated with in vitro measurement of overall geometry, full-field surface deformations, and regional wall thickness of the porcine aortic arch in its native anatomical configuration. Specifically, we combined two digital image correlation-based approaches, standard and panoramic, to track surface geometry and finite deformations during pressurization, with a 360-deg fringe projection system to contour the outer and inner geometry. The latter provided, for the first time, information on heterogeneous distributions of wall thickness of the arch and associated branches in the unloaded state. Results showed that mechanical responses vary significantly with orientation and location (e.g., less extensible in the circumferential direction and with increasing distance from the heart) and that the arch exhibits a nearly linear increase in pressure-induced strain up to 40%, consistent with other findings on proximal porcine aortas. Thickness measurements revealed strong regional differences, thus emphasizing the need to include nonuniform thicknesses in theoretical and computational studies of complex arterial geometries.

  10. Multimodal optical measurement in vitro of surface deformations and wall thickness of the pressurized aortic arch.

    PubMed

    Genovese, Katia; Humphrey, Jay D

    2015-04-01

    Computational modeling of arterial mechanics continues to progress, even to the point of allowing the study of complex regions such as the aortic arch. Nevertheless, most prior studies assign homogeneous and isotropic material properties and constant wall thickness even when implementing patient-specific luminal geometries obtained from medical imaging. These assumptions are not due to computational limitations, but rather to the lack of spatially dense sets of experimental data that describe regional variations in mechanical properties and wall thickness in such complex arterial regions. In this work, we addressed technical challenges associated with in vitro measurement of overall geometry, full-field surface deformations, and regional wall thickness of the porcine aortic arch in its native anatomical configuration. Specifically, we combined two digital image correlation-based approaches, standard and panoramic, to track surface geometry and finite deformations during pressurization, with a 360-deg fringe projection system to contour the outer and inner geometry. The latter provided, for the first time, information on heterogeneous distributions of wall thickness of the arch and associated branches in the unloaded state. Results showed that mechanical responses vary significantly with orientation and location (e.g., less extensible in the circumferential direction and with increasing distance from the heart) and that the arch exhibits a nearly linear increase in pressure-induced strain up to 40%, consistent with other findings on proximal porcine aortas. Thickness measurements revealed strong regional differences, thus emphasizing the need to include nonuniform thicknesses in theoretical and computational studies of complex arterial geometries.

  11. Deformation and degradation of polymers in ultra-high-pressure liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Uliyanchenko, Elena; van der Wal, Sjoerd; Schoenmakers, Peter J

    2011-09-28

    Ultra-high-pressure liquid chromatography (UHPLC) using columns packed with sub-2 μm particles has great potential for separations of many types of complex samples, including polymers. However, the application of UHPLC for the analysis of polymers meets some fundamental obstacles. Small particles and narrow bore tubing in combination with high pressures generate significant shear and extensional forces in UHPLC systems, which may affect polymer chains. At high stress conditions flexible macromolecules may become extended and eventually the chemical bonds in the molecules can break. Deformation and degradation of macromolecules will affect the peak retention and the peak shape in the chromatogram, which may cause errors in the obtained results (e.g. the calculated molecular-weight distributions). In the present work we explored the limitations of UHPLC for the analysis of polymers. Degradation and deformation of macromolecules were studied by collecting and re-injecting polymer peaks and by off-line two-dimensional liquid chromatography. Polystyrene standards with molecular weight of 4 MDa and larger were found to degrade at UHPLC conditions. However, for most polymers degradation could be avoided by using low linear velocities. No degradation of 3-MDa PS (and smaller) was observed at linear velocities up to 7 mm/s. The column frits were implicated as the main sources of polymer degradation. The extent of degradation was found to depend on the type of the column and on the column history. At high flow rates degradation was observed without a column being installed. We demonstrated that polymer deformation preceded degradation. Stretched polymers eluted from the column in slalom chromatography mode (elution order opposite to that in SEC or HDC). Under certain conditions we observed co-elution of large and small PS molecules though a convolution of slalom chromatography and hydrodynamic chromatography.

  12. Method and apparatus for simultaneously measuring temperature and pressure

    DOEpatents

    Hirschfeld, Tomas B.; Haugen, Gilbert R.

    1988-01-01

    Method and apparatus are provided for simultaneously measuring temperature and pressure in a class of crystalline materials having anisotropic thermal coefficients and having a coefficient of linear compression along the crystalline c-axis substantially the same as those perpendicular thereto. Temperature is determined by monitoring the fluorescence half life of a probe of such crystalline material, e.g., ruby. Pressure is determined by monitoring at least one other fluorescent property of the probe that depends on pressure and/or temperature, e.g., absolute fluorescent intensity or frequency shifts of fluorescent emission lines.

  13. Reversible elastic deformation of functionalized sp{sup 2} carbon at pressures of up to 33 GPa

    SciTech Connect

    Soignard, Emmanuel; Hochheimer, Hans D.; Yarger, Jeff; Raj, Rishi

    2014-10-06

    We show that sp{sup 2} carbon bonded to silicon and oxygen can withstand reversible elastic deformation at pressures of up to 33 GPa. These experiments were carried out in a diamond anvil cell. In-situ Raman spectroscopy was employed to record the reversibility of elastic deformation by measuring the movement in the D and G peaks of carbon. Above 33 GPa the material, a silicon oxycarbide, transforms into an unidentified state which is retained upon unloading down to ambient pressure. Thermodynamical analysis suggests that the material could have transformed into a crystalline state at these ultrahigh pressures, driven by mechanical work.

  14. Computing Temperatures And Pressures Along Heat Pipes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faker, K. W.; Marks, T. S.; Tower, L. K.

    1994-01-01

    NASA Lewis Research Center Heat Pipe, LERCHP, computer code developed to predict performances of heat pipes in steady state. Used as design software tool on personal computer or, with suitable calling routine, as subroutine for mainframe-computer radiator code. For accurate mathematical modeling of heat pipes, LERCHP makes variety of wick structures available to user. User chooses among several working fluids, for which monomer/dimer equilibrium considered. Vapor-flow algorithm treats compressibility and axially varying heat input. Facilitates determination of heat-pipe operating temperatures and heat-pipe limits encountered at specified heat input and environmental temperature. Written in FORTRAN 77.

  15. Deformation, Stress Relaxation, and Crystallization of Lithium Silicate Glass Fibers Below the Glass Transition Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Chandra S.; Brow, Richard K.; Kim, Cheol W.; Reis, Signo T.

    2004-01-01

    The deformation and crystallization of Li(sub 2)O (center dot) 2SiO2 and Li(sub 2)O (center dot) 1.6SiO2 glass fibers subjected to a bending stress were measured as a function of time over the temperature range -50 to -150 C below the glass transition temperature (Tg). The glass fibers can be permanently deformed at temperatures about 100 C below T (sub)g, and they crystallize significantly at temperatures close to, but below T,, about 150 C lower than the onset temperature for crystallization for these glasses in the no-stress condition. The crystallization was found to occur only on the surface of the glass fibers with no detectable difference in the extent of crystallization in tensile and compressive stress regions. The relaxation mechanism for fiber deformation can be best described by a stretched exponential (Kohlrausch-Williams-Watt (KWW) approximation), rather than a single exponential model.The activation energy for stress relaxation, Es, for the glass fibers ranges between 175 and 195 kJ/mol, which is considerably smaller than the activation energy for viscous flow, E, (about 400 kJ/mol) near T, for these glasses at normal, stress-free condition. It is suspected that a viscosity relaxation mechanism could be responsible for permanent deformation and crystallization of the glass fibers below T,

  16. Deformation Behavior and Dynamic Recovery Kinetics of Ultrahigh Strength Steel BR1500HS at Elevated Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Yufeng; Ji, Shuai; Zhang, Yandong; Wu, Dongsen; Quan, Guozheng

    2015-10-01

    The flow behaviors of ultrahigh strength steel BR1500HS at elevated temperature were studied by performing hot tension tests at the temperatures of 773 K, 873 K, 1023 K and 1173 K, and strain rates of 0.01 s-1, 0.1 s-1 and 1 s-1 on a Gleeble 3500 thermo-mechanical simulator. The true stress-strain curves were obtained and their characteristics were analyzed. Relationships among the maximum stress, temperature and strain rate were described by means of the conventional hyperbolic sine equation. The average deformation activation energy in the whole deformation temperatures was determined as Q = 235.257 KJ/mol by regression analysis. Based on σ(dσ/dɛ) verse σ2 curves, the values of dynamic recovery (DRV) rate coefficient, r, saturated stress, σrec, and yield strength, σ0, under different deformation conditions were calculated. In order to estimate the DRV volume fractions, the modified Avrami type equation including r (r = 106.911351Z-0.059) as a function of the temperature compensating parameter, Z, was established, and then the effects of deformation conditions on the DRV kinetics were described in details.

  17. Development of a high temperature capacitive pressure transducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Egger, R. L.

    1977-01-01

    High temperature pressure transducers capable of continuous operation while exposed to 650 C were developed and evaluated over a full-scale differential pressure range of + or - 69 kPa. The design of the pressure transducers was based on the use of a diaphragm to respond to pressure, variable capacitive elements arranged to operate as a differential capacitor to measure diaphragm response and on the use of fused silica for the diaphragm and its supporting assembly. The uncertainty associated with measuring + or - 69 kPa pressures between 20C and 650C was less than + or - 6%.

  18. Recent Improvement of Medical Optical Fibre Pressure and Temperature Sensors.

    PubMed

    Poeggel, Sven; Duraibabu, Dineshbabu; Kalli, Kyriacos; Leen, Gabriel; Dooly, Gerard; Lewis, Elfed; Kelly, Jimmy; Munroe, Maria

    2015-07-13

    This investigation describes a detailed analysis of the fabrication and testing of optical fibre pressure and temperature sensors (OFPTS). The optical sensor of this research is based on an extrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometer (EFPI) with integrated fibre Bragg grating (FBG) for simultaneous pressure and temperature measurements. The sensor is fabricated exclusively in glass and with a small diameter of 0.2 mm, making it suitable for volume-restricted bio-medical applications. Diaphragm shrinking techniques based on polishing, hydrofluoric (HF) acid and femtosecond (FS) laser micro-machining are described and analysed. The presented sensors were examined carefully and demonstrated a pressure sensitivity in the range of sp = 2-10 nm/kPa and a resolution of better than ΔP = 10 Pa protect (0.1 cm H2O). A static pressure test in 38 cm H2O shows no drift of the sensor in a six-day period. Additionally, a dynamic pressure analysis demonstrated that the OFPTS never exceeded a drift of more than 130 Pa (1.3 cm H2O) in a 12-h measurement, carried out in a cardiovascular simulator. The temperature sensitivity is given by k = 10.7 pm/K, which results in a temperature resolution of better than ΔT = 0.1 K. Since the temperature sensing element is placed close to the pressure sensing element, the pressure sensor is insensitive to temperature changes.

  19. Recent Improvement of Medical Optical Fibre Pressure and Temperature Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Poeggel, Sven; Duraibabu, Dineshbabu; Kalli, Kyriacos; Leen, Gabriel; Dooly, Gerard; Lewis, Elfed; Kelly, Jimmy; Munroe, Maria

    2015-01-01

    This investigation describes a detailed analysis of the fabrication and testing of optical fibre pressure and temperature sensors (OFPTS). The optical sensor of this research is based on an extrinsic Fabry–Perot interferometer (EFPI) with integrated fibre Bragg grating (FBG) for simultaneous pressure and temperature measurements. The sensor is fabricated exclusively in glass and with a small diameter of 0.2 mm, making it suitable for volume-restricted bio-medical applications. Diaphragm shrinking techniques based on polishing, hydrofluoric (HF) acid and femtosecond (FS) laser micro-machining are described and analysed. The presented sensors were examined carefully and demonstrated a pressure sensitivity in the range of sp = 2–10 nmkPa and a resolution of better than ΔP = 10 Pa (0.1 cm H2O). A static pressure test in 38 cmH2O shows no drift of the sensor in a six-day period. Additionally, a dynamic pressure analysis demonstrated that the OFPTS never exceeded a drift of more than 130 Pa (1.3 cm H2O) in a 12-h measurement, carried out in a cardiovascular simulator. The temperature sensitivity is given by k=10.7 pmK, which results in a temperature resolution of better than ΔT = 0.1 K. Since the temperature sensing element is placed close to the pressure sensing element, the pressure sensor is insensitive to temperature changes. PMID:26184331

  20. Recent Improvement of Medical Optical Fibre Pressure and Temperature Sensors.

    PubMed

    Poeggel, Sven; Duraibabu, Dineshbabu; Kalli, Kyriacos; Leen, Gabriel; Dooly, Gerard; Lewis, Elfed; Kelly, Jimmy; Munroe, Maria

    2015-01-01

    This investigation describes a detailed analysis of the fabrication and testing of optical fibre pressure and temperature sensors (OFPTS). The optical sensor of this research is based on an extrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometer (EFPI) with integrated fibre Bragg grating (FBG) for simultaneous pressure and temperature measurements. The sensor is fabricated exclusively in glass and with a small diameter of 0.2 mm, making it suitable for volume-restricted bio-medical applications. Diaphragm shrinking techniques based on polishing, hydrofluoric (HF) acid and femtosecond (FS) laser micro-machining are described and analysed. The presented sensors were examined carefully and demonstrated a pressure sensitivity in the range of sp = 2-10 nm/kPa and a resolution of better than ΔP = 10 Pa protect (0.1 cm H2O). A static pressure test in 38 cm H2O shows no drift of the sensor in a six-day period. Additionally, a dynamic pressure analysis demonstrated that the OFPTS never exceeded a drift of more than 130 Pa (1.3 cm H2O) in a 12-h measurement, carried out in a cardiovascular simulator. The temperature sensitivity is given by k = 10.7 pm/K, which results in a temperature resolution of better than ΔT = 0.1 K. Since the temperature sensing element is placed close to the pressure sensing element, the pressure sensor is insensitive to temperature changes. PMID:26184331

  1. Understanding creep in sandstone reservoirs - theoretical deformation mechanism maps for pressure solution in granular materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hangx, Suzanne; Spiers, Christopher

    2014-05-01

    Subsurface exploitation of the Earth's natural resources removes the natural system from its chemical and physical equilibrium. As such, groundwater extraction and hydrocarbon production from subsurface reservoirs frequently causes surface subsidence and induces (micro)seismicity. These effects are not only a problem in onshore (e.g. Groningen, the Netherlands) and offshore hydrocarbon fields (e.g. Ekofisk, Norway), but also in urban areas with extensive groundwater pumping (e.g. Venice, Italy). It is known that fluid extraction inevitably leads to (poro)elastic compaction of reservoirs, hence subsidence and occasional fault reactivation, and causes significant technical, economic and ecological impact. However, such effects often exceed what is expected from purely elastic reservoir behaviour and may continue long after exploitation has ceased. This is most likely due to time-dependent compaction, or 'creep deformation', of such reservoirs, driven by the reduction in pore fluid pressure compared with the rock overburden. Given the societal and ecological impact of surface subsidence, as well as the current interest in developing geothermal energy and unconventional gas resources in densely populated areas, there is much need for obtaining better quantitative understanding of creep in sediments to improve the predictability of the impact of geo-energy and groundwater production. The key problem in developing a reliable, quantitative description of the creep behaviour of sediments, such as sands and sandstones, is that the operative deformation mechanisms are poorly known and poorly quantified. While grain-scale brittle fracturing plus intergranular sliding play an important role in the early stages of compaction, these time-independent, brittle-frictional processes give way to compaction creep on longer time-scales. Thermally-activated mass transfer processes, like pressure solution, can cause creep via dissolution of material at stressed grain contacts, grain

  2. Effect of pressure on the low-temperature exciton absorption in GaAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goi, A. R.; Cantarero, A.; Syassen, K.; Cardona, M.

    1990-05-01

    We have measured low-temperature exciton optical-absorption spectra at the lowest direct band edge (E0) of GaAs as a function of pressure up to 9 GPa. Spectra are analyzed in terms of the Elliott model by taking into account the broadening of the exciton line. In this way, we determine the dependence on pressure of the E0 gap, the exciton binding energy scrR, and exciton linewidth at different temperatures. The pressure coefficient of the E0 fundamental gap [107(4) meV/GPa] is found to be independent of temperature. The exciton binding energy increases with pressure at a rate of d lnscrR/dP=0.083(3) GPa-1. The exciton lifetime becomes smaller for pressures above the crossover between Γ- and X-point conduction-band minima (P>4.2 GPa), a fact which is attributed to phonon-assisted intervalley scattering. From the pressure dependence of the exciton linewidth we determine an accurate value for the intervalley deformation-potential constant DΓX=4.8(3) eV/Å.

  3. The turgor pressure in the sugar-beet tissue under low temperatures (in Ukrainian)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulavin, L. A.; Zabashta, Yu. F.; Fridman, A. Ya.

    The microscopic mechanism of water transference from a cell to the space between cells is investigated under low temperatures. The study is based on the data about the turgor pressure behaviour. This data is determined with the help of the method suggested by the authors of determining the turgor pressure by the shear modulus values. The theoretical basis of this method is given with the use of the nonlinear theory of elasticity. The shear modulus of the sugar--beet is measured under the temperatures 253< T < 290~K. The temperature interval is determined in which the shear modulus is equal to the turgor pressure. The osmos pressure in the sugar--beet tissue is evaluated theoretically. From comparing the theoretical osmos pressure and the experimental values of the turgor pressure the conclusion is drawn that water from a cell to the space between cells is moved by the active transport, a mechanism of this motion is suggested. In the authors' opinion this mechanism reveals the motion of the deformation solitons along the water chains which are within canals in walls of the plasmalemma.

  4. Research on Softening of A95456 Alloy Deformed Under Elevated Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Petrov, Pavel A.; Perfilov, Victor I.

    2007-04-07

    The present paper describes the results of the research on the softening of aluminium alloy A95456 deformed at elevated temperatures. The investigations were carried out within the temperature range of 310-450 deg. C and strain rate of 0.01-0.4 s-1. The strain rate was either constant or variable in performed experiments. In case of variable strain rate two different schemes were observed. Firstly, the deformation of alloy A95456 was performed at constant die velocity and so the strain rate increased monotonically. Secondly, the die velocity was changed suddenly during the deformation of A95456 alloy. In turn, it caused the sudden strain rate change. To describe the softening behaviour of A95456 alloy several equations were investigated. The accuracy of each equation was estimated. Some practical recommendations for use of those equations were given.

  5. A technique for dynamically calibrating pressure transducers at cryogenic temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibbens, B. V.

    1983-01-01

    A technique was developed for the calibration of dynamic pressure transducers at cryogenic temperatures. The calibration system utilizes an 8.9 Newton peak thrust shaker which oscillates a helium-filled bellows to generate a sinusoidal dynamic pressure to calibrate transducers immersed in a cryogenic environment. The system has a dynamic pressure measurement uncertainty of approximately 11% and is capable of producing peak-to-peak dynamic pressure amplitudes of 1.4 kPa over a frequency range of 40 to 100 hertz and a temperature range of 100 to 300 K. It provides an unprecedented capability of both static and dynamic calibration of pressure transducers from ambient to cryogenic temperature.

  6. Differential absorption lidar measurements of atmospheric temperature and pressure profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korb, C. L.

    1981-01-01

    The theory and methodology of using differential absorption lidar techniques for the remote measurement of atmospheric pressure profiles, surface pressure, and temperature profiles from ground, air, and space-based platforms are presented. Pressure measurements are effected by means of high resolution measurement of absorption at the edges of the oxygen A band lines where absorption is pressure dependent due to collisional line broadening. Temperature is assessed using measurements of the absorption at the center of the oxygen A band line originating from a quantum state with high ground state energy. The population of the state is temperature dependent, allowing determination of the temperature through the Boltzmann term. The results of simulations of the techniques using Voigt profile and variational analysis are reported for ground-based, airborne, and Shuttle-based systems. Accuracies in the 0.5-1.0 K and 0.1-0.3% range are projected.

  7. Research at Very High Pressures and High Temperatures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bundy, Francis P.

    1977-01-01

    Reviews research and apparatus utilized in the study of the states and characteristics of materials at very high temperatures and pressures. Includes three examples of the research being conducted. (SL)

  8. Alterations in MAST suit pressure with changes in ambient temperature.

    PubMed

    Sanders, A B; Meislin, H W; Daub, E

    1983-01-01

    A study was undertaken to test the hypothesis that change in ambient air temperature has an effect on MAST suit pressure according to the ideal gas law. Two different MAST suits were tested on Resusci-Annie dummies. The MAST suits were applied in a cold room at 4.4 degrees C and warmed to 44 degrees C. Positive linear correlations were found in nine trials, but the two suits differed in their rate of increase in pressure. Three trials using humans were conducted showing increased pressure with temperature but at a lesser rate than with dummies. A correlation of 0.5 to 1.0 mm Hg increase in MAST suit pressure for each 1.0 degrees C increase in ambient temperature was found. Implications are discussed for the use of the MAST suit in environmental conditions where the temperature changes. PMID:6679851

  9. Fixture tests bellows reliability through repetitive pressure/temperature cycling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levinson, C.

    1967-01-01

    Fixture explores the reliability of bellows used in precision in inertial systems. The fixture establishes the ability of the bellows to withstand repetitive over-stress pressure cycling at elevated temperatures. It is applicable in quality control and reliability programs.

  10. Control of equilibrium pressure-temperature conditions in cryogenic storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ford, W.; Voss, J.

    1970-01-01

    Metered vent controls the pressure within a liquid hydrogen tank. Vent size is chosen to permit a gas flow which corresponds to the boil-off rate necessary to maintain the desired bulk temperature of the cryogen.

  11. Elevated Temperature Deformation of Cr3Si Alloyed with Mo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raj, S. V.; Whittenberger, J. Daniel; Zeumer, B.; Sauthoff, G.

    1998-01-01

    Four-point bend, constant load compressive creep and constant engineering strain rate tests were conducted on arc-melted and powder-metallurgy (PM) processed Cr40Mo30Si30 specimens in the temperature range 1400 and 1700 K. This is a two phase alloy consisting of (CrMo)3Si and (Cr,Mo)5Si3 phases. The PM specimens, which were substantially weaker than the arc-melted materials, exhibited a stress exponent n, of about 2 and an apparent activation energy for creep, Q(sub 3), of 485 kJ/mol. The mechanism in these specimens appeared to be controlled by creep of a glassy phase. In the case of arc-melted specimens for which nis approximately 3 and Q(sub 3) is approximately 430 kJ/mol, the rate-controlling creep mechanism appeared to be that dominant in the (Cr,Mo)5Si3 phase. In this case, it is suggested that the Nabarro creep mechanism, where dislocation climb is controlled by Bardeen-Herring vacancy sources, is the dominant creep mechanism. Finally, an analysis of the present and literature data on Cr3Si alloyed with Mo appeared to suggest that the creep rate decreases sharply with an increase in the Mo/Si ratio.

  12. Amorphous silicon under mechanical shear deformations: Shear velocity and temperature effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerrache, Ali; Mousseau, Normand; Lewis, Laurent J.

    2011-04-01

    Mechanical shear deformations lead, in some cases, to effects similar to those resulting from ion irradiation. Here we characterize the effects of shear velocity and temperature on amorphous silicon (a-Si) modeled using classical molecular-dynamics simulations based on the empirical environment-dependent interatomic potential (EDIP). With increasing shear velocity at low temperature, we find a systematic increase in the internal strain leading to the rapid appearance of structural defects (fivefold-coordinated atoms). The impacts of externally applied strain can be almost fully compensated by increasing the temperature, allowing the system to respond more rapidly to the deformation. In particular, we find opposite power-law relations between the temperature and the shear velocity and the deformation energy. The spatial distribution of defects is also found to depend strongly on temperature and strain velocity. For low temperature or high shear velocity, defects are concentrated in a few atomic layers near the center of the cell, while with increasing temperature or decreasing shear velocity, they spread slowly throughout the full simulation cell. This complex behavior can be related to the structure of the energy landscape and the existence of a continuous energy-barrier distribution.

  13. PREFACE: Rheology and Elasticity Studies at Ultra-High Pressures and Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Haozhe; Wenk, Hans-Rudolf; Duffy, Thomas S.

    2006-06-01

    One of the major goals of geophysical research is to understand deformation in the deep Earth. The COMPRES (Consortium for Materials Properties Research in Earth Sciences) workshop on `Rheology and Elasticity Studies at Ultra-High Pressures and Temperatures' was held on 21-23 October 2005 at the Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, organized by Haozhe Liu, Hans-Rudolf Wenk and Thomas S Duffy, and provided an opportunity to assemble more than 50 scientists from six countries. Experts in diamond anvil cell (DAC) design, large-volume high-pressure apparatus and data analysis defined the current state of ultra-high pressure deformation studies and explored initiatives to push the technological frontier. The DAC, when used in radial diffraction geometry, emerges as a powerful tool for investigation of plasticity and elasticity of materials at high pressures. More information regarding this workshop can be found at the website: http://www.hpcat.aps.anl.gov/Hliu/Workshop/Index1.htm. In this special issue of Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter, 17 manuscripts review the state-of-the-art and we hope they will stimulate researchers to participate in this field and take it forward to a new level. A major incentive for high-pressure research has been the need of geophysicists to understand composition, physical properties and deformation in the deep Earth in order to interpret the macroscopically observed seismic anisotropy. In the mantle and core, materials deform largely in a ductile manner at low stresses and strain rates. From observational inferences and experiments at lower pressures, it is considered plausible that deformation occurs in the field of dislocation creep or diffusion creep and deformation mechanisms depend in a complex way on stress, strain rate, pressure, temperature, grain size and hydration state. With novel apparatus such as the rotational Drickamer press or deformation DIA (D-DIA) multianvil apparatus, large volumes (approximately 10

  14. Engineering a laser remote sensor for atmospheric pressure and temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalshoven, J. E., Jr.; Korb, C. L.

    1978-01-01

    A system for the remote sensing of atmospheric pressure and temperature is described. Resonant lines in the 7600 Angstrom oxygen A band region are used and an organic dye laser beam is tuned to measure line absorption changes with temperature or pressure. A reference beam outside this band is also transmitted for calibration. Using lidar techniques, profiling of these parameters with altitude can be accomplished.

  15. Pressure and Temperature Sensitive Paint Measurements on Rotors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, John

    1999-01-01

    Luminescent molecular probes imbedded in a polymer binder form a temperature or pressure paint. On excitation by light of the proper wavelength, the luminescence, which is quenched either thermally or by oxygen, is detected by a camera or photodetector. From the detected luminescent intensity, temperature and pressure can be determined. The basic photophysics, calibration, accuracy and time response of luminescent paints is described followed by applications in wind tunnels and in rotating machinery.

  16. Improving Toughness of Heavy Steel Plate by Deformation Distribution Under Low Finish Cooling Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Xin-jun; Tang, Shuai; Chen, Jun; Liu, Zhen-yu; Wang, Guo-dong

    2016-09-01

    The significant role of deformation distribution in toughness improvement of heavy steel plate under low finish cooling temperature was investigated. Deformation distribution was conducted by changing temperature-holding thickness in two-stage control rolling. The results show that the low finish cooling temperature always inhibits the ferrite transformation. However, when heavy deformation was applied at noncrystallization region, extensive ferrite was formed and ferrite was also effectively refined. Hence, homogeneous ferrite microstructure through the thickness with the ferrite volume fraction of 82.4% and grain size refined to 6.7 μm at quarter thickness of 40-mm heavy steel plate was obtained when the deformation at nonrecrystallization region reaches 70%. Thus, high toughness can be achieved, showing that the fully ductile fracture can be maintained at -60 °C and the ductile-to-brittle transition temperature is lowered to -91 °C. The improved toughness is ascribed to the high ferrite volume fraction, refinement of ferrite and hard phase colony and the increase in the percent of high-angle grain boundaries and average grain boundary misorientation.

  17. Measurements for displacement and deformation at high temperature by using edge detection of digital image.

    PubMed

    Qu, Zhe; Fang, Xufei; Su, Honghong; Feng, Xue

    2015-10-10

    In this work, we propose a structural deformation measuring method based on structural feature processing (straight line/edge detection) of the recorded digital images for specimens subjected to a high-temperature environment. Both radiation light and oxidation at high temperatures challenge the optics-based measurements. The images of a rectangular piece of copper specimen are obtained by using a bandpass filtering method at high temperatures, then all the edges are detected by using an edge detection operator, and then a Hough transform is conducted to search the straight edges for the calculation of deformation. Especially, due to the severe oxidation, a special seed strategy is adopted to reduce the oxidation effect and obtain an accurate result. For validation, the structural thermal deformation and the values of coefficients of thermal expansion for the copper specimen are measured and compared with data in the literature. The results reveal that the proposed method is accurate to measure the deformation of the structures at high temperatures. PMID:26479811

  18. Brittle metallic glass deforms plastically at room temperature in glassy multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Parmanand; Yubuta, Kunio; Kimura, Hisamichi; Inoue, Akihisa

    2009-07-01

    Bulk metallic glasses are emerging as a new class of materials that can have applications ranging from structural materials to materials for future nanotechnology. However, catastrophic mechanical failure is a serious issue hindering the use of these materials in engineering applications. Here we introduce an approach to understanding and solving the problem of brittleness of metallic glasses. We have shown that even a very brittle metallic glass (La based) can be forced to deform plastically at room temperature if it is made in the form of multilayers involving other metallic glasses, i.e., a two-phase glass. The mechanically soft glassy layer (La based) having a lower critical shear stress acts as a nucleation or an initiation site for shear bands and the mechanically hard glassy layer (Zr based) acts as an obstacle to the propagation of shear bands. This process results in the multiplication of shear bands. Since the shear bands are associated with a local rise in temperature, a large number of shear bands can raise the overall temperature of the soft layer and eventually can drive it to the supercooled liquid state, where deformation of metallic glass is very large and homogeneous. The results reported here not only clarify the mechanism of large plastic deformation in two-phase glassy alloys but also suggest the possibility of a different kind of two-phase bulk glassy alloys exhibiting large plastic deformation at room temperature.

  19. Room-temperature ferromagnetism in zinc-blende and deformed CrAs thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bi, J. F.; Zhao, J. H.; Deng, J. J.; Zheng, Y. H.; Li, S. S.; Wu, X. G.; Jia, Q. J.

    2006-04-01

    We try to clarify the controversy about the origin of room-temperature ferromagnetism in a CrAs compound. Two kinds of CrAs thin films were grown on GaAs by molecular-beam epitaxy. Structural analyses confirm that the as-grown CrAs film is a pure zinc-blende phase. Magnetic measurements suggest that room-temperature ferromagnetism exists in zinc-blende CrAs. In contrast, the CrAs film turns into a mixture of zinc-blende and deformed CrAs after annealing. A ferromagnetic signal measured at room temperature demonstrates that zinc-blende CrAs remains room-temperature ferromagnetism even when it is partly deformed into a non-zinc-blende phase.

  20. The iceman under pressure (Part I): A description of skull deformations due to 5100 years of glacial action.

    PubMed

    Prossinger, H; Seidler, H; Weaver, D S; Schäfer, K; Fieder, M; Weber, G W

    1999-12-01

    Due to its long deposition in the glacier, the 'Iceman' (an ice-mummy from the Hauslabjoch) has been deformed, notably its skull. We introduce various comparative methods that describe these deformations, assuming they can be ascribed--to a large extent--to glacial action. While pressure is a scalar, the deformations must be described via a 2-tensor strain field (which can be represented by a matrix function value at every point throughout the skull). In this paper, we present the assumed deformations in numerous graphical forms and, furthermore, the limitations in interpretation--including an estimate of statistical variability--that can be revealed by this analysis. These methods, although describing the results of glacial action and implying a 2-tensor strain field (which will be presented in a subsequent paper), do not permit a straightforward reconstruction of the original, underformed skull. These methods have wider applications to the general problem of deformation.

  1. Microstructural changes during high temperature deformation of an Al-Li(8090) alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Eddahbi, M.; Carreno, F.; Ruano, O.A.

    1998-05-05

    In this work, the high temperature tensile behavior of an aluminum-lithium (8090) alloy is studied at various strain rates and temperatures. In particular, special attention was paid to the oscillations observed in the true stress versus strain curves at high strain rate, 0.8 s{sup {minus}1}, and high temperatures in excess of 380 C (> 0.57 T{sub m}, where T{sub m} is the melting temperature). The changes in the microstructure were analyzed and correlated to the flow curves of the deformed samples.

  2. Luminescence imaging for aerodynamic temperature and pressure measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Gallery, J.M.

    1993-01-01

    A luminescent temperature sensitive paint containing the molecule rhodamine B base (rhBb) is described whose emission intensity can be monitored by video camera to produce qualitative and quantitative two dimensional surface temperature maps. This paint was designed for use with the pressure sensitive paint containing platinum octaethylporphyrin (PtOEP), but is also a useful tool when used alone in the measurement of heat flow, boundary layer transition, and quantitative surface temperature during wind tunnel studies. The ability of the rhBb paint to produce a continuous temperature map makes it possible to locate structures in the temperature field on an airfoil that are otherwise undetected by surface mounted thermocouples spaced a finite distance apart. A dual temperature/pressure sensitive paint was investigated with both the rhBb and PtOEP dyes incorporated into the silicone polymer paint base of the pressure sensor. Photodegradation and batch variations in the polymer were found to compromise the calibration parameters of the PtOEP paint and therefore the accuracy of pressure predictions. Suggestions are made for improving the prediction ability of the paint. The molecule europium(III) thenoyltrifluoroacetonate (EuTTA) is also discussed as a temperature sensor for a two layer temperature/pressure paint. EuTTA can not be directly incorporated into the silicone paint base of the PtOEP paint (as the rhBp paint can), but performs well in non-oxygenpermeable coatings. Benefits of the EuTTA temperature paint include: (1) decreased photodegradation, (2) very bright luminescence intensity, and (3) long luminescent lifetime (several hundred microseconds). The long lifetime facilitates lifetime imaging, a technique currently under development as an alternative detection method where luminescent lifetimes rather than emission intensity are related to temperature and pressure.

  3. Computer program to analyze multipass pressure-temperature-spinner surveys

    SciTech Connect

    Spielman, Paul

    1994-01-20

    A computer program has been developed to analyze multipass pressure-temperature-spinner surveys and summarize the data in graphical form on two plots: (1) an overlay of spinner passes along with a fluid velocity profile calculated from the spinner and (2) an overlay of pressure, pressure gradient, and temperature profiles from each pass. The program has been written using SmartWare II Software. Fluid velocity is calculated for each data point using a cross-plot of tool speed and spinner counts to account for changing flow conditions in the wellbore. The program has been used successfully to analyze spinner surveys run in geothermal wells with two-phase flashing flow.

  4. Plastic Foam Withstands Greater Temperatures And Pressures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cranston, John A.; Macarthur, Doug

    1993-01-01

    Improved plastic foam suitable for use in foam-core laminated composite parts and in tooling for making fiber/matrix-composite parts. Stronger at high temperatures, more thermally and dimensionally stable, machinable, resistant to chemical degradation, and less expensive. Compatible with variety of matrix resins. Made of polyisocyanurate blown with carbon dioxide and has density of 12 to 15 pounds per cubic feet. Does not contibute to depletion of ozone from atmosphere. Improved foam used in cores of composite panels in such diverse products as aircraft, automobiles, railroad cars, boats, and sporting equipment like surfboards, skis, and skateboards. Also used in thermally stable flotation devices in submersible vehicles. Machined into mandrels upon which filaments wound to make shells.

  5. Effect of deformation temperature on the mechanical behavior and deformation mechanisms of Al-Al[sub 2]O[sub 3] metal matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Mazen, A.A. . Dept. of Engineering)

    1999-08-01

    Aluminum-alumina (Al-Al[sub 2]O[sub 3]) metal matrix composite (MMC) materials were fabricated using the powder metallurgy (PM) techniques of hot pressing followed by hot extrusion. Different reinforcement weight fractions were used, that is, 0, 2.5, 5, and 10 wt% Al[sub 2]O[sub 3]. The effect of deformation temperature was investigated through hot tensile deformation conducted at different temperatures. The microstructures of the tested specimens were also investigated to characterize the operative softening mechanisms. The yield and tensile strength of the Al-Al[sub 2]O[sub 3] were found to improve as a function of reinforcement weight fraction. With the exception of Al-10wt%Al[sub 2]O[sub 3], the MMC showed better strength and behavior at high temperatures than the unreinforced matrix. The uniform deformation range was found to decrease for the same reinforcement weight fraction, as a function of temperature. For the same deformation temperature, it increases as a function of reinforcement weight fraction. Both dynamic recovery and dynamic recrystallization were found to be operative in Al-Al[sub 2]O[sub 3] MMC as a function of deformation temperature. Dynamic recovery is dominant in the lower temperature range, while dynamic recrystallization is more dominant at the higher range. The increase in reinforcement weight fraction was found to lead to early nucleation of recrystallization. No direct relationship was established as far as the number of grains nucleated due to each reinforcement particle.

  6. Surface Temperature and Synthetic Spectral Energy Distributions for Rotationally Deformed Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovekin, C. C.; Deupree, R. G.; Short, C. I.

    2006-05-01

    Extreme deformation of a stellar surface, such as that produced by rapid rotation, causes the surface temperature and gravity to vary significantly with latitude. Thus, the spectral energy distribution (SED) of a nonspherical star could differ significantly from the SED of a spherical star with the same average temperature and luminosity. Calculation of the SED of a deformed star is often approximated as a composite of several spectra, each produced by a plane-parallel model of given effective temperature and gravity. The weighting of these spectra over the stellar surface, and hence the inferred effective temperature and luminosity, will be dependent on the inclination of the rotation axis of the star with respect to the observer, as well as the temperature and gravity distribution on the stellar surface. Here we calculate the surface conditions of rapidly rotating stars with a two-dimensional stellar structure and evolution code and compare the effective temperature distribution to that predicted by von Zeipel's law. We calculate the composite spectrum for a deformed star by interpolating within a grid of intensity spectra of plane-parallel model atmospheres and integrating over the surface of the star. This allows us to examine the SED for effects of inclination and degree of deformation based on the two-dimensional models. Using this method, we find that the deduced variation of effective temperature with inclination can be as much as 3000 K for an early B star, depending on the details of the underlying model. As a test case for our models, we examine the rapidly rotating star Achernar (α Eri, HD 10144). Recent interferometric observations have determined the star to be quite oblate. Combined with the ultraviolet SED measured by the OAO 2 satellite, we are able to make direct comparisons with observations.

  7. Digital pressure transducer for use at high temperatures

    DOEpatents

    Karplus, Henry H. B.

    1981-01-01

    A digital pressure sensor for measuring fluid pressures at relatively high temperatures includes an electrically conducting fiber coupled to the fluid by a force disc that causes tension in the fiber to be a function of fluid pressure. The tension causes changes in the mechanical resonant frequency of the fiber, which is caused to vibrate in a magnetic field to produce an electrical signal from a positive-feedback amplifier at the resonant frequency. A count of this frequency provides a measure of the fluid pressure.

  8. Digital pressure transducer for use at high temperatures

    DOEpatents

    Karplus, H.H.B.

    A digital pressure sensor for measuring fluid pressures at relatively high temperatures includes an electrically conducting fiber coupled to the fluid by a force disc that causes tension in the fiber to be a function of fluid pressure. The tension causes changes in the mechanical resonant frequency of the fiber, which is caused to vibrate in a magnetic field to produce an electrical signal from a positive-feedback amplifier at the resonant frequency. A count of this frequency provides a measure of the fluid pressure.

  9. Experimental investigation on pressurization performance of cryogenic tank during high-temperature helium pressurization process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Wang; Yanzhong, Li; Yonghua, Jin; Yuan, Ma

    2015-03-01

    Sufficient knowledge of thermal performance and pressurization behaviors in cryogenic tanks during rocket launching period is of importance to the design and optimization of a pressurization system. In this paper, ground experiments with liquid oxygen (LO2) as the cryogenic propellant, high-temperature helium exceeding 600 K as the pressurant gas, and radial diffuser and anti-cone diffuser respectively at the tank inlet were performed. The pressurant gas requirements, axial and radial temperature distributions, and energy distributions inside the propellant tank were obtained and analyzed to evaluate the comprehensive performance of the pressurization system. It was found that the pressurization system with high-temperature helium as the pressurant gas could work well that the tank pressure was controlled within a specified range and a stable discharging liquid rate was achieved. For the radial diffuser case, the injected gas had a direct impact on the tank inner wall. The severe gas-wall heat transfer resulted in about 59% of the total input energy absorbed by the tank wall. For the pressurization case with anti-cone diffuser, the direct impact of high-temperature gas flowing toward the liquid surface resulted in a greater deal of energy transferred to the liquid propellant, and the percentage even reached up to 38%. Moreover, both of the two cases showed that the proportion of energy left in ullage to the total input energy was quite small, and the percentage was only about 22-24%. This may indicate that a more efficient diffuser should be developed to improve the pressurization effect. Generally, the present experimental results are beneficial to the design and optimization of the pressurization system with high-temperature gas supplying the pressurization effect.

  10. High-pressure temperature-programmed reduction of sulfided catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Labruyere, F.; Lacroix, M.; Breysse, M.

    1997-04-15

    Temperature-programmed reduction (TPR) of solids materials is a widely used technique of characterization in heterogeneous catalysis. So far all studies dealing with this technique have been carried out at ambient or subambient pressure. Because most catalytic processes are performed at higher hydrogen pressures, the impact of this technique could be enhanced by the development of a new generation of equipment working under conditions approaching those used in reality. This work describes a new experimental temperature-programmed reduction set-up working at hydrogen pressures above 1 atm. Basic hydrodynamic considerations have been employed for correcting the signal from the variations of the residence time distribution of the molecules in the reactor. Model and industrial sulfide catalysts were studied at various pressures. When the raw signals are suitably corrected, it appears that the hydrogen pressure does not influence the TPR patterns. 25 refs., 7 figs.

  11. LX-17 Deflagration at High Pressures and Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Koerner, J; Maienschein, J; Black, K; DeHaven, M; Wardell, J

    2006-10-23

    We measure the laminar deflagration rate of LX-17 (92.5 wt% TATB, 7.5 wt% Kel-F 800) at high pressure and temperature in a strand burner, thereby obtaining reaction rate data for prediction of thermal explosion violence. Simultaneous measurements of flame front time-of-arrival and temporal pressure history allow for the direct calculation of deflagration rate as a function of pressure. Additionally, deflagrating surface areas are calculated in order to provide quantitative insight into the dynamic surface structure during deflagration and its relationship to explosion violence. Deflagration rate data show that LX-17 burns in a smooth fashion at ambient temperature and is represented by the burn rate equation B = 0.2P{sup 0.9}. At 225 C, deflagration is more rapid and erratic. Dynamic deflagrating surface area calculations show that ambient temperature LX-17 deflagrating surface areas remain near unity over the pressure range studied.

  12. Pressure and temperature induced elastic properties of rare earth chalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shriya, S.; Singh, N.; Sapkale, R.; Varshney, M.; Varshney, Dinesh

    2016-05-01

    The pressure and temperature dependent mechanical properties as Young modulus, Thermal expansion coefficient of rare earth REX (RE = La, Pr, Eu; X = O, S, Se, and Te) chalcogenides are studied. The rare earth chalcogenides showed a structural phase transition (B1-B2). Pressure dependence of Young modulus discerns an increase in pressure inferring the hardening or stiffening of the lattice as a consequence of bond compression and bond strengthening. Suppressed Young modulus as functions of temperature infers the weakening of the lattice results in bond weakening in REX. Thermal expansion coefficient demonstrates that REX (RE = La, Pr, Eu; X = O, S, Se, and Te) chalcogenides is mechanically stiffened, and thermally softened on applied pressure and temperature.

  13. Numerical simulation of rupture propagation with thermal pressurization based on measured hydraulic properties :Importance of deformation zone width

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noda, H.

    2004-12-01

    Thermal expansion and pressurization of pore water may effectively reduce frictional resistance during slip at high strain rate for faults with impermeable clayey material in shallow depth (<5km). Width of deformation zone is an important parameter in this process because the distribution of excess pore pressure is roughly equal to the width of deformation zone for relatively impermeable faults and pore pressure at the center rises more rapidly for thinner cases. In this study, dynamic rupture propagation simulation with thermal pressurization based on measured hydraulic properties of active faults demonstrates the importance of width of deformation zone. In the case that hydraulic properties of Hanaore fault in Southwest Japan (relatively impermeable) is used, when 100m radius asperity is assumed in which initial shear stress is set as static frictional level (0.6) and dynamic frictional coefficient is assumed to be 0.4, rupture velocity is proved sensitive to the width of deformation zone when it is less than 20mm under condition of 3km depth. When deformation width is reduced to 5mm, rupture velocity in direction of mode 2 exceeds S-wave velocity. This study also shows the importance of hydraulic properties by comparing results of a relatively impermeable fault and a permeable fault at different depths.

  14. Validation of UARS Microwave Limb Sounder temperature and pressure measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fishbein, E. F.; Cofield, R. E.; Froidevaux, L.; Jarnot, R. F.; Lungu, T.; Read, W. G.; Shippony, Z.; Waters, J. W.; McDermid, I. S.; McGee, T. J.; Singh, U.; Gross, M.; Hauchecorne, A.; Keckhut, P.; Gelman, M. E.; Nagatani, R. M.

    1996-04-01

    The accuracy and precision of the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) atmospheric temperature and tangent-point pressure measurements are described. Temperatures and tangent-point pressure (atmospheric pressure at the tangent height of the field of view boresight) are retrieved from a 15-channel 63-GHz radiometer measuring O2 microwave emissions from the stratosphere and mesosphere. The Version 3 data (first public release) contains scientifically useful temperatures from 22 to 0.46 hPa. Accuracy estimates are based on instrument performance, spectroscopic uncertainty and retrieval numerics, and range from 2.1 K at 22 hPa to 4.8 K at 0.46 hPa for temperature and from 200 m (equivalent log pressure) at 10 hPa to 300 m at 0.1 hPa. Temperature accuracy is limited mainly by uncertainty in instrument characterization, and tangent-point pressure accuracy is limited mainly by the accuracy of spectroscopic parameters. Precisions are around 1 K and 100 m. Comparisons are presented among temperatures from MLS, the National Meteorological Center (NMC) stratospheric analysis and lidar stations at Table Mountain, California, Observatory of Haute Provence (OHP), France, and Goddard Spaceflight Center, Maryland. MLS temperatures tend to be 1-2 K lower than NMC and lidar, but MLS is often 5 - 10 K lower than NMC in the winter at high latitudes, especially within the northern hemisphere vortex. Winter MLS and OHP (44°N) lidar temperatures generally agree and tend to be lower than NMC. Problems with Version 3 MLS temperatures and tangent-point pressures are identified, but the high precision of MLS radiances will allow improvements with better algorithms planned for the future.

  15. Validation of UARS Microwave Limb Sounder Temperature and Pressure Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fishbein, E. F.; Cofield, R. E.; Froidevaux, L.; Jarnot, R. F.; Lungu, T.; Read, W. G.; Shippony, Z.; Waters, J. W.; McDermid, I. S.; McGee, T. J.; Singh, U.; Gross, M.; Hauchecorne, A.; Keckhut, P.; Gelman, M. E.; Nagatani, R. M.

    1996-01-01

    The accuracy and precision of the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) atmospheric temperature and tangent-point pressure measurements are described. Temperatures and tangent- point pressure (atmospheric pressure at the tangent height of the field of view boresight) are retrieved from a 15-channel 63-GHz radiometer measuring O2 microwave emissions from the stratosphere and mesosphere. The Version 3 data (first public release) contains scientifically useful temperatures from 22 to 0.46 hPa. Accuracy estimates are based on instrument performance, spectroscopic uncertainty and retrieval numerics, and range from 2.1 K at 22 hPa to 4.8 K at 0.46 hPa for temperature and from 200 m (equivalent log pressure) at 10 hPa to 300 m at 0.1 hPa. Temperature accuracy is limited mainly by uncertainty in instrument characterization, and tangent-point pressure accuracy is limited mainly by the accuracy of spectroscopic parameters. Precisions are around 1 K and 100 m. Comparisons are presented among temperatures from MLS, the National Meteorological Center (NMC) stratospheric analysis and lidar stations at Table Mountain, California, Observatory of Haute Provence (OHP), France, and Goddard Spaceflight Center, Maryland. MLS temperatures tend to be 1-2 K lower than NMC and lidar, but MLS is often 5 - 10 K lower than NMC in the winter at high latitudes, especially within the northern hemisphere vortex. Winter MLS and OHP (44 deg N) lidar temperatures generally agree and tend to be lower than NMC. Problems with Version 3 MLS temperatures and tangent-point pressures are identified, but the high precision of MLS radiances will allow improvements with better algorithms planned for the future.

  16. Temperature-dependent elastic anisotropy and mesoscale deformation in a nanostructured ferritic alloy

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Stoica, G. M.; Stoica, A. D.; Miller, M. K.; Ma, D.

    2014-10-10

    Nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFA) are a new class of ultrafine-grained oxide dispersion-strengthened steels, promising for service in extreme environments of high temperature and high irradiation in the next-generation of nuclear reactors. This is owing to the remarkable stability of their complex microstructures containing a high density of Y-Ti-O nanoclusters within grains and along the grain boundaries. While nanoclusters have been recognized to be the primary contributor to the exceptional resistance to irradiation and high-temperature creep, very little is known about the mechanical roles of the polycrystalline grains that constitute the bulk ferritic matrix. Here we report the mesoscale characterization ofmore » anisotropic responses of the ultrafine NFA grains to tensile stresses at various temperatures using the state-of-the-art in situ neutron diffraction. We show the first experimental determination of temperature-dependent single-crystal elastic constants for the NFA, and reveal a strong temperature-dependent elastic anisotropy due to a sharp decrease in the shear stiffness constant [c'=(c_11-c_12)/2] when a critical temperature ( T_c ) is approached, indicative of elastic softening and instability of the ferritic matrix. We also show, from anisotropy-induced intergranular strain/stress accumulations, that a common dislocation slip mechanism operates at the onset of yielding for low temperatures, while there is a deformation crossover from low-temperature lattice hardening to high temperature lattice softening in response to extensive plastic deformation.« less

  17. Temperature-dependent elastic anisotropy and mesoscale deformation in a nanostructured ferritic alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Stoica, G. M.; Stoica, A. D.; Miller, M. K.; Ma, D.

    2014-10-10

    Nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFA) are a new class of ultrafine-grained oxide dispersion-strengthened steels, promising for service in extreme environments of high temperature and high irradiation in the next-generation of nuclear reactors. This is owing to the remarkable stability of their complex microstructures containing a high density of Y-Ti-O nanoclusters within grains and along the grain boundaries. While nanoclusters have been recognized to be the primary contributor to the exceptional resistance to irradiation and high-temperature creep, very little is known about the mechanical roles of the polycrystalline grains that constitute the bulk ferritic matrix. Here we report the mesoscale characterization of anisotropic responses of the ultrafine NFA grains to tensile stresses at various temperatures using the state-of-the-art in situ neutron diffraction. We show the first experimental determination of temperature-dependent single-crystal elastic constants for the NFA, and reveal a strong temperature-dependent elastic anisotropy due to a sharp decrease in the shear stiffness constant [c'=(c_11-c_12)/2] when a critical temperature ( T_c ) is approached, indicative of elastic softening and instability of the ferritic matrix. We also show, from anisotropy-induced intergranular strain/stress accumulations, that a common dislocation slip mechanism operates at the onset of yielding for low temperatures, while there is a deformation crossover from low-temperature lattice hardening to high temperature lattice softening in response to extensive plastic deformation.

  18. Fluorescence spectroscopy of anisole at elevated temperatures and pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, K. H.; Morin, C.; Kühni, M.; Guibert, P.

    2014-06-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence of anisole as tracer of isooctane at an excitation wavelength of 266 nm was investigated for conditions relevant to rapid compression machine studies and for more general application of internal combustion engines regarding temperature, pressure, and ambient gas composition. An optically accessible high pressure and high temperature chamber was operated by using different ambient gases (Ar, N2, CO2, air, and gas mixtures). Fluorescence experiments were investigated at a large range of pressure and temperature (0.2-4 MPa and 473-823 K). Anisole fluorescence quantum yield decreases strongly with temperature for every considered ambient gas, due to efficient radiative mechanisms of intersystem crossing. Concerning the pressure effect, the fluorescence signal decreases with increasing pressure, because increasing the collisional rate leads to more important non-radiative collisional relaxation. The quenching effect is strongly efficient in oxygen, with a fluorescence evolution described by Stern-Volmer relation. The dependence of anisole fluorescence versus thermodynamic parameters suggests the use of this tracer for temperature imaging in specific conditions detailed in this paper. The calibration procedure for temperature measurements is established for the single-excitation wavelength and two-color detection technique.

  19. Innovations in plantar pressure and foot temperature measurements in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Bus, S A

    2016-01-01

    Plantar pressure and temperature measurements in the diabetic foot primarily contribute to identifying abnormal values that increase risk for foot ulceration, and they are becoming increasingly more integrated in clinical practice and daily life of the patient. While plantar pressure measurements have long been present, only recently evidence shows their importance in ulcer prevention, as a data-driven approach to therapeutic footwear provision. The long-term monitoring of plantar pressures with the option to provide feedback, when alarming pressure levels occur, is a promising development in this area, although more technical and clinical validation is required. Shear is considered important in ulcer aetiology but is technically difficult to measure. Innovative research is underway to assess if foot temperature can act as a useful surrogate for shear. Because the skin heats up before it breaks down, frequent monitoring of foot temperature can identify these warning signals. This approach has shown to be effective in preventing foot ulcers. Innovation in diagnostic methods for foot temperature monitoring and evidence on cost effectiveness will likely facilitate implementation. Finally, monitoring of adherence to offloading treatment using temperature-based sensors has proven to be a feasible and relevant method with a wide range of possible research and patient care applications. These innovations in plantar pressure and temperature measurements illustrate an important transfer in diabetic foot care from subjective to objective evaluation of the high-risk patient. They demonstrate clinical value and a large potential in helping to reduce the patient and economic burden of diabetic foot disease.

  20. Deformation Control of Scroll Compressor for CO2 Refrigerant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiwata, Akira; Sawai, Kiyoshi; Morimoto, Takashi; Murakami, Hideki

    The compressors for CO2 refrigerant have a lot of difficulties to achieve high efficiency and reliability because of its very high operating pressure, which causes the deformation for scroll element. The deformations of the fixed scroll during operation fall into the following four categories: (1) pressure deformation due to pressure differences; (2) thermal deformation due to temperature difference; (3) deformation caused by welding for fixing the frame to the shell; and (4) bolt tightening deformation of the compression mechanism. In this study, in order to minimize the deformation during operation, deformations (1) and (2) are grasped by numerical calculations and deformations (3) and (4) are controlled to cancel the deformations (1) and (2) by adjusting the stiffness of fixed scroll. In addition, we measured the deformation under the operation by using the strain gauge in order to confirm that the proper stiffness of fixed scroll can minimize its total amount of deformation.

  1. Low temperature deformation behavior of an electromagnetically bulged 5052 aluminum alloy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zu; Li, Ning; Wang, Duzhen; Ouyang, Di; Liu, Lin

    2016-01-01

    The fundamental understanding of the deformation behavior of electromagnetically formed metallic components under extreme conditions is important. Here, the effect of low temperature on the deformation behavior of an electromagnetically-bulged 5052 aluminum alloy was investigated through uniaxial tension. We found that the Portevin-Le Chatelier Effect, designated by the serrated characteristic in stress-strain curves, continuously decays until completely disappears with decreasing temperature. The physical origin of the phenomenon is rationalized on the basis of the theoretical analysis and the Monte Carlo simulation, which reveal an increasing resistance to dislocation motion imposed by lowering temperature. The dislocations are captured completely by solute atoms at −50 °C, which results in the extinction of Portevin-Le Chatelier. The detailed mechanism responsible for this process is further examined through Monte Carlo simulation. PMID:27426919

  2. Low temperature deformation behavior of an electromagnetically bulged 5052 aluminum alloy.

    PubMed

    Li, Zu; Li, Ning; Wang, Duzhen; Ouyang, Di; Liu, Lin

    2016-01-01

    The fundamental understanding of the deformation behavior of electromagnetically formed metallic components under extreme conditions is important. Here, the effect of low temperature on the deformation behavior of an electromagnetically-bulged 5052 aluminum alloy was investigated through uniaxial tension. We found that the Portevin-Le Chatelier Effect, designated by the serrated characteristic in stress-strain curves, continuously decays until completely disappears with decreasing temperature. The physical origin of the phenomenon is rationalized on the basis of the theoretical analysis and the Monte Carlo simulation, which reveal an increasing resistance to dislocation motion imposed by lowering temperature. The dislocations are captured completely by solute atoms at -50 °C, which results in the extinction of Portevin-Le Chatelier. The detailed mechanism responsible for this process is further examined through Monte Carlo simulation. PMID:27426919

  3. Low temperature deformation behavior of an electromagnetically bulged 5052 aluminum alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zu; Li, Ning; Wang, Duzhen; Ouyang, Di; Liu, Lin

    2016-07-01

    The fundamental understanding of the deformation behavior of electromagnetically formed metallic components under extreme conditions is important. Here, the effect of low temperature on the deformation behavior of an electromagnetically-bulged 5052 aluminum alloy was investigated through uniaxial tension. We found that the Portevin-Le Chatelier Effect, designated by the serrated characteristic in stress-strain curves, continuously decays until completely disappears with decreasing temperature. The physical origin of the phenomenon is rationalized on the basis of the theoretical analysis and the Monte Carlo simulation, which reveal an increasing resistance to dislocation motion imposed by lowering temperature. The dislocations are captured completely by solute atoms at ‑50 °C, which results in the extinction of Portevin-Le Chatelier. The detailed mechanism responsible for this process is further examined through Monte Carlo simulation.

  4. Incompressibility of osmium metal at ultrahigh pressures and temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Armentrout, Matt M.; Kavner, Abby

    2010-07-23

    Osmium is one of the most incompressible elemental metals, and is used as a matrix material for synthesis of ultrahard materials. To examine the behavior of osmium metal under extreme conditions of high pressure and temperature, we measured the thermal equation of state of osmium metal at pressures up to 50 GPa and temperatures up to 3000 K. X-ray diffraction measurements were conducted in the laser heated diamond anvil cell at GeoSoilEnviroCARS and the High Pressure at the Advanced Photon Source and beamline 12.2.2 at the advanced light source. Ambient temperature data give a zero pressure bulk modulus of 421 (3) GPa with a first pressure derivative fixed at 4. Fitting to a high temperature Birch-Murnaghan equation of state gives a room pressure thermal expansion of 1.51(0.06) x 10{sup -5} K{sup -1} with a first temperature derivative of 4.9(0.7) x 10{sup -9} K{sup -2} and the first temperature derivative of bulk modulus of be dK{sub 0}/dT = -0.055 (0.004). Fitting to a Mie-Grueneisen-Debye equation of state gives a Grueneisen parameter of 2.32 (0.08) with a q of 7.2 (1.4). A comparison of the high pressure, temperature behavior among Re, Pt, Os, shows that Os has the highest bulk modulus and lowest thermal expansion of the three, suggesting that Os-based ultrahard materials may be especially mechanically stable under extreme conditions.

  5. Deformation Behavior of AZ80 Wrought Magnesium Alloy at Cryogenic Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Tang Wei; Li Xiuyan; Han Enhou; Xu Yongbo; Li Yiyi

    2006-03-31

    The influence of temperature on the deformation and failure behavior of AZ80 wrought Mg alloy has been examined from 77K to 298K. It is found that the yield strength (YS) and ultimate strength (UTS) are increasing with the temperature decreasing, while the elongation is decreasing especial between 213K and 143K. Based on the mechanical tests, observation of environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM), it is proposed that the alloy deforms mainly by slips and twins, but undergoes different mechanism of cleavage in the range of testing temperature. At T>213K, the alloy ductility is higher because the dislocations could pass through twins but pile up at precipitate phase: Mg17Al12, which causes the crack nucleate. At T<143K, the alloy ductility is lower because the dislocation slip are suppressed greatly and dislocations pile up at twins, and cause crack nucleate and expand along twins quickly. At 143Ktemperature. The twins play an important role in deformation and failure of Mg alloys at cryogenic temperature.

  6. Deformation Behavior of AZ80 Wrought Magnesium Alloy at Cryogenic Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Wei; Li, Xiuyan; Han, Enhou; Xu, Yongbo; Li, Yiyi

    2006-03-01

    The influence of temperature on the deformation and failure behavior of AZ80 wrought Mg alloy has been examined from 77K to 298K. It is found that the yield strength (YS) and ultimate strength (UTS) are increasing with the temperature decreasing, while the elongation is decreasing especial between 213K and 143K. Based on the mechanical tests, observation of environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM), it is proposed that the alloy deforms mainly by slips and twins, but undergoes different mechanism of cleavage in the range of testing temperature. At T>213K, the alloy ductility is higher because the dislocations could pass through twins but pile up at precipitate phase: Mg17Al12, which causes the crack nucleate. At T<143K, the alloy ductility is lower because the dislocation slip are suppressed greatly and dislocations pile up at twins, and cause crack nucleate and expand along twins quickly. At 143Ktemperature. The twins play an important role in deformation and failure of Mg alloys at cryogenic temperature.

  7. Method transfer from high-pressure liquid chromatography to ultra-high-pressure liquid chromatography. II. Temperature and pressure effects.

    PubMed

    Åsberg, Dennis; Samuelsson, Jörgen; Leśko, Marek; Cavazzini, Alberto; Kaczmarski, Krzysztof; Fornstedt, Torgny

    2015-07-01

    The importance of the generated temperature and pressure gradients in ultra-high-pressure liquid chromatography (UHPLC) are investigated and compared to high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC). The drug Omeprazole, together with three other model compounds (with different chemical characteristics, namely uncharged, positively and negatively charged) were used. Calculations of the complete temperature profile in the column at UHPLC conditions showed, in our experiments, a temperature difference between the inlet and outlet of 16 °C and a difference of 2 °C between the column center and the wall. Through van't Hoff plots, this information was used to single out the decrease in retention factor (k) solely due to the temperature gradient. The uncharged solute was least affected by temperature with a decrease in k of about 5% while for charged solutes the effect was more pronounced, with k decreases up to 14%. A pressure increase of 500 bar gave roughly 5% increase in k for the uncharged solute, while omeprazole and the other two charged solutes gave about 25, 20 and 15% increases in k, respectively. The stochastic model of chromatography was applied to estimate the dependence of the average number of adsorption/desorption events (n) and the average time spent by a molecule in the stationary phase (τs) on temperature and pressure on peak shape for the tailing, basic solute. Increasing the temperature yielded an increase in n and decrease in τs which resulted in less skew at high temperatures. With increasing pressure, the stochastic modeling gave interesting results for the basic solute showing that the skew of the peak increased with pressure. The conclusion is that pressure effects are more pronounced for both retention and peak shape than the temperature effects for the polar or charged compounds in our study.

  8. Decomposition reactions in RDX at elevated temperatures and pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schweigert, Igor

    2015-03-01

    Mechanisms and rates of elementary reactions controlling condensed-phase decomposition of RDX under elevated temperatures (up to 2000 K) and pressures (up to a few GPa) are not known. Global decomposition kinetics in RDX below 700 K has been measured; however, the observed global pathways result from complex manifolds of elementary reactions and are likely to be altered by elevated temperatures. Elevated pressures can further affect the condensed-phase kinetics and compete with elevated temperatures in promoting some elementary reactions and suppressing others. This presentation will describe density functional theory (DFT) based molecular dynamics simulations of crystalline and molten RDX aimed to delineate the effects of elevated temperatures and pressures on the mechanism of initial dissociation and the resulting secondary reactions. This work was supported by the Naval Research Laboratory, by the Office of Naval Research, and by the DOD High Performance Computing Modernization Program Software Application Institute for Multiscale Reactive Modeling of Insensitive Munitions.

  9. "Deflategate": Time, Temperature, and Moisture Effects on Football Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blumenthal, Jack; Beljak, Lauren; Macatangay, Dahlia-Marie; Helmuth-Malone, Lilly; McWilliams, Catharina; Raptis, Sofia

    2016-09-01

    In a recent paper in TPT, DiLisi and Rarick used the National Football League "Deflategate" controversy to introduce to physics students the physics of a bouncing ball. In this paper, we measure and analyze the environmental effects of time, ambient temperature, and moisture on the internal pressure of an NFL football. We focus on the rate of pressure recovery that occurs when a cold football (either wet or dry) is returned to the warm locker room environment where the pressure was initially measured. Both studies stem from the so-called NFL "Deflategate" controversy in which footballs that initially met a minimum internal pressure requirement were rechecked at halftime of the AFC Championship game, and in some cases were reported to have fallen below the minimum pressure requirement. The question is whether the pressure changes were due to environmental exposure or rather to some air being released from the balls, or both.

  10. An Investigation of Enhanced Formability in AA5182-O Al During High-Rate Fre-Forming at Room-Temperature: Quantification of Deformation History

    SciTech Connect

    Rohatgi, Aashish; Soulami, Ayoub; Stephens, Elizabeth V.; Davies, Richard W.; Smith, Mark T.

    2014-03-01

    Following the two prior publication of PNNL Pulse-Pressure research in the Journal of Materials Processing Technology, this manuscript continues to describe PNNL’s advances in getting a better understanding of sheet metal formability under high strain-rate conditions. Specifically, using a combination of numerical modeling and novel experiments, we quantitatively demonstrate the deformation history associated with enhanced formability (~2.5X) in Al under room temperature forming.

  11. Temperature Correction of Pressure-Sensitive Paints Simplified

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bencic, Timothy J.

    2000-01-01

    Pressure-sensitive paint (PSP) has become a useful tool to augment conventional pressure taps in measuring the surface pressure distribution of aerodynamic components in wind tunnel testing. Although PSP offers the advantage of nonintrusive global mapping of the surface pressure, one prominent drawback to the accuracy of this technique is the inherent temperature sensitivity of PSP's luminescent intensity. Typical aerodynamic surface PSP tests rely on the coated surface to be both spatially and temporally isothermal, along with conventional instrumentation, to yield the highest accuracy pressure mappings. In some tests, however, spatial and temporal thermal gradients are generated by the nature of the test, as in a blowing jet impinging on a surface. In these cases, high accuracy and reliable data cannot be obtained unless the temperature variations on the painted surface are accounted for. A new temperature-correction technique was developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field to collapse a "family" of PSP calibration curves to a single curve of intensity ratio versus pressure. This correction allows a streamlined procedure to be followed whether or not temperature information is used in the data reduction of the PSP.

  12. Influence of deformation behavior, oxydation, and temperature on the long time cyclic stress behavior of high temperature steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maile, K.

    1982-01-01

    The influence of different parameters on the creep-fatigue behavior of several steel alloys was investigated. The higher the temperature the lower the crack initiation value. Pauses during the cycle reduce the damage. Oxidation reduces and protective gas increases the lifetime. Prior loading and prior deformation reduce the lifetime. Short annealing slightly affects the cycle stress behavior. The test results do not satisfactorily agree with methods of extrapolation and damage accumulation.

  13. Evaluation Of Liner Back-pressure Due To Concrete Pore Pressure At Elevated Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    James, R.J.; Rashid, Y.R.; Liu, A.S.; Gou, B.

    2006-07-01

    GE's latest evolution of the boiling water reactor, the ESBWR, has innovative passive design features that reduce the number and complexity of active systems, which in turn provide economic advantages while also increasing safety. These passive systems used for emergency cooling also mean that the primary containment system will experience elevated temperatures with longer durations than conventional plants in the event of design basis accidents. During a Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA), the drywell in the primary containment structure for the ESBWR will be exposed to saturated steam conditions for up to 72 hours following the accident. A containment spray system may be activated that sprays the drywell area with water to condense the steam as part of the recovery operations. The liner back-pressure will build up gradually over the 72 hours as the concrete temperatures increase, and a sudden cool down could cause excessive differential pressure on the liner to develop. For this analysis, it is assumed that the containment spray is activated at the end of the 72-hour period. A back-pressure, acting between the liner and the concrete wall of the containment, can occur as a result of elevated temperatures in the concrete causing steam and saturated vapor pressures to develop from the free water remaining in the pores of the concrete. Additional pore pressure also develops under the elevated temperatures from the non-condensable gases trapped in the concrete pores during the concrete curing process. Any buildup of this pore pressure next to the liner, in excess of the drywell internal pressure, will act to push the liner away from the concrete with a potential for tearing at the liner anchorages. This paper describes the methods and analyses used to quantify this liner back-pressure so that appropriate measures are included in the design of the liner and anchorage system. A pore pressure model is developed that calculates the pressure distribution across the concrete

  14. Differential-pressure-based fiber-optic temperature sensor using Fabry-Perot interferometry.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tiegen; Yin, Jinde; Jiang, Junfeng; Liu, Kun; Wang, Shuang; Zou, Shengliang

    2015-03-15

    We propose a novel fiber-optic Fabry-Perot interferometric (FFPI) temperature sensor based on differential pressure resulting from thermal expansion of sealed air. A thin silicon diaphragm is sandwiched between two micro-circular cavity-structured Pyrex plates to construct a FP and an air cavity. The thermal expansion of sealed air induces differential pressure variation between cavities and thus the deformation of thin diaphragm, which transfers temperature change into cavity length shift of FP interferometer. Theory analysis results indicate that the temperature-sensitivity can be designed flexibly by choosing the parameters of radius and thickness of silicon diaphragm, and the differential pressure between two cavities. Experimental results demonstrate that the temperature sensitivity of 6.07 nm/°C is achieved with the resolution of 0.10°C under the range of -50°C to 100°C, and the response time is around 1.3 s with temperature change from 28°C to 100°C. PMID:25768179

  15. High pressure phase transitions in lawsonite at simultaneous high pressure and temperature: A single crystal study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Bannon, E. F., III; Vennari, C.; Beavers, C. C. G.; Williams, Q. C.

    2015-12-01

    Lawsonite (CaAl2Si2O7(OH)2.H2O) is a hydrous mineral with a high overall water content of ~11.5 wt.%. It is a significant carrier of water in subduction zones to depths greater than ~150 km. The structure of lawsonite has been extensively studied under room temperature, high-pressure conditions. However, simultaneous high-pressure and high-temperature experiments are scarce. We have conducted synchrotron-based simultaneous high-pressure and temperature single crystal experiments on lawsonite up to a maximum pressure of 8.4 GPa at ambient and high temperatures. We used a natural sample of lawsonite from Valley Ford, California (Sonoma County). At room pressure and temperature lawsonite crystallizes in the orthorhombic system with Cmcm symmetry. Room temperature compression indicates that lawsonite remains in the orthorhombic Cmcm space group up to ~9.0 GPa. Our 5.0 GPa crystal structure is similar to the room pressure structure, and shows almost isotropic compression of the crystallographic axes. Unit cell parameters at 5.0 GPa are a- 5.7835(10), b- 8.694(2), and c- 13.009(3). Single-crystal measurements at simultaneous high-pressure and temperature (e.g., >8.0 GPa and ~100 oC) can be indexed to a monoclinic P-centered unit cell. Interestingly, a modest temperature increase of ~100 oC appears to initiate the orthorhombic to monoclinic phase transition at ~0.6-2.4 GPa lower than room temperature compression studies have shown. There is no evidence of dehydration or H atom disorder under these conditions. This suggests that the orthorhombic to monoclinic transition could be kinetically impeded at 298 K, and that monoclinic lawsonite could be the dominant water carrier through much of the depth range of upper mantle subduction processes.

  16. High Pressure/Temperature Metal Silicate Partitioning of Tungsten

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shofner, G. A.; Danielson, L.; Righter, K.; Campbell, A. J.

    2010-01-01

    The behavior of chemical elements during metal/silicate segregation and their resulting distribution in Earth's mantle and core provide insight into core formation processes. Experimental determination of partition coefficients allows calculations of element distributions that can be compared to accepted values of element abundances in the silicate (mantle) and metallic (core) portions of the Earth. Tungsten (W) is a moderately siderophile element and thus preferentially partitions into metal versus silicate under many planetary conditions. The partitioning behavior has been shown to vary with temperature, silicate composition, oxygen fugacity, and pressure. Most of the previous work on W partitioning has been conducted at 1-bar conditions or at relatively low pressures, i.e. <10 GPa, and in two cases at or near 20 GPa. According to those data, the stronger influences on the distribution coefficient of W are temperature, composition, and oxygen fugacity with a relatively slight influence in pressure. Predictions based on extrapolation of existing data and parameterizations suggest an increased pressured dependence on metal/ silicate partitioning of W at higher pressures 5. However, the dependence on pressure is not as well constrained as T, fO2, and silicate composition. This poses a problem because proposed equilibration pressures for core formation range from 27 to 50 GPa, falling well outside the experimental range, therefore requiring exptrapolation of a parametereized model. Higher pressure data are needed to improve our understanding of W partitioning at these more extreme conditions.

  17. Mechanical properties of heavy oil-sand and shale as a function of pressure and temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Blair, S.C.; Sweeney, J.J.; Ralph, W.R.; Ruddle, D.G.

    1987-07-01

    Laboratory tests were conducted to determine the mechanical properties of oil-sand and shale samples from the Faja region of Venezuela at elevated temperature and pressure. Results describe pressure-volume (PV) behavior at temperatures of 23 and 125/sup 0/C; the effect of mechanical disturbance on PV behavior; equation-of-state (EOS) at temperatures of 23, 125, and 250/sup 0/C and effective pressures to 150 MPa; and creep/compaction behavior at temperatures of 23 and 125/sup 0/C. Data from PV tests on oil-sand show that increasing temperature from 23 to 125/sup 0/C had very little effect on this material. Mechanical disturbance of oil-sand prior to PV testing lowered values of K. The compressive strength of oil-sand increased as effective (P/sub E/) was raised and at both temperatures, samples tested at equivalent P/sub E/ had similar strengths. Compressive strength of oil-sand seems to be controlled by the drainage of pore fluid during axial deformation. Nearly all oil-sand samples exhibited strain-hardening. PV tests conducted on shale show that increasing temperature from 23 to 125/sup 0/C reduced values of K one third. Mechanical disturbance significantly affected the PV response of shale samples due to the friable nature of the material. Data for shale samples tested in triaxial compression show that ultimate stress increases with increasing pressure and increasing temperature. Results of long-term creep compaction tests show a linear change in sample volume as a function of the log of time and that the rate of volume change with time was larger at 125/sup 0/C than at 23/sup 0/C for both oil-sand and shale. 4 refs., 31 figs., 6 tabs.

  18. Low temperature measurement of the vapor pressures of planetary molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kraus, George F.

    1989-01-01

    Interpretation of planetary observations and proper modeling of planetary atmospheres are critically upon accurate laboratory data for the chemical and physical properties of the constitutes of the atmospheres. It is important that these data are taken over the appropriate range of parameters such as temperature, pressure, and composition. Availability of accurate, laboratory data for vapor pressures and equilibrium constants of condensed species at low temperatures is essential for photochemical and cloud models of the atmospheres of the outer planets. In the absence of such data, modelers have no choice but to assume values based on an educated guess. In those cases where higher temperature data are available, a standard procedure is to extrapolate these points to the lower temperatures using the Clausius-Clapeyron equation. Last summer the vapor pressures of acetylene (C2H2) hydrogen cyanide (HCN), and cyanoacetylene (HC3N) was measured using two different methods. At the higher temperatures 1 torr and 10 torr capacitance manometers were used. To measure very low pressures, a technique was used which is based on the infrared absorption of thin film (TFIR). This summer the vapor pressure of acetylene was measured the TFIR method. The vapor pressure of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) was measured using capacitance manometers. Results for H2O agree with literature data over the common range of temperature. At the lower temperatures the data lie slightly below the values predicted by extrapolation of the Clausius-Clapeyron equation. Thin film infrared (TFIR) data for acetylene lie significantly below the values predicted by extrapolation. It is hoped to bridge the gap between the low end of the CM data and the upper end of the TFIR data in the future using a new spinning rotor gauge.

  19. Effect of the particular temperature field on a National Ignition Facility deformable mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, Qi; Huang, Lei; Ma, Xingkun; Xue, Qiao; Gong, Mali

    2016-09-01

    The changes caused by temperature in the surface shape of a deformable mirror used at the National Ignition Facility has been investigated previously. In this paper the temperature induced surface shape under different temperature fields is further studied. We find that the changes of the peak and valley (PV) or root-mean-square (RMS) value rely on the temperature gradient as well as the difference between the mirror and the environment with a certain rule. This work analyzes these quantitative relationship, using the finite element method. Some experiments were carried out to verify the analysis results. The conclusion provides guidance to minimize the effect of the temperature field on the surface shape. Considerations about how to improve the temperature induced faceplate in actual work are suggested finally.

  20. Dual pressure-dual temperature isotope exchange process

    DOEpatents

    Babcock, D.F.

    1974-02-12

    A liquid and a gas stream, each containing a desired isotope, flow countercurrently through two liquid-gas contacting towers maintained at different temperatures and pressures. The liquid is enriched in the isotope in one tower while the gas is enriched within the other and a portion of at least one of the enriched streams is withdrawn from the system for use or further enrichment. The tower operated at the lower temperature is also maintained at the lower pressure to prevent formation of solid solvates. Gas flow between the towers passes through an expander-compressor apparatas to recover work from the expansion of gas to the lower pressure and thereby compress the gas returning to the tower of higher pressure. (Official Gazette)

  1. High temperature monotonic and cyclic deformation in a directionally solidified nickel-base superalloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huron, Eric S.

    1986-01-01

    Directionally solidified (DS) MAR-M246+Hf was tested in tension and fatigue, at temperatures from 20 C to 1093 C. Tests were performed on (001) oriented specimens at strain rates of 50 % and 0.5 % per minute. In tension, the yield strength was constant up to 704 C, above which the strength dropped off rapidly. A strong dependence of strength on strain rate was seen at the higher temperatures. The deformation mode was observed to change from heterogeneous to homogeneous with increasing temperature. Low Cycle Fatigue tests were done using a fully reversed waveform and total strain control. For a given plastic strain range, lives increased with increasing temperature. For a given temperature strain rate had a strong effect on life. At 704 C, decreasing strain rates decreased life, while at the higher temperatures, decreasing strain rates increased life, for a given plastic strain range. These results could be explained through considerations of the deformation modes and stress levels. At the higher temperatures, marked coarsening caused beneficial stress reductions, but oxidation limited the life. The longitudinal grain boundaries were found to influence slip behavior. The degree of secondary slip adjacent to the boundaries was found to be related to the degree of misorientation between the grains.

  2. Modeling of high homologous temperature deformation behavior for stress and life-time analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Krempl, E.

    1997-12-31

    Stress and lifetime analyses need realistic and accurate constitutive models for the inelastic deformation behavior of engineering alloys at low and high temperatures. Conventional creep and plasticity models have fundamental difficulties in reproducing high homologous temperature behavior. To improve the modeling capabilities {open_quotes}unified{close_quotes} state variable theories were conceived. They consider all inelastic deformation rate-dependent and do not have separate repositories for creep and plasticity. The viscoplasticity theory based on overstress (VBO), one of the unified theories, is introduced and its properties are delineated. At high homologous temperature where secondary and tertiary creep are observed modeling is primarily accomplished by a static recovery term and a softening isotropic stress. At low temperatures creep is merely a manifestation of rate dependence. The primary creep modeled at low homologous temperature is due to the rate dependence of the flow law. The model is unaltered in the transition from low to high temperature except that the softening of the isotropic stress and the influence of the static recovery term increase with an increase of the temperature.

  3. Purkynĕ's description of pressure phosphenes and modern neurophysiological studies on the generation of phosphenes by eyeball deformation.

    PubMed

    Grüsser, O J; Grüsser-Cornehls, U; Hagner, M; Przybyszewski, A W

    1989-01-01

    (a) When a subject indents one of his eyeballs in total darkness, he immediately perceives light extending slowly across the whole visual field of the indented eye. The appearance and the time course of these pressure or deformation phosphenes are described. (b) With simultaneous binocular indentation of the eyeballs a flickering patterned phosphene is observed. (c) A short history of the research on pressure phosphenes and its consequences for the theories of vision is presented. (d) Purkynĕ's observations of monocular deformation phosphenes are described. He repeatedly noted patterned light structures, which most observers only perceive with simultaneous binocular eyeball deformation. It is suggested that Purkynĕ's deviating observations were caused by amblyopia of one eye. (e) The neurophysiological basis of the monocular pressure phosphenes was investigated by means of microelectrode recordings from single optic tract fibers. The activity of single retinal ganglion cells (on-center, off-center neurons, latency class I [Y-neurons] or latency class II [X-neurons]), was recorded in anaesthetized cats. Eyeball deformation in total darkness led to an activation of the on-center ganglion cells, while the off-center ganglion cells were inhibited. The latency and strength of this activation or inhibition varied considerably between different neurons, but were fairly constant in the same neuron when the eyeball indentation was repeated after a pause of 1-3 min. The latency and strength of neuronal activation or inhibition seemed to be dependent mainly upon the neuron location relative to the point of eyeball indentation. Some on-center neurons also exhibited a short activation at "deformation off". (f) The antagonistic response type of on-center and off-center ganglion cells was also observed when the eyeball was deformed as a hydrostatic open system and the intraocular pressure was kept at 25 mm Hg basic pressure. (g) Dark adaptation up to 45 min affected the

  4. Passive Resistor Temperature Compensation for a High-Temperature Piezoresistive Pressure Sensor.

    PubMed

    Yao, Zong; Liang, Ting; Jia, Pinggang; Hong, Yingping; Qi, Lei; Lei, Cheng; Zhang, Bin; Li, Wangwang; Zhang, Diya; Xiong, Jijun

    2016-01-01

    The main limitation of high-temperature piezoresistive pressure sensors is the variation of output voltage with operating temperature, which seriously reduces their measurement accuracy. This paper presents a passive resistor temperature compensation technique whose parameters are calculated using differential equations. Unlike traditional experiential arithmetic, the differential equations are independent of the parameter deviation among the piezoresistors of the microelectromechanical pressure sensor and the residual stress caused by the fabrication process or a mismatch in the thermal expansion coefficients. The differential equations are solved using calibration data from uncompensated high-temperature piezoresistive pressure sensors. Tests conducted on the calibrated equipment at various temperatures and pressures show that the passive resistor temperature compensation produces a remarkable effect. Additionally, a high-temperature signal-conditioning circuit is used to improve the output sensitivity of the sensor, which can be reduced by the temperature compensation. Compared to traditional experiential arithmetic, the proposed passive resistor temperature compensation technique exhibits less temperature drift and is expected to be highly applicable for pressure measurements in harsh environments with large temperature variations. PMID:27455271

  5. Passive Resistor Temperature Compensation for a High-Temperature Piezoresistive Pressure Sensor.

    PubMed

    Yao, Zong; Liang, Ting; Jia, Pinggang; Hong, Yingping; Qi, Lei; Lei, Cheng; Zhang, Bin; Li, Wangwang; Zhang, Diya; Xiong, Jijun

    2016-07-22

    The main limitation of high-temperature piezoresistive pressure sensors is the variation of output voltage with operating temperature, which seriously reduces their measurement accuracy. This paper presents a passive resistor temperature compensation technique whose parameters are calculated using differential equations. Unlike traditional experiential arithmetic, the differential equations are independent of the parameter deviation among the piezoresistors of the microelectromechanical pressure sensor and the residual stress caused by the fabrication process or a mismatch in the thermal expansion coefficients. The differential equations are solved using calibration data from uncompensated high-temperature piezoresistive pressure sensors. Tests conducted on the calibrated equipment at various temperatures and pressures show that the passive resistor temperature compensation produces a remarkable effect. Additionally, a high-temperature signal-conditioning circuit is used to improve the output sensitivity of the sensor, which can be reduced by the temperature compensation. Compared to traditional experiential arithmetic, the proposed passive resistor temperature compensation technique exhibits less temperature drift and is expected to be highly applicable for pressure measurements in harsh environments with large temperature variations.

  6. Passive Resistor Temperature Compensation for a High-Temperature Piezoresistive Pressure Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Zong; Liang, Ting; Jia, Pinggang; Hong, Yingping; Qi, Lei; Lei, Cheng; Zhang, Bin; Li, Wangwang; Zhang, Diya; Xiong, Jijun

    2016-01-01

    The main limitation of high-temperature piezoresistive pressure sensors is the variation of output voltage with operating temperature, which seriously reduces their measurement accuracy. This paper presents a passive resistor temperature compensation technique whose parameters are calculated using differential equations. Unlike traditional experiential arithmetic, the differential equations are independent of the parameter deviation among the piezoresistors of the microelectromechanical pressure sensor and the residual stress caused by the fabrication process or a mismatch in the thermal expansion coefficients. The differential equations are solved using calibration data from uncompensated high-temperature piezoresistive pressure sensors. Tests conducted on the calibrated equipment at various temperatures and pressures show that the passive resistor temperature compensation produces a remarkable effect. Additionally, a high-temperature signal-conditioning circuit is used to improve the output sensitivity of the sensor, which can be reduced by the temperature compensation. Compared to traditional experiential arithmetic, the proposed passive resistor temperature compensation technique exhibits less temperature drift and is expected to be highly applicable for pressure measurements in harsh environments with large temperature variations. PMID:27455271

  7. Grain boundary sliding in aluminum nano-bi-crystals deformed at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Aitken, Zachary H; Jang, Dongchan; Weinberger, Christopher R; Greer, Julia R

    2014-01-15

    Room-temperature uniaxial compressions of 900-nm-diameter aluminum bi-crystals, each containing a high-angle grain boundary with a plane normal inclined at 24° to the loading direction, revealed frictional sliding along the boundary plane to be the dominant deformation mechanism. The top crystallite sheared off as a single unit in the course of compression instead of crystallographic slip and extensive dislocation activity, as would be expected. Compressive stress strain data of deforming nano bicrystals was continuous, in contrast to single crystalline nano structures that show a stochastic stress strain signature, and displayed a peak in stress at the elastic limit of ~ 176 MPa followed by gradual softening and a plateau centered around ~ 125 MPa. An energetics-based physical model, which may explain observed room-temperature grain boundary sliding, in presented, and observations are discussed within the framework of crystalline nano-plasticity and defect microstructure evolution.

  8. Grain boundary sliding in aluminum nano-bi-crystals deformed at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Aitken, Zachary H; Jang, Dongchan; Weinberger, Christopher R; Greer, Julia R

    2014-01-15

    Room-temperature uniaxial compressions of 900-nm-diameter aluminum bi-crystals, each containing a high-angle grain boundary with a plane normal inclined at 24° to the loading direction, revealed frictional sliding along the boundary plane to be the dominant deformation mechanism. The top crystallite sheared off as a single unit in the course of compression instead of crystallographic slip and extensive dislocation activity, as would be expected. Compressive stress strain data of deforming nano bicrystals was continuous, in contrast to single crystalline nano structures that show a stochastic stress strain signature, and displayed a peak in stress at the elastic limit of ~ 176 MPa followed by gradual softening and a plateau centered around ~ 125 MPa. An energetics-based physical model, which may explain observed room-temperature grain boundary sliding, in presented, and observations are discussed within the framework of crystalline nano-plasticity and defect microstructure evolution. PMID:23873787

  9. Alloy synthesis using the mach stem region in an axial symmetric implosive shock: Understanding the pressure strain-temperature contributions

    SciTech Connect

    Staudhammer, Karl P.

    2004-01-01

    The Mach stem region in an axial symmetric shock implosion has generally been avoided in the dynamic consolidation of powders for a number of reasons. The prime reason being that the convergence of the shock waves in the cylindrical axis produce enormous pressures and concomitant temperatures that have melted tungsten. This shock wave convergence consequently results in a discontinuity in the hydro-code calculations. Dynamic deformation experiments on gold plated 304L stainless steel powders were undertaken. These experiments utilized pressures of 0.08 to 1.0 Mbar and contained a symmetric radial melt region along the central axis of the sample holder. To understand the role of deformation in a porous material, the pressure, and temperature as well as the deformation heat and associated defects must be accounted for. When the added heat of consolidation deformation exceeds the melt temperature of the 304 powders, a melt zone results that can consume large regions of the compact while still under the high-pressure pulse. As the shock wave traverses the sample and is removed in a momentum trap, its pressure/temperature are quenched. It is within this region that very high diffusion/alloying occurs and has been observed in the gold plated powders. Anomalous increases of gold diffusion into 304 stainless steel have been observed via optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and EDAX measurements. Values exceeding 1200 m/sec have been measured and correlated to the powder sizes, size distribution and packing density, concomitant with sample container strains ranging from 2.0% to 26%.

  10. Magnetically Orchestrated Formation of Diamond at Lower Temperatures and Pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Little, Reginald B.; Lochner, Eric; Goddard, Robert

    2005-01-01

    Man's curiosity and fascination with diamonds date back to ancient times. The knowledge of the many properties of diamond is recorded during Biblical times. Antoine Lavoisier determined the composition of diamond by burning in O2 to form CO2. With the then existing awareness of graphite as carbon, the race began to convert graphite to diamond. The selective chemical synthesis of diamond has been pursued by Cagniard, Hannay, Moisson and Parson. On the basis of the thermodynamically predicted equilibrium line of diamond and graphite, P W Bridgman attempted extraordinary conditions of high temperature (>2200°C) and pressure (>100,000 atm) for the allotropic conversion of graphite to diamond. H T Hall was the first to successfully form bulk diamond by realizing the kinetic restrictions to Bridgman's (thermodynamic) high pressure high temperature direct allotropic conversion. Moreover, Hall identified catalysts for the faster kinetics of diamond formation. H M Strong determined the import of the liquid catalyst during Hall's catalytic synthesis. W G Eversole discovered the slow metastable low pressure diamond formation by pyrolytic chemical vapor deposition with the molecular hydrogen etching of the rapidly forming stable graphitic carbon. J C Angus determined the import of atomic hydrogen for faster etching for faster diamond growth at low pressure. S Matsumoto has developed plasma and hot filament technology for faster hydrogen and carbon radical generations at low pressure for faster diamond formation. However the metastable low pressure chemical vapor depositions by plasma and hot filament are prone to polycrystalline films. From Bridgman to Hall to Eversole, Angus and Matsumoto, much knowledge has developed of the importance of pressure, temperature, transition metal catalyst, liquid state of metal (metal radicals atoms) and the carbon radical intermediates for diamond synthesis. Here we advance this understanding of diamond formation by demonstrating the external

  11. High-pressure-low-temperature x-ray power diffractometer.

    PubMed

    Syassen, K; Holzapfel, W B

    1978-08-01

    A high-pressure technique for x-ray diffraction studies at low temperatures is described. The system consists of a Bridgman anvil type high-pressure device with either tungsten carbide or boron carbide anvils, a liquid He cryostat, and x-ray diffractometer operating in Debye-Scherrer geometry. The newly developed boron carbide anvil cell is capable of containing a liquid pressure transmitting medium. The precision of the lattice parameter determination is discussed and the effect of nonisostatic stress components on the diffraction pattern is examined.

  12. Influence of time, temperature, confining pressure and fluid content on the experimental compaction of spherical grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, M.; Vidal, O.; Wunder, B.; Renard, F.

    2007-08-01

    Theoretical models of compaction processes, such as for example intergranular pressure-solution (IPS), focus on deformation occurring at the contacts between spherical grains that constitute an aggregate. In order to investigate the applicability of such models, and to quantify the deformation of particles within an aggregate, isostatic experiments were performed in cold-sealed vessels on glass sphere aggregates at 200 MPa confining pressure and 350 °C with varying amounts of fluid. Several runs were performed in order to investigate the effects of time, fluid content, pressure and temperature, by varying one of these parameters and holding the others fixed. In order to compare the aggregates with natural materials, similar experiments were also performed using quartz sand instead of glass spheres. Experiments with quartz show evidence of IPS, but the strain could not be quantified. Experiments with glass spheres show evidence of several types of deformation processes: both brittle (fracturing) and ductile (plastic flow and fluid-enhanced deformation, such as IPS). In experiments with a large amount of water (≥ 5 vol.%), dissolution and recrystallization of the glass spheres also occurred, coupled with crystallization of new material filling the initial porosity. Experiments performed with a fluid content of less than 1 vol.% indicate creep behavior that is typical of glass deformation, following an exponential law. These experiments can also be made to fit a power law for creep, with a stress exponent of n = 10.5 ± 2.2 in both dry and wet experiments. However, the pre-factor of the power law creep increases 5 times with the addition of water, showing the strong effect of water on the deformation rate. These simple and low-cost experiments provide new insights on the rheology of soda-lime glass, which is used in analogue experiments, and of glass-bearing rocks under mid-crustal P- T conditions. They also highlight the strong enhancement of plasticity of natural

  13. Soft Wire Seals For High Temperatures And Pressures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsou, Peter

    1996-01-01

    Soft metal wires used to make O-ring and similar seals for vessels, flanges, and fittings subject to pressures equal to or greater than 1,000 psi and temperatures equal to or greater than 100 degrees C. Seals containing soft metal wires made inexpensively because fabricated to looser tolerances like those of lower-temperature, lower-pressure elastomeric-O-ring seals, which they resemble. Seals also made with noncircular grooves and with soft metals other than aluminum. For example, gold performs well, though expensive. For other applications, silver good choice.

  14. Temperature Induced Voltage Offset Drifts in Silicon Carbide Pressure Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okojie, Robert S.; Lukco, Dorothy; Nguyen, Vu; Savrun, Ender

    2012-01-01

    We report the reduction of transient drifts in the zero pressure offset voltage in silicon carbide (SiC) pressure sensors when operating at 600 C. The previously observed maximum drift of +/- 10 mV of the reference offset voltage at 600 C was reduced to within +/- 5 mV. The offset voltage drifts and bridge resistance changes over time at test temperature are explained in terms of the microstructure and phase changes occurring within the contact metallization, as analyzed by Auger electron spectroscopy and field emission scanning electron microscopy. The results have helped to identify the upper temperature reliable operational limit of this particular metallization scheme to be 605 C.

  15. LHDAC setup for high temperature and high pressure studies

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, Nishant N. Meenakshi, S. Sharma, Surinder M.

    2014-04-24

    A ytterbium fibre laser (λ = 1.07 μm) based laser heated diamond anvil cell (LHDAC) facility has been recently set up at HP and SRPD, BARC for simultaneous high temperature and high pressure investigation of material properties. Synthesis of GaN was carried out at pressure of ∼9 GPa and temperature of ∼1925 K in a Mao-Bell type diamond anvil cell (DAC) using the LHDAC facility. The retrieved sample has been characterized using our laboratory based micro Raman setup.

  16. Pressure and Temperature Sensors Using Two Spin Crossover Materials

    PubMed Central

    Jureschi, Catalin-Maricel; Linares, Jorge; Boulmaali, Ayoub; Dahoo, Pierre Richard; Rotaru, Aurelian; Garcia, Yann

    2016-01-01

    The possibility of a new design concept for dual spin crossover based sensors for concomitant detection of both temperature and pressure is presented. It is conjectured from numerical results obtained by mean field approximation applied to a Ising-like model that using two different spin crossover compounds containing switching molecules with weak elastic interactions it is possible to simultaneously measure P and T. When the interaction parameters are optimized, the spin transition is gradual and for each spin crossover compounds, both temperature and pressure values being identified from their optical densities. This concept offers great perspectives for smart sensing devices. PMID:26848663

  17. Temperature, Humidity, Wind and Pressure Sensors (THWAPS) Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Ritsche, MT

    2011-01-17

    The temperature, humidity, wind, and pressure system (THWAPS) provide surface reference values of these measurements for balloon-borne sounding system (SONDE) launches. The THWAPS is located adjacent to the SONDE launch site at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Central Facility. The THWAPS system is a combination of calibration-quality instruments intended to provide accurate measurements of meteorological conditions near the surface. Although the primary use of the system is to provide accurate surface reference values of temperature, pressure, relative humidity (RH), and wind velocity for comparison with radiosonde readings, the system includes a data logger to record time series of the measured variables.

  18. The geometry and high-temperature brittle deformation of the Skaergaard Intrusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norton, Denis; Taylor, H. P., Jr.; Bird, Dennis K.

    1984-11-01

    permeability of the layered gabbro decreased with time because the flow channels were sealed by high-temperature mineral deposition. We thus conclude the following: (1) layered gabbros fracture in response to local stress at conditions just below their solidus temperature if the confining pressures are typical of the upper crust. This observation contravenes the conceptual viewpoint that the style of deformation at such elevated temperatures is only by plastic flow, and (2) because an extensive fracture network develops at these near-solidus temperatures in layered gabbros, the bulk of the hydrothermal alteration of such bodies takes place at extremely high temperatures. This helps clarify the apparent paradox that extreme 18O depletions are found in "fresh" layered gabbros.

  19. Bicephality, a seldom occurring developmental deformity in Tegenaria atrica caused by alternating temperatures.

    PubMed

    Napiórkowska, Teresa; Napiórkowski, Paweł; Templin, Julita; Wołczuk, Katarzyna

    2016-08-01

    The experiment was aimed at demonstrating the relationship between deformities of the front part of the prosoma accompanied by changes in the brain structure in bicephalous Tegenaria atrica and exposure of their embryos to temperature fluctuations. By exposing spider embryos to alternating temperatures of 14 and 32°C for the first 10 days of embryonic development, we obtained eight two-headed individuals, subsequently divided into three groups according to morphological differences. We described in detail morphological abnormalities of the prosoma identified in members of each group. Histological examination confirmed a close relationship between morphological deformities and the brain structure of teratogenically changed spiders. The fusion of appendages (pedipalps and chalicerae) was accompanied by the fusion of corresponding ganglia. The absence of appendages (pedipalps) was accompanied by the absence of corresponding ganglia. This correlation may have resulted from previously impaired neuromere development which led to changes in the morphological structure of the prosoma. Since no deformities were identified in control animals, it can be concluded that bicephaly was caused by exposing embryos to alternating temperatures. PMID:27503724

  20. Bicephality, a seldom occurring developmental deformity in Tegenaria atrica caused by alternating temperatures.

    PubMed

    Napiórkowska, Teresa; Napiórkowski, Paweł; Templin, Julita; Wołczuk, Katarzyna

    2016-08-01

    The experiment was aimed at demonstrating the relationship between deformities of the front part of the prosoma accompanied by changes in the brain structure in bicephalous Tegenaria atrica and exposure of their embryos to temperature fluctuations. By exposing spider embryos to alternating temperatures of 14 and 32°C for the first 10 days of embryonic development, we obtained eight two-headed individuals, subsequently divided into three groups according to morphological differences. We described in detail morphological abnormalities of the prosoma identified in members of each group. Histological examination confirmed a close relationship between morphological deformities and the brain structure of teratogenically changed spiders. The fusion of appendages (pedipalps and chalicerae) was accompanied by the fusion of corresponding ganglia. The absence of appendages (pedipalps) was accompanied by the absence of corresponding ganglia. This correlation may have resulted from previously impaired neuromere development which led to changes in the morphological structure of the prosoma. Since no deformities were identified in control animals, it can be concluded that bicephaly was caused by exposing embryos to alternating temperatures.

  1. Structural Evolution and Mechanical Properties of a VT22 Titanium Alloy Under High-Temperature Deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratochka, I. V.; Mishin, I. P.; Lykova, O. N.; Naydenkin, E. V.; Varlamova, N. V.

    2016-07-01

    The special features inherent in the development of high-temperature deformation and structural evolution in materials are investigated, using a VT22 titanium alloy of the transition class (Ti - 4.74 mass% Al - 5.57 mass% Mo - 5.04 mass% V) subjected to helical rolling + aging as an example. This treatment is found to give rise to an intragrain fine acicular martensite structure with fine inclusions of α-phase particles of size ~1 μm. It is shown that in the alloy undergoing plastic deformation at temperatures approaching the polymorphic transformation temperature, the elongation to failure is in excess of 300%. The high plasticity of the alloy in the conditions considered is likely to be due to vigorous development of phase transformations and intensification of diffusion-controlled processes, including the effects of the evolution of the dislocation structure, growth of subgrains, and formation of new grains in the bulk of the pre-existing ones during plastic deformation.

  2. ACCEPT: a three-dimensional finite element program for large deformation elastic-plastic-creep analysis of pressurized tubes (LWBR/AWBA Development Program)

    SciTech Connect

    Hutula, D.N.; Wiancko, B.E.

    1980-03-01

    ACCEPT is a three-dimensional finite element computer program for analysis of large-deformation elastic-plastic-creep response of Zircaloy tubes subjected to temperature, surface pressures, and axial force. A twenty-mode, tri-quadratic, isoparametric element is used along with a Zircaloy materials model. A linear time-incremental procedure with residual force correction is used to solve for the time-dependent response. The program features an algorithm which automatically chooses the time step sizes to control the accuracy and numerical stability of the solution. A contact-separation capability allows modeling of interaction of reactor fuel rod cladding with fuel pellets or external supports.

  3. High pressure-low temperature processing of food proteins.

    PubMed

    Dumay, Eliane; Picart, Laetitia; Regnault, Stéphanie; Thiebaud, Maryse

    2006-03-01

    High pressure-low temperature (HP-LT) processing is of interest in the food field in view of: (i) obtaining a "cold" pasteurisation effect, the level of microbial inactivation being higher after pressurisation at low or sub-zero than at ambient temperature; (ii) limiting the negative impact of atmospheric pressure freezing on food structures. The specific effects of freezing by fast pressure release on the formation of ice I crystals have been investigated on oil in water emulsions stabilized by proteins, and protein gels, showing the formation of a high number of small ice nuclei compared to the long needle-shaped crystals obtained by conventional freezing at 0.1 MPa. It was therefore of interest to study the effects of HP-LT processing on unfolding or dissociation/aggregation phenomena in food proteins, in view of minimizing or controlling structural changes and aggregation reactions, and/or of improving protein functional properties. In the present studies, the effects of HP-LT have been investigated on protein models such as (i) beta-lactoglobulin, i.e., a whey protein with a well known 3-D structure, and (ii) casein micelles, i.e., the main milk protein components, the supramolecular structure of which is not fully elucidated. The effects of HP-LT processing was studied up to 300 MPa at low or sub-zero temperatures and after pressure release, or up to 200 MPa by UV spectroscopy under pressure, allowing to follow reversible structural changes. Pressurisation of approximately 2% beta-lactoglobulin solutions up to 300 MPa at low/subzero temperatures minimizes aggregation reactions, as measured after pressure release. In parallel, such low temperature treatments enhanced the size reduction of casein micelles.

  4. Pressure-Sensitive System for Gas-Temperature Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cesaro, Richard S; Matz, Norman

    1948-01-01

    A thermodynamic relation is derived and simplified for use as a temperature-limiting control equation involving measurement of gas temperature before combustion and gas pressures before and after combustion. For critical flow in the turbine nozzles of gas-turbine engines, the control equation is further simplified to require only measurements upstream of the burner. Hypothetical control systems are discussed to illustrate application of the control equations.

  5. Determination of the SSME high pressure oxidizer turbopump bearing temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naerheim, Y.; Stocker, P. J.; Lumsden, J. B.

    1988-01-01

    The SSME high pressure liquid oxygen turbopump (HPOTP) bearings sometimes wear and experience heating and oxidation of the ball and raceway surfaces. So far it has been impossible to measure the temperature of the bearings directly during operation of the turbopumps. However, a method was developed for determining the surface temperature of the bearings from the composition of the oxides using oxidation samples for calibration and Auger Electron Spectroscopy (AES) for chemical analysis.

  6. Pressure solution in sandstones: influence of clays and dependence on temperature and stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renard, François; Ortoleva, Peter; Gratier, Jean Pierre

    1997-10-01

    The enhancement of dissolution of quartz under the influence of clays has been recognized in sandstones for many years. It is well known that a grain of quartz in contact with a clay flake dissolves faster than when in contact with another grain of quartz. This phenomenon promotes silica transfer during the diagenesis of sandstones and is responsible of deformation and porosity variations. Here we make an attempt to explain the process of this rock deformation using a pressure solution mechanism. The model of water film diffusion assumes that matter is dissolved inside the contact between two grains. The resulting solutes are transported to the pore fluid through diffusion along an adsorbed water film. Between two micas, this trapped film is thicker than between two grains of quartz. As a consequence diffusion is easier and the rate of pressure solution faster. Experiments on pressure solution show that diffusion controls the mechanism at great depth whereas a model based on natural mica indentation indicates that kinetics is the limiting process through the precipitation rate of quartz at low depth, thus temperature is a crucial parameter. There should be a transition between thermally controlled rate and diffusion limited evolution.

  7. Modelling the rheology of MgO under Earth's mantle pressure, temperature and strain rates.

    PubMed

    Cordier, Patrick; Amodeo, Jonathan; Carrez, Philippe

    2012-01-12

    Plate tectonics, which shapes the surface of Earth, is the result of solid-state convection in Earth's mantle over billions of years. Simply driven by buoyancy forces, mantle convection is complicated by the nature of the convecting materials, which are not fluids but polycrystalline rocks. Crystalline materials can flow as the result of the motion of defects--point defects, dislocations, grain boundaries and so on. Reproducing in the laboratory the extreme deformation conditions of the mantle is extremely challenging. In particular, experimental strain rates are at least six orders of magnitude larger than in nature. Here we show that the rheology of MgO at the pressure, temperature and strain rates of the mantle is accessible by multiscale numerical modelling starting from first principles and with no adjustable parameters. Our results demonstrate that extremely low strain rates counteract the influence of pressure. In the mantle, MgO deforms in the athermal regime and this leads to a very weak phase. It is only in the lowermost lower mantle that the pressure effect could dominate and that, under the influence of lattice friction, a viscosity of the order of 10(21)-10(22) pascal seconds can be defined for MgO. PMID:22237109

  8. Hot Deformation Behavior of Alloy 800H at Intermediate Temperatures: Constitutive Models and Microstructure Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Y.; Di, H. S.; Misra, R. D. K.; Zhang, Jiecen

    2014-12-01

    The hot deformation behavior of a Fe-Ni-Cr austenitic Alloy 800H was explored in the intermediate temperature range of 825-975 °C and strain rate range of 0.01-10 s-1. The study indicates that dynamic recrystallization (DRX) occurred at 875-975 °C for strain rates of 0.01-0.1 s-1 and adiabatic heating generated at high strain rates accelerated the DRX process. Based on the experimental data, the Johnson-Cook, modified Johnson-Cook, and Arrhenius-type constitutive models were established to predict the flow stress during hot deformation. A comparative study was made on the accuracy and effectiveness of the above three developed models. The microstructure analysis indicated that all the deformation structures exhibited elongated grains and evidence of some degree of DRX. The multiple DRX at 975 °C and 0.01 s-1 led to an increase in the intensity of {001} <100> "cube" texture component and a significant reduction in the intensity of {011} <211> "brass" component. Additionally, the average values of grain average misorientation and grain orientation spread for deformed microstructure were inversely proportional to the fraction of DRX.

  9. A continuum deformation theory for metal-matrix composites at high temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, D. N.

    1987-01-01

    A continuum theory is presented for representing the high temperature, time dependent, hereditary deformation behavior of metallic composites that can be idealized as pseudohomogeneous continua with locally definable directional characteristics. Homogenization of textured materials (molecular, granular, fibrous) and applicability of continuum mechanics in structural applications depends on characteristic body dimensions, the severity of gradients (stress, temperature, etc.) in the structure and the relative size of the internal structure (cell size) of the material. The point of view taken here is that the composite is a material in its own right, with its own properties that can be measured and specified for the composite as a whole.

  10. INELASTIC PROPERTIES OF ICE I//h AT LOW TEMPERATURES AND HIGH PRESSURES.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kirby, S.H.; Durham, W.B.; Beeman, M.L.; Heard, H.C.; Daley, M.A.

    1987-01-01

    The aim of our research programme is to explore the rheological behavior of H//2O ices under conditions appropriate to the interiors of the icy satellites of the outer planets in order to give insight into their deformation. To this end, we have performed over 100 constant-strain-rate compression tests at pressures to 500 MPa and temperatures as low as 77 K. At P greater than 30 MPa, ice I//h fails by a shear instability producing faults in the maximum shear stress orientation and failure strength typically is independent of pressure. This unusual faulting behavior is thought to be connected with phase transformations localized in the shear zones. The steady-state strength follows rheological laws of the thermally-activated power-law type, with different flow law parameters depending on the range of test temperatures. The flow laws will be discussed with reference to the operating deformation mechanisms as deduced from optical-scale microstructures and comparison with other work.

  11. High-Pressure X-ray Tomography Microscope: Synchrotron Computed Microtomography at High Pressure and Temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Y.; Uchida, T.; Westferro, F.; Rivers, M.L.; Gebhardt, J.; Lesher, C.E.; Sutton, S.R.

    2010-07-20

    A new apparatus has been developed for microtomography studies under high pressure. The pressure generation mechanism is based on the concept of the widely used Drickamer anvil apparatus, with two opposed anvils compressed inside a containment ring. Modifications are made with thin aluminum alloy containment rings to allow transmission of x rays. Pressures up to 8 GPa have been generated with a hydraulic load of 25 T. The modified Drickamer cell is supported by thrust bearings so that the entire pressure cell can be rotated under load. Spatial resolution of the high pressure tomography apparatus has been evaluated using a sample containing vitreous carbon spheres embedded in FeS matrix, with diameters ranging from 0.01 to 0.2 mm. Spheres with diameters as small as 0.02 mm were well resolved, with measured surface-to-volume ratios approaching theoretical values. The sample was then subject to a large shear strain field by twisting the top and bottom Drickamer anvils. Imaging analysis showed that detailed microstructure evolution information can be obtained at various steps of the shear deformation, allowing strain partition determination between the matrix and the inclusions. A sample containing a vitreous Mg{sub 2}SiO{sub 4} sphere in FeS matrix was compressed to 5 GPa, in order to evaluate the feasibility of volume measurement by microtomography. The results demonstrated that quantitative inclusion volume information can be obtained, permitting in situ determination of P-V-T equation of state for noncrystalline materials.

  12. Magma-plumbing System of Asama Volcano after 2004 Eruption, Estimated from Vertical Deformation above the Presumed Pressure Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimata, F.

    2012-12-01

    Asama volcano is one of the active volcanoes in Japan, and it erupted on September 1, 2004. A shallow dike intrusion is estimated in the Takamine, 4 - 5 km west of the Asama crater from the ground deformation detected by GPS measurements (Aoki et al., 2005). Ground deformation observation close to the pressure source should clarify the depth and volume change of pressure sources. We establish the precise leveling routes ranging to Mt. Takamine above the presumed pressure source from Oiwake, at the southern foot of Asama volcano in May 2005.The precise levelings have practiced seven times for five years since May 2005 to June 2011. We calculated the vertical deformation for six-months or two-years between leveling epochs. Generally, deformations detected by the precise leveling are small of 10 mm. Deformations detected in the periods of May 2005 - Nov.2005. - May 2006 - May 2009 - June 2010 - June 2011, are grouping two patterns. One is definite subsidence, and another is slight uplift. Murakami (2005) discusses the line length changes between two GPS sites of Tsumagoi and Tobu, and he shows that the extension of line length just before the eruption in 2004 and 2009 and contraction between the eruption. Slight uplifts in the periods of May 2005 - May 2006 are corresponding to the period observed the extension, and subsidence in the periods of May 2006 - May 2007, May 2009 - June 2010, and June 2010 - June 2011. Two pressures sources are estimated from the ground deformation detected by precise leveling. One is a deeper spherical deflation source in the 6 km BSL depth beneath the mountainside, and another is the shallow dike intrusion beneath Mt. Takamine. A pressure source model was previously estimated from the leveling data for last 100 years (Murase et al., 2007), and it is suggestive a dominant source of the Asama volcano. They suggest a slight inflation after 1960, however our results show the deflation of -6.6 km3/6yr in the deeper sources for five years after

  13. Sulfidation kinetics of dolomite at high pressure and high temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Misro, S.K.; Jadhav, R.; Gupta, H.; Agnihotri, R.; Chauk, S.; Fan, L.S.

    1999-07-01

    Kinetic studies of the dolomite sulfidation reaction are carried out at high pressure (15 atm) and high temperature (600--900 C) in a differential bed flow-through reactor. The dolomite particles are exposed to simulated coal gas environments and the extent of conversion determined. Experiments are carried out to determine the influence of total pressure, reaction temperature and partial pressure of H{sub 2}S on the extent of fully calcined dolomite (FCD) sulfidation. Based on the grain theory it is found that towards the later stages of the reaction the FCD sulfidation is product layer diffusion controlled. The reaction is found to be first order with respect to H{sub 2}S partial pressure. A low apparent activation energy of 4.6 kcal/gmol for the product layer diffusion controlled reaction is attributed to the presence of porous MgO along with the low porosity CaS product layer. A comparison of the performance of dolomite and limestone as sorbents for desulfurization shows that dolomite is a better sorbent with higher conversions even at higher CO{sub 2} partial pressures. The high pressure sulfidation kinetic data obtained in this study would be useful in understanding and optimizing the in-gasifier H{sub 2}S capture using dolomite sorbents.

  14. Thermal diffusivity of igneous rocks at elevated pressure and temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Durham, W.B.; Mirkovich, V.V.; Heard, H.C.

    1987-10-10

    Thermal diffusivity measurements of seven igneous rocks were made to temperatures of 400 /sup 0/C and pressures of 200 MPa. The measuring method was based on the concept of cylindrical symmetry and periodic heat pulses. The seven rocks measured were Westerly (Rhode Island) granite, Climax Stock (Nevada) quartz monzonite, Pomona (Washington) basalt, Atikokan (Ontario, Canada) granite, Creighton (Ontario, Canada) gabbro, East Bull Lake (Ontario, Canada) gabbro, and Stripa (Sweden) granite. The diffusivity of all the rocks showed a positive linear dependence on inverse temperature and, excluding the East Bull Lake gabbro, showed a linear dependence on quartz content. (Quartz content varied from 0 to 31% by volume.) Diffusivity in all cases rose or remained steady with increasing confining pressure. The pressure effect was strongest at lowest pressures and vanished by levels between 10 and 100 MPa, depending on rock type. The pressure effect (measured as a percentage change in diffusivity) is stronger in the four rocks of granite composition than in the three of basaltic composition. Our results agree well with existing thermal diffusivity measurements at atmospheric pressure.

  15. High-temperature pressure-coupled ultrasonic waveguide

    DOEpatents

    Caines, M.J.

    1981-02-11

    A pressure coupled ultrasonic waveguide is provided to which one end may be attached a transducer and at the other end a high temperature material for continuous ultrasonic testing of the material. The ultrasonic signal is coupled from the waveguide into the material through a thin, dry copper foil.

  16. Mixture including hydrogen and hydrocarbon having pressure-temperature stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mao, Wendy L. (Inventor); Mao, Ho-Kwang (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    The invention relates to a method of storing hydrogen that employs a mixture of hydrogen and a hydrocarbon that can both be used as fuel. In one embodiment, the method involves maintaining a mixture including hydrogen and a hydrocarbon in the solid state at ambient pressure and a temperature in excess of about 10 K.

  17. "Deflategate": Time, Temperature, and Moisture Effects on Football Pressure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blumenthal, Jack; Beljak, Lauren; Macatangay, Dahlia-Marie; Helmuth-Malone, Lilly; McWilliams, Catharina; Raptis, Sofia

    2016-01-01

    In a recent paper in "The Physics Teacher (TPT)", DiLisi and Rarick used the National Football League "Deflategate" controversy to introduce to physics students the physics of a bouncing ball. In this paper, we measure and analyze the environmental effects of time, ambient temperature, and moisture on the internal pressure of…

  18. Properties of planetary fluids at high shock pressures and temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Nellis, W.J.; Mitchell, A.C.; Holmes, N.C.; McCandless, P.C.

    1991-03-01

    Models of the interiors of Uranus and Neptune are discussed. Pressures and temperatures in the interiors can be achieved in representative constituent molecular fluids by shock compression. Experimental techniques are described and recent results for synthetic Uranus and hydrogen are discussed. 19 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Temperature measurement of cryogenic nitrogen jets at supercritical pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tani, H.; Teramoto, S.; Toki, T.; Yoshida, S.; Yamaguchi, K.; Okamoto, K.

    2016-07-01

    The temperatures of transcritical and supercritical nitrogen jets were measured to explore the influence of "pseudovaporization" upon cryogenic propellant mixing in high-pressure rocket chambers. Pseudovaporization is the large thermodynamic transition near the pseudocritical temperature under transcritical conditions, which can include a drastic density change and large peak of isobaric specific heat. A decline in the rise of temperature along the jet centerline of the transcritical jet was caused at the position where the local temperature reached nearpseudocritical temperature. This can be considered to be due to the large peak of isobaric specific heat. The density jump appeared near the pseudocritical temperature, which can be correlated to the sudden expansion due to pseudovaporization. The axial profiles of the temperature and density of the supercritical jet monotonically increased and decreased, respectively, in the downstream region of the end of the jet potential core. Similar to the axial profiles, the radial profiles of the temperature were influenced by the pseudovaporization - i. e., the temperature rise in the radial direction became very shallow in the region where the local temperature was still lower than the pseudocritical temperature. The full width at half maximum of the density profiles stayed almost constant further downstream of the end of the jet potential core, whereas that of the mass fraction profiles of the incompressible variable-density jet began to increase near the end of the potential core. Hence, the evolutions of jet mixing layers of transcritical jets and variable-density jets can be considered to differ due to pseudovaporization.

  20. High-Temperature Deformation of Dry Diabase with Application to Tectonics on Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackwell, S. J.; Zimmerman, M. E.; Kohlstedt, D. L.

    1998-01-01

    We have performed an experimental study to quantify the high-temperature creep behavior of natural diabase rocks under dry deformation conditions. Samples of both Maryland diabase and Columbia diabase were investigated to measure the effects of temperature, oxygen fugacity, and plagioclase-to-pyroxene ratio on creep strength. Flow laws determined for creep of these diabases were characterized by an activation energy of Q = 485 +/- 30 kJ/mol and a stress exponent of n = 4.7 +/- 0.6, indicative of deformation dominated by dislocation creep processes. Although n and Q are the same for the two rocks within experimental error, the Maryland diabase, which has the lower plagioclase content, is significantly stronger than the Columbia diabase. Thus the modal abundance of the various minerals plays an important role in defining rock strength. Within the s ample-to-sample variation, no clear influence of oxygen fugacity on creep strength could be discerned for either rock. The dry creep strengths of both rocks are significantly greater than values previously measured on diabase under "as-received" or wet conditions. Application of these results to the present conditions in the lithosphere on Venus predicts a high viscosity crust with strong dynamic coupling between mantle convection and crustal deformation, consistent with measurements of topography and gravity for that planet.

  1. In situ visualization of magma deformation at high temperature using time-lapse 3D tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godinho, jose; Lee, Peter; Lavallee, Yan; Kendrick, Jackie; Von-Aulock, Felix

    2016-04-01

    We use synchrotron based x-ray computed micro-tomography (sCT) to visualize, in situ, the microstructural evolution of magma samples 3 mm diameter with a resolution of 3 μm during heating and uniaxial compression at temperatures up to 1040 °C. The interaction between crystals, melt and gas bubbles is analysed in 4D (3D + time) during sample deformation. The ability to observe the changes of the microstructure as a function of time allow us to: a) study the effect of temperature in the ability of magma to fracture or deform; b) quantify bubble nucleation and growth rates during heating; c) study the relation between crystal displacement and volatile exsolution. We will show unique beautiful videos of how bubbles grow and coalescence, how samples and crystals within the sample fracture, heal and deform. Our study establishes in situ sCT as a powerful tool to quantify and visualize with micro-scale resolution fast processes taking place in magma that are essential to understand ascent in a volcanic conduit and validate existing models for determining the explosivity of volcanic eruptions. Tracking simultaneously the time and spatial changes of magma microstructures is shown to be primordial to study disequilibrium processes between crystals, melt and gas phases.

  2. Hot deformation behavior of 7150 aluminum alloy during compression at elevated temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Jin Nengping; Zhang Hui; Han Yi; Wu Wenxiang; Chen Jianghua

    2009-06-15

    Hot compression tests of 7150 aluminum alloy were preformed on Gleeble-1500 system in the temperature range from 300 deg. C to 450 deg. C and at strain rate range from 0.01 s{sup -1} to 10 s{sup -1}, and the associated structural changes were studied by observations of metallographic and transmission electron microscope. The results show that the true stress-true strain curves exhibit a peak stress at a critical strain, after which the flow stresses decrease monotonically until high strains, showing a dynamic flow softening. The peak stress level decreases with increasing deformation temperature and decreasing strain rate, which can be represented by a Zener-Hollomon parameter in the hyperbolic-sine equation with the hot deformation activation energy of 229.75 kJ/mol. In the deformed structures appear the elongated grains with serrations developed in the grain boundaries, decreasing of Z value leads to more adequate proceeding of dynamic recrystallization and coarser recrystallized grains. The subgrains exhibit high-angle sub-boundaries with a certain amount of dislocations and large numbers of dynamic precipitates in subgrain interiors as increasing Z value. The dynamic recovery and recrystallization are the main reasons for the flow softening at low Z value, but the dynamic precipitates and successive dynamic particles coarsening have been assumed to be responsible for the flow softening at high Z value.

  3. Frictional Behavior of Anorthite and Quartz at High Pressure and High Temperature Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arai, T.; Masuda, K.; Fujimoto, K.; Shigematsu, N.; Ohtani, T.; Sumii, T.; Okuyama, Y.

    2002-12-01

    Most of earthquakes in the crust occurred at the depth of 5 to 20km, and the distribution of mainshocks matches the base of this zone, where is considered to be consistent with brittle-ductile transition zone. The lower boundary on seismicity results from a switch from velocity weakening to velocity strengthening of friction with increasing temperature. The physical properties of rocks associated with elevated temperatures were determined by many frictional experiments. In these experimental studies, quartz, which controls the rock strength at brittle-ductile transition zone, was generally used. On the other hand, frictional experiment with feldspar is very few in spite of dominant phase in the crust, because feldspar behaves in a brittle manner at greenshist facies. However, recent studies indicate fine-grained plagioclase (1um) contributed deformation process largely at the Hatagawa fault zone, northeast Japan, where is considered to have been brittle-ductile transition zone in the past. In order to understand the source processes of earthquakes, it is important to evaluate the physical properties of fine grained plagioclace as well as those of quartz. In this study, we conducted frictional experiments by using anorthite and quartz gouges under high pressure and high temperature in a triaxial apparatus, and compared frictional behaviors of two minerals with elevated temperature. Temperature varied from room temperature to 800°C. Fine- (1-10um,1um) and coarse-grained (50um, 100um) samples were prepared to evaluate the effect of different grain size as observed Hatagawa fault zone. The samples were put between upper and lower sawcut cylinders (20mm diameter x 40mm long). The sawcut was oriented at 30° to the loading axis. These were jacketed with thin sleeves of annealed Cu. Pore fluids accelerated deformation process of Hatagawa mylonite at higher temperature than 600°C under the same effective confining pressure (Masuda et al., presented in this meeting

  4. Dyke propagation and tensile fracturing at high temperature and pressure, insights from experimental rock mechanics.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakker, Richard; Benson, Philip; Vinciguerra, Sergio

    2014-05-01

    It is well known that magma ascends trough the crust by the process of dyking. To enable dyke emplacement, basement rocks typically fail in a mode 1 fracture, which acts as conduits for magma transport. An overpressure of the ascending magma will further open/widen the fracture and permit the fracture to propagate. In order to further understand the emplacement and arrest of dykes in the subsurface, analogue and numerical studies have been conducted. However, a number of assumptions regarding rock mechanical behaviour frequently has to be made as such data are very hard to directly measure at the pressure/temperature conditions of interest: high temperatures at relatively shallow depths. Such data are key to simulating the magma intrusion dynamics through the lithologies that underlie the volcanic edifice. Here we present a new laboratory setup, which allows us to investigate the tensile fracturing properties under both temperature and confining pressure, and the emplacement of molten material within the newly formed fracture. We have modified a traditional tri-axial test assembly setup to be able to use a Paterson type High Pressure, High Temperature deformation apparatus. Sample setup consists of cylindrical rock samples with a 22 mm diameter and a 8 mm bore at their centre, filled with a material chosen as such that it's in a liquid state at the experimental temperature and solid at room temperature to enable post-experiment analysis. The top and lower parts of the rock sample are fitted with plugs, sealing in the melt. The assembly is then placed between ceramic pistons to ensure there are no thermal gradients across the sample. The assembly is jacketed to ensure the confining medium (Ar) cannot enter the assembly. A piston is driven into the sample such that the inner conduit materials pressure is slowly increased. At some point a sufficient pressure difference between the inner and outer surfaces causes the sample to deform and fail in the tensile regime

  5. Pressure-temperature stability, Ca2+ binding, and pressure-temperature phase diagram of cod parvalbumin: Gad m 1.

    PubMed

    Somkuti, Judit; Bublin, Merima; Breiteneder, Heimo; Smeller, László

    2012-07-31

    Fish allergy is associated with IgE-mediated hypersensitivity reactions to parvalbumins, which are small calcium-binding muscle proteins and represent the major and sole allergens for 95% of fish-allergic patients. We performed Fourier transform infrared and tryptophan fluorescence spectroscopy to explore the pressure-temperature (p-T) phase diagram of cod parvalbumin (Gad m 1) and to elucidate possible new ways of pressure-temperature inactivation of this food allergen. Besides the secondary structure of the protein, the Ca(2+) binding to aspartic and glutamic acid residues was detected. The phase diagram was found to be quite complex, containing partially unfolded and molten globule states. The Ca(2+) ions were essential for the formation of the native structure. A molten globule conformation appears at 50 °C and atmospheric pressure, which converts into an unordered aggregated state at 75 °C. At >200 MPa, only heat unfolding, but no aggregation, was observed. A pressure of 500 MPa leads to a partially unfolded state at 27 °C. The complete pressure unfolding could only be reached at an elevated temperature (40 °C) and pressure (1.14 GPa). A strong correlation was found between Ca(2+) binding and the protein conformation. The partially unfolded state was reversibly refolded. The completely unfolded molecule, however, from which Ca(2+) was released, could not refold. The heat-unfolded protein was trapped either in the aggregated state or in the molten globule state without aggregation at elevated pressures. The heat-treated and the combined heat- and pressure-treated protein samples were tested with sera of allergic patients, but no change in allergenicity was found. PMID:22765301

  6. The Measured Temperature and Pressure of EDC37 detonation products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferguson, James; Richley, James; Ota, Tom; Sutton, Ben; Price, Ed

    2015-06-01

    We present the experimentally determined temperature and pressure of the detonation products of EDC37; a HMX based conventional high explosive. These measurements were performed on a series of cylinder tests. The temperature measurements were performed at the end of the cylinder with optical fibres observing the bare explosive through a LiF window. The temperature of the products was measured for 2 microseconds using single colour pyrometry, multicolour pyrometry and spectroscopy with the results from all three methods being consistent. The peak temperature was found to be ~ 3600 K dropping to ~ 2400 K at the end of the measurement window. The spectroscopy was time integrated and showed that the emission spectra can be approximated using a grey body curve with no other emission or absorption lines being present. The pressure was obtained using an analytical method which used the velocity of the expanding cylinder wall, measured using heterodyne velocimetry (HetV), and the velocity of detonation, measured with chirped fibre Bragg gratings. The pressure drops from an initial CJ value of ~38 GPa to ~4 GPa at the end of the 2 microsecond temperature measurement window.

  7. Pressure Effects on the Temperature Sensitivity of Fiber Bragg Gratings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Meng-Chou

    2012-01-01

    A 3-dimensional physical model was developed to relate the wavelength shifts resulting from temperature changes of fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) to the thermal expansion coefficients, Young s moduli of optical fibers, and thicknesses of coating polymers. Using this model the Bragg wavelength shifts were calculated and compared with the measured wavelength shifts of FBGs with various coating thickness for a finite temperature range. There was a discrepancy between the calculated and measured wavelength shifts. This was attributed to the refractive index change of the fiber core by the thermally induced radial pressure. To further investigate the pressure effects, a small diametric load was applied to a FBG and Bragg wavelength shifts were measured over a temperature range of 4.2 to 300K.

  8. Low Temperature and High Pressure Evaluation of Insulated Pressure Vessels for Cryogenic Hydrogen Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Aceves, S.; Martinez-Frias, J.; Garcia-Villazana, O.

    2000-06-25

    Insulated pressure vessels are cryogenic-capable pressure vessels that can be fueled with liquid hydrogen (LH{sub 2}) or ambient-temperature compressed hydrogen (CH{sub 2}). Insulated pressure vessels offer the advantages of liquid hydrogen tanks (low weight and volume), with reduced disadvantages (fuel flexibility, lower energy requirement for hydrogen liquefaction and reduced evaporative losses). The work described here is directed at verifying that commercially available pressure vessels can be safely used to store liquid hydrogen. The use of commercially available pressure vessels significantly reduces the cost and complexity of the insulated pressure vessel development effort. This paper describes a series of tests that have been done with aluminum-lined, fiber-wrapped vessels to evaluate the damage caused by low temperature operation. All analysis and experiments to date indicate that no significant damage has resulted. Required future tests are described that will prove that no technical barriers exist to the safe use of aluminum-fiber vessels at cryogenic temperatures.

  9. High-pressure cell for neutron diffraction with in situ pressure control at cryogenic temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobsen, Matthew K.; Ridley, Christopher J.; Bocian, Artur; Kirichek, Oleg; Manuel, Pascal; Khalyavin, Dmitry; Azuma, Masaki; Attfield, J. Paul; Kamenev, Konstantin V.

    2014-04-01

    Pressure generation at cryogenic temperatures presents a problem for a wide array of experimental techniques, particularly neutron studies due to the volume of sample required. We present a novel, compact pressure cell with a large sample volume in which load is generated by a bellow. Using a supply of helium gas up to a pressure of 350 bar, a load of up to 78 kN is generated with leak-free operation. In addition, special fiber ports added to the cryogenic center stick allow for in situ pressure determination using the ruby pressure standard. Mechanical stability was assessed using finite element analysis and the dimensions of the cell have been optimized for use with standard cryogenic equipment. Load testing and on-line experiments using NaCl and BiNiO3 have been done at the WISH instrument of the ISIS pulsed neutron source to verify performance.

  10. High-pressure cell for neutron diffraction with in situ pressure control at cryogenic temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobsen, Matthew K.; Ridley, Christopher J.; Bocian, Artur; Kamenev, Konstantin V.; Kirichek, Oleg; Manuel, Pascal; Khalyavin, Dmitry; Azuma, Masaki; Attfield, J. Paul

    2014-04-15

    Pressure generation at cryogenic temperatures presents a problem for a wide array of experimental techniques, particularly neutron studies due to the volume of sample required. We present a novel, compact pressure cell with a large sample volume in which load is generated by a bellow. Using a supply of helium gas up to a pressure of 350 bar, a load of up to 78 kN is generated with leak-free operation. In addition, special fiber ports added to the cryogenic center stick allow for in situ pressure determination using the ruby pressure standard. Mechanical stability was assessed using finite element analysis and the dimensions of the cell have been optimized for use with standard cryogenic equipment. Load testing and on-line experiments using NaCl and BiNiO{sub 3} have been done at the WISH instrument of the ISIS pulsed neutron source to verify performance.

  11. High-pressure cell for neutron diffraction with in situ pressure control at cryogenic temperatures.

    PubMed

    Jacobsen, Matthew K; Ridley, Christopher J; Bocian, Artur; Kirichek, Oleg; Manuel, Pascal; Khalyavin, Dmitry; Azuma, Masaki; Attfield, J Paul; Kamenev, Konstantin V

    2014-04-01

    Pressure generation at cryogenic temperatures presents a problem for a wide array of experimental techniques, particularly neutron studies due to the volume of sample required. We present a novel, compact pressure cell with a large sample volume in which load is generated by a bellow. Using a supply of helium gas up to a pressure of 350 bar, a load of up to 78 kN is generated with leak-free operation. In addition, special fiber ports added to the cryogenic center stick allow for in situ pressure determination using the ruby pressure standard. Mechanical stability was assessed using finite element analysis and the dimensions of the cell have been optimized for use with standard cryogenic equipment. Load testing and on-line experiments using NaCl and BiNiO3 have been done at the WISH instrument of the ISIS pulsed neutron source to verify performance. PMID:24784623

  12. Fluid Controlled Deformation Mechanisms and Recrystallization Regimes in a High Temperature Deformed Contact Aureole: Implications for the Rheology of the Lower Crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, S. S.; Law, R. D.

    2004-05-01

    Deformation in the aureole of the Eureka Valley-Joshua Flat-Beer Creek (EJB) composite pluton (California, USA) illustrates the role fluid content plays in lower crustal deformation. Microstructures and quartz c-axis fabrics were analyzed in five quartzite samples collected across the aureole. Temperatures of deformation are estimated to be approximately 740° C based on a modified c-axis opening angle thermometer of Kruhl (1998). There is a spatial inversion in microstructures and slip systems; apparent "high temperature" deformation and complete recrystallization (grain boundary migration and prism [c] slip) further from the pluton-contact and apparent "low temperature" deformation and partial recrystallization (subgrain rotation and slip) closer to the pluton-contact. Strain is also lower in the inner aureole based on relict grain shape ratios. We believe this spatial inversion in strain, deformation mechanisms and recrystallization mechanisms is a result of anhydrous conditions in the inner aureole. We suggest that a thick marble unit located between the pluton and the quartzite layers acted as a barrier to fluids emanating from the pluton. Decarbonation reactions in marble layers interbedded with the inner aureole quartzites and calc-silicate assemblages (quartz + calcite (and not wollastonite) + diopside ± K-feldspar) in the inner aureole quartzites produced high XCO2 (water absent) fluids during deformation. We suggest that it was these "dry" conditions that suppressed prism [c] slip and regime 3 recrystallization in the inner aureole and resulted in slip and regime 2 recrystallization. In contrast, the prograde assemblage in the pelite-dominated outer part of the aureole is biotite p K-feldspar. These "wet" pelitic assemblages indicate fluids dominated by water in the outer part of the aureole and promoted prism [c] slip and regime 3 recrystallization and resulted in higher strains. Strain rates for [c] slip are an order of magnitude higher than

  13. Deformation mechanisms of low-temperature superplasticity in 8090 Al-Li alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Pu, H.P.; Huang, J.C.

    1995-12-31

    The 8090 Al-Li alloys, after special thermomechanical processes, exhibited low-temperature superplasticity (LTSP) from 350 to 450 C, behaving differently from the conventional high-temperature superplasticity (HTSP). The LTSP sheets after {approximately} 700% elongation at 350 C and 8 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} s{sup {minus}1} still possessed fine (sub)grains 3.7 {micro}m in size and narrow surface Li-depletion zones 11 {micro}m in width. It results in a post-SP T6 strength of {approximately} 500 MPa, which is higher than that of the conventional superplastic 8090 alloys tested at 525 C or above. The tensile behavior and deformation mechanisms of the LTSP and HTSP sheets were investigated over the strain-rate range 10{sup {minus}5}--10{sup {minus}2} s{sup {minus}1} and strain range 0.5--1.0. At {var_epsilon} 0.5, the strain rate sensitivity (m-value) for the LTSP and HTSP materials was found to be {approximately} 0.33 and 0.50, respectively. The activation energy was extracted to be 92 kJ/mole for the LTSP sheets and to be 141 kJ/mole for the HTSP sheets. As straining to {var_epsilon} = 1.0 the m-value of the LTSP materials increased to 0.37 and the activation energy decreased slightly to 82 kJ/mole. By SEM examinations, the movement of surface grains in LTSP samples confirmed the role of grain boundary sliding (GBS). TEM observations revealed that the deformation mechanism consists of a large amount of dislocation motion resulting in the subgrain formation and rotation; and TEM observations from the transverse section might explain the anisotropic deformation behavior during the initial superplastic strain. The primary and rate-controlling deformation mechanisms for the HTSP and LTSP sheets are considered to be GBS and dislocation creep, respectively.

  14. Temperature-dependent elastic anisotropy and mesoscale deformation in a nanostructured ferritic alloy.

    PubMed

    Stoica, G M; Stoica, A D; Miller, M K; Ma, D

    2014-10-10

    Nanostructured ferritic alloys are a new class of ultrafine-grained oxide dispersion-strengthened steels that have promising properties for service in extreme environments in future nuclear reactors. This is due to the remarkable stability of their complex microstructures containing numerous Y-Ti-O nanoclusters within grains and along grain boundaries. Although nanoclusters account primarily for the exceptional resistance to irradiation damage and high-temperature creep, little is known about the mechanical roles of the polycrystalline grains that constitute the ferritic matrix. Here we report an in situ mesoscale characterization of anisotropic responses of ultrafine ferrite grains to stresses using state-of-the-art neutron diffraction. We show the experimental determination of single-crystal elastic constants for a 14YWT alloy, and reveal a strong temperature-dependent elastic anisotropy that leads to elastic softening and instability of the ferrite. We also demonstrate, from anisotropy-induced intergranular strains, that a deformation crossover exists from low-temperature lattice hardening to high-temperature lattice softening in response to extensive plastic deformation.

  15. High-temperature deformation field measurement by combining transient aerodynamic heating simulation system and reliability-guided digital image correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Bing; Wu, Dafang; Xia, Yong

    2010-09-01

    To determine the full-field high-temperature thermal deformation of the structural materials used in high-speed aerospace flight vehicles, a novel non-contact high-temperature deformation measurement system is established by combining transient aerodynamic heating simulation device with the reliability-guided digital image correlation (RG-DIC). The test planar sample with size varying from several mm 2 to several hundreds mm 2 can be heated from room temperature to 1100 °C rapidly and accurately using the infrared radiator of the transient aerodynamic heating simulation system. The digital images of the test sample surface at various temperatures are recorded using an ordinary optical imaging system. To cope with the possible local decorrelated regions caused by black-body radiation within the deformed images at the temperatures over 450 °C, the RG-DIC technique is used to extract full-field in-plane thermal deformation from the recorded images. In validation test, the thermal deformation fields and the values of coefficient of thermal expansion (CTEs) of a chromiumnickel austenite stainless steel sample from room temperature to 550 °C is measured and compared with the well-established handbook value, confirming the effectiveness and accuracy of the proposed technique. The experimental results reveal that the present system using an ordinary optical imaging system, is able to accurately measure full-field thermal deformation of metals and alloys at temperatures not exceeding 600 °C.

  16. High Pressure Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessel (COPV) Development Tests at Cryogenic Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, David M.; Greene, Nathanael J.; Revilock, Duane; Sneddon, Kirk; Anselmo, Estelle

    2008-01-01

    Development tests were conducted to evaluate the performance of 2 COPV designs at cryogenic temperatures. This allows for risk reductions for critical components for a Gaseous Helium (GHe) Pressurization Subsystem for an Advanced Propulsion System (APS) which is being proposed for NASA s Constellation project and future exploration missions. It is considered an advanced system since it uses Liquid Methane (LCH4) as the fuel and Liquid Oxygen (LO2) as the oxidizer for the propellant combination mixture. To avoid heating of the propellants to prevent boil-off, the GHe will be stored at subcooled temperatures equivalent to the LO2 temperature. Another advantage of storing GHe at cryogenic temperatures is that more mass of the pressurized GHe can be charged in to a vessel with a smaller volume, hence a smaller COPV, and this creates a significant weight savings versus gases at ambient temperatures. The major challenge of this test plan is to verify that a COPV can safely be used for spacecraft applications to store GHe at a Maximum Operating Pressure (MOP) of 4,500 psig at 140R to 160R (-320 F to -300 F). The COPVs for these tests were provided by ARDE , Inc. who developed a resin system to use at cryogenic conditions and has the capabilities to perform high pressure testing with LN2.

  17. First Cycle Heterogeneous Deformation Behavior and Cyclic Shakedown Phenomena of Nitinol Near A(sub f) Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, H. N.

    1996-01-01

    Experimental observations on the cyclic behavior of a NiTi alloy (Nitinol) at temperatures in the neighborhood of the A(sub f) (austenite finish) temperature are presented. The strongly heterogeneous nature of the deformation behavior of this material at temperatures within this regime during the first cycle is examined with emphasis placed on the difficulties that the existence of such phenomena pose on the formulation of realistic constitutive relations. It is further demonstrated that this heterogeneity of deformation persists on subsequent cycles with the result that the hysteretic cyclic behavior of these alloys can exhibit a point to point variation in an otherwise uniform geometry. The experimental observations on the deformation behavior of this alloy show that it is strongly dependent on temperature and prior deformation history of the sample, thus resulting in an almost intractable problem with respect to capturing an adequate constitutive description from either experiment or modeling.

  18. Aqueous Geochemistry at High Pressures and High Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Bass, Jay D.

    2015-05-21

    This project is aimed at experimental characterization of the sound velocities, equations of state (EOS), and derived physical and chemical properties of aqueous solutions and carbon dioxide at extreme pressure and temperature conditions relevant to processes occurring in the interior of the Earth. Chemical transport, phase changes (including melting), fluid-solid reactions, and formation of magmatic liquids at convergent plat boundaries are a key motivation for this project. Research in this area has long been limited by the extreme experimental challenges and lack of data under the appropriate pressure-temperature (P-T) conditions. The vast majority of studies of aqueous geochemistry relevant to terrestrial problems of fluid-rock interactions have been conducted at 0.3 GPa or less, and the widely used Helgeson-Kirkham-Flowers equation of state for aqueous species is applicable only at ~ < 0.5 GPa. These limits are unfortunate because fluid flow and reactions plays a central role in many deeper environments. Recent efforts including our own, have resulted in new experimental techniques that now make it possible to investigate properties of homogeneous and heterogeneous equilibria involving aqueous species and minerals over a much broader range of pressure and temperature appropriate for deep crustal and upper mantle processes involving water-rich fluids. We carried out 1) Brillouin scattering measurements of the equations of state and molar volume of water and carbon dioxide to over 10 GPa and 870K using precise resistance heating of samples under pressure in the diamond anvil cell, and 2) the phase diagrams of the water and CO2, and 3) Exploring new experimental approaches, including CO2 laser heating of samples in a diamond cell, to measurements of sound velocities, EOS, and phase relations by Brillouin scattering to far greater pressures and temperatures.

  19. A theoretical and experimental study of the deformation of the piston-cylinder unit of a metrological pressure balance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soares Júnior, L.; da Silva Júnior, F. I.; Lamary, P.

    2015-10-01

    Pressure balance is a measuring system widely used in metrology as a reference standard. The common procedure is to estimate the pressure from an analytical formula involving a set of phenomenological parameters. These parameters are determined experimentally by calibration tests of the balance. In particular, the piston-cylinder deformation is taking into account by the use of a global distortion coefficient and by the use of an effective area of the piston. In order to analyze the possible influence of local deformation on the pressure estimation, a Finite Element (FE) model has been developed using OpenCavok FE code. For a given position of the piston in the cylinder chamber, for a given initial gap between of the cylinder and the chamber, a coupled fluid-structure calculation is carried out. From the local fields, mean values are calculated from which the effective area of the piston-cylinder unit. The analysis is conducted for several engagement lengths of the piston in the chamber and for several loads. The first results obtained show that the local deformation play a role and that FE models could help for precise calculation of the measured pressure.

  20. Fused silica diaphragm module for high temperature pressure transducers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berthold, III, John W. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    A high temperature pressure transducer and sensing apparatus to determine the deflection of the transducer diaphragm is disclosed. The pressure transducer utilizes a fused silica diaphragm (12) which is illuminated at selected locations by a coherent laser source (52) via optical fibers (38, 46). The light reflected by the diaphragm (12) forms interference fringe patterns which are focused by gradient index rod lenses (36) on the ends of optical fibers (40, 48) for transmission to a fringe counting circuit (54). By digital techniques, the fringe count is converted into a determination of diaphragm deflection.

  1. Temperature and pressure adaptation of the binding site of acetylcholinesterase.

    PubMed

    Hochachka, P W

    1974-12-01

    1. Studies with a carbon substrate analogue, 3,3-dimethylbutyl acetate, indicate that the hydrophobic contribution to binding at the anionic site of acetylcholinesterase is strongly disrupted at low temperatures and high pressures. 2. Animals living in different physical environments circumvent this problem by adjusting the enthalpic and entropic contributions to binding. 3. An extreme example of this adaptational strategy is supplied by brain acetylcholinesterase extracted from an abyssal fish living at 2 degrees C and up to several hundred atmospheres of pressure. This acetylcholinesterase appears to have a smaller hydrophobic binding region in the anionic site, playing a measurably decreased role in ligand binding. PMID:4462739

  2. Temperature and pressure adaptation of the binding site of acetylcholinesterase

    PubMed Central

    Hochachka, Peter W.

    1974-01-01

    1. Studies with a carbon substrate analogue, 3,3-dimethylbutyl acetate, indicate that the hydrophobic contribution to binding at the anionic site of acetylcholinesterase is strongly disrupted at low temperatures and high pressures. 2. Animals living in different physical environments circumvent this problem by adjusting the enthalpic and entropic contributions to binding. 3. An extreme example of this adaptational strategy is supplied by brain acetylcholinesterase extracted from an abyssal fish living at 2°C and up to several hundred atmospheres of pressure. This acetylcholinesterase appears to have a smaller hydrophobic binding region in the anionic site, playing a measurably decreased role in ligand binding. PMID:4462739

  3. The temperature and strain rate dependence of the flow stress of single crystal NiAl deformed along <110>

    SciTech Connect

    Maloy, S.A.; Gray, G.T. III

    1995-12-31

    Single crystal NiAl and Ni-49.75Al-0.25Fe have been deformed along <110> at temperatures of 77, 298 and 773K and strain rates of 0.001/s, and 2000/s. The flow stress of <110> NiAl is rate and temperature sensitive. The 0.25 at.% Fe addition resulted in a small increase in flow stress at strain rates of 0.001 and 0.1/s at 298 and 77K. A significant decrease in the work hardening rate is observed after deformation at 77K and a strain rate of 2000/s. Coarse [110] slip traces are observed after deformation at a strain rate of 2000/s at 77K, while no slip traces were observed after deformation under all other conditions. TEM observations reveal distinct [110] slip bands after deformation at 77K and a strain rate of 2000/s.

  4. Anharmonic Materials and Thermoelasticity at High Temperatures and Pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlikowski, Daniel

    2005-03-01

    For large-scale constitutive strength models, the shear modulus is typically assumed to be linearly dependent on temperature. However, for materials compressed along or beyond the Hugoniot into high pressure and temperature regimes where there is no experimental measurement or very little, accurate and validated models must be used. To this end, we have investigated and compared, as a function of temperature (<26,000 K) and pressure (<10 Mbar), the anharmonic and quasi-harmonic thermoelasticity accounting for both the electron-thermal and ion-thermal contributions for bcc tantalum and bcc molybdenum. In this approach, the full potential linear muffin-tin orbital (FP-LMTO) method for the cold and electron-thermal contributions is closely coupled with ion-thermal contributions. For the ion contribution two separate approaches are used. In one approach, the quasi-harmonic ion contribution is obtained through a Brillouin zone sum of strain derivatives of the phonons, and in the other the anharmonic ion contribution is obtained directly through Monte Carlo (MC) canonical distribution averages of strain derivatives on the multi-ion potential itself. Both methods for the ion-contribution use quantum-based interatomic potentials derived from model generalized pseudopotential theory (MGPT). The resulting elastic moduli are compared to available ultrasonic measurements and diamond-anvil-cell compression experiments, as well as to sound speeds along the Hugoniot. Over this range of temperature and pressure, the results are then used in a polycrystalline averaging for a comparison to larger-scale shear models like the Steinberg-Guinan strength model. These results give an indication that anharmonic effects are negligible in tantalum but not in molybdenum for high pressures and temperatures up to melt. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by the University of California Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract W-7405-Eng-48.

  5. Iterative Boltzmann plot method for temperature and pressure determination in a xenon high pressure discharge lamp

    SciTech Connect

    Zalach, J.; Franke, St.

    2013-01-28

    The Boltzmann plot method allows to calculate plasma temperatures and pressures if absolutely calibrated emission coefficients of spectral lines are available. However, xenon arcs are not very well suited to be analyzed this way, as there are only a limited number of lines with atomic data available. These lines have high excitation energies in a small interval between 9.8 and 11.5 eV. Uncertainties in the experimental method and in the atomic data further limit the accuracy of the evaluation procedure. This may result in implausible values of temperature and pressure with inadmissible uncertainty. To omit these shortcomings, an iterative scheme is proposed that is making use of additional information about the xenon fill pressure. This method is proved to be robust against noisy data and significantly reduces the uncertainties. Intentionally distorted synthetic data are used to illustrate the performance of the method, and measurements performed on a laboratory xenon high pressure discharge lamp are analyzed resulting in reasonable temperatures and pressures with significantly reduced uncertainties.

  6. Deformation and Phase Transformation Processes in Polycrystalline NiTi and NiTiHf High Temperature Shape Memory Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benafan, Othmane

    2012-01-01

    The deformation and transformation mechanisms of polycrystalline Ni49.9Ti50.1 and Ni50.3Ti29.7Hf20 (in at.%) shape memory alloys were investigated by combined experimental and modeling efforts aided by an in situ neutron diffraction technique at stress and temperature. The thermomechanical response of the low temperature martensite, the high temperature austenite phases, and changes between these two states during thermomechanical cycling were probed and reported. In the cubic austenite phase, stress-induced martensite, deformation twinning and slip processes were observed which helped in constructing a deformation map that contained the limits over which each of the identified mechanisms was dominant. Deformation of the monoclinic martensitic phase was also investigated where the microstructural changes (texture, lattice strains, and phase fractions) during room-temperature deformation and subsequent thermal cycling were compared to the bulk macroscopic response. When cycling between these two phases, the evolution of inelastic strains, along with the shape setting procedures were examined and used for the optimization of the transformation properties as a function of deformation levels and temperatures. Finally, this work was extended to the development of multiaxial capabilities at elevated temperatures for the in situ neutron diffraction measurements of shape memory alloys on the VULCAN Diffractometer at Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  7. Water temperature induces jaw deformity and bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) gene expression in golden pompano Trachinotus ovatus larvae.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhenhua; Zhang, Nan; Qin, Jian G; Fu, Mingjun; Jiang, Shigui

    2016-01-01

    Golden pompano Trachinotus ovatus larvae were kept at 26, 29 and 33 °C for 15 days from 3-day post hatching (DPH) to 18 DPH to test temperature-dependent growth and jaw malformation. The growth, survival, jaw deformity and the gene expressions of bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) were used as criteria to examine the fish response to temperature manipulation. The growth rate of fish at 29 or 33 °C was significantly faster than fish at 26 °C, while fish survival at 29 °C was significantly higher than fish at 33 °C. Jaw deformity was significantly affected by water temperature. The highest jaw deformity occurred on fish at 33 °C, and the lowest jaw deformity was at 26 °C. The expressions of all BMP genes except BMP10 were significantly affected by water temperature. The highest gene expression of BMP2 was on fish at 29 °C, and the lowest expression was at 33 °C. For the BMP4 gene, the highest and lowest expressions were found on fish at 33 and 26 °C, respectively. The present study indicates that jaw deformity of golden pompano larvae increases with increasing temperature, and the gene expression of BMP4 proteins coincides with high jaw deformity and water temperature elevation.

  8. Water temperature induces jaw deformity and bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) gene expression in golden pompano Trachinotus ovatus larvae.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhenhua; Zhang, Nan; Qin, Jian G; Fu, Mingjun; Jiang, Shigui

    2016-01-01

    Golden pompano Trachinotus ovatus larvae were kept at 26, 29 and 33 °C for 15 days from 3-day post hatching (DPH) to 18 DPH to test temperature-dependent growth and jaw malformation. The growth, survival, jaw deformity and the gene expressions of bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) were used as criteria to examine the fish response to temperature manipulation. The growth rate of fish at 29 or 33 °C was significantly faster than fish at 26 °C, while fish survival at 29 °C was significantly higher than fish at 33 °C. Jaw deformity was significantly affected by water temperature. The highest jaw deformity occurred on fish at 33 °C, and the lowest jaw deformity was at 26 °C. The expressions of all BMP genes except BMP10 were significantly affected by water temperature. The highest gene expression of BMP2 was on fish at 29 °C, and the lowest expression was at 33 °C. For the BMP4 gene, the highest and lowest expressions were found on fish at 33 and 26 °C, respectively. The present study indicates that jaw deformity of golden pompano larvae increases with increasing temperature, and the gene expression of BMP4 proteins coincides with high jaw deformity and water temperature elevation. PMID:27652050

  9. Plastic Deformation Characteristics Of AZ31 Magnesium Alloy Sheets At Elevated Temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Jingee; Lee, Jongshin; You, Bongsun; Choi, Seogou; Kim, Youngsuk

    2007-05-17

    Using lightweight materials is the emerging need in order to reduce the vehicle's energy consumption and pollutant emissions. Being a lightweight material, magnesium alloys are increasingly employed in the fabrication of automotive and electronic parts. Presently, magnesium alloys used in automotive and electronic parts are mainly processed by die casting. The die casting technology allows the manufacturing of parts with complex geometry. However, the mechanical properties of these parts often do not meet the requirements concerning the mechanical properties (e.g. endurance strength and ductility). A promising alternative can be forming process. The parts manufactured by forming could have fine-grained structure without porosity and improved mechanical properties such as endurance strength and ductility. Because magnesium alloy has low formability resulted form its small slip system at room temperature it is usually formed at elevated temperature. Due to a rapid increase of usage of magnesium sheets in automotive and electronic industry it is necessary to assure database for sheet metal formability and plastic yielding properties in order to optimize its usage. Especially, plastic yielding criterion is a critical property to predict plastic deformation of sheet metal parts in optimizing process using CAE simulation. Von-Mises yield criterion generally well predicts plastic deformation of steel sheets and Hill'1979 yield criterion predicts plastic deformation of aluminum sheets. In this study, using biaxial tensile test machine yield loci of AZ31 magnesium alloy sheet were obtained at elevated temperature. The yield loci ensured experimentally were compared with the theoretical predictions based on the Von-Mises, Hill, Logan-Hosford, and Barlat model.

  10. Design optimization of high pressure and high temperature piezoresistive pressure sensor for high sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Zhe; Zhao, Yulong; Tian, Bian

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes a design method for optimizing sensitivity of piezoresistive pressure sensor in high-pressure and high-temperature environment. In order to prove the method, a piezoresistive pressure sensor (HPTSS) is designed. With the purpose of increasing sensitivity and to improve the measurement range, the piezoresistive sensor adopts rectangular membrane and thick film structure. The configuration of piezoresistors is arranged according to the characteristic of the rectangular membrane. The structure and configuration of the sensor chip are analyzed theoretically and simulated by the finite element method. This design enables the sensor chip to operate in high pressure condition (such as 150 MPa) with a high sensitivity and accuracy. The silicon on insulator wafer is selected to guarantee the thermo stability of the sensor chip. In order to optimize the fabrication and improve the yield of production, an electric conduction step is devised. Series of experiments demonstrates a favorable linearity of 0.13% and a high accuracy of 0.48%. And the sensitivity of HTPSS is about six times as high as a conventional square-membrane sensor chip in the experiment. Compared with the square-membrane pressure sensor and current production, the strength of HPTTS lies in sensitivity and measurement. The performance of the HPTSS indicates that it could be an ideal candidate for high-pressure and high-temperature sensing in real application.

  11. Design optimization of high pressure and high temperature piezoresistive pressure sensor for high sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Niu, Zhe; Zhao, Yulong; Tian, Bian

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes a design method for optimizing sensitivity of piezoresistive pressure sensor in high-pressure and high-temperature environment. In order to prove the method, a piezoresistive pressure sensor (HPTSS) is designed. With the purpose of increasing sensitivity and to improve the measurement range, the piezoresistive sensor adopts rectangular membrane and thick film structure. The configuration of piezoresistors is arranged according to the characteristic of the rectangular membrane. The structure and configuration of the sensor chip are analyzed theoretically and simulated by the finite element method. This design enables the sensor chip to operate in high pressure condition (such as 150 MPa) with a high sensitivity and accuracy. The silicon on insulator wafer is selected to guarantee the thermo stability of the sensor chip. In order to optimize the fabrication and improve the yield of production, an electric conduction step is devised. Series of experiments demonstrates a favorable linearity of 0.13% and a high accuracy of 0.48%. And the sensitivity of HTPSS is about six times as high as a conventional square-membrane sensor chip in the experiment. Compared with the square-membrane pressure sensor and current production, the strength of HPTTS lies in sensitivity and measurement. The performance of the HPTSS indicates that it could be an ideal candidate for high-pressure and high-temperature sensing in real application.

  12. Time-, stress-, and temperature-dependent deformation in nanostructured copper: Creep tests and simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xu-Sheng; Wang, Yun-Jiang; Zhai, Hui-Ru; Wang, Guo-Yong; Su, Yan-Jing; Dai, L. H.; Ogata, Shigenobu; Zhang, Tong-Yi

    2016-09-01

    In the present work, we performed experiments, atomistic simulations, and high-resolution electron microscopy (HREM) to study the creep behaviors of the nanotwinned (nt) and nanograined (ng) copper at temperatures of 22 °C (RT), 40 °C, 50 °C, 60 °C, and 70 °C. The experimental data at various temperatures and different sustained stress levels provide sufficient information, which allows one to extract the deformation parameters reliably. The determined activation parameters and microscopic observations indicate transition of creep mechanisms with variation in stress level in the nt-Cu, i.e., from the Coble creep to the twin boundary (TB) migration and eventually to the perfect dislocation nucleation and activities. The experimental and simulation results imply that nanotwinning could be an effective approach to enhance the creep resistance of twin-free ng-Cu. The experimental creep results further verify the newly developed formula (Yang et al., 2016) that describes the time-, stress-, and temperature-dependent plastic deformation in polycrystalline copper.

  13. Influence of high-pressure deformation and annealing on the structure and properties of a bulk MgB2 superconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degtyarev, M. V.; Pilyugin, V. P.; Akshentsev, Yu. N.; Kuznetsova, E. I.; Krinitsina, T. P.; Blinova, Yu. V.; Sudareva, S. V.; Romanov, E. P.

    2016-08-01

    A synthesized MgB2 superconductor has been investigated by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and by the measurements of the superconducting characteristics and microhardness after cold high-pressure deformation in a Toroid chamber and in Bridgman anvils and subsequent high-temperature annealing. A nanocrystalline structure is formed in the superconductor after high-pressure treatment, but internal cracks appear, and the critical current density decreases strongly. The annealing leads to a coarsening of the structure and to an increase in the critical current density up to 5.8-6.7 × 104 A/cm2, which is more than three times greater than that in the initial state.

  14. Stresses and deformations in cross-ply composite tubes subjected to a uniform temperature change

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyer, M. W.; Cooper, D. E.; Cohen, D.

    1986-01-01

    This study investigates the effects of a uniform temperature change on the stresses and deformations of composite tubes and determines the accuracy of an approximate solution based on the principle of complementary virtual work. Interest centers on tube response away from the ends and so a planar elasticity approach is used. For the approximate solution a piecewise linear variation of stresses with the radial coordinate is assumed. The results from the approximate solution are compared with the elasticity solution. The stress predictions agree well, particularly peak interlaminar stresses. Surprisingly, the axial deformations also agree well, despite the fact that the deformations predicted by the approximate solution do not satisfy the interface displacement continuity conditions required by the elasticity solution. The study shows that the axial thermal expansion coefficient of tubes with a specific number of axial and circumferential layers depends on the stacking sequence. This is in contrast to classical lamination theory, which predicts that the expansion will be independent of the stacking arrangement. As expected, the sign and magnitude of the peak interlaminar stresses depend on stacking sequence. For tubes with a specific number of axial and circumferential layers, thermally induced interlaminar stresses can be controlled by altering stacking arrangement.

  15. Deflagration Behavior of PBX 9501 at Elevated Temperature and Pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Maienschein, J L; Koerner, J G

    2008-04-15

    We report the deflagration behavior of PBX 9501 at pressures up to 300 MPa and temperatures of 150-180 C where the sample has been held at the test temperature for several hours before ignition. The purpose is to determine the effect on the deflagration behavior of material damage caused by prolonged exposure to high temperature. This conditioning is similar to that experienced by an explosive while it being heated to eventual explosion. The results are made more complicated by the presence of a significant thermal gradient along the sample during the temperature ramp and soak. Three major conclusions are: the presence of nitroplasticizer makes PBX 9501 more thermally sensitive than LX-04 with an inert Viton binder; the deflagration behavior of PBX 9501 is more extreme and more inconsistent than that of LX-04; and something in PBX 9501 causes thermal damage to 'heal' as the deflagration proceeds, resulting in a decelerating deflagration front as it travels along the sample.

  16. Tensile deformation of 2618 and Al-Fe-Si-V aluminum alloys at elevated temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leng, Y.; Porr, W. C., Jr.; Gangloff, R. P.

    1990-01-01

    The present study experimentally characterizes the effects of elevated temperature on the uniaxial tensile behavior of ingot metallurgy 2618 Al alloy and the rapidly solidified FVS 0812 P/M alloy by means of two constitutive formulations: the Ramberg/Osgood equation and the Bodner-Partom (1975) incremental formulation for uniaxial tensile loading. The elastoplastic strain-hardening behavior of the ingot metallurgy alloy is equally well represented by either formulation. Both alloys deform similarly under decreasing load after only 1-5 percent uniform tensile strain, a response which is not described by either constitutive relation.

  17. Stresses and deformations in composite tubes due to a circumferential temperature gradient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyer, M. W.; Cooper, D. E.

    1986-01-01

    A linear elasticity solution for determining the response of composite tubes subjected to a circumferential temperature gradient is presented. Numerical examples are used to show that, in a single layer tube, fiber orientation strongly influences response. When the fibers are aligned axially, all stress components in the tube are small. When the fibers are aligned circumferentially, the hoop stress becomes large. This difference in behavior is due to the large difference between the radial and circumferential coefficients of thermal expansion when the fibers are oriented circumferentially. In multilayer tubes, stresses are quite high and just two constants characterize the overall bending and axial deformations of the tubes.

  18. Strength of orthoenstatite single crystals at mantle pressure and temperature and comparison with olivine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raterron, Paul; Fraysse, Guillaume; Girard, Jennifer; Holyoke, Caleb W.

    2016-09-01

    Oriented single crystals of orthopyroxenes (OPx) were deformed in axisymmetric compression in the D-DIA at pressure and temperature in excess of 3 GPa and 1040 °C. Two crystal orientations were tested with the compression axis parallel to either [101]c crystallographic direction, to investigate [001](100) dislocation slip-system strength, or [011]c direction to investigate [001](010) slip-system strength. These slip systems are the most active in orthopyroxenes. Applied differential stresses and specimen strain rates were measured in situ by synchrotron X-ray diffraction and radiography. We used these data and comparison with previously reported low-pressure flow laws for protoenstatite and orthoenstatite to determine the power law parameters for the deformation of orthoenstatite crystals, which characterize OPx dislocation slip-system strengths. Applying these laws at reasonable mantle stresses along oceanic and continental geotherms indicates that OPx [001](100) slip system is weaker than OPx [001](010) slip system to ∼260 km depth where the strengths converge. It also indicates that both OPx slip systems are significantly stronger than olivine slip systems throughout the upper mantle, except in the upper most mantle, in the lithosphere, were OPx [001](100) slip system may be as weak or even weaker than olivine [100](010) easy slip system.

  19. Effect of high-pressure torsion deformation on surface properties and biocompatibility of Ti-50.9 mol. %Ni alloys.

    PubMed

    Awang Shri, Dayangku Noorfazidah; Tsuchiya, Koichi; Yamamoto, Akiko

    2014-06-01

    Ti-50.9 mol. %Ni was subjected to high-pressure torsion (HPT) deformation for different number of rotations (N) of 0.25, 0.5, 1, 5, and 10. The structural changes induced by HPT were analyzed using x-ray diffractometer (XRD). The surfaces of the samples before and after cell culture were characterized using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The biocompatibility of the samples was evaluated based on a colony formation assay, nickel ion release, and protein adsorption behavior. XRD analysis revealed the occurrence of grain refinement, phase transformation, and amorphization in the TiNi samples by HPT deformation due to high dislocation density. The changes in chemical composition and thickness of the passive film formed on the surface observed in XPS analysis reveals improvement in the stability of the passive film by HPT deformation. The microstructural change due to the deformation was found to influence the biocompatibility behaviors of TiNi. Plating efficiency and protein adsorption were found to be higher when the samples are in stress-induced martensitic or amorphous state. HPT deformation was found to alter the surface behavior of the TiNi, which effectively reduced the Ni ion release and improved its biocompatibility. PMID:24985211

  20. Microscopic structure of water at elevated pressures and temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Sahle, Christoph J.; Sternemann, Christian; Schmidt, Christian; Lehtola, Susi; Jahn, Sandro; Simonelli, Laura; Huotari, Simo; Hakala, Mikko; Pylkkänen, Tuomas; Nyrow, Alexander; Mende, Kolja; Tolan, Metin; Hämäläinen, Keijo; Wilke, Max

    2013-01-01

    We report on the microscopic structure of water at sub- and supercritical conditions studied using X-ray Raman spectroscopy, ab initio molecular dynamics simulations, and density functional theory. Systematic changes in the X-ray Raman spectra with increasing pressure and temperature are observed. Throughout the studied thermodynamic range, the experimental spectra can be interpreted with a structural model obtained from the molecular dynamics simulations. A spatial statistical analysis using Ripley’s K-function shows that this model is homogeneous on the nanometer length scale. According to the simulations, distortions of the hydrogen-bond network increase dramatically when temperature and pressure increase to the supercritical regime. In particular, the average number of hydrogen bonds per molecule decreases to ≈0.6 at 600 °C and p = 134 MPa. PMID:23479639

  1. Electrical conductivity of rocks at high pressures and temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parkhomenko, E. I.; Bondarenko, A. T.

    1986-01-01

    The results of studies of the electrical conductivity in the most widely distributed types of igneous rocks, at temperatures of up to 1200 C, at atmospheric pressure, and also at temperatures of up to 700 C and at pressures of up to 20,000 kg/sq cm are described. The figures of electrical conductivity, of activaation energy and of the preexponential coefficient are presented and the dependence of these parameters on the petrochemical parameters of the rocks are reviewed. The possible electrical conductivities for the depository, granite and basalt layers of the Earth's crust and of the upper mantle are presented, as well as the electrical conductivity distribution to the depth of 200 to 240 km for different geological structures.

  2. Metal/Silicate Partitioning at High Pressures and Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shofner, G.; Campbell, A.; Danielson, L.; Righter, K.; Rahman, Z.

    2010-01-01

    The behavior of siderophile elements during metal-silicate segregation, and their resulting distributions provide insight into core formation processes. Determination of partition coefficients allows the calculation of element distributions that can be compared to established values of element abundances in the silicate (mantle) and metallic (core) portions of the Earth. Moderately siderophile elements, including W, are particularly useful in constraining core formation conditions because they are sensitive to variations in T, P, oxygen fugacity (fO2), and silicate composition. To constrain the effect of pressure on W metal/silicate partitioning, we performed experiments at high pressures and temperatures using a multi anvil press (MAP) at NASA Johnson Space Center and laser-heated diamond anvil cells (LHDAC) at the University of Maryland. Starting materials consisted of natural peridotite mixed with Fe and W metals. Pressure conditions in the MAP experiments ranged from 10 to 16 GPa at 2400 K. Pressures in the LHDAC experiments ranged from 26 to 58 GPa, and peak temperatures ranged up to 5000 K. LHDAC experimental run products were sectioned by focused ion beam (FIB) at NASA JSC. Run products were analyzed by electron microprobe using wavelength dispersive spectroscopy. Liquid metal/liquid silicate partition coefficients for W were calculated from element abundances determined by microprobe analyses, and corrected to a common fO2 condition of IW-2 assuming +4 valence for W. Within analytical uncertainties, W partitioning shows a flat trend with increasing pressure from 10 to 16 GPa. At higher pressures, W becomes more siderophile, with an increase in partition coefficient of approximately 0.5 log units.

  3. Rheological assessment of nanofluids at high pressure high temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanjirakat, Anoop; Sadr, Reza

    2013-11-01

    High pressure high temperature (HPHT) fluids are commonly encountered in industry, for example in cooling and/or lubrications applications. Nanofluids, engineered suspensions of nano-sized particles dispersed in a base fluid, have shown prospective as industrial cooling fluids due to their enhanced rheological and heat transfer properties. Nanofluids can be potentially utilized in oil industry for drilling fluids and for high pressure water jet cooling/lubrication in machining. In present work rheological characteristics of oil based nanofluids are investigated at HPHT condition. Nanofluids used in this study are prepared by dispersing commercially available SiO2 nanoparticles (~20 nm) in a mineral oil. The basefluid and nanofluids with two concentrations, namely 1%, and 2%, by volume, are considered in this investigation. The rheological characteristics of base fluid and the nanofluids are measured using an industrial HPHT viscometer. Viscosity values of the nanofluids are measured at pressures of 100 kPa to 42 MPa and temperatures ranging from 25°C to 140°C. The viscosity values of both nanofluids as well as basefluid are observed to have increased with the increase in pressure. Funded by Qatar National Research Fund (NPRP 08-574-2-239).

  4. Extended irreversible thermodynamics and the quality of temperature and pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhalekar, Anil A.

    1999-08-01

    It is reiterated that without a Gibbs-Duhem equation no thermodynamic description ofirreversible and reversible processes exists. It is shown with the help of Gibbs-Duhem equation of extended irreversible thermodynamics that the physical contents of intensive quantities, the temperature and the pressure, do not change in going from reversible to irreversible processes. This confirms well with the earlier demonstrations of Eu and Garcia-Colin.

  5. Advancing a smart air cushion system for preventing pressure ulcers using projection Moiré for large deformation measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Sheng-Lin; Tsai, Tsung-Heng; Lee, Carina Jean-Tien; Hsu, Yu-Hsiang; Lee, Chih-Kung

    2016-03-01

    A pressure ulcer is one of the most important concerns for wheelchair bound patients with spinal cord injuries. A pressure ulcer is a localized injury near the buttocks that bear ischial tuberosity oppression over a long period of time. Due to elevated compression to blood vessels, the surrounding tissues suffer from a lack of oxygen and nutrition. The ulcers eventually lead to skin damage followed by tissue necrosis. The current medical strategy is to minimize the occurrence of pressure ulcers by regularly helping patients change their posture. However, these methods do not always work effectively or well. As a solution to fundamentally prevent pressure ulcers, a smart air cushion system was developed to detect and control pressure actively. The air cushion works by automatically adjusting a patient's sitting posture to effectively relieve the buttock pressure. To analyze the correlation between the dynamic pressure profiles of an air cell with a patient's weight, a projection Moiré system was adopted to measure the deformation of an air cell and its associated stress distribution. Combining a full-field deformation imaging with air pressure measured within an air cell, the patient's weight and the stress distribution can be simultaneously obtained. By integrating a full-field optical metrology with a time varying pressure sensor output coupled with different active air control algorithms for various designs, we can tailor the ratio of the air cells. Our preliminary data suggests that this newly developed smart air cushion has the potential to selectively reduce localized compression on the tissues at the buttocks. Furthermore, it can take a patient's weight which is an additional benefit so that medical personnel can reference it to prescribe the correct drug dosages.

  6. Proton delocalization under extreme conditions of high pressure and temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Goncharov, Alexander F.; Crowhurst, Jonathan

    2008-10-02

    Knowledge of the behaviour of light hydrogen-containing molecules under extreme conditions of high pressure and temperature is crucial to a comprehensive understanding of the fundamental physics and chemistry that is relevant under such conditions. It is also vital for interpreting the results of planetary observations, in particular those of the gas giants, and also for various materials science applications. On a fundamental level, increasing pressure causes the redistribution of the electronic density, which results in a modification of the interatomic potentials followed by a consequent qualitative change in the character of the associated bonding. Ultimately, at sufficiently high pressure, one may anticipate a transformation to a homogeneously bonded material possessing unusual physical properties (e.g. a quantum fluid). As temperature increases so does the concentration of ionised species leading ultimately to a plasma. Considerable improvements have recently been made in both the corresponding experimental and theoretical investigations. Here we review recent results for hydrogen and water that reveal unexpected routes of transformation to nonmolecular materials. We stress the importance of quantum effects, which remain significant even at high temperatures.

  7. Structure and Stability of Jarosite at High Temperature and Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, H.; Zhao, Y.; Hickmott, D. D.; Zhang, J.; Vogel, S. C.; Daemen, L. L.; Hartl, M. A.

    2008-12-01

    Jarosite, KFe3(SO4)2(OH)6, and its related sulfates commonly occur in acid drainage environments as the weathering products of sulfide ore deposits. They can also precipitate from aqueous sulfates due to oxidation of H2S in epithermal environments and hot springs associated with volcanic activities. In 2004, jarosite was detected by the Mars Exploration Rover Mössbauer spectrometer, which has been interpreted as a strong evidence for the existence of water (and thus life) on Mars. In this work, we have investigated the crystal structure and thermodynamic stability of jarosite at temperatures up to 650 K and/or pressures up to 8 GPa using in situ neutron and synchrotron X-ray diffraction. To avoid the large incoherent scattering of neutrons by hydrogen, a deuterated sample was synthesized and characterized. Rietveld analysis of the obtained diffraction data allowed determination of unit-cell parameters, atomic positions and atomic displacement parameters as a function of temperature and pressure. In addition, the coefficients of thermal expansion, bulk moduli and pressure-temperature stability regions of jarosite were determined.

  8. New chemical reactions in methane at high temperatures and pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Culler, T.S.; Schiferl, D. )

    1993-01-21

    The authors have used a Merrill-Bassett diamond anvil cell and Raman spectroscopy to study methane at high pressures (up to 13 GPa) and high temperatures (up to 912 K). At 2.5-5.0 GPa and 912 K, methane photoreacts with the laser light used for Raman spectroscopy and forms a graphitelike soot compound. At room temperature and pressure the Raman spectrum of the new material has an intense peak with a frequency of 1597 cm[sup [minus]1]. At higher pressures and temperatures (10-13 GPa and 948 K) a sample of [sup 13]CD[sub 4] methane photoreacted with the laser light and formed a hard, clear, solid film. At 0.34 GPa and 300 K, this film had Raman peaks at 541 and 1605 cm[sup [minus]1]. The 541-cm[sup [minus]1] peak may correspond to the 550-cm[sup [minus]1] peak found in some diamondlike carbon (DLC) films formed by chemical vapor deposition (CVD), but the 1605-cm[sup [minus]1] peak does not appear to have any such counterpart. Other possible Raman peaks were masked by interference from the diamond anvils. Thus, while the hard, clear film has some similarities to CVD DLC films, some important differences and questions remain. 35 refs., 5 figs.

  9. Effect of pressure on the strength of olivine at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proietti, Arnaud; Bystricky, Misha; Guignard, Jérémy; Béjina, Frédéric; Crichton, Wilson

    2016-10-01

    A fine grained fully-dense olivine aggregate was deformed in a D-DIA press at room temperature and pressures ranging from 3.5 to 6.8 GPa, at constant strain rates between 6 ×10-6 and 2.2 ×10-5 s-1. A weighted non-linear least square fit of a dataset including our results and data from other high-pressure studies to a low-temperature plasticity flow law yields a Peierls stress σP0 = 7.4 (0.5) GPa and an activation energy E∗ = 232 (60) kJ.mol-1. The dependence of the Peierls stress to pressure, σP = σP0 (1 + 0.09 P) , appears to be larger than the value predicted by the formulation proposed by Frost and Ashby (1982). With such a dependence, the activation volume is very small (V* = 1.6 (1.7) cm3.mol-1). Extrapolation to natural conditions yields a viscosity of ~1023 -1024 Pa.s for a cold subducting slab at depths of 50-100 km.

  10. The study of wall deformation and flow distribution with transmural pressure by three-dimensional model of thoracic aorta wall.

    PubMed

    Dabagh, Mahsa; Jalali, Payman; Konttinen, Yrjö T

    2009-09-01

    The sensitivity of shear stress over smooth muscle cells (SMCs) to the deformability of media layer due to pressure is investigated in thoracic aorta wall using three-dimensional simulations. A biphasic, anisotropic model assuming the radius, thickness, and hydraulic conductivity of vessel wall as functions of transmural pressure is employed in numerical simulations. The leakage of interstitial fluid from intima to media layer is only possible through fenestral pores on the internal elastic lamina (IEL). The media layer is assumed a heterogeneous medium containing SMCs embedded in a porous extracellular matrix of elastin, proteoglycan, and collagen fibers. The applicable pressures for the deformation of media layer are varied from 0 to 180 mmHg. The SMCs are cylindrical objects of circular cross section at zero pressure. The cross sectional shape of SMCs changes from circle to ellipse as the media is compressed. The local shear stress over the nearest SMC to the IEL profoundly depends on pressure, SMCs configurations, and the corresponding distance to the IEL. The consideration of various SMC configurations, namely the staggered and square arrays, mimics various physiological conditions that can happen in positioning of an SMC. The results of our simulations show that even the second nearest SMCs to the IEL can significantly change their functions due to high shear stress levels. This is in contrast to earlier studies suggesting the highest vulnerability to shear stress for the innermost layer of SMCs at the intimal-medial interface.

  11. Rheology of talc sheared at high pressure and temperature: a case study for hot subduction zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misra, Santanu; Boutareaud, Sébastien; Burg, Jean-Pierre

    2014-01-01

    Talc is a common fault-coating mineral occurring in a variety of tectonic settings from the immediate subsurface down to more than 100 km depth along subducting plate interfaces. It is considered to stabilize slip at seismogenic depth. To gain insight into the rheological behavior of talc and related deformation processes along the subduction interface of hot oceanic slabs, we conducted torsion experiments on intact synthetic talc samples at 200-600 °C under 100-300 MPa confining pressure at intermediate strain rates (3 × 10- 4 and 2.45 × 10- 3 s- 1) for bulk shear strains up to 12.6.We also conducted stepping strain rate experiments to investigate rate and temperature dependence on sliding velocity and slide-hold-slide experiments to explore the re-strengthening and frictional healing of the sliding zones. The experimental results reveal 1) post-yield strain hardening followed by brief weakening episodes and then again strain hardening with increasing deformation and 2) a gradual transition of friction evolution from velocity-strengthening to velocity-neutral. Microstructural observations coupled with mechanical data suggest that talc rheology combines localized and distributed deformation, in a state called the brittle-ductile transition, with a predominance of crystal-plastic over cataclastic (brittle to semi-brittle) processes at 600 °C and 300 MPa confining pressure. These data suggest that talc cannot accumulate the tectonic stress necessary for earthquake-generating rupture along the subduction interface. This result concurs with the concept that in weak heterogeneous talc-rich material, strong asperities that can resist the tectonic stress to a greater extent are responsible for the consequential earthquake occurrence.

  12. New pressure and temperature effects on bacterial spores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathys, A.; Heinz, V.; Knorr, D.

    2008-07-01

    The mechanism of inactivation of bacterial spores by heat and pressure is still a matter of discussion. Obviously, the change of the dissociation equilibrium under pressure and temperature plays a dominant role in inactivation of microorganisms. Heat and pressure inactivation of Geobacillus. stearothermophilus spores at different initial pH-values in ACES and phosphate buffer confirmed this view. Thermal inactivation in ACES buffer at 122°C resulted in higher logarithmic reductions. Contrary, after pressure treatment at 900 MPa with 80°C phosphate buffer showed higher inactivation. These results indicated the different dissociation equilibrium shifts in buffer systems by heat and pressure. Due to preparation, storage and handling of highly concentrated spore suspensions the clumping and the formation of aggregates can hardly be avoided. Consequently, the impact of the agglomeration size distribution on the quantitative assessment of G. stearothermophilus spore inactivation was determined by using a three-fold dynamic optical backreflexion measurement. Two limiting cases have been discriminated in mathematical modelling: three dimensional, spherical packing for maximum spore count and two dimensional, circular packing for minimum spore count of a particular agglomerate. Thermal inactivation studies have been carried out in thin glass capillaries, where by using numerical simulations the non isothermal conditions were modelled and taken into account. It is shown that the shoulder formation often found in thermal spore inactivation can sufficiently be described by first-order inactivation kinetics when the agglomeration size is considered. In case of high pressure inactivation agglomerations could be strongly changed by high forces at compression and especially decompression phase. The physiological response of Bacillus licheniformis spores to high pressure was investigated using multiparameter flow cytometry. Spores were treated by high pressure at 150 MPa with 37

  13. Temperature-compensated miniature cylinder pressure sensor for automotive applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wlodarczyk, Marek T.

    2004-03-01

    The 1.7 mm diameter pressure sensor utilizes the principle of light intensity changes, transmitted by two optical fibers, upon reflection from a specially shaped, metal diaphragm deflecting under the effect of pressure. In an ultra low-cost and durable design suitable for automotive applications the sensor compensates for all major temperature effects encountered in combustion engines. The auto-referencing function performed by the sensor"s signal conditioner compensates for the temperature induced LED, photodiode, and fiber-to-opto-electronics coupling errors, sensor thermal drift, as well as fiber bending related light intensity changes. The direct bonding of optical fibers to the photodiode and LED chips results in minimum thermal errors and high part-to-part consistency. Sensor head materials and dimensions are optimized to compensate for the sensitivity changes associated with the diaphragm"s Young"s modulus temperature dependence. The miniature signal conditioner, based on an LED-photodiode transceiver and an ASIC, can be integrated within an automotive connector or a package small enough to fit inside the engine head. Over the signal conditioner temperature range of -40°C to 150°C and the sensor head continuous range of -40°C to 300°C a typical total accuracy of 1-2% is achieved.

  14. Thermal Conductivity of Complex Materials at High Temperatures and Pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, J. M.; Xu, Y.; Harrell, M.; Shankland, T. J.

    2004-12-01

    Measurements of lattice thermal diffusivity have been obtained on (Mg0.9Fe0.1)2SiO4 olivine, its high-pressure polymorphs, and of (Mg0.9Fe0.1)SiO3 enstatite at conditions of temperature and pressure. We used two independent techniques: Impulsive Stimulated Light Scattering to 5 GPa and 1273 K and the Ångström method on cylindrical samples in a multianvil apparatus to 20 GPa and 1373 K. Lattice thermal conductivities were calculated from heat capacities and equations of state. Conductivities are consistent with previous results obtained at 1 atm. In olivines conductivity increases at each phase transition from olivine to spinel structures (corresponding to velocity discontinuities at depths of 410 and 520 km in the Earth). Of greatest significance is the fact that for each of these phases, lattice conductivity closely follows a T-1/2 dependence on temperature T, a prediction of Klemens (1960) for materials containing abundant lattice defects. If such a dependence applies to other silicates and complex crystals, there should be a useful way to estimate conductivities at high temperatures from room temperature measurements.

  15. Thermal Conductivity of Complex Materials at High Temperatures and Pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, J. Michael; Xu, Yousheng; Harrell, Michael D.; Shankland, Thomas

    2004-03-01

    This paper presents measurements of lattice thermal diffusivity on (Mg_0.9Fe_0.1)_2SiO4 olivine, its high-pressure polymorphs, and of (Mg_0.9Fe_0.1)SiO3 enstatite at conditions of temperature and pressure. We used two independent techniques: impulsive stimulated light scattering to 5 GPa and 1273 K and the Ångström method on cylindrical samples in a multianvil apparatus to 20 GPa and 1373 K. Lattice thermal conductivities were calculated from heat capacities and equations of state. Conductivities are consistent with previous results obtained at 1 atm. In olivines conductivity increases at each phase transition from olivine to spinel structures (corresponding to velocity discontinuities at depths of 410 and 520 km in the Earth). Of greatest significance is the fact that for each of these phases, lattice conductivity closely follows a T-1/2 dependence on temperature T, a prediction of Klemens (1960) for materials containing abundant lattice defects. If such a dependence applies to other silicates and complex crystals, there should be a useful way to estimate conductivities at high temperatures from room temperature measurements.

  16. Rotating disk electrode system for elevated pressures and temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Fleige, M. J.; Wiberg, G. K. H.; Arenz, M.

    2015-06-15

    We describe the development and test of an elevated pressure and temperature rotating disk electrode (RDE) system that allows measurements under well-defined mass transport conditions. As demonstrated for the oxygen reduction reaction on polycrystalline platinum (Pt) in 0.5M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, the setup can easily be operated in a pressure range of 1–101 bar oxygen, and temperature of 140 °C. Under such conditions, diffusion limited current densities increase by almost two orders of magnitude as compared to conventional RDE setups allowing, for example, fuel cell catalyst studies under more realistic conditions. Levich plots demonstrate that the mass transport is indeed well-defined, i.e., at low electrode potentials, the measured current densities are fully diffusion controlled, while at higher potentials, a mixed kinetic-diffusion controlled regime is observed. Therefore, the setup opens up a new field for RDE investigations under temperature and current density conditions relevant for low and high temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cells.

  17. Shear modeling: thermoelasticity at high temperature and pressure for tantalum

    SciTech Connect

    Orlikowski, D; Soderlind, P; Moriarty, J A

    2004-12-06

    For large-scale constitutive strength models the shear modulus is typically assumed to be linearly dependent on temperature. However, for materials compressed beyond the Hugoniot or in regimes where there is very little experimental data, accurate and validated models must be used. To this end, we present here a new methodology that fully accounts for electron- and ion-thermal contributions to the elastic moduli over broad ranges of temperature (<20,000 K) and pressure (<10 Mbar). In this approach, the full potential linear muffin-tin orbital (FP-LMTO) method for the cold and electron-thermal contributions is closely coupled with ion-thermal contributions. For the latter two separate approaches are used. In one approach, the quasi-harmonic, ion-thermal contribution is obtained through a Brillouin zone sum of strain derivatives of the phonons, and in the other a full anharmonic ion-thermal contribution is obtained directly through Monte Carlo (MC) canonical distribution averages of strain derivatives on the multi-ion potential itself. Both approaches use quantum-based interatomic potentials derived from model generalized pseudopotential theory (MGPT). For tantalum, the resulting elastic moduli are compared to available ultrasonic measurements and diamond-anvil-cell compression experiments. Over the range of temperature and pressure considered, the results are then used in a polycrystalline averaging for the shear modulus to assess the linear temperature dependence for Ta.

  18. Effect of Pedestal Temperature on Bonding Strength and Deformation Characteristics for 5N Copper Wire Bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Gurbinder; Haseeb, A. S. M. A.

    2016-06-01

    In recent years, copper has increasingly been used to replace gold to create wire-bonded interconnections in microelectronics. While engineers and researchers in the semiconductor packaging field are continuously working on this transition from gold to copper wires to reduce costs, the challenge remains in producing robust and reliable joints for semiconductor devices. This research paper investigates the effect of pedestal temperature on bonding strength and deformation for 99.999% purity (5N) copper wire bonding on nickel-palladium-gold (NiPdAu) bond pads. With increasing pedestal temperature, significant thinning of the copper ball bond can be achieved, resulting in higher as-bonded ball shear strengths while producing no pad damage. This can be helpful for low-k devices with thin structures, so as to prevent the use of excessive bond force and ultrasonic energy during copper wire bonding.

  19. On the Application of Deformation Kinetics to Nonlinear Constitutive Relations at Higher Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valanis, K. C.; Lee, C. F.

    1983-01-01

    A single phenomenological constitutive equation is derived theoretically from first principles and applied to aluminum, tin and lead. The theory is based on deformation kinetics of steady creep in which the fundamental mechanism is atomic transport over potential barriers whose conformation is distorted by the application of a stress field. The form of the functional dependence of barrier distortion and stress over the entire temperature range is found to be a sigmoidal curve which tends to straight lines of a unit slope in the small and high stress regions. With this form of barrier distortion, the constitutive equation prediction the steady creep behavior of aluminum, tin and lead over a wide range of temperature and stress.

  20. High temperature fatigue deformation behaviors of thermally sprayed steel measured with electronic speckle pattern interferometry method

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Rongguang; Kido, Mitsuo

    2003-07-14

    High temperature fatigue (R=0) damage and deformation behaviors of SUS304 steel thermally sprayed with Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/NiCr coating were investigated using an electronic speckle pattern interferometry (ESPI) method. Surface cracks and delamination occurred after 1x10{sup 5} cycles test when {sigma}{sub max} was 202 MPa at 873 K. The lengths and number of cracks and delamination largely decreased when {sigma}{sub max} or temperature decreased to 115 MPa or 573 K, respectively. Strain values along cracks measured with the ESPI method were much larger than other areas due to crack opening under the tensile load. The positions of strain concentration zones on strain distribution figures by ESPI method were well corresponded to those of cracks on sprayed coatings. Strain values decreased largely where local delamination occurred.

  1. Effects of low temperature neutron irradiation on deformation behavior of austenitic stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Pawel, J.E.; Rowcliffe, A.F.; Alexander, D.J.; Grossbeck, M.L.; Shiba, K.

    1996-04-01

    An austenitic stainless steel, designated 316LN-IG, has been chosen for the first wall/shield (FW/S) structure for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). The proposed operational temperature range for the structure (100 to 250{degree}C) is below the temperature regimes for void swelling (400-600{degree}C) and for helium embrittlement (500-700{degree}C). However, the proposed neutron dose is such that large changes in yield strength, deformation mode, and strain hardening capacity could be encountered which could significantly affect fracture properties. Definition of the irradiation regimes in which this phenomenon occurs is essential to the establishment of design rules to protect against various modes of failure.

  2. The dissociation of liquid silica at high pressure and temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Hicks, D; Boehly, T; Eggert, J; Miller, J; Celliers, P; Collins, G

    2005-11-17

    Liquid silica at high pressure and temperature is shown to undergo significant structural modifications and profound changes in its electronic properties. Temperature measurements on shock waves in silica at 70-1000 GPa indicate that the specific heat of liquid SiO{sub 2} rises well above the Dulong-Petit limit, exhibiting a broad peak with temperature that is attributable to the growing structural disorder caused by bond-breaking in the melt. The simultaneous sharp rise in optical reflectivity of liquid SiO{sub 2} indicates that dissociation causes the electrical and therefore thermal conductivities of silica to attain metallic-like values of 1-5 x 10{sup 5} S/m and 24-600 W/m.K respectively.

  3. Lattice strain and texture evolution during room-temperature deformation in Zircaloy-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Feng

    Zircaloy-2 and its sister alloy, Zircaloy-4, have extensive applications in the nuclear industry as core components in heavy water reactors and fuel cladding in both heavy and light water reactors. Intergranular stresses and texture can greatly affect the mechanical performance of these components. A complete understanding of the development of intergranular constraints and texture in Zircaloy-2 will allow an improved understanding of the plastic deformation of zirconium alloys, and the prediction of in-reactor deformation of tubes made by different manufacturing routes. Neutron diffraction was used to track the development of lattice strain and peak intensity in three dimensions for various crystallographic planes in samples cut from a rolled Zircaloy-2 slab. The samples were subject to room temperature compression or tension in-situ in the neutron spectrometer in each of the three principal directions of the slab. Textures in the deformed samples were measured using neutron diffraction. Strong evidence was found for tensile twinning in tensile tests in the plate normal direction and compression tests in the transverse and rolling directions. The lattice strain development inside the newly formed twins was recorded for the first time in a Zr alloy. An elasto-plastic self-consistent model and a visco-plastic self-consistent model were used to interpret the lattice strain and texture data, respectively. Various slip and twinning modes were considered in both models. Prism slip, basal slip, pyramidal slip and tensile twinning were concluded to be indispensable, while pyramidal slip was unnecessary in the modeling. The critical resolved shear stresses and hardening parameters were obtained by simultaneously achieving a 'best-fit' with the complete experimental data set. The effects of anisotropic latent hardening due to dislocation interactions were found to be critical, and the inclusion of Lankford coefficients as modeling constraints was necessary

  4. High temperature deformation behavior, thermal stability and irradiation performance in Grade 92 steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsagabi, Sultan

    The 9Cr-2W ferritic-martensitic steel (i.e. Grade 92 steel) possesses excellent mechanical and thermophysical properties; therefore, it has been considered to suit more challenging applications where high temperature strength and creep-rupture properties are required. The high temperature deformation mechanism was investigated through a set of tensile testing at elevated temperatures. Hence, the threshold stress concept was applied to elucidate the operating high temperature deformation mechanism. It was identified as the high temperature climb of edge dislocations due to the particle-dislocation interactions and the appropriate constitutive equation was developed. In addition, the microstructural evolution at room and elevated temperatures was investigated. For instance, the microstructural evolution under loading was more pronounced and carbide precipitation showed more coarsening tendency. The growth of these carbide precipitates, by removing W and Mo from matrix, significantly deteriorates the solid solution strengthening. The MX type carbonitrides exhibited better coarsening resistance. To better understand the thermal microstructural stability, long tempering schedules up to 1000 hours was conducted at 560, 660 and 760°C after normalizing the steel. Still, the coarsening rate of M23C 6 carbides was higher than the MX-type particles. Moreover, the Laves phase particles were detected after tempering the steel for long periods before they dissolve back into the matrix at high temperature (i.e. 720°C). The influence of the tempering temperature and time was studied for Grade 92 steel via Hollomon-Jaffe parameter. Finally, the irradiation performance of Grade 92 steel was evaluated to examine the feasibility of its eventual reactor use. To that end, Grade 92 steel was irradiated with iron (Fe2+) ions to 10, 50 and 100 dpa at 30 and 500°C. Overall, the irradiated samples showed some irradiation-induced hardening which was more noticeable at 30°C. Additionally

  5. Ignitability of DMSO vapors at elevated temperature and reduced pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Bergman, W; Ural, E A; Weisgerber, W

    1999-03-08

    Ignitability of DMSO vapors have been evaluated at 664 mm Hg pressure. The minimum temperature at which the DMSO vapors that are in equilibrium with liquid DMSO has been determined using two types of strong ignition sources. This temperature is 172 F for chemical igniters, and 178 F for spark ignition. Numerous tests have been conducted using controlled intensity sparks to define the shape of the minimum ignition energy curve as a function of temperature. The ignition energies spanned four orders of magnitude (approximately from 20,000 to 2 mJ) while the DMSO vapor mixture temperature varied from 185 to 207 F. The Sandia Generator was used to simulate worst case electrostatic sparks that can be produced by the human body. Although it was not designed for air discharges, this device had been used by LLNL for 1 mm spark gap and the resultant spark energy had been measured to fall within the range from 3.2 to 8.8 mJ. CRC tests using this device showed that the minimum ignition temperature strongly depends on the spark gap. The minimum ignition temperature was 207 F at 1 mm spark gap, 203 F at 3 mm spark gap, and 197 F at 6 mm spark gap. This strong dependence on the spark gap is believed to be partly due to the changes in the spark energy as the spark gap changes.

  6. Thermo-elastic behavior of deformed woven fabric composites at elevated temperatures: Part 1

    SciTech Connect

    Vu-Khanh, T.; Liu, B.

    1994-12-31

    This paper presents the results of a study on the effects of temperature on the thermo-elastic properties of woven fabric composites. The thermo-mechanical behavior of woven fabric composites is characterized by a laminate composed of four fictional unidirectional plies, called the sub-plies model. The model allows determination of the thermo-elastic properties of deformed fabric composites (non-orthogonal structure) and direct use of layered shell elements in finite element codes. A special procedure is also proposed to measure the fiber undulation effect and to predict the on-axis thermo-elastic coefficients of the equivalent constituent plies. The thermo-elastic behavior at elevated temperature was investigated on graphite/epoxy fabric composites. Experimental measurements were carried out from 23 C to 177 C. The results revealed that the equivalent thermal expansion coefficients of the sub-plies remain almost constant over a wide range of temperature. However, the equivalent elastic moduli and Poison`s ratio of the sub-plies vary nonlinearly with temperature. Semiempirical equations based on the experimental data were also developed to predict the equivalent on-axis thermo-elastic properties of the fictional constituent plies in the sub-plies model as a function of temperature.

  7. Research on Earth's rotation and the effect of atmospheric pressure on vertical deformation and sea level variability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wahr, John

    1993-01-01

    The work done under NASA grant NAG5-485 included modelling the deformation of the earth caused by variations in atmospheric pressure. The amount of deformation near coasts is sensitive to the nature of the oceanic response to the pressure. The PSMSL (Permanent Service for Mean Sea Level) data suggest the response is inverted barometer at periods greater than a couple months. Green's functions were constructed to describe the perturbation of the geoid caused by atmospheric and oceanic loading and by the accompanying load-induced deformation. It was found that perturbation of up to 2 cm are possible. Ice mass balance data was used for continental glaciers to look at the glacial contributions to time-dependent changes in polar motion, the lod, the earth's gravitational field, the position of the earth's center-of-mass, and global sea level. It was found that there can be lateral, non-hydrostatic structure inside the fluid core caused by gravitational forcing from the mantle, from the inner core, or from topography at the core/mantle or inner core/outer core boundaries. The nutational and tidal response of a non-hydrostatic earth with a solid inner core was modeled. Monthly, global tide gauge data from PSMSL was used to look at the 18.6-year ocean tide, the 14-month pole tide, the oceanic response to pressure, the linear trend and inter-annual variability in the earth's gravity field, the global sea level rise, and the effects of post glacial rebound. The effects of mantle anelasticity on nutations, earth tides, and tidal variation in the lod was modeled. Results of this model can be used with Crustal Dynamics observations to look at the anelastic dissipation and dispersion at tidal periods. The effects of surface topography on various components of crustal deformation was also modeled, and numerical models were developed of post glacial rebound.

  8. Research on Earth's rotation and the effect of atmospheric pressure on vertical deformation and sea level variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahr, John

    1993-03-01

    The work done under NASA grant NAG5-485 included modelling the deformation of the earth caused by variations in atmospheric pressure. The amount of deformation near coasts is sensitive to the nature of the oceanic response to the pressure. The PSMSL (Permanent Service for Mean Sea Level) data suggest the response is inverted barometer at periods greater than a couple months. Green's functions were constructed to describe the perturbation of the geoid caused by atmospheric and oceanic loading and by the accompanying load-induced deformation. It was found that perturbation of up to 2 cm are possible. Ice mass balance data was used for continental glaciers to look at the glacial contributions to time-dependent changes in polar motion, the lod, the earth's gravitational field, the position of the earth's center-of-mass, and global sea level. It was found that there can be lateral, non-hydrostatic structure inside the fluid core caused by gravitational forcing from the mantle, from the inner core, or from topography at the core/mantle or inner core/outer core boundaries. The nutational and tidal response of a non-hydrostatic earth with a solid inner core was modeled. Monthly, global tide gauge data from PSMSL was used to look at the 18.6-year ocean tide, the 14-month pole tide, the oceanic response to pressure, the linear trend and inter-annual variability in the earth's gravity field, the global sea level rise, and the effects of post glacial rebound. The effects of mantle anelasticity on nutations, earth tides, and tidal variation in the lod was modeled. Results of this model can be used with Crustal Dynamics observations to look at the anelastic dissipation and dispersion at tidal periods. The effects of surface topography on various components of crustal deformation was also modeled, and numerical models were developed of post glacial rebound.

  9. Bacterial adaptation to extremes of low temperature and elevated pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartlett, Douglas

    The largest portion of Earth's biosphere is represented by low temperature, high pressure deepsea environments which are exposed to reduced and recalcitrant forms of organic carbon and which are far removed from sun light. Progress that has been made in recent years examining the biodiversity, genomics and genetics of microbial life at great ocean depths will be described. Particular focus will be given to the comparative genomics of members of Colwellia, Photobacterium, Moritella, Shewanella, Psychromonas and Carnobacterium genera. The genomes of piezophiles (high pressure adapted microbes) are characterized by possessing large intergenic regions, large numbers of rRNA operons, rRNA of a modified secondary structure, a reliance on unsaturated and poly-unsaturated fatty acids in their membrane lipids, a diversity of transport and physiological capabilities, and large numbers of transposable elements. Genetic studies in Photobacterium profundum have highlighted roles for extracellular polysaccharide production and DNA replication and protein synthesis in low temperature and high pressure growth. Recent advances in the cultivation of novel piezophiles from a deep-trench environment will also be described.

  10. Synthesis and microdiffraction at extreme pressures and temperatures.

    PubMed

    Lavina, Barbara; Dera, Przemyslaw; Meng, Yue

    2013-01-01

    High pressure compounds and polymorphs are investigated for a broad range of purposes such as determine structures and processes of deep planetary interiors, design materials with novel properties, understand the mechanical behavior of materials exposed to very high stresses as in explosions or impacts. Synthesis and structural analysis of materials at extreme conditions of pressure and temperature entails remarkable technical challenges. In the laser heated diamond anvil cell (LH-DAC), very high pressure is generated between the tips of two opposing diamond anvils forced against each other; focused infrared laser beams, shined through the diamonds, allow to reach very high temperatures on samples absorbing the laser radiation. When the LH-DAC is installed in a synchrotron beamline that provides extremely brilliant x-ray radiation, the structure of materials under extreme conditions can be probed in situ. LH-DAC samples, although very small, can show highly variable grain size, phase and chemical composition. In order to obtain the high resolution structural analysis and the most comprehensive characterization of a sample, we collect diffraction data in 2D grids and combine powder, single crystal and multigrain diffraction techniques. Representative results obtained in the synthesis of a new iron oxide, Fe4O5 (1) will be shown. PMID:24145761

  11. Synthesis and microdiffraction at extreme pressures and temperatures.

    PubMed

    Lavina, Barbara; Dera, Przemyslaw; Meng, Yue

    2013-10-07

    High pressure compounds and polymorphs are investigated for a broad range of purposes such as determine structures and processes of deep planetary interiors, design materials with novel properties, understand the mechanical behavior of materials exposed to very high stresses as in explosions or impacts. Synthesis and structural analysis of materials at extreme conditions of pressure and temperature entails remarkable technical challenges. In the laser heated diamond anvil cell (LH-DAC), very high pressure is generated between the tips of two opposing diamond anvils forced against each other; focused infrared laser beams, shined through the diamonds, allow to reach very high temperatures on samples absorbing the laser radiation. When the LH-DAC is installed in a synchrotron beamline that provides extremely brilliant x-ray radiation, the structure of materials under extreme conditions can be probed in situ. LH-DAC samples, although very small, can show highly variable grain size, phase and chemical composition. In order to obtain the high resolution structural analysis and the most comprehensive characterization of a sample, we collect diffraction data in 2D grids and combine powder, single crystal and multigrain diffraction techniques. Representative results obtained in the synthesis of a new iron oxide, Fe4O5 (1) will be shown.

  12. Synthesis and Microdiffraction at Extreme Pressures and Temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Lavina, Barbara; Dera, Przemyslaw; Meng, Yue

    2013-01-01

    High pressure compounds and polymorphs are investigated for a broad range of purposes such as determine structures and processes of deep planetary interiors, design materials with novel properties, understand the mechanical behavior of materials exposed to very high stresses as in explosions or impacts. Synthesis and structural analysis of materials at extreme conditions of pressure and temperature entails remarkable technical challenges. In the laser heated diamond anvil cell (LH-DAC), very high pressure is generated between the tips of two opposing diamond anvils forced against each other; focused infrared laser beams, shined through the diamonds, allow to reach very high temperatures on samples absorbing the laser radiation. When the LH-DAC is installed in a synchrotron beamline that provides extremely brilliant x-ray radiation, the structure of materials under extreme conditions can be probed in situ. LH-DAC samples, although very small, can show highly variable grain size, phase and chemical composition. In order to obtain the high resolution structural analysis and the most comprehensive characterization of a sample, we collect diffraction data in 2D grids and combine powder, single crystal and multigrain diffraction techniques. Representative results obtained in the synthesis of a new iron oxide, Fe4O5 1 will be shown. PMID:24145761

  13. Effects of high pressure and temperature on the properties of nanocrystals in rocks: Evidences from Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobolev, G. A.; Genshaft, Yu. S.; Kireenkova, S. M.; Morozov, Yu. A.; Smul'Skaya, A. I.; Vettegren', V. I.; Kulik, V. B.

    2011-06-01

    A search is conducted to detect nanocrystals in a sample of apogranitic pseudotachylite, which is a product of extremely strong crushing of granite in a seismogenic fault. Raman spectroscopy revealed nanocrystals of quartz measuring approximately 17 to 25 nm and low-temperature albite ranging from 8 to 30 nm. The crystallographic cell in the nanocrystals is deformed. The internal stresses which might have been responsible for these deformations vary from approximately -300 (compression) to +480 (tension) MPa. It is found that after having been exposed to high pressure (1 GPa) and temperature (470-500°C for 10 minutes and 550-600°C for 16 minutes), the nanocrystals of quartz reduced in size to ≈10 nm, and the nanocrystals of albite, to 13 nm. At the same time, the level of tension in the lattice spacing of quartz increased.

  14. Structure and magnetic properties of a Ni3(Al, Fe, Cr) single crystal subjected to high-temperature deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazantseva, N. V.; Rigmant, M. B.; Stepanova, N. N.; Davydov, D. I.; Shishkin, D. A.; Terent'ev, P. B.; Vinogradova, N. I.

    2016-05-01

    The structure and magnetic properties of the Ni3(Al, Fe, Cr) single crystal subjected to high-temperature tensile deformation to failure at 850-900°C have been studied. No recrystallized grains and metastable phases were found. The rupture zone of the alloy subjected to deformation (at 900°C) to the highest degree demonstrates the fragmentation accompanied by rotation of atomic layers and changes of the chemical composition in the nickel and aluminum sublattices. Magnetic studies of the alloy have shown the existence of two Curie temperatures for samples cut from the rupture zone. Samples cut away from the rupture zone exhibit no additional magnetic transitions; twines and planar stacking faults in the alloy structure. The alloy deformed to the lower degree of deformation (at 850°C) also demonstrates twins; no ferromagnetic state was found to form.

  15. Deformation of forsterite polycrystals at mantle pressure: Comparison with Fe-bearing olivine and the effect of iron on its plasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bollinger, Caroline; Merkel, Sébastien; Cordier, Patrick; Raterron, Paul

    2015-03-01

    The rheology of polycrystalline forsterite was investigated in the Deformation-DIA (D-DIA) using insitu X-ray diffraction at pressure between 3.1 and 8.1 GPa, temperature in the 1373-1673 K range, and at steady-state strain rate ranging from 0.5 × 10-5 to 5.5 × 10-5 s-1. Microscopic observations of the run products show characteristic microstructures of the so-called "dislocation creep regime" in wet conditions. Based on the present data at 1473 K, the pressure effect on forsterite plasticity is quantified using an activation volume VFo∗ = 12.1 ± 3.0 cm3 mol-1. A comparison between the strain rates of San Carlos olivine and forsterite specimens deformed together indicates that, at the experimental conditions, they compare with each other within less than half an order of magnitude. This comparison also allows for the determination of the stress exponent of forsterite of nFo = 2.3 ± 0.6. Our results, combined with data from the literature, indicate a clear trend of increasing stress exponent with Fe content in olivine.

  16. Deformation of Forsterite Polycrystals at Mantle Pressure. Comparison with Fe-bearing Olivine and the Effect of Iron on its Plasticity

    SciTech Connect

    Bollinger, Caroline; Merkel, Sebastien; Cordier, Patrick; Raterron, Paul

    2014-12-23

    Rheology of polycrystalline forsterite was investigated in the Deformation-DIA (D-DIA) using insitu X-ray diffraction at pressure between 3.1 and 8.1 GPa, temperature in the 1373–1673 K range, and at steady-state strain rate ranging from 0.5 × 10-5 to 5.5 × 10-5 s-1. Microscopic observations of the run products show characteristic microstructures of the so-called “dislocation creep regime” in wet conditions. Based on the present data at 1473 K, the pressure effect on forsterite plasticity is quantified using an activation volume V*F0 = 12.1±3.0 cm3 mol-1. Moreover, a comparison between the strain rates of San Carlos olivine and forsterite specimens deformed together indicates that, at the experimental conditions, they compare with each other within less than half an order of magnitude. Our comparison also allows for the determination of the stress exponent of forsterite of nFo = 2.3 ± 0.6. Our results, combined with data from the literature, indicate a clear trend of increasing stress exponent with Fe content in olivine.

  17. Pressure and Temperature effects on the High Pressure Phase Transformation in Zirconium

    SciTech Connect

    Escobedo-Diaz, Juan P.; Cerreta, Ellen K.; Brown, Donald W.; Trujillo, Carl P.; Rigg, Paulo A.; Bronkhorst, Curt A.; Addessio, Francis L.; Lookman, Turab

    2012-06-20

    At high pressure zirconium is known to undergo a phase transformation from the hexagonal close packed (HCP) alpha phase ({alpha}) to the simple hexagonal omega phase ({omega}). Under conditions of shock loading, the high-pressure omega phase is retained upon release. However, the hysteresis in this transformation is not well represented by equilibrium phase diagrams. For this reason, the influence of peak shock pressure and temperature on the retention of omega phase in Zr is explored in this study. In situ VISAR measurements along with post-mortem metallographic and neutron diffraction characterization of soft recovered specimens have been utilized to quantify the volume fraction of retained omega phase, morphology of the shocked alpha and omega phases, and qualitatively understand the kinetics of this transformation. This understanding of the role of peak shock stress will be utilized to address physics to be encoded in our present macro-scale models.

  18. 30 CFR 35.21 - Temperature-pressure spray-ignition tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Temperature-pressure spray-ignition tests. 35... Temperature-pressure spray-ignition tests. (a) Purpose. The purpose of this test shall be to determine the... the pressure vessel and heated to a temperature of 150 °F. The temperature shall be maintained at...

  19. 30 CFR 35.21 - Temperature-pressure spray-ignition tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Temperature-pressure spray-ignition tests. 35... Temperature-pressure spray-ignition tests. (a) Purpose. The purpose of this test shall be to determine the... the pressure vessel and heated to a temperature of 150 °F. The temperature shall be maintained at...

  20. High Temperature Ceramic Guide Vane Temperature and Pressure Distribution Calculation for Flow with Cooling Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, Rakesh

    2004-01-01

    A ceramic guide vane has been designed and tested for operation under high temperature. Previous efforts have suggested that some cooling flow may be required to alleviate the high temperatures observed near the trailing edge region. The present report describes briefly a three-dimensional viscous analysis carried out to calculate the temperature and pressure distribution on the blade surface and in the flow path with a jet of cooling air exiting from the suction surface near the trailing edge region. The data for analysis was obtained from Dr. Craig Robinson. The surface temperature and pressure distribution along with a flowfield distribution is shown in the results. The surface distribution is also given in a tabular form at the end of the document.

  1. The Effect of Cold Plastic Straining of Submicrocrystalline and Coarse-Grained Titanium on the Temperature Behavior of Flow Stress in the Stage of Microplastic Deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudarev, E. F.; Pochivalova, G. P.; Kolobov, Yu. R.; Bakach, G. P.; Skosyrskii, A. B.; Zhorovkov, M. F.; Goraynov, А. А.

    2013-10-01

    The results of an experimental investigation of the effect of mechanical-thermal treatment of submicrocrystalline and coarse-grained titanium on the deformation behavior in the stage of microplastic deformation at room and elevated temperatures are reported. The structural factors giving rise to the flowstress changes in the stage of microplastic deformation as a result of mechanical-thermal treatment are discussed. The general tendencies and special features of the effect of annealing and testing temperatures on the deformation behavior and flow stress in the first and second stages of microplastic deformation of submicrocrystalline and coarse-grained titanium subjected to large plastic deformation at 295 K are clarified.

  2. Cryogenic Pressure Calibrator for Wide Temperature Electronically Scanned (ESP) Pressure Modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faulcon, Nettie D.

    2001-01-01

    Electronically scanned pressure (ESP) modules have been developed that can operate in ambient and in cryogenic environments, particularly Langley's National Transonic Facility (NTF). Because they can operate directly in a cryogenic environment, their use eliminates many of the operational problems associated with using conventional modules at low temperatures. To ensure the accuracy of these new instruments, calibration was conducted in a laboratory simulating the environmental conditions of NTF. This paper discusses the calibration process by means of the simulation laboratory, the system inputs and outputs and the analysis of the calibration data. Calibration results of module M4, a wide temperature ESP module with 16 ports and a pressure range of +/- 4 psid are given.

  3. Pressure effect on inverse temperature transitions: biological implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urry, Dan W.; Hayes, Larry C.; Channe Gowda, D.; Parker, Timothy M.

    1991-07-01

    Elastic protein-based polymers of the form poly [ fx(VPGXG), fv(VPGVG)], where fx and fv are mole fractions with fx+ fv=1, exhibit inverse temperature transitions in the form of a phase separation in which folding and aggregation of polymer chains into more-ordered states of the condensed (coacervate) phase occurs on raising the temperature. When X = Trp, Phe or Tyr, an increase in pressure causes a substantial increase in the temperature of the transition. The data are interpreted to indicate that water molecules surrounding the aromatic side chains of Trp(W), Phe(F) or Tyr(Y) occupy less volume than water molecules in bulk water. The calculated volume change for poly[0.8(GVGVP), 0.2(GFGVP)], for example, on going from coacervate phase, where hydrophobic associations have largely eliminated waters of hydrophobic hydration, to be dispersed in water where the hydrophobic moieties are surrounded by water is 80 cm 3/mol of mean pentamers or some 400 cm 3/mol of (GFGVP). The results provide an understanding of the source of pressure effects in biological systems and for the capacity to design materials capable of exhibiting baromechanical transduction.

  4. Stability of coronene at high temperature and pressure.

    PubMed

    Jennings, E; Montgomery, W; Lerch, Ph

    2010-12-01

    The infrared response of coronene (C(24)H(12)) under pressure and temperature conditions up to 10 GPa and 300 °C is examined in situ using a diamond anvil cell and synchrotron-source Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Coronene is a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon that is present in the interstellar medium and meteorites which may have contributed to the Earth's primordial carbon budget. It appears to undergo a reversible phase transition between 2 and 3.2 GPa at ambient temperature; new intramolecular bonds in the region 840-880 cm(-1) result from compression. We document the shift of spectral features to higher wavenumbers with increasing pressure but find this change suppressed by increased temperature. By investigating the stability of coronene over a range of naturally occurring conditions found in a range of environments, we assess the survival of the molecule through various terrestrial and extraterrestrial processes. Coronene has previously been shown to survive atmospheric entry during Earth accretion; this can now be extended to include survival through geological processes such as subduction and silicate melting of the rock cycle, opening the possibility of extraterrestrial coronene predating terrestrial accretion existing on Earth.

  5. Photoelectron Spectroscopy under Ambient Pressure and Temperature Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Ogletree, D. Frank; Bluhm, Hendrik; Hebenstreit, Eleonore B.; Salmeron, Miquel

    2009-02-27

    We describe the development and applications of novel instrumentation for photoemission spectroscopy of solid or liquid surfaces in the presence of gases under ambient conditions or pressure and temperature. The new instrument overcomes the strong scattering of electrons in gases by the use of an aperture close to the surface followed by a differentially-pumped electrostatic lens system. In addition to the scattering problem, experiments in the presence of condensed water or other liquids require the development of special sample holders to provide localized cooling. We discuss the first two generations of Ambient Pressure PhotoEmission Spectroscopy (APPES) instruments developed at synchrotron light sources (ALS in Berkeley and BESSY in Berlin), with special focus on the Berkeley instruments. Applications to environmental science and catalytic chemical research are illustrated in two examples.

  6. Fracture strength of flawed cylindrical pressure vessels under cryogenic temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christopher, T.; Sankarnarayanasamy, K.; Nageswara Rao, B.

    2002-11-01

    Damage tolerant and fail-safe approaches have been employed increasingly in the design of critical engineering components. In these approaches, one has to assess the residual strength of a component with an assumed pre-existing crack. In other cases, cracks may be detected during service. Then, there is a need to evaluate the residual strength of the cracked components in order to decide whether they can be continued safely or repair and replacement are imperative. A three-parameter fracture criterion is applied to correlate the fracture data on aluminium, titanium and steel materials from test results on cylindrical tanks/pressure vessels at cryogenic temperatures. Fracture parameters to generate the failure assessment diagram are determined for the materials considered in the present study. Failure pressure estimates were found to be in good agreement with test results.

  7. Groundwater pressure changes and crustal deformation before and after the 2007 and 2014 eruptions of Mt. Ontake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koizumi, Naoji; Sato, Tsutomu; Kitagawa, Yuichi; Ochi, Tadafumi

    2016-03-01

    Volcanic activity generally causes crustal deformation, which sometimes induces groundwater changes, and both of these phenomena are sometimes detected before volcanic eruptions. Therefore, investigations of crustal deformation and groundwater changes can be useful for predicting volcanic eruptions. The Geological Survey of Japan, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, has been observing groundwater pressure at Ohtaki observatory (GOT) since 1998. GOT is about 10 km southeast of the summit of Mt. Ontake. During this observation period, Mt. Ontake has erupted twice, in 2007 and in 2014. Before the 2007 eruption, the groundwater pressure at GOT clearly dropped, but it did not change before or after the 2014 eruption. These observations are consistent with the crustal deformation observed by Global Navigation Satellite System stations of the Geospatial Information Authority of Japan. The difference between the 2007 and 2014 eruptions can be explained if a relatively large magma intrusion occurred before the 2007 eruption but no or a small magma intrusion before the 2014 eruption.

  8. Mineral inclusions in diamond: temperature and pressure of equilibration.

    PubMed

    Meyer, H O; Tsai, H M

    1976-02-27

    Two distinct suites of minerals included in natural diamond occur and probably represent different physical and chemical conditions during diamond growth. Minerals of the ultramafic suite appear to have equilibrated in the range 1000 degrees to 1300 degrees C between 45 and 65 kilobars, whereas the temperature range for minerals of the eclogitic suite is 850 degrees to 1250 degrees C. At present, models relating the partitioning of magnesium and iron between coexisting phases are not sufficiently rigorous to determine a value for the pressure of equilibration of these eclogitic suite inclusions. PMID:17730997

  9. A lidar system for measuring atmospheric pressure and temperature profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwemmer, Geary K.; Dombrowski, Mark; Korb, C. Laurence; Milrod, Jeffry; Walden, Harvey

    1987-01-01

    The design and operation of a differential absorption lidar system capable of remotely measuring the vertical structure of tropospheric pressure and temperature are described. The measurements are based on the absorption by atmospheric oxygen of the spectrally narrowband output of two pulsed alexandrite lasers. Detailed laser output spectral characteristics, which are critical to successful lidar measurements, are presented. Spectral linewidths of 0.026 and 0.018 per cm for the lasers were measured with over 99.99 percent of the energy contained in three longitudinal modes.

  10. HIGH TEMPERATURE PRESSURE PROCESSING OF MIXED ALANATE COMPOUNDS

    SciTech Connect

    Berseth, P; Ragaiy Zidan, R; Donald Anton, D; Kirk Shanahan, K; Ashley Stowe, A

    2007-06-07

    Mixtures of light-weight elements and hydrides were investigated to increase the understanding of the chemical reactions that take place between various materials. This report details investigations we have made into mixtures that include NaAlH{sub 4}, LiAlH{sub 4}, MgH{sub 2}, Mg{sub 2}NiH{sub 4}, alkali(ne) hydrides, and early third row transition metals (V, Cr, Mn). Experimental parameters such as stoichiometry, heat from ball milling versus hand milling, and varying the temperature of high pressure molten state processing were studied to examine the effects of these parameters on the reactions of the complex metal hydrides.

  11. Anisotropic friction, deformation, and fracture of single-crystal silicon carbide at room temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1979-01-01

    Anisotropic friction, deformation, and fracture studies were conducted with /0001/, /10(-1)0/, and /11(-2)0/ silicon carbide surfaces in sliding contact with diamond. The experiments were conducted with loads of 0.1, 0.2, and 0.3 N at a sliding velocity of 3 mm/min in mineral oil or in dry argon at room temperature. The 1010 direction on the basal /0001/ plane exhibits the lowest coefficient of friction and the greatest resistance to abrasion for silicon carbide. Anisotropic friction and deformation of the /0001/, /10(-1)0/, and /11(-2)0/ silicon carbide surfaces are primarily controlled by the slip system /10(-1)0/ 11(-2)0. The anisotropic fracture during sliding on the basal plane is due to surface cracking along /10(-1)0/ and subsurface cracking along /0001/. The fracture during sliding on the /11(-2)0/ or /10(-1)0/ surfaces is due to surface cracking along /0001/ and /11(-2)0/ or /10(-1)-1 and to subsurface cracking along /10(-1)0/.

  12. Effect of Temperature and Deformation on Nb3Sn Strands Instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barzi, E.; Del Frate, L.; Turrioni, D.; Zlobin, A. V.

    2006-03-01

    The critical current of Nb3Sn strands used in Fermilab's high field magnets was measured at low and high fields under various experimental conditions using the voltage-current (V-I) and voltage-field (V-H) methods. The strands were commercially produced using Restack Rod Process (RRP) and Powder-in-Tube (PIT) technologies. Both round and deformed strands were studied. Measurements were performed at the Fermilab's Short Sample Test Facility using a 2-kA sample holder with a low contact resistivity. V-I characteristics at fields above 10-12T with a smooth transition from the superconducting to normal phase allowed determining strand critical current. V-I and V-H measurements at low fields showed premature quenches due to magnetic instability in strands with high critical current density and large effective filament size. The effects of strand deformation and RRR as well as test temperature were studied. This paper describes the Nb3Sn strand parameters, the equipment and measurement methods used, and the results of the critical current measurements at low and high fields. The effect of magnetic instabilities is analyzed for different measurement conditions and compared to the predictions of an instability model.

  13. Stress and temperature dependence of the avalanche dynamics during creep deformation of metallic glasses

    PubMed Central

    Herrero-Gómez, Carlos; Samwer, Konrad

    2016-01-01

    The understanding of the mesoscopic origin of plasticity in metallic glasses remains still an open issue. At the microscopic level, Shear Transformation Zones (STZ), composed by dozens of atoms, have been identified as the basic unit of the deformation process. Macroscopically, metallic glasses perform either homogeneous or inhomogeneous flow depending on the experimental conditions. However, the emergence of macroscopic behavior resulting from STZ interactions is still an open issue and is of great interest. In the current work we present an approach to analyze the different interaction mechanisms of STZ’s by studying the statistics of the avalanches produced by a metallic glass during tensile creep deformation. We identified a crossover between different regimes of avalanches, and we analyzed the dependence of such crossover on the experimental conditions, namely stress and temperature. We interpret such crossover as a transition from 3D random STZ activity to localized 2D nano-shear bands. The experimental time at which the crossover takes place seems to depend on the overall strain and strain rate in the sample PMID:27654069

  14. Stress and temperature dependence of the avalanche dynamics during creep deformation of metallic glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrero-Gómez, Carlos; Samwer, Konrad

    2016-09-01

    The understanding of the mesoscopic origin of plasticity in metallic glasses remains still an open issue. At the microscopic level, Shear Transformation Zones (STZ), composed by dozens of atoms, have been identified as the basic unit of the deformation process. Macroscopically, metallic glasses perform either homogeneous or inhomogeneous flow depending on the experimental conditions. However, the emergence of macroscopic behavior resulting from STZ interactions is still an open issue and is of great interest. In the current work we present an approach to analyze the different interaction mechanisms of STZ’s by studying the statistics of the avalanches produced by a metallic glass during tensile creep deformation. We identified a crossover between different regimes of avalanches, and we analyzed the dependence of such crossover on the experimental conditions, namely stress and temperature. We interpret such crossover as a transition from 3D random STZ activity to localized 2D nano-shear bands. The experimental time at which the crossover takes place seems to depend on the overall strain and strain rate in the sample

  15. Microstructures of beta silicon carbide after irradiation creep deformation at elevated temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Katoh, Yutai; Kondo, Sosuke; Snead, Lance Lewis

    2008-01-01

    Microstructures of silicon carbide were examined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) after creep deformation under neutron irradiation. Thin strip specimens of polycrystalline and monocrystalline, chemically vapor-deposited, beta-phase silicon carbide were irradiated in the high flux isotope reactor to 0.7-4.2 dpa at nominal temperatures of 640-1080 C in an elastically pre-strained bend stress relaxation configuration with the initial stress of {approx}100 MPa. Irradiation creep caused permanent strains of 0.6 to 2.3 x 10{sup -4}. Tensile-loaded near-surface portions of the crept specimens were examined by TEM. The main microstructural features observed were dislocation loops in all samples, and appeared similar to those observed in samples irradiated in non-stressed conditions. Slight but statistically significant anisotropy in dislocation loop microstructure was observed in one irradiation condition, and accounted for at least a fraction of the creep strain derived from the stress relaxation. The estimated total volume of loops accounted for 10-45% of the estimated total swelling. The results imply that the early irradiation creep deformation of SiC observed in this work was driven by anisotropic evolutions of extrinsic dislocation loops and matrix defects with undetectable sizes.

  16. Low Temperature Irradiation Embrittlement of Reactor Pressure Vessel Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jy-An John

    2015-08-01

    The embrittlement trend curve development project for HFIR reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels was carried out with three major tasks. Which are (1) data collection to match that used in HFIR steel embrittlement trend published in 1994 Journal Nuclear Material by Remec et. al, (2) new embrittlement data of A212B steel that are not included in earlier HFIR RPV trend curve, and (3) the adjustment of nil-ductility-transition temperature (NDTT) shift data with the consideration of the irradiation temperature effect. An updated HFIR RPV steel embrittlement trend curve was developed, as described below. NDTT( C) = 23.85 log(x) + 203.3 log (x) + 434.7, with 2- uncertainty of 34.6 C, where parameter x is referred to total dpa. The developed update HFIR RPV embrittlement trend curve has higher embrittlement rate compared to that of the trend curve developed in 1994.

  17. Specification of mesospheric density, pressure, and temperature by extrapolation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graves, M. E.; Low, Y. S.; Miller, A. H.

    1973-01-01

    A procedure is presented which employs an extrapolation technique to obtain estimates of density, pressure, and temperature up to 90 km from 52 km data. The resulting errors are investigated. The procedure is combined with a special temperature interpolation method around the stratopause to produce such estimates at eight levels between 36 km and 90 km from North American sectional chart data at 5, 2, and 0.4 mb. Fifth charts were processed to obtain mean values and standard deviations at grid points for midseasonal months from 1964 to 1966. The mean values were compared with Groves' model, and internal consistency tests were performed upon the statistics. Through application of the extrapolation procedure, the atmospheric structure of a stratospheric warming event is studied.

  18. Deciphering Pressure-Temperature path of the Stak eclogites (Pakistan)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanari, Pierre; Vidal, Olivier; Engi, Martin

    2013-04-01

    The Stak massif is located in the NW Himalaya syntaxis (northern Pakistan) and corresponds to a newly recognized occurrence of continental eclogite formed during the subduction of the northern margin of the Indian continent. This high pressure (HP) to ultra-high pressure (UHP) unit was extensively retrogressed during the Himalayan collision. This retrogressed metamorphic event occurs under lower pressure and is associated with the replacement of eclogite-facies minerals by amphibolite-facies minerals. We propose a continuous pressure-temperature (P-T) path assessed from a single thin-section, using a micro-cartographic approach with the program XMapTools (more details at http://www.xmaptools.com). This method uses electron microprobe X-ray compositional maps of a small thin-section area of 520 μm × 670 μm showing three assemblages. The HP assemblage (1) made of garnet + omphacite + phengite. This first assemblage is destabilized into (2) symplectites of clinopyroxene + amphibole + plagioclase. The low-pressure assemblage (3) is made of amphibole + plagioclase +/- biotite and is associated to the late collisional event. The study of the chemical images is followed by the calculations of ~200.000 P-T estimates using for each assemblage appropriate thermometers and barometers from the literature. This study shows that the Stak eclogite underwent prograde metamorphism, increasing from 650°C and 2.4 GPa to the pressure peak conditions of 750°C and 2.5 GPa. Then this unit is retrogressed to 700-650°C and 1.6-0.9 GPa under amphibolite-facies conditions. The estimated peak metamorphic P-T conditions and P-T path are similar to those of the Kaghan and Tso Morari HP/UHP massifs in NW Himalaya. We propose that these two HP/UHP massifs and the Stak massif define a large HP to UHP province covering more than 500 km × 150 km partly covered by the Kohistan-Ladakh arc and metamorphic Tethyan series. This NW Himalayan province is comparable in size to the Dabie-Sulu province

  19. Formation behavior of basal texture under the high temperature plane strain compression deformation in AZ80 magnesium alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, K.; Okayasu, K.; Fukutomi, H.

    2015-04-01

    The formation behavior of basal texture during high temperature deformation of AZ80 magnesium alloys in single phase was investigated by plane strain compression deformation. Three kinds of specimens with different initial textures were machined out from an extruded bar having a <101¯0> texture. Plane strain compression tests were conducted at temperatures of 623K and 723K and a strain rate of 5.0×10-2s-1, with a strain range of between - 0.4 and -1.0. After deformation, the specimens were immediately quenched in oil. Texture measurement was carried out on the compression planes by the Schulz reflection method using nickel filtered Cu Kα radiation. Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) measurements were also conducted in order to examine the spatial distribution of orientations. Three kinds of specimens named A, B and C were prepared from the same extruded bar. In the specimens A, B and C, {0001} was distributed preferentially parallel to ND, TD, and RD, respectively. After deformation, texture evaluation was conducted on the mid-plane section. At the plane strain compression deformation, peaks appeared in the true stress-true strain curves irrespective of the kinds of specimen used. It was found that the main components and the pole densities of the textures vary depending on deformation condition and initial texture. Six kinds of texture components were observed after deformation. The (0001)<101¯0> has formed regardless of the initial texture. There are two types of texture components; one exists before the deformation, and the other does not. Either types are considered to have stable orientations for plane strain compression. Also, the basal texture is composed of two crystal orientation components - (0001)<101¯0> and (0001)<112¯0>. When (0001) existed before deformation, an extremely sharp (0001) (compression plane) texture is formed.

  20. High pressure/high temperature thermogravimetric apparatus. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Calo, J.M.; Suuberg, E.M.

    1999-12-01

    The purpose of this instrumentation grant was to acquire a state-of-the-art, high pressure, high temperature thermogravimetric apparatus (HP/HT TGA) system for the study of the interactions between gases and carbonaceous solids for the purpose of solving problems related to coal utilization and applications of carbon materials. The instrument that we identified for this purpose was manufactured by DMT (Deutsche Montan Technologies)--Institute of Cokemaking and Coal Chemistry of Essen, Germany. Particular features of note include: Two reactors: a standard TGA reactor, capable of 1100 C at 100 bar; and a high temperature (HT) reactor, capable of operation at 1600 C and 100 bar; A steam generator capable of generating steam to 100 bar; Flow controllers and gas mixing system for up to three reaction gases, plus a separate circuit for steam, and another for purge gas; and An automated software system for data acquisition and control. The HP/TP DMT-TGA apparatus was purchased in 1996 and installed and commissioned during the summer of 1996. The apparatus was located in Room 128 of the Prince Engineering Building at Brown University. A hydrogen alarm and vent system were added for safety considerations. The system has been interfaced to an Ametek quadruple mass spectrometer (MA 100), pumped by a Varian V250 turbomolecular pump, as provided for in the original proposed. With this capability, a number of gas phase species of interest can be monitored in a near-simultaneous fashion. The MS can be used in a few different modes. During high pressure, steady-state gasification experiments, it is used to sample, measure, and monitor the reactant/product gases. It can also be used to monitor gas phase species during nonisothermal temperature programmed reaction (TPR) or temperature programmed desorption (TPD) experiments.

  1. High-temperature measurements of lattice parameters and internal stresses of a creep-deformed monocrystalline nickel-base superalloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biermann, Horst; Strehler, Marcus; Mughrabi, Haël

    1996-04-01

    High-temperature X-ray line profile measurements were performed to maximal temperatures of 1050 °C on samples of the nickel-base superalloy SRR 99. The samples with rod axes near the [001] direction were investigated in the initially undeformed state and after creep deformation at different temperatures and stresses. For the measurements of the (002) and (020) line profiles, a special X-ray double crystal diffractometer with negligible line broadening was used which was equipped with a high-temperature vacuum chamber. The line profiles were evaluated for the lattice parameters of the matrix phase γ and the precipitated γ' phase and for values of the lattice mismatch parallel and perpendicular to the stress axis, respectively, which were found to be different. Elastic, tetragonal distortions of the phases γ and γ' could be determined between room temperature and about 900 °C. These distortions are thermally induced due to the different thermal expansion coefficients of the two phases and deformation induced due to interfacial dislocation networks which were built up during deformation. At the high temperatures of the X-ray measurements, at least partial recovery of the deformation-induced internal stresses occurred, depending on the temperature of the X-ray measurements. The results are discussed and compared with data obtained by complementary techniques.

  2. A simple criterion for the onset of discontinuous plastic deformation in metals at very low temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, T. J.

    1994-05-01

    THE METHOD of small strain-rate-sensitivity asymptotics, which is the analogue of high-activation-energy asymptotics in the mathematical theory of combustion, is used to simplify a model of discontinuous plastic deformation in metals during tensile loading at cryogenic temperatures. The procedure is analogous to what has been used to derive the ignition problem in combustion theory. It is shown that a degenerate Poincaré-Andronov-Hopf bifurcation occurs in the simplified model as a control parameter which is proportional to the applied strain rate is increased. The bifurcation point is shown to correspond closely to the onset of " serrations" in the load-displacement response predicted by the original model.

  3. An internal variable constitutive model for the large deformation of metals at high temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Stuart; Anand, Lallit

    1988-01-01

    The advent of large deformation finite element methodologies is beginning to permit the numerical simulation of hot working processes whose design until recently has been based on prior industrial experience. Proper application of such finite element techniques requires realistic constitutive equations which more accurately model material behavior during hot working. A simple constitutive model for hot working is the single scalar internal variable model for isotropic thermal elastoplasticity proposed by Anand. The model is recalled and the specific scalar functions, for the equivalent plastic strain rate and the evolution equation for the internal variable, presented are slight modifications of those proposed by Anand. The modified functions are better able to represent high temperature material behavior. The monotonic constant true strain rate and strain rate jump compression experiments on a 2 percent silicon iron is briefly described. The model is implemented in the general purpose finite element program ABAQUS.

  4. High temperature inelastic deformation of the B1900 + Hf alloy under multiaxial loading - Theory and experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, K. S.; Lindholm, U. S.; Nagy, A.; Bodner, S. R.

    1990-01-01

    The multiaxial deformation behavior of the Ni-based alloy B1900 + Hf has been studied at elevated temperatures in the range of 649-982 C. Combined tension/torsion cyclic tests were performed on thin-wall tubular specimens under both in-phase and out-of-phase strain-controlled loading cycles. Both straining conditions resulted in stress loci of comparable magnitude, exhibiting no difference in cyclic hardening response. A phase angle was observed between the deviatoric stress and the incremental plastic strain vectors during 90-deg out-of-phase strain cycling, and nonproportional stress relaxation occurred under biaxial strain hold. The overall results have been used to assess the flow law, the hardening equations, and the applicability of the J2-based, elastic-viscoplastic model of Bodner-Partom (1979) for multiaxial loading conditions. The overall agreement between theory and experiment is good. Discrepancies are discussed in relation to micromechanical considerations.

  5. HIGH TEMPERATURE HIGH PRESSURE THERMODYNAMIC MEASUREMENTS FOR COAL MODEL COMPOUNDS

    SciTech Connect

    Vinayak N. Kabadi

    2000-05-01

    The flow VLE apparatus designed and built for a previous project was upgraded and recalibrated for data measurements for this project. The modifications include better and more accurate sampling technique, addition of a digital recorder to monitor temperature and pressure inside the VLE cell, and a new technique for remote sensing of the liquid level in the cell. VLE data measurements for three binary systems, tetralin-quinoline, benzene--ethylbenzene and ethylbenzene--quinoline, have been completed. The temperature ranges of data measurements were 325 C to 370 C for the first system, 180 C to 300 C for the second system, and 225 C to 380 C for the third system. The smoothed data were found to be fairly well behaved when subjected to thermodynamic consistency tests. SETARAM C-80 calorimeter was used for incremental enthalpy and heat capacity measurements for benzene--ethylbenzene binary liquid mixtures. Data were measured from 30 C to 285 C for liquid mixtures covering the entire composition range. An apparatus has been designed for simultaneous measurement of excess volume and incremental enthalpy of liquid mixtures at temperatures from 30 C to 300 C. The apparatus has been tested and is ready for data measurements. A flow apparatus for measurement of heat of mixing of liquid mixtures at high temperatures has also been designed, and is currently being tested and calibrated.

  6. Dirac-Hartree-Bogoliubov calculation for spherical and deformed hot nuclei: Temperature dependence of the pairing energy and gaps, nuclear deformation, nuclear radii, excitation energy, and entropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisboa, R.; Malheiro, M.; Carlson, B. V.

    2016-02-01

    Background: Unbound single-particle states become important in determining the properties of a hot nucleus as its temperature increases. We present relativistic mean field (RMF) for hot nuclei considering not only the self-consistent temperature and density dependence of the self-consistent relativistic mean fields but also the vapor phase that takes into account the unbound nucleon states. Purpose: The temperature dependence of the pairing gaps, nuclear deformation, radii, binding energies, entropy, and caloric curves of spherical and deformed nuclei are obtained in self-consistent RMF calculations up to the limit of existence of the nucleus. Method: We perform Dirac-Hartree-Bogoliubov (DHB) calculations for hot nuclei using a zero-range approximation to the relativistic pairing interaction to calculate proton-proton and neutron-neutron pairing energies and gaps. A vapor subtraction procedure is used to account for unbound states and to remove long range Coulomb repulsion between the hot nucleus and the gas as well as the contribution of the external nucleon gas. Results: We show that p -p and n -n pairing gaps in the S10 channel vanish for low critical temperatures in the range Tcp≈0.6 -1.1 MeV for spherical nuclei such as 90Zr, 124Sn, and 140Ce and for both deformed nuclei 150Sm and 168Er. We found that superconducting phase transition occurs at Tcp=1.03 Δp p(0 ) for 90Zr, Tcp=1.16 Δp p(0 ) for 140Ce, Tcp=0.92 Δp p(0 ) for 150Sm, and Tcp=0.97 Δp p(0 ) for 168Er. The superfluidity phase transition occurs at Tcp=0.72 Δn n(0 ) for 124Sn, Tcp=1.22 Δn n(0 ) for 150Sm, and Tcp=1.13 Δn n(0 ) for 168Er. Thus, the nuclear superfluidity phase—at least for this channel—can only survive at very low nuclear temperatures and this phase transition (when the neutron gap vanishes) always occurs before the superconducting one, where the proton gap is zero. For deformed nuclei the nuclear deformation disappear at temperatures of about Tcs=2.0 -4.0 MeV , well above the

  7. High temperature pressurized high frequency testing rig and test method

    DOEpatents

    De La Cruz, Jose; Lacey, Paul

    2003-04-15

    An apparatus is described which permits the lubricity of fuel compositions at or near temperatures and pressures experienced by compression ignition fuel injector components during operation in a running engine. The apparatus consists of means to apply a measured force between two surfaces and oscillate them at high frequency while wetted with a sample of the fuel composition heated to an operator selected temperature. Provision is made to permit operation at or near the flash point of the fuel compositions. Additionally a method of using the subject apparatus to simulate ASTM Testing Method D6079 is disclosed, said method involving using the disclosed apparatus to contact the faces of prepared workpieces under a measured load, sealing the workface contact point into the disclosed apparatus while immersing said contact point between said workfaces in a lubricating media to be tested, pressurizing and heating the chamber and thereby the fluid and workfaces therewithin, using the disclosed apparatus to impart a differential linear motion between the workpieces at their contact point until a measurable scar is imparted to at least one workpiece workface, and then evaluating the workface scar.

  8. HINDERED DIFFUSION OF ASPHALTENES AT ELEVATED TEMPERATURE AND PRESSURE

    SciTech Connect

    James A. Guin; Ganesh Ramakrishnan

    1999-10-07

    During this time period, experiments were performed to study the diffusion controlled uptake of quinoline and a coal asphaltene into porous carbon catalyst pellets. Cyclohexane and toluene were used as solvents for quinoline and the coal asphaltene respectively. The experiments were performed at 27 C and 75 C, at a pressure of 250 psi (inert gas) for the quinoline/cyclohexane system. For the coal asphaltene/toluene system, experiments were performed at 27 C, also at a pressure of 250 psi. These experiments were performed in a 20 cm{sup 3} microautoclave, the use of which is advantageous since it is economical from both a chemical procurement and waste disposal standpoint due to the small quantities of solvents and catalysts used. A C++ program was written to simulate data using a mathematical model which incorporated both diffusional and adsorption mechanisms. The simulation results showed that the mathematical model satisfactorily fitted the adsorptive diffusion of quinoline and the coal asphaltene onto a porous activated carbon. For the quinoline/cyclohexane system, the adsorption constant decreased with an increase in temperature. The adsorption constant for the coal asphaltene/toluene system at 27 C was found to be much higher than that of the quinoline/cyclohexane system at the same temperature. Apparently the coal asphaltenes have a much greater affinity for the surface of the carbon catalyst than is evidenced by the quinoline molecule.

  9. Opto-mechanical analysis of nonlinear elastomer membrane deformation under hydraulic pressure for variable-focus liquid-filled microlenses.

    PubMed

    Choi, Seung Tae; Son, Byeong Soo; Seo, Gye Won; Park, Si-Young; Lee, Kyung-Sick

    2014-03-10

    Nonlinear large deformation of a transparent elastomer membrane under hydraulic pressure was analyzed to investigate its optical performance for a variable-focus liquid-filled membrane microlens. In most membrane microlenses, actuators control the hydraulic pressure of optical fluid so that the elastomer membrane together with the internal optical fluid changes its shape, which alters the light path of the microlens to adapt its optical power. A fluid-structure interaction simulation was performed to estimate the transient behavior of the microlens under the operation of electroactive polymer actuators, demonstrating that the viscosity of the optical fluid successfully stabilizes the fluctuations within a fairly short period of time during dynamic operations. Axisymmetric nonlinear plate theory was used to calculate the deformation profile of the membrane under hydrostatic pressure, with which optical characteristics of the membrane microlens were estimated. The effects of gravitation and viscoelastic behavior of the elastomer membrane on the optical performance of the membrane microlens were also evaluated with finite element analysis. PMID:24663947

  10. Highly oriented NdFeCoB nanocrystalline magnets from partially disproportionated compacts by reactive deformation under low pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Qing; Li, Jun; Liu, Ying Yu, Yunping; Lian, Lixian

    2014-05-07

    In the present investigation, we take advantage of the ultrafine grain size of NdFeCoB partially hydrogen-disproportionated phases, and prepare anisotropic nanocrystalline magnets with full density and homogenous microstructure and texture by reactive deformation under low pressure. Our results suggest that the pressure could properly promote an occurrence of desorption-recombination reaction due to a shorter-range rearrangement of the atoms, and the newly recombined Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B grains with fine grain size could undergo deformation immediately after the phase transformation, and then an obvious anisotropy and uniform alignment would be obtained. The maximum magnetic properties, (BH){sub max} = 25.8 MGOe, Br = 11.8 kG, H{sub cj} = 5.5 kOe, were obtained after being treated for 5 min at 820 °C in vacuum. The present study highlights the feasibility to prepare anisotropic nanocrystalline magnets with homogeneous microstructure and a strong (00l) texture of uniform grain size under low pressure.

  11. The energy release rate of a pressurized crack in soft elastic materials: effects of surface tension and large deformation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tianshu; Long, Rong; Hui, Chung-Yuen

    2014-10-21

    In this paper we present a theoretical study on how surface tension affects fracture of soft solids. In classical fracture theory, the resistance to fracture is partly attributed to the energy required to create new surfaces. Thus, the energy released to the crack tip must overcome the surface energy in order to propagate a crack. In soft materials, however, surface tension can cause significant deformation and can reduce the energy release rate for crack propagation by resisting the stretch of crack surfaces. We quantify this effect by studying the inflation of a penny-shaped crack in an infinite elastic body with applied pressure. To avoid numerical difficulty caused by singular fields near the crack tip, we derived an expression for the energy release rate which depends on the applied pressure, the surface tension, the inflated crack volume and the deformed crack area. This expression is evaluated using a newly developed finite element method with surface tension elements. Our calculation shows that, when the elasto-capillary number ω ≡ σ/Ea is sufficiently large, where σ is the isotropic surface tension, E is the small strain Young's modulus and a is the initial crack radius, both the energy release rate and the crack opening displacement of an incompressible neo-Hookean solid are significantly reduced by surface tension. For a sufficiently high elasto-capillary number, the energy release rate can be negative for applied pressure less than a critical amount, suggesting that surface tension can cause crack healing in soft elastic materials.

  12. A method for compensating bellows pressure loads while accommodating thermal deformations

    SciTech Connect

    Woodle, M.H.

    1985-10-01

    Many metal bellows are used on storage ring vacuum chambers. They allow the ring to accomodate deformations associated with alignment, mechanical assembly and thermal expansion. The NSLS has two such electron storage rings, the VUV ring and the X-Ray ring. Both rings utilize a number of welded metal bellows within the ring and at every beam port.

  13. Pressure-Volume-Temperature (PVT) Gauging of an Isothermal Cryogenic Propellant Tank Pressurized with Gaseous Helium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanDresar, Neil T.; Zimmerli, Gregory A.

    2014-01-01

    Results are presented for pressure-volume-temperature (PVT) gauging of a liquid oxygen/liquid nitrogen tank pressurized with gaseous helium that was supplied by a high-pressure cryogenic tank simulating a cold helium supply bottle on a spacecraft. The fluid inside the test tank was kept isothermal by frequent operation of a liquid circulation pump and spray system, and the propellant tank was suspended from load cells to obtain a high-accuracy reference standard for the gauging measurements. Liquid quantity gauging errors of less than 2 percent of the tank volume were obtained when quasi-steady-state conditions existed in the propellant and helium supply tanks. Accurate gauging required careful attention to, and corrections for, second-order effects of helium solubility in the liquid propellant plus differences in the propellant/helium composition and temperature in the various plumbing lines attached to the tanks. On the basis of results from a helium solubility test, a model was developed to predict the amount of helium dissolved in the liquid as a function of cumulative pump operation time. Use of this model allowed correction of the basic PVT gauging calculations and attainment of the reported gauging accuracy. This helium solubility model is system specific, but it may be adaptable to other hardware systems.

  14. Observations of Seafloor Vertical Deformation on Axial Seamount with the Self-Calibrating Pressure Recorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, M. J.; Sasagawa, G. S.; Zumberge, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    A geodetic pressure gauge, the Self-Calibrating Pressure Recorder (SCPR), was deployed on Axial Seamount on September 7, 2013. The device performs in situ pressure calibrations every 10 days by applying a time-invariant reference pressure from a piston gauge (also known as a deadweight calibrator) to continuously recording quartz pressure gauges through a hydraulic valve. The reference pressure measurements are then used to estimate and correct for the inherent drift in the quartz resonant seafloor pressure gauges. Pressure data are collected at 100 s integration intervals. A small subset of a year-long data set was recovered via an acoustic modem in August 2014. Using three epoch measurements, the pressure rate of change from September 2013 to August 2014 was -4.1 to -4.2 kPa/year, equivalent to uplift of 41- 42 cm/year. Other pressure time series and micro-bathymetric repeat surveys are in rough agreement with this SCPR rate. The instrument is scheduled for recovery in August 2015; the anticipated data collection interval spans the eruption on April 24, 2015. We present the drift-corrected pressure series and constraints estimated for magma supply rates during the inflation, eruption, and post-eruptive phases.

  15. Importance of the temperature field and its uncertainties in modeling ductile deformation of the southern California lithosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thatcher, W. R.; Chapman, D. S.; Williams, C. F.; Hearn, E. H.

    2015-12-01

    Temperature is arguably the most important parameter controlling ductile deformation in tectonically active regions. Laboratory measurements at lower crust and upper mantle conditions define the mechanisms controlling ductile deformation and constrain quantitative rules relating stress and strain rate. Exhumed ductily deformed rocks reveal the micromechanics of deformation, supplying ground truth that can be compared with lab results. However, even if the mechanism and ductile deformation rules are accepted at face value, strain rates are exquisitely dependent on temperature. Here we critically assess observational data relevant to constraining the southern California lithospheric temperature field. Our goal is to improve estimates of the 3D temperature field and its real uncertainties and apply them to regional deformation modeling. We use a phased approach to estimating geotherms, beginning with simple 1D steady state conductive models. We identify the most important parameters and disaggregate them, separately examining the effects of varying radiogenic heat source concentration, rock type, crust and lithosphere thickness and asthenosphere solidus. We assess geotherm uncertainties by assigning realistic error bounds on all input quantities, propagate these uncertainties by Monte Carlo sampling and determine probability density functions for the geotherm. We find that although other parameter uncertainties contribute, variability in heat sources produces the largest variation in model-predicted geotherms. Because heat production depends strongly on rock type, better characterization of crustal lithology using refined seismic imaging results now becoming available beneath southern California is likely to produce the largest improvements in thermal models. Nonetheless, substantial uncertainty will remain, arguing for adoption of one or a few standard thermal models as common starting points for regional deformation modeling in southern California and elsewhere.

  16. Martensitic transformations and the evolution of the defect microstructure of metastable austenitic steel during severe plastic deformation by high-pressure torsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litovchenko, I. Yu.; Tyumentsev, A. N.; Akkuzin, S. A.; Naiden, E. P.; Korznikov, A. V.

    2016-08-01

    It has been shown that, in metastable austenitic Fe-18Cr-10Ni-Ti steel, under conditions of torsion under pressure, local reversible (forward plus reverse) (γ → α' → γ) martensitic transformations can occur, which are one of the mechanisms of the formation of nanostructured states. An increase in the rotation rate, which leads to an increase in the deformation temperature, stimulates the reverse (α' → γ) transformation. The evolution of the structural and phase states is represented as the following sequence: (1) mechanical twinning; (2) nucleation of martensitic plates in the microtwinned structure of the austenite with the formation of two-phase (γ + α') structures, packet α' martensite, and structural states with a high curvature of the crystal lattice; (3) reverse (α' → γ)-transformations; and (4) the fragmentation of nanosized crystals via the formation of a nanotwinned structure in the austenite and of a nanoscale banded structure of the ɛ martensite in the α' martensite.

  17. 46 CFR 154.701 - Cargo pressure and temperature control: General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Cargo pressure and temperature control: General. 154.701 Section 154.701 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS... Equipment Cargo Pressure and Temperature Control § 154.701 Cargo pressure and temperature control:...

  18. 46 CFR 154.701 - Cargo pressure and temperature control: General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cargo pressure and temperature control: General. 154.701 Section 154.701 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS... Equipment Cargo Pressure and Temperature Control § 154.701 Cargo pressure and temperature control:...

  19. 46 CFR 154.701 - Cargo pressure and temperature control: General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Cargo pressure and temperature control: General. 154.701 Section 154.701 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS... Equipment Cargo Pressure and Temperature Control § 154.701 Cargo pressure and temperature control:...

  20. 46 CFR 154.701 - Cargo pressure and temperature control: General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Cargo pressure and temperature control: General. 154.701 Section 154.701 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS... Equipment Cargo Pressure and Temperature Control § 154.701 Cargo pressure and temperature control:...

  1. 46 CFR 154.701 - Cargo pressure and temperature control: General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Cargo pressure and temperature control: General. 154.701 Section 154.701 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS... Equipment Cargo Pressure and Temperature Control § 154.701 Cargo pressure and temperature control:...

  2. Plasticity of single-grain icosahedral Al-Pd-Mn quasi-crystals deformed at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Mompiou, F.; Caillard, D

    2004-07-12

    Transmission electron microscopy observations have been performed on icosahedral Al-Pd-Mn quasi-crystal samples deformed at 20 deg. C under a high confining pressure. They reveal a large density of wavy walls from which several climbing dislocations are emitted. Near-screw dislocations have been found at the wall terminations with a Burgers vector contained in the wall plane. Careful plane determinations and dislocation analyses are not consistent with a glide and cross-slip mechanism. The results can be better interpreted as a deformation by cracks in mode III followed by a re-healing process.

  3. Foot pressure and radiographic outcome measures of lateral column lengthening for pes planovalgus deformity.

    PubMed

    Oeffinger, D J; Pectol, R W; Tylkowski, C M

    2000-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to establish and characterize the relationship between foot pressure analysis and radiographic measurements in children that underwent a lateral column lengthening procedure for pes planovalgus (PPV). Eight children (13 feet) with PPV that had failed non-operative treatment underwent a lateral column lengthening procedure. Pre-operative and post-operative standing AP and lateral radiographs and foot pressure data were obtained. The relationships between the radiographic and foot pressure measurements were investigated. The findings from this study demonstrated strong relationships between these parameters. The relationships seen in this study indicate that the addition of foot pressure analysis provides objective documentation of the improvement in foot pressure distribution following a lateral column lengthening. Also, there is a direct, positive relationship between the key radiographic and foot pressure measurements.

  4. In-situ pressure - temperature condition of tectonic melange : constraints from fluid inclusion analysis of syn-melange veins-

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, Y.; Enjoji, M.; Sakaguchi, A.; Kimura, G.

    2001-12-01

    One of the most reliable settings for the tectonic melange with composite planar fabric is along the decollement in the subduction zone (e.g. Cowan, 1985; Moore and Byrne, 1987; Kimura and Mukai, 1991). The decollement is developed from aseismic shallow part to seismogenic zone of several to tens of kilometer in depth. The decollement-related-melange, now exposed on land, might therefore record the deformation process along the aseismic to seismogenic decollement. Trapped pressure and temperature of fluid inclusion is estimated from "syn-melange" veins developed around the necks of boudin of sandstone blocks in the melange of the Shimanto Belt, SW Japan. The melange was decollement-related tectonic melange. Fluid inclusion analysis from "syn-melange" veins might be only tool to reveal the P-T condition during melange formation. The result of P-T estimation ranges from about 150 (}25)° Cto 220 (}31)° C for temperature and from 81 (+15) MPa to 235 (_}18) MPa for pressure. Geothermal gradient estimated from the result is between about 10.0 (+0.2/-1.5)° C/km (lithostatic) and 4.2 (+0.1/-0.9)° C/km (hydrostatic) if the fluid pressure ratio to lithostatic pressure is constant in each datum. The estimated lithostatic thermal gradient is much closer to that calculated from the oldness of the subducting oceanic plate. P-T range suggests that melange was formed enough within the seismogenic zone hypothesized by thermal model although the deformation mechanisms of melange, dominant diffusive mass transfer with minor brittle breakage, do not show the seismic deformation. One possible explanation for this discrepancy is that the melange was formed during the interseismic period. Alternative explanation is that melange formation was accomplished before subducting into the seismogenic zone but around the seismic front. Lithification front hypothesis for the seismic front suggests such frontal setting for the melange.

  5. Deformation temperatures and flow vorticities near the base of the Greater Himalayan Series, Sutlej Valley and Shimla Klippe, NW India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Law, R. D.; Stahr, D. W.; Francsis, M. K.; Ashley, K. T.; Grasemann, B.; Ahmad, T.

    2013-09-01

    We report new deformation temperature and flow vorticity data from the base of the Greater Himalayan Series (GHS) exposed in the Sutlej Valley and Shimla Klippe of NW India. We focus on three groups of transects across the hanging wall of the Main Central Thrust (MCT). In order of relative foreland - hinterland positions, they are the Shimla Klippe, Western and Eastern Sutlej transects. Deformation temperatures indicated by quartz c-axis fabric opening-angles increase both from foreland to hinterland at a given structural distance above the MCT and up structural section from the MCT within individual transects. Deformation temperatures in the immediate hanging wall to the MCT are estimated at ˜510-535, 535-550 and 610 °C on the Shimla, Western Sutlej and Eastern Sutlej transects, respectively. The steepest inferred field gradients in deformation temperatures are recorded adjacent to the MCT and progressively decrease up structural section following a power law relationship. Comparison with temperature estimates based on multi-mineral phase equilibria data suggests that penetrative shearing occurred at close to peak metamorphic conditions. Vorticity analyses indicate that shearing along the base of the GHS occurred under sub-simple shear conditions (Wm values of 0.9-1.0) with a minor component of pure shear.

  6. High-Temperature Creep Deformation and Fracture Behavior of a Directionally Solidified Ni-Base Superalloy DZ951

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Zhaokuang; Yu, Jinjiang; Sun, Xiaofeng; Guan, Hengrong; Hu, Zhuangqi

    2009-12-01

    The high-temperature creep deformation and fracture behavior of a directionally solidified Ni-base superalloy DZ951 have been investigated over a wide stress range of 110 to 880 MPa at high temperatures (700 °C to 1000 °C). In this article, the detailed creep deformation and fracture mechanism have been studied. The results show that the creep curves exhibit strong temperature dependence. From transmission election microscopy (TEM) observations, it is suggested that the deformation mechanism is temperature dependent and mainly consists of three dislocation-controlling mechanisms: stacking faults and dislocation-pair shearing, dislocation bowing, and dislocation climbing. It is found that the fracture mode of DZ951 alloy changes from cleavagelike fracture at low temperature to ductile fracture at high temperature. At 700 °C, the creep cracks mainly initiate at the surface and propagate along the cleavagelike facets. With increasing temperature, cracks can initiate at the surface, carbide/matrix interface, and cast pore. The growth of microcrack has a direction perpendicular to the stress direction. The creep-rupture data follow the Monkman-Grant relationship in different temperature regions.

  7. Development of a New Analog Test System Capable of Modeling Tectonic Deformation Incorporating the Effects of Pore Fluid Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, M.; Nakajima, H.; Takeda, M.; Aung, T. T.

    2005-12-01

    Understanding and predicting the tectonic deformation within geologic strata has been a very important research subject in many fields such as structural geology and petroleum geology. In recent years, such research has also become a fundamental necessity for the assessment of active fault migration, site selection for geological disposal of radioactive nuclear waste and exploration for methane hydrate. Although analog modeling techniques have played an important role in the elucidation of the tectonic deformation mechanisms, traditional approaches have typically used dry materials and ignored the effects of pore fluid pressure. In order for analog models to properly depict the tectonic deformation of the targeted, large-prototype system within a small laboratory-scale configuration, physical properties of the models, including geometry, force, and time, must be correctly scaled. Model materials representing brittle rock behavior require an internal friction identical to the prototype rock and virtually zero cohesion. Granular materials such as sand, glass beads, or steel beads of dry condition have been preferably used for this reason in addition to their availability and ease of handling. Modeling protocols for dry granular materials have been well established but such model tests cannot account for the pore fluid effects. Although the concept of effective stress has long been recognized and the role of pore-fluid pressure in tectonic deformation processes is evident, there have been few analog model studies that consider the effects of pore fluid movement. Some new applications require a thorough understanding of the coupled deformation and fluid flow processes within the strata. Taking the field of waste management as an example, deep geological disposal of radioactive waste has been thought to be an appropriate methodology for the safe isolation of the wastes from the human environment until the toxicity of the wastes decays to non-hazardous levels. For the

  8. An effective temperature theory coupling structural evolution and viscoplastic deformation of glassy polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Thao; Xiao, Rui

    Glassy polymers are amorphous polymers that have been driven out of equilibrium below the glass transition temperature. In the nonequilibrium state, the polymer chains continue to slowly rearrange towards a lower entropy state, which causes physical properties to change with time in a process referred to as physical aging. Physical aging can be reversed by plastic deformation, which moves the material further away from equilibrium. Though structural evolution and viscoplasticity are interdependent, they have been treated as separate processes and described by different theoretical approaches. Here, we introduce a new theory that strongly couples viscoplasticity and structural evolution through an effective temperature thermodynamic framework and a constitutive model for the dependence of the relaxation time on the configurational structure. The theory can describe a wide range of nonequilibrium behaviors, including viscoplasticity, physical aging, mechanical rejuvenation, and the glass transition, using a common set of parameters. We will show comparisons of theoretical predictions and experimental measurements of the effect of cold work and aging on the viscoplastic stress response and energy storage as measured by dynamic scanning calorimetry.

  9. High-temperature, high-pressure optical cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, R. P. (Inventor); Holland, L. R. (Inventor); Smith, R. E. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    The invention is an optical cell for containment of chemicals under conditions of high temperature and high pressure. The cell is formed of a vitreous silica tube, two optical windows comprising a vitreous silica rod inserted into the ends of a tube, and fused into position in the tube ends. Windows are spaced apart to form a cavity enclosed by the tube and the windows. A hole is drilled radially through the tube and into the cavity. Another vitreous silica tube is fused to the silica tube around the hole to form the stem, which is perpendicular to the long axis of the tube. The open end of the stem is used to load chemicals into the cavity. Then the stem may be sealed, and if desired, it may be shortened in order to reduce the volume of the cavity, which extends into the stem.

  10. Kinetics of Solid Phase Reactions at High Pressure and Temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Zaug, J M; Farber, D L; Saw, C K; Weeks, B L

    2002-02-11

    We report on the subject of temperature and/or pressure induced solid-solid phase transitions of energetic molecular crystals. Over the last three years we have applied experimental techniques that when used simultaneously provide insight into some of the complexities that govern reaction rate processes. After more than 55 years of study a global kinetics model describing the P-T phase space transition kinetics of such materials as HMX (octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine) is not only missing, but from a formal perspective is perhaps as many years away from completion. The essence of this report describes what material parameters affect first-order reaction rates of the CHNO moiety of molecular crystals and introduces the application of new experimental tools thus permitting quantifiable studies of important rate limiting mechanisms.

  11. Phase diagram of Mo at high pressure and temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, M

    2008-10-01

    We report values of the Poisson Ratios for shock compressed Mo, calculated from the sound speed measurements, which provide evidence that the 210 GPa ({approx}4100K) transition cannot be a bcc-hcp transition, as originally proposed. Instead, we find the transition is from the bcc to a noncrystalline phase. For pressures above 210 GPa, the Poisson Ratio increases steadily with increasing temperature, approaching the liquid value of 0.5 at 390 GPa({approx}10,000K), suggesting the presence of a noncrystalline solid-liquid mixture. Free energy model calculations were used to show that the low melting slope of Mo, and the phase diagram, can be explained by the presence of local liquid structures. A new phase diagram is proposed for Mo that is constrained by the experimental evidence.

  12. Temperature and pressure spikes in ion-beam cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Toulemonde, Marcel; Surdutovich, Eugene; Solov'yov, Andrey V

    2009-09-01

    The inelastic thermal spike model is applied to liquid water in relation to high-energy 12C6+ beams (hundreds of MeV/u) used for cancer therapy. The goal of this project is to calculate the heat transfer in the vicinity of the incident-ion track. Thermal spike calculations indicate a very large temperature increase in the vicinity of ion tracks near the Bragg peak during the time interval from 10(-15) to 10(-9) s after the ion's passage and an increase in pressure, as large as tens of MPa, can be induced during that time. These effects suggest a possibility of thermomechanical pathways to disruption of irradiated DNA. An extension of the model for hydrogen, beryllium, argon, krypton, xenon, and uranium ions around the Bragg peak is presented as well.

  13. [Genesis study of omphacite at high pressure and high temperature].

    PubMed

    Xiao, Ben-Fu; Yi, Li; Wang, Duo-Jun; Xie, Chao; Tang, Xue-Wu; Liu, Lei; Cui, Yue-Ju

    2013-11-01

    The melting and recrystallizing experiments of alkali basalt powder and mixture of pure oxides mixed as stoichiometry were performed at 3 GPa and 1 200 degrees C. Electronic microprobe analysis and Raman spectra showed that the recrystallized products were omphacites, the FWHM (full width at half maximum) of the Raman peak was narrow and its shape was sharp, which is attributed to the stable Si-O tetrahedral structure and the high degree of order in omphacite. Based on the results of previous studies, the influencing factors of omphacite genesis and its primary magma were discussed. The results showed that the formation of omphacite could be affected by many factors, such as the composition of parent rocks, the concentration of fluid in the system and the conditions of pressure and temperature. This result could support some experimental evidences on the genesis studies of omphacite and eclogite.

  14. High-pressure, high-temperature bioreactor for comparing effects of hyperbaric and hydrostatic pressure on bacterial growth.

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, C M; Schuppenhauer, M R; Clark, D S

    1992-01-01

    We describe a high-pressure reactor system suitable for simultaneous hyperbaric and hydrostatic pressurization of bacterial cultures at elevated temperatures. For the deep-sea thermophile ES4, the growth rate at 500 atm (1 atm = 101.29 kPa) and 95 degrees C under hydrostatic pressure was ca. three times the growth rate under hyperbaric pressure and ca. 40% higher than the growth rate at 35 atm. PMID:1622255

  15. Effect of pressure ratio and inlet pressure on performance of experimental gas turbine at inlet temperature of 800 R

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kohl, Robert C; Larkin, Robert G

    1948-01-01

    An experimental gas turbine was operated over a range of blade-jet speed ratios, total pressure ratios, and inlet total pressures at a constant inlet temperature of 800 R. Peak over-all efficiencies were obtained at blade-jet speed ratios from 0.525 to 0.575 for all runs. The variation in peak efficiency with inlet pressure and pressure ratio was of small magnitude for the conditions investigated.

  16. Thermoelastic analysis of non-uniform pressurized functionally graded cylinder with variable thickness using first order shear deformation theory(FSDT) and perturbation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoshgoftar, M. J.; Mirzaali, M. J.; Rahimi, G. H.

    2015-11-01

    Recently application of functionally graded materials(FGMs) have attracted a great deal of interest. These materials are composed of various materials with different micro-structures which can vary spatially in FGMs. Such composites with varying thickness and non-uniform pressure can be used in the aerospace engineering. Therefore, analysis of such composite is of high importance in engineering problems. Thermoelastic analysis of functionally graded cylinder with variable thickness under non-uniform pressure is considered. First order shear deformation theory and total potential energy approach is applied to obtain the governing equations of non-homogeneous cylinder. Considering the inner and outer solutions, perturbation series are applied to solve the governing equations. Outer solution for out of boundaries and more sensitive variable in inner solution at the boundaries are considered. Combining of inner and outer solution for near and far points from boundaries leads to high accurate displacement field distribution. The main aim of this paper is to show the capability of matched asymptotic solution for different non-homogeneous cylinders with different shapes and different non-uniform pressures. The results can be used to design the optimum thickness of the cylinder and also some properties such as high temperature residence by applying non-homogeneous material.

  17. Phase diagram of methane at high pressures and temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goncharov, A. F.; Chen, X.; Lobanov, S.; Chen, P.; Litasov, K. D.; Mao, H.

    2012-12-01

    We report the results of Raman spectroscopy measurements and visual observations of methane at high pressures (up to 80 GPa) and high temperatures (up to 2000 K). The experiments have been performed in resistive and laser heated diamond anvil cell (RHDAC and LHDAC, respectively) combined with confocal Raman microscope. The melting line has been determined by visual observations of the phase equilibrium and by Raman spectroscopy (in RHDAC). The results show an increase in slope of the melting line at 24 GPa and 800 K related to the presence of a triple point between the melt and two solid phases: orientationally disordered below 24 GPa and orientationally ordered above 24 GPa. Methane melts congruently to at least 26 GPa. The LHDAC experiments show that above 1100 K methane chemically reacts to form carbon and molecular hydrogen. At T>1350 K in the whole studied pressure range, there is a formation of longer alkanes, and at T>2000 double bonded hydrocarbons such as alkenes have been detected. These results evidence that hydrocarbons constitute an important part of the reduced C-O-H fluid under geothermal conditions.

  18. Pressure Resistance Welding of High Temperature Metallic Materials

    SciTech Connect

    N. Jerred; L. Zirker; I. Charit; J. Cole; M. Frary; D. Butt; M. Meyer; K. L. Murty

    2010-10-01

    Pressure Resistance Welding (PRW) is a solid state joining process used for various high temperature metallic materials (Oxide dispersion strengthened alloys of MA957, MA754; martensitic alloy HT-9, tungsten etc.) for advanced nuclear reactor applications. A new PRW machine has been installed at the Center for Advanced Energy Studies (CAES) in Idaho Falls for conducting joining research for nuclear applications. The key emphasis has been on understanding processing-microstructure-property relationships. Initial studies have shown that sound joints can be made between dissimilar materials such as MA957 alloy cladding tubes and HT-9 end plugs, and MA754 and HT-9 coupons. Limited burst testing of MA957/HT-9 joints carried out at various pressures up to 400oC has shown encouraging results in that the joint regions do not develop any cracking. Similar joint strength observations have also been made by performing simple bend tests. Detailed microstructural studies using SEM/EBSD tools and fatigue crack growth studies of MA754/HT-9 joints are ongoing.

  19. Constant pressure and temperature discrete-time Langevin molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Grønbech-Jensen, Niels; Farago, Oded

    2014-11-21

    We present a new and improved method for simultaneous control of temperature and pressure in molecular dynamics simulations with periodic boundary conditions. The thermostat-barostat equations are built on our previously developed stochastic thermostat, which has been shown to provide correct statistical configurational sampling for any time step that yields stable trajectories. Here, we extend the method and develop a set of discrete-time equations of motion for both particle dynamics and system volume in order to seek pressure control that is insensitive to the choice of the numerical time step. The resulting method is simple, practical, and efficient. The method is demonstrated through direct numerical simulations of two characteristic model systems—a one-dimensional particle chain for which exact statistical results can be obtained and used as benchmarks, and a three-dimensional system of Lennard-Jones interacting particles simulated in both solid and liquid phases. The results, which are compared against the method of Kolb and Dünweg [J. Chem. Phys. 111, 4453 (1999)], show that the new method behaves according to the objective, namely that acquired statistical averages and fluctuations of configurational measures are accurate and robust against the chosen time step applied to the simulation.

  20. Pressure-temperature evolution of Neoproterozoic metamorphism in the Welayati Formation (Kabul Block), Afghanistan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collett, Stephen; Faryad, Shah Wali

    2015-11-01

    The Welayati Formation, consisting of alternating layers of mica-schist and quartzite with lenses of amphibolite, unconformably overlies the Neoarchean Sherdarwaza Formation of the Kabul Block that underwent Paleoproterozoic granulite-facies and Neoproterozoic amphibolite-facies metamorphic events. To analyze metamorphic history of the Welayati Formation and its relations to the underlying Sherdarwaza Formation, petrographic study and pressure-temperature (P-T) pseudosection modeling were applied to staurolite- and kyanite-bearing mica-schists, which crop out to the south of Kabul City. Prograde metamorphism, identified by inclusion trails and chemical zonation in garnet from the micaschists indicates that the rocks underwent burial from around 6.2 kbar at 525 °C to maximum pressure conditions of around 9.5 kbar at temperatures of around 650 °C. Decompression from peak pressures under isothermal or moderate heating conditions are indicated by formation of biotite and plagioclase porphyroblasts which cross-cut and overgrow the dominant foliation. The lack of sillimanite and/or andalusite suggests that cooling and further decompression occurred in the kyanite stability field. The results of this study indicate a single amphibolite-facies metamorphism that based on P-T conditions and age dating correlates well with the Neoproterozoic metamorphism in the underlying Sherdarwaza Formation. The rocks lack any paragenetic evidence for a preceding granulite-facies overprint or subsequent Paleozoic metamorphism. Owing to the position of the Kabul Block, within the India-Eurasia collision zone, partial replacement of the amphibolite-facies minerals in the micaschist could, in addition to retrogression of the Neoproterozoic metamorphism, relate to deformation associated with the Alpine orogeny.

  1. A rift-related origin for regional medium-pressure, high-temperature metamorphism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tucker, Naomi M.; Hand, Martin; Payne, Justin L.

    2015-07-01

    Crustal-scale exhumation during the Alice Springs Orogeny (c. 450-320 Ma) in central Australia has exposed a region of medium-pressure, high-temperature metasedimentary and metabasic rocks that comprise the Harts Range Group (HRG). Similarities in the detrital zircon age spectra between the HRG and surrounding unmetamorphosed, intraplate late Neoproterozoic-Cambrian basin sequences suggest that the HRG is a highly metamorphosed equivalent of these successions. Calculated phase equilibria modelling and thermobarometry constrain peak metamorphic conditions to ˜ 880 °C and 10.5 kbar, and ˜ 680 °C and 5.5-8.0 kbar, in the structurally lowest and highest parts of the HRG, respectively. Metamorphic conditions also indicate that burial occurred along a near-linear moderately-high apparent thermal gradient, recorded by the prograde development of andalusite-bearing mineral assemblages at shallower structural levels. Prograde and peak metamorphism was associated with voluminous intrusive and extrusive mafic magmatism, the development of a coarse layer-parallel fabric and north-directed normal shear-sense kinematics. Collectively, these point to an extensional regime. Furthermore, burial and metamorphism at c. 480-460 Ma was concurrent with a shallow epicontinental marine environment and ongoing sedimentation in central Australia. Accordingly, the deep burial, metamorphism and deformation of the HRG to mid-lower crustal depths (˜ 20- 35 km) must be justified in the context of the broader intraplate basin evolution at this time. It is difficult to reconcile medium-pressure, high-temperature metamorphism of the HRG with deep burial by tectonic overthickening which is commonly assumed to be the case. In contrast, metamorphism of the HRG seems more compatible with burial within a deep rift-style basin driven by high heat flow and mafic magmatism, suggesting that regional medium-pressure metamorphic terranes are not necessarily reflective of compressional thickening of the

  2. Deformation and softening mechanism in naturally deformed rocks at the brittle-ductile transition zone in upper crust: pervasive micro-faulting accommodated by pressure solution of quartz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeshita, T.; El-Fakharani, A.

    2011-12-01

    aggregates, which are both negatively correlated with the area fraction of phengite. The facts suggest that the randomization of quartz c-axis fabrics were perhaps caused by dissolution-precipitation of quartz, and rather straight grain boundaries of quartz (i.e. lower normalized perimeter of grains) with random or weaker quartz c-axis fabrics resulted from the precipitation of quartz from the solution, which was pinned by newly grown phengite. All these composite deformation processes revealed by detailed microstructural analyses indicate that pervasive micro-faulting (i.e. formation of shear bands) was accommodated by pressure solution creep of quartz. This is consistent with a model frictional-viscous flow of phyllosilicate-bearing fault rocks proposed by Bos and Spiers (2002), by which the bulk strength of rocks is controlled by the coefficient of internal friction of phyllosilicate and becomes less than one-third of that predicted by the Byerlee's law.

  3. Partitioned fluid-solid coupling for cardiovascular blood flow: validation study of pressure-driven fluid-domain deformation.

    PubMed

    Krittian, Sebastian; Schenkel, Torsten; Janoske, Uwe; Oertel, Herbert

    2010-08-01

    The Karlsruhe Heart Model (KaHMo) is a patient-specific simulation tool for a three-dimensional blood flow evaluation inside the human heart. Whereas KaHMo MRT is based on geometry movement identified from MRT data, KaHMo FSI allows the consideration of structural properties and the analysis of FSI. Previous investigations by Oertel et al. have shown the ability of KaHMo to gain insight into different intra-ventricular fluid mechanics of both healthy and diseased hearts. However, the in vivo validation of the highly dynamic cavity flow pattern has been a challenging task in recent years. As a first step, the focus of this study is on an artificial ventricular experiment, derived from real heart anatomy. Fluid domain deformation and intra-ventricular flow dynamics are enforced by an outer surface pressure distribution. The pure geometrical representation of KaHMo MRT can now be complemented by constitutive properties, pressure forces, and interaction effects using KaHMo FSI's partitioned code-coupling approach. For the first time, fluid domain deformation and intra-ventricular flow of KaHMo FSI has been compared with experimental data. With a good overall agreement, the proof of KaHMo's validity represents an important step from feasibility study toward patient-specific analysis.

  4. Polymorphism of iron at high pressure: A 3D phase-field model for displacive transitions with finite elastoplastic deformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vattré, A.; Denoual, C.

    2016-07-01

    A thermodynamically consistent framework for combining nonlinear elastoplasticity and multivariant phase-field theory is formulated at large strains. In accordance with the Clausius-Duhem inequality, the Helmholtz free energy and time-dependent constitutive relations give rise to displacive driving forces for pressure-induced martensitic phase transitions in materials. Inelastic forces are obtained by using a representation of the energy landscape that involves the concept of reaction pathways with respect to the point group symmetry operations of crystal lattices. On the other hand, additional elastic forces are derived for the most general case of large strains and rotations, as well as nonlinear, anisotropic, and different elastic pressure-dependent properties of phases. The phase-field formalism coupled with finite elastoplastic deformations is implemented into a three-dimensional Lagrangian finite element approach and is applied to analyze the iron body-centered cubic (α-Fe) into hexagonal close-packed (ɛ-Fe) phase transitions under high hydrostatic compression. The simulations exhibit the major role played by the plastic deformation in the morphological and microstructure evolution processes. Due to the strong long-range elastic interactions between variants without plasticity, a forward α → ɛ transition is energetically unfavorable and remains incomplete. However, plastic dissipation releases considerably the stored strain energy, leading to the α ↔ ɛ ↔α‧ (forward and reverse) polymorphic phase transformations with an unexpected selection of variants.

  5. Flow-induced deformation of poroelastic tissues and gels: a new perspective on equilibrium pressure-flow-thickness relations.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Thomas M

    2013-01-01

    Hydrostatic pressure-driven flows through soft tissues and gels cause deformations of the solid network to occur, due to drag from the flowing fluid. This phenomenon occurs in many contexts including physiological flows and infusions through soft tissues, in mechanically stimulated engineered tissues, and in direct permeation measurements of hydraulic permeability. Existing theoretical descriptions are satisfactory in particular cases, but none provide a description which is easy to generalize for the design and interpretation of permeation experiments involving a range of different boundary conditions and gel properties. Here a theoretical description of flow-induced permeation is developed using a relatively simple approximate constitutive law for strain-dependent permeability and an assumed constant elastic modulus, using dimensionless parameters which emerge naturally. Analytical solutions are obtained for relationships between fundamental variables, such as flow rate and pressure drop, which were not previously available. Guidelines are provided for assuring that direct measurements of hydraulic permeability are performed accurately, and suggestions emerge for alternative measurement protocols. Insights obtained may be applied to interpretation of flow-induced deformation and related phenomena in many contexts.

  6. Anisotropic yielding of rocks at high temperatures and pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Kronenberg, A.K.; Russell, J.E.; Handin, J.; Gottschalk, R.R.; Shea, W.T.

    1987-12-01

    Results to date are: All of the starting materials for the three year project have been collected. Included in our collection are relatively fine-grained, fresh, oriented blocks of schist, gneiss, and micaceous quartzite with well-defined foliations and lineations as well as granite blocks oriented with respect to the principal quarrying orientations, the rift, grain, and hardway. A suite of samples has also been collected from an exposed granite stock and surrounding country rocks in order to evaluate the strengths and distribution of fabrics which may be encountered while drilling. These fabrics appear to be directly related to the forceful emplacement of the pluton. The literature on the mechanics of intrusion has been reviewed with regard to strain gradients and foliation development associated with diapiric flow. This information will be used to evaluate flow of varying fabrics on yield criteria within and surrounding magma chambers. Twenty-three successful experiments have been performed on samples of gneiss cored along six different orientations at temperatures ranging from 25{degrees} to 700{degrees}C. These experiments include extension tests, unconfined compression tests, and compression tests performed at P{sub c} = 100 MPa. Theoretical yield conditions for anisotropic materials have been reviewed and the assumptions upon which they are based probed. These yield conditions will ultimately be used to fit our data on gneiss, and the other foliated rocks under investigation. Two abstracts have been published and oral presentations made at the 1987 Fall Meeting of the American Geophysical Union, based upon our previous DOE-sponsored work on tensile fracturing of quartzite and related work on semi-brittle deformation of granitic rocks. 21 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. The instantaneous rate dependence in low temperature laboratory rock friction and rock deformation experiments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beeler, N.M.; Tullis, T.E.; Kronenberg, A.K.; Reinen, L.A.

    2007-01-01

    Earthquake occurrence probabilities that account for stress transfer and time-dependent failure depend on the product of the effective normal stress and a lab-derived dimensionless coefficient a. This coefficient describes the instantaneous dependence of fault strength on deformation rate, and determines the duration of precursory slip. Although an instantaneous rate dependence is observed for fracture, friction, crack growth, and low temperature plasticity in laboratory experiments, the physical origin of this effect during earthquake faulting is obscure. We examine this rate dependence in laboratory experiments on different rock types using a normalization scheme modified from one proposed by Tullis and Weeks [1987]. We compare the instantaneous rate dependence in rock friction with rate dependence measurements from higher temperature dislocation glide experiments. The same normalization scheme is used to compare rate dependence in friction to rock fracture and to low-temperature crack growth tests. For particular weak phyllosilicate minerals, the instantaneous friction rate dependence is consistent with dislocation glide. In intact rock failure tests, for each rock type considered, the instantaneous rate dependence is the same size as for friction, suggesting a common physical origin. During subcritical crack growth in strong quartzofeldspathic and carbonate rock where glide is not possible, the instantaneous rate dependence measured during failure or creep tests at high stress has long been thought to be due to crack growth; however, direct comparison between crack growth and friction tests shows poor agreement. The crack growth rate dependence appears to be higher than the rate dependence of friction and fracture by a factor of two to three for all rock types considered. Copyright 2007 by the American Geophysical Union.

  8. Effect of forging strain rate and deformation temperature on the mechanical properties of warm-worked 304L stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Switzner, N. T.; Van Tyne, C. J.; Mataya, M. C.

    2010-01-25

    Stainless steel 304L forgings were produced with four different types of production forging equipment – hydraulic press, mechanical press, screw press, and high-energy rate forging (HERF). Each machine imparted a different nominal strain rate during the deformation. The final forgings were done at the warm working (low hot working) temperatures of 816 °C, 843°C, and 871°C. The objectives of the study were to characterize and understand the effect of industrial strain rates (i.e. processing equipment), and deformation temperature on the mechanical properties for the final component. Some of the components were produced with an anneal prior to the final forging while others were deformed without the anneal. The results indicate that lower strain rates produced lower strength and higher ductility components, but the lower strain rate processes were more sensitive to deformation temperature variation and resulted in more within-part property variation. The highest strain rate process, HERF, resulted in slightly lower yield strength due to internal heating. Lower processing temperatures increased strength, decreased ductility but decreased within-part property variation. The anneal prior to the final forging produced a decrease in strength, a small increase in ductility, and a small decrease of within-part property variation.

  9. Cyclic deformation of NI/sub 3/(Al,Nb) single crystals at ambient and elevated temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Bonda, N.R.

    1985-01-01

    Cyclic tests were performed on Ni/sub 3/(Al,Nb) (..gamma..' phase) single crystals by using a servo-hydraulic machine under fully reversed plastic strain control at a frequency of 0.1-0.2 Hz at room temperature, 400/sup 0/C and 700/sup 0/C. Since the monotonic behavior is orientation dependent, three orientations were studied. Asymmetry in tensile and compressive stresses was observed in the cyclic hardening curves of specimens tested at these temperatures and they were discussed with regard to the model suggested by Paider et al for monotonic behavior. The stress levels in the cyclic stress-strain curves (CSSC) at room temperature depended on orientation and cyclic history. No CSSCs were established at 400/sup 0/C and 700/sup 0/C. The deformation in cyclic tests at small plastic strain amplitudes was found to be different from that in monotonic tests in the microplastic regions in which the deformation is believed to be carried by a small density of edge dislocations. But in cyclic deformation, to and from motion of dislocations trap the edge dislocations into dipoles and therefore screw dislocations will be forced to participate in the deformation. Cracks on the surfaces of specimens tested at room temperature and 400/sup 0/C were found to be of stage I type, whereas at 700/sup 0/C, they were of stage II type.

  10. Extreme Environment Silicon Carbide Hybrid Temperature & Pressure Optical Sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Nabeel Riza

    2010-09-01

    This final report contains the main results from a 3-year program to further investigate the merits of SiC-based hybrid sensor designs for extreme environment measurements in gas turbines. The study is divided in three parts. Part 1 studies the material properties of SiC such as temporal response, refractive index change with temperature, and material thermal response reversibility. Sensor data from a combustion rig-test using this SiC sensor technology is analyzed and a robust distributed sensor network design is proposed. Part 2 of the study focuses on introducing redundancy in the sensor signal processing to provide improved temperature measurement robustness. In this regard, two distinct measurement methods emerge. A first method uses laser wavelength sensitivity of the SiC refractive index behavior and a second method that engages the Black-Body (BB) radiation of the SiC package. Part 3 of the program investigates a new way to measure pressure via a distance measurement technique that applies to hot objects including corrosive fluids.

  11. Design of a Pressure Sensor Based on Optical Fiber Bragg Grating Lateral Deformation

    PubMed Central

    Urban, Frantisek; Kadlec, Jaroslav; Vlach, Radek; Kuchta, Radek

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes steps involved in the design and realization of a new type of pressure sensor based on the optical fiber Bragg grating. A traditional pressure sensor has very limited usage in heavy industrial environments, particularly in explosive or electromagnetically noisy environments. Utilization of optics in these environments eliminates all surrounding influences. An initial motivation for our development was the research, experimental validation, and realization of a complex smart pressure sensor based on the optical principle. The main benefit of this solution consists of increasing sensitivity, resistance to electromagnetic interference, dimensions, and potential increased accuracy. PMID:22163521

  12. Structures, microfabrics, fractal analysis and temperature-pressure estimation of the Mesozoic Xingcheng-Taili ductile shear zone in the North China craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Chenyue; Neubauer, Franz; Liu, Yongjiang; Jin, Wei; Zeng, Zuoxun; Bernroider, Manfred; Li, Weimin; Wen, Quanbo; Han, Guoqing; Zhao, Yingli

    2014-05-01

    orientation of quartz determined by electron back scatter diffraction (EBSD) suggest sinistral strike-slip displacement within a temperature at about 400 to 500° C. Quartz mainly shows low-temperature fabrics with dominant {0001}-slip system. As the deformed rocks show obvious deformation overprint, we have estimated flow stresses from dynamically recrystallized grain sizes of quartz separately. But coincident fractal analysis showed that the boundaries of recrystallized grains had statistically self similarities with the numbers of fractal dimension from 1.153 to 1.196 with the range of deformation temperatures from 500 to 600° C, which is corresponding to upper greenschist to lower amphibolite facies conditions. Together with published flow laws to estimated deformation rates between the region of 10-11 - 10-13 S-1depending on the temperature 500 ° C, and the paleo-stress was calculated with grain size of recrystallized quartz to be at 5.0 to 32.3 MPa. Even though the deformation history and kinematics are different, progressive microstructures and texture analysis indicate an overprint by the low-temperature deformation (D3). Typical regional-dynamic metamorphic conditions ere deduced by mineral pair hornblende-plagioclase and phengite barometry identified within the ductile shear zone. The hornblende-plagioclase pair of porphyritic granitic gneiss gives metamorphic conditions of T =450-500 ° C and p=0.39 GPa, which indicate a metamorphic grade of lower-amphibolite facies conditions and a depth of around 13 km estimated following a normal lithostatic pressure. All of the structural characteristics indicate that the Xingcheng-Taili ductile shear zone represents a mainly ENE-striking sinistral ductile strike-slip zone, which formed after intrusion of the Upper Jurassic biotite adamellite and transformed and superimposed previous deformation structures. This deformation event might have occurred in Early Cretaceous times and was related to the lithospheric thinning and

  13. Deformities in larvae and juvenile European lobster (Homarus gammarus) exposed to lower pH at two different temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agnalt, A.-L.; Grefsrud, E. S.; Farestveit, E.; Larsen, M.; Keulder, F.

    2013-12-01

    The ongoing warming and acidification of the world's oceans are expected to influence the marine ecosystems, including benthic marine resources. Ocean acidification may especially have an impact on calcifying organisms, and the European lobster (Homarus gammarus) is among those species at risk. A project was initiated in 2011 aiming to investigate long-term effects of ocean acidification on the early life-cycle of lobster under two temperatures. Larvae were exposed to pCO2 levels of ambient water (water intake at 90 m depth), medium 750 (pH = 7.79) and high 1200 μatm pCO2 (pH = 7.62) at temperatures 10 and 18 °C. The water parameters in ambient water did not stay stable and were very low towards the end of the experiment in the larval phase at 10 °C,with pH between 7.83 and 7.90. At 18°, pH in ambient treatment was even lower, between 7.76 and 7.83, i.e. close to medium pCO2 treatment. Long-term exposure lasted 5 months. At 18 °C the development from stage 1 to 4 lasted 14 to 16 days, as predicted under optimal water conditions. Growth was very slow at 10 °C and resulted in three larvae reaching stage 4 in high pCO2 treatment only. There were no clear effects of pCO2 treatment, on either carapace length or dry weight. However, deformities were observed in both larvae and juveniles. The proportion of larvae with deformities increased with increasing pCO2 exposure, independent of temperature. In the medium treatment about 23% were deformed, and in the high treatment about 43% were deformed. None of the larvae exposed to water of pH >7.9 developed deformities. Curled carapace was the most common deformity found in larvae raised in medium pCO2 treatment, irrespective of temperature, but damages in the tail fan occurred in addition to a bent rostrum. Curled carapace was the only deformity found in high pCO2 treatment at both temperatures. Occurrence of deformities after five months of exposure was 33 and 44% in juveniles raised in ambient and low pCO2 levels

  14. Geomechaical Behavior of Shale Rocks Under High Pressure and Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villamor Lora, R.; Ghazanfari, E.

    2014-12-01

    The mechanical properties of shale are demanding parameters for a number of engineering and geomechanical purposes. Borehole stability modeling, geophysics, shale oil and shale gas reservoirs, and underground storage of CO2 in shale formations are some of these potential applications to name a few. The growing interest in these reservoirs, as a source for hydrocarbons production, has resulted in an increasing demand for fundamental rock property data. These rocks are known to be non-linear materials. There are many factors, including induced cracks and their orientation, partial saturation, material heterogeneity and anisotropy, plasticity, strain rate, and temperature that may have an impact on the geomechanical behaviour of these shales.Experimental results and theoretical considerations have shown that the elastic moduli are not single-value, well-defined parameters for a given rock. Finding suitable values for these parameters is of vital importance in many geomechanical applications. In this study, shale heterogeneity and its geomechanical properties are explored through an extensive laboratory experimental program. A series of hydrostatic and triaxial tests were performed in order to evaluate the elasticity, viscoplasticity, yielding and failure response of Marcellus shale samples as a function of pressure and temperature. Additional characterization includes mineralogy, porosity, and permeability measurements. The shale samples were taken from a Marcellus outcrop at State Game Lands 252, located in Lycoming and Union counties, Allenwood, Pennsylvania. Laboratory experiments have shown that creep behaviour is highly sensitive to temperature. Furthermore, the non-linear nature of these rocks reveals interesting behaviour of the elastic moduli highly dependent on stress history of the rock. Results from cyclic triaxial tests point out the different behaviour between 1st-loading and unloading-reloading cycles. Experimental results of these Marcellus shales are

  15. Temperature/pressure and water vapor sounding with microwave spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muhleman, D. O.; Janssen, M. A.; Clancy, R. T.; Gulkis, S.; Mccleese, D. J.; Zurek, R.; Haberle, R. M.; Frerking, M.

    1992-01-01

    Two intense microwave spectra lines exist in the martian atmosphere that allow unique sounding capabilities: water vapor at 183 GHz and the (2-1) rotational line of CO at 230 GHz. Microwave spectra line sounding is a well-developed technique for the Earth's atmosphere for sounding from above from spacecraft and airplanes, and from below from fixed surface sites. Two simple instruments for temperature sounding on Mars (the CO line) and water vapor measurements are described. The surface sounder proposed for the MESUR sites is designed to study the boundary layer water vapor distribution and the temperature/pressure profiles with vertical resolution of 0.25 km up to 1 km with reduced resolution above approaching a scale height. The water channel will be sensitive to a few tenths of a micrometer of water and the temperature profile will be retrieved to an accuracy between 1 and 2 K. The latter is routinely done on the Earth using oxygen lines near 60 GHz. The measurements are done with a single-channel heterodyne receiver looking into a 10-cm mirror that is canned through a range of elevation angles plus a target load. The frequency of the receiver is sweep across the water and CO lines generating the two spectra at about 1-hr intervals throughout the mission. The mass and power for the proposed instrument are 2 kg and 5-8 W continuously. The measurements are completely immune to the atmospheric dust and ice particle loads. It was felt that these measurements are the ultimate ones to properly study the martian boundary layer from the surface to a few kilometers. Sounding from above requires an orbiting spacecraft with multichannel microwave spectrometers such as the instrument proposed for MO by a subset of the authors, a putative MESUR orbiter, and a proposed Discovery mission called MOES. Such an instrument can be built with less than 10 kg and use less than 15 W. The obvious advantage of this approach is that the entire atmosphere can be sounded for temperature and

  16. In-situ tube burst testing and high-temperature deformation behavior of candidate materials for accident tolerant fuel cladding

    SciTech Connect

    Byun, Thak Sang; Yamamoto, Yukinori; Maloy, Stuart A.; Gussev, M. N.; Terrani, K. A.

    2015-08-25

    Here, one of the most essential properties of accident tolerant fuel (ATF) for maintaining structural integrity during a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) is high resistance of the cladding to plastic deformation and burst failure, since the deformation and burst behavior governs the cooling efficiency of flow channels and the process of fission product release. To simulate and evaluate the deformation and burst process of thin-walled cladding, an in-situ testing and evaluation method has been developed on the basis of visual imaging and image analysis techniques. The method uses a specialized optics system consisting of a high-resolution video camera, a light filtering unit, and monochromatic light sources. The in-situ testing is performed using a 50 mm long pressurized thin-walled tubular specimen set in a programmable furnace. As the first application, ten (10) candidate cladding materials for ATF, i.e., five FeCrAl alloys and five nanostructured steels, were tested using the newly developed method, and the time-dependent images were analyzed to produce detailed deformation and burst data such as true hoop stress, strain (creep) rate, and failure stress. Relatively soft FeCrAl alloys deformed and burst below 800 °C, while negligible strain rates were measured for higher strength alloys.

  17. In-situ tube burst testing and high-temperature deformation behavior of candidate materials for accident tolerant fuel cladding

    SciTech Connect

    Gussev, Maxim N.; Byun, Thak Sang; Yamamoto, Yukinori; Maloy, Stuart A.; Terrani, Kurt A.

    2015-11-01

    The high resistance of cladding to plastic deformation and burst failure is one of the most essential properties of accident tolerant fuel (ATF) for maintaining structural integrity during a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) since the deformation and burst behavior governs the cooling efficiency of flow channels and process of fission product release. To simulate and evaluate such deformation and burst process of thin-walled cladding, an in-situ testing and evaluation method has been developed on the basis of visual imaging and image analysis techniques. The method uses a specialized optics system consisted of a high-resolution video camera, light filtering unit, and monochromatic light sources, and the in-situ testing is performed using a 50 mm long pressurized thin-walled tubular specimen set in a programmable furnace. In this study eleven (11) candidate cladding materials for ATF, i.e., 6 FeCrAl alloys and 5 nanostructured steels, were tested using the newly developed method, and the time-dependent images were analyzed to produce detailed deformation and burst data such as true hoop stress, strain (creep) rate, and failure stress. Relatively soft FeCrAl alloys deformed and burst below 800°C while negligible strain rates were measured for higher strength alloys and/or for relatively thick wall specimens.

  18. In-situ tube burst testing and high-temperature deformation behavior of candidate materials for accident tolerant fuel cladding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gussev, M. N.; Byun, T. S.; Yamamoto, Y.; Maloy, S. A.; Terrani, K. A.

    2015-11-01

    One of the most essential properties of accident tolerant fuel (ATF) for maintaining structural integrity during a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) is high resistance of the cladding to plastic deformation and burst failure, since the deformation and burst behavior governs the cooling efficiency of flow channels and the process of fission product release. To simulate and evaluate the deformation and burst process of thin-walled cladding, an in-situ testing and evaluation method has been developed on the basis of visual imaging and image analysis techniques. The method uses a specialized optics system consisting of a high-resolution video camera, a light filtering unit, and monochromatic light sources. The in-situ testing is performed using a 50 mm long pressurized thin-walled tubular specimen set in a programmable furnace. As the first application, ten (10) candidate cladding materials for ATF, i.e., five FeCrAl alloys and five nanostructured steels, were tested using the newly developed method, and the time-dependent images were analyzed to produce detailed deformation and burst data such as true hoop stress, strain (creep) rate, and failure stress. Relatively soft FeCrAl alloys deformed and burst below 800 °C, while negligible strain rates were measured for higher strength alloys.

  19. In-situ tube burst testing and high-temperature deformation behavior of candidate materials for accident tolerant fuel cladding

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Byun, Thak Sang; Yamamoto, Yukinori; Maloy, Stuart A.; Gussev, M. N.; Terrani, K. A.

    2015-08-25

    Here, one of the most essential properties of accident tolerant fuel (ATF) for maintaining structural integrity during a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) is high resistance of the cladding to plastic deformation and burst failure, since the deformation and burst behavior governs the cooling efficiency of flow channels and the process of fission product release. To simulate and evaluate the deformation and burst process of thin-walled cladding, an in-situ testing and evaluation method has been developed on the basis of visual imaging and image analysis techniques. The method uses a specialized optics system consisting of a high-resolution video camera, a light filteringmore » unit, and monochromatic light sources. The in-situ testing is performed using a 50 mm long pressurized thin-walled tubular specimen set in a programmable furnace. As the first application, ten (10) candidate cladding materials for ATF, i.e., five FeCrAl alloys and five nanostructured steels, were tested using the newly developed method, and the time-dependent images were analyzed to produce detailed deformation and burst data such as true hoop stress, strain (creep) rate, and failure stress. Relatively soft FeCrAl alloys deformed and burst below 800 °C, while negligible strain rates were measured for higher strength alloys.« less

  20. A review of the deformation behavior of tungsten at temperatures less than 0.2 of the melting point /K/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, J. R.

    1974-01-01

    The deformation behavior of tungsten at temperatures below 0.2 times the absolute melting temperature is reviewed with primary emphasis on the temperature dependence of the yield stress and the ductile-brittle transition. It is concluded that a model based on the high Peierls stress of tungsten best accounts for the observed mechanical behavior at low temperatures. Recent research suggests an important role of electron concentration and bonding on the mechanical behavior of tungsten. Future research on tungsten should include studies to define more clearly the correlation between electron concentration and mechanical behavior of alloys of tungsten and other transition metal alloys.

  1. Microstructures Resulting from Uniaxial Deformation of Magnetite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindquist, A. K.; Feinberg, J. M.

    2012-12-01

    Researchers rely on the magnetic record preserved in magnetite when investigating magnetic field reversals, reconstructing past tectonic plate locations, and studying changes in the strength of the earth's magnetic field. Despite the extensive use of magnetite in scientific studies, the effects of dislocations on magnetite's remanence and magnetic stability are poorly understood, yet are crucial to understanding how magnetite records and maintains past magnetic field directions and intensities. To begin to address this need, we have studied the dislocation and defect structures in magnetite that form after controlled deformation. We have also measured major hysteresis loops to investigate the changes in remanence and coercivity that result from each of these deformation events. A single magnetite octahedron was cut into roughly equal bar-shaped pieces, and each was deformed uniaxially along a <121> direction at one atmosphere using a variety of temperature and pressure conditions, each selected to fall within the dislocation glide regime. Slices were cut from each deformed bar after deformation and investigated using a transmission electron microscope to characterize the types of deformation structures resulting from each of the temperature-pressure combinations. A variety of deformation structures were observed, especially dislocations and deformation bands. Dislocations were more common in samples deformed below 875°C. Hysteresis loops were measured for each sample with a field direction perpendicular to the deformation axis. Surprisingly, there is no significant difference in the bulk coercivity of a deformed and undeformed piece of magnetite.

  2. Temperature-dependent phase-specific deformation mechanisms in a directionally solidified NiAl-Cr(Mo) lamellar composite

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Dunji; An, Ke; Chen, Xu; Bei, Hongbin

    2015-10-09

    Phase-specific thermal expansion and mechanical deformation behaviors of a directionally solidified NiAl–Cr(Mo) lamellar in situ composite were investigated by using real-time in situ neutron diffraction during compression at elevated temperatures up to 800 °C. Tensile and compressive thermal residual stresses were found to exist in the NiAl phase and Crss (solid solution) phase, respectively. Then, based on the evolution of lattice spacings and phase stresses, the phase-specific deformation behavior was analyzed qualitatively and quantitatively. Moreover, estimates of phase stresses were derived by Hooke's law on the basis of a simple method for the determination of stress-free lattice spacing in in situ composites. During compressive loading, the NiAl phase yields earlier than the Crss phase. The Crss phase carries much higher stress than the NiAl phase, and displays consistent strain hardening at all temperatures. The NiAl phase exhibits strain hardening at relatively low temperatures and softening at high temperatures. During unloading, the NiAl phase yields in tension whereas the Crss phase unloads elastically. Additionally, post-test microstructural observations show phase-through cracks at room temperature, micro cracks along phase interfaces at 600 °C and intact lamellae kinks at 800 °C, which is due to the increasing deformability of both phases as temperature rises.

  3. Temperature-dependent phase-specific deformation mechanisms in a directionally solidified NiAl-Cr(Mo) lamellar composite

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Yu, Dunji; An, Ke; Chen, Xu; Bei, Hongbin

    2015-10-09

    Phase-specific thermal expansion and mechanical deformation behaviors of a directionally solidified NiAl–Cr(Mo) lamellar in situ composite were investigated by using real-time in situ neutron diffraction during compression at elevated temperatures up to 800 °C. Tensile and compressive thermal residual stresses were found to exist in the NiAl phase and Crss (solid solution) phase, respectively. Then, based on the evolution of lattice spacings and phase stresses, the phase-specific deformation behavior was analyzed qualitatively and quantitatively. Moreover, estimates of phase stresses were derived by Hooke's law on the basis of a simple method for the determination of stress-free lattice spacing in inmore » situ composites. During compressive loading, the NiAl phase yields earlier than the Crss phase. The Crss phase carries much higher stress than the NiAl phase, and displays consistent strain hardening at all temperatures. The NiAl phase exhibits strain hardening at relatively low temperatures and softening at high temperatures. During unloading, the NiAl phase yields in tension whereas the Crss phase unloads elastically. Additionally, post-test microstructural observations show phase-through cracks at room temperature, micro cracks along phase interfaces at 600 °C and intact lamellae kinks at 800 °C, which is due to the increasing deformability of both phases as temperature rises.« less

  4. The energy release rate of a pressurized crack in soft elastic materials: effects of surface tension and large deformation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tianshu; Long, Rong; Hui, Chung-Yuen

    2014-10-21

    In this paper we present a theoretical study on how surface tension affects fracture of soft solids. In classical fracture theory, the resistance to fracture is partly attributed to the energy required to create new surfaces. Thus, the energy released to the crack tip must overcome the surface energy in order to propagate a crack. In soft materials, however, surface tension can cause significant deformation and can reduce the energy release rate for crack propagation by resisting the stretch of crack surfaces. We quantify this effect by studying the inflation of a penny-shaped crack in an infinite elastic body with applied pressure. To avoid numerical difficulty caused by singular fields near the crack tip, we derived an expression for the energy release rate which depends on the applied pressure, the surface tension, the inflated crack volume and the deformed crack area. This expression is evaluated using a newly developed finite element method with surface tension elements. Our calculation shows that, when the elasto-capillary number ω ≡ σ/Ea is sufficiently large, where σ is the isotropic surface tension, E is the small strain Young's modulus and a is the initial crack radius, both the energy release rate and the crack opening displacement of an incompressible neo-Hookean solid are significantly reduced by surface tension. For a sufficiently high elasto-capillary number, the energy release rate can be negative for applied pressure less than a critical amount, suggesting that surface tension can cause crack healing in soft elastic materials. PMID:25140489

  5. Simultaneous Grain Growth and Grain Refinement in Bulk Ultrafine-Grained Copper under Tensile Deformation at Room Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Hailiang; Lu, Cheng; Tieu, Anh Kiet; Li, Huijun; Godbole, Ajit; Kong, Charlie; Zhao, Xing

    2016-08-01

    Grain growth and grain refinement behavior during deformation determine the strength and ductility of ultrafine-grained materials. We used asymmetric cryorolling to fabricate ultrafine-grained copper sheets with an average grain width of 230 nm and having a laminate structure. The sheets show a high-true failure strain of 1.5. Observation of the microstructure at the fracture surface reveals that ultrafine laminate-structured grains were simultaneously transformed into both equiaxed nanograins and coarse grains under tensile deformation at room temperature.

  6. Wall thinning criteria for low temperature-low pressure piping

    SciTech Connect

    Mertz, G.E.

    1993-01-01

    This acceptance criteria is intended to prevent gross rupture or rapidly propagating failure during normal and abnormal operating conditions. Pitting may be present in the carbon steel piping. While the acceptance criteria have provisions to preclude gross rupture through a pitted region, they do not protect against throughwall pit growth and subsequent leakage. Potential leakage through a pit in low pressure piping is less than the post-DBE design basis leakage. Both the uniform thinning and LTA criteria protect against leakage, since their potential for leakage is larger. The acceptance criteria protects against gross rupture due to general wall thinning, local wall thinning (LTA's), pitting, and fracture through weld defects. General wall thinning calculations are based on the restart criteria, SEP-24. LTA criteria for hoop stresses are based on ASME Code Case N-480 [open quotes]Examination Requirements for Pipe Wall Thinning Due to Single Phase Erosion and Corrosion[close quotes]. The LTA criteria for axial stress is based on an effective average thickness concept, which prevents plastic collapse of a locally thinned pipe. Limits on pit density, based on an effective cross section concept, are used to prevent gross rupture through a group of pits. The CEGB R-6 failure assessment diagram is used in the fracture evaluation, along with postulated weld defects. This criteria is intended for low temperature, low pressure piping systems. Corrosion and/or weld defects increase the peak stresses during normal operation and may lead to a reduction in fatigue life. Piping systems subject to significant thermal or mechanical fatigue will require additional analysis which is beyond the scope of this document.

  7. Selective hydrogen purification through graphdiyne under ambient temperature and pressure.

    PubMed

    Cranford, Steven W; Buehler, Markus J

    2012-08-01

    Graphdiyne, a recently synthesized one-atom-thick carbon allotrope, is atomistically porous - characterized by a regular "nanomesh"- and suggests application as a separation membrane for hydrogen purification. Here we report a full atomistic reactive molecular dynamics investigation to determine the selective diffusion properties of hydrogen (H(2)) amongst carbon monoxide (CO) and methane (CH(4)), a mixture otherwise known as syngas, a product of the gasification of renewable biomass (such as animal wastes). Under constant temperature simulations, we find the mass flux of hydrogen molecules through a graphdiyne membrane to be on the order of 7 to 10 g cm(-2) s(-1) (between 300 K and 500 K), with carbon monoxide and methane remaining isolated. Using a simple Arrhenius relation, we determine the energy required for permeation on the order of 0.11 ± 0.03 eV for single H(2) molecules. We find that addition of marginal applied force (approximately 1 to 2 pN per molecule, representing a controlled pressure gradient, ΔP, on the order of 100 to 500 kPa) can successfully enhance the separation of hydrogen gas. Addition of larger driving forces (50 to 100 pN per molecule) is required to selectively filter carbon monoxide or methane, suggesting that, under near-atmospheric conditions, only hydrogen gas will pass such a membrane. Graphdiyne provides a unique, chemically inert and mechanically stable platform facilitating selective gas separation at nominal pressures using a homogeneous material system, without a need for chemical functionalization or the explicit introduction of molecular pores.

  8. High temperature deformation of hot-pressed polycrystalline orthoenstatite. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dehghan-Banadaki, A.

    1983-01-01

    Artificial hot pressed polycrystalline samples were prepared from purified powder of Bamble, Norway, orthoenstatite, (Mg0.86Fe0.14)SiO3. The uniaxial creep behavior of the polycrystalline orthoenstatite was studied over stress ranges of 10-180 MPa and temperatures of 1500-1700 K (0.82-0.93 T sub m) under two different oxygen fugacities, namely equilibrium (Mo-MoO2 buffer) and a reducing (graphite heating element) atmosphere, respectively. An intergranular glassy phase of different compositions with a cavitational creep deformation were observed. In the Mo-MoO2 buffer atmosphere with PO2 approx. 10 to the minus 11 power - 10 to the minus 13 power atmospheres, the results of an analytical electron microscopy analysis indicate that the glassy phases are richer in Ca and Al due to the residual impurities after hot pressing. In the reducing atmosphere with an oxygen fugacity of PO2 approx. 10 to the minus 3 power - 10 to the minus 25 power atmospheres, the results of analytical electron microscopy analysis indicate that the glassy phase is almost pure silica with the presence of free iron precipitate on grain facets and at triple junctions due to the reduction of bulk materials.

  9. Effect of spatial inlet temperature and pressure distortion on turbofan engine stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehalic, Charles M.

    1988-01-01

    The effects of circumferential and radial inlet temperature distortion, circumferential pressure distortion, and combined temperature and pressure distortion on the stability of an advanced turbofan engine were investigated experimentally at simulated altitude conditions. With circumferential and radial inlet temperature distortion, a flow instability generated by the fan operating near stall caused the high-pressure compressor to surge at, or near, the same time as the fan. The effect of combined distortion was dependent on the relative location of the high-temperature and low-pressure regions; high-pressure compressor stalls occurred when the regions coincided, and fan stalls occurred with the regions separated.

  10. High-Temperature Deformation Characteristics of a β-Type Ti-29Nb-13Ta-4.6Zr Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghanbari, E.; Zarei-Hanzaki, A.; Farghadany, E.; Abedi, H. R.; Khoddam, Sh.

    2016-04-01

    The hot deformation behavior of a biomedical β-type Ti-Nb-Ta-Zr alloy has been studied through applying hot compression tests over a wide range of temperatures and strain rates (600-900 °C and 0.003-0.3 s-1). The main microstructural feature of the specimens, which were deformed at 900 °C, is the pancaked primary grains decorated by the serrated boundaries. The latter may well imply to the occurrence of dynamic recovery. The dynamic recrystallization however is considered as the main restoration mechanism in the specimens, which were deformed at 800 °C under all strain rates. The sizes of the new recrystallized grains well follow the serration amplitude of the primary grain boundaries. At lower deformation temperatures (600 and 700 °C), the strain rate sensitivity is suddenly decreased and ended to the strain localization in the form of macro shear band. The higher accumulated energy within the shear band zones appears to stimulate the occurrence of dynamic recrystallization. To further clarify the high-temperature flow behavior of the experimental alloy, a quantitative approach has been also employed. The observed flow hardening and softening has been justified considering the evolved microstructural features.

  11. 30 CFR 35.21 - Temperature-pressure spray-ignition tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Temperature-pressure spray-ignition tests. 35... Temperature-pressure spray-ignition tests. (a) Purpose. The purpose of this test shall be to determine the... described in paragraph (b)(4) of this section. (b) Description of apparatus. (1) A 3-quart pressure...

  12. 30 CFR 35.21 - Temperature-pressure spray-ignition tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Temperature-pressure spray-ignition tests. 35... Temperature-pressure spray-ignition tests. (a) Purpose. The purpose of this test shall be to determine the... described in paragraph (b)(4) of this section. (b) Description of apparatus. (1) A 3-quart pressure...

  13. 30 CFR 35.21 - Temperature-pressure spray-ignition tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Temperature-pressure spray-ignition tests. 35... Temperature-pressure spray-ignition tests. (a) Purpose. The purpose of this test shall be to determine the... described in paragraph (b)(4) of this section. (b) Description of apparatus. (1) A 3-quart pressure...

  14. Deformation and fracture of thin sheet aluminum-lithium alloys: The effect of cryogenic temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, John A.; Gangloff, Richard P.

    1990-01-01

    The objective is to characterize the fracture behavior and to define the fracture mechanisms for new Al-Li-Cu alloys, with emphasis on the role of indium additions and cryogenic temperatures. Three alloys were investigated in rolled product form: 2090 baseline and 2090 + indium produced by Reynolds Metals, and commercial AA 2090-T81 produced by Alcoa. The experimental 2090 + In alloy exhibited increases in hardness and ultimate strength, but no change in tensile yield strength, compared to the baseline 2090 composition in the unstretched T6 condition. The reason for this behavior is not understood. Based on hardness and preliminary Kahn Tear fracture experiments, a nominally peak-aged condition was employed for detailed fracture studies. Crack initiation and growth fracture toughness were examined as a function of stress state and microstructure using J(delta a) methods applied to precracked compact tension specimens in the LT orientation. To date, J(delta a) experiments have been limited to 23 C. Alcoa 2090-T81 exhibited the highest toughness regardless of stress state. Fracture was accompanied by extensive delamination associated with high angle grain boundaries normal to the fatigue precrack surface and progressed microscopically by a transgranular shear mechanism. In contrast the two peak-aged Reynolds alloys had lower toughness and fracture was intersubgranular without substantial delamination. The influences of cryogenic temperature, microstructure, boundary precipitate structure, and deformation mode in governing the competing fracture mechanisms will be determined in future experiments. Results contribute to the development of predictive micromechanical models for fracture modes in Al-Li alloys, and to fracture resistant materials.

  15. Room-temperature deformation behavior of directionally solidified multiphase Ni-Fe-Al alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Misra, A.; Gibala, R.

    1997-03-01

    Directionally solidified (DS) {beta} + ({gamma} + {gamma}{prime}) Ni-Fe-Al alloys have been used to investigate the effect of a ductile second phase on the room-temperature mechanical behavior of a brittle <001>-oriented {beta} (B2) phase. The ductile phase in the composite consisted of a fine distribution of ordered {gamma}{prime} precipitates in a {gamma} (fcc) matrix. Three microstructures were studied: 100 pct lamellar/rod, lamellar + Proeutectic {beta}, and discontinuous {gamma}. The {beta} matrix in the latter two microstructures contained fine-scale bcc precipitates formed due to spinodal decomposition. Room-temperature tensile ductilities as high as 12 pct and fracture toughness (K{sub Q}) of 30.4 MPa {radical}m were observed in the 100 pct lamellar/rod microstructure. Observations of slip traces and dislocation substructures indicated that a substantial portion of the ductility was a result of slip transfer from the ductile phase to the brittle matrix. This slip transfer was facilitated by the Kurdjumov-Sachs (KS) orientation relationship between the two phases and the strong interphase interface which showed no decohesion during deformation. In microstructures which show higher values of tensile ductility and fracture toughness, <100> slip was seen in the {beta} phase, whereas <111> slip was seen in the {beta} phase in the microstructure which showed limited ductility. The high ductility and toughness are explained in terms of increased mobile dislocation density afforded by interface constraint. The effect of extrinsic toughening mechanisms on enhancing the ductility or toughness is secondary to that of slip transfer.

  16. Laser Scanning System for Pressure and Temperature Paints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, John

    1997-01-01

    Acquiring pressure maps of aerodynamic surfaces is very important for improving and validating the performance of aerospace vehicles. Traditional pressure measurements are taken with pressure taps embedded in the model surface that are connected to transducers. While pressure taps allow highly accurate measurements to be acquired, they do have several drawbacks. Pressure taps do not give good spatial resolution due to the need for individual pressure tubes, compounded by limited space available inside models. Also, building a model proves very costly if taps are needed because of the large amount of labor necessary to drill, connect and test each one. The typical cost to install one tap is about $200. Recently, a new method for measuring pressure on aerodynamic surfaces has been developed utilizing a technology known as pressure sensitive paints (PSP). Using PSP, pressure distributions can be acquired optically with high spatial resolution and simple model preparation. Flow structures can be easily visualized using PSP, but are missed using low spatial resolution arrays of pressure taps. PSP even allows pressure distributions to be found on rotating machinery where previously this has been extremely difficult or even impossible. The goal of this research is to develop a laser scanning system for use with pressure sensitive paints that allows accurate pressure measurements to be obtained on various aerodynamic surfaces ranging from wind tunnel models to high speed jet engine compressor blades.

  17. LASS U-Th-Pb monazite and rutile geochronology of felsic high-pressure granulites (Rhodope, N Greece): Effects of fluid, deformation and metamorphic reactions in local subsystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wawrzenitz, Nicole; Krohe, Alexander; Baziotis, Ioannis; Mposkos, Evripidis; Kylander-Clark, Andrew R. C.; Romer, Rolf L.

    2015-09-01

    altered monazite of the three pre-mylonitic domains by having a significantly more pronounced negative Eu anomaly, a flatter HREE pattern, and high Th content. These compositional characteristics are linked with syn-mylonitic formation of plagioclase and resorption of garnet in the shear bands under amphibolite facies conditions. The absence of pre-mylonitic monazite in the shear zones, in contrast to the other domains, suggests complete dissolution of old and formation of new monazite. This probably results from an increased alkalinity and reactivity of the fluid that again is controlled by syn-mylonitic interaction with feldspar and apatite in the shear zones. There, the deformation was accommodated by dissolution precipitation creep at ca. 690 ± 50 °C and 6-7.5 kbar. Growth of monazite at 55 ± 1 Ma dates this deformation, which precedes the regional migmatization of the Sidironero Complex, whereas rutile and biotite ages reflect these later stages. This new pressure-temperature-time constraint for a relictic deformation structure provides insight into the still missing parts of the overall metamorphic, deformation and exhumation processes of the UHP units in the Rhodope.

  18. Measurements of Electron Temperature and Gas Temperature in a Pulsed Atmospheric Pressure Air Discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leipold, Frank; Hufney Mohamed, Abdel-Aleam; Schoenbach, Karl H.

    2001-10-01

    The application of electrical pulses with duration shorter than the time constant for glow-to-arc transition allows us to shift the electron energy distribution in high pressure glow discharges temporally to high energy values [1]. Application of these nonequilibrium plasmas are plasma ramparts, plasma reactors, and excimer light sources. In order to obtain information on the electron energy distribution , or electron energy, respectively, and the gas temperature with the required temporal resolution of 1 ns, we have explored two diagnostic methods. One is based on the evaluation of the bremsstrahlung. This method allows us to determine the electron temperature [2]. The gas temperature is obtained from the rotational spectrum of the second positive system of nitrogen. The results of measurement on a 10 ns pulsed atmospheric pressure air glow will be presented. References [1] Robert H. Stark and Karl H. Schoenbach, J. Appl. Phys. 89, 3568 (2001) [2] Jaeyoung Park, Ivars Henins, Hans W. Herrmann, and Gary S. Selwyn, Physics of Plasmas 7, 3141 (2000). [3] R. Block, O. Toedter, and K. H. Schoenbach, Bull. APS 43, 1478 (1998)

  19. Low-pressure performance of annular, high-pressure (40 atm) high-temperature (2480 K) combustion system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wear, J. D.

    1980-01-01

    Experimental tests were conducted to develop a combustion system for a 40 atmosphere pressure, 2480 K exhaust gas temperature, turbine cooling facility. The tests were conducted in an existing facility with a maximum pressure capability of 10 atmospheres and where inlet air temperatures as high as 894 K could be attained. Exhaust gas temperatures were as high as 2365 K. Combustion efficiences were about 100 percent over a fuel air ratio range of 0.016 to 0.056. Combustion efficiency decreased at leaner and richer ratios when the inlet air temperature was 589 K. Data are presented that show the effect of fuel air ratio and inlet air temperature on liner metal temperature. Isothermal system pressure loss as a function of diffuser inlet Mach number is also presented. Data included exhaust gas pattern factors; unburned hydrocarbon, carbon monoxide, and oxides of nitrogen emission index values; and smoke numbers.

  20. Teratological deformities of pedipalps in the Tegenaria atrica spider, induced by low and high temperatures applied alternately.

    PubMed

    Napiórkowska, Teresa; Napiórkowski, Paweł; Templin, Julita

    2016-02-01

    The study was aimed at demonstrating the relationship between temperature (as a factor which disturbs morphogenesis) and deformities in the front part of the prosoma in Tegenaria atrica. By exposing spider embryos to alternating temperatures of 14 and 32°C for the first 10 days of embryonic development, i.e. until the first metameres of the prosoma appeared on the germ band, we obtained individuals with a range of anomalies including those which affected the prosomal morphology. We selected five spiders with deformities of pedipalps or of pedipalps and walking legs for comprehensive analysis. The results indicate a relationship between temperature applied as a teratogenic factor and anomalies in the front part of the prosoma.