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Sample records for pressure ulcer

  1. Neonatal Pressure Ulcer Prevention.

    PubMed

    Scheans, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of pressure ulcers in acutely ill infants and children ranges up to 27 percent in intensive care units, with a range of 16-19 percent in NICUs. Anatomic, physiologic, and developmental factors place ill and preterm newborns at risk for skin breakdown. Two case studies illustrate these factors, and best practices for pressure ulcer prevention are described.

  2. Pressure Ulcer Prevention

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Executive Summary In April 2008, the Medical Advisory Secretariat began an evidence-based review of the literature concerning pressure ulcers. Please visit the Medical Advisory Secretariat Web site, http://www.health.gov.on.ca/english/providers/program/mas/tech/tech_mn.html to review these titles that are currently available within the Pressure Ulcers series. Pressure ulcer prevention: an evidence based analysis The cost-effectiveness of prevention strategies for pressure ulcers in long-term care homes in Ontario: projections of the Ontario Pressure Ulcer Model (field evaluation) Management of chronic pressure ulcers: an evidence-based analysis (anticipated pubicstion date - mid-2009) Purpose A pressure ulcer, also known as a pressure sore, decubitus ulcer, or bedsore, is defined as a localized injury to the skin/and or underlying tissue occurring most often over a bony prominence and caused by pressure, shear, or friction, alone or in combination. (1) Those at risk for developing pressure ulcers include the elderly and critically ill as well as persons with neurological impairments and those who suffer conditions associated with immobility. Pressure ulcers are graded or staged with a 4-point classification system denoting severity. Stage I represents the beginnings of a pressure ulcer and stage IV, the severest grade, consists of full thickness tissue loss with exposed bone, tendon, and or muscle. (1) In a 2004 survey of Canadian health care settings, Woodbury and Houghton (2) estimated that the prevalence of pressure ulcers at a stage 1 or greater in Ontario ranged between 13.1% and 53% with nonacute health care settings having the highest prevalence rate (Table 1). Executive Summary Table 1: Prevalence of Pressure Ulcers* Setting Canadian Prevalence,% (95% CI) Ontario Prevalence,Range % (n) Acute care 25 (23.8–26.3) 23.9–29.7 (3418) Nonacute care† 30 (29.3–31.4) 30.0–53.3 (1165) Community care 15 (13.4–16.8) 13.2 (91) Mixed health care‡ 22 (20.9

  3. [Nursing care of pressure ulcers].

    PubMed

    Hautin, Pascale

    2013-01-01

    The definition of a pressure ulcer remains very academic. It results from tissue necrosis following ischemia through prolonged arteriolar constriction between two hard surfaces progressing in stages. The nursing care and the use of dressings are therefore adapted to each stage. Today, the treatment of pressure ulcers is complex due to the large number of categories of dressings available. Moreover, the choice of the dressing must take into account the specificities of elderly patients. However, certain basic principles remain essential.

  4. Management of Chronic Pressure Ulcers

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Executive Summary In April 2008, the Medical Advisory Secretariat began an evidence-based review of the literature concerning pressure ulcers. Please visit the Medical Advisory Secretariat Web site, http://www.health.gov.on.ca/english/providers/program/mas/tech/tech_mn.html to review these titles that are currently available within the Pressure Ulcers series. Pressure ulcer prevention: an evidence based analysis The cost-effectiveness of prevention strategies for pressure ulcers in long-term care homes in Ontario: projections of the Ontario Pressure Ulcer Model (field evaluation) Management of chronic pressure ulcers: an evidence-based analysis Objective The Medical Advisory Secretariat (MAS) conducted a systematic review on interventions used to treat pressure ulcers in order to answer the following questions: Do currently available interventions for the treatment of pressure ulcers increase the healing rate of pressure ulcers compared with standard care, a placebo, or other similar interventions? Within each category of intervention, which one is most effective in promoting the healing of existing pressure ulcers? Background A pressure ulcer is a localized injury to the skin and/or underlying tissue usually over a bony prominence, as a result of pressure, or pressure in conjunction with shear and/or friction. Many areas of the body, especially the sacrum and the heel, are prone to the development of pressure ulcers. People with impaired mobility (e.g., stroke or spinal cord injury patients) are most vulnerable to pressure ulcers. Other factors that predispose people to pressure ulcer formation are poor nutrition, poor sensation, urinary and fecal incontinence, and poor overall physical and mental health. The prevalence of pressure ulcers in Ontario has been estimated to range from a median of 22.1% in community settings to a median of 29.9% in nonacute care facilities. Pressure ulcers have been shown to increase the risk of mortality among geriatric patients by

  5. [Controversies over heel pressure ulcers].

    PubMed

    Rueda López, J

    2013-02-01

    Article whose content was exposed in the workshops of the GNEAUPP Congress, held in Seville in November2012, and which refers to ulcers by pressure on the heels as a location exposed to the analysis. A pressure ulcer is a lesion located in skin I underlying tissue usually over a bone prominence, as a result of the pressure, or pressure in combination with the shears. A number of contributing factors or confounding factors are also associated with ulcers by pressure; the importance of these factors still not been elucidated. The heels are next to the sacred area, parts of the body that most frequently presents ulcers by pressure, The importance of the predisposing factors for ulcers in the sacral area as humidity has been studied in recent years, but in heels, remains one of the most important locations in the extremities, which entails adverse outcomes such as amputation in persons with comorbid diseases like Diabetes Mellitus (DM). The incidence of ulcers on heels in patients with DM and without it, is approximately 19-32%. Everything and be a problem associated with elderly people and chronic pathologies, in acute patients are a problem that this underrated, but not devoid of controversy. In hospitals of treble in 2006, the NPUAP encrypted the incidence of UPPin heels in a 43%; in one systematic review conducted by Reddy et al. (2006) puts revealed that 60% of pressure ulcers is produced. The problem of the UPP in heels is present in all the areas of intervention and particularly in paediatric units intensive care, where the first localization it is the occipital area followed by the heels.

  6. Preventing pressure ulcers

    MedlinePlus

    ... skin in this area. If you use a Wheelchair Make sure your wheelchair is the right size for you. Have your ... physical therapist to check how you fit your wheelchair. If you feel pressure anywhere, have your doctor ...

  7. Recording pressure ulcer risk assessment and incidence.

    PubMed

    Plaskitt, Anne; Heywood, Nicola; Arrowsmith, Michaela

    2015-07-15

    This article reports on the introduction of an innovative computer-based system developed to record and report pressure ulcer risk and incidence at an acute NHS trust. The system was introduced to ensure that all patients have an early pressure ulcer risk assessment, which prompts staff to initiate appropriate management if a pressure ulcer is detected, thereby preventing further patient harm. Initial findings suggest that this electronic process has helped to improve the timeliness and accuracy of data on pressure ulcer risk and incidence. In addition, it has resulted in a reduced number of reported hospital-acquired pressure ulcers.

  8. Engaging patients in pressure ulcer prevention.

    PubMed

    Hudgell, Lynne; Dalphinis, Julie; Blunt, Chris; Zonouzi, Maryam; Procter, Susan

    2015-05-06

    As patients increasingly care for themselves at home, they require accessible information to enable informed self-care. This article describes the development of an educational electronic application (app) designed for use by patients at risk of pressure ulcers, and their carers. The app can be downloaded to Windows, Android or Apple smartphones or tablets. The app is based on the current pressure ulcer prevention and management guidelines from the National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel and the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence, and is designed to educate patients and carers about how to prevent a pressure ulcer, how to recognise a pressure ulcer, and what to do if they suspect they are developing a pressure ulcer. We hope the app will be used to help with educational conversations among patients, carers and healthcare professionals.

  9. Pressure ulcer prevention in frail older people.

    PubMed

    Barry, Maree; Nugent, Linda

    2015-12-16

    Pressure ulcers are painful and cause discomfort, have a negative effect on quality of life, and are costly to treat. The incidence and severity of preventable pressure ulcers is an important indicator of quality of care; it is essential that healthcare providers monitor prevalence and incidence rates to ensure that care strategies implemented are effective. Frail older people are at increased risk of developing pressure ulcers. This article discusses the complexities of preventing pressure ulcers in frail older people and emphasises the importance of structured educational programmes that incorporate effective clinical leadership and multidisciplinary teamwork.

  10. Pressure ulcers: Back to the basics

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Karoon; Chauhan, Neha

    2012-01-01

    Pressure ulcer in an otherwise sick patient is a matter of concern for the care givers as well as the medical personnel. A lot has been done to understand the disease process. So much so that USA and European countries have established advisory panels in their respective continents. Since the establishment of these organizations, the understanding of the pressure ulcer has improved significantly. The authors feel that the well documented and well publicized definition of pressure ulcer is somewhat lacking in the correct description of the disease process. Hence, a modified definition has been presented. This disease is here to stay. In the process of managing these ulcers the basic pathology needs to be understood well. Pressure ischemia is the main reason behind the occurrence of ulceration. Different extrinsic and intrinsic factors have been described in detail with review of literature. There are a large number of risk factors causing ulceration. The risk assessment scales have eluded the surgical literature and mostly remained in nursing books and websites. These scales have been reproduced for completion of the basics on decubitus ulcer. The classification of the pressure sores has been given in a comparative form to elucidate that most of the classifications are the same except for minor variations. The management of these ulcers is ever evolving but the age old saying of “prevention is better than cure” suits this condition the most. PMID:23162223

  11. Recurring pressure ulcers: identifying the definitions. A National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel white paper.

    PubMed

    Tew, Cindy; Hettrick, Heather; Holden-Mount, Sarah; Grigsby, Rebekah; Rhodovi, Julie; Moore, Lyn; Ghaznavi, Amir M; Siddiqui, Aamir

    2014-01-01

    Currently, there is a lack of consensus regarding the accepted terminology pertaining to the pressure ulcer healing progression and recidivism. This lack of uniformity can negatively impact initiation of treatment pathways, completion of appropriate interventions, clinical documentation, medical coding, patient education, discharge planning and healthcare revenue through out the healthcare system. The purpose of this paper is to introduce a standard nomenclature as it pertains to pressure ulcer healing progression and any recidivism that may occur. The National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel has formulated a framework of terms regarding pressure ulcer progression. We also developed a clearer nomenclature for lack of progress and recidivism of pressure ulcers. This document should serve as a starting point for the discussion of the pressure ulcer care, research, and terminology.

  12. The prevention and management of pressure ulcers.

    PubMed

    Goode, P S; Allman, R M

    1989-11-01

    Pressure ulcers are a common problem for older persons. Complications associated with pressure ulcers include infection and even death for some patients. Pressure is the primary pathogenic factor, but shearing forces, friction, and moisture are also important. Immobility, nutritional status, and age-related factors seem to be significant risk factors. Preventive care includes use of assessment tools to identify high risk patients, frequent repositioning, air or foam mattresses that reduce pressure over bony prominences, as well as careful attention to optimizing the overall patient condition. When pressure ulcers do develop, the treatment plan should include adequate nutrition including protein, vitamin C, and zinc supplements as indicated; systemic antibiotics for sepsis, cellulitis, osteomyelitis, or the prevention of bacterial endocarditis; and local wound care that eliminates necrotic tissue, decreases bacterial load, and provides a physiologic, pressure-free environment allowing the wound to heal. Specialized beds may be considered in some patients, particularly those with larger ulcers. Surgery is an option in older persons who are operative candidates. For some patients with pressure ulcers, appropriate treatment goals may focus on providing comfort rather than curing the ulcer.

  13. Pressure ulcer prevention in care home settings.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Michael

    2017-03-31

    Pressure ulcer prevention in the care home setting can be challenging and is often compromised by a lack of access to education and resources. There are measures that have been shown to consistently improve outcomes in pressure ulcer prevention including assessment of the patient and their individual risks, delivery of a consistent plan of care that meets patients' needs, and regular evaluation to identify shortfalls. In addition, there should be a robust approach to investigating events that lead to a person developing a pressure ulcer and that information should be used to improve future practice. Pressure ulcer prevention in care homes is achievable and nurses should all be aware of the necessary measures detailed in this article.

  14. Pressure ulcers - what to ask your doctor

    MedlinePlus

    ... best way to transfer from bed to a wheelchair or chair? If there is leakage of stool ... done to prevent pressure ulcers? If using a wheelchair: How often should someone make sure the wheelchair ...

  15. The role of nutrition for pressure ulcer management: national pressure ulcer advisory panel, European pressure ulcer advisory panel, and pan pacific pressure injury alliance white paper.

    PubMed

    Posthauer, Mary Ellen; Banks, Merrilyn; Dorner, Becky; Schols, Jos M G A

    2015-04-01

    Nutrition and hydration play an important role in preserving skin and tissue viability and in supporting tissue repair for pressure ulcer (PrU) healing. The majority of research investigating the relationship between nutrition and wounds focuses on PrUs. This white paper reviews the 2014 National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel, European Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel, and Pan Pacific Pressure Injury Alliance Nutrition Guidelines and discusses nutrition strategies for PrU management.

  16. Pressure ulcers in four Indonesian hospitals: prevalence, patient characteristics, ulcer characteristics, prevention and treatment.

    PubMed

    Amir, Yufitriana; Lohrmann, Christa; Halfens, Ruud Jg; Schols, Jos Mga

    2017-02-01

    The objective of this article was to study characteristics of pressure ulcer patients and their ulcers, pressure ulcer preventive and treatment measures in four Indonesian general hospitals. A multicentre cross-sectional design was applied to assess pressure ulcers and pressure ulcer care in adult patients in medical, surgical, specialised and intensive care units. Ninety-one of the 1132 patients had a total of 142 ulcers. Half (44·0%) already had pressure ulcers before admission. The overall prevalence of category I-IV pressure ulcers was 8·0% (95% CI 6·4-9·6), and the overall nosocomial pressure ulcer prevalence was 4·5% (95% CI 3·3-5·7). Most pressure ulcer patients had friction and shear problems, were bedfast, had diabetes and had more bedridden days. Most ulcers (42·3%) were category III and IV. One third of the patients had both pressure ulcers and moisture lesions (36·3%) and suffered from pain (45·1%). The most frequently used prevention measures were repositioning (61·5%), skin moisturising (47·3%), patient education (36·3%) and massage (35·2%). Most pressure ulcer dressings involved saline-impregnated or antimicrobial gauzes. This study shows the complexities of pressure ulcers in Indonesian general hospitals and reveals that the quality of pressure ulcer care (prevention and treatment) could be improved by implementing the recent evidence-based international guideline.

  17. Body Mass Index and Pressure Ulcers: Improved Predictability of Pressure Ulcers in Intensive Care Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hyun, Sookyung; Li, Xiaobai; Vermillion, Brenda; Newton, Cheryl; Fall, Monica; Kaewprag, Pacharmon; Moffatt-Bruce, Susan; Lenz, Elizabeth R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Obesity contributes to immobility and subsequent pressure on skin surfaces. Knowledge of the relationship between obesity and development of pressure ulcers in intensive care patients will provide better understanding of which patients are at high risk for pressure ulcers and allow more efficient prevention. Objectives To examine the incidence of pressure ulcers in patients who differ in body mass index and to determine whether inclusion of body mass index enhanced use of the Braden scale in the prediction of pressure ulcers. Methods In this retrospective cohort study, data were collected from the medical records of 4 groups of patients with different body mass index values: underweight, normal weight, obese, and extremely obese. Data included patients’ demographics, body weight, score on the Braden scale, and occurrence of pressure ulcers. Results The incidence of pressure ulcers in the underweight, normal weight, obese, and extremely obese groups was 8.6%, 5.5%, 2.8%, and 9.9%, respectively. When both the score on the Braden scale and the body mass index were predictive of pressure ulcers, extremely obese patients were about 2 times more likely to experience an ulcer than were normal weight patients. In the final model, the area under the curve was 0.71. The baseline area under the curve for the Braden scale was 0.68. Conclusions Body mass index and incidence of pressure ulcers were related in intensive care patients. Addition of body mass index did not appreciably improve the accuracy of the Braden scale for predicting pressure ulcers. PMID:25362673

  18. A new pressure ulcer conceptual framework

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, Susanne; Nixon, Jane; Keen, Justin; Wilson, Lyn; McGinnis, Elizabeth; Dealey, Carol; Stubbs, Nikki; Farrin, Amanda; Dowding, Dawn; Schols, Jos MGA; Cuddigan, Janet; Berlowitz, Dan; Jude, Edward; Vowden, Peter; Schoonhoven, Lisette; Bader, Dan L; Gefen, Amit; Oomens, Cees WJ; Nelson, E Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Aim This paper discusses the critical determinants of pressure ulcer development and proposes a new pressure ulcer conceptual framework. Background Recent work to develop and validate a new evidence-based pressure ulcer risk assessment framework was undertaken. This formed part of a Pressure UlceR Programme Of reSEarch (RP-PG-0407-10056), funded by the National Institute for Health Research. The foundation for the risk assessment component incorporated a systematic review and a consensus study that highlighted the need to propose a new conceptual framework. Design Discussion Paper. Data Sources The new conceptual framework links evidence from biomechanical, physiological and epidemiological evidence, through use of data from a systematic review (search conducted March 2010), a consensus study (conducted December 2010–2011) and an international expert group meeting (conducted December 2011). Implications for Nursing A new pressure ulcer conceptual framework incorporating key physiological and biomechanical components and their impact on internal strains, stresses and damage thresholds is proposed. Direct and key indirect causal factors suggested in a theoretical causal pathway are mapped to the physiological and biomechanical components of the framework. The new proposed conceptual framework provides the basis for understanding the critical determinants of pressure ulcer development and has the potential to influence risk assessment guidance and practice. It could also be used to underpin future research to explore the role of individual risk factors conceptually and operationally. Conclusion By integrating existing knowledge from epidemiological, physiological and biomechanical evidence, a theoretical causal pathway and new conceptual framework are proposed with potential implications for practice and research. PMID:24684197

  19. The VCU Pressure Ulcer Summit: Collaboration to Operationalize Hospital-Acquired Pressure Ulcer Prevention Best Practice Recommendations.

    PubMed

    Brindle, C Tod; Creehan, Sue; Black, Joyce; Zimmermann, Deb

    2015-01-01

    This executive summary reports outcomes of an interprofessional collaboration between experts in pressure ulcer prevention, bedside clinicians, regulatory agencies, quality improvement, informatics experts, and professional nursing organizations. The goal of the collaboration was to develop a framework to assist facilities to operationalize best practice recommendations to sustain organizational culture change in hospital-acquired pressure ulcer prevention, to develop a hospital-acquired pressure ulcer severity score, and to address topics related to the unavoidable pressure ulcer.

  20. Case study: the treatment or palliative care of pressure ulcers.

    PubMed

    Hampton, S

    As nurse education increases there are reduced justifications for the existence of pressure ulcers. Patient assessment, along with rationalization of equipment and repositioning techniques, reduces the potential for pressure ulcer formation. Therefore, the future for pressure ulcer prevention will rely on nurse education and motivation. The patient featured in this case study suffered unnecessarily from pressure ulcers as, after her admission to a new nursing home where she was given the appropriate pressure-relieving and wound-dressing treatment, the ulcers were showing signs of healing.

  1. Become the PPUPET Master: Mastering Pressure Ulcer Risk Assessment With the Pediatric Pressure Ulcer Prediction and Evaluation Tool (PPUPET).

    PubMed

    Sterken, David J; Mooney, JoAnn; Ropele, Diana; Kett, Alysha; Vander Laan, Karen J

    2015-01-01

    Hospital acquired pressure ulcers (HAPU) are serious, debilitating, and preventable complications in all inpatient populations. Despite evidence of the development of pressure ulcers in the pediatric population, minimal research has been done. Based on observations gathered during quarterly HAPU audits, bedside nursing staff recognized trends in pressure ulcer locations that were not captured using current pressure ulcer risk assessment tools. Together, bedside nurses and nursing leadership created and conducted multiple research studies to investigate the validity and reliability of the Pediatric Pressure Ulcer Prediction and Evaluation Tool (PPUPET).

  2. A rare location for a common problem: popliteal pressure ulcer.

    PubMed

    Ozer, Kadri; Colak, Ozlem; Goktas, Fethiye B; Sungur, Nezih; Kocer, Ugur

    2016-04-01

    Pressure ulcer is defined as localized injury to the skin and/or underlying tissue usually over a bony prominence, as a result of pressure, or pressure in combination with shear. The most frequent sites for pressure ulcers are the occiput, sacrum, ischial tuberosities, trochanters, lateral malleoli and posterior heels. Herein, we present a case of grade III pressure ulcer seen in popliteal region which is an unusual localisation that is rarely seen in the literature. An awareness of this unusual localisation of pressure ulcer is necessary to prevent decrease in quality of life, particularly in the wheelchair-dependent population.

  3. Pressure Ulcer Prevention: Where Practice and Education Meet.

    PubMed

    Bos, Brenda S; Wangen, Tina M; Elbing, Carl E; Rowekamp, Debra J; Kruggel, Heather A; Conlon, Patricia M; Scroggins, Leann M; Schad, Shauna P; Neumann, Julie A; Barth, Melissa M; Grubbs, Pamela L; Sievers, Beth A

    2016-01-01

    This article describes the processes used to implement a pressure ulcer management program in a Midwest academic medical center, which led to a decrease in reportable pressure ulcers. A learning needs assessment was completed, and a workgroup was formed to address the learning needs. Methods, materials, and processes included lectures, technology-enhanced learning, and interactive stations with mannequins and pressure ulcer moulages. The processes and outcome measures used to measure effectiveness of the program are discussed.

  4. Flap Reconstruction for Pressure Ulcers: An Outcomes Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Madden, James J.; Hoffman, Ashley N.; Kim, Justine S.; Thayer, Wesley P.; Nanney, Lillian B.; Spear, Marcia E.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Historically, complication rates after pressure ulcer reconstruction utilizing flap coverage have been high. Patients undergoing operations for pressure ulcer coverage typically have multiple risk factors for postoperative complications. The purpose of this study was to examine a large patient series in the pressure ulcer population to uncover objective evidence of the linkage between risk factors and outcomes after flap coverage. Methods: This study was a retrospective chart review of patients who underwent flap reconstruction for a pressure ulcer between 1997 and 2015. The characteristics of patients were analyzed to determine those who had complications such as pressure ulcer recurrence, wound dehiscence, and wound infection. Results: All patients (N = 276) underwent flap coverage of their pressure ulcers. The overall complication rate was 58.7% (162 patients). Wound dehiscence was the most common complication (31.2%), and the pressure ulcer recurrence rate was 28.6%. Multivariate regression for pressure ulcer recurrence revealed that body mass index <18.5 [relative risk (RR) 3.13], active smoking (RR 2.33), and ischial pressure ulcers (RR 3.46) were independent risk factors for pressure ulcer recurrence. Ischial pressure ulcers (RR 2.27) and preoperative osteomyelitis (RR 2.78) were independent risk factors for wound dehiscence. Diabetes was an independent risk factor for wound infection (RR 4.34). Conclusions: Our retrospective analysis revealed numerous factors that are associated with high rates of major postoperative complications. Risk factors must be taken into account when offering flap coverage, and risk-reducing strategies must be implemented in patients before pressure ulcer reconstruction. PMID:28203494

  5. [Prevention of pressure ulcers in heels].

    PubMed

    Verdú Soriano, José; López Casanaova, Pablo; Fuentes Pagés, Gemma; Torra i Bou, Joan-Enric

    2004-09-01

    Heels are, for all assistance levels, one of the most frequent locations for the development of pressure ulcers (PU). In this study we deal to investigate in order to determine in patients at risk in an Internal Medicine Unit, the PU incidence on heels, after applying a specific prevention protocol. This protocol particularly designed for pressure ulcers on heels included a combined application of special hydrocellular dressings specially shaped for heels (Allevyn Heel), hyper-oxygenated fatty acids (Mepentol) and special surfaces for pressure management (Aerocare); afterwards, we attempted a comparison of our results with those from previous similar studies. We designed a prospective study which lasted from May 1-2002 until June 30-2003, with a sample of 100 patients without PU included in the study when admitted to the unit. The cumulated incidence established for PU in heels is a 4% which means an incidence rate of 2.06 PU in heels per 1000 persons/day. After observing the results we may affirm that applying the protocol is, under a clinical point of view, as effective as other measures used in previous studies. If we focus on the cost-benefit, the protocol studied represents an option with an excellent cost-efficiency relationship.

  6. Dressings for Preventing Pressure Ulcers: A Meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Lei; Woo, Kevin Y; Liu, Li-Bao; Wen, Rui-Juan; Hu, Ai-Ling; Shi, Cheng-Gang

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this analysis is to determine the effectiveness of dressing material in the prevention of pressure ulcers. Results showed that hydrocolloid, foam, and film were more effective than a standard care protocol in patients at risk for pressure ulcers.

  7. The role of dressings in the prevention of pressure ulcers.

    PubMed

    Brown, Julie

    2016-08-11

    Pressure ulceration is a significant global healthcare problem and represents a considerable burden on healthcare resources. Within the literature an increasing number of studies have examined the role prophylactic dressings play in redistributing pressure and helping to protect the skin from the effects of friction and shear. The use of dressings to prevent pressure ulcers may be considered a controversial issue, as previous opinion has been that dressings do not reduce the effects of pressure. This article will critically evaluate the literature to examine the role dressings play in the prevention of pressure ulceration.

  8. A resource-efficient planning for pressure ulcer prevention.

    PubMed

    Ostadabbas, Sarah; Yousefi, Rasoul; Nourani, Mehrdad; Faezipour, Miad; Tamil, Lakshman; Pompeo, Matthew Q

    2012-11-01

    Pressure ulcer is a critical problem for bed-ridden and wheelchair-bound patients, diabetics, and the elderly. Patients need to be regularly repositioned to prevent excessive pressure on a single area of body, which can lead to ulcers. Pressure ulcers are extremely costly to treat and may lead to several other health problems, including death. The current standard for prevention is to reposition at-risk patients every two hours. Even if it is done properly, a fixed schedule is not sufficient to prevent all ulcers. Moreover, it may result in nurses being overworked by turning some patients too frequently. In this paper, we present an algorithm for finding a nurse-effort optimal repositioning schedule that prevents pressure ulcer formation for a finite planning horizon. Our proposed algorithm uses data from a commercial pressure mat assembled on the beds surface and provides a sequence of next positions and the time of repositioning for each patient.

  9. Pressure Ulcers: Factors Contributing to Their Development in the OR.

    PubMed

    Engels, Dawn; Austin, Melody; McNichol, Laurie; Fencl, Jennifer; Gupta, Sat; Kazi, Haseeb

    2016-03-01

    The prevention of health care-associated pressure ulcers (HAPUs) is an important quality measure because HAPUs are considered a never event. The literature suggests that the prevalence rate of pressure ulcers is 8.5% or higher among patients who undergo surgical procedures that last longer than three hours. We performed a retrospective chart review to determine what factors contribute to the development of pressure ulcers in patients who undergo surgical procedures. The sample population included patients who acquired a pressure ulcer that was not present at admission and developed during their postoperative hospital stay. The project revealed consistent risk factors that may contribute to the development of pressure ulcers in patients who have undergone surgical procedures. These findings can drive the implementation of preventive measures to reduce the occurrence of HAPUs associated with surgical procedures.

  10. Revised National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel Pressure Injury Staging System

    PubMed Central

    Black, Joyce M.; Goldberg, Margaret; McNichol, Laurie; Moore, Lynn; Sieggreen, Mary

    2016-01-01

    Our understanding of pressure injury etiology and development has grown in recent years through research, clinical expertise, and global interdisciplinary expert collaboration. Therefore, the National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel (NPUAP) has revised the definition and stages of pressure injury. The revision was undertaken to incorporate the current understanding of the etiology of pressure injuries, as well as to clarify the anatomical features present or absent in each stage of injury. An NPUAP-appointed Task Force reviewed the literature and created drafts of definitions, which were then reviewed by stakeholders and the public, including clinicians, educators, and researchers around the world. Using a consensus-building methodology, these revised definitions were the focus of a multidisciplinary consensus conference held in April 2016. As a result of stakeholder and public input, along with the consensus conference, important changes were made and incorporated into the new staging definitions. The revised staging system uses the term injury instead of ulcer and denotes stages using Arabic numerals rather than Roman numerals. The revised definition of a pressure injury now describes the injuries as usually occurring over a bony prominence or under a medical or other device. The revised definition of a Stage 2 pressure injury seeks to clarify the difference between moisture-associated skin damage and injury caused by pressure and/or shear. The term suspected has been removed from the Deep Tissue Pressure Injury diagnostic label. Each definition now describes the extent of tissue loss present and the anatomical features that may or may not be present in the stage of injury. These important revisions reflect the methodical and collaborative approach used to examine the available evidence and incorporate current interdisciplinary clinical expertise into better defining the important phenomenon of pressure injury etiology and development. PMID:27749790

  11. The VCU Pressure Ulcer Summit-Developing Centers of Pressure Ulcer Prevention Excellence: A Framework for Sustainability.

    PubMed

    Creehan, Sue; Cuddigan, Janet; Gonzales, Dana; Nix, Denise; Padula, William; Pittman, Joyce; Pontieri-Lewis, Vicky; Walden, Christine; Wells, Belinda; Wheeler, Robinetta

    2016-01-01

    Hospital-acquired pressure ulcer occurrences have declined over the past decade as reimbursement policies have changed, evidence-based practice guidelines have been implemented, and quality improvement initiatives have been launched. However, the 2006-2008 Institute for Healthcare Improvement goal of zero pressure ulcers remains difficult to achieve and even more challenging to sustain. Magnet hospitals tend to have lower hospital-acquired pressure ulcer rates than non-Magnet hospitals, yet many non-Magnet hospitals also have robust pressure ulcer prevention programs. Successful programs share commonalities in structure, processes, and outcomes. A national summit of 55 pressure ulcer experts was convened at the Virginia Commonwealth University Medical Center in March 2014. The group was divided into 3 focus groups; each was assigned a task to develop a framework describing components of a proposed Magnet-designated Center of Pressure Ulcer Prevention Excellence. Systematic literature reviews, analysis of exemplars, and nominal group process techniques were used to create the framework. This article presents a framework describing the proposed Magnet-designated Centers of Pressure Ulcer Prevention Excellence. Critical attributes of Centers of Excellence are identified and organized according to the 4 domains of the ANCC model for the Magnet Recognition Program: transformational leadership; structural empowerment; exemplary professional practice; and new knowledge innovation and improvements. The structures, processes, and outcome measures necessary to become a proposed Center of Pressure Ulcer Prevention Excellence are discussed.

  12. Spinal cord injury pressure ulcer treatment: an experience-based approach.

    PubMed

    Sunn, Gabriel

    2014-08-01

    Pressure ulcers continue to impact the lives of spinal cord injury patients severely. Pressure ulcers must be accurately staged according to National Pressure Ulcer Advisory recommendations before treatment design. The first priority in treatment of pressure ulcers is offloading. Intact skin ulcers may be treated with noncontact nonthermal low-frequency ultrasound. Superficial pressure ulcers may be treated with a combination of collagenase and foam dressings. Deeper pressure ulcers warrant negative-pressure wound therapy dressings along with biologic adjuncts to fill in wound depth. Discovery and treatment of osteomyelitis is a high priority when initially evaluating pressure ulcers. Surgical intervention must always be considered.

  13. Using a national guideline to prevent and manage pressure ulcers.

    PubMed

    Neilson, Julie; Avital, Liz; Willock, Jane; Broad, Nigel

    2014-05-01

    Developing pressure ulcers is a painful and distressing event for patients, and one that can be prevented. The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence pressure ulcer guideline has recently been updated to cover the prevention and management of this condition. This article focuses on the recommendations that are relevant to nurses, covering areas such as risk assessment, skin assessment, repositioning, pressure-redistributing devices, dressings, patient and carer information, and training and education. It also identifies what senior nurses and nurse managers must do to ensure their staff can prevent and manage pressure ulcers effectively.

  14. Animal Models in Pressure Ulcer Research

    PubMed Central

    Salcido, Richard; Popescu, Adrian; Ahn, Chulhyun

    2007-01-01

    Background/Objective: Research targeting the pathophysiology, prevention, and treatment of pressure ulcers (PrUs) continue to be a significant priority for clinical and basic science research. Spinal cord injury patients particularly benefit from PrU research, because the prevalence of chronic wounds in this category is increasing despite standardized medical care. Because of practical, ethical, and safety considerations, PrUs in the human environment are limited to studies involving patients with pre-existing ulcers. Therefore, we are limited in our basic knowledge pertaining to the development, progression, and healing environment in this devastating disease. Methods: This review provides a synopsis of literature and a discussion of techniques used to induce PrUs in animal models. The question of what animal model best mimics the human PrU environment has been a subject of debate by investigators, peer review panels, and editors. The similarities in wound development and healing in mammalian tissue make murine models a relevant model for understanding the causal factors as well as the wound healing elements. Although we are beginning to understand some of the mechanisms of PrU development, a key dilemma of what makes an apparently healthy tissue develop a PrU waits to be solved. Results and Conclusions: No single method of induction and exploring PrUs in animals can address all the aspects of the pathology of chronic wounds. Each model has its particular strengths and weaknesses. Certain types of models can selectively identify specific aspects of wound development, quantify the extent of lesions, and assess outcomes from interventions. The appropriate interpretation of these methods is significant for proper study design, an understanding of the results, and extrapolation to clinical relevance. PMID:17591222

  15. Pressure ulcers: critical considerations in prevention and management.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, O M

    1991-01-01

    Pressure ulcer development is a serious problem occurring predominately among elderly persons, who are confined to bed or chair. Factors associated with pressure ulcer development include: cerebrovascular accident, impaired nutritional intake, fecal incontinence, lymphocytopenia and a high comorbidity score. Implementation of preventative measures, such as: in-depth assessment for mobility, a pressure relieving device combined with adequate repositioning, thorough evaluation for nutritional status and urinary incontinence, significantly reduce pressure ulcer incidence. If the pressure ulcer is a partial thickness (Stage II) wound, the causative factors are probably friction and/or moisture. If the ulcer is full thickness (Stage III, IV) it is secondary to pressure and/or shearing forces. The development of wound infection is the most common complication. Osteomyelitis is not an uncommon occurrence and must be initially ruled out in all full thickness pressure ulcers. Surgical debridement of necrotic tissue is necessary prior to further treatment and /or assessments. Cultures and antibiotic therapy are indicated only upon evidence of infection (erythema, edema, cellulitis, osteomyelitis, leukocytosis, bandemia or fever). Topical pharmacologic agents may be used to prevent or treat infection but must be carefully controlled to avoid such adverse effects as toxicity to the wound, allergic reaction and development of resistant pathogens. Proper use of occlusive dressings increase patient comfort, enhance healing, decrease the possibility of infection, save time and reduce costs. A patient presenting an ulcer which fails to improve, or due to its size will take a great deal of time to heal, should be evaluated for surgical closure.

  16. Pressure ulcers. Physical, supportive, and local aspects of management.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, O M; Childs, E J

    1991-10-01

    Pressure ulcers are a common and serious problem predominately among elderly persons who are confined to bed or chair. Additional factors associated with pressure ulcer development include cerebrovascular accident, impaired nutritional intake, urinary or fecal incontinence, hypoalbuminemia, and previous fracture. Implementation of preventive measures, such as an in-depth assessment for mobility, a pressure-relieving device combined with adequate repositioning, and thorough evaluation for nutritional status and urinary incontinence, significantly reduce pressure ulcer incidence. If the pressure ulcer is a partial thickness (stage II) wound, the causative factors are probably friction or moisture. If the ulcer is full thickness (stage III and IV), it is secondary to pressure or shearing forces. The development of wound infection is the most common complication in the management approach. Osteomyelitis is not an uncommon occurrence and must be initially ruled out in all full thickness pressure ulcers. Surgical debridement of necrotic tissue is necessary prior to further treatment and assessments. Antibiotic therapy is indicated only upon evidence of infection (cellulitis, osteomyelitis, leukocytosis, bandemia, or fever). Topical pharmacologic agents may be used to prevent or treat infection but must be carefully controlled to avoid such adverse effects as toxicity to the wound, allergic reaction, and development of resistant pathogens. Proper use of occlusive dressings increase patient comfort, enhance healing, decrease the possibility of infection, save time, and reduce costs. A patient presenting an ulcer that fails to improve or, because of its size, will take a great deal of time to heal should be evaluated for surgical closure.

  17. Factors Associated With Pressure Ulcers in Individuals With Spina Bifida

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sunkyung; Ward, Elisabeth; Dicianno, Brad E.; Clayton, Gerald H.; Sawin, Kathleen J.; Beierwaltes, Patricia; Thibadeau, Judy

    2015-01-01

    Objective To describe factors associated with pressure ulcers in individuals with spina bifida (SB) enrolled in the National Spina Bifida Patient Registry (NSBPR). Design Unbalanced longitudinal multicenter cohort study. Setting Nineteen SB clinics. Participants Individuals with SB (N=3153) enrolled in 19 clinic sites that participate in the NSBPR. Interventions Not applicable. Main Outcome Measures Pressure ulcer status (yes/no) at the annual visit between 2009 and 2012. Results Of 3153 total participants, 19% (n=603) reported ulcers at their most recent annual clinic visit. Seven factors–level of lesion, wheelchair use, urinary incontinence, shunt presence, above the knee orthopedic surgery, recent surgery, and male sex–were significantly associated with the presence of pressure ulcers. Of these factors, level of lesion, urinary incontinence, recent surgery, and male sex were included in the final logistic regression model. The 3 adjusting variables–SB type, SB clinic, and age group–were significant in all analyses (all P<.001). Conclusions By adjusting for SB type, SB clinic, and age group, we found that 7 factors–level of lesion, wheelchair use, urinary incontinence, shunt presence, above the knee orthopedic surgery, recent surgery, and male sex–were associated with pressure ulcers. Identifying key factors associated with the onset of pressure ulcers can be incorporated into clinical practice in ways that prevent and enhance treatment of pressure ulcers in the population with SB. PMID:25796136

  18. Reducing hospital acquired pressure ulcers in intensive care

    PubMed Central

    Cullen Gill, Emma

    2015-01-01

    Pressure ulcers are a definite problem in our health care system and are growing in numbers. Unfortunately, it is usually the most weak and vulnerable of our culture that faces these complications, causing the patient and their families discomfort, anguish, and economic hardship due to their expensive treatment. Data collected by the tissue viability department showed high incidence of hospital acquire pressure ulcers in the intensive care unit in March 2013. An action plan was initiated and implemented by the tissue viability team, senior nursing management, pressure ulcer prevention (PUP) team and respiratory therapists (RT's) within the ICU. Our objective was to reduce hospital acquired pressure ulcers in the intensive care unit using the plan, do, check, act quality improvement process. PMID:26734370

  19. Beyond the pressure ulcer blame game: reflections for the future.

    PubMed

    Meehan, M

    2000-05-01

    The concept of skin wounds caused primarily as a result of external physical forces has been the focus of many healthcare professionals for decades. Unfortunately, some of the choices made regarding the definition, description, and topical management of pressure ulcers hampers the appreciation of the complexity of issues that generally accompany the occurrence of these wounds. As the healthcare industry increasingly focuses on quality and accountability, industry watchdogs continue to develop metrics to evaluate quality of care while legal professionals demand more accountability for healthcare interventions. The management of pressure ulcers is often scrutinized and many healthcare providers are often unfairly accused of neglect. The occurrence of pressure ulcers, when viewed as a failure of the healthcare system, prevents the comprehensive and constructive attention this topic deserves. Therefore, as wound care providers, we must change the image of pressure ulcers and provide a more balanced portrayal of the influences, treatments, and likely outcomes of these wounds. We must separate fact from fiction and reality from the psychological reaction that pressure ulcers evoke. It is now time to recreate a dialogue for pressure ulcers that is productive, realistic, and likely to result in the advancement of care.

  20. Pressure ulcer prevalence and risk factors during prolonged surgical procedures.

    PubMed

    Primiano, Mike; Friend, Michael; McClure, Connie; Nardi, Scott; Fix, Lisa; Schafer, Marianne; Savochka, Kathlyn; McNett, Molly

    2011-12-01

    Pressure ulcer formation related to positioning while in the OR increases the length of hospital stay and hospital costs, but there is little evidence documenting how positioning devices used in the OR influence pressure ulcer development when examined with traditional risk factors. The aim of this prospective cohort study was to identify the prevalence of and risk factors associated with pressure ulcer development among patients undergoing surgical procedures lasting longer than three hours. Participants included all adult same-day admission patients scheduled for a three-hour surgical procedure during an eight-month period (N = 258). Data were gathered preoperatively, intraoperatively, and postoperatively on pressure ulcer risk factors. Bivariate analyses indicated that the type of positioning (ie, heels elevated) (χ(2) = 7.897, P = .048), OR bed surface (ie, foam table pad) (χ(2) = 15.848, P = .000), skin assessment in the postanesthesia care unit (χ(2) = 41.652, P = .000), and male gender (χ(2) = 6.984, P = .030) were associated with pressure ulcer development. Logistic regression analyses indicated that the use of a foam pad (β = 2.691, P = .024) and a lower day-one Braden score (β = .244, P = .003) were predictive of pressure ulcers.

  1. Validity of pressure ulcer diagnosis using digital photography.

    PubMed

    Baumgarten, Mona; Margolis, David J; Selekof, Joan L; Moye, Nancy; Jones, Patricia S; Shardell, Michelle

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the validity of digital photographs for the assessment of the presence of pressure ulcers stage 2 or higher. Participants were 48 patients (28 white and 20 black) with pressure ulcers identified in the course of a wound specialist's routine clinical practice at the University of Maryland Medical Center. One pressure ulcer and one unaffected skin area were photographed on each participating patient. The gold standard diagnosis (stage 2 pressure ulcer vs. stage 1 or no pressure ulcer) was recorded by the wound specialist based on bedside examination. The photographs were reviewed blindly by another wound expert. The sensitivity of the blinded assessment was 97% (95% confidence interval [CI] 91-100%). The specificity was 97% (95% CI 92-100%). The sensitivity and specificity were both 100% in the white patients. In black patients, the sensitivity and specificity were 92% (95% CI 75-100%) and 93% (95% CI 82-100%), respectively. These results suggest that the use of photographic images to assess the presence or absence of a pressure ulcer stage 2 or higher has a high degree of validity. Since blinded outcome assessment is one of the cornerstones of good clinical trial design, photography offers the potential to strengthen future studies.

  2. Pressure ulcers: Current understanding and newer modalities of treatment.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Surajit; Mishra, R K

    2015-01-01

    This article reviews the mechanism, symptoms, causes, severity, diagnosis, prevention and present recommendations for surgical as well as non-surgical management of pressure ulcers. Particular focus has been placed on the current understandings and the newer modalities for the treatment of pressure ulcers. The paper also covers the role of nutrition and pressure-release devices such as cushions and mattresses as a part of the treatment algorithm for preventing and quick healing process of these wounds. Pressure ulcers develop primarily from pressure and shear; are progressive in nature and most frequently found in bedridden, chair bound or immobile people. They often develop in people who have been hospitalised for a long time generally for a different problem and increase the overall time as well as cost of hospitalisation that have detrimental effects on patient's quality of life. Loss of sensation compounds the problem manifold, and failure of reactive hyperaemia cycle of the pressure prone area remains the most important aetiopathology. Pressure ulcers are largely preventable in nature, and their management depends on their severity. The available literature about severity of pressure ulcers, their classification and medical care protocols have been described in this paper. The present treatment options include various approaches of cleaning the wound, debridement, optimised dressings, role of antibiotics and reconstructive surgery. The newer treatment options such as negative pressure wound therapy, hyperbaric oxygen therapy, cell therapy have been discussed, and the advantages and disadvantages of current and newer methods have also been described.

  3. Pressure ulcers: Current understanding and newer modalities of treatment

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Surajit; Mishra, R. K.

    2015-01-01

    This article reviews the mechanism, symptoms, causes, severity, diagnosis, prevention and present recommendations for surgical as well as non-surgical management of pressure ulcers. Particular focus has been placed on the current understandings and the newer modalities for the treatment of pressure ulcers. The paper also covers the role of nutrition and pressure-release devices such as cushions and mattresses as a part of the treatment algorithm for preventing and quick healing process of these wounds. Pressure ulcers develop primarily from pressure and shear; are progressive in nature and most frequently found in bedridden, chair bound or immobile people. They often develop in people who have been hospitalised for a long time generally for a different problem and increase the overall time as well as cost of hospitalisation that have detrimental effects on patient's quality of life. Loss of sensation compounds the problem manifold, and failure of reactive hyperaemia cycle of the pressure prone area remains the most important aetiopathology. Pressure ulcers are largely preventable in nature, and their management depends on their severity. The available literature about severity of pressure ulcers, their classification and medical care protocols have been described in this paper. The present treatment options include various approaches of cleaning the wound, debridement, optimised dressings, role of antibiotics and reconstructive surgery. The newer treatment options such as negative pressure wound therapy, hyperbaric oxygen therapy, cell therapy have been discussed, and the advantages and disadvantages of current and newer methods have also been described. PMID:25991879

  4. Obesity and pressure ulcers among nursing home residents

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Shubing; Rahman, Momotazur; Intrator, Orna

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To examine the prevalence of obesity and its relationship with pressure ulcers among nursing home (NH) populations, and whether such relationship varies with certified nursing assistant (CNA) level in NHs. Data and study population The 1999–2009 nationwide Minimum Data Sets were linked with Online Survey of Certification and Reporting records. We identified newly admitted NH residents who became long-stayers and followed them up to 1 year. Analyses The outcome variable was presence of pressure ulcers during the 1-year follow-up period. Residents were categorized as normal (18.5<=BMI<30 kg/m2), mild obesity (30 <=BMI <35 kg/m2) and moderate or severe obesity (BMI>=35 kg/m2). Pooled and stratified analyses were performed to examine the relationship between obesity and pressure ulcers, and how it varied by facility CNA level. Results The prevalence of obesity increased from 16.9% to 25.8% among newly admitted NH residents over the last decade. Obesity was associated with higher risks of pressure ulcers among long-stay residents. The relationship between obesity and pressure ulcers persisted after accounting for individual health conditions at the baseline and facility-level variations. Further, the within-facility relationship between obesity and pressure ulcers varied by facility CNA levels. The odds of pressure ulcers were 18.9% higher for residents with moderate or severe obesity than for non-obese residents within NHs with low CNA levels. The percents for medium and high CNA level facilities were 14.0% and 12.8%, respectively. Conclusion To prepare for the growing obesity epidemic in NHs, policies should focus on strategies to improve care provided for obese residents. PMID:23666490

  5. Developing eLearning for pressure ulcer prevention and management.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Rosie; Rodgers, Angela; Welsh, Lynn; McGown, Katrina

    2014-08-12

    The impact of pressure ulcers is psychologically, physically and clinically challenging for both patients and NHS staff. NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde (NHS GGC), in line with the Scottish Best Practice Statement for the Prevention and Management of Pressure Ulcers ( Quality Improvement Scotland, 2009 ), and the NHS Health Improvement Scotland (2011) Preventing Pressure Ulcers Change Package, launched an awareness campaign throughout the organisation in April 2012 and has more recently adopted a 'zero-tolerance' approach to pressure damage. The tissue viability service in NHS GGC recognised that in order to achieve this aim, education of front-line staff is essential. An educational framework for pressure ulcer prevention was developed for all levels of healthcare staff involved in the delivery of patient care. As a means to support the framework, an initiative to develop web-based eLearning modules has been taken forward. This has resulted in the creation of an accessible, cost-effective, stimulating, relevant, and evidence-based education programme designed around the educational needs of all healthcare staff. In conjunction with the organisation's 'top ten tools' for pressure ulcer prevention and management, the modular online education programme addresses the aims of quality improvement and zero tolerance by supporting the provision of safe and effective person-centered care.

  6. [Prevention of pressure ulcers--review of the evidence].

    PubMed

    Jaul, Efraim

    2008-10-01

    Pressure ulcers continue to constitute a health problem for people who are physically limited or bedridden, particularly among the elderly and victims of spinal cord injuries. The problem exists across the entire health framework, including hospitals, clinics, long-term care facilities and homes. The prevention of pressure ulcers is of prime importance, as most of them are preventable by means of a high level of awareness and by implementing preventive measures. These measures must be taken from the moment of admission or immobilization. Such preventive measures can save much suffering and expense to the family and the medical establishment alike. A pressure ulcer may develop in a matter of hours, whereas the cure takes many months, if at all. The complications of pressure ulcers are protean: they may serve as a conduit of pathogens, to prolong hospitalization, and to increase the risk of death. The diminution of the quality of life of the affected patient results from pain, discomfort, unpleasant odors from discharges, isolation and resultant depression. The prevention of pressure ulcers requires the involvement of a number of interventions, most of which have not undergone rigorous prospective randomized controlled studies. Recently, a systematic review has been undertaken to evaluate just such interventions. The preventive interventions that were reviewed include devices to relieve pressure, repositioning, exercise to assist bladder control, nutritional supplementation and moisturizing skin. The resultant recommendations appear in this review article.

  7. Fabric-based Pressure Sensor Array for Decubitus Ulcer Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Philip; Rowe, Allison; Etemadi, Mozziyar; Lee, Hanmin; Roy, Shuvo

    2015-01-01

    Decubitus ulcers occur in an estimated 2.5 million Americans each year at an annual cost of $11 billion to the U.S. health system. Current screening and prevention techniques for assessing risk for decubitus ulcer formation and repositioning patients every 1–2 hours are labor-intensive and can be subjective. We propose use of a Bluetooth-enabled fabric-based pressure sensor array as a simple tool to objectively assess and continuously monitor decubitus ulcer risk. PMID:24111232

  8. Clustering-based limb identification for pressure ulcer risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Baran Pouyan, M; Nourani, M; Pompeo, M

    2015-01-01

    Bedridden patients have a high risk of developing pressure ulcers. Risk assessment for pressure ulceration is critical for preventive care. For a reliable assessment, we need to identify and track the limbs continuously and accurately. In this paper, we propose a method to identify body limbs using a pressure mat. Three prevalent sleep postures (supine, left and right postures) are considered. Then, predefined number of limbs (body parts) are identified by applying Fuzzy C-Means (FCM) clustering on key attributes. We collected data from 10 adult subjects and achieved average accuracy of 93.2% for 10 limbs in supine and 7 limbs in left/right postures.

  9. [Prevention of ulcers by pressure as a universal right].

    PubMed

    Blanco, Jaime Zabala

    2013-02-01

    The title of the article matches the of the "Declaration of Rio de Janeiro on the prevention of ulcers by pressure as a Universal right" [ 1], promoted by numerous groups and associations related to the problematic of ulcers by pressure (UPP) at the international level, and is a decisive step for joint efforts to give visibility to a problem of global dimension. Efforts previously, and in what refers to our country, have been left reflected in statements [2] pressure driven by the National group for study and advice on ulcers and wounds chronicles (GNEAUPP). The Declaration dealt with masterfully what will be our thesis, beyond a clinical problem--that is--the UPP, and specifically its prevention, constitute a problem primarily ethical character and, more specifically, minimum ethics, as we already reflected more widely in another article [3], by what remains essential to influencing this aspect often underestimated.

  10. SAPPIRE: a prototype mobile tool for pressure ulcer risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyeoneui; Chung, Heejoon; Wang, Shuang; Jiang, Xiaoqian; Choi, Jeeyae

    2014-01-01

    Accurate assessment and documentation of skin conditions facilitate communication among care providers and are critical to effective prevention and mitigation of pressure ulcer. We report developing a prototype mobile system called SAPPIRE (Skin Assessment for Pressure Ulcer Prevention, an Integrated Recording Environment) for an android device to assist nurses with skin assessment and documentation at bedside. SAPPIRE demonstrates (1) data documentation conforming to the relevant terminology standards, (2) data exchange using Continuity of Care Records (CCR) standard and (3) smart display of patient data relevant to risk parameters to promote accurate pressure ulcer risk assessment with the Braden scale. Challenges associated standardizing assessment data faced during this development and the approaches that SAPPIRE took to overcome them are described.

  11. Factors related to the prevention and management of pressure ulcers.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ting-Ting; Lin, Kuan-Chia; Mills, Mary Etta; Kuo, Ya-Hui

    2012-09-01

    Pressure ulcers (a type of skin failure) have served as an indicator of care quality. The purpose of this study was to utilize data-mining techniques as a means of identifying risk factors related to different stages of pressure ulcers to demonstrate how this means of analysis might be used as a vehicle to guide improved care quality. Data were obtained from a Web-based incident reporting system at a regional hospital in Taiwan. A total of 4301 cases dating from March 2005 to May 2009 were collected. For data-cleaning purposes, data within 3 SDs were kept for further analysis. Data-mining techniques were applied to identify the predictors, and a logistic regression analysis was used for result comparison purposes. The results revealed that sacral ulcer was the most prevalent, and most ulcers were in stage I, followed by stages II to IV. Five predictors were identified including hemoglobin, weight, sex, height, and use of repositioning sheet. The study concluded that nurses could use data-mining technique to identify predictors to assist in guiding ulcer interventions such as those based on a patient's demographic profile and application of a repositioning sheet to prevent ulcer occurrence to minimize harm.

  12. Designing trials for pressure ulcer risk assessment research: methodological challenges.

    PubMed

    Balzer, K; Köpke, S; Lühmann, D; Haastert, B; Kottner, J; Meyer, G

    2013-08-01

    For decades various pressure ulcer risk assessment scales (PURAS) have been developed and implemented into nursing practice despite uncertainty whether use of these tools helps to prevent pressure ulcers. According to current methodological standards, randomised controlled trials (RCTs) are required to conclusively determine the clinical efficacy and safety of this risk assessment strategy. In these trials, PURAS-aided risk assessment has to be compared to nurses' clinical judgment alone in terms of its impact on pressure ulcer incidence and adverse outcomes. However, RCTs evaluating diagnostic procedures are prone to specific risks of bias and threats to the statistical power which may challenge their validity and feasibility. This discussion paper critically reflects on the rigour and feasibility of experimental research needed to substantiate the clinical efficacy of PURAS-aided risk assessment. Based on reflections of the methodological literature, a critical appraisal of available trials on this subject and an analysis of a protocol developed for a methodologically robust cluster-RCT, this paper arrives at the following conclusions: First, available trials do not provide reliable estimates of the impact of PURAS-aided risk assessment on pressure ulcer incidence compared to nurses' clinical judgement alone due to serious risks of bias and insufficient sample size. Second, it seems infeasible to assess this impact by means of rigorous experimental studies since sample size would become extremely high if likely threats to validity and power are properly taken into account. Third, means of evidence linkages seem to currently be the most promising approaches for evaluating the clinical efficacy and safety of PURAS-aided risk assessment. With this kind of secondary research, the downstream effect of use of PURAS on pressure ulcer incidence could be modelled by combining best available evidence for single parts of this pathway. However, to yield reliable modelling

  13. Transdermal deferoxamine prevents pressure-induced diabetic ulcers.

    PubMed

    Duscher, Dominik; Neofytou, Evgenios; Wong, Victor W; Maan, Zeshaan N; Rennert, Robert C; Inayathullah, Mohammed; Januszyk, Michael; Rodrigues, Melanie; Malkovskiy, Andrey V; Whitmore, Arnetha J; Walmsley, Graham G; Galvez, Michael G; Whittam, Alexander J; Brownlee, Michael; Rajadas, Jayakumar; Gurtner, Geoffrey C

    2015-01-06

    There is a high mortality in patients with diabetes and severe pressure ulcers. For example, chronic pressure sores of the heels often lead to limb loss in diabetic patients. A major factor underlying this is reduced neovascularization caused by impaired activity of the transcription factor hypoxia inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF-1α). In diabetes, HIF-1α function is compromised by a high glucose-induced and reactive oxygen species-mediated modification of its coactivator p300, leading to impaired HIF-1α transactivation. We examined whether local enhancement of HIF-1α activity would improve diabetic wound healing and minimize the severity of diabetic ulcers. To improve HIF-1α activity we designed a transdermal drug delivery system (TDDS) containing the FDA-approved small molecule deferoxamine (DFO), an iron chelator that increases HIF-1α transactivation in diabetes by preventing iron-catalyzed reactive oxygen stress. Applying this TDDS to a pressure-induced ulcer model in diabetic mice, we found that transdermal delivery of DFO significantly improved wound healing. Unexpectedly, prophylactic application of this transdermal delivery system also prevented diabetic ulcer formation. DFO-treated wounds demonstrated increased collagen density, improved neovascularization, and reduction of free radical formation, leading to decreased cell death. These findings suggest that transdermal delivery of DFO provides a targeted means to both prevent ulcer formation and accelerate diabetic wound healing with the potential for rapid clinical translation.

  14. Transdermal deferoxamine prevents pressure-induced diabetic ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Duscher, Dominik; Neofytou, Evgenios; Wong, Victor W.; Maan, Zeshaan N.; Rennert, Robert C.; Januszyk, Michael; Rodrigues, Melanie; Malkovskiy, Andrey V.; Whitmore, Arnetha J.; Galvez, Michael G.; Whittam, Alexander J.; Brownlee, Michael; Rajadas, Jayakumar; Gurtner, Geoffrey C.

    2015-01-01

    There is a high mortality in patients with diabetes and severe pressure ulcers. For example, chronic pressure sores of the heels often lead to limb loss in diabetic patients. A major factor underlying this is reduced neovascularization caused by impaired activity of the transcription factor hypoxia inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF-1α). In diabetes, HIF-1α function is compromised by a high glucose-induced and reactive oxygen species-mediated modification of its coactivator p300, leading to impaired HIF-1α transactivation. We examined whether local enhancement of HIF-1α activity would improve diabetic wound healing and minimize the severity of diabetic ulcers. To improve HIF-1α activity we designed a transdermal drug delivery system (TDDS) containing the FDA-approved small molecule deferoxamine (DFO), an iron chelator that increases HIF-1α transactivation in diabetes by preventing iron-catalyzed reactive oxygen stress. Applying this TDDS to a pressure-induced ulcer model in diabetic mice, we found that transdermal delivery of DFO significantly improved wound healing. Unexpectedly, prophylactic application of this transdermal delivery system also prevented diabetic ulcer formation. DFO-treated wounds demonstrated increased collagen density, improved neovascularization, and reduction of free radical formation, leading to decreased cell death. These findings suggest that transdermal delivery of DFO provides a targeted means to both prevent ulcer formation and accelerate diabetic wound healing with the potential for rapid clinical translation. PMID:25535360

  15. Documentation and record-keeping in pressure ulcer management.

    PubMed

    Chamanga, Edwin; Ward, Renee

    2015-05-06

    National and international guidelines recommend the use of clinical assessments and interventions to prevent pressure-related skin damage. This includes the categorisation of pressure ulcers as avoidable or unavoidable, which is challenging in clinical practice, mainly because of poor documentation and record-keeping for care delivered. Documentation and record-keeping are influenced by the individual's employing organisation, maintenance procedures for documentation and record-keeping, and local auditing processes. A transfer sticker to enable patient assessment and promote pressure ulcer documentation was designed and implemented. The transfer sticker captures the date, time and location of a pressure ulcer preventive risk assessment and the plan of care to be implemented. The increased clarity of record of care achieved by using the transfer sticker has enabled the number of avoidable hospital-acquired pressure ulcers resulting from poor documentation on admission or ward transfers to be reduced. The transfer sticker helps staff identify patients at risk and allows interventions to be implemented in a timely manner.

  16. Pressure ulcer prevention: education for nursing home staff.

    PubMed

    Law, Jaki

    This article describes an education programme for a group of nurses working in several nursing homes located in different areas of the Midlands but each belonging to the same care group. The group's management team had identified that there were patients in the nursing homes who had severe pressure ulcers and that staff were not managing their care adequately in order for healing to occur. It has been identified that 'education is probably the single most effective way of reducing the incidence of pressure ulcers' (Department of Health (DoH), 1993). Although the various nursing homes were able to access the skills of clinical nurse specialists in tissue viability, severe pressure ulcers were failing to heal and nursing home staff requested additional education to help them address this problem. Nurses in the homes expressed a desire to gain a deeper knowledge of the problem, so they would be able to plan and implement appropriate care autonomously and thus raise the standard of pressure ulcer care provided in each home. This article discusses the implementation of a comprehensive education programme that contributed to raising the standards of patient care and to the professional self-worth of the nurses involved.

  17. Acoustic pressure wound therapy in the treatment of stage II pressure ulcers.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Raenell

    2008-11-01

    Pressure ulcers are localized skin injuries secondary to unrelieved pressure or friction. Patients with immobility issues are at increased risk for developing pressure ulcers. In 2004, stricter federal regulations for prevention and treatment of pressure ulcers in institutional settings--eg, long-term care facilities--were introduced. Effective, low-cost treatments for pressure ulcers are needed; acoustic pressure wound therapy (APWT), a noncontact, low-frequency, therapeutic ultrasound system, is one option. A retrospective case series of six long-term care patients (two men and one woman, age range 61 to 92 years), each with one Stage II pressure ulcer, is presented. Acoustic pressure wound therapy was provided as an adjunct to standard treatment that included balsam of Peru/castor oil/trypsin ointment, hydrogel, hydrocolloid dressings, silver dressings, and offloading. Outcomes (days to healing) were determined through changes in wound dimensions. Study participants each received APWT for 3 to 4 minutes three to four times weekly. In four of the six wounds, the average number of days to healing was 22. One of the two remaining patients discontinued treatment at 95% healed; treatment for the sixth patient was ongoing due to hospitalization that delayed APWT. In a long-term care setting, APWT added to standard of care may accelerate healing of Stage II pressure ulcers.

  18. Ulcers

    MedlinePlus

    An ulcer is a crater-like sore on the skin or mucous membrane . Ulcers form when the top layers of skin or ... Ulcers can be caused by inflammation or infection. Some ulcers may be caused by a cancer.

  19. Evidence-based guidelines for pressure ulcer management at the end of life.

    PubMed

    Langemo, Diane; Haesler, Emily; Naylor, Wayne; Tippett, Aletha; Young, Trudie

    2015-05-01

    It is important to develop an individualised plan of care for people at the end of life to prevent pressure ulcers, and to treat them if they do occur. This article discusses patient and risk assessment, prevention and care for pressure ulcers for the palliative care patient and the recommendations given in the palliative care section of the Prevention and Treatment of Pressure Ulcers: Clinical Practice Guideline (National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel, European Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel and Pan Pacific Pressure Injury Alliance, 2014).

  20. Evaluation of the National Database of Nursing Quality Indicators (NDNQI) Training Program on Pressure Ulcers.

    PubMed

    Bergquist-Beringer, Sandra; Davidson, Jan; Agosto, Carolyn; Linde, Norma K; Abel, Marla; Spurling, Kara; Dunton, Nancy; Christopher, Angela

    2009-06-01

    The National Database of Nursing Quality Indicators (NDNQI) Pressure Ulcer Training Program was developed to improve nursing accuracy and reliability in identifying and staging pressure ulcers and differentiating hospital- and unit-acquired from community-acquired pressure ulcers. Of 5,200 individuals who completed the training program within 5 months of release, 937 provided written evaluation comments. Four major themes emerged from content analysis of the evaluation remarks: pressure ulcer and other wound pictures; accuracy and clarity of content; program design and technology; and the educational/informational experience. Reviewers most frequently commented on their positive learning experience. Program components that enhanced the educational experience included the array of pressure ulcer pictures at each stage and pictures of other wounds. Clarity of content, program design, and technological problems were barriers to reviewer satisfaction. Findings suggest the NDNQI Pressure Ulcer Training Program was effective for educating staff nurses on pressure ulcer identification and staging.

  1. Data mining techniques for assisting the diagnosis of pressure ulcer development in surgical patients.

    PubMed

    Su, Chao-Ton; Wang, Pa-Chun; Chen, Yan-Cheng; Chen, Li-Fei

    2012-08-01

    Pressure ulcer is a serious problem during patient care processes. The high risk factors in the development of pressure ulcer remain unclear during long surgery. Moreover, past preventive policies are hard to implement in a busy operation room. The objective of this study is to use data mining techniques to construct the prediction model for pressure ulcers. Four data mining techniques, namely, Mahalanobis Taguchi System (MTS), Support Vector Machines (SVMs), decision tree (DT), and logistic regression (LR), are used to select the important attributes from the data to predict the incidence of pressure ulcers. Measurements of sensitivity, specificity, F(1), and g-means were used to compare the performance of four classifiers on the pressure ulcer data set. The results show that data mining techniques obtain good results in predicting the incidence of pressure ulcer. We can conclude that data mining techniques can help identify the important factors and provide a feasible model to predict pressure ulcer development.

  2. Microcontrolled air-mattress for ulcer by pressure prevention

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasluosta, Cristian F.; Fontana, Juan M.; Beltramone, Diego A.; Taborda, Ricardo A. M.

    2007-11-01

    An ulcer by pressure is produced when a constant pressure is exerted over the skin. This generates the collapse of the blood vessels and, therefore, a lack in the contribution of the necessary nutrients for the affected zone. As a consequence, the skin deteriorates, eventually causing an ulcer. In order to prevent it, a protocol must be applied to the patient, which is reflected on time and cost of treatment. There are some air mattresses available for this purpose, but whose performance does not fulfill all requirements. The prototype designed in our laboratory is based on the principle of the air mattress. Its objective is to improve on existing technologies and, due to an increased automation, reduce time dedication for personnel in charge of the patient. A clinical experience was made in the local Emergencies Hospital and also in an institution dedicated to aged patients care. In both cases, the results obtained and the comments from the personnel involved were favorable.

  3. Topical Metronidazole for Odor Control in Pressure Ulcers.

    PubMed

    Lyvers, Elizabeth; Elliott, David P

    2015-09-01

    There are many remedies that have been recommended for the treatment of foul odor associated with pressure ulcers. This article seeks to review the literature surrounding the use of metronidazole as a safe and effective solution to an oftentimes stubborn and frustrating problem. Other tools used to control odor include bleach-based solutions and charcoal dressings. Metronidazole, with its antianaerobic properties, appears to have a useful role in therapy when applied topically to a pressure ulcer. Commercially available products include 0.75% and 1% creams, gels, lotions, and intravenous solutions. Of the 59 cases viewed throughout several publications, 56 reported nearly complete odor resolution in two to seven days when metronidazole was applied to the wound two or three times daily. Virtually no systemic adverse events have been reported in the literature, despite the risk for systemic absorption. A need remains to monitor for toxicities such as nausea, gastrointestinal distress, and neural toxicities from long-term use.

  4. Pressure ulcer risk of patient handling sling use.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Matthew J; Kahn, Julie A; Kerrigan, Michael V; Gutmann, Joseph M; Harrow, Jeffrey J

    2015-01-01

    Patient handling slings and lifts reduce the risk of musculoskeletal injuries for healthcare providers. However, no published evidence exists of their safety with respect to pressure ulceration for vulnerable populations, specifically persons with spinal cord injury, nor do any studies compare slings for pressure distribution. High-resolution interface pressure mapping was used to describe and quantify risks associated with pressure ulceration due to normal forces and identify at-risk anatomical locations. We evaluated 23 patient handling slings with 4 nondisabled adults. Sling-participant interface pressures were recorded while participants lay supine on a hospital bed and while suspended during typical patient transfers. Sling-participant interface pressures were greatest while suspended for all seated and supine slings and exceeded 200 mm Hg for all seated slings. Interface pressures were greatest along the sling seams (edges), regardless of position or sling type. The anatomical areas most at risk while participants were suspended in seated slings were the posterior upper and lower thighs. For supine slings, the perisacral area, ischial tuberosities, and greater trochanters were most at risk. The duration of time spent in slings, especially while suspended, should be limited.

  5. Assessment of sacrococcygeal pressure ulcers using diffuse correlation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz, David; Lafontant, Alec; Neidrauer, Michael; Weingarten, Michael S.; DiMaria-Ghalili, Rose Ann; Fried, Guy W.; Rece, Julianne; Lewin, Peter A.; Zubkov, Leonid

    2016-03-01

    Microcirculation is essential for proper supply of oxygen and nutritive substances to the biological tissue and the removal of waste products of metabolism. The determination of microcirculatory blood flow (mBF) is therefore of substantial interest to clinicians for assessing tissue health; particularly in pressure ulceration and suspected deep tissue injury. The goal of this pilot clinical study was to assess deep-tissue pressure ulceration by non-invasively measuring mBF using Diffuse Correlation Spectroscopy (DCS). DCS provides information about the flow of red blood cells in the capillary network by measuring the temporal autocorrelation function of scattering light intensity. A novel optical probe was developed in order to obtain measurements under the load of the subject's body as pressure is applied (ischemia) and then released (reperfusion) on sacrococcygeal tissue in a hospital bed. Prior to loading measurements, baseline readings of the sacral region were obtained by measuring the subjects in a side-lying position. DCS measurements from the sacral region of twenty healthy volunteers have been compared to those of two patients who initially had similar non-blanchable redness. The temporal autocorrelation function of scattering light intensity of the patient whose redness later disappeared was similar to that of the average healthy subject. The second patient, whose redness developed into an advanced pressure ulcer two weeks later, had a substantial decrease in blood flow while under the loading position compared to healthy subjects. Preliminary results suggest the developed system may potentially predict whether non-blanchable redness will manifest itself as advanced ulceration or dissipate over time.

  6. The incidence, risk factors and characteristics of pressure ulcers in hospitalized patients in China

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Qixia; Li, Xiaohua; Qu, Xiaolong; Liu, Yun; Zhang, Liyan; Su, Chunyin; Guo, Xiujun; Chen, Yuejuan; Zhu, Yajun; Jia, Jing; Bo, Suping; Liu, Li; Zhang, Rui; Xu, Ling; Wu, Leyan; Wang, Hai; Wang, Jiandong

    2014-01-01

    Pressure ulcers are very common in hospital patients. Though many studies have been reported in many countries, the large-scale benchmarking prevalence of pressure ulcers in China is not available. The aim of this study is to quantify the prevalence of pressure ulcers and the incidence of hospital-acquired pressure ulcers and analyze risk factors in hospitalized patients in China. A multi-central cross-sectional survey was conducted in one university hospital and 11 general hospitals in China. The Minimum Data Set (MDS) recommended by European Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel (EUPAP) was used to collect information of inpatients. All patients stayed in hospital more than 24 hours and older than 18 years signed consent form and were included. Data from 39952 out of 40415 (98.85%) inpatients were analyzed. Of the 39952 patients, 631 patients (including 1024 locations) had pressure ulcers. The prevalence rate of pressure ulcers in 12 hospitals was 1.58% (0.94-2.97%). The incidence of hospital-acquired pressure ulcers (HAPU) was 0.63% (0.20-1.20%). The most common locations developed pressure ulcers were sacrum, heels, and iliac crests. The common stages of pressure ulcers were stage I and II. Patients in Intensive Care Unit, Geriatric and Neurological Department were easier to develop pressure ulcers. The prevalence and incidence of pressure ulcers in China was lower than that reported in European and other countries. The stages of pressure ulcers in China were different than that reported in European countries. Our study provides with a baseline value for intensive research on pressure ulcer in China. PMID:24966973

  7. Pressure ulcer prevention knowledge among Jordanian nurses: a cross- sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Pressure ulcer remains a significant problem in the healthcare system. In addition to the suffering it causes patients, it bears a growing financial burden. Although pressure ulcer prevention and care have improved in recent years, pressure ulcer still exists and occurs in both hospital and community settings. In Jordan, there are a handful of studies on pressure ulcer. This study aims to explore levels of knowledge and knowledge sources about pressure ulcer prevention, as well as barriers to implementing pressure ulcer prevention guidelines among Jordanian nurses. Methods Using a cross-sectional study design and a self-administered questionnaire, data was collected from 194 baccalaureate and master’s level staff nurses working in eight Jordanian hospitals. From September to October of 2011, their knowledge levels about pressure ulcer prevention and the sources of this knowledge were assessed, along with the barriers which reduce successful pressure ulcer care and prevention. ANOVA and t-test analysis were used to test the differences in nurses’ knowledge according to participants’ characteristics. Means, standard deviation, and frequencies were used to describe nurses’ knowledge levels, knowledge sources, and barriers to pressure ulcer prevention. Results The majority (73%, n = 141) of nurses had inadequate knowledge about pressure ulcer prevention. The mean scores of the test for all participants was 10.84 out of 26 (SD = 2.3, range = 5–17), with the lowest score in themes related to PU etiology, preventive measures to reduce amount of pressure/shear, and risk assessment. In-service training was the second source of education on pressure ulcer, coming after university training. Shortage of staff and lack of time were the most frequently cited barriers to carrying out pressure ulcer risk assessment, documentation, and prevention. Conclusions This study highlights concerns about Jordanian nurses’ knowledge of pressure ulcer prevention. The

  8. Patient repositioning and pressure ulcer risk--monitoring interface pressures of at-risk patients.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Matthew J; Gravenstein, Nikolaus; Schwab, Wilhelm K; van Oostrom, Johannes H; Caruso, Lawrence J

    2013-01-01

    Repositioning patients regularly to prevent pressure ulcers and reduce interface pressures is the standard of care, yet prior work has found that standard repositioning does not relieve all areas of at-risk tissue in nondisabled subjects. To determine whether this holds true for high-risk patients, we assessed the effectiveness of routine repositioning in relieving at-risk tissue of the perisacral area using interface pressure mapping. Bedridden patients at risk for pressure ulcer formation (n = 23, Braden score <18) had their perisacral skin-bed interface pressures recorded every 30 s while they received routine repositioning care for 4-6 h. All participants had specific skin areas (206 +/- 182 cm(2)) that exceeded elevated pressure thresholds for >95% of the observation period. Thirteen participants were observed in three distinct positions (supine, turned left, turned right), and all had specific skin areas (166 +/- 184 cm(2)) that exceeded pressure thresholds for >95% of the observation period. At-risk patients have skin areas that are likely always at risk throughout their hospital stay despite repositioning. Healthcare providers are unaware of the actual tissue-relieving effectiveness (or lack thereof) of their repositioning interventions, which may partially explain why pressure ulcer mitigation strategies are not always successful. Relieving at-risk tissue is a necessary part of pressure ulcer prevention, but the repositioning practice itself needs improvement.

  9. Reswick and Rogers pressure-time curve for pressure ulcer risk. Part 2.

    PubMed

    Gefen, A

    In part one of this article, the concepts of an injury threshold were explained and it was shown that the Reswick and Rogers pressure-time curve is inaccurate at the extremes of the timescale. It was also shown that their curve cannot be used for studying deep tissue injuries, and that it is likely to be irrelevant for studying most pressure ulcers. The second part of this article describes recent research work focusing on tissue injury thresholds as related to pressure ulcers, with particular emphasis on thresholds that are specific for deep tissue injuries. Clinical implications are also discussed, with particular reference to patients who are obese and those with muscle atrophy.

  10. [Assessment of pain in a patient with pressure ulcer].

    PubMed

    Píriz-Campos, Rosa María; Martín-Espinosa, Noelia María; Cobo-Cuenca, Ana Isabel

    2010-01-01

    This is a summary of a presentation made in the symposium "Improved Continuous Quality Care in Patients with Pressure Ulcers and Chronic Injuries", which was held in Toledo in 2009. A 76 year old woman had been assessed (she belonged to the age group that frequently suffers this condition). She lived in a social healthcare centre and had a III stage sacral pressure ulcer. Using Gordon's Functional Health Patterns for assessing "Acute pain", a nursing diagnosis is described and the nursing care plan has been presented according to NANDA, NIC, NOC taxonomy. The aim of this article is to show the importance of considering the pain in patients who suffer from this type of lesion, which, although almost always present, it is often undervalued by nursing staff, resulting in an even worse quality of life for the patient, due to both physical and psychological effects. This case shows how to assess pain in a patient with ulcers, and helps establish an individualised care plan with a priority on pain treatment and relief. As as result of the interventions carried out, a better perception of pain is achieved, thus helping to improve patient's mobility and night rest.

  11. Prevalence and risk of pressure ulcers in acute care following implementation of practice guidelines: annual pressure ulcer prevalence census 1994-2008.

    PubMed

    VanDenKerkhof, Elizabeth G; Friedberg, Elaine; Harrison, Margaret B

    2011-09-01

    Hospital-acquired pressure ulcers in the United States were estimated to cost US$2.2 to US$3.6 billion per year in 1999. In the early 1990s clinical practice guidelines for the prevention and treatment of pressure ulcers were introduced. The purpose of this study was to examine the epidemiology of pressure ulcers in acute care in Canada. The current study is based on 12,787 individuals who were inpatients during a 1-day annual census conducted in an acute care facility in Ontario between 1994 and 2008. The prevalence and incidence of pressure ulcer decreased slightly over time while the risk of pressure ulcer increased. The coccyx sacrum (~27%), heel (13%), ankle (~12%), and ischial tubersosity (~10%) were the most common ulcer sites. The implementation of clinical practice guidelines appears to have improved the quality of patient care, as demonstrated by increasing pressure ulcer risk while the prevalence and incidence of pressure ulcers has remained somewhat constant. From a policy perspective the importance of monitoring and tracking the risk and occurrence of this adverse event provides a general indicator of care, considering the many organizational aspects that may ameliorate risk.

  12. Pressure ulcers in palliative ward patients: hyponatremia and low blood pressure as indicators of risk

    PubMed Central

    Sternal, Danuta; Wilczyński, Krzysztof; Szewieczek, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Background Prevention strategies for pressure ulcer formation remain critical in patients with an advanced illness. We analyzed factors associated with the development of pressure ulcers in patients hospitalized in a palliative care ward setting. Patients and methods This study was a retrospective analysis of 329 consecutive patients with a mean age (± standard deviation) of 70.4±11.8 years (range: 30–96 years, median 70.0 years; 55.3% women), who were admitted to the Palliative Care Department between July 2012 and May 2014. Results Patients were hospitalized for mean of 24.8±31.4 days (1–310 days, median 14 days). A total of 256 patients (77.8%) died in the ward and 73 patients (22.2%) were discharged. Two hundred and six patients (62.6%) did not develop pressure ulcers during their stay in the ward, 84 patients (25.5%) were admitted with pressure ulcers, and 39 patients (11.9%) developed pressure ulcers in the ward. Four factors assessed at admission appear to predict the development of pressure ulcers in the multivariate logistic regression model: Waterlow score (odds ratio [OR] =1.140, 95% confidence interval [CI] =1.057–1.229, P=0.001), transfer from other hospital wards (OR =2.938, 95% CI =1.339–6.448, P=0.007), hemoglobin level (OR =0.814, 95% CI =0.693–0.956, P=0.012), and systolic blood pressure (OR =0.976, 95% CI =0.955–0.997, P=0.023). Five other factors assessed during hospitalization appear to be associated with pressure ulcer development: mean evening body temperature (OR =3.830, 95% CI =1.729–8.486, P=0.001), mean Waterlow score (OR =1.194, 95% CI =1.092–1.306, P<0.001), the lowest recorded sodium concentration (OR =0.880, 95% CI =0.814–0.951, P=0.001), mean systolic blood pressure (OR =0.956, 95% CI =0.929–0.984, P=0.003), and the lowest recorded hemoglobin level (OR =0.803, 95% CI =0.672–0.960, P=0.016). Conclusion Hyponatremia and low blood pressure may contribute to the formation of pressure ulcers in patients with an

  13. Ulcers

    MedlinePlus

    ... give me an ulcer!" "There's been so much stress at work lately, I'm sure I'll get an ulcer." "Don't worry so much. Do you want an ulcer?" When people talk like this, it sounds like ulcers are easy to give and easy to get. It also sounds like stress is to blame. But is that the real ...

  14. Mobile health platform for pressure ulcer monitoring with electronic health record integration.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Joel J P C; Pedro, Luís M C C; Vardasca, Tomé; de la Torre-Díez, Isabel; Martins, Henrique M G

    2013-12-01

    Pressure ulcers frequently occur in patients with limited mobility, for example, people with advanced age and patients wearing casts or prostheses. Mobile information communication technologies can help implement ulcer care protocols and the monitoring of patients with high risk, thus preventing or improving these conditions. This article presents a mobile pressure ulcer monitoring platform (mULCER), which helps control a patient's ulcer status during all stages of treatment. Beside its stand-alone version, it can be integrated with electronic health record systems as mULCER synchronizes ulcer data with any electronic health record system using HL7 standards. It serves as a tool to integrate nursing care among hospital departments and institutions. mULCER was experimented with in different mobile devices such as LG Optimus One P500, Samsung Galaxy Tab, HTC Magic, Samsung Galaxy S, and Samsung Galaxy i5700, taking into account the user's experience of different screen sizes and processing characteristics.

  15. Traditional classroom education versus computer-based learning: how nurses learn about pressure ulcers.

    PubMed

    Esche, Carol Ann; Warren, Joan I; Woods, Anne B; Jesada, Elizabeth C; Iliuta, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    The goal of the Nurse Professional Development specialist is to utilize the most effective educational strategies when educating staff nurses about pressure ulcer prevention. More information is needed about the effect of computer-based learning and traditional classroom learning on pressure ulcer education for the staff nurse. This study compares computer-based learning and traditional classroom learning on immediate and long-term knowledge while evaluating the impact of education on pressure ulcer risk assessment, staging, and documentation.

  16. Civil claims relating to pressure ulcers: a claimants' lawyer's perspective.

    PubMed

    Soloway, D N

    1998-02-01

    This article addresses attorneys' evolving views of civil claims against nursing homes, hospitals, nurses and doctors relating to pressure ulcers. The author describes measures that healthcare professionals may take to avoid becoming subject to claims, such as properly documenting assessments of patient risks and documenting consistent and appropriate care. Several issues of ethical consideration for nurses are presented relating to the role of nurses as patient advocates, including the issue of under what circumstances may or should a nurse recommend that a patient confer with an attorney. The article describes some common misconceptions about nursing and medical malpractice claims, and identifies ways that some proposed tort reforms appear borne of unsubstantiated fears.

  17. Are There Racial-Ethnic Disparities in Time to Pressure Ulcer Development and Pressure Ulcer Treatment in Older Adults After Nursing Home Admission?

    PubMed Central

    Bliss, Donna Z.; Gurvich, Olga; Savik, Kay; Eberly, Lynn E.; Harms, Susan; Mueller, Christine; Wyman, Jean F.; Garrard, Judith; Virnig, Beth

    2017-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to assess whether there are racial and ethnic disparities in the time to development of a pressure ulcer and number of pressure ulcer treatments in individuals aged 65 and older after nursing home admission. Method Multi-level predictors of time to a pressure ulcer from three national surveys were analyzed using Cox proportional hazards regression for White Non-Hispanic residents. Using the Peters–Belson method to assess for disparities, estimates from the regression models were applied to American Indians/Alaskan Natives, Asians/ Pacific Islanders, Blacks, and Hispanics separately resulting in estimates of expected outcomes as if they were White Non-Hispanic, and were then compared with their observed outcomes. Results More Blacks developed pressure ulcers sooner than expected. No disparities in time to a pressure ulcer disadvantaging other racial/ethnic groups were found. There were no disparities in pressure ulcer treatment for any group. Discussion Reducing disparities in pressure ulcer development offers a strategy to improve the quality of nursing home care. PMID:25260648

  18. [Evaluation of pressure ulcers area using the softwares Motic and AutoCAD®].

    PubMed

    Reis, Camila Letícia Dias dos; Cavalcante, Janaína Mortosa; Rocha Júnior, Edvar Ferreira da; Neves, Rinaldo Souza; Santana, Levy Aniceto; Guadagnin, Renato da Veiga; Brasil, Lourdes Mattos

    2012-01-01

    Pressure ulcer is a lesion that affects skin layers in some regions of the body and its healing can be followed up using image processing. The analysis of pressure ulcer area is relevant to evaluate its evolution and response to therapeutic procedures. Such areas can be evaluated through contour marking with the softwares Motic and AutoCAD®. In this study 35 volunteers computed areas from two grade III pressure ulcers using these instruments. It was possible to conclude that results are clinically equivalent and so can be considered to follow up healing evolution from pressure ulcers.

  19. Pressure Relief Behaviors and Weight-Shifting Activities to Prevent Pressure Ulcers in Persons with SCI

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    just be reasonable) 20 Upright Sitting upright in the chair without leaning. 60 Beach ball volleyball Bounce the beach ball back and forth...ulcer etiology has demonstrated that the damaging effects of pressure are related to both its magnitude and duration. Based upon this and related...demonstrated that the damaging effects of pressure are related to both its magnitude and duration. Based upon this and related work, clinical

  20. Lifestyle Changes and Pressure Ulcer Prevention in Adults With Spinal Cord Injury in the Pressure Ulcer Prevention Study Lifestyle Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Ghaisas, Samruddhi; Pyatak, Elizabeth A.; Blanche, Erna; Clark, Florence

    2015-01-01

    Pressure ulcers (PrUs) are a major burden to patients with spinal cord injury (SCI), affecting their psychological, physical, and social well-being. Lifestyle choices are thought to contribute to the risk of developing PrUs. This article focuses on the interaction between lifestyle choices and the development of PrUs in community settings among participants in the University of Southern California–Rancho Los Amigos National Rehabilitation Center Pressure Ulcer Prevention Study (PUPS II), a randomized controlled trial of a lifestyle intervention for adults with SCI. We conducted a secondary cross-case analysis of treatment notes of 47 PUPS II participants and identified four patterns relating PrU development to lifestyle changes: positive PrU changes (e.g., healing PrUs) with positive lifestyle changes, negative or no PrU changes with positive lifestyle changes, positive PrU changes with minor lifestyle changes, and negative or no PrU changes with no lifestyle changes. We present case studies exemplifying each pattern. PMID:25553751

  1. Pressure Ulcers in Adults: Prediction and Prevention. Clinical Practice Guideline Number 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agency for Health Care Policy and Research (DHHS/PHS), Rockville, MD.

    This package includes a clinical practice guideline, quick reference guide for clinicians, and patient's guide to predicting and preventing pressure ulcers in adults. The clinical practice guideline includes the following: overview of the incidence and prevalence of pressure ulcers; clinical practice guideline (introduction, risk assessment tools…

  2. Prevention Practice Differences Among Persons With Spinal Cord Injuries Who Rarely Versus Frequently Sustain Pressure Ulcers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Michael L.; Marini, Irmo; Slate, John R.

    2005-01-01

    Pressure ulcers are common among people with spinal cord injury (SCI) and not only are costly to treat but also affect the quality of life of those affected by them. Despite a plethora of literature on prevention, there are few wellness studies focusing on the practices of people who do not develop pressure ulcers. This preliminary study sought to…

  3. Frequent manual repositioning and incidence of pressure ulcers among bed-bound elderly hip fracture patients.

    PubMed

    Rich, Shayna E; Margolis, David; Shardell, Michelle; Hawkes, William G; Miller, Ram R; Amr, Sania; Baumgarten, Mona

    2011-01-01

    Frequent manual repositioning is an established part of pressure ulcer prevention, but there is little evidence for its effectiveness. This study examined the association between repositioning and pressure ulcer incidence among bed-bound elderly hip fracture patients, using data from a 2004-2007 cohort study in nine Maryland and Pennsylvania hospitals. Eligible patients (n=269) were age ≥ 65 years, underwent hip fracture surgery, and were bed-bound at index study visits (during the first 5 days of hospitalization). Information about repositioning on the days of index visits was collected from patient charts; study nurses assessed presence of stage 2+ pressure ulcers 2 days later. The association between frequent manual repositioning and pressure ulcer incidence was estimated, adjusting for pressure ulcer risk factors using generalized estimating equations and weighted estimating equations. Patients were frequently repositioned (at least every 2 hours) on only 53% (187/354) of index visit days. New pressure ulcers developed at 12% of visits following frequent repositioning vs. 10% following less frequent repositioning; the incidence rate of pressure ulcers per person-day did not differ between the two groups (incidence rate ratio 1.1, 95% confidence interval 0.5-2.4). No association was found between frequent repositioning of bed-bound patients and lower pressure ulcer incidence, calling into question the allocation of resources for repositioning.

  4. Building a Biopsychosocial Conceptual Framework to Explore Pressure Ulcer Pain for Hospitalized Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Junglyun; Ahn, Hyochol; Lyon, Debra E.; Stechmiller, Joyce

    2016-01-01

    Although pressure ulcers are a prevalent condition, pain associated with pressure ulcers is not fully understood. Indeed, previous studies do not shed light on the association between pressure ulcer stages and the experience of pain. Especially, pain characteristics of suspected deep tissue injury, which is a new category that was recently added by the National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel, are yet unknown. This is concerning because the incidence of pressure ulcers in hospitalized patients has increased exponentially over the last two decades, and health care providers are struggling to ensure providing adequate care. Thus, in order to facilitate the development of effective interventions, this paper presents a conceptual framework to explore pressure ulcer pain in hospitalized patients. The concepts were derived from a biopsychosocial model of pain, and the relationships among each concept were identified through a literature review. Major propositions are presented based on the proposed conceptual framework, which integrates previous research on pressure ulcer pain, to ultimately improve understanding of pain in hospitalized patients with pressure ulcers. PMID:27417595

  5. Building a Biopsychosocial Conceptual Framework to Explore Pressure Ulcer Pain for Hospitalized Patients.

    PubMed

    Kim, Junglyun; Ahn, Hyochol; Lyon, Debra E; Stechmiller, Joyce

    2016-01-08

    Although pressure ulcers are a prevalent condition, pain associated with pressure ulcers is not fully understood. Indeed, previous studies do not shed light on the association between pressure ulcer stages and the experience of pain. Especially, pain characteristics of suspected deep tissue injury, which is a new category that was recently added by the National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel, are yet unknown. This is concerning because the incidence of pressure ulcers in hospitalized patients has increased exponentially over the last two decades, and health care providers are struggling to ensure providing adequate care. Thus, in order to facilitate the development of effective interventions, this paper presents a conceptual framework to explore pressure ulcer pain in hospitalized patients. The concepts were derived from a biopsychosocial model of pain, and the relationships among each concept were identified through a literature review. Major propositions are presented based on the proposed conceptual framework, which integrates previous research on pressure ulcer pain, to ultimately improve understanding of pain in hospitalized patients with pressure ulcers.

  6. SCI Survey to Determine Pressure Ulcer Vulnerability in the Outpatient Population

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-01

    2009. Patients with or without pressure ulcers were included. Patients with SCI due to terminal disease, multiple sclerosis of amyotrophic lateral ... sclerosis were excluded. A data extraction tool was used to compile information known to impact the development of pressure ulcers in persons with

  7. The pressure is on: midwives and decubitus ulcers.

    PubMed

    Prior, Jenny

    2002-05-01

    Research regarding pressure area care and management in nursing extends back many years, but remains relevant and cited today. With relevant knowledge, midwives can help prevent the development of pressure sores in the maternity setting. Clinical governance and risk management should ensure that the incidence and occurrence of pressure sores in the midwifery arena is reported and fed into appropriate audit analysis at local, regional and national levels. Midwives need to seriously consider the implications of modern midwifery care and management in relation to the development of pressure sores in our population. Labour suite, high dependency, ward and community areas should include guidelines for the prevention, treatment and management of pressure sores, including mattress policies. Prophylactic measures and assessment scores could be incorporated into partogram documentation in the labour suite and as part of postoperative documentation in the ward environment for women who have undergone caesarean section. Trusts may find that a link midwife liasing with tissue viability nurses proves beneficial. Community midwives should forge links with the district nursing services in their Primary Care Trust areas with regard to developing or adapting tools. Knowledge of pathophysiology, prophylaxis and subsequent management of decubitus ulcers in maternity care is sadly lacking in midwifery textbooks. Future authors and editors should include this subject and it should feature more prominently in midwifery education curricula. It is clear that there is much work to be done in this area, both educationally and clinically. Further research is required to evaluate pressure prevention strategies in the midwifery arena, including the increasing provision of one-to-one care in labour suite units. Improvements in the appropriate prevention and subsequent treatment and management of pressure sores will benefit women and help save the NHS hundreds of thousands of pounds in treatment

  8. Hybrid equation/agent-based model of ischemia-induced hyperemia and pressure ulcer formation predicts greater propensity to ulcerate in subjects with spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Solovyev, Alexey; Mi, Qi; Tzen, Yi-Ting; Brienza, David; Vodovotz, Yoram

    2013-01-01

    Pressure ulcers are costly and life-threatening complications for people with spinal cord injury (SCI). People with SCI also exhibit differential blood flow properties in non-ulcerated skin. We hypothesized that a computer simulation of the pressure ulcer formation process, informed by data regarding skin blood flow and reactive hyperemia in response to pressure, could provide insights into the pathogenesis and effective treatment of post-SCI pressure ulcers. Agent-Based Models (ABM) are useful in settings such as pressure ulcers, in which spatial realism is important. Ordinary Differential Equation-based (ODE) models are useful when modeling physiological phenomena such as reactive hyperemia. Accordingly, we constructed a hybrid model that combines ODEs related to blood flow along with an ABM of skin injury, inflammation, and ulcer formation. The relationship between pressure and the course of ulcer formation, as well as several other important characteristic patterns of pressure ulcer formation, was demonstrated in this model. The ODE portion of this model was calibrated to data related to blood flow following experimental pressure responses in non-injured human subjects or to data from people with SCI. This model predicted a higher propensity to form ulcers in response to pressure in people with SCI vs. non-injured control subjects, and thus may serve as novel diagnostic platform for post-SCI ulcer formation.

  9. Predictive Validity of Pressure Ulcer Risk Assessment Tools for Elderly: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Park, Seong-Hi; Lee, Young-Shin; Kwon, Young-Mi

    2016-04-01

    Preventing pressure ulcers is one of the most challenging goals existing for today's health care provider. Currently used tools which assess risk of pressure ulcer development rarely evaluate the accuracy of predictability, especially in older adults. The current study aimed at providing a systemic review and meta-analysis of 29 studies using three pressure ulcer risk assessment tools: Braden, Norton, and Waterlow Scales. Overall predictive validities of pressure ulcer risks in the pooled sensitivity and specificity indicated a similar range with a moderate accuracy level in all three scales, while heterogeneity showed more than 80% variability among studies. The studies applying the Braden Scale used five different cut-off points representing the primary cause of heterogeneity. Results indicate that commonly used screening tools for pressure ulcer risk have limitations regarding validity and accuracy for use with older adults due to heterogeneity among studies.

  10. Electronic SSKIN pathway: reducing device-related pressure ulcers.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Natalie

    2016-08-11

    This article describes how an interprofessional project in a London NHS Foundation Trust was undertaken to develop an intranet-based medical device-related pressure ulcer prevention and management pathway for clinical staff working across an adult critical care directorate, where life-threatening events require interventions using medical devices. The aim of this project was to improve working policies and processes to define key prevention strategies and provide clinicians with a clear, standardised approach to risk and skin assessment, equipment use, documentation and reporting clinical data using the Trust's CareVue (electronic medical records), Datix (incident reporting and risk-management tool) and eTRACE (online clinical protocol ordering) systems. The process included the development, trial and local implementation of the pathway using collaborative teamwork and the SSKIN care bundle tool. The experience of identifying issues, overcoming challenges, defining best practice and cascading SSKIN awareness training is shared.

  11. Effects of a comprehensive nutritional program on pressure ulcer healing, length of hospital stay, and charges to patients.

    PubMed

    Allen, Beverlin

    2013-05-01

    The burden of pressure ulcers will intensify because of a rapidly increasing elderly population. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of a comprehensive, interdisciplinary nutritional protocol on pressure ulcer wound healing, length of hospital stays, and charges for pressure ulcer management. The pre/post quasi-experimental design study comprised of 100 patients (50 patients in each group) 60 years or older with pressure ulcer. Research questions were analyzed using descriptive statistics, frequencies, chi-square tests, and t tests. Study findings indicate that the intervention was effective in improving pressure ulcer wound healing, decreasing both hospital length of stay (LOS) for treatment of pressure ulcer and total hospital LOS, while showing no significant additional charges for treatment of pressure ulcers. The older adults are at the highest risk of developing pressure ulcers that result in prolonged hospitalization, high health care costs, increased mortality, and decreased quality of life.

  12. Reswick and Rogers pressure-time curve for pressure ulcer risk. Part 1.

    PubMed

    Gefen, Amit

    Pressure ulcers are one of the most potentially devastating complications in individuals confined to a bed or a wheelchair for an extended period. Severe pressure ulcers may form in deep tissues overlying bony prominences, and only at a later stage become visible, or may even induce a full-thickness breakdown of the soft tissues at the affected site. A new type of pressure ulcer known as'deep tissue injury' has therefore been defined internationally. To understand the aetiology of deep tissue injury, health professionals should be able to predict whether or not a certain state of internal mechanical loads in deep tissues, such as tissue deformations and forces per unit area of tissue, would lead to localised irreversible cell damage. Part one of this article explains the concepts of injury thresholds as related to deep tissue injury. Some serious flaws in the classical, commonly used Reswick and Rogers pressure-time curve are analysed, and an alternative contemporary tissue injury threshold, the sigmoid threshold, is suggested. Part two of this article describes recent and ongoing work aimed at defining injury thresholds that are specific for deep tissue injury, standardised and therefore suitable for use with different patients. Clinical implications of current injury thresholds are also discussed, in relation to obese patients and patients with muscle atrophy.

  13. Pressure Ulcer Prevention in the Hospital Setting Using Silicone Foam Dressings

    PubMed Central

    Grigson, Eileen; Patel, Maulik; Liu, Xinwei

    2016-01-01

    Patient care is of the utmost importance in the hospital setting. Bedrest and immobility during hospitalization, especially in the surgical and intensive care setting, place the patient at high risk for pressure ulcers. It is very important to prevent or notice a pressure ulcer forming due to the significant health care costs involved and patient health associated with them. Various measures are in place to prevent patients from getting pressure ulcers, but a newer material, silicone foam dressings, has been introduced as an alternative solution for the prevention of these ulcers. We review the current literature to examine whether the standard protocol or silicone material is superior to the prevention of pressure ulcer formation. We conclude that silicone foam dressings, when used as prophylactic treatment, seems very promising and may even be superior to the standard care of prevention. However, there were limitations to some studies and further research is needed to confirm the role of silicone foam dressings. PMID:27630803

  14. Pressure ulcers in the intensive care unit: the relationship between nursing workload, illness severity and pressure ulcer risk.

    PubMed

    Cremasco, Mariana F; Wenzel, Fernanda; Zanei, Suely S V; Whitaker, Iveth Y

    2013-08-01

    Aims and objective.  To verify association between PU development with nursing workload and illness severity and to verify whether nursing workload and illness severity are related with Braden Scale scores. Background.  Critically ill patients are more susceptible to treatment complications because of the severity of their clinical condition. Design.  Prospective descriptive study. Methods.  Patients consecutively admitted to three intensive care units (ICUs) of a public university hospital located in Sao Paulo, Brazil and without pressure ulcer (PU) at admission and a minimum stay of 24 hours were included in the sample. Prospective data collection included demographic, clinical and hospitalisation data, Nursing Activities Score (NAS), Simplified Acute Physiology Score (SAPSII) and Braden Scale. Multivariate linear regression analysis was applied to verify whether nursing workload and illness severity are related with Braden Scale scores. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to verify whether nursing workload and illness severity were risk factors associated with PU development. Results.  The study sample included 160 patients. The mean Braden score was 12·0 and PU incidence was 34·4%. Multivariate linear regression analysis identified as factors related to variation of Braden scores: illness severity (SAPSII), nursing workload (NAS) and age. Multivariate logistic regression showed a model with risk factors associated with PU development: sex, length of ICU stay, illness severity and nursing workload. Conclusion.  Nursing workload, severity of illness, sex and length of ICU stay were identified as risk factors associated with PU development. However, nursing workload acted as a protective factor. Illness severity, nursing workload and age were related to Braden scores. Relevance to clinical practice.  Accurate identification of risk factors and the use of clinical judgment in skin assessment are prerequisites for determining

  15. Pressure ulcers among terminally ill nursing home residents.

    PubMed

    Kayser-Jones, Jeanie; Kris, Alison E; Lim, Kyung-Choon; Walent, Ronald J; Halifax, Elizabeth; Paul, Steven M

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this prospective, anthropological study was to describe and analyze the experiences and care of terminally ill nursing home residents who were admitted with or acquired pressure ulcers (PUs) after admission. Data were collected in two proprietary nursing homes. Participant observation, in-depth interviews, event analysis, and chart review were used to obtain data. A total of 64 (54.7%) of the 117 terminally ill residents in the study had PUs; 52 (81.3%) of whom died with PUs. The findings disclosed that the absence of family advocacy, inability to speak English, and inadequate staffing and lack of supervision, along with other previously reported risk factors, contributed to the development of PUs. Specifically, inadequate staffing and lack of supervision led to inadequate assistance at mealtime, infrequent repositioning, and inadequate continence care, which in turn led to weight loss, unrelieved pressure on bony prominences, and moist, irritated skin. The outcome was a high rate of residents dying with PUs. Knowledge of and attention to these risk factors can guide nurses in the prevention and management of PUs.

  16. Pressure Ulcers in the Hospitalized Neonate: Rates and Risk Factors

    PubMed Central

    Visscher, Marty; Taylor, Teresa

    2014-01-01

    Pressure ulcers (PU) are serious, reportable events causing pain, infection and prolonged hospitalization, particularly among critically ill patients. The literature on PUs in neonates is limited. The objective was to determine the etiology, severity and influence of gestational age on PUs among hospitalized infants. A two-year prospective study was conducted among 741 neonatal intensive care patients over 31,643 patient-days. Risk factors were determined by comparing the characteristics of infants who developed PUs with those who did not. There were 1.5 PUs per 1000 patient days with 1.0 PU per 1000 days in premature infants and 2.7 per 1000 days in term infants. The number of PUs associated with devices was nearly 80% overall and over 90% in premature infants. Infants with PUs had longer hospitalizations and weighed more than those who did not. Infants with device-related PUs were younger, of lower gestational age and developed the PU earlier than patients with PUs due to conventional pressure. The time to PU development was longer in prematurely born versus term infants. Hospitalized neonates are susceptible to device-related injury and the rate of stage II injury is high. Strategies for early detection and mitigation of device-related injury are essential to prevent PUs. PMID:25502955

  17. The Healing Effect of Low-Temperature Atmospheric-Pressure Plasma in Pressure Ulcer: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Chuangsuwanich, Apirag; Assadamongkol, Tananchai; Boonyawan, Dheerawan

    2016-08-31

    Pressure ulcers are difficult to treat. Recent reports of low-temperature atmospheric-pressure plasma (LTAPP) indicated its safe and effectiveness in chronic wound care management. It has been shown both in vitro and vivo studies that LTAPP not only helps facilitate wound healing but also has antimicrobial efficacy due to its composition of ion and electron, free radicals, and ultraviolet ray. We studied the beneficial effect of LTAPP specifically on pressure ulcers. In a prospective randomized study, 50 patients with pressure ulcers were divided into 2 groups: Control group received standard wound care and the study group was treated with LTAPP once every week for 8 consecutive weeks in addition to standard wound care. We found that the group treated with LTAPP had significantly better PUSH (Pressure Ulcer Scale for Healing) scores and exudate amount after 1 week of treatment. There was also a reduction in bacterial load after 1 treatment regardless of the species of bacteria identified.

  18. Implementation of pressure ulcer prevention best practice recommendations in acute care: an observational study.

    PubMed

    Barker, Anna Lucia; Kamar, Jeannette; Tyndall, Tamara Jane; White, Lyn; Hutchinson, Anastasia; Klopfer, Nicole; Weller, Carolina

    2013-06-01

    Pressure ulcers are a common but preventable problem in hospitals. Implementation of best practice guideline recommendations can prevent ulcers from occurring. This 9-year cohort study reports prevalence data from point prevalence surveys during the observation period, and three practice metrics to assess implementation of best practice guideline recommendations: (i) nurse compliance with use of a validated pressure ulcer risk assessment and intervention checklist; (ii) accuracy of risk assessment scoring in usual-care nurses and experienced injury prevention nurses; and (iii) use of pressure ulcer prevention strategies. The prevalence of hospital-acquired pressure ulcers decreased following implementation of an evidence-based prevention programme from 12·6% (2 years preprogramme implementation) to 2·6% (6 years postprogramme implementation) (P < 0·001). Audits between 2003 and 2011 of 4368 patient medical records identified compliance with pressure ulcer prevention documentation according to best practice guidelines was high (>84%). A sample of 270 patients formed the sample for the study of risk assessment scoring accuracy and use of prevention strategies. It was found usual-care nurses under-estimated patients' risk of pressure ulcer development and under-utilised prevention strategies compared with experienced injury prevention nurses. Despite a significant reduction in prevalence of hospital-acquired pressure ulcers and high documentation compliance, use of prevention strategies could further be improved to achieve better patient outcomes. Barriers to the use of prevention strategies by nurses in the acute hospital setting require further examination. This study provides important insights into the knowledge translation of pressure ulcer prevention best practice guideline recommendations at The Northern Hospital.

  19. On the potential of ultrasound elastography for pressure ulcer early detection

    PubMed Central

    Deprez, Jean-François; Brusseau, Elisabeth; Fromageau, Jérémie; Cloutier, Guy; Basset, Olivier

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Pressure ulcers are areas of soft tissue breakdown induced by a sustained mechanical stress that damages the skin and underlying tissues. They represent a considerable burden to the society in terms of health care and cost. Yet, techniques for prevention and detection of pressure ulcers still remain very limited. In this article, the authors investigated the potential of ultrasound elastography for pressure ulcer early detection. Elastography is an imaging technique providing local information on biological tissue mechanical properties. It is relevant for pressure ulcer detection as this pathology is associated with a gradual stiffening of damaged tissues, beginning in the deeper tissues and progressing toward the skin surface. Methods A 2D ultrasound elastography method was proposed and its ability in terms of pressure ulcer detection was validated through numerical simulations and physical acquisitions on pressure ulcer mimicking phantoms. In vivo experiments on a rat model are also reported. A maintained pressure was applied on the animal thigh, with a view to generate a pressure ulcer, and ultrasound data were acquired and processed before and after application of this pressure. Results Numerical simulations demonstrated that a pressure ulcer can theoretically be detected at a very early stage with ultrasound elastography. Even when the ulcer region was characterized by a low stiffening (ratio of 1.8 relative to normal tissues), the corresponding elastogram clearly underlined the pathological area. This observation was confirmed by the results obtained on a physical phantom mimicking a pressure ulcer at an early stage. Computed elastograms showed strain differences between areas mimicking healthy and pathological tissues. Results corresponding to in vivo experiments revealed a difference in the way tissues behaved before and after the pressure was applied on the animal thigh, which strongly suggests the presence of a pathological area. Conclusions

  20. Pressure Ulcer in Norway—A Snapshot of Pressure Ulcer Occurrence across Various Care Sites and Recommendations for Improved Preventive Care

    PubMed Central

    Johansen, Edda; Bakken, Linda N.; Moore, Zena

    2015-01-01

    Pressure ulcers (PU) are common in all care settings, although most ulcers are preventable. Much evidence exists on Hospital Acquired Pressure Ulcers (HAPU), however, few studies describe PU in community care. From a Norwegian perspective, little is known about pressure ulcer prevalence and prevention strategies across the variety of healthcare sectors. Therefore, this study explored PU prevalence and preventive care in home care, nursing homes and hospitals. Seventeen postgraduate wound care students collected data. A data collection instrument by Jordan O’Brien and Cowman was used together with an online forum in which students described how to improve practice to reduce PU incidence. This study showed that pressure ulcers are a problem across all care settings in Norway; however, nursing homes had the highest proportion of at risk patients and the highest prevalence. By implementing the care bundle provided by the Patient Safety Programme across all care settings, increasing staff competency and make sure that access to appropriate equipment for beds and chairs is readily available, a structured and evidence based approach to prevention could be ensured. PMID:27417771

  1. Pressure Ulcer in Norway-A Snapshot of Pressure Ulcer Occurrence across Various Care Sites and Recommendations for Improved Preventive Care.

    PubMed

    Johansen, Edda; Bakken, Linda N; Moore, Zena

    2015-06-09

    Pressure ulcers (PU) are common in all care settings, although most ulcers are preventable. Much evidence exists on Hospital Acquired Pressure Ulcers (HAPU), however, few studies describe PU in community care. From a Norwegian perspective, little is known about pressure ulcer prevalence and prevention strategies across the variety of healthcare sectors. Therefore, this study explored PU prevalence and preventive care in home care, nursing homes and hospitals. Seventeen postgraduate wound care students collected data. A data collection instrument by Jordan O'Brien and Cowman was used together with an online forum in which students described how to improve practice to reduce PU incidence. This study showed that pressure ulcers are a problem across all care settings in Norway; however, nursing homes had the highest proportion of at risk patients and the highest prevalence. By implementing the care bundle provided by the Patient Safety Programme across all care settings, increasing staff competency and make sure that access to appropriate equipment for beds and chairs is readily available, a structured and evidence based approach to prevention could be ensured.

  2. Incontinence-associated dermatitis and pressure ulcers in geriatric patients.

    PubMed

    Kottner, J; Beeckman, D

    2015-12-01

    The key characteristics of geriatric patients are advanced age, multimorbidity, a decrease of psychical performance and care dependency. In addition, advanced age, chronic and acute diseases and treatments (e.g. polypharmacy) lead, either directly or indirectly, to a wide range of skin and tissue problems. Incontinence-associated dermatitis and pressure ulcers (PUs) belong to the most prevalent in geriatric settings. Prolonged exposure of the skin to urine and/or stool can cause an irritant contact dermatitis. Skin surface 'wetness', increased skin surface pH, digestive intestinal enzymes, repeated skin cleansing activities, and a possible occlusive environment contribute to irritation and inflammation. Prevention and treatment includes activities to maintain and to enhance continence and to limit, to reduce exposure of the skin to urine and stool, and to promote healing and reepithelialisation. In frail aged skin, it is recommended to use incontinence products with smooth and breathable materials with maximum absorption capacity. Immediate skin cleansing after soiling using mild cleansers and protective and caring leave-on products are recommended. PUs are localized injuries to the skin and/or underlying tissue caused by sustained deformations of skin and underlying soft tissues. PUs management includes risk assessment, repositioning and mobilization, and the use of appropriate support surfaces. Patients must be never positioned directly on an existing PU. Especially at end of life, the PU closure and wound healing may not be the primary therapeutic goal.

  3. Spinal Cord Injury and Pressure Ulcer Prevention: Using Functional Activity in Pressure Relief

    PubMed Central

    Stinson, May; Gillan, Cathy; Morton, Julie; Gardner, Evie; Sprigle, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Background. People with spinal cord injury (SCI) are at increased risk of pressure ulcers due to prolonged periods of sitting. Concordance with pressure relieving movements is poor amongst this population, and one potential alternative to improve this would be to integrate pressure relieving movements into everyday functional activities. Objectives. To investigate both the current pressure relieving behaviours of SCI individuals during computer use and the application of an ergonomically adapted computer-based activity to reduce interface pressure. Design. Observational and repeated measures design. Setting. Regional Spinal Cord Injury Unit. Participants. Fourteen subjects diagnosed with SCI (12 male, 2 female). Intervention.Comparing normal sitting to seated movements and induced forward reaching positions. Main Outcome Measures. Interface pressure measurements: dispersion index (DI), peak pressure index (PPI), and total contact area (CA). The angle of trunk tilt was also measured. Results. The majority of movements yielded less than 25% reduction in interface pressure compared to normal sitting. Reaching forward by 150% of arm length during an adapted computer activity significantly reduced DI (P < 0.05), angle of trunk tilt (p<0.05), and PPI for both ischial tuberosity regions (P < 0.001) compared to normal sitting. Conclusion. Reaching forward significantly redistributed pressure at the seating interface, as evidenced by the change in interface pressures compared to upright sitting. PMID:23691301

  4. The development of pressure ulcers in patients with hip fractures: inadequate nursing documentation is still a problem.

    PubMed

    Gunningberg, L; Lindholm, C; Carlsson, M; Sjödén, P O

    2000-05-01

    The aims of the study were to investigate, on a daily basis: (i) the development and progress of pressure ulcers, (ii) the documented nursing interventions for prevention and treatment of pressure ulcers, and (iii) when nursing interventions regarding prevention and treatment of pressure ulcers were documented, in relation to patient risk status and the development of pressure ulcers. The study design was prospective, comparative and descriptive. A total of 55 patients with hip fracture were included. To facilitate the nurse's assessment, a 'pressure ulcer card' was developed, consisting of the Modified Norton Scale (MNS) and descriptions of the four stages of pressure ulcers. The incidence of pressure ulcers was 55%. The mean rank of the lowest MNS score was significantly lower for patients who developed pressure ulcers than for patients without pressure ulcers. The majority of the pressure ulcers occurred between admission to the ward and the fourth day after surgery. Documented interventions regarding prevention and treatment were: repositioning, overlays, cushions, use of lotion and observation. The mean number of interventions per patient was 2.2 for patients who developed pressure ulcers during their hospital stay. The comprehensiveness and quality of the nursing record was unsatisfactory, and only three nursing records reached the level required by Swedish law. Preventive interventions such as repositioning were documented when the pressure ulcer had already occurred. The lack of nursing documentation regarding prevention and treatment of pressure ulcers may indicate that nurses did not identify pressure ulcers as a prioritized nursing problem for this patient group. The Modified Norton Scale could be a valuable tool for nurses, both identifying the patient at risk and acting as a guide for nursing interventions. The study was approved by the ethics committee of the Faculty of Medicine at Uppsala University.

  5. Managing pressure ulcers in patients with a spinal cord injury: a case study.

    PubMed

    Warren, Diana V

    Grade 4 pressure ulceration is a common and often unavoidable secondary complication for patients who have sustained a traumatic spinal cord injury. Pressure ulcer management involves treating infection, providing a moist wound-healing environment and choosing the appropriate dressing. However, the case of Mr M highlights other issues such as pain, a poor appetite and sleep disturbance, which all delay wound healing. This article discusses ulcer prevention, from the initial assessment of the spinal injury to patient repositioning using the 'log-rolling' technique. Although this technique is not effective in providing prolonged pressure relief, it did reduce Mr M's pain. This article also suggests recommendations for future practice, including the need to relate to patients on a personal level, which should reduce mental health deterioration and increase the patient's quality of life, and to take a multidisciplinary approach to managing and treating pressure ulceration.

  6. Development of a pressure ulcer trigger tool for the neonatal population.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, Bette; Askew, Mary; Otten, Kathy

    2013-01-01

    A large Midwest level IIIb neonatal intensive care unit located in a 500-bed teaching hospital implemented quarterly skin prevalence surveys to monitor prevalence of altered skin integrity including pressure ulcers, diaper dermatitis (incontinence-associated dermatitis), and skin damage as a result of intravenous therapy, adhesive, or medical devices. Pressure ulcer prevalence varied from 0% to 1% per quarter, and no pressure ulcer risk assessment tool was regularly implemented. Therefore, a working group was formed to identify a risk assessment. The Iowa Model for Evidence-Based Practice was used to guide the project. A literature review was completed to identify validated instruments, but available tools were judged lengthy for routine clinical use. Therefore, we developed a short trigger tool comprising 3 questions to identify infants at risk for pressure ulcer development.

  7. SCI Survey to Determine Pressure Ulcer Vulnerability in the Outpatient Population

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    review. Ann Surg 2012;255:1069-79. 22. Buchholz AC, Bugaresti JM. A review of Body Mass Index and waist circumference as markers of obesity and...factors that warrant further investigation in a prospective fashion. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Pressure ulcer risk ; spinal cord injury 16. SECURITY...MD, PhD       Introduction: Most published research that identifies risk factors for development and recurrence of Pressure Ulcers (PrUs

  8. The Association between Malnutrition and Pressure Ulcers in Elderly in Long-Term Care Facility

    PubMed Central

    Neloska, Lenche; Damevska, Katerina; Nikolchev, Andjelka; Pavleska, Lidija; Petreska-Zovic, Biljana; Kostov, Milenko

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Malnutrition is common in elderly and is a risk factor for pressure ulcers. AIM: The aim of the present study was to determine the prevalence of malnutrition in geriatric and palliative patients hospitalised in long-term care facility, and to examine the influence of nutritional status on the prevalence of pressure ulcers (PU). MATERIAL AND METHODS: Descriptive, observational and cross-sectional study including 2099 patients admitted to the Hospital during a 24 month period (January 2013 to December 2014). We recorded: demographic data, body mass index (BMI), Braden score, laboratory parameters of interest (albumin, total protein, RBC count, haemoglobin and iron levels) and presence or absence of malnutrition and pressure ulcers. RESULTS: The pressure ulcer prevalence was 12.9% (256 out of 2099). Based on the BMI classification, 61.7% of patients had a good nutritional status, 27.4% were undernourished, and 2.1% were considered malnourished. Nutritional status was statistically significantly different between patients with and without PU (p < 0.0001). This study also showed that hypoproteinemia, hypoalbuminemia, low RBC was positively associated with PU prevalence. CONCLUSION: The results highlight the impact of nutritional status on the prevalence of pressure ulcers in hospitalised geriatric and palliative population. It is of paramount importance to correctly evaluate the presence of malnutrition in patients at risk of pressure ulcers. PMID:27703567

  9. Extension of the life span of pressure ulcer fibroblasts with recombinant human interleukin-1 beta.

    PubMed Central

    Vande Berg, J. S.; Robson, M. C.; Mikhail, R. J.

    1995-01-01

    Recombinant human interleukin-1 beta (rhuIL-1 beta) was investigated in a randomized, blinded placebo-controlled trial to evaluate its effect on the healing of chronic pressure ulcers. The influence of this topically applied cytokine to 26 pressure ulcer patients was correlated with tissue culture and electron microscopic evaluation. Cellular replication studies showed that low (0.01 micrograms/cm2/day) and medium (0.1 micrograms/cm2/day) concentrations of rhuIL-1 beta were not effective in extending replication in pressure ulcer fibroblasts, in vitro. Tissue culture measurements from pressure ulcer biopsies demonstrated that, after 29 days of a high level of rhuIL-1 beta treatment (1.0 micrograms/cm2/day), the cytokine was effective in extending the ability of pressure ulcer fibroblasts to replicate. Tissue culture and electron microscopy suggested that, although rhuIL-1 beta promoted increases in fibroblast numbers, the primary effect appeared to be development of the extracellular matrix. The possible direct and indirect influences of rhuIL-1 beta therapy on pressure ulcers are discussed. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 PMID:7747819

  10. A prospective window into medical device-related pressure ulcers in intensive care.

    PubMed

    Coyer, Fiona M; Stotts, Nancy A; Blackman, Virginia Schmied

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence, severity, location, aetiology, treatment and healing of medical device-related pressure ulcers (PUs) in intensive care patients for up to 7 days. A prospective repeated measures study design was used. Patients in six intensive care units of two major medical centres, one each in Australia and the USA, were screened 1 day per month for 6 months. Those with device-related ulcers were followed daily for up to 7 days. The outcome measures were device-related ulcer prevalence, pain, infection, treatment and healing. Fifteen of 483 patients had device-related ulcers and 9 of 15 with 11 ulcers were followed beyond screening. Their mean age was 60·5 years, and most were men, overweight and at increased risk of PU. Endotracheal (ET) and nasogastric (NG) tubes were the cause of most device-related ulcers. Repositioning was the most frequent treatment. Four of 11 ulcers healed within the 7-day observation period. In conclusion, device-related ulcer prevalence was 3·1%, similar to that reported in the limited literature available, indicating an ongoing problem. Systematic assessment and repositioning of devices are the mainstays of care. We recommend continued prevalence determination and that nurses remain vigilant to prevent device-related ulcers, especially in patients with NG and ET tubes.

  11. Impedance sensing device enables early detection of pressure ulcers in vivo.

    PubMed

    Swisher, Sarah L; Lin, Monica C; Liao, Amy; Leeflang, Elisabeth J; Khan, Yasser; Pavinatto, Felippe J; Mann, Kaylee; Naujokas, Agne; Young, David; Roy, Shuvo; Harrison, Michael R; Arias, Ana Claudia; Subramanian, Vivek; Maharbiz, Michel M

    2015-03-17

    When pressure is applied to a localized area of the body for an extended time, the resulting loss of blood flow and subsequent reperfusion to the tissue causes cell death and a pressure ulcer develops. Preventing pressure ulcers is challenging because the combination of pressure and time that results in tissue damage varies widely between patients, and the underlying damage is often severe by the time a surface wound becomes visible. Currently, no method exists to detect early tissue damage and enable intervention. Here we demonstrate a flexible, electronic device that non-invasively maps pressure-induced tissue damage, even when such damage cannot be visually observed. Using impedance spectroscopy across flexible electrode arrays in vivo on a rat model, we find that impedance is robustly correlated with tissue health across multiple animals and wound types. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of an automated, non-invasive 'smart bandage' for early detection of pressure ulcers.

  12. Treatment of pressure ulcers with autologous bone marrow nuclear cells in patients with spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Sarasúa, J González; López, S Pérez; Viejo, M Álvarez; Basterrechea, M Pérez; Rodríguez, A Fernández; Gutiérrez, A Ferrero; Gala, J García; Menéndez, Y Menéndez; Augusto, D Escudero; Arias, A Pérez; Hernández, J Otero

    2011-01-01

    Context Pressure ulcers are especially difficult to treat in patients with spinal cord injury (SCI) and recurrence rates are high. Prompted by encouraging results obtained using bone marrow stem cells to treat several diseases including chronic wounds, this study examines the use of autologous stem cells from bone marrow to promote the healing of pressure ulcers in patients with SCI. Objective To obtain preliminary data on the use of bone marrow mononuclear cells (BM-MNCs) to treat pressure ulcers in terms of clinical outcome, procedure safety, and treatment time. Participants Twenty-two patients with SCI (19 men, 3 women; mean age 56.41 years) with single type IV pressure ulcers of more than 4 months duration. Interventions By minimally invasive surgery, the ulcers were debrided and treated with BM-MNCs obtained by Ficoll density gradient separation of autologous bone marrow aspirates drawn from the iliac crest. Results In 19 patients (86.36%), the pressure ulcers treated with BM-MNCs had fully healed after a mean time of 21 days. The number of MNCs isolated was patient dependent, although similar clinical outcomes were observed in each case. Compared to conventional surgical treatment, mean intra-hospital stay was reduced from 85.16 to 43.06 days. Following treatment, 5 minutes of daily wound care was required per patient compared to 20 minutes for conventional surgery. During a mean follow-up of 19 months, none of the resolved ulcers recurred. Conclusions Our data indicate that cell therapy using autologous BM-MNCs could be an option to treat type IV pressure ulcers in patients with SCI, avoiding major surgical intervention. PMID:21756569

  13. Ulcers

    MedlinePlus

    ... if they cause heartburn.Does what I eat affect my ulcer?It may. But this isn't true for everyone. Certain foods and drinks may be more likely to make your pain worse. These include both regular and decaffeinated coffee, tea, chocolate, meat extracts, alcohol, black pepper, chili powder, mustard ...

  14. Diagnosing pelvic osteomyelitis beneath pressure ulcers in spinal cord injured patients: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Brunel, A-S; Lamy, B; Cyteval, C; Perrochia, H; Téot, L; Masson, R; Bertet, H; Bourdon, A; Morquin, D; Reynes, J; Le Moing, V

    2016-03-01

    There is no consensus on a diagnostic strategy for osteomyelitis underlying pressure ulcers. We conducted a prospective study to assess the accuracy of multiple bone biopsies and imaging to diagnose pelvic osteomyelitis. Patients with clinically suspected osteomyelitis beneath pelvic pressure ulcers were enrolled. Bone magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and surgical bone biopsies (three or more for microbiology and one for histology per ulcer) were performed. Bacterial osteomyelitis diagnosis relied upon the association of positive histology and microbiology (at least one positive culture for non-commensal microorganisms or three or more for commensal microorganisms of the skin). From 2011 to 2014, 34 patients with 44 pressure ulcers were included. Bacterial osteomyelitis was diagnosed for 28 (82.3%) patients and 35 (79.5%) ulcers according to the composite criterion. Discrepancy was observed between histology and microbiology for 5 (11.4%) ulcers. Most common isolates were Staphylococcus aureus (77.1%), Peptostreptococcus (48.6%) and Bacteroides (40%), cultured in three or more samples in 42.9% of ulcers for S. aureus and ≥20% for anaerobes. Only 2.8% of ulcers had three or more positive specimens with coagulase-negative staphylococci, group B Streptococcus, and nil with enterococci and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Staphylococcus aureus, Proteus and group milleri Streptococcus were recovered from one sample in 22.8%, 11.4% and 11.4% of ulcers, respectively. Agreement was poor between biopsies and MRI (κ 0.2). Sensitivity of MRI was 94.3% and specificity was 22.2%. The diagnosis of pelvic osteomyelitis relies on multiple surgical bone biopsies with microbiological and histological analyses. At least three bone samples allows the detection of pathogens and exclusion of contaminants. MRI is not routinely useful for diagnosis.

  15. Skin assessment and pressure ulcer care in hospital-based skilled nursing facilities.

    PubMed

    Siem, Carol A; Wipke-Tevis, Deidre D; Rantz, Marilyn J; Popejoy, Lori L

    2003-06-01

    The Minimum Data Set, a comprehensive assessment tool for nursing home residents, is used for clinical decision-making, research, quality improvement, and Medicare and Medicaid reimbursement. Within the Minimum Data Set, pressure ulcers and skin condition are evaluated. Because information about pressure ulcer prevalence and care in hospital-based skilled nursing facilities is sparse, a study was conducted to: a) determine pressure ulcer prevalence upon admission to hospital-based skilled nursing facilities in the state of Missouri, and b) ascertain methods of assessment, treatment, and documentation of skin and pressure ulcer care in these facilities. Prevalence data were obtained from analysis of the Minimum Data Set data, and a survey was conducted to obtain skin care practices. The vast majority of residents (96%) were admitted from acute care facilities, and pressure ulcer prevalence on admission was 18.4% +/- 8.0%. Seventy-seven percent (77%) of the 88 surveys mailed were returned. The Braden or Norton Scale for risk assessment is reportedly used by 55% of facilities; whereas, 35% use a facility-developed tool. Commonly reported pressure ulcer prevention/treatment interventions used include: dietitian referral, use of barrier ointments, and a written repositioning schedule. Incontinence management and minimizing the head of bed elevation were infrequently used. Nearly one-half (47%) of facilities reported daily reassessment and documentation of wound status, suggesting less-than-optimal, time-consuming wound care practices. Despite the limitations inherent in survey designs and the use of databases such as the Minimum Data Set, the results of this study suggest that pressure ulcers are a common problem in acute care and hospital-based skilled nursing facilities and research-based risk assessment, prevention, and wound assessment strategies have not been widely implemented. The results of this study provide a basis for developing educational programs and a

  16. Effects of local cooling on sacral skin perfusion response to pressure: implications for pressure ulcer prevention.

    PubMed

    Tzen, Yi-Ting; Brienza, David M; Karg, Patricia; Loughlin, Patrick

    2010-08-01

    People with spinal cord injuries are at high risk for developing pressure ulcers. Increased skin temperature is one of the extrinsic causative factors for this multi-factorial disease. Previous animal studies revealed that local skin cooling reduced the severity of ulceration, and cooling is widely used in plastic surgery and organ transplants for tissue preservation. The objectives of this pilot study were to develop test protocols and instrumentation and to investigate the effect of local cooling on skin perfusion response to pressure on young healthy human subjects. Reactive hyperemia was quantified in this study to compare the effects of pressure with and without cooling. Reactive hyperemia is a normal physiological response occurring after vessel occlusion. Laser Doppler flowmetry was used to measure skin blood flow. Time-dependent spectral analysis was used to analyze and decompose the blood flow data into frequency ranges associated with specific blood flow control mechanisms. The study used a repeated measures design with two test conditions: 8 kPa of pressure with and without cooling to 25 degrees C. We hypothesized that local cooling would reduce the post-ischemic reactive hyperemic response induced by the rigid indenter. Time series results showed that normalized peak perfusion response was significantly lower with cooling (p=0.019). Time-dependent spectral analysis results suggested that both metabolic and myogenic responses contribute to this protective effect. Findings from our study on humans were consistent with previous animal studies. Additional studies on individuals with spinal cord injury are planned to further evaluate the cooling effect in a high-risk population.

  17. A topical haemoglobin spray for oxygenating pressure ulcers: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Tickle, Joy

    2015-03-01

    The effect of pressure ulcers on patient quality of life have been recognised as a real problem for many years, and the need for robust and effective management of pressure ulcers is now a prominent national health-care issue. Myriad different interventions exist for the treatment of pressure ulcers, including clinically effective dressings and pressure-relieving devices, yet many pressure ulcers still do not heal and often become a chronic wound. This is the second of a series of articles (Norris, 2014) discussing the clinical evaluation of a topical oxygen therapy in practice. It describes a small evaluation involving 18 patients with pressure ulcers. The study set out to determine the effect of a topical oxygen therapy on wound size. The therapy comprises a canister that sprays pure haemoglobin in a water solution into or onto the wound. The haemoglobin spray needs to be used at least once every 3 days, does not require training on its use and can be used in any care setting. Overall, results identified wound healing progression in all 18 wounds and wound size reduction in 17 of the 18 wounds.

  18. Comparing physical assessment with administrative data for detecting pressure ulcers in a large Canadian academic health sciences centre

    PubMed Central

    Vanderloo, Saskia E; Miller, Toba B; Freeman, Lisa; Forster, Alan J

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to compare classification of pressure ulcers from administrative data with a gold standard assessment, specifically; pressure ulcers confirmed by an independent physical assessment performed by trained nurse surveyors. Setting A retrospective analysis of pooled cross-sectional samples of inpatients assessed across 3 consecutive prevalence surveys in a large academic health sciences centre between 2012 and 2013. Participants There were 2001 patients for whom physical and chart assessments were completed, and for whom a discharge abstract was also available at the time of analysis. The cohort's mean age was 65 years and 55% were women. Results Based on the physical assessment findings, 14.6% of patients (n=292) had at least 1 pressure ulcer, with a total of 345 pressure ulcers documented among these patients: (stage I=162; stage II=120; stage III=22; stage IV=22 and unstageable=19). Based on coded information, 78 (3.9%) of patients had a pressure ulcer. Of patients with a pressure ulcer determined by the physical assessment, only 21% also had a pressure ulcer captured in the administrative data. Furthermore, only 6% of the patients with a hospital-acquired pressure ulcer, stage II or greater determined by the physical assessment were coded in the Discharge Abstract Database (DAD). Conclusions The results of this study demonstrate that coding in the DAD may under-report and fail to accurately reflect the true burden of pressure ulcers in hospitalised patients. This may occur because the presence of pressure ulcers is currently documented in the health record by nurses and not by physicians, yet the administrative data recorded in the DAD only includes physician documented pressure ulcers. We recommend enhancements to the coding methods to monitor and report on pressure ulcers. PMID:27707831

  19. Dressings as an adjunct to pressure ulcer prevention: consensus panel recommendations.

    PubMed

    Black, Joyce; Clark, Michael; Dealey, Carol; Brindle, Christopher T; Alves, Paulo; Santamaria, Nick; Call, Evan

    2015-08-01

    The formulation of recommendations on the use of wound dressings in pressure ulcer prevention was undertaken by a group of experts in pressure ulcer prevention and treatment from Australia, Portugal, UK and USA. After review of literature, they concluded that there is adequate evidence to recommend the use of five-layer silicone bordered dressings (Mepilex Border Sacrum(®) and 3 layer Mepilex Heel(®) dressings by Mölnlycke Health Care, Gothenburg, Sweden) for pressure ulcer prevention in the sacrum, buttocks and heels in high-risk patients, those in Emergency Department (ED), intensive care unit (ICU) and operating room (OR). Literature on which this recommendation is based includes one prospective randomised control trial, three cohort studies and two case series. Recommendations for dressing use in patients at high risk for pressure injury and shear injury were also provided.

  20. A Retrospective Analysis of Pressure Ulcer Incidence and Modified Braden Scale Score Risk Classifications.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hong-Lin; Cao, Ying-Juan; Wang, Jing; Huai, Bao-Sha

    2015-09-01

    The Braden Scale is the most widely used pressure ulcer risk assessment in the world, but the currently used 5 risk classification groups do not accurately discriminate among their risk categories. To optimize risk classification based on Braden Scale scores, a retrospective analysis of all consecutively admitted patients in an acute care facility who were at risk for pressure ulcer development was performed between January 2013 and December 2013. Predicted pressure ulcer incidence first was calculated by logistic regression model based on original Braden score. Risk classification then was modified based on the predicted pressure ulcer incidence and compared between different risk categories in the modified (3-group) classification and the traditional (5-group) classification using chi-square test. Two thousand, six hundred, twenty-five (2,625) patients (mean age 59.8 ± 16.5, range 1 month to 98 years, 1,601 of whom were men) were included in the study; 81 patients (3.1%) developed a pressure ulcer. The predicted pressure ulcer incidence ranged from 0.1% to 49.7%. When the predicted pressure ulcer incidence was greater than 10.0% (high risk), the corresponding Braden scores were less than 11; when the predicted incidence ranged from 1.0% to 10.0% (moderate risk), the corresponding Braden scores ranged from 12 to 16; and when the predicted incidence was less than 1.0% (mild risk), the corresponding Braden scores were greater than 17. In the modified classification, observed pressure ulcer incidence was significantly different between each of the 3 risk categories (P less than 0.05). However, in the traditional classification, the observed incidence was not significantly different between the high-risk category and moderate-risk category (P less than 0.05) and between the mild-risk category and no-risk category (P less than 0.05). If future studies confirm the validity of these findings, pressure ulcer prevention protocols of care based on Braden Scale scores can

  1. Photographic assessment of the appearance of chronic pressure and leg ulcers.

    PubMed

    Houghton, P E; Kincaid, C B; Campbell, K E; Woodbury, M G; Keast, D H

    2000-04-01

    The purpose of this paper was to examine the validity and reliability of using photographs of wounds to accurately assess wound status. The results of assessing wound appearance using wound photographs was compared to results obtained from a bedside assessment using the Pressure Sore Status Tool (PSST). The photographic wound assessment tool (PWAT) used in this comparison represents a modified version of the PSST and includes the six domains that can be determined from wound photographs. The PWAT was used on photographs of both chronic pressure ulcers (n = 56) and leg ulcers due to vascular insufficiency (n = 81). The photographic tool has excellent intrarater (ICC = 0.96) and interrater (ICC = 0.73) reliability and good concurrent validity (r = 0.70) compared with a full bedside assessment PSST. The PWAT has also shown to be sensitive to change in wound appearance of healing ulcers, but not nonhealing ulcers. These results would suggest that in the event that a full bedside assessment is not possible, wound photographs may be used to accurately assess wound appearance of both chronic pressure ulcers located on the trunk and vascular ulcers of the lower extremity. Establishing a valid and reliable assessment of wound healing using photographic images is of great relevance to the advancing fields of computer image analysis and telemedicine.

  2. Plantar Pressure as a Risk Assessment Tool for Diabetic Foot Ulceration in Egyptian Patients with Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Fawzy, Olfat A; Arafa, Asmaa I; El Wakeel, Mervat A; Abdul Kareem, Shaimaa H

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Diabetic foot ulceration is a preventable long-term complication of diabetes. In the present study, peak plantar pressures (PPP) and other characteristics were assessed in a group of 100 Egyptian patients with diabetes with or without neuropathy and foot ulcers. The aim was to study the relationship between plantar pressure (PP) and neuropathy with or without ulceration and trying to clarify the utility of pedobarography as an ulceration risk assessment tool in patients with diabetes. SUBJECTS AND METHODS A total of 100 patients having diabetes were selected. All patients had a comprehensive foot evaluation, including assessment for neuropathy using modified neuropathy disability score (MNDS), for peripheral vascular disease using ankle brachial index, and for dynamic foot pressures using the MAT system (Tekscan). The studied patients were grouped into: (1) diabetic control group (DC), which included 37 patients who had diabetes without neuropathy or ulceration and MNDS ≤2; (2) diabetic neuropathy group (DN), which included 33 patients who had diabetes with neuropathy and MNDS >2, without current or a history of ulceration; and (3) diabetic ulcer group (DU), which included 30 patients who had diabetes and current ulceration, seven of those patients also gave a history of ulceration. RESULTS PP parameters were significantly different between the studied groups, namely, forefoot peak plantar pressure (FFPPP), rearfoot peak plantar pressure (RFPPP), forefoot/rearfoot ratio (F/R), forefoot peak pressure gradient (FFPPG) rearfoot peak pressure gradient (RFPPG), and forefoot peak pressure gradient/rearfoot peak pressure gradient (FFPPG/RFPPG) (P < 0.05). FFPPP and F/R were significantly higher in the DU group compared to the DN and DC groups (P < 0.05), with no significant difference between DN and DC. FFPPG was significantly higher in the DU and DN groups compared to the DC group (P < 0.05). RFPPP and FFPPG/RFPPG were significantly higher in the DU and DN

  3. Enhancing host resistance to pressure ulcers: a new approach to prevention.

    PubMed

    Mawson, A R; Siddiqui, F H; Biundo, J J

    1993-05-01

    Pressure ulcers are notoriously common in spinal-cord-injured patients, in patients with other neurological deficits, in malnourished and severely debilitated patients, and in the frail elderly. Prolonged localized external pressure, coupled with insensitivity to ischemia resulting from neurologic injury, has long been considered the major causal factor. Preventive efforts have focused on the relief of pressure via frequent repositioning and the use of pressure-relieving devices. However, consensus is growing that host factors also play a role in the development of pressure ulcers, the most important in spinal-cord-injured patients being the injury-induced loss of vasomotor control below the level of the lesion, resulting in hypoxemia. Accordingly, pressure ulcers may be prevented not only by reducing external pressure but also by increasing the patient's resistance to pressure, that is, by directly influencing tissue oxygenation. Review of the literature suggests that electrical stimulation increases cutaneous blood flow and promotes the healing of pressure ulcers. Moreover, high-voltage pulsed galvanic stimulation (75 V, 10 Hz) applied to the back at spinal level T6 in spinal-cord-injured persons lying supine on egg-crate mattresses can raise sacral transcutaneous oxygen tension levels into the normal ranges (A. R. Mawson, F. H. Siddiqui, B. J. Connolly, C. J. Sharp, W. R. Summer, and J. J. Biundo, Jr., Paraplegia in press). Randomized controlled trials are needed to determine the efficacy of high-voltage pulsed galvanic stimulation for preventing pressure ulcers in spinal-cord-injured persons and other groups at high risk.

  4. Prevalence of postoperative pressure ulcer: A systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Shafipour, Vida; Ramezanpour, Ensieh; Gorji, Mohammad Ali Heidari; Moosazadeh, Mahmood

    2016-01-01

    Introduction A pressure ulcer is a serious safety issue in healthcare systems. The patient’s rate of infection with an ulcer, especially a postoperative ulcer, is critical, as it is dictated by factors such as being in a fixed position during surgery, the type of anesthesia used, the duration of surgery, and patient-related factors. The present study was conducted to carry out a systematic assessment of the prevalence of a postoperative pressure ulcer and to find its general prevalence using a meta-analysis. Methods The researchers searched databases, including PubMed, Google Scholar, Scopus, Science Direct, the Thomson Reuters’ Web of Science (WOS). For English articles published online between January 2000 and October 2015 on the subject of a pressure ulcer, a total of 19 articles were ultimately selected based on the study inclusion criteria. Then results were analyzed in Stata-11. Results The 19 articles qualified for entering the meta-analysis examined a total of 9527 patients. The studies estimated the general prevalence of a postoperative pressure ulcer as 18.96% (CI 95%: 15.3–22.6); the prevalence by gender was reported as 10.1% (CI 95%: 7.2–13.01) in men and 12.8% (CI 95%: 8.3–17.2) in women. Stage 1 ulcer had a 17.02% prevalence (CI 95%: 11.04–22.9), stage 2 a 6.7% prevalence (CI 95%: 3.8–9.7), stage 3 a 0.9% prevalence (CI 95%: 0.2–1.6), and stage 4 a 0.4% (CI 95%: −0.05–0.8) prevalence. Conclusion The prevalence of a postoperative pressure ulcer is high among the entire population; however, it is still higher in women than in men. The prevalence of a stage 1 ulcer is higher than the prevalence of the other stages of an ulcer. PMID:28070249

  5. Reduced pressure for fewer pressure ulcers: can real-time feedback of interface pressure optimise repositioning in bed?

    PubMed

    Gunningberg, Lena; Carli, Cheryl

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to (i) describe registered nurses' and assistant nurses' repositioning skills with regard to their existing attitudes to and theoretical knowledge of pressure ulcer (PU) prevention, and (ii) evaluate if the continuous bedside pressure mapping (CBPM) system provides staff with a pedagogic tool to optimise repositioning. A quantitative study was performed using a descriptive, comparative design. Registered nurses (n = 19) and assistant nurses (n = 33) worked in pairs, and were instructed to place two volunteers (aged over 70 years) in the best pressure-reducing position (lateral and supine), first without viewing the CBPM monitor and then again after feedback. In total, 240 positionings were conducted. The results show that for the same person with the same available pressure-reducing equipment, the peak pressure varied considerably between nursing pairs. Reducing pressure in the lateral position appeared to be the most challenging. Peak pressures were significantly reduced, based on visual feedback from the CBPM monitor. The number of preventive interventions also increased, as well as patients' comfort. For the nurses as a group, the knowledge score was 59·7% and the attitude score was 88·8%. Real-time visual feedback of pressure points appears to provide another dimension to complement decision making with respect to PU prevention.

  6. Hematological change parameters in patients with pressure ulcer at long-term care hospital

    PubMed Central

    Neiva, Giselle Protta; Carnevalli, Julia Romualdo; Cataldi, Rodrigo Lessa; Furtado, Denise Mendes; Fabri, Rodrigo Luiz; Silva, Pâmela Souza

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess factors associated with the development of pressure ulcers, and to compare the effectiveness of pharmacological treatments. Methods The factors associated with the development of pressure ulcers were compared in lesion-carrying patients (n=14) and non-carriers (n=16). Lesion-carrying patients were treated with 1% silver sulfadiazine or 0.6IU/g collagenase and were observed for 8 weeks. The data collected was analyzed with p<0.05 being statistically relevant. Results The prevalence of pressure ulcers was about 6%. The comparison of carrier and non-carrier groups of pressure ulcers revealed no statistically significant difference in its occurrence with respect to age, sex, skin color, mobility, or the use of diapers. However, levels of hemoglobin, hematocrit, and red blood cells were found to be statistically different between groups, being lower in lesion-carrying patients. There was no significant difference found in lesion area between patients treated with collagenase or silver sulfadiazine, although both groups showed an overall reduction in lesion area through the treatment course. Conclusion Hematologic parameters showed a statistically significant difference between the two groups. Regarding the treatment of ulcers, there was no difference in the area of the lesion found between the groups treated with collagenase and silver sulfadiazine. PMID:25295450

  7. Identifying and classifying quality-of-life tools for assessing pressure ulcers after spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Hitzig, Sander L.; Balioussis, Christina; Nussbaum, Ethne; McGillivray, Colleen F.; Catharine Craven, B.; Noreau, Luc

    2013-01-01

    Context Although pressure ulcers may negatively influence quality of life (QoL) post-spinal cord injury (SCI), our understanding of how to assess their impact is confounded by conceptual and measurement issues. To ensure that descriptions of pressure ulcer impact are appropriately characterized, measures should be selected according to the domains that they evaluate and the population and pathologies for which they are designed. Objective To conduct a systematic literature review to identify and classify outcome measures used to assess the impact of pressure ulcers on QoL after SCI. Methods Electronic databases (Medline/PubMed, CINAHL, and PsycInfo) were searched for studies published between 1975 and 2011. Identified outcome measures were classified as being either subjective or objective using a QoL model. Results Fourteen studies were identified. The majority of tools identified in these studies did not have psychometric evidence supporting their use in the SCI population with the exception of two objective measures, the Short-Form 36 and the Craig Handicap Assessment and Reporting Technique, and two subjective measures, the Life Situation Questionnaire-Revised and the Ferrans and Powers Quality of Life Index SCI-Version. Conclusion Many QoL outcome tools showed promise in being sensitive to the presence of pressure ulcers, but few of them have been validated for use with SCI. Prospective studies should employ more rigorous methods for collecting data on pressure ulcer severity and location to improve the quality of findings with regard to their impact on QoL. The Cardiff Wound Impact Schedule is a potential tool for assessing impact of pressure ulcers-post SCI. PMID:24090238

  8. [Systematic pressure ulcer risk management.: Results of implementing multiple interventions at Charité-Universitätsmedizin Berlin].

    PubMed

    Hauss, Armin; Greshake, Susanne; Skiba, Thomas; Schmidt, Kristine; Rohe, Julia; Jürgensen, Jan Steffen

    2016-01-01

    Pressure ulcers impose a high burden of disease on both the affected individual and society. Demographic change and multimorbidity aggravate the problem. The present study describes the systematic implementation of a comprehensive approach to reduce the incidence of pressure ulcers in an inpatient setting. The introduction of systematic risk assessment and the subsequent risk-adjusted application of evidence-based prevention, combined with continuous feedback of outcomes as well as tailored training, were associated with a significant decline in the incidence of pressure ulcers. Especially the occurrence of high-grade ulcers could be minimized by this systems approach.

  9. Plantar pressure and daily cumulative stress in persons affected by leprosy with current, previous and no previous foot ulceration.

    PubMed

    van Schie, Carine H M; Slim, Frederik J; Keukenkamp, Renske; Faber, William R; Nollet, Frans

    2013-03-01

    Not only plantar pressure but also weight-bearing activity affects accumulated mechanical stress to the foot and may be related to foot ulceration. To date, activity has not been accounted for in leprosy. The purpose was to compare barefoot pressure, in-shoe pressure and daily cumulative stress between persons affected by leprosy with and without previous or current foot ulceration. Nine persons with current plantar ulceration were compared to 15 with previous and 15 without previous ulceration. Barefoot peak pressure (EMED-X), in-shoe peak pressure (Pedar-X) and daily cumulative stress (in-shoe forefoot pressure time integral×mean daily strides (Stepwatch™ Activity Monitor)) were measured. Barefoot peak pressure was increased in persons with current and previous compared to no previous foot ulceration (mean±SD=888±222 and 763±335 vs 465±262kPa, p<0.05). In-shoe peak pressure was only increased in persons with current compared to without previous ulceration (mean±SD=412±145 vs 269±70kPa, p<0.05). Daily cumulative stress was not different between groups, although persons with current and previous foot ulceration were less active. Although barefoot peak pressure was increased in people with current and previous plantar ulceration, it did not discriminate between these groups. While in-shoe peak pressure was increased in persons with current ulceration, they were less active, resulting in no difference in daily cumulative stress. Increased in-shoe peak pressure suggests insufficient pressure reducing footwear in persons with current ulceration, highlighting the importance of pressure reducing qualities of footwear.

  10. Systematic Review and Operative Technique of Recalcitrant Pressure Ulcers Using a Fillet Flap Technique

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Venkat K.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this article is to describe the indications, operative technique, outcomes, and systematic review of the literature on the reconstruction of patients with end-stage pressure ulcers using a fillet flap technique. In this technique, the femur, tibia, and fibula are removed from the thigh and leg, and the soft tissue is used as a pedicled, or free, myocutaneous flap for reconstruction. Long-term outcomes, salient surgical technique of flap elevation, and design are detailed for patients who had a fillet of leg flap for reconstruction of extensive pressure ulcers. Methods: The indications, surgical technique, and postoperative outcomes of 5 patients who had pedicled fillet flaps are reviewed including patient age, sex, underlying comorbidities, duration of paraplegia, operative technique, and complications. A systematic review of the literature was performed searching PubMed, Cochrane Database, and Medline with the following MeSH terms: pressure ulcer, pressure sore, decubitus ulcer, fillet flap, and fillet flap. Inclusion criteria were use of a fillet technique, article data on the number of reconstructions before fillet flap, complications, and English language. Results: Most of our patients were male 75% (n = 3) with an average age of 47.5 years, had been paralyzed for an average of 16 years, and had few medical comorbidities. Two patients (3 flaps) required hip disarticulation, 1 patient had a bilateral fillet flaps, and 3 patients had resection of tibia/fibula. After following patients for an average of 1.4 years (4 mo to 2 yr), complications were limited to 1 patient who had partial-thickness flap loss at the distal skin flap that healed by secondary intention and 1 patient who had ulcer recurrence because of noncompliance. Four articles met inclusion criteria for systematic review and 3 were excluded. Conclusions: The fillet of leg flap remains a useful and reliable method of reconstructing end-stage pressure ulcers. PMID:27622082

  11. Concordance of Shape Risk Scale, a new pressure ulcer risk tool, with Braden Scale.

    PubMed

    Soppi, Esa T; Iivanainen, Ansa K; Korhonen, Pasi A

    2014-12-01

    The occurrence of pressure ulcers was examined in a cross-sectional study in 23 health care facilities and in home care involving 548 patients. The screening of pressure ulcer risk was assessed simultaneously using the Braden Scale and the new Shape Risk Scale (SRS), and the results were compared. The overall prevalence of pressure ulcers in the study population was 15·5% (85/548). The Braden Scale was performed as described in the literature. The direct concordance of the Braden and SRS scales was 46%. In more than 90% of cases, the SRS classified patients as well as or better than the Braden Scale. The SRS allocates patients significantly different from the Braden Scale into the risk categories, especially the difference is significant between the low and medium-risk categories. The greatest advantage of SRS to Braden Scale is that it correctly identifies patients with low risk of pressure ulcers. It is interesting that the two risk scores, taking into consideration the basically different pathophysiological factors, can still give rather similar results. The users considered that both scales are easy to use.

  12. Risk, prevention and treatment of pressure ulcers--nursing staff knowledge and documentation.

    PubMed

    Gunningberg, L; Lindholm, C; Carlsson, M; Sjödén, P O

    2001-01-01

    The aims were to investigate (i) registered nurses' and nursing assistants' knowledge of risk, prevention and treatment of pressure ulcer before implementing a system for risk assessment and pressure ulcer classification for patients with hip fracture (ii) interventions documented in the patient's records by registered nurses, and (iii) to what extent reported and documented interventions accord with the Swedish quality guidelines. Nursing staff (n=85) completed a questionnaire, and patient's records (n=55) were audited retrospectively. The majority of the nursing staff reported that they performed risk assessment when caring for a patient with hip fracture. These risk assessments were, however, not comprehensive. The most frequently reported preventive interventions were repositioning, use of lotion, mattresses/overlays and cushions for the heels. These interventions were to some extent documented in the patient's records. Nutritional support, reduction of shear and friction, hygiene and skin moisture, and patient's education were reported to a small extent and not documented at all. The Swedish quality guidelines regarding prevention and treatment of pressure ulcers were not fully implemented in clinical practice. It was concluded that nursing staff's knowledge and documentation of risk, prevention and treatment of pressure ulcers for patients with hip fractures could be improved.

  13. PUMA project: Active involving of end users to achieve a smart solution to prevent pressure ulcer.

    PubMed

    Laparra-Hernández, José; Chicote, Juan Carlos; Medina, Enrique; Barberà, Ricard; Durà-Gil, Juan V; Lozano, Vicente; Gil, Ángel; Bermejo, Ignacio

    2015-01-01

    This paper shows the benefits to include spinal cord injury users and the other stakeholders during the development of a new system to prevent pressure ulcers. The complementary of information has been key and has enhanced the possibility to achieve market acceptance and introduction.

  14. Diabetic foot ulcer incidence in relation to plantar pressure magnitude and measurement location☆,☆☆,★

    PubMed Central

    Ledoux, William R.; Shofer, Jane B.; Cowley, Matthew S.; Ahroni, Jessie H.; Cohen, Victoria; Boyko, Edward J.

    2014-01-01

    Aims We prospectively examined the relationship between site-specific peak plantar pressure (PPP) and ulcer risk. Researchers have previously reported associations between diabetic foot ulcer and elevated plantar foot pressure, but the effect of location-specific pressures has not been studied. Methods Diabetic subjects (n = 591) were enrolled from a single VA hospital. Five measurements of in-shoe plantar pressure were collected using F-Scan. Pressures were measured at 8 areas: heel, lateral midfoot, medial midfoot, first metatarsal, second through fourth metatarsal, fifth metatarsal, hallux, and other toes. The relationship between incident plantar foot ulcer and PPP or pressure–time integral (PTI) was assessed using Cox regression. Results During follow-up (2.4 years), 47 subjects developed plantar ulcers (10 heel, 12 metatarsal, 19 hallux, 6 other). Overall mean PPP was higher for ulcer subjects (219 vs. 194 kPa), but the relationship differed by site (the metatarsals with ulcers had higher pressure, while the opposite was true for the hallux and heel). A statistical analysis was not performed on the means, but hazard ratios from a Cox survival analysis were nonsignificant for PPP across all sites and when adjusted for location. However, when the metatarsals were considered separately, higher baseline PPP was significantly associated with greater ulcer risk; at other sites, this relationship was nonsignificant. Hazard ratios for all PTI data were nonsignificant. Conclusions Location must be considered when assessing the relationship between PPP and plantar ulceration. PMID:24012295

  15. Managing Pressures Ulcers in a Resource Constrained Situation: A Holistic Approach

    PubMed Central

    Dam, Abhijit; Datta, Nivedita; Mohanty, Usha Rani; Bandhopadhyay, Chandreyi

    2011-01-01

    Managing pressure ulcers remain a challenge and call for a multidisciplinary team approach to care. Even more daunting is the management of such patients in remote locations and in resource constrained situations. The management of pressure sores in a patient with progressive muscular atrophy has been discussed using resources that were locally available, accessible, and affordable. Community participation was encouraged. A holistic approach to care was adopted. PMID:22346055

  16. Getting evidence-based pressure ulcer prevention into practice: a multi-faceted unit-tailored intervention in a hospital setting.

    PubMed

    Sving, Eva; Högman, Marieann; Mamhidir, Anna-Greta; Gunningberg, Lena

    2016-10-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate whether a multi-faceted, unit-tailored intervention using evidenced-based pressure ulcer prevention affects (i) the performance of pressure ulcer prevention, (ii) the prevalence of pressure ulcers and (iii) knowledge and attitudes concerning pressure ulcer prevention among registered and assistant nurses. A quasi-experimental, clustered pre- and post-test design was used. Five units at a hospital setting were included. The intervention was based on the PARIHS framework and included a multi-professional team, training and repeated quality measurements. An established methodology was used to evaluate the prevalence and prevention of pressure ulcers. Nurses' knowledge and attitudes were evaluated using a validated questionnaire. A total of 506 patients were included, of whom 105 patients had a risk to develop pressure ulcer. More patients were provided pressure ulcer prevention care (P = 0·001) and more prevention care was given to each patient (P = 0·021) after the intervention. Corresponding results were shown in the group of patients assessed as being at risk for developing pressure ulcers. Nurses' knowledge about pressure ulcer prevention increased (P < 0·001). Positive attitudes towards pressure ulcer prevention remained high between pre- and post-test surveys. This multi-faceted unit-tailored intervention affected pressure ulcer prevention. Facilitation and repeated quality measurement together with constructed feedback of results seemed to be the most important factor for pressure ulcer prevention.

  17. Point prevalence of pressure ulcers in three second-level hospitals in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Galván-Martínez, Iris L; Narro-Llorente, Roberto; Lezama-de-Luna, Favio; Arredondo-Sandoval, Jesus; Fabian-Victoriano, Ma Rosy; Garrido-Espindola, Ximena; Lozano-Platonoff, Adriana; Contreras-Ruiz, Jose

    2014-12-01

    Pressure ulcers (PU) are the source of multiple complications and even death. To our knowledge, there is no available data about PU prevalence in Mexico. The objective of this study was to determine the point prevalence of PU in three second-level hospitals in Mexico. Every adult hospitalised patient was included in each hospital. Age, gender, hospitalisation ward, Braden score, and the number, location and stage of the ulcers encountered were recorded, as well as any pressure relief measures. In total, 294 patients were examined (127 were male); of these, 63 were considered to be at risk. The average age was 48·6 years. The overall prevalence of the PU was 17%. The service with the highest prevalence was the ICU. The most frequent stage was II (32%) and they were most commonly found in the sacrum (74%). The average Braden score of the patients with ulcers was 10, and 21·4% of the patients obtained moderate- to high-risk Braden scores. Of them, 60·3% had ulcers and only 46% had any preventive measures. The prevalence of PU in three hospitals in Mexico is 17%. The most common stage is II and the most commonly affected site is the sacrum. Only 46% of patients with PU had at least one pressure release measure.

  18. The Application of Negative Pressure Wound Therapy in the Treatment of Chronic Venous Leg Ulceration: Authors Experience

    PubMed Central

    Mieszczański, Paweł; Wilemska-Kucharzewska, Katarzyna; Taradaj, Jakub; Kuropatnicki, Andrzej; Śliwiński, Zbigniew

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to use negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) in patients with chronic venous leg ulceration. The authors present their experience in treatment of 15 patients whose average ulceration surface area was 62.6 cm2. In 10 patients, the ulcers healed within 6 weeks and in the remaining patients within 20 weeks. Based on the results obtained, the authors imply that NPWT is an effective method in the treatment of chronic venous leg. PMID:24696847

  19. Enhancing pressure ulcer prevention using wound dressings: what are the modes of action?

    PubMed

    Call, Evan; Pedersen, Justin; Bill, Brian; Black, Joyce; Alves, Paulo; Brindle, C Tod; Dealey, Carol; Santamaria, Nick; Clark, Michael

    2015-08-01

    Recent clinical research has generated interest in the use of sacral wound dressings as preventive devices for patients at risk of ulceration. This study was conducted to identify the modes of action through which dressings can add to pressure ulcer prevention, for example, shear and friction force redistribution and pressure distribution. Bench testing was performed using nine commercially available dressings. The use of dressings can reduce the amplitude of shear stress and friction reaching the skin of patients at risk. They can also effectively redirect these forces to wider areas which minimises the mechanical loads upon skeletal prominences. Dressings can redistribute pressure based upon their effective Poisson ratio and larger deflection areas, providing greater load redistribution.

  20. Pressure ulcer prevalence, use of preventive measures, and mortality risk in an acute care population: a quality improvement project.

    PubMed

    Leijon, Siv; Bergh, Ingrid; Terstappen, Karin

    2013-01-01

    The primary aim of this quality improvement project was to determine pressure prevalence, risk of mortality, and use of preventive measures in a group of hospitalized patients. Two hundred fifty-eight patients recruited from Skaraborg Hospital in Sweden were assessed. A 1-day point prevalence study was carried out using a protocol advocated by the European PU Advisory Panel. Patients' age, gender, severity of PU (grades I-IV), anatomical location of PU, and use of preventive measures were recorded. The Swedish language version of the Modified Norton Scale was used for PU risk assessment. Data were collected by nurses trained according to the Web-based training: PU classification, "ePuclas2." After 21 months, a retrospective audit of the electronic records for patients identified with pressure ulcers was completed. The point prevalence of pressure ulcers was 23%. The total number of ulcers was 85, most were grade 1 (n = 39). The most common locations were the sacrum (n = 15) and the heel (n = 10). Three percent of patients (n = 9) had been assessed during their current hospital stay using a risk assessment tool. There was a statistically significant relationship between pressure ulcer occurrence and a low total score on the Modified Norton Scale. The patients' ages correlated significantly to the presence of a pressure ulcer. Patients with a pressure ulcer had a 3.6-fold increased risk of dying within 21 months, as compared with those without a pressure ulcer. Based on results from this quality improvement project, we recommend routine pressure ulcer risk assessment for all patients managed in a hospital setting such as ours. We further recommend that particular attention should be given to older and frail patients who are at higher risk for pressure ulcer occurrence and mortality.

  1. A pilot randomised controlled trial of negative pressure wound therapy to treat grade III/IV pressure ulcers [ISRCTN69032034

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) is widely promoted as a treatment for full thickness wounds; however, there is a lack of high-quality research evidence regarding its clinical and cost effectiveness. A trial of NPWT for the treatment of grade III/IV pressure ulcers would be worthwhile but premature without assessing whether such a trial is feasible. The aim of this pilot randomised controlled trial was to assess the feasibility of conducting a future full trial of NPWT for the treatment of grade III and IV pressure ulcers and to pilot all aspects of the trial. Methods This was a two-centre (acute and community), pilot randomised controlled trial. Eligible participants were randomised to receive either NPWT or standard care (SC) (spun hydrocolloid, alginate or foam dressings). Outcome measures were time to healing of the reference pressure ulcer, recruitment rates, frequency of treatment visits, resources used and duration of follow-up. Results Three hundred and twelve patients were screened for eligibility into this trial over a 12-month recruitment period and 12/312 participants (3.8%) were randomised: 6 to NPWT and 6 to SC. Only one reference pressure ulcer healed (NPWT group) during follow-up (time to healing 79 days). The mean number of treatment visits per week was 3.1 (NPWT) and 5.7 (SC); 6/6 NPWT and 1/6 SC participants withdrew from their allocated trial treatment. The mean duration of follow-up was 3.8 (NPWT) and 5.0 (SC) months. Conclusions This pilot trial yielded vital information for the planning of a future full study including projected recruitment rate, required duration of follow-up and extent of research nurse support required. Data were also used to inform the cost-effectiveness and value of information analyses, which were conducted alongside the pilot trial. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN69032034. PMID:22839453

  2. Nursing care missed in patients at risk of or having pressure ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Valles, Jonathan Hermayn Hernández; Monsiváis, María Guadalupe Moreno; Guzmán, Ma. Guadalupe Interial; Arreola, Leticia Vázquez

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: to determine the nursing care missed as perceived by the nursing staff and its relation with the nursing care missed identified in the assessment of patients at risk of or having pressur ulcers. Method: descriptive correlation study. The participants were 161 nurses and 483 patients from a public hospital. The MISSCARE survey was used in combination with a Nursing Care Assessment Form for Patients at Risk of or having pressure ulcers. For the analysis, descriptive and inferential statistics were used. Results: the nursing staff indicated greater omission in skin care (38.5%), position change (31.1%) and the registration of risk factors for the development of pressure ulcers (33.5%). The nursing care missed identified in the assessment related to the use of pressure relief on bony prominences and drainage tubes interfering in the patient's movements (both with 58.6%) and the use of pneumatic mattresses (57.6%). Conclusion: a high percentage of nursing care missed was found according to the staff's perception. Nevertheless, the assessment of the nursing care missed was much higher. No significant relation was found between both. Therefore, it is a priority to reflect on the importance of objective patient assessments. PMID:27878218

  3. Preventing Pressure Ulcers: A Multisite Randomized Controlled Trial in Nursing Homes

    PubMed Central

    Bergstrom, Nancy; Horn, Susan D.; Rapp, Mary; Stern, Anita; Barrett, Ryan; Watkiss, Michael; Krahn, Murray

    2014-01-01

    Background Pressure at the interface between bony prominences and support surfaces, sufficient to occlude or reduce blood flow, is thought to cause pressure ulcers (PrUs). Pressure ulcers are prevented by providing support surfaces that redistribute pressure and by turning residents to reduce length of exposure. Objective We aim to determine optimal frequency of repositioning in long-term care (LTC) facilities of residents at risk for PrUs who are cared for on high-density foam mattresses. Methods We recruited residents from 20 United States and 7 Canadian LTC facilities. Participants were randomly allocated to 1 of 3 turning schedules (2-, 3-, or 4-hour intervals). The study continued for 3 weeks with weekly risk and skin assessment completed by assessors blinded to group allocation. The primary outcome measure was PrU on the coccyx or sacrum, greater trochanter, or heels. Results Participants were mostly female (731/942, 77.6%) and white (758/942, 80.5%), and had a mean age of 85.1 (standard deviation [SD] ± 7.66) years. The most common comorbidities were cardiovascular disease (713/942, 75.7%) and dementia (672/942, 71.3%). Nineteen of 942 (2.02%) participants developed one superficial Stage 1 (n = 1) or Stage 2 (n = 19) ulcer; no full-thickness ulcers developed. Overall, there was no significant difference in PrU incidence (P = 0.68) between groups (2-hour, 8/321 [2.49%] ulcers/group; 3-hour, 2/326 [0.61%]; 4-hour, 9/295 [3.05%]. Pressure ulcers among high-risk (6/325, 1.85%) versus moderate-risk (13/617, 2.11%) participants were not significantly different (P = 0.79), nor was there a difference between moderate-risk (P = 0.68) or high-risk allocation groups (P = 0.90). Conclusions Results support turning moderate- and high-risk residents at intervals of 2, 3, or 4 hours when they are cared for on high-density foam replacement mattresses. Turning at 3-hour and at 4-hour intervals is no worse than the current practice of turning every 2 hours. Less frequent

  4. Comprehensive management of pressure ulcers in spinal cord injury: Current concepts and future trends

    PubMed Central

    Kruger, Erwin A.; Pires, Marilyn; Ngann, Yvette; Sterling, Michelle; Rubayi, Salah

    2013-01-01

    Pressure ulcers in spinal cord injury represent a challenging problem for patients, their caregivers, and their physicians. They often lead to recurrent hospitalizations, multiple surgeries, and potentially devastating complications. They present a significant cost to the healthcare system, they require a multidisciplinary team approach to manage well, and outcomes directly depend on patients' education, prevention, and compliance with conservative and surgical protocols. With so many factors involved in the successful treatment of pressure ulcers, an update on their comprehensive management in spinal cord injury is warranted. Current concepts of local wound care, surgical options, as well as future trends from the latest wound healing research are reviewed to aid medical professionals in treating patients with this difficult problem. PMID:24090179

  5. Treatment of Severe (Stage III and IV) Chronic Pressure Ulcers Using Pulsed Radio Frequency Energy in a Quadriplegic Patient

    PubMed Central

    Porreca, Eugene G.; Giordano-Jablon, Gina M.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To report an adjuvant treatment to basic wound care of stage III and IV pressure ulcers in a patient with quadriplegia. Methods: Pulsed radio frequency energy was used as an adjunct to basic wound care of 3 large, long-standing (6 years) stage III and IV pressure ulcers that were unresponsive to conventional therapy in a 59-year-old man with quadriplegia. Results: The ulcers (on right foot, left heel, and sacrum) markedly decreased in size (16.7, 28.5, and 13.1 mm2 per day, respectively). The ulcer on the right foot healed within 4 weeks, the left heel ulcer reduced in size by 95% at 7 months, and the large sacral ulcer healed to closure in 11 months. Conclusion: Pulsed radio frequency energy treatment with basic wound care, if administered early in the course of pressure ulcer therapy, might avoid the lengthy hospitalizations and repeated surgical procedures necessary for treatment of uncontrolled ulcers, reducing the overall cost of treatment and improving the quality of life for chronically ill or injured patients. PMID:19008935

  6. Detecting early stage pressure ulcer on dark skin using multispectral imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Dingrong; Kong, Linghua; Sprigle, Stephen; Wang, Fengtao; Wang, Chao; Liu, Fuhan; Adibi, Ali; Tummala, Rao

    2010-02-01

    We are developing a handheld multispectral imaging device to non-invasively inspect stage I pressure ulcers in dark pigmented skins without the need of touching the patient's skin. This paper reports some preliminary test results of using a proof-of-concept prototype. It also talks about the innovation's impact to traditional multispectral imaging technologies and the fields that will potentially benefit from it.

  7. Health Behavior Theory for Pressure Ulcer Prevention: Root-Cause Analysis Project in Critical Care Nursing.

    PubMed

    Choi, Kristen R; Ragnoni, Jennifer A; Bickmann, Jonathan D; Saarinen, Hannah A; Gosselin, Ann K

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to use a behavioral theory to examine pressure ulcer prevention by nurses in a critical care setting. A root-cause analysis approach was used, including an integrative literature review, operationalization of behavioral constructs into a survey, and root-cause analysis application in a cardiovascular intensive care unit. This article highlights an innovative approach to quality improvement in critical care.

  8. Development of a Personalized Model for Pressure Ulcer Prevention Acutely Following Spinal Cord Injury: Biomarkers of Muscle Composition and Resilience

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    Baseline muscle tissue biopsy and blood collections have been completed for two study participants. In progress 2) Specific objectives Circulatory ...months Toward personalized pressure ulcer care planning: development of a bioinformatics system for individualized prioritization of clinical

  9. Nursing Home Work Environment and the Risk of Pressure Ulcers and Incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Temkin-Greener, Helena; Cai, Shubing; Zheng, Nan Tracy; Zhao, Hongwei; Mukamel, Dana B

    2012-01-01

    Objective To examine the association between nursing home (NH) work environment attributes such as teams, consistent assignment and staff cohesion, and the risk of pressure ulcers and incontinence. Data Sources/Setting Minimum dataset for 46,044 residents in 162 facilities in New York State, for June 2006–July 2007, and survey responses from 7,418 workers in the same facilities. Study Design For each individual and facility, primary and secondary data were linked. Random effects logistic models were used to develop/validate outcome measures. Generalized estimating equation models with robust standard errors and probability weights were employed to examine the association between outcomes and work environment attributes. Key independent variables were staff cohesion, percent staff in daily care teams, and percent staff with consistent assignment. Other facility factors were also included. Principal Findings Residents in facilities with worse staff cohesion had significantly greater odds of pressure ulcers and incontinence, compared with residents in facilities with better cohesion scores. Residents in facilities with greater penetration of self-managed teams had lower risk of pressure ulcers, but not of incontinence. Prevalence of consistent assignment was not significantly associated with the outcome measures. Conclusions NH environments and management practices influence residents’ health outcomes. These findings provide important lessons for administrators and regulators interested in promoting NH quality improvement. PMID:22098384

  10. A systematic review of the performance of instruments designed to measure the dimensions of pressure ulcers.

    PubMed

    O'Meara, Susan M; Bland, J Martin; Dumville, Jo C; Cullum, Nicky A

    2012-01-01

    The objective was to undertake a systematic review of the performance of wound measurement instruments used for patients with pressure ulcers. Studies of any design, evaluating methods for estimating wound diameter, depth, surface area, or volume in patients with pressure ulcers were included. Eligible evaluations had to report intra- or inter-rater reliability, accuracy, agreement, or feasibility of methods. Electronic databases and other sources were accessed for study identification. Included studies were critically appraised using a modified checklist for diagnostic test evaluations. Twelve studies were included. Most had methodological problems and/or used inappropriate statistical methods. Reliable methods for measuring pressure ulcer surface area may include: grid tracings from photographs combined with whole plus partial square count; a portable digital pad; and stereophotogrammetry combined with computerized image analysis. The agreement between photographic tracing and direct transparency tracing may be satisfactory (both methods being combined with computerized planimetry). No definitive conclusions could be reached about studies of diameter or depth; this means that there is little evidence to underpin recommendations in clinical guidelines. Evaluations of volume measurement were of poor quality, and there were few data on feasibility. Further primary research is needed to evaluate methods of wound measurement used in clinical practice.

  11. Intraoperatively acquired pressure ulcers and perioperative normothermia: a look at relationships.

    PubMed

    Fred, Cynthia; Ford, Sharon; Wagner, Doreen; Vanbrackle, Lewis

    2012-09-01

    The risk of developing an intraoperatively acquired pressure ulcer (IAPU), which is recognized as a significant complication of deep tissue injury occurrence, is associated with duration of surgery and patient positioning. There is a strong association between hypothermia, tissue viability, and surgical site infections; however, the relationship between hypothermia and pressure ulcers has not been fully explored. We examined the incidence of pressure ulcers in surgical patients and determined that there is a relationship between maintaining perioperative normothermia and a reduction in IAPU development. We used a retrospective, explanatory, nonexperimental design, and we fit a binary logistic model to the data. This study shows that patients at higher risk for developing an IAPU include those who are critically ill, have a low Braden Scale skin assessment score, are thin, and are male with at least a 1° F (1.8° C) drop in temperature. These are important risks for perioperative nurses to take into account during care of surgical patients. More perioperative research is needed to identify ways to reduce risk, provide close assessment of high-risk patients, and implement the identified risk-reduction strategies.

  12. Pressure Ulcers in the United States' Inpatient Population From 2008 to 2012: Results of a Retrospective Nationwide Study.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Karen; Rock, Kathryn; Nazzal, Munier; Jones, Olivia; Qu, Weikai

    2016-11-01

    Pressure ulcers are common, increase patient morbidity and mortality, and costly for patients, their families, and the health care system. A retrospective study was conducted to evaluate the impact of pressure ulcers on short-term outcomes in United States inpatient populations and to identify patient characteristics associated with having 1 or more pressure ulcers. The US Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS) database was analyzed using the International Classification of Disease, 9th Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9 CM) diagnosis codes as the screening tool for all inpatient pressure ulcers recorded from 2008 to 2012. Patient demographics and comorbid conditions, as identified by ICD-9 code, were extracted, along with primary outcomes of length of stay (LOS), total hospital charge (TC), inhospital mortality, and discharge disposition. Continuous variables with normal distribution were expressed in terms of mean and standard deviation. Group comparisons were performed using t-test or ANOVA test. Continuous nonnormal distributed variables such as LOS and TC were expressed in terms of median, and nonparametric tests were used to compare the differences between groups. Categorical data were presented in terms of percentages of the number of cases within each group. Chi-squared tests were used to compare categorical data in different groups. For multivariate analysis, linear regressions (for continuous variable) and logistic regression (for categorical variables) were used to analyze the possible risk factors for the investigated outcomes of LOS, TC, inhospital mortality, and patient disposition. Coefficients were calculated with multivariate regression with all included patients versus patients with pressure ulcers alone. The 5-year average number of admitted patients with at least 1 pressure ulcer was determined to be 670 767 (average overall rate: 1.8%). Statistically significant differences between patients with and without pressure ulcers were observed for

  13. Bacteriology of pressure ulcers in individuals with spinal cord injury: What we know and what we should know

    PubMed Central

    Dana, Ali N.; Bauman, William A.

    2015-01-01

    Individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI) are at increased risk for the development of pressure ulcers. These chronic wounds are debilitating and contribute to prolonged hospitalization and worse medical outcome. However, the species of bacteria and the role that specific species may play in delaying the healing of chronic pressure ulcers in the SCI population has not been well characterized. This study will review the literature regarding what is known currently about the bacteriology of pressure ulcers in individuals with SCI. An electronic literature search of MEDLINE (1966 to February 2014) was performed. Eleven studies detailing bacterial cultures of pressure ulcers in the SCI population met inclusion criteria and were selected for review. Among these studies, bacterial cultures were often polymicrobial with both aerobic and anaerobic bacteria identified with culture techniques that varied significantly. The most common organisms identified in pressure ulcers were Staphylococcus aureus, Proteus mirabilis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Enterococcus faecalis. In general, wounds were poorly characterized with minimal to no physical description and/or location provided. Our present understanding of factors that may alter the microbiome of pressure ulcers in individuals with SCI is quite rudimentary, at best. Well-designed studies are needed to assess appropriate wound culture technique, the impact of bacterial composition on wound healing, development of infection, and the optimum medical and surgical approaches to wound care. PMID:25130374

  14. An in vitro quantification of pressures exerted by earlobe pulse oximeter probes following reports of device-related pressure ulcers in ICU patients .

    PubMed

    Goodell, Teresa T

    2012-11-01

    The earlobe often is used to monitor perfusion when pulse oximeter signal quality is impaired in the fingers and toes. Prompted by intermittent occurrences of roughly circular earlobe pressure ulcers among patients in intensive care units, a convenience sample of seven calibrated pulse oximeter probes was used to quantify earlobe pressure exerted by these devices in vitro. All were tested twice with an electronic load cell, a strain gauge with a transducer that transforms the measured force into a readable numerical signal. The probe was clipped to the load cell just as it is clipped to the earlobe in the clinical setting. The probes exerted an average of 0.24 lb (SD 0.6) of force over an area of 0.3 square inches, equal to an average of 20.7 mm Hg (SD 0.6) pressure on tissue. This value exceeds some empirically derived values of capillary perfusion pressure. The occurrence of device-related pressure ulcers, as well pressure ulcers on the ears, has been documented, but little is known about device-related earlobe pressure ulcers or the actual pressure exerted by these devices. Additional in vitro studies are needed to quantify the pressures exerted by these and other probes, and future prevalence and incidence studies should include more detailed pressure ulcer location and device use documentation. Until more is known about the possible role of these devices in the development of pressure ulcers, clinicians should be cognizant of their potential for causing pressure ulcers, particularly in patients whose conditions can compromise skin integrity.

  15. A Computational, Tissue-Realistic Model of Pressure Ulcer Formation in Individuals with Spinal Cord Injury.

    PubMed

    Ziraldo, Cordelia; Solovyev, Alexey; Allegretti, Ana; Krishnan, Shilpa; Henzel, M Kristi; Sowa, Gwendolyn A; Brienza, David; An, Gary; Mi, Qi; Vodovotz, Yoram

    2015-06-01

    People with spinal cord injury (SCI) are predisposed to pressure ulcers (PU). PU remain a significant burden in cost of care and quality of life despite improved mechanistic understanding and advanced interventions. An agent-based model (ABM) of ischemia/reperfusion-induced inflammation and PU (the PUABM) was created, calibrated to serial images of post-SCI PU, and used to investigate potential treatments in silico. Tissue-level features of the PUABM recapitulated visual patterns of ulcer formation in individuals with SCI. These morphological features, along with simulated cell counts and mediator concentrations, suggested that the influence of inflammatory dynamics caused simulations to be committed to "better" vs. "worse" outcomes by 4 days of simulated time and prior to ulcer formation. Sensitivity analysis of model parameters suggested that increasing oxygen availability would reduce PU incidence. Using the PUABM, in silico trials of anti-inflammatory treatments such as corticosteroids and a neutralizing antibody targeted at Damage-Associated Molecular Pattern molecules (DAMPs) suggested that, at best, early application at a sufficiently high dose could attenuate local inflammation and reduce pressure-associated tissue damage, but could not reduce PU incidence. The PUABM thus shows promise as an adjunct for mechanistic understanding, diagnosis, and design of therapies in the setting of PU.

  16. Evaluation of the pressure ulcers risk scales with critically ill patients: a prospective cohort study 1

    PubMed Central

    Borghardt, Andressa Tomazini; do Prado, Thiago Nascimento; de Araújo, Thiago Moura; Rogenski, Noemi Marisa Brunet; Bringuente, Maria Edla de Oliveira

    2015-01-01

    AIMS: to evaluate the accuracy of the Braden and Waterlow risk assessment scales in critically ill inpatients. METHOD: this prospective cohort study, with 55 patients in intensive care units, was performed through evaluation of sociodemographic and clinical variables, through the application of the scales (Braden and Waterlow) upon admission and every 48 hours; and through the evaluation and classification of the ulcers into categories. RESULTS: the pressure ulcer incidence was 30.9%, with the Braden and Waterlow scales presenting high sensitivity (41% and 71%) and low specificity (21% and 47%) respectively in the three evaluations. The cut off scores found in the first, second and third evaluations were 12, 12 and 11 in the Braden scale, and 16, 15 and 14 in the Waterlow scale. CONCLUSION: the Braden scale was shown to be a good screening instrument, and the Waterlow scale proved to have better predictive power. PMID:25806628

  17. Rate of Pressure Ulcers in Intensive Units and General Wards of Iranian Hospitals and Methods for Their Detection

    PubMed Central

    AKBARI SARI, Ali; DOSHMANGHIR, Leila; NEGHAHBAN, Zahra; GHIASIPOUR, Maryam; BEHESHTIZAVAREH, Zeinab

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background This study aimed to estimate the rate of pressure ulcers in intensive care units (ICUs) and medical and surgical wards of Iranian hospitals and compare the performance of methods of medical record review as well as direct observation for their detection. Methods The research team visited 308 patients in medical and surgical wards of hospitals affiliated with Tehran University of Medical Sciences and a further 90 patients in their ICUs between March 2009 and April 2010. In addition 310 patient records were randomly selected from patients discharged from the ICUs between March 2009 and April 2010. And a further 600 patient records were randomly selected from the patients that were discharged from medical and surgical wards between March 2010 and April 2011. These 910 selected records were retrospectively reviewed to identify pressure ulcers. Data were collected by a structured checklist. Results In ICUs 24 of 90 patients (26.7%, 95% CI: 17.56 to 35.84) that were directly observed and 59 of 310 patients (19.0%, 95% CI: 14.63 to 23.37) that were studied by retrospective review of medical records had pressure ulcers. In medical and surgical wards, 5 of 308 patients (1.6%, 95% CI: 0.20 to 3.00) that were directly observed had pressure ulcers, but no pressure ulcer was detected by review of 600 medical records. Conclusion Pressure ulcers are significantly more frequent in ICUs than in medical and surgical wards and a significant proportion of pressure ulcers are not reported. PMID:26110149

  18. Decreasing pressure ulcer risk during hospital procedures: a rapid process improvement workshop.

    PubMed

    Haugen, Vicki; Pechacek, Judy; Maher, Travis; Wilde, Joy; Kula, Larry; Powell, Julie

    2011-01-01

    A 300-bed acute care community hospital used a 2-day "Rapid Process Improvement Workshop" to identify factors contributing to facility-acquired pressure ulcers (PU). The Rapid Process Improvement Workshop included key stakeholders from all procedural areas providing inpatient services and used standard components of rapid process improvement: data analysis, process flow charting, factor identification, and action plan development.On day 1, the discovery process revealed increased PU risk related to prolonged immobility when transporting patients for procedures, during imaging studies, and during the perioperative period. On day 2, action plans were developed that included communication of PU risk or presence of an ulcer,measures to shorten procedure times when clinically appropriate, implementation of prevention techniques during procedures, and recommendations for mattress upgrades. In addition, educational programs about PU prevention were developed, schedules for presentations were established, and an online power point presentation was completed and placed in a learning management system module. Finally, our nursing department amended a hospital wide handoff communication tool to include skin status and PU risk level. This tool is used in all patient handoff situations, including nonnursing departments such as radiology. Patients deemed at risk for ulcers were provided "Braden Risk" armbands to enhance interdepartmental awareness.

  19. Pressure Ulcer Risk and Prevention Practices in Pediatric Patients: A Secondary Analysis of Data from the National Database of Nursing Quality Indicators®.

    PubMed

    Razmus, Ivy; Bergquist-Beringer, Sandra

    2017-01-01

    Little is known about pressure ulcer prevention practice among pediatric patients. To describe the frequency of pressure ulcer risk assessment in pediatric patients and pressure ulcer prevention intervention use overall and by hospital unit type, a descriptive secondary analysis was performed of data submitted to the National Database for Nursing Quality Indicators® (NDNQI®) for at least 3 of the 4 quarters in 2012. Relevant data on pressure ulcer risk from 271 hospitals across the United States extracted from the NDNQI database included patient skin and pressure ulcer risk assessment on admission, time since the last pressure ulcer risk assessment, method used to assess pressure ulcer risk, and risk status. Extracted data on pressure ulcer prevention included skin assessment, pressure-redistribution surface use, routine repositioning, nutritional support, and moisture management. These data were organized by unit type and merged with data on hospital characteristics for the analysis. The sample included 39 984 patients ages 1 day to 18 years on 678 pediatric acute care units (general pediatrics, pediatric critical care units, neonatal intensive care units, pediatric step-down units, and pediatric rehabilitation units). Descriptive statistics were used to analyze study data. Most of the pediatric patients (33 644; 89.2%) were assessed for pressure ulcer risk within 24 hours of admission. The Braden Q Scale was frequently used to assess risk on general pediatrics units (75.4%), pediatric step-down units (85.5%), pediatric critical care units (81.3%), and pediatric rehabilitation units (56.1%). In the neonatal intensive care units, another scale or method was used more often (55% to 60%) to assess pressure ulcer risk. Of the 11 203 pediatric patients (39%) determined to be at risk for pressure ulcers, the majority (10 741, 95.8%) received some kind of pressure ulcer prevention intervention during the 24 hours preceding the NDNQI pressure ulcer survey. The frequency

  20. Care-Related Risk Factors for Hospital-Acquired Pressure Ulcers Among Elderly Hip Fracture Patients

    PubMed Central

    Baumgarten, Mona; Rich, Shayna E.; Shardell, Michelle D.; Hawkes, William G.; Margolis, David J.; Langenberg, Patricia; Orwig, Denise L.; Palmer, Mary H.; Jones, Patricia S.; Sterling, Robert; Kinosian, Bruce P.; Magaziner, Jay

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To identify care-related factors associated with increased incidence of hospital-acquired pressure ulcers (HAPU) DESIGN Prospective cohort study SETTING Nine hospitals in Baltimore Hip Studies network PARTICIPANTS 658 patients age ≥65 years who underwent surgery for hip fracture MEASUREMENTS Skin examinations at baseline and alternating days until hospital discharge. Patients were deemed to have a HAPU if they developed ≥1 new pressure ulcers stage 2 or higher during the hospital stay. RESULTS Longer emergency department stays were associated with lower HAPU incidence (>4-6 hours: adjusted incidence rate ratio [aIRR] 0.68, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.48-0.96; >6 hours: aIRR 0.68, 95% CI 0.46-0.99, both compared to ≤4 hours). Patients with ≥24 hours between admission and surgery had a higher post-surgery HAPU rate than those with <24 hours (aIRR 1.62, 95% CI 1.24-2.11). Surgery with general anesthesia had a lower post-surgery HAPU rate than surgery with other types of anesthesia (aIRR 0.66, 95% CI 0.49-0.88). There was no significant association of HAPU incidence with timing or type of transport to hospital, or surgery duration. CONCLUSION Most of the factors hypothesized to be associated with higher pressure ulcer incidence were either associated with lower incidence or were not significantly associated, suggesting that HAPU development may not be as sensitive to care-related factors as commonly believed. Rigorous studies of innovative preventive interventions are needed to inform policy and practice. PMID:22332674

  1. The Nursing Diagnosis of risk for pressure ulcer: content validation 1

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, Cássia Teixeira; Almeida, Miriam de Abreu; Lucena, Amália de Fátima

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: to validate the content of the new nursing diagnosis, termed risk for pressure ulcer. Method: the content validation with a sample made up of 24 nurses who were specialists in skin care from six different hospitals in the South and Southeast of Brazil. Data collection took place electronically, through an instrument constructed using the SurveyMonkey program, containing a title, definition, and 19 risk factors for the nursing diagnosis. The data were analyzed using Fehring's method and descriptive statistics. The project was approved by a Research Ethics Committee. Results: title, definition and seven risk factors were validated as "very important": physical immobilization, pressure, surface friction, shearing forces, skin moisture, alteration in sensation and malnutrition. Among the other risk factors, 11 were validated as "important": dehydration, obesity, anemia, decrease in serum albumin level, prematurity, aging, smoking, edema, impaired circulation, and decrease in oxygenation and in tissue perfusion. The risk factor of hyperthermia was discarded. Conclusion: the content validation of these components of the nursing diagnosis corroborated the importance of the same, being able to facilitate the nurse's clinical reasoning and guiding clinical practice in the preventive care for pressure ulcers. PMID:27305182

  2. Addressing hospital-acquired pressure ulcers: patient care managers enhancing outcomes at the point of service.

    PubMed

    Frumenti, Jeanine M; Kurtz, Abby

    2014-01-01

    An innovative leadership training program for patient care managers (PCMs) aimed at improving the management of operational failures was conducted at a large metropolitan hospital center. The program focused on developing and enhancing the transformational leadership skills of PCMs by improving their ability to manage operational failures in general and, in this case, hospital-acquired pressure ulcers. The PCMs received 8 weeks of intense training using the Toyota Production System process improvement approach, along with executive coaching. Compared with the control group, the gains made by the intervention group were statistically significant.

  3. Pressure ulcer care and public policy: exploring the past to inform the future.

    PubMed

    Lyder, Courtney H; Ayello, Elizabeth A

    2012-02-01

    Over the last 25 years, the quality of pressure ulcer (PrU) care has significantly changed because of sweeping public policy changes from the federal government. In fact, how clinicians think about PrU prevention and treatment can be traced back to several landmark changes made by the federal government that affect the continuum of healthcare. Moreover, the types of reimbursements for providers and institutions have dramatically changed in the last 25 years. The purpose of this article is to briefly review some of the major changes in long-term care, acute care, and home healthcare that have been impacted by public policy over the last 25 years.

  4. Perioperative nurses' knowledge of indicators for pressure ulcer development in the surgical patient population.

    PubMed

    Lupear, Susan Krauser; Overstreet, Maria; Krau, Stephen D

    2015-06-01

    Despite focused attention to improve the quality and safety of patient care, and the financial impact pressure ulcers (PUs) can have on a health care provider or institution, evidence supports that PUs continue to occur in other patient populations during admission to the hospital. An example of a patient population in which evidence indicates that the development of PUs occurs, is patients who have a surgical procedure. The article discusses a project designed to identify potential knowledge deficits among perioperative nurses of indicators for PU development in the surgical patient population.

  5. Exploration of pressure ulcer and related skin problems across the spectrum of health care settings in Ontario using administrative data.

    PubMed

    Woo, Kevin Y; Sears, Kim; Almost, Joan; Wilson, Rosemary; Whitehead, Marlo; VanDenKerkhof, Elizabeth G

    2017-02-01

    This is a prospective cohort study using population-level administrative data to describe the scope of pressure ulcers in terms of its prevalence, incidence risk, associating factors and the extent to which best practices were applied across a spectrum of health care settings. The data for this study includes the information of Ontario residents who were admitted to acute care, home care, long term care or continuing care and whose health care data is contained in the resident assessment instrument-minimum data set (RAI-MDS) and the health outcomes for better information and care (HOBIC) database from 2010 to 2013. The analysis included 203 035 unique patients. The overall prevalence of pressure ulcers was approximately 13% and highest in the complex continuing care setting. Over 25% of pressure ulcers in long-term care developed one week after discharge from acute care hospitalisation. Individuals with cardiovascular disease, dementia, bed mobility problems, bowel incontinence, end-stage diseases, daily pain, weight loss and shortness of breath were more likely to develop pressure ulcers. While there were a number of evidence-based interventions implemented to treat pressure ulcers, only half of the patients received nutritional interventions.

  6. Successful Pedicled Anterolateral Thigh Flap Reconstruction for a Recurrent Ischial Pressure Ulcer: A Case With Multiple Recurrences Over a 7-year Follow-up.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chi-Yu; Shih, Yu-Jen; Chou, Chang-Yi; Chen, Tim-Mo; Chen, Shyi-Gen; Tzeng, Yuan-Sheng

    2015-06-01

    Ischial pressure ulcers are difficult ulcers to treat and have a low treatment success rate compared to sacral and trochanteric ulcers; regional flap failure further complicates the treatment. Reported here is a case of a 65-year-old man who experienced a spinal injury with paraplegia due to trauma 20 years ago. The patient experienced a recurrent ischial ulcer since 2007, and underwent several types of flap reconstruction with poor outcomes over a 7-year period. Therefore, the chosen intervention was a pedicled anterolateral thigh (pALT) fasciocutaneous flap reconstruction for the ischial ulcer via a subcutaneous route. Over the 10-month follow-up, the recurrent ischial ulcer healed without wound dehiscence. Island pALT reconstruction appears to be an alternative technique for treating recurrent ischial pressure ulcers. Though reconstruction of ischial ulcers via the pALT technique has been described previously, this may be the first case report to describe pALT flap in a patient with recurrent ischial ulcers after failed reconstructions using a gluteus maximus flap, V-Y advancement flap, and hatchet flap.Ischial pressure ulcers are difficult to treat and have a low treatment success rate1 compared to sacral and trochanteric ulcers. In addition, there are many different techniques that can be used to treat ischial pressure ulcers, including primary wound closure, gluteus maximus flaps, V-Y advancement flaps, or inferior gluteal artery perforator flaps. However, several experts have recently described using the pedicled anterolateral thigh (pALT) flap for reconstruction of recurrent ischial pressure ulcers.1,2 In the presented case, the authors followed a single patient with paraplegia with a recurrent ischial ulcer who had undergone several types of wound treatment over a 7-year period. The indurated ulcer was ultimately resolved by pALT reconstruction.

  7. Biochemical association of metabolic profile and microbiome in chronic pressure ulcer wounds.

    PubMed

    Ammons, Mary Cloud B; Morrissey, Kathryn; Tripet, Brian P; Van Leuven, James T; Han, Anne; Lazarus, Gerald S; Zenilman, Jonathan M; Stewart, Philip S; James, Garth A; Copié, Valérie

    2015-01-01

    Chronic, non-healing wounds contribute significantly to the suffering of patients with co-morbidities in the clinical population with mild to severely compromised immune systems. Normal wound healing proceeds through a well-described process. However, in chronic wounds this process seems to become dysregulated at the transition between resolution of inflammation and re-epithelialization. Bioburden in the form of colonizing bacteria is a major contributor to the delayed headlining in chronic wounds such as pressure ulcers. However how the microbiome influences the wound metabolic landscape is unknown. Here, we have used a Systems Biology approach to determine the biochemical associations between the taxonomic and metabolomic profiles of wounds colonized by bacteria. Pressure ulcer biopsies were harvested from primary chronic wounds and bisected into top and bottom sections prior to analysis of microbiome by pyrosequencing and analysis of metabolome using 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Bacterial taxonomy revealed that wounds were colonized predominantly by three main phyla, but differed significantly at the genus level. While taxonomic profiles demonstrated significant variability between wounds, metabolic profiles shared significant similarity based on the depth of the wound biopsy. Biochemical association between taxonomy and metabolic landscape indicated significant wound-to-wound similarity in metabolite enrichment sets and metabolic pathway impacts, especially with regard to amino acid metabolism. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of a statistically robust correlation between bacterial colonization and metabolic landscape within the chronic wound environment.

  8. Pressure ulcer prevention in nursing homes: nurse descriptions of individual and organization level factors.

    PubMed

    Dellefield, Mary Ellen; Magnabosco, Jennifer L

    2014-01-01

    Sustaining pressure ulcer prevention (PUP) in nursing homes has been difficult to achieve. Implementation science researchers suggest that identification of individual staff and organizational factors influencing current practices is essential to the development of an effective and customized plan to implement practice changes in a specific setting. A mixed methods approach was used to describe nurses' perceptions of individual and organization-level factors influencing performance of PUP in two Veterans Health Administration (VHA) nursing homes prior to implementation of a national VHA initiative on Hospital Acquired Pressure Ulcers (HAPUs). Individual interviews of 16 nursing staff were conducted. Individual factors influencing practice were a personal sense of responsibility to Veterans and belief in the effectiveness and importance of preventive measures. Organizational factors were existence of cooperative practices between nursing assistants and licensed nurses in assessing risk; teamwork, communication, and a commitment to Veterans' well-being. Integration and reinforcement of such factors in the development and maintenance of customized plans of PUP initiatives is recommended.

  9. Imaging Mass Spectrometry for Assessing Cutaneous Wound Healing: Analysis of Pressure Ulcers

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) was employed for the analysis of frozen skin biopsies to investigate the differences between stage IV pressure ulcers that remain stalled, stagnant, and unhealed versus those exhibiting clinical and histological signs of improvement. Our data reveal a rich diversity of proteins that are dynamically modulated, and we selectively highlight a family of calcium binding proteins (S-100 molecules) including calcyclin (S100-A6), calgranulins A (S100-A8) and B (S100-A9), and calgizzarin (S100-A11). IMS allowed us to target three discrete regions of interest: the wound bed, adjacent dermis, and hypertrophic epidermis. Plots derived using unsupervised principal component analysis of the global protein signatures within these three spatial niches indicate that these data from wound signatures have potential as a prognostic tool since they appear to delineate wounds that are favorably responding to therapeutic interventions versus those that remain stagnant or intractable in their healing status. Our discovery-based approach with IMS augments current knowledge of the molecular signatures within pressure ulcers while providing a rationale for a focused examination of the role of calcium modulators within the context of impaired wound healing. PMID:25488653

  10. Experimental study with nursing staff related to the knowledge about pressure ulcers 1

    PubMed Central

    Baron, Miriam Viviane; Reuter, Cézane Priscila; Burgos, Miria Suzana; Cavalli, Veniria; Brandenburg, Cristine; Krug, Suzane Beatriz Frantz

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: to compare the scores of knowledge in teams participating or not participating in educational interventions about pressure ulcers. Method: a quantitative study with experimental design. Data were collected through a validated questionnaire. The study included 71 individuals, including nurses and nursing technicians from three intensive care units, divided into intervention group and control group. Data analysis considered the scores of the groups in the moment before and after intervention. To check the average rate of correct answers, we calculated the mean and standard deviation. We carried out the Mann-Whitney test for analysis of two independent samples, and the Wilcoxon test for related samples. Results: The mean percentage of correct answers, at the baseline was 74.1% (SD = 26.4) in the intervention group and 76.0% (SD = 22.9) in the control group and post time -intervention, was 87.8% (SD = 18.8) in the group receiving educational intervention, considering that in the control group it was 79.1% (SD = 22.2). The group that participated in educational interventions did not reach the proper average of 90% correct answers for the test. Conclusion: educational interventions on staging, evaluation and prevention of pressure ulcers contributed significantly to the increase of correct responses score in the knowledge test of the intervention group and improved their knowledge on the subject. PMID:27878223

  11. Use of a topical haemoglobin spray for oxygenating pressure ulcers: healing outcomes.

    PubMed

    Tickle, Joy; Bateman, Sharon Dawn

    2015-12-01

    A published evaluation ( Tickle, 2015 ) of the use of a topical haemoglobin spray plus standard care in 18 patients with pressure ulcers showed that, following 4 weeks of treatment, the wound size reduced in 17 wounds and there was a progression toward healing in all 18. All but one of the wounds were over 2 months in duration at baseline. This article reports the results of the healing rates at 3 months of the 11 patients who continued to be treated with the haemoglobin spray. Nine of the 11 wounds healed, and 2 reduced in size by week 12 (i.e. 1 wound reduced from 30 cm(2) at baseline to 7 cm(2), while the other reduced from 6 cm(2) to 4 cm(2)). Of the 10 patients who were experiencing wound pain at baseline, 9 were pain free by week 8. Rapid elimination of slough was observed in all patients. The 82% healing rate achieved at 3 months and the fact that most patients continued to receive the same standard care as they had in the 4 weeks before recruitment into the evaluation increases the likelihood that the clinical outcomes observed here can be attributed to the haemoglobin spray. Topical haemoglobin shows promise in terms of its ability to accelerate healing in chronic pressure ulcers.

  12. Micronized, particulate dermal matrix to manage a non-healing pressure ulcer with undermined wound edges: a case report.

    PubMed

    Allam, Reynald C

    2007-04-01

    Pressure ulcers with undermined edges are generally hard to treat and may require surgical debridement and flap coverage. A woman with a 5-month history of a non-healing, undermined, sacro-coccygeal pressure ulcer presented for care at the author's wound care center. Because traditional wound care had failed and surgical debridement and repair was contraindicated due to her overall poor general health and malnutrition, an injectable dermal filler was applied inside the wound. The matrix filler was covered with secondary and tertiary dressings and the wound healed after 8 weeks with no adverse effects or infection. The results of this and previously published case studies suggest that injectable dermal matrix may be a viable option for non-surgical treatment of difficult-to-heal pressure ulcers with undermining. Additional safety, efficacy, and cost-effectiveness studies seem warranted.

  13. Potential application of in vivo imaging of impaired lymphatic duct to evaluate the severity of pressure ulcer in mouse model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasuya, Akira; Sakabe, Jun-Ichi; Tokura, Yoshiki

    2014-02-01

    Ischemia-reperfusion (IR) injury is a cause of pressure ulcer. However, a mechanism underlying the IR injury-induced lymphatic vessel damage remains unclear. We investigated the alterations of structure and function of lymphatic ducts in a mouse cutaneous IR model. And we suggested a new method for evaluating the severity of pressure ulcer. Immunohistochemistry showed that lymphatic ducts were totally vanished by IR injury, while blood vessels were relatively preserved. The production of harmful reactive oxygen species (ROS) was increased in injured tissue. In vitro study showed a high vulnerability of lymphatic endothelial cells to ROS. Then we evaluated the impaired lymphatic drainage using an in vivo imaging system for intradermally injected indocyanine green (ICG). The dysfunction of ICG drainage positively correlated with the severity of subsequent cutaneous changes. Quantification of the lymphatic duct dysfunction by this imaging system could be a useful strategy to estimate the severity of pressure ulcer.

  14. Use of Pressure-Redistributing Support Surfaces among Elderly Hip Fracture Patients across the Continuum of Care: Adherence to Pressure Ulcer Prevention Guidelines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baumgarten, Mona; Margolis, David; Orwig, Denise; Hawkes, William; Rich, Shayna; Langenberg, Patricia; Shardell, Michelle; Palmer, Mary H.; McArdle, Patrick; Sterling, Robert; Jones, Patricia S.; Magaziner, Jay

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To estimate the frequency of use of pressure-redistributing support surfaces (PRSS) among hip fracture patients and to determine whether higher pressure ulcer risk is associated with greater PRSS use. Design and Methods: Patients (n = 658) aged [greater than or equal] 65 years who had surgery for hip fracture were examined by research…

  15. Predictive Factors for Pressure Ulcers in an Older Adult Population Hospitalized for Hip Fractures: A Prognostic Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Background Older adult patients with fragility hip fractures constitute a population at high risk for complications, in particular pressure ulcers. The aim was to evaluate the incidence of pressure ulcers and potential predictive factors. Methods and Findings A prospective multicentric prognostic cohort study in orthopedic wards in three Italian public hospitals. Participants were all consecutive patients 65 years of age or older diagnosed with a fragility hip fracture. Outcomes were incidence of pressure ulcers. The exposure variables were grouped into three macro areas in order to facilitate reading: “intrinsic” variables, “extrinsic” variables and variables linked to the organization of patient care. One thousand eighty-three older adult patients with fragility hip fractures were enrolled from October 1st, 2013 to January 31st, 2015, and pressure ulcers developed in 22.7%. At multivariate analysis, the following were found to be risk factors: age> 80 years (odds ratio (OR) 1.03; p = 0.015), the length of time a urinary catheter was used (OR 1.013; p<0.001), the length of time pain was present (OR 1.008; p = 0.008), the absence of side rails on the bed (OR 1.668; p = 0.026) and the use of a foam position valve (OR 1.025; p<0.001). Instead, the protective factors were the presence of a caregiver for at least half a day daily (OR 0.994; p = 0.012) and the number of positionings during the postoperative period (OR 0.897; p = 0.008). Conclusions The study allowed the identification of the patients most at risk for developing pressure ulcers, and the construction of a pragmatic predictive model using significant risk or protective factors in order to reduce the number of pressure ulcers. PMID:28068425

  16. Advancing a smart air cushion system for preventing pressure ulcers using projection Moiré for large deformation measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Sheng-Lin; Tsai, Tsung-Heng; Lee, Carina Jean-Tien; Hsu, Yu-Hsiang; Lee, Chih-Kung

    2016-03-01

    A pressure ulcer is one of the most important concerns for wheelchair bound patients with spinal cord injuries. A pressure ulcer is a localized injury near the buttocks that bear ischial tuberosity oppression over a long period of time. Due to elevated compression to blood vessels, the surrounding tissues suffer from a lack of oxygen and nutrition. The ulcers eventually lead to skin damage followed by tissue necrosis. The current medical strategy is to minimize the occurrence of pressure ulcers by regularly helping patients change their posture. However, these methods do not always work effectively or well. As a solution to fundamentally prevent pressure ulcers, a smart air cushion system was developed to detect and control pressure actively. The air cushion works by automatically adjusting a patient's sitting posture to effectively relieve the buttock pressure. To analyze the correlation between the dynamic pressure profiles of an air cell with a patient's weight, a projection Moiré system was adopted to measure the deformation of an air cell and its associated stress distribution. Combining a full-field deformation imaging with air pressure measured within an air cell, the patient's weight and the stress distribution can be simultaneously obtained. By integrating a full-field optical metrology with a time varying pressure sensor output coupled with different active air control algorithms for various designs, we can tailor the ratio of the air cells. Our preliminary data suggests that this newly developed smart air cushion has the potential to selectively reduce localized compression on the tissues at the buttocks. Furthermore, it can take a patient's weight which is an additional benefit so that medical personnel can reference it to prescribe the correct drug dosages.

  17. The angiogenic peptide vascular endothelial growth factor-basic fibroblast growth factor signaling is up-regulated in a rat pressure ulcer model.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jing-Jin; Wang, Xue-Ling; Shi, Bo-Wen; Huang, Fang

    2013-08-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the mRNA and protein expression levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) in pressure ulcers, and to elucidate the molecular mechanism by which VEGF and bFGF are involved in pressure ulcer formation. A rat model of ischemia-reperfusion pressure ulcer was established by magnetic disk circulating compression method. Real-time fluorescence quantitative PCR and Western blot assays were conducted to detect the mRNA and protein expression of VEGF and bFGF in the tissues of rat I-, II-, and III-degree pressure ulcers, the surrounding tissues, and normal skin. Our study confirmed that the mRNA and protein expression levels of VEGF and bFGF in the tissues of rat I-degree pressure ulcer were significantly higher than that in the II- and III-degree pressure ulcer tissues (P < 0.05). The expression of VEGF and bFGF in the tissues surrounding I- and II-degree pressure ulcers were higher than the rats with normal skin. The expression of VEGF and bFGF in the tissues of rat III-degree pressure ulcer was lower than that in the surrounding tissues and normal skin (P < 0.05). There was a significant positive correlation between change in the VEGF and bFGF. The results showed that with an increase in the degree of pressure ulcers, the expression of VEGF and bFGF in pressure ulcers tissue are decreased. This leads to a reduction in angiogenesis and may be a crucial factor in the formation of pressure ulcers.

  18. Predictors of Barefoot Plantar Pressure during Walking in Patients with Diabetes, Peripheral Neuropathy and a History of Ulceration

    PubMed Central

    Barn, Ruth; Waaijman, Roelof; Nollet, Frans; Woodburn, James; Bus, Sicco A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Elevated dynamic plantar foot pressures significantly increase the risk of foot ulceration in diabetes mellitus. The aim was to determine which factors predict plantar pressures in a population of diabetic patients who are at high-risk of foot ulceration. Methods Patients with diabetes, peripheral neuropathy and a history of ulceration were eligible for inclusion in this cross sectional study. Demographic data, foot structure and function, and disease-related factors were recorded and used as potential predictor variables in the analyses. Barefoot peak pressures during walking were calculated for the heel, midfoot, forefoot, lesser toes, and hallux regions. Potential predictors were investigated using multivariate linear regression analyses. 167 participants with mean age of 63 years contributed 329 feet to the analyses. Results The regression models were able to predict between 6% (heel) and 41% (midfoot) of the variation in peak plantar pressures. The largest contributing factor in the heel model was glycosylated haemoglobin concentration, in the midfoot Charcot deformity, in the forefoot prominent metatarsal heads, in the lesser toes hammer toe deformity and in the hallux previous ulceration. Variables with local effects (e.g. foot deformity) were stronger predictors of plantar pressure than global features (e.g. body mass, age, gender, or diabetes duration). Conclusion The presence of local deformity was the largest contributing factor to barefoot dynamic plantar pressure in high-risk diabetic patients and should therefore be adequately managed to reduce plantar pressure and ulcer risk. However, a significant amount of variance is unexplained by the models, which advocates the quantitative measurement of plantar pressures in the clinical risk assessment of the patient. PMID:25647421

  19. Characteristics of Recurrent Pressure Ulcers in Veterans With Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Bates-Jensen, Barbara M; Guihan, Marylou; Garber, Susan L; Chin, Amy S; Burns, Stephen P

    2009-01-01

    Background/Objective: To describe characteristics of recurrent pressure ulcers (PrUs) in veterans with spinal cord injury (SCI). Design: Descriptive, cohort study. Settings and Participants: Twenty-four veterans with SCI from 6 SCI centers in the Department of Veterans Affairs. Methods: Data from a prospective study evaluating PrUs were analyzed for 24 veterans with 29 recurrent PrUs during 9 months. Additional retrospective medical record data were analyzed for 15 veterans who received inpatient treatment. Results: Participants were male, 50% non-Hispanic white, with paraplegia (63%), complete SCI (83%), a mean age of 56 years, and mean time since SCI of 21 years. Most PrUs recurred (63%, n = 15 patients) in the same location as the most recent ulcer and at the ischial tuberosities (63%). Mean time to recurrence was 16.6 weeks. PrUs were stage III (28%, n = 8) or IV (45%, n = 13) with undermining (48%), necrotic slough (50%), and minimal exudate. One third were (n = 9) larger than 16 cm2. Mean Bates-Jensen Wound Assessment Tool Score was 33.63. Inpatient medical record data (n = 15) showed 73% with documentation indicating infection treated with antibiotics (53%, n = 8 patients), osteomyelitis (47%, n = 7), and/or cellulitis (13%, n = 2) noted. Plastic surgery consultation was obtained for 67% with surgery as an option for 73% (1 without consultation). Scheduled repositioning was documented for 21%. Conclusions: Most PrUs were severe, located at the same anatomic site, and recurred within 4 months, suggesting that the recurrent ulcers were more likely incomplete healing of the initial PrUs. This sample of veterans with SCI provides early data on recurrent PrU characteristics. PMID:19264047

  20. A Quality-Improvement Collaborative Project to Reduce Pressure Ulcers in PICUs

    PubMed Central

    King, Alice; Nie, Ann Marie; Schaffer, Pat; Taylor, Teresa; Pruitt, David; Giaccone, Mary Jo; Ashby, Marshall; Keswani, Sundeep

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Pediatric patients are at risk for developing pressure ulcers (PUs) and associated pain, infection risk, and prolonged hospitalization. Stage III and IV ulcers are serious, reportable events. The objective of this study was to develop and implement a quality-improvement (QI) intervention to reduce PUs by 50% in our ICUs. METHODS: We established a QI collaborative leadership team, measured PU rates during an initial period of rapid-cycle tests of change, developed a QI bundle, and evaluated the PU rates after the QI implementation. The prospective study encompassed 1425 patients over 54 351 patient-days in the PICU and NICU. RESULTS: The PU rate in the PICU was 14.3/1000 patient-days during the QI development and 3.7/1000 patient-days after QI implementation (P < .05), achieving the aim of 50% reduction. The PICU rates of stages I, II, and III conventional and device-related PUs decreased after the QI intervention. The PU rate in the NICU did not change significantly over time but remained at a mean of 0.9/1000 patient-days. In the postimplementation period, 3 points were outside the control limits, primarily due to an increase in PUs associated with pulse oximeters and cannulas. CONCLUSIONS: The collaborative QI model was effective at reducing PUs in the PICU. Pediatric patients, particularly neonates, are at risk for device-related ulcers. Heightened awareness, early detection, and identification of strategies to mitigate device-related injury are necessary to further reduce PU rates. PMID:23650292

  1. Effectiveness of skin perfusion pressure monitoring during surgery for an ischemic steal syndrome associated refractory ulcer.

    PubMed

    Okubo, Kentaro; Sato, Takashi; Matsubara, Chieko; Tsuboi, Masato; Ishii, Yasuo; Tojimbara, Tamotsu

    2015-01-01

    We describe an 80-year-old man with end-stage renal disease due to type 2 diabetes who had been maintained on hemodialysis for 9 years. He developed refractory ulcers from an abraded wound in the right hand of his access arm. The arteriovenous fistula (AVF) was located between the right brachial artery and the median antecubital vein draining into the cephalic vein and the deep veins close to the elbow. The blood flow of the right brachial artery measured by using Doppler ultrasonography was 920 ml/min. On the contrary, the radial and ulnar arteries were poorly palpable near the wrist, and ultrasonography could not be performed accurately because of a high degree of calcification. The skin perfusion pressure (SPP) of the first finger on the affected side decreased to 22 mmHg. However, the SPP improved to approximately 40 mmHg upon blocking an inflow into the deep vein. According to SPP data, only a communicating branch of the deep vein was ligated, and the AVF itself was preserved. One month after surgery, the skin ulcer healed, and maintenance hemodialysis was performed by using the preserved cephalic vein for blood access.In conclusion, we successfully treated a refractory wound associated with steal syndrome, without terminating the AVF. SPP-guided surgery may be safe and effective to adjust the blood flow in patients with AVF having steal syndrome.

  2. Treatment of Early-Stage Pressure Ulcers by Using Autologous Adipose Tissue Grafts

    PubMed Central

    Marangi, Giovanni Francesco; Pallara, Tiziano; Cagli, Barbara; Schena, Emiliano; Giurazza, Francesco; Faiella, Elio; Zobel, Bruno Beomonte; Persichetti, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Assessing pressure ulcers (PUs) in early stages allows patients to receive safer treatment. Up to now, in addition to clinical evaluation, ultrasonography seems to be the most suitable technique to achieve this goal. Several treatments are applied to prevent ulcer progression but none of them is totally effective. Furthermore, the in-depth knowledge of fat regenerative properties has led to a wide use of it. With this study the authors aim at introducing a new approach to cure and prevent the worsening of early-stage PUs by using fat grafts. The authors selected 42 patients who showed clinical and ultrasonographic evidence of early-stage PUs. Values of skin thickness, fascial integrity, and subcutaneous vascularity were recorded both on the PU area and the healthy trochanteric one, used as control region. Fat grafting was performed on all patients. At three months, abnormal ultrasonographic findings, such as reduction of cutaneous and subcutaneous thickness, discontinuous fascia, and decrease in subcutaneous vascularity, all were modified with respect to almost all the corresponding parameters of the control region. Results highlight that the use of fat grafts proved to be an effective treatment for early-stage PUs, especially in the care of neurological and chronic bedridden patients. PMID:24818019

  3. The Association for the Advancement of Wound Care (AAWC) venous and pressure ulcer guidelines.

    PubMed

    Bolton, Laura L; Girolami, Sue; Corbett, Lisa; van Rijswijk, Lia

    2014-11-01

    Guidelines based on best available evidence to support pressure ulcer (PU) or venous ulcer (VU) management decisions can improve outcomes. Historically, such guidelines were consensus-based and differed in content and development methods used. Since 2002, the Association for the Advancement of Wound Care (AAWC) Guideline Task Force has used a systematic approach for developing "guidelines of guidelines" that unify and blend recommendations from relevant published guidelines while meeting Institute of Medicine and Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality standards. In addition to establishing the literature-based strength of each recommendation, guideline clinical relevance is examined using standard content validation procedures. All final recommendations included are clinically relevant and/or supported by the highest level of available evidence, cited with every recommendation. In addition, guideline implementation resources are provided. The most recent AAWC VU and PU guidelines and ongoing efforts for improving their clinical relevance are presented. The guideline development process must be transparent and guidelines must be updated regularly to maintain their relevance. In addition, end-user results and research studies to examine their construct and predictive validity are needed.

  4. Albumin administration prevents the onset of pressure ulcers in intensive care unit patients.

    PubMed

    Serra, Raffaele; Grande, Raffaele; Buffone, Gianluca; Gallelli, Luca; Caroleo, Santo; Tropea, Francesco; Amantea, Bruno; de Franciscis, Stefano

    2015-08-01

    Pressure ulcers (PUs) are a common problem in critically ill patients admitted to the intensive care units (ICUs) and they account for more than 70% of patients with low serum albumin at admission. The aim of this study was to test the efficacy of intravenous administration of albumin in patients with low serum albumin < 3·3 g/dl. In a 1-year period, a total of 73 patients were admitted to the ICU (males 45, 61·64% and females 28, 38·36%); of these, 21 patients were admitted with hypoalbuminaemia (serum albumin < 3·3 g/dl) and randomised into two groups: 11 patients were treated with 25 g intravenous albumin for the first 3 days within the first week of ICU stay (group A) and 10 patients did not receive albumin (group B). Three patients (27·27%) showed the onset of PUs in group A, whereas seven patients (70%) showed the onset of PUs within the first 7 days of stay in group B. Moreover, ulcers of group B were more severe than those of group A. This study shows that intravenous administration of albumin reduces the onset of PUs in patients admitted to the ICU and in some cases it also reduces the risk of progression to advanced stages of PUs.

  5. Pressure Combined with Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury Induces Deep Tissue Injury via Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress in a Rat Pressure Ulcer Model.

    PubMed

    Cui, Fei-Fei; Pan, Ying-Ying; Xie, Hao-Huang; Wang, Xiao-Hui; Shi, Hong-Xue; Xiao, Jian; Zhang, Hong-Yu; Chang, Hao-Teng; Jiang, Li-Ping

    2016-02-25

    Pressure ulcer is a complex and significant health problem in long-term bedridden patients, and there is currently no effective treatment or efficient prevention method. Furthermore, the molecular mechanisms and pathogenesis contributing to the deep injury of pressure ulcers are unclear. The aim of the study was to explore the role of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and Akt/GSK3β signaling in pressure ulcers. A model of pressure-induced deep tissue injury in adult Sprague-Dawley rats was established. Rats were treated with 2-h compression and subsequent 0.5-h release for various cycles. After recovery, the tissue in the compressed regions was collected for further analysis. The compressed muscle tissues showed clear cellular degenerative features. First, the expression levels of ER stress proteins GRP78, CHOP, and caspase-12 were generally increased compared to those in the control. Phosphorylated Akt and phosphorylated GSK3β were upregulated in the beginning of muscle compression, and immediately significantly decreased at the initiation of ischemia-reperfusion injury in compressed muscles tissue. These data show that ER stress may be involved in the underlying mechanisms of cell degeneration after pressure ulcers and that the Akt/GSK3β signal pathway may play an important role in deep tissue injury induced by pressure and ischemia/reperfusion.

  6. Biofilm detection by wound blotting can predict slough development in pressure ulcers: A prospective observational study.

    PubMed

    Nakagami, Gojiro; Schultz, Gregory; Gibson, Daniel J; Phillips, Priscilla; Kitamura, Aya; Minematsu, Takeo; Miyagaki, Tomomitsu; Hayashi, Akitatsu; Sasaki, Sanae; Sugama, Junko; Sanada, Hiromi

    2016-12-26

    Bacteria have been found to form multicellular aggregates which have collectively been termed "biofilms." It is hypothesized that biofilm formation is a means to protect bacterial cells including protection form the immune response of humans. This protective mechanism is believed to explain persistent chronic wound infections. At times, the biofilms are abundant enough to see, and remove by simple wiping. However, recent evidence has shown that the removal of these visible portions are not sufficient, and that biofilms can continue to form even with daily wiping. In this work, we tested an approach to detect the biofilms which are present after clinically wiping or sharp wound debridement. Our method is based on a variation of impression cytology in which a nitrocellulose membrane was used to collect surface biofilm components, which were then differentially stained. In this prospective study, members of an interdisciplinary pressure ulcer team at a university hospital tested our method's ability to predict the generation of wound slough in the week that followed each blotting. A total of 70 blots collected from 23 pressure ulcers produced 27 wounds negative for staining and 43 positive. In the negative blots 55.6% were found to have decreased wound slough, while 81.4% with positive staining had either increase or unchanged wound slough generation. These results lead to an odds ratio of positive blotting cases of 9.37 (95% confidence intervals: 2.47-35.5, p = 0.001) for slough formation; suggesting that the changes in wound slough formation can be predicted clinically using a non-invasive wound blotting method.

  7. Validity and reliability of a pressure ulcer monitoring tool for persons with spinal cord impairment

    PubMed Central

    Thomason, Susan S.; Luther, Stephen L.; Powell-Cope, Gail M.; Harrow, Jeffrey J.; Palacios, Polly

    2014-01-01

    Objective The purpose was to provide support for validity and reliability of the spinal cord impairment pressure ulcer monitoring tool (SCI-PUMT) to assess pressure ulcer (PrU) healing. Design Expert panels developed a 30-item pool, including new items and items from two established PrU healing tools, to represent potential variables for monitoring PrU healing. Subjects were prospectively assessed weekly for each variable over a 12-week period. Setting Data collection was conducted on a cohort of inpatients and outpatients in one Spinal Cord Injury/Disorders Center in the Veterans’ Health Administration. Subjects A convenience sample of Veterans (n = 66) with spinal cord impairment (SCI) was recruited. Eligible subjects had at least one PrU (n = 167) and a history of SCI for longer than 1 year. Interventions Not applicable. Outcome Measure A change in PrU volume was calculated using VeV Measurement Documentation software and a digital imaging camera. Results Content validity was established for a pool of items designed to gauge PrU healing. Exploratory factor analysis (construct validity) identified a parsimonious set of seven items for inclusion in the SCI-PUMT to assess PrU healing. The SCI-PUMT was found to explain 59% of the variance of the volume across the study. Inter-rater reliability was 0.79 and intra-rater reliability ranged from 0.81 to 0.99 among research assistants. Similar levels of reliability were subsequently established among registered nurses, who used the SCI-PUMT in the clinical setting. Conclusions The final version of the SCI-PUMT was determined to be valid, reliable, and sensitive in detecting PrU healing over time in Veterans with SCI. PMID:24621044

  8. Biomechanics Analysis of Pressure Ulcer Using Damaged Interface Model between Bone and Muscle in the Human Buttock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slamet, Samuel Susanto; Takano, Naoki; Tanabe, Yoshiyuki; Hatano, Asako; Nagasao, Tomohisa

    This paper aims at building up a computational procedure to study the bio-mechanism of pressure ulcer using the finite element method. Pressure ulcer is a disease that occurs in the human body after 2 hours of continuous external force. In the very early stage of pressure ulcer, it is found that the tissues inside the body are damaged, even though skin surface looks normal. This study assumes that tension and/or shear strain will cause damage to loose fibril tissue between the bone and muscle and that propagation of damaged area will lead to fatal stage. Analysis was performed using the finite element method by modeling the damaged fibril tissue as a cutout. By varying the loading directions and watching both tensile and shear strains, the risk of fibril tissue damage and propagation of the damaged area is discussed, which may give new insight for the careful nursing for patients, particularly after surgical treatment. It was found that the pressure ulcer could reoccur for a surgical flap treatment. The bone cut and surgical flap surgery is not perfect to prevent the bone-muscle interfacial damage.

  9. Transdermal Wound Oxygen Therapy on Pressure Ulcer Healing: A Single-Blind Multi-Center Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Azimian, Jalil; Dehghan Nayeri, Nahid; Pourkhaleghi, Enis; Ansari, Monireh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Although healthcare quality has considerably improved in many countries, pressure ulcer is still a major health challenge worldwide. Objectives: The current study aimed to evaluate the effects of TWOT on the healing of pressure ulcers. Patients and Methods: This study was a randomized controlled trial, and the convenient sample including 100 patients hospitalized in two university-affiliated medical-surgical intensive care units and one neurology unit located in Qazvin, Iran were studied. Patients with stage II-IV pressure ulcer on the sacral or ischial areas were randomly assigned to either the control or the experimental groups. The experimental group received a 12-day transdermal wound oxygen therapy. Wound status was assessed seven times before the intervention, as well as two, four, six, eight, ten, and twelve days after the intervention. Results: After 12 days of wound oxygen therapy, the number of patients with complete wound healing in the experimental group was significantly greater than that of the control group. Moreover, the total mean of wound area in the experimental group was significantly lower than that of the control group. Conclusions: Transdermal wound oxygen therapy can effectively promote wound healing in patients with pressure ulcers. PMID:26734476

  10. Spectroscopic detection of the blanch response at the heel of the foot: a possible diagnostic for stage I pressure ulcers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohlenberg, Elicia M.; Zanca, Jeanne; Brienza, David M.; Levasseur, Michelle A.; Sowa, Michael G.

    2005-09-01

    Pressure ulcers (sores) can occur when there is constant pressure being applied to tissue for extended periods of time. Immobile people are particularly prone to this problem. Ideally, pressure damage is detected at an early stage, pressure relief is applied and the pressure ulcer is averted. One of the hallmarks of pressure damaged skin is an obliterated blanch response due to compromised microcirculation near the surface of the skin. Visible reflectance spectroscopy can noninvasively probe the blood circulation of the upper layers of skin by measuring the electronic transitions arising from hemoglobin, the primary oxygen carrying protein in blood. A spectroscopic test was developed on a mixed population of 30 subjects to determine if the blanch response could be detected in healthy skin with high sensitivity and specificity regardless of the pigmentation of the skin. Our results suggest that a spectroscopic based blanch response test can accurately detect the blanching of healthy tissue and has the potential to be developed into a screening test for early stage I pressure ulcers.

  11. Adapting a SSKIN bundle for carers to aid identification of pressure damage and ulcer risks in the community.

    PubMed

    McCoulough, Siobhan

    2016-06-01

    If pressure damage is identified and addressed at an early stage, it may be reversed. Otherwise, it may quickly progress into a serious deep tissue injury. In the community, most daily skin care is undertaken by formal and informal carers. They therefore need to know how to identify signs that pressure ulcers may develop and what immediate actions to take. NICE guidance on pressure ulcer prevention is too extensive to be a simple tool for carers, so a SSKIN bundle was adapted for community use. This ensures carers know how to prevent and identify pressure damage, and includes skin care, repositioning and use of equipment. Carers need training. This is the responsibility of all involved with the patient, including health-care and local authority services.

  12. The Association between Pre-existing Diabetes Mellitus and Pressure Ulcers in Patients Following Surgery: A Meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Kang, Zhou-Qing; Zhai, Xiao-Jie

    2015-08-11

    Uncertainty exists about the role of diabetes in the development of surgery-related pressure ulcers. Therefore, we conducted a meta-analysis to explore the association between pre-existing diabetes mellitus and pressure ulcers among patients after surgery. Summary odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using random effects models. Thirteen eligible studies of 2367 patients in total and 12,053 controls were included in the final analysis. Compared with patients without diabetes, the pooled odds ratio (OR) of the incidence of pressure ulcers in diabetic patients was 1.74 [95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.40-2.15, I(2 )= 51.1%]. Estimates by type of surgery suggested similar results in cardiac surgery [OR = 2.00, 95% CI = 1.42-2.82, I(2 )= 0%], in general surgery [OR = 1.75, 95% CI = 1.42-2.15, I(2 )= 0%], and in major lower limb amputations [OR = 1.65, 95% CI = 1.01-2.68, I(2 )= 0%] for diabetic patients versus non-diabetic controls. We did not find an increased incidence of pressure ulcers in diabetic patients undergoing hip surgery compared with non-diabetic controls [OR = 1.46, 95% CI = 0.62-3.47, I(2 )= 93.1%]. The excess risk of pressure ulcers associated with pre-existing diabetes was significantly higher in patients undergoing surgery, specifically in patients receiving cardiac surgery. Further studies should be conducted to examine these associations in other types of surgery.

  13. VAC Therapy in Large Infected Sacral Pressure Ulcer Grade IV-Can Be an Alternative to Flap Reconstruction?

    PubMed

    Batra, R K; Aseeja, Veena

    2014-04-01

    Vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) therapy is a new entrant in wound care after growth factors and alginate or hydrocolloid dressing, in the treatment of pressure ulcers. We have been using this technique for diabetic foot ulcers. A young nondiabetic man presented with a large sacral bed sore after high doses of ionotropes in an intensive care unit for treating severe hypotension. His wound was debrided, and instead of flap surgery in such infected wound, he was treated with VAC therapy. The complete wound healing was achieved in 6 weeks and at half the cost of flap surgery. Moreover, the chances of flap failure and its related complications were eliminated.

  14. A Comparative Study Between Total Contact Cast and Pressure-Relieving Ankle Foot Orthosis in Diabetic Neuropathic Foot Ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Partha Pratim; Ray, Sayantan; Biswas, Dibakar; Baidya, Arjun; Bhattacharjee, Rana; Mukhopadhyay, Pradip; Ghosh, Sujoy; Mukhopadhyay, Satinath; Chowdhury, Subhankar

    2014-01-01

    Background: Off-loading of the ulcer area is extremely important for the healing of plantar ulcers. Off-loading with total contact cast (TCC) may be superior to other off-loading strategies studied so far, but practical limitations can dissuade clinicians from using this modality. This study was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of TCC compared with that of a pressure-relieving ankle foot orthosis (PRAFO) in healing of diabetic neuropathic foot ulcers and their effect on gait parameters. Methods: Thirty adult diabetic patients attending the foot clinic with neuropathic plantar ulcers irrespective of sex, age, duration and type of diabetes were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 off-loading modalities (TCC and PRAFO). Main outcome measures were ulcer healing after 4 weeks of randomization and effect of each of the modalities on various gait parameters. Results: The percentage reduction of the ulcer surface area at 4 weeks from baseline was 75.75 ± 9.25 with TCC and 34.72 ± 13.07 with PRAFO, which was significantly different (P < .001). The results of this study however, showed that most of the gait parameters were better with PRAFO than with TCC. Conclusions: This study comprehensively evaluated the well known advantages and disadvantages of a removable (PRAFO) and a nonremovable device (TCC) in the treatment of diabetic neuropathic foot ulcer. Further studies are needed involving larger subjects and using 3D gait analysis to collect more accurate data on gait parameters and wound healing with different off-loading devices. PMID:25452635

  15. Pressure ulcers: avoidable or unavoidable? Results of the National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel Consensus Conference.

    PubMed

    Black, Joyce M; Edsberg, Laura E; Baharestani, Mona M; Langemo, Diane; Goldberg, Margaret; McNichol, Laurie; Cuddigan, Janet

    2011-02-01

    Although pressure ulcer (PrU) development is now generally considered an indicator for quality of care, questions and concerns about situations in which they are unavoidable remain. Considering the importance of this issue and the lack of available research data, in 2010 the National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel (NPUAP) hosted a multidisciplinary conference to establish consensus on whether there are individuals in whom pressure ulcer development may be unavoidable and whether a difference exists between end-of-life skin changes and pressure ulcers. Thirty-four stakeholder organizations from various disciplines were identified and invited to send a voting representative. Of those, 24 accepted the invitation. Before the conference, existing literature was identified and shared via a webinar. A NPUAP task force developed standardized consensus questions for items with none or limited evidence and an interactive protocol was used to develop consensus among conference delegates and attendees. Consensus was established to be 80% agreement among conference delegates. Unanimous consensus was achieved for the following statements: most PrUs are avoidable; not all PrUs are avoidable; there are situations that render PrU development unavoidable, including hemodynamic instability that is worsened with physical movement and inability to maintain nutrition and hydration status and the presence of an advanced directive prohibiting artificial nutrition/hydration; pressure redistribution surfaces cannot replace turning and repositioning; and if enough pressure was removed from the external body the skin cannot always survive. Consensus was not obtained on the practicality or standard of turning patients every 2 hours nor on concerns surrounding the use of medical devices vis-à-vis their potential to cause skin damage. Research is needed to examine these issues, refine preventive practices in challenging situations, and identify the limits

  16. Patient and organisational variables associated with pressure ulcer prevalence in hospital settings: a multilevel analysis

    PubMed Central

    Bredesen, Ida Marie; Bjøro, Karen; Gunningberg, Lena; Hofoss, Dag

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the association of ward-level differences in the odds of hospital-acquired pressure ulcers (HAPUs) with selected ward organisational variables and patient risk factors. Design Multilevel approach to data from 2 cross-sectional studies. Settings 4 hospitals in Norway were studied. Participants 1056 patients at 84 somatic wards. Primary outcome measure HAPU. Results Significant variance in the odds of HAPUs was found across wards. A regression model using only organisational variables left a significant variance in the odds of HAPUs across wards but patient variables eliminated the across-ward variance. In the model including organisational and patient variables, significant ward-level HAPU variables were ward type (rehabilitation vs surgery/internal medicine: OR 0.17 (95% CI 0.04 to 0.66)), use of preventive measures (yes vs no: OR 2.02 (95% CI 1.12 to 3.64)) and ward patient safety culture (OR 0.97 (95% CI 0.96 to 0.99)). Significant patient-level predictors were age >70 vs <70 (OR 2.70 (95% CI 1.54 to 4.74)), Braden scale total score (OR 0.73 (95% CI 0.67 to 0.80)) and overweight (body mass index 25–29.99 kg/m2) (OR 0.32 (95% CI 0.17 to 0.62)). Conclusions The fact that the odds of HAPU varied across wards, and that across-ward variance was reduced when the selected ward-level variables entered the explanatory model, indicates that the HAPU problem may be reduced by ward-level organisation of care improvements, that is, by improving the patient safety culture and implementation of preventive measures. Some wards may prevent pressure ulcers better than other wards. The fact that ward-level variation was eliminated when patient-level HAPU variables were included in the model indicates that even wards with the best HAPU prevention will be challenged by an influx of high-risk patients. PMID:26316647

  17. A Study of the Factors Associated with Risk for Development of Pressure Ulcers: A Longitudinal Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Elizebeth; Vinodkumar, Sudhaya; Mathew, Silvia; Setia, Maninder Singh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Pressure ulcers (PUs) are prevalent in hospitalized patients; they may cause clinical, psychological, and economic problems in these patients. Previous studies are cross-sectional, have used pooled data, or cox-regression models to assess the risk for developing PU. However, PU risk scores change over time and models that account for time varying variables are useful for cohort analysis of data. Aims and Objectives: The present longitudinal study was conducted to compare the risk of PU between surgical and nonsurgical patients, and to evaluate the factors associated with the development of these ulcers over a period of time. Materials and Methods: We evaluated 290 hospitalized patients over a 4 months period. The main outcomes for our analysis were: (1) Score on the pressure risk assessment scale; and (2) the proportion of individuals who were at severe risk for developing PUs. We used random effects models for longitudinal analysis of the data. Results: The mean PU score was significantly higher in the nonsurgical patients compared with surgical patients at baseline (15.23 [3.86] vs. 9.33 [4.57]; P < 0.01). About 7% of the total patients had a score of >20 at baseline and were considered as being at high-risk for PU; the proportion was significantly higher among the nonsurgical patients compared with the surgical patients (14% vs. 4%, P = 0.003). In the adjusted models, there was no difference for severe risk for PU between surgical and nonsurgical patients (odds ratios [ORs]: 0.37, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.01–12.80). An additional day in the ward was associated with a significantly higher likelihood of being at high-risk for PU (OR: 1.47, 95% CI: 1.16–1.86). Conclusion: There were no significant differences between patients who were admitted for surgery compared with those who were not. An additional day in the ward, however, is important for developing a high-risk score for PU on the monitoring scale, and these patients require active

  18. A Case Study in Communication Strategies used for Pressure Ulcer Prevention in a Nursing Home with High IT Sophistication

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, Gregory L.; Madsen, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Current strategies for improving the care of millions of elderly people living in nursing homes (NH) include the implementation of information technology (IT). Few studies exist about the implementation of NH IT although there is evidence of increasing NH IT sophistication globally. NH IT sophistication includes a measure of the maturity and diversity of IT used to support resident care, clinical support, and administration. The current paper includes a case study of 1 NH known to have high IT sophistication in the Midwestern USA. The NH was purposively selected from 185 NHs taking part in a statewide evaluation of NH IT sophistication in Missouri. This NH reported the highest IT sophistication among 185 NHs. The research aim was to explore communication strategies for evidence based pressure ulcer preventions in NH IT. Focus group and observational data were collected to assess facilitators and barriers to communicating pressure ulcer preventions. PMID:24199033

  19. Relationship between time in the operating room and incident pressure ulcers: a matched case-control study.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Rachel M; Spear, Marcia E; Lee, Sheree I; Krauser Lupear, Buffy E; Benoit, Richard A; Valerio, Rainy; Dmochowski, Roger R

    2015-01-01

    The objective was to determine the relationship between time in the operating room (OR) and hospital-acquired pressure ulcers (HAPUs), controlling for temporality. The research team identified 931 HAPUs among surgical patients and matched them to 4 controls by hospital length of stay at the time the pressure ulcer (PU) was documented. A regression model estimated the relationship between OR time and HAPU after controlling for matching, age, sex, admission and current Braden score, weight, year, and American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status score. OR time in the 24 hours prior to PU documentation was associated with PUs. Only 5% of HAPUs occurred within 24 hours of extended (>4 hours) surgery and 58% occurred after hospital day 5. Extended surgery is confirmed as a risk factor for PU development. Most PUs do not appear in the immediate postoperative period, and prevention efforts should focus on postoperative patient care, when most HAPUs develop.

  20. Standardizing Support Surface Testing and Reporting: A National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel Executive Summary.

    PubMed

    Stone, Arthur; Brienza, David; Call, Evan; Fontaine, Rick; Goldberg, Margaret; Hong, K Z; Jordan, Rosalyn; Lachenbruch, Charlie; LaFleche, Patrick; Sylvia, Cindy

    2015-01-01

    In 2001, the National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel's Research Committee identified the need to create uniform terminology, test methods, and reporting technical standards for support surfaces. As a result, the S3I Committee was formed and initial meetings of interested stakeholders who included clinicians, researchers, academics, manufacturers, providers, and regulators were held. The group's initial goal was to (1) establish common language to facilitate understanding by developing standardized terminology for describing and discussing support surfaces, (2) establish a suite of standardized tests of performance capable of repeatedly, reliably, and accurately reporting upon characteristics common to all support surfaces that are believed to be related to the extrinsic risk factors associated with skin breakdown, as indicated by the literature to date, and (3) identify and standardize methods to evaluate the effective life of a support surface. The purpose of this article was to summarize the current status of the effort of the Support Surface Standards Initiative (S3I) Committee to identify and standardize methods to evaluate the many characteristic factors that determine the effective life of a support surface.

  1. Management of negative pressure wound therapy in the treatment of diabetic foot ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Meloni, Marco; Izzo, Valentina; Vainieri, Erika; Giurato, Laura; Ruotolo, Valeria; Uccioli, Luigi

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic foot (DF) is a common complication of diabetes and the first cause of hospital admission in diabetic patients. In recent years several guidelines have been proposed to reinforce the the management of DF with a notable increase in diabetes knowledge and an overall reduction of amputations. Significant improvements have been reached in the treatment of diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) and nowadays clinicians have several advanced medications to apply for the best local therapy. Among these, negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) is a useful adjunct in the management of chronic and complex wounds to promote healing and wound bed preparation for surgical procedures such as skin grafts and flap surgery. NPWT has shown remarkable results although its mechanisms of action are not completely understood. In this paper, we offer a complete overview of this medication and its implication in the clinical setting. We have examined literature related to NPWT concerning human, animal and in vitro studies, and we have summarized why, when and how we can use NPWT to treat DFUs. Further we have associated our clinical experience to scientific evidence in the field of diabetic foot to identify a defined strategy that could guide clinician in the use of NPWT approaching to DFUs. PMID:25992316

  2. Management of negative pressure wound therapy in the treatment of diabetic foot ulcers.

    PubMed

    Meloni, Marco; Izzo, Valentina; Vainieri, Erika; Giurato, Laura; Ruotolo, Valeria; Uccioli, Luigi

    2015-05-18

    Diabetic foot (DF) is a common complication of diabetes and the first cause of hospital admission in diabetic patients. In recent years several guidelines have been proposed to reinforce the the management of DF with a notable increase in diabetes knowledge and an overall reduction of amputations. Significant improvements have been reached in the treatment of diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) and nowadays clinicians have several advanced medications to apply for the best local therapy. Among these, negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) is a useful adjunct in the management of chronic and complex wounds to promote healing and wound bed preparation for surgical procedures such as skin grafts and flap surgery. NPWT has shown remarkable results although its mechanisms of action are not completely understood. In this paper, we offer a complete overview of this medication and its implication in the clinical setting. We have examined literature related to NPWT concerning human, animal and in vitro studies, and we have summarized why, when and how we can use NPWT to treat DFUs. Further we have associated our clinical experience to scientific evidence in the field of diabetic foot to identify a defined strategy that could guide clinician in the use of NPWT approaching to DFUs.

  3. Evaluation of Cueing Innovation for Pressure Ulcer Prevention Using Staff Focus Groups

    PubMed Central

    Yap, Tracey L.; Kennerly, Susan; Corazzini, Kirsten; Porter, Kristie; Toles, Mark; Anderson, Ruth A.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the manuscript is to describe long-term care (LTC) staff perceptions of a music cueing intervention designed to improve staff integration of pressure ulcer (PrU) prevention guidelines regarding consistent and regular movement of LTC residents a minimum of every two hours. The Diffusion of Innovation (DOI) model guided staff interviews about their perceptions of the intervention’s characteristics, outcomes, and sustainability. Methods: This was a qualitative, observational study of staff perceptions of the PrU prevention intervention conducted in Midwestern U.S. LTC facilities (N = 45 staff members). One focus group was held in each of eight intervention facilities using a semi-structured interview protocol. Transcripts were analyzed using thematic content analysis, and summaries for each category were compared across groups. Results: The a priori codes (observability, trialability, compatibility, relative advantage and complexity) described the innovation characteristics, and the sixth code, sustainability, was identified in the data. Within each code, two themes emerged as a positive or negative response regarding characteristics of the innovation. Moreover, within the sustainability code, a third theme emerged that was labeled “brainstormed ideas”, focusing on strategies for improving the innovation. Implications: Cueing LTC staff using music offers a sustainable potential to improve PrU prevention practices, to increase resident movement, which can subsequently lead to a reduction in PrUs. PMID:27429278

  4. Histology-guided protein digestion/extraction from FFPE pressure ulcer biopsies

    PubMed Central

    Taverna, Domenico; Pollins, Alonda C.; Nanney, Lillian B.; Sindona, Giovanni; Caprioli, Richard M.

    2015-01-01

    Herein we present a simple, reproducible, and versatile approach for in situ protein digestion and identification on formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues (FFPE). This adaptation is based on the use of an enzyme delivery platform (hydrogel discs) that can be positioned on the surface of a tissue section. By simultaneous deposition of multiple hydrogels over select regions of interest within the same tissue section, multiple peptide extracts can be obtained from discrete histologic areas. After enzymatic digestion, the hydrogel extracts are submitted for LC-MS/MS analysis followed by database inquiry for protein identification. Further, imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) is used to reveal the spatial distribution of the identified peptides within a serial tissue section. Optimization was achieved using cutaneous tissue from surgically excised pressure ulcers that were subdivided into two prime regions of interest: the wound bed and the adjacent dermal area. The robust display of tryptic peptides within these spectral analyses of histologically defined tissue regions suggests that LC-MS/MS in combination with IMS can serve as useful exploratory tools. PMID:26440596

  5. Developing a pressure ulcer risk assessment scale for patients in long-term care.

    PubMed

    Lepisto, Mervi; Eriksson, Elina; Hietanen, Helvi; Lepisto, Jyri; Lauri, Sirkka

    2006-02-01

    Previous pressure ulcer risk assessment scales appear to have relied on opinions about risk factors and are based on care setting rather than research evidence. Utilizing 21 existing risk assessment scales and relevant risk factor literature, an instrument was developed by Finnish researchers that takes into account individual patient risk factors, devices and methods applied in nursing care, and organizational characteristics. The instrument underwent two pilot tests to assess the relevance and clarity of the instrument: the first involved 43 nurses and six patients; the second involved 50 nurses with expertise in wound care. Changes to questionnaire items deemed necessary as a result of descriptive analysis and agreement percentages were completed. After pilot testing, the final instrument addressed the following issues: 1) patient risks: activity, mobility in bed, mental status, nutrition, urinary incontinence, fecal incontinence, sensory perception, and skin condition; 2) devices and methods used in patient care: technical devices, bed type, mattress, overlay, seat cushions, and care methods; and 3) staff number and structure, maximum number of beds, and beds in use (the last group of questions were included to ensure participants understood the items; results were not analyzed). The phases of the study provided an expeditious means of data collection and a suitable opportunity to assess how the instrument would function in practice. Instrument reliability and validity were improved as a result of the pilot testing and can be enhanced further with continued use and assessment.

  6. An Evidence-Based Cue-Selection Guide and Logic Model to Improve Pressure Ulcer Prevention in Long Term Care

    PubMed Central

    Yap, Tracey L.; Kennerly, Susan M.; Bergstrom, Nancy; Hudak, Sandra L.; Horn, Susan D.

    2015-01-01

    Pressure ulcers (PrUs) have consistently resisted prevention efforts in long term care (LTC) facilities nationwide. Recent research has described cueing innovations that – when selected according to the assumptions and resources of particular facilities – support best practices of PrU prevention. This paper synthesizes that research into a unified, dynamic logic model to facilitate effective staff implementation of a PrU prevention program. PMID:26066791

  7. Predictive capacity of risk assessment scales and clinical judgment for pressure ulcers: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    García-Fernández, Francisco Pedro; Pancorbo-Hidalgo, Pedro L; Agreda, J Javier Soldevilla

    2014-01-01

    A systematic review with meta-analysis was completed to determine the capacity of risk assessment scales and nurses' clinical judgment to predict pressure ulcer (PU) development. Electronic databases were searched for prospective studies on the validity and predictive capacity of PUs risk assessment scales published between 1962 and 2010 in English, Spanish, Portuguese, Korean, German, and Greek. We excluded gray literature sources, integrative review articles, and retrospective or cross-sectional studies. The methodological quality of the studies was assessed according to the guidelines of the Critical Appraisal Skills Program. Predictive capacity was measured as relative risk (RR) with 95% confidence intervals. When 2 or more valid original studies were found, a meta-analysis was conducted using a random-effect model and sensitivity analysis. We identified 57 studies, including 31 that included a validation study. We also retrieved 4 studies that tested clinical judgment as a risk prediction factor. Meta-analysis produced the following pooled predictive capacity indicators: Braden (RR = 4.26); Norton (RR = 3.69); Waterlow (RR = 2.66); Cubbin-Jackson (RR = 8.63); EMINA (RR = 6.17); Pressure Sore Predictor Scale (RR = 21.4); and clinical judgment (RR = 1.89). Pooled analysis of 11 studies found adequate risk prediction capacity in various clinical settings; the Braden, Norton, EMINA (mEntal state, Mobility, Incontinence, Nutrition, Activity), Waterlow, and Cubbin-Jackson scales showed the highest predictive capacity. The clinical judgment of nurses was found to achieve inadequate predictive capacity when used alone, and should be used in combination with a validated scale.

  8. Medical device-related hospital-acquired pressure ulcers: development of an evidence-based position statement.

    PubMed

    Pittman, Joyce; Beeson, Terrie; Kitterman, Jessica; Lancaster, Shelley; Shelly, Anita

    2015-01-01

    Hospital-acquired pressure ulcers (HAPUs) are a problem in the acute care setting causing pain, loss of function, infection, extended hospital stay, and increased costs. In spite of best practice strategies, occurrences of pressure ulcers continue. Many of these HAPUs are related to a medical device. Correct assessment and reporting of device-related HAPUs were identified as an important issue in our organization. Following the Iowa Model for Evidence-Based Practice to Promote Quality Care, a task force was created, a thorough review of current evidence and clinical practice recommendations was performed, and a definition for medical device-related HAPU and an evidence-based position statement were developed. Content of the statement was reviewed by experts and appropriate revisions were made. This position statement provides guidance and structure to accurately identify and report device-related HAPU across our 18 healthcare facilities. Through the intentional focus on pressure ulcer prevention and evidence-based practice in our organization and the use of this position statement, identification and reporting of device-related HAPUs have improved with a decrease in overall HAPU rates of 33% from 2011 and 2012. This article describes the development and implementation of this device-related HAPU position statement within our organization.

  9. Length of surgery and pressure ulcers risk in cardiovascular surgical patients: a dose-response meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hong-Lin; Shen, Wang-Qin; Liu, Peng; Liu, Kun

    2017-03-02

    The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between length of surgery (LOS) and pressure ulcer (PU) risk in cardiovascular surgery patients. PubMed and Web of Science were systematically searched. We compared LOS difference between PU (+) group and PU (-) group. We also examined the dose-response effect of this relationship. The mean LOS in the PU(+) groups ranged from 252·5 to 335·7 minutes, compared with 233·0 to 298·3 minutes in PU(-) groups. The LOS was higher in PU(+) groups compared with PU(-) groups [weighted mean difference (WMD) = 36·081 minutes; 95% CI: 21·640-50·522 minutes; Z = 4·90, P = 0·000]. The funnel plot showed no publication bias. A significant dose-response association was also found between the LOS and the risk of surgery-related pressure ulcers (SRPU, model χ(2)  = 9·29, P = 0·000). In the linear model, the PU OR was 1·296 (95% CI 1·097-1·531) for a 60-minute increase in the LOS intervals and 13·344 (95% CI 2·521-70·636) for a 600-minute increase. In a spline model, the OR of PU increased almost linearly along with the LOS. Our meta-analysis indicated that LOS was an important risk factor for pressure ulcers in cardiovascular surgical patients.

  10. Bone geometry on the contact stress in the shoulder for evaluation of pressure ulcers: finite element modeling and experimental validation.

    PubMed

    Luo, Ying; Wang, Yancheng; Tai, Bruce L; Chen, Roland K; Shih, Albert J

    2015-02-01

    This research presents the finite element modeling (FEM) of human-specific computed tomography (CT) data to study the effect of bone prominences on contact stress in the shoulder for prevention of pressure ulcers. The 3D geometry of scapula, skin, and surrounding soft tissues in the shoulder was reconstructed based on the anonymous CT data of a human subject in a prone posture (without loading on the shoulder) for FEM analysis of the contact stress. FEM analysis results show that the maximum stress is located at the prominence of the scapula with sharp bone geometry. This demonstrates that stress concentration at the bone prominence is a significant factor to cause the high contact stress, which is a source for pressure ulcers. For experimental validation, a physical shoulder model manufactured by 3D printing of the bone geometry and the mold for molding of tissue-mimicking silicone was developed. Compression tests of the mattress foam and silicone were conducted to find the nonlinear stress-strain relations as inputs for FEM. Experiments of compressing the shoulder model against the foam were carried out. Three flexible force sensors were embedded inside the model to measure the contact forces and compared to the FEM predictions. Results show that the FEM predicted forces match well with the experimental measurements and demonstrate that FEM can accurately predict the stress distributions in the shoulder to study the effect of bone geometry on the inception of pressure ulcers.

  11. A Randomized, Controlled Trial to Assess the Effect of Topical Insulin Versus Normal Saline in Pressure Ulcer Healing.

    PubMed

    Stephen, Shine; Agnihotri, Meenakshi; Kaur, Sukhpal

    2016-06-01

    Insulin has been used in wound healing to increase wound collagen, granulation tissue, wound tensile strength, and local production of insulin-like growth factors by fibroblasts. Saline is a widely used irrigating and wound dressing solution. Patients admitted to an acute care facility who had a Grade 2 or Grade 3 pressure ulcer were recruited to participate in a randomized, controlled trial to compare the effect of normal saline-impregnated gauze and insulin dressing in pressure ulcer healing. Persons with immunodeficiency, diabetes mellitus, pregnancy, osteomyelitis, and peripheral vascular illness were not eligible for the study. Study participants were randomized to receive either normal saline dressing gauze or insulin dressing twice daily for 7 days. At baseline, patient demographic data and ulcer history were recorded. Baseline and follow-up ulcer assessments (days 4 and day 7) included ulcer measurement (length and width) and completion of the Pressure Ulcer Scale for Healing (PUSH version 3.0) tool. Patients in the control group received dressings of sterile gauze soaked with normal saline; patients in the intervention group received topical insulin (1 U/cm2 wound area). The insulin was sprayed over the wound surface with an insulin syringe, allowed to dry for 15 minutes, and then covered with sterile gauze. To ascertain the safety of study participants, blood glucose levels were measured with a glucometer 10 minutes before and 1 hour after the topical insulin application in the intervention group. Treatment efficacy was deter- mined by assessing the reduction in wound area and PUSH scores at follow-up. Statistical analysis was performed; data are expressed as mean ± SD and percentage for continuous and categorical variables respectively. The differences in PUSH score and ulcer sizes between the 2 groups were analyzed using independent t-test, and within-group differences were analyzed using ANOVA with repeated measures; Greenhouse-Geisser correction was

  12. Reliability of Pressure Ulcer Rates: How Precisely Can We Differentiate Among Hospital Units, and Does the Standard Signal-Noise Reliability Measure Reflect This Precision?

    PubMed

    Staggs, Vincent S; Cramer, Emily

    2016-08-01

    Hospital performance reports often include rankings of unit pressure ulcer rates. Differentiating among units on the basis of quality requires reliable measurement. Our objectives were to describe and apply methods for assessing reliability of hospital-acquired pressure ulcer rates and evaluate a standard signal-noise reliability measure as an indicator of precision of differentiation among units. Quarterly pressure ulcer data from 8,199 critical care, step-down, medical, surgical, and medical-surgical nursing units from 1,299 US hospitals were analyzed. Using beta-binomial models, we estimated between-unit variability (signal) and within-unit variability (noise) in annual unit pressure ulcer rates. Signal-noise reliability was computed as the ratio of between-unit variability to the total of between- and within-unit variability. To assess precision of differentiation among units based on ranked pressure ulcer rates, we simulated data to estimate the probabilities of a unit's observed pressure ulcer rate rank in a given sample falling within five and ten percentiles of its true rank, and the probabilities of units with ulcer rates in the highest quartile and highest decile being identified as such. We assessed the signal-noise measure as an indicator of differentiation precision by computing its correlations with these probabilities. Pressure ulcer rates based on a single year of quarterly or weekly prevalence surveys were too susceptible to noise to allow for precise differentiation among units, and signal-noise reliability was a poor indicator of precision of differentiation. To ensure precise differentiation on the basis of true differences, alternative methods of assessing reliability should be applied to measures purported to differentiate among providers or units based on quality. © 2016 The Authors. Research in Nursing & Health published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Reliability of Pressure Ulcer Rates: How Precisely Can We Differentiate Among Hospital Units, and Does the Standard Signal‐Noise Reliability Measure Reflect This Precision?

    PubMed Central

    Cramer, Emily

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Hospital performance reports often include rankings of unit pressure ulcer rates. Differentiating among units on the basis of quality requires reliable measurement. Our objectives were to describe and apply methods for assessing reliability of hospital‐acquired pressure ulcer rates and evaluate a standard signal‐noise reliability measure as an indicator of precision of differentiation among units. Quarterly pressure ulcer data from 8,199 critical care, step‐down, medical, surgical, and medical‐surgical nursing units from 1,299 US hospitals were analyzed. Using beta‐binomial models, we estimated between‐unit variability (signal) and within‐unit variability (noise) in annual unit pressure ulcer rates. Signal‐noise reliability was computed as the ratio of between‐unit variability to the total of between‐ and within‐unit variability. To assess precision of differentiation among units based on ranked pressure ulcer rates, we simulated data to estimate the probabilities of a unit's observed pressure ulcer rate rank in a given sample falling within five and ten percentiles of its true rank, and the probabilities of units with ulcer rates in the highest quartile and highest decile being identified as such. We assessed the signal‐noise measure as an indicator of differentiation precision by computing its correlations with these probabilities. Pressure ulcer rates based on a single year of quarterly or weekly prevalence surveys were too susceptible to noise to allow for precise differentiation among units, and signal‐noise reliability was a poor indicator of precision of differentiation. To ensure precise differentiation on the basis of true differences, alternative methods of assessing reliability should be applied to measures purported to differentiate among providers or units based on quality. © 2016 The Authors. Research in Nursing & Health published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27223598

  14. On-Admission Pressure Ulcer Prediction Using the Nursing Needs Score

    PubMed Central

    Setoguchi, Yoko; Mitani, Kazue; Abe, Yoshiro; Hashimoto, Ichiro; Moriguchi, Hiroki

    2015-01-01

    Background Pressure ulcers (PUs) are considered a serious problem in nursing care and require preventive measures. Many risk assessment methods are currently being used, but most require the collection of data not available on admission. Although nurses assess the Nursing Needs Score (NNS) on a daily basis in Japanese acute care hospitals, these data are primarily used to standardize the cost of nursing care in the public insurance system for appropriate nurse staffing, and have never been used for PU risk assessment. Objective The objective of this study was to predict the risk of PU development using only data available on admission, including the on-admission NNS score. Methods Logistic regression was used to generate a prediction model for the risk of developing PUs after admission. A random undersampling procedure was used to overcome the problem of imbalanced data. Results A combination of gender, age, surgical duration, and on-admission total NNS score (NNS group B; NNS-B) was the best predictor with an average sensitivity, specificity, and area under receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) of 69.2% (6920/100), 82.8% (8280/100), and 84.0% (8400/100), respectively. The model with the median AUC achieved 80% (4/5) sensitivity, 81.3% (669/823) specificity, and 84.3% AUC. Conclusions We developed a model for predicting PU development using gender, age, surgical duration, and on-admission total NNS-B score. These results can be used to improve the efficiency of nurses and reduce the number of PU cases by identifying patients who require further examination. PMID:25673118

  15. Contribution of quorum sensing to the virulence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in pressure ulcer infection in rats.

    PubMed

    Nakagami, Gojiro; Morohoshi, Tomohiro; Ikeda, Tsukasa; Ohta, Yasunori; Sagara, Hiroshi; Huang, Lijuan; Nagase, Takashi; Sugama, Junko; Sanada, Hiromi

    2011-01-01

    The impact of quorum sensing (QS) in in vivo models of infection has been widely investigated, but there are no descriptions for ischemic wound infection. To explore the role of QS in Pseudomonas aeruginosa in the establishment of ischemic wound infection, we challenged a pressure ulcer model in rats with the PAO-1, PAO-1 derivatives ΔlasIΔrhlI and ΔlasRΔrhlR strains, which cannot induce the virulence factor under QS control, thus the reduced tissue destruction was expended in these mutant strains. However unexpectedly, on postwounding day 3, the inflammatory responses in the three groups were similarly severe and the numbers of bacteria in tissue samples did not differ among the three strains. Biofilm formation was immature in QS-deficient strains, defined by the absence of dense bacterial aggregates and extracellular polymeric substance, which was confirmed by scanning electron microscopy. The Pseudomonas aeruginosa QS signal, acylated homoserine lactone, was only quantified from wound samples in the PAO-1 group. The swimming and twitching motilities were significantly enhanced in the ΔlasRΔrhlR group compared with the PAO-1 group in vitro. A significantly larger wound area was correlated with the bacterial motility. The inflammation in the early phase of bacterial challenge to wounds with immature biofilm formation in the QS-deficient strains indicated that the role of QS was more crucial for the chronic phase than for the acute phase of infection. The present findings indicate a difference in the importance of QS in ischemic wound infections compared with other infection models.

  16. Association of Race, Socioeconomic Status, and Health Care Access with Pressure Ulcers after Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Saunders, Lee L.; Krause, James S.; Acuna, Joshua

    2012-01-01

    Objective To assess the associations of race and socioeconomic status (SES) with pressure ulcers (PU) after accounting for health care access (HCA) among persons with spinal cord injury (SCI). Design Cross-sectional. Setting Large specialty hospital in the southeastern United States. Participant Persons with traumatic SCI who 1) had residual effects from their injury, 2) were 18 years or older at survey, and 3) were a year or more post-injury at survey (n=2,549). Intervention None. Main Outcome Measures Outcomes were measured by mail-in survey: having a current PU (yes vs. no), having a PU in the past year with or without reduced sitting time (no PU, no reduced sitting time, month or less, 5+ weeks), and having at least 1 PU surgery since SCI onset (yes vs. no). Results Of participants, 39.3% reported a PU in the past year, 19.9% had a current PU, and 21.9% reported having had surgery for a PU since their SCI onset. While race was preliminarily associated with each PU outcome, it became non-significant after controlling for SES and HCA. In each analysis, household income was significantly associated with PU outcomes after controlling for demographic and injury factors and remained significant after accounting for the HCA factors. Persons with lower income had higher odds of each PU outcome. HCA was not consistently related to PU outcomes. Conclusions Even after accounting for HCA, household income, a measure of SES, remained significantly associated with PU outcomes after SCI; however, race became non-significant. PMID:22494948

  17. Subepidermal moisture surrounding pressure ulcers in persons with a spinal cord injury: A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Harrow, Jeffrey John; Mayrovitz, Harvey N.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Characterization of a non-invasive method of quantifying subepidermal moisture (SEM) surrounding stages III and IV pressure ulcers (PrUs) in spinal cord injury (SCI). Design Prospective, single-visit, single-rater, observational study, using repeated-measures analysis. Method Setting-inpatient units of one VA SCI Center. Participants Convenience sample of 16 subjects with SCI with stage III or IV PrUs over sacrum or ischium. Interventions Measurement with the MoistureMeter-D, a hand-held device using 300 MHz electromagnetic waves. Outcome measures Dielectric constant, a dimensionless number which increases with the moisture content. Each subject had a PrU site and a control site. Measurements were made at each site, on intact skin, at four points spaced angularly around the site, in triplicate. Results (1) Short-term, single-rater relative error was 2.5%. (2) Order effect: first readings were higher than second readings in 55 of 64 measurement sets. Order effect was significant for control sites (P < 0.0001) but not for PrU sites. (3) Angular effect: SEM varied by angle at the PrU sites (P < 0.01); 12 o'clock position the highest and 6 o'clock the lowest. (4) Ability to differentiate PrUs from intact skin: SEM at PrU sites was greater by 9.0% than control sites (P < 0.05). (5) Site effect: SEM was higher at sacral locations than ischial at control sites by 20% (P < 0.005). Conclusions SEM differentiates PrUs from intact skin. Future study designs must take into account order, angular, and site effects on this measure. This information will inform designers of future studies of SEM in healing of PrUs. PMID:25398030

  18. The Effectiveness of Negative Pressure Therapy in Diabetic Foot Ulcers with Elevated Protease Activity: A Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Izzo, Valentina; Meloni, Marco; Giurato, Laura; Ruotolo, Valeria; Uccioli, Luigi

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Despite several works have described the usefulness of negative pressure therapy (NPT) in the treatment of diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs), no studies have reported its ability in the proteases modulation in DFUs. The aim of this work was to evaluate the role of NPT as a protease-modulating treatment in DFUs. Approach: We conducted a prospective study of a series of diabetic patients affected by chronic DFUs. Each ulcer was assessed for matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) activity with a protease status diagnostic test at the baseline and after 2 weeks of NPT. Results: Four patients were included. All patients had type 2 diabetes with a disease duration of ≈20 years. A1c was 79.5 ± 15.3 mmol/mol. Ulcer area was >5 cm2 in all cases. All wounds showed elevated protease activity (EPA) at the baseline. After 2 weeks, all patients showed a normalization of MMPs activity. Innovation: NPT showed its effectiveness in the reduction of EPA in chronic DFUs. Conclusion: This study confirms the role of NPT in the positive modulation of protease activity also in chronic DFUs. PMID:28116227

  19. Pressure ulcer prevention algorithm content validation: a mixed-methods, quantitative study.

    PubMed

    van Rijswijk, Lia; Beitz, Janice M

    2015-04-01

    Translating pressure ulcer prevention (PUP) evidence-based recommendations into practice remains challenging for a variety of reasons, including the perceived quality, validity, and usability of the research or the guideline itself. Following the development and face validation testing of an evidence-based PUP algorithm, additional stakeholder input and testing were needed. Using convenience sampling methods, wound care experts attending a national wound care conference and a regional wound ostomy continence nursing (WOCN) conference and/or graduates of a WOCN program were invited to participate in an Internal Review Board-approved, mixed-methods quantitative survey with qualitative components to examine algorithm content validity. After participants provided written informed consent, demographic variables were collected and participants were asked to comment on and rate the relevance and appropriateness of each of the 26 algorithm decision points/steps using standard content validation study procedures. All responses were anonymous. Descriptive summary statistics, mean relevance/appropriateness scores, and the content validity index (CVI) were calculated. Qualitative comments were transcribed and thematically analyzed. Of the 553 wound care experts invited, 79 (average age 52.9 years, SD 10.1; range 23-73) consented to participate and completed the study (a response rate of 14%). Most (67, 85%) were female, registered (49, 62%) or advanced practice (12, 15%) nurses, and had > 10 years of health care experience (88, 92%). Other health disciplines included medical doctors, physical therapists, nurse practitioners, and certified nurse specialists. Almost all had received formal wound care education (75, 95%). On a Likert-type scale of 1 (not relevant/appropriate) to 4 (very relevant and appropriate), the average score for the entire algorithm/all decision points (N = 1,912) was 3.72 with an overall CVI of 0.94 (out of 1). The only decision point/step recommendation

  20. [PRESSURE ULCER: INCIDENCE AND DEMOGRAPHIC, CLINICAL AND NUTRITION FACTORS ASSOCIATED IN INTENSIVE CARE UNIT PATIENTS].

    PubMed

    Oliveira Costa, Ana Carolina; Sabino Pinho, Cláudia Porto; Almeida dos Santos, Alyne Dayana; Santos do Nascimento, Alexsandra Camila

    2015-11-01

    La úlcera por presión (UP) es una lesión localizada en la piel y/o tejido subyacente, generalmente sobre prominencias óseas, provocada por la presión y/o asociada a cizallamiento. Aunque evitable, todavía es muy prevalente, siendo destacable que en su etiología están involucrados múltiples factores. Objetivo: identificar la incidencia de úlceras por presión y los factores demográficos, clínicos y nutricionales asociados en pacientes internados en la UCI de un hospital universitario. Métodos: estudio prospectivo, observacional, con pacientes internados en una UCI de un hospital universitario ubicado en el nordeste brasileño, durante el periodo de junio a noviembre de 2014. Se determinó la UP a través de la inspección corporal tres veces a la semana durante el baño matinal, con base en las características establecidas por la National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel, 2014. Se recolectaron datos demográficos, clínicos, bioquímicos y nutricionales. Se utilizó la escala de Braden para verificar a los individuos con riesgo de desarrollo de UP. Resultados: la muestra se compuso de 51 pacientes, con un promedio de edad de 57,7(± 16,4) años. Se verificó una incidencia de UP del 52,9%, y los factores asociados a su desarrollo fueron: uso de droga vasoactiva (p = 0,029), tiempo de hospitalización > 10 días (p ≤ 0,001) y ausencia de anemia (p = 0,011). Conclusión: la elevada incidencia de UP resalta la vulnerabilidad de los pacientes en cuidados intensivos. A pesar de caracterizarse por ser una condición multifactorial, solo el uso de drogas vasoactivas, el tiempo de hospitalización y la ausencia de anemia se asociaron a la aparición de UP. Factores nutricionales y clínicos frecuentemente relacionados a las lesiones se asociaron con su desarrollo.

  1. Effects of pressure ulcer classification system education programme on knowledge and visual differential diagnostic ability of pressure ulcer classification and incontinence-associated dermatitis for clinical nurses in Korea.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yun Jin; Kim, Jung Yoon

    2016-03-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of pressure ulcer classification system education on clinical nurses' knowledge and visual differential diagnostic ability of pressure ulcer (PU) classification and incontinence-associated dermatitis (IAD). One group pre and post-test was used. A convenience sample of 407 nurses, participating in PU classification education programme of continuing education, were enrolled. The education programme was composed of a 50-minute lecture on PU classification and case-studies. The PU Classification system and IAD knowledge test (PUCS-KT) and visual differential diagnostic ability tool (VDDAT), consisting of 21 photographs including clinical information were used. Paired t-test was performed using SPSS/WIN 20.0. The overall mean difference of PUCS-KT (t = -11·437, P<0·001) and VDDAT (t = -21·113, P<0·001) was significantly increased after PU classification education. Overall understanding of six PU classification and IAD after education programme was increased, but lacked visual differential diagnostic ability regarding Stage III PU, suspected deep tissue injury (SDTI), and Unstageable. Continuous differentiated education based on clinical practice is needed to improve knowledge and visual differential diagnostic ability for PU classification, and comparison experiment study is required to examine effects of education programmes.

  2. A Real World, Observational Registry of Chronic Wounds and Ulcers

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-18

    Diabetic Foot; Varicose Ulcer; Pressure Ulcer; Surgical Wound Dehiscence; Vasculitis; Skin Ulcer; Leg Ulcer; Wounds and Injuries; Pyoderma; Peripheral Arterial Disease; Diabetic Neuropathies; Lymphedema; Venous Insufficiency; Diabetes Complications; Amputation Stump

  3. Construct Validity of the Braden Scale for Pressure Ulcer Assessment in Acute Care: A Structural Equation Modeling Approach.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hong-Lin; Cao, Ying-Juan; Shen, Wang-Qin; Zhu, Bin

    2017-02-01

    The Braden Scale is the most widely used pressure ulcer risk assessment system in the world. To investigate its construct validity using structural equation modeling (SEM), a secondary analysis of retrospective data of patients admitted to an acute care facility was conducted using the records of 2588 patients who were at risk for pressure ulcers and admitted between January 2013 and December 2013. Data were extracted to an Excel sheet and analyzed, including demographic characteristics (ie, patients age, gender, weight, and disease spectrum), as well as total Braden scores and subscale scores. The SEM was set according to modification indices suggestion. The original Braden Scale model was supported by χ2(9) = 22.854, CFI = 0.902, GFI = 0.974, root mean square error of approximation (RMSEA) = 0.092, indicating inadequate model fit. After modification according to software indices, χ2(2) = 2.052, CFI = 0.999, GFI = 0.999, RMSEA = 0.020 indicated an acceptable fit of the model (final model). The factor loadings of 6 subscales were all significant (P <.001), with .147 for nutrition, .137 for activity, .167 for friction and shear, .825 for sensory perception, .626 for mobility, and .556 for moisture subscale. The nutrition, activity, and friction and shear subscales were corrected to examine their relationships with other Braden Scale subscales (nutrition with activity [φ -0.063], activity with friction/shear [φ 0.136], and nutrition (φ friction/shear [0.159]). The factor loadings ranged from -0.067 to 0.159. These findings suggest the original Braden Scale has inadequate construct validity for acute care patients and that new risk-predicting scales should be designed based on data mining. Second, according to the factor loadings in the SEM, the most important risk factor in the Braden Scale for this patient population is sensory perception, followed by mobility and moisture. This suggests practitioners should pay particular attention to pressure ulcer prevention

  4. A Prospective, Descriptive Study to Determine the Rate and Characteristics of and Risk Factors for the Development of Medical Device-related Pressure Ulcers in Intensive Care Units.

    PubMed

    Hanonu, Seval; Karadag, Ayise

    2016-02-01

    Pressure ulcers do not develop only in areas with bony prominences; they can develop in any tissue under pressure, including pressure exerted by medical devices. A prospective, descriptive study was conducted from December 15, 2013 to March 25, 2014 to determine the prevalence, risk factors, and characteristics of medical device-related hospitalacquired pressure ulcers (MDR HAPUs) among all patients (N = 175) in 5 adult intensive care units (ICUs) in a university hospital in Turkey. The previously established point prevalence of hospital-acquired pressure ulcers (HAPUs) in these ICUs was 15%. Patients were evaluated in the first 24 hours after admission and observed 6 times thereafter in intervals of 48 hours. Demographic (eg, age, gender, body mass index) and medical device-related pressure ulcer data (eg, location, device type, stage), and Braden Scale scores were collected and analyzed; frequencies and percentages were calculated and Mann-Whitney U Test, t-test, and odds ratios were applied. Twenty-seven (27) patients (15.4%) developed nonMDR HAPUs and 70 (40.0%) developed MDR HAPUs. MDR HAPUs occurred most frequently (45.0%) in patients with an endotracheal tube. The most frequent type (42.6%) was Stage II. The highest rates of MDR HAPUs were observed among internal medicine ICU patients (OR 7.041), patients who also had a nonMDR HAPU (OR 6.6), patients in the high Braden risk score group (OR 1.8), or patients who received enteral feeding (OR 2.12). Because of the high rate of MDR HAPUs noted, policies and procedures aimed at preventing medical device-related pressure ulcers are needed.

  5. TexiCare: an innovative embedded device for pressure ulcer prevention. Preliminary results with a paraplegic volunteer.

    PubMed

    Chenu, Olivier; Vuillerme, Nicolas; Bucki, Marek; Diot, Bruno; Cannard, Francis; Payan, Yohan

    2013-08-01

    This paper introduces the recently developed TexiCare device that aims at preventing pressure ulcers for people with spinal cord injury. This embedded device is aimed to be mounted on the user wheelchair. Its sensor is 100% textile and allows the measurement of pressures at the interface between the cushion and the buttocks. It is comfortable, washable and low cost. It is connected to a cigarette-box sized unit that (i) measures the pressures in real time, (ii) estimates the risk for internal over-strains, and (iii) alerts the wheelchair user whenever necessary. The alert method has been defined as a result of a utility/usability/acceptability study conducted with representative end users. It is based on a tactile-visual feedback (via a watch or a smartphone for example): the tactile modality is used to discreetly alarm the person while the visual modality conveys an informative message. In order to evaluate the usability of the TexiCare device, a paraplegic volunteer equipped his wheelchair at home during a six months period. Interestingly, the first results revealed bad habits such as an inadequate posture when watching TV, rare relief maneuvers, and the occurrence of abnormal high pressures.

  6. Perioperative use of bispectral (BIS) monitor for a pressure ulcer patient with locked-in syndrome (LIS).

    PubMed

    Yoo, Christine; Ayello, Elizabeth A; Robins, Bryan; Salamanca, Victor R; Bloom, Marc J; Linton, Patrick; Brem, Harold; O'Neill, Daniel K

    2014-10-01

    The bispectral (BIS) monitor uses brain electroencephalographic data to measure the depth of sedation and pharmacological response during anaesthetic procedures. In this case, the BIS monitor was used for another purpose, to demonstrate postoperatively to the nursing staff that a patient with history of locked-in syndrome (LIS), who underwent pressure ulcer debridement, had periods of wakefulness and apparent sensation, even with his eyes closed. Furthermore, as patients with LIS can feel pain, despite being unable to move, local block or general anaesthesia should be provided for sharp surgical debridement and other painful procedures. This use of the BIS has shown that as a general rule, the staff should treat the patient as though he might be awake and sensate even if he does not open his eyes or move his limbs. The goal of this study was to continuously monitor pain level and communicate these findings to the entire wound team, i.e. anaesthesiologists, surgeons and nurses.

  7. Perioperative Use of Bispectral Monitor (BIS) for a Pressure Ulcer patient with Lock-In Syndrome (LIS)

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Christine; Ayello, Elizabeth A.; Robins, Bryan; Salamanca, Victor R.; Bloom, Marc J.; Linton, Patrick; Brem, Harold; O'Neill, Daniel K.

    2013-01-01

    The bispectral (BIS) monitor uses brain electroencephalographic data to measure depth of sedation and pharmacological response during anesthetic procedures. In this case, the BIS monitor was used for another purpose, to demonstrate postoperatively to the nursing staff that a patient with history of locked-in syndrome (LIS), who underwent pressure ulcer debridement, had periods of wakefulness and apparent sensation, even with his eyes closed. Furthermore, as patients with LIS can feel pain, despite being unable to move, local block or general anesthesia should be provided for sharp surgical debridement and other painful procedures. This use of the BIS has shown that as a general rule, the staff should treat the patient as though he might be awake and sensate even if he does not open his eyes or move his limbs. Our goal was to continuously monitor pain level and communicate these findings to the entire wound team, ie anesthesiologists, surgeons, and nurses. PMID:25252146

  8. The Relationship Among Evidence-Based Practice and Client Dyspnea, Pain, Falls, and Pressure Ulcer Outcomes in the Community Setting

    PubMed Central

    Doran, Diane; Lefebre, Nancy; O'Brien-Pallas, Linda; Estabrook, Carole A; White, Peggy; Carryer, Jennifer; Sun, Winnie; Qian, Gan; Bai, Yu Qing (Chris); Li, Mingyang

    2014-01-01

    Background There are gaps in knowledge about the extent to which home care nurses’ practice is based on best evidence and whether evidence-based practice impacts patient outcomes. Aim The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between evidence-based practice and client pain, dyspnea, falls, and pressure ulcer outcomes in the home care setting. Evidence-based practice was defined as nursing interventions based on best practice guidelines. Methods The Nursing Role Effectiveness model was used to guide the selection of variables for investigation. Data were collected from administrative records on percent of visits made by Registered Nurses (RN), total number of nursing visits, and consistency of visits by principal nurse. Charts audits were used to collect data on nursing interventions and client outcomes. The sample consisted of 338 nurses from 13 home care offices and 939 de-identified client charts. Hierarchical generalized linear regression approaches were constructed to explore which variables explain variation in client outcomes. Results The study found documentation of nursing interventions based on best practice guidelines was positively associated with improvement in dyspnea, pain, falls, and pressure ulcer outcomes. Percent of visits made by an RN and consistency of visits by a principal nurse were not found to be associated with improved client outcomes, but the total number of nursing visits was. Linking Evidence to Action Implementation of best practice is associated with improved client outcomes in the home care setting. Future research needs to explore ways to more effectively foster the documentation of evidence-based practice interventions. PMID:25099877

  9. Internal medicine interns' and residents' pressure ulcer prevention and assessment attitudes and abilities: results of an exploratory study .

    PubMed

    Suen, Winnie; Parker, Victoria A; Harney, Lauren; Nevin, Siobhan; Jansen, Jane; Alexander, Linda; Berlowitz, Dan

    2012-04-01

     To evaluate and determine differences between attitudes of internal medicine interns and residents toward pressure ulcer (PU) prevention and to evaluate the interns' abilities to accurately identify wounds and stage PUs, an exploratory, quantitative study was conducted in a 639-bed, safety net academic center. Participants (21 internal medicine interns and 21 internal medicine residents) attending an educational session on PU prevention and care were eligible to participate. The 1-hour conference session was prepared and provided by a physician and wound care nurses. Before the lecture, participants were asked to complete an 11-question paper-and-pencil PU attitude survey. Following the lecture, they were asked to identify 11 wounds and stage PUs using the inpatient admission history and physical template used in the hospital's electronic medical record. An audience response system was used to record correct and incorrect responses. Nineteen (19) interns and 20 residents completed the survey. Twenty-one (21) interns successfully completed the wound assessment quiz. Descriptive statistics were used to examine the survey data and residents' and interns' average attitude scores were compared using independent group t-test. The results suggest that interns and residents have a positive attitude toward and are concerned about PU prevention. The significantly higher overall score among interns compared to residents (average 43.8 versus 38.8 respectively, P = 0.002) suggests interns have a more positive attitude than residents. Statistically significant differences between item scores showed that, compared to residents, interns perceived PU prevention to be more time-consuming (P = 0.01), less of a concern in practice (P = 0.02), and a lower priority than other areas of care (P = 0.003). Compared to residents, interns also were more likely to agree to with statement, "In my opinion, patients tend to not get as many pressure

  10. Botulinum toxin effects on gasatrocnemius strength and plantar pressure in diabetics with peripheral neuropathy and forefoot ulceration

    PubMed Central

    Hastings, Mary K.; Mueller, Michael J.; Sinacore, David R.; Strube, Michael J.; Crowner, Beth; Johnson, Jeffrey E.; Racette, Brad A.

    2013-01-01

    Background High forefoot plantar pressure is associated with plantar ulcers in people with diabetes and peripheral neuropathy. The purpose of this pilot study is to determine safety and efficacy of botulinum toxin A injected into the gastrocnemius-soleus muscles to reduce muscle strength and plantar pressure. Materials and Methods This double blind, randomized clinical trial studied 17 people with diabetes mellitus, peripheral neuropathy and forefoot plantar ulcer. Subjects were randomized into one of three groups receiving gastrocnemius-soleus muscle injections on the involved side with; 1) Saline (n=5, weight = 99 ± 21 kg), 2) 200 units of Botox® (n=7, weight = 101 ± 5 kg), or 3) 300 units of Botox® (n=5, weight=129 ± 22 kg). Botox® dose was converted to units/kg, the majority received between 1.9 and 2.4 units/kg (n=11) and one 3.2 units/kg. Plantarflexor peak torque and forefoot peak plantar pressure were quantified prior and two weeks post injection. Results There were no complications from the injections. Plantarflexor peak torque on the involved side increased in the placebo and 300 groups (3 ± 4 Nm and 6 ± 10 Nm respectively) and decreased −8 ± 11 Nm in the 200 group. There was no relationship between units/kg of Botox® for each subject and change in plantarflexor peak torque. Forefoot peak plantar pressure did not change in the placebo and 300 groups (0 ± 11 and 0 ± 5 N/cm2 respectively) and decreased −4 ± 16 N/cm2 (4%) for the 200 group. Conclusions There were no adverse events associated with the Botox® injections. This study was unable to determine the dose to consistently reduce plantarflexor strength and forefoot plantar pressure. Additional research is needed to investigate diabetes mellitus specific physiological changes and their impact of BoNT-A effectiveness in order to guide appropriate dosing. PMID:22735277

  11. Effectiveness of olive oil for the prevention of pressure ulcers caused in immobilized patients within the scope of primary health care: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Pressure ulcers are considered an important issue, mainly affecting immobilized older patients. These pressure ulcers increase the care burden for the professional health service staff as well as pharmaceutical expenditure. There are a number of studies on the effectiveness of different products used for the prevention of pressure ulcers; however, most of these studies were carried out at a hospital level, basically using hyperoxygenated fatty acids (HOFA). There are no studies focused specifically on the use of olive-oil-based products and therefore this research is intended to find the most cost-effective treatment and achieve an alternative treatment. Methods/design The main objective is to assess the effectiveness of olive oil, comparing it with HOFA, to treat immobilized patients at home who are at risk of pressure ulcers. As a secondary objective, the cost-effectiveness balance of this new application with regard to the HOFA will be assessed. The study is designed as a noninferiority, triple-blinded, parallel, multi-center, randomized clinical trial. The scope of the study is the population attending primary health centers in Andalucía (Spain) in the regional areas of Malaga, Granada, Seville, and Cadiz. Immobilized patients at risk of pressure ulcers will be targeted. The target group will be treated by application of an olive-oil-based formula whereas the control group will be treated by application of HOFA to the control group. The follow-up period will be 16 weeks. The main variable will be the presence of pressure ulcers in the patient. Secondary variables include sociodemographic and clinical information, caregiver information, and whether technical support exists. Statistical analysis will include the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test, symmetry and kurtosis analysis, bivariate analysis using the Student’s t and chi-squared tests as well as the Wilcoxon and the Man-Whitney U tests, ANOVA and multivariate logistic regression analysis. Discussion The

  12. SCI Survey to Determine Pressure Ulcer Vulnerability in the Outpatient Population

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-03-01

    expressed are either mean ± SD or N (%). 554 L.J. Gould et al. / Medical Hypotheses 83 (2014) 552–558 day, osteomyelitis, diabetes , and ulcer location...and diabetes . Although advanced age has been identified as a PrU risk factor, this was not the case in our study. This is congruent with a meta...13.9) 0.200 Diabetes mellitus 9 (19.1) 11 (15.3) 0.581 LOS, rehab 79.0 ± 55.6 201.3 ± 145.4 0.001 LOS, hosp in prior year 5.3 ± 17.0 25.9 ± 57.1 0.018

  13. Pressure mapping and performance of the compression bandage/garment for venous leg ulcer treatment.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, S; Mukhopadhyay, A; Sikka, M; Nagla, K S

    2008-08-01

    A study has been conducted on the commercially available compression bandages as regards their performance with time. Pressure mapping of these bandages has been done using a fabricated pressure-measuring device on a mannequin leg to see the effect on pressure due to creep, fabric friction and angle of bandaging. The results show that the creep behavior, frictional behavior and the angle of bandaging have a significant effect on the pressure profile generated by the bandages during application. The regression analysis shows that the surface friction restricts the slippage in a multilayer system. Also the diameters of the limb and the amount of stretch given to the bandage during application have definite impact on the bandage pressure. In case of compression garments, washing improves the pressure generated but not to the extent of the pressure of a virgin garment. Comparing the two compression materials i.e. bandage and garment, it is found that the presence of higher percentage of elastomeric material and a highly close construction in case of garment provides better holding power and a more homogeneous pressure distribution.

  14. Assessing complexity of skin blood flow oscillations in response to locally applied heating and pressure in rats: Implications for pressure ulcer risk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Fuyuan; O'Brien, William D.; Jan, Yih-Kuen

    2013-10-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of local heating on the complexity of skin blood flow oscillations (BFO) under prolonged surface pressure in rats. Eleven Sprague-Dawley rats were studied: 7 rats underwent surface pressure with local heating (△t=10 °C) and 4 rats underwent pressure without heating. A pressure of 700 mmHg was applied to the right trochanter area of rats for 3 h. Skin blood flow was measured using laser Doppler flowmetry. The loading period was divided into nonoverlapping 30 min epochs. For each epoch, multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis (MDFA) was utilized to compute DFA coefficients and complexity of endothelial related metabolic, neurogenic, and myogenic frequencies of BFO. The results showed that under surface pressure, local heating led to a significant decrease in DFA coefficients of myogenic frequency during the initial epoch of loading period, a sustained decrease in complexity of myogenic frequency, and a significantly higher degree of complexity of metabolic frequency during the later phase of loading period. Surrogate tests showed that the reduction in complexity of myogenic frequency was associated with a loss of nonlinearity whereas increased complexity of metabolic frequency was associated with enhanced nonlinearity. Our results indicate that increased metabolic activity and decreased myogenic response due to local heating manifest themselves not only in magnitudes of metabolic and myogenic frequencies but also in their structural complexity. This study demonstrates the feasibility of using complexity analysis of BFO to monitor the ischemic status of weight-bearing skin and risk of pressure ulcers.

  15. Potentially modifiable risk factors among veterans with spinal cord injury hospitalized for severe pressure ulcers: a descriptive study

    PubMed Central

    Guihan, Marylou; Bombardier, Charles H.

    2012-01-01

    Context/objective Pressure ulcers (PrUs) are a serious, costly and potentially life-long complication of spinal cord injury (SCI). Co-morbid conditions increase PrU risk, adding to the health behavior challenges faced by people with SCI. Little is known about medical co-morbidities, health beliefs, risk, protective behaviors, and readiness to improve skin care behaviors in people with SCI. This study describes the potentially modifiable medical and behavioral risk factors among veterans with SCI and severe (Stage III/IV) PrUs. Design Cross-sectional observational design. Setting 6 VA SCI Centers. Participants Convenience sample from a larger intervention study of 148 veterans hospitalized for PrUs. Interventions Not applicable. Outcome measures Knowledge, PrU risk, skin protective behaviors, health beliefs, and practices, health locus of control, skin worsening. Results Most ulcers were stage IV (73%) and about half had 2+ PrUs. Participants reported a mean of 6.7 co-morbid conditions (respiratory, gastrointestinal, renal disease/urinary tract infection, autonomic dysreflexia, diabetes, bowel/bladder incontinence). Potential intervention opportunities include proactive assistance with management of multiple chronic conditions, substance abuse, nutrition, adherence to skin protective behaviors, readiness to change, and access to resources. Overall knowledge about PrUs was low, especially for how to prevent PrUs and what to do if skin breakdown occurs. Conclusion Future research should address whether comprehensive models that include patient self-management, decision support and health care system, and proactive behavior change assistance for patients help reduce PrU incidence and recurrence in persons with SCI. Trial Registration http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT00105859 PMID:22925750

  16. Venous Ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Caprini, J.A.; Partsch, H.; Simman, R.

    2013-01-01

    Venous leg ulcers are the most frequent form of wounds seen in patients. This article presents an overview on some practical aspects concerning diagnosis, differential diagnosis and treatment. Duplex ultrasound investigations are essential to ascertain the diagnosis of the underlying venous pathology and to treat venous refluxes. Differential diagnosis includes mainly other vascular lesions (arterial, microcirculatory causes), hematologic and metabolic diseases, trauma, infection, malignancies. Patients with superficial venous incompetence may benefit from endovenous or surgical reflux abolition diagnosed by Duplex ultrasound. The most important basic component of the management is compression therapy, for which we prefer materials with low elasticity applied with high initial pressure (short-stretch bandages and Velcro-strap devices). Local treatment should be simple, absorbing and not sticky dressings keeping adequate moisture balance after debridement of necrotic tissue and biofilms are preferred. After the ulcer is healed compression therapy should be continued in order to prevent recurrence. PMID:26236636

  17. Ugh! Ulcers

    MedlinePlus

    ... Going to the Doctor Medicines for Ulcers Ulcer Prevention "If you kids don't stop yelling, you'll give me an ulcer!" "Don't worry so much. You'll give yourself an ulcer." Have you ever heard people talk like this about ulcers? It ...

  18. Periodically Relieving Ischial Sitting Load to Decrease the Risk of Pressure Ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Makhsous, Mohsen; Rowles, Diane M.; Rymer, William Z.; Bankard, James; Nam, Ellis K.; Chen, David; Lin, Fang

    2010-01-01

    Objective To investigate the relieving effect on interface pressure of an alternate sitting protocol involving a sitting posture that reduces ischial support. Design Repeated measures in 2 protocols on 3 groups of subjects. Setting Laboratory. Participants Twenty able-bodied persons, 20 persons with paraplegia, and 20 persons with tetraplegia. Interventions Two 1-hour protocols were used: alternate and normal plus pushup. In the alternate protocol, sitting posture was alternated every 10 minutes between normal (sitting upright with ischial support) and with partially removed ischial support (WO-BPS) postures; in the normal plus pushup protocol, sitting was in normal posture with pushups (lifting the subject off the seat) performed every 20 minutes. Main Outcome Measure Interface pressure on seat and backrest. Results In WO-BPS posture, the concentrated interface pressure observed around the ischia in normal posture was significantly repositioned to the thighs. By cyclically repositioning the interface pressure, the alternate protocol was superior to the normal plus pushup protocol in terms of a significantly lower average interface pressure over the buttocks. Conclusions A sitting protocol periodically reducing the ischial support helps lower the sitting load on the buttocks, especially the area close to ischial tuberosities. PMID:17601466

  19. [Epidemiology of pressure ulcers or the danger of a new Tower of Babel].

    PubMed

    Torra i Bou, J E

    1998-06-01

    Pressure epidemiology is a fundamental facet in meeting this important challenge to the health care system. The studies done on epidemiology signify an important effort by their authors, although their validity may be conditioned by methodological and conceptual aspects. The proliferation of studies about pressure epidemiology in our country, some of which having methodological conceptions not in agreement with the existing bibliography about this topic in other countries, make it necessary to gain a grasp of the basic epidemiologic aspects applied to the study of pressures as a health problem. This paper presents a bibliographical review on the subject and states proposals adapted to the characteristics of our immediate environs. This paper includes a review of these concepts: prevalence, incidence, recurrence, and severity; in addition to the most utilized variables in describing the pressure problem. Different strategies for the elaboration of epidemiological studies about pressures are also analyzed. Furthermore, the minimum information which authors of said studies need to facilitate in their reports are mentioned.

  20. Exploring the Effect of Educating Certified Nursing Assistants on Pressure Ulcer Knowledge and Incidence in a Nursing Home Setting.

    PubMed

    Wogamon, Cathy L

    2016-09-01

    The certified nursing assistant (CNA) is the caregiver who frequently identifies the first signs and symptoms of pressure ulcers (PUs) in the long-term care setting. A quality improvement effort was implemented to explore the effect of a 1-hour CNA education program about early identification, treatment, and prevention of PUs on PU knowledge, PU incidence, and PU prevention interventions, including skin checks. All 33 CNAs employed in a care facility for residents 55+ years old were invited to participate. CNA demographic and PU education variables were obtained. PU knowledge was assessed using the Pressure Ulcer Toolkit questionnaire before, immediately after, and 3 months following the educational intervention about PU prevention. PU incidence data were abstracted from monthly quality assurance reports for the 3 months pre-intervention and 3 months post intervention. Patient medical records were mined for data on turning/repositioning, skin checks, and informing care staff of suspicious areas of skin for the 3 months pre- and post educational intervention. Data for percent of short-stay residents (< 90 days) with PUs were collected via the quarterly Medicare Nursing Home Compare Quality Measures report for this facility before and 3 months after the educational intervention. Pre-intervention and post-intervention PU incidence was statistically analyzed using the t-test. The CNA demographic survey was administered using an anonymous pencil-and-paper format and hand-tabulated by the primary investigator. Of the 31 CNAs surveyed (mean age 32 years [range 18-65], mean years of experience 7.7 years [SD = 8.1, range 0.5-40], 26 (84%) reported they received training regarding PU prevention in the classroom during their initial CNA training, and 81% received on-the-job training at some point in their careers regarding PU prevention. The Quality Indicator report showed a reduction from 5 PUs to 0 (12.3%) in the 3 months pre-intervention to 0% in the 3 months post

  1. [Oral ulcers].

    PubMed

    Bascones-Martínez, Antonio; Figuero-Ruiz, Elena; Esparza-Gómez, Germán Carlos

    2005-10-29

    Ulcers commonly occur in the oral cavity, their main symptom being pain. There are different ways to classify oral ulcers. The most widely accepted form divides them into acute ulcers--sudden onset and short lasting--and chronic ulcers--insidious onset and long lasting. Commonest acute oral ulcers include traumatic ulcer, recurrent aphthous stomatitis, viral and bacterial infections and necrotizing sialometaplasia. On the other hand, oral lichen planus, oral cancer, benign mucous membrane pemphigoid, pemphigus and drug-induced ulcers belong to the group of chronic oral ulcers. It is very important to make a proper differential diagnosis in order to establish the appropriate treatment for each pathology.

  2. Preventing Decubitus Ulcers with Cotton Sheeting Systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Decubitus pressure ulcers are a worldwide health crisis and their prevention and treatment has become a national priority. The National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Board estimates that as many as three million people in the United States have pressure ulcers. The causes of the ailment include both extr...

  3. Examining the validity of pressure ulcer risk assessment scales: developing and using illustrated patient simulations to collect the data.

    PubMed

    Gould, D; Kelly, D; Goldstone, L; Gammon, J

    2001-09-01

    Simulations are of particular advantage in research studies where large samples are necessary to achieve statistical power and the information must be collected under uniform conditions in order to aid interpretation. In the study reported below, simulation was achieved through the use of medical photography accompanied by case studies of the same patients. All information was collected on the same day. The purpose of the study was to determine the validity of the three pressure ulcer risk assessment scales most commonly used in clinical nursing practice in the UK. Each clinical nurse assessed the same four patients using three risk assessment scales and a visual analogue scale designed to capture their own clinical judgement. External validity was assessed by a panel of tissue viability experts who provided independent ratings. Data were obtained from 236 clinical nurses, yielding 941 risk assessments. Experience with this approach to data collection suggests that it requires careful planning. This should include measures to ensure that the simulated information is valid and that all data collectors have been adequately trained and are able to motivate the nurses participating in the study. Providing consideration is given to these issues, the use of simulation can help to collect data that would be difficult to obtain by more conventional means. It is also important to recognize that clinical decisions are de-contextualized in simulations because they are reduced to verbal and visual summaries. The decision to use simulations should thus be taken only if this is acknowledged.

  4. Cost-utility analysis of an advanced pressure ulcer management protocol followed by trained wound, ostomy, and continence nurses.

    PubMed

    Kaitani, Toshiko; Nakagami, Gojiro; Iizaka, Shinji; Fukuda, Takashi; Oe, Makoto; Igarashi, Ataru; Mori, Taketoshi; Takemura, Yukie; Mizokami, Yuko; Sugama, Junko; Sanada, Hiromi

    2015-01-01

    The high prevalence of severe pressure ulcers (PUs) is an important issue that requires to be highlighted in Japan. In a previous study, we devised an advanced PU management protocol to enable early detection of and intervention for deep tissue injury and critical colonization. This protocol was effective for preventing more severe PUs. The present study aimed to compare the cost-effectiveness of the care provided using an advanced PU management protocol, from a medical provider's perspective, implemented by trained wound, ostomy, and continence nurses (WOCNs), with that of conventional care provided by a control group of WOCNs. A Markov model was constructed for a 1-year time horizon to determine the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of advanced PU management compared with conventional care. The number of quality-adjusted life-years gained, and the cost in Japanese yen (¥) ($US1 = ¥120; 2015) was used as the outcome. Model inputs for clinical probabilities and related costs were based on our previous clinical trial results. Univariate sensitivity analyses were performed. Furthermore, a Bayesian multivariate probability sensitivity analysis was performed using Monte Carlo simulations with advanced PU management. Two different models were created for initial cohort distribution. For both models, the expected effectiveness for the intervention group using advanced PU management techniques was high, with a low expected cost value. The sensitivity analyses suggested that the results were robust. Intervention by WOCNs using advanced PU management techniques was more effective and cost-effective than conventional care.

  5. Lower temperature at the wound edge detected by thermography predicts undermining development in pressure ulcers: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Kanazawa, Toshiki; Kitamura, Aya; Nakagami, Gojiro; Goto, Taichi; Miyagaki, Tomomitsu; Hayashi, Akitatsu; Sasaki, Sanae; Mugita, Yuko; Iizaka, Shinji; Sanada, Hiromi

    2016-08-01

    Undermined pressure ulcers (PUs) are troublesome complications that are likely to delay wound healing. Early skin incision and debridement can prevent the deterioration of undermined PUs, thus it is necessary to identify devitalised tissue areas to determine the appropriate timing for such interventions. This retrospective cohort study evaluated whether a lower temperature at the wound edge than the wound bed and periwound skin, detected by thermography, can predict undermining development in PUs 1 week after the assessment. Twenty-two participants with category III, IV, or unstageable PUs who were examined by interdisciplinary PU team and were followed up for at least two consecutive weeks were analysed. We found 9/11 PUs without a lower temperature at the wound edge did not develop undermining development, whereas 8/11 PUs with the lower temperature did develop undermining. The relative risk of undermining development after 1 week in PUs with the lower temperature was 4·00 (95% confidence intervals: 1·08-14·7). The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value were 0·80, 0·75, 0·73 and 0·81, respectively. A thermal imaging assessment focusing on a lower temperature pattern at the wound edge may provide sufficient information to predict undermining development.

  6. A randomised controlled trial of the effectiveness of soft silicone multi-layered foam dressings in the prevention of sacral and heel pressure ulcers in trauma and critically ill patients: the border trial.

    PubMed

    Santamaria, Nick; Gerdtz, Marie; Sage, Sarah; McCann, Jane; Freeman, Amy; Vassiliou, Theresa; De Vincentis, Stephanie; Ng, Ai Wei; Manias, Elizabeth; Liu, Wei; Knott, Jonathan

    2015-06-01

    The prevention of hospital acquired pressure ulcers in critically ill patients remains a significant clinical challenge. The aim of this trial was to investigate the effectiveness of multi-layered soft silicone foam dressings in preventing intensive care unit (ICU) pressure ulcers when applied in the emergency department to 440 trauma and critically ill patients. Intervention group patients (n = 219) had Mepilex(®) Border Sacrum and Mepilex(®) Heel dressings applied in the emergency department and maintained throughout their ICU stay. Results revealed that there were significantly fewer patients with pressure ulcers in the intervention group compared to the control group (5 versus 20, P = 0·001). This represented a 10% difference in incidence between the groups (3·1% versus 13·1%) and a number needed to treat of ten patients to prevent one pressure ulcer. Overall there were fewer sacral (2 versus 8, P = 0·05) and heel pressure ulcers (5 versus 19, P = 0·002) and pressure injuries overall (7 versus 27, P = 0·002) in interventions than in controls. The time to injury survival analysis indicated that intervention group patients had a hazard ratio of 0·19 (P = 0·002) compared to control group patients. We conclude that multi-layered soft silicone foam dressings are effective in preventing pressure ulcers in critically ill patients when applied in the emergency department prior to ICU transfer.

  7. Peer-to-peer nursing rounds and hospital-acquired pressure ulcer prevalence in a surgical intensive care unit: a quality improvement project.

    PubMed

    Kelleher, Alyson Dare; Moorer, Amanda; Makic, MaryBeth Flynn

    2012-01-01

    We conducted a quality improvement project in order to evaluate the effect of nurse-to-nurse bedside "rounding" as a strategy to decrease hospital-acquired pressure ulcers (HAPU) in a surgical intensive care unit. We instituted weekly peer-to-peer bedside skin rounds in a 17-bed surgical intensive care unit. Two nurses were identified as skin champions and trained by the hospital's certified WOC nurse to conduct skin rounds. The skin champion nurses conducted weekly peer-to-peer rounds that included discussions about key elements of our patients' skin status including current Braden Scale for Pressure Sore Risk score, and implementation of specific interventions related to subscale risk assessment. If a pressure ulcer was present, the current action plan was reevaluated for effectiveness. Quarterly HAPU prevalence studies were conducted from January 2008 to December 2010. Nineteen patients experienced a HAPU: 17 were located on the coccyx and 2 on the heel. Ten ulcers were classified as stage II, 3 PU were stage IV, 5 were deemed unstageable, and 1 was classified as a deep tissue injury. The frequency of preventive interventions rose during our quality improvement project. Specifically, the use of prevention surfaces increased 92%, repositioning increased 30%, nutrition interventions increased 77%, and moisture management increased 100%. Prior to focused nursing rounds, the highest HAPU prevalence rate was 27%. After implementing focused nursing rounds, HAPU rates trended down and were 0% for 3 consecutive quarters.

  8. Morphological study on the pressure ulcer-like dermal lesions formed in the rat heel skin after transection of the sciatic nerves.

    PubMed

    Haba, Daijiro; Minami, Chie; Miyagawa, Miki; Arakawa, Takamitsu; Miki, Akinori

    2017-01-01

    Due to transection of bilateral sciatic nerves, pressure ulcer-like dermal lesion occurred in the hairy skin covering of the heel skin in almost all rats. In the present study, chronological changes of the rat heel skin after the transection were morphologically and immunohistochemically examined. In the heel skin, redness and swelling began by 3days after the operation, and open wound formed by 17days. At the redness and swelling stage, edema extensively occurred in the dermis. At the thickening stage, the epidermis at the pressed site became transiently thicker, and at the whitening stage, rapidly thinner. At these stages, the epidermis in the skin surrounding the pressed site became gradually thicker. At the yellow scar stage, the skin was covered only by necrotic tissues and horny layer. These layers were scratched during walking and turning, and the yellow scar stage became the open wound stage. Inflammatory reaction began at the thickening stage, and at the yellow scar and open wound stages, necrosis, infiltration of inflammatory cells and dilation of small blood vessels were observed. These morphological features are quite similar to those in the human pressure ulcer. These findings suggest that these dermal injuries could compare the human pressure ulcer for medical treatment and depressurization in future study.

  9. Negative pressure and nanocrystalline silver dressings for nonhealing ulcer: A randomized pilot study.

    PubMed

    Sáez-Martín, Luis C; García-Martínez, Lourdes; Román-Curto, Concepción; Sánchez-Hernández, Miguel V; Suárez-Fernández, Ricardo M

    2015-01-01

    Chronic wounds have a high prevalence and wound care, treatment, and prevention consume large quantities of resources. Chronic wounds are a growing challenge for clinicians. A prospective randomized pilot study was conducted to assess the effectiveness in terms of reduction in area and safety of the combined use of negative-pressure wound therapy and nanocrystalline silver dressings as compared to negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) alone in the management of outpatients with chronic wounds. A total of 17 patients were included in the study, 10 were treated with the combined method and 7 with NPWT. Patients were followed for 6 weeks, with a final assessment at 3 months. Clinical improvement, microbiologic data, and toxicity of silver were evaluated. The antibacterial effects of ionic silver together with the development of granulation tissue promoted by NPWT reduced significantly the median extension of the wound between weeks 3 and 6 of treatment. The combination with silver also reduced bacterial colonization with Pseudomonas aeruginosa and the bacterial load on the surface of the wound. The silver levels correlated positively with the extension of the wound, although in none of the patients' toxic levels were reached. The combination of NPWT with nanocrystalline silver dressings was safe and as effective as NPWT alone.

  10. A Meta-analysis to Evaluate the Predictive Validity of the Braden Scale for Pressure Ulcer Risk Assessment in Long-term Care.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hong-Lin; Shen, Wang-Qin; Liu, Peng

    2016-09-01

    Although it is among the most commonly used pressure ulcer risk assessment tools, the Braden Scale may lack strong predictive validity when used in the long-term care setting. A meta-analysis was conducted of English-language articles published in the PubMed database and Web of Science from the indices' inception through July 2015 to assess the predictive validity of the Braden Scale for pressure ulcers in long-term care residents. Search terms included pressure ulcer, pressure sore, bedsore, decubitus, long-term care, nursing home, skilled nursing facility, hospice, and Braden. Data extracted from the publications included sample and setting characteristics and predictive value indices. The pooled sensitivities, specificities, diagnostic odds ratios (DOR), and constructed summary receiver operating characteristic (SROC) curves were calculated. Eight studies (2 prospective cohorts and 6 cross-sectional studies) with 41 489 residents met selection criteria for inclusion in the analysis. The pooled sensitivity and specificity were 0.80 (95% CI: 0.79-0.81) and 0.42 (95% CI: 0.42-0.43), respectively, yielding a combined DOR of 5.66 (95% CI: 3.77-8.48). The area under the ROC curve (AUC) was 0.7686 ± 0.0478 (95% CI: 0.6749-0.8623), and the overall diagnostic accuracy (Q*) was 0.7090 ± 0.0402 (95% CI: 0.6302-0.7878). Significant heterogeneity was noted among the included studies; Q value was 302.54 (P = 0.000), and I2 for pooled sensitivity, pooled specificity, and pooled DOR was 97.4%, 98.7% and 96.4%, respectively. Meta-regression analysis showed no heterogeneity was noted among Braden scale cut-offs (P = 0.123) and pressure ulcer prevalence P = 0.547). The evidence showed the Braden Scale has moderate predictive validity and low predictive specificity for pressure ulcers in long-term care residents. The development and testing of new risk assessment scales for this population is warranted.

  11. Exploring the role of pain as an early predictor of category 2 pressure ulcers: a prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Isabelle L; Brown, Sarah; McGinnis, Elizabeth; Briggs, Michelle; Coleman, Susanne; Dealey, Carol; Muir, Delia; Nelson, E Andrea; Stevenson, Rebecca; Stubbs, Nikki; Wilson, Lyn; Brown, Julia M; Nixon, Jane

    2017-01-01

    Objective To explore pressure area related pain as a predictor of category ≥2 pressure ulcer (PU) development. Design Multicentre prospective cohort study. Setting UK hospital and community settings. Participants inclusion Consenting acutely ill patients aged ≥18 years, defined as high risk (Braden bedfast/chairfast AND completely immobile/very limited mobility; pressure area related pain or; category 1 PU). Exclusion Patients too unwell, unable to report pain, 2 or more category ≥2 PUs. Follow-up Twice weekly for 30 days. Primary and secondary outcome measures Development and time to development of one or more category ≥2 PUs. Results Of 3819 screened, 1266 were eligible, 634 patients were recruited, 32 lost to follow-up, providing a 602 analysis population. 152 (25.2%) developed one or more category ≥2 PUs. 464 (77.1%) patients reported pressure area related pain on a healthy, altered or category 1 skin site of whom 130 (28.0%) developed a category ≥2 PU compared with 22 (15.9%) of those without pain. Full stepwise variable selection was used throughout the analyses. (1) Multivariable logistic regression model to assess 9 a priori factors: presence of category 1 PU (OR=3.25, 95% CI (2.17 to 4.86), p<0.0001), alterations to intact skin (OR=1.98, 95% CI (1.30 to 3.00), p=0.0014), pressure area related pain (OR=1.56, 95% CI (0.93 to 2.63), p=0.0931). (2) Multivariable logistic regression model to account for overdispersion: presence of category 1 PU (OR=3.20, 95% CI (2.11 to 4.85), p<0.0001), alterations to intact skin (OR=1.90, 95% CI (1.24 to 2.91), p=0.0032), pressure area related pain (OR=1.85, 95% CI (1.07 to 3.20), p=0.0271), pre-existing category 2 PU (OR=2.09, 95% CI (1.35 to 3.23), p=0.0009), presence of chronic wound (OR=1.66, 95% CI (1.06 to 2.62), p=0.0277), Braden activity (p=0.0476). (3) Accelerated failure time model: presence of category 1 PU (AF=2.32, 95% CI (1.73 to 3.12), p<0.0001), pressure area related pain (AF=2.28, 95% CI (1

  12. A randomized, controlled study to assess the effect of silk-like textiles and high-absorbency adult incontinence briefs on pressure ulcer prevention.

    PubMed

    Twersky, Jack; Montgomery, Terry; Sloane, Richard; Weiner, Madeline; Doyle, Susan; Mathur, Kavita; Francis, Mary; Schmader, Kenneth

    2012-12-01

    Pressure ulcer prevention is an important aspect of nursing home care. A 20-week, unblinded, randomized, controlled trial was conducted to compare the rate of nursing home-acquired pressure ulcers and adverse events between residents managed using: 1) a silk-like textile for bedding paired with high-absorbency adult incontinence briefs or 2) usual-care, plain-weave cotton/polyester bed sheets and adult incontinence briefs. All residents with an expected length of stay 30 days or more who agreed to participate were enrolled in the study and assessed daily. A total of 46 residents (all men) was enrolled; 26 (median age 72.7 years, range 54 to 95 years) in the intervention group and 20 (median age 69.5 years, range 51 to 91 years) in the usual care group. At baseline, there were no significant differences in resident demographic variables, including Braden Scale risk scores. Fewer pressure ulcers developed in the intervention (six; average follow up 75.6 days/person) than in the standard care group (20; average follow up 95.6 days/person) (hazard ratio = 0.31, 95% confidence interval 0.12, 0.78) and the number of new non-Stage I ulcers was significantly lower in the intervention group (HR = .23, 95% CI .078, .69, P = 0.0084). The number of adverse events did not differ significantly between the two groups. Additional research is warranted on use of products with the silk-like fabric, alone or in combination with highabsorbencybriefs, in larger groups and different populations.

  13. Hard to heal pressure ulcers (stage III-IV): efficacy of injected activated macrophage suspension (AMS) as compared with standard of care (SOC) treatment controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Zuloff-Shani, Adi; Adunsky, Abraham; Even-Zahav, Aviva; Semo, Haim; Orenstein, Arie; Tamir, Jeremy; Regev, Eli; Shinar, Eilat; Danon, David

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare local injections of AMS with SOC treatments for stage III and IV pressure ulcers in elderly patients. It was designed as historically prospective 2-arms non-parallel open controlled trial, and conducted in a department of geriatric medicine and rehabilitation of a university affiliated tertiary hospital. We studied 100 consecutive elderly patients with a total of 216 stage III or IV pressure ulcers, 66 patients were assigned to the AMS group and had their wounds injected, while 38 patients were assigned to the SOC group. Primary outcome was rate of complete wound closure. Time to complete wound closure and 1-year mortality served as secondary outcomes. Statistical analyses were performed at both patient and wound levels. Percentage of completely closed wounds (wound level and patient level) were significantly better (p<0.001/p<0.001, respectively) in all patients in favor of AMS, as well as in the subset of diabetic patients (p<0.001/p<0.001). Similarly, AMS proved significantly better for the subset of those with leg ulcers and with baseline wounds ≤15 cm(2), compared with SOC. There were no statistically significant differences with regard to time to complete closure or 1-year mortality rates in the two groups. It is concluded that there is a significant difference in favor of stage III and IV wound closure rates by AMS, as compared with SOC treatments.

  14. Applying of Decision Tree Analysis to Risk Factors Associated with Pressure Ulcers in Long-Term Care Facilities

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Mikyung

    2017-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to use decision tree analysis to explore the factors associated with pressure ulcers (PUs) among elderly people admitted to Korean long-term care facilities. Methods The data were extracted from the 2014 National Inpatient Sample (NIS)—data of Health Insurance Review and Assessment Service (HIRA). A MapReduce-based program was implemented to join and filter 5 tables of the NIS. The outcome predicted by the decision tree model was the prevalence of PUs as defined by the Korean Standard Classification of Disease-7 (KCD-7; code L89*). Using R 3.3.1, a decision tree was generated with the finalized 15,856 cases and 830 variables. Results The decision tree displayed 15 subgroups with 8 variables showing 0.804 accuracy, 0.820 sensitivity, and 0.787 specificity. The most significant primary predictor of PUs was length of stay less than 0.5 day. Other predictors were the presence of an infectious wound dressing, followed by having diagnoses numbering less than 3.5 and the presence of a simple dressing. Among diagnoses, “injuries to the hip and thigh” was the top predictor ranking 5th overall. Total hospital cost exceeding 2,200,000 Korean won (US $2,000) rounded out the top 7. Conclusions These results support previous studies that showed length of stay, comorbidity, and total hospital cost were associated with PUs. Moreover, wound dressings were commonly used to treat PUs. They also show that machine learning, such as a decision tree, could effectively predict PUs using big data. PMID:28261530

  15. A systematic review of electrical stimulation for pressure ulcer prevention and treatment in people with spinal cord injuries

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Liang Qin; Moody, Julie; Traynor, Michael; Dyson, Sue; Gall, Angela

    2014-01-01

    Context Electrical stimulation (ES) can confer benefit to pressure ulcer (PU) prevention and treatment in spinal cord injuries (SCIs). However, clinical guidelines regarding the use of ES for PU management in SCI remain limited. Objectives To critically appraise and synthesize the research evidence on ES for PU prevention and treatment in SCI. Method Review was limited to peer-reviewed studies published in English from 1970 to July 2013. Studies included randomized controlled trials (RCTs), non-RCTs, prospective cohort studies, case series, case control, and case report studies. Target population included adults with SCI. Interventions of any type of ES were accepted. Any outcome measuring effectiveness of PU prevention and treatment was included. Methodological quality was evaluated using established instruments. Results Twenty-seven studies were included, 9 of 27 studies were RCTs. Six RCTs were therapeutic trials. ES enhanced PU healing in all 11 therapeutic studies. Two types of ES modalities were identified in therapeutic studies (surface electrodes, anal probe), four types of modalities in preventive studies (surface electrodes, ES shorts, sacral anterior nerve root implant, neuromuscular ES implant). Conclusion The methodological quality of the studies was poor, in particular for prevention studies. A significant effect of ES on enhancement of PU healing is shown in limited Grade I evidence. The great variability in ES parameters, stimulating locations, and outcome measure leads to an inability to advocate any one standard approach for PU therapy or prevention. Future research is suggested to improve the design of ES devices, standardize ES parameters, and conduct more rigorous trials. PMID:24969965

  16. Relationship between nonlinear properties of sacral skin blood flow oscillations and vasodilatory function in people at risk for pressure ulcers.

    PubMed

    Liao, Fuyuan; Garrison, David W; Jan, Yih-Kuen

    2010-07-01

    The purposes of this study were to quantify the nonlinear properties of sacral skin blood flow oscillations (BFO) and to explore their relationships with impaired vasodilatory function in people at risk for pressure ulcers. A total of 25 people with various levels of vasodilatory functions were studied, 10 people with normal vasodilatory function (Biphasic thermal index, BTI (5.5, 4.5, 10.1)), 10 people with slight impaired vasodilatory function (BTI (3.7, 3.2, 6.7)), and 5 people with severe impaired vasodilation (BTI (2.4, 1.7, 4.5)). A non-painful fast heating protocol was applied to the sacral region to induce biphasic vasodilation, axon reflex mediated and nitric oxide mediated. Biphasic thermal index is defined as ratios of first peak, nadir, and second peak to baseline blood flow. Laser Doppler flowmetry was used to record the BFO signals. Nonlinear properties of BFO were quantified based on self-similarity using Hurst exponent (HE) and detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA), regularity using sample entropy (SampEn), complexity using correlation dimension (CD), and chaotic behavior using largest Lyapunov exponent (LLE). The Wilcoxon signed rank tests were used to examine the differences between groups. Our results showed that local heating reduces the self-similarity and increases complexity of skin blood flow oscillations. Vasodilatory function has an inverse relationship with nonlinear properties in sacral skin baseline BFO. Nonlinear indexes, including HE, DFA, CD, and LLE, are appropriate tools to quantify nonlinear properties of BFO to study the microvascular dysfunction (p<0.05), and that SampEn may not be appropriate for this purpose (p>0.05). Our study supports the use of nonlinear indexes to predict the vasodilatory function, which can complement current analysis of blood flow control mechanisms using spectral (wavelet) analysis.

  17. A prospective, observational study of high-specification foam immersion surfaces used in populations at high risk for pressure ulcers.

    PubMed

    Girolami, Susan; Moore, Angelene; Haper, Casey; Betts, Connie; Woodward, Tracey

    2014-08-01

    There are insufficient clinical outcomes data to select pressure redistribution support surfaces for vulnerable populations at risk for skin breakdown. A prospective, descriptive case series study with historical controls was conducted to examine clinical outcomes and user feedback when non powered, ergonomically designed, high-specification foam (HSF) devices were added to either a medical grade portable recliner or standard hospital bed used in the care of persons at high risk for pressure ulcers (PU). The study was conducted in a hospice agency and a VA rehabilitation and long-term care unit. Eligible participants were mobility and/or activity impaired; had at least one comorbidity; received standardized skin hygiene, incontinence, and repositioning protocols; and/or had previously documented negative outcomes (eg, pain or discomfort associated with sitting or lying surfaces, falls from equipment, nonhealing PU, and posturing problems such as leaning, sliding, or slumping) on currently used support surfaces. Patients/caregivers ranked pretrial and trial surface performance for overall comfort, control of downward migration, overall immersion, support while sitting without bottoming-out or hammocking, and heel off loading as evidenced by suspension or total immersion of the foot and ankle. Follow-up variables, including changes in pain, discomfort, PU status (if present), and skin integrity, were obtained every 7 to 21 days. Forty-four (44) persons (24 men, 20 women; average age 79, range 47-98 years) participated in the mattress study for an average of 53 (range 3-120) days); and 33 (eight men, 25 women; average age 82, range 63 to 97 years) participated in the recliner support system evaluation, for an average of 39 days (range 13-66 days). Compared to prestudy surfaces, perceived comfort, migration, immersion, and heel off loading ratings were significantly higher for the mattress and recliner surface (P <0.05). No falls occurred, and 17 of 35 preexisting PU

  18. Prospective, nonrandomized controlled trials to compare the effect of a silk-like fabric to standard hospital linens on the rate of hospital-acquired pressure ulcers.

    PubMed

    Coladonato, Joseph; Smith, Annette; Watson, Nancy; Brown, Anne T; McNichol, Laurie L; Clegg, Amy; Griffin, Tracy; McPhail, Lora; Montgomery, Terry G

    2012-10-01

    Hospital bedding and gowns influence skin moisture, temperature, friction, and shear, which in turn may affect the development of pressure ulcers. To evaluate the effect of a new silk-like synthetic fabric on the incidence of pressure ulcers in an acute care setting, two consecutive 6-month clinical trials were conducted among 307 consecutively admitted patients in a Medical Renal Unit (August 2008 and March 2010) and in 275 patients admitted to a Surgical Intensive Care Unit (ICU) (September 2009 to March 2010). During the first 8 weeks, all patients used standard hospital bed linens, reusable underpads, and gowns. During the second 8 weeks, all admitted patients used the intervention linens (a silk-like fabric) followed by another 8 weeks of control (standard linen) use. Demographic variables and the prevalence of pressure ulcers on admission were statistically similar for control and intervention groups in both study populations with the exception of gender in the Renal Unit study (13% higher proportion of men in intervention group). Average Braden Scores were also similar and low (<18) in all study patients. Upon admission to the Medical Renal Unit, 21 of 154 patients (13.6%) in the control and 26 of 153 patients (17.0%) in the intervention group had a pressure ulcer. The incidence of new ulcers was 12.3% in the control and 4.6% in the intervention group (P = 0.01); average length of stay was 5.97 days (σ = 4.0) for control and 5.31 days (σ = 3.8) for intervention patients (P = 0.07). In the Surgical ICU group, 18 of 199 patients in the control (9.1%) and four of 76 patients in the intervention group (5.3%) were admitted with a pressure ulcer; the incidence of new pressure ulcers was 7.5 % in the control and 0% in the intervention group (P = 0.01). Average length of stay was 4.5 days and 4.33 days in the control and intervention groups, respectively (P = 0.33). The significant differences between the control and intervention group in the rate of pressure

  19. Peptic Ulcers

    MedlinePlus

    ... the stomach lining), peptic ulcer disease, and even stomach cancer later in life. In the past, having peptic ulcers meant living with a chronic condition for several years or even a lifetime. But ... pylori infection, and gastric ulcers, which may stem from other causes. It's ...

  20. Utility of Braden Scale Nutrition Subscale Ratings as an Indicator of Dietary Intake and Weight Outcomes among Nursing Home Residents at Risk for Pressure Ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Kennerly, Susan; Boss, Lisa; Yap, Tracey L.; Batchelor-Murphy, Melissa; Horn, Susan D.; Barrett, Ryan; Bergstrom, Nancy

    2015-01-01

    The Braden Scale for Pressure Sore Risk© is a screening tool to determine overall risk of pressure ulcer development and estimate severity of specific risk factors for individual residents. Nurses often use the Braden nutrition subscale to screen nursing home (NH) residents for nutritional risk, and then recommend a more comprehensive nutritional assessment as indicated. Secondary data analysis from the Turn for Ulcer ReductioN (TURN) study’s investigation of U.S. and Canadian NH residents (n = 690) considered at moderate or high pressure ulcer (PrU) risk was used to evaluate the subscale’s utility for identifying nutritional intake risk factors. Associations were examined between Braden Nutritional Risk subscale screening, dietary intake (mean % meal intake and by meal timing, mean number of protein servings, protein sources, % intake of supplements and snacks), weight outcomes, and new PrU incidence. Of moderate and high PrU risk residents, 61.9% and 59.2% ate a mean meal % of <75. Fewer than 18% overall ate <50% of meals or refused meals. No significant differences were observed in weight differences by nutrition subscale risk or in mean number protein servings per meal (1.4 (SD = 0.58) versus 1.3 (SD = 0.53)) for moderate versus high PrU risk residents. The nutrition subscale approximates subsequent estimated dietary intake and can provide insight into meal intake patterns for those at either moderate or high PrU risk. Findings support the Braden Scale’s use as a preliminary screening method to identify focused areas for potential intervention. PMID:27417802

  1. A Prospective, Descriptive, Quality Improvement Study to Decrease Incontinence-Associated Dermatitis and Hospital-Acquired Pressure Ulcers.

    PubMed

    Hall, Kimberly D; Clark, Rebecca C

    2015-07-01

    Incontinence is a common problem among hospitalized patients and has been associated with multiple health complications, including incontinence-associated dermatitis (IAD) and hospital-acquired pressure ulcers (HAPUs). A prospective, descriptive study was conducted in 2 acute care neurology units to 1) assess the prevalence of incontinence and incidence of IAD and HAPUs among incontinent patients, and 2) evaluate the effect of caregiver education and use of a 1-step cleanser, moisturizer, barrier product on the development of IAD and HAPUs among patients with incontinence. During a period of 1 month, the incontinence status of admitted patients was recorded and skin was assessed for the presence/absence of IAD and HAPUs twice per day. After the 1-month data collection, all clinicians on the study units completed a facility-based online education program about IAD, HAPUs, and skin care followed by the implementation of a 1-step cleanser/barrier product for skin care of all patients with incontinence. Data collection procedures remained the same. Data were collected using a paper/pencil instrument and entered into a spreadsheet for analysis. Descriptive statistics were calculated and prevalence and incidence rates were compared between the pre-intervention and post-intervention phase using Fisher's exact analysis. During the first phase of the study, 17 of 40 admitted patients (42.5%) were incontinent. Of those, 5 (29.4%) developed IAD and all of these patients developed HAPUs (5 of 40 admitted, 29.4%) during an average length of stay of 7.3 (range: 2-14) days. In the intervention phase of the study, 25 of 46 (54.3%) patients were incontinent and none developed IAD or a HAPU during an average length of stay of 7.4 (range: 2-14) days. The average Braden scale score was 14.14 in the pre-intervention group of patients with incontinence and 12.74 in the intervention group. The prevalence of incontinence among patients admitted to acute care neurology units and the rate

  2. Sitting can cause ischaemia in the subcutaneous tissue of the buttocks, which implicates multilayer tissue damage in the development of pressure ulcers.

    PubMed

    Thorfinn, Johan; Sjoberg, Folke; Lidman, Disa

    2009-01-01

    A better understanding of how pressure ulcers develop in the buttocks will improve prophylactic measures. Our aim was to investigate signs of reduced perfusion and ischaemia in the subcutaneous fat in the buttocks during sitting. A microelectrode was used to quantify oxygen (pO(2)). Metabolites that indicate aerobic or anaerobic metabolism (glucose, lactate, pyruvate, and glycerol) were quantified using microdialysis. Sixteen healthy people were studied while they sat on a wheel chair cushion, and a hard surface. Sitting pressures were mapped, and the thickness of the subcutaneous fatty layer was measured. The results showed that pO(2) and glucose were significantly reduced during sitting, and for pO(2) the effect is significantly more profound during sitting on a hard surface. After loading, both glucose and pO(2) increased significantly. We conclude that the subcutaneous adipose tissue covering the ischial tuberosities becomes ischaemic during sitting. This finding supports the theory that not only is the skin involved in early development of pressure ulcers, but also the deeper tissues.

  3. [Peptic ulcer

    PubMed

    Carvalho, A S

    2000-07-01

    OBJECTIVE: To present a current review about pathogenesis, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of peptic ulcer disease in children, based on the reviewed publications and the author personal experience. METHODS: We revised the most relevant articles about peptic ulcer in children, published from the last 20 years. RESULTS: The gastroduodenal peptic ulcer is very common in adults, mostly in the developing countries. Although it is less frequent in children, the optical fibroendoscopy has improved the number of diagnosed cases. The peptic ulcer is classified as its etiology in primary and secondary. The secondary peptic ulcer is related to a subjacent disease or use of drugs, while the primary ulcer happens in the absence of underlying systemic diseases The primary duodenal ulcer is the most common presentation, and there are strong evidences of the H. pylori association in the etiology. Clinical presentation changes with age and ulcer type. Secondary ulcers are mostly acute and sometimes dramatic, while the primary ones have a chronic evolution mostly similar to patients with functional recurrent abdominal pain, but the presence of epigastric pain, feeding-related pain, vomiting, bleeding, familiar history for peptic ulcer, nocturnal pain, and male gender are strongly related to peptic ulcer. The acid antisecretory agents have great efficacy on relieving symptoms and solving ulcerate lesion, although the H. pylori eradication itself prevents primary duodenal ulcer recurrence. CONCLUSIONS: The primary peptic ulcer involve many factors in Its etiopathogenesis, being H. pylori the most important of them Although there isn t yet a ideal therapeutic course. The antibiotics play an important role in peptic ulcer and the H. pylori research must be done for na accurate diagnosis and treatment.

  4. The effectiveness of hydrocolloid dressings versus other dressings in the healing of pressure ulcers in adults and older adults: a systematic review and meta-analysis1

    PubMed Central

    Pott, Franciele Soares; Meier, Marineli Joaquim; Stocco, Janislei Giseli Dorociak; Crozeta, Karla; Ribas, Janyne Dayane

    2014-01-01

    Objective to evaluate the effectiveness of hydrocolloids in the healing of pressure ulcers in adult and older adult patients. Method systematic review with meta-analysis, based on the recommendations of the Cochrane Handbook. The search was undertaken in the databases: Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System Online, Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences Literature (LILACS), Cochrane Database, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, Web of Science and the Scientific Electronic Library Online. Results 646 primary studies were identified, 69 were evaluated and nine were selected, referring to the use of the hydrocolloid dressing in healing; of these, four studies allowed meta-analysis. There was no statistically significant difference between the hydrocolloid group and the foams group (p value=0.84; Odds Ratio 1.06, CI 95% 0.61-1.86). A slight superiority of the polyurethane dressings was observed in relation to the hydrocolloid dressings. Conclusion the evidence is not sufficient to affirm whether the efficacy of hydrocolloid dressings is superior to that of other dressings. It is suggested that clinical randomized trials be undertaken so as to ascertain the efficacy of this intervention in the healing of pressure ulcers, in relation to other treatments. PMID:25029065

  5. Comparison of in-person and digital photograph assessment of stage III and IV pressure ulcers among veterans with spinal cord injuries.

    PubMed

    Terris, Darcey D; Woo, Christine; Jarczok, Marc N; Ho, Chester H

    2011-01-01

    Digital photographs are often used in treatment monitoring for home care of less advanced pressure ulcers. We investigated assessment agreement when stage III and IV pressure ulcers in individuals with spinal cord injury were evaluated in person and with the use of digital photographs. Two wound-care nurses assessed 31 wounds among 15 participants. One nurse assessed all wounds in person, while the other used digital photographs. Twenty-four wound description categories were applied in the nurses' assessments. Kappa statistics were calculated to investigate agreement beyond chance (p < or = 0.05). For 10 randomly selected "double-rated wounds," both nurses applied both assessment methods. Fewer categories were evaluated for the double-rated wounds, because some categories were chosen infrequently and agreement could not be measured. Interrater agreement with the two methods was observed for 12 of the 24 categories (50.0%). However, of the 12 categories with agreement beyond chance, agreement was only "slight" (kappa = 0-0.20) or "fair" (kappa = 0.21-0.40) for 6 categories. The highest agreement was found for the presence of undermining (kappa = 0.853, p < 0.001). Interrater agreement was similar to intramethod agreement (41.2% of the categories demonstrated agreement beyond chance) for the nurses' in-person assessment of the double-rated wounds. The moderate agreement observed may be attributed to variation in subjective perception of qualitative wound characteristics.

  6. Comparison of pressure ulcer treatments in long-term care facilities: clinical outcomes and impact on cost.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, Siva; Van Vleet, John; Strunk, Billy; Ross, Robert N; Gray, Mikel

    2005-01-01

    This study compared clinical outcomes and nursing labor costs associated with (a) balsam Peru, hydrogenated castor oil, and trypsin (BCT) ointment; (b) BCT + Other; and (c) Other treatments in 2014 wound episodes occurring in 861 patients (mean 2.34 wounds/patient). Treatment with BCT ointment or BCT + Other was associated with a higher healing rate (P < .05). No Stage 1 or 2 ulcer treated with BCT ointment progressed, compared with 13.8% treated with BCT + Other and 13.4% treated with Other. The reported mean duration of treatment and time to heal were shorter for ulcers treated with BCT ointment, but differences did not reach significance, possibly because of the variability in reported treatment times. Mean daily nursing labor costs were lower for treatment with BCT than Other ($50.8 vs $61.7, P < .05). These data suggest that treatment of Stage 1 or 2 ulcers with BCT may be associated with shorter treatment time and time to heal and a potential reduction in treatment-related nursing labor costs.

  7. Cushing's ulcer: Further reflections

    PubMed Central

    Kemp, William J.; Bashir, Asif; Dababneh, Haitham; Cohen-Gadol, Aaron A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Brain tumors, traumatic head injury, and other intracranial processes including infections, can cause increased intracranial pressure and lead to overstimulation of the vagus nerve. As a result, increased secretion of gastric acid may occur which leads to gastro-duodenal ulcer formation known as Cushing's ulcer. Methods: A review of original records of Dr. Harvey Cushing's patients suffering from gastro-duodenal ulcers was performed followed by a discussion of the available literature. We also reviewed the clinical records of the patients never reported by Cushing to gain his perspective in describing this phenomenon. Dr. Cushing was intrigued to investigate gastro-duodenal ulcers as he lost patients to acute gastrointestinal perforations following successful brain tumor operations. It is indeed ironic that Harvey Cushing developed a gastro-duodenal ulcer in his later years with failing health. Results: Clinically shown by Cushing's Yale Registry, a tumor or lesion can disrupt this circuitry, leading to gastroduodenal ulceration. Cushing said that it was “reasonable to believe that the perforations following posterior fossa cerebellar operations were produced in like fashion by an irritative disturbance either of fiber tracts or vagal centers in the brain stem.” Conclusion: Harvey Cushing's pioneering work depicted in his Yale registry serves as a milestone for continuing research that can further discern this pathway. PMID:25972936

  8. Neuropathic ulcers of the foot.

    PubMed

    Lang-Stevenson, A I; Sharrard, W J; Betts, R P; Duckworth, T

    1985-05-01

    We report a prospective study of the causes and treatment of 26 long-standing neuropathic ulcers of the foot in 21 patients. The most important causal factor, well illustrated by pressure studies, was the presence of a dynamic or static deformity leading to local areas of peak pressure on insensitive skin. All but one of the 26 ulcers had healed after an average of 10 weeks of treatment in a light, skin-tight plaster cast, with the prohibition of weight-bearing. Recurrent ulceration was prevented in all but one foot by early operation to correct the causative deformity; this was performed after the ulcer had healed and before allowing weight-bearing on the limb. Pressure studies after operation confirmed that pressure points had been relieved.

  9. Combined use of fenestrated-type artificial dermis and topical negative pressure wound therapy for the venous leg ulcer of a rheumatoid arthritis patient.

    PubMed

    Morimoto, Naoki; Kuro, Atsuyuki; Yamauchi, Takashi; Horiuchi, Ai; Kakudo, Natsuko; Sakamoto, Michiharu; Suzuki, Kenji; Kusumoto, Kenji

    2016-02-01

    We report a case of circumferential venous leg ulcer in a rheumatoid arthritis patient. Mesh skin grafting was performed in another hospital, but the graft failed and the patient was referred to our hospital. This ulcer was treated by the combination therapy of a fenestrated-type artificial dermis with negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) and secondary mesh grafting using our 'grip tape technique'. NPWT was started at -100 mmHg and continued until the formation of dermis-like tissue. A section stained using haematoxylin and eosin and an anti-αSMA (α smooth muscle actin) immunohistological section of the biopsy from dermis-like tissue showed an abundant infiltration of fibroblasts and capillary formation beneath the fenestration of the silicone sheet. Threefold mesh skin grafting was subsequently performed and it was taken up completely. The fenestrated-type artificial dermis in combination with NPWT produced good results without infection in the treatment of complex wounds. In addition, our 'grip tape technique' was useful to apply polyurethane foam to the entire surface of the lower leg.

  10. Problem focused integration of information, quality and process management with empirical research: The example of the Essen Interdisciplinary Pressure Ulcer Project.

    PubMed

    Stausberg, Jürgen; Bartoszek, Gabriele; Lottko, Birgit; Kröger, Knut; Niebel, Wolfgang; Schneider, Helmut; Maier, Irene

    2006-01-01

    Issues of information management, quality management, process management, and empirical research are often seen independently from each other. In the Essen interdisciplinary pressure ulcer project, they were integrated to establish a synergy between quality of care, economics and research. The electronic documentation of events and supplementary information was done with the hospital wide patient administration system. Feedback and automatically requests were used for quality improvement. Codes for reimbursement are generated from the clinical documentation. Research studies had been based on the routine documentation. Prerequisite was the cooperation of all relevant groups, nurses, physicians, informaticians, theoreticians and medical controller. In the future, it will be necessary to extend the approach to other relevant nursing problems and to replace the redundant documentation (paper-based as well as electronic) by an electronic health record.

  11. Analysis of Qualitative Interviews about the Impact of Information Technology on Pressure Ulcer Prevention Programs: Implications for the Wound Ostomy Continence Nurse

    PubMed Central

    Shepherd, Marilyn Murphy; Wipke-Tevis, Deidre D.; Alexander, Gregory L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to compare pressure ulcer prevention programs in 2 long term care facilities (LTC) with diverse Information Technology Sophistication (ITS), one with high sophistication and one with low sophistication, and to identify implications for the Wound Ostomy Continence Nurse (WOC Nurse) Design Secondary analysis of narrative data obtained from a mixed methods study. Subjects and Setting The study setting was 2 LTC facilities in the Midwestern United States. The sample comprised 39 staff from 2 facilities, including 26 from a high ITS facility and 13 from the low ITS facility. Respondents included Certified Nurse Assistants,, Certified Medical Technicians, Restorative Medical Technicians, Social Workers, Registered Nurses, Licensed Practical Nurses, Information Technology staff, Administrators, and Directors. Methods This study is a secondary analysis of interviews regarding communication and education strategies in two longterm care agencies. This analysis focused on focus group interviews, which included both direct and non-direct care providers. Results Eight themes (codes) were identified in the analysis. Three themes are presented individually with exemplars of communication and education strategies. The analysis revealed specific differences between the high ITS and low ITS facility in regards to education and communication involving pressure ulcer prevention. These differences have direct implications for WOC nurses consulting in the LTC setting. Conclusions Findings from this study suggest that effective strategies for staff education and communication regarding PU prevention differ based on the level of ITS within a given facility. Specific strategies for education and communication are suggested for agencies with high ITS and agencies with low ITS sophistication. PMID:25945822

  12. Is single room hospital accommodation associated with differences in healthcare-associated infection, falls, pressure ulcers or medication errors? A natural experiment with non-equivalent controls

    PubMed Central

    Maben, Jill; Murrells, Trevor; Griffiths, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Objectives A wide range of patient benefits have been attributed to single room hospital accommodation including a reduction in adverse patient safety events. However, studies have been limited to the US with limited evidence from elsewhere. The aim of this study was to assess the impact on safety outcomes of the move to a newly built all single room acute hospital. Methods A natural experiment investigating the move to 100% single room accommodation in acute assessment, surgical and older people’s wards. Move to 100% single room accommodation compared to ‘steady state’ and ‘new build’ control hospitals. Falls, pressure ulcer, medication error, meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Clostridium difficile rates from routine data sources were measured over 36 months. Results Five of 15 time series in the wards that moved to single room accommodation revealed changes that coincided with the move to the new all single room hospital: specifically, increased fall, pressure ulcer and Clostridium difficile rates in the older people’s ward, and temporary increases in falls and medication errors in the acute assessment unit. However, because the case mix of the older people’s ward changed, and because the increase in falls and medication errors on the acute assessment ward did not last longer than six months, no clear effect of single rooms on the safety outcomes was demonstrated. There were no changes to safety events coinciding with the move at the new build control site. Conclusion For all changes in patient safety events that coincided with the move to single rooms, we found plausible alternative explanations such as case-mix change or disruption as a result of the re-organization of services after the move. The results provide no evidence of either benefit or harm from all single room accommodation in terms of safety-related outcomes, although there may be short-term risks associated with a move to single rooms. PMID:26811373

  13. Skin debris and micro-organisms on the periwound skin of pressure ulcers and the influence of periwound cleansing on microbial flora.

    PubMed

    Konya, Chizuko; Sanada, Hiromi; Sugama, Junko; Kitayama, Yukie; Ishikawa, Shinji; Togashi, Hiroyasu; Tamura, Shigeru

    2005-01-01

    Many clinicians use the same solution, most often normal saline, to cleanse the periwound skin and the wound bed itself. However, skin debris such as water-insoluble proteins and lipids are not efficiently removed by normal saline solutions. To analyze the skin debris and micro-organisms found on the periwound skin of pressure ulcers and to evaluate the effect of periwound cleansing on the microbial flora, a descriptive study was conducted among 17 long-term care residents with Stage III and IV pressure ulcers. Skin debris from both the periwound area and normal skin was collected from all 17 residents. In addition, micro-organisms from the wound bed, periwound, and normal skin of five residents were collected before, immediately after, and 6 hours and 24 hours after periwound cleansing using a skin cleanser. All microbial species were identified by cultivation. Cholesterol and nitrogen-containing substances were found in greater quantity on the periwound than on normal skin (P = 0.0027 and P = 0.0054, respectively) and the number of isolated micro-organisms from the periwound area was larger than that from normal skin. Protein showed the highest correlation to the microbial count present on the periwound (r = 0.71, P = 0.0014). The microbial counts of all isolated micro-organisms decreased immediately after cleansing but the number of isolates with high microbial counts increased over time. In the wound bed, the number of isolates with decreasing microbial counts was larger than the number of isolates with increasing microbial counts. Both numbers returned to pre-cleansing values after 24 hours, suggesting that periwound cleansing only (without directly cleansing the wound bed) is effective at reducing the microbial counts in the wound bed for up to 24 hours. Further research is needed to evaluate the effects of periwound cleansing on healing time.

  14. Ugh! Ulcers

    MedlinePlus

    ... sores, or ulcers, are caused. continue Who Has H. Pylori Infection? By testing someone's blood or bowel movements ( ... she has been exposed to and might have H. pylori . When tested, lots of people have H. pylori ...

  15. Ulcerative colitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... proctocolectomy - discharge Types of ileostomy Ulcerative colitis - discharge Review Date 8/14/2015 Updated by: Subodh K. ... gastroenterologist at Gastrointestinal Specialists of Georgia, Austell, GA. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network. Internal review and ...

  16. Stomach ulcer

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... are absorbed in the small intestine. It produces acid and various enzymes that break down food into ... wall of the stomach is protected from the acid and enzymes by a mucous lining. Ulcers are ...

  17. [Orthopaedic footwear against foot ulcers in diabetes].

    PubMed

    Bus, Sicco A

    2014-01-01

    In people with diabetes mellitus, foot ulcers are a major problem because they increase the risk of a foot infection and amputation and reduce quality of life. After a foot ulcer has healed, the risk of recurrence is high. Orthopaedic shoes and orthotics are often prescribed to high risk patients and aim to reduce the mechanical pressure on the plantar surface of the foot. Orthopaedic footwear that is modified to reduce pressure is not much more effective in preventing foot ulcer recurrence than orthopaedic footwear that did not undergo such modification, unless the shoes are worn as recommended. In that case, the risk of ulcer recurrence is reduced by 46%. In patients with a history of ulceration, compliance in wearing orthopaedic shoes at home is low, while these patients walk more inside the house than outside the house. Foot pressure measurements should be part of the prescription and evaluation of orthopaedic footwear for patients at high risk for foot ulceration.

  18. Venous leg ulcers

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    , pentoxifylline, rutosides, stanozolol, sulodexide, thromboxane alpha2 antagonists, zinc), peri-ulcer injection of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, self-help (advice to elevate leg, to keep leg active, to modify diet, to stop smoking, to reduce weight), short-stretch bandages, single-layer non-elastic system, skin grafting, superficial vein surgery, systemic mesoglycan, therapeutic ultrasound, and topical treatments (antimicrobial agents, autologous platelet lysate, calcitonin gene-related peptide plus vasoactive intestinal polypeptide, freeze-dried keratinocyte lysate, mesoglycan, negative pressure, recombinant keratinocyte growth factor, platelet-derived growth factor). PMID:22189344

  19. Evaluation of physiological risk factors, oxidant-antioxidant imbalance, proteolytic and genetic variations of matrix metalloproteinase-9 in patients with pressure ulcer

    PubMed Central

    Latifa, Khlifi; Sondess, Sahli; Hajer, Graiet; Manel, Ben-Hadj-Mohamed; Souhir, Khelil; Nadia, Bouzidi; Abir, Jaballah; Salima, Ferchichi; Abdelhedi, Miled

    2016-01-01

    Pressure ulcer (PU) remains a common worldwide problem in all health care settings, it is synonymous with suffering. PU is a complex disease that is dependent on a number of interrelated factors. It involves multiple mechanisms such as physiological risk factors, chronic inflammation, oxidant–antioxidant imbalance and proteolytic attack on extracellular matrix by matrix metalloproteinases (MMP). Therefore, we propose that these wounds lead to molecular variations that can be detected by assessing biomarkers. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the major clinical elements and biological scars in Tunisian patients suffering from PU. Consistently, non-healing wound remains a challenging clinical problem. The complex challenges of the wound environment, involving nutrient deficiencies, bacterial infection, as well as the critical role played by inflammatory cells, should be considered because of their negative impact on wound healing. In addition, an imbalance between pro-oxidants and antioxidant systems seems to be more aggravated in patients with PU compared to healthy subjects. Of interest, this study provides further evidence to support a core role of the biological activity of MMP-9 in the pathogenesis of PU and indicates that the MMP9-1562 C/T (rs 3918242) functional polymorphism is associated with protection against this disease. PMID:27405842

  20. Autologous mesenchymal stem cells applied on the pressure ulcers had produced a surprising outcome in a severe case of neuromyelitis optica

    PubMed Central

    Dulamea, Adriana Octaviana; Sirbu-Boeti, Mirela-Patricia; Bleotu, Coralia; Dragu, Denisa; Moldovan, Lucia; Lupescu, Ioana; Comi, Giancarlo

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies provided evidence that mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have regenerative potential in cutaneous repair and profound immunomodulatory properties making them a candidate for therapy of neuroimmunologic diseases. Neuromyelitis optica (NMO) is an autoimmune, demyelinating central nervous system disorder characterized by a longitudinally extensive spinal cord lesion. A 46-year-old male diagnosed with NMO had relapses with paraplegia despite treatment and developed two stage IV pressure ulcers (PUs) on his legs. The patient consented for local application of autologous MSCs on PUs. MSCs isolated from the patient's bone marrow aspirate were multiplied in vitro during three passages and embedded in a tridimensional collagen-rich matrix which was applied on the PUs. Eight days after MSCs application the patient showed a progressive healing of PUs and improvement of disability. Two months later the patient was able to walk 20 m with bilateral assistance and one year later he started to walk without assistance. For 76 months the patient had no relapse and no adverse event was reported. The original method of local application of autologous BM-MSCs contributed to healing of PUs. For 6 years the patient was free of relapses and showed an improvement of disability. The association of cutaneous repair, sustained remission of NMO and improvement of disability might be explained by a promotion/optimization of recovery mechanisms in the central nervous system even if alternative hypothesis should be considered. Further studies are needed to assess the safety and efficacy of mesenchymal stem cells in NMO treatment. PMID:26807122

  1. Modeling the Effects of Moisture-Related Skin-Support Friction on the Risk for Superficial Pressure Ulcers during Patient Repositioning in Bed

    PubMed Central

    Shaked, Eliav; Gefen, Amit

    2013-01-01

    Patient repositioning when the skin is moist, e.g., due to sweat or urine may cause skin breakdown since wetness increases the skin-support coefficient of friction (COF) and hence also the shear stresses that are generated in the skin when the patient is being moved. This everyday hospital scenario was never studied systematically however. The aim of this study was to simulate such interactions using a biomechanical computational model which is the first of its kind, in order to quantitatively describe the effects of repositioning on the pathomechanics of moisture-related tissue damage. We designed a finite element model to analyze skin stresses under a weight-bearing bony prominence while this region of interest slides frictionally over the support surface, as occurs during repositioning. Our results show, expectedly, that maximal effective stresses in the skin increase as the moisture-contents-related COF between the skin and the mattress rises. Interestingly however, the rise in stresses for a wet interface became more prominent when the skin tissue was stiffer – which represented aging or diabetes. This finding demonstrates how the aged/diabetic skin is more fragile than a young-adult skin when repositioning in a moist environment. The modeling used herein can now be extended to test effects of different moisturizers, creams, lubricants, or possibly other interventions at the skin-support interface for testing their potential in protecting the skin from superficial pressure ulcers in a standard, objective, and quantitative manner. PMID:25022867

  2. Surgical Treatment of 55 Patients with Pressure Ulcers at the Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery Kosovo during the Period 2000-2010: A Retrospective Study.

    PubMed

    Duci, Shkelzen B; Arifi, Hysni M; Selmani, Mimoza E; Mekaj, Agon Y; Gashi, Musli M; Buja, Zejn A; Ismajli, Vildane H; Kllokoqi, Adem N; Hoxha, Enver T

    2013-01-01

    Objective. The objective of this study is to determine the incidence of PUs, the distribution of PUs, common injuries contributing to the occurrence of PUs in patients admitted to the Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery Kosovo for surgical interventions of PUs, localization of PUs in body, the topical treatment of pressure ulcers before surgical intervention, the methods of surgical interventions, number of surgical interventions, duration of treatment, complications, and mortality. Materials and Methods. This study includes 55 patients with PUs treated surgically in 2000-2010 period in the Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery Kosovo. The data were collected and analyzed from the archives and protocols of the University Clinical Center of Kosovo. Data processing was done with the statistical package In Stat 3. From statistical parameters arithmetic median and standard deviation were calculated. Data testing is done with χ (2)-test and the difference is significant if P < 0.05. Conclusion. Despite preventive measures against PUs, the incidence of Pus remains high.

  3. Evaluation of physiological risk factors, oxidant-antioxidant imbalance, proteolytic and genetic variations of matrix metalloproteinase-9 in patients with pressure ulcer.

    PubMed

    Latifa, Khlifi; Sondess, Sahli; Hajer, Graiet; Manel, Ben-Hadj-Mohamed; Souhir, Khelil; Nadia, Bouzidi; Abir, Jaballah; Salima, Ferchichi; Abdelhedi, Miled

    2016-07-11

    Pressure ulcer (PU) remains a common worldwide problem in all health care settings, it is synonymous with suffering. PU is a complex disease that is dependent on a number of interrelated factors. It involves multiple mechanisms such as physiological risk factors, chronic inflammation, oxidant-antioxidant imbalance and proteolytic attack on extracellular matrix by matrix metalloproteinases (MMP). Therefore, we propose that these wounds lead to molecular variations that can be detected by assessing biomarkers. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the major clinical elements and biological scars in Tunisian patients suffering from PU. Consistently, non-healing wound remains a challenging clinical problem. The complex challenges of the wound environment, involving nutrient deficiencies, bacterial infection, as well as the critical role played by inflammatory cells, should be considered because of their negative impact on wound healing. In addition, an imbalance between pro-oxidants and antioxidant systems seems to be more aggravated in patients with PU compared to healthy subjects. Of interest, this study provides further evidence to support a core role of the biological activity of MMP-9 in the pathogenesis of PU and indicates that the MMP9-1562 C/T (rs 3918242) functional polymorphism is associated with protection against this disease.

  4. Ulcer pain in patients with venous leg ulcers related to antibiotic treatment and compression therapy.

    PubMed

    Akesson, Nina; Oien, Rut Frank; Forssell, Henrik; Fagerström, Cecilia

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study was to compare venous leg ulcer patients with and without ulcer pain to see whether ulcer pain affected the use of antibiotic treatment and compression therapy throughout healing. A total of 431 patients with venous leg ulcers were included during the study period. Every patient was registered in a national quality registry for patients with hard-to-heal leg, foot, and pressure ulcers. A high incidence of ulcer pain (57%) was found when the patients entered the study. Patients with ulcer pain had been treated more extensively with antibiotics both before and during the study period. Throughout healing there was a significant reduction of antibiotic use among patients in the 'no pain' group, from 44% to 23% (P=0.008). There was no significant difference between the two groups concerning compression therapy (85% vs. 88%), but 12% of patients in the 'pain' group did not get their prescribed compression compared with 6% of patients in the 'no pain' group. The groups did not differ significantly in terms of ulcer duration, ulcer size or healing time. This study shows a high incidence of ulcer pain, confirming that pain has a great impact on patients with venous leg ulcers. Results further suggest that the presence of ulcer pain increases the prescription of antibiotics but does not affect the use of compression therapy. Several advantages were found from using a national quality registry. The registry is a valuable clinical tool showing the importance of accurate diagnosis and effective treatment.

  5. Prevention, Assessment and Treatment Of Decubitus Ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Morden, Patricia; Bayne, Ronald

    1976-01-01

    Decubitus ulcers are not uncommon in chronically ill and disabled people who are bedridden. Prevention is better than cure, but the chief ingredient in both is avoidance of excess pressure on the tissues, especially over bony prominences. If an ulcer does occur, it requires scrutiny, appropriate therapy with the agents listed and repeated re-examination. PMID:21308073

  6. Topical Olive Oil Is Not Inferior to Hyperoxygenated Fatty Aids to Prevent Pressure Ulcers in High-Risk Immobilised Patients in Home Care. Results of a Multicentre Randomised Triple-Blind Controlled Non-Inferiority Trial

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Pressure ulcers represent a major current health problem and produce an important economic impact on the healthcare system. Most of studies to prevent pressure ulcers have been carried out in hospital contexts, with respect to the use of hyperoxygenated fatty acids and to date, no studies have specifically examined the use of olive oil-based substances. Methods and Design Main objective: To assess the effectiveness of the use of olive oil, comparing it with hyperoxygenated fatty acids, for immobilised home-care patients at risk of suffering pressure ulcers. Design: Non-inferiority, triple-blind, parallel, multicentre, randomised clinical trial. Scope: Population attending Primary Healthcare Centres in Andalusia (Spain). Sample: 831 immobilised patients at risk of suffering pressure ulcers. Results The follow-up period was 16 weeks. Groups were similar after randomization. In the per protocol analysis, none of the body areas evaluated presented risk differences for pressure ulcers incidence that exceeded the 10% delta value established. Sacrum: Olive Oil 8 (2.55%) vs HOFA 8 (3.08%), ARR 0.53 (-2.2 to 3.26) Right heel: Olive Oil 4 (1.27%) vs HOFA 5 (1.92)%, ARR0.65 (-1.43 to 2.73). Left heel: Olive Oil 3 (0.96%) vs HOFA 3 (1.15%), ARR0.2 (-1.49 to 1.88). Right trochanter: Olive Oil 0 (0%) vs HOFA 4 (1.54%), ARR1.54 (0.04 to 3.03). Left trochanter: Olive Oil 1 (0.32%) vs HOFA 1 (0.38%), ARR0.07 (-0.91 to 1.04). In the intention to treat analysis the lower limit of the established confidence interval was never exceeded. Discussion The results obtained confirmed that the use of topical extra-virgin olive oil to prevent PU in the home environment, for immobilised patients at high risk, is not inferior to the use of HOFA. Further studies are needed to investigate the mechanism by which olive oil achieves this outcome. Trial Registration Clinicaltrials.gov NCT01595347 PMID:25886152

  7. Parafricta Bootees and Undergarments to Reduce Skin Breakdown in People with or at Risk of Pressure Ulcers: A NICE Medical Technologies Guidance.

    PubMed

    Meads, Catherine; Glover, Matthew; Dimmock, Paul; Pokhrel, Subhash

    2016-12-01

    As part of the development of the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) Medical Technologies Guidance on Parafricta Bootees and Undergarments to reduce skin breakdown in people with, or at risk of, pressure ulcers, the manufacturer (APA Parafricta Ltd) submitted clinical and economic evidence, which was critically appraised by an External Assessment Centre (EAC) and subsequently used by the Medical Technologies Advisory Committee (MTAC) to develop recommendations for further research. The University of Birmingham and Brunel University, acting as a consortium, were commissioned to act as the EAC, independently appraising the submission. This article is an overview of the original evidence submitted, the EAC's findings and the final NICE guidance. Very little comparative evidence was submitted to demonstrate the effectiveness of Parafricta Bootees or Undergarments. The sponsor submitted a simple cost analysis to estimate the costs of using Parafricta in addition to current practice-in comparison with current practice alone-in hospital and community settings separately. The analysis took a National Health Service (NHS) perspective. The basis of the analysis was a previously published comparative study, which showed no statistical difference in average lengths of stay between patients who wore Parafricta Undergarments and Bootees, and those who did not. The economic model incorporated the costs of Parafricta but assumed shorter lengths of stay with Parafricta. The sponsor concluded that Parafricta was cost saving relative to the comparators. The EAC made amendments to the sponsor's analysis to correct for errors and to reflect alternative assumptions. Parafricta remained cost saving in most analyses, and the savings per prevalent case ranged from £757 in the hospital model to £3455 in the community model. All analyses were severely limited by the available data on effectiveness-in particular, a lack of good-quality comparative studies.

  8. Venous ulcer review

    PubMed Central

    Bevis, Paul; Earnshaw, Jonothan

    2011-01-01

    Clinical question: What is the best treatment for venous ulcers? Results: Compression aids ulcer healing. Pentoxifylline can aid ulcer healing. Artificial skin grafts are more effective than other skin grafts in helping ulcer healing. Correction of underlying venous incompetence reduces ulcer recurrence. Implementation: Potential pitfalls to avoid are: Failure to exclude underlying arterial disease before application of compression.Unusual-looking ulcers or those slow to heal should be biopsied to exclude malignant transformation. PMID:21673869

  9. [Diagnosing venous and venous/arterial ulcers].

    PubMed

    Perceau, Géraldine

    2012-01-01

    A venous ulcer can be diagnosed on the basis of elements arising from the questioning and the clinical examination of the patient. A venous Doppler ultrasound can specify the type of reverse flow (superficial and/or deep). Measuring the ankle brachial pressure index helps to eliminate or confirm any arterial involvement. Depending on the systolic pressure index, the ulcer will be considered as purely venous, mixed (arterial-venous) or predominantly arterial.

  10. A retrospective, nonrandomized, beforeand- after study of the effect of linens constructed of synthetic silk-like fabric on pressure ulcer incidence.

    PubMed

    Smith, Annette; McNichol, Laurie L; Amos, Mary Anne; Mueller, Gayle; Griffin, Tracy; Davis, Joe; McPhail, Lora; Montgomery, Terry G

    2013-04-01

    A new, synthetic, silk-like fabric was developed for the purpose of providing bedding and patient gowns that manage moisture, friction, and shear when used between the patient and the healthcare support surface that may affect the development of pressure ulcers (PUs). A retrospective study was conducted to compare the incidence of hospital-acquired PUs in patients admitted to Telemetry, Urology, and Intensive Care Units before and after hospital linens were changed from standard to the synthetic (intervention) linens. Patient medical record data were abstracted for a period 12 weeks before (control) and 12 weeks following the linen change (intervention). Patient demographic information, Braden Risk Scale score, and PU status and stage were abstracted for a total of 659 patients in the control and 768 patients in the intervention groups. No significant differences in patient weight, age, gender distribution, PU risk (Braden scale scores), or proportion of PUs on admission between groups were found. The most common comorbidity was hypertension (n = 981, 68.7%). On admission, the percentage of patients with PUs in the control and intervention groups was 9.9% (σ = 0.3) and 8.7% (σ = 0.3), respectively (P = 0.23). Average length of stay was 5.6 days in the control and 5.2 days in the intervention groups (P = 0.08). Sixty-eight (68) of 659 patients (10.3%) in the control and 19 out of 768 patients in the intervention group (2.5%) developed one or more PUs (P <0.001) for an incidence of 11.5% in the control and 3.1% in the intervention group. At discharge, 136 PUs were present in the control and 64 were present in the intervention group (P <0.001). The significant differences in the incidence of hospital-acquired PUs between the two groups suggest that linen type affects PU risk. Additional controlled clinical studies in high-risk patient populations are warranted.

  11. [Therapeutic superiority of regional retrograde venous antibiotic pressure infusion versus systemic venous infusions in diabetic patients with infected neuropathic plantar ulcers].

    PubMed

    Seidel, C; Bühler-Singer, S; Tacke, J; Hornstein, O P

    1994-02-01

    Since systemic treatment of neuropathic plantar ulcers in diabetics (DNPU) has so far been rather ineffective, recent reports of successful management of DNPU by short-term retrograde transvenous leg perfusion (RVP) by South American angiologists encouraged us to apply this treatment method in diabetics suffering from chronic DNPU. Hence, in a prospective comparative clinical trial started in 1989 we have treated 45 male diabetics suffering from DNPU with the same daily doses of netilmycin, administered either in systemic venous infusions (SVI: n = 21, three times/day) or in RVP (n = 24, once/day). After 10 consecutive days of treatment, ulcers had closed in 8 of the 24 patients treated with RVP, as against 3 of the 21 treated with SVI. Diminution of the ulcer area by > 30% including full debridement was achieved in 10/24 of the RVP cases (SVI: 4/21). During 6 months of follow-up, amputation of toes or forefoot was necessary in only 1 patient in the RVP group, but in 4 in the SVI group. Partial restitution of osteolytic damage was observed in some cases after RVP. Our results show that regional netilmycin therapy given by the RVP procedure is clearly superior to equal netilmycin doses administered by SVI for the treatment of DNPU. RVP can be recommended in DNPU, particularly when the ulcers are complicated by infections.

  12. Definition and Facts for Peptic Ulcers (Stomach Ulcers)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Nutrition Clinical Trials Definition & Facts for Peptic Ulcers (Stomach Ulcers) What is a peptic ulcer? A peptic ... is a sore on the lining of your stomach or duodenum. Rarely, a peptic ulcer may develop ...

  13. Leveraging Electronic Health Care Record Information to Measure Pressure Ulcer Risk in Veterans With Spinal Cord Injury: A Longitudinal Study Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Thomason, Susan S; Sabharwal, Sunil; Finch, Dezon K; McCart, James; Toyinbo, Peter; Bouayad, Lina; Matheny, Michael E; Gobbel, Glenn T; Powell-Cope, Gail

    2017-01-01

    Background Pressure ulcers (PrUs) are a frequent, serious, and costly complication for veterans with spinal cord injury (SCI). The health care team should periodically identify PrU risk, although there is no tool in the literature that has been found to be reliable, valid, and sensitive enough to assess risk in this vulnerable population. Objective The immediate goal is to develop a risk assessment model that validly estimates the probability of developing a PrU. The long-term goal is to assist veterans with SCI and their providers in preventing PrUs through an automated system of risk assessment integrated into the veteran’s electronic health record (EHR). Methods This 5-year longitudinal, retrospective, cohort study targets 12,344 veterans with SCI who were cared for in the Veterans Health Administration (VHA) in fiscal year (FY) 2009 and had no record of a PrU in the prior 12 months. Potential risk factors identified in the literature were reviewed by an expert panel that prioritized factors and determined if these were found in structured data or unstructured form in narrative clinical notes for FY 2009-2013. These data are from the VHA enterprise Corporate Data Warehouse that is derived from the EHR structured (ie, coded in database/table) or narrative (ie, text in clinical notes) data for FY 2009-2013. Results This study is ongoing and final results are expected in 2017. Thus far, the expert panel reviewed the initial list of risk factors extracted from the literature; the panel recommended additions and omissions and provided insights about the format in which the documentation of the risk factors might exist in the EHR. This list was then iteratively refined through review and discussed with individual experts in the field. The cohort for the study was then identified, and all structured, unstructured, and semistructured data were extracted. Annotation schemas were developed, samples of documents were extracted, and annotations are ongoing. Operational

  14. Hydrogen water intake via tube-feeding for patients with pressure ulcer and its reconstructive effects on normal human skin cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Pressure ulcer (PU) is common in immobile elderly patients, and there are some research works to investigate a preventive and curative method, but not to find sufficient effectiveness. The aim of this study is to clarify the clinical effectiveness on wound healing in patients with PU by hydrogen-dissolved water (HW) intake via tube-feeding (TF). Furthermore, normal human dermal fibroblasts OUMS-36 and normal human epidermis-derived cell line HaCaT keratinocytes were examined in vitro to explore the mechanisms relating to whether hydrogen plays a role in wound-healing at the cellular level. Methods Twenty-two severely hospitalized elderly Japanese patients with PU were recruited in the present study, and their ages ranged from 71.0 to 101.0 (86.7 ± 8.2) years old, 12 male and 10 female patients, all suffering from eating disorder and bedridden syndrome as the secondary results of various underlying diseases. All patients received routine care treatments for PU in combination with HW intake via TF for 600 mL per day, in place of partial moisture replenishment. On the other hand, HW was prepared with a hydrogen-bubbling apparatus which produces HW with 0.8-1.3 ppm of dissolved hydrogen concentration (DH) and −602 mV to −583 mV of oxidation-reduction potential (ORP), in contrast to reversed osmotic ultra-pure water (RW), as the reference, with DH of < 0.018 ppm and ORP of +184 mV for use in the in vitro experimental research. In in vitro experiments, OUMS-36 fibroblasts and HaCaT keratinocytes were respectively cultured in medium prepared with HW and/or RW. Immunostain was used for detecting type-I collagen reconstruction in OUMS-36 cells. And intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) were quantified by NBT assay, and cell viability of HaCaT cells was examined by WST-1 assay, respectively. Results Twenty-two patients were retrospectively divided into an effective group (EG, n = 12) and a less effective group (LG, n = 10) according to

  15. Diabetic foot ulcers: Part II. Management.

    PubMed

    Alavi, Afsaneh; Sibbald, R Gary; Mayer, Dieter; Goodman, Laurie; Botros, Mariam; Armstrong, David G; Woo, Kevin; Boeni, Thomas; Ayello, Elizabeth A; Kirsner, Robert S

    2014-01-01

    The management of diabetic foot ulcers can be optimized by using an interdisciplinary team approach addressing the correctable risk factors (ie, poor vascular supply, infection control and treatment, and plantar pressure redistribution) along with optimizing local wound care. Dermatologists can initiate diabetic foot care. The first step is recognizing that a loss of skin integrity (ie, a callus, blister, or ulcer) considerably increases the risk of preventable amputations. A holistic approach to wound assessment is required. Early detection and effective management of these ulcers can reduce complications, including preventable amputations and possible mortality.

  16. Acute genital ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Delgado-García, Silvia; Palacios-Marqués, Ana; Martínez-Escoriza, Juan Carlos; Martín-Bayón, Tina-Aurora

    2014-01-01

    Acute genital ulcers, also known as acute vulvar ulcers, ulcus vulvae acutum or Lipschütz ulcers, refer to an ulceration of the vulva or lower vagina of non-venereal origin that usually presents in young women, predominantly virgins. Although its incidence is unknown, it seems a rare entity, with few cases reported in the literature. Their aetiology and pathogenesis are still unknown. The disease is characterised by an acute onset of flu-like symptoms with single or multiple painful ulcers on the vulva. Diagnosis is mainly clinical, after exclusion of other causes of vulvar ulcers. The treatment is mainly symptomatic, with spontaneous resolution in 2 weeks and without recurrences in most cases. We present a case report of a 13-year-old girl with two episodes of acute ulcers that fit the clinical criteria for Lipschütz ulcers. PMID:24473429

  17. Diabetic foot ulcers: practical treatment recommendations.

    PubMed

    Edmonds, Michael

    2006-01-01

    When treating diabetic foot ulcers it is important to be aware of the natural history of the diabetic foot, which can be divided into five stages: stage 1, a normal foot; stage 2, a high risk foot; stage 3, an ulcerated foot; stage 4, an infected foot; and stage 5, a necrotic foot. This covers the entire spectrum of foot disease but emphasises the development of the foot ulcer as a pivotal event in stage 3, which demands urgent and aggressive management. Diabetic foot care in all stages needs multidisciplinary management to control mechanical, wound, microbiological, vascular, metabolic and educational aspects. Achieving good metabolic control of blood glucose, lipids and blood pressure is important in each stage, as is education to teach proper foot care appropriate for each stage. Ideally, it is important to prevent the development of ulcers in stages 1 and 2. In stage 1, the normal foot, it is important to encourage the use of suitable footwear, and to educate the patient to promote healthy foot care and footwear habits. In stage 2, the foot has developed one or more of the following risk factors for ulceration: neuropathy, ischaemia, deformity, swelling and callus. The majority of deformities can be accommodated in special footwear and as callus is an important precursor of ulceration it should be treated aggressively, especially in the neuropathic foot. In stage 3, ulcers can be divided into two distinct entities: those in the neuropathic foot and those in the neuroischaemic foot. In the neuropathic foot, ulcers commonly develop on the plantar surface of the foot and the toes, and are associated with neglected callus and high plantar pressures. In the neuroischaemic foot, ulcers are commonly seen around the edges of the foot, including the apices of the toes and back of the heel, and are associated with trauma or wearing unsuitable shoes. Ulcers in stage 3 need relief of pressure (mechanical control), sharp debridement and dressings (wound control), and

  18. A multi-center, randomized, clinical trial comparing adhesive polyurethane foam dressing and adhesive hydrocolloid dressing in patients with grade II pressure ulcers in primary care and nursing homes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Pressure ulcers (PrUs) are ischemic wounds in the skin and underlying tissues caused by long-standing pressure force over an external bone or cartilaginous surface. PrUs are an important challenge for the overall health system because can prolong patient hospitalization and reduce quality of life. Moreover, 95% of PrUs are avoidable, suggesting they are caused by poor quality care assistance. PrUs are also costly, increasing national costs. For example, they represent about 5% of overall annual health expenses in Spain. Stages I and II PrUs have a combined prevalence of 65%. According main clinical guidelines, stage II PrUs (PrU-IIs) are usually treated by applying special dressings (polyurethane or hydrocolloid). However, little scientific evidence regarding their efficacy has been identified in scientific literature. Our aim is to assess the comparative efficacy of adhesive polyurethane foam and hydrocolloid dressings in the treatment of PrU-IIs in terms of healed ulcer after 8 weeks of follow-up. Methods/design This paper describes the development and evaluation protocol of a randomized clinical trial of two parallel treatment arms. A total of 820 patients with at least 1 PrU-II will be recruited from primary health care and home care centers. All patients will receive standardized healing procedures and preventive measures (e.g. positional changes and pressure-relieving support surfaces), following standardized procedures. The main outcome will be the percentage of wounds healed after 8 weeks. Secondary outcomes will include cost-effectiveness, as evaluated by cost per healed ulcer and cost per treated patient and safety evaluated by adverse events. Discussion This trial will address the hypothesis that hydrocolloid dressings will heal at least 10% more stage II PrUs and be more cost-effective than polyurethane foam dressings after 8 weeks. Trial registration This trial has been registered with controlled-trials number ISCRCTN57842461 and Eudra

  19. Diabetic foot ulcers. Pathophysiology, assessment, and therapy.

    PubMed Central

    Bowering, C. K.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review underlying causes of diabetic foot ulceration, provide a practical assessment of patients at risk, and outline an evidence-based approach to therapy for diabetic patients with foot ulcers. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: A MEDLINE search was conducted for the period from 1979 to 1999 for articles relating to diabetic foot ulcers. Most studies found were case series or small controlled trials. MAIN MESSAGE: Foot ulcers in diabetic patients are common and frequently lead to lower limb amputation unless a prompt, rational, multidisciplinary approach to therapy is taken. Factors that affect development and healing of diabetic patients' foot ulcers include the degree of metabolic control, the presence of ischemia or infection, and continuing trauma to feet from excessive plantar pressure or poorly fitting shoes. Appropriate wound care for diabetic patients addresses these issues and provides optimal local ulcer therapy with débridement of necrotic tissue and provision of a moist wound-healing environment. Therapies that have no known therapeutic value, such as foot soaking and topical antiseptics, can actually be harmful and should be avoided. CONCLUSION: Family physicians are often primary medical contacts for patients with diabetes. Patients should be screened regularly for diabetic foot complications, and preventive measures should be initiated for those at risk of ulceration. PMID:11398715

  20. [Prevention of leg ulcer].

    PubMed

    Marinović Kulisić, Sandra

    2013-10-01

    Lower leg ulcers is the most common form of ulceration of the lower extremities. The prevalence of leg ulcer varies among studies from 0.1% to 0.6%. In the majority of studies, 1% of the population develop leg ulcer at least once in lifetime. The prevalence is higher in elderly people. There are several hypotheses used to explain the pathophysiological steps leading from the popliteal venous hypertension in value. Currently, the treatment of leg ulcer relies on due knowledge of ulcer pathophysiology and making an accurate diagnosis. Venous disease has a significant impact on quality of life and work productivity. In addition, costs associated with the prevention and treatment of lower leg ulcers are significant.

  1. Management of leg ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, P; Ballantyne, S

    2000-01-01

    Leg ulcer is a leading cause of morbidity among older subjects, especially women in the Western world. About 400 years BC, Hippocrates wrote, "In case of an ulcer, it is not expedient to stand, especially if the ulcer be situated on the leg". Hippocrates himself had a leg ulcer. The best treatment of any leg ulcer depends upon the accurate diagnosis and the underlying aetiology. The majority of leg ulcers are due to venous disease and/or arterial disease, but the treatment of the underlying cause is far more important than the choice of dressing. The aetiology, pathogenesis, treatment, and the future trends in the management of the leg ulcers are discussed in this review.
 PMID:11060140

  2. Pharmacologic treatment of venous leg ulcers.

    PubMed

    Dormandy, J A

    1995-01-01

    In terms of prevalence, total cost and morbidity, venous leg ulcers are probably by far the most important type of ulcerations in the leg. The macrocirculatory defect leading to a raised ambulatory venous pressure is now accepted as a common initial pathologic pathway. Most current treatment modalities, such as surgery or external compression, are designed to control the macrovascular defect. However, it is the microcirculatory consequences of the venous hypertension that give rise to the trophic skin changes and ultimately to ulceration. At this microcirculatory level, pharmacotherapy may be a useful adjunct in the treatment of venous leg ulcers. The microcirculatory pathophysiologic changes include decreased fibrinolytic activity, elevated plasma fibrinogen, microcirculatory thrombi, and inappropriate activation of the white blood cells. The oxidative burst from the activated white cells probably plays a key role by releasing locally leukocyte-derived free radicals, proteolytic enzymes, cytokines, platelet-activating factor, and a number of other noxious mediators. An important additional component in recalcitrant venous ulcers is co-existing arterial disease, which is probably present in 15-20% of cases. Decreased arterial perfusion pressure will further aggravate the ischemic changes caused by the venous hypertension. Pentoxifylline downregulates leukocyte activation, reduces leukocyte adhesion, and also has fibrinolytic effects. A number of clinical studies have therefore been carried out to examine the clinical efficacy of pentoxifylline in treatment of venous leg ulcers. Probably the largest published placebo-controlled, double-blind randomized study was reported in 1990. In this study, 80 patients received either pentoxifylline 400 mg three times a day orally or matching placebo for 6 months or until their reference ulcer healed if this occurred sooner. Complete healing of the reference ulcer occurred in 23 of the 38 patients treated with pentoxifylline

  3. A case series to describe the clinical characteristics of foot ulceration in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Siddle, Heidi J; Firth, Jill; Waxman, Robin; Nelson, E Andrea; Helliwell, Philip S

    2012-03-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the clinical characteristics of foot ulceration in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Adults with RA and current foot ulceration but without diabetes were recruited. Clinical examination included assessment of RA disease activity, foot deformity, peripheral vascular disease, neuropathy and plantar pressures. Location, wound characteristics and time to healing were recorded for each ulcer. Participants completed the Health Assessment Questionnaire and Leeds Foot Impact Scale. Thirty-two cases with 52 current ulcers were recruited. Thirteen patients (41%) experienced more than one current ulcer: 5 (16%) had bilateral ulceration, 15 (47%) had previous ulceration at a current ulcer site. The majority (n = 33) of open ulcers were located over the dorsal aspect of the interphalangeal joints (n = 12), plantar aspect of the metatarsophalangeal joints (MTPJs) (n = 12) and medial aspect of first MTPJs (n = 9). In ulcerated limbs (n = 37), ankle brachial pressure index (ABPI) was <0.8 in 2 (5%); protective sensation was reduced in 25 (68%) and peak plantar pressures were >6 kg/cm(2) in 6 (16%). Mean ulcer size was 4.84 by 3.29 mm. Most ulcers (n = 42, 81%) were superficial; five (9.6%) were infected. Time to healing was available for 41 ulcers: mean duration was 28 weeks. Three ulcers remained open. In conclusion, foot ulceration in RA is recurrent and multiple ulcers are common. Whilst ulcers are small and shallow, time to achieve healing is slow, posing infection risk. Reduced protective sensation is common in affected patients. The prevalence of arterial disease is low but may be under estimated due to high intolerance of ABPI.

  4. Soft silicone foam dressing is more effective than polyurethane film dressing for preventing intraoperatively acquired pressure ulcers in spinal surgery patients: the Border Operating room Spinal Surgery (BOSS) trial in Japan.

    PubMed

    Yoshimura, Mine; Ohura, Norihiko; Tanaka, Junko; Ichimura, Shoichi; Kasuya, Yusuke; Hotta, Oruto; Kagaya, Yu; Sekiyama, Takuya; Tannba, Mitsuko; Suzuki, Nao

    2016-12-07

    Preventing intraoperatively acquired pressure ulcers (IAPUs) in patients undergoing spinal surgery in the prone position using a Relton-Hall frame is challenging. We investigated the efficacy of soft silicone foam dressings in preventing IAPUs. A prospective dual-center sham study was conducted among patients undergoing elective spinal surgery in a general hospital and a university hospital in Japan. The incidence of IAPUs that developed when soft silicone foam dressings and polyurethane film dressings were used was compared on two sides in the same patient. IAPUs developed on the chest in 11 of 100 patients (11%). Polyurethane film dressings were associated with a significantly higher rate of IAPUs than soft silicone foam dressings (11 versus 3, P = 0·027). A multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that a diastolic blood pressure of <50 mmHg (P = 0·025, OR 3·74, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1·18-13·08) and the length of surgery (by 1 hour: P = 0·038, OR 1·61, 95% CI 1·03-2·64) were independently associated with the development of IAPUs. The use of soft silicone foam dressings reduced the risk of IAPUs (P = 0·019, OR 0·23, 95% CI 0·05-0·79) and was more effective than film dressings for preventing IAPUs in spinal surgery patients.

  5. [Abomasal ulcers in cattle].

    PubMed

    Hund, Alexandra; Wittek, Thomas

    2017-03-29

    Abomasal ulcers lead to several problems. They cause pain resulting in a decrease in productivity and even the possible loss of the animal. Because they are frequently difficult to diagnose, information on their prevalence is variable. Additionally, therapeutic options are limited. Abomasal ulcers are graded as type 1 through 4, type 1 being a superficial defect and type 2 an ulcer where a large blood vessel has been eroded, leading to substantial blood loss. Types 3 and 4 are perforated abomasal ulcers leading to local and diffuse peritonitis, respectively. Causes of abomasal ulcers are multifactorial, for example, mistakes in feeding that lead to gastrointestinal disturbances or other diseases that induce stress. Ulcers can also result from side effects of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. In principal, the pathophysiological cause is the disturbance of the balance between protective and aggressive mechanisms at the abomasal mucosa due to stress. Clinical symptoms vary and are mostly non-specific. Fecal occult blood tests, hematology and blood chemistry as well as ultrasonographic examination and abdominocentesis can help to establish the diagnosis. Ulcers can be treated symptomatically, surgically and medically. To prevent abomasal ulcers, animals should be kept healthy by providing adequate nutrition and housing as well as early and effective medical care. Stressful management practices, including transport and commingling, should be avoided.

  6. [Ulcers of lower limb veins: venous ulcers].

    PubMed

    López Herranz, Marta; Bas Caro, Pedro; Moraleja Millán, Tania; Mateos García, Marina; García Jábega, Rosa Ma; López Corral, Juan Carlos

    2014-05-01

    The lower extremity vascular ulcers currently represent a major public health problem, particularly because of different situations: the chronic nature of the injury, a poor response to treatment, recurrence rates, high absenteeism, poor training in some cases of the health staff that treats, etc. Lower extremity ulcers mean a serious personal, family, health and social problem, with a significant expenditure of human and material resources. Since the prevalence and incidence of lower extremity vascular ulcers is high worldwide, it is necessary to go into detail about the knowledge of the epidemiology and to favour, in different countries, the creation of interdisciplinary research groups that addresses issues related to risk factors, pathogenesis, treatment, health care costs, quality of life and, above all, specialized training aimed at health professionals.

  7. Peptic ulcer disease today.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yuhong; Padol, Ireneusz T; Hunt, Richard H

    2006-02-01

    Over the past few decades, since the introduction of histamine H(2)-receptor antagonists, proton-pump inhibitors, cyclo-oxygenase-2-selective anti-inflammatory drugs (coxibs), and eradication of Helicobacter pylori infection, the incidence of peptic ulcer disease and ulcer complications has decreased. There has, however, been an increase in ulcer bleeding, especially in elderly patients. At present, there are several management issues that need to be solved: how to manage H. pylori infection when eradication failure rates are high; how best to prevent ulcers developing and recurring in nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) and aspirin users; and how to treat non-NSAID, non-H. pylori-associated peptic ulcers. Looking for H. pylori infection, the overt or surreptitious use of NSAIDs and/or aspirin, and the possibility of an acid hypersecretory state are important diagnostic considerations that determine the therapeutic approach. Combined treatment with antisecretory therapy and antibiotics for 1-2 weeks is the first-line choice for H. pylori eradication therapy. For patients at risk of developing an ulcer or ulcer complications, it is important to choose carefully which anti-inflammatory drugs, nonselective NSAIDs or coxibs to use, based on a risk assessment of the patient, especially if the high-risk patient also requires aspirin. Testing for and eradicating H. pylori infection in patients is recommended before starting NSAID therapy, and for those currently taking NSAIDs, when there is a history of ulcers or ulcer complications. Understanding the pathophysiology and best treatment strategies for non-NSAID, non-H. pylori-associated peptic ulcers presents a challenge.

  8. Optimal management of chronic leg ulcers in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Goodfield, M

    1997-05-01

    Chronic leg ulceration is a very common clinical problem in the elderly. Good management depends entirely on making an accurate diagnosis, and planning treatment after considering all aspects of patient well-being. All elderly patients with leg ulcers benefit from an assessment of their vascular status, since the effects of gravity influence treatment and healing irrespective of the diagnosis. The most common causes of ulceration are venous and arterial disease. Diabetes mellitus, pressure, vasculitis, metabolic abnormalities and skin cancer are all unusual causes of leg ulceration, but must be considered in the differential diagnosis. Almost all patients with ulcerated legs benefit from the use of compression bandaging at a level appropriate to their vascular status. In patients with venous ulcers, this can be achieved with a number of bandaging techniques; however, multilayer bandaging appears to be the most cost-effective means available, particularly when combined with community-based leg ulcer clinics. The effects of oral drug therapy for venous and arterial disease have been disappointing. Local dressings are important in ulcers that are not suitable for compression therapy. The choice of dressing depends on the nature of the ulcer and the tolerability of the dressing for the patient.

  9. Healing ulcers and preventing their recurrences in the diabetic foot

    PubMed Central

    Sabapathy, S. Raja; Periasamy, Madhu

    2016-01-01

    Fifteen percent of people with diabetes develop an ulcer in the course of their lifetime. Eighty-five percent of the major amputations in diabetes mellitus are preceded by an ulcer. Management of ulcers and preventing their recurrence is important for the quality of life of the individual and reducing the cost of care of treatment. The main causative factors of ulceration are neuropathy, vasculopathy and limited joint mobility. Altered bio-mechanics due to the deformities secondary to neuropathy and limited joint mobility leads to focal points of increased pressure, which compromises circulation leading to ulcers. Ulcer management must not only address the healing of ulcers but also should correct the altered bio-mechanics to reduce the focal pressure points and prevent recurrence. An analysis of 700 patients presenting with foot problems to the Diabetic Clinic of Ganga Hospital led to the stratification of these patients into four classes of incremental severity. Class 1 – the foot at risk, Class 2 – superficial ulcers without infection, Class 3 – the crippled foot and Class 4 – the critical foot. Almost 77.5% presented in either Class 3 or 4 with complicated foot ulcers requiring major reconstruction or amputation. Class 1 foot can be managed conservatively with foot care and appropriate foot wear. Class 2 in addition to measures for ulcer healing would need surgery to correct the altered bio-mechanics to prevent the recurrence. The procedures called surgical offloading would depend on the site of the ulcer and would need an in-depth clinical study of the foot. Class 3 would need major reconstructive procedures and Class 4 would need amputation since it may be life-threatening. As clinicians, our main efforts must be focused towards identifying patients in Class 1 and offer advice on foot care and Class 2 where appropriate surgical offloading procedure would help preserve the foot. PMID:28216809

  10. Guidelines for evaluating decubitus ulcer research.

    PubMed

    Abruzzese, R S

    1989-02-01

    The classic critique of research is applied to a systematic evaluation of the components of research reports and company literature related to pressure ulcer products and devices. Emphasis is on the need to control variables that influence the findings; some of these are: relief of pressure, nutrition and hydration, comparability of subjects, the Hawthorne Effect and the Pygmalion Effect. Replication of research before adopting products/devices for protocol use is advocated.

  11. Peptic ulcer disease.

    PubMed

    Malfertheiner, Peter; Chan, Francis K L; McColl, Kenneth E L

    2009-10-24

    Peptic ulcer disease had a tremendous effect on morbidity and mortality until the last decades of the 20th century, when epidemiological trends started to point to an impressive fall in its incidence. Two important developments are associated with the decrease in rates of peptic ulcer disease: the discovery of effective and potent acid suppressants, and of Helicobacter pylori. With the discovery of H pylori infection, the causes, pathogenesis, and treatment of peptic ulcer disease have been rewritten. We focus on this revolution of understanding and management of peptic ulcer disease over the past 25 years. Despite substantial advances, this disease remains an important clinical problem, largely because of the increasingly widespread use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and low-dose aspirin. We discuss the role of these agents in the causes of ulcer disease and therapeutic and preventive strategies for drug-induced ulcers. The rare but increasingly problematic H pylori-negative NSAID-negative ulcer is also examined.

  12. Connective Tissue Ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Dabiri, Ganary; Falanga, Vincent

    2013-01-01

    Connective tissue disorders (CTD), which are often also termed collagen vascular diseases, include a number of related inflammatory conditions. Some of these diseases include rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, systemic sclerosis (scleroderma), localized scleroderma (morphea variants localized to the skin), Sjogren’s syndrome, dermatomyositis, polymyositis, and mixed connective tissue disease. In addition to the systemic manifestations of these diseases, there are a number of cutaneous features that make these conditions recognizable on physical exam. Lower extremity ulcers and digital ulcers are an infrequent but disabling complication of long-standing connective tissue disease. The exact frequency with which these ulcers occur is not known, and the cause of the ulcerations is often multifactorial. Moreover, a challenging component of CTD ulcerations is that there are still no established guidelines for their diagnosis and treatment. The morbidity associated with these ulcerations and their underlying conditions is very substantial. Indeed, these less common but intractable ulcers represent a major medical and economic problem for patients, physicians and nurses, and even well organized multidisciplinary wound healing centers. PMID:23756459

  13. Hemoglobinopathies and Leg Ulcers.

    PubMed

    Alavi, Afsaneh; Kirsner, Robert S

    2015-09-01

    Major hemoglobinopathies, including sickle cell anemia, are becoming a global health issue. Leg ulcers are the most common cutaneous manifestation of sickle cell disease and an important contributor to morbidity burden in this population. Leg ulcers following sickling disorders are extremely painful, and hard to heal. The clinical evidence for the optimal management of these ulcers is limited. Treating the cause and the strategies to prevent sickling are the mainstay of treatment. The basic principles of wound bed preparation and compression therapy is beneficial in these patients.

  14. Corneal ulcers in horses.

    PubMed

    Williams, Lynn B; Pinard, Chantale L

    2013-01-01

    Corneal ulceration is commonly diagnosed by equine veterinarians. A complete ophthalmic examination as well as fluorescein staining, corneal cytology, and corneal bacterial (aerobic) and fungal culture and sensitivity testing are necessary for all infected corneal ulcers. Appropriate topical antibiotics, topical atropine, and systemic NSAIDs are indicated for all corneal ulcers. If keratomalacia (melting) is observed, anticollagenase/antiprotease therapy, such as autologous serum, is indicated. If fungal infection is suspected, antifungal therapy is a necessity. Subpalpebral lavage systems allow convenient, frequent, and potentially long-term therapy. Referral corneal surgeries provide additional therapeutic options when the globe's integrity is threatened or when improvement has not been detected after appropriate therapy.

  15. The cost-benefit of using soft silicone multilayered foam dressings to prevent sacral and heel pressure ulcers in trauma and critically ill patients: a within-trial analysis of the Border Trial.

    PubMed

    Santamaria, Nick; Liu, Wei; Gerdtz, Marie; Sage, Sarah; McCann, Jane; Freeman, Amy; Vassiliou, Theresa; DeVincentis, Stephanie; Ng, Ai W; Manias, Elizabeth; Knott, Jonathan; Liew, Danny

    2015-06-01

    Little is known about the cost-benefit of soft silicone foam dressings in pressure ulcer (PU) prevention among critically ill patients in the emergency department (ED) and intensive care unit (ICU). A randomised controlled trial to assess the efficacy of soft silicone foam dressings in preventing sacral and heel PUs was undertaken among 440 critically ill patients in an acute care hospital. Participants were randomly allocated either to an intervention group with prophylactic dressings applied to the sacrum and heels in the ED and changed every 3 days in the ICU or to a control group with standard PU prevention care provided during their ED and ICU stay. The results showed a significant reduction of PU incidence rates in the intervention group (P = 0·001). The intervention cost was estimated to be AU$36·61 per person based on an intention-to-treat analysis, but this was offset by lower downstream costs associated with PU treatment (AU$1103·52). Therefore, the average net cost of the intervention was lower than that of the control (AU$70·82 versus AU$144·56). We conclude that the use of soft silicone multilayered foam dressings to prevent sacral and heel PUs among critically ill patients results in cost savings in the acute care hospital.

  16. UNUSUAL CAUSES OF CUTANEOUS ULCERATION

    PubMed Central

    Panuncialman, Jaymie; Falanga, Vincent

    2010-01-01

    Synopsis Skin ulceration is a major source of morbidity and is often difficult to manage. Ulcers due to an inflammatory etiology or microvascular occlusion are particularly challenging in terms of diagnosis and treatment. The management of such ulcers requires careful assessment of associated systemic conditions and a thorough analysis of the ulcer's clinical and histologic findings. In this report, we discuss several examples of inflammatory ulcers and the approach to their diagnosis and treatment. PMID:21074034

  17. Factors related to venous ulceration: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Vlajinac, Hristina; Marinkovic, Jelena; Maksimovic, Milos; Radak, Djordje

    2014-10-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the factors related to venous ulceration. Patients with venous ulceration (278 patients) were compared with 1401 patients in other categories of clinical classification of venous disease (clinical, etiologic, anatomic, and pathophysiological [CEAP]). Demographic, anthropometric, and clinical data were collected. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were used. According to multivariate analyses, risk factors for venous ulceration were age, male sex, personal history of superficial and deep venous thrombosis, diabetes, high blood pressure, skeletal or joint disease in the legs and emphysema or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, higher body mass index and physical inactivity, parental history of ankle ulcer as well as reflux in deep and perforator veins, deep obstruction, and combination of reflux and obstruction. It seems reasonable to pay special attention to patients in whom the postulated risk factors for venous ulceration are present.

  18. What's new: Management of venous leg ulcers: Approach to venous leg ulcers.

    PubMed

    Alavi, Afsaneh; Sibbald, R Gary; Phillips, Tania J; Miller, O Fred; Margolis, David J; Marston, William; Woo, Kevin; Romanelli, Marco; Kirsner, Robert S

    2016-04-01

    Leg ulcerations are a common problem, with an estimated prevalence of 1% to 2% in the adult population. Venous leg ulcers are primarily treated in outpatient settings and often are managed by dermatologists. Recent advances in the diagnosis and treatment of leg ulcers combined with available evidence-based data will provide an update on this topic. A systematized approach and the judicious use of expensive advanced therapeutics are critical. Specialized arterial and venous studies are most commonly noninvasive. The ankle brachial pressure index can be performed with a handheld Doppler unit at the bedside by most clinicians. The vascular laboratory results and duplex Doppler findings are used to identify segmental defects and potential operative candidates. Studies of the venous system can also predict a subset of patients who may benefit from surgery. Successful leg ulcer management requires an interdisciplinary team to make the correct diagnosis, assess the vascular supply, and identify other modifiable factors to optimize healing. The aim of this continuing medical education article is to provide an update on the management of venous leg ulcers. Part I is focused on the approach to venous ulcer diagnostic testing.

  19. Lithium Battery Diaper Ulceration.

    PubMed

    Maridet, Claire; Taïeb, Alain

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of lithium battery diaper ulceration in a 16-month-old girl. Gastrointestinal and ear, nose, and throat lesions after lithium battery ingestion have been reported, but skin involvement has not been reported to our knowledge.

  20. Two Simple Leg Net Devices Designed to Protect Lower-Extremity Skin Grafts and Donor Sites and Prevent Decubitus Ulcer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-02-01

    Two Simple Leg Net Devices Designed to Protect Lower-Extremity Skin Grafts and Donor Sites and Prevent Decubitus Ulcer Travis L. Hedman, MPT, OCS... decubitus . Pressure ulcer is a serious health prob- lem and can cause pain, suffering, disability, and even death.1,2 The cost of treatment for a...single pressure decubitus has been estimated to be as high as $70,000.3 Therefore, prevention is paramount. The prevention of pressure ulcers is far less

  1. Pentoxifylline in the treatment of venous leg ulcers.

    PubMed

    Barbarino, C

    1992-01-01

    A double-blind, placebo-controlled study was carried out in 12 patients suffering from chronic venous insufficiency and persistent leg ulcers to assess the efficacy of pentoxifylline treatment as an adjunct to compression bandaging in the conservative management of venous leg ulcers. Six patients were allocated at random to receive twice-daily infusions of 200 mg pentoxifylline intravenously and 400 mg pentoxifylline orally 3-times daily for 7 days then 400 mg oral doses 3-times daily for a further 60 days. The control group received matching placebo in an identical regimen. Treatment outcome was assessed by changes between the start and end of the study in venous ulcer surface area, and continuous wave Doppler ultrasound was used to monitor ankle/arm systolic pressure ratio, venous pressure at the ankle, valvular competence and possible venous reflux at intervals throughout the study period. The results showed that in the patients treated with pentoxifylline complete ulcer healing took place in 4 out of 6 and there was a significant reduction in mean ulcer surface area. In the control group, complete ulcer healing was recorded in 1 out of 6 patient only and the ulcer area was only moderately reduced in the others. There was no statistically significant differences between the two groups in the variables monitored by Doppler ultrasound but the difference between treatment outcome was significant. Treatment was well-tolerated.

  2. A Prospective, Descriptive, Quality Improvement Study to Investigate the Impact of a Turn-and-Position Device on the Incidence of Hospital-acquired Sacral Pressure Ulcers and Nursing Staff Time Needed for Repositioning Patients.

    PubMed

    Hall, Kimberly D; Clark, Rebecca C

    2016-11-01

    Patients in critical care areas are at risk for developing hospital-acquired pressure ulcers (HAPUs) due to their physical conditions and limited ability to reposition themselves. A prospective, 2-phase quality improvement study was conducted from September to November 2011 and from February to April 2012 in 1 medical and 1 surgical ICU to investigate the impact of a turn-and-assist device on the incidence of HAPUs and the time and personnel required to reposition patients reported as person/minutes (staff x minutes). A consecutive, convenience sample of patients was selected from newly admitted ICU patients who were at least 18 years old, nonambulatory, and required 2 or more people to assist with turning and repositioning. Sociodemographic data (patient age, gender, height, weight, body mass index, incontinence status); total Braden score and subscores for Activity, Mobility, and Moisture on admission; length of ICU stay and ventilator days; and sacral pressure ulcer incidence and stage and turn-and-assist data were collected. Fifty (50) patients participated in each phase. In phase 1, standard care for positioning included pillows, underpads, standard low-air-loss beds and additional staff as required for turning. In phase 2, the study product replaced standard care repositioning products including pillows; and a larger disposable moisture-wicking underpad (included as part of the turn study project kit) was substituted for the smaller, standard moisture-wicking disposable underpad. Turning procedures were timed with a stopwatch. Data were collected for a total of 32 hours during the observation periods; all patients were followed from admission until discharge from the ICU for a maximum of 14 days. T-tests were used to compare patient characteristics and person-minutes needed for repositioning differences, and Fisher's exact test was used to compare the incidence of sacral HAPUs during phase 1 and phase 2 of the study. No statistically significant

  3. A case of HIV ulcer

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    HIV-associated ulcers must be distinguished from idiopathic anal fissures in HIV-positive patients and from other sexually transmitted diseases that cause anogenital ulcers as the treatments differ. PMID:26266040

  4. Ulcer disease of trout

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fish, F.F.

    1934-01-01

    During the summer of 1933, lesions of a disease were noted among some fingerling brook, rainbow, blackspotted, and lake trout at the Cortland (New York) trout hatchery. Although these lesions bore a marked superficial resemblance to those of furunculosis, they were sufficiently atypical to warrant further investigation. A more detailed examination of the lesions proved them to be of a distinct disease, which for lack of a better name is herein called "ulcer disease," for the lesions closely resemble those described by Calkins (1899) under this name. Because of the marked resemblance to furunculosis, ulcer disease has not been generally recognized by trout culturists, and any ulcer appearing on fish has been ascribed by them to furunculosis without further question.

  5. [Peripheral ulcerative keratitis].

    PubMed

    Stamate, Alina-cristina; Avram, Corina Ioana; Malciolu, R; Oprea, S; Zemba, M

    2014-01-01

    Ulcerative keratitis is frequently associated with collagen vascular diseases and presents a predilection for peripheral corneal localization, due to the distinct morphologic and immunologic features of the limbal conjunctiva, which provides access for the circulating immune complexes to the peripheral cornea via the capillary network. Deposition of immune complexes in the terminal ends of limbal vessels initiates an immune-mediated vasculitis process, with inflammatory cells and mediators involvement by alteration of the vascular permeability. Peripheral ulcerative keratitis generally correlates with exacerbations of the background autoimmune systemic disease. Associated sceritis, specially the necrotizing form, is usually observed in severe cases, which may evolve in corneal perforation and loss of vision. Although the first-line of treatment in acute phases is represented by systemic administration of corticosteroids, immunosuppressive and cytotoxic agents are necessary for the treatment of peripheral ulcerative keratitis associated with systemic diseases.

  6. HYPERTENSIVE-ISCHEMIC LEG ULCERS

    PubMed Central

    Farber, Eugene M.; Schmidt, Otto E. L.

    1950-01-01

    Ischemic ulcers of the leg having characteristics different from those of ordinary leg ulcers have been observed in a small number of hypertensive patients, mostly women, during the past few years. Such ulcers are usually located above the ankle. They begin with a small area of purplish discoloration at the site of slight trauma, and progress to acutely tender ulceration. In studies of tissue removed from the margin and the base of an ulcer of this kind, obliterative arteriolar sclerotic changes, ischemic-appearing connective tissue and inflammatory changes were noted. Two additional cases are reported. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4. PMID:15398887

  7. Diabetes - foot ulcers

    MedlinePlus

    ... such as high heels, flip-flops, or sandals. Wound Care and Dressings Care for your wound as instructed by your provider. You'll likely ... Keep the ulcer clean and bandaged. Cleanse the wound daily, using a wound dressing or bandage. Try ...

  8. Neuropathic diabetic foot ulcers – evidence-to-practice

    PubMed Central

    Ndip, Agbor; Ebah, Leonard; Mbako, Aloysius

    2012-01-01

    Foot ulcers and their attendant complications are disquietingly high in people with diabetes, a majority of whom have underlying neuropathy. This review examines the evidence base underpinning the prevention and management of neuropathic diabetic foot ulcers in order to inform best clinical practice. Since it may be impractical to ask patients not to weight-bear at all, relief of pressure through the use of offloading casting devices remains the mainstay for management of neuropathic ulcers, whilst provision of appropriate footwear is essential in ulcer prevention. Simple non-surgical debridement and application of hydrogels are both effective in preparing the wound bed for healthy granulation and therefore enhancing healing. Initial empirical antibiotic therapy for infected ulcers should cover the most common bacterial flora. There is limited evidence supporting the use of adjunctive therapies such as hyperbaric oxygen and cytokines or growth factors. In selected cases, recombinant human platelet-derived growth factor has been shown to enhance healing; however, its widespread use cannot be advised due to the availability of more cost-effective approaches. While patient education may be beneficial, the evidence base remains thin and conflicting. In conclusion, best management of foot ulcers is achieved by what is taken out of the foot (pressure, callus, infection, and slough) rather than what is put on the foot (adjuvant treatment). PMID:22371655

  9. Refractory duodenal ulcer.

    PubMed Central

    Bardhan, K D

    1984-01-01

    A refractory duodenal ulcer was arbitrarily defined as one that had failed to heal completely after treatment with cimetidine 1 g daily for three months. Of 66 patients with refractory duodenal ulcer, healing eventually occurred in 37 patients, after treatment for an average of 7.4 months. But 28 patients did not heal despite treatment for an average of 9.4 months; and one patient defaulted. In 41 patients the daily dose of cimetidine was increased to 2 g: the ulcers in 31 patients healed. In eight patients the daily dose was increased to 3 g and healing occurred in four patients. Eighteen patients required admission on 22 occasions because of severe symptoms despite treatment. Nine patients underwent surgery but in five the results were poor. Differences in clinical and endoscopic features between refractory and non-refractory ulcer patients were small. Acid and pepsin secretion were similar and gastrin concentrations normal. Blood levels of the drug and suppression of acid secretion were both satisfactory. Identification of refractory ulcer patients at the start of treatment was therefore not possible. Refractoriness could occur at any time during the course of the disease, previous treatment with cimetidine often having resulted in rapid healing, but subsequent relapses were also usually refractory. The cause of refractoriness remains unknown and the rather poor results of surgery in this series suggests that optimal management of these patients remains to be determined. Refractoriness probably indicates a changed natural history of the disease and in some patients a more poor prognosis. PMID:6428982

  10. Vicair Academy Mattress in the prevention of pressure damage.

    PubMed

    Collins, Fiona

    There are many costs associated with the development of pressure ulcers, both in terms of the patient experience and those associated with healing. If patients who are deemed to be at risk are identified and suitable preventive equipment is provided, incidence of pressure ulcer development can be reduced significantly. Pressure-reducing mattresses are primarily used to prevent pressure ulcers from occurring, in conjunction with other preventive measures, such as repositioning. The Vicair Academy Mattress, manufactured by Vicair BV and distributed by Gerald Simonds, uses Vicair's 'dry air' flotation system to offer maximum pressure and shear protection to patients who are at high risk of developing pressure ulcers.

  11. Pressure Alopecia

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Kate E; Yesudian, PD

    2012-01-01

    Postoperative or pressure alopecia (PA) is an infrequently reported group of scarring and non-scarring alopecias. It has been reported after immobilization of the head during surgery and following prolonged stays on intensive care units, and may be analogous to a healed pressure ulcer. This review presents a summary of cases published in pediatrics and after cardiac, gynecological, abdominal and facial surgeries. PA may manifest as swelling, tenderness, and ulceration of the scalp in the first few postoperative days; in other cases, the alopecia may be the presenting feature with a history of scalp immobilization in the previous four weeks. The condition may cause considerable psychological distress in the long term. Regular head turning schedules and vigilance for the condition should be used as prophylaxis to prevent permanent alopecia. A multi-center study in high-risk patients would be beneficial to shed further light on the etiology of the condition. PMID:23180911

  12. Neuropathic Ulcers Among Children With Neural Tube Defects: A Review of Literature.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Anand; Gupta, Vipin; Singh, Shailendra P; Kumar, Vijendra; Verma, Rajesh

    2015-12-01

    A trophic ulcer is a pressure ulcer caused by external trauma to a part of the body that is compromised due to disease, vascular insufficiency, or loss of afferent nerve fibers. Spinal dysraphism (ie, neural tube defects [NTD]) such as meningomyelocele is a risk factor for developing these ulcers in adults and pediatric patients. Information regarding the occurrence of trophic ulcers in pediatric patients with NTD is lacking. A review of the English-language literature on skin/neuropathic ulcers in patients with NTDs, irrespective of study design, published between 1975 and 2014, was undertaken using the PubMed database. Search terms included trophic ulcer, neuropathic ulcer, NTDs, and meningomyelocele. From among the more than 200 papers related to skin care in neonates and pediatric patients, 11 addressed skin ulcers in patients of NTD - 1 in French (a review article), 1 in German (a case report), and 9 in English (7 cohort studies and 2 reviewing surgical techniques). Typically, ulcers in patients with NTD are neuropathic (ie, related to nerve pathology). The most common type is meningomyelocele. Patients with NTD present with a spectrum of functional and sensory deficits that impair mobility; other causative factors that may contribute to the occurrence of ulcers include stress to the tissue, the length of time the stress occurs, muscle spasticity, infection, moisture, and nutritional status of the patient. Awareness of ulcer risk and preventive measures, such as maintaining foot flexibility or careful handling bony prominences such as kyphosis, is important. Once an ulcer occurs, management is challenging and involves collaboration of multiple medical, surgical, nutrition, and other specialists. If an ulcer develops and NTD has not been previously treated surgically or the MRI shows evidence of retethering, surgical treatment is needed. More research is needed to help guide ulcer prevention and treatment strategies in pediatric patients with NTD.

  13. Another 'Cushing ulcer'.

    PubMed

    Hoshino, Chisho; Satoh, Noriyuki; Narita, Masashi; Kikuchi, Akio; Inoue, Minoru

    2011-04-09

    The authors describe the case of a 39-year-old man who presented to our hospital with easy fatigability and malaise. On physical examination, hypertension was noted without any cushingoid appearance. Laboratory testing revealed normochromic-normocytic anaemia with positive results of occult blood in the stool, hyperglycaemia and hypokalemia. Upper endoscopy revealed active gastric ulcer with Helicobacter pylori infection, likely causing gastrointestinal bleeding. Endocrine examinations showed that both serum adrenocorticotropic hormone and cortisol were elevated with loss of diurnal variation. A diagnosis of Cushing's disease secondary to pituitary adenoma was made as results of brain MRI and blood sampling from inferior petrosal sinus. In a patient with peptic ulcer disease, physician should be alert to the possible endocrine background.

  14. Venous Leg Ulcers.

    PubMed

    Vivas, Alejandra; Lev-Tov, Hadar; Kirsner, Robert S

    2016-08-02

    This issue provides a clinical overview of venous leg ulcers, focusing on prevention, diagnosis, treatment, and practice improvement. The content of In the Clinic is drawn from the clinical information and education resources of the American College of Physicians (ACP), including MKSAP (Medical Knowledge and Self-Assessment Program). Annals of Internal Medicine editors develop In the Clinic in collaboration with the ACP's Medical Education and Publishing divisions and with the assistance of additional science writers and physician writers.

  15. Clinical characteristics of foot ulceration in people with chronic gout.

    PubMed

    Rome, Keith; Erikson, Kathryn; Otene, Cynthia; Sahid, Hazra; Sangster, Karyn; Gow, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Gout is the most common form of inflammatory arthritis and it has an affliction to the foot. Foot involvement in gout has been linked to foot pain, impairment and disability. There has been limited research on the effect of ulceration on foot pain, impairment, disability and health-related quality of life in patients already living with gout. The aim of the study was to describe the wound characteristics and the effect on foot pain, disability and health-related quality of life in patients with foot ulceration associated with gout. Participants were recruited from rheumatology clinics in Auckland, New Zealand. All the current foot ulceration sites and wound characteristics were recorded using the TIME wound assessment tool. The outcome measures included general pain, patient global assessment scale, foot pain, disability and impairment. Participants completed the Cardiff Wound Impact Schedule to assess the effect of ulcers on health-related quality of life. Sensory loss, vibrational thresholds and ankle brachial pressure index were collated to assess for lower limb arterial disease. Six participants were predominantly older men with a long duration of gout, high rates of obesity and co-morbidities such as hypertension, hyperlipidaemia, diabetes and cardiovascular disease. The mean (SD) duration of the foot ulcers was 4 (2) months. The majority of foot ulcers observed were 0·5 cm(2) or smaller superficial thickness with surrounding callus. Partial thickness and full-thickness ulcers were also observed. Two patients presented with ulcers on multiple sites. There was only one case of infection. Gouty tophi were evident in most of the wounds. The dorsal aspect of the third toe was found to ulcerate in most cases. Moderate scores of foot pain, disability, impairment and health-related quality of life were observed. Most participants wore shoes deemed as poor. Foot ulceration in gout is chronic and multiple ulcers can occur with the potential of leading to delayed

  16. Persistent nicorandil induced oral ulceration

    PubMed Central

    Healy, C M; Smyth, Y; Flint, S R

    2004-01-01

    Four patients with nicorandil induced ulceration are described, and the literature on the subject is reviewed. Nicorandil induced ulcers are very painful and distressing for patients. Clinically they appear as large, deep, persistent ulcers that have punched out edges. They are poorly responsive to topical steroids and usually require alteration of nicorandil treatment. The ulceration tends to occur at high doses of nicorandil and all four cases reported here were on doses of 40 mg per day or greater. In these situations reduction of nicorandil dose may be sufficient to promote ulcer healing and prevent further recurrence. However, nicorandil induced ulcers have been reported at doses as low as 10 mg daily and complete cessation of nicorandil may be required. PMID:15201264

  17. Treatment of a Non-Healing Diabetic Foot Ulcer With Platelet-Rich Plasma

    PubMed Central

    Suresh, Deepak H; Suryanarayan, Shwetha; Sarvajnamurthy, Sacchidanand; Puvvadi, Srikanth

    2014-01-01

    Lower extremity ulcers and amputations are an increasing problem among individuals with diabetes. Among diabetes mellitus-related complications, foot ulceration is the most common, affecting approximately 15% of diabetic patients during their lifetime. The pathogenesis of diabetic ulcer is peripheral sensory neuropathy, calluses, oedema and peripheral vascular disease. Diabetic ulcer is managed by adequate control of infections and blood sugar levels, surgical debridement with various dressings and off loading of the foot from pressure. In spite of these standard measures, some recalcitrant non-healing ulcers need additional growth factors for healing. Autologous platelet-rich plasma is easy and cost-effective method in treating diabetic ulcers as it provides necessary growth factors which enhance healing. PMID:25722604

  18. [Peptic ulcer disease and stress].

    PubMed

    Herszényi, László; Juhász, Márk; Mihály, Emese; Tulassay, Zsolt

    2015-08-30

    The discovery that Helicobacter pylori infection is the major cause of peptic ulcer disease revolutionised our views on the etiology and treatment of the disease. This discovery has tempted many experts to conclude that psychological factors and, specifically, stress are unimportant. However, Helicobacter pylori infection alone does not explain fully the incidence and prevalence of peptic ulcer disease. It has been demonstrated that stress can cause peptic ulcer disease even in the absence of Helicobacter pylori infection, supporting a multicausal model of peptic ulcer etiology. Psychological stress among other risk factors can function as a cofactor with Helicobacter pylori infection.

  19. [Guidelines of treatment for peptic ulcer disease in special conditions].

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji Hyun; Moon, Jeong Seop; Jee, Sam Ryong; Shin, Woon Geon; Park, Soo-Heon

    2009-11-01

    The pathogenesis, incidence, complication rates, response to acid suppression and Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) eradication therapy in peptic ulcer associated with chronic disease such as liver cirrhosis, chronic renal failure, diabetes mellitus, and critically ill conditions are different from those with general population, so that the management strategies also should be differentiated. The eradication of H. pylori are not so effective for preventing recurrence of peptic ulcer in liver cirrhosis patients as shown in general population, and conservative managements such as preventing deterioration of hepatic function and decrease in portal pressure are mandatory to reduce the risk of ulcer recurrence. The standard triple therapy for H. pylori eradication are as effective in chronic renal failure patients as in normal population, but the frequency of side effects of amoxicillin is higher in the patients not receiving dialysis therapy. Delay in eradication therapy until beginning of dialysis therapy or modification of eradication regimen should be considered in such cases. High prevalence of asymptomatic peptic ulcers and increased mortality in complicated peptic ulcer disease warrant regular endoscopic surveillance in diabetic patients, especially with angiopathy. The prolongation of duration of eradication therapy also should be considered in diabetic patients with angiopathic complication because of lower eradication rate with standard triple regimens as compared to normal population. Prophylactic acid suppressive therapy is highly recommended in critically ill patients with multiple risk factors. Herein, we propose evidence-based treatment guidelines for the management of peptic ulcer disease in special conditions based on literature review and experts opinion.

  20. Sustained compression and healing of chronic venous ulcers.

    PubMed Central

    Blair, S. D.; Wright, D. D.; Backhouse, C. M.; Riddle, E.; McCollum, C. N.

    1988-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVE--Comparison of four layer bandage system with traditional adhesive plaster bandaging in terms of (a) compression achieved and (b) healing of venous ulcers. DESIGN--Part of larger randomised trial of five different dressings. SETTING--Outpatient venous ulcer clinic in university hospital. PATIENTS--(a) Pressure exerted by both bandage systems was measured in the same 20 patients. (b) Healing with the four layer bandage was assessed in 148 legs in 126 consecutive patients (mean age 71 (SE 2); range 30-96) with chronic venous ulcers that had resisted treatment with traditional bandaging for a mean of 27.2 (SE 8) months. INTERVENTIONS--(a) Four layer bandage system or traditional adhesive plaster bandaging for pressure studies; (b) four layer bandaging applied weekly for studies of healing. END POINTS--(a) Comparison of pressures achieved at the ankle for up to one week; (b) complete healing within 12 weeks. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS--(a) Four layer bandage produced higher initial pressures at the ankle of 42.5 (SE 1) mm Hg compared with 29.8 (1.8) for the adhesive plaster (p less than 0.001; 95% confidence interval 18.5 to 6.9). Pressure was maintained for one week with the four layer bandage but fell to 10.4 (3.5) mm Hg at 24 hours with adhesive plaster bandaging. (b) After weekly bandaging with the four layer bandage 110 of 48 venous ulcers had healed completely within 12 (mean 6.3 (0.4)) weeks. CONCLUSION--Sustained compression of over 40 mm Hg achieved with a multilayer bandage results in rapid healing of chronic venous ulcers that have failed to heal in many months of compression at lower pressures with more conventional bandages. PMID:3144330

  1. [Peptic ulcer in children].

    PubMed

    Sawada, Atsushi

    2004-03-01

    H. pylori infection is the main cause of peptic ulcer in children. Japan pediatric H. pylori research meeting made the guideline for diagnosis and eradication therapy for H. pylori. This guideline showed the methods for diagnose and the eradication therapy for children with H. pylori infection. Many pediatric patients have been free from some abdominal symptoms after eradication therapy for H. pylori. However we need endoscopy for diagnose in spite of children. And recently new non-invasive diagnostic devices are developed and some species acquired tolerance for clarithromycin. Therefore we hope that a new guideline for children will be written soon.

  2. Refractory peptic ulcer disease.

    PubMed

    Napolitano, Lena

    2009-06-01

    Refractory PUD is a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. Optimal management of severe or refractory PUD requires a multidisciplinary team approach, using primary care providers, gastroenterologists, and general surgeons. Medical management has become the cornerstone of therapy. Identification and eradication of H pylori infection combined with acid reduction regimens can heal ulceration and also prevent recurrence. Severe, intractable or recurrent PUD and associated complications mandates a careful and methodical evaluation and management strategy to determine the potential etiologies and necessary treatment (medical or surgical) required.

  3. Peptic ulcer disease in children.

    PubMed

    Dohil, R; Hassall, E

    2000-02-01

    A peptic ulcer in a child looks the same as it does in an adult, and many of the aetiologies of peptic ulcer disease in children are similar to those in adults. However, there are many differences between children and adults, especially in the areas of clinical presentation, the prevalences of different types of ulcer disease, and the prevalence of complications of ulcer disease. Therefore the approach to diagnosis and management in children is often at variance with that in adults. One important example is the approach to suspected Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) disease in children, in which consensus groups have advised a considerably different approach in children. While the chapter deals with the full range of peptic ulcer disease in children, the focus is on those aspects in which there are differences between adults and children.

  4. Reviewing the Literature on the Effectiveness of Pressure Relieving Movements

    PubMed Central

    Stinson, May

    2013-01-01

    Sitting for prolonged periods of time increases seating interface pressures, which is known to increase the risk of developing pressure ulcers. Those at risk of developing pressure ulcers are advised to perform pressure relieving movements such as “pushups” or “forward leans” in order to reduce the duration and magnitude of pressure acting on the vulnerable ischial tuberosity region. The aim of this review was to synthesize and critique the existing literature investigating the effectiveness of pressure relieving movements on seating interface pressures. The twenty-seven articles included in this paper highlight the need for further research investigating the effect of recommended pressure relieving movements on the pressures around the ischial tuberosities. Furthermore, this review found that the majority of individuals at risk of developing pressure ulcers do not adhere with the pressure relieving frequency or magnitude of movements currently recommended, indicating a need for pressure ulcer prevention to be explored further. PMID:23365733

  5. Venous ulceration, fibrinogen and fibrinolysis.

    PubMed Central

    Leach, R. D.

    1984-01-01

    The effect of long and short-term venous hypertension upon lymph fibrinogen concentrations was studied in an attempt to explain the peri-capillary deposition of fibrin reported in patients with post-phlebitic syndromes. The clearance of radioactive fibrinogen/thrombin clots from the subcutaneous tissues of rats and human volunteers was also studied. Both long- and short-term venous hypertension were found to increase fibrinogen transport across the interstitial space by more than 600%. Not only was there evidence of fibrinolytic activity in the lymph but after long-term venous hypertension alpha 2 antiplasmin activity was also detectable. Skin biopsies from the venous hypertensive ankles showed deposition of interstitial fibrin. The clearance of radioactive fibrinogen/thrombin clots from the subcutaneous tissues of the rat was found to be delayed if the rats were given epsilon amino caproic acid but it could not be increased with stanozolol. In human subjects it was found that patients with lipodermatosclerosis had delayed clot clearance and retarded blood fibrinolytic activity when compared with normal volunteers and patients with uncomplicated varicose veins. The principle cause why tall men are more subject to ulcers than short men, Dr Young conceived to be then length of the column of blood in their veins; which by its pressure, renders the legs less able to recover when hurt by any violence. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 5 PMID:6742738

  6. Refractory Ulcerative Colitis Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Green, Jesse A.

    2007-01-01

    Treatment of refractory ulcerative colitis (UC) is a common clinical challenge. In either acute or chronic refractory UC, the disease may continue to remain active, even though the patient is on appropriate therapy. It is important to reassess and characterize the patient's disease before adding new medications to the current medical regimen. After determining the current extent and severity of the UC—ruling out other causes of bloody diarrhea and determining what complications are present—new treatment approaches can then be started. It is critical to first optimize oral 5-aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA) therapy combined with rectal 5-ASA or corticosteroid suppositories, plus corticosteroid or 5-ASA enemas or foam preparations. Oral or intravenous corticosteroids are appropriate to use if needed, but alternative approaches must be used for long-term maintenance. 6-Mercaptopurine (6-MP) or azathioprine can be very helpful for severe chronic refractory UC. In those patients who do not respond to 5-ASA medications, corticosteroids, and 6-MP or azathioprine, infliximab offers an important approach for induction and maintenance of remission for refractory chronic ulcerative colitis as well as for select cases of refractory acute UC. Cyclosporine use is an alternative medical approach for the refractory acute UC patient. Colectomy with ileal pouch-anal anastomosis remains a valuable option for the refractory chronic or acute UC patient, because it can provide both a “cure” for the disease, as well as eliminate ineffective medications with their associated side effects. PMID:21960779

  7. Assessing venous ulcer population characteristics and practices in a home care community.

    PubMed

    Lorimer, Karen R; Harrison, Margaret B; Graham, Ian D; Friedberg, Elaine; Davies, Barbara

    2003-05-01

    To plan for a new community leg ulcer service in one Ontario region, venous ulcer population characteristics and current community care practices were obtained from a home care cohort of people with venous ulcers. A secondary analysis was conducted on the venous ulcer cohort using data collected during a Regional Prevalence and Profile Study. Patients were identified based on the clinical syndrome for venous disease criteria described in the Royal College of Nurses clinical practice guidelines and by the presence of an ankle-brachial pressure index 0.8. The Regional Prevalence and Profile Study identified 263 people with leg ulcers for a rate of 2.0 per 1,000 people >25 years of age. One hundred, seven ulcers (41%) were the result of venous disease; of these, 83 (78% of cases) were associated with a single nursing agency and formed the study cohort. Most patients (51, 61%) were female and 65 years old. Thirty-eight (46%) had 4 comorbid conditions, 63 spoke English, 29 lived alone, 38 did not require physical aids or assistance for mobility, and 81 (98%) were able to travel outside of their home. The current ulcer had been present for an average of 15 months (median 6 months), 51 participants had a previous leg ulcer, and 22 had episodes of ulceration for > 5 years. Of the 121 ulcers in the study, 48 (41%) were located at the ankle, and the majority (85%) were > 1 cm2. General practitioners were the main medical care providers for 48 participants, and 52 (62%) had seen a specialist physician for their current ulcer. These findings are similar to large studies conducted in other industrialized countries and confirm that venous ulcers are a chronic problem in a population with complex health needs.

  8. Medical therapy for ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Hanauer, S B

    2000-07-01

    Last year was not a banner year for developments in medical therapy for ulcerative colitis. In contrast to the expansion of therapies for Crohn disease, treatment for ulcerative colitis was evolutionary, at best, leading many patients to seek alternative medical approaches. Nevertheless, there have been advances in the application of aminosalicylates and immune modifiers for ulcerative colitis. Additional, nonconventional approaches include nicotine, probiotics, dietary therapies, and heparins. Several novel approaches have arisen from animal models, including additional means of inhibiting nuclear factor-kappaB and targeting of tumor necrosis factor-alpha.

  9. [Psychological differences between ulcer and non-ulcer dyspeptic patients].

    PubMed

    Slepoy, V; Pezzotto, S; Pedrana, R; Gatto, A; Poletto, L

    1994-01-01

    The existence of differences in the psychological profile of 39 endoscopically evaluated patients with ulcer (U) and non ulcer (NU) dyspepsia were examined. There were 21 U and 18 NU subjects. Cigarette smoking, intake of alcohol, coffee, mate, aspirin and NSAID were recorded, but there were no significant differences between the two groups. Personality traits were determined by the Rorschach Test, considering psychological profile (introversive, extroversive, self-restrained), impulse and emotion control (do not allow their expression, impulsive, adequately conveyed) and level of social adaptation (low, normal, high). U and NU subjects experienced a similar number of potentially stressful life events. However, U patients perceived their events more negatively. Although no one type of "ulcer personality" was found consistently, ulcer patients tended to be more introversive and they had a better social adaptation than NU.

  10. Classifying bed inclination using pressure images.

    PubMed

    Baran Pouyan, M; Ostadabbas, S; Nourani, M; Pompeo, M

    2014-01-01

    Pressure ulcer is one of the most prevalent problems for bed-bound patients in hospitals and nursing homes. Pressure ulcers are painful for patients and costly for healthcare systems. Accurate in-bed posture analysis can significantly help in preventing pressure ulcers. Specifically, bed inclination (back angle) is a factor contributing to pressure ulcer development. In this paper, an efficient methodology is proposed to classify bed inclination. Our approach uses pressure values collected from a commercial pressure mat system. Then, by applying a number of image processing and machine learning techniques, the approximate degree of bed is estimated and classified. The proposed algorithm was tested on 15 subjects with various sizes and weights. The experimental results indicate that our method predicts bed inclination in three classes with 80.3% average accuracy.

  11. Hyperhomocysteinaemia and chronic venous ulcers.

    PubMed

    de Franciscis, Stefano; De Sarro, Giovambattista; Longo, Paola; Buffone, Gianluca; Molinari, Vincenzo; Stillitano, Domenico M; Gallelli, Luca; Serra, Raffaele

    2015-02-01

    Chronic venous ulceration (CVU) is the major cause of chronic wounds of lower extremities, and is a part of the complex of chronic venous disease. Previous studies have hypothesised that several thrombophilic factors, such as hyperhomocysteinaemia (HHcy), may be associated with chronic venous ulcers. In this study, we evaluated the prevalence of HHcy in patients with venous leg ulcers and the effect of folic acid therapy on wound healing. Eighty-seven patients with venous leg ulcers were enrolled in this study to calculate the prevalence of HHcy in this population. All patients underwent basic treatment for venous ulcer (compression therapy ± surgical procedures). Patients with HHcy (group A) received basic treatment and administered folic acid (1·2 mg/day for 12 months) and patients without HHcy (group B) received only basic treatment. Healing was assessed by means of computerised planimetry analysis. The prevalence of HHcy among patients with chronic venous ulcer enrolled in this study was 62·06%. Healing rate was significantly higher (P < 0·05) in group A patients (78·75%) compared with group B patients (63·33%). This study suggests a close association, statistically significant, between HHcy and CVU. Homocysteine-lowering therapy with folic acid seems to expedite wound healing. Despite these aspects, the exact molecular mechanisms between homocysteine and CVU have not been clearly defined and further studies are needed.

  12. [Drug-induced oral ulcerations].

    PubMed

    Madinier, I; Berry, N; Chichmanian, R M

    2000-06-01

    Different side effects of drugs have been described in the oral cavity, including oral ulcerations. Direct contact between drugs and oral mucosa may induce chemical burn or local hypersensitivity. Less frequently, these drug-induced oral ulcerations are part of a complex reaction with cutaneous or systemic manifestations. Sometimes, one or more oral ulcerations appear as the main side-effect of a drug, or exceptionally as solitary lesions. Solitary oral ulcerations usually appear after few weeks of treatment. In most of cases, these lesions resist to conventional treatments, with a rapid healing following the suppression of the responsible drug. This diagnosis is usually difficult, particularly with patients receiving multiple drug therapy. Besides, special attention must be paid to new drugs. Oral ulcerations following symptoms of burning mouth, metallic taste, dysgueusia or agueusia are strongly suggestive of a pharmacological origin. Most of the molecules able to induce solitary oral ulcerations are commonly prescribed in a) rheumatology: NSAI (diclofenac, flurbiprofen, indomethacin, naproxen), long-term rheumatoid arthritis therapy (azathioprine, methotrexate, penicillamine, gold compounds, tiopronin); b) cardiology: angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitors (captopril, enalapril), angiotensin 2-receptor antagonist (losartan), anti-angorous (nicorandil), c) psychiatry: antidepressants (fluoxetine, lithium), d) AIDS therapy (foscarnet, zalcitabine).

  13. Effect of Custom-Made Footwear on Foot Ulcer Recurrence in Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Bus, Sicco A.; Waaijman, Roelof; Arts, Mark; de Haart, Mirjam; Busch-Westbroek, Tessa; van Baal, Jeff; Nollet, Frans

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Custom-made footwear is the treatment of choice to prevent foot ulcer recurrence in diabetes. This footwear primarily aims to offload plantar regions at high ulcer risk. However, ulcer recurrence rates are high. We assessed the effect of offloading-improved custom-made footwear and the role of footwear adherence on plantar foot ulcer recurrence. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We randomly assigned 171 neuropathic diabetic patients with a recently healed plantar foot ulcer to custom-made footwear with improved and subsequently preserved offloading (∼20% peak pressure relief by modifying the footwear) or to usual care (i.e., nonimproved custom-made footwear). Primary outcome was plantar foot ulcer recurrence in 18 months. Secondary outcome was ulcer recurrence in patients with an objectively measured adherence of ≥80% of steps taken. RESULTS On the basis of intention-to-treat, 33 of 85 patients (38.8%) with improved footwear and 38 of 86 patients (44.2%) with usual care had a recurrent ulcer (relative risk −11%, odds ratio 0.80 [95% CI 0.44–1.47], P = 0.48). Ulcer-free survival curves were not significantly different between groups (P = 0.40). In the 79 patients (46% of total group) with high adherence, 9 of 35 (25.7%) with improved footwear and 21 of 44 (47.8%) with usual care had a recurrent ulcer (relative risk −46%, odds ratio 0.38 [0.15–0.99], P = 0.045). CONCLUSIONS Offloading-improved custom-made footwear does not significantly reduce the incidence of plantar foot ulcer recurrence in diabetes compared with custom-made footwear that does not undergo such improvement, unless it is worn as recommended. PMID:24130357

  14. Venous ulcer: epidemiology, physiopathology, diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Abbade, Luciana P Fernandes; Lastória, Sidnei

    2005-06-01

    This review discusses the epidemiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis and current therapeutic options for venous ulcer. Venous ulcer is a severe clinical manifestation of chronic venous insufficiency (CVI). It is responsible for about 70% of chronic ulcers of the lower limbs. The high prevalence of venous ulcer has a significant socioeconomic impact in terms of medical care, days off work and reduced quality of life. Long-term therapeutics are needed to heal venous ulcers and recurrence is quite common, ranging from 54 to 78%. Thrombophlebitis and trauma with long-term immobilization predisposing to deep venous thrombosis are important risk factors for CVI and venous ulcer. The most recent theories about pathogenesis of venous ulcer have associated it with microcirculatory abnormalities and generation of an inflammatory response. Management of venous leg ulcers is based on understanding the pathogenesis. In recent years novel therapeutic approaches for venous ulcers have offered valuable tools for the management of patients with this disorder.

  15. [Guidelines of diagnosis for peptic ulcer disease].

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang Gyun; Kim, Jae Gyu; Shin, Sung Kwan; Kim, Hyun Soo; Seol, Sang Young

    2009-11-01

    Peptic ulcer is one of the most prevalent diseases in gastrointestinal field. Recently, evolution was made for pathophysiology of peptic ulcer from "no acid, no ulcer" to Helicobacter pylori and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. The prevalence of peptic ulcer disease is estimated about 10% in Korea, and has declined due to Helicobacter pylori eradication therapy. Peptic ulcer has the cycle of exacerbation and improvement in the clinical course, and has not occasionally any clinical symptom. Helicobacter pylori eradication has made the marked reduction of relapse of peptic ulcer disease. Although nationwide endoscopic screening has enabled accurate diagnosis of peptic ulcer disease, general guideline for diagnosis of peptic ulcer has not made in Korea. Herein, we propose a guideline for the diagnosis of peptic ulcer according to domestic, international clinical studies, and experts opinions with level of evidence and grade of recommendation.

  16. [Peptic ulcer disease etiology, diagnosis and treatment].

    PubMed

    Bak-Romaniszyn, Leokadia; Wojtuń, Stanisław; Gil, Jerzy; Płaneta-Małecka, Izabela

    2004-01-01

    Authors in this article present etiology, clinical manifestations, diagnostic procedures and treatment of peptic ulcer disease in children and adults. Increased gastric acid output, Helicobacter pylori, NSAIDs and stress are the basic risk factors in peptic ulcer disease. H. pylori infection is a widely known risk factor in peptic ulcer disease and influences diagnostic and treatment procedures. Primary ulcer disease concerns mainly duodenum and is accompanied by H. pylori infection. Gastroscopy and Helicobacter tests are the only reliable procedures to diagnose peptic ulcer disease. Nowadays the most important aim in peptic ulcer treatment is the H. pylori eradication. Therapy with two antibiotics and a protein pomp inhibitor eradicates the bacteria, treats the ulceration and lowers the number of ulcer recurrence. In non-infected H. pylori ulcers or in a long-term treatment protein pomp inhibitors and H2-inhibitors are effective as well in gastroprotective therapy.

  17. Medical therapy of peptic ulcer disease.

    PubMed

    McQuaid, K R; Isenberg, J I

    1992-04-01

    The gastric duodenal mucosa normally is protected from the damaging effects of gastric acid and pepsin by ill-defined mechanisms. Ulcers may arise when there is an imbalance between the aggressive and defensive factors that renders the mucosa susceptible to damage. A variety of factors have been identified that may favor the development of peptic ulcers, but no single pathophysiologic defect applies in all ulcer patients. In duodenal ulcers, gastric acid hypersecretion is observed in as many as one third of patients; however, most patients with duodenal ulcers secrete normal amounts of gastric acid. Decreased mucosal bicarbonate secretion may be important in at least some duodenal ulcer patients. Use of NSAIDs may cause either gastric or duodenal ulcers, probably through the inhibition of mucosal prostaglandin synthesis and disruption of mucosal defenses. Finally, a recently identified bacterium, H. pylori, causes a chronic gastritis that is found in the overwhelming majority of patients with duodenal ulcers and non-NSAID-associated gastric ulcers. This bacterium may play a pivotal role in ulcer pathogenesis and, especially, in ulcer recurrences. A number of drugs of proved efficacy are available for the treatment of acute duodenal and gastric ulcers. The H2 receptor antagonists administered once daily remain the mainstay of ulcer therapy because of their efficacy, ease of use, and excellent safety profile. More thorough and long-lasting acid inhibition is afforded by the H+/K(+)-ATPase inhibitor omeprazole. This agent also promotes more rapid ulcer healing, but in most patients, this minor advantage may not justify the higher cost. It is not known whether more rapid healing will translate into lower ulcer complication rates. Until further data are available, this drug may be preferable in patients with large or complicated ulcers. In patients with refractory ulcers, omeprazole is clearly superior to other available agents. Agents that promote mucosal defense

  18. Nutritional care in peptic ulcer

    PubMed Central

    VOMERO, Nathália Dalcin; COLPO, Elisângela

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Peptic ulcer is a lesion of the mucosal lining of the upper gastrointestinal tract characterized by an imbalance between aggressive and protective factors of the mucosa, having H. pylori as the main etiologic factor. Dietotherapy is important in the prevention and treatment of this disease. Aim To update nutritional therapy in adults' peptic ulcer. Methods Exploratory review without restrictions with primary sources indexed in Scielo, PubMed, Medline, ISI, and Scopus databases. Results Dietotherapy, as well as caloric distribution, should be adjusted to the patient's needs aiming to normalize the nutritional status and promote healing. Recommended nutrients can be different in the acute phase and in the recovery phase, and there is a greater need of protein and some micronutrients, such as vitamin A, zinc, selenium, and vitamin C in the recovery phase. In addition, some studies have shown that vitamin C has a beneficial effect in eradication of H. pylori. Fibers and probiotics also play a important role in the treatment of peptic ulcer, because they reduce the side effects of antibiotics and help reduce treatment time. Conclusion A balanced diet is vital in the treatment of peptic ulcer, once food can prevent, treat or even alleviate the symptoms involving this pathology. However, there are few papers that innovate dietotherapy; so additional studies addressing more specifically the dietotherapy for treatment of peptic ulcer are necessary. PMID:25626944

  19. Medical management of venous ulcers.

    PubMed

    Pascarella, Luigi; Shortell, Cynthia K

    2015-03-01

    Venous disease is the most common cause of chronic leg ulceration and represents an advanced clinical manifestation of venous insufficiency. Due to their frequency and chronicity, venous ulcers have a high socioeconomic impact, with treatment costs accounting for 1% of the health care budget in Western countries. The evaluation of patients with venous ulcers should include a thorough medical history for prior deep venous thrombosis, assessment for an hypercoagulable state, and a physical examination. Use of the CEAP (clinical, etiology, anatomy, pathophysiology) Classification System and the revised Venous Clinical Severity Scoring System is strongly recommended to characterize disease severity and assess response to treatment. This venous condition requires lifestyle modification, with affected individuals performing daily intervals of leg elevation to control edema; use of elastic compression garments; and moderate physical activity, such as walking wearing below-knee elastic stockings. Meticulous skin care, treatment of dermatitis, and prompt treatment of cellulitis are important aspects of medical management. The pharmacology of chronic venous insufficiency and venous ulcers include essentially two medications: pentoxifylline and phlebotropic agents. The micronized purified flavonoid fraction is an effective adjunct to compression therapy in patients with large, chronic ulceration.

  20. Potassium Channelopathies and Gastrointestinal Ulceration

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jaeyong; Lee, Seung Hun; Giebisch, Gerhard; Wang, Tong

    2016-01-01

    Potassium channels and transporters maintain potassium homeostasis and play significant roles in several different biological actions via potassium ion regulation. In previous decades, the key revelations that potassium channels and transporters are involved in the production of gastric acid and the regulation of secretion in the stomach have been recognized. Drugs used to treat peptic ulceration are often potassium transporter inhibitors. It has also been reported that potassium channels are involved in ulcerative colitis. Direct toxicity to the intestines from nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs has been associated with altered potassium channel activities. Several reports have indicated that the long-term use of the antianginal drug Nicorandil, an adenosine triphosphate-sensitive potassium channel opener, increases the chances of ulceration and perforation from the oral to anal regions throughout the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Several of these drug features provide further insights into the role of potassium channels in the occurrence of ulceration in the GI tract. The purpose of this review is to investigate whether potassium channelopathies are involved in the mechanisms responsible for ulceration that occurs throughout the GI tract. PMID:27784845

  1. Hallux ulceration in diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    ElMakki Ahmed, Mohamed; Tamimi, Abdulhakim O; Mahadi, Seif I; Widatalla, Abubakr H; Shawer, Mohamed A

    2010-01-01

    We undertook a prospective cohort study to assess risk factors associated with hallux ulceration, and to determine the incidence of healing or amputation, in consecutive patients with diabetes mellitus who were treated over the observation period extending from September 2004 to March 2005, at the Jabir Abu Eliz Diabetic Centre, Khartoum City, Sudan. There were 122 diabetic patients in the cohort (92 males and 30 females) with an overall mean age of 58 +/- 9 years. Fifty-three percent of patients had complete healing within 8 weeks and 43% healed within 20 weeks. The overall mean time to healing was 16 +/- 8 weeks. In 32 (26.2%) patients, osteomyelitic bone was removed, leaving a healed and boneless hallux. The hallux was amputated in 17 (13.9%) patients; in 2 (1.6%) patients it was followed by forefoot amputation and in 7 (5.7%) patients by below-the-knee amputation. In 90 (73.8%) patients the initial lesion was a blister. In conclusion, hallux ulceration is common in patients with diabetes mellitus and is usually preceded by a blister. Neuropathy, foot deformity, and wearing new shoes are common causative factors; and ischemia, osteomyelitis, any form of wound infection, and the size of the ulcer are main outcome determinants. Complete healing occurred in 103 (85%) of diabetic patients with a hallux ulcer. Vascular intervention is important relative to limb salvage when ischemia is the main cause of the ulcer.

  2. Peptic Ulcer - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Peptic Ulcer URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/ ... V W XYZ List of All Topics All Peptic Ulcer - Multiple Languages To use the sharing features on ...

  3. Ostectomy and Medial Plantar Artery Flap Reconstruction for Charcot Foot Ulceration Involving the Midfoot.

    PubMed

    Sato, Tomoya; Ichioka, Shigeru

    2016-01-01

    Charcot foot is a serious complication of diabetes, characterized by deformity and overlying ulceration. The condition most commonly affects the midfoot. However, little information is available on the use of a medial plantar artery flap to treat diabetic midfoot ulceration. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the versatility of ostectomy and medial plantar flap reconstruction for midfoot plantar ulceration associated with rocker-bottom deformity secondary to Charcot foot. Four patients underwent ostectomy and medial plantar flap reconstruction. Before flap reconstruction, the devitalized soft tissues and bone were radically resected. After the infection had been controlled, the ulcerated portion was minimally excised, and the bony prominence underlying the ulcer was removed. A medial plantar artery flap was applied to the ulcer. The donor site was covered with a split-thickness skin graft or artificial dermis. In all patients, the ulcers healed and independent ambulation was achieved. However, 1 patient experienced ulcer recurrence, and subsequent infection necessitated a major amputation. Limb salvage is challenging in the setting of deformity and intractable plantar ulceration. The advantages of medial plantar artery flap reconstruction are that tissues with a rich blood supply are used to cover the exposed bone, and the flap can withstand the pressure and shear stress of the patient's body weight. However, a dominant artery in the foot is sacrificed. Therefore, the patency of the dorsalis pedis artery must be confirmed in every patient. The results of the present study have demonstrated that a medial plantar artery can be an effective alternative for diabetic patients with a plantar ulcer secondary to Charcot foot.

  4. Inflammation in chronic venous ulcers.

    PubMed

    Raffetto, J D

    2013-03-01

    Chronic venous ulcers (CVUs) occur in approximately 1% of the general population. Risk factors for chronic venous disease (CVD) include heredity, age, female sex and obesity. Although not restricted to the elderly, the prevalence of CVD, especially leg ulcers, increases with age. CVD has a considerable impact on health-care resources. It has been estimated that venous ulcers cause the loss of approximately two million working days and incur treatment costs of approximately $3 billion per year in the USA. Overall, CVD has been estimated to account for 1-3% of the total health-care budgets in countries with developed health-care systems. The pathophysiology of dermal abnormalities in CVU is reflective of a complex interplay that involves sustained venous hypertension, inflammation, changes in microcirculation, cytokine and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activation, resulting in altered cellular function and delayed wound healing.

  5. [Surgical treatment of duodenal ulcer].

    PubMed

    Lese, M; Naghi, I; Pop, C

    2001-01-01

    The medical and endoscopic treatment of duodenal ulcer are decreasing the frequency of surgical treatment in this disease. The authors study the operations performed for duodenal ulcer within the period 1989-1999 in the County Hospital Baia Mare. The decrease of the rate of surgical interventions is the pure effect of the medical treatment, as long as the endoscopic treatment is not yet available in our service. The rate of ulcer--induced perforations remained, however, unmodified (48% of total operatory indications), as well as the postoperative morbidity and--mortality (18% respectively 9%). The last category seems not to be influenced by the type of chosen surgical procedure, but by the patient's age, duration of the disease, and associated pathology.

  6. [Compression therapy in leg ulcers].

    PubMed

    Dissemond, J; Protz, K; Reich-Schupke, S; Stücker, M; Kröger, K

    2016-04-01

    Compression therapy is well-tried treatment with only few side effects for most patients with leg ulcers and/or edema. Despite the very long tradition in German-speaking countries and good evidence for compression therapy in different indications, recent scientific findings indicate that the current situation in Germany is unsatisfactory. Today, compression therapy can be performed with very different materials and systems. In addition to the traditional bandaging with Unna Boot, short-stretch, long-stretch, or multicomponent bandage systems, medical compression ulcer stockings are available. Other very effective but far less common alternatives are velcro wrap systems. When planning compression therapy, it is also important to consider donning devices with the patient. In addition to compression therapy, intermittent pneumatic compression therapy can be used. Through these various treatment options, it is now possible to develop an individually accepted, geared to the needs of the patients, and functional therapy strategy for nearly all patients with leg ulcers.

  7. Pradaxa-induced esophageal ulcer.

    PubMed

    Wood, Michele; Shaw, Paul

    2015-10-09

    Pradaxa (dabigatran) is a direct thrombin inhibitor approved for prevention of stroke and systemic embolism in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation. We describe a case of esophageal ulceration associated with Pradaxa administration in a 75-year-old man. The patient reported difficulty swallowing and a burning sensation after taking his first dose of Pradaxa. An esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) revealed linear ulcerations in the mid-esophagus. Pradaxa was held beginning the day before the EGD. The patient reported that his pain and difficulty swallowing resolved on stopping Pradaxa. Pradaxa is formulated with a tartaric acid excipient to reduce variability in absorption. We hypothesise that the capsule lodged in the patient's esophagus and the tartaric acid may have caused local damage resulting in an esophageal ulcer. It is important to educate patients on proper administration of Pradaxa, to decrease the risk of this rare, but potentially serious adverse event.

  8. Preventing venous ulcer recurrence: a review.

    PubMed

    Vowden, Kathryn R; Vowden, Peter

    2006-03-01

    This review article examines the available evidence on both the primary and secondary prevention of venous ulceration, exploring both the individual, social and financial implications of system failures that allow patients to remain at increased risk of recurrent ulceration. The role of both venous disease assessment and corrective superficial venous surgery are discussed in the light of recently published randomised controlled studies on the role of superficial venous surgery as both an adjunct to ulcer healing and ulcer prevention.

  9. Raynaud, digital ulcers and calcinosis in scleroderma.

    PubMed

    Nitsche, Alejandro

    2012-01-01

    Raynaud, digital ulcers and calcinosis are frequent manifestations of patients with systemic sclerosis. Digital ulcers are seen in more than half of the patients with scleroderma. Hospitalizations, ischemic complications and impairment of hand function are frequently observed in patients with digital ulcers, especially if treatment is delayed. Rapid and intensive treatment escalation in patients with scleroderma and refractory Raynaud's phenomenon is one of the most effective preventive action available in order to avoid the development of digital ulcers and tissue loss.

  10. Misoprostol in peptic ulcer disease.

    PubMed

    Watkinson, G; Akbar, F A

    1987-01-01

    Misoprostol, a synthetic prostaglandin E1 (PGE1) methyl ester analog has potent antisecretory and cytoprotective effects on the gastric and duodenal mucosa which should make it an effective drug in the treatment of gastric and duodenal ulcer. In two multicenter, randomised, double-blind, controlled studies involving over 900 patients with endoscopically proven benign gastric ulcer and in six similar studies involving over 2000 patients with active duodenal ulcers, differing doses of misoprostol have been compared with either placebo therapy or with conventional doses of cimetidine. In these studies misoprostol 800 mcg daily given as two or four divided doses has been shown to produce rates of complete ulcer healing and pain relief which were significantly superior to placebo therapy and comparable to those achieved with cimetidine. Drug related adverse effects were infrequent. A dose related diarrhea occurred in a small proportion of patients which seldom necessitated suspension of therapy. Because of the known uterotropic effect of prostaglandins the drug should not be used in pregnant women or women of child bearing age unless they are using adequate contraceptive measures. No clinically significant adverse, hematological or biochemical effects have been reported. Two studies suggested that misoprostol reduced the adverse effect of smoking on the healing of duodenal ulcer. In addition, misoprostol has been shown to protect the gastro-duodenal mucosa from the damaging effects of alcohol and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. This action may prove of value in the treatment of ulcer patients who are inveterate smokers, alcohol users or who are compelled to consume non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for pain relief from rheumatic and allied diseases.

  11. 38 CFR 4.110 - Ulcers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Digestive System § 4.110 Ulcers. Experience has shown that the term “peptic ulcer” is not sufficiently specific for rating purposes. Manifest differences in ulcers of the stomach... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Ulcers. 4.110 Section...

  12. Computed tomographic findings in penetrating peptic ulcer

    SciTech Connect

    Madrazo, B.L.; Halpert, R.D.; Sandler, M.A.; Pearlberg, J.L.

    1984-12-01

    Four cases of peptic ulcer penetrating the head of the pancreas were diagnosed by computed tomography (CT). Findings common to 3 cases included (a) an ulcer crater, (b) a sinus tract, and (c) enlargement of the head of the pancreas. Unlike other modalities, the inherent spatial resolution of CT allows a convenient diagnosis of this important complication of peptic ulcer disease.

  13. 38 CFR 4.110 - Ulcers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Digestive System § 4.110 Ulcers. Experience has shown that the term “peptic ulcer” is not sufficiently specific for rating purposes. Manifest differences in ulcers of the stomach... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Ulcers. 4.110 Section...

  14. 38 CFR 4.110 - Ulcers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Digestive System § 4.110 Ulcers. Experience has shown that the term “peptic ulcer” is not sufficiently specific for rating purposes. Manifest differences in ulcers of the stomach... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Ulcers. 4.110 Section...

  15. 38 CFR 4.110 - Ulcers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Digestive System § 4.110 Ulcers. Experience has shown that the term “peptic ulcer” is not sufficiently specific for rating purposes. Manifest differences in ulcers of the stomach... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Ulcers. 4.110 Section...

  16. 38 CFR 4.110 - Ulcers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Digestive System § 4.110 Ulcers. Experience has shown that the term “peptic ulcer” is not sufficiently specific for rating purposes. Manifest differences in ulcers of the stomach... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Ulcers. 4.110 Section...

  17. Gastric ulceration in an equine neonate

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Susan

    2003-01-01

    A 24-hour-old colt presented with clinical signs consistent with gastric ulceration. Treatment was initiated with a histamine type-2 receptor antagonist and clinical signs resolved. Gastroscopy at 16 d confirmed the presence of a gastric ulcer. Although gastric ulceration is common in foals, it is rarely reported in foals this young. PMID:12757136

  18. Diagnosis and treatment of venous ulcers.

    PubMed

    Collins, Lauren; Seraj, Samina

    2010-04-15

    Venous ulcer, also known as stasis ulcer, is the most common etiology of lower extremity ulceration, affecting approximately 1 percent of the U.S. population. Possible causes of venous ulcers include inflammatory processes resulting in leukocyte activation, endothelial damage, platelet aggregation, and intracellular edema. The primary risk factors for venous ulcer development are older age, obesity, previous leg injuries, deep venous thrombosis, and phlebitis. On physical examination, venous ulcers are generally irregular, shallow, and located over bony prominences. Granulation tissue and fibrin are typically present in the ulcer base. Associated findings include lower extremity varicosities, edema, venous dermatitis, and lipodermatosclerosis. Venous ulcers are usually recurrent, and an open ulcer can persist for weeks to many years. Severe complications include cellulitis, osteomyelitis, and malignant change. Poor prognostic factors include large ulcer size and prolonged duration. Evidence-based treatment options for venous ulcers include leg elevation, compression therapy, dressings, pentoxifylline, and aspirin therapy. Surgical management may be considered for ulcers that are large in size, of prolonged duration, or refractory to conservative measures.

  19. Recurrent and other new foot ulcers after healed plantar forefoot diabetic ulcer.

    PubMed

    Örneholm, Hedvig; Apelqvist, Jan; Larsson, Jan; Eneroth, Magnus

    2017-04-01

    Diabetic foot ulcer is a serious complication in patients with diabetes. In most outcome studies of this condition, there is a combination of various types of ulcer and ulcer locations. Plantar ulcers are usually localized to the forefoot, and constitute a quarter of all diabetic foot ulcers. There are a limited number of studies regarding development of new ulcers following healing of a plantar forefoot ulcer, and there are no uniform definitions of recurrent and other new ulcers. The aim of this study was to evaluate the outcome of a large cohort of consecutively treated patients with diabetes mellitus and a healed planter forefoot ulcer (n=617) with regard to development, characteristics, and outcome of recurrent and other new ulcers. Patients were followed consecutively and prospectively with a two-year follow-up, according to a pre-set protocol. Out of 617 patients, 250 (41%) did not develop any new ulcer, 262 (42%) developed a new ulcer, 87 (14%) died and 18 (3%) were lost at two years following healing of a plantar forefoot ulcer. Thirty-four per cent developed other new ulcers (112 on the same foot and 99 on the contralateral foot), whereas 51 patients (8%) developed a recurrent ulcer (at the same site and foot). Of the patients who died within two years, 30 patients had developed other new ulcers. The risk of a recurrent ulcer in patients with diabetes and a healed plantar forefoot ulcer was only eight per cent within two years, whereas other new ulcers, on the same foot or on the contralateral foot, was seen in 4 out of 10 patients indicating the need for further preventive measures and surveillance in these patients. We suggest a concise definition for new ulcer to be used in future research. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  20. Chronic ulcers: MATRIDERM® system in smoker, cardiopathic, and diabetic patients

    PubMed Central

    Gentile, Pietro; Agovino, Annarita; Migner, Alessia; Orlandi, Fabrizio; Delogu, Pamela; Cervelli, Valerio

    2013-01-01

    Diabetic ulcers and pressure ulcers represent a more frequent cause of chronic wounds in aging populations. It is estimated that approximately 15% of the diabetic population will develop diabetic ulcers during their life and over half of these patients develop an infection, often osteomyelitis, with 20% requiring amputation. The authors report a case of a 65-year-old woman affected by a post-traumatic loss of substance due to road accidents with soft tissue exposure (comprising muscle tendon) of the left knee combined with the fracture of the right fibula previously subjected to surgery and reconstruction of muscle tendon. The patient was affected by diabetes type II, hypertension, and ischemic heart disease. In 2008, she underwent a double bypass surgery and coronary angioplasty. Initially, the patient was treated with cycles of advanced dressings, with fibrinolytic ointments, hydrocolloid, and subsequently, when the bottom began granulated with fibrinolytic and idrocellulosa, Hydrofibra-Ag, and Ag-alginate, three times a week for 30 days. In the second step, the authors decided to treat the ulcer with the MATRIDERM system and auto skin graft. Following the first treatment, 7 days after the procedure, the authors found the reduction of the loss of substance until its complete closure. The wound’s infection was evaluated by a buffer negative confirmation performed every 2 weeks four times. We obtained decrease of limb edema and full functional rehabilitation. The skin appeared renovated, with volume restoration and an improvement of the texture. PMID:24020011

  1. Active Pedicle Epithelial Flap Transposition Combined with Amniotic Membrane Transplantation for Treatment of Nonhealing Corneal Ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ting; Wang, Yuexin; Jia, Yanni; Liu, Dongle; Li, Suxia; Shi, Weiyun

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. The objective was to evaluate the efficacy of active pedicle epithelial flap transposition combined with amniotic membrane transplantation (AMT) in treating nonhealing corneal ulcers. Material and Methods. Eleven patients (11 eyes) with nonhealing corneal ulcer who underwent the combined surgery were included. Postoperatively, ulcer healing time was detected by corneal fluorescein staining. Visual acuity, intraocular pressure, surgical complications, and recurrence were recorded. Corneal status was inspected by the laser scanning confocal microscopy and anterior segment optical coherence tomography (AS-OCT). Results. The primary diseases were herpes simplex keratitis (8 eyes), corneal graft ulcer (2 eyes), and Stevens-Johnson syndrome (1 eye). All epithelial flaps were intact following surgery, without shedding or displacement. Mean ulcer healing time was 10.8 ± 3.1 days, with a healing rate of 91%. Vision significantly improved from 1.70 to 0.82 log MAR (P = 0.001). A significant decrease in inflammatory cell infiltration and corneal stromal edema was revealed 2 months postoperatively by confocal microscopy and AS-OCT. Corneal ulcer recurred in 1 eye. None of the patients developed major complications. Conclusion. Active pedicle epithelial flap transposition combined with AMT is a simple and effective treatment for nonhealing corneal ulcers. PMID:27830086

  2. Endoscopic Management of Peptic Ulcer Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Joon Sung; Park, Sung Min

    2015-01-01

    Acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding is a common medical emergency around the world and the major cause is peptic ulcer bleeding. Endoscopic treatment is fundamental for the management of peptic ulcer bleeding. Despite recent advances in endoscopic treatment, mortality from peptic ulcer bleeding has still remained high. This is because the disease often occurs in elderly patients with frequent comorbidities and are taking ulcerogenic medications. Therefore, the management of peptic ulcer bleeding is still a challenge for clinicians. This article reviews the various endoscopic methods available for management of peptic ulcer bleeding and the techniques in using these methods. PMID:25844337

  3. Endoscopic management of peptic ulcer bleeding.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joon Sung; Park, Sung Min; Kim, Byung-Wook

    2015-03-01

    Acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding is a common medical emergency around the world and the major cause is peptic ulcer bleeding. Endoscopic treatment is fundamental for the management of peptic ulcer bleeding. Despite recent advances in endoscopic treatment, mortality from peptic ulcer bleeding has still remained high. This is because the disease often occurs in elderly patients with frequent comorbidities and are taking ulcerogenic medications. Therefore, the management of peptic ulcer bleeding is still a challenge for clinicians. This article reviews the various endoscopic methods available for management of peptic ulcer bleeding and the techniques in using these methods.

  4. Lingual ulceration in disseminated histoplasmosis.

    PubMed

    Guttal, Kruthika S; Naikmasur, Venkatesh G; Bathi, Renuka J; Rao, Ravikala

    2010-03-01

    Histoplasmosis is a rare systemic fungal infection commonly presenting as mucosal ulceration of the oral cavity. It has been increasingly reported in India as disseminated disease with lesions in the oral cavity as a consequence of rapid spread of HIV infection. The authors report a case of disseminated histoplasmosis with oral manifestation in a 40-year-old male patient.

  5. FAQs on leg ulcer care.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Irene; King, Brenda; Knight, Susan; Keynes, Milton

    In a webchat on leg ulcer management issues, hosted by Nursing Times, participants raised three key areas of care: the role of healthcare assistants in compression bandaging; reporting and investigating damage caused by compression therapy; and recommendations for dressings to be used under compression. This article discusses each of these in turn.

  6. [Ulcerative colitis and cytomegalovirus infection].

    PubMed

    Tárraga Rodríguez, I; Ferreras Fernández, P; Vicente Gutiérrez, M; de Arriba, J J; García Mouriño, M L

    2003-02-01

    Colitis ulcerous and citomegalovirus infection association have been reported in medical literature in sometimes, althougth this prevalence have lately increased. We report a case record of this association and do a review of this subject. It is not clear what factors are involved in this association, being necessary hore studies to know them.

  7. Peptic ulcers: mortality and hospitalization.

    PubMed

    Riley, R

    1991-01-01

    This study analyzes data on peptic ulcer disease based on deaths for 1951-1988 and hospital separations for 1969-1988. The source of the data are mortality and morbidity statistics provided to Statistics Canada by the provinces. The age-standardized mortality rates (ASMR) for peptic ulcer disease decreased from 1951 to 1988 by 69.4% for men (8.5 to 2.6 per 100,000 population), and 31.8% for women (2.2 to 1.5). Separation rates from hospitals during 1969-1988 for peptic ulcer disease also decreased by 59.8% for men (242.7 to 97.6 per 100,000 population) and 35.6% for women (103.2 to 66.5). Age-specific rates for both mortality and hospital separations increased with age. Epidemiological studies indicate that the incidence of peptic ulcer disease is declining in the general population. The downward trends in mortality and hospitalization rates for peptic ulcer disease reflect this change in incidence, but additional factors probably contribute as well to this decline. Male rates for both mortality and hospital separations were much higher than female rates at the beginning of the study period; but toward the end, the gap between the sexes narrowed considerably, mainly because the male rates declined substantially while the female rates decline moderately. The slower decline in the rates for women may be related to such factors as the increasing labour force participation among women and the slower decline in the population of female smokers.

  8. Dutch Venous Ulcer guideline update.

    PubMed

    Maessen-Visch, M Birgitte; de Roos, Kees-Peter

    2014-05-01

    The revised guideline of 2013 is an update of the 2005 guideline "venous leg ulcer". In this special project four separate guidelines (venous leg ulcer, varicose veins, compression therapy and deep venous disorders) were revised and developed simultaneously. A meeting was held including representatives of any organisation involved in venous disease management including patient organizations and health insurance companies. Eighteen clinical questions where defined, and a new strategy was used to accelerate the process. This resulted in two new and two revised guidelines within one year. The guideline committee advises use of the C of the CEAP classification as well as the Venous Clinical Severity Score (VCSS) and a Quality of life (QoL) score in the assessment of clinical signs. These can provide insight into the burden of disease and the effects of treatment as experienced by the patient. A duplex ultrasound should be performed in every patient to establish the underlying aetiology and to evaluate the need for treatment (which is discussed in a separate guideline). The use of the TIME model for describing venous ulcers is recommended. There is no evidence for antiseptic or antibiotic wound care products except for a Cochrane review in which some evidence is presented for cadexomer iodine. Signs of infection are the main reason for the use of oral antibiotics. When the ulcer fails to heal the use of oral aspirin and pentoxifylline can be considered as an adjunct. For the individual patient, the following aspects should be considered: the appearance of the ulcer (amount of exudate) according to the TIME model, the influence of wound care products on moisturising the wound, frequency of changing compression bandages, pain and allergies. The cost of the dressings should also be considered. Education and training of patients t improves compliance with compression therapy but does not influence wound healing rates.

  9. Neuropathic ulcers in leprosy treated with intralesional platelet-rich plasma.

    PubMed

    Conde-Montero, Elena; Horcajada-Reales, Celia; Clavo, Petunia; Delgado-Sillero, Irene; Suárez-Fernández, Ricardo

    2016-10-01

    Neuropathic ulcers in leprosy represent a therapeutic challenge for clinicians. Chronic ulcers affect patient health, emotional state and quality of life, causing considerable morbidity and mortality in addition to contributing to significant health care costs. The pathogenesis is mainly related to the abnormally increased pressure in areas such as the sole of the foot, secondary to lack of sensation and deformities induced by peripheral sensory-motor neuropathy. Conventional treatment of these wounds can be slow due to their chronic inflammatory state and the senescence of local reparative cells. Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) may restore the healing process, leading to a reparative phase. We present two patients with four neuropathic leprosy ulcers that have responded satisfactory to PRP treatment. PRP therapy has been growing as a viable treatment alternative for chronic ulcers. However, stronger scientific evidence is required to support its potential benefit for use in chronic wounds.

  10. Choice of wound care in diabetic foot ulcer: A practical approach

    PubMed Central

    Kavitha, Karakkattu Vijayan; Tiwari, Shalbha; Purandare, Vedavati Bharat; Khedkar, Sudam; Bhosale, Shilpa Sameer; Unnikrishnan, Ambika Gopalakrishnan

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic foot ulcers are the consequence of multiple factors including peripheral neuropathy, decreased blood supply, high plantar pressures, etc., and pose a significant risk for morbidity, limb loss and mortality. The critical aspects of the wound healing mechanism and host physiological status in patients with diabetes necessitate the selection of an appropriate treatment strategy based on the complexity and type of wound. In addition to systemic antibiotics and surgical intervention, wound care is considered to be an important component of diabetic foot ulcer management. This article will focus on the use of different wound care materials in diabetic foot. From a clinical perspective, it is important to decide on the wound care material depending on the type and grade of the ulcer. This article will also provide clinicians with a simple approach to the choice of wound care materials in diabetic foot ulcer. PMID:25126400

  11. The prevention of diabetic foot ulceration: how biomechanical research informs clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    DiLiberto, Frank E.; Baumhauer, Judith F.; Nawoczenski, Deborah A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background Implementation of interprofessional clinical guidelines for the prevention of neuropathic diabetic foot ulceration has demonstrated positive effects regarding ulceration and amputation rates. Current foot care recommendations are primarily based on research regarding the prevention of ulcer recurrence and focused on reducing the magnitude of plantar stress (pressure overload). Yet, foot ulceration remains to be a prevalent and debilitating consequence of Diabetes Mellitus. There is limited evidence targeting the prevention of first-time ulceration, and there is a need to consider additional factors of plantar stress to supplement current guidelines. Objectives The first purpose of this article is to discuss the biomechanical theory underpinning diabetic foot ulcerations and illustrate how plantar tissue underloading may precede overloading and breakdown. The second purpose of this commentary is to discuss how advances in biomechanical foot modeling can inform clinical practice in the prevention of first-time ulceration. Discussion Research demonstrates that progressive weight-bearing activity programs to address the frequency of plantar stress and avoid underloading do not increase ulceration risk. Multi-segment foot modeling studies indicate that dynamic foot function of the midfoot and forefoot is compromised in people with diabetes. Emerging research demonstrates that implementation of foot-specific exercises may positively influence dynamic foot function and improve plantar stress in people with diabetes. Conclusion Continued work is needed to determine how to best design and integrate activity recommendations and foot-specific exercise programs into the current interprofessional paradigm for the prevention of first-time ulceration in people with Diabetes Mellitus. PMID:27849290

  12. [Compression therapy of venous leg ulcers in the decongestion phase].

    PubMed

    Dissemond, J; Eder, S; Läuchli, S; Partsch, H; Stücker, M; Vanscheidt, W

    2017-01-11

    Compression therapy is the basis for successful treatment in most patients with venous leg ulcers. Concerning compression therapy, the initial phase of decongestion and the following phase of maintenance should be differentiated. While in the maintenance phase (ulcer) stocking systems are now frequently recommended, in the decongestion phase compression bandages are mostly still used, which however are often inappropriately applied. In German-speaking countries, compression therapy with short-stretch bandages has a long tradition. However, their correct application requires good training and monitoring, which is often lacking in daily practice. Less error-prone treatment alternatives are multicomponent systems, some of which have an optical marker for the control of the correct subbandage pressure. In another new type of compression system, which is called adaptive or wrap bandages, the compression pressure can be adjusted using a Velcro fastener. Accompanying intermittent pneumatic compression therapy can also be used in the decongestion phase. Thus, there are now several different treatment options that can be used for the decongestion phase in patients with venous leg ulcers. Often bandages with short-stretch materials are very prone to errors and should in most cases be replaced by other compression systems today. The patient's preference, need, and capability should be considered when selecting the appropriate system for the individual patient.

  13. Practical Management of Pressure Sores

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, John M.

    1992-01-01

    Pressure sores are common in the debilitated elderly. Causal factors are unrelieved pressure, shearing forces, friction, and moisture. Preventive measures should be used for all high-risk patients, defined by general condition, mental status, degree of incontinence, amount of activity, and mobility. Principles of treating ulcers include pressure relief, reducing bacterial counts, debriding necrotic tissue, and providing a moist, clean environment. Imagesp2385-ap2389-ap2392-a PMID:21221298

  14. Intestinal microbiota and ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Ohkusa, Toshifumi; Koido, Shigeo

    2015-11-01

    There is a close relationship between the human host and the intestinal microbiota, which is an assortment of microorganisms, protecting the intestine against colonization by exogenous pathogens. Moreover, the intestinal microbiota play a critical role in providing nutrition and the modulation of host immune homeostasis. Recent reports indicate that some strains of intestinal bacteria are responsible for intestinal ulceration and chronic inflammation in inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) such as ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD). Understanding the interaction of the intestinal microbiota with pathogens and the human host might provide new strategies treating patients with IBD. This review focuses on the important role that the intestinal microbiota plays in maintaining innate immunity in the pathogenesis and etiology of UC and discusses new antibiotic therapies targeting the intestinal microbiota.

  15. Polymyositis associated with ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed Central

    Chugh, S; Dilawari, J B; Sawhney, I M; Dang, N; Radotra, B D; Chawla, Y K

    1993-01-01

    An elderly woman with chronic ulcerative colitis who developed proximal muscle weakness, increased serum creatine phosphokinase activity, and histological and electromyographic abnormalities characteristic of polymyositis is described. Treatment with corticosteroids and 5-acetylsalicylic acid was followed by a remission in bowel symptoms, improvement in muscle power, and reversal of electromyographic changes. An autoimmune link between the two disorders seems likely. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:8491410

  16. IMMUNOLOGICAL STUDIES IN ULCERATIVE COLITIS

    PubMed Central

    Lagercrantz, R.; Hammarström, S.; Perlmann, P.; Gustafsson, B. E.

    1968-01-01

    The incidence and height of antibody titers to colon, assayed by indirect hemagglutination with a heat stable colon extract from germ free rats, is significantly higher in sera from patients with ulcerative colitis than in those from healthy controls or from patients with amebic liver abscess or dysentery. While sera from ulcerative colitis patients and controls are indistinguishable in regard to incidence and height of antibody titers to Forsman antigen, Staphylococcus aureus S 209, Clostridium difficile, and several common strains of E. coli, they have elevated titers and increased incidence of antibodies to a heat stable antigen of E. coli O14. Patients with amebic dysentery have normal titers of such antibodies. Absorption of patients' sera with E. coli O14 antigen inhibits the colon directed hemagglutination reaction in approximately 30% of the cases tested. Likewise, the anti-E. coli O14 reaction can sometimes be inhibited with the colon extract. Other E. coli strains and other bacteria are inactive or have only weak inhibitory activity. Hemagglutination inhibition experiments show that germ free rat colon and E. coli O14 contain common structures, depicted by antibodies in the patients' sera. This pattern of reactivity closely resembles that seen in rats made autoimmune to colon by injection of newborn rabbit colon. E. coli O14 is known to carry a heterogenetic antigen present in lower concentration (or activity) in most Enterobacteriaceae. Hemagglutination inhibition experiments with rabbit antisera to E. coli O14 suggest that the antigen common for E. coli O14 and colon is related to this heterogenetic antigen. The findings imply that this antigen, which is constantly present in low concentrations in the human colon, may give rise to anticolon antibody formation in ulcerative colitis through breakage of tolerance. Since this antigen is present in healthy individuals as well, additional factors are required to explain the induction of anti

  17. Reaginic hypersensitivity in ulcerative colitis

    PubMed Central

    Jewell, D. P.; Truelove, S. C.

    1972-01-01

    Reaginic hypersensitivity in ulcerative colitis has been investigated in respect of a hypersensitivity to the cow's milk proteins and the frequency of atopic asthma, hay fever, and eczema. Intradermal tests were frequently positive, especially to casein, but the results did not differ from those found in healthy individuals and in groups of patients with Crohn's disease, hypolactasia, and the irritable colon syndrome. No circulating IgE-specific antibodies to the milk proteins were found. An increased frequency of atopic diseases was found in patients suffering from ulcerative colitis (15·7%) and Crohn's disease (13·3%) compared with the findings in a control group (1·2%). It is concluded that, if an allergy to milk proteins is a factor in the pathogenesis of ulcerative colitis, it is not mediated by reaginic antibodies. It is possible, however, that the frequent occurrence of atopy indicates a susceptibility to develop reaginic responses even though this mechanism does not apply to the milk proteins. PMID:4646293

  18. Approach to infected skin ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Christopher; Bayoumi, Imaan; Westendorp, Claire

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To review the diagnosis and management of infected chronic skin ulcers. SOURCES OF INFORMATION Cochrane database, MEDLINE, and Google were searched for clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) for wound care. Most recommendations found in the CPGs had level II or III evidence. Expert and consensus opinion from the Canadian Chronic Wound Advisory Board and the International Wound Bed Preparation Advisory Board were also used. MAIN MESSAGE Bacteria in skin ulcers act along a continuum from contamination through colonization and critical colonization to infection. Critical colonization is not always associated with overt signs of infection but can result in failure to heal, poor-quality granulation tissue, increased wound friability, and increased drainage. Good-quality swab samples should be an adjunct to clinical acumen, not a primary strategy for diagnosis. Iodine and silver-based dressings, topical antibiotics, and systemic antibiotics can be helpful. CONCLUSION Diagnosis of chronic wound infection is based on clinical signs and a holistic approach to patients. More research into assessment and treatment of skin ulcer infection is needed. PMID:16250422

  19. Perforated peptic ulcer - an update

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Kin Tong; Shelat, Vishalkumar G

    2017-01-01

    Peptic ulcer disease (PUD) affects 4 million people worldwide annually. The incidence of PUD has been estimated at around 1.5% to 3%. Perforated peptic ulcer (PPU) is a serious complication of PUD and patients with PPU often present with acute abdomen that carries high risk for morbidity and mortality. The lifetime prevalence of perforation in patients with PUD is about 5%. PPU carries a mortality ranging from 1.3% to 20%. Thirty-day mortality rate reaching 20% and 90-d mortality rate of up to 30% have been reported. In this review we have summarized the current evidence on PPU to update readers. This literature review includes the most updated information such as common causes, clinical features, diagnostic methods, non-operative and operative management, post-operative complications and different scoring systems of PPU. With the advancement of medical technology, PUD can now be treated with medications instead of elective surgery. The classic triad of sudden onset of abdominal pain, tachycardia and abdominal rigidity is the hallmark of PPU. Erect chest radiograph may miss 15% of cases with air under the diaphragm in patients with bowel perforation. Early diagnosis, prompt resuscitation and urgent surgical intervention are essential to improve outcomes. Exploratory laparotomy and omental patch repair remains the gold standard. Laparoscopic surgery should be considered when expertise is available. Gastrectomy is recommended in patients with large or malignant ulcer. PMID:28138363

  20. A Hydroxyurea-induced Leg Ulcer

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Seon-Wook; Hong, Soon-Kwon; Kim, Sang-Hyun; Seo, Jong-Keun; Sung, Ho-Suk

    2009-01-01

    Hydroxyurea is a cytostatic agent that has recently become the drug of choice in the treatment of various myeloproliferative diseases. The cutaneous side effects of hydroxyurea include xerosis, hyperpigmentation, nail discoloration, and scaling. Leg ulcers have only rarely been reported in association with hydroxyurea treatment. A 75-year-old woman presented with leg ulcers, nail discoloration, and xerosis. The leg ulcers were refractory to conventional treatment. She had been taking oral hydroxyurea since being diagnosed with essential thrombocytosis in 2002. Hence, we suspected hydroxyurea-induced leg ulcers and discontinued her hydroxyurea treatment; the ulcers gradually healed thereafter. We present a rare case of hydroxyurea-induced leg ulcers in Korea. PMID:20548853

  1. Recurrence of Mooren's ulcer after lamellar keratoplasty.

    PubMed

    McDonnell, P J

    1989-09-01

    A 45-year-old man with unilateral Mooren's ulcer in a quiescent state underwent annular lamellar keratoplasty after corneal rupture due to minor trauma. Postoperatively, he did well until 8 months later when a recurrence of the Mooren's ulceration occurred, involving the central island of the patient's original corneal stroma. The stroma of the lamellar graft was uninvolved. This unusual occurrence lends support to the concept that there is a specific immunologic reaction to the cornea in patients with Mooren's ulcer.

  2. [Treatment of severe ulcerative colitis flares].

    PubMed

    Aceituno, Montserrat; Montserrat, Aceituno; Zabana, Yamile; Yamile, Zabana; Esteve, Maria; Maria, Esteve

    2014-10-01

    The treatment of severe ulcerative colitis remains a challenge for gastroenterologists. A not inconsiderable number of patients will experience severe flares throughout their lives and will require hospitalization. Mortality in severe ulcerative colitis is still high and consequently treatment must be aggressive, avoiding delays in rescue therapies or even surgery. The aim of this review was to describe the medical treatment of severe ulcerative colitis, highlighting recent therapeutic advances.

  3. Ulcerative necrobiosis lipoidica responsive to colchicine.

    PubMed

    Schofield, Clare; Sladden, Michael J

    2012-08-01

    Necrobiosis lipoidica is an uncommon granulomatous disease of unknown aetiology. Few treatments have emerged with consistent efficacy and the ulcerated form of necrobiosis lipoidica can be particularly difficult to treat. A 56-year-old non-diabetic woman with chronic ulcerative necrobiosis lipoidica unresponsive to other therapies was commenced on colchicine treatment. Complete resolution of the ulcers was observed after 2 months' therapy with colchicine 500 µg twice daily.

  4. Refractory leg ulcers associated with Klinefelter syndrome.

    PubMed

    Yabuno, Yuto; Tosa, Mamiko; Iwakiri, Itaru; Nomoto, Shunichi; Kaneko, Mayuko; Kuwahara, Kousuke; Hyakusoku, Hiko; Murakami, Masahiro

    2015-01-01

    We present a man with refractory leg ulcers, bilateral varicosis of the lower extremities, and Buerger disease. Autoimmune work-up was negative. However, chromosome analysis showed Klinefelter syndrome (48 XXY). Ulcerative lesions of the lower extremities are a complication of Klinefelter syndrome. To date, the pathogenesis of ulcers in Klinefelter syndrome has not been clarified, but several factors, such as abnormalities of fibrinolysis and prothrombotic states, might be involved. Our present case emphasizes the importance of considering Klinefelter syndrome in the differential diagnosis of a male patient with nonhealing ulcers of the lower extremities.

  5. Ischemic Gastropathic Ulcer Mimics Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Daher, Saleh; Lahav, Ziv; Rmeileh, Ayman Abu; Mizrahi, Meir

    2016-01-01

    Gastric ulcer due to mesenteric ischemia is a rare clinical finding. As a result, few reports of ischemic gastric ulcers have been reported in the literature. The diagnosis of ischemic gastropathy is seldom considered in patients presenting with abdominal pain and gastric ulcers. In this case report, we describe a patient with increasing abdominal pain, weight loss, and gastric ulcers, who underwent extensive medical evaluation and whose symptoms were resistant to medical interventions. Finally he was diagnosed with chronic mesenteric ischemia, and his clinical and endoscopic abnormalities resolved after surgical revascularization of both the superior mesenteric artery and the celiac trunk. PMID:27579191

  6. Ischemic Gastropathic Ulcer Mimics Gastric Cancer.

    PubMed

    Daher, Saleh; Lahav, Ziv; Rmeileh, Ayman Abu; Mizrahi, Meir; Khoury, Tawfik

    2016-01-01

    Gastric ulcer due to mesenteric ischemia is a rare clinical finding. As a result, few reports of ischemic gastric ulcers have been reported in the literature. The diagnosis of ischemic gastropathy is seldom considered in patients presenting with abdominal pain and gastric ulcers. In this case report, we describe a patient with increasing abdominal pain, weight loss, and gastric ulcers, who underwent extensive medical evaluation and whose symptoms were resistant to medical interventions. Finally he was diagnosed with chronic mesenteric ischemia, and his clinical and endoscopic abnormalities resolved after surgical revascularization of both the superior mesenteric artery and the celiac trunk.

  7. [Peptic ulcer disease. Clinical evaluation in 2006].

    PubMed

    Malfertheiner, P; Bellutti, M

    2006-06-01

    Treatment of peptic ulcer disease has undergone a radical change due to the discovery of its main cause, the Helicobacter pylori infection. The management of the chronic infection is now the primary aim. Treatment of peptic ulcer essentially consists of eradicating H. pylori. A current problem is the resistance developed by H. pylori to the antibiotics used in eradication regimen. Ulcers that are induced by nonsteroidal antirheumatic (NSAR) agents and acetylsalicylic acid are gaining in importance. Optimized inhibition of acid secretion with proton pump inhibitors has made it possible to both prevent and cure ulcers in the stomach and duodenum caused by NSAR agents.

  8. Cushing's ulcer: the eponym and his own.

    PubMed

    Wijdicks, Eelco F M

    2011-06-01

    One of the least remembered eponyms associated with Harvey Cushing is "Cushing's ulcer." The basis of this credit is a paper published in 1932 in which Cushing describes patients who postoperatively and unexpectedly died of perforated peptic ulcers. It is one of the first descriptions of a stress ulcer and a treatise on the brain-stomach connection. Harvey Cushing was puzzled by the pathogenesis of these peptic ulcerations and perforations and advanced several theories. The least plausible included the bile-vomiting theory suggesting that hemorrhagic ulceration could be produced by a combination of bile and acid in a patient recovering from the anesthetic. Other theories were stimulation of a parasympathetic center in the diencephalon or a disturbance of vagal centers in the brainstem. Quite surprisingly to Cushing, the Boston Herald implicitly insinuated that Cushing found the cause of ulcers and this claim upset him greatly. It is ironic that Harvey Cushing, in his later years with failing health, developed an ulcer himself. Cushing noted in his correspondence that he felt the agitation over this newspaper clipping caused his later ulcer. The first description of a neurogenic ulcer remains an important medical observation and is a testament to Cushing's broad accomplishments.

  9. Current Medical Management of Peptic Ulcer Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lukie, Bryan E.

    1989-01-01

    Peptic ulceration occurs when the digestive action of gastric secretions overcomes gastroduodenal mucosal defences. The therapeutic strategy used to correct this imbalance uses drugs that either reduce gastric secretion or increase mucosal resistance. Traditional therapies of dietary manipulation and antacid administration no longer play major roles in peptic ulcer therapy. Uncomplicated peptic ulcers respond quite well to drug treatment, although recurrences are common and may require long-term maintenance therapy. Drug-induced gastric ulcers have represented a challenging problem, for which effective therapy is now available. PMID:21249091

  10. Peptic Ulcer Disease in Bangladesh: A Multi-centre Study.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, C K; Khan, M R; Alam, F; Shil, B C; Kabir, M S; Mahmuduzzaman, M; Das, S C; Masud, H; Roy, P K

    2017-01-01

    The incidence of peptic ulcer has steadily declined through out the world. This decreasing trend is also noticeable in this subcontinent. The point prevalence of peptic ulcer (PUD) in Bangladesh was around 15% in eighties. The aim of this study was to see the present prevalence of peptic ulcer at endoscopy and to identify changing trends in the occurrence of peptic ulcer in Bangladesh. This retrospective analysis of the endoscopic records of multiple tertiary referral centres of Dhaka city were done from January 2012 to July 2013. A total of 5608 subjects were the study samples. We included those patients having peptic ulcer in the form of duodenal ulcer, benign gastric ulcer including pre-pyloric ulcer and gastric outlet obstruction due to peptic ulcer. Duodenal ulcer and benign gastric ulcer were found in 415(7.4%) and 184(3.28%) patients respectively and gastric outlet obstruction due to peptic ulcer was found in 23(0.40%) patients.

  11. Accelerated Ulcer Healing and Resistance to Ulcer Recurrence with Gastroprotectants in Rat Model of Acetic Acid-induced Gastric Ulcer

    PubMed Central

    Young Oh, Tae; Ok Ahn, Byung; Jung Jang, Eun; Sang Park, Joo; Jong Park, Sang; Wook Baik, Hyun; Hahm, Ki-Baik

    2008-01-01

    Quality of ulcer healing (QOUH) is defined as ideal ulcer healing featuring with the fine granular ulcer scar, high functional restoration and the resistance to recurrence. This study was designed to compare the rates of QOUH achievement in rat gastric ulcer model between acid suppressant treated group and gastroprotectant treated group accompanied with elucidations of molecular mechanisms. Serosal injection of acetic acids for generating gastric ulcer and intraperitoneal (ip) injection of recombinant interleukin 1-beta (IL-1β) for recurring healed ulcer was done in SD rats. The 72 rats were divided into three groups according to treatment as follows; Group I, no further treatment, Group II, 8 weeks treatment of omeprazole, and Group III, 8 weeks of gastroprotectant treatment. IL-1β was administered for ulcer recurrence after 28 weeks of acetic acid injection. At four weeks after gastric ulcerogenesis, 58.3% (7/12) of active gastric ulcer were converted to healing stage in Group III, but 16.7% (2/12) in Group II and none in Group I, for which significant levels of epidermal growth factor, mucin, and pS2/trefoil peptide1 were contributive to these accelerated healings of Group III. ip injections of rIL-1β (200 µg/kg) at 28 weeks after acetic acid injection led to 100% of ulcer recurrence in Group I and 75.0% in Group II, but only 16.7% of Group III rats showed ulcer recurrence. Significantly attenuated levels of inflammatory cytokines including IL-2, transforming growth factor-alpha (TNF-α), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), nitrotyrosine were responsible for the resistance to ulcer recurrence in Group III. Conclusively, gastroprotectant might be prerequisite in order to achieve ideal QOUH through significant inductions of remodeling. PMID:18545642

  12. Chronic venous ulceration of leg associated with peripheral arterial disease: an underappreciated entity in developing country.

    PubMed

    Nag, Falguni; De, Abhishek; Hazra, Avijit; Chatterjee, Gobinda; Ghosh, Arghyaprasun; Surana, Trupti V

    2014-10-01

    Chronic venous ulcer can often be associated with asymptomatic peripheral arterial disease (PAD), which usually remains undiagnosed adding significantly to the morbidity of these patients. The Ankle-Brachial Pressure Index (ABPI) is suggested for PAD evaluation. Many PAD studies were conducted in western countries, but there is a scarcity of data on the prevalence of PAD in clinical venous ulcer patient in developing countries. We conducted a study in a tertiary care hospital of eastern part of India to find out the prevalence of PAD in venous ulcer patients, and also to find the sensitivity of ABPI as a diagnostic tool in these patients. We evaluated clinically diagnosed patients with venous ulcer using ABPI and Colour Doppler study for the presence of PAD. Possible associations such as age, sex, body mass index (BMI), smoking, hypertension and atherosclerosis were studied. All results were analysed using the software Statistica version 6. PAD was present in 23 (27·71%) patients. Older age, longer duration, smoking, high BMI and hypertension were found to be significantly associated with PAD. A very strong level of agreement was found between venous Doppler and ABPI. Assessment for the presence of PAD is important in all clinically diagnosed venous ulcer patients. ABPI being a simple, non-invasive outpatient department (OPD)-based procedure, can be routinely used in cases of venous ulcer to find out the hidden cases of PAD even in developing countries.

  13. Peculiar Presentation of Ulcerative Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Diab, Amany; Ahmed, Ayman; Abohamad, Samar; Elgendy, Hala

    2016-01-01

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a chronic inflammatory and recurrent disorder that is characterized by bowel inflammation. Among the extraintestinal manifestations (EIMs) that associate UC are the joints and renal manifestations. Joint affection in the form of arthritis can precede the intestinal manifestations of UC. However, renal affection with amyloidosis does not precede the UC diagnosis. Herein, we report a case of 26-year-old male diagnosed with UC after having peripheral arthritis for long time in addition to spondylitis and kidney amyloidosis. PMID:27042365

  14. Skin ulceration due to cement.

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, S M; Tachakra, S S

    1992-01-01

    Despite legislation that requires manufacturers to inform the public about the dangers of contact with cement, severe ulceration from cement contact still occurs. We present a retrospective study of seven patients presenting to this department over a 2-year period. All were male and employed in the building trade, their injuries being sustained whilst at work. The injuries were to the lower limb, often multiple and required a median of seven visits before healing was complete. One required hospital admission and skin grafting. PMID:1449582

  15. Triple gastric peptic ulcer perforation.

    PubMed

    Radojkovic, Milan; Mihajlovic, Suncica; Stojanovic, Miroslav; Stanojevic, Goran; Damnjanovic, Zoran

    2016-03-01

    Patients with advanced or metastatic cancer have compromised nutritional, metabolic, and immune conditions. Nevertheless, little is known about gastroduodenal perforation in cancer patients. Described in the present report is the case of a 41-year old woman with stage IV recurrent laryngeal cancer, who used homeopathic anticancer therapy and who had triple peptic ulcer perforation (PUP) that required surgical repair. Triple gastric PUP is a rare complication. Self-administration of homeopathic anticancer medication should be strongly discouraged when evidence-based data regarding efficacy and toxicity is lacking.

  16. Hypostatic ulcers in 47,XXY Klinefelter's syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Verp, Marion S; Simpson, Joe Leigh; Martin, Alice O

    1983-01-01

    Hypostatic leg ulcers, probably secondary to vascular insufficiency, were observed in two adult men with 47,XXY Klinefelter's syndrome. The association between leg ulcers and 47,XXY Klinefelter's syndrome deserves increased attention because knowledge of the association may alert clinicians to an otherwise unsuspected chromosome abnormality. PMID:6842542

  17. [Treatment of patients with trophic ulcer].

    PubMed

    Karapetian, G É; Iakimov, S V; Mikitin, I L; Kochetova, L V; Pakhomova, R A

    2014-01-01

    The authors present the investigation of inpatient treatment of 137 patients with trophic ulcers of venous aethiology. All the patients were hospitalized in the "Road clinical hospital" on the Krasnoyarsk station. A comparative analysis of treatment results of the patients with trophic ulcers using different medical methods was made. The efficacy of combined use of low-frequency ultrasound and ozone therapy was proved.

  18. Brimonidine Toxicity Secondary to Topical Use for an Ulcerated Hemangioma.

    PubMed

    Gill, Kamalvir; Bayart, Cheryl; Desai, Ritu; Golden, Alex; Raimer, Patricia; Tamburro, Joan

    2016-07-01

    Combigan (Allergan, Irvine, CA) is an ophthalmic solution that combines 0.2% brimonidine, a selective α-2 adrenergic agonist, with 0.5% timolol, a nonselective β-adrenergic antagonist. It is approved for the reduction of intraocular pressure in patients with glaucoma or ocular hypertension. There have been recent reports of successful treatment of superficial infantile hemangiomas (IHs) using Combigan topically. We report the case of a 2-month-old girl who developed life-threatening brimonidine toxicity requiring intubation and mechanical ventilation secondary to central nervous system depression and apnea after topical application to an ulcerated IH.

  19. Volumetric CT measurement of the ischial tuberosities for designing analytical models of decubitus ulcers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, David R., III; Robb, Richard A.

    2006-03-01

    Decubitus ulcers can have a deleterious effect on the quality of life for some patients, particularly those prone to chronic development of skin ulcerations. The bones of the pelvis are particularly relevant as nearly half of all ulcerations observed in the hospital are in the pelvic region. This research focuses on the development of methods to extract the ischium and adjacent anatomy from volumetric CT data of the pelvis which will be used for patient-specific modeling of high-pressure regions and the treatment of associated ulcers. Six volumetric CT scans were evaluated to determine the size and shape of the ischial tuberosities. Using oblique images computed from the CT data, cross-sectional measurements (approximately Superior-Inferior, Anterior-Posterior, and Left-Right) were made to estimate the size of the ischial tuberosities. Similar measurements were made on the ischial ramus. The mean length of the ischial tuberosities (S-I direction) is 12.35 cm. The mean dimension in the L-R and A-P directions are 2.97 cm and 3.78 cm, respectively. For the ischial ramus, the S-I, L-R, and A-P mean lengths are 6.57 cm, 1.72 cm, and 1.49 cm. Due to a limited field of view for the CT datasets, the thickness of the soft tissue (i.e. Gluteus Maximus and subcutaneous fat) could not be measured. Using the bony measurements and adjacent soft tissue measurements, an investigator would be able estimate the posterior pelvis forces for calculations of pressure on the proximal skin, which could then be used to predict ulcerations in patients, or to design new ulcer-inhibiting seating devices. Current efforts are focused on collecting a large cohort of data with both bony and soft tissue measurements. Future work will incorporate the physical properties of the soft tissue to specifically predict high-pressure regions.

  20. Rosiglitazone for Active Ulcerative Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, James D.; Lichtenstein, Gary R.; Deren, Julius J; Sands, Bruce E.; Hanauer, Stephen B.; Katz, Jeffry A.; Lashner, Bret; Present, Daniel H.; Chuai, Shaokun; Ellenberg, Jonas H.; Nessel, Lisa; Wu, Gary D.

    2008-01-01

    Background Thiazolidinedione ligands for the gamma subtype of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARγ), widely used to treat type 2 diabetes mellitus, have been proposed as novel therapies for ulcerative colitis. Methods This multicenter randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial compared the efficacy of rosiglitazone (Avandia™) 4 mg orally twice daily versus placebo twice daily for 12 weeks in 105 patients with mild to moderately active UC. Disease activity was measured with the Mayo Score. The primary endpoint was clinical response (≥ 2 point reduction) at week 12. Clinical remission (Mayo Score ≤2), endoscopic remission, and quality of life were secondary outcomes. Results After 12 weeks of therapy, 23 patients (44%) treated with rosiglitazone and 12 patients (23%) treated with placebo achieved clinical response (p=0.04). Remission was achieved in 9 patients (17%) treated with rosiglitazone and 1 patient (2%) treated with placebo (p=0.01). Endoscopic remission was uncommon in either treatment arm (8% rosiglitazone vs. 2% placebo, p=0.34). Clinical improvement was evident as early as 4 weeks (p=0.049). Quality of life was significantly improved at week 8 (p=0.01) but not at week 4 (p=0.48) or 12 (p=0.14). Serious adverse events were rare. Conclusions Rosiglitazone was efficacious in the treatment of mild to moderately active ulcerative colitis. PMID:18325386

  1. Help-Seeking for Pre-Ulcer and Ulcer Conditions of Mycobacterium ulcerans Disease (Buruli Ulcer) in Ghana

    PubMed Central

    Ackumey, Mercy M.; Gyapong, Margaret; Pappoe, Matilda; Weiss, Mitchell G.

    2011-01-01

    This study examined sociocultural features of help-seeking for Buruli ulcer–affected persons with pre-ulcers and ulcers in a disease-endemic area in Ghana. A sample of 181 respondents were purposively selected. Fisher's exact test was used to compare help-seeking variables for pre-ulcers and ulcers. Qualitative phenomenologic analysis of narratives clarified the meaning and content of selected quantitative help-seeking variables. For pre-ulcers, herbal dressings were used to expose necrotic tissues and subsequently applied as dressings for ulcers. Analgesics and left-over antibiotics were used to ease pain and reduce inflammation. Choices for outside-help were influenced by the perceived effectiveness of the treatment, the closeness of the provider to residences, and family and friends. Health education is required to emphasize the risk of self-medication with antibiotics and the importance of medical treatment for pre-ulcers, and to caution against the use of herbs to expose necrotic tissues, which could lead to co-infections. PMID:22144453

  2. Radionuclide angiography and blood pool imaging to assess skin ulcer healing prognosis in patients with peripheral vascular disease

    SciTech Connect

    Alazraki, N.; Lawrence, P.F.; Syverud, J.B.

    1984-01-01

    Several non-invasive diagnostic techniques including segmental limb blood pressures, skin fluoresence, and photo plethysmography, have been evaluated as predictors of skin ulcer healing in patients with peripheral vascular disease, but none are widely used. Using 20mCi of Tc-99m phosphate compounds, four phase bone scans were obtained, including (1) radionuclide angiogram (2) blood pool image (3) 2 hour and 4-6 hour static images and (4) 24 hour static delayed images. The first two phases were used to assess vacularity to the region of distal extremity ulceration; the last two phases evaluated presence or absence of osteomyelitis. Studies were performed in 30 patients with non-healing ulcers of the lower extremities. Perfusion to the regions of ulceration on images was graded as normal, increased, or reduced with respect to the opposite (presumed normal) limb or some other normal reference area. Hypervascular response was interpreted as good prognosis for healing unless osteomyelitis was present. Clinicians followed patients for 14 days to assess limb healing with optimum care. If there was no improvement, angiography and/or surgery (reconstructive surgery, sympathectomy, or amputation) was done. Results showed: sensitivity for predicting ulcer healing was 94%, specificity 89%. Patients who failed to heal their ulcers showed reduced perfusion, no hypervascular response, or osteomyelitis. Microcirculatory adequacy for ulcer healing appear predictable by this technique.

  3. Anti-ulcer and ulcer healing potentials of Musa sapientum peel extract in the laboratory rodents

    PubMed Central

    Onasanwo, Samuel Adetunji; Emikpe, Benjamin Obukowho; Ajah, Austin Azubuike; Elufioye, Taiwo Olayemi

    2013-01-01

    Background: This study investigated the anti-ulcer and ulcer healing potentials of the methanol extract of Musa sapientum peel in the laboratory rats. Materials and Methods: Methanol extract of the peels on Musa sapientum (MEMS) was evaluated for its anti-ulcer using alcohol-induced, aspirin-induced, and pyloric ligation-induced models, and for its ulcer healing employing acetic acid-induced ulcer models in rats. Results: The findings from this experiment showed that MEMS (50, 100 and 200 mg/kg, b.w.) anti-ulcer and ulcer healing activity (P ≤ 0.05) is dose-dependent. Also, MEMS exhibited healing of the ulcer base in all the treated groups when compared with the control group. Conclusion: The outcomes of this experiment revealed that the anti-ulcer effect of MEMS may be due to its anti-secretory and cyto-protective activity. The healing of the ulcer base might not be unconnected with basic fibroblast growth factors responsible for epithelial regeneration. PMID:23900937

  4. Haemophilus ducreyi Cutaneous Ulcer Strains Are Nearly Identical to Class I Genital Ulcer Strains

    PubMed Central

    Gangaiah, Dharanesh; Webb, Kristen M.; Humphreys, Tricia L.; Fortney, Kate R.; Toh, Evelyn; Tai, Albert; Katz, Samantha S.; Pillay, Allan; Chen, Cheng-Yen; Roberts, Sally A.; Munson, Robert S.; Spinola, Stanley M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Although cutaneous ulcers (CU) in the tropics is frequently attributed to Treponema pallidum subspecies pertenue, the causative agent of yaws, Haemophilus ducreyi has emerged as a major cause of CU in yaws-endemic regions of the South Pacific islands and Africa. H. ducreyi is generally susceptible to macrolides, but CU strains persist after mass drug administration of azithromycin for yaws or trachoma. H. ducreyi also causes genital ulcers (GU) and was thought to be exclusively transmitted by microabrasions that occur during sex. In human volunteers, the GU strain 35000HP does not infect intact skin; wounds are required to initiate infection. These data led to several questions: Are CU strains a new variant of H. ducreyi or did they evolve from GU strains? Do CU strains contain additional genes that could allow them to infect intact skin? Are CU strains susceptible to azithromycin? Methodology/Principal Findings To address these questions, we performed whole-genome sequencing and antibiotic susceptibility testing of 5 CU strains obtained from Samoa and Vanuatu and 9 archived class I and class II GU strains. Except for single nucleotide polymorphisms, the CU strains were genetically almost identical to the class I strain 35000HP and had no additional genetic content. Phylogenetic analysis showed that class I and class II strains formed two separate clusters and CU strains evolved from class I strains. Class I strains diverged from class II strains ~1.95 million years ago (mya) and CU strains diverged from the class I strain 35000HP ~0.18 mya. CU and GU strains evolved under similar selection pressures. Like 35000HP, the CU strains were highly susceptible to antibiotics, including azithromycin. Conclusions/Significance These data suggest that CU strains are derivatives of class I strains that were not recognized until recently. These findings require confirmation by analysis of CU strains from other regions. PMID:26147869

  5. Ulcers

    MedlinePlus

    ... doctors think it happens: Bacteria weaken the protective coating of the stomach and upper small intestine. Acid ... take you to a site outside of KidsHealth's control. About TeensHealth Nemours.org Reading BrightStart! Contact Us ...

  6. Treatment of venous leg ulcers with sulodexide.

    PubMed

    Scondotto, G; Aloisi, D; Ferrari, P; Martini, L

    1999-11-01

    Venous ulcers are still today one of the main socioeconomic problems of medical interest in terms of prevalence, morbidity, and costs to the health service. In the past, various studies have been carried out to identify a systemic pharmacologic treatment able to accelerate venous ulcer healing times, but frequently the results have not been satisfactory. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of sulodexide, a drug with profibrinolytic and antithrombotic activity, in accelerating venous ulcer's healing time. Ninety-four patients (32 men and 62 women), aged 72 years old on average, were randomly distributed between two groups. In the first group ("control group") a standard treatment was applied, which consisted of cleansing by washing with physiological solution and the application of elastic compression with short-extensibility, removable bandages. The second group ("sulodexide group") received the standard treatment plus sulodexide (600 lipoprotein lipase releasing units [LRU] by im route per day for 30 consecutive days, followed by 500 LRU by oral route per day for a further 30 days). After 2 months the venous ulcers were found healed in 15 patients (36%) in the control group and in 30 patients (58%) in the sulodexide group (p = 0.03). The life table showed that the healing times were shorter in the sulodexide group in the first 2 months of treatment. Total healing times amounted to 110 days in the control group and 72 days in the sulodexide group (p = 0.08) and the results were in proportion to the initial severity of the lesion. A significant correlation was noted between ulcer healing times and severity of the initial ulcerous lesion, the duration of the ulcer, and the group the patient belonged to. No correlation was found between age, gender of the patient and the etiology of the ulcer. In conclusion sulodexide was shown effective in the treatment of venous leg ulcers, yielding healing more quickly than the standard treatment.

  7. Healing of ulcers due to cryofibrinogenemia with colchicine and high-dose pentoxifylline.

    PubMed

    Chartier, Molly; Falanga, Vincent

    2009-01-01

    Cryofibrinogenemia is due to the presence of reversibly cold-precipitating plasma proteins and material, consisting mostly of fibrinogen, fibronectin, and fibrin. This condition can be idiopathic or secondary to infection, thromboembolic states, neoplasm, or connective tissue disease. The characteristic lesions of cryofibrinogenemia include purpura and ulcerations. Histologically, the lesions of cryofibrinogenemia demonstrate fibrin thrombi within vessels, with no evidence of vasculitis. Treatment of cryofibrinogenemia should be directed at the underlying disease process, if one can be found. Other treatments have included the anabolic steroid stanozolol, which is presently unavailable, anticoagulants, immunosuppressive agents, plasmapheresis, and the combination of streptokinase and streptodornase. We report a case of a 61-year-old male smoker with a 10-year history of intermittent ulcerations of both legs and feet. Two separate biopsies showed epidermal ulceration and thrombi within superficial dermal vessels without evidence of vasculitis. These findings, together with the presence of elevated plasma cryofibrinogen, led to the diagnosis of cryofibrinogenemia. The patient continued to have ulcerations despite efforts to control his high blood pressure, cold avoidance, local wound care, and treatment with pentoxifylline 800 mg three times daily. However, when colchicine 0.6 mg twice daily was added to the patient's care, this led to rapid healing of his ulcerations. He has remained ulcer free for 2 years taking the combination of colchicine and high-dose pentoxifylline. Efforts to reduce the dose of these agents have repeatedly led to recurrences, and remission has promptly followed re-establishment of the combination. To our knowledge, this is the first report documenting use of the combination of colchicine and high-dose pentoxifylline to successfully treat ulcers due to cryofibrinogenemia.

  8. Sarcoidosis mimicking a venous ulcer: a case report.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Smita S; Romanelli, Paolo; Kirsner, Robert S

    2009-11-01

    Sarcoidosis--a chronic, multisystem disease of unknown etiology characterized by noncaseating granulomas--may cause ulcerative lesions, particularly in African American women. A case of ulcerative sarcoidosis mimicking a venous ulcer is presented. The patient is a 44-year-old African American hypertensive, obese woman with a nonhealing medially based lower leg ulcer of 3 years' duration clinically consistent with a venous ulcer. The ulcer did not heal with compression therapy and pentoxifylline. Subsequent biopsies showed granulomatous inflammation consistent with sarcoidosis. When intralesional triamcinolone was added to compression therapy, the ulcer resolved after 3 months. Given its propensity toward formation on the lower extremities and ulcerative and atrophic appearance, ulcerative sarcoidosis should be considered in the differential diagnosis of a venous ulcer refractory to standard therapy, especially in African American women.

  9. Successes and pitfalls in the healing of neuropathic forefoot ulcerations with the IPOS postoperative shoe.

    PubMed

    Needleman, R L

    1997-07-01

    Unnecessary amputations can be avoided with the healing of foot ulcerations in neuropathic feet. Traditional approaches have relied on relieving plantar and other extrinsic foot pressures. A retrospective review was performed of the office records of patients with Wagner grade 1 and 2 neuropathic forefoot ulcerations who were prescribed an IPOS (Niagara Falls, NY) postoperative shoe. A total of .33 patients were in the chart review. Twenty-three of these patients were located and agreed to participate in a telephone survey. Patients showed a compliance of 78%. Seventy-seven percent of the patients healed their ulcers and wore prescription inserts and extra-depth shoes at a mean of 8 weeks. Seventy-eight percent of our telephone survey patients were either satisfied or satisfied with reservations. Problems or complications from wearing the IPOS postoperative shoe occurred with 38% of all patients.

  10. Therapy of peptic ulcer with semax peptide.

    PubMed

    Ivanikov, I O; Brekhova, M E; Samonina, G E; Myasoedov, N F; Ashmarin, I P

    2002-07-01

    Experiments used is combination with traditional preparations (omeprasole, de-nol, and solcoseril), Semax peptide (Met-Glu-His-Phe-Pro-Gly-Pro) possessing nootropic and neuroprotective activity significantly promoted ulcer healing in patients with refractory peptic ulcers. On day 14 of treatment ulcer healing was observed in 89.5% patients receiving intranasal Semax (1% solution, 2-4 drops 3 times a day for 10 days) vs. 30.8% in the control group. Clinical studies of antiulcer activity of Semax in different combinations with usual antiulcer drugs are needed.

  11. Acid inhibition and peptic ulcer bleeding.

    PubMed

    Štimac, D; Franjić, N; Krznarić, Ž

    2011-01-01

    Peptic ulcer bleeding is one of the most common emergency situations in medicine. Combined pharmacological and endoscopic therapy together with emerging interventional radiological procedures are successfully treating peptic ulcer disease, reserving surgical procedures for only a small portion of patients unresponsive to 'conventional' therapy. Technological advancement has seen a great improvement in the field of endoscopic treatment in the form of various methods of hemostasis. However, pharmacological therapy with proton pump inhibitors still plays the central role in the peptic ulcer bleeding treatment algorithm.

  12. Automatic system for corneal ulcer diagnostic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ventura, Liliane; de Sousa, Sidney J. F.

    1997-05-01

    Corneal Ulcer is a very common disease in agricultural countries and it is responsible for 10% of the blindness causes. One of the main aspects to be observed in these cases is the increasing or decreasing of the affected area. We have been developing an automatic optical system in order to evaluate the affected area (the ulcer) to be implemented in a public hospital (400 patients per week are analyzed). The optical system is implemented in a Slit Lamp and connected to a CCD detector. The image is displayed in a PC monitor by a commercial frame grabber and a dedicated software for determining the area of the ulcer has been developed.

  13. Emerging aspects of Buruli ulcer.

    PubMed

    Thangaraj, Harry S; Phillips, Richard O; Evans, Mark R W; Wansbrough-Jones, Mark H

    2003-08-01

    Buruli ulcer, caused by the pathogen Mycobacterium ulcerans, is a major mycobacteriosis that affects people in scattered foci in the third world. It is amongst the most neglected of diseases in terms of primary healthcare strategies. However, this is changing as the World Health Organization launches a number of major global initiatives. Recent progress includes the unraveling of the genetic structure of the pathogen, examination of the mechanisms of virulence and the role of chemotherapy in disease treatment and prevention of recurrence, together with strategies aimed at reducing the economic burdens placed upon healthcare budgets of poorer nations. This review focuses upon the recent developments and the understanding of the disease, with particular focus on potential chemotherapy.

  14. Biological therapy for ulcerative colitis

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Zubin; Shen, Bo

    2015-01-01

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a major form of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) worldwide. Better understanding of the pathogenesis of UC has led to the development of novel therapeutic agents that target specific mediators of the inflammatory cascade. A number of biological agents have been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of UC and several more are currently in various phases of drug development. The commonly used agents include TNFα antagonists (e.g. infliximab, adalimumab, and golimumab) and anti-integrin agents (vedolizumab). These biological agents have profoundly influenced the management of UC patients, especially those with refractory disease. This paper reviews the currently available knowledge and evidence for the use of various biological agents in the treatment of UC. PMID:25344680

  15. Radiographical evaluation of ulcerative colitis

    PubMed Central

    Deepak, Parakkal; Bruining, David H.

    2014-01-01

    Radiographical modalities have become important diagnostic tools in cases of ulcerative colitis (UC). Imaging can be used non-invasively to determine the extent of involvement, severity of disease and to detect disease-related complications and extra-intestinal inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) manifestations. While abdominal X-rays and barium enemas still retain their relevance in specific clinical settings, the use of computed tomography enterography (CTE) or magnetic resonance enterography (MRE) are now used as first-line investigations to exclude active small bowel disease in IBD patients and can be utilized to detect active colonic inflammation. Additionally, CT colonography and MR colonography are emerging techniques with potential applications in UC. Ultrasonography, leukocyte scintigraphy and positron emission tomography are novel abdominal imaging modalities currently being explored for IBD interrogations. This plethora of radiological imaging options has become a vital component of UC assessments. PMID:24843072

  16. [Caesarean section for ulcerative colitis].

    PubMed

    Unda-Franco, Eduardo; Ramírez-Avilés, Eva María; Moreno-de Gante, Leonardo; González, Quintín Héctor

    2011-02-01

    We present a case of a 35-year-old patient with diagnosis of ulcerative colitis that presented failure and complications associated with medical treatment; with a report of a colonoscopy and biopsy of pancolitis with severe activity. The patient was submitted to laparoscopic restorative total proctocolectomy with ileal "J" pouch anal anastomosis. Two months later the ileostomy was reversed. The patient received progesterone at the same time she was receiving immunosuppressive drugs. This was suspended two months after the second colon surgery. The patient did not require treatment with ovulation induction to achieve pregnancy. At the fourth month of gestation, the patient developed a perianal abscess, which was successfully drained. After multidisciplinary assessment in week 38 of gestation, it was decided to perform cesarean birth as a way to not affect the ileal pouch and the anastomosis of the digestive tract. At present time, the patient has had no further complications.

  17. A large Italian observational multicentre study on vascular ulcers of the lower limbs (Studio Ulcere Vascolari).

    PubMed

    Apollonio, Alessandro; Antignani, Pier L; Di Salvo, Michelangelo; Failla, Giacomo; Guarnera, Giorgio; Mosti, Giovanni; Ricci, Elia

    2016-02-01

    An observational study of 2 years was promoted by the Italian Association for Cutaneous Ulcers (AIUC) in order to monitor the epidemiology of leg ulcers, the trend of healing and the more frequent therapeutic approaches in lower limb ulcers. Fifty-nine sites in 14 different Italian regions involved in the study, with 1333 enrolled patients (1163 patients fully evaluated and followed up for 9 months). A prevalence of females (62%) was observed with a mean age of 70 years and a high rate of hypertension (62%), diabetes (38%) and obesity (29%). Venous ulcer was most frequent (55%), followed by mixed (25%) and diabetic (8·3%) ulcers. Basically, all patients received a local therapy (LT) (compression and advanced local therapies), while 63% of patients have an associated systemic pharmaceutical treatment. Ulcer healing rates progressively increased throughout the study and despite the type of observational study does not allow conclusions on the treatment, it was observed that the patients receiving additional systemic drugs were associated with a more rapid acceleration of healing rates of ulcers compared to LT alone (3 months: 39·7% versus 29·2%; 6 months: 62·0% versus 47·0%; 9 months: 74·7% versus 63·8%). In particular, the Studio Ulcere Vascolari (SUV) study showed that a combination treatment with sulodexide and compression therapy allows for a greater increase in the healing rates in venous ulcers.

  18. Small bowel ulcerative lesions are common in elderly NSAIDs users with peptic ulcer bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Tsibouris, Panagiotis; Kalantzis, Chissostomos; Apostolopoulos, Periklis; Zalonis, Antonios; Isaacs, Peter Edward Thomas; Hendrickse, Mark; Alexandrakis, Georgios

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To determine the frequency of small bowel ulcerative lesions in patients with peptic ulcer and define the significance of those lesions. METHODS: In our prospective study, 60 consecutive elderly patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding from a peptic ulceration (cases) and 60 matched patients with a non-bleeding peptic ulcer (controls) underwent small bowel capsule endoscopy, after a negative colonoscopy (compulsory in our institution). Controls were evaluated for non-bleeding indications. Known or suspected chronic inflammatory conditions and medication that could harm the gut were excluded. During capsule endoscopy, small bowel ulcerative lesions were counted thoroughly and classified according to Graham classification. Other small bowel lesions were also recorded. Peptic ulcer bleeding was controlled endoscopically, when adequate, proton pump inhibitors were started in both cases and controls, and Helicobacter pylori eradicated whenever present. Both cases and controls were followed up for a year. In case of bleeding recurrence upper gastrointestinal endoscopy was repeated and whenever it remained unexplained it was followed by repeat colonoscopy and capsule endoscopy. RESULTS: Forty (67%) cases and 18 (30%) controls presented small bowel erosions (P = 0.0001), while 22 (37%) cases and 4 (8%) controls presented small bowel ulcers (P < 0.0001). Among non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) consumers, 39 (95%) cases and 17 (33%) controls presented small bowel erosions (P < 0.0001), while 22 (55%) cases and 4 (10%) controls presented small bowel ulcers (P < 0.0001). Small bowel ulcerative lesions were infrequent among patients not consuming NSAIDs. Mean entry hemoglobin was 9.3 (SD = 1.4) g/dL in cases with small bowel ulcerative lesions and 10.5 (SD = 1.3) g/dL in those without (P = 0.002). Cases with small bowel ulcers necessitate more units of packed red blood cells. During their hospitalization, 6 (27%) cases with small bowel ulcers presented

  19. Oxandrolone: Pressure (Decubitis) Ulcers in Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Generali, Joyce A.; Cada, Dennis J.

    2013-01-01

    This Hospital Pharmacy feature is extracted from Off-Label Drug Facts, a publication available from Wolters Kluwer Health. Off-Label Drug Facts is a practitioner-oriented resource for information about specific drug uses that are unapproved by the US Food and Drug Administration. This new guide to the literature enables the health care professional or clinician to quickly identify published studies on off-label uses and determine if a specific use is rational in a patient care scenario. References direct the reader to the full literature for more comprehensive information before patient care decisions are made. Direct questions or comments regarding Off-Label Drug Uses to jgeneral@ku.edu. PMID:24421532

  20. Restoring Psychology's Role in Peptic Ulcer

    PubMed Central

    Overmier, J Bruce; Murison, Robert

    2013-01-01

    This paper reviews the history of the transition from the belief that gastrointestinal ulcers are caused primarily by psychological factors to the current state of belief that they are caused primarily by infection and argues that neither is fully accurate. We argue that psychological factors play a significant role as predisposing to vulnerability, modulating of precipitation, and sustaining of gastric ulceration. We review data that challenge the assumption of a simple infectious disease model and adduce recent preclinical data that confirm the predisposing, modulatory, and sustaining roles for psychological factors. We note that others, too, are now challenging the adequacy of the contemporary simple bacterial infection model. We hope to replace the competition between psychology and medicine with cooperation in understanding and treating patients suffering gastric ulceration and ulcer. PMID:23457084

  1. Crohn's Disease and Ulcerative Colitis: Emotional Factors

    MedlinePlus

    ... correct this common and erroneous impression. ARE CERTAIN PERSONALITY TYPES MORE PRONE TO DEVELOP ULCERATIVE COLITIS OR ... of medical disorders that were characteristic of certain personality traits and a specific biological predisposition. The latest ...

  2. Perforated peptic ulcer in an adolescent girl.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Shepard; Edden, Yair; Orkin, Boris; Erlichman, Matityahu

    2012-07-01

    A perforated peptic ulcer in a child is a rare entity. Severe abdominal pain in an ill-appearing child with a rigid abdomen and possibly with signs of shock is the typical presenting feature of this life-threatening complication of peptic ulcer disease. We present a case of a 14.5-year-old adolescent girl who developed abdominal and shoulder pain that resolved after 1 day. She was then completely well for 2 days until the abdominal and shoulder pain recurred. On examination, she appeared well, but in pain. A chest radiograph revealed a large pneumoperitoneum. She underwent emergent laparoscopic omental patch repair of a perforated ulcer on the anterior wall of her stomach. Result of a urea breath test to detect Helicobacter pylori was negative. The differential diagnosis of pneumoperitoneum in children is discussed, as are childhood perforated peptic ulcer in general, and the unique clinical features present in this case in particular.

  3. Tannins, Peptic Ulcers and Related Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    de Jesus, Neyres Zinia Taveira; de Souza Falcão, Heloina; Gomes, Isis Fernandes; de Almeida Leite, Thiago Jose; de Morais Lima, Gedson Rodrigues; Barbosa-Filho, Jose Maria; Tavares, Josean Fechine; da Silva, Marcelo Sobral; de Athayde-Filho, Petrônio Filgueiras; Batista, Leonia Maria

    2012-01-01

    This review of the current literature aims to study correlations between the chemical structure and gastric anti-ulcer activity of tannins. Tannins are used in medicine primarily because of their astringent properties. These properties are due to the fact that tannins react with the tissue proteins with which they come into contact. In gastric ulcers, this tannin-protein complex layer protects the stomach by promoting greater resistance to chemical and mechanical injury or irritation. Moreover, in several experimental models of gastric ulcer, tannins have been shown to present antioxidant activity, promote tissue repair, exhibit anti Helicobacter pylori effects, and they are involved in gastrointestinal tract anti-inflammatory processes. The presence of tannins explains the anti-ulcer effects of many natural products. PMID:22489149

  4. Tannins, peptic ulcers and related mechanisms.

    PubMed

    de Jesus, Neyres Zinia Taveira; de Souza Falcão, Heloina; Gomes, Isis Fernandes; de Almeida Leite, Thiago Jose; de Morais Lima, Gedson Rodrigues; Barbosa-Filho, Jose Maria; Tavares, Josean Fechine; da Silva, Marcelo Sobral; de Athayde-Filho, Petrônio Filgueiras; Batista, Leonia Maria

    2012-01-01

    This review of the current literature aims to study correlations between the chemical structure and gastric anti-ulcer activity of tannins. Tannins are used in medicine primarily because of their astringent properties. These properties are due to the fact that tannins react with the tissue proteins with which they come into contact. In gastric ulcers, this tannin-protein complex layer protects the stomach by promoting greater resistance to chemical and mechanical injury or irritation. Moreover, in several experimental models of gastric ulcer, tannins have been shown to present antioxidant activity, promote tissue repair, exhibit anti Helicobacter pylori effects, and they are involved in gastrointestinal tract anti-inflammatory processes. The presence of tannins explains the anti-ulcer effects of many natural products.

  5. Peripheral Ulcerative Keratitis with Pyoderma Gangrenosum

    PubMed Central

    Imbernón-Moya, Adrián; Vargas-Laguna, Elena; Aguilar, Antonio; Gallego, Miguel Ángel; Vergara, Claudia; Nistal, María Fernanda

    2015-01-01

    Pyoderma gangrenosum is an unusual necrotizing noninfective and ulcerative skin disease whose cause is unknown. Ophthalmic involvement in pyoderma gangrenosum is an unusual event. Only a few cases have been reported, from which we can highlight scleral, corneal, and orbital cases. Peripheral ulcerative keratitis is a process which destroys the peripheral cornea. Its cause is still unknown although it is often associated with autoimmune conditions. Pyoderma gangrenosum should be included in the differential diagnosis of peripheral ulcerative keratitis. Early recognition of these manifestations can vary the prognosis by applying the appropriate treatment. We introduce a 70-year-old woman who suffered pyoderma gangrenosum associated with peripheral ulcerative keratitis in her left eye. The patient's skin lesions and peripheral keratitis responded successfully to systemic steroids and cyclosporine A. PMID:26527531

  6. Automatic analysis of the corneal ulcer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ventura, Liliane; Chiaradia, Caio; Faria de Sousa, Sidney J.

    1999-06-01

    A very common disease in agricultural countries is the corneal ulcer. Particularly in the public hospitals, several patients come every week presenting this kind of pathology. One of the most important features to diagnose the regression of the disease is the determination of the vanishing of the affected area. An automatic system (optical system and software), attached to a Slit Lamp, has been developed to determine automatically the area of the ulcer and to follow up its regression. The clinical procedure to isolate the ulcer is still done, but the measuring time is fast enough to not cause discomfort to the patient as the traditional evaluation does. The system has been used in the last 6 months in a hospital that has about 80 patients per week presenting corneal ulcer. The patients follow up (which is an indispensable criteria for the cure of the disease) has been improved by the system and has guaranteed the treatment success.

  7. Automatic system for corneal ulcer diagnostic: II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ventura, Liliane; Chiaradia, Caio; Faria de Sousa, Sidney J.

    1998-06-01

    Corneal Ulcer is a deepithelization of the cornea and it is a very common disease in agricultural countries. The clinician most used parameter in order to identify a favorable ulcer evolution is the regress of the affected area. However, this kind of evaluation is subjective, once just the horizontal and vertical axes are measured based on a graduated scale and the affected area is estimated. Also, the registration of the disease is made by photographs. In order to overcome the subjectiveness and to register the images in a more accessible way (hard disks, floppy disks, etc.), we have developed an automatic system in order to evaluate the affected area (the ulcer). An optical system is implemented in a Slit Lamp (SL) and connected to a CCD detector. The image is displayed in PC monitor by a commercial frame grabber and a dedicated software for determining the area of the ulcer (precision of 20 mm) has been developed.

  8. Etiopathogenetic principles and peptic ulcer disease classification.

    PubMed

    Tytgat, G N J

    2011-01-01

    Ulceration corresponds to tissue loss, breaching the muscularis mucosae. When ulcers develop in the acid-peptic environment of the gastroduodenum, they are traditionally called peptic ulcer (PUD). Ulcers never develop spontaneously in a healthy gastroduodenal mucosa. Ulceration is the ultimate consequence of a disequilibrium between aggressive injurious factors and defensive mucosa-protective factors. The dominant aggressors are strong acid and high proteolytic (pepsin) activity in gastric secretions. The dominant defensors are the phospholipid surfactant layer, covering the mucus bicarbonate gel, the mucus bicarbonate layer covering the epithelium, the tight junctional structures between the epithelial cells, restricting proton permeability, and the epithelial trefoil peptides, contributing to healing after injury. Initially, acid-peptic aggression was considered the overwhelming cause of PUD, supported by the pioneering work of Schwartz, launching the dictum 'no acid, no ulcer'. This led to the universal therapy directed against intragastric acidity, also interfering with peptic activity when the pH was >4. The therapeutic sequence went from large doses of antacids to H(2)-receptor antagonists and finally to proton pump inhibitors (PPIs). The longer the intragastric pH was >3, the quicker ulcer healing was seen. Unfortunately, ulcers often recurred after stopping therapy, demanding maintenance therapy to keep the ulcers healed and to prevent the need for surgery (vagotomy, partial gastric resection). Later on, the emphasis gradually shifted to weakening/failing of the defensive factors, raising the vulnerability of the gastroduodenal mucosa to luminal secretions. Leading injurious mechanisms jeopardizing the mucosal integrity are numerous: infections, especially Helicobacter pylori, drug-induced injury, particularly acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), physicochemical and caustic injury, vascular disorders, interfering

  9. Using an alternating pressure mattress to offload heels in ICU.

    PubMed

    Masterson, Sarah; Younger, Caroline

    2014-08-12

    The heel continues to be one of the most common sites of pressure damage. This article reviews the anatomy and physiology of the heel and explores significant risk factors, including those found in the critically ill patient. Interventions to prevent heel pressure ulceration by offloading the heel are explored. An evaluation of the Nimbus 4 alternating pressure mattress was undertaken within an intensive care unit (ICU) to consider the efficacy of its unique Wound Valve Technology, which is designed to help prevent heel pressure ulceration. During the evaluation period none of the patients using the Nimbus 4 developed a pressure ulcer. Staff observed that the Wound Valves provided effective pressure redistribution and, although the cells frequently needed to be adjusted, patient safety was maintained throughout. The Wound Valves were most effective on patients who were less prone to voluntary movement.

  10. The economics of adalimumab for ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Xie, Feng

    2015-06-01

    Ulcerative colitis is a chronic inflammatory disease, characterized by diffuse mucosal inflammation in the colon. Adalimumab, as a TNF-α blocker, offers a safe and efficacious treatment option for patients with moderate to severe ulcerative colitis and refractory or intolerant to conventional medications; however, its cost-effectiveness profile has not yet been well established. Future economic evaluations should choose appropriate comparators in the context of target-reimbursement decision making and focus on cost-effectiveness over a long time horizon.

  11. [Cycloferon in treating duodenal ulcers in rats].

    PubMed

    Bul'on, V V; Khnychenko, L K; Sapronov, N S; Kuznetsova, N N; Anikin, V B; arinenko, R Iu; Kovalenko, A L; Alekseeva, L E

    2001-01-01

    The possibility of using cycloferon (interferon inductor) for a complex treatment (in combination with the main drug solcoseryl possessing pronounced therapeutic properties) of duodenum ulcers was experimentally studied in male rats. The experiments showed a considerable difference in the interferon status of animals with model duodenum ulcers treated with cycloferon, solcoseryl, their combination, and placebo (control). The healing effect of solcoseryl administered in combination with cycloferon exceeded that of each component administered separately.

  12. 21 CFR 880.5550 - Alternating pressure air flotation mattress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... body pressure. The device is used to prevent and treat decubitus ulcers (bed sores). (b) Classification... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Alternating pressure air flotation mattress. 880... Personal Use Therapeutic Devices § 880.5550 Alternating pressure air flotation mattress. (a)...

  13. Treatment and prognosis in peptic ulcer bleeding.

    PubMed

    Laursen, Stig Borbjerg

    2014-02-01

    Peptic ulcer bleeding is a frequent cause of admission. Despite several advances in treatment the 30-day mortality seems unchanged at a level around 11%. Use of risk scoring systems is shown to be advantageous in the primary assessment of patients presenting with symptoms of peptic ulcer bleeding. Studies performed outside Denmark have demonstrated that use of risk scoring systems facilitates identification of low-risk patients suitable for outpatient management. Nevertheless, these systems have not been implemented for routine use in Denmark. This is mainly explained by concerns about the external validity due to considerable inter-country variation in patients' characteristics. In recent years, transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) has become increasingly used for achievement of haemostasis in patients with peptic ulcer bleeding not responding to endoscopic therapy. As rebleeding is associated with poor outcome TAE could, in theory, also be beneficial as a supplementary treatment in patients with ulcer bleeding responding to endoscopic therapy. This has not been examined previously. Several studies have concluded that peptic ulcer bleeding is associated with excess long-term mortality. These findings are, however, questioned as the studies were based on life-table analysis, unmatched control groups, or did not perform adequate adjustment for comorbidity. Treatment with blood transfusion is, among patients undergoing cardiac bypass surgery, shown to increase the long-term mortality. Despite frequent use of blood transfusion in treatment of peptic ulcer bleeding a possible adverse effect of on long-term survival has not been examined in these patients.

  14. Autonomic neuropathy and diabetic foot ulceration.

    PubMed

    Edmonds, M E; Nicolaides, K H; Watkins, P J

    1986-01-01

    Autonomic function was studied in three groups of insulin-dependent diabetic patients. Heart rate changes during deep breathing and on standing were significantly less in 28 patients with a recent history of foot ulceration compared with 40 patients with peripheral neuropathy but without ulceration (p less than 0.001) and 54 patients without neuropathy (p less than 0.001). Sympathetic function was assessed in 36 of these patients from peripheral arterial diastolic flow patterns obtained by Doppler ultrasound measurements and expressed as the pulsatility index (PI). Patients with a history of ulceration (n = 10) showed considerably increased diastolic flow (PI = 4.28 +/- 0.53, mean +/- S.E.M.) compared with 12 neuropathic patients with no history of ulceration (PI = 7.80 +/- 0.68, p less than 0.002) and 14 patients without neuropathy (PI = 9.55 +/- 0.89, p less than 0.002). Severely abnormal autonomic function occurs in association with neuropathic foot ulceration, but patients without ulcers have lesser degrees of autonomic neuropathy, thus a causal relationship has not been established.

  15. History of Helicobacter pylori, duodenal ulcer, gastric ulcer and gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Graham, David Y

    2014-05-14

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection underlies gastric ulcer disease, gastric cancer and duodenal ulcer disease. The disease expression reflects the pattern and extent of gastritis/gastric atrophy (i.e., duodenal ulcer with non-atrophic and gastric ulcer and gastric cancer with atrophic gastritis). Gastric and duodenal ulcers and gastric cancer have been known for thousands of years. Ulcers are generally non-fatal and until the 20th century were difficult to diagnose. However, the presence and pattern of gastritis in past civilizations can be deduced based on the diseases present. It has been suggested that gastric ulcer and duodenal ulcer both arose or became more frequent in Europe in the 19th century. Here, we show that gastric cancer and gastric ulcer were present throughout the 17th to 19th centuries consistent with atrophic gastritis being the predominant pattern, as it proved to be when it could be examined directly in the late 19th century. The environment before the 20th century favored acquisition of H. pylori infection and atrophic gastritis (e.g., poor sanitation and standards of living, seasonal diets poor in fresh fruits and vegetables, especially in winter, vitamin deficiencies, and frequent febrile infections in childhood). The latter part of the 19th century saw improvements in standards of living, sanitation, and diets with a corresponding decrease in rate of development of atrophic gastritis allowing duodenal ulcers to become more prominent. In the early 20th century physician's believed they could diagnose ulcers clinically and that the diagnosis required hospitalization for "surgical disease" or for "Sippy" diets. We show that while H. pylori remained common and virulent in Europe and the United States, environmental changes resulted in changes of the pattern of gastritis producing a change in the manifestations of H. pylori infections and subsequently to a rapid decline in transmission and a rapid decline in all H. pylori-related diseases.

  16. History of Helicobacter pylori, duodenal ulcer, gastric ulcer and gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Graham, David Y

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection underlies gastric ulcer disease, gastric cancer and duodenal ulcer disease. The disease expression reflects the pattern and extent of gastritis/gastric atrophy (i.e., duodenal ulcer with non-atrophic and gastric ulcer and gastric cancer with atrophic gastritis). Gastric and duodenal ulcers and gastric cancer have been known for thousands of years. Ulcers are generally non-fatal and until the 20th century were difficult to diagnose. However, the presence and pattern of gastritis in past civilizations can be deduced based on the diseases present. It has been suggested that gastric ulcer and duodenal ulcer both arose or became more frequent in Europe in the 19th century. Here, we show that gastric cancer and gastric ulcer were present throughout the 17th to 19th centuries consistent with atrophic gastritis being the predominant pattern, as it proved to be when it could be examined directly in the late 19th century. The environment before the 20th century favored acquisition of H. pylori infection and atrophic gastritis (e.g., poor sanitation and standards of living, seasonal diets poor in fresh fruits and vegetables, especially in winter, vitamin deficiencies, and frequent febrile infections in childhood). The latter part of the 19th century saw improvements in standards of living, sanitation, and diets with a corresponding decrease in rate of development of atrophic gastritis allowing duodenal ulcers to become more prominent. In the early 20th century physician’s believed they could diagnose ulcers clinically and that the diagnosis required hospitalization for “surgical disease” or for “Sippy” diets. We show that while H. pylori remained common and virulent in Europe and the United States, environmental changes resulted in changes of the pattern of gastritis producing a change in the manifestations of H. pylori infections and subsequently to a rapid decline in transmission and a rapid decline in all H. pylori

  17. Ischemic ulcers - self-care

    MedlinePlus

    ... that can cause ischemic wounds include: Diseases that cause inflammation, such as lupus High blood pressure High cholesterol levels Chronic kidney disease Blockage of the lymph vessels , which causes fluid ...

  18. Literature review on the management of diabetic foot ulcer

    PubMed Central

    Yazdanpanah, Leila; Nasiri, Morteza; Adarvishi, Sara

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic foot ulcer (DFU) is the most costly and devastating complication of diabetes mellitus, which affect 15% of diabetic patients during their lifetime. Based on National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence strategies, early effective management of DFU can reduce the severity of complications such as preventable amputations and possible mortality, and also can improve overall quality of life. The management of DFU should be optimized by using a multidisciplinary team, due to a holistic approach to wound management is required. Based on studies, blood sugar control, wound debridement, advanced dressings and offloading modalities should always be a part of DFU management. Furthermore, surgery to heal chronic ulcer and prevent recurrence should be considered as an essential component of management in some cases. Also, hyperbaric oxygen therapy, electrical stimulation, negative pressure wound therapy, bio-engineered skin and growth factors could be used as adjunct therapies for rapid healing of DFU. So, it’s suggested that with appropriate patient education encourages them to regular foot care in order to prevent DFU and its complications. PMID:25685277

  19. Effects of a continuous lateral turning device on pressure relief

    PubMed Central

    Do, Nam Ho; Kim, Deog Young; Kim, Jung-Hoon; Choi, Jong Hyun; Joo, So Young; Kang, Na Kyung; Baek, Yoon Su

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine the pressure-relieving effects of a continuous lateral turning device on common pressure ulcer sites. [Subjects] Twenty-four healthy adults participated. [Methods] The design of our continuous lateral turning device was motivated by the need for an adequate pressure-relieving device for immobile and/or elderly people. The procedure of manual repositioning is embodied in our continuous lateral turning device. The interface pressure and time were measured, and comfort grade was evaluated during sessions of continuous lateral turning at 0°, 15°, 30°, and 45°. We quantified the pressure-relieving effect using peak pressure, mean pressure, and pressure time integration. [Results] Participants demonstrated pressure time integration values below the pressure-time threshold at 15°, 30°, and 45° at all the common pressure ulcer sites. Moreover, the most effective angles for pressure relief at the common pressure ulcer sites were 30° at the occiput, 15° at the left scapula, 45° at the right scapula, 45° at the sacrum, 15° at the right heel, and 30° at the left heel. However, angles greater than 30° induced discomfort. [Conclusion] Continuous lateral turning with our specially designed device effectively relieved the pressure of targeted sites. Moreover, the suggested angles of continuous lateral turning can be used to relieve pressure at targeted sites. PMID:27065531

  20. Effects of a continuous lateral turning device on pressure relief.

    PubMed

    Do, Nam Ho; Kim, Deog Young; Kim, Jung-Hoon; Choi, Jong Hyun; Joo, So Young; Kang, Na Kyung; Baek, Yoon Su

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine the pressure-relieving effects of a continuous lateral turning device on common pressure ulcer sites. [Subjects] Twenty-four healthy adults participated. [Methods] The design of our continuous lateral turning device was motivated by the need for an adequate pressure-relieving device for immobile and/or elderly people. The procedure of manual repositioning is embodied in our continuous lateral turning device. The interface pressure and time were measured, and comfort grade was evaluated during sessions of continuous lateral turning at 0°, 15°, 30°, and 45°. We quantified the pressure-relieving effect using peak pressure, mean pressure, and pressure time integration. [Results] Participants demonstrated pressure time integration values below the pressure-time threshold at 15°, 30°, and 45° at all the common pressure ulcer sites. Moreover, the most effective angles for pressure relief at the common pressure ulcer sites were 30° at the occiput, 15° at the left scapula, 45° at the right scapula, 45° at the sacrum, 15° at the right heel, and 30° at the left heel. However, angles greater than 30° induced discomfort. [Conclusion] Continuous lateral turning with our specially designed device effectively relieved the pressure of targeted sites. Moreover, the suggested angles of continuous lateral turning can be used to relieve pressure at targeted sites.

  1. Prevention and treatment of diabetic foot ulcers.

    PubMed

    Lim, Jonathan Zhang Ming; Ng, Natasha Su Lynn; Thomas, Cecil

    2017-03-01

    The rising prevalence of diabetes estimated at 3.6 million people in the UK represents a major public health and socioeconomic burden to our National Health Service. Diabetes and its associated complications are of a growing concern. Diabetes-related foot complications have been identified as the single most common cause of morbidity among diabetic patients. The complicating factor of underlying peripheral vascular disease renders the majority of diabetic foot ulcers asymptomatic until latter evidence of non-healing ulcers become evident. Therefore, preventative strategies including annual diabetic foot screening and diabetic foot care interventions facilitated through a multidisciplinary team have been implemented to enable early identification of diabetic patients at high risk of diabetic foot complications. The National Diabetes Foot Care Audit reported significant variability and deficiencies of care throughout England and Wales, with emphasis on change in the structure of healthcare provision and commissioning, improvement of patient education and availability of healthcare access, and emphasis on preventative strategies to reduce morbidities and mortality of this debilitating disease. This review article aims to summarise major risk factors contributing to the development of diabetic foot ulcers. It also considers the key evidence-based strategies towards preventing diabetic foot ulcer. We discuss tools used in risk stratification and classifications of foot ulcer.

  2. Bilobed flaps for nonhealing ulcer treatment.

    PubMed

    Yetkin, Haluk; Kanatli, Ulunay; Oztürk, Akif Muhtar; Ozalay, Metin

    2003-09-01

    Healing of round ulcers may be difficult particularly in the plantar area. Rigidity and thickness of the plantar skin do not allow fusiform excision and primary suturing. The bilobed flap is a simple reconstructive technique principally used to repair substantial defects in the facial region. The authors' experience with this local flap in the foot is presented with good short-term results. Between 1995 and 1998, five female and seven male neuropathic foot patients with round plantar ulcers were treated with bilobed flaps. The average age of the patients was 50 (range, 15-76). The average size of the ulcers was 1.6 cm (1-3.2 cm). Debridement and orthotic insoles were used at least for 3 months before considering bilobed flaps. Seven patients were diagnosed as type II diabetes mellitus, four patients had cerebral palsy, and another patient had meningomyelocele. The minimal follow-up period was 1 year (average, 19.5 months). The only complication was wound dehiscence at the lateral side of the heel in a type II diabetic. Subsequently, this complicated ulcer was managed with a sliding flap and skin graft without further problem. The study concluded that nonhealing foot ulcers can be effectively treated with a bilobed skin flap of healthy tissues rotated from nonweightbearing parts of the sole.

  3. Pyoderma vegetans developed on chronic leg ulcer.

    PubMed

    Molodoi, Andreea Dana; Dimitriu, Andreea; Andronic, Cătălina Diana; Stoleriu, Gabriela; Bădescu, Aida; Boda, D; Brănisteanu, Daciana Elena

    2015-01-01

    Pyoderma vegetans is a rare disorder that more commonly affects middle-aged persons, with a male predilection. It is characterized by vegetating lesions that coalescence into a plaque with eroded surface, covered by purulent discharge and crusts. The etiology of this disease is not known with certainty, but it is often associated with bacterial infections in immunocompromised patients. We report the case of a 73-year-old men who presented to the Iasi Dermatology Clinic with a large, irregular, relatively well-defined dermohypodermic ulcer, with infiltrated sclerosing borders, accompanied by pain, with the floor covered in the Northern part by a proliferative, vegetative bleeding area, and the rest by a yellowish secretion and cellular debris, located on the left leg. Bacteriological examination of ulcer secretion identified Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Anatomopathological examination confirmed the development of Pyoderma vegetans on chronic leg ulcer. Under specific treatment for chronic leg ulcer and eradication of infectious focus the outcome was favorable both in terms of trophic ulcer scar- ring and Pyoderma vegetans healing.

  4. Rare cause of odynophagia: Giant esophageal ulcer.

    PubMed

    Veroux, Massimiliano; Aprile, Giuseppe; Amore, Francesca F; Corona, Daniela; Giaquinta, Alessia; Veroux, Pierfrancesco

    2016-04-14

    Gastrointestinal complications are a frequent cause of morbidity after transplantation and may affect up to 40% of kidney transplant recipients. Here we report a rare case of idiopathic giant esophageal ulcer in a kidney transplant recipient. A 37-year-old female presented with a one-week history of odynophagia and weight loss. Upon admission, the patient presented cold sores, and a quantitative cytomegalovirus polymerase chain reaction was positive (10(5) copies/mL). An upper endoscopy demonstrated the presence of a giant ulcer. Serological test and tissue biopsies were unable to demonstrate an infectious origin of the ulcer. Immunosuppression was reduced and everolimus was introduced. An empirical i.v. therapy with acyclovir was started, resulting in a dramatic improvement in symptoms and complete healing of the ulcer. Only two cases of idiopathic giant esophageal ulcer in kidney transplant recipients have been reported in the literature; in both cases, steroid therapy was successful without recurrence of symptoms or endoscopic findings. However, this report suggests that correction of immune imbalance is mandatory to treat such a rare complication.

  5. Bronchial hypersecretion, chronic airflow limitation, and peptic ulcer.

    PubMed

    Kauffmann, F; Brille, D

    1981-11-01

    Men with and men without a history of peptic ulcers were compared using respiratory symptoms and spirographic measurements taken from data recorded in an epidemiologic study. Among the 1,049 men examined, 7% reported a history of peptic ulcer. A clear relationship appeared between bronchial hypersecretion and peptic ulcers. It persisted after adjustment for age, smoking habits, social class, and country of origin. Men with ulcers inhaled tobacco smoke more often. Ulcers, smoking, and chronic phlegm were independently related to a lower body build index. It seems that the relationship between smoking and ulcers was greater among men with chronic phlegm, and it is postulated that peptic ulcers and "chronic bronchitis" might be related to a "common secretory disorder." After adjustment for age, men with a history of peptic ulcers had, not a lower FEV1, but a higher vital capacity. A slightly lower FEV1/VC ratio cannot in such cases be considered as an index of chronic airflow limitation.

  6. Assessment of foot perfusion in patients with a diabetic foot ulcer.

    PubMed

    Forsythe, Rachael O; Hinchliffe, Robert J

    2016-01-01

    Assessment of foot perfusion is a vital step in the management of patients with diabetic foot ulceration, in order to understand the risk of amputation and likelihood of wound healing. Underlying peripheral artery disease is a common finding in patients with foot ulceration and is associated with poor outcomes. Assessment of foot perfusion should therefore focus on identifying the presence of peripheral artery disease and to subsequently estimate the effect this may have on wound healing. Assessment of perfusion can be difficult because of the often complex, diffuse and distal nature of peripheral artery disease in patients with diabetes, as well as poor collateralisation and heavy vascular calcification. Conventional methods of assessing tissue perfusion in the peripheral circulation may be unreliable in patients with diabetes, and it may therefore be difficult to determine the extent to which poor perfusion contributes to foot ulceration. Anatomical data obtained on cross-sectional imaging is important but must be combined with measurements of tissue perfusion (such as transcutaneous oxygen tension) in order to understand the global and regional perfusion deficit present in a patient with diabetic foot ulceration. Ankle-brachial pressure index is routinely used to screen for peripheral artery disease, but its use in patients with diabetes is limited in the presence of neuropathy and medial arterial calcification. Toe pressure index may be more useful because of the relative sparing of pedal arteries from medial calcification but may not always be possible in patients with ulceration. Fluorescence angiography is a non-invasive technique that can provide rapid quantitative information about regional tissue perfusion; capillaroscopy, iontophoresis and hyperspectral imaging may also be useful in assessing physiological perfusion but are not widely available. There may be a future role for specialized perfusion imaging of these patients, including magnetic resonance

  7. Ulcerative colitis: a challenge to surgeons.

    PubMed

    Parray, Fazl Q; Wani, Mohd L; Malik, Ajaz A; Wani, Shadab N; Bijli, Akram H; Irshad, Ifat; Nayeem-Ul-Hassan

    2012-11-01

    Ulcerative colitis is a chronic disease that specifically affects the mucosa of the rectum and colon. Although the etiology of this recurring inflammatory disorder remains essentially unknown, there have been significant advances in identifying the likely genetic and environmental factors that contribute to its pathogenesis. The clinical course of the disease typically manifests with remissions and exacerbations characterized by rectal bleeding and diarrhea. Since ulcerative colitis most commonly affects patients in their youth or early middle age, the disease can have serious long-term local and systemic consequences. There is no specific medical therapy that is curative. Although medical therapy can ameliorate the inflammatory process and control most symptomatic flares, it provides no definitive treatment for the disease. Proctocolectomy or total removal of the colon and rectum provides the only complete cure; however, innovative surgical alternatives have eliminated the need for a permanent ileostomy. The aim of this review is to provide a detailed account of the surgical management of ulcerative colitis.

  8. [Tuberculous ulcer of the tongue: clinical case].

    PubMed

    Ladron de Guevara, R

    1989-12-01

    A 26 year-old female was seeking treatment for a painless ulcerated lesion of the tongue developing 30 days before. No history of a sef biting in that area was told by the patient. Following a provisional diagnosis of tuberculous ulcer or a neoplasm, under local anesthesia, a segment of the lesion was excised and sent to histological diagnosis, which confirmed the existence of a tuberculous ulcer. Additionally, a chest roentgenogram disclosed the presence of an undiagnosed pulmonar tuberculous lesion. The patient underwent a successful treatment with rifampicin, isoniazide and pirazinamide, and two month after the initial diagnosis the oral lesion was almost absent, although the pulmonar lesion was still detected on the roentgenogram. Finally, a total disappearance of the pulmonar lesion was detected six month following drug treatment.

  9. Thyroid storm precipitated by duodenal ulcer perforation.

    PubMed

    Natsuda, Shoko; Nakashima, Yomi; Horie, Ichiro; Ando, Takao; Kawakami, Atsushi

    2015-01-01

    Thyroid storm is a rare and life-threatening complication of thyrotoxicosis that requires prompt treatment. Thyroid storm is also known to be associated with precipitating events. The simultaneous treatment of thyroid storm and its precipitant, when they are recognized, in a patient is recommended; otherwise such disorders, including thyroid storm, can exacerbate each other. Here we report the case of a thyroid storm patient (a 55-year-old Japanese male) complicated with a perforated duodenal ulcer. The patient was successfully treated with intensive treatment for thyroid storm and a prompt operation. Although it is believed that peptic ulcer rarely coexists with hyperthyroidism, among patients with thyroid storm, perforation of a peptic ulcer has been reported as one of the causes of fatal outcome. We determined that surgical intervention was required in this patient, reported despite ongoing severe thyrotoxicosis, and reported herein a successful outcome.

  10. [Buruli ulcer--Africa's latest mycobacterial scourge].

    PubMed

    Roupe, Gösta

    2003-11-06

    Buruliulcer is an extensive ulceration usually on the extremities. The ulcer can spread to subcutaneous fat, muscle and even bone causing osteomyelitis and death. It is the the third most common mycobacterial disease in humans after tuberculosis and leprosy. The bacterium grows in still standing water and infects children through small ulcerations in their skin. Mycobacterium ulcerans may also be transmitted by the bite of aquatic bugs (Naucordiae), which harbor the bacterium in their salivary glands. The disease affects poor people in rural, tropical areas where deforestation has led to flooding rivers, stagnant bodies of water and marsh. Benin, Cote d'Ivoire and Ghana in West Africa are seriously hit. Skin transplantation is the treatment of choice. Treatment with antibiotics has been disappointing.

  11. Gastric ulcer penetrating to liver diagnosed by endoscopic biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Kayacetin, Ertugrul; Kayacetin, Serra

    2004-01-01

    Liver penetration is a rare but serious complication of peptic ulcer disease. Usually the diagnosis is made by operation or autopsy. Clinical and laboratory data were no specific. A 64-year-old man was admitted with upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Hepatic penetration was diagnosed as the cause of bleeding. Endoscopy showed a large gastric ulcer with a pseudotumoral mass protruding from the ulcer bed. Definitive diagnosis was established by endoscopic biopsies of the ulcer base. PMID:15188520

  12. Venous Leg Ulcer in a Sarcoidosis Patient: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Ohn, Jungyoon; Byun, Sang Young; Kim, In Su

    2015-01-01

    Venous leg ulcers, the most common form of leg ulcers, are relevant to the pathogenicity of pericapillary fibrin cuff. Sarcoidosis, a multiorgan granulomatous disease, causes fibrin deposition in tissues. We report a case of a 50-year-old man with venous leg ulcers coexisting with sarcoidosis. On the basis of the histologic findings, we propose the hypothesis that sarcoidosis patients are prone to the development of venous leg ulcers. PMID:26719645

  13. Accuracy of endoscopic ultrasonography for diagnosing ulcerative early gastric cancers

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jin-Seok; Kim, Hyungkil; Bang, Byongwook; Kwon, Kyesook; Shin, Youngwoon

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Although endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) is the first-choice imaging modality for predicting the invasion depth of early gastric cancer (EGC), the prediction accuracy of EUS is significantly decreased when EGC is combined with ulceration. The aim of present study was to compare the accuracy of EUS and conventional endoscopy (CE) for determining the depth of EGC. In addition, the various clinic-pathologic factors affecting the diagnostic accuracy of EUS, with a particular focus on endoscopic ulcer shapes, were evaluated. We retrospectively reviewed data from 236 consecutive patients with ulcerative EGC. All patients underwent EUS for estimating tumor invasion depth, followed by either curative surgery or endoscopic treatment. The diagnostic accuracy of EUS and CE was evaluated by comparing the final histologic result of resected specimen. The correlation between accuracy of EUS and characteristics of EGC (tumor size, histology, location in stomach, tumor invasion depth, and endoscopic ulcer shapes) was analyzed. Endoscopic ulcer shapes were classified into 3 groups: definite ulcer, superficial ulcer, and ill-defined ulcer. The overall accuracy of EUS and CE for predicting the invasion depth in ulcerative EGC was 68.6% and 55.5%, respectively. Of the 236 patients, 36 patients were classified as definite ulcers, 98 were superficial ulcers, and 102 were ill-defined ulcers, In univariate analysis, EUS accuracy was associated with invasion depth (P = 0.023), tumor size (P = 0.034), and endoscopic ulcer shapes (P = 0.001). In multivariate analysis, there is a significant association between superficial ulcer in CE and EUS accuracy (odds ratio: 2.977; 95% confidence interval: 1.255–7.064; P = 0.013). The accuracy of EUS for determining tumor invasion depth in ulcerative EGC was superior to that of CE. In addition, ulcer shape was an important factor that affected EUS accuracy. PMID:27472672

  14. [C. pylori colonization of the mucosa in patients with chronic ulcerative and non-ulcerative gastropathies].

    PubMed

    Loschiavo, F; Ventura-Spagnolo, T; Broccio, G

    1990-05-01

    C. pyloridis colonization was investigated in a selected group of 58 patients with upper gastrointestinal disorders submitted to endoscopy and biopsy. The following results were registered. C. pyloridis was isolated in 14 out of 18 cases of active chronic gastritis, in 15 out of 24 cases of non active chronic gastritis, and 7 out of 8 cases of antral ulceration. A negative finding was registered in 8 patients whose gastric mucosa was normal. Therefore, the Authors consider as valid the etiopathogenetic correlation between C. pyloridis and ulcerative or non-ulcerative chronic gastric diseases, suggested by others.

  15. Venous leg ulcer treatment and practice--part 1: the causes and diagnosis of venous leg ulcers.

    PubMed

    Rajendran, S; Rigby, A J; Anand, S C

    2007-01-01

    This article, the first of a series of four on venous leg ulceration, discusses theories relating to the pathophysiology underlying the condition, and the range of diagnostic procedures undertaken to establish that ulceration is of venous origin.

  16. Prevention and treatment of venous ulceration.

    PubMed Central

    Negus, D.

    1985-01-01

    Venous ulcers are related to incompetence of the direct calf and ankle perforating veins, the majority of which follow deep vein thrombosis. Prevention of the latter by intravenous micro-dose heparin (1 unit/kg/hour) is effective, safe and inexpensive. Its efficacy has been proved in two controlled clinical trials. Venous ulcers have been treated by perforating vein ligation, with saphenous ligation and stripping where necessary, and with the addition of permanent knee-length elastic compression stockings in patients with femoro-popliteal incompetence. This regimen has achieved a 92% long-term success rate in patients without rheumatoid arthritis. Images Fig. 3 PMID:3890671

  17. Evolving medical therapies for ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Russell D

    2002-12-01

    Therapies for patients with ulcerative colitis have, until recently, been limited in scope and efficacy. New formulations of mesalamine and corticosteroids have challenged the older therapies with respect to both efficacy and safety. The application of 6-mercaptopurine and azathioprine for steroid-refractory disease and maintenance of remission has resulted in studies of other candidate immunomodulatory agents. Biologic therapies targeting tumor necrosis factor, adhesion molecules, or other cytokines are under intense scrutiny as potential disease-altering agents that may even replace currently available products. Other approaches, including such wide-ranging products as heparin, nicotine, and probiotics, suggest that control of ulcerative colitis may require an individualized approach for each patient.

  18. Leg ulcer in lepromatous leprosy - Case report*

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Tania Rita Moreno de Oliveira; dos Santos, Talita Suzany Siqueira; Lopes, Ramon Rodrigues de Macedo

    2016-01-01

    In Brazil, leprosy is a widespread infectious and contagious disease. Clinicians and specialists view leprosy broadly as a systemic infection, since, in its manifestations, it mimics many conditions, such as rheumatic, vascular, ENT, neurological and dermatological diseases. There are few studies that characterize the factors associated with ulcers in leprosy. These injuries should be prevented and treated promptly to avoid serious problems like secondary infections, sepsis, carcinomatous degeneration and amputations. We describe a patient with ulcers on his legs, involving late diagnosis of lepromatous leprosy. PMID:27828650

  19. Umbilical cord ulceration: An underdiagnosed entity

    PubMed Central

    Maheshwari, Barkha; Roy, Maitrayee; Devi, S; Singh, Ashu; Khurana, Nita; Gupta, Sangeeta

    2016-01-01

    Umbilical cord ulceration is a rare condition presenting with sudden fetal bradycardia due to fetal hemorrhage and in most cases leading to intrauterine death. A strong association with intestinal atresia has been reported. Most cases present after 30 weeks of gestation, with preterm labor or rupture of membranes followed by sudden fetal bradycardia. We report two such cases of umbilical cord ulceration and review the available literature. One of the cases interestingly presented at 26 weeks, much earlier than what is reported in the world literature. In view of high perinatal mortality and morbidity, awareness of this condition is mandatory for timely and appropriate management to improve the fetal outcome. PMID:27668202

  20. Endoscopic management of acute peptic ulcer bleeding.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yidan; Chen, Yen-I; Barkun, Alan

    2014-12-01

    This review discusses the indications, technical aspects, and comparative effectiveness of the endoscopic treatment of upper gastrointestinal bleeding caused by peptic ulcer. Pre-endoscopic considerations, such as the use of prokinetics and timing of endoscopy, are reviewed. In addition, this article examines aspects of postendoscopic care such as the effectiveness, dosing, and duration of postendoscopic proton-pump inhibitors, Helicobacter pylori testing, and benefits of treatment in terms of preventing rebleeding; and the use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, antiplatelet agents, and oral anticoagulants, including direct thrombin and Xa inhibitors, following acute peptic ulcer bleeding.

  1. Ulcerative cheilitis in a rhesus macaque.

    PubMed

    Bailey, C C; Miller, A D

    2012-03-01

    A 2-year-old, female, simian immunodeficiency virus E543-infected rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) was presented for necropsy following euthanasia due to a history of diarrhea, weight loss, and a small, round ulcer along the left labial commissure. Histopathologic examination of the ulcer revealed infiltration by large numbers of degenerate and nondegenerate neutrophils and macrophages admixed with syncytial epithelial cells. Rare epithelial cells contained herpetic inclusion bodies. These cells stained positive for Human herpesvirus 1 via immunohistochemistry, and DNA sequencing confirmed the presence of closely related Macacine herpesvirus 1 (B virus).

  2. New Research Methods Developed for Studying Diabetic Foot Ulceration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Dr. Brian Davis, one of the Cleveland Clinic Foundation's researchers, has been investigating the risk factors related to diabetic foot ulceration, a problem that accounts for 20 percent of all hospital admissions for diabetic patients. He had developed a sensor pad to measure the friction and pressure forces under a person's foot when walking. As part of NASA Lewis Research Center's Space Act Agreement with the Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Dr. Davis requested Lewis' assistance in visualizing the data from the sensor pad. As a result, Lewis' Interactive Data Display System (IDDS) was installed at the Cleveland Clinic. This computer graphics program is normally used to visualize the flow of air through aircraft turbine engines, producing color two- and three-dimensional images.

  3. Haemophilus ducreyi associated with skin ulcers among children, Solomon Islands.

    PubMed

    Marks, Michael; Chi, Kai-Hua; Vahi, Ventis; Pillay, Allan; Sokana, Oliver; Pavluck, Alex; Mabey, David C; Chen, Cheng Y; Solomon, Anthony W

    2014-10-01

    During a survey of yaws prevalence in the Solomon Islands, we collected samples from skin ulcers of 41 children. Using PCR, we identified Haemophilus ducreyi infection in 13 (32%) children. PCR-positive and PCR-negative ulcers were phenotypically indistinguishable. Emergence of H. ducreyi as a cause of nongenital ulcers may affect the World Health Organization's yaws eradication program.

  4. Haemophilus ducreyi causing chronic skin ulceration in children visiting Samoa.

    PubMed

    Ussher, James E; Wilson, Elizabeth; Campanella, Silvana; Taylor, Susan L; Roberts, Sally A

    2007-05-15

    Chancroid is a sexually transmitted infection associated with genital ulceration and lymphadenopathy caused by Haemophilus ducreyi. Localized skin infections, in the absence of genital lesions, have not been previously reported. We report 3 cases of lower limb ulceration in children caused by H. ducreyi and postulate that H. ducreyi may be a previously unrecognized cause of chronic skin ulceration.

  5. Chronic ulcers and myasis as ports of entry for Clostridium tetani.

    PubMed

    Greco, J B; Sacramento, E; Tavares-Neto, J

    2001-12-01

    Evaluating tetanus immune status is not yet the usual clinical practice regarding patients with chronic ulcers or myasis. However, of 858 tetanus patients at Hospital Couto Maia (Salvador, Bahia, Brazil) aged 1 year or above, 2 had pressure ulcers and 17 had chronic ulceration of the lower limbs where these skin lesions were the ports of entry for Clostridium tetani. In these 19 cases, the following predisposing factors were described: venous insufficiency (n=6), sickle cell anemia (n=2), Hansen s disease (n=1), malnutrition (n=1), diabetes mellitus (n=1), trauma (n=1) and unknown factors (n=7). In 6 other cases, in addition to the Hansen s disease patient, the port of entry for tetanus was the site of extraction of Tunga penetrans larvae. In these 25 cases, the majority of patients (68%) were over 40 years old (17/25) and all of these patients stated that they had either not followed a tetanus toxoid vaccination regimen (19/25), or had partially completed such a regimen, or did not give precise information (6/25). Among the same series studied, over half (52%) of the patients died (13/25). We conclude that tetanus prevention must be included in the treatment of chronic skin ulcer patients, vaccination coverage should be increased among older people, and strategies aimed at improving coverage for all age groups must be reviewed.

  6. Swift and Complete Healing of Digital Ulcers after Macitentan Treatment

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Digital ulcers are a burdensome and painful condition with sparse options of treatment. We report the case of a 78-year-old female patient with limited cutaneous systemic sclerosis that sequentially developed digital ulcers. After the appearance of digital ulcers in the soles of her feet she was successfully treated with bosentan. The report of two new digital ulcers in her hands 9 months later alongside with elevated transaminase levels led to a switch to macitentan treatment. A swift and complete healing of both digital ulcers was observed after 3 months, with the restoration of normal biochemical values. PMID:27994906

  7. Colonic mucus, smoking and ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Pullan, R D

    1996-03-01

    Human colonic mucosal protection is not fully understood but may in part rely on a layer of mucus gel adherent to the mucosa. Ulcerative colitis may occur if mucosal protection breaks down. Two studies are presented, both of which relate to the aetiology of ulcerative colitis. First, a layer of adherent mucus gel was demonstrated by a simple, reliable method. Measurements of mucus layer thickness were made in freshly resected colonic specimens and shown to increase from a mean of 107 microns on the right colon to 155 microns in the rectum. In ulcerative colitis the layer is significantly thinner or absent, whereas in Crohn's disease the colonic mucus layer is significantly thicker. Second, the relationship between smoking and colitis is explored by a double-blind, randomised and placebo-controlled trial of transdermal nicotine in active disease. Significant clinical benefit was seen, indicating nicotine may be both useful therapeutically and the component of tobacco smoke that acts to protect against colitis. Since smoking and nicotine have actions on mucosae and mucus in other organs, it is argued that there is a mucus deficiency in ulcerative colitis that smoking acts to reverse.

  8. [Therapy of non-ulcer dyspepsia].

    PubMed

    Cortese, I; Maselli, M A

    1990-04-30

    The authors describe the gastro-kinetic drugs that act on functional dyspepsia including metoclopramide, domperidone, clebopride cisapride. Moreover, in some forms of non-ulcer dyspepsia it is useful to give sulglicotide, a cytoprotective drug that has been shown to induce marked improvement of clinical symptoms and endoscopic findings.

  9. Genital Ulcers: Their Diagnosis and Management

    PubMed Central

    Sacks, Stephen L.