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Sample records for pressure ulcer

  1. Pressure ulcer prevention.

    PubMed

    Edlich, Richard F; Winters, Kathryne L; Woodard, Charles R; Buschbacher, Ralph M; Long, William B; Gebhart, Jocelynn H; Ma, Eva K

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this collective review is to outline the predisposing factors in the development of pressure ulcers and to identify a pressure ulcer prevention program. The most frequent sites for pressure ulcers are areas of skin overlying bony prominences. There are four critical factors contributing to the development of pressure ulcers: pressure, shearing forces, friction, and moisture. Pressure is now viewed as the single most important etiologic factor in pressure ulcer formation. Prolonged immobilization, sensory deficit, circulatory disturbances, and poor nutrition have been identified as important risk factors in the development of pressure ulcer formation. Among the clinical assessment scales available, only two, the Braden Scale and Norton Scale, have been tested extensively for reliability and/or validity. The most commonly used risk assessment tools for pressure ulcer formation are computerized pressure monitoring and measurement of laser Doppler skin blood flow. Pressure ulcers can predispose the patient to a variety of complications that include bacteremia, osteomyelitis, squamous cell carcinoma, and sinus tracts. The three components of pressure ulcer prevention that must be considered in any patient include management of incontinence, nutritional support, and pressure relief. The pressure relief program must be individualized for non-weight-bearing individuals as well as those that can bear weight. For those that can not bear weight and passively stand, the RENAISSANCE Mattress Replacement System is recommended for the immobile patient who lies supine on the bed, the stretcher, or operating room table. This alternating pressure system is unique because it has three separate cells that are not interconnected. It is specifically designed so that deflation of each individual cell will reach a ZERO PRESSURE during each alternating pressure cycle. The superiority of this system has been documented by comprehensive clinical studies in which this system

  2. Pressure Ulcer Prevention

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Executive Summary In April 2008, the Medical Advisory Secretariat began an evidence-based review of the literature concerning pressure ulcers. Please visit the Medical Advisory Secretariat Web site, http://www.health.gov.on.ca/english/providers/program/mas/tech/tech_mn.html to review these titles that are currently available within the Pressure Ulcers series. Pressure ulcer prevention: an evidence based analysis The cost-effectiveness of prevention strategies for pressure ulcers in long-term care homes in Ontario: projections of the Ontario Pressure Ulcer Model (field evaluation) Management of chronic pressure ulcers: an evidence-based analysis (anticipated pubicstion date - mid-2009) Purpose A pressure ulcer, also known as a pressure sore, decubitus ulcer, or bedsore, is defined as a localized injury to the skin/and or underlying tissue occurring most often over a bony prominence and caused by pressure, shear, or friction, alone or in combination. (1) Those at risk for developing pressure ulcers include the elderly and critically ill as well as persons with neurological impairments and those who suffer conditions associated with immobility. Pressure ulcers are graded or staged with a 4-point classification system denoting severity. Stage I represents the beginnings of a pressure ulcer and stage IV, the severest grade, consists of full thickness tissue loss with exposed bone, tendon, and or muscle. (1) In a 2004 survey of Canadian health care settings, Woodbury and Houghton (2) estimated that the prevalence of pressure ulcers at a stage 1 or greater in Ontario ranged between 13.1% and 53% with nonacute health care settings having the highest prevalence rate (Table 1). Executive Summary Table 1: Prevalence of Pressure Ulcers* Setting Canadian Prevalence,% (95% CI) Ontario Prevalence,Range % (n) Acute care 25 (23.8–26.3) 23.9–29.7 (3418) Nonacute care† 30 (29.3–31.4) 30.0–53.3 (1165) Community care 15 (13.4–16.8) 13.2 (91) Mixed health care‡ 22 (20.9

  3. Pressure Ulcer Prevention

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Executive Summary In April 2008, the Medical Advisory Secretariat began an evidence-based review of the literature concerning pressure ulcers. Please visit the Medical Advisory Secretariat Web site, http://www.health.gov.on.ca/english/providers/program/mas/tech/tech_mn.html to review these titles that are currently available within the Pressure Ulcers series. Pressure ulcer prevention: an evidence based analysis The cost-effectiveness of prevention strategies for pressure ulcers in long-term care homes in Ontario: projections of the Ontario Pressure Ulcer Model (field evaluation) Management of chronic pressure ulcers: an evidence-based analysis (anticipated pubicstion date - mid-2009) Purpose A pressure ulcer, also known as a pressure sore, decubitus ulcer, or bedsore, is defined as a localized injury to the skin/and or underlying tissue occurring most often over a bony prominence and caused by pressure, shear, or friction, alone or in combination. (1) Those at risk for developing pressure ulcers include the elderly and critically ill as well as persons with neurological impairments and those who suffer conditions associated with immobility. Pressure ulcers are graded or staged with a 4-point classification system denoting severity. Stage I represents the beginnings of a pressure ulcer and stage IV, the severest grade, consists of full thickness tissue loss with exposed bone, tendon, and or muscle. (1) In a 2004 survey of Canadian health care settings, Woodbury and Houghton (2) estimated that the prevalence of pressure ulcers at a stage 1 or greater in Ontario ranged between 13.1% and 53% with nonacute health care settings having the highest prevalence rate (Table 1). Executive Summary Table 1: Prevalence of Pressure Ulcers* Setting Canadian Prevalence,% (95% CI) Ontario Prevalence,Range % (n) Acute care 25 (23.8–26.3) 23.9–29.7 (3418) Nonacute care† 30 (29.3–31.4) 30.0–53.3 (1165) Community care 15 (13.4–16.8) 13.2 (91) Mixed health care‡ 22 (20.9

  4. Management of Chronic Pressure Ulcers

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Executive Summary In April 2008, the Medical Advisory Secretariat began an evidence-based review of the literature concerning pressure ulcers. Please visit the Medical Advisory Secretariat Web site, http://www.health.gov.on.ca/english/providers/program/mas/tech/tech_mn.html to review these titles that are currently available within the Pressure Ulcers series. Pressure ulcer prevention: an evidence based analysis The cost-effectiveness of prevention strategies for pressure ulcers in long-term care homes in Ontario: projections of the Ontario Pressure Ulcer Model (field evaluation) Management of chronic pressure ulcers: an evidence-based analysis Objective The Medical Advisory Secretariat (MAS) conducted a systematic review on interventions used to treat pressure ulcers in order to answer the following questions: Do currently available interventions for the treatment of pressure ulcers increase the healing rate of pressure ulcers compared with standard care, a placebo, or other similar interventions? Within each category of intervention, which one is most effective in promoting the healing of existing pressure ulcers? Background A pressure ulcer is a localized injury to the skin and/or underlying tissue usually over a bony prominence, as a result of pressure, or pressure in conjunction with shear and/or friction. Many areas of the body, especially the sacrum and the heel, are prone to the development of pressure ulcers. People with impaired mobility (e.g., stroke or spinal cord injury patients) are most vulnerable to pressure ulcers. Other factors that predispose people to pressure ulcer formation are poor nutrition, poor sensation, urinary and fecal incontinence, and poor overall physical and mental health. The prevalence of pressure ulcers in Ontario has been estimated to range from a median of 22.1% in community settings to a median of 29.9% in nonacute care facilities. Pressure ulcers have been shown to increase the risk of mortality among geriatric patients by

  5. Pressure ulcer management: the importance of nutrition.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, M; Cook, A; Rimmasch, H; Bender, S; Voss, A

    2000-08-01

    Nutrition plays an important role in pressure ulcer prevention and treatment. Nutrition assessment techniques and nutritional interventions for patients at risk for developing a pressure ulcer or who currently have pressure ulcers are essential components of quality patient care.

  6. Common Questions About Pressure Ulcers.

    PubMed

    Raetz, Jaqueline G M; Wick, Keren H

    2015-11-15

    Patients with limited mobility due to physical or cognitive impairment are at risk of pressure ulcers. Primary care physicians should examine at-risk patients because pressure ulcers are often missed in inpatient, outpatient, and long-term care settings. High-risk patients should use advanced static support surfaces to prevent pressure ulcers and air-fluidized beds to treat pressure ulcers. Physicians should document the size and clinical features of ulcers. Cleansing should be done with saline or tap water, while avoiding caustic agents, such as hydrogen peroxide. Dressings should promote a moist, but not wet, wound healing environment. The presence of infection is determined through clinical judgment; if uncertain, a tissue biopsy should be performed. New or worsening pain may indicate infection of a pressure ulcer. When treating patients with pressure ulcers, it is important to keep in mind the patient's psychological, behavioral, and cognitive status. The patient's social, financial, and caregiver resources, as well as goals and long-term prognosis, should also be considered in the treatment plan. PMID:26554282

  7. Nutritional prediction of pressure ulcers.

    PubMed

    Breslow, R A; Bergstrom, N

    1994-11-01

    This article focuses on nutritional risk factors that predict the development of pressure ulcers in hospital and nursing home patients. Cross-sectional studies associate inadequate energy and protein intake; underweight; low triceps skinfold measurement; and low serum albumin, low serum cholesterol, and low hemoglobin levels with pressure ulcers. Prospective studies identify inadequate energy and protein intake, a poor score on the Braden scale (a risk assessment instrument that includes a nutrition component), and possibly low serum albumin level as risk factors for developing a pressure ulcer. Nutritionists should provide a high-energy, high-protein diet for patients at risk of development of pressure ulcers to improve their dietary intake and nutritional status.

  8. Pressure ulcer prevention in the community setting.

    PubMed

    Jones, Donna

    Pressure ulcers are associated with reduced quality of life, affecting individuals physically, socially and emotionally. The financial cost to the NHS of preventing and treating such ulcers is substantial. Although largely preventable, pressure ulcers are still common. The Department of Health is committed to eliminating all avoidable pressure ulcers in NHS-provided care. This article explores methods of preventing pressure ulcers, with particular focus on risk assessment, skin inspection, pressure-relieving measures, nutrition and hydration, and patient and carer education.

  9. Management of Chronic Pressure Ulcers

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Executive Summary In April 2008, the Medical Advisory Secretariat began an evidence-based review of the literature concerning pressure ulcers. Please visit the Medical Advisory Secretariat Web site, http://www.health.gov.on.ca/english/providers/program/mas/tech/tech_mn.html to review these titles that are currently available within the Pressure Ulcers series. Pressure ulcer prevention: an evidence based analysis The cost-effectiveness of prevention strategies for pressure ulcers in long-term care homes in Ontario: projections of the Ontario Pressure Ulcer Model (field evaluation) Management of chronic pressure ulcers: an evidence-based analysis Objective The Medical Advisory Secretariat (MAS) conducted a systematic review on interventions used to treat pressure ulcers in order to answer the following questions: Do currently available interventions for the treatment of pressure ulcers increase the healing rate of pressure ulcers compared with standard care, a placebo, or other similar interventions? Within each category of intervention, which one is most effective in promoting the healing of existing pressure ulcers? Background A pressure ulcer is a localized injury to the skin and/or underlying tissue usually over a bony prominence, as a result of pressure, or pressure in conjunction with shear and/or friction. Many areas of the body, especially the sacrum and the heel, are prone to the development of pressure ulcers. People with impaired mobility (e.g., stroke or spinal cord injury patients) are most vulnerable to pressure ulcers. Other factors that predispose people to pressure ulcer formation are poor nutrition, poor sensation, urinary and fecal incontinence, and poor overall physical and mental health. The prevalence of pressure ulcers in Ontario has been estimated to range from a median of 22.1% in community settings to a median of 29.9% in nonacute care facilities. Pressure ulcers have been shown to increase the risk of mortality among geriatric patients by

  10. [Controversies over heel pressure ulcers].

    PubMed

    Rueda López, J

    2013-02-01

    Article whose content was exposed in the workshops of the GNEAUPP Congress, held in Seville in November2012, and which refers to ulcers by pressure on the heels as a location exposed to the analysis. A pressure ulcer is a lesion located in skin I underlying tissue usually over a bone prominence, as a result of the pressure, or pressure in combination with the shears. A number of contributing factors or confounding factors are also associated with ulcers by pressure; the importance of these factors still not been elucidated. The heels are next to the sacred area, parts of the body that most frequently presents ulcers by pressure, The importance of the predisposing factors for ulcers in the sacral area as humidity has been studied in recent years, but in heels, remains one of the most important locations in the extremities, which entails adverse outcomes such as amputation in persons with comorbid diseases like Diabetes Mellitus (DM). The incidence of ulcers on heels in patients with DM and without it, is approximately 19-32%. Everything and be a problem associated with elderly people and chronic pathologies, in acute patients are a problem that this underrated, but not devoid of controversy. In hospitals of treble in 2006, the NPUAP encrypted the incidence of UPPin heels in a 43%; in one systematic review conducted by Reddy et al. (2006) puts revealed that 60% of pressure ulcers is produced. The problem of the UPP in heels is present in all the areas of intervention and particularly in paediatric units intensive care, where the first localization it is the occipital area followed by the heels.

  11. Recording pressure ulcer risk assessment and incidence.

    PubMed

    Plaskitt, Anne; Heywood, Nicola; Arrowsmith, Michaela

    2015-07-15

    This article reports on the introduction of an innovative computer-based system developed to record and report pressure ulcer risk and incidence at an acute NHS trust. The system was introduced to ensure that all patients have an early pressure ulcer risk assessment, which prompts staff to initiate appropriate management if a pressure ulcer is detected, thereby preventing further patient harm. Initial findings suggest that this electronic process has helped to improve the timeliness and accuracy of data on pressure ulcer risk and incidence. In addition, it has resulted in a reduced number of reported hospital-acquired pressure ulcers.

  12. Preventing pressure ulcers

    MedlinePlus

    ... or gel seat cushion that fits your wheelchair. Natural sheepskin pads are also helpful to reduce pressure on the skin. DO NOT sit on a donut-shaped cushions. You or your caregiver should shift your weight in your wheelchair every ...

  13. [Therapeutic options for pressure ulcers].

    PubMed

    Damert, H-G; Meyer, F; Altmann, S

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this overview is based on remarks on the pathogenesis of and therapy for pressure ulcers and selected but representative cases to demonstrate current options of plastic coverage. As a consequence of the demographic developments, in particular, with regard to the increasing proportion of older patients as well as the advances in modern medicine, the number of multimorbid, geriatric and bedridden patients and of those with prolonged sickbed periods has been steadily growing. Therefore, partly severe manifestations of pressure ulcers at various exposed body regions can be observed in spite of the best preventive intention of care. While in the early stages rather conservative treatment is adequate, surgical intervention might become important and indispensable for a sufficient treatment in advanced stages. To facilitate basic care and to appropriately treat the infectious focus, the methods and procedures of plastic surgery can become relevant. Although there are several options and approaches existing to sanitise and cover defects of pressure ulcers, which are described within the article based on representative cases, preventive measures can still be considered the best approach.

  14. Engaging patients in pressure ulcer prevention.

    PubMed

    Hudgell, Lynne; Dalphinis, Julie; Blunt, Chris; Zonouzi, Maryam; Procter, Susan

    2015-05-01

    As patients increasingly care for themselves at home, they require accessible information to enable informed self-care. This article describes the development of an educational electronic application (app) designed for use by patients at risk of pressure ulcers, and their carers. The app can be downloaded to Windows, Android or Apple smartphones or tablets. The app is based on the current pressure ulcer prevention and management guidelines from the National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel and the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence, and is designed to educate patients and carers about how to prevent a pressure ulcer, how to recognise a pressure ulcer, and what to do if they suspect they are developing a pressure ulcer. We hope the app will be used to help with educational conversations among patients, carers and healthcare professionals.

  15. Pressure ulcer prevention in frail older people.

    PubMed

    Barry, Maree; Nugent, Linda

    2015-12-16

    Pressure ulcers are painful and cause discomfort, have a negative effect on quality of life, and are costly to treat. The incidence and severity of preventable pressure ulcers is an important indicator of quality of care; it is essential that healthcare providers monitor prevalence and incidence rates to ensure that care strategies implemented are effective. Frail older people are at increased risk of developing pressure ulcers. This article discusses the complexities of preventing pressure ulcers in frail older people and emphasises the importance of structured educational programmes that incorporate effective clinical leadership and multidisciplinary teamwork.

  16. [Pressure ulcer management--Evidence-based interventions].

    PubMed

    Rocha, J A; Miranda, M J; Andrade, M J

    2006-01-01

    Despite improved awareness and quality of care among health care personnel, pressure ulcers prevalence remains high especially in the inpatient setting. Pressure ulcers are associated with increased morbidity and mortality, affecting the quality of life of patients and their caregivers, and significantly increasing direct and indirect healthcare costs. Early risk assessment for developing a pressure ulcer is essential to decide on the appropriate preventive measures and for initiation of a tailored therapeutic approach. Interventions include strategies to reduce extrinsic and intrinsic risk factors associated with tissue ischemia, optimization of patient's nutritional status, and local wound care. This revision intends to review current evidence-based therapeutic interventions in pressure ulcer care, and support implementation of management protocols in an inpatient ward.

  17. Pressure ulcers - what to ask your doctor

    MedlinePlus

    ... best way to transfer from bed to a wheelchair or chair? If there is leakage of stool ... done to prevent pressure ulcers? If using a wheelchair: How often should someone make sure the wheelchair ...

  18. Pressure ulcer pain: a systematic literature review and national pressure ulcer advisory panel white paper.

    PubMed

    Pieper, Barbara; Langemo, Diane; Cuddigan, Janet

    2009-02-01

    Pain is an ever-present problem in patients with pressure ulcers. As an advocate for persons with pressure ulcers, the National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel (NPUAP) is concerned about pain. To synthesize available pressure ulcer pain literature, a systematic review was performed of English language literature, specific to human research, 1992 to April 2008, using PubMed and the Cumulative Index in Nursing and Allied Health Literature. Fifteen relevant papers were found; they examined pain assessment tools, topical analgesia for pain management, and/or descriptions of persons with pressure ulcer pain. Studies had small sample sizes and included only adults. The literature established that 1) pressure ulcers cause pain; 2) pain assessment was typically found to be self-reported using different versions of the McGill Pain Questionnaire, Faces Rating Scale, or Visual Analog Scale; 3) pain assessment instruments should be appropriate to patient cognitive level and medical challenges; 4) in some cases, topical medications can ease pain and although information on systemic medication is limited, pain medications have been found to negatively affect appetite; and 5) wound treatment is painful, particularly dressing changes. Research gaps include the prevention and treatment of pressure ulcer pain, the impact of pain on nutrition, and pressure ulcer pain considerations for special groups (eg, children, end-of-life patients, and bariatric patients). The NPUAP presents this white paper as the current scientific know-ledge base on the topic. Research regarding the multidimensional aspects of pressure ulcer pain is strongly recommended.

  19. Pressure ulcer prevention: utilizing unlicensed assistive personnel.

    PubMed

    Walker Sewill, Danielle K; Van Sell, Sharon; Kindred, Chris

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide education to the RN regarding pressure ulcer prevention and best practice interventions. This investigation focuses on the definition of a pressure ulcer, risk factors for pressure ulcers, and the benefits and importance of using unlicensed assistive personnel to help prevent pressure ulcers. A comprehensive literature review was completed using the Texas Woman's University Library, the Texas Christian University Library, and the World Wide Web. The search engine used was Google. The databases included were CINAHL, Academic Search Complete, Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, and ProQuest Nursing & Allied Health Source. The literature was current, defined as from the last 10 years, and the primary language searched was English. Full-text articles from these databases were included as well as print publications from the university collections. The key search terms from the literature review included (a) pressure ulcer, (b) prevention, (c) unlicensed assistive personnel, (d) nursing assistant, (e) theory of nursing knowledge, (f) incidence, (g) prevalence, (h) Braden scale, (i) moisture, and (j) repositioning. Best practice guidelines were reviewed via the Joanna Briggs database, National Guideline Clearinghouse, Cochrane Library, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, and the National Institutes of Health. Literature was synthesized to define evidence-based practices that would justify the use of unlicensed assistive personnel for the prevention and care of pressure ulcers. PMID:20827067

  20. The role of nutrition for pressure ulcer management: national pressure ulcer advisory panel, European pressure ulcer advisory panel, and pan pacific pressure injury alliance white paper.

    PubMed

    Posthauer, Mary Ellen; Banks, Merrilyn; Dorner, Becky; Schols, Jos M G A

    2015-04-01

    Nutrition and hydration play an important role in preserving skin and tissue viability and in supporting tissue repair for pressure ulcer (PrU) healing. The majority of research investigating the relationship between nutrition and wounds focuses on PrUs. This white paper reviews the 2014 National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel, European Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel, and Pan Pacific Pressure Injury Alliance Nutrition Guidelines and discusses nutrition strategies for PrU management.

  1. Bed posture classification for pressure ulcer prevention.

    PubMed

    Yousefi, R; Ostadabbas, S; Faezipour, M; Farshbaf, M; Nourani, M; Tamil, L; Pompeo, M

    2011-01-01

    Pressure ulcer is an age-old problem imposing a huge cost to our health care system. Detecting and keeping record of the patient's posture on bed, help care givers reposition patient more efficiently and reduce the risk of developing pressure ulcer. In this paper, a commercial pressure mapping system is used to create a time-stamped, whole-body pressure map of the patient. An image-based processing algorithm is developed to keep an unobtrusive and informative record of patient's bed posture over time. The experimental results show that proposed algorithm can predict patient's bed posture with up to 97.7% average accuracy. This algorithm could ultimately be used with current support surface technologies to reduce the risk of ulcer development. PMID:22255993

  2. Malnutrition as a Precursor of Pressure Ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Litchford, Mary D.; Dorner, Becky; Posthauer, Mary Ellen

    2014-01-01

    Significance: Numerous studies have reported associations between declining nutrition status and risk for pressure ulcers. Oral eating problems, weight loss, low body weight, undernutrition, and malnutrition are associated with an increased risk for pressure ulcers. Moreover, inadequate nutrient intake and low body weight are associated with slow and nonhealing wounds. However, the biologic significance of deterioration in nutrition status and consistent methodologies to quantify malnutrition and diminished micronutrient stores as predictors of skin breakdown remains controversial. Recent Advances: The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (Academy) and the American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (ASPEN) Consensus Statement: Characteristics Recommended for the Identification and Documentation of Adult Malnutrition provide a standardized and measureable set of criterion for all health professionals to use to identify malnutrition. The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality identified malnutrition as one of the common geriatric syndromes associated with increased risk for institutionalization and mortality that may be impacted by primary and secondary preventions. Critical Issues: The purpose of this article is to examine the Academy/ASPEN consensus statement on characteristics of adult malnutrition in the context of the National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel (NPUAP)/European Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel (EPUAP) Guidelines on the Prevention and Treatment of Pressure Ulcers. Future Directions: Moreover, clinicians, and in particular, registered dietitians have the opportunity to integrate the Characteristics of Malnutrition with the NPUAP/EPUAP 2009 Prevention and Treatment Clinical Practice Guidelines, into clinical assessment and documentation using the Nutrition Care Process. Consensus guidelines will provide consistent research criteria yielding more useful data than presently available. PMID:24761345

  3. Malnutrition as a Precursor of Pressure Ulcers.

    PubMed

    Litchford, Mary D; Dorner, Becky; Posthauer, Mary Ellen

    2014-01-01

    Significance: Numerous studies have reported associations between declining nutrition status and risk for pressure ulcers. Oral eating problems, weight loss, low body weight, undernutrition, and malnutrition are associated with an increased risk for pressure ulcers. Moreover, inadequate nutrient intake and low body weight are associated with slow and nonhealing wounds. However, the biologic significance of deterioration in nutrition status and consistent methodologies to quantify malnutrition and diminished micronutrient stores as predictors of skin breakdown remains controversial. Recent Advances: The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (Academy) and the American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (ASPEN) Consensus Statement: Characteristics Recommended for the Identification and Documentation of Adult Malnutrition provide a standardized and measureable set of criterion for all health professionals to use to identify malnutrition. The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality identified malnutrition as one of the common geriatric syndromes associated with increased risk for institutionalization and mortality that may be impacted by primary and secondary preventions. Critical Issues: The purpose of this article is to examine the Academy/ASPEN consensus statement on characteristics of adult malnutrition in the context of the National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel (NPUAP)/European Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel (EPUAP) Guidelines on the Prevention and Treatment of Pressure Ulcers. Future Directions: Moreover, clinicians, and in particular, registered dietitians have the opportunity to integrate the Characteristics of Malnutrition with the NPUAP/EPUAP 2009 Prevention and Treatment Clinical Practice Guidelines, into clinical assessment and documentation using the Nutrition Care Process. Consensus guidelines will provide consistent research criteria yielding more useful data than presently available.

  4. The VCU Pressure Ulcer Summit: Collaboration to Operationalize Hospital-Acquired Pressure Ulcer Prevention Best Practice Recommendations.

    PubMed

    Brindle, C Tod; Creehan, Sue; Black, Joyce; Zimmermann, Deb

    2015-01-01

    This executive summary reports outcomes of an interprofessional collaboration between experts in pressure ulcer prevention, bedside clinicians, regulatory agencies, quality improvement, informatics experts, and professional nursing organizations. The goal of the collaboration was to develop a framework to assist facilities to operationalize best practice recommendations to sustain organizational culture change in hospital-acquired pressure ulcer prevention, to develop a hospital-acquired pressure ulcer severity score, and to address topics related to the unavoidable pressure ulcer. PMID:26010220

  5. Multidisciplinary approaches to the pressure ulcer problem.

    PubMed

    Bogie, Kath M; Ho, Chester H

    2007-10-01

    Multiple factors affect the specific condition and overall clinical profile of individuals at risk for chronic wounds. The complexity of the pressure ulcer problem lends itself to the application of the National Institute of Health Roadmap Initiative that encourages interdisciplinary research and new organizational models. An overview of research studies relevant to telemedicine and neuromuscular electrical stimulation in the care and prevention of pressure ulcers as well as preliminary results of an innovative multidisciplinary skin care team approach to the primary and tertiary prevention of pressure ulcers are encouraging. The team's pilot study results indicate that patients are satisfied with telehealth provision of care; however, literature and experience also suggest that discrepancies in the inter-rater assessment of wounds using digital photography remain, particularly with regard to wound dimension variables assessed (P<0.01). In another endeavor, the skin care team developed a Longitudinal Analysis with Self-Registration statistical algorithm to assess the effects of electrical stimulation; in a preliminary study, this tool documented improvement in gluteus maximus health and resultant ability to withstand pressure. As the number of groups pursuing multidisciplinary research and care increases, so, too, will the evidence base required to address these common, and complex, chronic wounds. PMID:17978412

  6. Become the PPUPET Master: Mastering Pressure Ulcer Risk Assessment With the Pediatric Pressure Ulcer Prediction and Evaluation Tool (PPUPET).

    PubMed

    Sterken, David J; Mooney, JoAnn; Ropele, Diana; Kett, Alysha; Vander Laan, Karen J

    2015-01-01

    Hospital acquired pressure ulcers (HAPU) are serious, debilitating, and preventable complications in all inpatient populations. Despite evidence of the development of pressure ulcers in the pediatric population, minimal research has been done. Based on observations gathered during quarterly HAPU audits, bedside nursing staff recognized trends in pressure ulcer locations that were not captured using current pressure ulcer risk assessment tools. Together, bedside nurses and nursing leadership created and conducted multiple research studies to investigate the validity and reliability of the Pediatric Pressure Ulcer Prediction and Evaluation Tool (PPUPET).

  7. A rare location for a common problem: popliteal pressure ulcer.

    PubMed

    Ozer, Kadri; Colak, Ozlem; Goktas, Fethiye B; Sungur, Nezih; Kocer, Ugur

    2016-04-01

    Pressure ulcer is defined as localized injury to the skin and/or underlying tissue usually over a bony prominence, as a result of pressure, or pressure in combination with shear. The most frequent sites for pressure ulcers are the occiput, sacrum, ischial tuberosities, trochanters, lateral malleoli and posterior heels. Herein, we present a case of grade III pressure ulcer seen in popliteal region which is an unusual localisation that is rarely seen in the literature. An awareness of this unusual localisation of pressure ulcer is necessary to prevent decrease in quality of life, particularly in the wheelchair-dependent population.

  8. Determinants of mortality among older adults with pressure ulcers.

    PubMed

    Khor, Hui Min; Tan, Juan; Saedon, Nor Izzati; Kamaruzzaman, Shahrul B; Chin, Ai Vyrn; Poi, Philip J H; Tan, Maw Pin

    2014-01-01

    The presence of pressure ulcers imposes a huge burden on the older person's quality of life and significantly increases their risk of dying. The objective of this study was to determine patient characteristics associated with the presence of pressure ulcers and to evaluate the risk factors associated with mortality among older patients with pressure ulcers. A prospective observational study was performed between Oct 2012 and May 2013. Patients with preexisting pressure ulcers on admission and those with hospital acquired pressure ulcers were recruited into the study. Information on patient demographics, functional status, nutritional level, stages of pressure ulcer and their complications were obtained. Cox proportional hazard analysis was used to assess the risk of death in all patients. 76/684 (11.1%) patients had pre-existing pressure ulcers on admission and 30/684 (4.4%) developed pressure ulcers in hospital. There were 68 (66%) deaths by the end of the median follow-up period of 12 (IQR 2.5-14) weeks. Our Cox regression model revealed that nursing home residence (Hazard Ratio, HR=2.33, 95% confidence interval, CI=1.30, 4.17; p=0.005), infected deep pressure ulcers (HR=2.21, 95% CI=1.26, 3.87; p=0.006) and neutrophilia (HR=1.76; 95% CI 1.05, 2.94; p=0.031) were independent predictors of mortality in our elderly patients with pressure ulcers. The prevalence of pressure ulcers in our setting is comparable to previously reported figures in Europe and North America. Mortality in patients with pressure ulcer was high, and was predicted by institutionalization, concurrent infection and high neutrophil counts.

  9. Bridging the theory-practice gap in pressure ulcer prevention.

    PubMed

    Moore, Zena

    Pressure ulcers are a largely preventable problem, but the incidence can impact negatively on the ability of the health service to deliver effective and quality care. Pressure ulcers commonly occur in the very old, the malnourished and those with acute illness. As pressure ulcers most commonly occur in the hospital setting, this can increase both length of stay and costs to the health service. As a result, prevention and management strategies should be core components in the strategic planning of healthcare services. This article discusses the importance of education and knowledge in pressure ulcers, and the onus of the nurse to put theory into practice in order to prevent this problem. PMID:20852478

  10. Pressure ulcers: a strategic plan to prevent and heal them.

    PubMed

    Levine, J M; Totolos, E

    1995-01-01

    Pressure ulcers are common in frail, disabled, or acutely ill older patients in the home, hospital, or nursing home. Prevention is the most important aspect of pressure ulcer care, and physician and nurse share in this responsibility. A nosocomial pressure ulcer adds significantly to mortality, morbidity, and hospital length-of-stay. Risk factor assessment scales can help identify patients who need prevention efforts, such as pressure relief, incontinence care, and nutritional supplements. When an ulcer does occur, careful documentation is required, including staging, size and depth description, and review of the interdisciplinary care plan. Knowledge of wound biology and cost-effectiveness should guide the choice of wound healing products.

  11. Cohort study of atypical pressure ulcers development.

    PubMed

    Jaul, Efraim

    2014-12-01

    Atypical pressure ulcers (APU) are distinguished from common pressure ulcers (PU) with both unusual location and different aetiology. The occurrence and attempts to characterise APU remain unrecognised. The purpose of this cohort study was to analyse the occurrence of atypical location and the circumstances of the causation, and draw attention to the prevention and treatment by a multidisciplinary team. The cohort study spanned three and a half years totalling 174 patients. The unit incorporates two weekly combined staff meetings. One concentrates on wound assessment with treatment decisions made by the physician and nurse, and the other, a multidisciplinary team reviewing all patients and coordinating treatment. The main finding of this study identified APU occurrence rate of 21% within acquired PU over a three and a half year period. Severe spasticity constituted the largest group in this study and the most difficult to cure wounds, located in medial aspects of knees, elbows and palms. Medical devices caused the second largest occurrence of atypical wounds, located in the nape of the neck, penis and nostrils. Bony deformities were the third recognisable atypical wound group located in shoulder blades and upper spine. These three categories are definable and time observable. APU are important to be recognisable, and can be healed as well as being prevented. The prominent role of the multidisciplinary team is primary in identification, prevention and treatment. PMID:23374746

  12. Cohort study of atypical pressure ulcers development.

    PubMed

    Jaul, Efraim

    2014-12-01

    Atypical pressure ulcers (APU) are distinguished from common pressure ulcers (PU) with both unusual location and different aetiology. The occurrence and attempts to characterise APU remain unrecognised. The purpose of this cohort study was to analyse the occurrence of atypical location and the circumstances of the causation, and draw attention to the prevention and treatment by a multidisciplinary team. The cohort study spanned three and a half years totalling 174 patients. The unit incorporates two weekly combined staff meetings. One concentrates on wound assessment with treatment decisions made by the physician and nurse, and the other, a multidisciplinary team reviewing all patients and coordinating treatment. The main finding of this study identified APU occurrence rate of 21% within acquired PU over a three and a half year period. Severe spasticity constituted the largest group in this study and the most difficult to cure wounds, located in medial aspects of knees, elbows and palms. Medical devices caused the second largest occurrence of atypical wounds, located in the nape of the neck, penis and nostrils. Bony deformities were the third recognisable atypical wound group located in shoulder blades and upper spine. These three categories are definable and time observable. APU are important to be recognisable, and can be healed as well as being prevented. The prominent role of the multidisciplinary team is primary in identification, prevention and treatment.

  13. Petrolatum versus Resurfix ointment in the treatment of pressure ulcers.

    PubMed

    Kuflik, A; Stillo, J V; Sanders, D; Roland, K; Sweeney, T; Lemke, P M

    2001-02-01

    This study compares the therapeutic effects of a new topically applied, nonprescription medication that has been introduced for re-epithelialization of ulcers and erosions of the skin, with petrolatum in treating pressure ulcers of shallow depth (Stage I and Stage II). A 6-week, randomized, double-blind study was performed on 19 patients with Stage I or Stage II pressure ulcers. The patients received either the new nonprescription medication or petrolatum, which served as a control. After the course of the study, the study ointment effected resolution in a majority of pressure ulcers (9 out of 10), while only one out of three ulcers treated with petrolatum resolved in the same time period. These preliminary results show that the study ointment is a safe and effective treatment for Stage I and II pressure ulcers.

  14. The care of decubitus ulcers pressure sores.

    PubMed

    Michocki, R J; Lamy, P P

    1976-05-01

    Despite a large volume of literature particularly directed toward treatment, pressure sores (including decubitus ulcers) remain a difficult problem, especially in the nursing home environment. The treatment of pressure sores is somewhat controversial and quite diversified. Selection of a successful therapeutic modality must be preceded by correct evaluation, i.e., whether the sore is superficial or deep, open or closed. The treatment of superficial sores is conservative and directed toward cleanliness, relief of pressure, and exposure to air. Surgical debridement may be indicated. Proteolytic enzymes often are employed as adjunctive therapy, although there are some major drawbacks to their use. The plethora of therapeutic agents suggested for the treatment of deep pressure sores probably is related to the difficulties in achieving success. Surgical debridement is indicated, and proteolytic enzymes are widely used. Possible interactions. and factors leading to the inactivation of these enzymes are discussed, as is the use of various solutions, ointments, gold leaf, oxygen, dry heat, and other adjunctive devices. Of paramount importance in the management of pressure sores is the maintenance of cleanliness and dryness.

  15. Pressure ulcers. Nutrition strategies that make a difference.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Teresa

    2002-06-01

    One of the more influential factors associated with pressure ulcer prevention, development, and treatment is nutrition. Both the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS, formerly HCFA) and Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) specifically identify nutritional status as a significant risk factor. Three nutrition-focused steps will help you protect patients from the debilitating effects of pressure ulcers.

  16. Pressure ulcers or moisture lesions: the theatre perspective.

    PubMed

    Rego, A

    2016-04-01

    Pressure ulcers continue to be a cause for concern in the healthcare industry (IHI 2015). Unfortunately older patients are at a greater risk of developing pressure ulcers (Kottner et al 2013); moisture lesions and the presence of other comorbidities could have long term effects on the patient's health and recovery. PMID:27290758

  17. The role of dressings in the prevention of pressure ulcers.

    PubMed

    Brown, Julie

    2016-08-11

    Pressure ulceration is a significant global healthcare problem and represents a considerable burden on healthcare resources. Within the literature an increasing number of studies have examined the role prophylactic dressings play in redistributing pressure and helping to protect the skin from the effects of friction and shear. The use of dressings to prevent pressure ulcers may be considered a controversial issue, as previous opinion has been that dressings do not reduce the effects of pressure. This article will critically evaluate the literature to examine the role dressings play in the prevention of pressure ulceration. PMID:27523773

  18. Biomechanical modeling to prevent ischial pressure ulcers.

    PubMed

    Luboz, Vincent; Petrizelli, Marion; Bucki, Marek; Diot, Bruno; Vuillerme, Nicolas; Payan, Yohan

    2014-07-18

    With 300,000 paraplegic persons only in France, ischial pressure ulcers represent a major public health issue. They result from the buttocks׳ soft tissues compression by the bony prominences. Unfortunately, the current clinical techniques, with - in the best case - embedded pressure sensor mats, are insufficient to prevent them because most are due to high internal strains which can occur even with low pressures at the skin surface. Therefore, improving prevention requires using a biomechanical model to estimate internal strains from skin surface pressures. However, the buttocks׳ soft tissues׳ stiffness is still unknown. This paper provides a stiffness sensitivity analysis using a finite element model. Different layers with distinct Neo Hookean materials simulate the skin, fat and muscles. With Young moduli in the range [100-500 kPa], [25-35 kPa], and [80-140 kPa] for the skin, fat, and muscles, respectively, maximum internal strains reach realistic 50 to 60% values. The fat and muscle stiffnesses have an important influence on the strain variations, while skin stiffness is less influent. Simulating different sitting postures and changing the muscle thickness also result in a variation in the internal strains.

  19. Biomechanical modeling to prevent ischial pressure ulcers.

    PubMed

    Luboz, Vincent; Petrizelli, Marion; Bucki, Marek; Diot, Bruno; Vuillerme, Nicolas; Payan, Yohan

    2014-07-18

    With 300,000 paraplegic persons only in France, ischial pressure ulcers represent a major public health issue. They result from the buttocks׳ soft tissues compression by the bony prominences. Unfortunately, the current clinical techniques, with - in the best case - embedded pressure sensor mats, are insufficient to prevent them because most are due to high internal strains which can occur even with low pressures at the skin surface. Therefore, improving prevention requires using a biomechanical model to estimate internal strains from skin surface pressures. However, the buttocks׳ soft tissues׳ stiffness is still unknown. This paper provides a stiffness sensitivity analysis using a finite element model. Different layers with distinct Neo Hookean materials simulate the skin, fat and muscles. With Young moduli in the range [100-500 kPa], [25-35 kPa], and [80-140 kPa] for the skin, fat, and muscles, respectively, maximum internal strains reach realistic 50 to 60% values. The fat and muscle stiffnesses have an important influence on the strain variations, while skin stiffness is less influent. Simulating different sitting postures and changing the muscle thickness also result in a variation in the internal strains. PMID:24873863

  20. The VCU Pressure Ulcer Summit-Developing Centers of Pressure Ulcer Prevention Excellence: A Framework for Sustainability.

    PubMed

    Creehan, Sue; Cuddigan, Janet; Gonzales, Dana; Nix, Denise; Padula, William; Pittman, Joyce; Pontieri-Lewis, Vicky; Walden, Christine; Wells, Belinda; Wheeler, Robinetta

    2016-01-01

    Hospital-acquired pressure ulcer occurrences have declined over the past decade as reimbursement policies have changed, evidence-based practice guidelines have been implemented, and quality improvement initiatives have been launched. However, the 2006-2008 Institute for Healthcare Improvement goal of zero pressure ulcers remains difficult to achieve and even more challenging to sustain. Magnet hospitals tend to have lower hospital-acquired pressure ulcer rates than non-Magnet hospitals, yet many non-Magnet hospitals also have robust pressure ulcer prevention programs. Successful programs share commonalities in structure, processes, and outcomes. A national summit of 55 pressure ulcer experts was convened at the Virginia Commonwealth University Medical Center in March 2014. The group was divided into 3 focus groups; each was assigned a task to develop a framework describing components of a proposed Magnet-designated Center of Pressure Ulcer Prevention Excellence. Systematic literature reviews, analysis of exemplars, and nominal group process techniques were used to create the framework. This article presents a framework describing the proposed Magnet-designated Centers of Pressure Ulcer Prevention Excellence. Critical attributes of Centers of Excellence are identified and organized according to the 4 domains of the ANCC model for the Magnet Recognition Program: transformational leadership; structural empowerment; exemplary professional practice; and new knowledge innovation and improvements. The structures, processes, and outcome measures necessary to become a proposed Center of Pressure Ulcer Prevention Excellence are discussed. PMID:26808304

  1. The VCU Pressure Ulcer Summit-Developing Centers of Pressure Ulcer Prevention Excellence: A Framework for Sustainability.

    PubMed

    Creehan, Sue; Cuddigan, Janet; Gonzales, Dana; Nix, Denise; Padula, William; Pittman, Joyce; Pontieri-Lewis, Vicky; Walden, Christine; Wells, Belinda; Wheeler, Robinetta

    2016-01-01

    Hospital-acquired pressure ulcer occurrences have declined over the past decade as reimbursement policies have changed, evidence-based practice guidelines have been implemented, and quality improvement initiatives have been launched. However, the 2006-2008 Institute for Healthcare Improvement goal of zero pressure ulcers remains difficult to achieve and even more challenging to sustain. Magnet hospitals tend to have lower hospital-acquired pressure ulcer rates than non-Magnet hospitals, yet many non-Magnet hospitals also have robust pressure ulcer prevention programs. Successful programs share commonalities in structure, processes, and outcomes. A national summit of 55 pressure ulcer experts was convened at the Virginia Commonwealth University Medical Center in March 2014. The group was divided into 3 focus groups; each was assigned a task to develop a framework describing components of a proposed Magnet-designated Center of Pressure Ulcer Prevention Excellence. Systematic literature reviews, analysis of exemplars, and nominal group process techniques were used to create the framework. This article presents a framework describing the proposed Magnet-designated Centers of Pressure Ulcer Prevention Excellence. Critical attributes of Centers of Excellence are identified and organized according to the 4 domains of the ANCC model for the Magnet Recognition Program: transformational leadership; structural empowerment; exemplary professional practice; and new knowledge innovation and improvements. The structures, processes, and outcome measures necessary to become a proposed Center of Pressure Ulcer Prevention Excellence are discussed.

  2. Spinal cord injury pressure ulcer treatment: an experience-based approach.

    PubMed

    Sunn, Gabriel

    2014-08-01

    Pressure ulcers continue to impact the lives of spinal cord injury patients severely. Pressure ulcers must be accurately staged according to National Pressure Ulcer Advisory recommendations before treatment design. The first priority in treatment of pressure ulcers is offloading. Intact skin ulcers may be treated with noncontact nonthermal low-frequency ultrasound. Superficial pressure ulcers may be treated with a combination of collagenase and foam dressings. Deeper pressure ulcers warrant negative-pressure wound therapy dressings along with biologic adjuncts to fill in wound depth. Discovery and treatment of osteomyelitis is a high priority when initially evaluating pressure ulcers. Surgical intervention must always be considered.

  3. Skin blood flow dynamics and its role in pressure ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Fuyuan; Burns, Stephanie; Jan, Yih-Kuen

    2013-01-01

    Pressure ulcers are a significant healthcare problem affecting the quality of life in wheelchair bounded or bed-ridden people and are a major cost to the healthcare system. Various assessment tools such as the Braden scale have been developed to quantify the risk level of pressure ulcers. These tools have provided an initial guideline on preventing pressure ulcers while additional assessments are needed to improve the outcomes of pressure ulcer prevention. Skin blood flow function that determines the ability of the skin in response to ischemic stress has been proposed to be a good indicator for identifying people at risk of pressure ulcers. Wavelet spectral and nonlinear complexity analyses have been performed to investigate the influences of the metabolic, neurogenic and myogenic activities on microvascular regulation in people with various pathological conditions. These findings have contributed to the understanding of the role of ischemia and viability on the development of pressure ulcers. The purpose of the present review is to provide an introduction of the basic concepts and approaches for the analysis of skin blood flow oscillations, and present an overview of the research results obtained so far. We hope this information may contribute to the development of better clinical guidelines for the prevention of pressure ulcers. PMID:23602509

  4. Managing pressure ulcers and moisture lesions with new hydrocolloid technology.

    PubMed

    Linthwaite, Adele; Bethell, Elaine

    In efforts to reduce the number of avoidable pressure ulcers in a large trust, a number of initiatives have taken place to increase staff awareness about the importance of preventing and treating pressure ulcers and moisture lesions. New documentation, the use of the 'Think Pink' folders and a social media campaign have all proved successful in seeing the number of avoidable pressure ulcers reported within the trust reduce. As part of this initiative an evaluation took place of a new hydrocolloid dressing. This proved effective at reducing healing times, reducing dressing spend and facilitating regular inspection of the affected areas. PMID:27126753

  5. Factors Associated With Pressure Ulcers in Individuals With Spina Bifida

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sunkyung; Ward, Elisabeth; Dicianno, Brad E.; Clayton, Gerald H.; Sawin, Kathleen J.; Beierwaltes, Patricia; Thibadeau, Judy

    2015-01-01

    Objective To describe factors associated with pressure ulcers in individuals with spina bifida (SB) enrolled in the National Spina Bifida Patient Registry (NSBPR). Design Unbalanced longitudinal multicenter cohort study. Setting Nineteen SB clinics. Participants Individuals with SB (N=3153) enrolled in 19 clinic sites that participate in the NSBPR. Interventions Not applicable. Main Outcome Measures Pressure ulcer status (yes/no) at the annual visit between 2009 and 2012. Results Of 3153 total participants, 19% (n=603) reported ulcers at their most recent annual clinic visit. Seven factors–level of lesion, wheelchair use, urinary incontinence, shunt presence, above the knee orthopedic surgery, recent surgery, and male sex–were significantly associated with the presence of pressure ulcers. Of these factors, level of lesion, urinary incontinence, recent surgery, and male sex were included in the final logistic regression model. The 3 adjusting variables–SB type, SB clinic, and age group–were significant in all analyses (all P<.001). Conclusions By adjusting for SB type, SB clinic, and age group, we found that 7 factors–level of lesion, wheelchair use, urinary incontinence, shunt presence, above the knee orthopedic surgery, recent surgery, and male sex–were associated with pressure ulcers. Identifying key factors associated with the onset of pressure ulcers can be incorporated into clinical practice in ways that prevent and enhance treatment of pressure ulcers in the population with SB. PMID:25796136

  6. Pressure-ulcer reduction using low-friction fabric bootees.

    PubMed

    Gleeson, Deborah

    At St Helens and Knowsley Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, implementation of pressure management measures has reduced the incidence of hospital-acquired pressure ulcers. There is now a focus on those pressure ulcers still occurring despite these measures, particularly grade 2 ulcers on the heel, which are often attributed to friction and shear. During 2012 and 2013 low friction fabric bootees (Parafricta®) were used on at-risk patients (where possible) to attempt to address this issue. The bootees were first introduced in 2012. There was a decline in heel ulcers of 78% in the 2 years, which accounted for a sizeable portion of the overall decline in all grade 2 pressure ulcers. There was also a substantial change in the ratio of heel to all other grade 2 pressure ulcers, which fell from 0.67 to 0.24. On the basis of heel pressure ulcers avoided, there is an implied net saving to the NHS. The trust concluded that routine use of low-friction fabric bootees made a significant further contribution towards achieving zero harm targets and had done so while providing substantial cost benefits.

  7. Pressure ulcer-like presacral gummata in a patient with tertiary syphilis.

    PubMed

    Wollina, Uwe; Koch, André; Abdel-Naser, Mohammed Badawy; Schönlebe, Jacqueline

    2005-03-01

    Pressure ulcers are common among elderly patients. Here, we describe a case of tertiary syphilis with ulcerated gummata, appearing as a possible pressure ulcer. In such a case, wound management has to be accompanied by specific antibiosis to achieve healing.

  8. [Systematic review of nutritional support in pressure ulcer].

    PubMed

    de Luis, D; Aller, R

    2007-07-01

    Pressure ulcer is an area of localised damage to the skin and underlying tissue caused by pressure, shear, friction and/or combination of these things. Prevalence of this entity is between 3 and 66%, depending of the patients and the pathology. Pressure ulcer is associated with an increased risk of morbidity and mortality. One of the most important risk factors to develop a pressure ulcer is nutritional status. We can use different interventional strategies, first of all (primary intervention) before the patient has developed a ulcer and secondly, the treatment of a established ulcer (secondary prevention). In the most important primary prevention study with 662 patients, two oral nutritional supplements per day were given to the patients. The incidence of pressure ulcer was 40% (118/295) in the interventional group and 48% (181/377) in control group. A relative risk to develop a pressure ulcer with supplementation of 0.83 (CI95%: 0.70 a 0.99). In the studies with secondary prevention, when we analyze in an individual way the different nutrients, zinc has not demonstrated the utility in an independent way. Vitamin C shows contradictory data in two randomized clinical trial with the same dose (500 mg each 12 hours). Recently, some randomized clinical trials have demonstrated an improvement in healing rates with enhanced enteral formulas (zinc, arginine, vitamin C). Oral supplementation without taking account micronutrients decreases risk of pressure ulcer. However, studies of secondary prevention due to heterogeneity have not let clear conclusions. However, enteral enhanced formula could improve ulcer healing.

  9. Pressure ulcer prevention and care: a survey of current practice.

    PubMed

    Sharp, C; Burr, G; Broadbent, M; Cummins, M; Casey, H; Merriman, A

    2000-12-01

    The incidence and management of pressure ulcers in hospitalised patients is an ongoing concern for nurses. Efforts to prevent pressure ulcer development are plagued with inconsistencies and a general lack of best practice guidelines. Establishing current practice approaches to the assessment, prevention and management of pressure ulcers is a necessary first step in the implementation of evidence-based/best practice guidelines. Anecdotal evidence suggested a range of different approaches were being used in a Sydney metropolitan area health service (AHS) to assess patients to identify those at risk, to prevent pressure ulcers and to treat existing ulcers. A collaborative research project was undertaken to examine current practice and to explore the apparent clinical variance. It involved the distribution of a questionnaire to registered nurses working within the AHS (n = 2113) and a review of nursing policy documents in the various hospitals in the health service area. While the overall response rate was satisfactory (40%) many of the returned questionnaires were incomplete. Only 21% (n = 444) of the questionnaires were deemed suitable for analysis. The findings highlight a range of inconsistencies within and across nursing practice domains. Nurses generally do not use a tool to assess pressure ulcer risk potential, but rely on a range of practice procedures and risk indicators to determine risk potential of developing pressure ulcers. Repositioning patients is the most common approach used in an attempt to prevent the development of pressure ulcers, but additional measures are diverse. Most nurses seem to be familiar with modern wound dressings such as hydrocolloids, foams and alginates in the treatment of second and third stage ulceration. However, the care provided by some nurses reflects an adherence to outdated practices, including the use of water filled gloves, povidone iodine and gauze packing.

  10. Characteristics of hospitalised US veterans with nosocomial pressure ulcers.

    PubMed

    Tarnowski Goodell, Teresa; Moskovitz, Zoe

    2013-02-01

    The objective of this study was to describe demographic and clinical characteristics of hospitalised US veterans with nosocomial pressure ulcer (NPU) referred to a certified Wound, Ostomy & Continence Nurse (WOCN). We conducted a retrospective review of electronic records at a Veterans Affairs Medical Center in the northwestern USA. Records of veterans with NPU referred to a WOCN (n = 29) from May 2005 to June 2006 were reviewed. Location and stage of pressure ulcer(s), Braden score on admission and when the ulcer was first noted, day of hospital stay when the ulcer was first noted, medical diagnoses and clinical conditions and events such as surgery, hypoxemia, hypoalbuminemia and hypotension were recorded. Mean age of the patients was 69·8. The most common location was the sacrum/coccyx. Most ulcers were stage 1 when identified. Braden score during admission classified half of the sample at risk, but 81% of Braden scores at ulcer occurrence were <18. Ninety percent of the sample had three or more comorbidities. Over half had died in the 1-14 months after the reviewed hospitalisation. Hospitalised veterans referred for WOCN consultation had multiple risk factors and comorbid conditions, including hypoxemia, serum albumin depletion, anaemia and hypotension. Veterans cared for in Veterans Affairs Medical Centers are known to have multiple health problems, and those in this sample not only had nosocomial pressure ulcer, but also other physiological derangements that may shorten survival.

  11. Pressure ulcers: Current understanding and newer modalities of treatment

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Surajit; Mishra, R. K.

    2015-01-01

    This article reviews the mechanism, symptoms, causes, severity, diagnosis, prevention and present recommendations for surgical as well as non-surgical management of pressure ulcers. Particular focus has been placed on the current understandings and the newer modalities for the treatment of pressure ulcers. The paper also covers the role of nutrition and pressure-release devices such as cushions and mattresses as a part of the treatment algorithm for preventing and quick healing process of these wounds. Pressure ulcers develop primarily from pressure and shear; are progressive in nature and most frequently found in bedridden, chair bound or immobile people. They often develop in people who have been hospitalised for a long time generally for a different problem and increase the overall time as well as cost of hospitalisation that have detrimental effects on patient's quality of life. Loss of sensation compounds the problem manifold, and failure of reactive hyperaemia cycle of the pressure prone area remains the most important aetiopathology. Pressure ulcers are largely preventable in nature, and their management depends on their severity. The available literature about severity of pressure ulcers, their classification and medical care protocols have been described in this paper. The present treatment options include various approaches of cleaning the wound, debridement, optimised dressings, role of antibiotics and reconstructive surgery. The newer treatment options such as negative pressure wound therapy, hyperbaric oxygen therapy, cell therapy have been discussed, and the advantages and disadvantages of current and newer methods have also been described. PMID:25991879

  12. Developing eLearning for pressure ulcer prevention and management.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Rosie; Rodgers, Angela; Welsh, Lynn; McGown, Katrina

    2014-08-12

    The impact of pressure ulcers is psychologically, physically and clinically challenging for both patients and NHS staff. NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde (NHS GGC), in line with the Scottish Best Practice Statement for the Prevention and Management of Pressure Ulcers ( Quality Improvement Scotland, 2009 ), and the NHS Health Improvement Scotland (2011) Preventing Pressure Ulcers Change Package, launched an awareness campaign throughout the organisation in April 2012 and has more recently adopted a 'zero-tolerance' approach to pressure damage. The tissue viability service in NHS GGC recognised that in order to achieve this aim, education of front-line staff is essential. An educational framework for pressure ulcer prevention was developed for all levels of healthcare staff involved in the delivery of patient care. As a means to support the framework, an initiative to develop web-based eLearning modules has been taken forward. This has resulted in the creation of an accessible, cost-effective, stimulating, relevant, and evidence-based education programme designed around the educational needs of all healthcare staff. In conjunction with the organisation's 'top ten tools' for pressure ulcer prevention and management, the modular online education programme addresses the aims of quality improvement and zero tolerance by supporting the provision of safe and effective person-centered care. PMID:25117595

  13. Clustering-based limb identification for pressure ulcer risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Baran Pouyan, M; Nourani, M; Pompeo, M

    2015-01-01

    Bedridden patients have a high risk of developing pressure ulcers. Risk assessment for pressure ulceration is critical for preventive care. For a reliable assessment, we need to identify and track the limbs continuously and accurately. In this paper, we propose a method to identify body limbs using a pressure mat. Three prevalent sleep postures (supine, left and right postures) are considered. Then, predefined number of limbs (body parts) are identified by applying Fuzzy C-Means (FCM) clustering on key attributes. We collected data from 10 adult subjects and achieved average accuracy of 93.2% for 10 limbs in supine and 7 limbs in left/right postures.

  14. Pressure ulcer prevention: the role of the multidisciplinary team.

    PubMed

    Samuriwo, Ray

    Pressure ulcer prevention has long been a priority for health professionals; however, poor pressure-ulcer-related practices like poor documentation continue to be identified. Research has shown that the attitude and behaviour of some nurses towards pressure ulcer prevention are not conducive to the best possible patient outcomes.This article reviews the findings of a Straussian grounded theory study, which sought to ascertain the value that is placed on pressure ulcer prevention by nurses, but also revealed the role that other health professionals in the multidisciplinary team play in the maintenance of skin integrity. The findings of this study which are presented in this paper highlight a number of important issues. Firstly, nurses are expected to know how to prevent and manage pressure ulcers, but in reality they are very reliant on the advice and support of other health professionals to maintain their patients' skin integrity. In addition,the level of support that nurses get from other health professionals in the multidisciplinary varies tremendously. Therefore, nurses in clinical practice need to be proactive in seeking input from other health professionals, as there are many members of the multidisciplinary team who are able to give them the advice and support that they need in prevention and management. PMID:22489336

  15. [Risk assessment for pressure ulcer in critical patients].

    PubMed

    Gomes, Flávia Sampaio Latini; Bastos, Marisa Antonini Ribeiro; Matozinhos, Fernanda Penido; Temponi, Hanrieti Rotelli; Velásquez-Meléndez, Gustavo

    2011-04-01

    Bedridden patients are in risk to developing pressure ulcers and represent a priority group to be studied to identify this condition. To reach this goal, specific instruments are used to assess this problem. The objective of this study was to analyze the risk factors to developing pressure ulcers in adult patients hospitalized in ICUs. This is a sectional analytical study, in which evaluations were performed on 140 patients, hospitalized in 22 ICUs, using the Braden scale. Results showed that patients hospitalized from 15 days or more showed some level of risk. The highest frequencies of pressure ulcers were found in patients in the following categories: sensorial perception (completely limited), moistness (constantly moist), mobility (completely immobilized), activity (bedridden), nutrition (adequate) and friction and shear (problem). In conclusion, the use of this scale is an important strategy when providing care to patients in intensive treatment.

  16. Evaluation of an alginate dressing for pressure ulcers.

    PubMed

    Fowler, E; Papen, J C

    1991-08-01

    Pressure ulcers that secrete moderate to large amounts of fluid often cause leakage from under dressings, odor, staining of clothing, denuding of the skin, and pain. Two highly absorbent dressings derived from seaweed have been introduced into the U.S. market for use in the management of exuding wounds. Severely debilitated patients with full-thickness pressure ulcers were treated for one week to three months with one of these alginate dressings (Kaltostat). The handling and performance characteristics of the dressing are discussed.

  17. Transdermal deferoxamine prevents pressure-induced diabetic ulcers.

    PubMed

    Duscher, Dominik; Neofytou, Evgenios; Wong, Victor W; Maan, Zeshaan N; Rennert, Robert C; Inayathullah, Mohammed; Januszyk, Michael; Rodrigues, Melanie; Malkovskiy, Andrey V; Whitmore, Arnetha J; Walmsley, Graham G; Galvez, Michael G; Whittam, Alexander J; Brownlee, Michael; Rajadas, Jayakumar; Gurtner, Geoffrey C

    2015-01-01

    There is a high mortality in patients with diabetes and severe pressure ulcers. For example, chronic pressure sores of the heels often lead to limb loss in diabetic patients. A major factor underlying this is reduced neovascularization caused by impaired activity of the transcription factor hypoxia inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF-1α). In diabetes, HIF-1α function is compromised by a high glucose-induced and reactive oxygen species-mediated modification of its coactivator p300, leading to impaired HIF-1α transactivation. We examined whether local enhancement of HIF-1α activity would improve diabetic wound healing and minimize the severity of diabetic ulcers. To improve HIF-1α activity we designed a transdermal drug delivery system (TDDS) containing the FDA-approved small molecule deferoxamine (DFO), an iron chelator that increases HIF-1α transactivation in diabetes by preventing iron-catalyzed reactive oxygen stress. Applying this TDDS to a pressure-induced ulcer model in diabetic mice, we found that transdermal delivery of DFO significantly improved wound healing. Unexpectedly, prophylactic application of this transdermal delivery system also prevented diabetic ulcer formation. DFO-treated wounds demonstrated increased collagen density, improved neovascularization, and reduction of free radical formation, leading to decreased cell death. These findings suggest that transdermal delivery of DFO provides a targeted means to both prevent ulcer formation and accelerate diabetic wound healing with the potential for rapid clinical translation.

  18. Transdermal deferoxamine prevents pressure-induced diabetic ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Duscher, Dominik; Neofytou, Evgenios; Wong, Victor W.; Maan, Zeshaan N.; Rennert, Robert C.; Januszyk, Michael; Rodrigues, Melanie; Malkovskiy, Andrey V.; Whitmore, Arnetha J.; Galvez, Michael G.; Whittam, Alexander J.; Brownlee, Michael; Rajadas, Jayakumar; Gurtner, Geoffrey C.

    2015-01-01

    There is a high mortality in patients with diabetes and severe pressure ulcers. For example, chronic pressure sores of the heels often lead to limb loss in diabetic patients. A major factor underlying this is reduced neovascularization caused by impaired activity of the transcription factor hypoxia inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF-1α). In diabetes, HIF-1α function is compromised by a high glucose-induced and reactive oxygen species-mediated modification of its coactivator p300, leading to impaired HIF-1α transactivation. We examined whether local enhancement of HIF-1α activity would improve diabetic wound healing and minimize the severity of diabetic ulcers. To improve HIF-1α activity we designed a transdermal drug delivery system (TDDS) containing the FDA-approved small molecule deferoxamine (DFO), an iron chelator that increases HIF-1α transactivation in diabetes by preventing iron-catalyzed reactive oxygen stress. Applying this TDDS to a pressure-induced ulcer model in diabetic mice, we found that transdermal delivery of DFO significantly improved wound healing. Unexpectedly, prophylactic application of this transdermal delivery system also prevented diabetic ulcer formation. DFO-treated wounds demonstrated increased collagen density, improved neovascularization, and reduction of free radical formation, leading to decreased cell death. These findings suggest that transdermal delivery of DFO provides a targeted means to both prevent ulcer formation and accelerate diabetic wound healing with the potential for rapid clinical translation. PMID:25535360

  19. Clinical workflow for personalized foot pressure ulcer prevention.

    PubMed

    Bucki, M; Luboz, V; Perrier, A; Champion, E; Diot, B; Vuillerme, N; Payan, Y

    2016-09-01

    Foot pressure ulcers are a common complication of diabetes because of patient's lack of sensitivity due to neuropathy. Deep pressure ulcers appear internally when pressures applied on the foot create high internal strains nearby bony structures. Monitoring tissue strains in persons with diabetes is therefore important for an efficient prevention. We propose to use personalized biomechanical foot models to assess strains within the foot and to determine the risk of ulcer formation. Our workflow generates a foot model adapted to a patient's morphology by deforming an atlas model to conform it to the contours of segmented medical images of the patient's foot. Our biomechanical model is composed of rigid bodies for the bones, joined by ligaments and muscles, and a finite element mesh representing the soft tissues. Using our registration algorithm to conform three datasets, three new patient models were created. After applying a pressure load below these foot models, the Von Mises equivalent strains and "cluster volumes" (i.e. volumes of contiguous elements with strains above a given threshold) were measured within eight functionally meaningful foot regions. The results show the variability of both location and strain values among the three considered patients. This study also confirms that the anatomy of the foot has an influence on the risk of pressure ulcer. PMID:27212210

  20. Solving the problem of pressure ulcers resulting from cervical collars.

    PubMed

    Blaylock, B

    1996-05-01

    Cervical orthotic devices (cervical collars) are integral to the treatment of patients with suspected or confirmed fracture of the cervical spine. Pressure ulcers can develop under the cervical collar on the occipital protuberance and on the chin due to both prolonged immobilization and the collar construction. A multidisciplinary team at a Northwest Ohio trauma center led an investigation of this problem when a one day study of pressure ulcer prevalence revealed that of 4% of nosocomial pressure ulcers, 2% were attributed to cervical collars. To solve this problem, the team visualized risk factors using a fishbone diagram, investigated by calling manufacturers and other institutions and by searching the literature, developed educational programs on skin care and correct collar fitting, conducted a product trial on a new collar, and continuously monitored the results. The conclusions of the team were that the pressure ulcers were the result of the construction of the previous cervical collars used. The product trial resulted in zero skin breakdown for the 20 patients involved. Changes implemented as a result were an improved skin care regimen, education on proper fitting and appropriate choice of collars, and implementation of the new collar for trauma patients. PMID:8826136

  1. Solving the problem of pressure ulcers resulting from cervical collars.

    PubMed

    Blaylock, B

    1996-05-01

    Cervical orthotic devices (cervical collars) are integral to the treatment of patients with suspected or confirmed fracture of the cervical spine. Pressure ulcers can develop under the cervical collar on the occipital protuberance and on the chin due to both prolonged immobilization and the collar construction. A multidisciplinary team at a Northwest Ohio trauma center led an investigation of this problem when a one day study of pressure ulcer prevalence revealed that of 4% of nosocomial pressure ulcers, 2% were attributed to cervical collars. To solve this problem, the team visualized risk factors using a fishbone diagram, investigated by calling manufacturers and other institutions and by searching the literature, developed educational programs on skin care and correct collar fitting, conducted a product trial on a new collar, and continuously monitored the results. The conclusions of the team were that the pressure ulcers were the result of the construction of the previous cervical collars used. The product trial resulted in zero skin breakdown for the 20 patients involved. Changes implemented as a result were an improved skin care regimen, education on proper fitting and appropriate choice of collars, and implementation of the new collar for trauma patients.

  2. Evidence-based guidelines for pressure ulcer management at the end of life.

    PubMed

    Langemo, Diane; Haesler, Emily; Naylor, Wayne; Tippett, Aletha; Young, Trudie

    2015-05-01

    It is important to develop an individualised plan of care for people at the end of life to prevent pressure ulcers, and to treat them if they do occur. This article discusses patient and risk assessment, prevention and care for pressure ulcers for the palliative care patient and the recommendations given in the palliative care section of the Prevention and Treatment of Pressure Ulcers: Clinical Practice Guideline (National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel, European Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel and Pan Pacific Pressure Injury Alliance, 2014).

  3. Microcontrolled air-mattress for ulcer by pressure prevention

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasluosta, Cristian F.; Fontana, Juan M.; Beltramone, Diego A.; Taborda, Ricardo A. M.

    2007-11-01

    An ulcer by pressure is produced when a constant pressure is exerted over the skin. This generates the collapse of the blood vessels and, therefore, a lack in the contribution of the necessary nutrients for the affected zone. As a consequence, the skin deteriorates, eventually causing an ulcer. In order to prevent it, a protocol must be applied to the patient, which is reflected on time and cost of treatment. There are some air mattresses available for this purpose, but whose performance does not fulfill all requirements. The prototype designed in our laboratory is based on the principle of the air mattress. Its objective is to improve on existing technologies and, due to an increased automation, reduce time dedication for personnel in charge of the patient. A clinical experience was made in the local Emergencies Hospital and also in an institution dedicated to aged patients care. In both cases, the results obtained and the comments from the personnel involved were favorable.

  4. The incidence, risk factors and characteristics of pressure ulcers in hospitalized patients in China.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Qixia; Li, Xiaohua; Qu, Xiaolong; Liu, Yun; Zhang, Liyan; Su, Chunyin; Guo, Xiujun; Chen, Yuejuan; Zhu, Yajun; Jia, Jing; Bo, Suping; Liu, Li; Zhang, Rui; Xu, Ling; Wu, Leyan; Wang, Hai; Wang, Jiandong

    2014-01-01

    Pressure ulcers are very common in hospital patients. Though many studies have been reported in many countries, the large-scale benchmarking prevalence of pressure ulcers in China is not available. The aim of this study is to quantify the prevalence of pressure ulcers and the incidence of hospital-acquired pressure ulcers and analyze risk factors in hospitalized patients in China. A multi-central cross-sectional survey was conducted in one university hospital and 11 general hospitals in China. The Minimum Data Set (MDS) recommended by European Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel (EUPAP) was used to collect information of inpatients. All patients stayed in hospital more than 24 hours and older than 18 years signed consent form and were included. Data from 39952 out of 40415 (98.85%) inpatients were analyzed. Of the 39952 patients, 631 patients (including 1024 locations) had pressure ulcers. The prevalence rate of pressure ulcers in 12 hospitals was 1.58% (0.94-2.97%). The incidence of hospital-acquired pressure ulcers (HAPU) was 0.63% (0.20-1.20%). The most common locations developed pressure ulcers were sacrum, heels, and iliac crests. The common stages of pressure ulcers were stage I and II. Patients in Intensive Care Unit, Geriatric and Neurological Department were easier to develop pressure ulcers. The prevalence and incidence of pressure ulcers in China was lower than that reported in European and other countries. The stages of pressure ulcers in China were different than that reported in European countries. Our study provides with a baseline value for intensive research on pressure ulcer in China.

  5. Assessment of sacrococcygeal pressure ulcers using diffuse correlation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz, David; Lafontant, Alec; Neidrauer, Michael; Weingarten, Michael S.; DiMaria-Ghalili, Rose Ann; Fried, Guy W.; Rece, Julianne; Lewin, Peter A.; Zubkov, Leonid

    2016-03-01

    Microcirculation is essential for proper supply of oxygen and nutritive substances to the biological tissue and the removal of waste products of metabolism. The determination of microcirculatory blood flow (mBF) is therefore of substantial interest to clinicians for assessing tissue health; particularly in pressure ulceration and suspected deep tissue injury. The goal of this pilot clinical study was to assess deep-tissue pressure ulceration by non-invasively measuring mBF using Diffuse Correlation Spectroscopy (DCS). DCS provides information about the flow of red blood cells in the capillary network by measuring the temporal autocorrelation function of scattering light intensity. A novel optical probe was developed in order to obtain measurements under the load of the subject's body as pressure is applied (ischemia) and then released (reperfusion) on sacrococcygeal tissue in a hospital bed. Prior to loading measurements, baseline readings of the sacral region were obtained by measuring the subjects in a side-lying position. DCS measurements from the sacral region of twenty healthy volunteers have been compared to those of two patients who initially had similar non-blanchable redness. The temporal autocorrelation function of scattering light intensity of the patient whose redness later disappeared was similar to that of the average healthy subject. The second patient, whose redness developed into an advanced pressure ulcer two weeks later, had a substantial decrease in blood flow while under the loading position compared to healthy subjects. Preliminary results suggest the developed system may potentially predict whether non-blanchable redness will manifest itself as advanced ulceration or dissipate over time.

  6. Pressure ulcer risk of patient handling sling use.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Matthew J; Kahn, Julie A; Kerrigan, Michael V; Gutmann, Joseph M; Harrow, Jeffrey J

    2015-01-01

    Patient handling slings and lifts reduce the risk of musculoskeletal injuries for healthcare providers. However, no published evidence exists of their safety with respect to pressure ulceration for vulnerable populations, specifically persons with spinal cord injury, nor do any studies compare slings for pressure distribution. High-resolution interface pressure mapping was used to describe and quantify risks associated with pressure ulceration due to normal forces and identify at-risk anatomical locations. We evaluated 23 patient handling slings with 4 nondisabled adults. Sling-participant interface pressures were recorded while participants lay supine on a hospital bed and while suspended during typical patient transfers. Sling-participant interface pressures were greatest while suspended for all seated and supine slings and exceeded 200 mm Hg for all seated slings. Interface pressures were greatest along the sling seams (edges), regardless of position or sling type. The anatomical areas most at risk while participants were suspended in seated slings were the posterior upper and lower thighs. For supine slings, the perisacral area, ischial tuberosities, and greater trochanters were most at risk. The duration of time spent in slings, especially while suspended, should be limited.

  7. Pressure Ulcer-Related Pelvic Osteomyelitis: A Neglected Disease?

    PubMed Central

    Bodavula, Phani; Liang, Stephen Y.; Wu, Jiami; VanTassell, Paige; Marschall, Jonas

    2015-01-01

    Background. Decubitus ulcers can become complicated by pelvic osteomyelitis. Little is known about the epidemiology of pressure ulcer-related pelvic osteomyelitis. Methods. We performed a retrospective cohort study of adult patients with pressure ulcer and pelvic osteomyelitis admitted to an academic center from 2006 to 2011. Data on clinical presentation, diagnostic evaluation, and treatment during the index admission were collected. Outcome measures included length of hospital stay and number of readmissions in the subsequent year. Results. Two hundred twenty patients were included: 163 (74%) were para/quadriplegic and 148 (67%) were male (148; 67%). Mean age was 50 (±18) years. Pelvic osteomyelitis was the primary admission diagnosis for 117 (53%). Fifty-six (26%) patients had concurrent febrile urinary tract infection. Wound cultures collected for 113 patients (51%) were notable for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (37; 33%), Streptococci (19; 17%), and Pseudomonas spp (20; 18%). Plain films were obtained in 89 (40%) patients, computed tomography scans were obtained for 81 (37%) patients, and magnetic resonance images were obtained for 40 (18%) patients. Most patients received osteomyelitis-directed antibiotics (153; 70%), 134 of 153 (88%) of which were scheduled to receive ≥6 weeks of treatment. Fifty-five (25%) patients underwent surgery during the index admission; 48 (22%) patients received a combined medical-surgical approach. One third of patients had ≥2 readmissions during the subsequent year. Patients treated with a combined approach were less likely to be readmitted than those who received antibiotics alone (0 [range, 0–4] vs 1 [0–7] readmissions; P = .04). Conclusions. This is one of the largest cohort studies of pressure ulcer-related pelvic osteomyelitis to date. Significant variations existed in diagnostic approach. Most patients received antibiotics; those treated with a combined medical-surgical approach had fewer

  8. Patient repositioning and pressure ulcer risk--monitoring interface pressures of at-risk patients.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Matthew J; Gravenstein, Nikolaus; Schwab, Wilhelm K; van Oostrom, Johannes H; Caruso, Lawrence J

    2013-01-01

    Repositioning patients regularly to prevent pressure ulcers and reduce interface pressures is the standard of care, yet prior work has found that standard repositioning does not relieve all areas of at-risk tissue in nondisabled subjects. To determine whether this holds true for high-risk patients, we assessed the effectiveness of routine repositioning in relieving at-risk tissue of the perisacral area using interface pressure mapping. Bedridden patients at risk for pressure ulcer formation (n = 23, Braden score <18) had their perisacral skin-bed interface pressures recorded every 30 s while they received routine repositioning care for 4-6 h. All participants had specific skin areas (206 +/- 182 cm(2)) that exceeded elevated pressure thresholds for >95% of the observation period. Thirteen participants were observed in three distinct positions (supine, turned left, turned right), and all had specific skin areas (166 +/- 184 cm(2)) that exceeded pressure thresholds for >95% of the observation period. At-risk patients have skin areas that are likely always at risk throughout their hospital stay despite repositioning. Healthcare providers are unaware of the actual tissue-relieving effectiveness (or lack thereof) of their repositioning interventions, which may partially explain why pressure ulcer mitigation strategies are not always successful. Relieving at-risk tissue is a necessary part of pressure ulcer prevention, but the repositioning practice itself needs improvement.

  9. Friction-induced skin injuries-are they pressure ulcers? An updated NPUAP white paper.

    PubMed

    Brienza, David; Antokal, Steven; Herbe, Laura; Logan, Susan; Maguire, Jeanine; Van Ranst, Jennifer; Siddiqui, Aamir

    2015-01-01

    Friction injuries are often misdiagnosed as pressure ulcers. The reason for the misdiagnosis may be a misinterpretation of classic pressure ulcer literature that reported friction increased the susceptibility of the skin to pressure damage. This analysis assesses the classic literature that led to the inclusion of friction as a causative factor in the development of pressure ulcers in light of more recent research on the effects of shear. The analysis in this article suggests that friction can contribute to pressure ulcers by creating shear strain in deeper tissues, but friction does not appear to contribute to pressure ulcers in the superficial layers of the skin. Injuries to the superficial layers of the skin caused by friction are not pressure ulcers and should not be classified or treated as such.

  10. [Pressure ulcers and undernutrition--screening and assessment of nutritional status].

    PubMed

    Tran, C; Roulet, M; Guex, E; Coti Bertrand, P

    2008-03-01

    Acquired pressure ulcer is associated with significant human, economic and functional consequences. Its prevalence varies between 3 and 23% in a community hospital and between 7 and 54% in an elderly home residency. Pressure ulcer healing is a complex process which involves numerous cellular and molecular mechanisms. An altered nutritional status is a contributing factor in the development of pressure ulcers and the delay in pressure ulcer healing. The key to management of undernutrition is screening and early intervention. According to the gravity of undernutrition, various degrees of intervention will be required. Systematic oral supplementation with various nutrients may provide benefit in the prevention of pressure ulcers, but further studies have to be completed in human subjects prior to being recommended for the treatment of pressure ulcers.

  11. Improving outcome of pressure ulcers with nutritional interventions: a review of the evidence.

    PubMed

    Thomas, D R

    2001-02-01

    Pressure ulcers and malnutrition frequently co-exist in frail patients. Nutritional parameters have been correlated with development and with healing in chronic pressure ulcers, leading to suggestions that improving nutritional status can prevent or treat pressure ulcers. Despite a strong association, a causal relationship of poor nutritional status to development of pressure ulcers has not been established. Support for a causal relationship would include evidence that nutritional interventions improve general nutritional status, acute wound healing, or chronic wound healing. The data suggesting that nutritional intervention can improve clinical outcome are limited. No study has demonstrated that improvement in nutritional status can prevent pressure ulcers. There is at least suggestive evidence that improvement in nutritional status can improve outcome in pressure ulcer healing.

  12. Mobile health platform for pressure ulcer monitoring with electronic health record integration.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Joel J P C; Pedro, Luís M C C; Vardasca, Tomé; de la Torre-Díez, Isabel; Martins, Henrique M G

    2013-12-01

    Pressure ulcers frequently occur in patients with limited mobility, for example, people with advanced age and patients wearing casts or prostheses. Mobile information communication technologies can help implement ulcer care protocols and the monitoring of patients with high risk, thus preventing or improving these conditions. This article presents a mobile pressure ulcer monitoring platform (mULCER), which helps control a patient's ulcer status during all stages of treatment. Beside its stand-alone version, it can be integrated with electronic health record systems as mULCER synchronizes ulcer data with any electronic health record system using HL7 standards. It serves as a tool to integrate nursing care among hospital departments and institutions. mULCER was experimented with in different mobile devices such as LG Optimus One P500, Samsung Galaxy Tab, HTC Magic, Samsung Galaxy S, and Samsung Galaxy i5700, taking into account the user's experience of different screen sizes and processing characteristics.

  13. Ulcers

    MedlinePlus

    ... have one. Ulcers can also be caused by anti-inflammatory medicines. Although most people take these medicines without ... may damage the stomach lining and cause ulcers. Anti-inflammatory drugs include aspirin, ibuprofen (one brand name: Motrin), ...

  14. Traditional classroom education versus computer-based learning: how nurses learn about pressure ulcers.

    PubMed

    Esche, Carol Ann; Warren, Joan I; Woods, Anne B; Jesada, Elizabeth C; Iliuta, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    The goal of the Nurse Professional Development specialist is to utilize the most effective educational strategies when educating staff nurses about pressure ulcer prevention. More information is needed about the effect of computer-based learning and traditional classroom learning on pressure ulcer education for the staff nurse. This study compares computer-based learning and traditional classroom learning on immediate and long-term knowledge while evaluating the impact of education on pressure ulcer risk assessment, staging, and documentation. PMID:25608093

  15. Traditional classroom education versus computer-based learning: how nurses learn about pressure ulcers.

    PubMed

    Esche, Carol Ann; Warren, Joan I; Woods, Anne B; Jesada, Elizabeth C; Iliuta, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    The goal of the Nurse Professional Development specialist is to utilize the most effective educational strategies when educating staff nurses about pressure ulcer prevention. More information is needed about the effect of computer-based learning and traditional classroom learning on pressure ulcer education for the staff nurse. This study compares computer-based learning and traditional classroom learning on immediate and long-term knowledge while evaluating the impact of education on pressure ulcer risk assessment, staging, and documentation.

  16. Nutritional care to prevent and heal pressure ulcers.

    PubMed

    Singer, Pierre

    2002-09-01

    Pressure sores are a well-recognized problem, with an etiology that is multifactorial and not solely a consequence of pressure itself. Malnutrition is one of the factors involved, namely low calorie and protein intake. Mainly elderly patients, patients after hip fracture, but also patients after trauma, burns or extended surgery require additional nutritional support to reduce the possibility of pressure ulcers developing. Evidence has shown the efficacy of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy in elderly patients with malnutrition and dementia. Nutritional support should include sufficient calories, protein, fat, carbohydrates, vitamins and minerals. Arginine is the main amino acid required and is essential for collagen deposition and wound healing. Vitamin A and zinc should be added to nutritional support.

  17. [Evaluation of pressure ulcers area using the softwares Motic and AutoCAD®].

    PubMed

    Reis, Camila Letícia Dias dos; Cavalcante, Janaína Mortosa; Rocha Júnior, Edvar Ferreira da; Neves, Rinaldo Souza; Santana, Levy Aniceto; Guadagnin, Renato da Veiga; Brasil, Lourdes Mattos

    2012-01-01

    Pressure ulcer is a lesion that affects skin layers in some regions of the body and its healing can be followed up using image processing. The analysis of pressure ulcer area is relevant to evaluate its evolution and response to therapeutic procedures. Such areas can be evaluated through contour marking with the softwares Motic and AutoCAD®. In this study 35 volunteers computed areas from two grade III pressure ulcers using these instruments. It was possible to conclude that results are clinically equivalent and so can be considered to follow up healing evolution from pressure ulcers. PMID:22911414

  18. [Evaluation of pressure ulcers area using the softwares Motic and AutoCAD®].

    PubMed

    Reis, Camila Letícia Dias dos; Cavalcante, Janaína Mortosa; Rocha Júnior, Edvar Ferreira da; Neves, Rinaldo Souza; Santana, Levy Aniceto; Guadagnin, Renato da Veiga; Brasil, Lourdes Mattos

    2012-01-01

    Pressure ulcer is a lesion that affects skin layers in some regions of the body and its healing can be followed up using image processing. The analysis of pressure ulcer area is relevant to evaluate its evolution and response to therapeutic procedures. Such areas can be evaluated through contour marking with the softwares Motic and AutoCAD®. In this study 35 volunteers computed areas from two grade III pressure ulcers using these instruments. It was possible to conclude that results are clinically equivalent and so can be considered to follow up healing evolution from pressure ulcers.

  19. 76 FR 74789 - Scientific Information Request on Pressure Ulcer Treatment Medical Devices

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Scientific Information Request on Pressure... (AHRQ) is seeking scientific information submissions from manufacturers of pressure ulcer treatment medical devices, such as (but not limited to): Ultrasonic wound care systems, negative pressure...

  20. Plantar Pressure in Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy Patients with Active Foot Ulceration, Previous Ulceration and No History of Ulceration: A Meta-Analysis of Observational Studies

    PubMed Central

    Fernando, Malindu Eranga; Crowther, Robert George; Pappas, Elise; Lazzarini, Peter Anthony; Cunningham, Margaret; Sangla, Kunwarjit Singh; Buttner, Petra; Golledge, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Aims Elevated dynamic plantar pressures are a consistent finding in diabetes patients with peripheral neuropathy with implications for plantar foot ulceration. This meta-analysis aimed to compare the plantar pressures of diabetes patients that had peripheral neuropathy and those with neuropathy with active or previous foot ulcers. Methods Published articles were identified from Medline via OVID, CINAHL, SCOPUS, INFORMIT, Cochrane Central EMBASE via OVID and Web of Science via ISI Web of Knowledge bibliographic databases. Observational studies reporting barefoot dynamic plantar pressure in adults with diabetic peripheral neuropathy, where at least one group had a history of plantar foot ulcers were included. Interventional studies, shod plantar pressure studies and studies not published in English were excluded. Overall mean peak plantar pressure (MPP) and pressure time integral (PTI) were primary outcomes. The six secondary outcomes were MPP and PTI at the rear foot, mid foot and fore foot. The protocol of the meta-analysis was published with PROPSERO, (registration number CRD42013004310). Results Eight observational studies were included. Overall MPP and PTI were greater in diabetic peripheral neuropathy patients with foot ulceration compared to those without ulceration (standardised mean difference 0.551, 95% CI 0.290–0.811, p<0.001; and 0.762, 95% CI 0.303–1.221, p = 0.001, respectively). Sub-group analyses demonstrated no significant difference in MPP for those with neuropathy with active ulceration compared to those without ulcers. A significant difference in MPP was found for those with neuropathy with a past history of ulceration compared to those without ulcers; (0.467, 95% CI 0.181– 0.753, p = 0.001). Statistical heterogeneity between studies was moderate. Conclusions Plantar pressures appear to be significantly higher in patients with diabetic peripheral neuropathy with a history of foot ulceration compared to those with diabetic neuropathy

  1. [Decubitus ulcer. Basic treatment intervention is pressure unloading].

    PubMed

    Völker, H U; Röper, G; Gerngross, H; Willy, C

    1999-11-11

    With an incidence of between 3 and 34%, decubitus ulcers are common chronic wounds, many of which can be avoided by prophylactic measures. The most effective preventive measure is relieving pressure on the endangered part of the body, and this is most easily achieved by regularly changing the patient's position in bed. Since, however, this is not always possible for staff-shortage or illness-related (e.g. fractures of the spine) reasons, modern pressure-relieving systems are being increasingly used. The range of options extends from simple foam plastic underlays to water-filled cushions to pneumatic cushions or beds filled with tiny glass beads. Selection of the most appropriate system is often difficult. For effective prophylaxis, determination of the individual risk of developing a bedsore with the aid of special scales makes good sense. In this way, the measures required can be adapted to the particular needs of the individual patient. New approaches to decubitus ulcer prevention and wound management may help to ensure effective care of the endangered or affected patient.

  2. Lifestyle Changes and Pressure Ulcer Prevention in Adults With Spinal Cord Injury in the Pressure Ulcer Prevention Study Lifestyle Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Ghaisas, Samruddhi; Pyatak, Elizabeth A.; Blanche, Erna; Clark, Florence

    2015-01-01

    Pressure ulcers (PrUs) are a major burden to patients with spinal cord injury (SCI), affecting their psychological, physical, and social well-being. Lifestyle choices are thought to contribute to the risk of developing PrUs. This article focuses on the interaction between lifestyle choices and the development of PrUs in community settings among participants in the University of Southern California–Rancho Los Amigos National Rehabilitation Center Pressure Ulcer Prevention Study (PUPS II), a randomized controlled trial of a lifestyle intervention for adults with SCI. We conducted a secondary cross-case analysis of treatment notes of 47 PUPS II participants and identified four patterns relating PrU development to lifestyle changes: positive PrU changes (e.g., healing PrUs) with positive lifestyle changes, negative or no PrU changes with positive lifestyle changes, positive PrU changes with minor lifestyle changes, and negative or no PrU changes with no lifestyle changes. We present case studies exemplifying each pattern. PMID:25553751

  3. [Skin Care to Prevent Development of Pressure Ulcers in Bedridden Nursing Home Residents from Developing Pressure Ulcers in Nursing Home Residents].

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Chie

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to clarify whether skincare products are effective in preventing development of pressure ulcers in bedridden nursing home residents. The study sample consisted of 21 nursing home residents at a nursing home in Osaka, Japan who use diapers. Participants were assigned to 3 groups and compared to a control group. None of the subjects developed a pressure ulcer and had improved skin condition around the anus. PMID:26809416

  4. Pressure Ulcers in Adults: Prediction and Prevention. Clinical Practice Guideline Number 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agency for Health Care Policy and Research (DHHS/PHS), Rockville, MD.

    This package includes a clinical practice guideline, quick reference guide for clinicians, and patient's guide to predicting and preventing pressure ulcers in adults. The clinical practice guideline includes the following: overview of the incidence and prevalence of pressure ulcers; clinical practice guideline (introduction, risk assessment tools…

  5. Building a Biopsychosocial Conceptual Framework to Explore Pressure Ulcer Pain for Hospitalized Patients.

    PubMed

    Kim, Junglyun; Ahn, Hyochol; Lyon, Debra E; Stechmiller, Joyce

    2016-01-08

    Although pressure ulcers are a prevalent condition, pain associated with pressure ulcers is not fully understood. Indeed, previous studies do not shed light on the association between pressure ulcer stages and the experience of pain. Especially, pain characteristics of suspected deep tissue injury, which is a new category that was recently added by the National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel, are yet unknown. This is concerning because the incidence of pressure ulcers in hospitalized patients has increased exponentially over the last two decades, and health care providers are struggling to ensure providing adequate care. Thus, in order to facilitate the development of effective interventions, this paper presents a conceptual framework to explore pressure ulcer pain in hospitalized patients. The concepts were derived from a biopsychosocial model of pain, and the relationships among each concept were identified through a literature review. Major propositions are presented based on the proposed conceptual framework, which integrates previous research on pressure ulcer pain, to ultimately improve understanding of pain in hospitalized patients with pressure ulcers.

  6. Prevention Practice Differences Among Persons With Spinal Cord Injuries Who Rarely Versus Frequently Sustain Pressure Ulcers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Michael L.; Marini, Irmo; Slate, John R.

    2005-01-01

    Pressure ulcers are common among people with spinal cord injury (SCI) and not only are costly to treat but also affect the quality of life of those affected by them. Despite a plethora of literature on prevention, there are few wellness studies focusing on the practices of people who do not develop pressure ulcers. This preliminary study sought to…

  7. An evaluation of Debrisan in chronic leg ulcers and pressure sores.

    PubMed

    Allen, P C; Turmer, A D

    1979-01-01

    Debrisan (Dextranomer) was subjected to a simple open assessment in the treatment of fifty-three chronic leg ulcers and thirty pressure sores in eight hospitals. It was found that 70% of leg ulcers and 76% of pressure sores improved, with a noticeable cleansing effect being evident in 79% and 83% respectively. No side-effects were recorded.

  8. Building a Biopsychosocial Conceptual Framework to Explore Pressure Ulcer Pain for Hospitalized Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Junglyun; Ahn, Hyochol; Lyon, Debra E.; Stechmiller, Joyce

    2016-01-01

    Although pressure ulcers are a prevalent condition, pain associated with pressure ulcers is not fully understood. Indeed, previous studies do not shed light on the association between pressure ulcer stages and the experience of pain. Especially, pain characteristics of suspected deep tissue injury, which is a new category that was recently added by the National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel, are yet unknown. This is concerning because the incidence of pressure ulcers in hospitalized patients has increased exponentially over the last two decades, and health care providers are struggling to ensure providing adequate care. Thus, in order to facilitate the development of effective interventions, this paper presents a conceptual framework to explore pressure ulcer pain in hospitalized patients. The concepts were derived from a biopsychosocial model of pain, and the relationships among each concept were identified through a literature review. Major propositions are presented based on the proposed conceptual framework, which integrates previous research on pressure ulcer pain, to ultimately improve understanding of pain in hospitalized patients with pressure ulcers. PMID:27417595

  9. Building a Biopsychosocial Conceptual Framework to Explore Pressure Ulcer Pain for Hospitalized Patients.

    PubMed

    Kim, Junglyun; Ahn, Hyochol; Lyon, Debra E; Stechmiller, Joyce

    2016-01-01

    Although pressure ulcers are a prevalent condition, pain associated with pressure ulcers is not fully understood. Indeed, previous studies do not shed light on the association between pressure ulcer stages and the experience of pain. Especially, pain characteristics of suspected deep tissue injury, which is a new category that was recently added by the National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel, are yet unknown. This is concerning because the incidence of pressure ulcers in hospitalized patients has increased exponentially over the last two decades, and health care providers are struggling to ensure providing adequate care. Thus, in order to facilitate the development of effective interventions, this paper presents a conceptual framework to explore pressure ulcer pain in hospitalized patients. The concepts were derived from a biopsychosocial model of pain, and the relationships among each concept were identified through a literature review. Major propositions are presented based on the proposed conceptual framework, which integrates previous research on pressure ulcer pain, to ultimately improve understanding of pain in hospitalized patients with pressure ulcers. PMID:27417595

  10. Hybrid Equation/Agent-Based Model of Ischemia-Induced Hyperemia and Pressure Ulcer Formation Predicts Greater Propensity to Ulcerate in Subjects with Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Solovyev, Alexey; Mi, Qi; Tzen, Yi-Ting; Brienza, David; Vodovotz, Yoram

    2013-01-01

    Pressure ulcers are costly and life-threatening complications for people with spinal cord injury (SCI). People with SCI also exhibit differential blood flow properties in non-ulcerated skin. We hypothesized that a computer simulation of the pressure ulcer formation process, informed by data regarding skin blood flow and reactive hyperemia in response to pressure, could provide insights into the pathogenesis and effective treatment of post-SCI pressure ulcers. Agent-Based Models (ABM) are useful in settings such as pressure ulcers, in which spatial realism is important. Ordinary Differential Equation-based (ODE) models are useful when modeling physiological phenomena such as reactive hyperemia. Accordingly, we constructed a hybrid model that combines ODEs related to blood flow along with an ABM of skin injury, inflammation, and ulcer formation. The relationship between pressure and the course of ulcer formation, as well as several other important characteristic patterns of pressure ulcer formation, was demonstrated in this model. The ODE portion of this model was calibrated to data related to blood flow following experimental pressure responses in non-injured human subjects or to data from people with SCI. This model predicted a higher propensity to form ulcers in response to pressure in people with SCI vs. non-injured control subjects, and thus may serve as novel diagnostic platform for post-SCI ulcer formation. PMID:23696726

  11. Predictive Validity of Pressure Ulcer Risk Assessment Tools for Elderly: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Park, Seong-Hi; Lee, Young-Shin; Kwon, Young-Mi

    2016-04-01

    Preventing pressure ulcers is one of the most challenging goals existing for today's health care provider. Currently used tools which assess risk of pressure ulcer development rarely evaluate the accuracy of predictability, especially in older adults. The current study aimed at providing a systemic review and meta-analysis of 29 studies using three pressure ulcer risk assessment tools: Braden, Norton, and Waterlow Scales. Overall predictive validities of pressure ulcer risks in the pooled sensitivity and specificity indicated a similar range with a moderate accuracy level in all three scales, while heterogeneity showed more than 80% variability among studies. The studies applying the Braden Scale used five different cut-off points representing the primary cause of heterogeneity. Results indicate that commonly used screening tools for pressure ulcer risk have limitations regarding validity and accuracy for use with older adults due to heterogeneity among studies.

  12. Efficacy of one-stage surgical treatment and clinical features in patients with multiple pressure ulcers.

    PubMed

    Han, Hyun Ho; Choi, Eun Jeong; Choi, Jong Yun; Rhie, Jong Won

    2016-03-01

    Treating patients with multiple pressure ulcers is a very challenging task for physicians. However, there are very few reports on treatment protocols for multiple pressure ulcers and treatment outcomes. The authors have consistently treated multiple pressure ulcers in a one-stage operation rather than a staged operation. We evaluated multiple pressure ulcers patients who underwent a one-stage operation from 2007 to 2014. A comparison was made between 20 patients who underwent a one-stage operation on 44 foci and 68 patients with a single focus. Though the results, we could conclude that one-stage operation of multiple pressure ulcers was found to have a shorter recovery period and shorter hospitalization without a significant increase in complications.

  13. Enteral nutrition in the prevention and treatment of pressure ulcers in adult critical care patients.

    PubMed

    Cox, Jill; Rasmussen, Louisa

    2014-12-01

    Prevention and healing of pressure ulcers in critically ill patients can be especially challenging because of the patients' burden of illness and degree of physiological compromise. Providing adequate nutrition may help halt the development or worsening of pressure ulcers. Optimization of nutrition can be considered an essential ingredient in prevention and healing of pressure ulcers. Understanding malnutrition in critical care patients, the effect of nutrition on wound healing, and the application of evidence-based nutritional guidelines are important aspects for patients at high risk for pressure ulcers. Appropriate screenings for nutritional status and risk for pressure ulcers, early collaboration with a registered dietician, and administration of appropriate feeding formulations and micronutrient and macronutrient supplementation to promote wound healing are practical solutions to improve the nutritional status of critical care patients. Use of nutritional management and enteral feeding protocols may provide vital elements to augment nutrition and ultimately result in improved clinical outcomes.

  14. Effects of warming therapy on pressure ulcers--a randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Scott, E M; Leaper, D J; Clark, M; Kelly, P J

    2001-05-01

    Postoperative pressure ulcers are a common and expensive problem. Intraoperative hypothermia also is a common problem and may have a connection with impaired tissue viability. Researchers in this study hypothesized that intraoperative control of hypothermia may reduce the incidence of postoperative pressure ulcers. A randomized clinical trial (n = 338) was used to test the effects of using forced air warming therapy versus standard care. Results indicated an absolute risk reduction in pressure ulcers of 4.8% (i.e., 10.4% to 5.6%) with a relative risk reduction of 46% in patients who received warming therapy. Although not reaching statistical significance, the clinical significance of almost halving the pressure ulcer rate is important. A correlation between body temperature and postoperative pressure ulcers was established.

  15. The impact of nurses' values on the prevention of pressure ulcers.

    PubMed

    Samuriwo, Ray

    Values are perceived to be a key determinant of people's behaviour and actions. There is a limited amount of research into the value that nurses place on the prevention of pressure ulcers, but past studies have suggested that nurses place a low value on pressure ulcer prevention. This article describes a study that was undertaken to ascertain what value nurses place on pressure ulcer prevention. The participants in this study (n=16) were recruited from the non-acute adult medical wards of 14 hospitals of one NHS trust and a local university. Data were gathered via semi-structured interviews, then transcribed and analysed via Straussian grounded theory. The findings of this study show that the value that nurses place on pressure ulcer prevention is important because all nurses attempt to work in line with the value that they place on pressure ulcer prevention. The nurses who place a high value on pressure ulcer prevention appear to be more proactive and determined to deliver care that protects the care of their patients' skin. However, the findings suggest that the efforts of nurses to prevent pressure ulcers are often impeded by environmental factors like bed management, and the differing values placed on ulcer prevention by colleagues. It also shows that interventions to protect the skin of patients are often undertaken by healthcare assistants and students because nurses are too busy carrying out other tasks. PMID:20852477

  16. Effects of a comprehensive nutritional program on pressure ulcer healing, length of hospital stay, and charges to patients.

    PubMed

    Allen, Beverlin

    2013-05-01

    The burden of pressure ulcers will intensify because of a rapidly increasing elderly population. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of a comprehensive, interdisciplinary nutritional protocol on pressure ulcer wound healing, length of hospital stays, and charges for pressure ulcer management. The pre/post quasi-experimental design study comprised of 100 patients (50 patients in each group) 60 years or older with pressure ulcer. Research questions were analyzed using descriptive statistics, frequencies, chi-square tests, and t tests. Study findings indicate that the intervention was effective in improving pressure ulcer wound healing, decreasing both hospital length of stay (LOS) for treatment of pressure ulcer and total hospital LOS, while showing no significant additional charges for treatment of pressure ulcers. The older adults are at the highest risk of developing pressure ulcers that result in prolonged hospitalization, high health care costs, increased mortality, and decreased quality of life.

  17. Risk factors for pressure ulcer development in institutionalized elderly.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Diba Maria Sebba Tosta; Santos, Vera Lúcia Conceição de Gouveia

    2007-01-01

    This study aimed to analyze the risk factors for the development of Pressure Ulcers (PU) in old people living in Long Staying Institutions. It is a prospective and cohort study carried out in four Institutions. A total of 94 old people composed the sample and were assessed during three consecutive months. The total scores of the Braden Scale were different between the groups with and without PU, at the first (p=0.030) and last assessments (p=0.001); humidity, nutrition and friction/shearing were significantly different between those with and without PU, and were always worst among the first. Female gender and previous PU were confirmed as predictive for the development of PU (r(2)=0.311).

  18. Electronic SSKIN pathway: reducing device-related pressure ulcers.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Natalie

    2016-08-11

    This article describes how an interprofessional project in a London NHS Foundation Trust was undertaken to develop an intranet-based medical device-related pressure ulcer prevention and management pathway for clinical staff working across an adult critical care directorate, where life-threatening events require interventions using medical devices. The aim of this project was to improve working policies and processes to define key prevention strategies and provide clinicians with a clear, standardised approach to risk and skin assessment, equipment use, documentation and reporting clinical data using the Trust's CareVue (electronic medical records), Datix (incident reporting and risk-management tool) and eTRACE (online clinical protocol ordering) systems. The process included the development, trial and local implementation of the pathway using collaborative teamwork and the SSKIN care bundle tool. The experience of identifying issues, overcoming challenges, defining best practice and cascading SSKIN awareness training is shared.

  19. Electronic SSKIN pathway: reducing device-related pressure ulcers.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Natalie

    2016-08-11

    This article describes how an interprofessional project in a London NHS Foundation Trust was undertaken to develop an intranet-based medical device-related pressure ulcer prevention and management pathway for clinical staff working across an adult critical care directorate, where life-threatening events require interventions using medical devices. The aim of this project was to improve working policies and processes to define key prevention strategies and provide clinicians with a clear, standardised approach to risk and skin assessment, equipment use, documentation and reporting clinical data using the Trust's CareVue (electronic medical records), Datix (incident reporting and risk-management tool) and eTRACE (online clinical protocol ordering) systems. The process included the development, trial and local implementation of the pathway using collaborative teamwork and the SSKIN care bundle tool. The experience of identifying issues, overcoming challenges, defining best practice and cascading SSKIN awareness training is shared. PMID:27523768

  20. Pressure Ulcer Prevention in the Hospital Setting Using Silicone Foam Dressings.

    PubMed

    Truong, Bao; Grigson, Eileen; Patel, Maulik; Liu, Xinwei

    2016-01-01

    Patient care is of the utmost importance in the hospital setting. Bedrest and immobility during hospitalization, especially in the surgical and intensive care setting, place the patient at high risk for pressure ulcers. It is very important to prevent or notice a pressure ulcer forming due to the significant health care costs involved and patient health associated with them. Various measures are in place to prevent patients from getting pressure ulcers, but a newer material, silicone foam dressings, has been introduced as an alternative solution for the prevention of these ulcers. We review the current literature to examine whether the standard protocol or silicone material is superior to the prevention of pressure ulcer formation. We conclude that silicone foam dressings, when used as prophylactic treatment, seems very promising and may even be superior to the standard care of prevention. However, there were limitations to some studies and further research is needed to confirm the role of silicone foam dressings. PMID:27630803

  1. Pressure Ulcer Prevention in the Hospital Setting Using Silicone Foam Dressings

    PubMed Central

    Grigson, Eileen; Patel, Maulik; Liu, Xinwei

    2016-01-01

    Patient care is of the utmost importance in the hospital setting. Bedrest and immobility during hospitalization, especially in the surgical and intensive care setting, place the patient at high risk for pressure ulcers. It is very important to prevent or notice a pressure ulcer forming due to the significant health care costs involved and patient health associated with them. Various measures are in place to prevent patients from getting pressure ulcers, but a newer material, silicone foam dressings, has been introduced as an alternative solution for the prevention of these ulcers. We review the current literature to examine whether the standard protocol or silicone material is superior to the prevention of pressure ulcer formation. We conclude that silicone foam dressings, when used as prophylactic treatment, seems very promising and may even be superior to the standard care of prevention. However, there were limitations to some studies and further research is needed to confirm the role of silicone foam dressings.

  2. Pressure Ulcer Prevention in the Hospital Setting Using Silicone Foam Dressings

    PubMed Central

    Grigson, Eileen; Patel, Maulik; Liu, Xinwei

    2016-01-01

    Patient care is of the utmost importance in the hospital setting. Bedrest and immobility during hospitalization, especially in the surgical and intensive care setting, place the patient at high risk for pressure ulcers. It is very important to prevent or notice a pressure ulcer forming due to the significant health care costs involved and patient health associated with them. Various measures are in place to prevent patients from getting pressure ulcers, but a newer material, silicone foam dressings, has been introduced as an alternative solution for the prevention of these ulcers. We review the current literature to examine whether the standard protocol or silicone material is superior to the prevention of pressure ulcer formation. We conclude that silicone foam dressings, when used as prophylactic treatment, seems very promising and may even be superior to the standard care of prevention. However, there were limitations to some studies and further research is needed to confirm the role of silicone foam dressings. PMID:27630803

  3. Erythropoietin restores C-fiber function and prevents pressure ulcer formation in diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Demiot, Claire; Sarrazy, Vincent; Javellaud, James; Gourloi, Loriane; Botelle, Laurent; Oudart, Nicole; Achard, Jean-Michel

    2011-11-01

    Pressure-induced vasodilatation (PIV), a cutaneous physiological neurovascular (C-fiber/endothelium) mechanism, is altered in diabetes and could possibly contribute to pressure ulcer development. We wanted to determine whether recombinant human erythropoietin (rhEPO), which has protective neurovascular effects, could prevent PIV alteration and pressure ulcer formation. We developed a skin pressure ulcer model in mice by applying two magnetic plates to the dorsal skin. This induced significant stage 2 ulcers (assessed visually and histologically) in streptozotocin-treated mice with 8 weeks of diabetes compared with very few in controls. Control and streptozotocin mice received either no treatment or systematic rhEPO (3,000 UI kg(-1) intraperitoneally, twice a week) during the last 2 weeks of diabetes. After 8 weeks of diabetes, we assessed ulcer development, PIV, endothelium-dependent vasodilation, C-fiber-mediated nociception threshold, and skin innervation density. Pretreatment with rhEPO fully prevented ulcer development in streptozotocin mice and also fully restored C-fiber nociception, skin innervation density, and significantly improved PIV, but had no effect on endothelium-dependent vasodilation. Our finding that rhEPO treatment protects the skin against pressure-induced ulcers in diabetic mice encourages evaluation of the therapeutic potential for non-hematopoietic analogs of EPO in preventing neuropathic diabetic ulcers.

  4. Validity of pressure ulcer risk assessment scales; Cubbin and Jackson, Braden, and Douglas scale.

    PubMed

    Jun Seongsook, R N; Jeong Ihnsook, R N; Lee Younghee, R N

    2004-02-01

    This study was to compare the validity of three pressure ulcer risk tools: Cubbin and Jackson, Braden, and Douglas scales. Data were collected three times per week from 48 to 72 h after admission based on the three pressure ulcer risk assessment scales and skin assessment tool developed by the Panel for the Prediction and Prevention of Pressure Ulcers (1994) from 112 intensive care unit (ICU) patients in a educational hospital Ulsan, Korea during December 11, 2000 to February 10, 2001. When a patient developed a pressure ulcer at the time of assessment, the patient was classified into 'pressure ulcer group', and when patients did not have a pressure ulcer until they died, moved to other wards or were discharged from the hospital, they were classified into 'not pressure ulcer group'. Four indices of validity and area under the curves (AUC) of receiver operating characteristic (ROC) were calculated. Based on the cut-off point presented by the developer, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value were as follows: Cubbin and Jackson scale: 89%, 61%, 51%, 92%, respectively, Braden scale: 97%, 26%, 37%, 95%, respectively, and Douglas scale: 100%, 18%, 34%, 100%, respectively. AUCs of ROC curve were 0.826 for Cubbin and Jackson, 0.707 for Braden, and 0.791 for Douglas. Overall, the Cubbin and Jackson scale showed the best validity among scales tested and we recommended it for this ICU.

  5. Use of photographs for the identification of pressure ulcers in elderly hospitalized patients: validity and reliability.

    PubMed

    Russell Localio, A; Margolis, David J; Kagan, Sarah H; Lowe, Robert A; Kinosian, Bruce; Abbuhl, Stephanie; Kavesh, William; Holmes, John H; Ruffin, Althea; Baumgarten, Mona

    2006-01-01

    To evaluate the ability of research nurses to identify pressure ulcers, the authors assembled digital photographs of the skin of 160 consenting elderly patients (80% African American, 63% women). The series included 39 photos of pressure ulcers, 109 of normal skin, and 12 of other skin conditions, determined by consensus by two experts (D.J.M. and S.H.K.). Photos were packaged electronically into eight blocks of 20, with pressure ulcer prevalence ranging from 20% to 30% per block. The eight blocks were duplicated to create two sets of 160 photos each. Each of six raters (experienced clinical research nurses), working independently, evaluated the 320 photos as if each photo depicted a different patient. For analysis, the ratings were collapsed into binary determinations (any pressure ulcer vs. none). The overall sensitivity and specificity of the ratings were 0.97 (95% confidence interval: 0.94, 0.98) and 0.81 (95% confidence interval: 0.77, 0.86), respectively. Rater-specific prevalence (range: 31.8-47.5%) exceeded the true prevalence (24.4%). Inter- and intrarater reliability coefficients were 0.69 and 0.84, respectively. Trained research nurses can accurately classify pressure ulcers from photographs, even when patients are largely non-White and the photographs depict pressure ulcers spanning all pressure ulcer stages.

  6. Preventing in-facility pressure ulcers as a patient safety strategy: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Nancy; Schoelles, Karen M

    2013-03-01

    Complications from hospital-acquired pressure ulcers cause 60,000 deaths and significant morbidity annually in the United States. The objective of this systematic review is to review evidence regarding multicomponent strategies for preventing pressure ulcers and to examine the importance of contextual aspects of programs that aim to reduce facility-acquired pressure ulcers. CINAHL, the Cochrane Library, EMBASE, MEDLINE, and PreMEDLINE were searched for articles published from 2000 to 2012. Studies (any design) that implemented multicomponent initiatives to prevent pressure ulcers in adults in U.S. acute and long-term care settings and that reported pressure ulcer rates at least 6 months after implementation were selected. Two reviewers extracted study data and rated quality of evidence. Findings from 26 implementation studies (moderate strength of evidence) suggested that the integration of several core components improved processes of care and reduced pressure ulcer rates. Key components included the simplification and standardization of pressure ulcer-specific interventions and documentation, involvement of multidisciplinary teams and leadership, use of designated skin champions, ongoing staff education, and sustained audit and feedback. PMID:23460098

  7. Preventing in-facility pressure ulcers as a patient safety strategy: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Nancy; Schoelles, Karen M

    2013-03-01

    Complications from hospital-acquired pressure ulcers cause 60,000 deaths and significant morbidity annually in the United States. The objective of this systematic review is to review evidence regarding multicomponent strategies for preventing pressure ulcers and to examine the importance of contextual aspects of programs that aim to reduce facility-acquired pressure ulcers. CINAHL, the Cochrane Library, EMBASE, MEDLINE, and PreMEDLINE were searched for articles published from 2000 to 2012. Studies (any design) that implemented multicomponent initiatives to prevent pressure ulcers in adults in U.S. acute and long-term care settings and that reported pressure ulcer rates at least 6 months after implementation were selected. Two reviewers extracted study data and rated quality of evidence. Findings from 26 implementation studies (moderate strength of evidence) suggested that the integration of several core components improved processes of care and reduced pressure ulcer rates. Key components included the simplification and standardization of pressure ulcer-specific interventions and documentation, involvement of multidisciplinary teams and leadership, use of designated skin champions, ongoing staff education, and sustained audit and feedback.

  8. Characterization of a Murine Pressure Ulcer Model to Assess Efficacy of Adipose-derived Stromal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Strong, Amy L.; Bowles, Annie C.; MacCrimmon, Connor P.; Lee, Stephen J.; Frazier, Trivia P.; Katz, Adam J.; Gawronska-Kozak, Barbara; Bunnell, Bruce A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: As the world’s population lives longer, the number of individuals at risk for pressure ulcers will increase considerably in the coming decades. In developed countries, up to 18% of nursing home residents suffer from pressure ulcers and the resulting hospital costs can account for up to 4% of a nation’s health care budget. Although full-thickness surgical skin wounds have been used as a model, preclinical rodent studies have demonstrated that repeated cycles of ischemia and reperfusion created by exposure to magnets most closely mimic the human pressure ulcer condition. Methods: This study uses in vivo and in vitro quantitative parameters to characterize the temporal kinetics and histology of pressure ulcers in young, female C57BL/6 mice exposed to 2 or 3 ischemia-reperfusion cycles. This pressure ulcer model was validated further in studies examining the efficacy of adipose-derived stromal/stem cell administration. Results: Optimal results were obtained with the 2-cycle model based on the wound size, histology, and gene expression profile of representative angiogenic and reparative messenger RNAs. When treated with adipose-derived stromal/stem cells, pressure ulcer wounds displayed a dose-dependent and significant acceleration in wound closure rates and improved tissue histology. Conclusion: These findings document the utility of this simplified preclinical model for the evaluation of novel tissue engineering and medical approaches to treat pressure ulcers in humans. PMID:25878945

  9. Longitudinal pressure ulcer rates since the adoption of culture change in Veterans Health Administration nursing homes

    PubMed Central

    Hartmann, Christine W.; Shwartz, Michael; Zhao, Shibei; Palmer, Jennifer A.; Berlowitz, Dan R.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine facility-level pressure ulcer development rates and variations in these rates after a system-wide adoption of culture change in Veterans Health Administration (VHA) nursing homes. Design 4-year retrospective longitudinal design. Setting 109 VHA facilities representing 132 nursing homes, known as Community Living Centers (CLCs). Measurements Pressure ulcers were identified using FY08-11 Minimum Data Set (MDS) data. Pressure ulcer development was defined as a stage 2 or larger pressure ulcer on an MDS assessment with no pressure ulcer on the previous assessment. A risk adjustment model was developed using 105,274 MDS observations to predict the likelihood of pressure ulcers (c statistic = 0.72). A Bayesian hierarchical model that adjusted for differences in the precision of pressure ulcer rates from differently sized facilities was used to calculate smoothed risk-adjusted (SRA) rates for each facility. The statistical significance of the trend over the 4 years was determined by examining the 95% interval estimate for the slope. Results Over the 4 year period, the beginning of which coincided with the VHA’s system-wide adoption of culture change as a performance measure, median SRA facility pressure ulcer development rates were fairly consistent at approximately 4%. The range in SRA rates declined from 14.8% to 10.1%. Some facilities had significantly improving SRA rates (e.g., declined steadily from 5.5% to 3.9%) and some had significantly worsening SRA rates (e.g., increased steadily from 5.1% to 7.9%). Seven sites had significantly improving rates (p<.001) that were below the median across all 4 years. Conclusion CLC pressure ulcer development rates were unaffected by a system-wide culture change implementation. There was, however, significant variation in facility rates and some facilities exhibited sustained high performance. PMID:26782865

  10. The benefits of VAC therapy in the management of pressure ulcers.

    PubMed

    Smith, Noleen

    This study investigates whether vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) therapy, alginate or hydrocolloid dressing are most effective in the treatment of pressure ulcers. A total of 281 patients were included in this study. The response of each patient's wound was monitored, satisfactory wound closure was examined and the time taken to attain satisfactory wound closure was also taken into consideration. An original analysis of the published data was carried out. Most of the pressure ulcers showed some response in all of the categories investigated, with pressure ulcers in the VAC therapy group showing a greater response in all aspects than those in the other two groups.

  11. [The role of nursing documentation in the analysis of the risk of pressure ulcers].

    PubMed

    Iveta, Vedrana; Krecak, Antonija; Kalogjera, Marija; Milić, Dorde

    2014-03-01

    The aim of the study was to analyze the risk of pressure ulcers in Dubrovnik General Hospital based on data from nursing documentation and records on the number of nurses on duty. Specifically, the intent was to show the importance of analyzing serum proteins in patients with a documented risk (Braden's scale) of pressure ulcers and to assess the incidence of pressure ulcers recorded during holidays/weekends when the number of nurses on duty is, generally, lower. The study included patients admitted to the hospital during the year 2012. Nursing documentation was the source of patient data. The risk of pressure ulcers was assessed in 34% of patients. Pressure ulcers were recorded in 185 patients, initially estimated as very high risk (32.3%), high risk (40%), moderate risk (7%) and no risk (20.7%). Analysis of total serum protein showed a significantly lower value in patients with ulcers in comparison with patients without pressure ulcer. During a one-month period (December 2012), the number of recorded pressure ulcers was analyzed at Department of Neurology according to weekends/holidays and other weekdays. Results showed the weekends/holidays to be more risky for the development of pressure ulcers (72% vs. 28%). At the same time, given the regulations on minimum requirements, about 33% of nurses are missing every day. However, over the weekend, this disadvantage can hardly compensate for the often demanding emergency admission patients. Therefore, our results suggest a possible reallocation of working hours for nurses respecting week routine and the need for the weekend. Continuous monitoring, documentation and evaluation of nursing work through documentation have created a prerequisite for professional communication that leads to good results and recognition of the profession. Good health care organization can significantly influence the overall treatment, which has professional and financial effects on the health care in general. PMID:24979892

  12. Pressure Ulcer in Norway—A Snapshot of Pressure Ulcer Occurrence across Various Care Sites and Recommendations for Improved Preventive Care

    PubMed Central

    Johansen, Edda; Bakken, Linda N.; Moore, Zena

    2015-01-01

    Pressure ulcers (PU) are common in all care settings, although most ulcers are preventable. Much evidence exists on Hospital Acquired Pressure Ulcers (HAPU), however, few studies describe PU in community care. From a Norwegian perspective, little is known about pressure ulcer prevalence and prevention strategies across the variety of healthcare sectors. Therefore, this study explored PU prevalence and preventive care in home care, nursing homes and hospitals. Seventeen postgraduate wound care students collected data. A data collection instrument by Jordan O’Brien and Cowman was used together with an online forum in which students described how to improve practice to reduce PU incidence. This study showed that pressure ulcers are a problem across all care settings in Norway; however, nursing homes had the highest proportion of at risk patients and the highest prevalence. By implementing the care bundle provided by the Patient Safety Programme across all care settings, increasing staff competency and make sure that access to appropriate equipment for beds and chairs is readily available, a structured and evidence based approach to prevention could be ensured. PMID:27417771

  13. Pressure ulcer prevalence, incidence and associated risk factors in the community.

    PubMed

    Oot-Giromini, B A

    1993-09-01

    This study examined the prevalence and incidence of pressure ulcers as well as associated risk factors in the community. By using the Web of Causation and the Braden conceptual schema, barriers to effective interventions were identified and analyzed. The Web of Causation for pressure ulcer development includes socioeconomic factors and personal belief systems. It also includes the following risk factors: mobility, activity, moisture, nutrition, friction, shear, and altered sensory perception. There were 103 participants in this study. Data gathered by public health nurses included occurrence, risk assessment score, and demographics. Significant demographics for the pressure ulcer group included age greater than 70 years and diagnoses related to altered mobility, activity, and circulatory status. Pressure ulcer patients who were incontinent accounted for 73% of the total, with urinary incontinence accounting for 33%. There were 1.4 ulcers per patient. Most of the ulcers (78%) occurred on the sacral/coccygeal area and were either Stage II or Stage III. The prevalence rate of pressure ulcers in the community was 29% and the incidence rate was 16.5%.

  14. An alternating pressure sequence proposal for an air-cell cushion for preventing pressure ulcers.

    PubMed

    Arias, Sandra; Cardiel, Eladio; Rogeli, Pablo; Mori, Taketoshi; Nakagami, Gojiro; Noguchi, Hiroshi; Sanada, Hiromi

    2014-01-01

    The distribution and release of pressure on ischial regions are two important parameters for evaluating the effectiveness of a cushion; especially the release of pressure over time on ischial tuberosities, which is significant for preventing pressure ulcers. The aim of this work is to evaluate the effect on interface pressure through the application of a proposed alternating pressure sequence for an air-cell cushion. Six healthy volunteers were asked to sit on the air cell cushion, in static and alternating modes, as well as on a typical foam cushion for 12 minutes. Interface pressure was monitored with a matrix sensor system. Interface pressure values on ischial tuberosities, user contact area and pressure distribution were analyzed. Results showed that IP on IT tends to increase in both foam and static cushions, while in alternating cushion IP on IT tends to decrease. User contact area was significantly larger in alternating cushion than in static or foam cushions. Moreover, there is a better pressure re-distribution with alternating cushion than with the other cushions. The goal of the alternating sequence is to redistribute pressure and stimulate the ischial regions in order to promote blood flow and prevent pressure occurring in wheelchair users.

  15. Do nutritional markers in wound fluid reflect pressure ulcer status?

    PubMed

    Iizaka, Shinji; Sanada, Hiromi; Minematsu, Takeo; Oba, Miho; Nakagami, Gojiro; Koyanagi, Hiroe; Nagase, Takashi; Konya, Chizuko; Sugama, Junko

    2010-01-01

    Evaluation of wound fluid characteristics for pressure ulcer (PU) assessment in clinical settings remains subjective, requiring considerable expertise. This cross-sectional study focused on nutritional markers in wound fluid as possible objective tools and investigated whether they reflect the PU status according to the healing phase, infection, and granulation, especially after adjusting for serum values. Twenty-eight patients with 32 full-thickness PUs were studied. The concentration of albumin, total protein, glucose, and zinc in wound fluid were measured. For PU status, the healing phases and infection were evaluated by clinical signs, and the degree of granulation tissue formation was determined as the hydroxyproline concentration. The wound fluid/serum ratio for albumin was significantly lower during the inflammatory phase than during the proliferative phase (p=0.020). Infected wound fluid contained less glucose (0.3-1.0 mmol/L) than noninfected ones did (5.0-7.6 mmol/L) in an intraindividual comparison of three cases. The wound fluid/serum ratio for glucose was negatively correlated with hydroxyproline level in the proliferative phase (rho=-0.73, p=0.007), while zinc level in wound fluid showed a positive correlation (rho=0.61, p=0.028). Our results suggest that these traditional nutritional markers in wound fluid, especially wound fluid/serum ratio may be useful to evaluate local PU status.

  16. Incontinence-associated dermatitis and pressure ulcers in geriatric patients.

    PubMed

    Kottner, J; Beeckman, D

    2015-12-01

    The key characteristics of geriatric patients are advanced age, multimorbidity, a decrease of psychical performance and care dependency. In addition, advanced age, chronic and acute diseases and treatments (e.g. polypharmacy) lead, either directly or indirectly, to a wide range of skin and tissue problems. Incontinence-associated dermatitis and pressure ulcers (PUs) belong to the most prevalent in geriatric settings. Prolonged exposure of the skin to urine and/or stool can cause an irritant contact dermatitis. Skin surface 'wetness', increased skin surface pH, digestive intestinal enzymes, repeated skin cleansing activities, and a possible occlusive environment contribute to irritation and inflammation. Prevention and treatment includes activities to maintain and to enhance continence and to limit, to reduce exposure of the skin to urine and stool, and to promote healing and reepithelialisation. In frail aged skin, it is recommended to use incontinence products with smooth and breathable materials with maximum absorption capacity. Immediate skin cleansing after soiling using mild cleansers and protective and caring leave-on products are recommended. PUs are localized injuries to the skin and/or underlying tissue caused by sustained deformations of skin and underlying soft tissues. PUs management includes risk assessment, repositioning and mobilization, and the use of appropriate support surfaces. Patients must be never positioned directly on an existing PU. Especially at end of life, the PU closure and wound healing may not be the primary therapeutic goal.

  17. The development of pressure ulcers in patients with hip fractures: inadequate nursing documentation is still a problem.

    PubMed

    Gunningberg, L; Lindholm, C; Carlsson, M; Sjödén, P O

    2000-05-01

    The aims of the study were to investigate, on a daily basis: (i) the development and progress of pressure ulcers, (ii) the documented nursing interventions for prevention and treatment of pressure ulcers, and (iii) when nursing interventions regarding prevention and treatment of pressure ulcers were documented, in relation to patient risk status and the development of pressure ulcers. The study design was prospective, comparative and descriptive. A total of 55 patients with hip fracture were included. To facilitate the nurse's assessment, a 'pressure ulcer card' was developed, consisting of the Modified Norton Scale (MNS) and descriptions of the four stages of pressure ulcers. The incidence of pressure ulcers was 55%. The mean rank of the lowest MNS score was significantly lower for patients who developed pressure ulcers than for patients without pressure ulcers. The majority of the pressure ulcers occurred between admission to the ward and the fourth day after surgery. Documented interventions regarding prevention and treatment were: repositioning, overlays, cushions, use of lotion and observation. The mean number of interventions per patient was 2.2 for patients who developed pressure ulcers during their hospital stay. The comprehensiveness and quality of the nursing record was unsatisfactory, and only three nursing records reached the level required by Swedish law. Preventive interventions such as repositioning were documented when the pressure ulcer had already occurred. The lack of nursing documentation regarding prevention and treatment of pressure ulcers may indicate that nurses did not identify pressure ulcers as a prioritized nursing problem for this patient group. The Modified Norton Scale could be a valuable tool for nurses, both identifying the patient at risk and acting as a guide for nursing interventions. The study was approved by the ethics committee of the Faculty of Medicine at Uppsala University.

  18. Medicaid claims history of Florida long-term care facility residents hospitalized for pressure ulcers.

    PubMed

    Baker, J

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify patterns of admission, discharge, and readmission between hospital and long-term care facility among a group of Florida long-term care facility residents with pressure ulcers whose care was paid for by Medicaid. A patient-specific, longitudinal claims history database was constructed from data provided by the Florida Department of Health and Rehabilitative Services. This database was used to determine and analyze hospital admissions for pressure ulcer care among Medicaid recipients cared for in a long-term care facility. Analysis of the data determined that more than half of the Medicaid-covered long-term care facility residents who formed the target study group (54.57%) had multiple hospital admissions associated with pressure ulcers. Pressure ulcer hospital admissions amounted to a program cost of $9.9 million. PMID:8704846

  19. Economics of pressure-ulcer care: review of the literature on modern versus traditional dressings.

    PubMed

    San Miguel, L; Torra i Bou, J E; Verdú Soriano, J

    2007-01-01

    Published evidence suggests that some of the benefits of modern dressings--longer wear times and less frequent dressing changes--make them more cost-effective than traditional gauze dressings in pressure ulcer management.

  20. Use of telerehabilitation to manage pressure ulcers in persons with spinal cord injuries.

    PubMed

    Vesmarovich, S; Walker, T; Hauber, R P; Temkin, A; Burns, R

    1999-06-01

    Pressure ulcers are a common and serious secondary complication of spinal cord injury. In addition to being costly and difficult to treat, pressure ulcers may interfere with many aspects of patient and family life, including the ability to meet educational, vocational, and social goals. Treatment of pressure ulcers includes weekly assessment by a clinician, a requirement that often is impossible for clients to meet. In an effort to improve outcomes in wound care treatment, a rehabilitation center undertook an exploratory project to determine whether wound care via telerehabilitation was a viable alternative to clinic visits. Telerehabilitation is the use of telecommunication technology to deliver rehabilitation services at a distance. Eight patients being followed in the outpatient clinic participated in the project. The Picasso Still-Image Videophone was used to capture and send images from the patients' homes to the clinic. Findings from the exploratory study demonstrated that pressure ulcers can be successfully managed via telerehabilitation. PMID:10655800

  1. Economic evaluation of noncontact normothermic wound therapy for treatment of pressure ulcers.

    PubMed

    Macario, Alex

    2002-06-01

    New adjunctive treatments for pressure ulcers have become available to complement standard care. The economic benefits of new advanced wound care treatments like noncontact normothermic wound therapy are related to: the costs of adequately providing standard care treatment, the baseline probability of healing a pressure ulcer to closure with standard care, the relative improvement in healing rates with the advanced wound care treatment and the acquisition cost of the advanced treatment. Healing data from preliminary clinical trials suggest that pressure ulcer healing in long-term care patients is accelerated two-fold with noncontact normothermic wound therapy. At this healing rate, noncontact normothermic wound therapy for stage III and IV pressure ulcer is an economically attractive intervention. Additional well-controlled clinical trials are necessary.

  2. Development of a pressure ulcer trigger tool for the neonatal population.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, Bette; Askew, Mary; Otten, Kathy

    2013-01-01

    A large Midwest level IIIb neonatal intensive care unit located in a 500-bed teaching hospital implemented quarterly skin prevalence surveys to monitor prevalence of altered skin integrity including pressure ulcers, diaper dermatitis (incontinence-associated dermatitis), and skin damage as a result of intravenous therapy, adhesive, or medical devices. Pressure ulcer prevalence varied from 0% to 1% per quarter, and no pressure ulcer risk assessment tool was regularly implemented. Therefore, a working group was formed to identify a risk assessment. The Iowa Model for Evidence-Based Practice was used to guide the project. A literature review was completed to identify validated instruments, but available tools were judged lengthy for routine clinical use. Therefore, we developed a short trigger tool comprising 3 questions to identify infants at risk for pressure ulcer development. PMID:22948496

  3. Methodological Issues in Studies of the Effectiveness of Pressure Ulcer Prevention Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Baumgarten, Mona; Shardell, Michelle; Rich, Shayna

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE To enhance the wound care practitioner's understanding of the research methods used to obtain information about the effectiveness of pressure ulcer prevention interventions. TARGET AUDIENCE This continuing education activity is intended for physicians and nurses with an interest in skin and wound care. OBJECTIVES After reading this article and taking this test, the reader should be able to: 1. Differentiate between randomized, historical, and nonrandomized comparison studies. 2. Explain terminology and concepts associated with pressure ulcer prevention research. PMID:19325278

  4. Management of Marjolin's ulcer in a chronic pressure sore secondary to paraplegia: a radical surgical solution.

    PubMed

    Fairbairn, Neil G; Hamilton, Stuart A

    2011-10-01

    Marjolin's ulcer refers to malignant degeneration in a chronic wound. Although originally described in an area of burns scar, many other chronic wounds such as osteomyelitis sinus tracts, venous stasis ulcers and chronic pressure sores have the potential to undergo malignant transformation. We present an interesting case of malignant degeneration in a male paraplegic patient with chronic sacral and ischial pressure sores. By discussing our radical surgical solution to this problem, we aim to highlight the importance of prompt diagnosis.

  5. Using statistical process control for monitoring the prevalence of hospital-acquired pressure ulcers.

    PubMed

    Kottner, Jan; Halfens, Ruud

    2010-05-01

    Institutionally acquired pressure ulcers are used as outcome indicators to assess the quality of pressure ulcer prevention programs. Determining whether quality improvement projects that aim to decrease the proportions of institutionally acquired pressure ulcers lead to real changes in clinical practice depends on the measurement method and statistical analysis used. To examine whether nosocomial pressure ulcer prevalence rates in hospitals in the Netherlands changed, a secondary data analysis using different statistical approaches was conducted of annual (1998-2008) nationwide nursing-sensitive health problem prevalence studies in the Netherlands. Institutions that participated regularly in all survey years were identified. Risk-adjusted nosocomial pressure ulcers prevalence rates, grade 2 to 4 (European Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel system) were calculated per year and hospital. Descriptive statistics, chi-square trend tests, and P charts based on statistical process control (SPC) were applied and compared. Six of the 905 healthcare institutions participated in every survey year and 11,444 patients in these six hospitals were identified as being at risk for pressure ulcers. Prevalence rates per year ranged from 0.05 to 0.22. Chi-square trend tests revealed statistically significant downward trends in four hospitals but based on SPC methods, prevalence rates of five hospitals varied by chance only. Results of chi-square trend tests and SPC methods were not comparable, making it impossible to decide which approach is more appropriate. P charts provide more valuable information than single P values and are more helpful for monitoring institutional performance. Empirical evidence about the decrease of nosocomial pressure ulcer prevalence rates in the Netherlands is contradictory and limited. PMID:20511685

  6. Potential efficiency of antioxidants to prevent pressure ulcers. A neglected hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Bonne, Claude

    2016-06-01

    Pressure ulcers are necrotic lesions mainly due to capillary hypoperfusion. It is well known that hypoxia and also subsequent oxygenation at reperfusion provoke the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) responsible for cell death. The hypothesis of their participation in the pathogenesis of pressure ulcers has already been tested; several antioxidants have the capacity to inhibit skin necrosis in animal models but their efficiency in preventing bedsores has never been demonstrated in patients. The failure of clinical trials to show the protective activity of some antioxidants does not rule out the involvement of ROS in ischemic ulcers and the potential efficacy of other antioxidants in preventing their formation remains possible. PMID:27142137

  7. The Association between Malnutrition and Pressure Ulcers in Elderly in Long-Term Care Facility

    PubMed Central

    Neloska, Lenche; Damevska, Katerina; Nikolchev, Andjelka; Pavleska, Lidija; Petreska-Zovic, Biljana; Kostov, Milenko

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Malnutrition is common in elderly and is a risk factor for pressure ulcers. AIM: The aim of the present study was to determine the prevalence of malnutrition in geriatric and palliative patients hospitalised in long-term care facility, and to examine the influence of nutritional status on the prevalence of pressure ulcers (PU). MATERIAL AND METHODS: Descriptive, observational and cross-sectional study including 2099 patients admitted to the Hospital during a 24 month period (January 2013 to December 2014). We recorded: demographic data, body mass index (BMI), Braden score, laboratory parameters of interest (albumin, total protein, RBC count, haemoglobin and iron levels) and presence or absence of malnutrition and pressure ulcers. RESULTS: The pressure ulcer prevalence was 12.9% (256 out of 2099). Based on the BMI classification, 61.7% of patients had a good nutritional status, 27.4% were undernourished, and 2.1% were considered malnourished. Nutritional status was statistically significantly different between patients with and without PU (p < 0.0001). This study also showed that hypoproteinemia, hypoalbuminemia, low RBC was positively associated with PU prevalence. CONCLUSION: The results highlight the impact of nutritional status on the prevalence of pressure ulcers in hospitalised geriatric and palliative population. It is of paramount importance to correctly evaluate the presence of malnutrition in patients at risk of pressure ulcers. PMID:27703567

  8. Meeting targets in pressure ulcer prevention in the community by collaborating with industry.

    PubMed

    Woodhouse, Lucy; Graham, Katriona

    2014-12-01

    This article describes how a community health-care trust achieved a reduction in acquired pressure ulcers. Commissioning for Quality and Innovation 2014/15 guidance states that provider organisations should work with their partners across their local health and social care system to address the causes of pressure ulcers and reduce their prevalence, regardless of source. Gloucestershire Care Service NHS Trust was challenged to reduce the number of acquired pressure ulcers by 17% in 2013-14. The challenge for the three members of the tissue viability team was to train the qualified and unqualified staff within seven community hospitals and district nurse teams from 85 GP practices, covering a population of 600 000 within 4 months. Staff shortages and a lack of venues available meant that an adaptive educational approach was necessary. A dedicated programme of educational support from both the tissue viability nurse and an industry partner enabled the delivery of a wide range of educational materials to staff across the county. As a result of this partnership working, there was a reduction of category 3 and 4 pressure ulcers, and an increased awareness of the initial stages of pressure ulcer development demonstrated by an increase in grade 2 pressure ulcers.

  9. Hip fracture and pressure ulcers - the Pan-European Pressure Ulcer Study - intrinsic and extrinsic risk factors.

    PubMed

    Lindholm, Christina; Sterner, Eila; Romanelli, Marco; Pina, Elaine; Torra y Bou, Joan; Hietanen, Helvi; Iivanainen, Ansa; Gunningberg, Lena; Hommel, Ami; Klang, Birgitta; Dealey, Carol

    2008-06-01

    Pressure ulcers (PU) in patients with hip fracture remain a problem. Incidence of between 8.8% and 55% have been reported. There are few studies focusing on the specific patient-, surgery- and care-related risk indicators in this group. The aims of the study were: - to investigate prevalence and incidence of PU upon arrival and at discharge from hospital and to identify potential intrinsic and extrinsic risk factors for development of PU in patients admitted for hip fracture surgery, - to illuminate potential differences in patient logistics, surgery, PU prevalence and incidence and care between Northern and Southern Europe. Consecutive patients with hip fracture in six countries, Sweden, Finland, UK (North) and Spain, Italy and Portugal (South), were included. The patients were followed from Accident and Emergency Department and until discharge or 7 days. Prevalence, PU at discharge and incidence were investigated, and intrinsic and extrinsic risk indicators, including waiting time for surgery and duration of surgery were recorded. Of the 635 patients, 10% had PU upon arrival and 22% at discharge (26% North and 16% South). The majority of ulcers were grade 1 and none was grade 4. Cervical fractures were more common in the North and trochanteric in the South. Waiting time for surgery and duration of surgery were significantly longer in the South. Traction was more common in the South and perioperative warming in the North. Risk factors of statistical significance correlated to PU at discharge were age >or=71 (P = 0.020), dehydration (P = 0.005), moist skin (P = 0.004) and total Braden score (P = 0.050) as well as subscores for friction (P = 0.020), nutrition (P = 0.020) and sensory perception (P = 0.040). Comorbid conditions of statistical significance for development of PU were diabetes (P = 0.005) and pulmonary disease (P = 0.006). Waiting time for surgery, duration of surgery, warming or non warming perioperatively, type of anaesthesia, traction and type of

  10. The effect of nitric oxide releasing cream on healing pressure ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Saidkhani, Vahid; Asadizaker, Marziyeh; Khodayar, Mohammad Javad; Latifi, Sayed Mahmoud

    2016-01-01

    Background: Pressure ulcer is one of the main concerns of nurses in medical centers around the world, which, if untreated, causes irreparable problems for patients. In recent years, nitric oxide (NO) has been proposed as an effective method for wound healing. This study was conducted to determine the effect of nitric oxide on pressure ulcer healing. Materials and Methods: In this clinical trial, 58 patients with pressure ulcer at hospitals affiliated to Ahvaz Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences were homogenized and later divided randomly into two groups of treatment (nitric oxide cream; n = 29) and control (placebo cream; n = 29). In this research, the data collection tool was the Pressure Ulcer Scale for Healing (PUSH). At the outset of the study (before using the cream), the patients' ulcers were examined weekly in terms of size, amount of exudates, and tissue type using the PUSH tool for 3 weeks. By integrating these three factors, wound healing was determined. Data were analyzed using SPSS. Results: Although no significant difference was found in terms of the mean of score size, the amount of exudates, and the tissue type between the two groups, the mean of total score (healing) between the two groups was statistically significant (P = 0.04). Conclusions: Nitric oxide cream seems to accelerate wound healing. Therefore, considering its easy availability and cost-effectiveness, it can be used for treating pressure ulcers in the future. PMID:27186212

  11. Treatment of pressure ulcers with autologous bone marrow nuclear cells in patients with spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Sarasúa, J González; López, S Pérez; Viejo, M Álvarez; Basterrechea, M Pérez; Rodríguez, A Fernández; Gutiérrez, A Ferrero; Gala, J García; Menéndez, Y Menéndez; Augusto, D Escudero; Arias, A Pérez; Hernández, J Otero

    2011-01-01

    Context Pressure ulcers are especially difficult to treat in patients with spinal cord injury (SCI) and recurrence rates are high. Prompted by encouraging results obtained using bone marrow stem cells to treat several diseases including chronic wounds, this study examines the use of autologous stem cells from bone marrow to promote the healing of pressure ulcers in patients with SCI. Objective To obtain preliminary data on the use of bone marrow mononuclear cells (BM-MNCs) to treat pressure ulcers in terms of clinical outcome, procedure safety, and treatment time. Participants Twenty-two patients with SCI (19 men, 3 women; mean age 56.41 years) with single type IV pressure ulcers of more than 4 months duration. Interventions By minimally invasive surgery, the ulcers were debrided and treated with BM-MNCs obtained by Ficoll density gradient separation of autologous bone marrow aspirates drawn from the iliac crest. Results In 19 patients (86.36%), the pressure ulcers treated with BM-MNCs had fully healed after a mean time of 21 days. The number of MNCs isolated was patient dependent, although similar clinical outcomes were observed in each case. Compared to conventional surgical treatment, mean intra-hospital stay was reduced from 85.16 to 43.06 days. Following treatment, 5 minutes of daily wound care was required per patient compared to 20 minutes for conventional surgery. During a mean follow-up of 19 months, none of the resolved ulcers recurred. Conclusions Our data indicate that cell therapy using autologous BM-MNCs could be an option to treat type IV pressure ulcers in patients with SCI, avoiding major surgical intervention. PMID:21756569

  12. Prospective clinical study of a new adhesive gelling foam dressing in pressure ulcers.

    PubMed

    Parish, Lawrence Charles; Dryjski, Maciej; Cadden, Sue

    2008-03-01

    This prospective, non comparative study evaluated the safety and effectiveness of an adhesive gelling foam dressing in pressure ulcer management. Twenty-three subjects with exuding pressure ulcers were recruited from seven centres in the USA and Canada. Study treatment included an adhesive gelling foam dressing, optional tape/roll bandaging and mandatory pressure-reducing/relieving devices. Subjects were followed until ulcer healing, for up to 28 days, or on patient withdrawal from the study, whichever came first. Dressings were changed at least once every 7 days. Mean percentage change in ulcer area from baseline to final measurement was -13%. Investigators reported healing or subjective improvement of ulcer condition in 61% of patients. Mean dressing wear time was 4.2 days. Subjects found the dressing was comfortable, soothing and cushioning in situ at 80%, 64% and 70% of dressing changes, respectively. Subjects reported pain severity of none or mild for every dressing change. Fourteen subjects experienced adverse events, including seven subjects with study-related maceration, erythema, wound enlargement, blister or infection. A regimen including an adhesive gelling foam dressing proved to be safe and effective for managing exudate, protecting the surrounding skin, minimising pain and supporting healing of pressure ulcers with exudate.

  13. A topical haemoglobin spray for oxygenating pressure ulcers: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Tickle, Joy

    2015-03-01

    The effect of pressure ulcers on patient quality of life have been recognised as a real problem for many years, and the need for robust and effective management of pressure ulcers is now a prominent national health-care issue. Myriad different interventions exist for the treatment of pressure ulcers, including clinically effective dressings and pressure-relieving devices, yet many pressure ulcers still do not heal and often become a chronic wound. This is the second of a series of articles (Norris, 2014) discussing the clinical evaluation of a topical oxygen therapy in practice. It describes a small evaluation involving 18 patients with pressure ulcers. The study set out to determine the effect of a topical oxygen therapy on wound size. The therapy comprises a canister that sprays pure haemoglobin in a water solution into or onto the wound. The haemoglobin spray needs to be used at least once every 3 days, does not require training on its use and can be used in any care setting. Overall, results identified wound healing progression in all 18 wounds and wound size reduction in 17 of the 18 wounds.

  14. The prevalence of pain at pressure areas and pressure ulcers in hospitalised patients

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Patients with pressure ulcers (PUs) report that pain is their most distressing symptom, but there are few PU pain prevalence studies. We sought to estimate the prevalence of unattributed pressure area related pain (UPAR pain) which was defined as pain, soreness or discomfort reported by patients, on an “at risk” or PU skin site, reported at a patient level. Methods We undertook pain prevalence surveys in 2 large UK teaching hospital NHS Trusts (6 hospitals) and a district general hospital NHS Trust (3 hospitals) during their routine annual PU prevalence audits. The hospitals provide secondary and tertiary care beds in acute and elective surgery, trauma and orthopaedics, burns, medicine, elderly medicine, oncology and rehabilitation. Anonymised individual patient data were recorded by the ward nurse and PU prevalence team. The analysis of this prevalence survey included data summaries; no inferential statistical testing was planned or undertaken. Percentages were calculated using the total number of patients from the relevant population as the denominator (i.e. including all patients with missing data for that variable). Results A total of 3,397 patients in 9 acute hospitals were included in routine PU prevalence audits and, of these, 2010 (59.2%) patients participated in the pain prevalence study. UPAR pain prevalence was 16.3% (327/2010). 1769 patients had no PUs and of these 223 patients reported UPAR pain, a prevalence of 12.6%. Of the 241 people with pressure ulcers, 104 patients reported pain, a UPAR pain prevalence of 43.2% (104/241). Conclusion One in six people in acute hospitals experience UPAR pain on ‘at risk’ or PU skin sites; one in every 8 people without PUs and, more than 2 out of every five people with PUs. The results provide a clear indication that all patients should be asked if they have pain at pressure areas even when they do not have a PU. PMID:23902583

  15. Assessment and management of pressure ulcers in the elderly: current strategies.

    PubMed

    Jaul, Efraim

    2010-04-01

    Pressure ulcers (pressure sores) continue to be a common health problem, particularly among the physically limited or bedridden elderly. The problem exists within the entire health framework, including hospitals, clinics, long-term care facilities and private homes. For many elderly patients, pressure ulcers may become chronic for no apparent reason and remain so for prolonged periods, even for the remainder of the patient's lifetime. A large number of grade 3 and 4 pressure ulcers become chronic wounds, and the afflicted patient may even die from an ulcer complication (sepsis or osteomyelitis). The presence of a pressure ulcer constitutes a geriatric syndrome consisting of multifactorial pathological conditions. The accumulated effects of impairment due to immobility, nutritional deficiency and chronic diseases involving multiple systems predispose the aging skin of the elderly person to increasing vulnerability. The assessment and management of a pressure ulcer requires a comprehensive and multidisciplinary approach in order to understand the patient with the ulcer. Factors to consider include the patient's underlying pathologies (such as obstructive lung disease or peripheral vascular disease), severity of his or her primary illness (such as an infection or hip fracture), co-morbidities (such as dementia or diabetes mellitus), functional state (activities of daily living), nutritional status (swallowing difficulties), and degree of social and emotional support; focusing on just the wound itself is not enough. An understanding of the physiological and pathological processes of aging skin throws light on the aetiology and pathogenesis of the development of pressure ulcers in the elderly. Each health discipline (nursing staff, aides, physician, dietitian, occupational and physical therapists, and social worker) has its own role to play in the assessment and management of the patient with a pressure ulcer. The goals of treating a pressure ulcer include avoiding any

  16. Dressings as an adjunct to pressure ulcer prevention: consensus panel recommendations.

    PubMed

    Black, Joyce; Clark, Michael; Dealey, Carol; Brindle, Christopher T; Alves, Paulo; Santamaria, Nick; Call, Evan

    2015-08-01

    The formulation of recommendations on the use of wound dressings in pressure ulcer prevention was undertaken by a group of experts in pressure ulcer prevention and treatment from Australia, Portugal, UK and USA. After review of literature, they concluded that there is adequate evidence to recommend the use of five-layer silicone bordered dressings (Mepilex Border Sacrum(®) and 3 layer Mepilex Heel(®) dressings by Mölnlycke Health Care, Gothenburg, Sweden) for pressure ulcer prevention in the sacrum, buttocks and heels in high-risk patients, those in Emergency Department (ED), intensive care unit (ICU) and operating room (OR). Literature on which this recommendation is based includes one prospective randomised control trial, three cohort studies and two case series. Recommendations for dressing use in patients at high risk for pressure injury and shear injury were also provided.

  17. Case 9: heavily exuding, malodorous, necrotic pressure ulcer.

    PubMed

    Simon, Deborah

    2016-03-01

    In this case, the necrotic tissue was so hard it was not possible to categorise the ulcer. Octenilin products were able to debride the necrotic tissue, so that the wound depth could be determined. After 4 weeks, the wound was covered with granulation tissue, improving the patient's quality of life.

  18. A Retrospective Analysis of Pressure Ulcer Incidence and Modified Braden Scale Score Risk Classifications.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hong-Lin; Cao, Ying-Juan; Wang, Jing; Huai, Bao-Sha

    2015-09-01

    The Braden Scale is the most widely used pressure ulcer risk assessment in the world, but the currently used 5 risk classification groups do not accurately discriminate among their risk categories. To optimize risk classification based on Braden Scale scores, a retrospective analysis of all consecutively admitted patients in an acute care facility who were at risk for pressure ulcer development was performed between January 2013 and December 2013. Predicted pressure ulcer incidence first was calculated by logistic regression model based on original Braden score. Risk classification then was modified based on the predicted pressure ulcer incidence and compared between different risk categories in the modified (3-group) classification and the traditional (5-group) classification using chi-square test. Two thousand, six hundred, twenty-five (2,625) patients (mean age 59.8 ± 16.5, range 1 month to 98 years, 1,601 of whom were men) were included in the study; 81 patients (3.1%) developed a pressure ulcer. The predicted pressure ulcer incidence ranged from 0.1% to 49.7%. When the predicted pressure ulcer incidence was greater than 10.0% (high risk), the corresponding Braden scores were less than 11; when the predicted incidence ranged from 1.0% to 10.0% (moderate risk), the corresponding Braden scores ranged from 12 to 16; and when the predicted incidence was less than 1.0% (mild risk), the corresponding Braden scores were greater than 17. In the modified classification, observed pressure ulcer incidence was significantly different between each of the 3 risk categories (P less than 0.05). However, in the traditional classification, the observed incidence was not significantly different between the high-risk category and moderate-risk category (P less than 0.05) and between the mild-risk category and no-risk category (P less than 0.05). If future studies confirm the validity of these findings, pressure ulcer prevention protocols of care based on Braden Scale scores can

  19. The VCU Pressure Ulcer Summit: The Search for a Clearer Understanding and More Precise Clinical Definition of the Unavoidable Pressure Injury.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Oscar M; Brindle, C Tod; Langemo, Diane; Kennedy-Evans, Karen Lou; Krasner, Diane L; Brennan, Mary R; Levine, Jeffrey M

    2016-01-01

    This article reports the findings of the Unavoidable Pressure Ulcer Committee (of the VCU Pressure Ulcer Summit) that was tasked with addressing key issues associated with pressure injuries that are unavoidable or unpreventable. Our goals were (1) to clarify nomenclature and descriptions surrounding "terminal ulceration," (2) to describe the medical complications and comorbid conditions that can lead to skin failure and/or terminal ulceration, (3) to describe the variable possible causes of unavoidable pressure injuries, and (4) to present clinical cases to exemplify pressure injuries considered to be unavoidable. PMID:27509367

  20. The VCU Pressure Ulcer Summit: The Search for a Clearer Understanding and More Precise Clinical Definition of the Unavoidable Pressure Injury.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Oscar M; Brindle, C Tod; Langemo, Diane; Kennedy-Evans, Karen Lou; Krasner, Diane L; Brennan, Mary R; Levine, Jeffrey M

    2016-01-01

    This article reports the findings of the Unavoidable Pressure Ulcer Committee (of the VCU Pressure Ulcer Summit) that was tasked with addressing key issues associated with pressure injuries that are unavoidable or unpreventable. Our goals were (1) to clarify nomenclature and descriptions surrounding "terminal ulceration," (2) to describe the medical complications and comorbid conditions that can lead to skin failure and/or terminal ulceration, (3) to describe the variable possible causes of unavoidable pressure injuries, and (4) to present clinical cases to exemplify pressure injuries considered to be unavoidable.

  1. Development of a simple, noninvasive, clinically relevant model of pressure ulcers in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Stadler, Istvan; Zhang, Ren-Yu; Oskoui, Phillip; Whittaker, Megan S; Lanzafame, Raymond J

    2004-01-01

    The formation of pressure ulcers and other skin wounds is considered to be a multifactorial process. Cycles of ischemia-reperfusion have been considered to be significant contributing factors in the pathogenesis of pressure ulcers. This study reports the development of a reproducible murine model of ischemia-reperfusion injury by the external application of magnets. Mice were sedated with 50% CO2:50% O2 for 50-60 s. Dorsal hair was shaved and the area cleaned. The skin was gently pulled and placed between two round ceramic magnetic plates (5 x 12 mm diameter, 2.4 g weight, 1000 G magnetic force). The resultant "pinch" procedure was designed to leave a 5-mm skin bridge between the magnets, creating 50 mm Hg pressure between the plates. Three 12-h ischemia-reperfusion cycles were employed to cause pressure ulcer formation. Animals tolerated the procedure well. They returned to normal activity a few minutes after magnet placement. The lesions reached their maximum at 10 days postinjury. Full-thickness skin loss with damage and necrosis of subcutaneous tissue (ulcer stage 3) was observed in all cases, reaching a mean stage score of 3.6 +/- 0.6 of based on a 0-5 scale for extent of injury by visual assessment. Thus, an inexpensive, reproducible murine pressure ulcer model was developed, which results in graded injury without long-term immobilization of the animals. This method will facilitate the development of new prevention and management strategies. PMID:15371164

  2. A case of von Willebrand disease discovered during treatment of a sacral pressure ulcer.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Masahiro; Fukaya, Sumiko; Furuya, Masaichi; Hyakusoku, Hiko

    2010-12-01

    A sacral pressure ulcer developed in a patient hospitalized for cerebral infarction. Each time necrotic tissue was debrided from the ulcer, pressure hemostasis was necessary to stop the bleeding. As treatment continued, the pressure required to stop the bleeding caused the ulcer to worsen, leading to a downward spiral in the patient's condition. While trying to determine the cause of this problem, we discovered that the patient had von Willebrand disease. Medication controlled the bleeding, and the pressure ulcer began to heal at the same time. It was clear to us that conservative treatment would lead to a complete cure but that the healing process would take a long time and require continued administration of an expensive drug. We decided, therefore, to close the wound with a fasciocutaneous flap so that the patient could be quickly transferred to a rehabilitation hospital. About 1 month after surgery, epithelialization was complete, we were able to discontinue medication, and the patient was discharged. This experience demonstrates the importance of determining the cause of any deviation from the normal course of healing in pressure ulcers. It also indicates that the use of fasciocutaneous flaps, which involve little intraoperative bleeding in short surgeries, is appropriate in cases like this one.

  3. Hematological change parameters in patients with pressure ulcer at long-term care hospital

    PubMed Central

    Neiva, Giselle Protta; Carnevalli, Julia Romualdo; Cataldi, Rodrigo Lessa; Furtado, Denise Mendes; Fabri, Rodrigo Luiz; Silva, Pâmela Souza

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess factors associated with the development of pressure ulcers, and to compare the effectiveness of pharmacological treatments. Methods The factors associated with the development of pressure ulcers were compared in lesion-carrying patients (n=14) and non-carriers (n=16). Lesion-carrying patients were treated with 1% silver sulfadiazine or 0.6IU/g collagenase and were observed for 8 weeks. The data collected was analyzed with p<0.05 being statistically relevant. Results The prevalence of pressure ulcers was about 6%. The comparison of carrier and non-carrier groups of pressure ulcers revealed no statistically significant difference in its occurrence with respect to age, sex, skin color, mobility, or the use of diapers. However, levels of hemoglobin, hematocrit, and red blood cells were found to be statistically different between groups, being lower in lesion-carrying patients. There was no significant difference found in lesion area between patients treated with collagenase or silver sulfadiazine, although both groups showed an overall reduction in lesion area through the treatment course. Conclusion Hematologic parameters showed a statistically significant difference between the two groups. Regarding the treatment of ulcers, there was no difference in the area of the lesion found between the groups treated with collagenase and silver sulfadiazine. PMID:25295450

  4. Identifying and classifying quality-of-life tools for assessing pressure ulcers after spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Hitzig, Sander L.; Balioussis, Christina; Nussbaum, Ethne; McGillivray, Colleen F.; Catharine Craven, B.; Noreau, Luc

    2013-01-01

    Context Although pressure ulcers may negatively influence quality of life (QoL) post-spinal cord injury (SCI), our understanding of how to assess their impact is confounded by conceptual and measurement issues. To ensure that descriptions of pressure ulcer impact are appropriately characterized, measures should be selected according to the domains that they evaluate and the population and pathologies for which they are designed. Objective To conduct a systematic literature review to identify and classify outcome measures used to assess the impact of pressure ulcers on QoL after SCI. Methods Electronic databases (Medline/PubMed, CINAHL, and PsycInfo) were searched for studies published between 1975 and 2011. Identified outcome measures were classified as being either subjective or objective using a QoL model. Results Fourteen studies were identified. The majority of tools identified in these studies did not have psychometric evidence supporting their use in the SCI population with the exception of two objective measures, the Short-Form 36 and the Craig Handicap Assessment and Reporting Technique, and two subjective measures, the Life Situation Questionnaire-Revised and the Ferrans and Powers Quality of Life Index SCI-Version. Conclusion Many QoL outcome tools showed promise in being sensitive to the presence of pressure ulcers, but few of them have been validated for use with SCI. Prospective studies should employ more rigorous methods for collecting data on pressure ulcer severity and location to improve the quality of findings with regard to their impact on QoL. The Cardiff Wound Impact Schedule is a potential tool for assessing impact of pressure ulcers-post SCI. PMID:24090238

  5. [Systematic pressure ulcer risk management.: Results of implementing multiple interventions at Charité-Universitätsmedizin Berlin].

    PubMed

    Hauss, Armin; Greshake, Susanne; Skiba, Thomas; Schmidt, Kristine; Rohe, Julia; Jürgensen, Jan Steffen

    2016-01-01

    Pressure ulcers impose a high burden of disease on both the affected individual and society. Demographic change and multimorbidity aggravate the problem. The present study describes the systematic implementation of a comprehensive approach to reduce the incidence of pressure ulcers in an inpatient setting. The introduction of systematic risk assessment and the subsequent risk-adjusted application of evidence-based prevention, combined with continuous feedback of outcomes as well as tailored training, were associated with a significant decline in the incidence of pressure ulcers. Especially the occurrence of high-grade ulcers could be minimized by this systems approach. PMID:27480185

  6. A non-contact imaging-based approach to detecting stage I pressure ulcers.

    PubMed

    Leachtenauer, Jon; Kell, Steve; Turner, Beverely; Newcomer, Chris; Lyder, Courtney; Alwan, Majd

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes a non-contact imaging-based method to detect stage I pressure ulcers over a wide range of melanin levels. Two approaches were explored: the first used broad and narrow band visible spectrum imaging, and the second used near infrared (NIR) imaging. Preliminary results are presented together with results of numerical analysis of different erythema indices derived from the visible spectrum images. The results have shown that a low-cost imaging-based approach to detecting pressure ulcers is feasible and can yield promising results when applied to subjects with darker skin pigmentation. PMID:17946762

  7. Applied felted foam for plantar pressure relief is an efficient therapy in neuropathic diabetic foot ulcers.

    PubMed

    Zimny, S; Meyer, M F; Schatz, H; Pfohl, M

    2002-10-01

    The application of felted foam is a promising method for plantar pressure reduction in the ulcer region of neuropathic diabetic foot ulcers, but the knowledge of its impact on the wound healing and healing times in foot ulcers compared to conventional methods of pressure relief is sparse. The aim of this study was to assess the effects on the wound healing of felted foam dressings for plantar pressure reduction in the therapy of neuropathic foot ulcers. This prospective cohort study evaluates healing times and wound healing in 61 diabetic patients with neuropathic foot ulcerations. Ulcer healing was assessed by planimetric measurement of the wound area at beginning of the study and after 10 weeks and at least until wound healing. The patients were consecutively enrolled in the study, 27 patients were randomized to the felted foam therapy, and 34 patients were randomized to conventional therapy. In the felted foam group, the initial average wound area was 110.8 +/- 14.4 mm 2 (mean +/- SE), and 2.1 +/- 0.5 mm 2 after ten weeks (p < 0.0001), with an average healing time of 79.6 (95%-CI 75-84) days. In the conventional therapy group, the initial average wound area was 119.2 +/- 13.8 mm 2, and 3.4 +/- 0.7 mm 2 after ten weeks (p < 0.0001). The average healing times was 83.2 (95%-CI 77-90) days. Both with respect to the wound healing process and the healing times, the felted foam technique appears to be as effective as conventional plantar ulcer treatment. We conclude that the felted foam technique is an useful alternative in the therapy of the neuropathic diabetic foot syndrome, especially in patients who are not able to avoid weight-bearing reliably.

  8. Systematic Review and Operative Technique of Recalcitrant Pressure Ulcers Using a Fillet Flap Technique

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Venkat K.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this article is to describe the indications, operative technique, outcomes, and systematic review of the literature on the reconstruction of patients with end-stage pressure ulcers using a fillet flap technique. In this technique, the femur, tibia, and fibula are removed from the thigh and leg, and the soft tissue is used as a pedicled, or free, myocutaneous flap for reconstruction. Long-term outcomes, salient surgical technique of flap elevation, and design are detailed for patients who had a fillet of leg flap for reconstruction of extensive pressure ulcers. Methods: The indications, surgical technique, and postoperative outcomes of 5 patients who had pedicled fillet flaps are reviewed including patient age, sex, underlying comorbidities, duration of paraplegia, operative technique, and complications. A systematic review of the literature was performed searching PubMed, Cochrane Database, and Medline with the following MeSH terms: pressure ulcer, pressure sore, decubitus ulcer, fillet flap, and fillet flap. Inclusion criteria were use of a fillet technique, article data on the number of reconstructions before fillet flap, complications, and English language. Results: Most of our patients were male 75% (n = 3) with an average age of 47.5 years, had been paralyzed for an average of 16 years, and had few medical comorbidities. Two patients (3 flaps) required hip disarticulation, 1 patient had a bilateral fillet flaps, and 3 patients had resection of tibia/fibula. After following patients for an average of 1.4 years (4 mo to 2 yr), complications were limited to 1 patient who had partial-thickness flap loss at the distal skin flap that healed by secondary intention and 1 patient who had ulcer recurrence because of noncompliance. Four articles met inclusion criteria for systematic review and 3 were excluded. Conclusions: The fillet of leg flap remains a useful and reliable method of reconstructing end-stage pressure ulcers. PMID:27622082

  9. Systematic Review and Operative Technique of Recalcitrant Pressure Ulcers Using a Fillet Flap Technique

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Venkat K.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this article is to describe the indications, operative technique, outcomes, and systematic review of the literature on the reconstruction of patients with end-stage pressure ulcers using a fillet flap technique. In this technique, the femur, tibia, and fibula are removed from the thigh and leg, and the soft tissue is used as a pedicled, or free, myocutaneous flap for reconstruction. Long-term outcomes, salient surgical technique of flap elevation, and design are detailed for patients who had a fillet of leg flap for reconstruction of extensive pressure ulcers. Methods: The indications, surgical technique, and postoperative outcomes of 5 patients who had pedicled fillet flaps are reviewed including patient age, sex, underlying comorbidities, duration of paraplegia, operative technique, and complications. A systematic review of the literature was performed searching PubMed, Cochrane Database, and Medline with the following MeSH terms: pressure ulcer, pressure sore, decubitus ulcer, fillet flap, and fillet flap. Inclusion criteria were use of a fillet technique, article data on the number of reconstructions before fillet flap, complications, and English language. Results: Most of our patients were male 75% (n = 3) with an average age of 47.5 years, had been paralyzed for an average of 16 years, and had few medical comorbidities. Two patients (3 flaps) required hip disarticulation, 1 patient had a bilateral fillet flaps, and 3 patients had resection of tibia/fibula. After following patients for an average of 1.4 years (4 mo to 2 yr), complications were limited to 1 patient who had partial-thickness flap loss at the distal skin flap that healed by secondary intention and 1 patient who had ulcer recurrence because of noncompliance. Four articles met inclusion criteria for systematic review and 3 were excluded. Conclusions: The fillet of leg flap remains a useful and reliable method of reconstructing end-stage pressure ulcers.

  10. Acemannan hydrogel dressing versus saline dressing for pressure ulcers. A randomized, controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Thomas, D R; Goode, P S; LaMaster, K; Tennyson, T

    1998-10-01

    Aloe vera has been used for centuries as a topical treatment for various conditions and as a cathartic. An amorphous hydrogel dressing derived from the aloe plant (Carrasyn Gel Wound Dressing, Carrington Laboratories, Inc., Irving, TX) is approved by the Food and Drug Administration for the management of Stages I through IV pressure ulcers. To evaluate effectiveness of this treatment, 30 patients were randomized to receive either daily topical application of the hydrogel study dressing (acemannan hydrogel wound dressing) or a moist saline gauze dressing. Complete healing of the study ulcer occurred in 19 of 30 subjects (63%) during the 10-week observation period. No difference was observed in complete healing between the experimental and the control groups (odds ratio 0.93, 95% CI 0.16, 5.2). This study indicates that the acemannan hydrogel dressing is as effective as, but is not superior to, a moist saline gauze wound dressing for the management of pressure ulcers.

  11. Effects of the magnitude of pressure on the severity of injury and capillary closure in rat experimental pressure ulcers.

    PubMed

    Kawamata, Seiichi; Kurose, Tomoyuki; Kubori, Yohei; Muramoto, Hiroaki; Honkawa, Yuta

    2015-03-01

    Experimental pressure ulcers were successfully produced in the rat abdominal wall at 100 mmHg in our previous study. We hypothesized that injury is less severe when pressures are lower than 100 mmHg and explored a critical pressure in the production of pressure ulcers. At 70 and 60 mmHg, repeated compressions for 4 h daily for 5 consecutive days resulted in partial skin necrosis and eschar formation in the majority of rats, whereas skin injuries were absent or very mild in most of the rats at 50 mmHg. The extent of ischemia was also examined by visualization of capillary blood flow using intravascular infusion of Lycopersicon esculentum lectin. Rat abdominal walls were compressed in the range from 0 (control) to 100 mmHg. The percentages of open capillaries were 62.8 ± 10.1% at 0 mmHg and 34.7 ± 18.5% at 10 mmHg. The ratio of open capillaries was further decreased with increasing pressure, but not pressure dependently. In conclusion, the severity of injury at 50 mmHg was drastically milder than that at 60 mmHg or higher, whereas the extent of ischemia (capillary closure) was not significantly different. The pressure is vitally important; however, other factor(s) besides ischemia is likely to promote the development of pressure ulcers. PMID:24676460

  12. A comparative assessment of interface pressures generated by four surgical theatre heel pressure ulcer prophylactics.

    PubMed

    Malkoun, Mario; Huber, Jacqueline; Huber, David

    2012-06-01

    Current heel protection devices used in the operating room do not comply with the consensus document of the European and National (North American) Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panels. A complying prototype has been tested. Prospective cohort study comparing interface pressures. While using the prototype device, the heel interface pressure is significantly [mean 0·0 mmHg, standard deviation (SD) 0·0] less than the viscose elastic gel (VEG) mat (mean 174·8 mmHg, SD 64·5), the Action(®) heel block (mean 182·3 mmHg, SD 70·8) and the theatre table (mean 193·2 mmHg, SD 57·1). At the Achilles tendon, the prototype device (mean 16·2 mmHg, SD 19·0) is significantly superior to the Oasis (mean 183·7 mmHg, SD 67·4) and Action(®) heel blocks (mean 112·3 mmHg, SD 64·7). At the lateral malleolus, the prototype device (mean 0·0, SD 0·0) is better than the Action(®) (mean 24·3 mmHg, SD 53·4) and Oasis heel blocks (mean 20·9 mmHg, SD 49·2). At the calf, the prototype (mean 53·7 mmHg, SD 23·0) imposed more pressure than all other devices tested but was not statistically significant compared with the theatre table or the VEG mat. It is possible to design a device that protects the heel, lateral malleolus and Achilles tendon without causing hyperextension of the knee and consequent popliteal vein compression, thereby complying with the above guidelines.

  13. Estimating the risk of pressure ulcer development: is it truly evidence based?

    PubMed

    Sharp, Catherine A; McLaws, Mary-Louise

    2006-12-01

    The aim of the current method of screening patients is to identify risk factors that are considered to cause, or contribute to, pressure ulcer (PU) development. Yet screening has not resulted in a reduction in pressure ulcer development. The literature was reviewed to identify the level of evidence for the inclusion of risk factors in six published pressure ulcer risk-screening tools. Evidence for each risk factor was ranked according to the National Health and Medical Research Council levels of evidence with a modification. Three of 19 risk factors (mobility, continence and nutrition) included in more than one screening tool have been tested for association with pressure ulcer development. While varying degrees of immobility and decreased serum albumin are reported to significantly increase the risk for PU development, the direction of the relationship, i.e. causal or resultant of PU, is not always clear. No publications reported a significant causal link between incontinence and PU development. Inclusion of risk factors for PU in screening tools must be evidence based. Until other risk factors have been tested for positive predictive value, the Ramstadius approach to screening is the only evidence-based tool.

  14. PUMA project: Active involving of end users to achieve a smart solution to prevent pressure ulcer.

    PubMed

    Laparra-Hernández, José; Chicote, Juan Carlos; Medina, Enrique; Barberà, Ricard; Durà-Gil, Juan V; Lozano, Vicente; Gil, Ángel; Bermejo, Ignacio

    2015-01-01

    This paper shows the benefits to include spinal cord injury users and the other stakeholders during the development of a new system to prevent pressure ulcers. The complementary of information has been key and has enhanced the possibility to achieve market acceptance and introduction. PMID:26294582

  15. Risk, prevention and treatment of pressure ulcers--nursing staff knowledge and documentation.

    PubMed

    Gunningberg, L; Lindholm, C; Carlsson, M; Sjödén, P O

    2001-01-01

    The aims were to investigate (i) registered nurses' and nursing assistants' knowledge of risk, prevention and treatment of pressure ulcer before implementing a system for risk assessment and pressure ulcer classification for patients with hip fracture (ii) interventions documented in the patient's records by registered nurses, and (iii) to what extent reported and documented interventions accord with the Swedish quality guidelines. Nursing staff (n=85) completed a questionnaire, and patient's records (n=55) were audited retrospectively. The majority of the nursing staff reported that they performed risk assessment when caring for a patient with hip fracture. These risk assessments were, however, not comprehensive. The most frequently reported preventive interventions were repositioning, use of lotion, mattresses/overlays and cushions for the heels. These interventions were to some extent documented in the patient's records. Nutritional support, reduction of shear and friction, hygiene and skin moisture, and patient's education were reported to a small extent and not documented at all. The Swedish quality guidelines regarding prevention and treatment of pressure ulcers were not fully implemented in clinical practice. It was concluded that nursing staff's knowledge and documentation of risk, prevention and treatment of pressure ulcers for patients with hip fractures could be improved.

  16. Concordance of Shape Risk Scale, a new pressure ulcer risk tool, with Braden Scale.

    PubMed

    Soppi, Esa T; Iivanainen, Ansa K; Korhonen, Pasi A

    2014-12-01

    The occurrence of pressure ulcers was examined in a cross-sectional study in 23 health care facilities and in home care involving 548 patients. The screening of pressure ulcer risk was assessed simultaneously using the Braden Scale and the new Shape Risk Scale (SRS), and the results were compared. The overall prevalence of pressure ulcers in the study population was 15·5% (85/548). The Braden Scale was performed as described in the literature. The direct concordance of the Braden and SRS scales was 46%. In more than 90% of cases, the SRS classified patients as well as or better than the Braden Scale. The SRS allocates patients significantly different from the Braden Scale into the risk categories, especially the difference is significant between the low and medium-risk categories. The greatest advantage of SRS to Braden Scale is that it correctly identifies patients with low risk of pressure ulcers. It is interesting that the two risk scores, taking into consideration the basically different pathophysiological factors, can still give rather similar results. The users considered that both scales are easy to use.

  17. Assessment of Knowledge and Level of Satisfaction of Nursing Undergraduates in a Pressure Ulcer Online Course

    PubMed Central

    Aroldi, Juscilynne B. C.; Peres, Heloisa H. H.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study is to identify the effectiveness of two different educational modalities in an online course on pressure ulcers by comparing the degree of knowledge and level of satisfaction of nursing undergraduate students. The result will ground the adoption of Information and Communication Technologies in the teaching process in nursing. PMID:24199036

  18. PUMA project: Active involving of end users to achieve a smart solution to prevent pressure ulcer.

    PubMed

    Laparra-Hernández, José; Chicote, Juan Carlos; Medina, Enrique; Barberà, Ricard; Durà-Gil, Juan V; Lozano, Vicente; Gil, Ángel; Bermejo, Ignacio

    2015-01-01

    This paper shows the benefits to include spinal cord injury users and the other stakeholders during the development of a new system to prevent pressure ulcers. The complementary of information has been key and has enhanced the possibility to achieve market acceptance and introduction.

  19. Automatic limb identification and sleeping parameters assessment for pressure ulcer prevention.

    PubMed

    Baran Pouyan, Maziyar; Birjandtalab, Javad; Nourani, Mehrdad; Matthew Pompeo, M D

    2016-08-01

    Pressure ulcers (PUs) are common among vulnerable patients such as elderly, bedridden and diabetic. PUs are very painful for patients and costly for hospitals and nursing homes. Assessment of sleeping parameters on at-risk limbs is critical for ulcer prevention. An effective assessment depends on automatic identification and tracking of at-risk limbs. An accurate limb identification can be used to analyze the pressure distribution and assess risk for each limb. In this paper, we propose a graph-based clustering approach to extract the body limbs from the pressure data collected by a commercial pressure map system. A robust signature-based technique is employed to automatically label each limb. Finally, an assessment technique is applied to evaluate the experienced stress by each limb over time. The experimental results indicate high performance and more than 94% average accuracy of the proposed approach. PMID:27268736

  20. Managing Pressures Ulcers in a Resource Constrained Situation: A Holistic Approach

    PubMed Central

    Dam, Abhijit; Datta, Nivedita; Mohanty, Usha Rani; Bandhopadhyay, Chandreyi

    2011-01-01

    Managing pressure ulcers remain a challenge and call for a multidisciplinary team approach to care. Even more daunting is the management of such patients in remote locations and in resource constrained situations. The management of pressure sores in a patient with progressive muscular atrophy has been discussed using resources that were locally available, accessible, and affordable. Community participation was encouraged. A holistic approach to care was adopted. PMID:22346055

  1. Getting evidence-based pressure ulcer prevention into practice: a multi-faceted unit-tailored intervention in a hospital setting.

    PubMed

    Sving, Eva; Högman, Marieann; Mamhidir, Anna-Greta; Gunningberg, Lena

    2016-10-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate whether a multi-faceted, unit-tailored intervention using evidenced-based pressure ulcer prevention affects (i) the performance of pressure ulcer prevention, (ii) the prevalence of pressure ulcers and (iii) knowledge and attitudes concerning pressure ulcer prevention among registered and assistant nurses. A quasi-experimental, clustered pre- and post-test design was used. Five units at a hospital setting were included. The intervention was based on the PARIHS framework and included a multi-professional team, training and repeated quality measurements. An established methodology was used to evaluate the prevalence and prevention of pressure ulcers. Nurses' knowledge and attitudes were evaluated using a validated questionnaire. A total of 506 patients were included, of whom 105 patients had a risk to develop pressure ulcer. More patients were provided pressure ulcer prevention care (P = 0·001) and more prevention care was given to each patient (P = 0·021) after the intervention. Corresponding results were shown in the group of patients assessed as being at risk for developing pressure ulcers. Nurses' knowledge about pressure ulcer prevention increased (P < 0·001). Positive attitudes towards pressure ulcer prevention remained high between pre- and post-test surveys. This multi-faceted unit-tailored intervention affected pressure ulcer prevention. Facilitation and repeated quality measurement together with constructed feedback of results seemed to be the most important factor for pressure ulcer prevention.

  2. An Evidence-Based Cue-Selection Guide and Logic Model to Improve Pressure Ulcer Prevention in Long-term Care.

    PubMed

    Yap, Tracey L; Kennerly, Susan M; Bergstrom, Nancy; Hudak, Sandra L; Horn, Susan D

    2016-01-01

    Pressure ulcers have consistently resisted prevention efforts in long-term care facilities nationwide. Recent research has described cueing innovations that-when selected according to the assumptions and resources of particular facilities-support best practices of pressure ulcer prevention. This article synthesizes that research into a unified, dynamic logic model to facilitate effective staff implementation of a pressure ulcer prevention program.

  3. The use of honey for the treatment of two patients with pressure ulcers.

    PubMed

    Van der Weyden, Elizabeth A

    2003-12-01

    Chronic wounds such as pressure ulcers, leg ulcers and diabetic wounds are a common problem among older people and alternative methods to the current time-consuming and costly practices of wound management in the nursing home need to be identified. To this end, we trialled the use of a honey alginate on two elderly males in our nursing home who were suffering from pressure ulcers (one on the ankle and one on the sacral region), to evaluate its effectiveness as a viable alternative to the current wound management practices in nursing homes. The use of honey resulted in a rapid and complete healing of both wounds. In addition, the antibacterial activity of honey had a deodorizing effect on the wounds and its anti-inflammatory actions helped reduce the level of pain. Similar healing results are also being observed in other patients with pressure-induced ulcers and as a result honey alginates are now being used as the 'standard' treatment for chronic wounds in our nursing home.

  4. A review of the surgical management of heel pressure ulcers in the 21st century.

    PubMed

    Bosanquet, David C; Wright, Ann M; White, Richard D; Williams, Ian M

    2016-02-01

    Heel ulceration, most frequently the result of prolonged pressure because of patient immobility, can range from the trivial to the life threatening. Whilst the vast majority of heel pressure ulcers (PUs) are superficial and involve the skin (stages I and II) or underlying fat (stage III), between 10% and 20% will involve deeper tissues, either muscle, tendon or bone (stage IV). These stage IV heel PUs represent a major health and economic burden and can be difficult to treat. The worst outcomes are seen in those with large ulcers, compromised peripheral arterial supply, osteomyelitis and associated comorbidities. Whilst the mainstay of management of stage I-III heel pressure ulceration centres on offloading and appropriate wound care, successful healing in stage IV PUs is often only possible with surgical intervention. Such intervention includes simple debridement, partial or total calcanectomy, arterial revascularisation in the context of coexisting peripheral vascular disease or using free tissue flaps. Amputation may be required for failed surgical intervention, or as a definitive first-line procedure in certain high-risk or poor prognosis patient groups. This review provides an overview of heel PUs, alongside a comprehensive literature review detailing the surgical interventions available when managing such patients.

  5. Role of Negative Pressure Wound Therapy in Healing of Diabetic Foot Ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Nain, Prabhdeep Singh; Uppal, Sanjeev K.; Garg, Ramneesh; Bajaj, Kuljyot; Garg, Shirin

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Foot disorders such as ulceration, infection and gangrene are the most common, complex and costly sequelae of diabetes mellitus.[1–3] Even for the most superficial wounds, treatment is often difficult with poor healing responses and high rates of complications. The purpose of this study is to compare the rate of ulcer healing with the negative pressure dressing technique to conventional moist dressings in the treatment of diabetic foot ulcers. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted on 30 patients, which were divided into two groups. One group received negative pressure dressing while other group received conventional saline moistened gauze dressing. Results were compared for rate of wound healing. Results: There was a statistically significant difference in the rate of appearance of granulation tissue between the two groups; with granulation tissue appearing earlier in the study group. The study group promised a better outcome (80% complete responders) as compared to the control group (60% complete responders). Conclusions: Negative pressure wound therapy has a definitive role in healing of diabetic foot ulcers. PMID:22022649

  6. Point prevalence of pressure ulcers in three second-level hospitals in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Galván-Martínez, Iris L; Narro-Llorente, Roberto; Lezama-de-Luna, Favio; Arredondo-Sandoval, Jesus; Fabian-Victoriano, Ma Rosy; Garrido-Espindola, Ximena; Lozano-Platonoff, Adriana; Contreras-Ruiz, Jose

    2014-12-01

    Pressure ulcers (PU) are the source of multiple complications and even death. To our knowledge, there is no available data about PU prevalence in Mexico. The objective of this study was to determine the point prevalence of PU in three second-level hospitals in Mexico. Every adult hospitalised patient was included in each hospital. Age, gender, hospitalisation ward, Braden score, and the number, location and stage of the ulcers encountered were recorded, as well as any pressure relief measures. In total, 294 patients were examined (127 were male); of these, 63 were considered to be at risk. The average age was 48·6 years. The overall prevalence of the PU was 17%. The service with the highest prevalence was the ICU. The most frequent stage was II (32%) and they were most commonly found in the sacrum (74%). The average Braden score of the patients with ulcers was 10, and 21·4% of the patients obtained moderate- to high-risk Braden scores. Of them, 60·3% had ulcers and only 46% had any preventive measures. The prevalence of PU in three hospitals in Mexico is 17%. The most common stage is II and the most commonly affected site is the sacrum. Only 46% of patients with PU had at least one pressure release measure.

  7. A retrospective study using the pressure ulcer scale for healing (PUSH) tool to examine factors affecting stage II pressure ulcer healing in a Korean acute care hospital.

    PubMed

    Park, Kyung Hee

    2014-09-01

    Stage II pressure ulcers (PUs) should be managed promptly and appropriately in order to prevent complications. To identify the factors affecting Stage II PU healing and optimize care, the electronic medical records of patients with a Stage II PU in an acute care hospital were examined. Patient and ulcer characteristics as well as nutritional assessment variables were retrieved, and ulcer variables were used to calculate Pressure Ulcer Scale for Healing (PUSH) scores. The effect of all variables on healing status (healed versus nonhealed) and change in PUSH score for healing rate were compared. Records of 309 Stage II PUs from 155 patients (mean age 61.2 ± 15.2 [range 5-89] years, 182 [58.9%] male) were retrieved and analyzed. Of those, 221 healed and 88 were documented as not healed at the end of the study. The variables that were significantly different between patients with PUs that did and did not heal were: major diagnosis (P = 0.001), peripheral arterial disease (P = 0.007), smoking (P = 0.048), serum albumin ( <2.5 g/dL) (P = 0.002), antidepressant use (P = 0.035), vitamin use (P = 0.006), history of surgery (P <0.001), PU size (P = 0.003), Malnutrition Universal Screening Tool (MUST) score (P = 0.020), Braden scale score (P = 0.003), and mean arterial pressure (MAP, mm Hg) (P = 0.026). The Cox proportional hazard model showed a significant positive difference in PUSH score change -indicative of healing - when pressure-redistribution surfaces were used (P <0.001, HR = 2.317), PU size was small (≤3.0 cm2, P = 0.006, HR = 1.670), MAP (within a range of 52-112 mm Hg) was higher P = 0.010, HR = 1.016), and patients were provided multivitamins (P = 0.037, HR=1.431). The results of this study suggest strategies for healing Stage II PUs in the acute care setting should include early recognition of lower-stage PUs, the provision of static pressure-redistribution surfaces and multivitamins, and maintaining higher MAP may facilitate healing and prevent deterioration

  8. Enhancing pressure ulcer prevention using wound dressings: what are the modes of action?

    PubMed

    Call, Evan; Pedersen, Justin; Bill, Brian; Black, Joyce; Alves, Paulo; Brindle, C Tod; Dealey, Carol; Santamaria, Nick; Clark, Michael

    2015-08-01

    Recent clinical research has generated interest in the use of sacral wound dressings as preventive devices for patients at risk of ulceration. This study was conducted to identify the modes of action through which dressings can add to pressure ulcer prevention, for example, shear and friction force redistribution and pressure distribution. Bench testing was performed using nine commercially available dressings. The use of dressings can reduce the amplitude of shear stress and friction reaching the skin of patients at risk. They can also effectively redirect these forces to wider areas which minimises the mechanical loads upon skeletal prominences. Dressings can redistribute pressure based upon their effective Poisson ratio and larger deflection areas, providing greater load redistribution.

  9. Strategies to support prevention, identification and management of pressure ulcers in the community.

    PubMed

    Payne, Drew

    2016-06-01

    Pressure ulcers are classified as serious incidents, cause pain and distress, and are a source of infection. Unlike patients in hospital, those in the community spend only a small amount of time with healthcare practitioners, so strategies are required to ensure they remain protected against pressure damage when community nurses are not with them. A risk assessment should be carried out to outline a patient's risks and used to develop a strategy for that person. Patients have different risks so prevention strategies need to be tailored individually. Strategies, which cover issues such as pressure-relieving equipment, mattress type, mobility aids and nutrition, should be monitored to ensure they continue to meet patients' needs, as their health, carers and other matters may change. Patients and their carers may need education on ulcers, including on myths, as it is essential they are involved. PMID:27297572

  10. Assessing Predictive Validity of Pressure Ulcer Risk Scales- A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    PARK, Seong-Hi; LEE, Hea Shoon

    2016-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to present a scientific reason for pressure ulcer risk scales: Cubbin& Jackson modified Braden, Norton, and Waterlow, as a nursing diagnosis tool by utilizing predictive validity of pressure sores. Methods: Articles published between 1966 and 2013 from periodicals indexed in the Ovid Medline, Embase, CINAHL, KoreaMed, NDSL, and other databases were selected using the key word “pressure ulcer”. QUADAS-II was applied for assessment for internal validity of the diagnostic studies. Selected studies were analyzed using meta-analysis with MetaDisc 1.4. Results: Seventeen diagnostic studies with high methodological quality, involving 5,185 patients, were included. In the results of the meta-analysis, sROC AUC of Braden, Norton, and Waterflow scale was over 0.7, showing moderate predictive validity, but they have limited interpretation due to significant differences between studies. In addition, Waterlow scale is insufficient as a screening tool owing to low sensitivity compared with other scales. Conclusion: The contemporary pressure ulcer risk scale is not suitable for uninform practice on patients under standardized criteria. Therefore, in order to provide more effective nursing care for bedsores, a new or modified pressure ulcer risk scale should be developed upon strength and weaknesses of existing tools. PMID:27114977

  11. Pressure ulcer prevalence, use of preventive measures, and mortality risk in an acute care population: a quality improvement project.

    PubMed

    Leijon, Siv; Bergh, Ingrid; Terstappen, Karin

    2013-01-01

    The primary aim of this quality improvement project was to determine pressure prevalence, risk of mortality, and use of preventive measures in a group of hospitalized patients. Two hundred fifty-eight patients recruited from Skaraborg Hospital in Sweden were assessed. A 1-day point prevalence study was carried out using a protocol advocated by the European PU Advisory Panel. Patients' age, gender, severity of PU (grades I-IV), anatomical location of PU, and use of preventive measures were recorded. The Swedish language version of the Modified Norton Scale was used for PU risk assessment. Data were collected by nurses trained according to the Web-based training: PU classification, "ePuclas2." After 21 months, a retrospective audit of the electronic records for patients identified with pressure ulcers was completed. The point prevalence of pressure ulcers was 23%. The total number of ulcers was 85, most were grade 1 (n = 39). The most common locations were the sacrum (n = 15) and the heel (n = 10). Three percent of patients (n = 9) had been assessed during their current hospital stay using a risk assessment tool. There was a statistically significant relationship between pressure ulcer occurrence and a low total score on the Modified Norton Scale. The patients' ages correlated significantly to the presence of a pressure ulcer. Patients with a pressure ulcer had a 3.6-fold increased risk of dying within 21 months, as compared with those without a pressure ulcer. Based on results from this quality improvement project, we recommend routine pressure ulcer risk assessment for all patients managed in a hospital setting such as ours. We further recommend that particular attention should be given to older and frail patients who are at higher risk for pressure ulcer occurrence and mortality.

  12. Reducing the incidence of pressure ulcers in nursing home residents: a prospective 6-year evaluation.

    PubMed

    Tippet, Aletha W

    2009-11-01

    Despite numerous clinical efforts and regulatory mandates to reduce occurrence, pressure ulcers (PUs) continue to plague up to one fourth of patients in healthcare facilities. In 2003, staff and administrators of a 151-bed skilled nursing facility in the Midwest started a quality improvement project based on 1992 Agency for Health Care Policy and Research guidelines to reduce the incidence of facility-acquired PUs. Pre-initiative PU data collection suggested a 12% to 25% PU prevalence rate with an average pre-initiative incidence of 5.19% (168 acquired ulcers over 3,234 person-months). During the next 4 years post-initiative, the average incidence was 0.73% (47 acquired ulcers over 6,446 person-months). Implementation of the comprehensive preventive efforts involving an interdisciplinary team with strong leadership, intensive training, use of evidence-based protocols, carefully evaluated support surfaces and wound/skin products, and simplification of processes led to a significant (P <0.0001) and sustained reduction in the incidence and prevalence of PUs. Additional observations included a simultaneous and unexplained reduction in resident falls and an overall cost reduction of more than $124,000 per year. These results confirm that nosocomial pressure ulcers can be significantly reduced in long-term care when well-established standard guidelines are followed.

  13. Maggot versus conservative debridement therapy for the treatment of pressure ulcers.

    PubMed

    Sherman, Ronald A

    2002-01-01

    To define the efficacy and safety of maggot therapy, a cohort of 103 inpatients with 145 pressure ulcers was evaluated. Sixty-one ulcers in 50 patients received maggot therapy at some point during their monitored course; 84 ulcers in 70 patients did not. Debridement and wound healing could be quantified for 43 maggot-treated wounds and 49 conventionally treated wounds. Eighty percent of maggot-treated wounds were completely debrided, while only 48% of wounds were completely debrided with conventional therapy alone (p=0.021). Within 3 weeks, maggot-treated wounds contained one-third the necrotic tissue (p = 0.05) and twice the granulation tissue (p < 0.001), compared to non-maggot-treated wounds. Of the 31 measurable maggot-treated wounds monitored initially during conventional therapy, necrotic tissue decreased 0.2 cm(2) per week during conventional therapy, while total wound area increased 1.2 cm(2) per week. During maggot therapy, necrotic tissue decreased 0.8 cm(2) per week (p = 0.003) and total wound surface area decreased 1.2 cm2 per week (p = 0.001). Maggot therapy was more effective and efficient in debriding chronic pressure ulcers than were the conventional treatments prescribed. Patients readily accepted maggot therapy, and adverse events were uncommon.

  14. A comparison of pressure ulcer prevalence rates in nursing homes in the Netherlands and Germany, adjusted for population characteristics.

    PubMed

    Tannen, Antje; Bours, Gerrie; Halfens, Ruud; Dassen, Theo

    2006-12-01

    Annual pressure ulcer surveys in the Netherlands and Germany have shown remarkable differences in prevalence rates. We explored the differences between the two populations, and the degree to which these differences were associated with differences in prevalence. To this end, data from 48 Dutch and 45 German facilities (n = 9772) from 2003 were analyzed. The prevalence of pressure ulcers (excluding grade 1) was 12.5% in the Netherlands and 4.3% in Germany. After adjusting for age, sex, and other risk factors, the probability of developing a pressure ulcer of stage 2 or higher in Dutch nursing homes was three times greater than in German homes.

  15. Use of negative pressure wound therapy as an adjunct to the treatment of extremity soft-tissue sarcoma with ulceration or impending ulceration

    PubMed Central

    CHEN, YU; XU, SONG-FENG; XU, MING; YU, XIU-CHUN

    2016-01-01

    Major wound complications of the extremities, following wide tumor resection and reconstruction for soft-tissue sarcomas (STSs), remain a challenge for limb-sparing surgery. Furthermore, STSs with ulceration or impending ulceration predispose patients to an increased risk of post-operative infection. The present study was conducted to assess the efficacy of negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) in preventing wound complications associated with surgical treatment of STSs with ulceration or impending ulceration, in patients treated between February 2012 and January 2013. A total of 5 patients, with a mean age of 48 years (range, 24–68 years), were enrolled in the present study. The diagnoses consisted of undifferentiated pleomorphic sarcoma (n=2), leiomyosarcoma (n=1), synovial sarcoma (n=1) and epithelioid sarcoma (n=1). According to American Joint Committee on Cancer criteria, 3 cases were stage III tumors, and the remaining 2 cases were of stages IIA and IIB, respectively. A total of 3 patients exhibited ulceration at diagnosis, and the remaining patients demonstrated impending ulceration. The mean wound area following wide resection of the tumor was 73 cm2 (range, 45–110 cm2). A continuous suction mode, with pressures measuring −200 to −300 mmHg, was used for 7–10 days on the soft-tissue defects as preparation for wound closure. Soft-tissue reconstruction included muscle flaps (n=2) and skin grafts (n=5). No major wound complications occurred. Post-operative functional and cosmetic outcomes were acceptable. A single patient demonstrated local recurrence 12 months after surgery and re-excision of the tumor was performed. All patients remained alive at the conclusion of follow-up, with a mean follow-up time of 26 months (range, 12–36 months). The present study demonstrated that NPWT is effective and safe when used as an adjunct to wound closure following resection of extremity STS with ulceration/impending ulceration. PMID:27347212

  16. Preventing Pressure Ulcers: A Multisite Randomized Controlled Trial in Nursing Homes

    PubMed Central

    Bergstrom, Nancy; Horn, Susan D.; Rapp, Mary; Stern, Anita; Barrett, Ryan; Watkiss, Michael; Krahn, Murray

    2014-01-01

    Background Pressure at the interface between bony prominences and support surfaces, sufficient to occlude or reduce blood flow, is thought to cause pressure ulcers (PrUs). Pressure ulcers are prevented by providing support surfaces that redistribute pressure and by turning residents to reduce length of exposure. Objective We aim to determine optimal frequency of repositioning in long-term care (LTC) facilities of residents at risk for PrUs who are cared for on high-density foam mattresses. Methods We recruited residents from 20 United States and 7 Canadian LTC facilities. Participants were randomly allocated to 1 of 3 turning schedules (2-, 3-, or 4-hour intervals). The study continued for 3 weeks with weekly risk and skin assessment completed by assessors blinded to group allocation. The primary outcome measure was PrU on the coccyx or sacrum, greater trochanter, or heels. Results Participants were mostly female (731/942, 77.6%) and white (758/942, 80.5%), and had a mean age of 85.1 (standard deviation [SD] ± 7.66) years. The most common comorbidities were cardiovascular disease (713/942, 75.7%) and dementia (672/942, 71.3%). Nineteen of 942 (2.02%) participants developed one superficial Stage 1 (n = 1) or Stage 2 (n = 19) ulcer; no full-thickness ulcers developed. Overall, there was no significant difference in PrU incidence (P = 0.68) between groups (2-hour, 8/321 [2.49%] ulcers/group; 3-hour, 2/326 [0.61%]; 4-hour, 9/295 [3.05%]. Pressure ulcers among high-risk (6/325, 1.85%) versus moderate-risk (13/617, 2.11%) participants were not significantly different (P = 0.79), nor was there a difference between moderate-risk (P = 0.68) or high-risk allocation groups (P = 0.90). Conclusions Results support turning moderate- and high-risk residents at intervals of 2, 3, or 4 hours when they are cared for on high-density foam replacement mattresses. Turning at 3-hour and at 4-hour intervals is no worse than the current practice of turning every 2 hours. Less frequent

  17. Use of a sacral silicone border foam dressing as one component of a pressure ulcer prevention program in an intensive care unit setting.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Nancy S; Blanck, Alyson W; Smith, Lisa; Cross, Maribeth; Andersson, Liane; Polito, Carol

    2012-01-01

    In 2008, patients in the intensive care unit (ICU) at Danbury Hospital, Danbury, Connecticut, experienced 79 pressure ulcers. As a result, pressure ulcer-prevention interventions were standardized in critical care and medical-surgical units and education was provided to all direct patient care staff about principles of skin care and prevention. Following these efforts, 53 ICU patients developed pressure ulcers in the sacral area in fiscal year 2009, representing a 12.5% incidence for the ICU as compared to a 3.4% overall pressure ulcer incidence for the total hospital. In order to achieve additional reduction in pressure ulcer incidence, we replicated an initiative that called for application of a silicone foam dressing every 3 days to determine its effect on sacral pressure ulcer incidence in the ICU. We found that the use of the dressing further diminished the incidence of sacral pressure ulcers in our patients.

  18. Comprehensive management of pressure ulcers in spinal cord injury: Current concepts and future trends

    PubMed Central

    Kruger, Erwin A.; Pires, Marilyn; Ngann, Yvette; Sterling, Michelle; Rubayi, Salah

    2013-01-01

    Pressure ulcers in spinal cord injury represent a challenging problem for patients, their caregivers, and their physicians. They often lead to recurrent hospitalizations, multiple surgeries, and potentially devastating complications. They present a significant cost to the healthcare system, they require a multidisciplinary team approach to manage well, and outcomes directly depend on patients' education, prevention, and compliance with conservative and surgical protocols. With so many factors involved in the successful treatment of pressure ulcers, an update on their comprehensive management in spinal cord injury is warranted. Current concepts of local wound care, surgical options, as well as future trends from the latest wound healing research are reviewed to aid medical professionals in treating patients with this difficult problem. PMID:24090179

  19. [Pressure ulcer care quality indicator: analysis of medical records and incident report].

    PubMed

    dos Santos, Cássia Teixeira; Oliveira, Magáli Costa; Pereira, Ana Gabriela da Silva; Suzuki, Lyliam Midori; Lucena, Amália de Fátima

    2013-03-01

    Cross-sectional study that aimed to compare the data reported in a system for the indication of pressure ulcer (PU) care quality, with the nursing evolution data available in the patients' medical records, and to describe the clinical profile and nursing diagnosis of those who developed PU grade 2 or higher Sample consisted of 188 patients at risk for PU in clinical and surgical units. Data were collected retrospectively from medical records and a computerized system of care indicators and statistically analyzed. Of the 188 patients, 6 (3%) were reported for pressure ulcers grade 2 or higher; however, only 19 (10%) were recorded in the nursing evolution records, thus revealing the underreporting of data. Most patients were women, older adults and patients with cerebrovascular diseases. The most frequent nursing diagnosis was risk of infection. The use of two or more research methodologies such as incident reporting data and retrospective review of patients' records makes the results trustworthy.

  20. Pressure-ulcer management and prevention in acute and primary care.

    PubMed

    Newham, Roger; Hudgell, Lynne

    This article describes a study to ascertain what it is like to follow the processes in practice for prevention and management of pressure ulcers as one aspect of care among others. The participants in this study were bands 5 and 6 staff nurses and healthcare assistants (HCAs) (n=72) recruited from two acute and two primary NHS trusts. Data were gathered from open-ended questions via an online survey (n=61) and interviews (n=11). The interviews were transcribed and all the data were analysed by thematic analysis. The findings show that participants believe there has been a high-profile imposition of guidelines and policies by management during at least the past 18 months, resulting in perceived good outcomes in the form of fewer pressure ulcers generally and less fragmentation of care, particularly within primary care. However, a number of perceived obstacles to the implementation of recommended interventions remain, notably lack of time and lack of knowledge.

  1. Pressure ulcers in the ICU patient: an update on prevention and treatment.

    PubMed

    Krupp, Anna E; Monfre, Jill

    2015-03-01

    The occurrence of hospital-acquired pressure ulcers (HAPU) is a recognized metric of quality of care by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) and the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. Pressure ulcer (PU) prevention and treatment have become a priority for many facilities as the reimbursement for hospital-acquired PUs has been significantly restricted by regulations implemented by CMS in 2008. Intensive care unit (ICU) patients are at higher risk for PU development due to comorbidities and life-saving treatment modalities in this environment. PU occurrence in ICUs ranges from 8.8 to 23 %. The literature was reviewed for recent advances in PU prevention and treatment in ICU patients. Advancements include risk assessment, education, turning schedules, providing staff with feedback from audits, lift teams, review of linen, consensus statement regarding unavoidable PU, treatment modalities, and an assessment of the knowledge providers have of PU prevention and treatment.

  2. Karomed armchairs and cushions in the prevention of pressure ulcers.

    PubMed

    Collins, F

    The clinician providing seating for patients who are unwell, who have poor functional ability or who are at risk of pressure sores, is faced with an increasing choice of products. Making the decision as to which product and associated features to choose can be a difficult task. This article describes the importance of suitable seating provision in patients who are at risk and outlines the Karomed range of armchairs. PMID:11051887

  3. Pressure ulcer prevention and treatment: transforming research findings into consensus based clinical guidelines.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Matthew; Pearson, Alan; Ward, Cathy

    2003-04-01

    The translation of research findings into practice guidelines is an important aspect in maintaining the currency of practice and adding value to research. While there has been a large amount of published literature regarding the treatment and prevention of pressure ulcers, very few studies have attempted to provide clear clinical guidelines. The present study proposes a model to transform research into clinical guidelines whilst developing a series of guidelines that can be applied to a variety of clinical settings. PMID:12694478

  4. Detecting early stage pressure ulcer on dark skin using multispectral imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Dingrong; Kong, Linghua; Sprigle, Stephen; Wang, Fengtao; Wang, Chao; Liu, Fuhan; Adibi, Ali; Tummala, Rao

    2010-02-01

    We are developing a handheld multispectral imaging device to non-invasively inspect stage I pressure ulcers in dark pigmented skins without the need of touching the patient's skin. This paper reports some preliminary test results of using a proof-of-concept prototype. It also talks about the innovation's impact to traditional multispectral imaging technologies and the fields that will potentially benefit from it.

  5. Nutrition, skin integrity, and pressure ulcer healing in chronically ill children: an overview.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Key, Margie; Alonzi, Allison

    2007-06-01

    Although information in the literature is scant, pediatric patients in long-term care are known to be at risk for pressure ulcers. Modifying adult guidelines and standards for well children has helped guide provision of care in the authors' pediatric long-term care and rehabilitation facility. In addition to standard comprehensive clinical and nutritional assessment protocols, patient growth and a history of prematurity, as well as the effect of chromosomal and neurological abnormalities, must be considered. Optimal protein intake is of particular concern in this population. Experience, along with necessary protocol adaptations, has offered insight into nutritional requirements and modifications needed for positive outcomes in pressure ulcer healing in chronically ill children. Better understanding of the role of nutrition in the assessment, treatment, and prevention of pressure ulcers is essential in any population. Research to increase understanding of the role of nutrition in maintaining skin integrity and optimizing repair in chronically ill children is needed to help clinicians improve care and outcomes.

  6. Historical perspective on pressure ulcers: the decubitus ominosus of Jean-Martin Charcot.

    PubMed

    Levine, Jeffrey M

    2005-07-01

    Jean-Martin Charcot was a towering figure in the French medical community in the 19th century. Among the diseases he studied was the decubitus, or pressure ulcer, as it is commonly called today. He did not believe that pressure or local irritation were causative factors for the decubitus but rather subscribed to the "neurotrophic theory," which held that damage to the central nervous system led directly to its occurrence. Charcot observed that many patients who developed eschar of the sacrum and buttocks died soon afterwards, and referred to this lesion as the decubitus ominosus, implying that its occurrence heralded impending death. His description of the evolving decubitus is extraordinarily detailed and accurate and includes complications that are seldom seen today, such as gangrenous metastases to the lung and invasion of the spinal cord. Charcot's therapeutic nihilism is largely a product of the limited medical technology of his day. The importance of risk factor assessment and timely intervention for persons at risk is now understood. In addition, it is recognized that not all pressure ulcers are unavoidable and that many ulcers, particularly those in early stages, can be reversed. Comparing Charcot's view of the decubitus with our own, insight is provided into the way medicine is practiced today.

  7. Predicting pressure ulcer risk with the modified Braden, Braden, and Norton scales in acute care hospitals in Mainland China.

    PubMed

    Kwong, Enid; Pang, Samantha; Wong, Thomas; Ho, Jacqueline; Shao-ling, Xue; Li-jun, Tao

    2005-05-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a modified Braden scale, to evaluate its predictive validity, and to identify a more valid pressure ulcer risk calculator for application in acute care hospitals in Mainland China among the modified Braden, Braden, and Norton scales. The initial modified Braden scale, with the addition of skin type and body build for height, was proposed in this study. Four hundred twenty-nine subjects who were admitted to two acute care hospitals in Mainland China within 24 hr and free of pressure ulcers upon admission were assessed with the initial modified Braden, Braden, and Norton scales by three nurse assessors. This was followed by a daily skin assessment to note any pressure ulcer by a nurse assessor. Nine subjects had pressure ulcers detected at Stages I (89%) and II (11%) after an average stay of 11 days. The descriptive analysis of each subscale scoring item in the initial modified Braden scale indicated that skin type and body build for height were the most distinct predictive factors whereas nutrition was the least distinct factor for predicting pressure ulcer development. Based on these findings, the modified Braden scale was further developed with the addition of skin type and body build for height and by exclusion of nutrition. The predictive validity test reported that the modified Braden scale demonstrated a better balance of sensitivity (89%) and specificity (75%) at a cutoff score of 16, with a higher positive predictive value (7%), than the Braden and Norton scales. This finding revealed that for this sample, the modified Braden scale is more effective in pressure ulcer risk prediction than the other two scales. Because the modified Braden scale is not 100% sensitive and specific, to increase clinical efficacy in the prevention of pressure ulcer, it is recommended that it be adopted combined with nursing judgment to predict pressure ulcer development in acute care settings in Mainland China.

  8. Heparan sulfate glycosaminoglycan mimetic improves pressure ulcer healing in a rat model of cutaneous ischemia-reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Tong, Miao; Tuk, Bastiaan; Hekking, Ineke M; Pleumeekers, Mieke M; Boldewijn, Mireille B; Hovius, Steven E R; van Neck, Johan W

    2011-01-01

    Pressure ulcers are a major clinical problem, with a large burden on healthcare resources. This study evaluated the effects of the heparan sulfate glycosaminoglycan mimetic, OTR4120, on pressure ulceration and healing. Ischemia-reperfusion (I-R) was evoked to induce pressure ulcers by external clamping and then removal of a pair of magnet disks on rat dorsal skin for a single ischemic period of 16 hours. Immediately after magnet removal, rats received an intramuscular injection of OTR4120 weekly for up to 1 month. During the ischemic period, normal skin perfusion was reduced by at least 60% and at least 20-45% reperfused into the ischemic region after compression release. This model caused sustained skin incomplete necrosis for up to 14 days and led to grade 2-3 ulcers. OTR4120 treatment decreased the area of skin incomplete necrosis and degree of ulceration. OTR4120 treatment also reduced inflammation and increased angiogenesis. In OTR4120-treated ulcers, the contents of vascular endothelial growth factor, platelet-derived growth factor, and transforming growth factor beta-1 were increased. Moreover, OTR4120 treatment promoted early expression of alpha-smooth muscle actin and increased collagen biosynthesis. Long-term restoration of wounded tissue biomechanical strength was significantly enhanced after OTR4120 treatment. Taken together, we conclude that OTR4120 treatment reduces pressure ulcer formation and potentiates the internal healing bioavailability.

  9. Incidence and Predicted Risk Factors of Pressure Ulcers in Surgical Patients: Experience at a Medical Center in Taipei, Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Fu Shaw, Ling; Chang, Pao-Chu; Lee, Jung-Fen; Kung, Huei-Yu

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To explore the context of incidence of and associated risk factors for pressure ulcers amongst the population of surgical patients. Methods. The initial study cohort was conducted with a total of 297 patients admitted to a teaching hospital for a surgical operation from November 14th to 27th 2006 in Taipei, Taiwan. The Braden scale, pressure ulcers record sheet, and perioperative patient outcomes free from signs and symptoms of injury related to positioning and related nursing interventions and activities were collected. Results. The incidence of immediate and thirty-minute-later pressure ulcers is 9.8% (29/297) and 5.1% (15/297), respectively. Using logistic regression model, the statistically significantly associated risk factors related to immediate and thirty-minute-later pressure ulcers include operation age, type of anesthesia, type of operation position, type of surgery, admission Braden score, and number of nursing intervention after adjustment for confounding factors. Conclusion. Admission Braden score and number of nursing intervention are well-established protected factors for the development of pressure ulcers. Our study shows that older operation age, type of anesthesia, type of operation position, and type of surgery are also associated with the development of pressure ulcers. PMID:25057484

  10. Bacteriology of pressure ulcers in individuals with spinal cord injury: What we know and what we should know

    PubMed Central

    Dana, Ali N.; Bauman, William A.

    2015-01-01

    Individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI) are at increased risk for the development of pressure ulcers. These chronic wounds are debilitating and contribute to prolonged hospitalization and worse medical outcome. However, the species of bacteria and the role that specific species may play in delaying the healing of chronic pressure ulcers in the SCI population has not been well characterized. This study will review the literature regarding what is known currently about the bacteriology of pressure ulcers in individuals with SCI. An electronic literature search of MEDLINE (1966 to February 2014) was performed. Eleven studies detailing bacterial cultures of pressure ulcers in the SCI population met inclusion criteria and were selected for review. Among these studies, bacterial cultures were often polymicrobial with both aerobic and anaerobic bacteria identified with culture techniques that varied significantly. The most common organisms identified in pressure ulcers were Staphylococcus aureus, Proteus mirabilis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Enterococcus faecalis. In general, wounds were poorly characterized with minimal to no physical description and/or location provided. Our present understanding of factors that may alter the microbiome of pressure ulcers in individuals with SCI is quite rudimentary, at best. Well-designed studies are needed to assess appropriate wound culture technique, the impact of bacterial composition on wound healing, development of infection, and the optimum medical and surgical approaches to wound care. PMID:25130374

  11. African Americans show increased risk for pressure ulcers: a retrospective analysis of acute care hospitals in America.

    PubMed

    Fogerty, Mary; Guy, Jeffrey; Barbul, Adrian; Nanney, Lillian B; Abumrad, Naji N

    2009-01-01

    In an earlier study, we reported a significantly increased risk of pressure ulcer hospital discharge diagnoses in African Americans, higher age groups, and those with certain medical conditions. The objectives of the present study were to: (a) investigate the demographics associated with a higher odds ratio (OR) in African Americans and (b) determine whether African Americans have different rates of medical risk factors. The 2003 Nationwide Inpatient Sample database was queried. Patients with pressure ulcers were identified by discharge diagnoses using ICD-9 codes 707.0-707.09. Discharge diagnosis was examined using the agency for healthcare research and quality clinical classifications software (CCS). The present study used identified CCS discharge diagnoses present in at least 5% of all patients, with an OR>2. African Americans exhibited a higher incidence of an OR>2 for 28 identified CCS risk factors for pressure ulcers. The pressure ulcer diagnoses tended to occur at younger ages in African Americans. No significant differences were noted in African Americans with pressure ulcers when a subanalysis was conducted by zip code income quartile, region of the country, or teaching status of the hospital. Hospitalized African Americans exhibit an age-dependent, higher prevalence of pressure ulcers compared with Caucasians. Socioeconomic factors tracked within the Nationwide Inpatient Sample do not provide an explanation for this phenomenon.

  12. A Computational, Tissue-Realistic Model of Pressure Ulcer Formation in Individuals with Spinal Cord Injury.

    PubMed

    Ziraldo, Cordelia; Solovyev, Alexey; Allegretti, Ana; Krishnan, Shilpa; Henzel, M Kristi; Sowa, Gwendolyn A; Brienza, David; An, Gary; Mi, Qi; Vodovotz, Yoram

    2015-06-01

    People with spinal cord injury (SCI) are predisposed to pressure ulcers (PU). PU remain a significant burden in cost of care and quality of life despite improved mechanistic understanding and advanced interventions. An agent-based model (ABM) of ischemia/reperfusion-induced inflammation and PU (the PUABM) was created, calibrated to serial images of post-SCI PU, and used to investigate potential treatments in silico. Tissue-level features of the PUABM recapitulated visual patterns of ulcer formation in individuals with SCI. These morphological features, along with simulated cell counts and mediator concentrations, suggested that the influence of inflammatory dynamics caused simulations to be committed to "better" vs. "worse" outcomes by 4 days of simulated time and prior to ulcer formation. Sensitivity analysis of model parameters suggested that increasing oxygen availability would reduce PU incidence. Using the PUABM, in silico trials of anti-inflammatory treatments such as corticosteroids and a neutralizing antibody targeted at Damage-Associated Molecular Pattern molecules (DAMPs) suggested that, at best, early application at a sufficiently high dose could attenuate local inflammation and reduce pressure-associated tissue damage, but could not reduce PU incidence. The PUABM thus shows promise as an adjunct for mechanistic understanding, diagnosis, and design of therapies in the setting of PU.

  13. A Computational, Tissue-Realistic Model of Pressure Ulcer Formation in Individuals with Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Ziraldo, Cordelia; Solovyev, Alexey; Allegretti, Ana; Krishnan, Shilpa; Henzel, M. Kristi; Sowa, Gwendolyn A.; Brienza, David; An, Gary; Mi, Qi; Vodovotz, Yoram

    2015-01-01

    People with spinal cord injury (SCI) are predisposed to pressure ulcers (PU). PU remain a significant burden in cost of care and quality of life despite improved mechanistic understanding and advanced interventions. An agent-based model (ABM) of ischemia/reperfusion-induced inflammation and PU (the PUABM) was created, calibrated to serial images of post-SCI PU, and used to investigate potential treatments in silico. Tissue-level features of the PUABM recapitulated visual patterns of ulcer formation in individuals with SCI. These morphological features, along with simulated cell counts and mediator concentrations, suggested that the influence of inflammatory dynamics caused simulations to be committed to “better” vs. “worse” outcomes by 4 days of simulated time and prior to ulcer formation. Sensitivity analysis of model parameters suggested that increasing oxygen availability would reduce PU incidence. Using the PUABM, in silico trials of anti-inflammatory treatments such as corticosteroids and a neutralizing antibody targeted at Damage-Associated Molecular Pattern molecules (DAMPs) suggested that, at best, early application at a sufficiently high dose could attenuate local inflammation and reduce pressure-associated tissue damage, but could not reduce PU incidence. The PUABM thus shows promise as an adjunct for mechanistic understanding, diagnosis, and design of therapies in the setting of PU. PMID:26111346

  14. Evaluation of the pressure ulcers risk scales with critically ill patients: a prospective cohort study 1

    PubMed Central

    Borghardt, Andressa Tomazini; do Prado, Thiago Nascimento; de Araújo, Thiago Moura; Rogenski, Noemi Marisa Brunet; Bringuente, Maria Edla de Oliveira

    2015-01-01

    AIMS: to evaluate the accuracy of the Braden and Waterlow risk assessment scales in critically ill inpatients. METHOD: this prospective cohort study, with 55 patients in intensive care units, was performed through evaluation of sociodemographic and clinical variables, through the application of the scales (Braden and Waterlow) upon admission and every 48 hours; and through the evaluation and classification of the ulcers into categories. RESULTS: the pressure ulcer incidence was 30.9%, with the Braden and Waterlow scales presenting high sensitivity (41% and 71%) and low specificity (21% and 47%) respectively in the three evaluations. The cut off scores found in the first, second and third evaluations were 12, 12 and 11 in the Braden scale, and 16, 15 and 14 in the Waterlow scale. CONCLUSION: the Braden scale was shown to be a good screening instrument, and the Waterlow scale proved to have better predictive power. PMID:25806628

  15. Identification of pre-operative and intra-operative variables predictive of pressure ulcer development in patients undergoing urologic surgical procedures.

    PubMed

    Connor, Tom; Sledge, Jennifer A; Bryant-Wiersema, Laurel; Stamm, Linda; Potter, Patricia

    2010-01-01

    This study examined variables predictive of pressure ulcers among patients undergoing urologic surgical procedures. Anesthesia duration and total time of the diastolic blood pressure was less than 50 Hgmm were statistically significant predictors. Dynamic pressure-relieving devices are recommended to reduce incidences of pressure ulcer incidence.

  16. A pilot study to evaluate the role of the Spinal Cord Impairment Pressure Ulcer Monitoring Tool (SCI-PUMT) in clinical decisions for pressure ulcer treatment.

    PubMed

    Thomason, Susan S; Graves, Barbara Ann; Madaris, Linda

    2014-12-01

    The Spinal Cord Impairment Pressure Ulcer Monitoring Tool (SCI-PUMT) was designed to assess pressure ulcer (PrU) healing in the spinal cord impaired (SCI) population. The tool contains 7 variables: wound surface area, depth, edges, tunneling, undermining, exudate type, and necrotic tissue amount. A 2-phased, quantitative pilot study based on the Theory of Reasoned Action and Theory of Planned Behavior was conducted at a large SCI/Disorders Center in the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). In the first phase of the study, a convenience sample of 5 physicians, 3 advanced practice registered nurses, and 3 certified wound care nurses (CWCN) was surveyed using a 2-part questionnaire to assess use of the SCI-PUMT instrument, its anticipated improvement in PrU assessment, and intent to use the SCI-PUMT in clinical practice. Attitudes, subjective norms, perceived behavioral controls, and barriers related to the intent to use the SCI-PUMT were evaluated using a 5-point Likert scale (range: 1= extremely likely, 5 = extremely unlikely). In the second phase of the study, the electronic health records (EHR) of 24 veterans (with 30 PrUs) who had at least 2 completed SCI-PUMT scores during a 4-week period were used to evaluate whether an association existed between magnitudes of change of total SCI-PUMT scores and ordered changes in PrU treatment. The overall mean score for intent to use SCI-PUMT was 1.80 (SD 0.75). The least favorable scores were for convenience and motivation to use the SCI-PUMT. Analysis of EHR data showed no significant difference in magnitudes of change in the SCI-PUMT score and changes in PrU treatment recommendations made by the CWCNs. The significance was not affected regardless of an increase or no change in the score (χ2 with 1 degree of freedom = 1.158, P = 0.282) or for a decrease in the score (χ2 with 1 degree of freedom = 0.5, P = 0.478). In this pilot study, the expressed intent to use the SCI-PUMT in making clinical decisions was generally

  17. A pilot study to evaluate the role of the Spinal Cord Impairment Pressure Ulcer Monitoring Tool (SCI-PUMT) in clinical decisions for pressure ulcer treatment.

    PubMed

    Thomason, Susan S; Graves, Barbara Ann; Madaris, Linda

    2014-12-01

    The Spinal Cord Impairment Pressure Ulcer Monitoring Tool (SCI-PUMT) was designed to assess pressure ulcer (PrU) healing in the spinal cord impaired (SCI) population. The tool contains 7 variables: wound surface area, depth, edges, tunneling, undermining, exudate type, and necrotic tissue amount. A 2-phased, quantitative pilot study based on the Theory of Reasoned Action and Theory of Planned Behavior was conducted at a large SCI/Disorders Center in the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). In the first phase of the study, a convenience sample of 5 physicians, 3 advanced practice registered nurses, and 3 certified wound care nurses (CWCN) was surveyed using a 2-part questionnaire to assess use of the SCI-PUMT instrument, its anticipated improvement in PrU assessment, and intent to use the SCI-PUMT in clinical practice. Attitudes, subjective norms, perceived behavioral controls, and barriers related to the intent to use the SCI-PUMT were evaluated using a 5-point Likert scale (range: 1= extremely likely, 5 = extremely unlikely). In the second phase of the study, the electronic health records (EHR) of 24 veterans (with 30 PrUs) who had at least 2 completed SCI-PUMT scores during a 4-week period were used to evaluate whether an association existed between magnitudes of change of total SCI-PUMT scores and ordered changes in PrU treatment. The overall mean score for intent to use SCI-PUMT was 1.80 (SD 0.75). The least favorable scores were for convenience and motivation to use the SCI-PUMT. Analysis of EHR data showed no significant difference in magnitudes of change in the SCI-PUMT score and changes in PrU treatment recommendations made by the CWCNs. The significance was not affected regardless of an increase or no change in the score (χ2 with 1 degree of freedom = 1.158, P = 0.282) or for a decrease in the score (χ2 with 1 degree of freedom = 0.5, P = 0.478). In this pilot study, the expressed intent to use the SCI-PUMT in making clinical decisions was generally

  18. [Valid and reliable methods for describing pressure sores and leg ulcer--a systematic literature review].

    PubMed

    Panfil, Eva-Maria; Linde, Eva

    2007-08-01

    In the wound documentation of pressure sore and leg ulcer the most important tasks and objectives are the presentation of the outcomes of the diagnostic inspection, planning of therapy and evaluation of wound healing. The aim of the systematic literature review covering the period of time between 2001 and 2006 was to look for valid, reliable and feasible methods to the size, appearance, edge, grade, and healing of wounds. Due to their heterogeneity the studies that were found can hardly be compared; some of them show methodological weaknesses. Measurements of an elliptical area based on the perpendicular method using a ruler are the most reliable within the linear methods; however, they only allow an estimation of the size. Together with mechanical or digital planimetry tracings can measure the wound's size reliably. Photographs do not assess large or circular wounds reliably, nor do they adequately document the wound's colour. There are no valid and reliable standardized procedures for the documentation of the wound's colour, exudate, odour; margins and maceration. To describe the pressure sore's degree of severity there are twenty different systems of classification. The data, however, confirm the difficulty to classify pressure ulcers reliably. Wound healing can also be assessed by a number of standardized tools: PSST, PUSH, SWHT, SS, PUHP, CODED and DESIGN (pressure sore) and LUMT (leg ulcer). These tools have not been translated into German and have not been adequately researched. No data exists to allow generalization concerning the practicability of these methods. For all methods of measurement, it can be concluded that training and experience in the use of the method is required and that the validity and reliability are higher when measurements are conducted by an experienced person. PMID:18019553

  19. Accelerated wound closure of pressure ulcers in aged mice by chitosan scaffolds with and without bFGF.

    PubMed

    Park, Chan J; Clark, Sherrie G; Lichtensteiger, Carol A; Jamison, Russell D; Johnson, Amy J Wagoner

    2009-07-01

    Pressure ulcers are a significant healthcare concern, especially for elderly populations. Our work served to ameliorate the chronicity of these ulcers by addressing ischemia-reperfusion injury mediated by neutrophils and the concomitant loss of vasculature in these wounds. To this end, chitosan scaffolds loaded with basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) contained in gelatin microparticles were developed and tested for clinical relevance in an aged mouse model. Pressure ulcers were induced in aged mice, and efficacy of treatment was assessed. On days 3 and 7, both chitosan and chitosan-bFGF scaffolds significantly accelerated wound closure compared to gauze control. By day 10, all wounds achieved similar closure. Delivery and angiogenic function of bFGF was verified through ELISA and histology. Elevated neutrophil levels were observed in chitosan and chitosan-bFGF groups. Since neutrophil elastase contributes to the proteolytic environments of pressure ulcers, the effect of chitosan on elastase was assessed. In vitro, chitosan inhibited elastase activity. In vivo, elastase protein levels in wounds were reduced with chitosan-bFGF scaffolds by day 10. These results suggest that chitosan is an effective material for growth factor delivery and can help to heal chronic ulcers. Collectively, our data show that chitosan-bFGF scaffolds are effective in accelerating wound closure of pressure ulcers in aged animals.

  20. Adipose Stromal Cells Repair Pressure Ulcers in Both Young and Elderly Mice: Potential Role of Adipogenesis in Skin Repair

    PubMed Central

    Strong, Amy L.; Bowles, Annie C.; MacCrimmon, Connor P.; Frazier, Trivia P.; Lee, Stephen J.; Wu, Xiying; Katz, Adam J.; Gawronska-Kozak, Barbara; Bunnell, Bruce A.

    2015-01-01

    More than 2.5 million patients in the U.S. require treatment for pressure ulcers annually, and the elderly are at particularly high risk for pressure ulcer development. Current therapy for pressure ulcers consists of conservative medical management for shallow lesions and aggressive debridement and surgery for deeper lesions. The current study uses a murine model to address the hypothesis that adipose-derived stromal/stem cell (ASC) treatment would accelerate and enhance pressure ulcer repair. The dorsal skin of both young (2 months old [mo]) and old (20 mo) C57BL/6J female mice was sandwiched between external magnets for 12 hours over 2 consecutive days to initiate a pressure ulcer. One day following the induction, mice were injected with ASCs isolated from congenic mice transgenic for the green fluorescent protein under a ubiquitous promoter. Relative to phosphate-buffered saline-treated controls, ASC-treated mice displayed a cell concentration-dependent acceleration of wound closure, improved epidermal/dermal architecture, increased adipogenesis, and reduced inflammatory cell infiltration. The ASC-induced improvements occurred in both young and elderly recipients, although the expression profile of angiogenic, immunomodulatory, and reparative mRNAs differed as a function of age. The results are consistent with clinical reports that fat grafting improved skin architecture in thermal injuries; the authors of this published study have invoked ASC-based mechanisms to account for their clinical outcomes. Thus, the current proof-of-principle study sets the stage for clinical translation of autologous and/or allogeneic ASC treatment of pressure ulcers. Significance Adipose-derived stromal/stem cells (ASCs) promote the healing of pressure ulcer wounds in both young and old mice. ASCs enhance wound healing rates through adipogenic differentiation and regeneration of the underlying architecture of the skin. PMID:25900728

  1. Assessing clinical efficacy of a hydrocolloid/alginate dressing on full-thickness pressure ulcers.

    PubMed

    Barr, J E; Day, A L; Weaver, V A; Taler, G M

    1995-04-01

    An absorbent hydrocolloid/alginate spiral dressing and a hydrocolloid secondary dressing were used in the management of 30 patients with 30 exuding State III and IV pressure ulcers. After a mean treatment time of 12.9 days (SD 6.5), all wounds had a significant increase in the amount of granulation tissue/epithelium and a decrease in the amount of devitalized tissue (p < 0.05). Wounds that underwent wide surgical debridement prior to the study were covered with 15 percent fibrin slough at study entry versus 39 percent for non-debrided wounds (p < 0.05). The dressing combination facilitated wound contraction and removal of fibrin slough in ulcers that were surgically debrided prior to the study. Ulcers which had not been surgically debrided expanded as autolytic debridement reduced the amount of fibrin slough/necrotic tissue present at the wound bed (Mean: 17.6 percent, p < 0.05). The absorbent spiral dressing helped manage exudate, was easy to use and comfortable for the patients. The average time between dressing changes in these exuding wounds was 1.56 days (SD = 0.95). Use of air-fluidized bed or mattress was found to significantly reduce wear time of the dressing (p < 0.01). Further studies are needed to confirm short-term, and evaluate long-term effects of this dressing combination on healing and debridement.

  2. The Nursing Diagnosis of risk for pressure ulcer: content validation 1

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, Cássia Teixeira; Almeida, Miriam de Abreu; Lucena, Amália de Fátima

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: to validate the content of the new nursing diagnosis, termed risk for pressure ulcer. Method: the content validation with a sample made up of 24 nurses who were specialists in skin care from six different hospitals in the South and Southeast of Brazil. Data collection took place electronically, through an instrument constructed using the SurveyMonkey program, containing a title, definition, and 19 risk factors for the nursing diagnosis. The data were analyzed using Fehring's method and descriptive statistics. The project was approved by a Research Ethics Committee. Results: title, definition and seven risk factors were validated as "very important": physical immobilization, pressure, surface friction, shearing forces, skin moisture, alteration in sensation and malnutrition. Among the other risk factors, 11 were validated as "important": dehydration, obesity, anemia, decrease in serum albumin level, prematurity, aging, smoking, edema, impaired circulation, and decrease in oxygenation and in tissue perfusion. The risk factor of hyperthermia was discarded. Conclusion: the content validation of these components of the nursing diagnosis corroborated the importance of the same, being able to facilitate the nurse's clinical reasoning and guiding clinical practice in the preventive care for pressure ulcers. PMID:27305182

  3. Perioperative nurses' knowledge of indicators for pressure ulcer development in the surgical patient population.

    PubMed

    Lupear, Susan Krauser; Overstreet, Maria; Krau, Stephen D

    2015-06-01

    Despite focused attention to improve the quality and safety of patient care, and the financial impact pressure ulcers (PUs) can have on a health care provider or institution, evidence supports that PUs continue to occur in other patient populations during admission to the hospital. An example of a patient population in which evidence indicates that the development of PUs occurs, is patients who have a surgical procedure. The article discusses a project designed to identify potential knowledge deficits among perioperative nurses of indicators for PU development in the surgical patient population.

  4. Successful Pedicled Anterolateral Thigh Flap Reconstruction for a Recurrent Ischial Pressure Ulcer: A Case With Multiple Recurrences Over a 7-year Follow-up.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chi-Yu; Shih, Yu-Jen; Chou, Chang-Yi; Chen, Tim-Mo; Chen, Shyi-Gen; Tzeng, Yuan-Sheng

    2015-06-01

    Ischial pressure ulcers are difficult ulcers to treat and have a low treatment success rate compared to sacral and trochanteric ulcers; regional flap failure further complicates the treatment. Reported here is a case of a 65-year-old man who experienced a spinal injury with paraplegia due to trauma 20 years ago. The patient experienced a recurrent ischial ulcer since 2007, and underwent several types of flap reconstruction with poor outcomes over a 7-year period. Therefore, the chosen intervention was a pedicled anterolateral thigh (pALT) fasciocutaneous flap reconstruction for the ischial ulcer via a subcutaneous route. Over the 10-month follow-up, the recurrent ischial ulcer healed without wound dehiscence. Island pALT reconstruction appears to be an alternative technique for treating recurrent ischial pressure ulcers. Though reconstruction of ischial ulcers via the pALT technique has been described previously, this may be the first case report to describe pALT flap in a patient with recurrent ischial ulcers after failed reconstructions using a gluteus maximus flap, V-Y advancement flap, and hatchet flap.Ischial pressure ulcers are difficult to treat and have a low treatment success rate1 compared to sacral and trochanteric ulcers. In addition, there are many different techniques that can be used to treat ischial pressure ulcers, including primary wound closure, gluteus maximus flaps, V-Y advancement flaps, or inferior gluteal artery perforator flaps. However, several experts have recently described using the pedicled anterolateral thigh (pALT) flap for reconstruction of recurrent ischial pressure ulcers.1,2 In the presented case, the authors followed a single patient with paraplegia with a recurrent ischial ulcer who had undergone several types of wound treatment over a 7-year period. The indurated ulcer was ultimately resolved by pALT reconstruction.

  5. [Pressure Ulcer Caused by Long-term Keeping of the Same Body Position during Epidural Labour Analgesia].

    PubMed

    Naruse, Satoshi; Uchizaki, Sakiko; Mimura, Shinichiro; Taniguchi, Mizuki; Akinaga, Chieko; Sato, Shigehito

    2016-06-01

    We report the case of a 34-year-old woman (height: 153 cm, weight : 62.4 kg, non-pregnant weight : 52 kg, uniparous) without underlying diseases who developed pressure ulcer due to keeping a similar body position during long-term epidural delivery. Induction of childbirth was started in gestational week 40, causing reduction of fetal heart rate, which improved after adoption of a right lateral recumbent position. Severe contractions occurred and epidural labour analgesia was started. The fetal heart rate decreased again and induction of childbirth was suspended, but the right lateral recumbent position was maintained. Epidural administration was continued due to persistent contractions. Next morning, induction of childbirth was restarted and birth occurred in approximately 6 hours. The right lateral recumbent position was maintained for approximately 20 hours. At childbirth, a pressure ulcer was present in the intertrochanteric part of the right femur. The causes included insufficient knowledge of medical staff about the risk of pressure ulcer during epidural delivery, and no position change. A decreased sensation and blocked motor nerve caused by epidural anesthesia might have accelerated pressure ulcer development. This case suggests that preventive measures against pressure ulcer are required in epidural anesthesia in pregnant women.

  6. [Pressure Ulcer Caused by Long-term Keeping of the Same Body Position during Epidural Labour Analgesia].

    PubMed

    Naruse, Satoshi; Uchizaki, Sakiko; Mimura, Shinichiro; Taniguchi, Mizuki; Akinaga, Chieko; Sato, Shigehito

    2016-06-01

    We report the case of a 34-year-old woman (height: 153 cm, weight : 62.4 kg, non-pregnant weight : 52 kg, uniparous) without underlying diseases who developed pressure ulcer due to keeping a similar body position during long-term epidural delivery. Induction of childbirth was started in gestational week 40, causing reduction of fetal heart rate, which improved after adoption of a right lateral recumbent position. Severe contractions occurred and epidural labour analgesia was started. The fetal heart rate decreased again and induction of childbirth was suspended, but the right lateral recumbent position was maintained. Epidural administration was continued due to persistent contractions. Next morning, induction of childbirth was restarted and birth occurred in approximately 6 hours. The right lateral recumbent position was maintained for approximately 20 hours. At childbirth, a pressure ulcer was present in the intertrochanteric part of the right femur. The causes included insufficient knowledge of medical staff about the risk of pressure ulcer during epidural delivery, and no position change. A decreased sensation and blocked motor nerve caused by epidural anesthesia might have accelerated pressure ulcer development. This case suggests that preventive measures against pressure ulcer are required in epidural anesthesia in pregnant women. PMID:27483666

  7. Randomized clinical trial of ascorbic acid in the treatment of pressure ulcers.

    PubMed

    ter Riet, G; Kessels, A G; Knipschild, P G

    1995-12-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the effects of ascorbic acid supplementation, 500 mg twice daily in the treatment of pressure ulcers as an adjunct to standardized treatment. The design consisted of a multicenter blinded randomized trial. The control group received 10 mg of ascorbic acid twice daily. Patients from 11 nursing homes and 1 hospital participated. Main outcome measures included wound survival, healing rates of wound surfaces, and clinimetric changes over 12 weeks. Eighty-eight patients were randomized. Intention-to-treat analysis showed that the wound closure probability per unit time (i.e., the closure rate) was not higher in the intervention group than in the control group (Cox hazard ratio of 0.78 [90% precision interval, 0.44-1.39]). Mean absolute healing rates were 0.21 and 0.27 cm2/week in the intervention and control group, respectively (PI of the adjusted difference: -0.17 to 0.13). Relative healing rates and healing velocities did not show favorable results of ascorbic acid supplementation, either. A panel scored slides of the ulcers with a report mark between 1 (bad) and 10 (excellent). The improvement was 0.45 and 0.72 points per week in the intervention and control group, respectively (PI of the adjusted difference: -0.50 to 0.20). With another clinimetric index we could not show any differences, either. These data do not support the idea that ascorbic acid supplementation (500 vs. 10 mg twice daily) speeds up the healing of pressure ulcers.

  8. Imaging Mass Spectrometry for Assessing Cutaneous Wound Healing: Analysis of Pressure Ulcers

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) was employed for the analysis of frozen skin biopsies to investigate the differences between stage IV pressure ulcers that remain stalled, stagnant, and unhealed versus those exhibiting clinical and histological signs of improvement. Our data reveal a rich diversity of proteins that are dynamically modulated, and we selectively highlight a family of calcium binding proteins (S-100 molecules) including calcyclin (S100-A6), calgranulins A (S100-A8) and B (S100-A9), and calgizzarin (S100-A11). IMS allowed us to target three discrete regions of interest: the wound bed, adjacent dermis, and hypertrophic epidermis. Plots derived using unsupervised principal component analysis of the global protein signatures within these three spatial niches indicate that these data from wound signatures have potential as a prognostic tool since they appear to delineate wounds that are favorably responding to therapeutic interventions versus those that remain stagnant or intractable in their healing status. Our discovery-based approach with IMS augments current knowledge of the molecular signatures within pressure ulcers while providing a rationale for a focused examination of the role of calcium modulators within the context of impaired wound healing. PMID:25488653

  9. Use of a topical haemoglobin spray for oxygenating pressure ulcers: healing outcomes.

    PubMed

    Tickle, Joy; Bateman, Sharon Dawn

    2015-12-01

    A published evaluation ( Tickle, 2015 ) of the use of a topical haemoglobin spray plus standard care in 18 patients with pressure ulcers showed that, following 4 weeks of treatment, the wound size reduced in 17 wounds and there was a progression toward healing in all 18. All but one of the wounds were over 2 months in duration at baseline. This article reports the results of the healing rates at 3 months of the 11 patients who continued to be treated with the haemoglobin spray. Nine of the 11 wounds healed, and 2 reduced in size by week 12 (i.e. 1 wound reduced from 30 cm(2) at baseline to 7 cm(2), while the other reduced from 6 cm(2) to 4 cm(2)). Of the 10 patients who were experiencing wound pain at baseline, 9 were pain free by week 8. Rapid elimination of slough was observed in all patients. The 82% healing rate achieved at 3 months and the fact that most patients continued to receive the same standard care as they had in the 4 weeks before recruitment into the evaluation increases the likelihood that the clinical outcomes observed here can be attributed to the haemoglobin spray. Topical haemoglobin shows promise in terms of its ability to accelerate healing in chronic pressure ulcers.

  10. Traditional Japanese Formula Kigikenchuto Accelerates Healing of Pressure-Loading Skin Ulcer in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Mari; Shibahara, Naotoshi; Hikiami, Hiroaki; Yoshida, Toshiko; Jo, Michiko; Kaneko, Maria; Nogami, Tatsuya; Fujimoto, Makoto; Goto, Hirozo; Shimada, Yutaka

    2011-01-01

    We evaluated the effect of kigikenchuto (KKT), a traditional Japanese formula, in a modified rat pressure-loading skin ulcer model. Rats were divided into three groups, KKT extract orally administered (250 or 500 mg/kg/day for 35 days) and control. KKT shortened the duration until healing. Immunohistochemically, KKT increased CD-31-positive vessels in early phase and increased α-smooth muscle actin-(α-SMA-) positive fibroblastic cells in early phase and decreased them in late phase of wound healing. By Western blotting, KKT showed the potential to decrease inflammatory cytokines (MCP-1, IL-1β, and TNF-α) in early phase, decrease vascular endothelial growth factor in early phase and increase it in late phase, and modulate the expression of extracellular protein matrix (α-SMA, TGF-β1, bFGF, collagen III, and collagen I). These results suggested the possibility that KKT accelerates pressure ulcer healing through decreases of inflammatory cytokines, increase of angiogenesis, and induction of extracellular matrix remodeling. PMID:21660308

  11. Biochemical association of metabolic profile and microbiome in chronic pressure ulcer wounds.

    PubMed

    Ammons, Mary Cloud B; Morrissey, Kathryn; Tripet, Brian P; Van Leuven, James T; Han, Anne; Lazarus, Gerald S; Zenilman, Jonathan M; Stewart, Philip S; James, Garth A; Copié, Valérie

    2015-01-01

    Chronic, non-healing wounds contribute significantly to the suffering of patients with co-morbidities in the clinical population with mild to severely compromised immune systems. Normal wound healing proceeds through a well-described process. However, in chronic wounds this process seems to become dysregulated at the transition between resolution of inflammation and re-epithelialization. Bioburden in the form of colonizing bacteria is a major contributor to the delayed headlining in chronic wounds such as pressure ulcers. However how the microbiome influences the wound metabolic landscape is unknown. Here, we have used a Systems Biology approach to determine the biochemical associations between the taxonomic and metabolomic profiles of wounds colonized by bacteria. Pressure ulcer biopsies were harvested from primary chronic wounds and bisected into top and bottom sections prior to analysis of microbiome by pyrosequencing and analysis of metabolome using 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Bacterial taxonomy revealed that wounds were colonized predominantly by three main phyla, but differed significantly at the genus level. While taxonomic profiles demonstrated significant variability between wounds, metabolic profiles shared significant similarity based on the depth of the wound biopsy. Biochemical association between taxonomy and metabolic landscape indicated significant wound-to-wound similarity in metabolite enrichment sets and metabolic pathway impacts, especially with regard to amino acid metabolism. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of a statistically robust correlation between bacterial colonization and metabolic landscape within the chronic wound environment.

  12. Biochemical Association of Metabolic Profile and Microbiome in Chronic Pressure Ulcer Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Ammons, Mary Cloud B.; Morrissey, Kathryn; Tripet, Brian P.; Van Leuven, James T.; Han, Anne; Lazarus, Gerald S.; Zenilman, Jonathan M.; Stewart, Philip S.; James, Garth A.; Copié, Valérie

    2015-01-01

    Chronic, non-healing wounds contribute significantly to the suffering of patients with co-morbidities in the clinical population with mild to severely compromised immune systems. Normal wound healing proceeds through a well-described process. However, in chronic wounds this process seems to become dysregulated at the transition between resolution of inflammation and re-epithelialization. Bioburden in the form of colonizing bacteria is a major contributor to the delayed headlining in chronic wounds such as pressure ulcers. However how the microbiome influences the wound metabolic landscape is unknown. Here, we have used a Systems Biology approach to determine the biochemical associations between the taxonomic and metabolomic profiles of wounds colonized by bacteria. Pressure ulcer biopsies were harvested from primary chronic wounds and bisected into top and bottom sections prior to analysis of microbiome by pyrosequencing and analysis of metabolome using 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Bacterial taxonomy revealed that wounds were colonized predominantly by three main phyla, but differed significantly at the genus level. While taxonomic profiles demonstrated significant variability between wounds, metabolic profiles shared significant similarity based on the depth of the wound biopsy. Biochemical association between taxonomy and metabolic landscape indicated significant wound-to-wound similarity in metabolite enrichment sets and metabolic pathway impacts, especially with regard to amino acid metabolism. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of a statistically robust correlation between bacterial colonization and metabolic landscape within the chronic wound environment. PMID:25978400

  13. Potential application of in vivo imaging of impaired lymphatic duct to evaluate the severity of pressure ulcer in mouse model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasuya, Akira; Sakabe, Jun-Ichi; Tokura, Yoshiki

    2014-02-01

    Ischemia-reperfusion (IR) injury is a cause of pressure ulcer. However, a mechanism underlying the IR injury-induced lymphatic vessel damage remains unclear. We investigated the alterations of structure and function of lymphatic ducts in a mouse cutaneous IR model. And we suggested a new method for evaluating the severity of pressure ulcer. Immunohistochemistry showed that lymphatic ducts were totally vanished by IR injury, while blood vessels were relatively preserved. The production of harmful reactive oxygen species (ROS) was increased in injured tissue. In vitro study showed a high vulnerability of lymphatic endothelial cells to ROS. Then we evaluated the impaired lymphatic drainage using an in vivo imaging system for intradermally injected indocyanine green (ICG). The dysfunction of ICG drainage positively correlated with the severity of subsequent cutaneous changes. Quantification of the lymphatic duct dysfunction by this imaging system could be a useful strategy to estimate the severity of pressure ulcer.

  14. Use of wound dressings to enhance prevention of pressure ulcers caused by medical devices.

    PubMed

    Black, Joyce; Alves, Paulo; Brindle, Christopher Tod; Dealey, Carol; Santamaria, Nick; Call, Evan; Clark, Michael

    2015-06-01

    Medical device related pressure ulcers (MDR PUs) are defined as pressure injuries associated with the use of devices applied for diagnostic or therapeutic purposes wherein the PU that develops has the same configuration as the device. Many institutions have reduced the incidence of traditional PUs (sacral, buttock and heel) and therefore the significance of MDR PU has become more apparent. The highest risk of MDR PU has been reported to be patients with impaired sensory perception, such as neuropathy, and an impaired ability for the patient to communicate discomfort, for example, oral intubation, language barriers, unconsciousness or non-verbal state. Patients in critical care units typify the high-risk patient and they often require more devices for monitoring and therapeutic purposes. An expert panel met to review the evidence on the prevention of MDR PUs and arrived at these conclusions: (i) consider applying dressings that demonstrate pressure redistribution and absorb moisture from body areas in contact with medical devices, tubing and fixators, (ii) in addition to dressings applied beneath medical devices, continue to lift and/or move the medical device to examine the skin beneath it and reposition for pressure relief and (iii) when simple repositioning does not relieve pressure, it is important not to create more pressure by placing dressings beneath tight devices.

  15. Unusual cause of a facial pressure ulcer: the helmet securing the Sengstaken-Blakemore tube.

    PubMed

    Kim, S M; Ju, R K; Lee, J H; Jun, Y J; Kim, Y J

    2015-06-01

    Many medical devices, such as pulse oximetry, ventilation masks and other splints are put on critically ill patients. Although these devices are designed to deliver relatively low physical pressure to the skin of the patient, they can still cause pressure ulcers (PUs) in critically ill patients. There are reports of medical device-related PUs on the face. Here we describe forehead skin necrosis caused by the securing helmet for the Sengstaken-Blakemore tube. It is difficult to detect this kind of PU early, because most of the patients have decreased mental status or delirium due to varix bleeding. For this reason, medical staff should be aware of the risk of developing a PU by the device and take preventive measures accordingly.

  16. Wound fluids from human pressure ulcers contain elevated matrix metalloproteinase levels and activity compared to surgical wound fluids.

    PubMed

    Yager, D R; Zhang, L Y; Liang, H X; Diegelmann, R F; Cohen, I K

    1996-11-01

    Fluid from acute surgical wounds and from nonhealing pressure ulcers was examined for the presence of several matrix metalloproteinases. Gelatin zymography demonstrated the presence of two major gelatinases with apparent molecular masses of 72 kDa and 92 kDa and two minor gelatinases with apparent mobilities of 68 kDa and 125 kDa. Antigen-specific sera identified the 72-kDa protein as matrix melloproteinase-2. The same sera also reacted with the 68-kDa protein, which is consistent with it being an activated form of matrix metalloproteinase-2. Antigen-specific sera identified the 92-kDa and 125-kDa proteins as matrix metalloproteinase-9. Levels of matrix metalloproteinase-2 and matrix metalloproteinase-9 were elevated more than 10-fold and 25-fold, respectively, in fluids from pressure ulcers compared with fluids from healing wounds. Examination of total potential and actual collagenolytic activity revealed that fluid from pressure ulcers contained significantly greater levels of both total and active collagenase compared with that of acute surgical wounds. In addition, an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay demonstrated that fluids from pressure ulcers contained significantly more collagenase complexed with the inhibitor, tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases. Together, these observations suggest that an imbalance exists between levels of matrix metalloproteinases and their inhibitors in the fluids of pressure ulcers and that this is primarily the result of elevated levels of the matrix metalloproteinases. The presence of excessive levels of activated forms of matrix-degrading enzymes at the wound surface of pressure ulcers may impede the healing of these wounds and may be relevant to the development of new rationales for treatment.

  17. Relation between the serum albumin level and nutrition supply in patients with pressure ulcers: retrospective study in an acute care setting.

    PubMed

    Sugino, Hirotaka; Hashimoto, Ichiro; Tanaka, Yuka; Ishida, Soshi; Abe, Yoshiro; Nakanishi, Hideki

    2014-01-01

    This retrospective study examined the validity of the commonly used serum albumin level as an indicator of nutrition status of patients with pressure ulcer(s), particularly because the serum albumin level is affected by various factors and may not be specific to malnutrition. Specifically, we investigated whether nutrition supply or inflammation affects the serum albumin level in 82 patients with pressure ulcers(s) (29 in whom pressure ulcer was present upon admission and 53 in whom pressure ulcer developed after hospital admission). Serum albumin levels, blood test including C-reactive protein (CRP) levels and blood count, caloric intake, and depth and healing of pressure ulcers were compared between various subgroups of patients. Serum albumin levels correlated with red blood cell counts and hemoglobin and CRP levels but not with caloric intake. The correlation with CRP before and after several weeks of pressure ulcer treatment was negative. The serum albumin level upon admission was higher in patients in whom the ulcer healed than in those in whom it did not heal as well as in patients who were discharged than in those who died in the hospital. The serum albumin level appears to reflect inflammation, wound healing, and disease severity rather than nutrition supply in patients with pressure ulcer. J. Med. Invest. 61: 15-21, February, 2014.

  18. The angiogenic peptide vascular endothelial growth factor-basic fibroblast growth factor signaling is up-regulated in a rat pressure ulcer model.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jing-Jin; Wang, Xue-Ling; Shi, Bo-Wen; Huang, Fang

    2013-08-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the mRNA and protein expression levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) in pressure ulcers, and to elucidate the molecular mechanism by which VEGF and bFGF are involved in pressure ulcer formation. A rat model of ischemia-reperfusion pressure ulcer was established by magnetic disk circulating compression method. Real-time fluorescence quantitative PCR and Western blot assays were conducted to detect the mRNA and protein expression of VEGF and bFGF in the tissues of rat I-, II-, and III-degree pressure ulcers, the surrounding tissues, and normal skin. Our study confirmed that the mRNA and protein expression levels of VEGF and bFGF in the tissues of rat I-degree pressure ulcer were significantly higher than that in the II- and III-degree pressure ulcer tissues (P < 0.05). The expression of VEGF and bFGF in the tissues surrounding I- and II-degree pressure ulcers were higher than the rats with normal skin. The expression of VEGF and bFGF in the tissues of rat III-degree pressure ulcer was lower than that in the surrounding tissues and normal skin (P < 0.05). There was a significant positive correlation between change in the VEGF and bFGF. The results showed that with an increase in the degree of pressure ulcers, the expression of VEGF and bFGF in pressure ulcers tissue are decreased. This leads to a reduction in angiogenesis and may be a crucial factor in the formation of pressure ulcers.

  19. [Venous ulcer].

    PubMed

    Böhler, Kornelia

    2016-06-01

    Venous disorders causing a permanent increase in venous pressure are by far the most frequent reason for ulcers of the lower extremity. With a prevalence of 1 % in the general population rising to 4 % in the elderly over 80 and its chronic character, 1 % of healthcare budgets of the western world are spent on treatment of venous ulcers. A thorough investigation of the underlying venous disorder is the prerequisite for a differenciated therapy. This should comprise elimination of venous reflux as well as local wound management. Chronic ulcers can successfully be treated by shave therapy and split skin grafting. Compression therapy is a basic measure not only in venous ulcer treatment but also in prevention of ulcer recurrence. Differential diagnosis which have to be considered are arterial ulcers, vasculitis and neoplasms. PMID:27405863

  20. Use of Pressure-Redistributing Support Surfaces among Elderly Hip Fracture Patients across the Continuum of Care: Adherence to Pressure Ulcer Prevention Guidelines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baumgarten, Mona; Margolis, David; Orwig, Denise; Hawkes, William; Rich, Shayna; Langenberg, Patricia; Shardell, Michelle; Palmer, Mary H.; McArdle, Patrick; Sterling, Robert; Jones, Patricia S.; Magaziner, Jay

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To estimate the frequency of use of pressure-redistributing support surfaces (PRSS) among hip fracture patients and to determine whether higher pressure ulcer risk is associated with greater PRSS use. Design and Methods: Patients (n = 658) aged [greater than or equal] 65 years who had surgery for hip fracture were examined by research…

  1. Multicenter comparison of the efficacy on prevention of pressure ulcer in postoperative patients between two types of pressure-relieving mattresses in China

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Qixia; Li, Xiaohua; Zhang, Aiqin; Guo, Yanxia; Liu, Yahong; Liu, Haiying; Qu, Xiaolong; Zhu, Yajun; Guo, Xiujun; Liu, Li; Zhang, Liyan; Bo, Suping; Jia, Jing; Chen, Yuejuan; Zhang, Rui; Wang, Jiandong

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Present study is designed to evaluate the effects of preventing pressure ulcer in surgical patients with two types of pressure-relieving mattresses. Methods: 1074 surgical patients from 12 hospitals in China were divided into A group (static air mattress with repositioning every 2 hours, n = 562) and B group (power pressure air mattress with repositioning every 2 hours, n = 512). The patient was subjected to a pressure-relieving mattress and observed from 0-5 days after surgery. Indications include the Braden scores, hospital-acquired pressure ulcers (HAPU) incidence and stage. Results: The Braden scores between two groups in five days after surgery were no significant (P > 0.05). The incidence of HAPU between two groups in same days also was no significant (1.07% vs. 0.98%, P > 0.05). The incidence of Stage I and stage II pressure ulcers in group A and B were 1.07% (6/562) and 0.98% (5/512), respectively (χ2 = 0.148, P = 0.882). Conclusion: The effects of preventing pressure ulcer in surgical patients with two types of pressure-relieving mattresses are similar, but the protocol by static air mattress with repositioning every 2 hours is benefit when no power. PMID:25356144

  2. Advancing a smart air cushion system for preventing pressure ulcers using projection Moiré for large deformation measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Sheng-Lin; Tsai, Tsung-Heng; Lee, Carina Jean-Tien; Hsu, Yu-Hsiang; Lee, Chih-Kung

    2016-03-01

    A pressure ulcer is one of the most important concerns for wheelchair bound patients with spinal cord injuries. A pressure ulcer is a localized injury near the buttocks that bear ischial tuberosity oppression over a long period of time. Due to elevated compression to blood vessels, the surrounding tissues suffer from a lack of oxygen and nutrition. The ulcers eventually lead to skin damage followed by tissue necrosis. The current medical strategy is to minimize the occurrence of pressure ulcers by regularly helping patients change their posture. However, these methods do not always work effectively or well. As a solution to fundamentally prevent pressure ulcers, a smart air cushion system was developed to detect and control pressure actively. The air cushion works by automatically adjusting a patient's sitting posture to effectively relieve the buttock pressure. To analyze the correlation between the dynamic pressure profiles of an air cell with a patient's weight, a projection Moiré system was adopted to measure the deformation of an air cell and its associated stress distribution. Combining a full-field deformation imaging with air pressure measured within an air cell, the patient's weight and the stress distribution can be simultaneously obtained. By integrating a full-field optical metrology with a time varying pressure sensor output coupled with different active air control algorithms for various designs, we can tailor the ratio of the air cells. Our preliminary data suggests that this newly developed smart air cushion has the potential to selectively reduce localized compression on the tissues at the buttocks. Furthermore, it can take a patient's weight which is an additional benefit so that medical personnel can reference it to prescribe the correct drug dosages.

  3. A Quality-Improvement Collaborative Project to Reduce Pressure Ulcers in PICUs

    PubMed Central

    King, Alice; Nie, Ann Marie; Schaffer, Pat; Taylor, Teresa; Pruitt, David; Giaccone, Mary Jo; Ashby, Marshall; Keswani, Sundeep

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Pediatric patients are at risk for developing pressure ulcers (PUs) and associated pain, infection risk, and prolonged hospitalization. Stage III and IV ulcers are serious, reportable events. The objective of this study was to develop and implement a quality-improvement (QI) intervention to reduce PUs by 50% in our ICUs. METHODS: We established a QI collaborative leadership team, measured PU rates during an initial period of rapid-cycle tests of change, developed a QI bundle, and evaluated the PU rates after the QI implementation. The prospective study encompassed 1425 patients over 54 351 patient-days in the PICU and NICU. RESULTS: The PU rate in the PICU was 14.3/1000 patient-days during the QI development and 3.7/1000 patient-days after QI implementation (P < .05), achieving the aim of 50% reduction. The PICU rates of stages I, II, and III conventional and device-related PUs decreased after the QI intervention. The PU rate in the NICU did not change significantly over time but remained at a mean of 0.9/1000 patient-days. In the postimplementation period, 3 points were outside the control limits, primarily due to an increase in PUs associated with pulse oximeters and cannulas. CONCLUSIONS: The collaborative QI model was effective at reducing PUs in the PICU. Pediatric patients, particularly neonates, are at risk for device-related ulcers. Heightened awareness, early detection, and identification of strategies to mitigate device-related injury are necessary to further reduce PU rates. PMID:23650292

  4. Evaluation of effects of nutrition intervention on healing of pressure ulcers and nutritional states (randomized controlled trial).

    PubMed

    Ohura, Takehiko; Nakajo, Toshio; Okada, Shingo; Omura, Kenji; Adachi, Kayoko

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of nutrition intervention on nutritional states and healing of pressure ulcers by standardizing or unified factors including nursing, care and treatment in a multicenter open randomized trial. Tube-fed patients with Stage III-IV pressure ulcers were selected. The control group (30 patients) received the same nutrition management as before participating in this trial, whereas the intervention group (30 patients) was given calories in the range of Basal Energy Expenditure (BEE) × 1.1 × 1.3 to 1.5. The intervention period was 12 weeks. The efficacy and safety were evaluated based on the nutritional states and the sizes of ulcers (length × width), and on the incidence of adverse events related to the study, respectively. The calories administered to the control and intervention groups were 29.1 ± 4.9 and 37.9 ± 6.5 kcal/kg/day, respectively. Significant interactions between the presence or absence of the intervention and the intervention period were noted for nutritional states (p<0.001 for body weight, p<0.05 for prealbumin). Similarly, the size of ulcers differed significantly between subjects in the intervention group and in the control group (p<0.001). The results suggest that nutrition intervention could directly enhance the healing process in pressure ulcer patients.

  5. Predictors of Barefoot Plantar Pressure during Walking in Patients with Diabetes, Peripheral Neuropathy and a History of Ulceration

    PubMed Central

    Barn, Ruth; Waaijman, Roelof; Nollet, Frans; Woodburn, James; Bus, Sicco A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Elevated dynamic plantar foot pressures significantly increase the risk of foot ulceration in diabetes mellitus. The aim was to determine which factors predict plantar pressures in a population of diabetic patients who are at high-risk of foot ulceration. Methods Patients with diabetes, peripheral neuropathy and a history of ulceration were eligible for inclusion in this cross sectional study. Demographic data, foot structure and function, and disease-related factors were recorded and used as potential predictor variables in the analyses. Barefoot peak pressures during walking were calculated for the heel, midfoot, forefoot, lesser toes, and hallux regions. Potential predictors were investigated using multivariate linear regression analyses. 167 participants with mean age of 63 years contributed 329 feet to the analyses. Results The regression models were able to predict between 6% (heel) and 41% (midfoot) of the variation in peak plantar pressures. The largest contributing factor in the heel model was glycosylated haemoglobin concentration, in the midfoot Charcot deformity, in the forefoot prominent metatarsal heads, in the lesser toes hammer toe deformity and in the hallux previous ulceration. Variables with local effects (e.g. foot deformity) were stronger predictors of plantar pressure than global features (e.g. body mass, age, gender, or diabetes duration). Conclusion The presence of local deformity was the largest contributing factor to barefoot dynamic plantar pressure in high-risk diabetic patients and should therefore be adequately managed to reduce plantar pressure and ulcer risk. However, a significant amount of variance is unexplained by the models, which advocates the quantitative measurement of plantar pressures in the clinical risk assessment of the patient. PMID:25647421

  6. Effectiveness of skin perfusion pressure monitoring during surgery for an ischemic steal syndrome associated refractory ulcer.

    PubMed

    Okubo, Kentaro; Sato, Takashi; Matsubara, Chieko; Tsuboi, Masato; Ishii, Yasuo; Tojimbara, Tamotsu

    2015-01-01

    We describe an 80-year-old man with end-stage renal disease due to type 2 diabetes who had been maintained on hemodialysis for 9 years. He developed refractory ulcers from an abraded wound in the right hand of his access arm. The arteriovenous fistula (AVF) was located between the right brachial artery and the median antecubital vein draining into the cephalic vein and the deep veins close to the elbow. The blood flow of the right brachial artery measured by using Doppler ultrasonography was 920 ml/min. On the contrary, the radial and ulnar arteries were poorly palpable near the wrist, and ultrasonography could not be performed accurately because of a high degree of calcification. The skin perfusion pressure (SPP) of the first finger on the affected side decreased to 22 mmHg. However, the SPP improved to approximately 40 mmHg upon blocking an inflow into the deep vein. According to SPP data, only a communicating branch of the deep vein was ligated, and the AVF itself was preserved. One month after surgery, the skin ulcer healed, and maintenance hemodialysis was performed by using the preserved cephalic vein for blood access.In conclusion, we successfully treated a refractory wound associated with steal syndrome, without terminating the AVF. SPP-guided surgery may be safe and effective to adjust the blood flow in patients with AVF having steal syndrome.

  7. Successful Intervention for Pressure Ulcer by Nutrition Support Team: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Inui, Shigeki; Konishi, Yuko; Yasui, Yoko; Harada, Toshiko; Itami, Satoshi

    2010-07-02

    A 23-year-old woman with heart failure developed pressure ulcer on her sacral area due to a long-term bed rest and impaired hemodynamics. The ulcer improved only slightly after 2 months with povidone-iodine sugar ointment because of severe nausea and anorexia. Then, the nutrition support team (NST) started intervention and estimated the patient's malnutrition from her body weight (30.1 kg), body mass index (BMI) (13.9), triceps skinfold thickness (TSF) (3.5 mm), arm circumference (AC) (17.2 cm) and serum albumin (2.6 g/dl). The NST administrated an enteral nutrition formula through a nasogastric tube and tried to provide meals according to the patient's taste. Although DESIGN score improved to 7 (DESIGN: d2e1s2i1g1n0 = 7) 2 months later, severe nausea prevented the patient from taking any food perorally. However, after nasogastric decannulation, her appetite improved and 1 month later her body weight increased to 32.8 kg, her BMI to 15.2, TSF to 7.5 mm, AC to 19.7 cm and serum albumin to 4.1 g/dl, and the wound completely healed.

  8. The Association for the Advancement of Wound Care (AAWC) venous and pressure ulcer guidelines.

    PubMed

    Bolton, Laura L; Girolami, Sue; Corbett, Lisa; van Rijswijk, Lia

    2014-11-01

    Guidelines based on best available evidence to support pressure ulcer (PU) or venous ulcer (VU) management decisions can improve outcomes. Historically, such guidelines were consensus-based and differed in content and development methods used. Since 2002, the Association for the Advancement of Wound Care (AAWC) Guideline Task Force has used a systematic approach for developing "guidelines of guidelines" that unify and blend recommendations from relevant published guidelines while meeting Institute of Medicine and Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality standards. In addition to establishing the literature-based strength of each recommendation, guideline clinical relevance is examined using standard content validation procedures. All final recommendations included are clinically relevant and/or supported by the highest level of available evidence, cited with every recommendation. In addition, guideline implementation resources are provided. The most recent AAWC VU and PU guidelines and ongoing efforts for improving their clinical relevance are presented. The guideline development process must be transparent and guidelines must be updated regularly to maintain their relevance. In addition, end-user results and research studies to examine their construct and predictive validity are needed.

  9. Albumin administration prevents the onset of pressure ulcers in intensive care unit patients.

    PubMed

    Serra, Raffaele; Grande, Raffaele; Buffone, Gianluca; Gallelli, Luca; Caroleo, Santo; Tropea, Francesco; Amantea, Bruno; de Franciscis, Stefano

    2015-08-01

    Pressure ulcers (PUs) are a common problem in critically ill patients admitted to the intensive care units (ICUs) and they account for more than 70% of patients with low serum albumin at admission. The aim of this study was to test the efficacy of intravenous administration of albumin in patients with low serum albumin < 3·3 g/dl. In a 1-year period, a total of 73 patients were admitted to the ICU (males 45, 61·64% and females 28, 38·36%); of these, 21 patients were admitted with hypoalbuminaemia (serum albumin < 3·3 g/dl) and randomised into two groups: 11 patients were treated with 25 g intravenous albumin for the first 3 days within the first week of ICU stay (group A) and 10 patients did not receive albumin (group B). Three patients (27·27%) showed the onset of PUs in group A, whereas seven patients (70%) showed the onset of PUs within the first 7 days of stay in group B. Moreover, ulcers of group B were more severe than those of group A. This study shows that intravenous administration of albumin reduces the onset of PUs in patients admitted to the ICU and in some cases it also reduces the risk of progression to advanced stages of PUs.

  10. The Association for the Advancement of Wound Care (AAWC) venous and pressure ulcer guidelines.

    PubMed

    Bolton, Laura L; Girolami, Sue; Corbett, Lisa; van Rijswijk, Lia

    2014-11-01

    Guidelines based on best available evidence to support pressure ulcer (PU) or venous ulcer (VU) management decisions can improve outcomes. Historically, such guidelines were consensus-based and differed in content and development methods used. Since 2002, the Association for the Advancement of Wound Care (AAWC) Guideline Task Force has used a systematic approach for developing "guidelines of guidelines" that unify and blend recommendations from relevant published guidelines while meeting Institute of Medicine and Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality standards. In addition to establishing the literature-based strength of each recommendation, guideline clinical relevance is examined using standard content validation procedures. All final recommendations included are clinically relevant and/or supported by the highest level of available evidence, cited with every recommendation. In addition, guideline implementation resources are provided. The most recent AAWC VU and PU guidelines and ongoing efforts for improving their clinical relevance are presented. The guideline development process must be transparent and guidelines must be updated regularly to maintain their relevance. In addition, end-user results and research studies to examine their construct and predictive validity are needed. PMID:25380098

  11. A modeled analysis of telehealth methods for treating pressure ulcers after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Smith, Mark W; Hill, Michelle L; Hopkins, Karen L; Kiratli, B Jenny; Cronkite, Ruth C

    2012-01-01

    Home telehealth can improve clinical outcomes for conditions that are common among patients with spinal cord injury (SCI). However, little is known about the costs and potential savings associated with its use. We developed clinical scenarios that describe common situations in treatment or prevention of pressure ulcers. We calculated the cost implications of using telehealth for each scenario and under a range of reasonable assumptions. Data were gathered primarily from US Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) administrative records. For each scenario and treatment method, we multiplied probabilities, frequencies, and costs to determine the expected cost over the entire treatment period. We generated low-, medium-, and high-cost estimates based on reasonable ranges of costs and probabilities. Telehealth care was less expensive than standard care when low-cost technology was used but often more expensive when high-cost, interactive devices were installed in the patient's home. Increased utilization of telehealth technology (particularly among rural veterans with SCI) could reduce the incidence of stage III and stage IV ulcers, thereby improving veterans' health and quality of care without increasing costs. Future prospective studies of our present scenarios using patients with various healthcare challenges are recommended.

  12. Comparison of the treatment of hydrocolloid and saline gauze for pressure ulcer: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Xuemei; Li, Jieqiong

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the hydrocolloid dressing versus saline gauze for the treatment of pressure ulcer. Methods: Pubmed and Web of Knowledge were searched for randomized controlled trials for the treatment of hydrocolloid and saline gauze for pressure ulcer. The random effect model was used. Sensitivity analysis and publication bias were conducted. Results: Seven randomized controlled trials involving a total of 329 participants were included in this meta-analysis. The combined results suggested that significant association in complete healing were detected among hydrocolloid dressings and saline gauze [Summary RR=2.20, 95% CI=1.21-4.02, I2=48.5%]. The associations were also significant when we only combine the results for ulcers healed and the treatment duration of 8-12 weeks. No publication bias was found. Conclusions: Our meta-analysis suggested that the use of hydrocolloid dressing increased the likelihood of complete healing by more than two-fold compared with saline gauze dressing. PMID:26885012

  13. Pressure ulcer and wounds reporting in NHS hospitals in England part 2: Survey of monitoring systems.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Susanne; Smith, Isabelle L; Nixon, Jane; Wilson, Lyn; Brown, Sarah

    2016-02-01

    This is the second of a two related papers describing work undertaken to compare and contrast Pressure Ulcer (PU) monitoring systems across NHS in-patient facilities in England. The work comprised 1) a PU/Wound Audit (PUWA) and 2) a survey of PU monitoring systems. This second paper focusses on the survey which explores differences in the implementation of PU adverse event monitoring systems in 24 NHS hospital Trusts in England. The survey questionnaire comprised 41 items incorporating single and multiple response options and free-text items and was completed by the PUWA Trust lead in liaison with key people in the organisation. All 24 (100%) Trusts returned the questionnaire, with high levels of data completeness (99.1%). The questionnaire results showed variation between Trusts in relation to the recording of PUs and their reporting as part of NHS prevalence and incident monitoring systems and to Trust boards and healthcare commissioners including the inclusion (or not) of device ulcers, unstageable ulcers, Deep Tissue Injury, combined PUs/Incontinence Associated Dermatitis, category ≥ 1 ulcers or category ≥ 2 ulcers, inherited ulcers, acquired ulcers, avoidable and unavoidable ulcers and the definition of Present On Admission. These fundamental differences in reporting preclude Trust to Trust comparisons of PU prevalence and incident reporting and monitoring systems due to variation in local application and data collection methods. The results of this work and the PUWA led to the development of recommendations for PU monitoring practice, many of which are internationally relevant. PMID:26774821

  14. Pressure ulcer and wounds reporting in NHS hospitals in England part 2: Survey of monitoring systems.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Susanne; Smith, Isabelle L; Nixon, Jane; Wilson, Lyn; Brown, Sarah

    2016-02-01

    This is the second of a two related papers describing work undertaken to compare and contrast Pressure Ulcer (PU) monitoring systems across NHS in-patient facilities in England. The work comprised 1) a PU/Wound Audit (PUWA) and 2) a survey of PU monitoring systems. This second paper focusses on the survey which explores differences in the implementation of PU adverse event monitoring systems in 24 NHS hospital Trusts in England. The survey questionnaire comprised 41 items incorporating single and multiple response options and free-text items and was completed by the PUWA Trust lead in liaison with key people in the organisation. All 24 (100%) Trusts returned the questionnaire, with high levels of data completeness (99.1%). The questionnaire results showed variation between Trusts in relation to the recording of PUs and their reporting as part of NHS prevalence and incident monitoring systems and to Trust boards and healthcare commissioners including the inclusion (or not) of device ulcers, unstageable ulcers, Deep Tissue Injury, combined PUs/Incontinence Associated Dermatitis, category ≥ 1 ulcers or category ≥ 2 ulcers, inherited ulcers, acquired ulcers, avoidable and unavoidable ulcers and the definition of Present On Admission. These fundamental differences in reporting preclude Trust to Trust comparisons of PU prevalence and incident reporting and monitoring systems due to variation in local application and data collection methods. The results of this work and the PUWA led to the development of recommendations for PU monitoring practice, many of which are internationally relevant.

  15. [Association of Braden subscales with the risk of development of pressure ulcer].

    PubMed

    Zambonato, Bruna Pochmann; de Assis, Michelli Cristina Silva; Beghetto, Mariur Gomes

    2013-06-01

    Pressure ulcers (PU) may increase the incidence of hospital complications, and one should prevent this damage. The Braden Scale stands out as a tool to assess the risk of PU. The study aimed to identify changes in the score of the Braden subscales are associated with the risk of developing PCU. Logistic regression was used in a retrospective cohort study conducted in Hospital de Clínicas de Porto Alegre in adults hospitalized in surgical clinical units from October 2005 to June 2006. We evaluated the records database of 1503 patients with a mean aged 55.5 +/- 16 years, 52.7% female. The incidence of PU was 1.8% and was associated with diabetes and heart failure. There was a higher PU in patients worst in sensory perception, mobility, and activity and the presence of moisture. No association was found between nutrition and PU. Except nutrition, the other Braden sub-scales shown to be predictive of PU.

  16. Using the TRIP model to disseminate an IT-based pressure ulcer intervention.

    PubMed

    Tschannen, Dana; Talsma, Akkeneel; Gombert, Jan; Mowry, Jolé L

    2011-04-01

    Pressure ulcers (PUs) are among the most common harms experienced by patients in health care facilities. Despite the existence of evidence-based guidelines and protocols for PU prevention and treatment, the sustained success in reducing the development of PUs is elusive. The purpose of this article is to describe how the Translating Research Into Practice (TRIP) model was used to support implementation of a care management solution (i.e., the Daily Project) aimed at preventing PUs. Using a case study approach, the development and implementation of the Daily Project is described in relation to the TRIP model. Initial success was evidenced by a 34% reduction in PU rates and an 86% reduction in missed patient turns 3 months postimplementation of the Daily intervention. Based on our experiences, the TRIP model successfully can assist with the implementation and diffusion of a tool that addresses a complex clinical issue such as PU prevention and treatment.

  17. Prophylactic use of dressings for pressure ulcer prevention in the critical care unit.

    PubMed

    Thorpe, Elaine

    2016-06-23

    Multiple comorbidities and intensive therapy increase the risk of pressure ulcer (PU) development in critical care unit (CCU) patients. Given the high number of risk factors that CCU patients present with, it is important to acknowledge that not all PUs are entirely preventable, and incidence is thought to be between 14% and 42%. The consequences of acquiring a PU in critical care include increased mortality, morbidity and longer length of stay. Implementing prevention strategies as soon as the patient enters the unit can significantly reduce incidence. By adopting a proactive versus reactive mind-set, one CCU abandoned traditional PU risk assessment and implemented a number of intensive interventions, including the use of a prophylactic sacral dressing as an adjunct. As a result, PU incidence fell from 19.9 per 1000 patient population to 0.84 per 1000 patient population in 2014. In addition, 310 PU-free days were achieved. PMID:27345087

  18. Prevalence of pressure ulcers by race and ethnicity for older adults admitted to nursing homes.

    PubMed

    Harms, Susan; Bliss, Donna Z; Garrard, Judith; Cunanan, Kristen; Savik, Kay; Gurvich, Olga; Mueller, Christine; Wyman, Jean F; Eberly, Lynn; Virnig, Beth

    2014-03-01

    Little is known about the prevalence of pressure ulcers (PUs) among racial and ethnic groups of older individuals admitted to nursing homes (NHs). NHs admitting higher percentages of minority individuals may face resource challenges for groups with more PUs or ones of greater severity. This study examined the prevalence of PUs (Stages 2 to 4) among older adults admitted to NHs by race and ethnicity at the individual, NH, and regional levels. Results show that the prevalence of PUs in Black older adults admitted to NHs was greater than that in Hispanic older adults, which were both greater than in White older adults. The PU rate among admissions of Black individuals was 1.7 times higher than White individuals. A higher prevalence of PUs was observed among NHs with a lower percentage of admissions of White individuals. [Journal of Gerontological Nursing, 40(3), 20-26.]. PMID:24219072

  19. Attitudes towards pressure ulcer prevention: a psychometric evaluation of the Swedish version of the APuP instrument.

    PubMed

    Florin, Jan; Bååth, Carina; Gunningberg, Lena; Mårtensson, Gunilla

    2016-10-01

    The primary aim was to conduct a psychometric evaluation of the Attitude towards Pressure ulcer Prevention (APuP) instrument in a Swedish context. A further aim was to describe and compare attitudes towards pressure ulcer prevention between registered nurses (RNs), assistant nurses (ANs) and student nurses (SNs). In total, 415 RNs, ANs and SNs responded to the questionnaire. In addition to descriptive and comparative statistics, confirmatory factor analyses were performed. Because of a lack of support for the instrument structure, further explorative and consecutive confirmatory tests were conducted. Overall, positive attitudes towards pressure ulcer prevention were identified for all three groups, but SNs reported lower attitude scores on three items and a higher score on one item compared to RNs and ANs. The findings indicated no support in this Swedish sample for the previously reported five-factor model of APuP. Further explorative and confirmative factor analyses indicated that a four-factor model was most interpretable: (i) Priority (five items), (ii) Competence (three items), (iii) Importance (three items) and (iv) Responsibility (two items). The five-factor solution could not be confirmed. Further research is recommended to develop a valid and reliable tool to assess nurses' attitudes towards pressure ulcer prevention working across different settings on an international level.

  20. Implementation of a comprehensive skin care program across care settings using the AHCPR pressure ulcer prevention and treatment guidelines.

    PubMed

    Suntken, G; Starr, B; Ermer-Seltun, J; Hopkins, L; Preftakes, D

    1996-03-01

    Healthcare professionals in the Central Midwest identified the need for a comprehensive skin care program for pressure ulcer prevention and treatment across care settings. A multidisciplinary team, representing acute, extended and home care, was formed to create a program for all three settings based upon the AHCPR pressure ulcer guidelines. The team performed literature reviews on which to base the development and use of tools, conducted prevalence studies, and developed educational approaches. Implementation of the program was tailored for each setting. Some of the approaches used were a skin care fair, quality studies, continuous quality improvement concepts, a "Product Book" and educational presentations. Outcomes include improvement of continuity of care across settings and the use of the Braden Scale and the NPUAP pressure ulcer staging system. The focus has turned toward patient outcomes. Professionals have a better understanding of the care that is provided by other disciplines. Referrals are made based upon decision trees. Appropriate resources are used. Other outcomes anticipated include a decrease in nosocomial pressure ulcers, shortened wound healing time, appropriate referral of unresponsive chronic wounds, decreased discrepancies in wound documentation, decreased length of stay, improved financial outcomes, and improved client knowledge and participation. PMID:8703293

  1. Biomechanics Analysis of Pressure Ulcer Using Damaged Interface Model between Bone and Muscle in the Human Buttock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slamet, Samuel Susanto; Takano, Naoki; Tanabe, Yoshiyuki; Hatano, Asako; Nagasao, Tomohisa

    This paper aims at building up a computational procedure to study the bio-mechanism of pressure ulcer using the finite element method. Pressure ulcer is a disease that occurs in the human body after 2 hours of continuous external force. In the very early stage of pressure ulcer, it is found that the tissues inside the body are damaged, even though skin surface looks normal. This study assumes that tension and/or shear strain will cause damage to loose fibril tissue between the bone and muscle and that propagation of damaged area will lead to fatal stage. Analysis was performed using the finite element method by modeling the damaged fibril tissue as a cutout. By varying the loading directions and watching both tensile and shear strains, the risk of fibril tissue damage and propagation of the damaged area is discussed, which may give new insight for the careful nursing for patients, particularly after surgical treatment. It was found that the pressure ulcer could reoccur for a surgical flap treatment. The bone cut and surgical flap surgery is not perfect to prevent the bone-muscle interfacial damage.

  2. Tailoring International Pressure Ulcer Prevention Guidelines for Nigeria: A Knowledge Translation Study Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Ilesanmi, Rose Ekama; Gillespie, Brigid M.; Adejumo, Prisca Olabisi; Chaboyer, Wendy

    2015-01-01

    Background: The 2014 International Pressure Ulcer Prevention (PUP) Clinical Practice Guidelines (CPG) provides the most current evidence based strategies to prevent Pressure Ulcer (PU). The evidence upon which these guidelines have been developed has predominantly been generated from research conducted in developed countries. Some of these guidelines may not be feasible in developing countries due to structural and resource issues; therefore there is a need to adapt these guidelines to the context thus making it culturally acceptable. Aim: To present a protocol detailing the tailoring of international PUPCPG into a care bundle for the Nigerian context. Methods: Guided by the Knowledge to Action (KTA) framework, a two phased study will be undertaken. In Phase 1, the Delphi technique with stakeholder leaders will be used to review the current PUPCPG, identifying core strategies that are feasible to be adopted in Nigeria. These core strategies will become components of a PUP care bundle. In Phase 2, key stakeholder interviews will be used to identify the barriers, facilitators and potential implementation strategies to promote uptake of the PUP care bundle. Results: A PUP care bundle, with three to eight components is expected to be developed from Phase 1. Implementation strategies to promote adoption of the PUP care bundle into clinical practice in selected Nigerian hospitals, is expected to result from Phase 2. Engagement of key stakeholders and consumers in the project should promote successful implementation and translate into better patient care. Conclusion: Using KTA, a knowledge translation framework, to guide the implementation of PUPCPG will enhance the likelihood of successful adoption in clinical practice. In implementing a PUP care bundle, developing countries face a number of challenges such as the feasibility of its components and the required resources. PMID:27417784

  3. Spectroscopic detection of the blanch response at the heel of the foot: a possible diagnostic for stage I pressure ulcers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohlenberg, Elicia M.; Zanca, Jeanne; Brienza, David M.; Levasseur, Michelle A.; Sowa, Michael G.

    2005-09-01

    Pressure ulcers (sores) can occur when there is constant pressure being applied to tissue for extended periods of time. Immobile people are particularly prone to this problem. Ideally, pressure damage is detected at an early stage, pressure relief is applied and the pressure ulcer is averted. One of the hallmarks of pressure damaged skin is an obliterated blanch response due to compromised microcirculation near the surface of the skin. Visible reflectance spectroscopy can noninvasively probe the blood circulation of the upper layers of skin by measuring the electronic transitions arising from hemoglobin, the primary oxygen carrying protein in blood. A spectroscopic test was developed on a mixed population of 30 subjects to determine if the blanch response could be detected in healthy skin with high sensitivity and specificity regardless of the pigmentation of the skin. Our results suggest that a spectroscopic based blanch response test can accurately detect the blanching of healthy tissue and has the potential to be developed into a screening test for early stage I pressure ulcers.

  4. Comparisons of negative pressure wound therapy and ultrasonic debridement for diabetic foot ulcers: a network meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ruran; Feng, Yanhua; Di, Bo

    2015-01-01

    Objective: a network meta-analysis was performed to compare the strength and weakness of negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) with ultrasound debridement (UD) as for diabetic foot ulcers (DFU). Methods: PubMed, Ovid EMBASE, Web of Science, Cochrane library databases, and Chinese Biomedical Literature Database were searched till February 2015. Clinical compared studies of negative pressure wound therapy and ultrasound debridement were enrolled. The primary efficacy outcomes included healed ulcers, reduction of ulcer areas and time to closure. Secondary amputation including major and minor amputations was used to assess the safety profile. Results: Out of 715 studies, 32 were selected which enrolled 2880 diabetic patients. The pooled analysis revealed that NPWT including vacuum assisted closure (VAC) and vacuum sealing drainage (VSD) were as efficacious as ultrasound debridement improving healed ulcers, odds ratio, 0.86; 95% CI 0.28 to 2.6 and 1.2; 95% CI 0.38 to 4, respectively. However, both were better to standard wound care in wound healing patients. Compared with the standard wound care treated diabetic foot ulcers, NPWT and UD resulted in a significantly superior efficacy in time to wound closure and decrement in area of wound. No significances were observed between NPWT and UD groups in both indicators. Fewer patients tended to receive amputation in NPWT and UD groups compared to standard wound care group. Conclusions: The results of the network meta-analysis indicated that negative pressure wound therapy was similar to ultrasound debridement for diabetic foot ulcers, but better than standard wound care both in efficacy and safety profile. PMID:26550165

  5. Adapting a SSKIN bundle for carers to aid identification of pressure damage and ulcer risks in the community.

    PubMed

    McCoulough, Siobhan

    2016-06-01

    If pressure damage is identified and addressed at an early stage, it may be reversed. Otherwise, it may quickly progress into a serious deep tissue injury. In the community, most daily skin care is undertaken by formal and informal carers. They therefore need to know how to identify signs that pressure ulcers may develop and what immediate actions to take. NICE guidance on pressure ulcer prevention is too extensive to be a simple tool for carers, so a SSKIN bundle was adapted for community use. This ensures carers know how to prevent and identify pressure damage, and includes skin care, repositioning and use of equipment. Carers need training. This is the responsibility of all involved with the patient, including health-care and local authority services.

  6. Adapting a SSKIN bundle for carers to aid identification of pressure damage and ulcer risks in the community.

    PubMed

    McCoulough, Siobhan

    2016-06-01

    If pressure damage is identified and addressed at an early stage, it may be reversed. Otherwise, it may quickly progress into a serious deep tissue injury. In the community, most daily skin care is undertaken by formal and informal carers. They therefore need to know how to identify signs that pressure ulcers may develop and what immediate actions to take. NICE guidance on pressure ulcer prevention is too extensive to be a simple tool for carers, so a SSKIN bundle was adapted for community use. This ensures carers know how to prevent and identify pressure damage, and includes skin care, repositioning and use of equipment. Carers need training. This is the responsibility of all involved with the patient, including health-care and local authority services. PMID:27297573

  7. Assistive technologies for self-managed pressure ulcer prevention in spinal cord injury: a scoping review.

    PubMed

    Tung, James Y; Stead, Brent; Mann, William; Ba'Pham; Popovic, Milos R

    2015-01-01

    Pressure ulcers (PUs) in individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI) present a persistent and costly problem. Continuing effort in developing new technologies that support self-managed care is an important prevention strategy. Specifically, the aims of this scoping review are to review the key concepts and factors related to self-managed prevention of PUs in individuals with SCI and appraise the technologies available to assist patients in self-management of PU prevention practices. There is broad consensus that sustaining long-term adherence to prevention regimens is a major concern. Recent literature highlights the interactions between behavioral and physiological risk factors. We identify four technology categories that support self-management: computer-based educational technologies demonstrated improved short-term gains in knowledge (2 studies), interface pressure mapping technologies demonstrated improved adherence to pressure-relief schedules up to 3 mo (5 studies), electrical stimulation confirmed improvements in tissue tolerance after 8 wk of training (3 studies), and telemedicine programs demonstrated improvements in independence and reduced hospital visits over 6 mo (2 studies). Overall, self-management technologies demonstrated low-to-moderate effectiveness in addressing a subset of risk factors. However, the effectiveness of technologies in preventing PUs is limited due to a lack of incidence reporting. In light of the key findings, we recommend developing integrated technologies that address multiple risk factors.

  8. Eating difficulties, need for assisted eating, nutritional status and pressure ulcers in patients admitted for stroke rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Westergren, A; Karlsson, S; Andersson, P; Ohlsson, O; Hallberg, I R

    2001-03-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the types and extent of eating difficulties, the need for assistance when eating, the nutritional status and pressure ulcers in consecutive patients (n = 162) admitted for stroke rehabilitation over a period of 1 year. Structured observations and assessments of eating, nutritional status (subjective global assessment of nutritional status), pressure ulcers and activities in daily living (Katz ADL-index) were performed by a nurse who also trained the staff to perform these assessments. Difficulties in eating were found in 80%, and 52.5% were unable to eat without assistance. Eating difficulties were: 'eats three-quarters or less of served food' (60%), difficulties in 'manipulating food on the plate' (56%), 'transportation of food to the mouth' (46%), 'sitting position' (29%), 'aberrant eating speed' (slow or forced) (26%), 'manipulating food in the mouth' (leakage, hoarding, chewing difficulties) (24%), 'swallowing difficulties' (18%), 'opening and/or closing the mouth' (16%), and 'alertness' (9%). Thirty-two percent were undernourished (49% of patients needing assisted eating and 13% of those not needing assistance, P < 0.0005). Among patients who were dependent in one or more functions according to the Katz ADL-index, 15% had pressure ulcers. The strongest eating variables for predicting nutritional status were 'alertness', 'swallowing difficulties', 'eats three-quarters or less of served food', and 'aberrant eating speed'. Nutritional status could in turn significantly predict pressure ulcers. Eating difficulties among patients with stroke are complex and the patient's situation before stroke adds to this complexity, especially among those dependent on assisted eating. As difficulties occur both among patients needing and not needing assisted eating, all patients with stroke admitted for rehabilitation need to be systematically assessed for eating difficulties and action needs to be taken to facilitate eating, especially as

  9. The Association between Pre-existing Diabetes Mellitus and Pressure Ulcers in Patients Following Surgery: A Meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Kang, Zhou-Qing; Zhai, Xiao-Jie

    2015-08-11

    Uncertainty exists about the role of diabetes in the development of surgery-related pressure ulcers. Therefore, we conducted a meta-analysis to explore the association between pre-existing diabetes mellitus and pressure ulcers among patients after surgery. Summary odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using random effects models. Thirteen eligible studies of 2367 patients in total and 12,053 controls were included in the final analysis. Compared with patients without diabetes, the pooled odds ratio (OR) of the incidence of pressure ulcers in diabetic patients was 1.74 [95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.40-2.15, I(2 )= 51.1%]. Estimates by type of surgery suggested similar results in cardiac surgery [OR = 2.00, 95% CI = 1.42-2.82, I(2 )= 0%], in general surgery [OR = 1.75, 95% CI = 1.42-2.15, I(2 )= 0%], and in major lower limb amputations [OR = 1.65, 95% CI = 1.01-2.68, I(2 )= 0%] for diabetic patients versus non-diabetic controls. We did not find an increased incidence of pressure ulcers in diabetic patients undergoing hip surgery compared with non-diabetic controls [OR = 1.46, 95% CI = 0.62-3.47, I(2 )= 93.1%]. The excess risk of pressure ulcers associated with pre-existing diabetes was significantly higher in patients undergoing surgery, specifically in patients receiving cardiac surgery. Further studies should be conducted to examine these associations in other types of surgery.

  10. VAC Therapy in Large Infected Sacral Pressure Ulcer Grade IV-Can Be an Alternative to Flap Reconstruction?

    PubMed

    Batra, R K; Aseeja, Veena

    2014-04-01

    Vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) therapy is a new entrant in wound care after growth factors and alginate or hydrocolloid dressing, in the treatment of pressure ulcers. We have been using this technique for diabetic foot ulcers. A young nondiabetic man presented with a large sacral bed sore after high doses of ionotropes in an intensive care unit for treating severe hypotension. His wound was debrided, and instead of flap surgery in such infected wound, he was treated with VAC therapy. The complete wound healing was achieved in 6 weeks and at half the cost of flap surgery. Moreover, the chances of flap failure and its related complications were eliminated.

  11. A Comparative Study Between Total Contact Cast and Pressure-Relieving Ankle Foot Orthosis in Diabetic Neuropathic Foot Ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Partha Pratim; Ray, Sayantan; Biswas, Dibakar; Baidya, Arjun; Bhattacharjee, Rana; Mukhopadhyay, Pradip; Ghosh, Sujoy; Mukhopadhyay, Satinath; Chowdhury, Subhankar

    2014-01-01

    Background: Off-loading of the ulcer area is extremely important for the healing of plantar ulcers. Off-loading with total contact cast (TCC) may be superior to other off-loading strategies studied so far, but practical limitations can dissuade clinicians from using this modality. This study was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of TCC compared with that of a pressure-relieving ankle foot orthosis (PRAFO) in healing of diabetic neuropathic foot ulcers and their effect on gait parameters. Methods: Thirty adult diabetic patients attending the foot clinic with neuropathic plantar ulcers irrespective of sex, age, duration and type of diabetes were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 off-loading modalities (TCC and PRAFO). Main outcome measures were ulcer healing after 4 weeks of randomization and effect of each of the modalities on various gait parameters. Results: The percentage reduction of the ulcer surface area at 4 weeks from baseline was 75.75 ± 9.25 with TCC and 34.72 ± 13.07 with PRAFO, which was significantly different (P < .001). The results of this study however, showed that most of the gait parameters were better with PRAFO than with TCC. Conclusions: This study comprehensively evaluated the well known advantages and disadvantages of a removable (PRAFO) and a nonremovable device (TCC) in the treatment of diabetic neuropathic foot ulcer. Further studies are needed involving larger subjects and using 3D gait analysis to collect more accurate data on gait parameters and wound healing with different off-loading devices. PMID:25452635

  12. Pressure ulcers: avoidable or unavoidable? Results of the National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel Consensus Conference.

    PubMed

    Black, Joyce M; Edsberg, Laura E; Baharestani, Mona M; Langemo, Diane; Goldberg, Margaret; McNichol, Laurie; Cuddigan, Janet

    2011-02-01

    Although pressure ulcer (PrU) development is now generally considered an indicator for quality of care, questions and concerns about situations in which they are unavoidable remain. Considering the importance of this issue and the lack of available research data, in 2010 the National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel (NPUAP) hosted a multidisciplinary conference to establish consensus on whether there are individuals in whom pressure ulcer development may be unavoidable and whether a difference exists between end-of-life skin changes and pressure ulcers. Thirty-four stakeholder organizations from various disciplines were identified and invited to send a voting representative. Of those, 24 accepted the invitation. Before the conference, existing literature was identified and shared via a webinar. A NPUAP task force developed standardized consensus questions for items with none or limited evidence and an interactive protocol was used to develop consensus among conference delegates and attendees. Consensus was established to be 80% agreement among conference delegates. Unanimous consensus was achieved for the following statements: most PrUs are avoidable; not all PrUs are avoidable; there are situations that render PrU development unavoidable, including hemodynamic instability that is worsened with physical movement and inability to maintain nutrition and hydration status and the presence of an advanced directive prohibiting artificial nutrition/hydration; pressure redistribution surfaces cannot replace turning and repositioning; and if enough pressure was removed from the external body the skin cannot always survive. Consensus was not obtained on the practicality or standard of turning patients every 2 hours nor on concerns surrounding the use of medical devices vis-à-vis their potential to cause skin damage. Research is needed to examine these issues, refine preventive practices in challenging situations, and identify the limits

  13. Topical betamethasone butyrate propionate exacerbates pressure ulcers after cutaneous ischemia-reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Uchiyama, Akihiko; Yamada, Kazuya; Perera, Buddhini; Ogino, Sachiko; Yokoyama, Yoko; Takeuchi, Yuko; Ishikawa, Osamu; Motegi, Sei-Ichiro

    2016-09-01

    Ischaemia-reperfusion (I/R) is involved in the development of various organ diseases. There has been increasing evidence that cutaneous I/R injury is associated with the pathogenesis of pressure ulcers (PUs), especially at the early stage presenting as non-blanchable erythema. However, there is no evidence-based treatment for early-stage PUs. Our objective was to assess the effects of topical steroid on the development of PUs after cutaneous I/R injury in mice. Cutaneous I/R was performed by trapping the dorsal skin between two magnetic plates for 12 h, followed by plate removal. Topical application of betamethasone butyrate propionate (BBP) in I/R areas significantly increased the size of PUs after I/R. The number of thromboses was increased, and CD31(+) vessels were decreased in the I/R area treated with topical BBP. The number of oxidative stress-associated DNA-damaged cells and apoptotic cells in the I/R area was increased by topical BBP treatment. In addition, the mRNA level of NADPH oxidase 4 (Nox4), the essential enzyme that produces reactive oxygen species, was significantly increased and that of NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), a transcription factor that regulates the expression of antioxidant proteins, was inhibited in the I/R area treated by BBP. The number of CD68(+) macrophages and the level of transforming growth factor-beta in lesional skin were also decreased by BBP. These results suggest that a topical steroid might accelerate the formation of PUs induced by cutaneous I/R injury by aggravating oxidative stress-induced tissue damage. Topical steroids might not be recommended for the treatment of acute-phase decubitus ulcers. PMID:27094458

  14. Analysis of Gene Expression in Experimental Pressure Ulcers in the Rat with Special Reference to Inflammatory Cytokines

    PubMed Central

    Kurose, Tomoyuki; Hashimoto, Masakazu; Ozawa, Junya; Kawamata, Seiichi

    2015-01-01

    Pressure ulcers have been investigated in a few animal models, but the molecular mechanisms of pressure ulcers are not well understood. We hypothesized that pressure results in up-regulation of inflammatory cytokines and those cytokines contribute to the formation of pressure ulcers. We measured genome-wide changes in transcript levels after compression, and focused especially on inflammatory cytokines. The abdominal wall of rats was compressed at 100 mmHg for 4 hours by two magnets. Specimens were obtained 12 hours, 1, or 3 days after compression, and analyzed by light microscopy, microarray, Real-Time PCR, and ELISA. The skin and subcutaneous tissue in the compressed area were markedly thickened. The microarray showed that numerous genes were up-regulated after the compression. Up-regulated genes were involved in apoptosis, inflammation, oxidative stress, proteolysis, hypoxia, and so on. Real-Time PCR showed the up-regulation of granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF), interferon γ (IFN-γ), interleukin 1β (IL-1β), interleukin 1 receptor antagonist gene (IL1Ra), interleukin 6 (IL-6), interleukin 10 (IL-10), matrix metalloproteinase 3 (MMP-3), tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 1 (TIMP-1), and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) at 12 hours, IFN-γ, IL-6, IL-10, MMP-3, and TIMP-1 at 1 day, and IFN-γ, IL-6, and MMP-3 at 3 days. Some genes from subcutaneous tissue were up-regulated temporarily, and others were kept at high levels of expression. ELISA data showed that the concentrations of IL-1β and IL-6 proteins were most notably increased following compression. Prolonged up-regulation of IL-1β, and IL-6 might enhance local inflammation, and continuous local inflammation may contribute to the pressure ulcer formation. In addition, GM-CSF, IFN-γ, MMP-3, and TIMP-1 were not reported previously in the wound healing process, and those genes may have a role in development of the pressure ulcers. Expression data from Real-Time PCR were generally

  15. Prevalence and incidence rates of pressure ulcers in an Emergency Department.

    PubMed

    Dugaret, Elodie; Videau, Marie-Neige; Faure, Isabelle; Gabinski, Claude; Bourdel-Marchasson, Isabelle; Salles, Nathalie

    2014-08-01

    Older patients represent an increasing population in emergency department (ED) with underlying diseases and longer ED length of stay, which are potential risk factors of pressure ulcers (PUs). The aim of the study was to determine the prevalence and incidence rates of PUs in an Emergency Department and to analyse variables related to PUs occurrence. The study was carried out in the Emergency Department of Bordeaux (France), and included 602 patients from 1 to 15 June 2010. All the potential body sites of pressure were examined at admission and discharge for all the patients by trained nurses. Comorbidity score, list of treatment, length of stay (hours), PUs (including stage I) and C-reactive protein (CRP) level were systematically recorded. A total of 47 (7·8%) patients had prevalent PUs at admission and 74 (12·3%) at discharge. The cumulative incidence was 4·9% and the incidence density was 5·4 per 1000 patients per hour. In multivariate analysis, higher comorbidities (OR 1·3; P = 0·014) and CRP levels (OR 1·005; P = 0·017) were both independent risk factors for developing PU. In conclusion, these data show that even a very short stay to the ED is sufficient to induce PUs especially stage I.

  16. Developing a pressure ulcer risk assessment scale for patients in long-term care.

    PubMed

    Lepisto, Mervi; Eriksson, Elina; Hietanen, Helvi; Lepisto, Jyri; Lauri, Sirkka

    2006-02-01

    Previous pressure ulcer risk assessment scales appear to have relied on opinions about risk factors and are based on care setting rather than research evidence. Utilizing 21 existing risk assessment scales and relevant risk factor literature, an instrument was developed by Finnish researchers that takes into account individual patient risk factors, devices and methods applied in nursing care, and organizational characteristics. The instrument underwent two pilot tests to assess the relevance and clarity of the instrument: the first involved 43 nurses and six patients; the second involved 50 nurses with expertise in wound care. Changes to questionnaire items deemed necessary as a result of descriptive analysis and agreement percentages were completed. After pilot testing, the final instrument addressed the following issues: 1) patient risks: activity, mobility in bed, mental status, nutrition, urinary incontinence, fecal incontinence, sensory perception, and skin condition; 2) devices and methods used in patient care: technical devices, bed type, mattress, overlay, seat cushions, and care methods; and 3) staff number and structure, maximum number of beds, and beds in use (the last group of questions were included to ensure participants understood the items; results were not analyzed). The phases of the study provided an expeditious means of data collection and a suitable opportunity to assess how the instrument would function in practice. Instrument reliability and validity were improved as a result of the pilot testing and can be enhanced further with continued use and assessment.

  17. Evaluation of Cueing Innovation for Pressure Ulcer Prevention Using Staff Focus Groups

    PubMed Central

    Yap, Tracey L.; Kennerly, Susan; Corazzini, Kirsten; Porter, Kristie; Toles, Mark; Anderson, Ruth A.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the manuscript is to describe long-term care (LTC) staff perceptions of a music cueing intervention designed to improve staff integration of pressure ulcer (PrU) prevention guidelines regarding consistent and regular movement of LTC residents a minimum of every two hours. The Diffusion of Innovation (DOI) model guided staff interviews about their perceptions of the intervention’s characteristics, outcomes, and sustainability. Methods: This was a qualitative, observational study of staff perceptions of the PrU prevention intervention conducted in Midwestern U.S. LTC facilities (N = 45 staff members). One focus group was held in each of eight intervention facilities using a semi-structured interview protocol. Transcripts were analyzed using thematic content analysis, and summaries for each category were compared across groups. Results: The a priori codes (observability, trialability, compatibility, relative advantage and complexity) described the innovation characteristics, and the sixth code, sustainability, was identified in the data. Within each code, two themes emerged as a positive or negative response regarding characteristics of the innovation. Moreover, within the sustainability code, a third theme emerged that was labeled “brainstormed ideas”, focusing on strategies for improving the innovation. Implications: Cueing LTC staff using music offers a sustainable potential to improve PrU prevention practices, to increase resident movement, which can subsequently lead to a reduction in PrUs. PMID:27429278

  18. Predictive capacity of risk assessment scales and clinical judgment for pressure ulcers: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    García-Fernández, Francisco Pedro; Pancorbo-Hidalgo, Pedro L; Agreda, J Javier Soldevilla

    2014-01-01

    A systematic review with meta-analysis was completed to determine the capacity of risk assessment scales and nurses' clinical judgment to predict pressure ulcer (PU) development. Electronic databases were searched for prospective studies on the validity and predictive capacity of PUs risk assessment scales published between 1962 and 2010 in English, Spanish, Portuguese, Korean, German, and Greek. We excluded gray literature sources, integrative review articles, and retrospective or cross-sectional studies. The methodological quality of the studies was assessed according to the guidelines of the Critical Appraisal Skills Program. Predictive capacity was measured as relative risk (RR) with 95% confidence intervals. When 2 or more valid original studies were found, a meta-analysis was conducted using a random-effect model and sensitivity analysis. We identified 57 studies, including 31 that included a validation study. We also retrieved 4 studies that tested clinical judgment as a risk prediction factor. Meta-analysis produced the following pooled predictive capacity indicators: Braden (RR = 4.26); Norton (RR = 3.69); Waterlow (RR = 2.66); Cubbin-Jackson (RR = 8.63); EMINA (RR = 6.17); Pressure Sore Predictor Scale (RR = 21.4); and clinical judgment (RR = 1.89). Pooled analysis of 11 studies found adequate risk prediction capacity in various clinical settings; the Braden, Norton, EMINA (mEntal state, Mobility, Incontinence, Nutrition, Activity), Waterlow, and Cubbin-Jackson scales showed the highest predictive capacity. The clinical judgment of nurses was found to achieve inadequate predictive capacity when used alone, and should be used in combination with a validated scale.

  19. The application of implementation science for pressure ulcer prevention best practices in an inpatient spinal cord injury rehabilitation program

    PubMed Central

    Scovil, Carol Y.; Flett, Heather M.; McMillan, Lan T.; Delparte, Jude J.; Leber, Diane J.; Brown, Jacquie; Burns, Anthony S.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To implement pressure ulcer (PU) prevention best practices in spinal cord injury (SCI) rehabilitation using implementation science frameworks. Design Quality improvement. Setting SCI Rehabilitation Center. Participants Inpatients admitted January 2012 to July 2013. Interventions Implementation of two PU best practices were targeted: (1) completing a comprehensive PU risk assessment and individualized interprofessional PU prevention plan (PUPP); and (2) providing patient education for PU prevention; as part of the pan-Canadian SCI Knowledge Mobilization Network. At our center, the SCI Pressure Ulcer Scale replaced the Braden risk assessment scale and an interprofessional PUPP form was implemented. Comprehensive educational programing existed, so efforts focused on improving documentation. Implementation science frameworks provided structure for a systematic approach to best practice implementation (BPI): (1) site implementation team, (2) implementation drivers, (3) stages of implementation, and (4) improvement cycles. Strategies were developed to address key implementation drivers (staff competency, organizational supports, and leadership) through the four stages of implementation: exploration, installation, initial implementation, and full implementation. Improvement cycles were used to address BPI challenges. Outcome Measures Implementation processes (e.g. staff training) and BPI outcomes (completion rates). Results Following BPI, risk assessment completion rates improved from 29 to 82%. The PUPP completion rate was 89%. PU education was documented for 45% of patients (vs. 21% pre-implementation). Conclusion Implementation science provided a framework and effective tools for successful pressure ulcer BPI in SCI rehabilitation. Ongoing improvement cycles will target timeliness of tool completion and documentation of patient education. PMID:25029674

  20. Bone geometry on the contact stress in the shoulder for evaluation of pressure ulcers: finite element modeling and experimental validation.

    PubMed

    Luo, Ying; Wang, Yancheng; Tai, Bruce L; Chen, Roland K; Shih, Albert J

    2015-02-01

    This research presents the finite element modeling (FEM) of human-specific computed tomography (CT) data to study the effect of bone prominences on contact stress in the shoulder for prevention of pressure ulcers. The 3D geometry of scapula, skin, and surrounding soft tissues in the shoulder was reconstructed based on the anonymous CT data of a human subject in a prone posture (without loading on the shoulder) for FEM analysis of the contact stress. FEM analysis results show that the maximum stress is located at the prominence of the scapula with sharp bone geometry. This demonstrates that stress concentration at the bone prominence is a significant factor to cause the high contact stress, which is a source for pressure ulcers. For experimental validation, a physical shoulder model manufactured by 3D printing of the bone geometry and the mold for molding of tissue-mimicking silicone was developed. Compression tests of the mattress foam and silicone were conducted to find the nonlinear stress-strain relations as inputs for FEM. Experiments of compressing the shoulder model against the foam were carried out. Three flexible force sensors were embedded inside the model to measure the contact forces and compared to the FEM predictions. Results show that the FEM predicted forces match well with the experimental measurements and demonstrate that FEM can accurately predict the stress distributions in the shoulder to study the effect of bone geometry on the inception of pressure ulcers.

  1. A Randomized, Controlled Trial to Assess the Effect of Topical Insulin Versus Normal Saline in Pressure Ulcer Healing.

    PubMed

    Stephen, Shine; Agnihotri, Meenakshi; Kaur, Sukhpal

    2016-06-01

    Insulin has been used in wound healing to increase wound collagen, granulation tissue, wound tensile strength, and local production of insulin-like growth factors by fibroblasts. Saline is a widely used irrigating and wound dressing solution. Patients admitted to an acute care facility who had a Grade 2 or Grade 3 pressure ulcer were recruited to participate in a randomized, controlled trial to compare the effect of normal saline-impregnated gauze and insulin dressing in pressure ulcer healing. Persons with immunodeficiency, diabetes mellitus, pregnancy, osteomyelitis, and peripheral vascular illness were not eligible for the study. Study participants were randomized to receive either normal saline dressing gauze or insulin dressing twice daily for 7 days. At baseline, patient demographic data and ulcer history were recorded. Baseline and follow-up ulcer assessments (days 4 and day 7) included ulcer measurement (length and width) and completion of the Pressure Ulcer Scale for Healing (PUSH version 3.0) tool. Patients in the control group received dressings of sterile gauze soaked with normal saline; patients in the intervention group received topical insulin (1 U/cm2 wound area). The insulin was sprayed over the wound surface with an insulin syringe, allowed to dry for 15 minutes, and then covered with sterile gauze. To ascertain the safety of study participants, blood glucose levels were measured with a glucometer 10 minutes before and 1 hour after the topical insulin application in the intervention group. Treatment efficacy was deter- mined by assessing the reduction in wound area and PUSH scores at follow-up. Statistical analysis was performed; data are expressed as mean ± SD and percentage for continuous and categorical variables respectively. The differences in PUSH score and ulcer sizes between the 2 groups were analyzed using independent t-test, and within-group differences were analyzed using ANOVA with repeated measures; Greenhouse-Geisser correction was

  2. A Randomized, Controlled Trial to Assess the Effect of Topical Insulin Versus Normal Saline in Pressure Ulcer Healing.

    PubMed

    Stephen, Shine; Agnihotri, Meenakshi; Kaur, Sukhpal

    2016-06-01

    Insulin has been used in wound healing to increase wound collagen, granulation tissue, wound tensile strength, and local production of insulin-like growth factors by fibroblasts. Saline is a widely used irrigating and wound dressing solution. Patients admitted to an acute care facility who had a Grade 2 or Grade 3 pressure ulcer were recruited to participate in a randomized, controlled trial to compare the effect of normal saline-impregnated gauze and insulin dressing in pressure ulcer healing. Persons with immunodeficiency, diabetes mellitus, pregnancy, osteomyelitis, and peripheral vascular illness were not eligible for the study. Study participants were randomized to receive either normal saline dressing gauze or insulin dressing twice daily for 7 days. At baseline, patient demographic data and ulcer history were recorded. Baseline and follow-up ulcer assessments (days 4 and day 7) included ulcer measurement (length and width) and completion of the Pressure Ulcer Scale for Healing (PUSH version 3.0) tool. Patients in the control group received dressings of sterile gauze soaked with normal saline; patients in the intervention group received topical insulin (1 U/cm2 wound area). The insulin was sprayed over the wound surface with an insulin syringe, allowed to dry for 15 minutes, and then covered with sterile gauze. To ascertain the safety of study participants, blood glucose levels were measured with a glucometer 10 minutes before and 1 hour after the topical insulin application in the intervention group. Treatment efficacy was deter- mined by assessing the reduction in wound area and PUSH scores at follow-up. Statistical analysis was performed; data are expressed as mean ± SD and percentage for continuous and categorical variables respectively. The differences in PUSH score and ulcer sizes between the 2 groups were analyzed using independent t-test, and within-group differences were analyzed using ANOVA with repeated measures; Greenhouse-Geisser correction was

  3. Noninfectious genital ulcers.

    PubMed

    Kirshen, Carly; Edwards, Libby

    2015-12-01

    Noninfectious genital ulcers are much more common than ulcers arising from infections. Still, it is important to take a thorough history of sexual activity and a sexual abuse screen. A physical exam should include skin, oral mucosa, nails, hair, vulva, and vaginal mucosa if needed. The differential diagnosis of noninfectious genital ulcers includes: lipschütz ulcers, complex aphthosis, Behçet's syndrome, vulvar metastatic Crohn's disease, hidradenitis suppurativa, pyoderma gangrenosum, pressure ulcers, and malignancies. It is important to come to the correct diagnosis to avoid undue testing, stress, and anxiety in patients experiencing genital ulcerations.

  4. Reliability of Pressure Ulcer Rates: How Precisely Can We Differentiate Among Hospital Units, and Does the Standard Signal-Noise Reliability Measure Reflect This Precision?

    PubMed

    Staggs, Vincent S; Cramer, Emily

    2016-08-01

    Hospital performance reports often include rankings of unit pressure ulcer rates. Differentiating among units on the basis of quality requires reliable measurement. Our objectives were to describe and apply methods for assessing reliability of hospital-acquired pressure ulcer rates and evaluate a standard signal-noise reliability measure as an indicator of precision of differentiation among units. Quarterly pressure ulcer data from 8,199 critical care, step-down, medical, surgical, and medical-surgical nursing units from 1,299 US hospitals were analyzed. Using beta-binomial models, we estimated between-unit variability (signal) and within-unit variability (noise) in annual unit pressure ulcer rates. Signal-noise reliability was computed as the ratio of between-unit variability to the total of between- and within-unit variability. To assess precision of differentiation among units based on ranked pressure ulcer rates, we simulated data to estimate the probabilities of a unit's observed pressure ulcer rate rank in a given sample falling within five and ten percentiles of its true rank, and the probabilities of units with ulcer rates in the highest quartile and highest decile being identified as such. We assessed the signal-noise measure as an indicator of differentiation precision by computing its correlations with these probabilities. Pressure ulcer rates based on a single year of quarterly or weekly prevalence surveys were too susceptible to noise to allow for precise differentiation among units, and signal-noise reliability was a poor indicator of precision of differentiation. To ensure precise differentiation on the basis of true differences, alternative methods of assessing reliability should be applied to measures purported to differentiate among providers or units based on quality. © 2016 The Authors. Research in Nursing & Health published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Reliability of Pressure Ulcer Rates: How Precisely Can We Differentiate Among Hospital Units, and Does the Standard Signal-Noise Reliability Measure Reflect This Precision?

    PubMed

    Staggs, Vincent S; Cramer, Emily

    2016-08-01

    Hospital performance reports often include rankings of unit pressure ulcer rates. Differentiating among units on the basis of quality requires reliable measurement. Our objectives were to describe and apply methods for assessing reliability of hospital-acquired pressure ulcer rates and evaluate a standard signal-noise reliability measure as an indicator of precision of differentiation among units. Quarterly pressure ulcer data from 8,199 critical care, step-down, medical, surgical, and medical-surgical nursing units from 1,299 US hospitals were analyzed. Using beta-binomial models, we estimated between-unit variability (signal) and within-unit variability (noise) in annual unit pressure ulcer rates. Signal-noise reliability was computed as the ratio of between-unit variability to the total of between- and within-unit variability. To assess precision of differentiation among units based on ranked pressure ulcer rates, we simulated data to estimate the probabilities of a unit's observed pressure ulcer rate rank in a given sample falling within five and ten percentiles of its true rank, and the probabilities of units with ulcer rates in the highest quartile and highest decile being identified as such. We assessed the signal-noise measure as an indicator of differentiation precision by computing its correlations with these probabilities. Pressure ulcer rates based on a single year of quarterly or weekly prevalence surveys were too susceptible to noise to allow for precise differentiation among units, and signal-noise reliability was a poor indicator of precision of differentiation. To ensure precise differentiation on the basis of true differences, alternative methods of assessing reliability should be applied to measures purported to differentiate among providers or units based on quality. © 2016 The Authors. Research in Nursing & Health published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27223598

  6. Contextual Facilitators of and Barriers to Nursing Home Pressure Ulcer Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Hartmann, Christine W.; Solomon, Jeffrey; Palmer, Jennifer A.; Lukas, Carol VanDeusen

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Important gaps exist in the knowledge of how to achieve successful, sustained prevention of pressure ulcers (PrUs) in nursing homes. This study aimed to address those gaps by comparing nursing leadership and indirect care staff members’ impressions about the context of PrU prevention in facilities with improving and declining PrU rates. SETTING The study was conducted in a sample of 6 Veterans Health Administration nursing homes (known as community living centers) purposively selected to represent a range of PrU care performance. DESIGN AND PARTICIPANTS One-time 30-minute semistructured interviews with 23 community living center staff were conducted. Qualitative interview data were analyzed using an analytic framework containing (a) a priori analytic constructs based on the study’s conceptual framework and (b) sections for emerging constructs. MAIN RESULTS Analysis revealed 6 key concepts differentiating sites with improving and declining PrU care performance. These concepts were (1) structures through which the change effort is initiated; (2) organizational prioritization, alignment, and support; (3) improvement culture; (4) clarity of roles and responsibilities; (5) communication strategies; and (6) staffing and clinical practices. Results also pointed to potential contextual facilitators of and barriers to successful PrU prevention. CONCLUSIONS Leadership’s visible prioritization of and support for PrU prevention and the initiation of PrU prevention activities through formal structures were the most striking components represented at sites with improving performance, but not at ones where performance declined. Sites with improving performance were more likely to align frontline staff and leadership goals for PrU prevention. PMID:27089151

  7. Risk Assessment Tool for Pressure Ulcer Development in Indian Surgical Wards.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Sushma; Sharma, Deborshi; Rana, Anshika; Pathak, Reetesh; Lal, Romesh; Kumar, Ajay; Biswal, U C

    2015-06-01

    The aims of this paper were to compare the predictive validity of three pressure ulcer (PU) risk scales-the Norton scale, the Braden scale, and the Waterlow scale-and to choose the most appropriate calculator for predicting PU risk in surgical wards of India. This is an observational prospective cohort study in a tertiary educational hospital in New Delhi among 100 surgical ward patients from April to July 2011. The main outcomes measured included sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PVP) and negative predictive value (PVN), and the area under the curve of the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve of the three PU risk assessment scales. Based on the cutoff points found most appropriate in this study, the sensitivity, specificity, PVP, and PVN were as follows: the Norton scale (cutoff, 16) had the values of 95.6, 93.5, 44.8, and 98.6, respectively; the Braden scale (cutoff, 17) had values of 100, 89.6, 42.5, and 100, respectively; and the Waterlow scale (cutoff, 11) had 91.3, 84.4, 38.8, and 97, respectively. According to the ROC curve, the Norton scale is the most appropriate tool. Factors such as physical condition, activity, mobility, body mass index (BMI), nutrition, friction, and shear are extremely significant in determining risk of PU development (p < 0.0001). The Norton scale is most effective in predicting PU risk in Indian surgical wards. BMI, mobility, activity, nutrition, friction, and shear are the most significant factors in Indian surgical ward settings with necessity for future comparison with established scales.

  8. Improving identification and documentation of pressure ulcers at an urban academic hospital

    PubMed Central

    Dahlstrom, Marcus; Best, Thomas; Baker, Christine; Doeing, Diane; Davis, Andrew; Doty, Judith; Arora, Vineet M.

    2012-01-01

    Background A two-year quality improvement campaign at a single teaching hospital was launched to improve the identification, documentation, and treatment of pressure ulcers (PUs) after Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) declared severe hospital-acquired PUs are “never-events.” Method The campaign included (1) reference materials, (2) new documentation templates, (3) staff education, and (4) hospital-wide mattress replacement. An ongoing retrospective chart review of frail older patients determined the presence of PU documentation, which provider (nurse or physician) documented the PU, and which descriptors (stage, size, or location) were used. Results The campaign significantly increased the proportion of PUs completely documented by nurses from 27% to 55% following mattress replacement and resident education (OR 3.68, p = 0.001, 95% CI: 1.68–8.08). A similar improvement was observed for physician documentation increasing from 12% to 36% following the same interventions however this change was not statistically significant (OR 2.11, p = 0.12, 95% CI: 0.82–5.39). These improvements were short-lived due to the implementation of electronic medical records (EMR) for nursing notes. Although the percentage of PUs completely documented by nurses decreased following EMR implementation, it increased in the following months, above the pre-campaign baseline as nurses adapted to the new documentation system. However, after EMR implementation, complete PU documentation by physicians fell to a nadir of 0% and did not recover. Discussion A multi-component campaign to improve the quality of PU documentation by both physicians and nurses can yield positive gains. However, these improvements were short-lived due to EMR implementation, which acutely worsened documentation of PUs. This emphasizes the importance of frequent and repeated interventions to sustain quality improvement successes. PMID:21500755

  9. Impact of practice guidelines on support surface selection, incidence of pressure ulcers, and fiscal dollars.

    PubMed

    Dukich, J; O'Connor, D

    2001-03-01

    Predicated on a need to control overall hospital costs and to integrate a Level 1 trauma center (Campus A) with a family practice based tertiary care hospital system (Campus B), expenditures associated with rental support surfaces were evaluated. Consistency and appropriateness of support surface selection is necessary to promote positive clinical outcomes, patient comfort, and a healthier bottom line, despite increasing costs. Clinical practice guidelines for therapeutic support surfaces were developed to decrease support surface expenditures and maintain prevalence rates below national averages. Utilizing the Agency for Health Care Policy and Research algorithm for managing tissue loads, along with other guidelines, criteria for prevention, comfort, and treatment were developed to assist nurses and physicians in support surface selections. A prevalence study was conducted before these criteria were implemented and repeated 1 year later. Expenditures for all rental support surfaces were assessed quarterly. Campus A, with a history of higher financial expenditures, was monitored weekly to assess whether support surfaces selections met guideline recommendations. Nursing staff reviewed hospital protocol regarding guidelines before implementation, and a self-administered review test was required during the first year post-implementation. One year later, a modest decrease in annual expenditures for rental support surfaces was noted. Campus A had a decrease in nosocomial pressure ulcers, while Campus B had an increased prevalence rate. Staff selection of support surfaces, within guideline recommendations, improved to 75% on medical/surgical units, and 98.8% in ICUs on Campus A. Although implementing support surface selection guidelines did not result in a significant reduction in cost, it created a framework for monitoring future related decisions. PMID:11889749

  10. Association of Race, Socioeconomic Status, and Health Care Access with Pressure Ulcers after Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Saunders, Lee L.; Krause, James S.; Acuna, Joshua

    2012-01-01

    Objective To assess the associations of race and socioeconomic status (SES) with pressure ulcers (PU) after accounting for health care access (HCA) among persons with spinal cord injury (SCI). Design Cross-sectional. Setting Large specialty hospital in the southeastern United States. Participant Persons with traumatic SCI who 1) had residual effects from their injury, 2) were 18 years or older at survey, and 3) were a year or more post-injury at survey (n=2,549). Intervention None. Main Outcome Measures Outcomes were measured by mail-in survey: having a current PU (yes vs. no), having a PU in the past year with or without reduced sitting time (no PU, no reduced sitting time, month or less, 5+ weeks), and having at least 1 PU surgery since SCI onset (yes vs. no). Results Of participants, 39.3% reported a PU in the past year, 19.9% had a current PU, and 21.9% reported having had surgery for a PU since their SCI onset. While race was preliminarily associated with each PU outcome, it became non-significant after controlling for SES and HCA. In each analysis, household income was significantly associated with PU outcomes after controlling for demographic and injury factors and remained significant after accounting for the HCA factors. Persons with lower income had higher odds of each PU outcome. HCA was not consistently related to PU outcomes. Conclusions Even after accounting for HCA, household income, a measure of SES, remained significantly associated with PU outcomes after SCI; however, race became non-significant. PMID:22494948

  11. Contribution of quorum sensing to the virulence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in pressure ulcer infection in rats.

    PubMed

    Nakagami, Gojiro; Morohoshi, Tomohiro; Ikeda, Tsukasa; Ohta, Yasunori; Sagara, Hiroshi; Huang, Lijuan; Nagase, Takashi; Sugama, Junko; Sanada, Hiromi

    2011-01-01

    The impact of quorum sensing (QS) in in vivo models of infection has been widely investigated, but there are no descriptions for ischemic wound infection. To explore the role of QS in Pseudomonas aeruginosa in the establishment of ischemic wound infection, we challenged a pressure ulcer model in rats with the PAO-1, PAO-1 derivatives ΔlasIΔrhlI and ΔlasRΔrhlR strains, which cannot induce the virulence factor under QS control, thus the reduced tissue destruction was expended in these mutant strains. However unexpectedly, on postwounding day 3, the inflammatory responses in the three groups were similarly severe and the numbers of bacteria in tissue samples did not differ among the three strains. Biofilm formation was immature in QS-deficient strains, defined by the absence of dense bacterial aggregates and extracellular polymeric substance, which was confirmed by scanning electron microscopy. The Pseudomonas aeruginosa QS signal, acylated homoserine lactone, was only quantified from wound samples in the PAO-1 group. The swimming and twitching motilities were significantly enhanced in the ΔlasRΔrhlR group compared with the PAO-1 group in vitro. A significantly larger wound area was correlated with the bacterial motility. The inflammation in the early phase of bacterial challenge to wounds with immature biofilm formation in the QS-deficient strains indicated that the role of QS was more crucial for the chronic phase than for the acute phase of infection. The present findings indicate a difference in the importance of QS in ischemic wound infections compared with other infection models.

  12. Implementing trials of complex interventions in community settings: The USC – Rancho Los Amigos Pressure Ulcer Prevention Study (PUPS)

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Florence; Pyatak, Elizabeth A.; Carlson, Mike; Blanche, Erna Imperatore; Vigen, Cheryl; Hay, Joel; Mallinson, Trudy; Blanchard, Jeanine; Unger, Jennifer B.; Garber, Susan L.; Diaz, Jesus; Florindez, Lucia I.; Atkins, Michal; Rubayi, Salah; Azen, Stanley Paul

    2014-01-01

    Background Randomized trials of complex, non-pharmacologic interventions implemented in home and community settings, such as the University of Southern California (USC)–Rancho Los Amigos National Rehabilitation Center (RLANRC) Pressure Ulcer Prevention Study (PUPS), present unique challenges with respect to: (a) participant recruitment and retention, (b) intervention delivery and fidelity, (c) randomization and assessment, and (d) potential inadvertent treatment effects. Purpose We describe the methods employed to address the challenges confronted in implementing PUPS. In this randomized controlled trial, we are assessing the efficacy of a complex, preventive intervention in reducing the incidence of, and costs associated with, the development of medically serious pressure ulcers in people with spinal cord injury. Method Individuals with spinal cord injury recruited from RLANRC were assigned to either a 12-month preventive intervention group or a standard care control group. The primary outcome is the incidence of serious pressure ulcers with secondary endpoints including ulcer-related surgeries, medical treatment costs, and quality of life. These outcomes are assessed at 12 and 24 months after randomization. Additionally, we are studying the mediating mechanisms that account for intervention outcomes. Results PUPS has been successfully implemented, including recruitment of the target sample size of 170 participants, assurance of the integrity of intervention protocol delivery with an average 90% treatment adherence rate, and enactment of the assessment plan. However, implementation has been replete with challenges. To meet recruitment goals, we instituted a five-pronged approach customized for an underserved, ethnically diverse population. In intervention delivery, we increased staff time to overcome economic and cultural barriers to retention and adherence. To ensure treatment fidelity and replicability, we monitored intervention protocol delivery in accord

  13. Effectiveness of platelet-rich plasma and hyaluronic acid for the treatment and care of pressure ulcers.

    PubMed

    Ramos-Torrecillas, Javier; García-Martínez, Olga; De Luna-Bertos, Elvira; Ocaña-Peinado, Francisco Manuel; Ruiz, Concepción

    2015-03-01

    Platelet-rich growth factor (PRGF) is a natural source of growth factors (GF), while hyaluronic acid (HA) is a biopolymer present in the extracellular matrix of skin, cartilage, bone, and brain, among other tissues. Both are involved in the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying wound healing. The objective of this study was to evaluate the clinical efficacy (as measured by ulcer area) and safety (as measured by signs of infection) of PRGF and PRGF plus HA in the treatment of pressure ulcers (PUs). Patients (N = 100) with 124 Stage II-III PUs were randomized to a control group (n = 25 PUs) for standard care or to case groups for treatment with one (n = 34 PUs) or two (n = 25 PUs) doses of PRGF from their own peripheral blood, or two doses of PRGF plus HA (n = 40 PUs). All ulcers were followed up every 3 days for a 36-day period. At 36 days, a significant reduction in ulcer area (p ≤ .001) was observed in all treatment groups, with a mean reduction of more than 48.0% versus baseline. The greatest mean reduction (80.4% vs. baseline) was obtained with the PRGF plus HA regimen. Complete wound healing was observed in 32.0% of PUs treated with two doses of PRGF (p ≤ .002) and in 37.5% of those treated with two doses of PRGF plus HA (p ≤ .004). There were no signs of infection in any PUs during the 36-day follow-up period. The degree of wound healing was inversely correlated with the consumption of drugs such as statins and with the peripheral blood platelet levels of patients at baseline.

  14. [PRESSURE ULCER: INCIDENCE AND DEMOGRAPHIC, CLINICAL AND NUTRITION FACTORS ASSOCIATED IN INTENSIVE CARE UNIT PATIENTS].

    PubMed

    Oliveira Costa, Ana Carolina; Sabino Pinho, Cláudia Porto; Almeida dos Santos, Alyne Dayana; Santos do Nascimento, Alexsandra Camila

    2015-11-01

    La úlcera por presión (UP) es una lesión localizada en la piel y/o tejido subyacente, generalmente sobre prominencias óseas, provocada por la presión y/o asociada a cizallamiento. Aunque evitable, todavía es muy prevalente, siendo destacable que en su etiología están involucrados múltiples factores. Objetivo: identificar la incidencia de úlceras por presión y los factores demográficos, clínicos y nutricionales asociados en pacientes internados en la UCI de un hospital universitario. Métodos: estudio prospectivo, observacional, con pacientes internados en una UCI de un hospital universitario ubicado en el nordeste brasileño, durante el periodo de junio a noviembre de 2014. Se determinó la UP a través de la inspección corporal tres veces a la semana durante el baño matinal, con base en las características establecidas por la National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel, 2014. Se recolectaron datos demográficos, clínicos, bioquímicos y nutricionales. Se utilizó la escala de Braden para verificar a los individuos con riesgo de desarrollo de UP. Resultados: la muestra se compuso de 51 pacientes, con un promedio de edad de 57,7(± 16,4) años. Se verificó una incidencia de UP del 52,9%, y los factores asociados a su desarrollo fueron: uso de droga vasoactiva (p = 0,029), tiempo de hospitalización > 10 días (p ≤ 0,001) y ausencia de anemia (p = 0,011). Conclusión: la elevada incidencia de UP resalta la vulnerabilidad de los pacientes en cuidados intensivos. A pesar de caracterizarse por ser una condición multifactorial, solo el uso de drogas vasoactivas, el tiempo de hospitalización y la ausencia de anemia se asociaron a la aparición de UP. Factores nutricionales y clínicos frecuentemente relacionados a las lesiones se asociaron con su desarrollo.

  15. Pressure ulcer-induced oxidative organ injury is ameliorated by beta-glucan treatment in rats.

    PubMed

    Sener, Göksel; Sert, Gülten; Ozer Sehirli, A; Arbak, Serap; Uslu, Bahar; Gedik, Nursal; Ayanoglu-Dulger, Gül

    2006-05-01

    Pressure ulcers (PU) cause morphological and functional alterations in the skin and visceral organs. In this study we investigated the role of oxidative damage in PUs and the probable beneficial effect of beta-glucan treatment against this damage. beta-glucan is known to have immunomodulatory effects. Experiments were carried on Wistar albino rats. PU was induced by applying magnets over steel plates that were implanted under the skin, to compress the skin and cause ischemia where removing the magnets cause reperfusion of the tissue. Within the first 12 h, rats were subjected to 5 cycles of ischemia/reperfusion (I/R), followed by 12 h ischemia. This protocol was repeated for 3 days. In treatment groups, twice a day during reperfusion periods, beta-glucan was either applied locally (25 mg/kg) as an ointment on skin, or administered orally (50 mg/kg) as a gavage. At the end of the experimental periods, tissue samples (skin, liver, kidney, lung, stomach, and ileum) were taken for the measurement of malondialdehyde (MDA)--an index of lipid peroxidation--and glutathione (GSH)--a key antioxidant--levels. Neutrophil infiltration was evaluated by the measurement of tissue myeloperoxidase activity, while collagen contents were measured for the evaluation of tissue fibrosis. Skin tissues were also examined microscopically. Liver and kidney functions were assayed in serum samples. Local treatment with beta-glucan inhibited the increase in MDA and MPO levels and the decrease in GSH in the skin induced by PU, but was less efficient in preventing the damage in visceral organs. However, systemic treatment prevented the damage in the visceral organs. Significant increases in creatinine, BUN, ALT, AST, LDH and collagen levels in PU group were prevented by beta-glucan treatment. The light microscopic examination exhibited significant degenerative changes in dermis and epidermis in the PU group. Tissue injury was decreased especially in the locally treated group. Thus, supplementing

  16. Pressure ulcer prevention algorithm content validation: a mixed-methods, quantitative study.

    PubMed

    van Rijswijk, Lia; Beitz, Janice M

    2015-04-01

    Translating pressure ulcer prevention (PUP) evidence-based recommendations into practice remains challenging for a variety of reasons, including the perceived quality, validity, and usability of the research or the guideline itself. Following the development and face validation testing of an evidence-based PUP algorithm, additional stakeholder input and testing were needed. Using convenience sampling methods, wound care experts attending a national wound care conference and a regional wound ostomy continence nursing (WOCN) conference and/or graduates of a WOCN program were invited to participate in an Internal Review Board-approved, mixed-methods quantitative survey with qualitative components to examine algorithm content validity. After participants provided written informed consent, demographic variables were collected and participants were asked to comment on and rate the relevance and appropriateness of each of the 26 algorithm decision points/steps using standard content validation study procedures. All responses were anonymous. Descriptive summary statistics, mean relevance/appropriateness scores, and the content validity index (CVI) were calculated. Qualitative comments were transcribed and thematically analyzed. Of the 553 wound care experts invited, 79 (average age 52.9 years, SD 10.1; range 23-73) consented to participate and completed the study (a response rate of 14%). Most (67, 85%) were female, registered (49, 62%) or advanced practice (12, 15%) nurses, and had > 10 years of health care experience (88, 92%). Other health disciplines included medical doctors, physical therapists, nurse practitioners, and certified nurse specialists. Almost all had received formal wound care education (75, 95%). On a Likert-type scale of 1 (not relevant/appropriate) to 4 (very relevant and appropriate), the average score for the entire algorithm/all decision points (N = 1,912) was 3.72 with an overall CVI of 0.94 (out of 1). The only decision point/step recommendation

  17. Pressure ulcer prevention algorithm content validation: a mixed-methods, quantitative study.

    PubMed

    van Rijswijk, Lia; Beitz, Janice M

    2015-04-01

    Translating pressure ulcer prevention (PUP) evidence-based recommendations into practice remains challenging for a variety of reasons, including the perceived quality, validity, and usability of the research or the guideline itself. Following the development and face validation testing of an evidence-based PUP algorithm, additional stakeholder input and testing were needed. Using convenience sampling methods, wound care experts attending a national wound care conference and a regional wound ostomy continence nursing (WOCN) conference and/or graduates of a WOCN program were invited to participate in an Internal Review Board-approved, mixed-methods quantitative survey with qualitative components to examine algorithm content validity. After participants provided written informed consent, demographic variables were collected and participants were asked to comment on and rate the relevance and appropriateness of each of the 26 algorithm decision points/steps using standard content validation study procedures. All responses were anonymous. Descriptive summary statistics, mean relevance/appropriateness scores, and the content validity index (CVI) were calculated. Qualitative comments were transcribed and thematically analyzed. Of the 553 wound care experts invited, 79 (average age 52.9 years, SD 10.1; range 23-73) consented to participate and completed the study (a response rate of 14%). Most (67, 85%) were female, registered (49, 62%) or advanced practice (12, 15%) nurses, and had > 10 years of health care experience (88, 92%). Other health disciplines included medical doctors, physical therapists, nurse practitioners, and certified nurse specialists. Almost all had received formal wound care education (75, 95%). On a Likert-type scale of 1 (not relevant/appropriate) to 4 (very relevant and appropriate), the average score for the entire algorithm/all decision points (N = 1,912) was 3.72 with an overall CVI of 0.94 (out of 1). The only decision point/step recommendation

  18. Pressure ulcer knowledge of registered nurses, assistant nurses and student nurses: a descriptive, comparative multicentre study in Sweden.

    PubMed

    Gunningberg, Lena; Mårtensson, Gunilla; Mamhidir, Anna-Greta; Florin, Jan; Muntlin Athlin, Åsa; Bååth, Carina

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to describe and compare the knowledge of registered nurses (RNs), assistant nurses (ANs) and student nurses (SNs) about preventing pressure ulcers (PUs). PU prevention behaviours in the clinical practice of RNs and ANs were also explored. A descriptive, comparative multicentre study was performed. Hospital wards and universities from four Swedish county councils participated. In total, 415 participants (RN, AN and SN) completed the Pressure Ulcer Knowledge Assessment Tool. The mean knowledge score for the sample was 58·9%. The highest scores were found in the themes 'nutrition' (83·1%) and 'risk assessment' (75·7%). The lowest scores were found in the themes 'reduction in the amount of pressure and shear' (47·5%) and 'classification and observation' (55·5%). RNs and SNs had higher scores than ANs on 'aetiology and causes'. SNs had higher scores than RNs and ANs on 'nutrition'. It has been concluded that there is a knowledge deficit in PU prevention among nursing staff in Sweden. A major educational campaign needs to be undertaken both in hospital settings and in nursing education.

  19. Treatment of pressure ulcers in patients with declining renal function using arginine, glutamine and ß-hydroxy-ß-methylbutyrate.

    PubMed

    Ogura, Y; Yuki, N; Sukegane, A; Nishi, T; Miyake, Y; Sato, H; Miyamoto, C; Mihara, C

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study is to examine the efficacy on healing pressure ulcers (PU) of using a supplement combination containing arginine, glutamine and ß-hydroxy-ß-methylbutyrate, which was given to two elderly patients with renal dysfunction. The PU was surgically opened, decompressed and treated by drugs. A half quantity of the defined dose of the supplement combination, with an enteral nutrition product, was administered to the patients twice a day. This combination improved the PUs, with no effect on renal function. This novel finding may provide a nutritional rationale of arginine, glutamine and ß-hydroxy-ß-methylbutyrate for PUs associated with renal dysfunction.

  20. The use of alternating mattresses in the management and prevention of pressure ulcers in a community setting.

    PubMed

    Hampton, Sylvie

    2016-09-01

    The district nurse and community nurse has a duty of care to provide the most appropriate care for any individual who is at risk of pressure injury. This is often difficult as time constraints mean that education can be absent or reliant on other nurses who may not be up to date with the latest thinking on prevention. Also, district and community nurses cannot be in a patient's home 24 hours a day in order to provide the turning regime that is required for prevention of pressure ulcers. Therefore, they are reliant on education for the carers and provision of the most appropriate equipment for the individual patient. It is vital that the carer not only knows what to look for, but also what to do if any redness is noted and who to call. This article will provide tips on mattress types for the high-risk patient who may or may not have a pressure injury. PMID:27594310

  1. A Real World, Observational Registry of Chronic Wounds and Ulcers

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-18

    Diabetic Foot; Varicose Ulcer; Pressure Ulcer; Surgical Wound Dehiscence; Vasculitis; Skin Ulcer; Leg Ulcer; Wounds and Injuries; Pyoderma; Peripheral Arterial Disease; Diabetic Neuropathies; Lymphedema; Venous Insufficiency; Diabetes Complications; Amputation Stump

  2. Randomised controlled trial evaluating the efficacy of wrap therapy for wound healing acceleration in patients with NPUAP stage II and III pressure ulcer

    PubMed Central

    Mizuhara, Akihiro; Oonishi, Sandai; Takeuchi, Kensuke; Suzuki, Masatsune; Akiyama, Kazuhiro; Kobayashi, Kazuyo; Matsunaga, Kayoko

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate if ‘wrap therapy’ using food wraps, which is widely used in Japanese clinical sites, is not inferior when compared to guideline adhesion treatments. Design Multicentre, prospective, randomised, open, blinded endpoint clinical trial. Setting 15 hospitals in Japan. Patients 66 older patients with new National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel stage II or III pressure ulcers. Interventions Of these 66 patients, 31 were divided into the conventional treatment guidelines group and 35 into the wrap therapy group. Main outcome measures The primary end point was the period until the pressure ulcers were cured. The secondary end point was a comparison of the speed of change in the Pressure Ulcer Scale for Healing score. Results 64 of the 66 patients were analysed. The estimated mean period until healing was 57.5 days (95% CI 45.2 to 69.8) in the control group as opposed to 59.8 days (95% CI 49.7 to 69.9) in the wrap therapy group. By the extent of pressure ulcer infiltration, the mean period until healing was 16.0 days (95% CI 8.1 to 23.9) in the control group as opposed to 18.8 days (95% CI 10.3 to 27.2) in the wrap therapy group with National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel stage II ulcers, and 71.8 days (95% CI 61.4 to 82.3) as opposed to 63.2 days (95% CI 53.0 to 73.4), respectively, with stage III ulcers. There is no statistical significance in difference in Pressure Ulcer Scale for Healing scores. Conclusions It might be possible to consider wrap therapy as an alternative choice in primary care settings as a simple and inexpensive dressing care. Clinical Trial registration UMIN Clinical Trials Registry UMIN000002658. Summary protocol is available on https://upload.umin.ac.jp/cgi-bin/ctr/ctr.cgi?function=brows&action=brows&type=detail&recptno=R000003235&admin=0&language=J PMID:22223842

  3. An Approach to Acquiring, Normalizing, and Managing EHR Data From a Clinical Data Repository for Studying Pressure Ulcer Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Padula, William V; Blackshaw, Leon; Brindle, C Tod; Volchenboum, Samuel L

    2016-01-01

    Changes in the methods that individual facilities follow to collect and store data related to hospital-acquired pressure ulcer (HAPU) occurrences are essential for improving patient outcomes and advancing our understanding the science behind this clinically relevant issue. Using an established electronic health record system at a large, urban, tertiary-care academic medical center, we investigated the process required for taking raw data of HAPU outcomes and submitting these data to a normalization process. We extracted data from 1.5 million patient shifts and filtered observations to those with a Braden score and linked tables in the electronic health record, including (1) Braden scale scores, (2) laboratory outcomes data, (3) surgical time, (4) provider orders, (5) medications, and (6) discharge diagnoses. Braden scores are important measures specific to HAPUs since these scores clarify the daily risk of a hospitalized patient for developing a pressure ulcer. The other more common measures that may be associated with HAPU outcomes are important to organize in a single data frame with Braden scores according to each patient. Primary keys were assigned to each table, and the data were processed through 3 normalization steps and 1 denormalization step. These processes created 8 tables that can be stored efficiently in a clinical database of HAPU outcomes. As hospitals focus on organizing data for review of HAPUs and other types of hospital-acquired conditions, the normalization process we describe in this article offers directions for collaboration between providers and informatics teams using a common language and structure.

  4. Pathologic changes of wound tissue in rats with stage III pressure ulcers treated by transplantation of human amniotic epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xilan; Jiang, Zhixia; Zhou, Aiting; Yu, Limei; Quan, Mingtao; Cheng, Huagang

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to determine the impact of orthotopic transplantation of human amniotic epithelial cells (hAECs) on the pathologic changes of wound tissues in a self-prepared rat stage III pressure ulcer model. Ninety-six SD rats were randomly divided into the model group (group M), hAEC transplantation group (group H), traditional treatment group (group T), and the control group (group C), with 24 rats in each group. The wound healing time was observed in 6 rats from each group, and 6 rats of each group were selected for post-modeling on day(s) (D) 1, 3, and 7 for HE staining to compare the pathological changes. The healing time of group H was significantly shorter than the other three groups. Moreover, pathological observations revealed that group H exhibited significant proliferation of fibrous tissues and vessels in the dermal layer, and the appearance time and degree of skin appendages were significantly greater than that observed in the other three groups. Pathological observations showed that hAEC transplantation could significantly speed up the healing of stage III pressure ulcer.

  5. An Approach to Acquiring, Normalizing, and Managing EHR Data From a Clinical Data Repository for Studying Pressure Ulcer Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Padula, William V; Blackshaw, Leon; Brindle, C Tod; Volchenboum, Samuel L

    2016-01-01

    Changes in the methods that individual facilities follow to collect and store data related to hospital-acquired pressure ulcer (HAPU) occurrences are essential for improving patient outcomes and advancing our understanding the science behind this clinically relevant issue. Using an established electronic health record system at a large, urban, tertiary-care academic medical center, we investigated the process required for taking raw data of HAPU outcomes and submitting these data to a normalization process. We extracted data from 1.5 million patient shifts and filtered observations to those with a Braden score and linked tables in the electronic health record, including (1) Braden scale scores, (2) laboratory outcomes data, (3) surgical time, (4) provider orders, (5) medications, and (6) discharge diagnoses. Braden scores are important measures specific to HAPUs since these scores clarify the daily risk of a hospitalized patient for developing a pressure ulcer. The other more common measures that may be associated with HAPU outcomes are important to organize in a single data frame with Braden scores according to each patient. Primary keys were assigned to each table, and the data were processed through 3 normalization steps and 1 denormalization step. These processes created 8 tables that can be stored efficiently in a clinical database of HAPU outcomes. As hospitals focus on organizing data for review of HAPUs and other types of hospital-acquired conditions, the normalization process we describe in this article offers directions for collaboration between providers and informatics teams using a common language and structure. PMID:26727681

  6. A non-randomised, controlled clinical trial of an innovative device for negative pressure wound therapy of pressure ulcers in traumatic paraplegia patients.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Rajeshwar N; Dwivedi, Mukesh K; Bhagat, Amit K; Raj, Saloni; Agarwal, Rajiv; Chandra, Abhijit

    2016-06-01

    The conventional methods of treatment of pressure ulcers (PUs) by serial debridement and daily dressings require prolonged hospitalisation, associated with considerable morbidity. There is, however, recent evidence to suggest that negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) accelerates healing. The commercial devices for NPWT are costly, cumbersome, and electricity dependent. We compared PU wound healing in traumatic paraplegia patients by conventional dressing and by an innovative negative pressure device (NPD). In this prospective, non-randomised trial, 48 traumatic paraplegia patients with PUs of stages 3 and 4 were recruited. Patients were divided into two groups: group A (n = 24) received NPWT with our NPD, and group B (n = 24) received conventional methods of dressing. All patients were followed up for 9 weeks. At week 9, all patients on NPD showed a statistically significant improvement in PU healing in terms of slough clearance, granulation tissue formation, wound discharge and culture. A significant reduction in wound size and ulcer depth was observed in NPD as compared with conventional methods at all follow-up time points (P = 0·0001). NPWT by the innovative device heals PUs at a significantly higher rate than conventional treatment. The device is safe, easy to apply and cost-effective.

  7. Evaluation of a new sitting concept designed for prevention of pressure ulcer on the buttock using finite element analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Dohyung; Lin, Fang; Hendrix, Ronald W.; Moran, Brian; Fasanati, Charles

    2010-01-01

    Excessive compressive load induces pressure related soft tissue damage, i.e. pressure ulcer (PU), in buttock area in wheelchair users. In solving this problem, our previous study has introduced a concept of Off-Loading sitting, which partially removes the ischial support to reduce pressure under buttocks. However, the effect of this sitting concept has only been evaluated using the interface pressure and tissue perfusion measurements. The objective of this investigation was to evaluate the Off-Loading posture for its ability to reduce internal pressure and stress in deep buttock tissues. This evaluation was performed on a 3D finite element (FE) model which was established and validated in a sitting posture and has realistic material properties and boundary conditions. FE analysis in this study confirmed that the pressure relief provided by Off-Loading posture created profound effect in reducing the mechanical stress within deep tissues. It was concluded that Off-Loading posture may prove beneficial in preventing sitting related PU. PMID:17922158

  8. Peptic ulcer

    MedlinePlus

    ... I. bleed - peptic ulcer; H. pylori - peptic ulcer; Helicobacter pylori - peptic ulcer ... is infection of the stomach by bacteria called Helicobacter pylori ( H pylori ). Most people with peptic ulcers have ...

  9. A comparative, descriptive study of systemic factors and survival in elderly patients with sacral pressure ulcers.

    PubMed

    Jaul, Efraim; Menczel, Jacob

    2015-03-01

    Sacral pressure ulcers (PUs) are a serious complication in frail elderly patients. Thin tissue in the sacral area, low body mass index, and anatomical location contribute to the development of sacral PUs. A comparative, descriptive study was conducted to identify patient systemic factors associated with sacral PUs and to compare survival time in patients with and without PU. All consecutive patients with PUs (n = 77) and without sacral PUs (n = 53) admitted to the skilled nursing department of a geriatric hospital in Jerusalem, Israel between July 1, 2008 and December 31, 2011 were eligible to participate. Charts of previously admitted patients were abstracted and patients were prospectively followed until discharge, death, or the end of the study. Patient demographics, comorbidities, nutritional status, physical and cognitive function (measured using the Reisberg's Functional Assessment Staging Tool [FAST], Stages of Dementia of Alzheimer Scale, and the Glasgow Coma Scale), PU status, number of courses of antibiotic treatment during admission, length of hospitalization, and mortality were compared between patients admitted with and without a sacral PU using descriptive and univariate statistics. Logistic regression models were used to estimate the odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for sacral PU versus without PU by study covariate. The association between sacral PU and survival time was assessed using Kaplan-Meier models. Patients with a sacral PU were significantly older (average age 81.60 ±10.78 versus 77.06±11.19 years old, P = 0.02) and had a higher prevalence of dementia (70% versus 30%, P = 0.007), Parkinson's disease (92.3% versus 7.7%, P = 0.03), and anemia (67.7% versus 32.3%, P = 0.06) than patients admitted without a PU. Patients with a sacral PU also had a lower body mass index (23.1 versus 25.4, P = 0.04), and lower hemoglobin (10.54 versus 11.11, P = 0.03), albumin (26.2 versus 29.7, P = 0.002), and total protein levels (61.3 versus

  10. Enteral n-3 fatty acids and micronutrients enhance percentage of positive neutrophil and lymphocyte adhesion molecules: a potential mediator of pressure ulcer healing in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Theilla, Miriam; Schwartz, Betty; Zimra, Yael; Shapiro, Haim; Anbar, Ronit; Rabizadeh, Esther; Cohen, Jonathan; Singer, Pierre

    2012-04-01

    n-3 Fatty acids are recognised as influencing both wound healing and immunity. We assessed the impact of a fish oil- and micronutrient-enriched formula (study formula) on the healing of pressure ulcers and on immune function in critically ill patients in an intensive care unit. A total of forty patients with pressure ulcers and receiving nutritional support were enrolled (intervention group, n 20, received study formula; and a control group, n 20, received an isoenergetic formula). Total and differential leucocyte count and percentage of adhesion molecule positive granulocyte and lymphocyte cells (CD11a, CD11b, CD18 and CD49b) were measured on days 0, 7 and 14. Percentage of positive lymphocytes for CD54, CD49b, CD49d and CD8 were also measured on days 0, 7 and 14. The state of pressure ulcers was assessed by using the pressure ulcer scale for healing tool score on days 7, 14 and 28 of treatment. No between-group differences in patient demographics, anthropometry or diagnostic class were observed. Patients who received the study formula showed significant increases in the percentage of positive CD18 and CD11a lymphocytes and of CD49b granulocytes as compared to controls (P < 0·05). While the severity of pressure ulcers was not significantly different between the two groups on admission, severity increased significantly over time for the control group (P < 0·05), but not for the study group. The present study suggests that a fish oil- and micronutrient-enriched formula may prevent worsening of pressure ulcers and that this effect may be mediated by an effect on adhesion molecule expression.

  11. TexiCare: an innovative embedded device for pressure ulcer prevention. Preliminary results with a paraplegic volunteer.

    PubMed

    Chenu, Olivier; Vuillerme, Nicolas; Bucki, Marek; Diot, Bruno; Cannard, Francis; Payan, Yohan

    2013-08-01

    This paper introduces the recently developed TexiCare device that aims at preventing pressure ulcers for people with spinal cord injury. This embedded device is aimed to be mounted on the user wheelchair. Its sensor is 100% textile and allows the measurement of pressures at the interface between the cushion and the buttocks. It is comfortable, washable and low cost. It is connected to a cigarette-box sized unit that (i) measures the pressures in real time, (ii) estimates the risk for internal over-strains, and (iii) alerts the wheelchair user whenever necessary. The alert method has been defined as a result of a utility/usability/acceptability study conducted with representative end users. It is based on a tactile-visual feedback (via a watch or a smartphone for example): the tactile modality is used to discreetly alarm the person while the visual modality conveys an informative message. In order to evaluate the usability of the TexiCare device, a paraplegic volunteer equipped his wheelchair at home during a six months period. Interestingly, the first results revealed bad habits such as an inadequate posture when watching TV, rare relief maneuvers, and the occurrence of abnormal high pressures.

  12. TexiCare: an innovative embedded device for pressure ulcer prevention. Preliminary results with a paraplegic volunteer.

    PubMed

    Chenu, Olivier; Vuillerme, Nicolas; Bucki, Marek; Diot, Bruno; Cannard, Francis; Payan, Yohan

    2013-08-01

    This paper introduces the recently developed TexiCare device that aims at preventing pressure ulcers for people with spinal cord injury. This embedded device is aimed to be mounted on the user wheelchair. Its sensor is 100% textile and allows the measurement of pressures at the interface between the cushion and the buttocks. It is comfortable, washable and low cost. It is connected to a cigarette-box sized unit that (i) measures the pressures in real time, (ii) estimates the risk for internal over-strains, and (iii) alerts the wheelchair user whenever necessary. The alert method has been defined as a result of a utility/usability/acceptability study conducted with representative end users. It is based on a tactile-visual feedback (via a watch or a smartphone for example): the tactile modality is used to discreetly alarm the person while the visual modality conveys an informative message. In order to evaluate the usability of the TexiCare device, a paraplegic volunteer equipped his wheelchair at home during a six months period. Interestingly, the first results revealed bad habits such as an inadequate posture when watching TV, rare relief maneuvers, and the occurrence of abnormal high pressures. PMID:23791763

  13. Perioperative Use of Bispectral Monitor (BIS) for a Pressure Ulcer patient with Lock-In Syndrome (LIS)

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Christine; Ayello, Elizabeth A.; Robins, Bryan; Salamanca, Victor R.; Bloom, Marc J.; Linton, Patrick; Brem, Harold; O'Neill, Daniel K.

    2013-01-01

    The bispectral (BIS) monitor uses brain electroencephalographic data to measure depth of sedation and pharmacological response during anesthetic procedures. In this case, the BIS monitor was used for another purpose, to demonstrate postoperatively to the nursing staff that a patient with history of locked-in syndrome (LIS), who underwent pressure ulcer debridement, had periods of wakefulness and apparent sensation, even with his eyes closed. Furthermore, as patients with LIS can feel pain, despite being unable to move, local block or general anesthesia should be provided for sharp surgical debridement and other painful procedures. This use of the BIS has shown that as a general rule, the staff should treat the patient as though he might be awake and sensate even if he does not open his eyes or move his limbs. Our goal was to continuously monitor pain level and communicate these findings to the entire wound team, ie anesthesiologists, surgeons, and nurses. PMID:25252146

  14. Perioperative use of bispectral (BIS) monitor for a pressure ulcer patient with locked-in syndrome (LIS).

    PubMed

    Yoo, Christine; Ayello, Elizabeth A; Robins, Bryan; Salamanca, Victor R; Bloom, Marc J; Linton, Patrick; Brem, Harold; O'Neill, Daniel K

    2014-10-01

    The bispectral (BIS) monitor uses brain electroencephalographic data to measure the depth of sedation and pharmacological response during anaesthetic procedures. In this case, the BIS monitor was used for another purpose, to demonstrate postoperatively to the nursing staff that a patient with history of locked-in syndrome (LIS), who underwent pressure ulcer debridement, had periods of wakefulness and apparent sensation, even with his eyes closed. Furthermore, as patients with LIS can feel pain, despite being unable to move, local block or general anaesthesia should be provided for sharp surgical debridement and other painful procedures. This use of the BIS has shown that as a general rule, the staff should treat the patient as though he might be awake and sensate even if he does not open his eyes or move his limbs. The goal of this study was to continuously monitor pain level and communicate these findings to the entire wound team, i.e. anaesthesiologists, surgeons and nurses.

  15. Preliminary design of a simple passive toe exercise apparatus with a flexible metal hydride actuator for pressure ulcer prevention.

    PubMed

    Ino, Shuichi; Sato, Mitsuru; Hosono, Minako; Nakajima, Sawako; Yamashita, Kazuhiko; Izumi, Takashi

    2010-01-01

    In an aging society, social demands for home-based rehabilitation and assistive technologies by healthcare and welfare services are globally increasing. The progress of quality-of-life technologies and rehabilitation science is a very important and urgent issue for elderly and disabled individuals as well as for their caregivers. Thus, there is a substantial need to develop simple bedside apparatuses for both continuous exercise of joints and for power assistance for standing to prevent and manage disuse syndromes (e.g., pressure ulcers, joint contractures and muscular atrophy). Unfortunately, there are currently no commercially-available actuators compatible with the human requirements of flexibility, quietness, lightness and a high power-to-weight ratio. To fulfill the above demands, we have developed a novel actuation device using a metal hydride (MH) alloy and a laminate film, called the flexible MH actuator, as a human-friendly force generator for healthcare and welfare services. In this paper, we show the basic structure and characteristics of the flexible MH actuator used to create a passive exercise system for preventing disuse syndromes. To evaluate the efficiency of passive exercise for bedsore prevention, subcutaneous blood flow during passive exercise at common pressure-ulcer sites is measured by a laser blood flow meter. The force and range-of-motion angle required for a passive exercise apparatus is also examined with the help of a professional physical therapist. Based on these findings, a prototype of a passive exercise apparatus is fabricated using the flexible MH actuator technology, and its operation characteristics are preliminarily verified using a thermoelectric control system.

  16. Internal medicine interns' and residents' pressure ulcer prevention and assessment attitudes and abilities: results of an exploratory study .

    PubMed

    Suen, Winnie; Parker, Victoria A; Harney, Lauren; Nevin, Siobhan; Jansen, Jane; Alexander, Linda; Berlowitz, Dan

    2012-04-01

     To evaluate and determine differences between attitudes of internal medicine interns and residents toward pressure ulcer (PU) prevention and to evaluate the interns' abilities to accurately identify wounds and stage PUs, an exploratory, quantitative study was conducted in a 639-bed, safety net academic center. Participants (21 internal medicine interns and 21 internal medicine residents) attending an educational session on PU prevention and care were eligible to participate. The 1-hour conference session was prepared and provided by a physician and wound care nurses. Before the lecture, participants were asked to complete an 11-question paper-and-pencil PU attitude survey. Following the lecture, they were asked to identify 11 wounds and stage PUs using the inpatient admission history and physical template used in the hospital's electronic medical record. An audience response system was used to record correct and incorrect responses. Nineteen (19) interns and 20 residents completed the survey. Twenty-one (21) interns successfully completed the wound assessment quiz. Descriptive statistics were used to examine the survey data and residents' and interns' average attitude scores were compared using independent group t-test. The results suggest that interns and residents have a positive attitude toward and are concerned about PU prevention. The significantly higher overall score among interns compared to residents (average 43.8 versus 38.8 respectively, P = 0.002) suggests interns have a more positive attitude than residents. Statistically significant differences between item scores showed that, compared to residents, interns perceived PU prevention to be more time-consuming (P = 0.01), less of a concern in practice (P = 0.02), and a lower priority than other areas of care (P = 0.003). Compared to residents, interns also were more likely to agree to with statement, "In my opinion, patients tend to not get as many pressure

  17. Effectiveness of olive oil for the prevention of pressure ulcers caused in immobilized patients within the scope of primary health care: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Pressure ulcers are considered an important issue, mainly affecting immobilized older patients. These pressure ulcers increase the care burden for the professional health service staff as well as pharmaceutical expenditure. There are a number of studies on the effectiveness of different products used for the prevention of pressure ulcers; however, most of these studies were carried out at a hospital level, basically using hyperoxygenated fatty acids (HOFA). There are no studies focused specifically on the use of olive-oil-based products and therefore this research is intended to find the most cost-effective treatment and achieve an alternative treatment. Methods/design The main objective is to assess the effectiveness of olive oil, comparing it with HOFA, to treat immobilized patients at home who are at risk of pressure ulcers. As a secondary objective, the cost-effectiveness balance of this new application with regard to the HOFA will be assessed. The study is designed as a noninferiority, triple-blinded, parallel, multi-center, randomized clinical trial. The scope of the study is the population attending primary health centers in Andalucía (Spain) in the regional areas of Malaga, Granada, Seville, and Cadiz. Immobilized patients at risk of pressure ulcers will be targeted. The target group will be treated by application of an olive-oil-based formula whereas the control group will be treated by application of HOFA to the control group. The follow-up period will be 16 weeks. The main variable will be the presence of pressure ulcers in the patient. Secondary variables include sociodemographic and clinical information, caregiver information, and whether technical support exists. Statistical analysis will include the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test, symmetry and kurtosis analysis, bivariate analysis using the Student’s t and chi-squared tests as well as the Wilcoxon and the Man-Whitney U tests, ANOVA and multivariate logistic regression analysis. Discussion The

  18. Venous Ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Caprini, J.A.; Partsch, H.; Simman, R.

    2013-01-01

    Venous leg ulcers are the most frequent form of wounds seen in patients. This article presents an overview on some practical aspects concerning diagnosis, differential diagnosis and treatment. Duplex ultrasound investigations are essential to ascertain the diagnosis of the underlying venous pathology and to treat venous refluxes. Differential diagnosis includes mainly other vascular lesions (arterial, microcirculatory causes), hematologic and metabolic diseases, trauma, infection, malignancies. Patients with superficial venous incompetence may benefit from endovenous or surgical reflux abolition diagnosed by Duplex ultrasound. The most important basic component of the management is compression therapy, for which we prefer materials with low elasticity applied with high initial pressure (short-stretch bandages and Velcro-strap devices). Local treatment should be simple, absorbing and not sticky dressings keeping adequate moisture balance after debridement of necrotic tissue and biofilms are preferred. After the ulcer is healed compression therapy should be continued in order to prevent recurrence. PMID:26236636

  19. Venous Ulcers.

    PubMed

    Caprini, J A; Partsch, H; Simman, R

    2012-09-01

    Venous leg ulcers are the most frequent form of wounds seen in patients. This article presents an overview on some practical aspects concerning diagnosis, differential diagnosis and treatment. Duplex ultrasound investigations are essential to ascertain the diagnosis of the underlying venous pathology and to treat venous refluxes. Differential diagnosis includes mainly other vascular lesions (arterial, microcirculatory causes), hematologic and metabolic diseases, trauma, infection, malignancies. Patients with superficial venous incompetence may benefit from endovenous or surgical reflux abolition diagnosed by Duplex ultrasound. The most important basic component of the management is compression therapy, for which we prefer materials with low elasticity applied with high initial pressure (short-stretch bandages and Velcro-strap devices). Local treatment should be simple, absorbing and not sticky dressings keeping adequate moisture balance after debridement of necrotic tissue and biofilms are preferred. After the ulcer is healed compression therapy should be continued in order to prevent recurrence.

  20. [Seasonal variation and influence of atmospheric pressure diurnal fluctuations on occurrence of acute complications in patients with stomach and duodenal ulcer].

    PubMed

    Budzyński, P; Pogoda, W; Pogodziński, M

    2000-01-01

    Although there is rich literature concerning seasonal fluctuations of incidence of peptic ulcer, no one can find so many data on acute complications of this disease--bleedings and perforations. There is also only little information saying about the role of meteorological factors that can take part in occurrence of the mentioned complications. This study aimed to analyze the seasonal variation (in calendar months, quarters of the year and calendar seasons--winter, spring, summer, autumn) of peptic ulcer bleeding and perforations as well as the influence of atmospheric pressure diurnal fluctuations on the occurrence of these diseases. The conducted study was retrospective and based on data of patients admitted to III Department of General Surgery of the Jagiellonian University Medical School in Cracow. Altogether, from 1993 to 1997--26 patients with peptic gastroduodenal ulcer bleeding were admitted. 220 bleedings were endoscopically proven (6 patients did not agree for gastroscopy and were excluded from further analysis). 157 patients were treated because of peptic ulcer perforation at the same time and all of them underwent surgical procedure during which perforation was proven. The chi 2 test was used in order to verify our statistic hypothesis (p = 0.05). The examination did not show any significant seasonal variation of the studied complications. Neither hemorrhage nor perforation presented any seasonal prevalence. As for calendar months, quarters and calendar seasons (p > 0.01; p > 0.02; p > 0.02 respectively). However, the study confirmed the role of atmospheric pressure falls in the occurrence of both: bleeding and perforation of peptic ulcer (p < 0.001). 153 patients with bleeding were admitted on days with decreasing pressure, while 67 when pressure was going up. Similarly as for perforations--94 with falling down to 33 with growing up pressure. PMID:11293205

  1. [Oral ulcers].

    PubMed

    Bascones-Martínez, Antonio; Figuero-Ruiz, Elena; Esparza-Gómez, Germán Carlos

    2005-10-29

    Ulcers commonly occur in the oral cavity, their main symptom being pain. There are different ways to classify oral ulcers. The most widely accepted form divides them into acute ulcers--sudden onset and short lasting--and chronic ulcers--insidious onset and long lasting. Commonest acute oral ulcers include traumatic ulcer, recurrent aphthous stomatitis, viral and bacterial infections and necrotizing sialometaplasia. On the other hand, oral lichen planus, oral cancer, benign mucous membrane pemphigoid, pemphigus and drug-induced ulcers belong to the group of chronic oral ulcers. It is very important to make a proper differential diagnosis in order to establish the appropriate treatment for each pathology. PMID:16277953

  2. [Oral ulcers].

    PubMed

    Bascones-Martínez, Antonio; Figuero-Ruiz, Elena; Esparza-Gómez, Germán Carlos

    2005-10-29

    Ulcers commonly occur in the oral cavity, their main symptom being pain. There are different ways to classify oral ulcers. The most widely accepted form divides them into acute ulcers--sudden onset and short lasting--and chronic ulcers--insidious onset and long lasting. Commonest acute oral ulcers include traumatic ulcer, recurrent aphthous stomatitis, viral and bacterial infections and necrotizing sialometaplasia. On the other hand, oral lichen planus, oral cancer, benign mucous membrane pemphigoid, pemphigus and drug-induced ulcers belong to the group of chronic oral ulcers. It is very important to make a proper differential diagnosis in order to establish the appropriate treatment for each pathology.

  3. Preventing Decubitus Ulcers with Cotton Sheeting Systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Decubitus pressure ulcers are a worldwide health crisis and their prevention and treatment has become a national priority. The National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Board estimates that as many as three million people in the United States have pressure ulcers. The causes of the ailment include both extr...

  4. Exploring the Effect of Educating Certified Nursing Assistants on Pressure Ulcer Knowledge and Incidence in a Nursing Home Setting.

    PubMed

    Wogamon, Cathy L

    2016-09-01

    The certified nursing assistant (CNA) is the caregiver who frequently identifies the first signs and symptoms of pressure ulcers (PUs) in the long-term care setting. A quality improvement effort was implemented to explore the effect of a 1-hour CNA education program about early identification, treatment, and prevention of PUs on PU knowledge, PU incidence, and PU prevention interventions, including skin checks. All 33 CNAs employed in a care facility for residents 55+ years old were invited to participate. CNA demographic and PU education variables were obtained. PU knowledge was assessed using the Pressure Ulcer Toolkit questionnaire before, immediately after, and 3 months following the educational intervention about PU prevention. PU incidence data were abstracted from monthly quality assurance reports for the 3 months pre-intervention and 3 months post intervention. Patient medical records were mined for data on turning/repositioning, skin checks, and informing care staff of suspicious areas of skin for the 3 months pre- and post educational intervention. Data for percent of short-stay residents (< 90 days) with PUs were collected via the quarterly Medicare Nursing Home Compare Quality Measures report for this facility before and 3 months after the educational intervention. Pre-intervention and post-intervention PU incidence was statistically analyzed using the t-test. The CNA demographic survey was administered using an anonymous pencil-and-paper format and hand-tabulated by the primary investigator. Of the 31 CNAs surveyed (mean age 32 years [range 18-65], mean years of experience 7.7 years [SD = 8.1, range 0.5-40], 26 (84%) reported they received training regarding PU prevention in the classroom during their initial CNA training, and 81% received on-the-job training at some point in their careers regarding PU prevention. The Quality Indicator report showed a reduction from 5 PUs to 0 (12.3%) in the 3 months pre-intervention to 0% in the 3 months post

  5. A Quasi-experimental Study to Assess an Interactive Educational Intervention on Nurses' Knowledge of Pressure Ulcer Prevention in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Ekama Ilesanmi, Rose; Morohunfoluwa Oluwatosin, Odunayo

    2016-04-01

    Educational intervention programs are an important element to improve nurses' knowledge of pressure ulcer (PU) prevention. Various teaching methods have been used with diverse results but none have been analyzed in Nigeria. A quasi- experimental study using a pretest/post test design was conducted among 193 registered nurses with >6 months experience who worked in purposefully selected wards (neuroscience, orthopedics, renal, and cardiac) in 3 teaching hospitals to examine the level of knowledge retention after interactive instruction. Participants were randomized to intervention (IG, n = 127 from 2 hospitals) and control (CG, n = 66 from 1 hospital) groups; the IG was provided a 5-day, face-to-face interactive lecture, and the CG engaged in a 1-day, 4-hour discussion of PU prevention practices. The Pressure Ulcer Knowledge Tool, a 47-item questionnaire in which a correct answer = 1 point and an incorrect/"I don't know" answer = 0 (maximum score 47), was used to assess and compare knowledge retention at 3 time points: baseline (T1), immediately after instruction (T2), and after 3 months (T3). Three trained research assistants assisted with registration of participants and distribution and collection of the questionnaires. All questionnaires were retrieved at T1 before the intervention be- gan. Respondents were encouraged to respond to all questions. Data were analyzed using t-test and ANOVA (P = 0.05). At T1, knowledge scores were comparable between the IG and CG (32.5 ± 4.2 and 30.8 ± 5.0 for IG and CG, respectively). At T2, knowledge scores increased significantly only in the IG to 40.7 ± 3.4 (d = 1.94, P less than 0.05). The mean difference between T1 and T2 was -8.2 ± 5.4, t = -17.0, P = 0.000. Similarly, mean scores increased significantly from T2 to T3 in the IG (mean= -2.0 ± 5.5, t = -4.1, P = 0.000); scores in the CG were -6.2 ± 7.2, t = -6.3 (P = 0.000). A face-to-face interactive lecture was shown to be an effective method of program delivery for

  6. Inter-rater reliability of three most commonly used pressure ulcer risk assessment scales in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li-Hua; Chen, Hong-Lin; Yan, Hong-Yan; Gao, Jian-Hua; Wang, Fang; Ming, Yue; Lu, Li; Ding, Jing-Jing

    2015-10-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate inter-rater reliability of Braden Scale, Norton Scale and Waterlow Scale for pressure ulcer risk assessment in clinical practice. The design of the study was cross-sectional. A total of 23 patients at pressure ulcer risk were included in the study, and 6 best registered nurses conducted three subsequent risk assessments for all included patients. They assessed alone and independently from each other. An intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) was used to determine the inter-rater reliability. For the Braden Scale, the ICC values ranged between 0·603 (95% CI: 0·435-0·770) for the item 'moisture' and a maximum of 0·964 (95% CI: 0·936-0·982) for the item 'activity'; for the Norton Scale, the ICC values ranged between 0·595 (95% CI: 0·426-0·764) for the item 'physical condition' and a maximum of 0·975 (95% CI: 0·955-0·988) for the item 'activity'; and for the Waterlow Scale, the ICC values ranged between 0·592 (95% CI: 0·422-0·762) for the item 'skin type' and a maximum of 0·990 (95% CI: 0·982-0·995) for the item 'activity'. The ICC values of total score for three scales of were 0·955 (95% CI: 0·922-0·978), 0·967 (95% CI: 0·943-0·984), and 0·915 (95% CI: 0·855-0·958) for Braden, Norton, and Waterlow scales, respectively. Although the inter-rater reliability of Braden Scale, Norton Scale and Waterlow Scale total scores were all substantial, the reliability of some items was not so good. The items of 'moisture', 'physical condition' and 'skin type' should be paid more attention. However, some studies are needed to find out high reliable quantitative items to replace these ambiguous items in new designed scales.

  7. Cost-utility analysis of an advanced pressure ulcer management protocol followed by trained wound, ostomy, and continence nurses.

    PubMed

    Kaitani, Toshiko; Nakagami, Gojiro; Iizaka, Shinji; Fukuda, Takashi; Oe, Makoto; Igarashi, Ataru; Mori, Taketoshi; Takemura, Yukie; Mizokami, Yuko; Sugama, Junko; Sanada, Hiromi

    2015-01-01

    The high prevalence of severe pressure ulcers (PUs) is an important issue that requires to be highlighted in Japan. In a previous study, we devised an advanced PU management protocol to enable early detection of and intervention for deep tissue injury and critical colonization. This protocol was effective for preventing more severe PUs. The present study aimed to compare the cost-effectiveness of the care provided using an advanced PU management protocol, from a medical provider's perspective, implemented by trained wound, ostomy, and continence nurses (WOCNs), with that of conventional care provided by a control group of WOCNs. A Markov model was constructed for a 1-year time horizon to determine the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of advanced PU management compared with conventional care. The number of quality-adjusted life-years gained, and the cost in Japanese yen (¥) ($US1 = ¥120; 2015) was used as the outcome. Model inputs for clinical probabilities and related costs were based on our previous clinical trial results. Univariate sensitivity analyses were performed. Furthermore, a Bayesian multivariate probability sensitivity analysis was performed using Monte Carlo simulations with advanced PU management. Two different models were created for initial cohort distribution. For both models, the expected effectiveness for the intervention group using advanced PU management techniques was high, with a low expected cost value. The sensitivity analyses suggested that the results were robust. Intervention by WOCNs using advanced PU management techniques was more effective and cost-effective than conventional care.

  8. Modeling Hospital-Acquired Pressure Ulcer Prevalence on Medical-Surgical Units: Nurse Workload, Expertise, and Clinical Processes of Care

    PubMed Central

    Aydin, Carolyn; Donaldson, Nancy; Stotts, Nancy A; Fridman, Moshe; Brown, Diane Storer

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study modeled the predictive power of unit/patient characteristics, nurse workload, nurse expertise, and hospital-acquired pressure ulcer (HAPU) preventive clinical processes of care on unit-level prevalence of HAPUs. Data Sources Seven hundred and eighty-nine medical-surgical units (215 hospitals) in 2009. Study Design Using unit-level data, HAPUs were modeled with Poisson regression with zero-inflation (due to low prevalence of HAPUs) with significant covariates as predictors. Data Collection/Extraction Methods Hospitals submitted data on NQF endorsed ongoing performance measures to CALNOC registry. Principal Findings Fewer HAPUs were predicted by a combination of unit/patient characteristics (shorter length of stay, fewer patients at-risk, fewer male patients), RN workload (more hours of care, greater patient [bed] turnover), RN expertise (more years of experience, fewer contract staff hours), and processes of care (more risk assessment completed). Conclusions Unit/patient characteristics were potent HAPU predictors yet generally are not modifiable. RN workload, nurse expertise, and processes of care (risk assessment/interventions) are significant predictors that can be addressed to reduce HAPU. Support strategies may be needed for units where experienced full-time nurses are not available for HAPU prevention. Further research is warranted to test these finding in the context of higher HAPU prevalence. PMID:25290866

  9. Peer-to-peer nursing rounds and hospital-acquired pressure ulcer prevalence in a surgical intensive care unit: a quality improvement project.

    PubMed

    Kelleher, Alyson Dare; Moorer, Amanda; Makic, MaryBeth Flynn

    2012-01-01

    We conducted a quality improvement project in order to evaluate the effect of nurse-to-nurse bedside "rounding" as a strategy to decrease hospital-acquired pressure ulcers (HAPU) in a surgical intensive care unit. We instituted weekly peer-to-peer bedside skin rounds in a 17-bed surgical intensive care unit. Two nurses were identified as skin champions and trained by the hospital's certified WOC nurse to conduct skin rounds. The skin champion nurses conducted weekly peer-to-peer rounds that included discussions about key elements of our patients' skin status including current Braden Scale for Pressure Sore Risk score, and implementation of specific interventions related to subscale risk assessment. If a pressure ulcer was present, the current action plan was reevaluated for effectiveness. Quarterly HAPU prevalence studies were conducted from January 2008 to December 2010. Nineteen patients experienced a HAPU: 17 were located on the coccyx and 2 on the heel. Ten ulcers were classified as stage II, 3 PU were stage IV, 5 were deemed unstageable, and 1 was classified as a deep tissue injury. The frequency of preventive interventions rose during our quality improvement project. Specifically, the use of prevention surfaces increased 92%, repositioning increased 30%, nutrition interventions increased 77%, and moisture management increased 100%. Prior to focused nursing rounds, the highest HAPU prevalence rate was 27%. After implementing focused nursing rounds, HAPU rates trended down and were 0% for 3 consecutive quarters.

  10. Insulin complexation with hydroxypropyl-beta-cyclodextrin: Spectroscopic evaluation of molecular inclusion and use of the complex in gel for healing of pressure ulcers.

    PubMed

    Valentini, Sóstenes Rosa; Nogueira, Ana Cláudia; Fenelon, Vanderson Carvalho; Sato, Francielle; Medina, Antonio N; Santana, Rosângela Getirana; Baesso, Mauro Luciano; Matioli, Graciette

    2015-07-25

    The pressure ulcer healing is a complex process and difficult to be achieved. Insulin is known to promote wound healing, and when complexed with cyclodextrin presents improved solubility, stability and biological activity. Complexation of insulin with hydroxypropyl-beta-cyclodextrin (HPβCD) was performed in this work through the coprecipitation method, providing the inclusion complex (HPβCD-I). The spectroscopic techniques used to analyze the complex were H(1) NMR, FT-Raman and FT-IR/ATR. A gel containing the HPβCD-I complex was prepared and a clinical study was conducted in patients with pressure ulcers. The spectroscopic techniques allowed to confirm the complex formation through the inclusion of aromatic amino acids, such as phenylalanine present in the HPβCD cavity. Data obtained from the FT-Raman and FT-IR/ATR techniques, combined with the H(1) NMR results, showed the effectiveness of these techniques in evaluating the inclusion complex of HPβCD with insulin. Clinical studies demonstrated tissue revitalization and a trend (p=0.06) for a significant difference between the healing effect of the control gel and that with HPβCD-I complex. The creation of the gel prepared with insulin and HPβCD-I complex and its use in patients with pressure ulcers appears to be promising in wound healing and its possible use in hospital care.

  11. A Meta-analysis to Evaluate the Predictive Validity of the Braden Scale for Pressure Ulcer Risk Assessment in Long-term Care.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hong-Lin; Shen, Wang-Qin; Liu, Peng

    2016-09-01

    Although it is among the most commonly used pressure ulcer risk assessment tools, the Braden Scale may lack strong predictive validity when used in the long-term care setting. A meta-analysis was conducted of English-language articles published in the PubMed database and Web of Science from the indices' inception through July 2015 to assess the predictive validity of the Braden Scale for pressure ulcers in long-term care residents. Search terms included pressure ulcer, pressure sore, bedsore, decubitus, long-term care, nursing home, skilled nursing facility, hospice, and Braden. Data extracted from the publications included sample and setting characteristics and predictive value indices. The pooled sensitivities, specificities, diagnostic odds ratios (DOR), and constructed summary receiver operating characteristic (SROC) curves were calculated. Eight studies (2 prospective cohorts and 6 cross-sectional studies) with 41 489 residents met selection criteria for inclusion in the analysis. The pooled sensitivity and specificity were 0.80 (95% CI: 0.79-0.81) and 0.42 (95% CI: 0.42-0.43), respectively, yielding a combined DOR of 5.66 (95% CI: 3.77-8.48). The area under the ROC curve (AUC) was 0.7686 ± 0.0478 (95% CI: 0.6749-0.8623), and the overall diagnostic accuracy (Q*) was 0.7090 ± 0.0402 (95% CI: 0.6302-0.7878). Significant heterogeneity was noted among the included studies; Q value was 302.54 (P = 0.000), and I2 for pooled sensitivity, pooled specificity, and pooled DOR was 97.4%, 98.7% and 96.4%, respectively. Meta-regression analysis showed no heterogeneity was noted among Braden scale cut-offs (P = 0.123) and pressure ulcer prevalence P = 0.547). The evidence showed the Braden Scale has moderate predictive validity and low predictive specificity for pressure ulcers in long-term care residents. The development and testing of new risk assessment scales for this population is warranted. PMID:27668477

  12. Negative pressure and nanocrystalline silver dressings for nonhealing ulcer: A randomized pilot study.

    PubMed

    Sáez-Martín, Luis C; García-Martínez, Lourdes; Román-Curto, Concepción; Sánchez-Hernández, Miguel V; Suárez-Fernández, Ricardo M

    2015-01-01

    Chronic wounds have a high prevalence and wound care, treatment, and prevention consume large quantities of resources. Chronic wounds are a growing challenge for clinicians. A prospective randomized pilot study was conducted to assess the effectiveness in terms of reduction in area and safety of the combined use of negative-pressure wound therapy and nanocrystalline silver dressings as compared to negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) alone in the management of outpatients with chronic wounds. A total of 17 patients were included in the study, 10 were treated with the combined method and 7 with NPWT. Patients were followed for 6 weeks, with a final assessment at 3 months. Clinical improvement, microbiologic data, and toxicity of silver were evaluated. The antibacterial effects of ionic silver together with the development of granulation tissue promoted by NPWT reduced significantly the median extension of the wound between weeks 3 and 6 of treatment. The combination with silver also reduced bacterial colonization with Pseudomonas aeruginosa and the bacterial load on the surface of the wound. The silver levels correlated positively with the extension of the wound, although in none of the patients' toxic levels were reached. The combination of NPWT with nanocrystalline silver dressings was safe and as effective as NPWT alone.

  13. [Aphthous ulcers and oral ulcerations].

    PubMed

    Vaillant, Loïc; Samimi, Mahtab

    2016-02-01

    Aphthous ulcers are painful ulcerations located on the mucous membrane, generally in the mouth, less often in the genital area. Three clinical forms of aphthous ulcers have been described: minor aphthous ulcers, herpetiform aphthous ulcers and major aphthous ulcers. Many other conditions presenting with oral bullous or vesiculous lesions orulcerations and erosions can be mistaken for aphthous ulcers. Currently, treatment of aphthous ulcers is palliative and symptomatic. Topical treatments (topical anesthetics, topical steroids and sucralfate) are the first line therapy. Recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) is defined by the recurrence of oral aphthous ulcers at least 4 times per year. RAS is often idiopathic but can be associated with gastro-intestinal diseases (i.e. celiac disease, inflammatory bowel diseases), nutritional deficiencies (iron, folates...), immune disorders (HIV infection, neutropenia) and rare syndromes. Behçet's disease is a chronic, inflammatory, disease whose main clinical feature is recurrent bipolar aphthosis. Colchicine associated with topical treatments constitutes a suitable treatment of most RAS. Thalidomide is the most effective treatment of RAS but its use is limited by frequent adverse effects. Oral ulcers can be related to a wide range of conditions that constitute the differential diagnoses of aphthous ulcers. Oral ulcers are classified into three main groups: acute ulcers with abrupt onset and short duration, recurrent ulcers (mainly due to postherpetic erythema multiforme) and chronic ulcers (with slow onset and insidious progression). Acute oral ulcers are due to trauma, bacterial infections (including acute necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis), deep fungal infection, gastro-intestinal (namely inflammatory bowel disease) or systemic diseases. Chronic oral ulcers may be drug-induced, or due to benign or malignant tumors. Every oral solitary chronic ulcer should be biopsied to rule out squamous cell carcinoma. A solitary palatal ulcer

  14. A randomized, controlled study to assess the effect of silk-like textiles and high-absorbency adult incontinence briefs on pressure ulcer prevention.

    PubMed

    Twersky, Jack; Montgomery, Terry; Sloane, Richard; Weiner, Madeline; Doyle, Susan; Mathur, Kavita; Francis, Mary; Schmader, Kenneth

    2012-12-01

    Pressure ulcer prevention is an important aspect of nursing home care. A 20-week, unblinded, randomized, controlled trial was conducted to compare the rate of nursing home-acquired pressure ulcers and adverse events between residents managed using: 1) a silk-like textile for bedding paired with high-absorbency adult incontinence briefs or 2) usual-care, plain-weave cotton/polyester bed sheets and adult incontinence briefs. All residents with an expected length of stay 30 days or more who agreed to participate were enrolled in the study and assessed daily. A total of 46 residents (all men) was enrolled; 26 (median age 72.7 years, range 54 to 95 years) in the intervention group and 20 (median age 69.5 years, range 51 to 91 years) in the usual care group. At baseline, there were no significant differences in resident demographic variables, including Braden Scale risk scores. Fewer pressure ulcers developed in the intervention (six; average follow up 75.6 days/person) than in the standard care group (20; average follow up 95.6 days/person) (hazard ratio = 0.31, 95% confidence interval 0.12, 0.78) and the number of new non-Stage I ulcers was significantly lower in the intervention group (HR = .23, 95% CI .078, .69, P = 0.0084). The number of adverse events did not differ significantly between the two groups. Additional research is warranted on use of products with the silk-like fabric, alone or in combination with highabsorbencybriefs, in larger groups and different populations. PMID:23221015

  15. The influence of ischemic factors on the migration rates of cell types involved in cutaneous and subcutaneous pressure ulcers.

    PubMed

    Topman, Gil; Lin, Feng-Huei; Gefen, Amit

    2012-09-01

    A pressure ulcer (PU) is a localized injury to the skin and/or to underlying tissues, typically over a weight-bearing bony prominence. PUs often develop in ischemic tissues. Other than being relevant to the etiology of PUs, ischemic factors such as glucose levels, acidity and temperature could potentially affect healing processes as well, particularly, the rate of damage repair. Using an in vitro cell culture model, the goal of the present study was to determine the influence of ischemic factors: low temperature (35 °C), low glucose (1 g/L) and acidic pH (6.7) on the migration rate of NIH3T3 fibroblasts, 3T3L1 preadipocytes and C2C12 myoblasts, which could all be affected by PUs. Cell migration into a local damage site, produced by crushing cells under a micro-indentor, was monitored over ~16 h under controlled temperature and pH conditions. We found that in the NIH3T3 cultures, acidosis significantly hindered the migration rate as well as delayed the times for onset and end of mass cell migration. The effects of temperature and glucose however were not significant. Additionally, under control conditions (temperature 37 °C, glucose 4.5 g/L, pH 7.6), migration rates and times differed significantly across the different cell types. The present findings motivate further studies related to the effects of pH levels on migration performances, particularly in PU where bacterial contamination-associated with an acidic environment-is involved.

  16. A systematic review of electrical stimulation for pressure ulcer prevention and treatment in people with spinal cord injuries

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Liang Qin; Moody, Julie; Traynor, Michael; Dyson, Sue; Gall, Angela

    2014-01-01

    Context Electrical stimulation (ES) can confer benefit to pressure ulcer (PU) prevention and treatment in spinal cord injuries (SCIs). However, clinical guidelines regarding the use of ES for PU management in SCI remain limited. Objectives To critically appraise and synthesize the research evidence on ES for PU prevention and treatment in SCI. Method Review was limited to peer-reviewed studies published in English from 1970 to July 2013. Studies included randomized controlled trials (RCTs), non-RCTs, prospective cohort studies, case series, case control, and case report studies. Target population included adults with SCI. Interventions of any type of ES were accepted. Any outcome measuring effectiveness of PU prevention and treatment was included. Methodological quality was evaluated using established instruments. Results Twenty-seven studies were included, 9 of 27 studies were RCTs. Six RCTs were therapeutic trials. ES enhanced PU healing in all 11 therapeutic studies. Two types of ES modalities were identified in therapeutic studies (surface electrodes, anal probe), four types of modalities in preventive studies (surface electrodes, ES shorts, sacral anterior nerve root implant, neuromuscular ES implant). Conclusion The methodological quality of the studies was poor, in particular for prevention studies. A significant effect of ES on enhancement of PU healing is shown in limited Grade I evidence. The great variability in ES parameters, stimulating locations, and outcome measure leads to an inability to advocate any one standard approach for PU therapy or prevention. Future research is suggested to improve the design of ES devices, standardize ES parameters, and conduct more rigorous trials. PMID:24969965

  17. Ulcerative Colitis

    MedlinePlus

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a disease that causes inflammation and sores, called ulcers, in the lining of the rectum and colon. ... a group of diseases called inflammatory bowel disease. UC can happen at any age, but it usually ...

  18. Peptic Ulcer

    MedlinePlus

    A peptic ulcer is a sore in the lining of your stomach or your duodenum, the first part of your ... Comes and goes for several days or weeks Peptic ulcers happen when the acids that help you digest ...

  19. A prospective, observational study of high-specification foam immersion surfaces used in populations at high risk for pressure ulcers.

    PubMed

    Girolami, Susan; Moore, Angelene; Haper, Casey; Betts, Connie; Woodward, Tracey

    2014-08-01

    There are insufficient clinical outcomes data to select pressure redistribution support surfaces for vulnerable populations at risk for skin breakdown. A prospective, descriptive case series study with historical controls was conducted to examine clinical outcomes and user feedback when non powered, ergonomically designed, high-specification foam (HSF) devices were added to either a medical grade portable recliner or standard hospital bed used in the care of persons at high risk for pressure ulcers (PU). The study was conducted in a hospice agency and a VA rehabilitation and long-term care unit. Eligible participants were mobility and/or activity impaired; had at least one comorbidity; received standardized skin hygiene, incontinence, and repositioning protocols; and/or had previously documented negative outcomes (eg, pain or discomfort associated with sitting or lying surfaces, falls from equipment, nonhealing PU, and posturing problems such as leaning, sliding, or slumping) on currently used support surfaces. Patients/caregivers ranked pretrial and trial surface performance for overall comfort, control of downward migration, overall immersion, support while sitting without bottoming-out or hammocking, and heel off loading as evidenced by suspension or total immersion of the foot and ankle. Follow-up variables, including changes in pain, discomfort, PU status (if present), and skin integrity, were obtained every 7 to 21 days. Forty-four (44) persons (24 men, 20 women; average age 79, range 47-98 years) participated in the mattress study for an average of 53 (range 3-120) days); and 33 (eight men, 25 women; average age 82, range 63 to 97 years) participated in the recliner support system evaluation, for an average of 39 days (range 13-66 days). Compared to prestudy surfaces, perceived comfort, migration, immersion, and heel off loading ratings were significantly higher for the mattress and recliner surface (P <0.05). No falls occurred, and 17 of 35 preexisting PU

  20. Prospective, nonrandomized controlled trials to compare the effect of a silk-like fabric to standard hospital linens on the rate of hospital-acquired pressure ulcers.

    PubMed

    Coladonato, Joseph; Smith, Annette; Watson, Nancy; Brown, Anne T; McNichol, Laurie L; Clegg, Amy; Griffin, Tracy; McPhail, Lora; Montgomery, Terry G

    2012-10-01

    Hospital bedding and gowns influence skin moisture, temperature, friction, and shear, which in turn may affect the development of pressure ulcers. To evaluate the effect of a new silk-like synthetic fabric on the incidence of pressure ulcers in an acute care setting, two consecutive 6-month clinical trials were conducted among 307 consecutively admitted patients in a Medical Renal Unit (August 2008 and March 2010) and in 275 patients admitted to a Surgical Intensive Care Unit (ICU) (September 2009 to March 2010). During the first 8 weeks, all patients used standard hospital bed linens, reusable underpads, and gowns. During the second 8 weeks, all admitted patients used the intervention linens (a silk-like fabric) followed by another 8 weeks of control (standard linen) use. Demographic variables and the prevalence of pressure ulcers on admission were statistically similar for control and intervention groups in both study populations with the exception of gender in the Renal Unit study (13% higher proportion of men in intervention group). Average Braden Scores were also similar and low (<18) in all study patients. Upon admission to the Medical Renal Unit, 21 of 154 patients (13.6%) in the control and 26 of 153 patients (17.0%) in the intervention group had a pressure ulcer. The incidence of new ulcers was 12.3% in the control and 4.6% in the intervention group (P = 0.01); average length of stay was 5.97 days (σ = 4.0) for control and 5.31 days (σ = 3.8) for intervention patients (P = 0.07). In the Surgical ICU group, 18 of 199 patients in the control (9.1%) and four of 76 patients in the intervention group (5.3%) were admitted with a pressure ulcer; the incidence of new pressure ulcers was 7.5 % in the control and 0% in the intervention group (P = 0.01). Average length of stay was 4.5 days and 4.33 days in the control and intervention groups, respectively (P = 0.33). The significant differences between the control and intervention group in the rate of pressure

  1. Bedsores (Pressure Ulcers)

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2006-2013 Logical Images, Inc. All rights reserved. Advertising Notice This Site and third parties who place ... would like to obtain more information about these advertising practices and to make choices about online behavioral ...

  2. Utility of Braden Scale Nutrition Subscale Ratings as an Indicator of Dietary Intake and Weight Outcomes among Nursing Home Residents at Risk for Pressure Ulcers.

    PubMed

    Kennerly, Susan; Boss, Lisa; Yap, Tracey L; Batchelor-Murphy, Melissa; Horn, Susan D; Barrett, Ryan; Bergstrom, Nancy

    2015-09-24

    The Braden Scale for Pressure Sore Risk(©) is a screening tool to determine overall risk of pressure ulcer development and estimate severity of specific risk factors for individual residents. Nurses often use the Braden nutrition subscale to screen nursing home (NH) residents for nutritional risk, and then recommend a more comprehensive nutritional assessment as indicated. Secondary data analysis from the Turn for Ulcer ReductioN (TURN) study's investigation of U.S. and Canadian NH residents (n = 690) considered at moderate or high pressure ulcer (PrU) risk was used to evaluate the subscale's utility for identifying nutritional intake risk factors. Associations were examined between Braden Nutritional Risk subscale screening, dietary intake (mean % meal intake and by meal timing, mean number of protein servings, protein sources, % intake of supplements and snacks), weight outcomes, and new PrU incidence. Of moderate and high PrU risk residents, 61.9% and 59.2% ate a mean meal % of <75. Fewer than 18% overall ate <50% of meals or refused meals. No significant differences were observed in weight differences by nutrition subscale risk or in mean number protein servings per meal (1.4 (SD = 0.58) versus 1.3 (SD = 0.53)) for moderate versus high PrU risk residents. The nutrition subscale approximates subsequent estimated dietary intake and can provide insight into meal intake patterns for those at either moderate or high PrU risk. Findings support the Braden Scale's use as a preliminary screening method to identify focused areas for potential intervention.

  3. Utility of Braden Scale Nutrition Subscale Ratings as an Indicator of Dietary Intake and Weight Outcomes among Nursing Home Residents at Risk for Pressure Ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Kennerly, Susan; Boss, Lisa; Yap, Tracey L.; Batchelor-Murphy, Melissa; Horn, Susan D.; Barrett, Ryan; Bergstrom, Nancy

    2015-01-01

    The Braden Scale for Pressure Sore Risk© is a screening tool to determine overall risk of pressure ulcer development and estimate severity of specific risk factors for individual residents. Nurses often use the Braden nutrition subscale to screen nursing home (NH) residents for nutritional risk, and then recommend a more comprehensive nutritional assessment as indicated. Secondary data analysis from the Turn for Ulcer ReductioN (TURN) study’s investigation of U.S. and Canadian NH residents (n = 690) considered at moderate or high pressure ulcer (PrU) risk was used to evaluate the subscale’s utility for identifying nutritional intake risk factors. Associations were examined between Braden Nutritional Risk subscale screening, dietary intake (mean % meal intake and by meal timing, mean number of protein servings, protein sources, % intake of supplements and snacks), weight outcomes, and new PrU incidence. Of moderate and high PrU risk residents, 61.9% and 59.2% ate a mean meal % of <75. Fewer than 18% overall ate <50% of meals or refused meals. No significant differences were observed in weight differences by nutrition subscale risk or in mean number protein servings per meal (1.4 (SD = 0.58) versus 1.3 (SD = 0.53)) for moderate versus high PrU risk residents. The nutrition subscale approximates subsequent estimated dietary intake and can provide insight into meal intake patterns for those at either moderate or high PrU risk. Findings support the Braden Scale’s use as a preliminary screening method to identify focused areas for potential intervention. PMID:27417802

  4. Sitting can cause ischaemia in the subcutaneous tissue of the buttocks, which implicates multilayer tissue damage in the development of pressure ulcers.

    PubMed

    Thorfinn, Johan; Sjoberg, Folke; Lidman, Disa

    2009-01-01

    A better understanding of how pressure ulcers develop in the buttocks will improve prophylactic measures. Our aim was to investigate signs of reduced perfusion and ischaemia in the subcutaneous fat in the buttocks during sitting. A microelectrode was used to quantify oxygen (pO(2)). Metabolites that indicate aerobic or anaerobic metabolism (glucose, lactate, pyruvate, and glycerol) were quantified using microdialysis. Sixteen healthy people were studied while they sat on a wheel chair cushion, and a hard surface. Sitting pressures were mapped, and the thickness of the subcutaneous fatty layer was measured. The results showed that pO(2) and glucose were significantly reduced during sitting, and for pO(2) the effect is significantly more profound during sitting on a hard surface. After loading, both glucose and pO(2) increased significantly. We conclude that the subcutaneous adipose tissue covering the ischial tuberosities becomes ischaemic during sitting. This finding supports the theory that not only is the skin involved in early development of pressure ulcers, but also the deeper tissues.

  5. The effectiveness of hydrocolloid dressings versus other dressings in the healing of pressure ulcers in adults and older adults: a systematic review and meta-analysis1

    PubMed Central

    Pott, Franciele Soares; Meier, Marineli Joaquim; Stocco, Janislei Giseli Dorociak; Crozeta, Karla; Ribas, Janyne Dayane

    2014-01-01

    Objective to evaluate the effectiveness of hydrocolloids in the healing of pressure ulcers in adult and older adult patients. Method systematic review with meta-analysis, based on the recommendations of the Cochrane Handbook. The search was undertaken in the databases: Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System Online, Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences Literature (LILACS), Cochrane Database, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, Web of Science and the Scientific Electronic Library Online. Results 646 primary studies were identified, 69 were evaluated and nine were selected, referring to the use of the hydrocolloid dressing in healing; of these, four studies allowed meta-analysis. There was no statistically significant difference between the hydrocolloid group and the foams group (p value=0.84; Odds Ratio 1.06, CI 95% 0.61-1.86). A slight superiority of the polyurethane dressings was observed in relation to the hydrocolloid dressings. Conclusion the evidence is not sufficient to affirm whether the efficacy of hydrocolloid dressings is superior to that of other dressings. It is suggested that clinical randomized trials be undertaken so as to ascertain the efficacy of this intervention in the healing of pressure ulcers, in relation to other treatments. PMID:25029065

  6. Cushing's ulcer: Further reflections

    PubMed Central

    Kemp, William J.; Bashir, Asif; Dababneh, Haitham; Cohen-Gadol, Aaron A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Brain tumors, traumatic head injury, and other intracranial processes including infections, can cause increased intracranial pressure and lead to overstimulation of the vagus nerve. As a result, increased secretion of gastric acid may occur which leads to gastro-duodenal ulcer formation known as Cushing's ulcer. Methods: A review of original records of Dr. Harvey Cushing's patients suffering from gastro-duodenal ulcers was performed followed by a discussion of the available literature. We also reviewed the clinical records of the patients never reported by Cushing to gain his perspective in describing this phenomenon. Dr. Cushing was intrigued to investigate gastro-duodenal ulcers as he lost patients to acute gastrointestinal perforations following successful brain tumor operations. It is indeed ironic that Harvey Cushing developed a gastro-duodenal ulcer in his later years with failing health. Results: Clinically shown by Cushing's Yale Registry, a tumor or lesion can disrupt this circuitry, leading to gastroduodenal ulceration. Cushing said that it was “reasonable to believe that the perforations following posterior fossa cerebellar operations were produced in like fashion by an irritative disturbance either of fiber tracts or vagal centers in the brain stem.” Conclusion: Harvey Cushing's pioneering work depicted in his Yale registry serves as a milestone for continuing research that can further discern this pathway. PMID:25972936

  7. Combined use of fenestrated-type artificial dermis and topical negative pressure wound therapy for the venous leg ulcer of a rheumatoid arthritis patient.

    PubMed

    Morimoto, Naoki; Kuro, Atsuyuki; Yamauchi, Takashi; Horiuchi, Ai; Kakudo, Natsuko; Sakamoto, Michiharu; Suzuki, Kenji; Kusumoto, Kenji

    2016-02-01

    We report a case of circumferential venous leg ulcer in a rheumatoid arthritis patient. Mesh skin grafting was performed in another hospital, but the graft failed and the patient was referred to our hospital. This ulcer was treated by the combination therapy of a fenestrated-type artificial dermis with negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) and secondary mesh grafting using our 'grip tape technique'. NPWT was started at -100 mmHg and continued until the formation of dermis-like tissue. A section stained using haematoxylin and eosin and an anti-αSMA (α smooth muscle actin) immunohistological section of the biopsy from dermis-like tissue showed an abundant infiltration of fibroblasts and capillary formation beneath the fenestration of the silicone sheet. Threefold mesh skin grafting was subsequently performed and it was taken up completely. The fenestrated-type artificial dermis in combination with NPWT produced good results without infection in the treatment of complex wounds. In addition, our 'grip tape technique' was useful to apply polyurethane foam to the entire surface of the lower leg. PMID:25650053

  8. Ulcerative colitis - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Inflammatory bowel disease - ulcerative colitis - discharge; Ulcerative proctitis - discharge; Colitis - discharge ... were in the hospital because you have ulcerative colitis. This is a swelling of the inner lining ...

  9. Is single room hospital accommodation associated with differences in healthcare-associated infection, falls, pressure ulcers or medication errors? A natural experiment with non-equivalent controls

    PubMed Central

    Maben, Jill; Murrells, Trevor; Griffiths, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Objectives A wide range of patient benefits have been attributed to single room hospital accommodation including a reduction in adverse patient safety events. However, studies have been limited to the US with limited evidence from elsewhere. The aim of this study was to assess the impact on safety outcomes of the move to a newly built all single room acute hospital. Methods A natural experiment investigating the move to 100% single room accommodation in acute assessment, surgical and older people’s wards. Move to 100% single room accommodation compared to ‘steady state’ and ‘new build’ control hospitals. Falls, pressure ulcer, medication error, meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Clostridium difficile rates from routine data sources were measured over 36 months. Results Five of 15 time series in the wards that moved to single room accommodation revealed changes that coincided with the move to the new all single room hospital: specifically, increased fall, pressure ulcer and Clostridium difficile rates in the older people’s ward, and temporary increases in falls and medication errors in the acute assessment unit. However, because the case mix of the older people’s ward changed, and because the increase in falls and medication errors on the acute assessment ward did not last longer than six months, no clear effect of single rooms on the safety outcomes was demonstrated. There were no changes to safety events coinciding with the move at the new build control site. Conclusion For all changes in patient safety events that coincided with the move to single rooms, we found plausible alternative explanations such as case-mix change or disruption as a result of the re-organization of services after the move. The results provide no evidence of either benefit or harm from all single room accommodation in terms of safety-related outcomes, although there may be short-term risks associated with a move to single rooms. PMID:26811373

  10. Skin debris and micro-organisms on the periwound skin of pressure ulcers and the influence of periwound cleansing on microbial flora.

    PubMed

    Konya, Chizuko; Sanada, Hiromi; Sugama, Junko; Kitayama, Yukie; Ishikawa, Shinji; Togashi, Hiroyasu; Tamura, Shigeru

    2005-01-01

    Many clinicians use the same solution, most often normal saline, to cleanse the periwound skin and the wound bed itself. However, skin debris such as water-insoluble proteins and lipids are not efficiently removed by normal saline solutions. To analyze the skin debris and micro-organisms found on the periwound skin of pressure ulcers and to evaluate the effect of periwound cleansing on the microbial flora, a descriptive study was conducted among 17 long-term care residents with Stage III and IV pressure ulcers. Skin debris from both the periwound area and normal skin was collected from all 17 residents. In addition, micro-organisms from the wound bed, periwound, and normal skin of five residents were collected before, immediately after, and 6 hours and 24 hours after periwound cleansing using a skin cleanser. All microbial species were identified by cultivation. Cholesterol and nitrogen-containing substances were found in greater quantity on the periwound than on normal skin (P = 0.0027 and P = 0.0054, respectively) and the number of isolated micro-organisms from the periwound area was larger than that from normal skin. Protein showed the highest correlation to the microbial count present on the periwound (r = 0.71, P = 0.0014). The microbial counts of all isolated micro-organisms decreased immediately after cleansing but the number of isolates with high microbial counts increased over time. In the wound bed, the number of isolates with decreasing microbial counts was larger than the number of isolates with increasing microbial counts. Both numbers returned to pre-cleansing values after 24 hours, suggesting that periwound cleansing only (without directly cleansing the wound bed) is effective at reducing the microbial counts in the wound bed for up to 24 hours. Further research is needed to evaluate the effects of periwound cleansing on healing time.

  11. A novel, non-invasive diagnostic clinical procedure for the determination of an oxygenation status of chronic lower leg ulcers using peri-ulceral transcutaneous oxygen partial pressure measurements: results of its application in chronic venous insufficiency (CVI).

    PubMed

    Barnikol, Wolfgang K R; Pötzschke, Harald

    2012-01-01

    The basis for the new procedure is the simultaneous transcutaneous measurement of the peri-ulceral oxygen partial pressure (tcPO(2)), using a minimum of 4 electrodes which are placed as close to the wound margin as possible, additionally, as a challenge the patient inhales pure oxygen for approximately 15 minutes. In order to evaluate the measurement data and to characterise the wounds, two new oxygen parameters were defined: (1) the oxygen characteristic (K-PO(2)), and (2) the oxygen inhomogeneity (I-PO(2)) of a chronic wound. The first of these is the arithmetic mean of the two lowest tcPO(2) measurement values, and the second is the variation coefficient of the four measurement values. Using the K-PO(2) parameter, a grading of wound hypoxia can be obtained. To begin with, the physiologically regulated (and still compensated) hypoxia with K-PO(2) values of between 35 and 40 mmHg is distinguished from the pathological decompensated hypoxia with K-PO(2) values of between 0 and 35 mmHg; the first of these still stimulates self-healing (within the limits of the oxygen balance). The decompensated hypoxia can be (arbitrarily) divided into "simple" hypoxia (Grade I), intense hypoxia (Grade II) and extreme hypoxia (Grade III), with the possibility of intermediate grades (I/II and II/III).Measurements were carried out using the new procedure on the skin of the right inner ankle of 21 healthy volunteers of various ages, and in 17 CVI (chronic venous insufficiency) wounds. Sixteen of the 17 CVI wounds (i.e., 94%) were found to be pathologically hypoxic, a state which was not found in any of the healthy volunteers. The oxygen inhomogeneity (I-PO(2)) of the individual chronic wounds increased exponentially as a function of the hypoxia grading (K-PO(2)), with a 10-fold increase with extreme hypoxia in contrast to a constant value of approximately 14% in the healthy volunteers. This pronounced oxygen inhomogeneity explains inhomogeneous wound healing, resulting in the so

  12. [Orthopaedic footwear against foot ulcers in diabetes].

    PubMed

    Bus, Sicco A

    2014-01-01

    In people with diabetes mellitus, foot ulcers are a major problem because they increase the risk of a foot infection and amputation and reduce quality of life. After a foot ulcer has healed, the risk of recurrence is high. Orthopaedic shoes and orthotics are often prescribed to high risk patients and aim to reduce the mechanical pressure on the plantar surface of the foot. Orthopaedic footwear that is modified to reduce pressure is not much more effective in preventing foot ulcer recurrence than orthopaedic footwear that did not undergo such modification, unless the shoes are worn as recommended. In that case, the risk of ulcer recurrence is reduced by 46%. In patients with a history of ulceration, compliance in wearing orthopaedic shoes at home is low, while these patients walk more inside the house than outside the house. Foot pressure measurements should be part of the prescription and evaluation of orthopaedic footwear for patients at high risk for foot ulceration.

  13. Effects of Electrical Stimulation on Risk Factors for Developing Pressure Ulcers in People with a Spinal Cord Injury: A Focused Review of Literature.

    PubMed

    Smit, Christof A J; de Groot, Sonja; Stolwijk-Swuste, Janneke M; Janssen, Thomas W J

    2016-07-01

    Pressure ulcers (PUs) are a common and serious problem for wheelchair users, such as individuals with a spinal cord injury (SCI), resulting in great discomfort, loss of quality of life, and significant medical care costs. Therefore, it is of utmost importance to prevent PUs. In this literature overview, the effects of electrical stimulation (ES) on the risk factors for developing PUs in people with an SCI are examined and synthesized from January 1980 to January 2015. Thirty-four relevant studies of PU prevention in SCI were identified. Four were randomized clinical trials, 24 were case series, 6 had other designs. Three types of ES modalities were identified. The methodological quality varied from poor to fairly strong, with a large variety in used ES parameters. Twenty-three studies were identified describing short-term effects of ES on interface pressure, oxygenation, and/or blood flow, and 24 studies described the long-term effects of ES on muscle volume, muscle strength, and histology. Whereas there is a lack of controlled studies on the effects of ES on PU incidence, which disallows definite conclusions, there is moderate evidence to suggest that ES-induced muscle activation has a positive influence on several risk factors for developing PUs in people with an SCI. PMID:27149579

  14. Effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of telephone-based support versus usual care for treatment of pressure ulcers in people with spinal cord injury in low-income and middle-income countries: study protocol for a 12-week randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Mohit; Harvey, Lisa Anne; Hayes, Alison Joy; Chhabra, Harvinder Singh; Glinsky, Joanne Valentina; Cameron, Ian Douglas; Lavrencic, Lucija; Arumugam, Narkeesh; Hossain, Sohrab; Bedi, Parneet Kaur

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Pressure ulcers are a common and severe complication of spinal cord injury, particularly in low-income and middle-income countries where people often need to manage pressure ulcers alone and at home. Telephone-based support may help people in these situations to manage their pressure ulcers. The aim of this study is to determine the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of telephone-based support to help people with spinal cord injury manage pressure ulcers at home in India and Bangladesh. Methods and analysis A multicentre (3 sites), prospective, assessor-blinded, parallel, randomised controlled trial will be undertaken. 120 participants with pressure ulcers on the sacrum, ischial tuberosity or greater trochanter of the femur secondary to spinal cord injury will be randomly assigned to a Control or Intervention group. Participants in the Control group will receive usual community care. That is, they will manage their pressure ulcers on their own at home but will be free to access whatever healthcare support they can. Participants in the Intervention group will also manage their pressure ulcers at home and will also be free to access whatever healthcare support they can, but in addition they will receive weekly telephone-based support and advice for 12 weeks (15–25 min/week). The primary outcome is the size of the pressure ulcer at 12 weeks. 13 secondary outcomes will be measured reflecting other aspects of pressure ulcer resolution, depression, quality of life, participation and satisfaction with healthcare provision. An economic evaluation will be run in parallel and will include a cost-effectiveness and a cost-utility analysis. Ethics and dissemination Ethical approval was obtained from the Institutional Ethics Committee at each site. The results of this study will be disseminated through publications and presented at national and international conferences. Trial registration number ACTRN12613001225707. PMID:26220871

  15. A prospective, randomized clinical trial to assess the cost-effectiveness of a modern foam dressing versus a traditional saline gauze dressing in the treatment of stage II pressure ulcers.

    PubMed

    Payne, Wyatt G; Posnett, John; Alvarez, Oscar; Brown-Etris, Marie; Jameson, Gayle; Wolcott, Randall; Dharma, Hussein; Hartwell, Samantha; Ochs, Diane

    2009-02-01

    Modern dressings such as hydrocolloids, gels, and foams are typically more expensive than traditional dressings such as gauze. However, if modern dressings require fewer changes, the overall cost of treatment may be lower despite the higher initial purchase price. If healing rates are comparable or better, modern dressings also may be cost-effective. A 4-week, prospective, randomized clinical trial to assess differences in treatment costs and cost-effectiveness between a modern foam dressing and saline-soaked gauze was conducted among 36 patients (22 men, 14 women, mean age 72.8 years) with a Stage II pressure ulcer (mean duration 35 weeks) at five centers in the United States. Participants were randomized to treatment with a self-adhesive polyurethane foam (n = 20) or saline-soaked gauze dressing (n = 16). No difference in time to wound closure was observed (P = 0.817). Patients in the foam group had less frequent dressing changes (P <0.001). Total cost over the study period was lower by $466 per patient (P = 0.055) and spending on dressings was lower by $92 per patient in the foam group (P = 0.025). Cost per ulcer healed was lower by $1,517 and cost per ulcer-free day was lower by $80 for patients in the foam group. On the evidence of this study, the foam dressing is a more cost-effective treatment than saline-soaked gauze for the treatment of Stage II pressure ulcers.

  16. Peptic Ulcers

    MedlinePlus

    ... is a good alternative to NSAIDs for most childhood conditions. Signs and Symptoms Although peptic ulcers are rare in kids, if your child has any of these signs and symptoms, call your doctor: burning pain in the abdomen between the breastbone and the belly button (the ...

  17. [Ulcerative colitis].

    PubMed

    Lopetuso, Loris; Gasbarrini, Antonio

    2016-06-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), such as Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC), are chronic, relapsing inflammatory disorders of the digestive tract resulting from dysregulated immune responses toward environmental factors in genetically predisposed individuals. This review focus on what is the state of the art of UC pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment and how any future findings could drive our clinical practice. PMID:27362722

  18. A Quantitative, Pooled Analysis and Systematic Review of Controlled Trials on the Impact of Electrical Stimulation Settings and Placement on Pressure Ulcer Healing Rates in Persons With Spinal Cord Injuries.

    PubMed

    Liu, Liang; Moody, Julie; Gall, Angela

    2016-07-01

    Pressure ulcers (PrUs) are among the most common secondary complications following spinal cord injury (SCI). External electrical current applied to a wound is believed to mimic the body's natural bioelectricity and to restart and stimulate endogenous electrical fields to promote wound healing. A systematic review was conducted to critically appraise and synthesize updated evidence on the impact of electrical stimulation (ES) versus standard wound care (comprising cleansing, dressing, nutrition, and debridement as necessary) and/or sham stimulation on PrU healing rates in persons with SCIs. Medline, Embase, the Cumulative Index for Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), PsycINFO, and Cochrane Central were searched using the terms spinal cord injury, electrical stimulation, and pressure ulcer in free text and MESH terms. Publications were limited to peer-reviewed, randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and non-RCTs (CCTs) published in English from 1985 to 2014. The methodological quality of the RCTs was evaluated using the Jadad scale; CCTs were assessed using the Downs and Black tool. Pooled analyses were performed to calculate the mean difference (MD) for continuous data, odds ratio (OR) for dichotomous data, and 95% confidence intervals (CI). A total of 8 trials were reviewed - 6 RCTs and 2 CCTs included a total of 517 SCI participants who had at least 1 PrU. The number of patients per study ranged from 7 to 150 and the number of wounds from 7 to 192. Comparison models included ES irrespective of current type and placement of electrodes against sham/no ES (7 trials), ES delivered by electrodes overlaid on the ulcer versus sham/no ES (4 trials), ES delivered by electrodes placed on intact skin around the ulcer versus sham/no ES (4 trials), ES delivered by electrodes overlaid on the wound bed versus placed on intact skin around the ulcer (1 trial), ES with pulsed current versus sham/no ES (6 trials), ES with constant current versus sham/no ES (2 trials), pulsed

  19. Evaluation of physiological risk factors, oxidant-antioxidant imbalance, proteolytic and genetic variations of matrix metalloproteinase-9 in patients with pressure ulcer.

    PubMed

    Latifa, Khlifi; Sondess, Sahli; Hajer, Graiet; Manel, Ben-Hadj-Mohamed; Souhir, Khelil; Nadia, Bouzidi; Abir, Jaballah; Salima, Ferchichi; Abdelhedi, Miled

    2016-01-01

    Pressure ulcer (PU) remains a common worldwide problem in all health care settings, it is synonymous with suffering. PU is a complex disease that is dependent on a number of interrelated factors. It involves multiple mechanisms such as physiological risk factors, chronic inflammation, oxidant-antioxidant imbalance and proteolytic attack on extracellular matrix by matrix metalloproteinases (MMP). Therefore, we propose that these wounds lead to molecular variations that can be detected by assessing biomarkers. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the major clinical elements and biological scars in Tunisian patients suffering from PU. Consistently, non-healing wound remains a challenging clinical problem. The complex challenges of the wound environment, involving nutrient deficiencies, bacterial infection, as well as the critical role played by inflammatory cells, should be considered because of their negative impact on wound healing. In addition, an imbalance between pro-oxidants and antioxidant systems seems to be more aggravated in patients with PU compared to healthy subjects. Of interest, this study provides further evidence to support a core role of the biological activity of MMP-9 in the pathogenesis of PU and indicates that the MMP9-1562 C/T (rs 3918242) functional polymorphism is associated with protection against this disease. PMID:27405842

  20. Evaluation of physiological risk factors, oxidant-antioxidant imbalance, proteolytic and genetic variations of matrix metalloproteinase-9 in patients with pressure ulcer.

    PubMed

    Latifa, Khlifi; Sondess, Sahli; Hajer, Graiet; Manel, Ben-Hadj-Mohamed; Souhir, Khelil; Nadia, Bouzidi; Abir, Jaballah; Salima, Ferchichi; Abdelhedi, Miled

    2016-07-11

    Pressure ulcer (PU) remains a common worldwide problem in all health care settings, it is synonymous with suffering. PU is a complex disease that is dependent on a number of interrelated factors. It involves multiple mechanisms such as physiological risk factors, chronic inflammation, oxidant-antioxidant imbalance and proteolytic attack on extracellular matrix by matrix metalloproteinases (MMP). Therefore, we propose that these wounds lead to molecular variations that can be detected by assessing biomarkers. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the major clinical elements and biological scars in Tunisian patients suffering from PU. Consistently, non-healing wound remains a challenging clinical problem. The complex challenges of the wound environment, involving nutrient deficiencies, bacterial infection, as well as the critical role played by inflammatory cells, should be considered because of their negative impact on wound healing. In addition, an imbalance between pro-oxidants and antioxidant systems seems to be more aggravated in patients with PU compared to healthy subjects. Of interest, this study provides further evidence to support a core role of the biological activity of MMP-9 in the pathogenesis of PU and indicates that the MMP9-1562 C/T (rs 3918242) functional polymorphism is associated with protection against this disease.

  1. Evaluation of physiological risk factors, oxidant-antioxidant imbalance, proteolytic and genetic variations of matrix metalloproteinase-9 in patients with pressure ulcer

    PubMed Central

    Latifa, Khlifi; Sondess, Sahli; Hajer, Graiet; Manel, Ben-Hadj-Mohamed; Souhir, Khelil; Nadia, Bouzidi; Abir, Jaballah; Salima, Ferchichi; Abdelhedi, Miled

    2016-01-01

    Pressure ulcer (PU) remains a common worldwide problem in all health care settings, it is synonymous with suffering. PU is a complex disease that is dependent on a number of interrelated factors. It involves multiple mechanisms such as physiological risk factors, chronic inflammation, oxidant–antioxidant imbalance and proteolytic attack on extracellular matrix by matrix metalloproteinases (MMP). Therefore, we propose that these wounds lead to molecular variations that can be detected by assessing biomarkers. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the major clinical elements and biological scars in Tunisian patients suffering from PU. Consistently, non-healing wound remains a challenging clinical problem. The complex challenges of the wound environment, involving nutrient deficiencies, bacterial infection, as well as the critical role played by inflammatory cells, should be considered because of their negative impact on wound healing. In addition, an imbalance between pro-oxidants and antioxidant systems seems to be more aggravated in patients with PU compared to healthy subjects. Of interest, this study provides further evidence to support a core role of the biological activity of MMP-9 in the pathogenesis of PU and indicates that the MMP9-1562 C/T (rs 3918242) functional polymorphism is associated with protection against this disease. PMID:27405842

  2. Modeling the Effects of Moisture-Related Skin-Support Friction on the Risk for Superficial Pressure Ulcers during Patient Repositioning in Bed.

    PubMed

    Shaked, Eliav; Gefen, Amit

    2013-01-01

    Patient repositioning when the skin is moist, e.g., due to sweat or urine may cause skin breakdown since wetness increases the skin-support coefficient of friction (COF) and hence also the shear stresses that are generated in the skin when the patient is being moved. This everyday hospital scenario was never studied systematically however. The aim of this study was to simulate such interactions using a biomechanical computational model which is the first of its kind, in order to quantitatively describe the effects of repositioning on the pathomechanics of moisture-related tissue damage. We designed a finite element model to analyze skin stresses under a weight-bearing bony prominence while this region of interest slides frictionally over the support surface, as occurs during repositioning. Our results show, expectedly, that maximal effective stresses in the skin increase as the moisture-contents-related COF between the skin and the mattress rises. Interestingly however, the rise in stresses for a wet interface became more prominent when the skin tissue was stiffer - which represented aging or diabetes. This finding demonstrates how the aged/diabetic skin is more fragile than a young-adult skin when repositioning in a moist environment. The modeling used herein can now be extended to test effects of different moisturizers, creams, lubricants, or possibly other interventions at the skin-support interface for testing their potential in protecting the skin from superficial pressure ulcers in a standard, objective, and quantitative manner.

  3. Approach to skin ulcers in older patients.

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Christopher

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To provide family physicians with an approach to managing skin ulcers in older patients. SOURCES OF INFORMATION: Clinical practice guidelines and best practice guidelines were summarized to describe an evidence-based approach. MAIN MESSAGE; Preventing ulcers is important in frail older patients. Using guidelines can help prevent ulcers in institutions. Clarifying the cause and contributing factors is the first step in management. Pressure and venous ulcers are common in elderly people. Poor nutrition, edema, arterial insufficiency, and anemia often impair wound healing. Adequate debridement is important to decrease risk of infection and to promote healing. There are guidelines for cleaning ulcers. Choice of dressings depends on the circumstances of each wound, but dressings should provide a moist environment. Options for dressings are summarized. CONCLUSION: Family physicians can manage skin ulcers effectively by applying basic principles and using readily available guidelines. PMID:15648380

  4. Topical Olive Oil Is Not Inferior to Hyperoxygenated Fatty Aids to Prevent Pressure Ulcers in High-Risk Immobilised Patients in Home Care. Results of a Multicentre Randomised Triple-Blind Controlled Non-Inferiority Trial

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Pressure ulcers represent a major current health problem and produce an important economic impact on the healthcare system. Most of studies to prevent pressure ulcers have been carried out in hospital contexts, with respect to the use of hyperoxygenated fatty acids and to date, no studies have specifically examined the use of olive oil-based substances. Methods and Design Main objective: To assess the effectiveness of the use of olive oil, comparing it with hyperoxygenated fatty acids, for immobilised home-care patients at risk of suffering pressure ulcers. Design: Non-inferiority, triple-blind, parallel, multicentre, randomised clinical trial. Scope: Population attending Primary Healthcare Centres in Andalusia (Spain). Sample: 831 immobilised patients at risk of suffering pressure ulcers. Results The follow-up period was 16 weeks. Groups were similar after randomization. In the per protocol analysis, none of the body areas evaluated presented risk differences for pressure ulcers incidence that exceeded the 10% delta value established. Sacrum: Olive Oil 8 (2.55%) vs HOFA 8 (3.08%), ARR 0.53 (-2.2 to 3.26) Right heel: Olive Oil 4 (1.27%) vs HOFA 5 (1.92)%, ARR0.65 (-1.43 to 2.73). Left heel: Olive Oil 3 (0.96%) vs HOFA 3 (1.15%), ARR0.2 (-1.49 to 1.88). Right trochanter: Olive Oil 0 (0%) vs HOFA 4 (1.54%), ARR1.54 (0.04 to 3.03). Left trochanter: Olive Oil 1 (0.32%) vs HOFA 1 (0.38%), ARR0.07 (-0.91 to 1.04). In the intention to treat analysis the lower limit of the established confidence interval was never exceeded. Discussion The results obtained confirmed that the use of topical extra-virgin olive oil to prevent PU in the home environment, for immobilised patients at high risk, is not inferior to the use of HOFA. Further studies are needed to investigate the mechanism by which olive oil achieves this outcome. Trial Registration Clinicaltrials.gov NCT01595347 PMID:25886152

  5. Anti-ulcer Activity.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    This chapter explains the procedure of ethanol-induced ulcer to check the protective effect of drugs over induced ulcer in rats. Ulcer is defined as the erosion in the lining of the stomach or duodenum and is caused by the disruptions of the gastric mucosal defence and repair systems. Ulceration of stomach is called gastric ulcer and that of duodenum is called duodenal ulcer and together peptic ulcer. In clinical practice, peptic ulcer is one of the most prevalent gastrointestinal disorders, which commonly occurs in developed countries.

  6. Pathogenesis of foot ulcers and the need for offloading.

    PubMed

    Rathur, H M; Boulton, A J

    2005-04-01

    Diabetic foot ulceration represents a major medical, social and economic problem all over the world. While more than 5% of diabetic patients have a history of foot ulceration, the cumulative lifetime incidence may be as high as 15%. Ethnic differences exist in both ulcer and amputation incidences. Foot ulceration results from the interaction of several contributory factors, the most important of which is neuropathy. The use of the total-contact cast is demonstrated in the treatment of plantar neuropathic ulcers. Histological evidence suggests that pressure relief results in chronic foot ulcers changing their morphological appearance by displaying some features of an acute wound. Thus, repetitive stresses on the insensate foot appear to play a major role in maintaining ulcer chronicity. It is hoped that research activity in foot disease will ultimately result in fewer ulcers and less amputation in diabetes.

  7. A retrospective, nonrandomized, beforeand- after study of the effect of linens constructed of synthetic silk-like fabric on pressure ulcer incidence.

    PubMed

    Smith, Annette; McNichol, Laurie L; Amos, Mary Anne; Mueller, Gayle; Griffin, Tracy; Davis, Joe; McPhail, Lora; Montgomery, Terry G

    2013-04-01

    A new, synthetic, silk-like fabric was developed for the purpose of providing bedding and patient gowns that manage moisture, friction, and shear when used between the patient and the healthcare support surface that may affect the development of pressure ulcers (PUs). A retrospective study was conducted to compare the incidence of hospital-acquired PUs in patients admitted to Telemetry, Urology, and Intensive Care Units before and after hospital linens were changed from standard to the synthetic (intervention) linens. Patient medical record data were abstracted for a period 12 weeks before (control) and 12 weeks following the linen change (intervention). Patient demographic information, Braden Risk Scale score, and PU status and stage were abstracted for a total of 659 patients in the control and 768 patients in the intervention groups. No significant differences in patient weight, age, gender distribution, PU risk (Braden scale scores), or proportion of PUs on admission between groups were found. The most common comorbidity was hypertension (n = 981, 68.7%). On admission, the percentage of patients with PUs in the control and intervention groups was 9.9% (σ = 0.3) and 8.7% (σ = 0.3), respectively (P = 0.23). Average length of stay was 5.6 days in the control and 5.2 days in the intervention groups (P = 0.08). Sixty-eight (68) of 659 patients (10.3%) in the control and 19 out of 768 patients in the intervention group (2.5%) developed one or more PUs (P <0.001) for an incidence of 11.5% in the control and 3.1% in the intervention group. At discharge, 136 PUs were present in the control and 64 were present in the intervention group (P <0.001). The significant differences in the incidence of hospital-acquired PUs between the two groups suggest that linen type affects PU risk. Additional controlled clinical studies in high-risk patient populations are warranted.

  8. [Therapeutic superiority of regional retrograde venous antibiotic pressure infusion versus systemic venous infusions in diabetic patients with infected neuropathic plantar ulcers].

    PubMed

    Seidel, C; Bühler-Singer, S; Tacke, J; Hornstein, O P

    1994-02-01

    Since systemic treatment of neuropathic plantar ulcers in diabetics (DNPU) has so far been rather ineffective, recent reports of successful management of DNPU by short-term retrograde transvenous leg perfusion (RVP) by South American angiologists encouraged us to apply this treatment method in diabetics suffering from chronic DNPU. Hence, in a prospective comparative clinical trial started in 1989 we have treated 45 male diabetics suffering from DNPU with the same daily doses of netilmycin, administered either in systemic venous infusions (SVI: n = 21, three times/day) or in RVP (n = 24, once/day). After 10 consecutive days of treatment, ulcers had closed in 8 of the 24 patients treated with RVP, as against 3 of the 21 treated with SVI. Diminution of the ulcer area by > 30% including full debridement was achieved in 10/24 of the RVP cases (SVI: 4/21). During 6 months of follow-up, amputation of toes or forefoot was necessary in only 1 patient in the RVP group, but in 4 in the SVI group. Partial restitution of osteolytic damage was observed in some cases after RVP. Our results show that regional netilmycin therapy given by the RVP procedure is clearly superior to equal netilmycin doses administered by SVI for the treatment of DNPU. RVP can be recommended in DNPU, particularly when the ulcers are complicated by infections.

  9. [Ulcer surgery - what remains?].

    PubMed

    Hölscher, A H; Bollschweiler, E; Mönig, S P

    2006-06-01

    Ulcer surgery today concentrates on the complications of chronic ulcer disease, especially ulcer perforation and endoscopically uncontrollable ulcer bleeding. In this case the laparoscopic or open closure of the gastroduodenal defect or local hemostasis of the bleeding ulcer by laparotomy are the main aims of surgery. Elective operations due to recurrent gastric or duodenal ulcers have become rare. An indication for gastric ulcer resistant to conservative therapy could be persisting suspicion of malignancy whereas in duodenal ulcer gastric outlet obstruction represents a reason for surgery. If these indications are confirmed the classic procedures of gastric resection like Billroth I and Billroth II are performed whereas vagotomy is no longer used. Altogether ulcer surgery has become very safe although it is practiced quite rarely.

  10. Emergency ulcer surgery.

    PubMed

    Lee, Constance W; Sarosi, George A

    2011-10-01

    The rate of elective surgery for peptic ulcer disease has been declining steadily over the past 3 decades. During this same period, the rate of emergency ulcer surgery rose by 44%. This means that the gastrointestinal surgeon is likely to be called on to manage the emergent complications of peptic ulcer disease without substantial experience in elective peptic ulcer disease surgery. The goal of this review is to familiarize surgeons with our evolving understanding of the pathogenesis, epidemiology, presentation, and management of peptic ulcer disease in the emergency setting, with a focus on peptic ulcer disease-associated bleeding and perforation.

  11. Acute genital ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Delgado-García, Silvia; Palacios-Marqués, Ana; Martínez-Escoriza, Juan Carlos; Martín-Bayón, Tina-Aurora

    2014-01-01

    Acute genital ulcers, also known as acute vulvar ulcers, ulcus vulvae acutum or Lipschütz ulcers, refer to an ulceration of the vulva or lower vagina of non-venereal origin that usually presents in young women, predominantly virgins. Although its incidence is unknown, it seems a rare entity, with few cases reported in the literature. Their aetiology and pathogenesis are still unknown. The disease is characterised by an acute onset of flu-like symptoms with single or multiple painful ulcers on the vulva. Diagnosis is mainly clinical, after exclusion of other causes of vulvar ulcers. The treatment is mainly symptomatic, with spontaneous resolution in 2 weeks and without recurrences in most cases. We present a case report of a 13-year-old girl with two episodes of acute ulcers that fit the clinical criteria for Lipschütz ulcers. PMID:24473429

  12. Peptic Ulcer Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... stomach and duodenum to diagnose or treat disease. Erosion – a very shallow sore, similar to an abrasion ... Ulcer – an open sore. Ulcers are deeper than erosions. Author(s) and Publication Date(s) Sean P. Caufield, MD, ...

  13. Ulcer emergencies (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Peptic ulcers may lead to emergency situations. Severe abdominal pain with or without evidence of bleeding may indicate a perforation of the ulcer through the stomach or duodenum. Vomiting of a substance that resembles coffee grounds, ...

  14. Acute genital ulcers.

    PubMed

    Delgado-García, Silvia; Palacios-Marqués, Ana; Martínez-Escoriza, Juan Carlos; Martín-Bayón, Tina-Aurora

    2014-01-28

    Acute genital ulcers, also known as acute vulvar ulcers, ulcus vulvae acutum or Lipschütz ulcers, refer to an ulceration of the vulva or lower vagina of non-venereal origin that usually presents in young women, predominantly virgins. Although its incidence is unknown, it seems a rare entity, with few cases reported in the literature. Their aetiology and pathogenesis are still unknown. The disease is characterised by an acute onset of flu-like symptoms with single or multiple painful ulcers on the vulva. Diagnosis is mainly clinical, after exclusion of other causes of vulvar ulcers. The treatment is mainly symptomatic, with spontaneous resolution in 2 weeks and without recurrences in most cases. We present a case report of a 13-year-old girl with two episodes of acute ulcers that fit the clinical criteria for Lipschütz ulcers.

  15. Hydrogen water intake via tube-feeding for patients with pressure ulcer and its reconstructive effects on normal human skin cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Pressure ulcer (PU) is common in immobile elderly patients, and there are some research works to investigate a preventive and curative method, but not to find sufficient effectiveness. The aim of this study is to clarify the clinical effectiveness on wound healing in patients with PU by hydrogen-dissolved water (HW) intake via tube-feeding (TF). Furthermore, normal human dermal fibroblasts OUMS-36 and normal human epidermis-derived cell line HaCaT keratinocytes were examined in vitro to explore the mechanisms relating to whether hydrogen plays a role in wound-healing at the cellular level. Methods Twenty-two severely hospitalized elderly Japanese patients with PU were recruited in the present study, and their ages ranged from 71.0 to 101.0 (86.7 ± 8.2) years old, 12 male and 10 female patients, all suffering from eating disorder and bedridden syndrome as the secondary results of various underlying diseases. All patients received routine care treatments for PU in combination with HW intake via TF for 600 mL per day, in place of partial moisture replenishment. On the other hand, HW was prepared with a hydrogen-bubbling apparatus which produces HW with 0.8-1.3 ppm of dissolved hydrogen concentration (DH) and −602 mV to −583 mV of oxidation-reduction potential (ORP), in contrast to reversed osmotic ultra-pure water (RW), as the reference, with DH of < 0.018 ppm and ORP of +184 mV for use in the in vitro experimental research. In in vitro experiments, OUMS-36 fibroblasts and HaCaT keratinocytes were respectively cultured in medium prepared with HW and/or RW. Immunostain was used for detecting type-I collagen reconstruction in OUMS-36 cells. And intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) were quantified by NBT assay, and cell viability of HaCaT cells was examined by WST-1 assay, respectively. Results Twenty-two patients were retrospectively divided into an effective group (EG, n = 12) and a less effective group (LG, n = 10) according to

  16. Diabetic foot ulcers: practical treatment recommendations.

    PubMed

    Edmonds, Michael

    2006-01-01

    When treating diabetic foot ulcers it is important to be aware of the natural history of the diabetic foot, which can be divided into five stages: stage 1, a normal foot; stage 2, a high risk foot; stage 3, an ulcerated foot; stage 4, an infected foot; and stage 5, a necrotic foot. This covers the entire spectrum of foot disease but emphasises the development of the foot ulcer as a pivotal event in stage 3, which demands urgent and aggressive management. Diabetic foot care in all stages needs multidisciplinary management to control mechanical, wound, microbiological, vascular, metabolic and educational aspects. Achieving good metabolic control of blood glucose, lipids and blood pressure is important in each stage, as is education to teach proper foot care appropriate for each stage. Ideally, it is important to prevent the development of ulcers in stages 1 and 2. In stage 1, the normal foot, it is important to encourage the use of suitable footwear, and to educate the patient to promote healthy foot care and footwear habits. In stage 2, the foot has developed one or more of the following risk factors for ulceration: neuropathy, ischaemia, deformity, swelling and callus. The majority of deformities can be accommodated in special footwear and as callus is an important precursor of ulceration it should be treated aggressively, especially in the neuropathic foot. In stage 3, ulcers can be divided into two distinct entities: those in the neuropathic foot and those in the neuroischaemic foot. In the neuropathic foot, ulcers commonly develop on the plantar surface of the foot and the toes, and are associated with neglected callus and high plantar pressures. In the neuroischaemic foot, ulcers are commonly seen around the edges of the foot, including the apices of the toes and back of the heel, and are associated with trauma or wearing unsuitable shoes. Ulcers in stage 3 need relief of pressure (mechanical control), sharp debridement and dressings (wound control), and

  17. Diabetic foot ulcers. Pathophysiology, assessment, and therapy.

    PubMed Central

    Bowering, C. K.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review underlying causes of diabetic foot ulceration, provide a practical assessment of patients at risk, and outline an evidence-based approach to therapy for diabetic patients with foot ulcers. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: A MEDLINE search was conducted for the period from 1979 to 1999 for articles relating to diabetic foot ulcers. Most studies found were case series or small controlled trials. MAIN MESSAGE: Foot ulcers in diabetic patients are common and frequently lead to lower limb amputation unless a prompt, rational, multidisciplinary approach to therapy is taken. Factors that affect development and healing of diabetic patients' foot ulcers include the degree of metabolic control, the presence of ischemia or infection, and continuing trauma to feet from excessive plantar pressure or poorly fitting shoes. Appropriate wound care for diabetic patients addresses these issues and provides optimal local ulcer therapy with débridement of necrotic tissue and provision of a moist wound-healing environment. Therapies that have no known therapeutic value, such as foot soaking and topical antiseptics, can actually be harmful and should be avoided. CONCLUSION: Family physicians are often primary medical contacts for patients with diabetes. Patients should be screened regularly for diabetic foot complications, and preventive measures should be initiated for those at risk of ulceration. PMID:11398715

  18. A multi-center, randomized, clinical trial comparing adhesive polyurethane foam dressing and adhesive hydrocolloid dressing in patients with grade II pressure ulcers in primary care and nursing homes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Pressure ulcers (PrUs) are ischemic wounds in the skin and underlying tissues caused by long-standing pressure force over an external bone or cartilaginous surface. PrUs are an important challenge for the overall health system because can prolong patient hospitalization and reduce quality of life. Moreover, 95% of PrUs are avoidable, suggesting they are caused by poor quality care assistance. PrUs are also costly, increasing national costs. For example, they represent about 5% of overall annual health expenses in Spain. Stages I and II PrUs have a combined prevalence of 65%. According main clinical guidelines, stage II PrUs (PrU-IIs) are usually treated by applying special dressings (polyurethane or hydrocolloid). However, little scientific evidence regarding their efficacy has been identified in scientific literature. Our aim is to assess the comparative efficacy of adhesive polyurethane foam and hydrocolloid dressings in the treatment of PrU-IIs in terms of healed ulcer after 8 weeks of follow-up. Methods/design This paper describes the development and evaluation protocol of a randomized clinical trial of two parallel treatment arms. A total of 820 patients with at least 1 PrU-II will be recruited from primary health care and home care centers. All patients will receive standardized healing procedures and preventive measures (e.g. positional changes and pressure-relieving support surfaces), following standardized procedures. The main outcome will be the percentage of wounds healed after 8 weeks. Secondary outcomes will include cost-effectiveness, as evaluated by cost per healed ulcer and cost per treated patient and safety evaluated by adverse events. Discussion This trial will address the hypothesis that hydrocolloid dressings will heal at least 10% more stage II PrUs and be more cost-effective than polyurethane foam dressings after 8 weeks. Trial registration This trial has been registered with controlled-trials number ISCRCTN57842461 and Eudra

  19. [Decubitus ulcer and nutritional status: literature review].

    PubMed

    Castilho, Lillian Dias; Caliri, Maria Helena Larcher

    2005-01-01

    In order to better understand aspects related to the nutritional assessment of patients in risk for pressure ulcers, we reviewed the national and international literature indexed on Medline and LILACS bibliographic databases, from 1987 to 2001. The aim of this research was to investigate the knowledge production on pressure ulcers and nutritional status, as well as to learn about the authors and the publication focus. We concluded that patients in risk for pressure ulcers can be early identified based on nutritional assessment, including biochemical data, anthropometric evaluation, clinical data, diet history and energetic consumption. The alterations are frequent in elderly patients, hospitalized patients, patients with a chronic disease such as a vascular cerebral accident, cancer and spinal cord injury.

  20. A case series to describe the clinical characteristics of foot ulceration in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Siddle, Heidi J; Firth, Jill; Waxman, Robin; Nelson, E Andrea; Helliwell, Philip S

    2012-03-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the clinical characteristics of foot ulceration in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Adults with RA and current foot ulceration but without diabetes were recruited. Clinical examination included assessment of RA disease activity, foot deformity, peripheral vascular disease, neuropathy and plantar pressures. Location, wound characteristics and time to healing were recorded for each ulcer. Participants completed the Health Assessment Questionnaire and Leeds Foot Impact Scale. Thirty-two cases with 52 current ulcers were recruited. Thirteen patients (41%) experienced more than one current ulcer: 5 (16%) had bilateral ulceration, 15 (47%) had previous ulceration at a current ulcer site. The majority (n = 33) of open ulcers were located over the dorsal aspect of the interphalangeal joints (n = 12), plantar aspect of the metatarsophalangeal joints (MTPJs) (n = 12) and medial aspect of first MTPJs (n = 9). In ulcerated limbs (n = 37), ankle brachial pressure index (ABPI) was <0.8 in 2 (5%); protective sensation was reduced in 25 (68%) and peak plantar pressures were >6 kg/cm(2) in 6 (16%). Mean ulcer size was 4.84 by 3.29 mm. Most ulcers (n = 42, 81%) were superficial; five (9.6%) were infected. Time to healing was available for 41 ulcers: mean duration was 28 weeks. Three ulcers remained open. In conclusion, foot ulceration in RA is recurrent and multiple ulcers are common. Whilst ulcers are small and shallow, time to achieve healing is slow, posing infection risk. Reduced protective sensation is common in affected patients. The prevalence of arterial disease is low but may be under estimated due to high intolerance of ABPI. PMID:22052587

  1. PEPTIC ULCER DISEASE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Peptic ulcer disease (PUD) is an ulcerative condition of the stomach or duodenum that may be accompanied by mucosal inflammation. PUD is classified as primary when it occurs in healthy children and as secondary when underlying disorders associated with injury, illness, or drug therapy co-exists. Pri...

  2. Connective Tissue Ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Dabiri, Ganary; Falanga, Vincent

    2013-01-01

    Connective tissue disorders (CTD), which are often also termed collagen vascular diseases, include a number of related inflammatory conditions. Some of these diseases include rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, systemic sclerosis (scleroderma), localized scleroderma (morphea variants localized to the skin), Sjogren’s syndrome, dermatomyositis, polymyositis, and mixed connective tissue disease. In addition to the systemic manifestations of these diseases, there are a number of cutaneous features that make these conditions recognizable on physical exam. Lower extremity ulcers and digital ulcers are an infrequent but disabling complication of long-standing connective tissue disease. The exact frequency with which these ulcers occur is not known, and the cause of the ulcerations is often multifactorial. Moreover, a challenging component of CTD ulcerations is that there are still no established guidelines for their diagnosis and treatment. The morbidity associated with these ulcerations and their underlying conditions is very substantial. Indeed, these less common but intractable ulcers represent a major medical and economic problem for patients, physicians and nurses, and even well organized multidisciplinary wound healing centers. PMID:23756459

  3. Etiology of venous ulceration.

    PubMed

    Gourdin, F W; Smith, J G

    1993-10-01

    The etiology of venous ulceration is far more complex than Homans' theory of stagnation and hypo-oxygenation. Indeed, studies have shown that flow in lipodermatosclerotic limbs is actually faster than normal. We suggest, therefore, that the terms "stasis dermatitis" and "stasis ulcer" be dropped from medical parlance. The term "lipodermatosclerosis with ulceration" as used by the British, or simply "venous ulcer," would seem more appropriate. Venous hypertension, produced by incompetence of deep and communicating vein valves and thrombosis of segments of the deep system, is closely correlated with the development of venous ulcers. Precisely how this venous hypertension translates into ulceration is unclear. Burnand et al showed that fibrin cuffs are deposited around the capillaries in lipodermatosclerotic limbs. These cuffs may serve as barriers to the diffusion of oxygen, leading to local ischemia and epidermal necrosis. Others suggest that trapped leukocytes in the microcirculation alter capillary permeability by releasing various inflammatory mediators that hasten the flow of fibrinogen across the capillary membrane and promote the formation of fibrin cuffs. Proof of this hypothesis is still lacking, but may eventually come from using radioactive WBC tagging procedures. A synthesis of these two theories may in fact explain the etiology of venous ulceration. PMID:8211332

  4. [Perforated gastroduodenal stress ulcer].

    PubMed

    Melinte, C; Dragomir, Cr

    2006-01-01

    Experimental and clinical data support the role of oxidative stress in the development of gastro-duodenal inflammatory lesions and peptic ulcer. Although quite common, stress ulcer remains a minor concern in the The authors review the literature data and perform a retrospective study on 205 personal cases of gastroduodenal ulcers, diagnosed and operated in the period 1986-2005. Of these, 58 (28.29%) were perforated ulcers, including 4 cases (6.8%) caused by various psychic traumas. All the patients presented symptoms and signs characteristic for perforated ulcer and were undoubtedly of psychogenic cause. The surgical treatment consisted in the closure of the perforation and peritoneal drainage. Besides medical treatment of peptic ulcer disease consisting of antisecretory drugs, antioxidants and sedatives were used. Postoperative follow-up showed a rapid and uneventful recovery in all cases. In conclusion, surgery is the mainstay of treatment in perforated ulcer, but additional stress therapy promotes healing and may reduce postoperative morbidity in cases with certain involvement of psychic trauma.

  5. Susceptibility to decubitus ulcer formation.

    PubMed

    Meijer, J H; Germs, P H; Schneider, H; Ribbe, M W

    1994-03-01

    The hypothesis of blood-flow recovery time after pressure relief was prospectively evaluated as a measure of a patient's susceptibility to develop decubitus ulcers. This blood-flow recovery time was measured using the noninvasive pressure-temperature-time (PTT) method, which uses a 10-minute test-pressure stimulus. The blood-flow response after pressure relief was measured by means of skin-temperature measurements. The evaluation was performed in a group of 109 elderly nursing home patients. A pressure-index was used as a measure for the intensity and duration of pressure and shear forces, to which a patient was exposed, to measure a set of external determinants that are independent of the susceptibility. Both the blood-flow recovery time and the pressure-index were found to correlate significantly with the risk to develop decubitus. A conceptualization of the relationship between the risk, on the one hand, and the susceptibility and the external determinants, on the other hand, is presented, assuming independence (orthogonality) of both sets of determinants. Based on this conceptualization, a three-dimensional risk-relationship was constructed. It is concluded that the blood-flow recovery time can be considered to be a measure for the susceptibility. Further, the conceptualization provides valuable insight into the risk-relationships and forms a base for future research with regard to susceptibility. PMID:8129586

  6. Nonspecific genital ulcers.

    PubMed

    Sehgal, Virendra N; Pandhi, Deepika; Khurana, Ananta

    2014-01-01

    Recent intervention of nonspecific genital ulcers has added refreshing dimensions to genital ulcer disease. It was considered pertinent to dwell on diverse clinical presentation and diagnostic strategies. It seems to possess spectrum. It includes infective causes, Epstein Bar Virus, tuberculosis, Leishmaniasis, HIV/AIDS related ulcers and amoebiasis. Noninfective causes are immunobullous disorders, aphthosis, Behcet's disease (BD), inflammatory bowel disease, lichen planus and lichen sclerosis et atrophicus, drug reactions, premalignant and malignant conditions, pyoderma gangrenosum, and hidradenitis suppurativa. The diagnostic features and treatment option of each disorder are succinctly outlined for ready reference.

  7. Treatment of cutaneous ulcers with benzoyl peroxide.

    PubMed Central

    Pace, W. E.

    1976-01-01

    Benzoyl peroxide, a powerful organic oxidizing agent, was applied topically according to a carefully developed technique to cutaneous ulcers of different types. The healing time was shortened greatly by the rapid development of healthy granulation tissue and the quick ingrowth of epithelium. Exceptionally large pressure ulcers with deep cavities, undercut edges and sinus tracts were sucessfully treated, as were stasis ulcers of long duration resistant to all other therapy. There were only 13 treatment failures among the 133 cases. The slow, sustained release of oxygen by benzoyl peroxide was though to be responsible for the success. The only complications were contact irritant dermatitis in 3% and contact allergic dermatitis in 2% of patients treated. Images FIG. 2 FIG. 3 FIG. 4 PMID:1000442

  8. Lithium Battery Diaper Ulceration.

    PubMed

    Maridet, Claire; Taïeb, Alain

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of lithium battery diaper ulceration in a 16-month-old girl. Gastrointestinal and ear, nose, and throat lesions after lithium battery ingestion have been reported, but skin involvement has not been reported to our knowledge.

  9. Ulcer and gastritis.

    PubMed

    Kashiwagi, H

    2007-02-01

    Five papers, discussing important topics related to ulcer and gastritis, have been selected for review here. The papers, which include some excellent systematic reviews and meta-analyses, were published between July 2005 and August 2006.

  10. What's new: Management of venous leg ulcers: Approach to venous leg ulcers.

    PubMed

    Alavi, Afsaneh; Sibbald, R Gary; Phillips, Tania J; Miller, O Fred; Margolis, David J; Marston, William; Woo, Kevin; Romanelli, Marco; Kirsner, Robert S

    2016-04-01

    Leg ulcerations are a common problem, with an estimated prevalence of 1% to 2% in the adult population. Venous leg ulcers are primarily treated in outpatient settings and often are managed by dermatologists. Recent advances in the diagnosis and treatment of leg ulcers combined with available evidence-based data will provide an update on this topic. A systematized approach and the judicious use of expensive advanced therapeutics are critical. Specialized arterial and venous studies are most commonly noninvasive. The ankle brachial pressure index can be performed with a handheld Doppler unit at the bedside by most clinicians. The vascular laboratory results and duplex Doppler findings are used to identify segmental defects and potential operative candidates. Studies of the venous system can also predict a subset of patients who may benefit from surgery. Successful leg ulcer management requires an interdisciplinary team to make the correct diagnosis, assess the vascular supply, and identify other modifiable factors to optimize healing. The aim of this continuing medical education article is to provide an update on the management of venous leg ulcers. Part I is focused on the approach to venous ulcer diagnostic testing.

  11. [Leg ulcer: conservative treatment].

    PubMed

    Fradique, Caldeira; Pupo, Alexandra; Quaresma, Luísa; Palma-Rosa, Ana; Fernandes, Mário; Silva, Gualdino; Almeida, Heitor; Diogo, Cláudia; Pinho, Ana Catarina

    2011-01-01

    During 16 years 202 patients with leg ulcer have been studied prospectively. Whenever possible, cure has been obtained in ambulatory, which was the main objective. Surgery was preferentially made after the cure of the ulcer. From the 202 patients, 166 have made a prolonged follow-up. Cure in ambulatory has been obtained in 91% of the patients. We stress the importance of the direct control of all the treatment by the responsible doctor.

  12. The Buruli Ulcer.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Satendra; Basu, Somprakas; Bhartiya, Satyanam Kumar; Shukla, Vijay Kumar

    2015-09-01

    Buruli ulcer (BU) is caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans and can manifest as a simple nodule or as aggressive skin ulcers leading to debilitating osteoarthritis or limb deformity. The disease is more prevalent in those living in remote rural areas, especially in children younger than 15 years. The exact mode of transmission is possibly through traumatic skin lesions contaminated by M ulcerans. IS2404 polymerase chain reaction from ulcer swabs or biopsies is a rapid method for confirmation of BU. In coendemic countries, HIV infection complicates the progression of BU, leading to rapidly spreading osteomyelitis. Treatment is principally medical, with antitubercular drugs, and surgery is utilized for complicated disease. Because of ineffective vaccination, primary prevention is the best option for control of the disease. PMID:26286931

  13. Ulcerated tophaceous gout.

    PubMed

    Filanovsky, Michelle Gita; Sukhdeo, Kumar; McNamara, Megan Cunnane

    2015-01-01

    Gout is an inflammatory arthritis characterised by hyperuricemia, which, if poorly controlled, can lead to the development of tophi. We report the case of a 60-year-old Caucasian man with poorly controlled polyarticular tophaceous gout with multiple comorbidities (including renal failure) who presented with tophaceous ulcers of the upper extremity. These ulcers caused extreme pain, requiring chronic opiate medications, and were associated with decreased sensation and reduced ability to move the extremity. His hospital course was complicated by acute kidney injury, haemolytic anaemia and Clostridium difficile infection. He required 1 month of antibiotics and intensive wound care for his ulcers. This case highlights the diagnosis, natural history and management of an unusual complication of hyperuricemia. PMID:26240104

  14. [Peripheral ulcerative keratitis].

    PubMed

    Stamate, Alina-cristina; Avram, Corina Ioana; Malciolu, R; Oprea, S; Zemba, M

    2014-01-01

    Ulcerative keratitis is frequently associated with collagen vascular diseases and presents a predilection for peripheral corneal localization, due to the distinct morphologic and immunologic features of the limbal conjunctiva, which provides access for the circulating immune complexes to the peripheral cornea via the capillary network. Deposition of immune complexes in the terminal ends of limbal vessels initiates an immune-mediated vasculitis process, with inflammatory cells and mediators involvement by alteration of the vascular permeability. Peripheral ulcerative keratitis generally correlates with exacerbations of the background autoimmune systemic disease. Associated sceritis, specially the necrotizing form, is usually observed in severe cases, which may evolve in corneal perforation and loss of vision. Although the first-line of treatment in acute phases is represented by systemic administration of corticosteroids, immunosuppressive and cytotoxic agents are necessary for the treatment of peripheral ulcerative keratitis associated with systemic diseases.

  15. [The acute bleeding rectal ulcer].

    PubMed

    Hansen, H

    1985-06-14

    An acute bleeding rectal ulcer was the solitary condition in four patients. The cause of such an ulcer, which always results in heavy arterial bleeding, remains unknown. The source of bleeding is demonstrated by rectoscopy which may at times be difficult because of the large amount of blood in the rectum and the hidden position of the small ulcer. Sclerosing or circumferential suturing of the ulcer provides immediate cessation of bleeding and cure.

  16. [Helicobacter pylori and gastric ulcer].

    PubMed

    Maaroos, H I

    1994-01-01

    In connection with longitudinal ulcer studies and the demonstration of Helicobacter pylori as the main cause of chronic gastritis, new aspects of gastric ulcer recurrences and healing become evident. This extends the possibilities to prognosticate the course of gastric ulcer and to use more effective treatment. PMID:7937016

  17. Peptic ulcer disease.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishnan, Kalyanakrishnan; Salinas, Robert C

    2007-10-01

    Peptic ulcer disease usually occurs in the stomach and proximal duodenum. The predominant causes in the United States are infection with Helicobacter pylori and use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Symptoms of peptic ulcer disease include epigastric discomfort (specifically, pain relieved by food intake or antacids and pain that causes awakening at night or that occurs between meals), loss of appetite, and weight loss. Older patients and patients with alarm symptoms indicating a complication or malignancy should have prompt endoscopy. Patients taking nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs should discontinue their use. For younger patients with no alarm symptoms, a test-and-treat strategy based on the results of H. pylori testing is recommended. If H. pylori infection is diagnosed, the infection should be eradicated and antisecretory therapy (preferably with a proton pump inhibitor) given for four weeks. Patients with persistent symptoms should be referred for endoscopy. Surgery is indicated if complications develop or if the ulcer is unresponsive to medications. Bleeding is the most common indication for surgery. Administration of proton pump inhibitors and endoscopic therapy control most bleeds. Perforation and gastric outlet obstruction are rare but serious complications. Peritonitis is a surgical emergency requiring patient resuscitation; laparotomy and peritoneal toilet; omental patch placement; and, in selected patients, surgery for ulcer control.

  18. Peptic ulcer in hospital

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, H. Daintree

    1962-01-01

    This study corresponds to an estimated 142,250 admissions for peptic ulcer to the wards of National Health Service hospitals in England and Wales during the two years 1956 and 1957. It presents a picture of the incidence and mortality of complications and surgical treatment throughout England and Wales. PMID:14036965

  19. The predictors of foot ulceration in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Firth, Jill; Waxman, Robin; Law, Graham; Nelson, E Andrea; Helliwell, Philip; Siddle, Heidi; Otter, Simon; Butters, Violet; Baker, Lesley; Hryniw, Rosemary; Bradley, Sarah; Loughrey, Lorraine; Alcacer-Pitarch, Begonya; Davies, Samantha; Tranter, Jennifer

    2014-05-01

    This study was conducted to determine the predictors of foot ulceration occurring in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) without diabetes. A multi-centre case control study was undertaken; participants were recruited from eight sites (UK). Cases were adults diagnosed with RA (without diabetes) and the presence of a validated foot ulcer, defined as a full thickness skin defect occurring in isolation on / below the midline of the malleoli and requiring > 14 days to heal. Controls met the same criteria but were ulcer naive. Clinical examination included loss of sensation (10g monofilament); ankle-brachial pressure index (ABPI); forefoot deformity (Platto); plantar pressures (PressureStat); RA disease activity (36 swollen/tender joint counts) and the presence of vasculitis. History taking included past ulceration/foot surgery; current medication and smoking status. Participants completed the Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ) and Foot Impact Scale. A total of 83 cases with 112 current ulcers and 190 ulcer naïve controls participated. Cases were significantly older (mean age 71 years; 95 % confidence interval [CI], 69-73 vs. 62 years, 60-64) and had longer RA disease duration (mean 22 years; 19-25 vs. 15, 13-17). Univariate analysis showed that risk of ulceration increases with loss of sensation; abnormality of ABPI and foot deformity. Plantar pressures and joint counts were not significant predictors. HAQ score and history of foot surgery were strongly associated with ulceration (odds ratio [OR] = 1.704, 95 % CI 1.274-2.280 and OR = 2.256, 95 % CI 1.294-3.932). Three cases and two controls presented with suspected cutaneous vasculitis. In logistic regression modelling, ABPI (OR = 0.04; 95 % CI, 0.01-0.28) forefoot deformity (OR = 1.14; 95 % CI, 1.08-1.21) and loss of sensation (OR = 1.22; 95 % CI, 1.10-1.36) predicted risk of ulceration. In patients with RA, ABPI, forefoot deformity and loss of sensation predict risk of ulceration

  20. Neuropathic diabetic foot ulcers – evidence-to-practice

    PubMed Central

    Ndip, Agbor; Ebah, Leonard; Mbako, Aloysius

    2012-01-01

    Foot ulcers and their attendant complications are disquietingly high in people with diabetes, a majority of whom have underlying neuropathy. This review examines the evidence base underpinning the prevention and management of neuropathic diabetic foot ulcers in order to inform best clinical practice. Since it may be impractical to ask patients not to weight-bear at all, relief of pressure through the use of offloading casting devices remains the mainstay for management of neuropathic ulcers, whilst provision of appropriate footwear is essential in ulcer prevention. Simple non-surgical debridement and application of hydrogels are both effective in preparing the wound bed for healthy granulation and therefore enhancing healing. Initial empirical antibiotic therapy for infected ulcers should cover the most common bacterial flora. There is limited evidence supporting the use of adjunctive therapies such as hyperbaric oxygen and cytokines or growth factors. In selected cases, recombinant human platelet-derived growth factor has been shown to enhance healing; however, its widespread use cannot be advised due to the availability of more cost-effective approaches. While patient education may be beneficial, the evidence base remains thin and conflicting. In conclusion, best management of foot ulcers is achieved by what is taken out of the foot (pressure, callus, infection, and slough) rather than what is put on the foot (adjuvant treatment). PMID:22371655

  1. Neuropathic diabetic foot ulcers - evidence-to-practice.

    PubMed

    Ndip, Agbor; Ebah, Leonard; Mbako, Aloysius

    2012-01-01

    Foot ulcers and their attendant complications are disquietingly high in people with diabetes, a majority of whom have underlying neuropathy. This review examines the evidence base underpinning the prevention and management of neuropathic diabetic foot ulcers in order to inform best clinical practice. Since it may be impractical to ask patients not to weight-bear at all, relief of pressure through the use of offloading casting devices remains the mainstay for management of neuropathic ulcers, whilst provision of appropriate footwear is essential in ulcer prevention. Simple non-surgical debridement and application of hydrogels are both effective in preparing the wound bed for healthy granulation and therefore enhancing healing. Initial empirical antibiotic therapy for infected ulcers should cover the most common bacterial flora. There is limited evidence supporting the use of adjunctive therapies such as hyperbaric oxygen and cytokines or growth factors. In selected cases, recombinant human platelet-derived growth factor has been shown to enhance healing; however, its widespread use cannot be advised due to the availability of more cost-effective approaches. While patient education may be beneficial, the evidence base remains thin and conflicting. In conclusion, best management of foot ulcers is achieved by what is taken out of the foot (pressure, callus, infection, and slough) rather than what is put on the foot (adjuvant treatment).

  2. Sensor architectural tradeoff for diabetic foot ulcer monitoring.

    PubMed

    Ostadabbas, Sarah; Saeed, Adnan; Nourani, Mehrdad; Pompeo, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    The diabetic foot complications constitute a tremendous challenge for patients, caregivers, and the healthcare system. Studies show up to 25% of diabetic individuals will develop a foot ulcer during their lifetime and many of these patients eventually must undergo amputation as a result of infection due to untreated foot ulcers. With current technology, in-shoe monitoring systems can be implemented to continuously monitor at-risk ulceration sites based on known indicators such as peak pressure. The important parameters in designing a pressure-sensing insole include the number, location and size of sensors. In this paper, we aim at showing the criticality of sensor architectural tradeoff in developing the in-shoe plantar pressure monitoring systems. We evaluate this tradeoff by using our custom-made platform for data collection during normal walking.

  3. [List of diagnostic tests and procedures in leg ulcer].

    PubMed

    Spoljar, Sanja

    2013-10-01

    Many factors contribute to the pathogenesis of leg ulcer. Most patients have venous leg ulcer due to chronic venous insufficiency. Less often, patients have arterial leg ulcer resulting from peripheral arterial occlusive disease, the most common cause of which is arteriosclerosis. Leg ulcer may be of a mixed arteriovenous origin. In diabetic patients, distal symmetric neuropathy and peripheral vascular disease are probably the most important etiologic factors in the development of diabetic leg ulcer. Other causes of chronic leg ulcers are hematologic diseases, autoimmune diseases, genetic defects, infectious diseases, primary skin diseases, cutaneous malignant diseases, use of some medications and therapeutic procedures, and numerous exogenous factors. Diagnosis of leg ulcer is based on medical history, inspection, palpation of skin temperature, palpation of arteries, fascia holes, presence and degree of edema, firm painful cords, and functional testing to assess peripheral occlusive arterial disease or identify superficial and deep venous reflux of the legs. Knowledge of differential diagnosis is essential for ensuring treatment success in patients with leg ulcer. There are many possible etiologic factors of leg ulcers and sometimes, clinical findings are similar. Additional testing should be performed, e.g., serologic testing such as blood count, C-reactive protein, HBA1c, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, differential blood count, total proteins, electrolytes, coagulation parameters, circulating immune complex, cryoglobulins, homocysteins, AT, PAI-1, APC resistance, proteins C and S, paraproteins, ANA, ENA, ANCA, dsDNA, antiphospholipid antibodies, urea, creatinine, blood lipids, vitamins and trace elements. Also, biopsy of the lesion for histopathology, direct immunofluorescence, bacteriology and mycology should be included. Other tests are Raynaud (cold stimulation) test and pathergy test. Device-based diagnostic testing should be performed for future

  4. Management of ulcerative colitis

    PubMed Central

    Fell, John M; Muhammed, Rafeeq; Spray, Chris; Crook, Kay; Russell, Richard K

    2016-01-01

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) in children is increasing. The range of treatments available has also increased too but around 1 in 4 children still require surgery to control their disease. An up-to-date understanding of treatments is essential for all clinicians involved in the care of UC patients to ensure appropriate and timely treatment while minimising the risk of complications and side effects. PMID:26553909

  5. Chronic leg ulcer: does a patient always get a correct diagnosis and adequate treatment?

    PubMed

    Mooij, Michael C; Huisman, Laurens C

    2016-03-01

    Patients with chronic leg ulcers have severely impaired quality of life and account for a high percentage of annual healthcare costs. To establish the cause of a chronic leg ulcer, referral to a center with a multidisciplinary team of professionals is often necessary. Treating the underlying cause diminishes healing time and reduces costs. In venous leg ulcers adequate compression therapy is still a problem. It can be improved by training the professionals with pressure measuring devices. A perfect fitting of elastic stockings is important to prevent venous leg ulcer recurrence. In most cases, custom-made stockings are the best choice for this purpose. PMID:26916772

  6. [Ulcerative colitis? Guidelines 2004].

    PubMed

    Siegmund, B; Zeitz, M

    2005-10-12

    Ulcerative colitis was first described in 1859 from Samuel Wilks, a physician at Guy's hospital in London. The prevalence in the high incidence areas ranges from 80 to 120/100.000/year. Ulcerative colitis is a chronic relapsing or chronic active disease which starts at the rectum and presents with a continuous inflammation. Primarily young adults are affected (20 to 40 years of age) but the disease may present at all ages, from younger than 1 year of life to the 80s. Many series show a secondary peak in incidence in the elderly. In the present review we will focus on the basic principles of the therapy with regard to the variety of disease manifestations. The therapeutic algorithms will be described separately for the induction of remission and the maintenance of remission. The localization of inflammation and disease activity represent crucial factors which have to be considered. With regard to these factors, the therapeutic regimens range from simple local therapy with aminosalicylates to systemic immunosuppressive therapy, which will in extreme cases require the administration of ciclosporin. Since ulcerative colitis is associated with an increased risk in developing colon carcinoma, medical therapy as well as endoscopic surveillance are fundamental in the prevention of carcinoma. In the end an outlook to future therapeutic targets and strategies will be provided. PMID:16245638

  7. Bacteriology of chronic leg ulcers.

    PubMed

    Lookingbill, D P; Miller, S H; Knowles, R C

    1978-12-01

    The quantitative bacteriology of 13 chronic leg ulcers was sequentially assessed by both swab and biopsy culture techniques, and the effect of either a 10% benzoyl peroxide lotion or placebo lotion was evaluated. There was good correlation between the swab and biopsy culture techniques in 12 of the 17 instances where simultaneous swabs and biopsies were done. Though the benzoyl peroxide did not favorably affect the bacterial flora, ulcer healing did appear to correlate with quantitative bacterial counts. THREE of five ulcers containing fewer than 10(5) organisms per gram of tissue or per centimeter of ulcer surface area healed, while none of eight ulcers containing more than 10(5) organisms healed. Quantitative bacteriological measurements can serve as useful tools in evaluating healing of leg ulcers.

  8. Treatment of a non-healing diabetic foot ulcer with platelet-rich plasma.

    PubMed

    Suresh, Deepak H; Suryanarayan, Shwetha; Sarvajnamurthy, Sacchidanand; Puvvadi, Srikanth

    2014-01-01

    Lower extremity ulcers and amputations are an increasing problem among individuals with diabetes. Among diabetes mellitus-related complications, foot ulceration is the most common, affecting approximately 15% of diabetic patients during their lifetime. The pathogenesis of diabetic ulcer is peripheral sensory neuropathy, calluses, oedema and peripheral vascular disease. Diabetic ulcer is managed by adequate control of infections and blood sugar levels, surgical debridement with various dressings and off loading of the foot from pressure. In spite of these standard measures, some recalcitrant non-healing ulcers need additional growth factors for healing. Autologous platelet-rich plasma is easy and cost-effective method in treating diabetic ulcers as it provides necessary growth factors which enhance healing.

  9. [Peptic ulcer disease and stress].

    PubMed

    Herszényi, László; Juhász, Márk; Mihály, Emese; Tulassay, Zsolt

    2015-08-30

    The discovery that Helicobacter pylori infection is the major cause of peptic ulcer disease revolutionised our views on the etiology and treatment of the disease. This discovery has tempted many experts to conclude that psychological factors and, specifically, stress are unimportant. However, Helicobacter pylori infection alone does not explain fully the incidence and prevalence of peptic ulcer disease. It has been demonstrated that stress can cause peptic ulcer disease even in the absence of Helicobacter pylori infection, supporting a multicausal model of peptic ulcer etiology. Psychological stress among other risk factors can function as a cofactor with Helicobacter pylori infection.

  10. Increased plasma noradrenaline and serum gastrin in patients with duodenal ulcer.

    PubMed

    Brandsborg, O; Brandsborg, M; Løvgreen, N A; Christensen, N J

    1978-02-01

    Serum gastrin, serum insulin, plasma noradrenaline, plasma adrenaline, pulse rate and blood pressure were measured repeatedly during 24h in six patients with duodenal ulcer and in six control subjects. Mean serum gastrin concentration was 3-4 times higher in duodenal ulcer patients than in controls during both the day and at night. Serum insulin was the same in both groups of subjects. Overnight fasting and mean supine plasma noradrenaline as well as mean supine pulse rate were significantly higher in duodenal ulcer patients than in controls. Plasma adrenaline and arterial blood pressure were the same in patients and controls. These results suggest that sympathetic nervous activity is increased in patients with duodenal ulcer. The increased sympathetic nervous activity may mean that duodenal ulcer patients are subject to more stress than normal subjects or may be compensatory to increased vagal nervous activity presumed by some authors to be present in such patients.

  11. Perforated peptic ulcer.

    PubMed

    Søreide, Kjetil; Thorsen, Kenneth; Harrison, Ewen M; Bingener, Juliane; Møller, Morten H; Ohene-Yeboah, Michael; Søreide, Jon Arne

    2015-09-26

    Perforated peptic ulcer is a common emergency condition worldwide, with associated mortality rates of up to 30%. A scarcity of high-quality studies about the condition limits the knowledge base for clinical decision making, but a few published randomised trials are available. Although Helicobacter pylori and use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are common causes, demographic differences in age, sex, perforation location, and underlying causes exist between countries, and mortality rates also vary. Clinical prediction rules are used, but accuracy varies with study population. Early surgery, either by laparoscopic or open repair, and proper sepsis management are essential for good outcome. Selected patients can be managed non-operatively or with novel endoscopic approaches, but validation of such methods in trials is needed. Quality of care, sepsis care bundles, and postoperative monitoring need further assessment. Adequate trials with low risk of bias are urgently needed to provide better evidence. We summarise the evidence for perforated peptic ulcer management and identify directions for future clinical research.

  12. Venous ulceration, fibrinogen and fibrinolysis.

    PubMed Central

    Leach, R. D.

    1984-01-01

    The effect of long and short-term venous hypertension upon lymph fibrinogen concentrations was studied in an attempt to explain the peri-capillary deposition of fibrin reported in patients with post-phlebitic syndromes. The clearance of radioactive fibrinogen/thrombin clots from the subcutaneous tissues of rats and human volunteers was also studied. Both long- and short-term venous hypertension were found to increase fibrinogen transport across the interstitial space by more than 600%. Not only was there evidence of fibrinolytic activity in the lymph but after long-term venous hypertension alpha 2 antiplasmin activity was also detectable. Skin biopsies from the venous hypertensive ankles showed deposition of interstitial fibrin. The clearance of radioactive fibrinogen/thrombin clots from the subcutaneous tissues of the rat was found to be delayed if the rats were given epsilon amino caproic acid but it could not be increased with stanozolol. In human subjects it was found that patients with lipodermatosclerosis had delayed clot clearance and retarded blood fibrinolytic activity when compared with normal volunteers and patients with uncomplicated varicose veins. The principle cause why tall men are more subject to ulcers than short men, Dr Young conceived to be then length of the column of blood in their veins; which by its pressure, renders the legs less able to recover when hurt by any violence. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 5 PMID:6742738

  13. Sensing Senses: Tactile Feedback for the Prevention of Decubitus Ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Verbunt, Marcel

    2009-01-01

    Decubitus ulcers, also known as pressure sores, is a major problem in health care, in particular for patients with spinal cord injuries. These patients cannot feel the discomfort that would urge healthy people to change their posture. We describe a system that uses a sensor mat to detect problematic postures and provides tactile feedback to the user. The results of our preliminary study with healthy subjects show that the tactile feedback is a viable option to spoken feedback. We envision the system being used for rehabilitation games, but also for everyday Decubitus ulcers prevention. PMID:19949852

  14. Stromal vascularization prevents corneal ulceration.

    PubMed

    Conn, H; Berman, M; Kenyon, K; Langer, R; Gage, J

    1980-04-01

    Experiments were performed with a model of focal, thermal-induced ulceration to test the clinical impression that vascularization prevents ulceration of the corneal stroma. Slow-release polymers containing a vasoproliferase agent (tumor angiogenesis factor) were placed in corneal pockets 2 mm central to the limbus of albino rabbits. These polymers elicited blood vessel ingrowth up to the implant. Control eyes received empty polymers which caused minimal to no vessel growth. Polymers were removed, and each cornea received a focal, thermal burn placed just central to the polymer site. All control corneas ulcerated: most (79%) developed deep stromal or perforating ulcers. Only 25% of prevascularized corneas developed stromal ulcers, and none was deep or perforating. After thermal burns, vessels in both groups grew at the same linear rate toward the burned area. There was a direct relationship between the distance separating the nearest blood vessel and the burned area at the time of burning and the maximum depth of stromal ulceration. Thus prevention of or less severe stromal ulceration is correlated with the earlier presence of vessels in the burned area.

  15. Complications of peptic ulcer disease.

    PubMed

    Milosavljevic, Tomica; Kostić-Milosavljević, Mirjana; Jovanović, Ivan; Krstić, Miodrag

    2011-01-01

    There are four major complications of peptic ulcer disease (PUD): bleeding, perforation, penetration, and obstruction. Complications can occur in patients with peptic ulcer of any etiology. Despite improvements in the medical management and the lower overall incidence of PUD, there are conflicting data about the incidence of potentially life-threatening ulcer complications. There are important time trends embedded within this stable overall rate of complications: the dramatic decline in the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori (comparing the cohort born from 1900 to 1920 to cohorts born after 1940); an increased use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and an increased rate of ulcer complications related to such drug use, especially in the elderly. As a result of these trends, ulcer complications are on the rise in older patients but on the decline in younger individuals. Hemorrhage is the most frequent PUD complication and its incidence is increasing in comparison to perforation and stenosis. Therapeutic endoscopy is considered the treatment of choice for bleeding ulcers, reducing the need for emergent surgical procedures to 10-20% of the cases. In recent years, besides the success of angiographic embolization, the containment of massive hemorrhage must also be taken into account. Transcatheter arterial embolization is also an effective and safe treatment in patients with duodenal ulcers re-bleeding after therapeutic endoscopy or surgery.

  16. [THERAPEUTIC GUIDE IN VENOUS ULCERS].

    PubMed

    López Herranz, Marta; Bas Caro, Pedro; García Jábega, Rosa Ma; García Carmona, Francisco Javier; Villalta García, Pedro; Postigo Mota, Salvador

    2014-11-01

    The treatment of venous ulcers and wounds in general, is a complex and important public health problem, with personal effects, family and health, without addressing the economic impact includes assistance, care of patients with ulcerative lesions. The increase in life expectancy, driven by improved socio-sanitary conditions that this aging population, facilitates the emergence of chronic diseases may be complicated by the presence of skin ulcers. There is no doubt that the best way to treat a skin ulcer is avoiding to occur, hence the importance of early diagnosis and risk factors act alone them. In relation to venous ulcers is crucial, provide local treatment, act on the cause, because if not, relapse is the norm in this type of injury. Currently, the moist wound healing, is an important step in solving earlier of these chronic wounds. This has meant that the pharmaceutical industry has been involved in researching and creating different types of dressings, having specific activity at different stages of venous ulcer healing, ie inflammatory phase, proliferative and remodeling. The proliferation of these products has been increasing over the years, not surprisingly, are described therapeutic 12 families that are applied in the management, care of these injuries. The fact of existing therapeutic options highlights the ineffectiveness of these products individually. Therefore, the nurse will not forget that the optimal treatment of venous ulcers, necessarily involves choosing the right product for every type and stage of the lesion. In this decision process, strongly influenced by the specific characteristics of each patient and injury, the nurse will take into account a lot of factors when choosing the product, not forgetting that an ulcer is not cured with a single therapeutic element, several products being used throughout the process to evolutionary venous ulcer until complete resolution.

  17. [Golimumab Therapy in Ulcerative Colitis].

    PubMed

    Moon, Won

    2016-02-01

    Ulcerative colitis is a chronic inflammatory condition of the colon, characterized by diffuse mucosal inflammation and blood-mixed diarrhea. The main treatment has been 5-aminosalicylic acid, steroid, thiopurine, and anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) antibodies including infliximab, adalimumab, and golimumab. Golimumab, a new anti-TNF-α agent has been recently approved for patients with moderate to severe ulcerative colitis. Its efficacy and safety has been demonstrated in line with infliximab and adalimumab in preclinical and clinical studies. This review will focus on golimumab therapy in ulcerative colitis.

  18. [Psychological differences between ulcer and non-ulcer dyspeptic patients].

    PubMed

    Slepoy, V; Pezzotto, S; Pedrana, R; Gatto, A; Poletto, L

    1994-01-01

    The existence of differences in the psychological profile of 39 endoscopically evaluated patients with ulcer (U) and non ulcer (NU) dyspepsia were examined. There were 21 U and 18 NU subjects. Cigarette smoking, intake of alcohol, coffee, mate, aspirin and NSAID were recorded, but there were no significant differences between the two groups. Personality traits were determined by the Rorschach Test, considering psychological profile (introversive, extroversive, self-restrained), impulse and emotion control (do not allow their expression, impulsive, adequately conveyed) and level of social adaptation (low, normal, high). U and NU subjects experienced a similar number of potentially stressful life events. However, U patients perceived their events more negatively. Although no one type of "ulcer personality" was found consistently, ulcer patients tended to be more introversive and they had a better social adaptation than NU.

  19. Ulcerative Colitis in Infancy

    PubMed Central

    Rukunuzzaman, Md; Karim, A. S. M. Bazlul

    2011-01-01

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a chronic idiopathic inflammatory disorder of colon. Frequency of UC is gradually increasing over few years worldwide. Prevalence is 35 to 100/100 000 people in USA, 1% of them are infants. UC develops in a genetically predisposed individual with altered intestinal immune response. An eight-month-old girl presented with loose bloody stool, growth failure, and moderate pallor. The girl was diagnosed as a case of UC by colonoscopy and biopsy. Treatment was thereafter started with immunosuppressive drugs. After initial induction therapy with parenteral steroid and infliximab, the patient is now on remission with azathioprine and mesalamine. UC is rare in Bangladesh, especially in children, and it is rarer during infancy. Several conditions like infective colitis, allergic colitis, Meckel's diverticulitis, Crohn's disease, etc. may mimic the features of UC. So, if a child presents with recurrent bloody diarrhea, UC should be considered as differential diagnosis. PMID:22064342

  20. Reviewing the Literature on the Effectiveness of Pressure Relieving Movements

    PubMed Central

    Stinson, May

    2013-01-01

    Sitting for prolonged periods of time increases seating interface pressures, which is known to increase the risk of developing pressure ulcers. Those at risk of developing pressure ulcers are advised to perform pressure relieving movements such as “pushups” or “forward leans” in order to reduce the duration and magnitude of pressure acting on the vulnerable ischial tuberosity region. The aim of this review was to synthesize and critique the existing literature investigating the effectiveness of pressure relieving movements on seating interface pressures. The twenty-seven articles included in this paper highlight the need for further research investigating the effect of recommended pressure relieving movements on the pressures around the ischial tuberosities. Furthermore, this review found that the majority of individuals at risk of developing pressure ulcers do not adhere with the pressure relieving frequency or magnitude of movements currently recommended, indicating a need for pressure ulcer prevention to be explored further. PMID:23365733

  1. [Surgical treatment of peptic ulcer].

    PubMed

    Hurtado-Andrade, Humberto

    2003-01-01

    Despite a decreasing number of operations for ulcer, there are many patients who require definitive treatment. If an operation is required for duodenal ulcer, vagotomy of some type is part of the treatment, and in gastric ulcer resection with or without vagotomy is required. Extended proximal gastric vagotomy can be performed in the majority of patients, excluding those who are unstable or have severe concomitant diseases. In cases of urgent surgery for hemorrhage or perforation, the surgical procedure must be selected individually. Although the role of traditional operations is well established, there is increasing interest in laparoscopic approaches. However, because there is a diminishing of elective surgery for ulcer, it is unlikely that these new procedures may be evaluated as operations were evaluated in the past.

  2. The pivotal role of offloading in the management of neuropathic foot ulceration.

    PubMed

    Wu, Stephanie C; Crews, Ryan T; Armstrong, David G

    2005-12-01

    Lower extremity amputations among persons with diabetes are generally preceded by neuropathic foot ulcerations. Healing of diabetic ulcerations in a timely manner is of central importance in any plan for amputation prevention. With sufficient vascular supply, appropriate débridement, and infection control, the primary mode of healing a diabetic neuropathic foot ulcer is pressure dispersion. The total contact cast has been deemed by many to be the gold standard in offloading; however, modification of a standard removable cast walker to ensure patient compliance may be as efficacious in healing diabetic foot ulcers as the total contact cast. Combining an effective, easy to use offloading device that ensures patient compliance with advanced wound healing modalities may form a formidable team in healing ulcers and potentially averting lower limb amputations.

  3. Compression therapy of leg ulcers with PAOD.

    PubMed

    Ladwig, Andrea; Haase, Hermann; Bichel, Jens; Schuren, Jan; Jünger, Michael

    2014-05-19

    Objectives: To assess the clinical safety of a new short-stretch 2-layer compression system (3M(tm) Coban(tm) 2 Lite) in patients with peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAOD). This system combines a low resting pressure with a high working pressure. Methods: A pilot study was performed in 15 subjects with moderate PAOD, i.e. an ABPI of 0.5-0.8. Co-existing chronic venous insufficiency or leg ulcer was not mandatory. All subjects received the compression system which was reapplied at each study visit (days 1, 2, 3, 4, 7, 10, 14). The safety parameters were: sub-bandage pressure immediately after application, pressure-related skin damage, hypoxia-related pain, and adverse events. A product comfort questionnaire was completed at the last visit. Results: The average sub-bandage pressure of 30 mmHg defined by the protocol was achieved. No pressure-related skin damage or hypoxia-related pain was found. The reported adverse device effects were as expected for compression therapies, including dry skin and pruritus. The product comfort questionnaire completed by the subjects showed a good tolerability profile. Conclusion: The short-stretch 2-layer compression system (3M(tm) Coban(tm) 2 Lite) was safe and well tolerated in subjects with moderate PAOD. PMID:24843079

  4. Pressure and the diabetic foot: clinical science and offloading techniques.

    PubMed

    Boulton, Andrew J M

    2004-05-01

    Diabetic foot ulceration is a common, yet in many cases an eminently preventable, complication that affects 1 in 20 patients with diabetes. Risk factors for ulceration include insensitivity (secondary to somatic neuropathy), high foot pressures, callus formation (a consequence of sympathetic neuropathy and high foot pressures), deformities (such as claw feet, prominent metatarsal heads, etc.), peripheral vascular disease, and most importantly, a past history of ulceration. None of these factors alone causes ulceration; thus, early identification and amelioration of these factors is a primary aim in foot ulcer prevention. A number of therapeutic approaches may help reduce ulcer incidence: these include therapeutic footwear, hosiery, and, potentially, liquid silicone injected under high-pressure areas. In the management of neuropathic ulcers, pressure relief is of the utmost importance, and total contact casting remains the "gold standard" means of achieving such pressure redistribution. The successful management of diabetic foot ulceration depends on a team approach, remembering that ulcers should heal if (1) the arterial circulation is intact, (2) pressure relief is achieved and maintained over the ulcer, and (3) infection is appropriately treated.

  5. Hyperhomocysteinaemia and chronic venous ulcers.

    PubMed

    de Franciscis, Stefano; De Sarro, Giovambattista; Longo, Paola; Buffone, Gianluca; Molinari, Vincenzo; Stillitano, Domenico M; Gallelli, Luca; Serra, Raffaele

    2015-02-01

    Chronic venous ulceration (CVU) is the major cause of chronic wounds of lower extremities, and is a part of the complex of chronic venous disease. Previous studies have hypothesised that several thrombophilic factors, such as hyperhomocysteinaemia (HHcy), may be associated with chronic venous ulcers. In this study, we evaluated the prevalence of HHcy in patients with venous leg ulcers and the effect of folic acid therapy on wound healing. Eighty-seven patients with venous leg ulcers were enrolled in this study to calculate the prevalence of HHcy in this population. All patients underwent basic treatment for venous ulcer (compression therapy ± surgical procedures). Patients with HHcy (group A) received basic treatment and administered folic acid (1·2 mg/day for 12 months) and patients without HHcy (group B) received only basic treatment. Healing was assessed by means of computerised planimetry analysis. The prevalence of HHcy among patients with chronic venous ulcer enrolled in this study was 62·06%. Healing rate was significantly higher (P < 0·05) in group A patients (78·75%) compared with group B patients (63·33%). This study suggests a close association, statistically significant, between HHcy and CVU. Homocysteine-lowering therapy with folic acid seems to expedite wound healing. Despite these aspects, the exact molecular mechanisms between homocysteine and CVU have not been clearly defined and further studies are needed.

  6. Effect of Custom-Made Footwear on Foot Ulcer Recurrence in Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Bus, Sicco A.; Waaijman, Roelof; Arts, Mark; de Haart, Mirjam; Busch-Westbroek, Tessa; van Baal, Jeff; Nollet, Frans

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Custom-made footwear is the treatment of choice to prevent foot ulcer recurrence in diabetes. This footwear primarily aims to offload plantar regions at high ulcer risk. However, ulcer recurrence rates are high. We assessed the effect of offloading-improved custom-made footwear and the role of footwear adherence on plantar foot ulcer recurrence. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We randomly assigned 171 neuropathic diabetic patients with a recently healed plantar foot ulcer to custom-made footwear with improved and subsequently preserved offloading (∼20% peak pressure relief by modifying the footwear) or to usual care (i.e., nonimproved custom-made footwear). Primary outcome was plantar foot ulcer recurrence in 18 months. Secondary outcome was ulcer recurrence in patients with an objectively measured adherence of ≥80% of steps taken. RESULTS On the basis of intention-to-treat, 33 of 85 patients (38.8%) with improved footwear and 38 of 86 patients (44.2%) with usual care had a recurrent ulcer (relative risk −11%, odds ratio 0.80 [95% CI 0.44–1.47], P = 0.48). Ulcer-free survival curves were not significantly different between groups (P = 0.40). In the 79 patients (46% of total group) with high adherence, 9 of 35 (25.7%) with improved footwear and 21 of 44 (47.8%) with usual care had a recurrent ulcer (relative risk −46%, odds ratio 0.38 [0.15–0.99], P = 0.045). CONCLUSIONS Offloading-improved custom-made footwear does not significantly reduce the incidence of plantar foot ulcer recurrence in diabetes compared with custom-made footwear that does not undergo such improvement, unless it is worn as recommended. PMID:24130357

  7. Endoscopic Obliteration for Bleeding Peptic Ulcer

    PubMed Central

    Zawadzki, J.J. J.; Gajda, A.G. G.; Kamiński, P. Ł.; Lembas, L.; Bielecki, K.

    1997-01-01

    A group of 133 patients treated for bleeding peptic ulcer in our Department, is reviewed. Within several hours of admission, all patients underwent upper gastrointestinal tract gastroscopy and obliteration of the bleeding ulcer. Bleeding gastric ulcers were found in 41 patients, and duodenal ulcers in 92 patients. Patients were classified according to the Forrest scale: IA – 11 patients, IB – 49 patients, IIA – 35 patients, lIB – 40 patients. In 126 (94.7%) patients the bleeding was stopped, and 7 required urgent surgery: 3 patients with gastric ulcer underwent gastrectomy, and 4 with duodenal ulcer – truncal vagotomy with pyloroplasty and had the bleeding site underpinned. Fifty-five patients underwent elective surgery: gastrectomy and vagotomy (18 patients with gastric ulcer), highly selective vagotomy (25 patients with duodenal ulcer) and truncal vagotomy and pyloroplasty (12 patients with duodenal ulcer). None of the patients was observed to have recurrent bleeding. PMID:18493453

  8. Perforated peptic ulcer

    PubMed Central

    Søreide, Kjetil; Thorsen, Kenneth; Harrison, Ewen M.; Bingener, Juliane; Møller, Morten H.; Ohene-Yeboah, Michael; Søreide, Jon Arne

    2015-01-01

    Summary Perforated peptic ulcer (PPU) is a frequent emergency condition worldwide with associated mortality up to 30%. A paucity of studies on PPU limits the knowledge base for clinical decision-making, but a few randomised trials are available. While Helicobacter pylori and use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are frequent causes of PPU, demographic differences in age, gender, perforation location and aetiology exist between countries, as do mortality rates. Clinical prediction rules are used, but accuracy varies with study population. Early surgery, either by laparoscopic or open repair, and proper sepsis management are essential for good outcome. Selected patients can perhaps be managed non-operatively or with novel endoscopic approaches, but validation in trials is needed. Quality of care, sepsis care-bundles and postoperative monitoring need further evaluation. Adequate trials with low risk of bias are urgently needed for better evidence. Here we summarize the evidence for PPU management and identify directions for future clinical research. PMID:26460663

  9. Classifying bed inclination using pressure images.

    PubMed

    Baran Pouyan, M; Ostadabbas, S; Nourani, M; Pompeo, M

    2014-01-01

    Pressure ulcer is one of the most prevalent problems for bed-bound patients in hospitals and nursing homes. Pressure ulcers are painful for patients and costly for healthcare systems. Accurate in-bed posture analysis can significantly help in preventing pressure ulcers. Specifically, bed inclination (back angle) is a factor contributing to pressure ulcer development. In this paper, an efficient methodology is proposed to classify bed inclination. Our approach uses pressure values collected from a commercial pressure mat system. Then, by applying a number of image processing and machine learning techniques, the approximate degree of bed is estimated and classified. The proposed algorithm was tested on 15 subjects with various sizes and weights. The experimental results indicate that our method predicts bed inclination in three classes with 80.3% average accuracy.

  10. Antibiotic treatment for uncomplicated neuropathic forefoot ulcers in diabetes: a controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Chantelau, E; Tanudjaja, T; Altenhöfer, F; Ersanli, Z; Lacigova, S; Metzger, C

    1996-02-01

    To investigate the effect of oral antibiotics in purely neuropathic ulcers (Wagner grade 1-2, no osteomyelitis), a double blind placebo-controlled study was performed. Forty-four patients were enrolled and subjected to standard treatment with absolute pressure relief (half shoes), daily wound cleansing (topical disinfectant), sterile dressings (specialized nurse). Patients were randomized to an antibiotic (amoxicillin plus clavulanic acid), or placebo. The study was stopped when the antibiotic proved unsuitable according to swab result, or on clinical grounds (no improvement within 6 days of recruitment). Main outcome measure was the ulcer closing rate during 20 days, as assessed by standardized photographs. All ulcers except one were infected. Of the placebo group (n = 22), 2 patients had to be withdrawn within 6 days, versus 3 patients of the antibiotic-group (n = 22). In the placebo group, 10 ulcers were healed versus 6 ulcers in the antibiotic group (NS). Mean (95% CI) reduction in ulcer radius was 0.41 (0.21-0.61) mm day-1 in the placebo group versus 0.27 (0.15-0.39) mm day-1 in the antibiotic group (NS). In conclusion, there is no benefit from antibiotic treatment with amoxicillin plus clavulanic acid as a supplement to standard therapy in uncomplicated neuropathic foot ulcers, provided pressure relief is complete, and wound care is performed strictly supervised. However, a Type-II statistical error cannot be excluded in this small study.

  11. Nutritional care in peptic ulcer

    PubMed Central

    VOMERO, Nathália Dalcin; COLPO, Elisângela

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Peptic ulcer is a lesion of the mucosal lining of the upper gastrointestinal tract characterized by an imbalance between aggressive and protective factors of the mucosa, having H. pylori as the main etiologic factor. Dietotherapy is important in the prevention and treatment of this disease. Aim To update nutritional therapy in adults' peptic ulcer. Methods Exploratory review without restrictions with primary sources indexed in Scielo, PubMed, Medline, ISI, and Scopus databases. Results Dietotherapy, as well as caloric distribution, should be adjusted to the patient's needs aiming to normalize the nutritional status and promote healing. Recommended nutrients can be different in the acute phase and in the recovery phase, and there is a greater need of protein and some micronutrients, such as vitamin A, zinc, selenium, and vitamin C in the recovery phase. In addition, some studies have shown that vitamin C has a beneficial effect in eradication of H. pylori. Fibers and probiotics also play a important role in the treatment of peptic ulcer, because they reduce the side effects of antibiotics and help reduce treatment time. Conclusion A balanced diet is vital in the treatment of peptic ulcer, once food can prevent, treat or even alleviate the symptoms involving this pathology. However, there are few papers that innovate dietotherapy; so additional studies addressing more specifically the dietotherapy for treatment of peptic ulcer are necessary. PMID:25626944

  12. Medical management of venous ulcers.

    PubMed

    Pascarella, Luigi; Shortell, Cynthia K

    2015-03-01

    Venous disease is the most common cause of chronic leg ulceration and represents an advanced clinical manifestation of venous insufficiency. Due to their frequency and chronicity, venous ulcers have a high socioeconomic impact, with treatment costs accounting for 1% of the health care budget in Western countries. The evaluation of patients with venous ulcers should include a thorough medical history for prior deep venous thrombosis, assessment for an hypercoagulable state, and a physical examination. Use of the CEAP (clinical, etiology, anatomy, pathophysiology) Classification System and the revised Venous Clinical Severity Scoring System is strongly recommended to characterize disease severity and assess response to treatment. This venous condition requires lifestyle modification, with affected individuals performing daily intervals of leg elevation to control edema; use of elastic compression garments; and moderate physical activity, such as walking wearing below-knee elastic stockings. Meticulous skin care, treatment of dermatitis, and prompt treatment of cellulitis are important aspects of medical management. The pharmacology of chronic venous insufficiency and venous ulcers include essentially two medications: pentoxifylline and phlebotropic agents. The micronized purified flavonoid fraction is an effective adjunct to compression therapy in patients with large, chronic ulceration.

  13. Potassium Channelopathies and Gastrointestinal Ulceration

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jaeyong; Lee, Seung Hun; Giebisch, Gerhard; Wang, Tong

    2016-01-01

    Potassium channels and transporters maintain potassium homeostasis and play significant roles in several different biological actions via potassium ion regulation. In previous decades, the key revelations that potassium channels and transporters are involved in the production of gastric acid and the regulation of secretion in the stomach have been recognized. Drugs used to treat peptic ulceration are often potassium transporter inhibitors. It has also been reported that potassium channels are involved in ulcerative colitis. Direct toxicity to the intestines from nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs has been associated with altered potassium channel activities. Several reports have indicated that the long-term use of the antianginal drug Nicorandil, an adenosine triphosphate-sensitive potassium channel opener, increases the chances of ulceration and perforation from the oral to anal regions throughout the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Several of these drug features provide further insights into the role of potassium channels in the occurrence of ulceration in the GI tract. The purpose of this review is to investigate whether potassium channelopathies are involved in the mechanisms responsible for ulceration that occurs throughout the GI tract. PMID:27784845

  14. Cost comparison of three kinds of compression therapy in venous ulcer*

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Bruno Emmanuel de Medeiros; de Sousa, Alana Tamar Oliveira; França, Jael Rúbia Figueiredo de Sá; Soares, Maria Júlia Guimarães Oliveira

    2016-01-01

    Evolution and cost of three types of compression therapy (single layer, multilayer and Unna boot) in patients with venous ulceration were compared. The evaluation lasted two months and used photographic records and instrument based on pressure ulcer scale for healing (PUSH). Treatment with monolayer compression therapy presented the lowest cost and more efficacy of the three types, with 82% savings compared with the multilayer therapy. PMID:27579760

  15. Cost comparison of three kinds of compression therapy in venous ulcer.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Bruno Emmanuel de Medeiros; Sousa, Alana Tamar Oliveira de; França, Jael Rúbia Figueiredo de Sá; Soares, Maria Júlia Guimarães Oliveira

    2016-01-01

    Evolution and cost of three types of compression therapy (single layer, multilayer and Unna boot) in patients with venous ulceration were compared. The evaluation lasted two months and used photographic records and instrument based on pressure ulcer scale for healing (PUSH). Treatment with monolayer compression therapy presented the lowest cost and more efficacy of the three types, with 82% savings compared with the multilayer therapy. PMID:27579760

  16. Multisystemic Sarcoidosis Presenting as Pretibial Leg Ulcers.

    PubMed

    Wollina, Uwe; Baunacke, Anja; Hansel, Gesina

    2016-09-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multisystemic disease of unknown etiology. Up to 30% of patients develop cutaneous manifestations, either specific or nonspecific. Ulcerating sarcoidosis leading to leg ulcers is a rare observation that may lead to confusions with other, more common types of chronic leg ulcers. We report the case of a 45-year-old female patient with chronic multisystemic sarcoidosis presenting with pretibial leg ulcers. Other etiology could be excluded. Histology revealed nonspecific findings. Therefore, the diagnosis of nonspecific leg ulcers in sarcoidosis was confirmed. Treatment consisted of oral prednisolone and good ulcer care. Complete healing was achieved within 6 months. Sarcoidosis is a rare cause of leg ulcers and usually sarcoid granulomas can be found. Our patient illustrates that even in the absence of sarcoid granulomas, leg ulcers can be due to sarcoidosis. PMID:27272316

  17. Peptic Ulcer - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Peptic Ulcer URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/ ... V W XYZ List of All Topics All Peptic Ulcer - Multiple Languages To use the sharing features on ...

  18. Inflammation in chronic venous ulcers.

    PubMed

    Raffetto, J D

    2013-03-01

    Chronic venous ulcers (CVUs) occur in approximately 1% of the general population. Risk factors for chronic venous disease (CVD) include heredity, age, female sex and obesity. Although not restricted to the elderly, the prevalence of CVD, especially leg ulcers, increases with age. CVD has a considerable impact on health-care resources. It has been estimated that venous ulcers cause the loss of approximately two million working days and incur treatment costs of approximately $3 billion per year in the USA. Overall, CVD has been estimated to account for 1-3% of the total health-care budgets in countries with developed health-care systems. The pathophysiology of dermal abnormalities in CVU is reflective of a complex interplay that involves sustained venous hypertension, inflammation, changes in microcirculation, cytokine and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activation, resulting in altered cellular function and delayed wound healing.

  19. [Genital ulcers--what's new?].

    PubMed

    Abu Raya, Bahaa; Bamberger, Ellen; Srugo, Isaac

    2013-08-01

    The most common infectious causes of genital ulcers are herpes simplex virus and syphilis. However, mixed infections can occur and genital ulcer may increase the risk of acquiring human immunodeficiency virus. Although the history and physical examination can narrow the differential diagnosis, there is a need for initial routine laboratory testing for the most common pathogens that includes: for syphilis: serologic screening and dark field examination of the lesion; for herpes simplex virus: serology, vial culture and/or polymerase chain reaction. Human immunodeficiency testing is mandatory. Recently, some clinical laboratories adapted the reverse screening algorithm for syphilis (initial treponemal test, and, if positive, followed by non-treponemal test) that may potentially lead to overtreatment. Early and prompt therapy may decrease the risk of transmission of the infectious agent to others. This article reviews the infectious pathogens causing genital ulcers, their unique clinical manifestation, diagnosis and treatment.

  20. Pradaxa-induced esophageal ulcer.

    PubMed

    Wood, Michele; Shaw, Paul

    2015-10-09

    Pradaxa (dabigatran) is a direct thrombin inhibitor approved for prevention of stroke and systemic embolism in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation. We describe a case of esophageal ulceration associated with Pradaxa administration in a 75-year-old man. The patient reported difficulty swallowing and a burning sensation after taking his first dose of Pradaxa. An esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) revealed linear ulcerations in the mid-esophagus. Pradaxa was held beginning the day before the EGD. The patient reported that his pain and difficulty swallowing resolved on stopping Pradaxa. Pradaxa is formulated with a tartaric acid excipient to reduce variability in absorption. We hypothesise that the capsule lodged in the patient's esophagus and the tartaric acid may have caused local damage resulting in an esophageal ulcer. It is important to educate patients on proper administration of Pradaxa, to decrease the risk of this rare, but potentially serious adverse event.

  1. [Martorell Hypertensive Ischaemic Leg Ulcer].

    PubMed

    Nobbe, S; Hafner, J

    2015-10-01

    Martorell hypertensive ischaemic leg ulcer (HYTILU) represents an important differential diagnosis of painful leg ulcerations. Stenotic subcutaneous arteriolosclerosis in patients with long-standing arterial hypertension finally leads to skin infarction. The typical histological changes are very similar in Martorell HYTILU and calciphylaxis. This raises the hypothesis that the two entities may have a common pathogenesis. Martorell HYTILU presents as an extremely painful ulcer that is regularly located at the laterodorsal lower leg or at the Achilles tendon. Because of its inflammatory and violaceous wound edges and its tendency to progression, clinicians unaware of the diagnosis Martorell HYTILU might misdiagnose pyoderma gangrenosum or necrotising cutaneous vasculitis start an immunosuppressive treatment and avoid surgical diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. Instead, necrosectomy and split skin grafting are the treatment of choice for Martorell HYTILU.

  2. Raynaud, digital ulcers and calcinosis in scleroderma.

    PubMed

    Nitsche, Alejandro

    2012-01-01

    Raynaud, digital ulcers and calcinosis are frequent manifestations of patients with systemic sclerosis. Digital ulcers are seen in more than half of the patients with scleroderma. Hospitalizations, ischemic complications and impairment of hand function are frequently observed in patients with digital ulcers, especially if treatment is delayed. Rapid and intensive treatment escalation in patients with scleroderma and refractory Raynaud's phenomenon is one of the most effective preventive action available in order to avoid the development of digital ulcers and tissue loss.

  3. 38 CFR 4.110 - Ulcers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Digestive System § 4.110 Ulcers. Experience has shown that the term “peptic ulcer” is not sufficiently specific for rating purposes. Manifest differences in ulcers of the stomach... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Ulcers. 4.110 Section...

  4. 38 CFR 4.110 - Ulcers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Digestive System § 4.110 Ulcers. Experience has shown that the term “peptic ulcer” is not sufficiently specific for rating purposes. Manifest differences in ulcers of the stomach... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Ulcers. 4.110 Section...

  5. 38 CFR 4.110 - Ulcers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Digestive System § 4.110 Ulcers. Experience has shown that the term “peptic ulcer” is not sufficiently specific for rating purposes. Manifest differences in ulcers of the stomach... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Ulcers. 4.110 Section...

  6. Computed tomographic findings in penetrating peptic ulcer

    SciTech Connect

    Madrazo, B.L.; Halpert, R.D.; Sandler, M.A.; Pearlberg, J.L.

    1984-12-01

    Four cases of peptic ulcer penetrating the head of the pancreas were diagnosed by computed tomography (CT). Findings common to 3 cases included (a) an ulcer crater, (b) a sinus tract, and (c) enlargement of the head of the pancreas. Unlike other modalities, the inherent spatial resolution of CT allows a convenient diagnosis of this important complication of peptic ulcer disease.

  7. Endoscopic Management of Peptic Ulcer Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Joon Sung; Park, Sung Min

    2015-01-01

    Acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding is a common medical emergency around the world and the major cause is peptic ulcer bleeding. Endoscopic treatment is fundamental for the management of peptic ulcer bleeding. Despite recent advances in endoscopic treatment, mortality from peptic ulcer bleeding has still remained high. This is because the disease often occurs in elderly patients with frequent comorbidities and are taking ulcerogenic medications. Therefore, the management of peptic ulcer bleeding is still a challenge for clinicians. This article reviews the various endoscopic methods available for management of peptic ulcer bleeding and the techniques in using these methods. PMID:25844337

  8. Endoscopic management of peptic ulcer bleeding.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joon Sung; Park, Sung Min; Kim, Byung-Wook

    2015-03-01

    Acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding is a common medical emergency around the world and the major cause is peptic ulcer bleeding. Endoscopic treatment is fundamental for the management of peptic ulcer bleeding. Despite recent advances in endoscopic treatment, mortality from peptic ulcer bleeding has still remained high. This is because the disease often occurs in elderly patients with frequent comorbidities and are taking ulcerogenic medications. Therefore, the management of peptic ulcer bleeding is still a challenge for clinicians. This article reviews the various endoscopic methods available for management of peptic ulcer bleeding and the techniques in using these methods.

  9. Experimental ulcerative disease of the colon.

    PubMed

    Watt, J; Marcus, R

    1975-01-01

    The oral administration to guinea-pigs of an aqueous solution of carrageenan derived from the red seaweed, Eucheuma spinosum, provides a useful, readily available experimental model for the study of ulcerative disease of the colon. Two types of ulcerative disease can be produced within a 4-6 week period, viz., ulceration localised mainly to the caecum by using 1% undegraded carrageenan in the drinking fluid, and extensive ulceration involving caecum, colon, and rectum by using 5% degraded carrageenan. Ulceration is probably due to the local action of carrageenan in the bowel. PMID:1202321

  10. FAQs on leg ulcer care.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Irene; King, Brenda; Knight, Susan; Keynes, Milton

    In a webchat on leg ulcer management issues, hosted by Nursing Times, participants raised three key areas of care: the role of healthcare assistants in compression bandaging; reporting and investigating damage caused by compression therapy; and recommendations for dressings to be used under compression. This article discusses each of these in turn.

  11. [Diagnosis of gastric ulcer in the elderly].

    PubMed

    Ashida, Kiyoshi; Fukuchi, Takumi; Yamashita, Hiroshi

    2010-11-01

    It is well known that gastric ulcers are most often found at anglus and upper corpus in the elderly. The number of gastric ulcer found at upper corpus hold half of all cases in the elderly patients with bleeding ulcer. Sixty percent of the elderly patients with bleeding ulcer took NSAIDs including low-dose aspirin in authors' hospital. Now it is easy to treat and cure bleeding ulcers due to development of endoscopic hemostasis and antiulcer drugs such as proton pump inhibitor(PPI). However, the elderly patients sometimes result in fatal outcome on bleeding from gastric ulcer. Therefore, it is important to prevent ulcer complications by PPI for the high-risk group such as elderly patients taking NSAIDs.

  12. Peptic ulcers: mortality and hospitalization.

    PubMed

    Riley, R

    1991-01-01

    This study analyzes data on peptic ulcer disease based on deaths for 1951-1988 and hospital separations for 1969-1988. The source of the data are mortality and morbidity statistics provided to Statistics Canada by the provinces. The age-standardized mortality rates (ASMR) for peptic ulcer disease decreased from 1951 to 1988 by 69.4% for men (8.5 to 2.6 per 100,000 population), and 31.8% for women (2.2 to 1.5). Separation rates from hospitals during 1969-1988 for peptic ulcer disease also decreased by 59.8% for men (242.7 to 97.6 per 100,000 population) and 35.6% for women (103.2 to 66.5). Age-specific rates for both mortality and hospital separations increased with age. Epidemiological studies indicate that the incidence of peptic ulcer disease is declining in the general population. The downward trends in mortality and hospitalization rates for peptic ulcer disease reflect this change in incidence, but additional factors probably contribute as well to this decline. Male rates for both mortality and hospital separations were much higher than female rates at the beginning of the study period; but toward the end, the gap between the sexes narrowed considerably, mainly because the male rates declined substantially while the female rates decline moderately. The slower decline in the rates for women may be related to such factors as the increasing labour force participation among women and the slower decline in the population of female smokers. PMID:1801957

  13. Peptic ulcers: mortality and hospitalization.

    PubMed

    Riley, R

    1991-01-01

    This study analyzes data on peptic ulcer disease based on deaths for 1951-1988 and hospital separations for 1969-1988. The source of the data are mortality and morbidity statistics provided to Statistics Canada by the provinces. The age-standardized mortality rates (ASMR) for peptic ulcer disease decreased from 1951 to 1988 by 69.4% for men (8.5 to 2.6 per 100,000 population), and 31.8% for women (2.2 to 1.5). Separation rates from hospitals during 1969-1988 for peptic ulcer disease also decreased by 59.8% for men (242.7 to 97.6 per 100,000 population) and 35.6% for women (103.2 to 66.5). Age-specific rates for both mortality and hospital separations increased with age. Epidemiological studies indicate that the incidence of peptic ulcer disease is declining in the general population. The downward trends in mortality and hospitalization rates for peptic ulcer disease reflect this change in incidence, but additional factors probably contribute as well to this decline. Male rates for both mortality and hospital separations were much higher than female rates at the beginning of the study period; but toward the end, the gap between the sexes narrowed considerably, mainly because the male rates declined substantially while the female rates decline moderately. The slower decline in the rates for women may be related to such factors as the increasing labour force participation among women and the slower decline in the population of female smokers.

  14. Choice of wound care in diabetic foot ulcer: A practical approach

    PubMed Central

    Kavitha, Karakkattu Vijayan; Tiwari, Shalbha; Purandare, Vedavati Bharat; Khedkar, Sudam; Bhosale, Shilpa Sameer; Unnikrishnan, Ambika Gopalakrishnan

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic foot ulcers are the consequence of multiple factors including peripheral neuropathy, decreased blood supply, high plantar pressures, etc., and pose a significant risk for morbidity, limb loss and mortality. The critical aspects of the wound healing mechanism and host physiological status in patients with diabetes necessitate the selection of an appropriate treatment strategy based on the complexity and type of wound. In addition to systemic antibiotics and surgical intervention, wound care is considered to be an important component of diabetic foot ulcer management. This article will focus on the use of different wound care materials in diabetic foot. From a clinical perspective, it is important to decide on the wound care material depending on the type and grade of the ulcer. This article will also provide clinicians with a simple approach to the choice of wound care materials in diabetic foot ulcer. PMID:25126400

  15. [The newly occurred and recurrent gastric ulcers after organ-preserving operations for the ulcer disease].

    PubMed

    Todurov, I M; Dibrova, Iu A

    2008-10-01

    The literature data and the results of own investigations on gastric recurrent ulcers occurrence after organpreserving operations performance for the ulcer disease are summarized. The data on gastric recurrent ulcers occurrence rate are adduced. Modern views on possible causes of occurrence, necessary volume and informativity of investigation methods and tactics of treatment are presented. Gastroduodenal motor-evacuation function disorders, duodenogastric reflux and gastric hypersecretion are suggested as a most frequent causes of gastric recurrent ulcers occurrence. The method of operative intervention choice for recurrent gastric ulcer is determined by the cause of its occurrence, as well as the character of ulcer complication and the kind of previous surgical procedure performed.

  16. Endoscopic management of peptic ulcer disease.

    PubMed Central

    Laws, H L; McKernan, J B

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This article reviews the authors' experience with endoscopic management of duodenal ulcer and ulcers occurring after a previous drainage procedure. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Patients with complications of duodenal ulcer and ulcers occurring after a previous drainage procedure still require surgical management. Virtually all operations for duodenal ulcer include some form of vagotomy. American surgeons in academic centers prefer highly selective vagotomy in suitable candidates. Video-directed laparoscopic and thoracoscopic operations have been done for all complications of duodenal ulcer except for acute hemorrhage. METHODS: The authors have performed laparoscopic operation on eight patients with intractable chronic duodenal ulcer, seven patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease combined with duodenal ulcer, one patient with chronic duodenal ulcer and gastric outlet obstruction, and one patient with acute perforation. Operations performed included omentopexy, anterior seromyotomy plus post truncal vagotomy, and highly selective vagotomy. Seven patients had a simultaneous Nissen fundoplication; and the patient with obstruction underwent concomitant pyloroplasty and vagotomy. Six patients with intestinal ulcers occurring after a previous drainage procedure were treated with thoracoscopic vagotomy. Techniques used are shown. RESULTS: There has been one recurrent ulcer in the laparoscopic group after anterior seromyotomy plus posterior truncal vagotomy. The patient treated by omentopexy for duodenal perforation recovered gastrointestinal function promptly with no further difficulty, but eventually died of primary medical disease. Patients undergoing thoracoscopic vagotomy have all become asymptomatic. Postoperative hospital stay after highly selective vagotomy, anterior seromyotomy plus posterior truncal vagotomy, or thoracoscopic vagotomy was 1-5 days. CONCLUSIONS: Laparoscopic management of duodenal ulcers is feasible. Larger numbers of patients with

  17. Intestinal microbiota and ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Ohkusa, Toshifumi; Koido, Shigeo

    2015-11-01

    There is a close relationship between the human host and the intestinal microbiota, which is an assortment of microorganisms, protecting the intestine against colonization by exogenous pathogens. Moreover, the intestinal microbiota play a critical role in providing nutrition and the modulation of host immune homeostasis. Recent reports indicate that some strains of intestinal bacteria are responsible for intestinal ulceration and chronic inflammation in inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) such as ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD). Understanding the interaction of the intestinal microbiota with pathogens and the human host might provide new strategies treating patients with IBD. This review focuses on the important role that the intestinal microbiota plays in maintaining innate immunity in the pathogenesis and etiology of UC and discusses new antibiotic therapies targeting the intestinal microbiota.

  18. Intractable ulcerating enterocolitis of infancy.

    PubMed Central

    Sanderson, I R; Risdon, R A; Walker-Smith, J A

    1991-01-01

    Five children (three boys, two girls) presenting in the first year of life with intractable diarrhoea had a number of features in common. All had ulcerating stomatitis, four had partial villous atrophy on small intestinal biopsy, all had colitis characterised by large ulcers with overhanging edges, and four had severe perianal disease; no stool pathogens were detected. Treatment with steroids, sulphasalazine, and azathioprine was unsuccessful. All five required subtotal colectomy. Four were children of consanguinous marriages, two were siblings of Pakistani origin, two were cousins of Arab origin, and the fifth was Portuguese. Although the diagnoses of Behçet's disease and Crohn's disease were considered, it appears that these children represent a distinct inherited condition affecting the whole gastrointestinal tract, particularly the colon. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:2025003

  19. [Digital ulcers in systemic scleroderma].

    PubMed

    Belz, D; Hunzelmann, N; Moinzadeh, P

    2014-11-01

    Digital ulcers (DU's) are one of the main symptoms of systemic scleroderma and occur in approximately 60% of all scleroderma patients. Due to possible complications such as infections, gangrene or amputation, they require regular medical attention and a good wound treatment by doctors and nursing staff. A definition of DU's has not yet been established. In 2009 the European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) published guidelines for the treatment of DU's. An improvement of the healing of active ulcers has been described with Iloprost. Bosentan significantly reduced the frequency of occurrence of new DU's. In some small studies PDE-5 inhibitors appear helpful. Further studies with other therapeutic approaches will follow in the next few years. PMID:25336296

  20. A new option for endovascular treatment of leg ulcers caused by venous insufficiency with fluoroscopically guided sclerotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Garcarek, Jerzy; Falkowski, Aleksander; Rybak, Zbigniew; Jargiello, Tomasz; Łokaj, Marek; Czapla, Norbert

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Ulcers of lower legs are the most bothersome complication of chronic venous insufficiency (CVI). Aim To assess the effectiveness of endovascular fluoroscopically guided sclerotherapy for the treatment of venous ulcers. Material and methods Thirty-eight limbs in 35 patients with crural venous ulcers were treated with guided sclerotherapy under the control of fluoroscopy. Patients with non-healing ulcers in the course of chronic venous insufficiency, with and without features of past deep vein thrombosis, were qualified for the study. Doppler ultrasound and dynamic venography with mapping of venous flow were performed. Ambulatory venous pressure measurements, leg circumference and varicography were performed just before and following the procedure. Results In 84% of cases, ulcers were treated successfully and healed. Patients with post-thrombotic syndrome (n = 17) healed in 13 (76.5%) cases, whereas patients without post-thrombotic syndrome (n = 21) healed in 19 (90.5%) cases. The mean time of healing of an ulcer for all patients was 83 days (in the first group it was 121 days and in the second group 67 days). Recurrence of an ulcer was observed in 10 limbs: 6 cases in the first group and 4 cases in the second group. Occurrence of deep vein thrombosis associated with the procedure was not observed. Temporary complications were reported but none giving a serious clinical outcome. Conclusions Endovascular fluoroscopically guided sclerotherapy can be an alternative method of treatment of venous ulcers, especially in situations when surgical procedures or other options of treatment are impossible. PMID:26649090

  1. Three cases of Lipschutz vulval ulceration.

    PubMed

    Alés-Fernández, M; Rodríguez-Pichardo, A; García-Bravo, B; Ferrándiz-Pulido, L; Camacho-Martínez, F M

    2010-05-01

    A Lipschütz ulcer or 'ulcus vulvae acutum' is an acute simple ulceration of the vulva or vagina of non-venereal origin which can be associated with lymphadenopathy. Three cases are described with accompanying clinical photographs. Two cases refer to adolescents, one an infant, all without any history of sexual contact. The cases serve to illustrate a little known but potentially important differential diagnosis of vulval ulceration.

  2. [SURGICAL TREATMENT OF COMPLICATED GASTRODUODENAL ULCER].

    PubMed

    Lupahltsov, V I

    2016-03-01

    Results of operative treatment of 437 patients with complicated gastroduodenal ulcer were summarized. The modern views on the problem of conservative therapy for gas- troduodenal ulcer were presented. A rational individual approach with a certain terms is necessary for conservative treatment of gastroduodenal ulcer. A real way for improve- ment of the patients treatment results--it is a combination of effective conservative treatment with a timely established indications for a planned operative treatment before dangerous complications occur.

  3. Recurrence of Mooren's ulcer after lamellar keratoplasty.

    PubMed

    McDonnell, P J

    1989-09-01

    A 45-year-old man with unilateral Mooren's ulcer in a quiescent state underwent annular lamellar keratoplasty after corneal rupture due to minor trauma. Postoperatively, he did well until 8 months later when a recurrence of the Mooren's ulceration occurred, involving the central island of the patient's original corneal stroma. The stroma of the lamellar graft was uninvolved. This unusual occurrence lends support to the concept that there is a specific immunologic reaction to the cornea in patients with Mooren's ulcer.

  4. [SURGICAL TREATMENT OF COMPLICATED GASTRODUODENAL ULCER].

    PubMed

    Lupahltsov, V I

    2016-03-01

    Results of operative treatment of 437 patients with complicated gastroduodenal ulcer were summarized. The modern views on the problem of conservative therapy for gas- troduodenal ulcer were presented. A rational individual approach with a certain terms is necessary for conservative treatment of gastroduodenal ulcer. A real way for improve- ment of the patients treatment results--it is a combination of effective conservative treatment with a timely established indications for a planned operative treatment before dangerous complications occur. PMID:27514084

  5. A comparative study between total contact casting and conventional dressings in the non-surgical management of diabetic plantar foot ulcers.

    PubMed

    Ganguly, Suparno; Chakraborty, Koustubh; Mandal, Pankaj Kumar; Ballav, Ambar; Choudhury, Subhankar; Bagchi, Subrata; Mukherjee, Satinath

    2008-04-01

    Of all non-traumatic amputations 50% occur in Diabetics, mostly as a final outcome of foot ulcers. A major biomechanical factor in the causation of foot ulcers in persons with diabetes mellitus is elevated peak plantar pressure. Offloading the ulcer area in the form of equalisation of pressure across the plantar surface can accelerate healing of the ulcer. Total contact casting is one such method of offloading, and this study attempts to investigate the advantages of the above method as compared to conventional dressings in the physiatric management of the depth--ischaemia grades 1A, 1B, 2A, 2B neuropathic plantar ulcers in a diabetic patient. The outcome measure was the time taken for complete resolution of the ulcers. Of the 29 patients in Category A treated with total contact casting involving a total of 39 foot ulcers, 36 healed, which was statistically significant (p < 0.05) as compared to 25 out of the 33 ulcers healing in Category B consisting of 26 patients treated by conventional dressings alone. Total contact casting is an effective, rapid, economical, ambulatory and outpatient--based method for the treatment of diabetic foot ulcers.

  6. A revised risk analysis of stress ulcers in burn patients receiving ulcer prophylaxis

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Young Hwan; Lee, Jong Ho; Shin, Jae Jun; Cho, Young Soon

    2015-01-01

    Objective Most of the literature about Curling’s ulcer was published from 1960 through 1980. Therefore, an updated study of Curling’s ulcer is needed. We analyzed the risk factors affecting ulcer incidence in burn patients. Methods We retrospectively analyzed the medical records of burn patients who were admitted to two burn centers. We collected information about the general characteristics of patients, burn area size, abbreviated burn severity index, whether surgery was performed, endoscopy results, and the total body surface area (TBSA). We performed a multivariate regression analysis predicting development of Curling’s ulcer. Results In total, 135 patients (mean age, 49.5±13.5 years) underwent endoscopy. Endoscopy revealed ulcer in 51 patients: 36 (70.6%) with gastric ulcers, 9 (17.6%) with duodenal ulcers, and 6 (11.8%) with both ulcer types. Burn area, burn depth, epigastric pain, melena, intensive care unit admission, burn area >20% of TBSA, and undergoing surgery for the burn were significantly different between the ulcer and non-ulcer groups. Multivariate analysis showed two independent factors significantly associated with ulcer: epigastric pain (odds ratio [OR]: 4.55, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.74 to 11.90), major burn (TBSA > 20%)(OR: 4.31 ,95% CI: 1.34 to 13.85). Conclusion For burn patients, presence of epigastric pain and major burn with TBSA > 20% showed significant association with ulcer development. PMID:27752605

  7. Ischemic Gastropathic Ulcer Mimics Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Daher, Saleh; Lahav, Ziv; Rmeileh, Ayman Abu; Mizrahi, Meir

    2016-01-01

    Gastric ulcer due to mesenteric ischemia is a rare clinical finding. As a result, few reports of ischemic gastric ulcers have been reported in the literature. The diagnosis of ischemic gastropathy is seldom considered in patients presenting with abdominal pain and gastric ulcers. In this case report, we describe a patient with increasing abdominal pain, weight loss, and gastric ulcers, who underwent extensive medical evaluation and whose symptoms were resistant to medical interventions. Finally he was diagnosed with chronic mesenteric ischemia, and his clinical and endoscopic abnormalities resolved after surgical revascularization of both the superior mesenteric artery and the celiac trunk. PMID:27579191

  8. Cushing's ulcer: the eponym and his own.

    PubMed

    Wijdicks, Eelco F M

    2011-06-01

    One of the least remembered eponyms associated with Harvey Cushing is "Cushing's ulcer." The basis of this credit is a paper published in 1932 in which Cushing describes patients who postoperatively and unexpectedly died of perforated peptic ulcers. It is one of the first descriptions of a stress ulcer and a treatise on the brain-stomach connection. Harvey Cushing was puzzled by the pathogenesis of these peptic ulcerations and perforations and advanced several theories. The least plausible included the bile-vomiting theory suggesting that hemorrhagic ulceration could be produced by a combination of bile and acid in a patient recovering from the anesthetic. Other theories were stimulation of a parasympathetic center in the diencephalon or a disturbance of vagal centers in the brainstem. Quite surprisingly to Cushing, the Boston Herald implicitly insinuated that Cushing found the cause of ulcers and this claim upset him greatly. It is ironic that Harvey Cushing, in his later years with failing health, developed an ulcer himself. Cushing noted in his correspondence that he felt the agitation over this newspaper clipping caused his later ulcer. The first description of a neurogenic ulcer remains an important medical observation and is a testament to Cushing's broad accomplishments. PMID:21346647

  9. Gastric emptying abnormal in duodenal ulcer

    SciTech Connect

    Holt, S.; Heading, R.C.; Taylor, T.V.; Forrest, J.A.; Tothill, P.

    1986-07-01

    To investigate the possibility that an abnormality of gastric emptying exists in duodenal ulcer and to determine if such an abnormality persists after ulcer healing, scintigraphic gastric emptying measurements were undertaken in 16 duodenal ulcer patients before, during, and after therapy with cimetidine; in 12 patients with pernicious anemia, and in 12 control subjects. No difference was detected in the rate or pattern of gastric emptying in duodenal ulcer patients before and after ulcer healing with cimetidine compared with controls, but emptying of the solid component of the test meal was more rapid during treatment with the drug. Comparison of emptying patterns obtained in duodenal ulcer subjects during and after cimetidine treatment with those obtained in pernicious anemia patients and controls revealed a similar relationship that was characterized by a tendency for reduction in the normal differentiation between the emptying of solid and liquid from the stomach. The similarity in emptying patterns in these groups of subjects suggests that gastric emptying of solids may be influenced by changes in the volume of gastric secretion. The failure to detect an abnormality of gastric emptying in duodenal ulcer subjects before and after ulcer healing calls into question the widespread belief that abnormally rapid gastric emptying is a feature with pathogenetic significance in duodenal ulcer disease.

  10. Gastric cancer detection in gastric ulcer disease.

    PubMed Central

    Mountford, R A; Brown, P; Salmon, P R; Alvarenga, C; Neumann, C S; Read, A E

    1980-01-01

    A retrospective study has been performed of all cases of gastric ulcer diagnosed or investigated within the Endoscopy Unit of the Department of Medicine, Bristol, over a three year period (1974-76). The average length of follow-up was two years. Two hundred and sixty five cases of gastric ulcer were studied of which 37 proved to be malignant (14%). Presenting complaints of anorexia, weight loss, nausea and/or vomiting, and multiple (greater than 3) symptoms, were commoner in the malignant ulcer group. Ulcer site and the presence of coexisting duodenal ulceration were largely unhelpful in deciding the status of an ulcer. Malignant ulcers tended to be large (greater than 1 cm diameter). Radiology was highly unreliable in distinguishing benign from malignant ulcers. Visual inspection at endoscopy was more reliable, but associated with a tendency to over-diagnose malignancy. False positive biopsies were uncommon (two cases). Three cases of clinically unsuspected superficial gastric carcinoma were revealed. Repeated endoscopy and biopsy of all gastric ulcers until they are completely healed is advised. Images Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:7364322

  11. [Peptic ulcer surgery in the aged].

    PubMed

    Michel, D

    1981-04-01

    Particular problems are discussed in 257 patients over 75 years of age, who were treated for peptic ulcer disease between 1960 and 1979. In elderly patients the peptic ulcer is complicated, often requiring emergency surgery. A special problem in the aged is simultaneous appearance of various sicknesses, which produces further complications. The chosen method of surgery is described and the post-operative period and its general and surgical problems are discussed. The result is a concept of indication for surgery, particularly for the elective operation of chronic ulcers not responding to therapy, before the ulcer becomes complicated. PMID:7227008

  12. [Ambulant compression therapy for crural ulcers; an effective treatment when applied skilfully].

    PubMed

    de Boer, Edith M; Geerkens, Maud; Mooij, Michael C

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of crural ulcers is high. They reduce quality of life considerably and create a burden on the healthcare budget. The key treatment is ambulant compression therapy (ACT). We describe two patients with crural ulcers whose ambulant compression treatment was suboptimal and did not result in healing. When the bandages were applied correctly healing was achieved. If correctly applied ACT should provide sufficient pressure to eliminate oedema, whilst taking local circumstances such as bony structures and arterial qualities into consideration. To provide pressure-to-measure regular practical training, skills and regular quality checks are needed. Knowledge of the properties of bandages and the proper use of materials for padding under the bandage enables good personalised ACT. In trained hands adequate compression and making use of simple bandages and dressings provides good care for patients suffering from crural ulcers in contrast to inadequate ACT using the same materials. PMID:26374726

  13. Chronic venous ulceration of leg associated with peripheral arterial disease: an underappreciated entity in developing country.

    PubMed

    Nag, Falguni; De, Abhishek; Hazra, Avijit; Chatterjee, Gobinda; Ghosh, Arghyaprasun; Surana, Trupti V

    2014-10-01

    Chronic venous ulcer can often be associated with asymptomatic peripheral arterial disease (PAD), which usually remains undiagnosed adding significantly to the morbidity of these patients. The Ankle-Brachial Pressure Index (ABPI) is suggested for PAD evaluation. Many PAD studies were conducted in western countries, but there is a scarcity of data on the prevalence of PAD in clinical venous ulcer patient in developing countries. We conducted a study in a tertiary care hospital of eastern part of India to find out the prevalence of PAD in venous ulcer patients, and also to find the sensitivity of ABPI as a diagnostic tool in these patients. We evaluated clinically diagnosed patients with venous ulcer using ABPI and Colour Doppler study for the presence of PAD. Possible associations such as age, sex, body mass index (BMI), smoking, hypertension and atherosclerosis were studied. All results were analysed using the software Statistica version 6. PAD was present in 23 (27·71%) patients. Older age, longer duration, smoking, high BMI and hypertension were found to be significantly associated with PAD. A very strong level of agreement was found between venous Doppler and ABPI. Assessment for the presence of PAD is important in all clinically diagnosed venous ulcer patients. ABPI being a simple, non-invasive outpatient department (OPD)-based procedure, can be routinely used in cases of venous ulcer to find out the hidden cases of PAD even in developing countries. PMID:23170845

  14. Treatment of a venous leg ulcer with a honey alginate dressing.

    PubMed

    van der Weyden, Elizabeth A

    2005-06-01

    The management of chronic wounds such as venous ulcers is a common and long-term issue with the aging population. Non-standard treatment that is both medically and financially effective needs to be identified. Honey has been used for its healing properties for centuries and has been used to successfully heal wounds including pressure-ulcers in our care facility. However, there is not much evidence for its use in treating venous ulcers. To this end, I trialed the use of a honey-impregnated alginate dressing on a man who had a long-standing history of venous ulcers on his leg with the aim of evaluating the effectiveness of honey as an alternative treatment to the current wound management therapies. The honey seemed to act as an effective antibacterial, anti-inflammatory and deodorizing dressing, with total healing of the ulcer achieved. This result, together with past successes with the use of honey alginate on ulcerated wounds, has led to this product becoming mainstream in the treatment of chronic wounds within our care facility.

  15. The process of implementing a rural VA wound care program for diabetic foot ulcer patients.

    PubMed

    Reiber, Gayle E; Raugi, Gregory J; Rowberg, Donald

    2007-10-01

    Delivering and documenting evidence-based treatment to all Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) foot ulcer patients has wide appeal. However, primary and secondary care medical centers where 52% of these patients receive care are at a disadvantage given the frequent absence of trained specialists to manage diabetic foot ulcers. A retrospective review of diabetic foot ulcer patient records and a provider survey were conducted to document the foot ulcer problem and to assess practitioner needs. Results showed of the 125 persons with foot ulcers identified through administrative data, only, 21% of diabetic foot patients were correctly coded. Chronic Care and Microsystem models were used to prepare a tailored intervention in a VA primary care medical center. The site Principal Investigators, a multidisciplinary site wound care team, and study investigators jointly implemented a diabetic foot ulcer program. Intervention components include wound care team education and training, standardized good wound care practices based on strong scientific evidence, and a wound care template embedded in the electronic medical record to facilitate data collection, clinical decision making, patient ordering, and coding. A strategy for delivering offloading pressure devices, regular case management support, and 24/7 emergency assistance also was developed. It took 9 months to implement the model. Patients were enrolled and followed for 1 year. Process and outcome evaluations are on-going.

  16. Effects of vacuum-compression therapy on healing of diabetic foot ulcers: randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Akbari, Asghar; Moodi, Hesam; Ghiasi, Fatemeh; Sagheb, Hamidreza Mahmoudzadeh; Rashidi, Homayra

    2007-01-01

    A single-blind, randomized controlled trial was conducted to evaluate vacuum-compression therapy (VCT) for the healing of diabetic foot ulcers. Eighteen diabetic patients with foot ulcers were recruited through simple nonprobability sampling. Subjects were randomly assigned to either an experimental or a control group. Before and after intervention, the foot ulcer surface area was estimated stereologically, based on Cavalieri's principle. The experimental group was treated with VCT in addition to conventional therapy for 10 sessions. The control group received only conventional therapy, including debridement, blood glucose control agents, systemic antibiotics, wound cleaning with normal saline, offloading (pressure relief), and daily wound dressings. The mean foot ulcer surface area decreased from 46.88 +/- 9.28 mm(2) to 35.09 +/- 4.09 mm(2) in the experimental group (p = 0.006) and from 46.62 +/- 10.03 mm(2) to 42.89 +/- 8.1 mm(2) in the control group (p = 0.01). After treatment, the experimental group significantly improved in measures of foot ulcer surface area compared with the control group (p = 0.024). VCT enhances diabetic foot ulcer healing when combined with appropriate wound care.

  17. A shift in priority in diabetic foot care and research: 75% of foot ulcers are preventable.

    PubMed

    Bus, Sicco A; van Netten, Jaap J

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic foot ulceration poses a heavy burden on the patient and the healthcare system, but prevention thereof receives little attention. For every euro spent on ulcer prevention, ten are spent on ulcer healing, and for every randomized controlled trial conducted on prevention, ten are conducted on healing. In this article, we argue that a shift in priorities is needed. For the prevention of a first foot ulcer, we need more insight into the effect of interventions and practices already applied globally in many settings. This requires systematic recording of interventions and outcomes, and well-designed randomized controlled trials that include analysis of cost-effectiveness. After healing of a foot ulcer, the risk of recurrence is high. For the prevention of a recurrent foot ulcer, home monitoring of foot temperature, pressure-relieving therapeutic footwear, and certain surgical interventions prove to be effective. The median effect size found in a total of 23 studies on these interventions is large, over 60%, and further increases when patients are adherent to treatment. These interventions should be investigated for efficacy as a state-of-the-art integrated foot care approach, where attempts are made to assure treatment adherence. Effect sizes of 75-80% may be expected. If such state-of-the-art integrated foot care is implemented, the majority of problems with foot ulcer recurrence in diabetes can be resolved. It is therefore time to act and to set a new target in diabetic foot care. This target is to reduce foot ulcer incidence with at least 75%.

  18. Clopidogrel delays gastric ulcer healing in rats.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jiing-Chyuan; Huo, Teh-Ia; Hou, Ming-Chih; Lin, Hsiao-Yi; Li, Chung-Pin; Lin, Han-Chieh; Chang, Full-Young; Lee, Fa-Yauh

    2012-11-15

    Clopidogrel is not safe enough for the gastric mucosa in patients with high risk of peptic ulcer. This study aimed to explore if clopidogrel delays gastric ulcer healing and elucidate the involved mechanisms. Gastric ulcer was induced in rats and the ulcer size, mucosal epithelial cell proliferation of the ulcer margin, expression of growth factors [epidermal growth factor (EGF), basic fibroblast growth factor] and their receptors, and signal transduction pathways for cell proliferation were measured and compared between the clopidogrel-treated group and untreated controls. For the in vitro part, rat gastric mucosal epithelial cell line (RGM-1 cells) was used to establish EGF receptor over-expressed cells. Cell proliferation and molecular change under EGF treatment (10ng/ml) with and without clopidogrel (10(-6)M) were demonstrated. Ulcer size was significantly larger in the clopidogrel-treated group compared to the control and mucosal epithelial cell proliferation of the ulcer margin was significantly decreased in the clopidogrel-treated group (P<0.05). Clopidogrel (2mg and 10mg/kg/day) significantly decreased ulcer-induced gastric epithelial cell proliferation and ulcer-stimulated expressions of EGF receptor and phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (PERK) at the ulcer margin (P<0.05). Clopidogrel (10(-6)M) also inhibited EGF-stimulated EGF receptor, PERK expression, and cell proliferation in RGM-1 cells (P<0.05), and caused much less inhibition of EGF-stimulated cell proliferation in EGF receptor over-expressed RGM-1 cells than in RGM-1 cells (22% vs. 32% reduction). In conclusion, clopidogrel delays gastric ulcer healing in rats via inhibiting gastric epithelial cell proliferation, at least by inhibition of the EGF receptor-ERK signal transduction pathway.

  19. Thrombophilia and chronic venous ulceration.

    PubMed

    Bradbury, A W; MacKenzie, R K; Burns, P; Fegan, C

    2002-08-01

    It is known that thrombophilia (TP) is a risk factor for deep venous thrombosis (DVT), and that DVT predisposes to chronic venous ulceration (CVU). However, the relationship between TP and CVU has not been well studied. Review of the literature reveals that the prevalence of TP in CVU patients is high--similar to the prevalence found in patients with a history of DVT. This is despite many patients with CVU having no clear history, or duplex evidence of previous DVT. TP may predispose to CVU by leading to macro- or micro-vascular thrombosis. This association raises several issues regarding the investigation, prevention and management of patients with venous disease.

  20. Triple gastric peptic ulcer perforation.

    PubMed

    Radojkovic, Milan; Mihajlovic, Suncica; Stojanovic, Miroslav; Stanojevic, Goran; Damnjanovic, Zoran

    2016-03-01

    Patients with advanced or metastatic cancer have compromised nutritional, metabolic, and immune conditions. Nevertheless, little is known about gastroduodenal perforation in cancer patients. Described in the present report is the case of a 41-year old woman with stage IV recurrent laryngeal cancer, who used homeopathic anticancer therapy and who had triple peptic ulcer perforation (PUP) that required surgical repair. Triple gastric PUP is a rare complication. Self-administration of homeopathic anticancer medication should be strongly discouraged when evidence-based data regarding efficacy and toxicity is lacking.

  1. Scleritis and Peripheral Ulcerative Keratitis

    PubMed Central

    Galor, Anat; Thorne, Jennifer E.

    2008-01-01

    Scleritis and peripheral ulcerative keratitis (PUK) can present as isolated conditions or as part of a systemic inflammatory or infectious disorder. Both are serious ocular conditions that can result in vision loss and therefore require early diagnosis and treatment. Nearly two-thirds of patients with non-infectious scleritis require systemic glucocorticoid therapy, and one fourth need a glucocorticoid-sparing agent, as well. Essentially all patients with non-infectious PUK require systemic glucocorticoids. Detailed clinical history, thorough physical examination, and thoughtful laboratory evaluations are all important in the exclusion of underlying disorders and extraocular involvement. PMID:18037120

  2. A rapidly fatal palatal ulcer: rhinocerebral mucormycosis.

    PubMed

    Van der Westhuijzen, A J; Grotepass, F W; Wyma, G; Padayachee, A

    1989-07-01

    A case of a patient with a palatal ulcer who was in a diabetic ketoacidotic coma is described. This ulcer proved to be the presenting sign of rhinocerebral mucormycosis. The patient had hemifacial swelling, ocular signs, and gross tissue destruction and died less than 4 weeks after she was first seen.

  3. Symptoms and Causes of Peptic Ulcer Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ulcer Disease Next: Diagnosis of Peptic Ulcer Disease Digestive Disease Organizations Many organizations provide support to patients and medical professionals. View the full list of Digestive Disease Organizations​​ (PDF, 341 KB)​​​​​ NIH...Turning Discovery ...

  4. Ulcerative colitis flare with splenic ven thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Bozkurt, Huseyin Sancar; Kara, Banu; Citil, Serdal

    2015-01-01

    Patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) have an increased risk of thromboembolic events. Here, we present a 28-year-old man with active ulcerative pancolitis presenting via splenic vein thrombosis and left renal superior infarct that was not associated with a surgical procedure.

  5. Diagnosis and management of genital ulcers.

    PubMed

    Roett, Michelle A; Mayor, Mejebi T; Uduhiri, Kelechi A

    2012-02-01

    Herpes simplex virus infection and syphilis are the most common causes of genital ulcers in the United States. Other infectious causes include chancroid, lymphogranuloma venereum, granuloma inguinale (donovanosis), secondary bacterial infections, and fungi. Noninfectious etiologies, including sexual trauma, psoriasis, Behçet syndrome, and fixed drug eruptions, can also lead to genital ulcers. Although initial treatment of genital ulcers is generally based on clinical presentation, the following tests should be considered in all patients: serologic tests for syphilis and darkfield microscopy or direct fluorescent antibody testing for Treponema pallidum, culture or polymerase chain reaction test for herpes simplex virus, and culture for Haemophilus ducreyi in settings with a high prevalence of chancroid. No pathogen is identified in up to 25 percent of patients with genital ulcers. The first episode of herpes simplex virus infection is usually treated with seven to 10 days of oral acyclovir (five days for recurrent episodes). Famciclovir and valacyclovir are alternative therapies. One dose of intramuscular penicillin G benzathine is recommended to treat genital ulcers caused by primary syphilis. Treatment options for chancroid include a single dose of intramuscular ceftriaxone or oral azithromycin, ciprofloxacin, or erythromycin. Lymphogranuloma venereum and donovanosis are treated with 21 days of oral doxycycline. Treatment of noninfectious causes of genital ulcers varies by etiology, and ranges from topical wound care for ulcers caused by sexual trauma to consideration of subcutaneous pegylated interferon alfa-2a for ulcers caused by Behçet syndrome.

  6. 38 CFR 4.110 - Ulcers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Ulcers. 4.110 Section 4.110 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS SCHEDULE FOR RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Digestive System § 4.110 Ulcers. Experience has shown that the term...

  7. 38 CFR 4.110 - Ulcers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Ulcers. 4.110 Section 4.110 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS SCHEDULE FOR RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Digestive System § 4.110 Ulcers. Experience has shown that the term...

  8. Vesicular, ulcerative, and necrotic dermatitis of reptiles.

    PubMed

    Maas, Adolf K

    2013-09-01

    Vesicular, ulcerative, and necrotic dermatologic conditions are common in captive reptiles. Although these conditions have distinct differences histologically, they are commonly sequelae to each other. This article examines the anatomy and physiology of reptile skin; discusses reported causes of vesicular, ulcerative, and necrotic dermatologic conditions; and reviews various management options.

  9. [Multiple and prepyloric ulcers of the stomach].

    PubMed

    Dibrova, Iu A

    2010-01-01

    The literature data and own experience results concerning treatment of relatively rare multiple and prepyloric ulcers were summarized. The peculiarities of functional diagnosis methods of these ulcers are adduced. The tactics of surgical treatment, depending on localization, the complication character and gastric functional state was substantiated.

  10. Low molecular weight heparin seems to improve local capillary circulation and healing of chronic foot ulcers in diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Jörneskog, G; Brismar, K; Fagrell, B

    1993-01-01

    Ten diabetic patients with peripheral arterial occlusive disease, peripheral polyneuropathy and chronic foot ulcers were given 2500 U low molecular weight heparin (Fragmin, Kabi-Pharmacia AB, Sweden) subcutaneously once a day during 8 weeks. The mean age was 63 (47-80) years and the mean duration of foot ulcers 8 (4-12) months. All patients had previously received conventional treatment during 12 weeks, without any noticeable improvement on ulcer healing. The ulcer area was measured, and the skin microcirculation of the forefoot and around the ulcers was investigated before, during and after treatment with Fragmin. The total skin microcirculation was measured by laser Doppler fluxmetry, the nutritional skin microcirculation by vital capillaroscopy and the macrocirculation by determination of the ankle/arm pressure ratio. The ulcer area decreased significantly in eight patients of which four healed the ulcers completely. Of the remaining two patients one deteriorated, whereas one showed a decrease of the ulcer area during treatment, but an increase when treatment was stopped. The macro- and total microcirculation were unchanged in all patients, whereas the nutritional capillary circulation improved in seven out of nine patients, concomitantly with clinical improvement. The biological zero value (a flow-independent part of the LD signal) was high in 4 patients before treatment, but decreased during treatment and remained low even after treatment with Fragmin.-The results indicate that Fragmin positively influences the healing process of chronic foot ulcers in diabetic patients, possibly by improving the capillary circulation in the ulcer margin, in spite of an unchanged arterial and total skin microcirculation of the region.

  11. Probiotics and prebiotics in ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Derikx, Lauranne A A P; Dieleman, Levinus A; Hoentjen, Frank

    2016-02-01

    The intestinal microbiota is one of the key players in the etiology of ulcerative colitis. Manipulation of this microflora with probiotics and prebiotics is an attractive strategy in the management of ulcerative colitis. Several intervention studies for both the induction and maintenance of remission in ulcerative colitis patients have been performed. Most of these studies evaluated VSL#3 or E. Coli Nissle 1917 and in general there is evidence for efficacy of these agents for induction and maintenance of remission. However, studies are frequently underpowered, lack a control group, and are very heterogeneous investigating different probiotic strains in different study populations. The absence of well-powered robust randomized placebo-controlled trials impedes the widespread use of probiotics and prebiotics in ulcerative colitis. However, given the promising results that are currently available, probiotics and prebiotics may find their way to the treatment algorithm for ulcerative colitis in the near future. PMID:27048897

  12. Factors precipitating acute ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Puri, A S; Chaubal, C C; Midha, Vandana

    2014-08-01

    Ulcerative colitis is characterized by mucosal inflammation of a variable length of the colon starting from the rectum. The precise etiopathogenesis is unknown but it occurs in genetically susceptible individuals who manifest an abnormal immunological response against gut commensal bacteria. The disease course is-characterized by multiple spontaneous relapses and remissions. Two pathogens namely CMV and C. difficile have been associated with disease exacerbation in specific clinical situations. Whereas C. difficile may produce worsening of the disease in those exposed to broad spectrum antibiotics, CMV reactivation is seen only in patients with moderate to severe steroid refractory disease. The importance of these two super-infections can be gauged by the fact that both the ACG and the ECCO recommend testing for these two pathogens in appropriate clinical situations. The applicability of these guidelines in the Indian scenario has yet to be determined in view of the bacterial and parasitic infections endemic in tropical countries. The guidelines for diagnosis and management of these two super-infections in the presence of ulcerative colitis are discussed in this review. PMID:25735121

  13. Volumetric CT measurement of the ischial tuberosities for designing analytical models of decubitus ulcers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, David R., III; Robb, Richard A.

    2006-03-01

    Decubitus ulcers can have a deleterious effect on the quality of life for some patients, particularly those prone to chronic development of skin ulcerations. The bones of the pelvis are particularly relevant as nearly half of all ulcerations observed in the hospital are in the pelvic region. This research focuses on the development of methods to extract the ischium and adjacent anatomy from volumetric CT data of the pelvis which will be used for patient-specific modeling of high-pressure regions and the treatment of associated ulcers. Six volumetric CT scans were evaluated to determine the size and shape of the ischial tuberosities. Using oblique images computed from the CT data, cross-sectional measurements (approximately Superior-Inferior, Anterior-Posterior, and Left-Right) were made to estimate the size of the ischial tuberosities. Similar measurements were made on the ischial ramus. The mean length of the ischial tuberosities (S-I direction) is 12.35 cm. The mean dimension in the L-R and A-P directions are 2.97 cm and 3.78 cm, respectively. For the ischial ramus, the S-I, L-R, and A-P mean lengths are 6.57 cm, 1.72 cm, and 1.49 cm. Due to a limited field of view for the CT datasets, the thickness of the soft tissue (i.e. Gluteus Maximus and subcutaneous fat) could not be measured. Using the bony measurements and adjacent soft tissue measurements, an investigator would be able estimate the posterior pelvis forces for calculations of pressure on the proximal skin, which could then be used to predict ulcerations in patients, or to design new ulcer-inhibiting seating devices. Current efforts are focused on collecting a large cohort of data with both bony and soft tissue measurements. Future work will incorporate the physical properties of the soft tissue to specifically predict high-pressure regions.

  14. Ulcers

    MedlinePlus

    ... stomach is empty. Eating something or taking an antacid medication sometimes makes the pain go away for ... are taken every day for about 2 weeks. Antacids — acid blockers or proton pump inhibitors — are given ...

  15. Radionuclide angiography and blood pool imaging to assess skin ulcer healing prognosis in patients with peripheral vascular disease

    SciTech Connect

    Alazraki, N.; Lawrence, P.F.; Syverud, J.B.

    1984-01-01

    Several non-invasive diagnostic techniques including segmental limb blood pressures, skin fluoresence, and photo plethysmography, have been evaluated as predictors of skin ulcer healing in patients with peripheral vascular disease, but none are widely used. Using 20mCi of Tc-99m phosphate compounds, four phase bone scans were obtained, including (1) radionuclide angiogram (2) blood pool image (3) 2 hour and 4-6 hour static images and (4) 24 hour static delayed images. The first two phases were used to assess vacularity to the region of distal extremity ulceration; the last two phases evaluated presence or absence of osteomyelitis. Studies were performed in 30 patients with non-healing ulcers of the lower extremities. Perfusion to the regions of ulceration on images was graded as normal, increased, or reduced with respect to the opposite (presumed normal) limb or some other normal reference area. Hypervascular response was interpreted as good prognosis for healing unless osteomyelitis was present. Clinicians followed patients for 14 days to assess limb healing with optimum care. If there was no improvement, angiography and/or surgery (reconstructive surgery, sympathectomy, or amputation) was done. Results showed: sensitivity for predicting ulcer healing was 94%, specificity 89%. Patients who failed to heal their ulcers showed reduced perfusion, no hypervascular response, or osteomyelitis. Microcirculatory adequacy for ulcer healing appear predictable by this technique.

  16. Haemophilus ducreyi Cutaneous Ulcer Strains Are Nearly Identical to Class I Genital Ulcer Strains

    PubMed Central

    Gangaiah, Dharanesh; Webb, Kristen M.; Humphreys, Tricia L.; Fortney, Kate R.; Toh, Evelyn; Tai, Albert; Katz, Samantha S.; Pillay, Allan; Chen, Cheng-Yen; Roberts, Sally A.; Munson, Robert S.; Spinola, Stanley M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Although cutaneous ulcers (CU) in the tropics is frequently attributed to Treponema pallidum subspecies pertenue, the causative agent of yaws, Haemophilus ducreyi has emerged as a major cause of CU in yaws-endemic regions of the South Pacific islands and Africa. H. ducreyi is generally susceptible to macrolides, but CU strains persist after mass drug administration of azithromycin for yaws or trachoma. H. ducreyi also causes genital ulcers (GU) and was thought to be exclusively transmitted by microabrasions that occur during sex. In human volunteers, the GU strain 35000HP does not infect intact skin; wounds are required to initiate infection. These data led to several questions: Are CU strains a new variant of H. ducreyi or did they evolve from GU strains? Do CU strains contain additional genes that could allow them to infect intact skin? Are CU strains susceptible to azithromycin? Methodology/Principal Findings To address these questions, we performed whole-genome sequencing and antibiotic susceptibility testing of 5 CU strains obtained from Samoa and Vanuatu and 9 archived class I and class II GU strains. Except for single nucleotide polymorphisms, the CU strains were genetically almost identical to the class I strain 35000HP and had no additional genetic content. Phylogenetic analysis showed that class I and class II strains formed two separate clusters and CU strains evolved from class I strains. Class I strains diverged from class II strains ~1.95 million years ago (mya) and CU strains diverged from the class I strain 35000HP ~0.18 mya. CU and GU strains evolved under similar selection pressures. Like 35000HP, the CU strains were highly susceptible to antibiotics, including azithromycin. Conclusions/Significance These data suggest that CU strains are derivatives of class I strains that were not recognized until recently. These findings require confirmation by analysis of CU strains from other regions. PMID:26147869

  17. Corneal ulceration following measles in Nigerian children.

    PubMed Central

    Sandford-Smith, J H; Whittle, H C

    1979-01-01

    Acute corneal ulceration in malnourished children is the commonest cause of childhood blindness in Northern Nigeria and usually develops after measles. Other severe diseases in malnourished children rarely precipitate corneal ulceration. A survey in a school for blind children showed that 69% of the children were blind from corneal disease, and a survey of children with corneal scars showed that at least 42% were caused by ulceration after measles. The clinical appearance of the active ulcers was very varied. The serum retinol-binding protein and prealbumin levels in children with corneal ulcers following measles were below normal, but a group of malnourished children without eye complaints following measles were found to have even lower levels. Thus a specific deficiency of vitamin A does not appear to be the primary cause of these ulcers, though it may be a contributory one. A specific measles keratitis and secondary herpes simplex infectious may be local factors contributing to this ulceration, and there is nearly always a background of protein calorie malnutrition. Racial factors may also be of some significance. PMID:508686

  18. Management of finger ulcers in scleroderma.

    PubMed

    Ward, W A; Van Moore, A

    1995-09-01

    Twelve patients (15 hands) with documented scleroderma and chronic nonhealing digital ulcers were followed for their response to nonoperative and operative treatment. The patients were initially managed with nifedipine, biofeedback, digital xylocaine blockade, and silver sulfadiazine topical ointment and cessation of all vasoconstrictive agents. Ulcerations healed in 6 of 15 hands and remained healed at a 2-year follow-up examination. The remaining nine hands in seven patients failed nonoperative treatment and underwent a palmar digital sympathectomy. These chronic digital ulcerations healed within 6 weeks after surgery. After a 26- to 64-month follow-up period, six of the nine hands remained free of all digital ulcerations. Two patients (three hands) had partial recurrence of the ulceration. Digital sympathectomy can be an effective procedure for treating nonhealing digital ulcers in scleroderma patients after nonoperative treatment has failed. Significant vaso-occlusive disease is likely to be present in these patients, as demonstrated by arteriography. Our initial approach is cessation of all vasoconstricting agents, nifedipine biofeedback, and local antibiotic ointment. Wrist blocks with xylocaine and marcaine are offered if these modalities fail. If these methods do not result in healing of the ulcer within 12 weeks, then digital sympathectomy is considered.

  19. Clinical picture of peptic ulceration diagnosed endoscopically.

    PubMed Central

    Sheppard, M C; Holmes, G K; Cockel, R

    1977-01-01

    Clinical features and laboratory data are presented for 100 patients with benign gastric ulceration and 150 patients with duodenal ulceration confirmed endoscopically in a district general hospital unit. Abdominal pain was the commonest indication for endoscopy, but one third of examinations were performed for acute gastrointestinal haemorrhage. Although the patients were selected by referral for endoscopy their clinical presentation, age, and sex distribution were similar to those reported in previous general surveys. There were no clinical features which clearly distinguished gastric from duodenal ulceration. However, of those with gastric ulceration younger patients more often had distal ulcers and presented with pain, while elderly subjects tended to have high lesser curve involvement and presented with haemorrhage. Moreover, all females presenting with haemorrhage were aged over 50 years, while 6% of males bleeding from gastric ulceration and 40% of males bleeding from duodenal ulceration were under this age. Anaemia when present, except in two premenopausal females, indicated either a recent acute gastrointestinal haemorrhage or a coexistent second diagnosis. PMID:873333

  20. Seasonal behaviour of healed duodenal ulcer.

    PubMed

    Gupta, A K; Pal, L S

    1998-04-01

    Incidence of peptic ulcer is more in people living at higher altitude and similarly relapse of healed duodenal ulcer is more in winter season. Seasonal behaviour of healed duodenal ulcer with or without maintenance therapy with H2 blockers was studied among subjects residing around Shimla (approximate altitude 7000 feet above mean sea level). Sixty-four subjects of endoscopically healed duodenal ulcer were alternatively advised placebo (32 subjects) and ranitidine 150 mg (32 subjects) at bed time as maintenance therapy for period of one year. Subjects were reviewed endoscopically and evaluated for H pylori by rapid urease test, every months or earlier if symptomatic. Relapse rate was analysed among 60 subjects at the end of one year. Cumulative relapse rate was found 60% in ranitidine group and 100% in placebo group. In ranitidine group percentage of relapse to number of endoscopic examinations was 21.4% throughout the year, but in placebo group during winter and spring season relapse was 87.5% of endoscopic examination whereas 57.2% during summer and fall season. Incidence of duodenal ulcer relapse without maintenance therapy was more in winter and spring season (October to March) as compared to summer and fall (April to September), whereas intermittent seasonal treatment is efficacious in prevention of duodenal ulcer relapse and also improves cost benefit ratio of ulcer treatment.

  1. Liposomes as drug carriers for oral ulcers.

    PubMed

    Harsanyi, B B; Hilchie, J C; Mezei, M

    1986-09-01

    The aim of this study was to test the potential of liposomes as drug carriers to the ulcerated oral mucosa. Radioactive triamcinolone acetonide palmitate (3H-TRMAp) was encapsulated in large multilamellar lipid vesicles and served as the test lotion. 3H-TRMAp in solution served as control. Forty-six hamsters were divided into three groups. In group I, multiple confluent ulcers in both cheek pouches were treated by topical application. In group II, single ulcers on the cheeks were treated by intramucosal injection. In group III, multiple confluent ulcers were produced in the cheek pouch on one side, with a single ulcer in the contralateral cheek pouch; no drug was applied, and the tissues were prepared for histology. Hamsters were killed at three and 24 hours, respectively, after treatment. Pouches were divided into ulcerated and intact adjacent mucosa. Cheeks were divided into ulcerated mucosa and distant mucosa. Drug levels in the four mucosal portions as well as in the blood, liver, spleen, brain, and thalamic region were determined by radioactive tracer technique. At three hours, liposomal drug concentrations were lower than in control animals in the brain and the thalamic region. At 24 hours, liposomal drug values were higher than in control animals in the ulcerated mucosa and lower than in control animals in the thalamic region. Mean drug concentrations in the ulcerated mucosa were higher in group II than group I. The results parallel those of Mezei and Gulasekharam (1980, 1982); liposomes increase local and decrease systemic drug concentration.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. Lipschutz ulcers: evaluation and management of acute genital ulcers in women.

    PubMed

    Huppert, Jill S

    2010-01-01

    Acute genital ulcers are painful and distressing to women and perplexing to the providers who care for them. The differential diagnosis includes sexually and nonsexually transmitted infections, autoimmune conditions, drug reactions, and local manifestations of systemic illness. However, in many cases, no causative agent is identified, and lesions are classified as idiopathic aphthosis. In the setting of fever and acute onset of genital ulcers in girls and women, the term Lipschutz ulcers has been used to describe ulcers associated with an immunologic reaction to a distant source of infection or inflammation. The aims of this article are to review the differential diagnosis and pathogenesis of acute genital ulcers, to offer an evaluation and classification scheme, and to discuss treatment options for the dermatologist who cares for women and girls with vulvar ulcers.

  3. [Lipschütz acute genital ulcer].

    PubMed

    Kluger, N; Garcia, C; Guillot, B

    2009-10-01

    Lipschütz acute genital ulcer is a rare distinctive cause of nonvenereal acute genital ulcers that occurs particularly in adolescents described in 1913. We report here a typical case that occurred in a 24-year-old virgin woman who developed flu-like symptoms and painful genital ulcers that healed spontaneously within a week and without any infection (Epstein Barr Virus, toxoplasmosis, salmonella). The physiopathogeny remains unknown. However, there are body of evidences pointing out a possible link to several nonvenereal infections, including mainly Epstein-Barr virus acute infection. This rare benign but disabling entity should be known by gynecologists.

  4. Extracorporeal shockwave therapy in diabetic foot ulcers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ching-Jen; Cheng, Jai-Hong; Kuo, Yur-Ren; Schaden, Wolfgang; Mittermayr, Rainer

    2015-12-01

    Diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) are among the most common foot disorders with ulceration, infection, and gangrene that may ultimately lead to lower extremity amputation. The goals of treatment include the control of diabetes and proper shoe wear. An effective therapy and appropriate foot care are important in wound healing in DFUs. Recently, extracorporeal shockwave therapy (ESWT) was reported to significantly promote and accelerate the healing of complex soft tissue wounds as compared to the standard methods of treatment in DFUs. ESWT showed positive results in short-term and long-term outcomes in diabetic patients suffering from foot ulcers. In this article, we review the clinical results of ESWT in DFUs.

  5. [Study of genetic markers of duodenal ulcer].

    PubMed

    Tsimmerman, Ia S; Onosova, E A; Tsimmerman, I Ia

    1989-05-01

    The results of determination of various hereditary predisposition markers in peptic ulcer are given: in the population, in patients with duodenal ulcer and in their siblings (risk group). Of importance for revealing subjects with hereditary predisposition to duodenal ulcer are the clinico-genealogical analysis, determination of the blood group, especially in simultaneous determination of a "secretory status" ("status of non-secretion" of the ABH blood system agglutinogen in the saliva), increase in the mass of parietal cells and, to some extent, of the distinguishing features of dermatoglyphics (in combination with the above markers). Determination of taste sensitivity to phenylthiocarbamide is non-informative. PMID:2770215

  6. [Contact eczema in patients with leg ulcers].

    PubMed

    Degreef, H; Dooms-Goossens, A; Gladys, K

    1986-01-01

    Patients with leg ulcers or varicose eczema suffer much more often from contact eczema due to the local application of pharmaceutical preparations than patients suffering from other dermatological problems (even those of eczematous origin). This contact allergy may concern not only the active ingredient but also the excipient, the preservative, or even the perfume. In all cases of leg ulcers, of varicose eczema, but also of badly healed ulcers, epicutaneous tests should be carried out with all the components of the pharmaceutical preparations concerned. Moreover, the pharmaceutical industry really must perfect non-allergenic preparations.

  7. Drug therapy for ulcerative colitis

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Chang-Tai; Meng, Shu-Yong; Pan, Bo-Rong

    2004-01-01

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is an inflammatory destructive disease of the large intestine occurred usually in the rectum and lower part of the colon as well as the entire colon. Drug therapy is not the only choice for UC treatment and medical management should be as a comprehensive whole. Azulfidine, Asacol, Pentasa, Dipentum, and Rowasa all contain 5-aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA), which is the topical anti-inflammatory ingredient. Pentasa is more commonly used in treating Crohn’s ileitis because Pentasa capsules release more 5-ASA into the small intestine than Asacol tablets. Pentasa can also be used for treating mild to moderate UC. Rowasa enemas are safe and effective in treating ulcerative proctitis and proctosigmoiditis. The sulfa-free 5-ASA agents (Asacol, Pentasa, Dipentum and Rowasa) have fewer side effects than sulfa-containing Azulfidine. In UC patients with moderate to severe disease and in patients who failed to respond to 5-ASA compounds, systemic (oral) corticosteroids should be used. Systemic corticosteroids (prednisone, prednisolone, cortisone, etc.) are potent and fast-acting drugs for treating UC, Crohn’s ileitis and ileocolitis. Systemic corticosteroids are not effective in maintaining remission in patients with UC. Serious side effects can result from prolonged corticosteroid treatment. To minimize side effects, corticosteroids should be gradually reduced as soon as the disease remission is achieved. In patients with corticosteroid-dependent or unresponsive to corticosteroid treatment, surgery or immunomodulator is considered. Immunomodulators used for treating severe UC include azathioprine/6-MP, methotrexate, and cyclosporine. Integrated traditional Chinese and Western medicine is safe and effective in maintaining remission in patients with UC. PMID:15285010

  8. Successes and pitfalls in the healing of neuropathic forefoot ulcerations with the IPOS postoperative shoe.

    PubMed

    Needleman, R L

    1997-07-01

    Unnecessary amputations can be avoided with the healing of foot ulcerations in neuropathic feet. Traditional approaches have relied on relieving plantar and other extrinsic foot pressures. A retrospective review was performed of the office records of patients with Wagner grade 1 and 2 neuropathic forefoot ulcerations who were prescribed an IPOS (Niagara Falls, NY) postoperative shoe. A total of .33 patients were in the chart review. Twenty-three of these patients were located and agreed to participate in a telephone survey. Patients showed a compliance of 78%. Seventy-seven percent of the patients healed their ulcers and wore prescription inserts and extra-depth shoes at a mean of 8 weeks. Seventy-eight percent of our telephone survey patients were either satisfied or satisfied with reservations. Problems or complications from wearing the IPOS postoperative shoe occurred with 38% of all patients. PMID:9252810

  9. Young onset peptic ulcer disease and non-ulcer dyspepsia are separate entities.

    PubMed

    Cederberg, A; Varis, K; Salmi, H A; Sipponen, P; Härkönen, M; Sarna, S

    1991-01-01

    The characteristics of peptic ulcer and non-ulcer dyspepsia in young men were studied in 202 consecutive conscripts who attended Central Military Hospital in Helsinki because of long-standing upper abdominal complaints. Active peptic ulceration (APU) was found in 48 patients, inactive peptic ulcer disease (IPU) was diagnosed in 77 patients, non-ulcer dyspepsia (NUD) was diagnosed in 52 patients. In 25 cases the reason for symptoms was another disease, and these patients were excluded from the study. A control series (CON) consisted of 30 symptomless healthy young male volunteers. The likelihood of discriminating between peptic ulcer disease and non-ulcer dyspepsia in a young male patient with dyspepsia are indicated by odds ratios (OR) and its 95% confidence limits (CL 95). Active peptic ulcer disease differs from NUD, e.g., by 1) presence of antrum gastritis, OR 41.5 (CL 95: 10.1-171), 2) Helicobacter pylori in the gastric mucosa, OR 31.0 (7.4-130), 3) Lewisa+ phenotype, OR 8.9 (1.7-45.4), 4) serum pepsinogen I (S-PGI) greater than 100 micrograms/l, OR 4.6 (1.7-12.4), 5) non-secretor status, OR 4.3 (1.6-11.6), and 6) O-blood group, OR 3.0 (1.2-7.7). In conclusion, the status of gastroduodenal mucosa, gastric secretion pattern and distribution of some genetic markers in patient series indicate that young onset peptic ulcer and non-ulcer dyspepsia are two separate entities. Helicobacter-positive antrum gastritis is the best determinant of ulcer risk, but also high S-PGI, Lewisa+ phenotype, non-secretor status and O-blood group are signs of increased risk of peptic ulcer.

  10. Risk factors for healing of duodenal ulcer under antacid treatment: do ulcer patients need individual treatment?

    PubMed

    Massarrat, S; Müller, H G; Schmitz-Moormann, P

    1988-03-01

    In order to identify the risk factors affecting the healing of duodenal ulcer, a clinical trial with effective dose of antacid was carried out in 53 patients. Duration of ulcer history, number of relapses, duration of the last and present relapse, number, duration and severity of pain attacks in the present ulcer relapse, pain radiation to back, vomiting, appetite, smoking habit, intake of analgesics and previous haemorrhage were registered. Number of ulcers, ulcer depth, bublar narrowing, erosions, duodenitis at initial endoscopy and healing of ulcer were assessed by one endoscopist. Basic and peak acid output were measured. The extent of duodenitis on the site opposite the ulcer was determined by histological examination. Sixty per cent of the duodenal ulcers were healed after three weeks. By univariate analysis, the following factors affect the healing; pain radiation to back and pain duration during treatment (p less than 0.001), multiple or deep ulcers, narrowing of duodenal bulb (p less than 0.01), number of pain attacks and poor appetite (p less than 0.05). By the stepwise logistic regression model, the following factors were selected as predictors for healing of duodenal ulcer with 76% correct classification: pain radiation to back (p = 0.002), deep ulcer (p = 0.013), multiple ulcers (p = 0.028). Number of cigarettes/day (p less than 0.007) and male sex (p = 0.036). By this model, the prediction of healing could be accurately assessed in 78% in a new sample. Individual treatment should be carried out on the basis of these factors. PMID:3356359

  11. Small bowel ulcerative lesions are common in elderly NSAIDs users with peptic ulcer bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Tsibouris, Panagiotis; Kalantzis, Chissostomos; Apostolopoulos, Periklis; Zalonis, Antonios; Isaacs, Peter Edward Thomas; Hendrickse, Mark; Alexandrakis, Georgios

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To determine the frequency of small bowel ulcerative lesions in patients with peptic ulcer and define the significance of those lesions. METHODS: In our prospective study, 60 consecutive elderly patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding from a peptic ulceration (cases) and 60 matched patients with a non-bleeding peptic ulcer (controls) underwent small bowel capsule endoscopy, after a negative colonoscopy (compulsory in our institution). Controls were evaluated for non-bleeding indications. Known or suspected chronic inflammatory conditions and medication that could harm the gut were excluded. During capsule endoscopy, small bowel ulcerative lesions were counted thoroughly and classified according to Graham classification. Other small bowel lesions were also recorded. Peptic ulcer bleeding was controlled endoscopically, when adequate, proton pump inhibitors were started in both cases and controls, and Helicobacter pylori eradicated whenever present. Both cases and controls were followed up for a year. In case of bleeding recurrence upper gastrointestinal endoscopy was repeated and whenever it remained unexplained it was followed by repeat colonoscopy and capsule endoscopy. RESULTS: Forty (67%) cases and 18 (30%) controls presented small bowel erosions (P = 0.0001), while 22 (37%) cases and 4 (8%) controls presented small bowel ulcers (P < 0.0001). Among non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) consumers, 39 (95%) cases and 17 (33%) controls presented small bowel erosions (P < 0.0001), while 22 (55%) cases and 4 (10%) controls presented small bowel ulcers (P < 0.0001). Small bowel ulcerative lesions were infrequent among patients not consuming NSAIDs. Mean entry hemoglobin was 9.3 (SD = 1.4) g/dL in cases with small bowel ulcerative lesions and 10.5 (SD = 1.3) g/dL in those without (P = 0.002). Cases with small bowel ulcers necessitate more units of packed red blood cells. During their hospitalization, 6 (27%) cases with small bowel ulcers presented

  12. Cure of peptic gastric ulcer associated with eradication of Helicobacter pylori. Finnish Gastric Ulcer Study Group.

    PubMed

    Seppälä, K; Pikkarainen, P; Sipponen, P; Kivilaakso, E; Gormsen, M H

    1995-06-01

    The effect of Helicobacter pylori eradication on ulcer healing and the relapse rate were investigated in a multicentre trial of 239 gastric ulcer patients. Patients with H pylori positive gastric ulcer were randomly assigned to one of three groups: (A) 10 days' treatment with metronidazole and eight weeks' treatment with colloidal bismuth subcitrate (CBS) (84 patients); (B) 10 days' treatment with metronidazole placebo and eight weeks with CBS (73 patients); or (C) ranitidine (82 patients). At 12 weeks in 210 patients, gastric ulcer was present in three (9%) of 35 H pylori negative patients, and in 45 (26%) of 175 H pylori positive patients (p < 0.05). Results after one year of follow up were available for 205 patients. Between 12 and 52 weeks, two (7%) ulcer relapses occurred in 29 H pylori negative patients and in 60 (47%) of 128 H pylori positive patients (p < 0.001). After two weeks of open triple therapy (CBS 120 mg four times daily, amoxicillin 500 mg four times daily, and metronidazole 400 mg three times daily), given to the patients with ulcer relapse, only one (an NSAID user) of 55 successfully treated patients had an ulcer relapse during the one year follow up. Healing of gastric ulcer is rapid and recurrence is infrequent after successful H pylori eradication. H pylori eradication changes the natural history of the gastric ulcer disease.

  13. Diabetic foot ulcer--A review on pathophysiology, classification and microbial etiology.

    PubMed

    Noor, Saba; Zubair, Mohammad; Ahmad, Jamal

    2015-01-01

    As the prevalence of diabetes is increasing globally, secondary complications associated to this endocrinal disorder are also ascending. Diabetic foot ulcers are potentially modifying complications. Disruption of harmony in glucose homeostasis causes hyperglycemic status, results in activation of certain metabolic pathways which in their abnormal state subsequently leads to development of vascular insufficiency, nerve damages headed by ulceration in lower extremity due to plantar pressures and foot deformity. Insult to foot caused by trauma at the affected site goes unnoticeable to patient due to loss of sensation. Among the above mention causes, resistance to infection is also considered as chief modulator of pathophysiological image of diabetic foot lesions. Healing as well as non-healing nature of ulcer relies upon the wound microbial communities and the extent of their pathogenicity. A validated classification system of foot ulcer is primarily necessary for clinicians in management of diabetic foot problems. Another aspect which needs management is proper identification of causative pathogen causing infection. The way of approaches presently employed in the diagnosis for treatment of foot ulcer colonized by different microbes is conventional techniques. Conventional diagnostic methods are widely acceptable since decades. But in recent years newly invented molecular techniques are exploring the use of 16S ribosomal regions specific to prokaryotes in bacterial identification and quantification. Molecular techniques would be a better choice if engaged, in finding the specific species harboring the wound.

  14. Evaluation of Hallux Interphalangeal Joint Arthroplasty Compared With Nonoperative Treatment of Recalcitrant Hallux Ulceration.

    PubMed

    Lew, Eric; Nicolosi, Nicole; McKee, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Patients with chronic diabetes can develop plantar hallux ulcerations secondary to neuropathy, increased pressure, and deformity. The present retrospective study evaluated the efficacy of hallux interphalangeal joint (HIPJ) arthroplasty to address recalcitrant ulceration. Two groups of patients with diabetes were compared: a surgical group of 13 patients and a nonsurgical standard therapy group of 13 patients. The patients in the surgical group underwent HIPJ arthroplasty. All the patients in the standard therapy group received local wound care and offloading. The mean duration of follow-up was 19.5 (range 1.2 to 47.9) months, and the mean age was 55 ± 13.0 years. Statistical significance was found in the surgical group for faster time to healing (3.5 weeks [2.5, 4.25] vs 9 weeks [2, 17.29], p = .033) and lower incidence of ulcer recurrence (8% ± 7.69 vs 54% ± 53.85, p = .031). There were also fewer amputations in the surgical group (0% ± 0 vs 38% ± 38.6, p = .063). To our knowledge, only 1 other published study has evaluated HIPJ arthroplasty as a treatment of recalcitrant hallux ulceration. The present study adds comparison data from a nonoperative standard therapy group and found that HIPJ arthroplasty is an effective curative treatment option to address chronic plantar hallux ulcerations in diabetic patients with neuropathy.

  15. A pilot study investigating the utilization of crest pads for treatment of toe callus and ulceration.

    PubMed

    Melo, Monica; Bernecker, Tricia; McCullough, James; Hong, John; Trumbauer, Jane Scott; Miller, Mary Ellen

    2015-12-01

    Patients with lesser-toe deformities are at increased risk of developing calluses and ulcers on the distal ends of the affected digits because of the increased pressures applied to these areas. The number of diabetic patients in the United States continues to increase, along with associated comorbidities such as peripheral vascular disease and peripheral neuropathy. These conditions predispose patients to developing foot ulcerations, especially if foot deformities are present. Crest pads are a simple-to-make, inexpensive option to treat calluses and ulcerations on the distal ends of digits; however, there is no research available that support their use. Crest pads consist of rolled gauze covered in moleskin, with a large opening that fits over several toes and lies on the dorsal aspect of the foot, with the padded portion resting under the toes. Over several days of use, the pad molds to the plantar aspect of the toes, offloading pressure from the distal end of the affected digit(s). The sample was obtained through a retrospective chart review of patients identified as having had at least one nail care visit and at least one follow-up visit at a vascular surgery practice between August 2011 and December 2014. Potential subjects with toe deformities who presented with callus or ulcer on the distal end of a digit were considered for inclusion, if they received a crest pad as part of their treatment plan. The scholarly project was a preintervention or postintervention design with subjects acting as their own controls. McNemar's test was used to analyze the results which were statistically significant (P < .0001 at first callus follow-up and P = .0002 at second callus follow-up) for callus, hemorrhagic callus, and/or ulcer improvement following the crest pad intervention. The results of this scholarly project support the use of crest pads in patients with lesser-toe deformities to treat distal toe calluses and/or ulcerations.

  16. Cutaneous leishmaniasis "chiclero's ulcer" in subtropical Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Calvopiña, Manuel; Martinez, Leonardo; Hashiguchi, Yoshihisa

    2013-08-01

    An 18-year-old female presented with a severe ulcerative lesion on her right ear of 6 weeks duration. Her right ear was edematous and erythematous with a large, painless ulcerative lesion covering a third of the pinna and satellite papular lesions on the posterior. She was diagnosed with chiclero's ulcer. A skin smear stained with Diff-quik showed abundant Leishmania parasites. Chiclero's ulcer is a rare clinical presentation and is typically severe and difficult to treat. Physicians in Ecuador recommend administering prolonged intramuscular Glucantime. Side effects are common and can be severe resulting in low patient compliance. Because of preferences of the patient and the large volume needed for her weight, we recommended topical treatment with a lotion of Glucantime mixed half and half with white Merthiolate. After applying this lotion to the lesion 3 to 4 times a day for 6 weeks, the lesion healed.

  17. Chronic leg ulcers in Werner's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Yeong, E K; Yang, C C

    2004-01-01

    We report two siblings suffered from Werner's syndrome, which is a rare premature aging disorder caused by genetic mutations. They developed premature aging during adolescence with loss and graying of hair, short stature, baldness, atrophic skin, thin extremities, flat feet, 'bird' face and cataracts. Multiple chronic ulcers were noted over the feet in both patients. Healing was prolonged because of atrophic subcutaneous tissue, poor perfusion, impaired fibroblast activity and the loss of normal foot architecture. Treatment of the ulcers was challenging, as flap options were limited over the lower third of the leg and skin grafting was not easy as there was a lack of healthy granulations. However, we have successfully closed the ulcers with Integra artificial skin and ultra-thin split thickness skin grafting with the scalp as donor site. The main purpose of this paper is to alert physicians to this syndrome when treatments are being planned for patients with chronic leg ulcers.

  18. Sunitinib induced pyoderma gangrenosum-like ulcerations.

    PubMed

    Akanay-Diesel, S; Hoff, N P; Kürle, S; Haes, J; Erhardt, A; Häussinger, D; Schulte, K-W; Bölke, Edwin; Matuschek, C; Budach, W; Gerber, P A; Homey, B

    2011-11-10

    Pyoderma gangrenosum is a non-infectious neutro?philic skin disease commonly associated with underlying systemic diseases. Histopathological and laboratory diagnostics are unspecific in the majority of the cases and the diagnosis is made in accordance with the clinical picture. Here, we report the case of a 69-year old man with progredient pyoderma gangrenosum-like ulcerations under treatment with sunitinib due to hepatocellular carcinoma. A conventional ulcer therapy did not lead to a regression of the lesions. Solely cessation of sunitinib therapy resulted in an improvement of the ulcerations. Sunitinib is a multikinase inhibitor that targets the PDGF-α- and ?β-, VEGF-1-3-, KIT-, FLT3-, CSF-1- and RET-receptor, thereby impairing tumour proliferation, pathological angiogenesis and metastasation. Here, we demonstrate that pyoderma gangrenosum-like ulcers may represent a serious side effect of sunitinib-based anti-cancer treatment. PMID:22027642

  19. Genital ulcers: their diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Sacks, S L

    1987-08-01

    THIS ARTICLE OFFERS SOME BACKGROUND INFORMATION ON DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT OF THREE MAJOR CAUSES OF GENITAL ULCERS: syphilis, herpes simplex virus (HSV), and chancroid. The author also discusses differential diagnoses and suggests an approach to treatment.

  20. [The ulcerative form of skin sarcoidosis].

    PubMed

    Rodionov, A N; Samtsov, A V

    1990-01-01

    A female patient suffering from the ulcerative form of skin sarcoidosis is described and the literature dealing with this problem is reviewed. Peculiar features of this case are described: ulceration of the nodes, which is an extremely rare phenomenon; no involvement of other organs, lungs included, was detectable, which is not typical of ulcerative sarcoidosis; small-nodular elements are parallelled by nodes (Boeck's small-nodular sarcoid and Darier-Roussy's subcutaneous sarcoids) in this patient, this evidencing an uniform pathologic process in the skin and subcutaneous fat. Ulceration in this patient is explained by the development of allergic vasculitis of the immediate hypersensitivity type (leukocytoclastic vasculitis and manifest increase of the level of circulating immune complexes). Prednisolone therapy has resulted in an excellent clinical effect.