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Sample records for pressure waves

  1. Characteristics of pressure waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Air blast characteristics generated by most types of explosions are discussed. Data cover both negative and positive blast load phases and net transverse pressure as a function of time. The effects of partial or total confinement, atmospheric propagation, absorption of energy by ground shock or cratering, and transmission over irregular terrain on blast wave properties were also considered.

  2. Arterial pulse wave pressure transducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, C.; Gorelick, D.; Chen, W. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    An arterial pulse wave pressure transducer is introduced. The transducer is comprised of a fluid filled cavity having a flexible membrane disposed over the cavity and adapted to be placed on the skin over an artery. An arterial pulse wave creates pressure pulses in the fluid which are transduced, by a pressure sensitive transistor in direct contact with the fluid, into an electric signal. The electrical signal is representative of the pulse waves and can be recorded so as to monitor changes in the elasticity of the arterial walls.

  3. Pressure wave: Gun barrel interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowley, A. B.; King, W. P. C.

    1986-01-01

    The interaction of pressure waves generated during the internal ballistics cycle with the vibrations of a tank barrel, and the possible effects on accuracy, are described. The investigation is based on codes simulating the complete internal ballistics cycle, including the venting of gases after shot exit, and the longitudinal and flexural vibration modes of the barrel, both of which were developed at the Royal Military College of Science. The computative effects of pressure waves on both accuracy and structural integrity are discussed for a number of different charge and barrel configurations.

  4. Fluid pressure waves trigger earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulargia, Francesco; Bizzarri, Andrea

    2015-03-01

    Fluids-essentially meteoric water-are present everywhere in the Earth's crust, occasionally also with pressures higher than hydrostatic due to the tectonic strain imposed on impermeable undrained layers, to the impoundment of artificial lakes or to the forced injections required by oil and gas exploration and production. Experimental evidence suggests that such fluids flow along preferred paths of high diffusivity, provided by rock joints and faults. Studying the coupled poroelastic problem, we find that such flow is ruled by a nonlinear partial differential equation amenable to a Barenblatt-type solution, implying that it takes place in form of solitary pressure waves propagating at a velocity which decreases with time as v ∝ t [1/(n - 1) - 1] with n ≳ 7. According to Tresca-Von Mises criterion, these waves appear to play a major role in earthquake triggering, being also capable to account for aftershock delay without any further assumption. The measure of stress and fluid pressure inside active faults may therefore provide direct information about fault potential instability.

  5. Supratentorial pressures. Part II: Intracerebral pulse waves.

    PubMed

    Miller, J D; Peeler, D F; Pattisapu, J; Parent, A D

    1987-09-01

    Intracerebral pulse waves were recorded in cat and monkey while intracranial pressure (ICP) manipulations were performed. The intracerebral pulse waves appeared comparable to cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pulsations. The wave forms were divided into multiple smaller waves, designated P1 to P4. The P1 component was primarily of arterial origin and was accentuated by increasing ICP unrelated to increased venous pressure, most commonly from a mass lesion. Bilateral carotid occlusion resulted in decreased amplitude of P1. Venous hypertension from jugular venous or sagittal sinus occlusion, on the other hand, accentuated waves P2 and P3 more than P1. This is consistent with a Starling resistor model of the cerebral venous system in which mass lesions may compress low-pressure veins and accentuate the arterial pressure-dependent P1 wave, whereas venous hypertension causes increased prominence of the later P2 and P3 waves. PMID:2891069

  6. Investigation of Pressurized Wave Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keith, Theo G., Jr.; Dimofte, Florin

    2003-01-01

    The wave bearing has been pioneered and developed by Dr. Dimofte over the past several years. This bearing will be the main focus of this research. It is believed that the wave bearing offers a number of advantages over the foil bearing, which is the bearing that NASA is currently pursuing for turbomachinery applications. The wave bearing is basically a journal bearing whose film thickness varies around the circumference approximately sinusoidally, with usually 3 or 4 waves. Being a rigid geometry bearing, it provides precise control of shaft centerlines. The wave profile also provides good load capacity and makes the bearing very stable. Manufacturing techniques have been devised that should allow the production of wave bearings almost as cheaply as conventional full-circular bearings.

  7. Pressure diffusion waves in porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Silin, Dmitry; Korneev, Valeri; Goloshubin, Gennady

    2003-04-08

    Pressure diffusion wave in porous rocks are under consideration. The pressure diffusion mechanism can provide an explanation of the high attenuation of low-frequency signals in fluid-saturated rocks. Both single and dual porosity models are considered. In either case, the attenuation coefficient is a function of the frequency.

  8. Blast wave parameters at diminished ambient pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silnikov, M. V.; Chernyshov, M. V.; Mikhaylin, A. I.

    2015-04-01

    Relation between blast wave parameters resulted from a condensed high explosive (HE) charge detonation and a surrounding gas (air) pressure has been studied. Blast wave pressure and impulse differences at compression and rarefaction phases, which traditionally determine damage explosive effect, has been analyzed. An initial pressure effect on a post-explosion quasi-static component of the blast load has been investigated. The analysis is based on empirical relations between blast parameters and non-dimensional similarity criteria. The results can be directly applied to flying vehicle (aircraft or spacecraft) blast safety analysis.

  9. Pressure waves in a supersaturated bubbly magma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kurzon, I.; Lyakhovsky, V.; Navon, O.; Chouet, B.

    2011-01-01

    We study the interaction of acoustic pressure waves with an expanding bubbly magma. The expansion of magma is the result of bubble growth during or following magma decompression and leads to two competing processes that affect pressure waves. On the one hand, growth in vesicularity leads to increased damping and decreased wave amplitudes, and on the other hand, a decrease in the effective bulk modulus of the bubbly mixture reduces wave velocity, which in turn, reduces damping and may lead to wave amplification. The additional acoustic energy originates from the chemical energy released during bubble growth. We examine this phenomenon analytically to identify conditions under which amplification of pressure waves is possible. These conditions are further examined numerically to shed light on the frequency and phase dependencies in relation to the interaction of waves and growing bubbles. Amplification is possible at low frequencies and when the growth rate of bubbles reaches an optimum value for which the wave velocity decreases sufficiently to overcome the increased damping of the vesicular material. We examine two amplification phase-dependent effects: (1) a tensile-phase effect in which the inserted wave adds to the process of bubble growth, utilizing the energy associated with the gas overpressure in the bubble and therefore converting a large proportion of this energy into additional acoustic energy, and (2) a compressive-phase effect in which the pressure wave works against the growing bubbles and a large amount of its acoustic energy is dissipated during the first cycle, but later enough energy is gained to amplify the second cycle. These two effects provide additional new possible mechanisms for the amplification phase seen in Long-Period (LP) and Very-Long-Period (VLP) seismic signals originating in magma-filled cracks.

  10. Transient flows and pressure waves in pipes

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, X.Q.; Sun, J.G.; Sha, W.T.

    1994-06-01

    Transient laminar flows and pressure-wave propagations in pipes connected with components, commonly known as water hammer, are analyzed. The system studied consists of a constant-pressure vessel, a uniform circular pipe, a valve between them, and a receiver vessel. A pressure-wave equation and a linearized velocity equation are derived from the equations of mass and momentum conservation. Waveform distortion due to viscous dissipation and pipe-wall elastic expansion is characterized by a dimensionless transmission number, K. The coefficients of the damping of the pressure waves were found to be related to the roots of the Bessel function J{sub 0}. An exact solution of the pressure-wave equation was obtained numerically. The relationship between the distortion of a traveling wave and the transmission number K was studied. The problem is also calculated with a general-purpose computer code, COMMIX, which solves the exact mass conservation equation and Navier-Stokes equations. The COMMIX calculational results agreed well with the analytical solutions.

  11. Modulated pressure waves in large elastic tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mefire Yone, G. R.; Tabi, C. B.; Mohamadou, A.; Ekobena Fouda, H. P.; Kofané, T. C.

    2013-09-01

    Modulational instability is the direct way for the emergence of wave patterns and localized structures in nonlinear systems. We show in this work that it can be explored in the framework of blood flow models. The whole modified Navier-Stokes equations are reduced to a difference-differential amplitude equation. The modulational instability criterion is therefore derived from the latter, and unstable patterns occurrence is discussed on the basis of the nonlinear parameter model of the vessel. It is found that the critical amplitude is an increasing function of α, whereas the region of instability expands. The subsequent modulated pressure waves are obtained through numerical simulations, in agreement with our analytical expectations. Different classes of modulated pressure waves are obtained, and their close relationship with Mayer waves is discussed.

  12. Reflections of pressure waves at tunnel portals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, J. M. B.; Vardy, A. E.

    1994-05-01

    Reflections of plane waves from the open ends (portals) of axisymmetric pipes and plane two-dimensional (2-D) channels are investigated analytically, numerically, and experimentally. An analytical approach developed by Rudinger for pressure decay at an axisymmetric, flanged portal is extended to longer times, and equivalent analyses are developed for reflections from unflanged portals - both axisymmetric and plane 2-D. Predictions for the latter case are compared with numerical results from a computer program based on a 2-D method of bicharacteristics. The theoretical results are compared with measurements from a low pressure shock tube, which was used to investigate alternative end configurations including scarfed portals with and without flange plates. These confirm that the rate of pressure decay is much slower in the plane 2-D case and that flange plates further reduce the rate of decay, albeit slightly. Scarfed portals are shown to cause more uniform decay rates than 90 deg portals.

  13. Pressure waves generated by steady flames.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhl, A. L.; Kamel, M. M.; Oppenheim, A. K.

    1973-01-01

    Analysis of pressure waves that can be generated by clouds of explosive gas mixtures in a free atmosphere which is initially at a uniform state. The treatment is restricted only to the final stage of constant flame velocity when the flowfield is self-similar. By the introduction of reduced blast-wave parameters as phase-plane coordinates, the problem is resolved into the determination of the appropriate integral curves on this plane. Results, including space profiles of gasdynamic parameters, have been computed for a specific case of a hydrocarbon-air mixture characterized by a specific heat ratio of 1.3, sound speed at NTP of 345 m/sec, and volumetric expansion ratio corresponding to constant pressure deflagration of 7. Maximum overpressure ratios that can be generated by such flames in point-and line-symmetrical waves range from .00053, for the lower bound in the burning speed, up to 6 for the deflagration, while, for the average speeds of 5 to 10 m/sec, they are at a level of 0.05 to 0.10.

  14. On the pressure field of nonlinear standing water waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwartz, L. W.

    1980-01-01

    The pressure field produced by two dimensional nonlinear time and space periodic standing waves was calculated as a series expansion in the wave height. The high order series was summed by the use of Pade approximants. Calculations included the pressure variation at great depth, which was considered to be a likely cause of microseismic activity, and the pressure distribution on a vertical barrier or breakwater.

  15. Numerical Study of Unsteady Supercavitation Perturbed by a Pressure Wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, J. G.; Khoo, B. C.

    2016-06-01

    The unsteady features of supercavitation disturbed by an introduced pressure wave are investigated numerically using a one-fluid cavitation model. The supercavitating flow is assumed to be the homogeneous mixture of liquid and vapour which are locally under both kinetic and thermodynamic equilibrium. The compressibility effects of liquid water are taken into account to model the propagation of pressure wave through flow and its interaction with supercavitation bubble. The interaction between supercavity enveloping an underwater flat-nose cylinder and pressure wave is simulated and the resulting unsteady behavior of supercavitation is illustrated. It is observed that the supercavity will become unstable under the impact of the pressure wave and may collapse locally, which depends on the strength of perturbation. The huge pressure surge accompanying the collapse of supercavitation may cause the material erosion, noise, vibration and efficiency loss of operating underwater devices.

  16. Plateau Waves of Intracranial Pressure and Multimodal Brain Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Dias, Celeste; Maia, Isabel; Cerejo, Antonio; Smielewski, Peter; Paiva, José-Artur; Czosnyka, Marek

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe multimodal brain monitoring characteristics during plateau waves of intracranial pressure (ICP) in patients with head injury, using ICM+ software for continuous recording. Plateau waves consist of an abrupt elevation of ICP above 40 mmHg for 5-20 min. This is a prospective observational study of patients with head injury who were admitted to a neurocritical care unit and who developed plateau waves. We analyzed 59 plateau waves that occurred in 8 of 18 patients (44 %). At the top of plateau waves arterial blood pressure remained almost constant, but cerebral perfusion pressure, cerebral blood flow, brain tissue oxygenation, and cerebral oximetry decreased. After plateau waves, patients with a previously better autoregulation status developed hyperemia, demonstrated by an increase in cerebral blood flow and brain oxygenation. Pressure and oxygen cerebrovascular reactivity indexes (pressure reactivity index and ORxshort) increased significantly during the plateau wave as a sign of disruption of autoregulation. Bedside multimodal brain monitoring is important to characterize increases in ICP and give differential diagnoses of plateau waves, as management of this phenomenon differs from that of regular ICP.

  17. Influence of Plasma Pressure Fluctuation on RF Wave Propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhiwei; Bao, Weimin; Li, Xiaoping; Liu, Donglin; Zhou, Hui

    2016-02-01

    Pressure fluctuations in the plasma sheath from spacecraft reentry affect radio-frequency (RF) wave propagation. The influence of these fluctuations on wave propagation and wave properties is studied using methods derived by synthesizing the compressible turbulent flow theory, plasma theory, and electromagnetic wave theory. We study these influences on wave propagation at GPS and Ka frequencies during typical reentry by adopting stratified modeling. We analyzed the variations in reflection and transmission properties induced by pressure fluctuations. Our results show that, at the GPS frequency, if the waves are not totally reflected then the pressure fluctuations can remarkably affect reflection, transmission, and absorption properties. In extreme situations, the fluctuations can even cause blackout. At the Ka frequency, the influences are obvious when the waves are not totally transmitted. The influences are more pronounced at the GPS frequency than at the Ka frequency. This suggests that the latter can mitigate blackout by reducing both the reflection and the absorption of waves, as well as the influences of plasma fluctuations on wave propagation. Given that communication links with the reentry vehicles are susceptible to plasma pressure fluctuations, the influences on link budgets should be taken into consideration. supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (No. 2014CB340205) and National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 61301173)

  18. Corotating pressure waves without streams in the solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burlaga, L. F.

    1983-01-01

    Voyager 1 and 2 magnetic field and plasma data are presented which demonstrate the existence of large scale, corotating, non-linear pressure waves between 2 AU and 4 AU that are not accompanied by fast streams. The pressure waves are presumed to be generated by corotating streams near the Sun. For two of the three pressure waves that are discussed, the absence of a stream is probably a real, physical effect, viz., a consequence of deceleration of the stream by the associated compression wave. For the third pressure wave, the apparent absence of a stream may be a geometrical effect; it is likely that the stream was at latitudes just above those of the spacecraft, while the associated shocks and compression wave extended over a broader range of latitudes so that they could be observed by the spacecraft. It is suggested that the development of large-scale non-linear pressure waves at the expense of the kinetic energy of streams produces a qualitative change in the solar wind in the outer heliosphere. Within a few AU the quasi-stationary solar wind structure is determined by corotating streams whose structure is determined by the boundary conditions near the Sun.

  19. Novel wave power analysis linking pressure-flow waves, wave potential, and the forward and backward components of hydraulic power.

    PubMed

    Mynard, Jonathan P; Smolich, Joseph J

    2016-04-15

    Wave intensity analysis provides detailed insights into factors influencing hemodynamics. However, wave intensity is not a conserved quantity, so it is sensitive to diameter variations and is not distributed among branches of a junction. Moreover, the fundamental relation between waves and hydraulic power is unclear. We, therefore, propose an alternative to wave intensity called "wave power," calculated via incremental changes in pressure and flow (dPdQ) and a novel time-domain separation of hydraulic pressure power and kinetic power into forward and backward wave-related components (ΠP±and ΠQ±). Wave power has several useful properties:1) it is obtained directly from flow measurements, without requiring further calculation of velocity;2) it is a quasi-conserved quantity that may be used to study the relative distribution of waves at junctions; and3) it has the units of power (Watts). We also uncover a simple relationship between wave power and changes in ΠP±and show that wave reflection reduces transmitted power. Absolute values of ΠP±represent wave potential, a recently introduced concept that unifies steady and pulsatile aspects of hemodynamics. We show that wave potential represents the hydraulic energy potential stored in a compliant pressurized vessel, with spatial gradients producing waves that transfer this energy. These techniques and principles are verified numerically and also experimentally with pressure/flow measurements in all branches of a central bifurcation in sheep, under a wide range of hemodynamic conditions. The proposed "wave power analysis," encompassing wave power, wave potential, and wave separation of hydraulic power provides a potent time-domain approach for analyzing hemodynamics. PMID:26873972

  20. Novel wave power analysis linking pressure-flow waves, wave potential, and the forward and backward components of hydraulic power.

    PubMed

    Mynard, Jonathan P; Smolich, Joseph J

    2016-04-15

    Wave intensity analysis provides detailed insights into factors influencing hemodynamics. However, wave intensity is not a conserved quantity, so it is sensitive to diameter variations and is not distributed among branches of a junction. Moreover, the fundamental relation between waves and hydraulic power is unclear. We, therefore, propose an alternative to wave intensity called "wave power," calculated via incremental changes in pressure and flow (dPdQ) and a novel time-domain separation of hydraulic pressure power and kinetic power into forward and backward wave-related components (ΠP±and ΠQ±). Wave power has several useful properties:1) it is obtained directly from flow measurements, without requiring further calculation of velocity;2) it is a quasi-conserved quantity that may be used to study the relative distribution of waves at junctions; and3) it has the units of power (Watts). We also uncover a simple relationship between wave power and changes in ΠP±and show that wave reflection reduces transmitted power. Absolute values of ΠP±represent wave potential, a recently introduced concept that unifies steady and pulsatile aspects of hemodynamics. We show that wave potential represents the hydraulic energy potential stored in a compliant pressurized vessel, with spatial gradients producing waves that transfer this energy. These techniques and principles are verified numerically and also experimentally with pressure/flow measurements in all branches of a central bifurcation in sheep, under a wide range of hemodynamic conditions. The proposed "wave power analysis," encompassing wave power, wave potential, and wave separation of hydraulic power provides a potent time-domain approach for analyzing hemodynamics.

  1. Nonlinear Pressure Wave Analysis by Concentrated Mass Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, Satoshi; Kondou, Takahiro; Matsuzaki, Kenichiro

    A pressure wave propagating in a tube often changes to a shock wave because of the nonlinear effect of fluid. Analyzing this phenomenon by the finite difference method requires high computational cost. To lessen the computational cost, a concentrated mass model is proposed. This model consists of masses, connecting nonlinear springs, connecting dampers, and base support dampers. The characteristic of a connecting nonlinear spring is derived from the adiabatic change of fluid, and the equivalent mass and equivalent damping coefficient of the base support damper are derived from the equation of motion of fluid in a cylindrical tube. Pressure waves generated in a hydraulic oil tube, a sound tube and a plane-wave tube are analyzed numerically by the proposed model to confirm the validity of the model. All numerical computational results agree very well with the experimental results carried out by Okamura, Saenger and Kamakura. Especially, the numerical analysis reproduces the phenomena that a pressure wave with large amplitude propagating in a sound tube or in a plane tube changes to a shock wave. Therefore, it is concluded that the proposed model is valid for the numerical analysis of nonlinear pressure wave problem.

  2. Standing wave pressure fields generated in an acoustic levitation chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hancock, Andrew; Allen, John S.; Kruse, Dustin E.; Dayton, Paul A.; Kargel, Christian M.; Insana, Michael F.

    2001-05-01

    We are developing an acoustic levitation chamber for measuring adhesion force strengths among biological cells. Our research has four phases. Phase I, presented here, is concerned with the design and construction of a chamber for trapping cell-sized microbubbles with known properties in acoustic standing waves, and examines the theory that describes the standing wave field. A cylindrical chamber has been developed to generate a stable acoustic standing wave field. The pressure field was mapped using a 0.4-mm needle hydrophone, and experiments were performed using 100 micron diameter unencapsulated air bubbles, 9 micron diameter isobutane-filled microbubbles, and 3 micron diameter decafluorobutane (C4F10)-filled microbubbles, confirming that the net radiation force from the standing wave pressure field tends to band the microbubbles at pressure antinodes, in accordance with theory.

  3. Measurement of Strength at High Pressures Using Oblique Shock Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolyar, Victoria; Ravichandran, Guruswami; Alexander, Scott

    2013-06-01

    At high pressures and high strain rates, the measurement of strength is important to many implications including planetary impact and inertial confinement fusion. Understanding how strength depends on pressure allows for the characterization of materials and validation of constitutive models. Slotted barrel guns have traditionally been used in experiments, such as the pressure-shear plate impact technique, to generate longitudinal and shear waves through an oblique impact. A new methodology for measuring material strength using normal impact (1-2 km/s) is described. In this configuration, a composite target is designed with an angled material of interest embedded into a driver material. This driver material is used to generate an oblique shock wave that is followed by a shear wave, due to the angled nature of the target material. Using shock polar analysis, the rear surface of the target is designed to be parallel to the transmitted shock wave in order to mitigate wave interactions at the rear surface. A window is used on the rear surface of the target to measure the in-situ particle velocities at the target-window interface. Using three VISAR measurements, the tangential and longitudinal particle velocities at the rear surface of the target are found from which the shear stress (strength) is inferred as a function of pressure. Results are presented for 6061-T6 Aluminum as well as Tantalum. Hydrocode simulations are used to predict the experimental results as well as characterize the wave interactions in the oblique wedge experiments.

  4. Calculated mean arterial pressure in the posterior tibial and radial artery pressure wave in newborn infants.

    PubMed

    Gevers, M; Hack, M W; van Genderingen, H R; Lafeber, H N; Westerhof, N

    1995-01-01

    Mean arterial pressure (MAP) is the area under the pressure wave averaged over the cardiac cycle, and therefore depends on pressure wave contour. A generally used rule of thumb to estimate MAP of peripheral arteries in adults is adding one-third of the arterial pulse pressure (PP) to diastolic arterial pressure (DAP). As peripheral pressure wave forms in neonates do not resemble adult peripheral wave forms, it may be expected that this rule of thumb does not hold for neonates. Previously, we found that MAP can be calculated by adding 50% PP to DAP in radial artery waves in neonates. In the present study, we investigated in neonates how MAP in the posterior tibial artery depends on systolic and diastolic pressure and we compared these findings to those found in the radial artery. Forty infants admitted for intensive care were studied. We analyzed 5000 invasively and accurately obtained blood pressure waves in the posterior tibial artery of 20 neonates and another 5000 waves similarly obtained from the radial artery in another group of 20 neonates. We found that MAP in posterior tibial artery waves is well approximated by adding 41.5 +/- 2.0% of PP to DAP, whereas MAP in radial artery waves can be calculated by adding 46.7 +/- 1.7% of PP to DAP. These values are significantly different (p < 0.0001). In conclusion, the rule of thumb as used in the adult to find MAP, where 33% PP is added to DAP, does not hold for the newborn. We recommend to calculate MAP in the tibial artery by adding 40% of PP to DAP and in the radial artery by adding 50% of PP to DAP.

  5. Dual mode acoustic wave sensor for precise pressure reading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, Xiaojing; Kropelnicki, Piotr; Wang, Yong; Randles, Andrew Benson; Chuan Chai, Kevin Tshun; Cai, Hong; Gu, Yuan Dong

    2014-09-01

    In this letter, a Microelectromechanical system acoustic wave sensor, which has a dual mode (lateral field exited Lamb wave mode and surface acoustic wave (SAW) mode) behavior, is presented for precious pressure change read out. Comb-like interdigital structured electrodes on top of piezoelectric material aluminium nitride (AlN) are used to generate the wave modes. The sensor membrane consists of single crystalline silicon formed by backside-etching of the bulk material of a silicon on insulator wafer having variable device thickness layer (5 μm-50 μm). With this principle, a pressure sensor has been fabricated and mounted on a pressure test package with pressure applied to the backside of the membrane within a range of 0 psi to 300 psi. The temperature coefficient of frequency was experimentally measured in the temperature range of -50 °C to 300 °C. This idea demonstrates a piezoelectric based sensor having two modes SAW/Lamb wave for direct physical parameter—pressure readout and temperature cancellation which can operate in harsh environment such as oil and gas exploration, automobile and aeronautic applications using the dual mode behavior of the sensor and differential readout at the same time.

  6. Acoustic Wave Propagation in Pressure Sense Lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vitarius, Patrick; Gregory, Don A.; Wiley, John; Korman, Valentin

    2003-01-01

    Sense lines are used in pressure measurements to passively transmit information from hostile environments to areas where transducers can be used. The transfer function of a sense line can be used to obtain information about the measured environment from the protected sensor. Several properties of this transfer function are examined, including frequency dependence, Helmholtz resonance, and time of flight delay.

  7. Ultrasonic wave based pressure measurement in small diameter pipeline.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dan; Song, Zhengxiang; Wu, Yuan; Jiang, Yuan

    2015-12-01

    An effective non-intrusive method of ultrasound-based technique that allows monitoring liquid pressure in small diameter pipeline (less than 10mm) is presented in this paper. Ultrasonic wave could penetrate medium, through the acquisition of representative information from the echoes, properties of medium can be reflected. This pressure measurement is difficult due to that echoes' information is not easy to obtain in small diameter pipeline. The proposed method is a study on pipeline with Kneser liquid and is based on the principle that the transmission speed of ultrasonic wave in pipeline liquid correlates with liquid pressure and transmission speed of ultrasonic wave in pipeline liquid is reflected through ultrasonic propagation time providing that acoustic distance is fixed. Therefore, variation of ultrasonic propagation time can reflect variation of pressure in pipeline. Ultrasonic propagation time is obtained by electric processing approach and is accurately measured to nanosecond through high resolution time measurement module. We used ultrasonic propagation time difference to reflect actual pressure in this paper to reduce the environmental influences. The corresponding pressure values are finally obtained by acquiring the relationship between variation of ultrasonic propagation time difference and pressure with the use of neural network analysis method, the results show that this method is accurate and can be used in practice.

  8. Acoustic waves in gases with strong pressure gradients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zorumski, William E.

    1989-01-01

    The effect of strong pressure gradients on the acoustic modes (standing waves) of a rectangular cavity is investigated analytically. When the cavity response is represented by a sum of modes, each mode is found to have two resonant frequencies. The lower frequency is near the Viaesaela-Brundt frequency, which characterizes the buoyant effect, and the higher frequency is above the ordinary acoustic resonance frequency. This finding shows that the propagation velocity of the acoustic waves is increased due to the pressure gradient effect.

  9. Rapid miniature fiber optic pressure sensors for blast wave measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Xiaotian; Wu, Nan; Tian, Ye; Niezrecki, Christopher; Chen, Julie; Wang, Xingwei

    2013-02-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a serious potential threat to soldiers who are exposed to explosions. Since the pathophysiology of TBI associated with a blast wave is not clearly defined, it is crucial to have a sensing system to accurately quantify the blast wave dynamics. This paper presents an ultra-fast fiber optic pressure sensor based on Fabry-Perot (FP) interferometric principle that is capable of measuring the rapid pressure changes in a blast event. The blast event in the experiment was generated by a starter pistol blank firing at close range, which produced a more realistic wave profile compared to using compressed air driven shock tubes. To the authors' knowledge, it is also the first study to utilize fiber optic pressure sensors to measure the ballistics shock wave of a pistol firing. The results illustrated that the fiber optic pressure sensor has a rise time of 200 ns which demonstrated that the sensor has ability to capture the dynamic pressure transient during a blast event. Moreover, the resonant frequency of the sensor was determined to be 4.11 MHz, which agrees well with the specific designed value.

  10. Numerical study on pressure wave propagation in a mercury loop

    SciTech Connect

    Kogawa, Hiroyuki; Hasegawa, Shoichi; Futakawa, Masatoshi; Riemer, Bernie; Wendel, Mark W; Haines, John R

    2008-01-01

    On-beam tests were carried out at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center Weapons Neutron Research (LANSCE WNR) facility in June 2005 to investigate pressure wave mitigation in mercury targets for the MW-class spallation neutron sources under international collaboration between US Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) and Japanese Spallation Neutron Source (JSNS). A mercury loop was used for the target, a so-called In-Beam Bubbling Test Loop (IBBTL). The loop consists of the rectangular pipe of 25 mm x 50 mm^2 in cross section, 1.5 mm in wall thickness and 2 m in total length approximately. The SNS team set 8 strain sensors on the pipe wall to measure the strain propagation caused by the pressure wave. The maximum strain appeared at 350 mm apart from the proton-bombarded point at 5.5 ms after the proton bombardment. It is known that the propagation velocity of the pressure wave in mercury is ca. 1500 m/s and that of the stress wave in stainless steel is ca. 5000 m/s. However, the apparent wave propagation velocity in the IBBTL was lower than those velocities and was observed to be 65 m/s. Numerical analysis was carried out to understand the strain propagation in the pipe wall of the IBBTL. Numerical results showed that the maximum strain at 350 mm apart from the beam spot appeared at 5.5 ms after proton bombardment in good agreement with experimental results.

  11. Pressure induced Superconductivity in the Charge Density Wave Compound Tritelluride

    SciTech Connect

    Hamlin, J.J.; Zocco, D.A.; Sayles, T.A.; Maple, M.B.; Chu, J.-H.; Fisher, I.R.; /Stanford U., Geballe Lab.

    2010-02-15

    A series of high-pressure electrical resistivity measurements on single crystals of TbTe{sub 3} reveal a complex phase diagram involving the interplay of superconducting, antiferromagnetic and charge density wave order. The onset of superconductivity reaches a maximum of almost 4 K (onset) near {approx} 12.4 GPa.

  12. Measurement of Blast Waves from Bursting Pressureized Frangible Spheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Esparza, E. D.; Baker, W. E.

    1977-01-01

    Small-scale experiments were conducted to obtain data on incident overpressure at various distances from bursting pressurized spheres. Complete time histories of blast overpressure generated by rupturing glass spheres under high internal pressure were obtained using eight side-on pressure transducers. A scaling law is presented, and its nondimensional parameters are used to compare peak overpressures, arrival times, impulses, and durations for different initial conditions and sizes of blast source. The nondimensional data are also compared, whenever possible, with results of theoretical calculations and compiled data for Pentolite high explosive. The scaled data are repeatable and show significant differences from blast waves generated by condensed high-explosives.

  13. Effect of tube ovalling on pressure wave propagation speed.

    PubMed

    Anderson, A; Johnson, G R

    1990-01-01

    For physiological and other flows it is often assumed that the pressure pulse wave speed is given by the classic Moens-Korteweg expression and this may be used, for example, to assist in the determination of in vivo blood vessel wall incremental Young's modulus. A number of physical factors affecting the value of this wave speed have been reviewed in the literature, but the effect of slight ovalling of the tube cross-section is rarely mentioned. The analysis for a tube of elliptic cross-section shows that even a very small degree of ovalling can cause quite substantial reductions in Young mode wave propagation velocities compared with the classic Moens-Korteweg expression. Bending-induced changes in cross-section shape with internal pressure increase the apparent elasticity of the tube wall. Experimental confirmation is provided by waterhammer wave speed measurements in a copper tube that has been ovalled by coiling. Even though the Young mode is not dominant in this case, as it would be for a physiological case, the measured wave speed is quite clearly less than the Moens-Korteweg theory and it can be shown that the small degree of measured tube ovality explains this.

  14. Internal wave-turbulence pressure above sloping sea bottoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haren, Hans

    2011-12-01

    An accurate bottom pressure sensor has been moored at different sites varying from a shallow sea strait via open ocean guyots to a 1900 m deep Gulf of Mexico. All sites show more or less sloping bottom topography. Focusing on frequencies (σ) higher than tidal, the pressure records are remarkably similar, to within the 95% statistical significance bounds, in the internal gravity wave continuum (IWC) band up to buoyancy frequency N. The IWC has a relatively uniform spectral slope: log(P(σ)) = -αlog(σ), α = 2 ± 1/3. The spectral collapse is confirmed from independent internal hydrostatic pressure estimate, which suggests a saturated IWC. For σ > N, all pressure-spectra transit to a bulge that differs in magnitude. This bulge is commonly attributed to long surface waves. For the present data it is suggested to be due to stratified turbulence-internal wave coupling, which is typically large over sloping topography. The bulge drops off at a more or less common frequency of 2-3 × 10-2 Hz, which is probably related with typical turbulent overturning scales.

  15. Propagation of waves in a medium with high radiation pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bisnovatyy-Kogan, G. S.; Blinnikov, S. I.

    1979-01-01

    The propagation and mutual transformation of acoustic and thermal waves are investigated in media with a high radiative pressure. The equations of hydrodynamics for matter and the radiative transfer equations in a moving medium in the Eddington approximation are used in the investigation. Model problems of waves in a homogeneous medium with an abrupt jump in opacity and in a medium of variable opacity are presented. The characteristic and the times of variability are discussed. Amplitude for the brightness fluctuations for very massive stars are discussed.

  16. Plateau Waves of Intracranial Pressure and Partial Pressure of Cerebral Oxygen.

    PubMed

    Lang, Erhard W; Kasprowicz, Magdalena; Smielewski, Peter; Pickard, John; Czosnyka, Marek

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates 55 intracranial pressure (ICP) plateau waves recorded in 20 patients after severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) with a focus on a moving correlation coefficient between mean arterial pressure (ABP) and ICP, called PRx, which serves as a marker of cerebrovascular reactivity, and a moving correlation coefficient between ABP and cerebral partial pressure of oxygen (pbtO2), called ORx, which serves as a marker for cerebral oxygen reactivity. ICP and ICPamplitude increased significantly during the plateau waves, whereas CPP and pbtO2 decreased significantly. ABP, ABP amplitude, and heart rate remained unchanged. In 73 % of plateau waves PRx increased during the wave. ORx showed an increase during and a decrease after the plateau waves, which was not statistically significant. Our data show profound cerebral vasoparalysis on top of the wave and, to a lesser extent, impairment of cerebral oxygen reactivity. The different behavior of the indices may be due to the different latencies of the cerebral blood flow and oxygen level control mechanisms. While cerebrovascular reactivity is a rapidly reacting mechanism, cerebral oxygen reactivity is slower.

  17. Pressure measurements of a three wave journal air bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dimofte, Florin; Addy, Harold E., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    In order to validate theoretical predictions of a wave journal bearing concept, a bench test rig was assembled at NASA Lewis Research Center to measure the steady-state performance of a journal air bearing. The tester can run up to 30,000 RPM and the spindle has a run out of less than 1 micron. A three wave journal bearing (50 mm diameter and 58 mm length) has been machined at NASA Lewis. The pressures at 16 ports along the bearing circumference at the middle of the bearing length were measured and compared to the theoretical prediction. The bearing ran at speeds up to 15,000 RPM and certain loads. Good agreement was found between the measured and calculated pressures.

  18. Wave pressure acting on V-shaped floating breakwater in random seas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yang; Ding, Ning; Lin, Jie; Hou, Jiajia

    2015-12-01

    Wave pressure on the wet surface of a V-shaped floating breakwater in random seas is investigated. Considering the diffraction effect, the unit velocity potential caused by the single regular waves around the breakwater is solved using the finite-depth Green function and boundary element method, in which the Green function is solved by integral method. The Response-Amplitude Operator (RAO) of wave pressure is acquired according to the Longuet-Higgins' wave model and the linear Bernoulli equation. Furthermore, the wave pressure's response spectrum is calculated according to the wave spectrum by discretizing the frequency domain. The wave pressure's characteristic value corresponding to certain cumulative probability is determined according to the Rayleigh distribution of wave heights. The numerical results and field test results are compared, which indicates that the wave pressure calculated in random seas agrees with that of field measurements. It is found that the bigger angle between legs will cause the bigger pressure response, while the increase in leg length does not influence the pressure significantly. The pressure at the side of head sea is larger than that of back waves. When the incident wave angle changes from 0° to 90°, the pressure at the side of back waves decreases clearly, while at the side of head sea, the situation is more complicated and there seems no obvious tendency. The concentration of wave energy around low frequency (long wavelength) will induce bigger wave pressure, and more attention should be paid to this situation for the structure safety.

  19. Intracranial pressure increases during exposure to a shock wave.

    PubMed

    Leonardi, Alessandra Dal Cengio; Bir, Cynthia A; Ritzel, Dave V; VandeVord, Pamela J

    2011-01-01

    Traumatic brain injuries (TBI) caused by improvised explosive devices (IEDs) affect a significant percentage of surviving soldiers wounded in Iraq and Afghanistan. The extent of a blast TBI, especially initially, is difficult to diagnose, as internal injuries are frequently unrecognized and therefore underestimated, yet problems develop over time. Therefore it is paramount to resolve the physical mechanisms by which critical stresses are inflicted on brain tissue from blast wave encounters with the head. This study recorded direct pressure within the brains of male Sprague-Dawley rats during exposure to blast. The goal was to understand pressure wave dynamics through the brain. In addition, we optimized in vivo methods to ensure accurate measurement of intracranial pressure (ICP). Our results demonstrate that proper sealing techniques lead to a significant increase in ICP values, compared to the outside overpressure generated by the blast. Further, the values seem to have a direct relation to a rat's size and age: heavier, older rats had the highest ICP readings. These findings suggest that a global flexure of the skull by the transient shockwave is an important mechanism of pressure transmission inside the brain.

  20. Intracranial pressure increases during exposure to a shock wave.

    PubMed

    Leonardi, Alessandra Dal Cengio; Bir, Cynthia A; Ritzel, Dave V; VandeVord, Pamela J

    2011-01-01

    Traumatic brain injuries (TBI) caused by improvised explosive devices (IEDs) affect a significant percentage of surviving soldiers wounded in Iraq and Afghanistan. The extent of a blast TBI, especially initially, is difficult to diagnose, as internal injuries are frequently unrecognized and therefore underestimated, yet problems develop over time. Therefore it is paramount to resolve the physical mechanisms by which critical stresses are inflicted on brain tissue from blast wave encounters with the head. This study recorded direct pressure within the brains of male Sprague-Dawley rats during exposure to blast. The goal was to understand pressure wave dynamics through the brain. In addition, we optimized in vivo methods to ensure accurate measurement of intracranial pressure (ICP). Our results demonstrate that proper sealing techniques lead to a significant increase in ICP values, compared to the outside overpressure generated by the blast. Further, the values seem to have a direct relation to a rat's size and age: heavier, older rats had the highest ICP readings. These findings suggest that a global flexure of the skull by the transient shockwave is an important mechanism of pressure transmission inside the brain. PMID:21091267

  1. On Pressure Wave Simulations in Liquid Metal Neutron Source Targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fetzer, Jana R.; Class, Andreas

    2014-11-01

    Sound waves generated by fluid flow at low Mach numbers is associated with separated scales and thus with difficulties to construct efficient numerical methods for their approximation. One method is the Multi Pressure Variables (MPV) approach introduced for aero-acoustic applications. The MPV approach is based on a single time scale multiple space scale asymptotic analysis derived for subsonic flow by an asymptotic series expansion in the Mach-number. Distinguished are the flow and acoustic length scales resulting in three pressure contribution, i.e. thermodynamic, acoustic and dynamic pressure which are discretized on numerical meshes of different resolution. We propose to apply MPV to analyse liquid metal cooled spallation targets with a pulsed proton beams. These targets are operating in high power neutron sources for fundamental research. The nearly instantaneous heating of the liquid metal results in volumetric expansion of inertia confined liquid and thus to high pressure waves, which represent a major lifetime limiting thread. Our development accompanies design activities for the META:LIC (MEgawatt TArget: Lead bIsmuth Cooled) target proposed for the European Spallation Source.

  2. Radiation-pressure-driven dust waves inside bursting interstellar bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochsendorf, B. B.; Verdolini, S.; Cox, N. L. J.; Berné, O.; Kaper, L.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.

    2014-06-01

    Massive stars drive the evolution of the interstellar medium through their radiative and mechanical energy input. After their birth, they form "bubbles" of hot gas surrounded by a dense shell. Traditionally, the formation of bubbles is explained through the input of a powerful stellar wind, even though direct evidence supporting this scenario is lacking. Here we explore the possibility that interstellar bubbles seen by the Spitzer- and Herschel space telescopes, blown by stars with log (L/L⊙) ≲ 5.2, form and expand because of the thermal pressure that accompanies the ionization of the surrounding gas. We show that density gradients in the natal cloud or a puncture in the swept-up shell lead to an ionized gas flow through the bubble into the general interstellar medium, which is traced by a dust wave near the star, which demonstrates the importance of radiation pressure during this phase. Dust waves provide a natural explanation for the presence of dust inside H II bubbles, offer a novel method to study dust in H II regions and provide direct evidence that bubbles are relieving their pressure into the interstellar medium through a champagne flow, acting as a probe of the radiative interaction of a massive star with its surroundings. We explore a parameter space connecting the ambient density, the ionizing source luminosity, and the position of the dust wave, while using the well studied H II bubbles RCW 120 and RCW 82 as benchmarks of our model. Finally, we briefly examine the implications of our study for the environments of super star clusters formed in ultraluminous infrared galaxies, merging galaxies, and the early Universe, which occur in very luminous and dense environments and where radiation pressure is expected to dominate the dynamical evolution.

  3. Exercise central (aortic) blood pressure is predominantly driven by forward traveling waves, not wave reflection.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Martin G; Davies, Justin E; Roberts-Thomson, Phillip; Black, J Andrew; Hughes, Alun D; Sharman, James E

    2013-07-01

    Exercise hypertension independently predicts cardiovascular mortality, although little is known about exercise central hemodynamics. This study aimed to determine the contribution of arterial wave travel and aortic reservoir characteristics to central blood pressure (BP) during exercise. We hypothesized that exercise central BP would be principally related to forward wave travel and aortic reservoir function. After routine diagnostic coronary angiography, invasive pressure and flow velocity were recorded in the ascending aorta via sensor-tipped intra-arterial wires in 10 participants (age, 55±10 years; 70% men) free of coronary artery disease with normal left ventricular function. Measures were recorded at baseline and during supine cycle ergometry. Using wave intensity analysis, dominant wave types throughout the cardiac cycle were identified (forward and backward, compression, and decompression), and aortic reservoir and excess pressure were calculated. Central systolic BP increased significantly with exercise (Δ=19±12 mm Hg; P<0.001). This was associated with increases in systolic forward compression waves (Δ=12×10(6)±17×10(6) W·m(-2)·s(-1); P=0.045) and forward decompression waves in late systole (Δ=9×10(6)±6×10(6) W·m(-2)·s(-1); P<0.001). Despite significant augmentation in BP (Δ=9±6 mm Hg; P=0.002), reflected waves did not increase in magnitude (Δ=-1×10(6)±3×10(6) W·m(-2)·s(-1); P=0.2). Excess pressure rose significantly with exercise (Δ=16±9 mm Hg; P<0.001), and reservoir pressure integral fell (Δ=-5×10(5)±5×10(5) Pa·s; P=0.010). Change in reflection coefficient negatively correlated with change in central systolic BP (r=-0.68; P=0.03). We conclude that elevation of exercise central BP is principally because of increases in aortic forward traveling waves generated by left ventricular ejection. These findings have relevance to understanding central BP waveform morphology and pathophysiology of exercise hypertension.

  4. Narrowed Aortoseptal Angle Is Related to Increased Central Blood Pressure and Aortic Pressure Wave Reflection.

    PubMed

    Olafiranye, Oladipupo; Ibrahim, Mediha; Kamran, Haroon; Venner-Jones, Kinda; McFarlane, Samy I; Salciccioli, Louis; Lazar, Jason M

    2012-08-01

    The left ventricular (LV) aortoseptal angle (ASA) decreases with age, and is associated with basal septal hypertrophy (septal bulge). Enhanced arterial pressure wave reflection is known to impact LV hypertrophy. We assessed whether ASA is related to central blood pressure (BP) and augmentation index (AI), a measure of the reflected pressure wave. We studied 75 subjects (age 62 ± 16 years; 66% female) who were referred for transthoracic echocardiography and had radial artery applanation tonometry within 24 h. Peripheral systolic BP (P-SBP), peripheral diastolic BP (P-DBP), and peripheral pulse pressure (P-PP) were obtained by sphygmomanometry. Central BPs (C-SBP, C-DBP, C-PP) and AI were derived from applanation tonometry. AI was corrected for heart rate (AI75). The basal septal wall thickness (SWT), mid SWT and ASA were measured using the parasternal long axis echocardiographic view. Mean ASA and AI75 were 117 ± 11° and 22 ± 11%, respectively. ASA correlated with AI75 (r = -0.31, p ≤ 0.01), C-SBP (r = -0.24, p = 0.04), C-PP (r = -0.29, p = 0.01), but only showed a trend towards significance with P-SBP (r = -0.2, p = 0.09) and P-PP (r = -0.21, p = 0.08). Interestingly, C-PP was correlated with basal SWT (r = 0.27, p = 0.02) but not with mid SWT (r = 0.19, p = 0.11). On multivariate linear regression analysis, adjusted for age, gender, weight, and mean arterial pressure, AI75 was an independent predictor of ASA (p = 0.02). Our results suggest that a narrowed ASA is related to increased pressure wave reflection and higher central BP. Further studies are needed to determine whether narrowed LV ASA is a cause or consequence of enhanced wave reflection and whether other factors are involved.

  5. Measurement of sound speed vs. depth in South Pole ice: pressure waves and shear waves

    SciTech Connect

    IceCube Collaboration; Klein, Spencer

    2009-06-04

    We have measured the speed of both pressure waves and shear waves as a function of depth between 80 and 500 m depth in South Pole ice with better than 1% precision. The measurements were made using the South Pole Acoustic Test Setup (SPATS), an array of transmitters and sensors deployed in the ice at the South Pole in order to measure the acoustic properties relevant to acoustic detection of astrophysical neutrinos. The transmitters and sensors use piezoceramics operating at {approx}5-25 kHz. Between 200 m and 500 m depth, the measured profile is consistent with zero variation of the sound speed with depth, resulting in zero refraction, for both pressure and shear waves. We also performed a complementary study featuring an explosive signal propagating vertically from 50 to 2250 m depth, from which we determined a value for the pressure wave speed consistent with that determined for shallower depths, higher frequencies, and horizontal propagation with the SPATS sensors. The sound speed profile presented here can be used to achieve good acoustic source position and emission time reconstruction in general, and neutrino direction and energy reconstruction in particular. The reconstructed quantities could also help separate neutrino signals from background.

  6. Tunnel pressure waves - A smartphone inquiry on rail travel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Andreas; Hirth, Michael; Kuhn, Jochen

    2016-02-01

    When traveling by rail, you might have experienced the following phenomenon: The train enters a tunnel, and after some seconds a noticeable pressure change occurs, as perceived by your ears or even by a rapid wobbling of the train windows. The basic physics is that pressure waves created by the train travel down the tunnel, are reflected at its other end, and travel back until they meet the train again. Here we will show (i) how this effect can be well understood as a kind of large-scale outdoor case of a textbook paradigm, and (ii) how, e.g., a prediction of the tunnel length from the inside of a moving train on the basis of this model can be validated by means of a mobile phone measurement.

  7. On the Generation of Multiple Atmospheric Pressure Waves Observed During Violent Volcanic Eruptions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medici, E. F.; Waite, G. P.

    2015-12-01

    One or more atmospheric pressure waves followed by a supersonic jet may be generated during the over pressurized vapor-solid-liquid mixture ejection of a violent volcanic eruption. The source of these multiple atmospheric pressure waves could have different origins. Among the physical mechanisms that could explain these behaviors are pulsating eruptions, the dynamics of shock waves, coupled pressure wave-supersonic jet interaction, or a combination of all these factors. In order to elucidate the causes of these complex fluid flow dynamics, a series of analog volcanic eruption experiments using an atmospheric shock tube were performed. During the testing, single and multiple pressure waves and the subsequent supersonic jet were generated. The controlled laboratory conditions enable studies of the most relevant variables potentially responsible for the formation of the multiple pressure waves. The tests were performed using dry, compressed nitrogen at standard room temperature that was free of particles. Yet, under this idealization of a real volcanic eruption, multiple pressure waves were observed on the high-speed video imaging and recorded on the pressure transducer. The amount of energy being released on each test was varied to achieve different discharge dynamics and the formation of single and multiple pressure waves. The preliminary experimental observations indicate a coupled pressure wave-jet interaction as source of multiple pressure waves.

  8. Wave-Induced Pressure Under an Internal Solitary Wave and Its Impact at the Bed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivera, Gustavo; Diamesis, Peter; Jenkins, James; Berzi, Diego

    2015-11-01

    The bottom boundary layer (BBL) under a mode-1 internal solitary wave (ISW) of depression propagating against an oncoming model barotropic current is examined using 2-D direct numerical simulation based on a spectral multidomain penalty method model. Particular emphasis is placed on the diffusion into the bed of the pressure field driven by the wake and any near-bed instabilities produced under specific conditions. To this end, a spectral nodal Galerkin approach is used for solving the diffusion equation for the wave-induced pressure. At sufficiently high ISW amplitude, the BBL undergoes a global instability which produces intermittent vortex shedding from within the separation bubble in the lee of the wave. The interplay between the bottom shear stress field and pressure perturbations during vortex ejection events and the subsequent evolution of the vortices is examined. The potential for bed failure upon the passage of the ISW trough and implications for resuspension of bottom particulate matter are both discussed in the context of specific sediment transport models.

  9. Internal wave pressure, velocity, and energy flux from density perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allshouse, Michael R.; Lee, Frank M.; Morrison, Philip J.; Swinney, Harry L.

    2016-05-01

    Determination of energy transport is crucial for understanding the energy budget and fluid circulation in density varying fluids such as the ocean and the atmosphere. However, it is rarely possible to determine the energy flux field J =p u , which requires simultaneous measurements of the pressure and velocity perturbation fields p and u , respectively. We present a method for obtaining the instantaneous J (x ,z ,t ) from density perturbations alone: A Green's function-based calculation yields p ; u is obtained by integrating the continuity equation and the incompressibility condition. We validate our method with results from Navier-Stokes simulations: The Green's function method is applied to the density perturbation field from the simulations and the result for J is found to agree typically to within 1% with J computed directly using p and u from the Navier-Stokes simulation. We also apply the Green's function method to density perturbation data from laboratory schlieren measurements of internal waves in a stratified fluid and the result for J agrees to within 6 % with results from Navier-Stokes simulations. Our method for determining the instantaneous velocity, pressure, and energy flux fields applies to any system described by a linear approximation of the density perturbation field, e.g., to small-amplitude lee waves and propagating vertical modes. The method can be applied using our matlab graphical user interface EnergyFlux.

  10. Pressure wave attenuation and dispersion in two-phase flow

    SciTech Connect

    Kovarik, F.S.; Bankoff, S.G.

    1987-01-01

    The pressure shock wave propagation behavior in three vapor-liquid systems, steam-water, ethanol-ethanol, and Freon-Freon, has been investigated over a void fraction, ..cap alpha.., range from zero to 30%. Attenuation and dispersion behavior seems relatively insensitive (no order-of-magnitude deviations) to differences in system physical properties. The attenuation coefficient of water, BETA/sub H/2/sub O/ ranged from 0.021 cm/sup -1/ at 5% void to 0.072 cm/sup -1/ at 30% void fraction. BETA/sub F113/ was as much as 40% lower than BETA/sub ETOH/ or BETA/sub H/2/sub O/ for void fractions less than 20% where the initial wave amplitude, ..delta..P/sub o/ was 2.90 bar. Larger amplitude waves (4.14 bar) demonstrated a greater rate of attenuation throughout the void fraction range, more pronounced in the lower regions: 80% greater for 5% steam-water and 120% greater for 5% Freon-113. The attenuation data from the present investigation tend to lie between one- and two-component acoustic attenuation theories and data. However, near the resonant bubble frequency, the two component results approach the one-component region. As the void fraction is decreased, the one- and two-component acoustic theories and data (small and finite amplitude, including the present experimentation) smoothly converge.

  11. Genesis of the characteristic pulmonary venous pressure waveform as described by the reservoir-wave model

    PubMed Central

    Bouwmeester, J Christopher; Belenkie, Israel; Shrive, Nigel G; Tyberg, John V

    2014-01-01

    Conventional haemodynamic analysis of pulmonary venous and left atrial (LA) pressure waveforms yields substantial forward and backward waves throughout the cardiac cycle; the reservoir wave model provides an alternative analysis with minimal waves during diastole. Pressure and flow in a single pulmonary vein (PV) and the main pulmonary artery (PA) were measured in anaesthetized dogs and the effects of hypoxia and nitric oxide, volume loading, and positive-end expiratory pressure (PEEP) were observed. The reservoir wave model was used to determine the reservoir contribution to PV pressure and flow. Subtracting reservoir pressure and flow resulted in ‘excess’ quantities which were treated as wave-related. Wave intensity analysis of excess pressure and flow quantified the contributions of waves originating upstream (from the PA) and downstream (from the LA and/or left ventricle (LV)). Major features of the characteristic PV waveform are caused by sequential LA and LV contraction and relaxation creating backward compression (i.e. pressure-increasing) waves followed by decompression (i.e. pressure-decreasing) waves. Mitral valve opening is linked to a backwards decompression wave (i.e. diastolic suction). During late systole and early diastole, forward waves originating in the PA are significant. These waves were attenuated less with volume loading and delayed with PEEP. The reservoir wave model shows that the forward and backward waves are negligible during LV diastasis and that the changes in pressure and flow can be accounted for by the discharge of upstream reservoirs. In sharp contrast, conventional analysis posits forward and backward waves such that much of the energy of the forward wave is opposed by the backward wave. PMID:25015922

  12. Genesis of the characteristic pulmonary venous pressure waveform as described by the reservoir-wave model.

    PubMed

    Bouwmeester, J Christopher; Belenkie, Israel; Shrive, Nigel G; Tyberg, John V

    2014-09-01

    Conventional haemodynamic analysis of pulmonary venous and left atrial (LA) pressure waveforms yields substantial forward and backward waves throughout the cardiac cycle; the reservoir wave model provides an alternative analysis with minimal waves during diastole. Pressure and flow in a single pulmonary vein (PV) and the main pulmonary artery (PA) were measured in anaesthetized dogs and the effects of hypoxia and nitric oxide, volume loading, and positive-end expiratory pressure (PEEP) were observed. The reservoir wave model was used to determine the reservoir contribution to PV pressure and flow. Subtracting reservoir pressure and flow resulted in 'excess' quantities which were treated as wave-related.Wave intensity analysis of excess pressure and flow quantified the contributions of waves originating upstream (from the PA) and downstream (from the LA and/or left ventricle (LV)).Major features of the characteristic PV waveform are caused by sequential LA and LV contraction and relaxation creating backward compression (i.e.pressure-increasing) waves followed by decompression (i.e. pressure-decreasing) waves. Mitral valve opening is linked to a backwards decompression wave (i.e. diastolic suction). During late systole and early diastole, forward waves originating in the PA are significant. These waves were attenuated less with volume loading and delayed with PEEP. The reservoir wave model shows that the forward and backward waves are negligible during LV diastasis and that the changes in pressure and flow can be accounted for by the discharge of upstream reservoirs. In sharp contrast, conventional analysis posits forward and backward waves such that much of the energy of the forward wave is opposed by the backward wave.

  13. Effect of the initial pressure of multicomponent bubble media on the characteristics of detonation waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sychev, A. I.

    2016-05-01

    The effect of the initial pressure of multicomponent bubble media on the conditions of initiation, the structure, the velocity, and the pressure of detonation waves is experimentally studied. The variation of the initial pressure of a bubble medium is found to be an effective method to control the parameters of bubble detonation waves.

  14. Electron Density in Atmospheric Pressure Microwave Surface Wave Discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jasinski, M.; Zakrzewski, Z.; Mizeraczyk, J.

    2008-03-01

    In this paper, we present results of the spectroscopic measurements of the electron density in a microwave surface wave sustained discharges in Ar and Ne at atmospheric pressure. The discharge in the form of a plasma column was generated inside a quartz tube cooled with a dielectric liquid. The microwave power delivered to the discharge via rectangular waveguide was applied in the range of 200-1500 W. In all investigations presented in this paper, the gas flow rate was relatively low (0.5 l/min), so the plasma column was generated in the form of a single filament, and the lengths of the upstream and downstream plasma columns were almost the same. The electron density in the plasma columns was determined using the method based on the Stark broadening of Hβ spectral line, including plasma region inside the waveguide which was not investigated earlier.

  15. Electron Density in Atmospheric Pressure Microwave Surface Wave Discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Jasinski, M.; Zakrzewski, Z.; Mizeraczyk, J.

    2008-03-19

    In this paper, we present results of the spectroscopic measurements of the electron density in a microwave surface wave sustained discharges in Ar and Ne at atmospheric pressure. The discharge in the form of a plasma column was generated inside a quartz tube cooled with a dielectric liquid. The microwave power delivered to the discharge via rectangular waveguide was applied in the range of 200-1500 W. In all investigations presented in this paper, the gas flow rate was relatively low (0.5 l/min), so the plasma column was generated in the form of a single filament, and the lengths of the upstream and downstream plasma columns were almost the same. The electron density in the plasma columns was determined using the method based on the Stark broadening of H{sub {beta}} spectral line, including plasma region inside the waveguide which was not investigated earlier.

  16. Mass Spectrometry of Atmospheric Pressure Surface Wave Discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ridenti, M. A.; Souza-Corrêa, J. A.; Amorim, J.

    2016-05-01

    By applying mass spectrometry techniques, we carried out measurements of ionic mass spectrum and their energy distribution in order to investigate an atmospheric argon discharge by using a surfatron surface-wave device. The mass and energy distribution measurements were performed with fixed flow rate (2.5 SLM) of pure argon gas (99.999%) and different Ar-O2 gas mixture compositions (99-1, 98-2 and 97-3). The mass spectra and energy distributions were recorded for Ar+, O+, O+ 2, N+ and N2 +. The axial distribution profiles of ionic mass and their energy were obtained for different experimental conditions as a function of the plasma length. The results showed that the peak of the positive ion energy distributions shifted to higher energies and also that the distribution width increased as the distance between the sampling orifice and the launcher gap was increased. It was also found that under certain experimental conditions the ion flux of atomic species were higher than the ion flux of their diatomic counterpart. The motivation of this study was to obtain a better understanding of a surface wave discharge in atmospheric pressure that may play a key role on new second generation biofuel technologies.

  17. A thoracic mechanism of mild traumatic brain injury due to blast pressure waves.

    PubMed

    Courtney, A C; Courtney, M W

    2009-01-01

    The mechanisms by which blast pressure waves cause mild-to-moderate traumatic brain injury (mTBI) are an open question. Possibilities include acceleration of the head, direct passage of the blast wave via the cranium, and propagation of the blast wave to the brain via a thoracic mechanism. The hypothesis that the blast pressure wave reaches the brain via a thoracic mechanism is considered in light of ballistic and blast pressure wave research. Ballistic pressure waves, caused by penetrating ballistic projectiles or ballistic impacts to body armor, can only reach the brain via an internal mechanism and have been shown to cause cerebral effects. Similar effects have been documented when a blast pressure wave has been applied to the whole body or focused on the thorax in animal models. While vagotomy reduces apnea and bradycardia due to ballistic or blast pressure waves, it does not eliminate neural damage in the brain, suggesting that the pressure wave directly affects the brain cells via a thoracic mechanism. An experiment is proposed which isolates the thoracic mechanism from cranial mechanisms of mTBI due to blast wave exposure. Results have implications for evaluating risk of mTBI due to blast exposure and for developing effective protection. PMID:18829180

  18. Magnetospheric ULF waves with an increasing amplitude induced by solar wind dynamic pressure changes: THEMIS observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, X.; Zong, Q.; Shi, Q.; Tian, A.; Sun, W.; Wang, Y.; Zhou, X.; Fu, S.; Angelopoulos, V.; Pu, Z.; Hartinger, M.

    2014-12-01

    We report the in situ observation of the magnetospheric ultra-low frequency (ULF) waves with an increasing amplitude induced by solar wind dynamic pressure changes. We examine the magnetospheric responses to solar wind dynamic pressure enhancements from April 1, 2007 to December 31, 2012, and find six ULF wave events with slow but clear wave amplitude increase. The amplitudes of ion velocities and magnetic field of these waves continuously increase by 2.1 ˜ 4.4 times during three to six wave cycles. We choose two typical cases to further investigate the cause of this wave amplitude increase. We find that the wave amplitude growth is mainly contributed by the toroidal mode wave. Interestingly, toroidal mode waves are standing, while compressional and poloidal mode waves are not. Thus, we suspect that the wave amplitude increase may be caused by the superposition of two wave sources. One wave source is the standing wave excited by the solar wind dynamic impulse. Additionally, fast mode compressional wave continuously shakes the magnetic field lines. The azimuthal component of this magnetic perturbation is the second wave source. Furthermore, the simple model calculation of superposing two waves match the observations pretty well.

  19. Investigations of High Pressure Acoustic Waves in Resonators with Seal-Like Features

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniels, Christopher C.; Steinetz, Bruce M.; Finkbeiner, Joshua R.; Li, Xiao-Fan; Raman, Ganesh

    2004-01-01

    1) Standing waves with maximum pressures of 188 kPa have been produced in resonators containing ambient pressure air; 2) Addition of structures inside the resonator shifts the fundamental frequency and decreases the amplitude of the generated pressure waves; 3) Addition of holes to the resonator does reduce the magnitude of the acoustic waves produced, but their addition does not prohibit the generation of large magnitude non-linear standing waves; 4) The feasibility of reducing leakage using non-linear acoustics has been confirmed.

  20. An application of Love SH waves for the viscosity measurement of triglycerides at high pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rostocki, A. J.; Siegoczyński, R. M.; Kiełczyński, P.; Szalewski, M.

    2010-03-01

    A new ultrasonic method of viscosity measurements at a high-pressure conditions has been presented. The method is based on the Love wave amplitude measurement. The same electronic setup as in the Bleustein-Gulyaev (B-G) wave method applied by the authors recently for a high-pressure measurement was adopted. The new sensors were made of metallic materials, which make them more reliable at high-pressure conditions. The method has been successfully applied for the viscosity measurement of some triglycerides at high-pressure conditions up to 1 GPa. The results have been compared with the earlier results obtained using B-G waves. This comparison has shown that Love wave method sensors are more reliable than B-G wave sensors and are also cheaper in fabrication, although the sensitivity of Love wave sensors is lower. During the measurement, the phase transitions in the investigated liquids were observed.

  1. Predicting S-wave velocities for unconsolidated sediments at low effective pressure

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, Myung W.

    2010-01-01

    Accurate S-wave velocities for shallow sediments are important in performing a reliable elastic inversion for gas hydrate-bearing sediments and in evaluating velocity models for predicting S-wave velocities, but few S-wave velocities are measured at low effective pressure. Predicting S-wave velocities by using conventional methods based on the Biot-Gassmann theory appears to be inaccurate for laboratory-measured velocities at effective pressures less than about 4-5 megapascals (MPa). Measured laboratory and well log velocities show two distinct trends for S-wave velocities with respect to P-wave velocity: one for the S-wave velocity less than about 0.6 kilometer per second (km/s) which approximately corresponds to effective pressure of about 4-5 MPa, and the other for S-wave velocities greater than 0.6 km/s. To accurately predict S-wave velocities at low effective pressure less than about 4-5 MPa, a pressure-dependent parameter that relates the consolidation parameter to shear modulus of the sediments at low effective pressure is proposed. The proposed method in predicting S-wave velocity at low effective pressure worked well for velocities of water-saturated sands measured in the laboratory. However, this method underestimates the well-log S-wave velocities measured in the Gulf of Mexico, whereas the conventional method performs well for the well log velocities. The P-wave velocity dispersion due to fluid in the pore spaces, which is more pronounced at high frequency with low effective pressures less than about 4 MPa, is probably a cause for this discrepancy.

  2. The Pressure in a Deep-Water Stokes Wave of Greatest Height

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyons, Tony

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we investigate the qualitative behaviour of the pressure function beneath an extreme Stokes wave over infinite depth. The presence of a stagnation point at the wave-crest of an extreme Stokes wave introduces a number of mathematical difficulties resulting in the irregularity of the free surface profile. It will be proven that the pressure decreases in the horizontal direction between a crest-line and subsequent trough-line, except along these lines themselves where the pressure is stationary with respect to the horizontal coordinate. In addition we will prove that the pressure strictly increases with depth throughout the fluid body.

  3. Measurement of blast wave by a miniature fiber optic pressure transducer in the rat brain.

    PubMed

    Chavko, Mikulas; Koller, Wayne A; Prusaczyk, W Keith; McCarron, Richard M

    2007-01-30

    Exposure to blast wave that is generated during an explosion may result in brain damage and related neurological impairments. The aim of this study was to investigate pressure changes induced by exposure to blast inside the rat brain. For intracranial pressure measurement we used a miniature optic fiber sensor (o.d. 550 microm) with a computer recording system. The sensor was placed in the third cerebral ventricle of anesthetized rats exposed to 40 kPa blast wave in a pneumatic-pressure driven shock tube. Short pressure waves lasting several ms were detected inside the brain with the magnitude that might result in nervous tissue damage. PMID:16949675

  4. Stochastic sensitivity analysis for timing and amplitude of pressure waves in the arterial system.

    PubMed

    Eck, V G; Feinberg, J; Langtangen, H P; Hellevik, L R

    2015-04-01

    In the field of computational hemodynamics, sensitivity quantification of pressure and flow wave dynamics has received little attention. This work presents a novel study of the sensitivity of pressure-wave timing and amplitude in the arterial system with respect to arterial stiffness. Arterial pressure and flow waves were simulated with a one-dimensional distributed wave propagation model for compliant arterial networks. Sensitivity analysis of this model was based on a generalized polynomial chaos expansion evaluated by a stochastic collocation method. First-order statistical sensitivity indices were formulated to assess the effect of arterial stiffening on timing and amplitude of the pressure wave and backward-propagating pressure wave in the ascending aorta, at the maximum pressure and inflection point in the systolic phase. Only the stiffness of aortic arteries was found to significantly influence timing and amplitude of the backward-propagating pressure wave, whereas other large arteries in the systemic tree showed marginal impact. Furthermore, the ascending aorta, aortic arch, thoracic aorta, and infrarenal abdominal aorta had the largest influence on amplitude, whereas only the thoracic aorta influenced timing. Our results showed that the non-intrusive polynomial chaos expansion is an efficient method to compute statistical sensitivity measures for wave propagation models. These sensitivities provide new knowledge in the relative importance of arterial stiffness at various locations in the arterial network. Moreover, they will significantly influence clinical data collection and effective composition of the arterial tree for in-silico clinical studies.

  5. Relationship between orientation to a blast and pressure wave propagation inside the rat brain.

    PubMed

    Chavko, Mikulas; Watanabe, Tomas; Adeeb, Saleena; Lankasky, Jason; Ahlers, Stephen T; McCarron, Richard M

    2011-01-30

    Exposure to a blast wave generated during an explosion may result in brain damage and related neurological impairments. Several mechanisms by which the primary blast wave can damage the brain have been proposed, including: (1) a direct effect of the shock wave on the brain causing tissue damage by skull flexure and propagation of stress and shear forces; and (2) an indirect transfer of kinetic energy from the blast, through large blood vessels and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), to the central nervous system. To address a basic question related to the mechanisms of blast brain injury, pressure was measured inside the brains of rats exposed to a low level of blast (~35kPa), while positioned in three different orientations with respect to the primary blast wave; head facing blast, right side exposed to blast and head facing away from blast. Data show different patterns and durations of the pressure traces inside the brain, depending on the rat orientation to blast. Frontal exposures (head facing blast) resulted in pressure traces of higher amplitude and longer duration, suggesting direct transmission and reflection of the pressure inside the brain (dynamic pressure transfer). The pattern of the pressure wave inside the brain in the head facing away from blast exposures assumes contribution of the static pressure, similar to hydrodynamic pressure to the pressure wave inside the brain. PMID:21129403

  6. Topography and measurement of pyloric pressure waves and tone in humans.

    PubMed

    Heddle, R; Dent, J; Toouli, J; Read, N W

    1988-10-01

    The topography of human pyloric pressure is ill defined, and previous studies of pyloric motility in humans have given conflicting results. A detailed profile of pyloric pressure has been recorded in seven healthy volunteers using a manometric assembly with 13 side holes spaced at 3-mm intervals on reverse aspect of a 3.5-cm long sleeve sensor. After a fasting control period of 40 min, recordings were made for 40 min during intraduodenal infusion of a lipid emulsion. Two major patterns of pressure waves were seen during the fasting control period, namely pressure waves confined to a narrow pyloric zone (isolated pyloric pressure waves) and pressure waves that were less localized and involved the antrum and/or duodenum. During lipid infusion the motility pattern was dominated by isolated pyloric pressure waves and localized pyloric tone. Ninety-two percent of the isolated pyloric pressure waves recorded by the sleeve were recorded by only one or two side holes, consistent with a phasically active zone less than 9 mm in length. Pyloric tone was confined to an even narrower zone and was most often recorded by only one side hole. When both tone and isolated pyloric pressure waves occurred together, they were recorded by the same side holes. By comparison with the side holes, the sleeve recorded 89% of isolated pyloric pressure waves and 98% of nonlocalized waves and recorded pyloric tone with a moderate sensitivity but high specificity. The technical challenge of recording localized pyloric contraction is considerable, and much of the conflict between previous studies of the human pylorus is explicable on methodological grounds.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. A Non-Intrusive Pressure Sensor by Detecting Multiple Longitudinal Waves

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hongliang; Lin, Weibin; Ge, Xiaocheng; Zhou, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Pressure vessels are widely used in industrial fields, and some of them are safety-critical components in the system—for example, those which contain flammable or explosive material. Therefore, the pressure of these vessels becomes one of the critical measurements for operational management. In the paper, we introduce a new approach to the design of non-intrusive pressure sensors, based on ultrasonic waves. The model of this sensor is built based upon the travel-time change of the critically refracted longitudinal wave (LCR wave) and the reflected longitudinal waves with the pressure. To evaluate the model, experiments are carried out to compare the proposed model with other existing models. The results show that the proposed model can improve the accuracy compared to models based on a single wave. PMID:27527183

  8. A Non-Intrusive Pressure Sensor by Detecting Multiple Longitudinal Waves.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hongliang; Lin, Weibin; Ge, Xiaocheng; Zhou, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Pressure vessels are widely used in industrial fields, and some of them are safety-critical components in the system-for example, those which contain flammable or explosive material. Therefore, the pressure of these vessels becomes one of the critical measurements for operational management. In the paper, we introduce a new approach to the design of non-intrusive pressure sensors, based on ultrasonic waves. The model of this sensor is built based upon the travel-time change of the critically refracted longitudinal wave (LCR wave) and the reflected longitudinal waves with the pressure. To evaluate the model, experiments are carried out to compare the proposed model with other existing models. The results show that the proposed model can improve the accuracy compared to models based on a single wave. PMID:27527183

  9. A Non-Intrusive Pressure Sensor by Detecting Multiple Longitudinal Waves.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hongliang; Lin, Weibin; Ge, Xiaocheng; Zhou, Jian

    2016-08-05

    Pressure vessels are widely used in industrial fields, and some of them are safety-critical components in the system-for example, those which contain flammable or explosive material. Therefore, the pressure of these vessels becomes one of the critical measurements for operational management. In the paper, we introduce a new approach to the design of non-intrusive pressure sensors, based on ultrasonic waves. The model of this sensor is built based upon the travel-time change of the critically refracted longitudinal wave (LCR wave) and the reflected longitudinal waves with the pressure. To evaluate the model, experiments are carried out to compare the proposed model with other existing models. The results show that the proposed model can improve the accuracy compared to models based on a single wave.

  10. Intravascular pressure augments cerebral arterial constriction by inducing voltage-insensitive Ca2+ waves.

    PubMed

    Mufti, Rania E; Brett, Suzanne E; Tran, Cam Ha T; Abd El-Rahman, Rasha; Anfinogenova, Yana; El-Yazbi, Ahmed; Cole, William C; Jones, Peter P; Chen, S R Wayne; Welsh, Donald G

    2010-10-15

    This study examined whether elevated intravascular pressure stimulates asynchronous Ca(2+) waves in cerebral arterial smooth muscle cells and if their generation contributes to myogenic tone development. The endothelium was removed from rat cerebral arteries, which were then mounted in an arteriograph, pressurized (20-100 mmHg) and examined under a variety of experimental conditions. Diameter and membrane potential (V(M)) were monitored using conventional techniques; Ca(2+) wave generation and myosin light chain (MLC(20))/MYPT1 (myosin phosphatase targeting subunit) phosphorylation were assessed by confocal microscopy and Western blot analysis, respectively. Elevating intravascular pressure increased the proportion of smooth muscle cells firing asynchronous Ca(2+) waves as well as event frequency. Ca(2+) wave augmentation occurred primarily at lower intravascular pressures (<60 mmHg) and ryanodine, a plant alkaloid that depletes the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) of Ca(2+), eliminated these events. Ca(2+) wave generation was voltage insensitive as Ca(2+) channel blockade and perturbations in extracellular [K(+)] had little effect on measured parameters. Ryanodine-induced inhibition of Ca(2+) waves attenuated myogenic tone and MLC(20) phosphorylation without altering arterial V(M). Thapsigargin, an SR Ca(2+)-ATPase inhibitor also attenuated Ca(2+) waves, pressure-induced constriction and MLC(20) phosphorylation. The SR-driven component of the myogenic response was proportionally greater at lower intravascular pressures and subsequent MYPT1 phosphorylation measures revealed that SR Ca(2+) waves facilitated pressure-induced MLC(20) phosphorylation through mechanisms that include myosin light chain phosphatase inhibition. Cumulatively, our findings show that mechanical stimuli augment Ca(2+) wave generation in arterial smooth muscle and that these transient events facilitate tone development particularly at lower intravascular pressures by providing a proportion of the Ca

  11. Harmonics tracking of intracranial and arterial blood pressure waves.

    PubMed

    Shahsavari, Sima; McKelvey, Tomas

    2008-01-01

    Considering cardiorespiratory interaction and heart rate variability, a new approach is proposed to decompose intracranial pressure and arterial blood pressure to their different harmonics. The method is based on tracking the amplitudes of the harmonics by a Kalman filter based tracking algorithm. The algorithm takes benefit of combined frequency estimation technique which uses both Fast Fourier Transform and RR-interval detection. The result would be of use in intracranial pressure and arterial blood pressure waveform analysis as well as other investigations which need to estimate contribution of specific harmonic in above mentioned signals such as Pressure-Volume Compensatory Reserve assessment.

  12. Observed high-altitude pressure waves from an underground and a surface explosion

    SciTech Connect

    Banister, J.R.; Hereford, W.V. )

    1991-03-20

    Measurements of high-altitude pressure waves from underground and surface explosions are of interest, as these waves can affect ionospheric electron density and be a source of infrasonic signals. Canisters, equipped with parachutes, were dropped from aircraft to determine time histories of pressure waves radiated by the ground surface above an underground nuclear explosion and a surface chemical explosion. These canisters contained transducers to document pressure and acceleration histories as well as a transmitter to relay information to ground receiver stations. The authors found observed pressure histories from the underground explosion to be consistent with histories calculated from surface ground motion records. The peak blast wave overpressures from the chemical explosion agreed with predicted scaled values. Observed time histories, however, had shorter positive phase duration than predicted with scaling.

  13. The impact of wave loads and pore-water pressure generation on initiation of sediment transport

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clukey, E.C.; Kulhawy, F.H.; Liu, P.L.-F.; Tate, G.B.

    1985-01-01

    The build-up of pore-water pressure by waves can lead to sediment liquefaction and subsequent transport by traction currents. This process was investigated by measuring pore-water pressures both in a field experiment and laboratory wave tank tests. Liquefaction was observed in the wave tank tests. The results suggest that sand is less susceptible than silts to wave-induced liquefaction because of the tendency to partially dissipate pore-water pressures. However, previous studies have determined that pore-water pressures must approach liquefaction before current velocities necessary to initiate transport are reduced. Once liquefaction has occurred more sediment can be transported. ?? 1985 Springer-Verlag New York Inc.

  14. Observed high-altitude pressure waves from an underground and a surface explosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banister, John R.; Hereford, William V.

    1991-03-01

    Measurements of high-altitude pressure waves from underground and surface explosions are of interest, as these waves can affect ionospheric electron density and be a source of infrasonic signals. Canisters, equipped with parachutes, were dropped from aircraft to determine time histories of pressure waves radiated by the ground surface above an underground nuclear explosion and a surface chemical explosion. These canisters contained transducers to document pressure and acceleration histories as well as a transmitter to relay information to ground receiver stations. We found observed pressure histories from the underground explosion to be consistent with histories calculated from surface ground motion records. The peak blast wave overpressures from the chemical explosion agreed with predicted scaled values. Observed time histories, however, had shorter positive phase duration than predicted with scaling.

  15. Arterial blood pressure wave forms in radial and posterior tibial arteries in critically ill newborn infants.

    PubMed

    Gevers, M; Hack, W W; Ree, E F; Lafeber, H N; Westerhof, N

    1993-04-01

    The aim of this study was to document arterial blood pressure wave forms at two sites along the arterial tree of the neonate: in the radial and posterior tibial arteries. Using a high-fidelity catheter tip-transducer system, peripheral arterial blood pressure wave forms in 26 critically newborn infants were studied. In 14 infants the radial artery and in 12 infants the posterior tibial artery was cannulated. Radial artery blood pressure waves resembled those of proximal aortic rather than those of the radial artery in adults. Quantitative analysis of the waves was performed to reassure this finding. Blood pressure waves obtained from posterior tibial artery resembled those of femoral artery rather than those of posterior tibial artery waves in adults. We conclude that radial and posterior tibial artery wave forms in neonates appear to have a central appearance. This phenomenon might be explained by the close proximity of the radial and posterior tibial artery to the central aorta and femoral artery respectively, due to the small and short limbs of the neonate. The finding allows an "easy central pressure look" at both ends of the neonatal aorta.

  16. [Research on the Method of Blood Pressure Monitoring Based on Multiple Parameters of Pulse Wave].

    PubMed

    Miao, Changyun; Mu, Dianwei; Zhang, Cheng; Miao, Chunjiao; Li, Hongqiang

    2015-10-01

    In order to improve the accuracy of blood pressure measurement in wearable devices, this paper presents a method for detecting blood pressure based on multiple parameters of pulse wave. Based on regression analysis between blood pressure and the characteristic parameters of pulse wave, such as the pulse wave transit time (PWTT), cardiac output, coefficient of pulse wave, the average slope of the ascending branch, heart rate, etc. we established a model to calculate blood pressure. For overcoming the application deficiencies caused by measuring ECG in wearable device, such as replacing electrodes and ECG lead sets which are not convenient, we calculated the PWTT with heart sound as reference (PWTT(PCG)). We experimentally verified the detection of blood pressure based on PWTT(PCG) and based on multiple parameters of pulse wave. The experiment results showed that it was feasible to calculate the PWTT from PWTT(PCG). The mean measurement error of the systolic and diastolic blood pressure calculated by the model based on multiple parameters of pulse wave is 1.62 mm Hg and 1.12 mm Hg, increased by 57% and 53% compared to those of the model based on simple parameter. This method has more measurement accuracy. PMID:26964321

  17. Quantification of abnormal intracranial pressure waves and isotope cisternography for diagnosis of occult communicating hydrocephalus

    SciTech Connect

    Cardoso, E.R.; Piatek, D.; Del Bigio, M.R.; Stambrook, M.; Sutherland, J.B.

    1989-01-01

    Nineteen consecutive patients with suspected occult communicating hydrocephalus were investigated by means of clinical evaluation, neuropsychological testing, isotope cisternography, computed tomography scanning, and continuous intracranial pressure monitoring. Semi-quantitative grading systems were used in the evaluation of the clinical, neuropsychological, and cisternographic assessments. Clinical examination, neuropsychological testing, and computed tomography scanning were repeated 3 months after ventriculoperitoneal shunting. All patients showed abnormal intracranial pressure waves and all improved after shunting. There was close correlation between number, peak, and pulse pressures of B waves and the mean intracranial pressure. However, quantification of B waves by means of number, frequency, and amplitude did not help in predicting the degree of clinical improvement postshunting. The most sensitive predictor of favorable response to shunting was enlargement of the temporal horns on computed tomography scan. Furthermore, the size of temporal horns correlated with mean intracranial pressure. There was no correlation between abnormalities on isotope cisternography and clinical improvement.

  18. Observations of height-dependent pressure-perturbation structure of a strong mesoscale gravity wave

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starr, David O'C.; Korb, C. L.; Schwemmer, Geary K.; Weng, Chi Y.

    1992-01-01

    Airborne observations using a downward-looking, dual-frequency, near-infrared, differential absorption lidar system provide the first measurements of the height-dependent pressure-perturbation field associated with a strong mesoscale gravity wave. A pressure-perturbation amplitude of 3.5 mb was measured within the lowest 1.6 km of the atmosphere over a 52-km flight line. Corresponding vertical displacements of 250-500 m were inferred from lidar-observed displacement of aerosol layers. Accounting for probable wave orientation, a horizontal wavelength of about 40 km was estimated. Satellite observations reveal wave structure of a comparable scale in concurrent cirrus cloud fields over an extended area. Smaller-scale waves were also observed. Local meteorological soundings are analyzed to confirm the existence of a suitable wave duct. Potential wave-generation mechanisms are examined and discussed. The large pressure-perturbation wave is attributed to rapid amplification or possible wave breaking of a gravity wave as it propagated offshore and interacted with a very stable marine boundary layer capped by a strong shear layer.

  19. Medium characterization from interface-wave impedance and ellipticity using simultaneous displacement and pressure measurements.

    PubMed

    van Dalen, K N; Drijkoningen, G G; Smeulders, D M J; Heller, H K J; Glorieux, C; Sarens, B; Verstraeten, B

    2011-09-01

    The interface-wave impedance and ellipticity are wave attributes that interrelate the full waveforms as observed in different components. For each of the fluid/elastic-solid interface waves, i.e., the pseudo-Rayleigh (pR) and Stoneley (St) waves, the impedance and ellipticity are found to have different functional dependencies on Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio. By combining the attributes in a cost function, unique and stable estimates of these parameters can be obtained, particularly when using the St wave. In a validation experiment, the impedance of the laser-excited pR wave is successfully extracted from simultaneous measurements of the normal particle displacement and the fluid pressure at a water/aluminum interface. The displacement is measured using a laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV) and the pressure with a needle hydrophone. Any LDV measurement is perturbed by refractive-index changes along the LDV beam once acoustic waves interfere with the beam. Using a model that accounts for these perturbations, an impedance decrease of 28% with respect to the plane wave impedance of the pR wave is predicted for the water/aluminum configuration. Although this deviation is different for the experimentally extracted impedance, there is excellent agreement between the observed and predicted pR waveforms in both the particle displacement and fluid pressure.

  20. Ultrafast Time Response Pressure-Sensitive Paint for Unsteady Shock-Wave Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Numata, Daiju; Asai, Keisuke

    Pressure-Sensitive Paint (PSP) is an optical pressure measurement technique widely used in aerodynamic experiments, and has been applied to unsteady shock-wave phenomena [1, 2]. However, one of the largest problems to apply PSP to high-speed and unsteady phenomena is the response time of PSP.

  1. Two Dimensional Finite Element Analysis for the Effect of a Pressure Wave in the Human Brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponce L., Ernesto; Ponce S., Daniel

    2008-11-01

    Brain injuries in people of all ages is a serious, world-wide health problem, with consequences as varied as attention or memory deficits, difficulties in problem-solving, aggressive social behavior, and neuro degenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's. Brain injuries can be the result of a direct impact, but also pressure waves and direct impulses. The aim of this work is to develop a predictive method to calculate the stress generated in the human brain by pressure waves such as high power sounds. The finite element method is used, combined with elastic wave theory. The predictions of the generated stress levels are compared with the resistance of the arterioles that pervade the brain. The problem was focused to the Chilean mining where there are some accidents happen by detonations and high sound level. There are not formal medical investigation, however these pressure waves could produce human brain damage.

  2. Amplification of Pressure Waves during Vibrational Equilibration of Excited Chemical Reaction Products

    SciTech Connect

    Tarver, C M

    2004-05-11

    The Non-Equilibrium Zeldovich - von Neumann - Doring (NEZND) theory of self-sustaining detonation identified amplification of pressure wavelets during equilibration of vibrationally excited reaction products in the reaction zone as the physical mechanism by which exothermic chemical energy release sustains detonation waves. This mechanism leads to the formation of the well-known, complex three-dimensional structure of a self-sustaining detonation wave. This amplification mechanism is postulated to be a general property of subsonic and supersonic reactive flows occurring during: shock to detonation transition (SDT); hot spot ignition and growth; deflagration to detonation transition (DDT); flame acceleration by shock or compression waves; and acoustic (sound) wave amplification. The existing experimental and theoretical evidence for pressure wave amplification by chemical energy release into highly vibrationally excited product molecules under these reactive flow conditions is reviewed in this paper.

  3. Characterization of laser-driven shock waves in solids using a fiber optic pressure probe

    DOE PAGES

    Cranch, Geoffrey A.; Lunsford, Robert; Grun, Jacob; Weaver, James; Compton, Steve; May, Mark; Kostinski, Natalie

    2013-11-08

    Measurement of laser-driven shock wave pressure in solid blocks of polymethyl methacrylate is demonstrated using fiber optic pressure probes. Three probes based on a fiber Fabry–Perot, fiber Bragg grating, and interferometric fiber tip sensor are tested and compared. Shock waves are generated using a high-power laser focused onto a thin foil target placed in close proximity to the test blocks. The fiber Fabry–Perot sensor appears capable of resolving the shock front with a rise time of 91 ns. As a result, the peak pressure is estimated, using a separate shadowgraphy measurement, to be 3.4 GPa.

  4. Low-pressure sustainment of surface-wave microwave plasma with modified microwave coupler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasai, Kensuke; Suzuki, Haruka; Toyoda, Hirotaka

    2016-01-01

    Sustainment of long-scale surface-wave plasma (SWP) at pressures below 1 Pa is investigated for the application of the SWP as an assisting plasma source for roll-to-roll sputter deposition. A modified microwave coupler (MMC) for easier surface-wave propagation is proposed, on the basis of the concept of the power direction alignment of the slot antenna and surface-wave propagation. The superiority of the MMC-SWP over conventional SWPs is shown at a sustainment pressure as low as 0.6 Pa and an electron density as high as 3 × 1017 m-3. A polymer film is treated with the MMC-SWP at a low pressure of 0.6 Pa, and surface modification at a low pressure is proved using Ar plasma. These results show the availability of the MMC-SWP as the surface treatment plasma source that is compatible with sputter deposition in the same processing chamber.

  5. New ultrasonic Bleustein-Gulyaev wave method for measuring the viscosity of liquids at high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiełczyński, P.; Szalewski, M.; Siegoczyński, R. M.; Rostocki, A. J.

    2008-02-01

    In this paper, a new method for measuring the viscosity of liquids at high pressure is presented. To this end the authors have applied an ultrasonic method using the Bleustein-Gulyaev (BG) surface acoustic wave. By applying the perturbation method, we can prove that the change in the complex propagation constant of the BG wave produced by the layer of liquid loading the waveguide surface is proportional to the shear mechanical impedance of the liquid. In the article, a measuring setup employing the BG wave for the purpose of measuring the viscosity of liquids at high pressure (up to 1GPa) is presented. The results of high-pressure viscosity measurements of triolein and castor oil are also presented. In this paper the model of a Newtonian liquid was applied. Using this new method it is also possible to measure the viscosity of liquids during the phase transition and during the decompression process (hysteresis of the dependence of viscosity on pressure).

  6. Modelling and Experimental Verification of Pressure Wave Following Gaseous Helium Storage Tank Rupture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chorowski, M.; Grabowski, M.; Jędrusyna, A.; Wach, J.

    Helium inventory in high energy accelerators, tokamaks and free electron lasers may exceed tens of tons. The gaseous helium is stored in steel tanks under a pressure of about 20 bar and at environment temperature. Accidental rupture of any of the tanks filled with the gaseous helium will create a rapid energy release in form of physical blast. An estimation of pressure wave distribution following the tank rupture and potential consequences to the adjacent research infrastructure and buildings is a very important task, critical in the safety aspect of the whole cryogenic system. According to the present regulations the TNT equivalent approach is to be applied to evaluate the pressure wave following a potential gas storage tank rupture. A special test stand was designed and built in order to verify experimentally the blast effects in controlled conditions. In order to obtain such a shock wave a pressurized plastic tank was used. The tank was ruptured and the resulting pressure wave was recorded using a spatially-distributed array of pressure sensors connected to a high-speed data acquisition device. The results of the experiments and the comparison with theoretical values obtained from thermodynamic model of the blast are presented. A good agreement between the simulated and measured data was obtained. Recommendations regarding the applicability of thermodynamic model of physical blast versus TNT approach, to estimate consequences of gas storage tank rupture are formulated. The laboratory scale experimental results have been scaled to ITER pressurized helium storage tanks.

  7. Frequency interpretation of tidal peak in intracranial pressure wave.

    PubMed

    Shahsavari, Sima; McKelvey, Tomas

    2008-01-01

    A new approach to locate different components of ICP signal for each cardiac induced ICP beat is presented. In this method an initial timing map is used to define the appropriate part of the ICP wave which should be searched for the specific component. In parallel a recently proposed method was used to decompose the ICP wave to its different frequency harmonics. This algorithm, which is based on tracking the amplitude of the harmonic components using Kalman filtering, brings both heart rate variability and cardiorespiratory interaction into account and provides good time and frequency resolution. Comparing the results of two methods for seventeen ICP records, each one hour long, it has been observed that the fundamental cardiac component has the most significant contribution in the construction of the tidal peak in ICP and therefore tracking of this harmonic could be informative of the tidal peak evolution over the time.

  8. Wave reflection augments central systolic and pulse pressures during facial cooling.

    PubMed

    Edwards, David G; Roy, Matthew S; Prasad, Raju Y

    2008-06-01

    Cardiovascular events are more common in the winter months, possibly because of hemodynamic alterations in response to cold exposure. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of acute facial cooling on central aortic pressure, arterial stiffness, and wave reflection. Twelve healthy subjects (age 23 +/- 3 yr; 6 men, 6 women) underwent supine measurements of carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (PWV), brachial artery blood pressure, and central aortic pressure (via the synthesis of a central aortic pressure waveform by radial artery applanation tonometry and generalized transfer function) during a control trial (supine rest) and a facial cooling trial (0 degrees C gel pack). Aortic augmentation index (AI), an index of wave reflection, was calculated from the aortic pressure waveform. Measurements were made at baseline, 2 min, and 7 min during each trial. Facial cooling increased (P < 0.05) peripheral and central diastolic and systolic pressures. Central systolic pressure increased more than peripheral systolic pressure (22 +/- 3 vs. 15 +/- 2 mmHg; P < 0.05), resulting in decreased pulse pressure amplification ratio. Facial cooling resulted in a robust increase in AI and a modest increase in PWV (AI: -1.4 +/- 3.8 vs. 21.2 +/- 3.0 and 19.9 +/- 3.6%; PWV: 5.6 +/- 0.2 vs. 6.5 +/- 0.3 and 6.2 +/- 0.2 m/s; P < 0.05). Change in mean arterial pressure but not PWV predicted the change in AI, suggesting that facial cooling may increase AI independent of aortic PWV. Facial cooling and the resulting peripheral vasoconstriction are associated with an increase in wave reflection and augmentation of central systolic pressure, potentially explaining ischemia and cardiovascular events in the cold.

  9. The impact of hepatic pressurization on liver shear wave speed estimates in constrained versus unconstrained conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotemberg, V.; Palmeri, M.; Nightingale, R.; Rouze, N.; Nightingale, K.

    2012-01-01

    Increased hepatic venous pressure can be observed in patients with advanced liver disease and congestive heart failure. This elevated portal pressure also leads to variation in acoustic radiation-force-derived shear wave-based liver stiffness estimates. These changes in stiffness metrics with hepatic interstitial pressure may confound stiffness-based predictions of liver fibrosis stage. The underlying mechanism for this observed stiffening behavior with pressurization is not well understood and is not explained with commonly used linear elastic mechanical models. An experiment was designed to determine whether the stiffness increase exhibited with hepatic pressurization results from a strain-dependent hyperelastic behavior. Six excised canine livers were subjected to variations in interstitial pressure through cannulation of the portal vein and closure of the hepatic artery and hepatic vein under constrained conditions (in which the liver was not free to expand) and unconstrained conditions. Radiation-force-derived shear wave speed estimates were obtained and correlated with pressure. Estimates of hepatic shear stiffness increased with changes in interstitial pressure over a physiologically relevant range of pressures (0-35 mmHg) from 1.5 to 3.5 m s-1. These increases were observed only under conditions in which the liver was free to expand while pressurized. This behavior is consistent with hyperelastic nonlinear material models that could be used in the future to explore methods for estimating hepatic interstitial pressure noninvasively.

  10. Atmospheric Pressure Oscillations Forced by Surface Waves From the 2003 Tokachi-Oki Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watada, S.; Nishida, K.; Sekiguchi, S.

    2004-12-01

    Clear atmospheric pressure changes associated with the 2003 Tokachi-Oki Earthquake with M 8.3 were recorded by 8 microbarographs along Japan. The maximum oscillatory pressure change is about 2 Pascal with dominant period is about 15-20 second, and lasted for more than 30 minutes. Comparing the pressure change with broadband seismic records observed near or at the microbarogram, the pressure change starts at the arrival of seismic waves and reaches its maximum amplitude at the arrival of Rayleigh waves. Four microbarographs, co-located with STS-1 broadband seismographs and suffering less atmospheric wind noise, show that peaks in vertical ground velocity records correspond to the peaks of atmospheric pressure records. Similar pressure changes were observed during the largest aftershock (M 7.4). All ground motion analyzed in this paper were recorded by STS-1 broadband sensors. Spectrum analysis in the frequency domain supports that the vertical ground velocity and the pressure change has the same phase and the amplitude ratio is constant up to a period of about 50 second. The constant amplitude ratio is about (atmospheric density) times (sound velocity in the atmosphere), indicating that the surface ground in vertical ground motion compresses or inflates the air above the ground locally and low-frequency sound waves are generated. Pressure change recorded after the passage of Rayleigh waves does not well correlate with the ground velocity. Through the precise atmospheric pressure and ground motion measurement at the same sites, we witnessed the process of low-frequency sound generation by the vertical ground surface motion acted as a vibrating plate of a speaker. The radiated low-frequency sound waves propagates upward and reaches to the ionosphere with large amplitude because of the energy conservation. The ionospheric turbulence reported in the past researches were originated from this low-frequency sound at the ground surface.

  11. The relationship between pore-pressure and the elastic-wave velocities of TCDP-cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitamura, K.; Takahashi, M.; Masuda, K.; Ito, H.; Song, S.; Wang, C.

    2005-12-01

    The elastic-wave velocities and the permeability of fault-related rocks are essential keys to reveal the earthquake process. We measured these parameters of boring-cores of the Chelungpu-fault (TCDP-cores) that is the earthquake-source fault of the 1999 Chi-Chi earthquake in Taiwan under high-pressure conditions. Experimental apparatus we used is the gas-medium, high-pressure and high-temperature deformation apparatus at the AIST Japan. We measured elastic-wave velocities and permeability simultaneously with decreasing pore-pressure (Pp) from 20 to 0 MPa under the constant confining-pressure and temperature condition (30 MPa and 25C). We measured compressional-wave velocities (Vp) and shear-wave velocities (Vs) at once. We adopted the oscillation method to measure the permeability because this method can measure the low-permeability with relatively short time, under high pore pressure conditions. We obtained 18 experimental cylindrical specimens sized 20 mm in diameter and 20 mm long, sampled from 482 m to 1316 m depth of the TCDP-core archives (mainly silty-sandstone and sandstone). It would be the first report to refer a relation between these physical properties of porous sediments. The results of our elastic-wave velocities measurement indicate the strong effect of pore-pressure on elastic-wave velocities. They increased rapidly with decreasing Pp down to 10 MPa. The elastic-wave velocities didn_ft change with decreasing Pp from 10 to 0 MPa. All samples showed similar pore pressure- velocity curves but different ratios of dV/dPp. It is considered that the volume of pores and crack decreased with decrease of pore-pressure. It can be said the pressurization effect on the elastic wave velocity would reflect significantly on the bulk density of sedimentary rocks. The Vp- and Vs-values decreased successively from silty-sandstone to sandstone at low-Pp condition (10-0 MPa). These results indicate that the Vp- and Vs-values are controlled by lithology under low

  12. The acute effects of smokeless tobacco on central aortic blood pressure and wave reflection characteristics.

    PubMed

    Martin, Jeffrey S; Beck, Darren T; Gurovich, Alvaro N; Braith, Randy W

    2010-10-01

    The main objectives of this study were to examine the acute effect of a single dose of smokeless tobacco (ST) on central aortic blood pressure and wave reflection characteristics. Fifteen apparently healthy male subjects (aged 30.6 ± 6.2 y) were given a 2.5 g oral dose of ST after baseline measurements were recorded. Pulse wave analysis using radial artery applanation tonometry was performed in triplicate at baseline (0 min) and at 10-min intervals during (10, 20 and 30 min) and after (40, 50 and 60 min) ST use. An acute dose of ST was associated with a significant increase in heart rate (HR), central aortic systolic and diastolic blood pressure, peripheral brachial systolic and diastolic blood pressure, and aortic augmentation index normalized to a fixed heart rate of 75 bpm (AIx@75). Furthermore, ejection duration and round trip travel time of the reflected pressure wave (Δt(p)) were significantly decreased as a result of one time ST use. As a result of changes in aortic pressure wave reflection characteristics, there was a significant increase in wasted left ventricular pressure energy (LVE(w)) and the tension-time index (TTI) as a result of ST use. In conclusion, one time use of ST elicits significant transient increases in HR, central aortic pressures, AIx@75, the TTI and LVE(w). Chronic users subjected to decades of elevated central pressures and left ventricular work may have an increased cardiovascular risk as central aortic pressures are even more strongly related to cardiovascular outcomes than peripheral blood pressures.

  13. Experimental and Numerical Investigation of Pressure Wave Attenuation due to Bubbly Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayaprakash, Arvind; Fourmeau, Tiffany; Hsiao, Chao-Tsung; Chahine, Georges; Dynaflow Inc. Team

    2013-03-01

    In this work, the effects of dispersed microbubbles on a steep pressure wave and its attenuation are investigated both numerically and experimentally. Numerical simulations were carried out using a compressible Euler equation solver, where the liquid-gas mixture was modeled using direct numerical simulations involving discrete deforming bubbles. To reduce computational costs a 1D configuration is used and the bubbles are assumed distributed in layers and the initial pressure profile is selected similar to that of a one-dimensional shock tube problem. Experimentally, the pressure pulse was generated using a submerged spark electric discharge, which generates a large vapor bubble, while the microbubbles in the bubbly layer are generated using electrolysis. High speed movies were recorded in tandem with high fidelity pressure measurements. The dependence of pressure wave attenuation on the bubble radii, the void fraction, and the bubbly layer thickness were parametrically studied. It has been found that the pressure wave attenuation can be seen as due to waves reflecting and dispersing in the inter-bubble regions, with the energy absorbed by bubble volume oscillations and re-radiation. Layer thickness and small bubble sizes were also seen as having a strong effect on the attenuation with enhanced attenuation as the bubble size is reduced for the same void fraction. This study was supported by the Department of Energy, under SBIR Phase II Contract DE-FG02-07ER84839.

  14. Change in Pulsatile Cerebral Arterial Pressure and Flow Waves as a Therapeutic Strategy?

    PubMed

    Kim, Mi Ok; Adji, Audrey; O'Rourke, Michael F; Avolio, Alberto P; Smielewski, Peter; Pickard, John D; Czosnyka, Marek

    2016-01-01

    While intracranial pressure (ICP), arterial pressure and transcranial middle cerebral artery flow velocity (MCAFV) are often monitored in unconscious patients following stroke or head injury, the value of waveform indices has not been fully established. We retrospectively analysed the data of eight adults (aged 19-36 years) with closed head injury who had spontaneous and repeated episodes of elevated ICP (i.e. "plateau waves"). MCAFV was measured using transcranial Doppler, ICP using a Codman catheter and radial artery pressure using cannulation. Ascending aortic pressure (AAP) was generated from the radial artery using SphygmoCor(TM). Cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) was calculated as AAP - ICP in the time domain.During the period of increased ICP, ICP and cerebral flow velocity amplitude increased significantly compared with the basal condition, while cerebral mean flow decreased. Amplitude of the secondary peak in ICP, AAP and MCAFV waveform became apparent.An increase in the amplitude of ICP, AAP and MCAFV waves can be attributed to the greater prominence of reflected waves from the lower body, which was apparent in pulse waveform analysis. Arterial vasodilators such as nitrates reduce reflected pressure waves from the lower body and, by decreasing the amplitude of AAP, ICP and MCAFV, may be as beneficial for the cerebral circulation as they are for the left ventricle of the heart.

  15. Relationship between radial and central arterial pulse wave and evaluation of central aortic pressure using the radial arterial pulse wave.

    PubMed

    Takazawa, Kenji; Kobayashi, Hideyuki; Shindo, Naohisa; Tanaka, Nobuhiro; Yamashina, Akira

    2007-03-01

    Since a decrease of central aortic pressure contributes to the prevention of cardiovascular events, simple measurement of not only brachial blood pressure but also central aortic pressure may be useful in the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular diseases. In this study, we simultaneously measured radial artery pulse waves non-invasively and ascending aortic pressure invasively, before and after the administration of nicorandil. We then compared changes in central aortic pressure and radial arterial blood pressure calibrated with brachial blood pressure in addition to calculating the augmentation index (AI) at the aorta and radial artery. After nicorandil administration, the reduction in maximal systolic blood pressure in the aorta (Deltaa-SBP) was -14+/-15 mmHg, significantly larger than that in early systolic pressure in the radial artery (Deltar-SBP) (-9+/-12 mmHg). The reduction in late systolic blood pressure in the radial artery (Deltar-SBP2) was -15+/-14 mmHg, significantly larger than Deltar-SBP, but not significantly different from Deltaa-SBP. There were significant relationships between Deltaa-SBP and Deltar-SBP (r=0.81, p<0.001), and between Deltaa-SBP and Deltar-SBP2 (r=0.91, p<0.001). The slope of the correlation regression line with Deltar-SBP2 (0.83) was larger and closer to 1 than that with Deltar-SBP (0.63), showing that the relationship was close to 1:1. Significant correlations were obtained between aortic AI (a-AI) and radial AI (r-AI) (before nicorandil administration: r=0.91, p<0.001; after administration: r=0.70, p<0.001). These data suggest that the measurement of radial artery pulse wave and observation of changes in the late systolic blood pressure in the radial artery (r-SBP2) in addition to the ordinary measurement of brachial blood pressure may enable a more accurate evaluation of changes in maximal systolic blood pressure in the aorta (a-SBP).

  16. Generation and Propagation of Long Waves due to Spatial and Temporal Pressure Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metin, A. D.; Yalçıner, A. C.; Ozyurt Tarakcıoglu, G.; Zaytsev, A.

    2015-12-01

    An abnormal wave event was observed between 23 and 27 June 2014 in the Mediterranean and Black Seas. First, sea level oscillations began in Ciutadella Inlet (Spain) after midnight of 22 June. The phenomena continued with observation of strong oscillations (up to 3 m wave height) in the Adriatic Sea, Mediterranean Sea and Black Sea on 25-26 June. Finally, at noon on 27 June on a calm and sunny day, the abnormal waves suddenly struck coasts of Odessa with 1-2 m wave height injuring a number of people. This tsunami-like event which is called meteotsunami is generated by different types of meteorological disturbances such as atmospheric gravity waves, pressure jumps and squall lines and the significant consequences necessitates the research to understand, model and simulate such events accurately. Thus, using the 2014 event as a case study, the waves generated by the change of atmospheric pressure distribution is studied. A static water level drop due to high atmospheric pressure in a region and rise due to low atmospheric pressure in another region deform the water level throughout the entire sea area. To compute the sea level change, the relation between the pressure difference and change of water level from normal position (ζ=0.99ΔP) is used where ζ is the change of water level (cm) according to the pressure difference from normal pressure ΔP. This relation gives that 1 hPa (1millibar) depression in air pressure from normal water level position (under 1000millibar) creates almost 1 cm rise in mean sea level. The respective small amplitude long waves propagate along the sea which is continuously excited by the spatial and temporal changes of atmospheric pressure. And, the amplification becomes important to understand the occurrence of unexpected water level changes, especially near the coastal zone. In this study, this long wave propagation due to water surface deformation is modelled by solving nonlinear shallow water equations. The model results are compared

  17. Pressure Dependence of the Charge-Density-Wave Gap in Rare-Earth Tri-Tellurides

    SciTech Connect

    Sacchetti, A.; Arcangeletti, E.; Perucchi, A.; Baldassarre, L.; Postorino, P.; Lupi, S.; Ru, N.; Fisher, I.R.; Degiorgi, L.; /Zurich, ETH

    2009-12-14

    We investigate the pressure dependence of the optical properties of CeTe{sub 3}, which exhibits an incommensurate charge-density-wave (CDW) state already at 300 K. Our data are collected in the mid-infrared spectral range at room temperature and at pressures between 0 and 9 GPa. The energy for the single particle excitation across the CDW gap decreases upon increasing the applied pressure, similarly to the chemical pressure by rare-earth substitution. The broadening of the bands upon lattice compression removes the perfect nesting condition of the Fermi surface and therefore diminishes the impact of the CDW transition on the electronic properties of RTe{sub 3}.

  18. Pressure waves generated by metastable intermolecular composites in an aqueous environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maines, Geoff; Radulescu, Matei; Bacciochini, Antoine; Jodoin, Bertrand; Lee, Julian

    2013-06-01

    In the present study, pressure waves generated by a metastable intermolecular composite (MIC) have been measured experimentally in an aqueous environment. Experiments were performed in a 1.0 L high pressure chamber mounted with high resolution pressure transducers and designed with optical access. Samples consisting of a stoichiometric mixture of aluminum and copper(II)oxide particles were evaluated. Two types of samples were constructed; a mixture of micron-sized raw powders, and ball milled powders with a lamellated nanostructure. A planetary mill was used to refine reactant powders from micron- to nano-scale dimensions. Manual compaction and cold spray deposition techniques were used to consolidate powders in various densities. The dynamics of the pressure wave and high pressure gas bubble were monitored via pressure data and high-speed Schlieren visualization. The effects of reactant particle size and sample density have been evaluated quantitatively and compared with equilibrium calculations. Dynamics of the pressure wave were correlated with the amount of gas released and the rate of burning of the sample material. Work supported by DRDC Suffield (Dr. Julian J. Lee).

  19. Influence of ambient air pressure on the energy conversion of laser-breakdown induced blast waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bin; Komurasaki, Kimiya; Arakawa, Yoshihiro

    2013-09-01

    Influence of ambient pressure on energy conversion efficiency from a Nd : glass laser pulse (λ = 1.053 µm) to a laser-induced blast wave was investigated at reduced pressure. Temporal incident and transmission power histories were measured using sets of energy meters and photodetectors. A half-shadowgraph half-self-emission method was applied to visualize laser absorption waves. Results show that the blast energy conversion efficiency ηbw decreased monotonically with the decrease in ambient pressure. The decrease was small, from 40% to 38%, for the pressure change from 101 kPa to 50 kPa, but the decrease was considerable, to 24%, when the pressure was reduced to 30 kPa. Compared with a TEA-CO2-laser-induced blast wave (λ = 10.6 µm), higher fraction absorption in the laser supported detonation regime ηLSD of 90% was observed, which is influenced slightly by the reduction of ambient pressure. The conversion fraction ηbw/ηLSD≈90% was achieved at pressure >50 kPa, which is significantly higher than that in a CO2 laser case.

  20. Finite-amplitude pressure waves in the radial mode of a cylinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kubo, I.; Moore, F. K.

    1972-01-01

    A numerical study of finite-strength, isentropic pressure waves transverse to the axis of a circular cylinder was made for the radial resonant mode. The waves occur in a gas otherwise at rest, filling the cylinder. A method of characteristics was used for the numerical solution. For small but finite amplitudes, calculations indicate the existence of waves of permanent potential form. For larger amplitudes, a shock is indicated to occur. The critical value of the initial amplitude parameter in the power series is found to be 0.06 to 0.08, under various types of initial conditions.

  1. Propagation of terahertz waves in an atmospheric pressure microplasma with Epstein electron density profile

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan Chengxun; Zhou Zhongxiang; Zhang, Jingwen W.; Sun Hongguo; Wang He; Du Yanwei; Xiang Xiaoli

    2011-03-15

    Propagation properties of terahertz (THz) waves in a bounded atmospheric-pressure microplasma (AMP) are analyzed in this study. A modified Epstein profile model is used to simulate the electron density distribution caused by the plasma sheaths. By introducing the dielectric constant of a Drude-Lorentz model and using the method of dividing the plasma into a series of subslabs with uniform electron density, the coefficients of power reflection, transmission, and absorption are derived for a bounded microplasma structure. The effects of size of microplasma, electron density profile, and collision frequency on the propagation of THz waves are analyzed numerically. The results indicate that the propagation of THz waves in AMPs depend greatly on the above three parameters. It is demonstrated that the THz wave can play an important role in AMPs diagnostics; meanwhile, the AMP can be used as a novel potential tool to control THz wave propagation.

  2. Experimental observation of standing wave effect in low-pressure very-high-frequency capacitive discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yong-Xin; Gao, Fei; Liu, Jia; Wang, You-Nian

    2014-07-28

    Radial uniformity measurements of plasma density were carried out by using a floating double probe in a cylindrical (21 cm in electrode diameter) capacitive discharge reactor driven over a wide range of frequencies (27–220 MHz). At low rf power, a multiple-node structure of standing wave effect was observed at 130 MHz. The secondary density peak caused by the standing wave effect became pronounced and shifts toward the axis as the driving frequency further to increase, indicative of a much more shortened standing-wave wavelength. With increasing rf power, the secondary density peak shift toward the radial edge, namely, the standing-wave wavelength was increased, in good qualitative agreement with the previous theory and simulation results. At higher pressures and high frequencies, the rf power was primarily deposited at the periphery of the electrode, due to the fact that the waves were strongly damped as they propagated from the discharge edge into the center.

  3. Modeling and simulation of pressure waves generated by nano-thermite reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martirosyan, Karen S.; Zyskin, Maxim; Jenkins, Charles M.; (Yuki) Horie, Yasuyuki

    2012-11-01

    This paper reports the modeling of pressure waves from the explosive reaction of nano-thermites consisting of mixtures of nanosized aluminum and oxidizer granules. Such nanostructured thermites have higher energy density (up to 26 kJ/cm3) and can generate a transient pressure pulse four times larger than that from trinitrotoluene (TNT) based on volume equivalence. A plausible explanation for the high pressure generation is that the reaction times are much shorter than the time for a shock wave to propagate away from the reagents region so that all the reaction energy is dumped into the gaseous products almost instantaneously and thereby a strong shock wave is generated. The goal of the modeling is to characterize the gas dynamic behavior for thermite reactions in a cylindrical reaction chamber and to model the experimentally measured pressure histories. To simplify the details of the initial stage of the explosive reaction, it is assumed that the reaction generates a one dimensional shock wave into an air-filled cylinder and propagates down the tube in a self-similar mode. Experimental data for Al/Bi2O3 mixtures were used to validate the model with attention focused on the ratio of specific heats and the drag coefficient. Model predictions are in good agreement with the measured pressure histories.

  4. Rubber-induced uniform laser shock wave pressure for thin metal sheets microforming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Zongbao; Wang, Xiao; Liu, Huixia; Wang, Yayuan; Wang, Cuntang

    2015-02-01

    Laser shock microforming of thin metal sheets is a new high velocity forming technique, which employs laser shock wave to deform the thin metal sheets. The spatial distribution of forming pressure is mainly dependent on the laser beam. A new type of laser shock loading method is introduced which gives a uniform pressure distribution. A low density rubber is inserted between the laser beam and the thin metal sheets. The mechanism of rubber-induced smoothing effect on confined laser shock wave is proposed. Plasticine is used to perform the smoothing effect experiments due to its excellent material flow ability. The influence of rubber on the uniformity of laser shock wave pressure is studied by measuring the surface micro topography of the deformed plasticine. And the four holes forming experiment is used to verify the rubber-induced uniform pressure on thin metal sheets surface. The research results show the possibility of smoothing laser shock wave pressure using rubber. And the good surface quality can be obtained under rubber dynamic loading.

  5. The effects of pressure, temperature, and pore water on velocities in Westerly granite. [for seismic wave propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spencer, J. W., Jr.; Nur, A. M.

    1976-01-01

    A description is presented of an experimental assembly which has been developed to conduct concurrent measurements of compressional and shear wave velocities in rocks at high temperatures and confining pressures and with independent control of the pore pressure. The apparatus was used in studies of the joint effects of temperature, external confining pressure, and internal pore water on sonic velocities in Westerly granite. It was found that at a given temperature, confining pressure has a larger accelerating effect on compressional waves in dry rock, whereas at a given confining pressure, temperature has a larger retarding effect on shear waves.

  6. Continuous-wave dye laser pumped by a high-pressure argon arc

    SciTech Connect

    Thiel, E.; Zander, C.; Drexhage, K.

    1988-11-01

    Continuous-wave operation of a Rhodamine 6G dye laser, incoherently pumped by a high-pressure argon arc, has been achieved. A special electrode design reduces melting of the electrode tips, and thus the arc provides the necessary brightness for periods of the order of hours.

  7. Internal combustion engine supercharging: turbocharger vs. pressure wave compressor. Performance comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, Atanasiu Catalin; Chiru, Anghel

    2014-06-01

    This paper aims on comparison between a turbocharged engine and a pressure wave charged engine. The comparison was accomplished using the engine simulation software AVL Boost, version 2010. The grahps were extracted using AVL Impress, version 2010. The performance increase is limited by the mechanical side of the simulated engine.

  8. Control and reduction of unsteady pressure loads in separated shock wave turbulent boundary layer interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dolling, David S.; Barter, John W.

    1995-01-01

    The focus was on developing means of controlling and reducing unsteady pressure loads in separated shock wave turbulent boundary layer interactions. Section 1 describes how vortex generators can be used to effectively reduce loads in compression ramp interaction, while Section 2 focuses on the effects of 'boundary-layer separators' on the same interaction.

  9. Pressure fluctuations beneath instability wave packets and turbulent spots in a hypersonic boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casper, Katya M.

    During atmospheric reentry, hypersonic vehicles are subjected to high levels of boundary-layer pressure fluctuations that cause vibration of internal components. Current models are not adequate to predict these fluctuations. A more physics-based approach can be obtained by using a turbulent-spot model of transition. In order to gain a better understanding of the pressure-fluctuation field and the growth of turbulent spots in a hypersonic boundary layer, the development of disturbances was studied on the nozzle wall of the Boeing/AFOSR Mach-6 Quiet Tunnel. Under quiet flow conditions, the nozzle wall boundary layer remains laminar and grows very thick over the long nozzle length. This allows the development of large disturbances that can be well-resolved with high-frequency pressure transducers. For a controlled study, disturbances were created by pulsed glow perturbations and studied at various freestream conditions. Both the centerline and the spanwise distribution of pressure fluctuations were measured as boundary-layer disturbances grew from linear instability wave packets into turbulent spots. A disturbance first grows into a linear instability wave packet and then quickly becomes nonlinear. At this point, the wave packet is still concentrated near the disturbance centerline, but weaker disturbances are seen spreading from the center. Throughout the nonlinear growth of the wave packets, large harmonics are visible in the power spectra. Breakdown to turbulence begins in the core of the wave packets where the wave amplitudes are largest. As breakdown begins, the peak amplitudes of the instability waves and harmonics decrease into the rising broadband frequencies. Second-mode waves are still evident in front of and behind the breakdown point and can be seen propagating in the spanwise direction at a spreading angle. The turbulent core grows downstream, resulting in a turbulent spot with a typical arrowhead shape. However, the spot is not merely a localized patch

  10. Effect of the dynamic pressure on the shock wave structure in a rarefied polyatomic gas

    SciTech Connect

    Taniguchi, Shigeru Sugiyama, Masaru; Arima, Takashi; Ruggeri, Tommaso

    2014-01-15

    We study the shock wave structure in a rarefied polyatomic gas based on a simplified model of extended thermodynamics in which the dissipation is due only to the dynamic pressure. In this case the differential system is very simple because it is a variant of Euler system with a new scalar equation for the dynamic pressure [T. Arima, S. Taniguchi, T. Ruggeri, and M. Sugiyama, Phys. Lett. A 376, 2799–2803 (2012)]. It is shown that this theory is able to describe the three types of the shock wave structure observed in experiments: the nearly symmetric shock wave structure (Type A, small Mach number), the asymmetric structure (Type B, moderate Mach number), and the structure composed of thin and thick layers (Type C, large Mach number)

  11. Modeling wave-induced pore pressure and effective stress in a granular seabed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholtès, Luc; Chareyre, Bruno; Michallet, Hervé; Catalano, Emanuele; Marzougui, Donia

    2015-01-01

    The response of a sandy seabed under wave loading is investigated on the basis of numerical modeling using a multi-scale approach. To that aim, the discrete element method is coupled to a finite volume method specially enhanced to describe compressible fluid flow. Both solid and fluid phase mechanics are upscaled from considerations established at the pore level. Model's predictions are validated against poroelasticity theory and discussed in comparison with experiments where a sediment analog is subjected to wave action in a flume. Special emphasis is put on the mechanisms leading the seabed to liquefy under wave-induced pressure variation on its surface. Liquefaction is observed in both dilative and compactive regimes. It is shown that the instability can be triggered for a well-identified range of hydraulic conditions. Particularly, the results confirm that the gas content, together with the permeability of the medium are key parameters affecting the transmission of pressure inside the soil.

  12. Three-dimensional visualization of shear wave propagation generated by dual acoustic radiation pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mochizuki, Yuta; Taki, Hirofumi; Kanai, Hiroshi

    2016-07-01

    An elastic property of biological soft tissue is an important indicator of the tissue status. Therefore, quantitative and noninvasive methods for elasticity evaluation have been proposed. Our group previously proposed a method using acoustic radiation pressure irradiated from two directions for elastic property evaluation, in which by measuring the propagation velocity of the shear wave generated by the acoustic radiation pressure inside the object, the elastic properties of the object were successfully evaluated. In the present study, we visualized the propagation of the shear wave in a three-dimensional space by the synchronization of signals received at various probe positions. The proposed method succeeded in visualizing the shear wave propagation clearly in the three-dimensional space of 35 × 41 × 4 mm3. These results show the high potential of the proposed method to estimate the elastic properties of the object in the three-dimensional space.

  13. Pressure estimation for a low-speed detonation wave in pressed TEN

    SciTech Connect

    Martynyuk, V.F.; Sulimov, A.A.; Sukoyan, M.K.; Obmenin, A.V.

    1988-05-01

    This paper examined the dynamic deformation in steel shells with stationary low-speed detonation propagating in pressed TEN. Shell expansion was recorded with a ZhLV-2 triggered photographic system with the shell seen against a bright screen. The pressure pattern behind the front was shown to be stationary by the constant mode of shell expansion. Pressure in the stationary low-speed detonation was estimated from the photographic data. An expression was derived for calculating the estimated pressure from an equation for radial expansion of the shell. A dynamic deformation pattern was found which was used to calculate the explosive burnup in stationary low-speed detonation waves.

  14. Syrinx fluid transport: modeling pressure-wave-induced flux across the spinal pial membrane.

    PubMed

    Elliott, N S J

    2012-03-01

    Syrinxes are fluid-filled cavities of the spinal cord that characterize syringomyelia, a disease involving neurological damage. Their formation and expansion is poorly understood, which has hindered successful treatment. Syrinx cavities are hydraulically connected with the spinal subarachnoid space (SSS) enveloping the spinal cord via the cord interstitium and the network of perivascular spaces (PVSs), which surround blood vessels penetrating the pial membrane that is adherent to the cord surface. Since the spinal canal supports pressure wave propagation, it has been hypothesized that wave-induced fluid exchange across the pial membrane may play a role in syrinx filling. To investigate this conjecture a pair of one-dimensional (1-d) analytical models were developed from classical elastic tube theory coupled with Darcy's law for either perivascular or interstitial flow. The results show that transpial flux serves as a mechanism for damping pressure waves by alleviating hoop stress in the pial membrane. The timescale ratio over which viscous and inertial forces compete was explicitly determined, which predicts that dilated PVS, SSS flow obstructions, and a stiffer and thicker pial membrane-all associated with syringomyelia-will increase transpial flux and retard wave travel. It was also revealed that the propagation of a pressure wave is aided by a less-permeable pial membrane and, in contrast, by a more-permeable spinal cord. This is the first modeling of the spinal canal to include both pressure-wave propagation along the spinal axis and a pathway for fluid to enter and leave the cord, which provides an analytical foundation from which to approach the full poroelastic problem.

  15. Syrinx fluid transport: modeling pressure-wave-induced flux across the spinal pial membrane.

    PubMed

    Elliott, N S J

    2012-03-01

    Syrinxes are fluid-filled cavities of the spinal cord that characterize syringomyelia, a disease involving neurological damage. Their formation and expansion is poorly understood, which has hindered successful treatment. Syrinx cavities are hydraulically connected with the spinal subarachnoid space (SSS) enveloping the spinal cord via the cord interstitium and the network of perivascular spaces (PVSs), which surround blood vessels penetrating the pial membrane that is adherent to the cord surface. Since the spinal canal supports pressure wave propagation, it has been hypothesized that wave-induced fluid exchange across the pial membrane may play a role in syrinx filling. To investigate this conjecture a pair of one-dimensional (1-d) analytical models were developed from classical elastic tube theory coupled with Darcy's law for either perivascular or interstitial flow. The results show that transpial flux serves as a mechanism for damping pressure waves by alleviating hoop stress in the pial membrane. The timescale ratio over which viscous and inertial forces compete was explicitly determined, which predicts that dilated PVS, SSS flow obstructions, and a stiffer and thicker pial membrane-all associated with syringomyelia-will increase transpial flux and retard wave travel. It was also revealed that the propagation of a pressure wave is aided by a less-permeable pial membrane and, in contrast, by a more-permeable spinal cord. This is the first modeling of the spinal canal to include both pressure-wave propagation along the spinal axis and a pathway for fluid to enter and leave the cord, which provides an analytical foundation from which to approach the full poroelastic problem. PMID:22482686

  16. Determination of aortic pulse wave velocity from waveform decomposition of the central aortic pressure pulse.

    PubMed

    Qasem, Ahmed; Avolio, Alberto

    2008-02-01

    Aortic pulse wave velocity (PWV), calculated from pulse transit time (PTT) using 2 separate pulse recordings over a known distance, is a significant biomarker of cardiovascular risk. This study evaluates a novel method of determining PTT from waveform decomposition of central aortic pressure using a single pulse measurement. Aortic pressure was estimated from a transformed radial pulse and decomposed into forward and backward waves using a triangular flow wave. Pulse transit time was determined from cross-correlation of forward and backward waves. Pulse transit time, representing twice the PTT between 2 specific sites, was compared with independent measurements of carotid-femoral PTT in a cohort of 46 subjects (23 females; age 57+/-14 years). Linear regression between measured PTT (y; milliseconds) and calculated PTT (x; milliseconds) was y=1.05x-2.1 (r=0.67; P<0.001). This model was tested in a separate group of 44 subjects (21 females; age 55+/-14 years) by comparing measured carotid-femoral PWV (y; meters per second) and PWV calculated using the estimated value of PTT (eTR/2) and carotid femoral distance (x; meters per second; y=1.21x-2.5; r=0.82; P<0.001). Findings indicate that the time lag between the forward and backward waves obtained from the decomposition of aortic pressure wave can be used to determine PWV along the aortic trunk and shows good agreement with carotid-femoral PWV. This technique can be used as a noninvasive and nonintrusive method for measurement of aortic PWV using a single pressure recording.

  17. Mild neurotrauma indicates a range-specific pressure response to low level shock wave exposure.

    PubMed

    Vandevord, Pamela J; Bolander, Richard; Sajja, Venkata Siva Sai Sujith; Hay, Kathryn; Bir, Cynthia A

    2012-01-01

    Identifying the level of overpressure required to create physiological deficits is vital to advance prevention, diagnostic, and treatment strategies for individuals exposed to blasts. In this study, a rodent model of primary blast neurotrauma was employed to determine the pressure at which acute neurological alterations occurred. Rats were exposed to a single low intensity shock wave at a pressure of 0, 97, 117, or 153 kPa. Following exposure, rats were assessed for acute cognitive alterations using the Morris water maze and motor dysfunction using the horizontal ladder test. Subsequently, histological analyses of three brain regions (primary motor cortex, the hippocampal dentate gyrus region, and the posteromedial cortical amygdala) were conducted. Histological parameters included measuring the levels of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) to identify astrocyte activation, cleaved caspase-3 for early apoptosis identification and Fluoro-Jade B (FJB) which labels degenerating neurons within the brain tissue. The results demonstrated that an exposure to a single 117 kPa shock wave revealed a significant change in overall neurological deficits when compared to controls and the other pressures. The animals showed significant alterations in water maze parameters and a histological increase in the number of GFAP, caspase-3, and FJB-positive cells. It is suggested that when exposed to a low level shock wave, there may be a biomechanical response elicited by a specific pressure range which can cause low level neurological deficits within the rat. These data indicate that neurotrauma induced from a shock wave may lead to cognitive deficits in short-term learning and memory of rats. Additional histological evidence supports significant and diffuse glial activation and cellular damage. Further investigation into the biomechanical aspects of shock wave exposure is required to elucidate this pressure range-specific phenomenon. PMID:21994066

  18. Experimental Study on a Standing Wave Thermoacoustic Prime Mover with Air Working Gas at Various Pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setiawan, Ikhsan; Achmadin, Wahyu N.; Murti, Prastowo; Nohtomi, Makoto

    2016-04-01

    Thermoacoustic prime mover is an energy conversion device which converts thermal energy into acoustic work (sound wave). The advantages of this machine are that it can work with air as the working gas and does not produce any exhaust gases, so that it is environmentally friendly. This paper describes an experimental study on a standing wave thermoacoustic prime mover with air as the working gas at various pressures from 0.05 MPa to 0.6 MPa. We found that 0.2 MPa is the optimum pressure which gives the lowest onset temperature difference of 355 °C. This pressure value would be more preferable in harnessing low grade heat sources to power the thermoacoustic prime mover. In addition, we find that the lowest onset temperature difference is obtained when rh /δ k ratio is 2.85, where r h is the hydraulic radius of the stack and δ k is the thermal penetration depth of the gas. Moreover, the pressure amplitude of the sound wave is significantly getting larger from 2.0 kPa to 9.0 kPa as the charged pressure increases from 0.05 MPa up to 0.6 MPa.

  19. Dynamics of quantum-classical hybrid systems: Effect of matter-wave pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, J.; Huang, X. L.; Yi, X. X.; Wu, Chunfeng; Oh, C. H.

    2010-12-01

    Radiation pressure affects the kinetics of a system exposed to radiation and it constitutes the basis of laser cooling. In this article, we study matter-wave pressure through examining the dynamics of a quantum-classical hybrid system. The quantum and classical subsystems are affected mutually via a changing boundary condition. Two systems, that is, an atom and a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC), are considered as the quantum subsystems, while an oscillating wall is taken as the classical subsystem. We show that the classical subsystem would experience a force proportional to Q-3 from the quantum atom, where Q denotes the distance between the two walls, whereas it acquires an additional force proportional to Q-2 from the BEC due to the atom-atom interaction in the BEC. These forces can be understood as the matter-wave pressure.

  20. Measurement of the normal component of compressive wave pressure in a rock with Manganin sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Virchenko, V.A.; Egorov, A.P.; Krasavin, S.V.

    1985-03-01

    Measurement of dynamic pressures in compressed media with manganin wire sensors has become common in the past few years. The increased interest in this method is due to the technological simplicity of measurement and the ease of manufacturing the manganin pickup. The method has been continually improved and put to new applications. In this paper the authors describe an experiment using manganin sensors to measure the normal component of a compressive pressure wave in rocks (marble, schist, and diabase) generated by industrial blasts. Subtle effects not previously identified include: decomposition of the shockwave in the rock and identification of an elastic precursor; features of damping of the normal component of compressive wave pressure as a function of distance from the load application point; and the pattern of destruction of brittle materials. The authors conclude that manganin sensors can be broadly applied in mining for studies of the efficacy of various types of explosives and in investigations of the mechanism of rock destruction.

  1. Computation of the pressure field generated by surface acoustic waves in microchannels.

    PubMed

    Darinskii, A N; Weihnacht, M; Schmidt, H

    2016-07-01

    The high-frequency pressure induced by a surface acoustic wave in the fluid filling a microchannel is computed by solving the full scattering problem. The microchannel is fabricated inside a container attached to the top of a piezoelectric substrate where the surface wave propagates. The finite element method is used. The pressure found in this way is compared with the pressure obtained by solving boundary-value problems formulated on the basis of simplifications which have been introduced in earlier papers by other research studies. The considered example shows that the difference between the results can be significant, ranging from several tens of percent up to several times in different points inside the channel. PMID:27314212

  2. Time-resolved wave profile measurements in copper to Megabar pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Chhabildas, L C; Asay, J R

    1981-01-01

    Many time-resolved techniques have been developed which have greatly aided in the understanding of dynamic material behavior such as the high pressure-dynamic strength of materials. In the paper, time-resolved measurements of copper (at shock-induced high pressures and temperatures) are used to illustrate the capability of using such techniques to investigate high pressure strength. Continuous shock loading and release wave profiles have been made in copper to 93 GPa using velocity interferometric techniques. Fine structure in the release wave profiles from the shocked state indicates an increase in shear strength of copper to 1.5 GPa at 93 GPa from its ambient value of 0.08 GPa.

  3. Brachial vs. central systolic pressure and pulse wave transmission indicators: a critical analysis.

    PubMed

    Izzo, Joseph L

    2014-12-01

    This critique is intended to provide background for the reader to evaluate the relative clinical utilities of brachial cuff systolic blood pressure (SBP) and its derivatives, including pulse pressure, central systolic pressure, central augmentation index (AI), and pulse pressure amplification (PPA). The critical question is whether the newer indicators add sufficient information to justify replacing or augmenting brachial cuff blood pressure (BP) data in research and patient care. Historical context, pathophysiology of variations in pulse wave transmission and reflection, issues related to measurement and model errors, statistical limitations, and clinical correlations are presented, along with new comparative data. Based on this overview, there is no compelling scientific or practical reason to replace cuff SBP with any of the newer indicators in the vast majority of clinical situations. Supplemental value for central SBP may exist in defining patients with exaggerated PPA ("spurious systolic hypertension"), managing cardiac and aortic diseases, and in studies of cardiovascular drugs, but there are no current standards for these possibilities.

  4. Comparison of actinide production in traveling wave and pressurized water reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Osborne, A.G.; Smith, T.A.; Deinert, M.R.

    2013-07-01

    The geopolitical problems associated with civilian nuclear energy production arise in part from the accumulation of transuranics in spent nuclear fuel. A traveling wave reactor is a type of breed-burn reactor that could, if feasible, reduce the overall production of transuranics. In one possible configuration, a cylinder of natural or depleted uranium would be subjected to a fast neutron flux at one end. The neutrons would transmute the uranium, producing plutonium and higher actinides. Under the right conditions, the reactor could become critical, at which point a self-stabilizing fission wave would form and propagate down the length of the reactor cylinder. The neutrons from the fission wave would burn the fissile nuclides and transmute uranium ahead of the wave to produce additional fuel. Fission waves in uranium are driven largely by the production and fission of {sup 239}Pu. Simulations have shown that the fuel burnup can reach values greater than 400 MWd/kgIHM, before fission products poison the reaction. In this work we compare the production of plutonium and minor actinides produced in a fission wave to that of a UOX fueled light water reactor, both on an energy normalized basis. The nuclide concentrations in the spent traveling wave reactor fuel are computed using a one-group diffusion model and are verified using Monte Carlo simulations. In the case of the pressurized water reactor, a multi-group collision probability model is used to generate the nuclide quantities. We find that the traveling wave reactor produces about 0.187 g/MWd/kgIHM of transuranics compared to 0.413 g/MWd/kgIHM for a pressurized water reactor running fuel enriched to 4.95 % and burned to 50 MWd/kgIHM. (authors)

  5. Pressure fluctuations beneath turbulent spots and instability wave packets in a hypersonic boundary layer.

    SciTech Connect

    Beresh, Steven Jay; Casper, Katya M.; Schneider, Steven P.

    2010-12-01

    The development of turbulent spots in a hypersonic boundary layer was studied on the nozzle wall of the Boeing/AFOSR Mach-6 Quiet Tunnel. Under quiet flow conditions, the nozzle wall boundary layer remains laminar and grows very thick over the long nozzle length. This allows the development of large turbulent spots that can be readily measured with pressure transducers. Measurements of naturally occurring wave packets and developing turbulent spots were made. The peak frequencies of these natural wave packets were in agreement with second-mode computations. For a controlled study, the breakdown of disturbances created by spark and glow perturbations were studied at similar freestream conditions. The spark perturbations were the most effective at creating large wave packets that broke down into turbulent spots. The flow disturbances created by the controlled perturbations were analyzed to obtain amplitude criteria for nonlinearity and breakdown as well as the convection velocities of the turbulent spots. Disturbances first grew into linear instability waves and then quickly became nonlinear. Throughout the nonlinear growth of the wave packets, large harmonics are visible in the power spectra. As breakdown begins, the peak amplitudes of the instability waves and harmonics decrease into the rising broad-band frequencies. Instability waves are still visible on either side of the growing turbulent spots during this breakdown process.

  6. Dominance of the forward compression wave in determining pulsatile components of blood pressure: similarities between inotropic stimulation and essential hypertension.

    PubMed

    Fok, Henry; Guilcher, Antoine; Brett, Sally; Jiang, Benyu; Li, Ye; Epstein, Sally; Alastruey, Jordi; Clapp, Brian; Chowienczyk, Phil

    2014-11-01

    Pulsatile components of blood pressure may arise from forward (ventricular generated) or backward wave travel in the arterial tree. The objective of this study was to determine the relative contributions of forward and backward waves to pulsatility. We used wave intensity and wave separation analysis to determine pulsatile components of blood pressure during inotropic and vasopressor stimulation by dobutamine and norepinephrine in normotensive subjects and compared pulse pressure components in hypertensive (mean±SD, 48.8±11.3 years; 165±26.6/99±14.2 mm Hg) and normotensive subjects (52.2±12.6 years; 120±14.2/71±8.2 mm Hg). Dobutamine (7.5 μg/kg per minute) increased the forward compression wave generated by the ventricle and increased pulse pressure from 36.8±3.7 to 59.0±3.4 mm Hg (mean±SE) but had no significant effect on mean arterial pressure or the midsystolic backward compression wave. By contrast, norepinephrine (50 ng/kg per minute) had no significant effect on the forward compression wave but increased the midsystolic backward compression wave. Despite this increase in the backward compression wave, and an increase in mean arterial pressure, norepinephrine increased central pulse pressure less than dobutamine (increases of 22.1±3.8 and 7.2±2.8 mm Hg for dobutamine and norepinephrine, respectively; P<0.02). An elevated forward wave component (mean±SE, 50.4±3.4 versus 35.2±1.8 mm Hg, in hypertensive and normotensive subjects, respectively; P<0.001) accounted for approximately two thirds of the total difference in central pulse pressures between hypertensive and normotensive subjects. Increased central pulse pressure during inotropic stimulation and in essential hypertension results primarily from the forward compression wave.

  7. Thermal-hydraulic behaviors of vapor-liquid interface due to arrival of a pressure wave

    SciTech Connect

    Inoue, Akira; Fujii, Yoshifumi; Matsuzaki, Mitsuo

    1995-09-01

    In the vapor explosion, a pressure wave (shock wave) plays a fundamental role for triggering, propagation and enhancement of the explosion. Energy of the explosion is related to the magnitude of heat transfer rate from hot liquid to cold volatile one. This is related to an increasing rate of interface area and to an amount of transient heat flux between the liquids. In this study, the characteristics of transient heat transfer and behaviors of vapor film both on the platinum tube and on the hot melt tin drop, under same boundary conditions have been investigated. It is considered that there exists a fundamental mechanism of the explosion in the initial expansion process of the hot liquid drop immediately after arrival of pressure wave. The growth rate of the vapor film is much faster on the hot liquid than that on the solid surface. Two kinds of roughness were observed, one due to the Taylor instability, by rapid growth of the explosion bubble, and another, nucleation sites were observed at the vapor-liquid interface. Based on detailed observation of early stage interface behaviors after arrival of a pressure wave, the thermal fragmentation mechanism is proposed.

  8. Kinetic model of ionization waves in a positive column at intermediate pressures in inert gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golubovskii, Yu. B.; Maiorov, V. A.; Nekutchaev, V. O.; Behnke, J.; Behnke, J. F.

    2001-03-01

    A kinetic model of ionization waves in the inert gas discharge is constructed, which is based on the simultaneous solution of the kinetic equation for electrons and the continuity equations for ions and excited atoms. The model corresponds to a range of intermediate pressures and small currents, when elastic collisions dominate in the electron energy balance and electron-electron collisions are negligibly small. A linear theory of ionization waves is constructed, growth rates and frequencies of wave disturbances able to propagate in plasma are found. It is shown that there is an upper bound to the existence of striations by pressure, as well as the lower bound by current. The self-consistent solution of the source system of equations is obtained, which describes a nonlinear wave. The profile of electric field and the electron distribution function in this field are calculated. The results of calculations are compared with the experimental data. The wavelengths obtained are essentially larger than the electron energy relaxation length. Such waves cannot be described within the limits of fluid models.

  9. Direct analysis of dispersive wave fields from near-field pressure measurements.

    PubMed

    Hörchens, Lars

    2011-10-01

    Flexural waves play a significant role for the radiation of sound from plates. The analysis of flexural wave fields enables the detection of sources and transmission paths in plate-like structures. The measurement of these wave fields can be carried out indirectly by means of near-field acoustic holography, which determines the vibrational wave field from pressure information measured in a plane close to the plate under investigation. The reconstruction of the plate vibration is usually obtained by inverting the forward radiation problem, i.e., by inversion of an integral operator. In this article, it is shown that a pressure measurement taken in the extreme near-field of a vibrating plate can directly be used for the approximate analysis of the dispersive flexural wave field. The inversion step of near-field acoustic holography is not necessarily required if such an approximate solution is sufficient. The proposed method enables fast and simple analysis of dispersion characteristics. Application of dispersion compensation to the measured field allows for visualizations of propagating wavefronts, such that sources and scatterers in the plate can be detected. The capabilities of the described approach are demonstrated on several measurements. PMID:21973358

  10. Ventricular size and isotope cisternography in patients with acute transient rises of intracranial pressure (plateau waves)

    SciTech Connect

    Hayashi, M.; Kobayashi, H.; Fujii, H.; Yamamoto, S.

    1982-12-01

    The size of the ventricular system and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow were determined in 17 patients with plateau waves, using computerized tomography (CT) and isotope cisternography. Some patients had increased intracranial pressure (ICP) resulting from space-occupying lesions and other causes, and some had normal ICP observed in normal-pressure hydrocephalus. The size and shape of the ventricular system during plateau wave phases as ascertained by CT showed little or no change as compared with its size and shape during the interval phases between two waves. It was also noticed that, in patients with supratentorial masses, the midline shift showed no difference in degree between the two phases. These findings suggest that there is little change in the intracranial CSF volume between the two phases, that is, there is little compensatory outflow of the intracranial CSF for the ICP variations. These results may also support the assumption that the plateau waves are not caused by an intermittent obstruction of the CSF pathways. Isotope cisternography showed a marked delay of clearance of radioactivity from the intracranial CSF in 15 patients. The cisternographic pattern in patients with increased ICP and the absence of ventricular dilatation demonstrated an abnormally large accumulation of radioactivity over the cerebral convexities, and the pattern in patients with normal-pressure hydrocephalus showed complete obstruction of the subarachnoid space over both cerebral convexities. These observations suggest that, in patients with plateau waves, there is a marked delay in CSF absorption. The authors postulate that the reduction of CSF absorption may create a critically tight condition within the cranial cavity and act as a contributory factor in the development of the plateau waves.

  11. Characterization of a Setup to test the Impact of High-Amplitude Pressure Waves on Living Cells

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Mischa; Kahlert, Ulf; Wessolleck, Johanna; Maciaczyk, Donata; Merkt, Benjamin; Maciaczyk, Jaroslaw; Osterholz, Jens; Nikkhah, Guido; Steinhauser, Martin O.

    2014-01-01

    The impact of pressure waves on cells may provide several possible applications in biology and medicine including the direct killing of tumors, drug delivery or gene transfection. In this study we characterize the physical properties of mechanical pressure waves generated by a nanosecond laser pulse in a setup with well-defined cell culture conditions. To systematically characterize the system on the relevant length and time scales (micrometers and nanoseconds) we use photon Doppler velocimetry (PDV) and obtain velocity profiles of the cell culture vessel at the passage of the pressure wave. These profiles serve as input for numerical pressure wave simulations that help to further quantify the pressure conditions on the cellular length scale. On the biological level we demonstrate killing of glioblastoma cells and quantify experimentally the pressure threshold for cell destruction. PMID:24458018

  12. Influence of equivalence ratio on the mechanism of pressure wave generation during knocking combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terashima, Hiroshi; Koshi, Mitsuo

    2015-11-01

    Knocking in spark-assisted engines is known as a severe pressure oscillation mainly caused by hot-spot autoignition in end-gas regions. In this study, knocking combustion of n-heptane/air mixtures modeled in a one-dimensional constant volume reactor is simulated with particular emphasis on the effects of equivalence ratio (0.6 to 2.0) on the mechanism of pressure wave generation. An efficient compressible flow solver with detailed chemical kinetics of n-heptane (373 species and 1071 reactions) is applied. The results demonstrate that the presence of negative temperature coefficient region significantly influence the knocking timing and knocking intensity, i.e., pressure wave amplitude in end-gas regions. The condition with equivalence ratios lower than 1.0 mostly leads to the reduction of the knocking intensity because of slower heat release rates of end-gas autoignition. On the other hand, the results with higher equivalence ratios of 1.2 to 2.0 indicate that a significant peak in the knocking intensity is produced at an equivalence ratio, which varies with initial temperature conditions. The final presentation will address the relationship between the knocking intensity and equivalence ratio with the discussion on detailed physics of pressure wave generation.

  13. Pressure wave measurements from thermal cook-off of an HMX based high explosive

    SciTech Connect

    Forbes, J W; Tarver, C M; Urtiew, P A; Garcia, F; Greenwood, D W; Vandersall, K S

    2000-10-10

    A better understanding of thermal cook-off is important for safe handling and storing explosive devices. A number of safety issues exist about what occurs when a cased explosive thermally cooks off. For example, violence of the events as a function of confinement are important for predictions of collateral damage. This paper demonstrates how adjacent materials can be gauged to measure the resulting pressure wave and how this wave propagates in this adjacent material. The output pulse from the thermal cook-off explosive containing fixture is of obvious interest for assessing many scenarios.

  14. Pressure Wave Measurements from Thermal Cook-off of an HMX Based Explosive

    SciTech Connect

    Forbes, J W; Tarver, C M; Urtiew, P A; Garcia, F; Greenwood, D W; Vandersall, K S

    2001-05-09

    A better understanding of thermal cook-off is important for safe handling and storing explosive devices. A number of safety issues exist about what occurs when a cased explosive thermally cooks off. For example, violence of the events as a function of confinement are important for predictions of collateral damage. This paper demonstrates how adjacent materials can be gauged to measure the resulting pressure wave and how this wave propagates in this adjacent material. The output pulse from the thermal cook-off explosive containing fixture is of obvious interest for assessing many scenarios.

  15. Pressure Wave Measurements from Thermal Cook-Off of an HMX Based High Explosive PBX 9501

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, F; Forbes, J W; Tarver, C M; Urtiew, P A; Greenwood, D W; Vandersall, K S

    2001-05-31

    A better understanding of thermal cook-off is important for safe handling and storing explosive devices. A number of safety issues exist about what occurs when a cased explosive thermally cooks off. For example, violence of the events as a function of confinement are important for predictions of collateral damage. This paper demonstrates how adjacent materials can be gauged to measure the resulting pressure wave and how this wave propagates in this adjacent material. The output pulse from the thermal cook-off explosive containing fixture is of obvious interest for assessing many scenarios.

  16. Wave propagation with different pressure signals: an experimental study on the latex tube.

    PubMed

    Ursino, M; Artioli, E; Gallerani, M

    1993-07-01

    To have deeper insight into the main factors affecting wave propagation in real hydraulic lines, we measured the true propagation coefficient in two latex rubber tubes via the three-point pressure method. The measurements were performed using both sinusoidal pressure signals of different amplitudes and periodic square waves as well as aperiodic pressure impulses. The results obtained were then compared with those predicted by a classic linear model valuable for a purely elastic maximally tethered tube. Our measurements demonstrate that the three-point pressure method may introduce significant errors at low frequencies (below 1 Hz in the present experiments) when the distance between two consecutive transducers becomes much lower than the wavelength. The pattern of phase velocity in the range 2-20 Hz turns out to be about 10 per cent higher than the theoretical one computed using the static value of the Young modulus. This result supports the idea that the dynamic Young modulus of the material is slightly higher than that measured in static conditions. The experimental attenuation per wavelength is significantly higher than the theoretical one over most of the frequencies examined, and settles at a constant value as frequency increases. Introduction of wall viscoelasticity in the theoretical model can explain only a portion of the observed high frequency damping and wave attenuation. Finally, increasing the amplitude of pressure changes significantly affects the measured value of the propagation coefficient, especially at those frequencies for which direct and reflected waves sum together in a positive fashion. In these conditions we observed a moderate increase in phase velocity and a much more evident increase in attenuation per wavelength.

  17. Wave propagation with different pressure signals: an experimental study on the latex tube.

    PubMed

    Ursino, M; Artioli, E; Gallerani, M

    1993-07-01

    To have deeper insight into the main factors affecting wave propagation in real hydraulic lines, we measured the true propagation coefficient in two latex rubber tubes via the three-point pressure method. The measurements were performed using both sinusoidal pressure signals of different amplitudes and periodic square waves as well as aperiodic pressure impulses. The results obtained were then compared with those predicted by a classic linear model valuable for a purely elastic maximally tethered tube. Our measurements demonstrate that the three-point pressure method may introduce significant errors at low frequencies (below 1 Hz in the present experiments) when the distance between two consecutive transducers becomes much lower than the wavelength. The pattern of phase velocity in the range 2-20 Hz turns out to be about 10 per cent higher than the theoretical one computed using the static value of the Young modulus. This result supports the idea that the dynamic Young modulus of the material is slightly higher than that measured in static conditions. The experimental attenuation per wavelength is significantly higher than the theoretical one over most of the frequencies examined, and settles at a constant value as frequency increases. Introduction of wall viscoelasticity in the theoretical model can explain only a portion of the observed high frequency damping and wave attenuation. Finally, increasing the amplitude of pressure changes significantly affects the measured value of the propagation coefficient, especially at those frequencies for which direct and reflected waves sum together in a positive fashion. In these conditions we observed a moderate increase in phase velocity and a much more evident increase in attenuation per wavelength. PMID:8231298

  18. Radial energy transport by magnetospheric ULF waves: Effects of magnetic curvature and plasma pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kouznetsov, Igor; Lotko, William

    1995-01-01

    The 'radial' transport of energy by internal ULF waves, stimulated by dayside magnetospheric boundary oscillations, is analyzed in the framework of one-fluid magnetohydrodynamics. (the term radial is used here to denote the direction orthogonal to geomagnetic flux surfaces.) The model for the inhomogeneous magnetospheric plasma and background magnetic field is axisymmetric and includes radial and parallel variations in the magnetic field, magnetic curvature, plasma density, and low but finite plasma pressure. The radial mode structure of the coupled fast and intermediate MHD waves is determined by numerical solution of the inhomogeneous wave equation; the parallel mode structure is characterized by a Wentzel-Kramer-Brillouin (WKB) approximation. Ionospheric dissipation is modeled by allowing the parallel wave number to be complex. For boudnary oscillations with frequencies in the range from 10 to 48 mHz, and using a dipole model for the background magnetic field, the combined effects of magnetic curvature and finite plasma pressure are shown to (1) enhance the amplitude of field line resonances by as much as a factor of 2 relative to values obtained in a cold plasma or box-model approximation for the dayside magnetosphere; (2) increase the energy flux delivered to a given resonance by a factor of 2-4; and (3) broaden the spectral width of the resonance by a factor of 2-3. The effects are attributed to the existence of an 'Alfven buoyancy oscillation,' which approaches the usual shear mode Alfven wave at resonance, but unlike the shear Alfven mode, it is dispersive at short perpendicular wavelengths. The form of dispersion is analogous to that of an internal atmospheric gravity wave, with the magnetic tension of the curved background field providing the restoring force and allowing radial propagation of the mode. For nominal dayside parameters, the propagation band of the Alfven buoyancy wave occurs between the location of its (field line) resonance and that of the

  19. Optimizing OBS data using shielding and by removing ocean wave loading noise with Pressure and Horizontal Pressure Gradient Sensor Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, Spahr C.; Barclay, Andrew H.

    2016-04-01

    Ocean bottom seismometer (OBS) data, particularly from sites in shallow water are notoriously noisy. Ocean currents generate forces on an unshielded OBS sensor causing time varying tilt that greatly raises noise levels. Shallow burial can mitigate this source of noise, but is expensive and difficult to accomplish, particularly for large fleets of instruments. Large shields can provide significant reduction in noise levels as demonstrated with Cascadia Array OBS data. A recent test deployment investigated the relative motion of the shield and the sensor within the shield, providing guidance on the effectiveness of shielding. Even with shielding or burial, deformation of the seafloor caused by loading by the ocean waves raises seismic noise levels. We have previously shown the vertical component noise can be reduced using data from pressure sensors to predict the vertical deformation and remove it from the vertical record. We recently deployed a new OBS instrument in shallow water (80m) that measured two horizontal components of pressure gradient and show these data can be used to reduce wave induced deformation noise from horizontal component seismic data.

  20. Negative pressures and spallation in water drops subjected to nanosecond shock waves

    DOE PAGES

    Stan, Claudiu A.; Willmott, Philip R.; Stone, Howard A.; Koglin, Jason E.; Liang, Mengning; Aquila, Andrew L.; Robinson, Joseph S.; Gumerlock, Karl L.; Blaj, Gabriel; Sierra, Raymond G.; et al

    2016-05-16

    Most experimental studies of cavitation in liquid water at negative pressures reported cavitation at tensions significantly smaller than those expected for homogeneous nucleation, suggesting that achievable tensions are limited by heterogeneous cavitation. We generated tension pulses with nanosecond rise times in water by reflecting cylindrical shock waves, produced by X-ray laser pulses, at the internal surface of drops of water. Depending on the X-ray pulse energy, a range of cavitation phenomena occurred, including the rupture and detachment, or spallation, of thin liquid layers at the surface of the drop. When spallation occurred, we evaluated that negative pressures below –100 MPamore » were reached in the drops. As a result, we model the negative pressures from shock reflection experiments using a nucleation-and-growth model that explains how rapid decompression could outrun heterogeneous cavitation in water, and enable the study of stretched water close to homogeneous cavitation pressures.« less

  1. Arterial pulse pressure amplification described by means of a nonlinear wave model: characterization of human aging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alfonso, M.; Cymberknop, L.; Armentano, R.; Pessana, F.; Wray, S.; Legnani, W.

    2016-04-01

    The representation of blood pressure pulse as a combination of solitons captures many of the phenomena observed during its propagation along the systemic circulation. The aim of this work is to analyze the applicability of a compartmental model for propagation regarding the pressure pulse amplification associated with arterial aging. The model was applied to blood pressure waveforms that were synthesized using solitons, and then validated by waveforms obtained from individuals from differentiated age groups. Morphological changes were verified in the blood pressure waveform as a consequence of the aging process (i.e. due to the increase in arterial stiffness). These changes are the result of both a nonlinear interaction and the phenomena present in the propagation of nonlinear mechanic waves.

  2. Negative Pressures and Spallation in Water Drops Subjected to Nanosecond Shock Waves.

    PubMed

    Stan, Claudiu A; Willmott, Philip R; Stone, Howard A; Koglin, Jason E; Liang, Mengning; Aquila, Andrew L; Robinson, Joseph S; Gumerlock, Karl L; Blaj, Gabriel; Sierra, Raymond G; Boutet, Sébastien; Guillet, Serge A H; Curtis, Robin H; Vetter, Sharon L; Loos, Henrik; Turner, James L; Decker, Franz-Josef

    2016-06-01

    Most experimental studies of cavitation in liquid water at negative pressures reported cavitation at tensions significantly smaller than those expected for homogeneous nucleation, suggesting that achievable tensions are limited by heterogeneous cavitation. We generated tension pulses with nanosecond rise times in water by reflecting cylindrical shock waves, produced by X-ray laser pulses, at the internal surface of drops of water. Depending on the X-ray pulse energy, a range of cavitation phenomena occurred, including the rupture and detachment, or spallation, of thin liquid layers at the surface of the drop. When spallation occurred, we evaluated that negative pressures below -100 MPa were reached in the drops. We model the negative pressures from shock reflection experiments using a nucleation-and-growth model that explains how rapid decompression could outrun heterogeneous cavitation in water, and enable the study of stretched water close to homogeneous cavitation pressures. PMID:27182751

  3. Negative Pressures and Spallation in Water Drops Subjected to Nanosecond Shock Waves.

    PubMed

    Stan, Claudiu A; Willmott, Philip R; Stone, Howard A; Koglin, Jason E; Liang, Mengning; Aquila, Andrew L; Robinson, Joseph S; Gumerlock, Karl L; Blaj, Gabriel; Sierra, Raymond G; Boutet, Sébastien; Guillet, Serge A H; Curtis, Robin H; Vetter, Sharon L; Loos, Henrik; Turner, James L; Decker, Franz-Josef

    2016-06-01

    Most experimental studies of cavitation in liquid water at negative pressures reported cavitation at tensions significantly smaller than those expected for homogeneous nucleation, suggesting that achievable tensions are limited by heterogeneous cavitation. We generated tension pulses with nanosecond rise times in water by reflecting cylindrical shock waves, produced by X-ray laser pulses, at the internal surface of drops of water. Depending on the X-ray pulse energy, a range of cavitation phenomena occurred, including the rupture and detachment, or spallation, of thin liquid layers at the surface of the drop. When spallation occurred, we evaluated that negative pressures below -100 MPa were reached in the drops. We model the negative pressures from shock reflection experiments using a nucleation-and-growth model that explains how rapid decompression could outrun heterogeneous cavitation in water, and enable the study of stretched water close to homogeneous cavitation pressures.

  4. CMOS-compatible ruggedized high-temperature Lamb wave pressure sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kropelnicki, P.; Muckensturm, K.-M.; Mu, X. J.; Randles, A. B.; Cai, H.; Ang, W. C.; Tsai, J. M.; Vogt, H.

    2013-08-01

    This paper describes the development of a novel ruggedized high-temperature pressure sensor operating in lateral field exited (LFE) Lamb wave mode. The comb-like structure electrodes on top of aluminum nitride (AlN) were used to generate the wave. A membrane was fabricated on SOI wafer with a 10 µm thick device layer. The sensor chip was mounted on a pressure test package and pressure was applied to the backside of the membrane, with a range of 20-100 psi. The temperature coefficient of frequency (TCF) was experimentally measured in the temperature range of -50 °C to 300 °C. By using the modified Butterworth-van Dyke model, coupling coefficients and quality factor were extracted. Temperature-dependent Young's modulus of composite structure was determined using resonance frequency and sensor interdigital transducer (IDT) wavelength which is mainly dominated by an AlN layer. Absolute sensor phase noise was measured at resonance to estimate the sensor pressure and temperature sensitivity. This paper demonstrates an AlN-based pressure sensor which can operate in harsh environment such as oil and gas exploration, automobile and aeronautic applications.

  5. Cavitation inception by the backscattering of pressure waves from a bubble interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahira, Hiroyuki; Ogasawara, Toshiyuki; Mori, Naoto; Tanaka, Moe

    2015-10-01

    The secondary cavitation that occurs by the backscattering of focused ultrasound from a primary cavitation bubble caused by the negative pressure part of the ultrasound (Maxwell, et al., 2011) might be useful for the energy exchange due to bubble oscillations in High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU). The present study is concerned with the cavitation inception by the backscattering of ultrasound from a bubble. In the present experiment, a laser-induced bubble which is generated by a pulsed focused laser beam with high intensity is utilized as a primary cavitation bubble. After generating the bubble, focused ultrasound is emitted to the bubble. The acoustic field and the bubble motion are observed with a high-speed video camera. It is confirmed that the secondary cavitation bubble clouds are generated by the backscattering from the laser-induced bubble. The growth of cavitation bubble clouds is analyzed with the image processing method. The experimental results show that the height and width of the bubble clouds grow in stepwise during their evolution. The direct numerical simulations are also conducted for the backscattering of incident pressure waves from a bubble in order to evaluate a pressure field near the bubble. It is shown that the ratio of a bubble collapse time t0 to a characteristic time of wave propagation tS, η = t0/ts, is an important determinant for generating negative pressure region by backscattering. The minimum pressure location by the backscattering in simulations is in good agreement with the experiment.

  6. Bromoform (CHBr sub 3 ) -- A very high-pressure shock-wave analyzer

    SciTech Connect

    McQueen, R.G.; Isaak, D.G.

    1989-01-01

    Bromoform, CHBr{sub 3}, appears to radiate like a black body. This means that the amount of radiation emitted from the shock front is extremely sensitive to temperature and hence even more sensitive to pressure. This feature has been exploited to locate overtake waves in impact experiments. Heretofore, Bromoform was used only for making timing measurements. However, if its P, V, E, and T EOS are known it could be used as high-pressure analyzer. Measurements to determine the Hugoniot, the Grueneisen parameter, {gamma}, and its optical radiation characterization are described, and preliminary data are presented. 8 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Numerical simulation of pressure waves in the cochlea induced by a microwave pulse.

    PubMed

    Yitzhak, Nir M; Ruppin, Raphael; Hareuveny, Ronen

    2014-10-01

    The pressure waves developing at the cochlea by the irradiation of the body with a plane wave microwave pulse are obtained by numerical simulation, employing a two-step finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) algorithm. First, the specific absorption rate (SAR) distribution is obtained by solving the Maxwell equations on a FDTD grid. Second, the temperature rise due to this SAR distribution is used to formulate the thermoelastic equations of motion, which are discretized and solved by the FDTD method. The calculations are performed for anatomically based full body human models, as well as for a head model. The dependence of the pressure amplitude at the cochlea on the frequency, the direction of propagation, and the polarization of the incident electromagnetic radiation, as well as on the pulse width, was investigated.

  8. Shock wave reflection induced detonation (SWRID) under high pressure and temperature condition in closed cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z.; Qi, Y.; Liu, H.; Zhang, P.; He, X.; Wang, J.

    2016-07-01

    Super-knock is one of the major obstacles for improving power density in advanced internal combustion engines (ICE). This work studied the mechanism of super-knock initiation using a rapid compression machine that simulated conditions relevant to ICEs and provided excellent optical accessibility. Based on the high-speed images and pressure traces of the stoichiometric iso-octane/oxygen/nitrogen combustion under high-temperature and high-pressure conditions, it was observed that detonation was first initiated in the near-wall region as a result of shock wave reflection. Before detonation was initiated, the speed of the combustion wave front was less than that of the Chapman-Jouguet (C-J) detonation speed (around 1840 m/s). In the immediate vicinity of the initiation, the detonation speed was much higher than that of the C-J detonation.

  9. Shock wave reflection induced detonation (SWRID) under high pressure and temperature condition in closed cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z.; Qi, Y.; Liu, H.; Zhang, P.; He, X.; Wang, J.

    2016-09-01

    Super-knock is one of the major obstacles for improving power density in advanced internal combustion engines (ICE). This work studied the mechanism of super-knock initiation using a rapid compression machine that simulated conditions relevant to ICEs and provided excellent optical accessibility. Based on the high-speed images and pressure traces of the stoichiometric iso-octane/oxygen/nitrogen combustion under high-temperature and high-pressure conditions, it was observed that detonation was first initiated in the near-wall region as a result of shock wave reflection. Before detonation was initiated, the speed of the combustion wave front was less than that of the Chapman-Jouguet (C-J) detonation speed (around 1840 m/s). In the immediate vicinity of the initiation, the detonation speed was much higher than that of the C-J detonation.

  10. Instantaneous and efficient surface wave excitation of a low pressure gas or gases

    DOEpatents

    Levy, Donald J.; Berman, Samuel M.

    1988-01-01

    A system for instantaneously ionizing and continuously delivering energy in the form of surface waves to a low pressure gas or mixture of low pressure gases, comprising a source of rf energy, a discharge container, (such as a fluorescent lamp discharge tube), an rf shield, and a coupling device responsive to rf energy from the source to couple rf energy directly and efficiently to the gas or mixture of gases to ionize at least a portion of the gas or gases and to provide energy to the gas or gases in the form of surface waves. The majority of the rf power is transferred to the gas or gases near the inner surface of the discharge container to efficiently transfer rf energy as excitation energy for at least one of the gases. The most important use of the invention is to provide more efficient fluorescent and/or ultraviolet lamps.

  11. Pressure broadening measurement of submillimeter-wave lines of O3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, M. M.; Amano, T.

    2005-10-01

    The pressure broadening coefficients and their temperature dependences for two submillimeter-wave transitions of ozone, one being monitored with Odin and the other to be monitored with JEM/SMILES and EOS-MLS, have been determined by using a BWO based submillimeter-wave spectrometer. The measurements have also been extended to one of the symmetric isotopic species, 16O18O16O. The isotopic species is observed in natural abundance and as a consequence the temperature dependence is not determined due to weak signal intensity. The pressure broadening parameters are determined with better than 1% accuracy, while the temperature dependence exponents are obtained within 1.5 3% accuracy for the normal species transitions.

  12. New experimental capabilities and theoretical insights of high pressure compression waves

    SciTech Connect

    Orlikowski, D; Nguyen, J; Patterson, J R; Minich, R; Martin, L P; Holmes, N

    2007-07-20

    Currently there are three platforms that offer quasi-isentropic compression or ramp-wave compression (RWC): light-gas gun, magnetic flux (Z-pinch), and laser. We focus here on the light-gas gun technique and on some current theoretical insights from experimental data. A gradient impedance through the length of the impactor provides the pressure pulse upon impactor to the subject material. Applications and results are given concerning high-pressure strength and liquid to solid, phase transition of water plus its associated phase fraction history. We also introduce the Korteweg-deVries-Burgers equation as a means to understand the evolution these RWC waves that propagate through the thickness of the subject material. This equation has the necessary competition between non-linear, dispersion, and dissipation processes, which is shown through observed structures that are manifested in the experimental particle velocity histories. Such methodology points towards a possible quantifiable dissipation, through which RWC experiments may be analyzed.

  13. Bottom shear stress and pressure perturbations under an internal solitary wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivera, Gustavo; Diamessis, Peter

    2014-11-01

    The bottom boundary layer (BBL) under a mode-1 internal solitary wave (ISW) of depression propagating against an oncoming model barotropic current is examined using 2-D direct numerical simulation based on a spectral multidomain penalty method model. Use of a postprocessing projection onto a modified set of divergence-free basis functions enables investigation of wave-based Reynolds numbers within the range [105 ,106 ] . At sufficiently high ISW amplitude, the BBL undergoes a global instability which produces intermittent vortex shedding from within the separation bubble in the lee of the wave. The interplay between the bottom shear stress field and pressure perturbations during vortex ejection events and the subsequent evolution of the vortices is the focus of this presentation. Implications for resuspension of bottom particulate matter are discussed in the context of specific sediment transport models. Support from the Cornell Sloan Diversity Fellowship program is gratefully acknowledged.

  14. Heart rate variability during plateau waves of intracranial pressure: A pilot descriptive study.

    PubMed

    Luís, A; Santos, A S; Dias, C; Almeida, R; Rocha, A P

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to describe heart rate variability during the first episode of plateau waves of intracranial pressure (ICP) in Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) in order to characterize and identify at bedside this cerebrovascular phenomenon. The general behavior of the heart rate variability (HRV) spectral measures expressed in the medians across patients is concordant with an increased HRV in the latter part of the baseline and plateau wave, followed by a decrease after the event and a new increase during the recovery. In low and high frequency bands the same increase is more marked in the parametric analysis. Interpretation of HRV may help clinicians to better identify the plateau waves and allow earlier management. PMID:26737694

  15. Ultrasonic Guided Waves for Health Monitoring of High Pressure Composite Tanks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castaings, M.; Hosten, B.

    2008-02-01

    Ultrasonic guided wave modes are proposed to control the integrity of high-pressure composite tanks produced by EADS—ASTRIUM, France. The purpose is to demonstrate the potentiality of air-coupled transducers to set-up a contact-less, single-sided technique for testing the moisture content and/or the micro-cracking of carbon epoxy composite wound around a Titanium liner.

  16. The vibration of a box-type structure. II - Response to a travelling pressure wave.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Popplewell, N.

    1971-01-01

    A finite element method is formulated for determining the transient response of a box-type structure to a traveling, arbitrarily shaped pressure wave. The method is illustrated by considering an example of practical concern - the sonic boom. The acceleration-time histories of a closed box are compared with those obtained experimentally from a simulated boom. Satisfactory agreement is obtained with only four rectangular elements per individual face and a simplified loading of the box.

  17. Theoretical study of the light pressure force acting on a spherical dielectric particle of an arbitrary size in the interference field of two plane monochromatic electromagnetic waves

    SciTech Connect

    Guzatov, D V; Gaida, L S; Afanas'ev, Anatolii A

    2008-12-31

    The light pressure force acting on a spherical dielectric particle in the interference field of two plane monochromatic electromagnetic waves is studied in detail for different particle radii and angles of incidence of waves. (light pressure)

  18. Underwater blast wave pressure sensor based on polymer film fiber Fabry-Perot cavity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Junjie; Wang, Meng; Xu, Jian; Peng, Li; Yang, Minghong; Xia, Minghe; Jiang, Desheng

    2014-10-01

    This paper describes the theoretical and experimental aspects of an optical underwater shock wave sensor based on a polymer film optical fiber Fabry-Perot cavity manufactured by vacuum deposition technology. The transduction mechanism of the sensor involves a normally incident acoustic stress wave that changes the thickness of the polymer film, thereby giving rise to a phase shift. This transient interferometric phase is interrogated by a three-phase-step algorithm. Theoretically, the sensor-acoustic-field interaction principle is analyzed, and the phase modulation sensitivity based on the theory of waves in the layered media is calculated. Experimentally, a static calibration test and a dynamic calibration test are conducted using a piston-type pressure calibration machine and a focusing-type electromagnetic shock wave. Results indicate that the repeatability, hysteresis, nonlinearity, and the overall measurement accuracy of the sensor within the full pressure range of 55 MPa are 1.82%, 0.86%, 1.81%, and 4.49%, respectively. The dynamic response time is less than 0.767 μs. Finally, three aspects that need further study for practical use are pointed out.

  19. Underwater blast wave pressure sensor based on polymer film fiber Fabry-Perot cavity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Junjie; Wang, Meng; Xu, Jian; Peng, Li; Yang, Minghong; Xia, Minghe; Jiang, Desheng

    2014-10-01

    This paper describes the theoretical and experimental aspects of an optical underwater shock wave sensor based on a polymer film optical fiber Fabry-Perot cavity manufactured by vacuum deposition technology. The transduction mechanism of the sensor involves a normally incident acoustic stress wave that changes the thickness of the polymer film, thereby giving rise to a phase shift. This transient interferometric phase is interrogated by a three-phase-step algorithm. Theoretically, the sensor-acoustic-field interaction principle is analyzed, and the phase modulation sensitivity based on the theory of waves in the layered media is calculated. Experimentally, a static calibration test and a dynamic calibration test are conducted using a piston-type pressure calibration machine and a focusing-type electromagnetic shock wave. Results indicate that the repeatability, hysteresis, nonlinearity, and the overall measurement accuracy of the sensor within the full pressure range of 55 MPa are 1.82%, 0.86%, 1.81%, and 4.49%, respectively. The dynamic response time is less than 0.767 μs. Finally, three aspects that need further study for practical use are pointed out. PMID:25322237

  20. Head orientation affects the intracranial pressure response resulting from shock wave loading in the rat.

    PubMed

    Dal Cengio Leonardi, Alessandra; Keane, Nickolas J; Bir, Cynthia A; Ryan, Anne G; Xu, Liaosa; Vandevord, Pamela J

    2012-10-11

    Since an increasing number of returning military personnel are presenting with neurological manifestations of traumatic brain injury (TBI), there has been a great focus on the effects resulting from blast exposure. It is paramount to resolve the physical mechanism by which the critical stress is being inflicted on brain tissue from blast wave encounters with the head. This study quantitatively measured the effect of head orientation on intracranial pressure (ICP) of rats exposed to a shock wave. Furthermore, the study examined how skull maturity affects ICP response of animals exposed to shock waves at various orientations. Results showed a significant increase in ICP values in larger rats at any orientation. Furthermore, when side-ICP values were compared to the other orientations, the peak pressures were significantly lower suggesting a relation between ICP and orientation of the head due to geometry of the skull and location of sutures. This finding accentuates the importance of skull dynamics in explaining possible injury mechanisms during blast. Also, the rate of pressure change was measured and indicated that the rate was significantly higher when the top of the head was facing the shock front. The results confirm that the biomechanical response of the superior rat skull is distinctive compared to other areas of the skull, suggesting a skull flexure mechanism. These results not only present insights into the mechanism of brain injury, but also provide information which can be used for designing more effective protective head gear. PMID:22947434

  1. A new approach to generate arbitrary pulsatile pressure wave forms in mechanical circulatory support systems.

    PubMed

    Aghababaei, Amin; Hexamer, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Pulsatile pressure/flow wave forms reproduction of blood in mechanical circulatory systems are still an open topic. Regarding the periodic behavior of pulsatile hemodynamics, a repetitive control algorithm was adopted as a potential methodology for rotary blood pumps. The developed algorithm was tested on a mock system including an oxygenator, a resistance, and a compliance. The post-oxygenator pressure served as the feedback of the control system. Initially, a model of the whole system was developed in order to use repetitive control algorithm. Then the performance of the developed algorithm was evaluated in three different scenarios. The experimental results indicated that the proposed method was able to accurately reproduce any pattern of pulsatile pressure. Moreover, it demonstrated an acceptable robustness in terms of model uncertainty and nonlinearity.

  2. Pressure Wave Measurements During Thermal Explosion of HMX-Based High Explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Forbes, J W; Garcia, F; Tarver, C M; Urtiew, P A; Greenwood, D W; Vandersall, K S

    2002-06-27

    Five different experiments on thermal heating of explosive materials have been performed. Three experiments thermally exploded PBX 9501 (HMX/Estane/BDNPA-F; 9512.512.5 wt %) donor charges while two others thermally exploded LX-04 (HMX/Viton A; 85/15 wt %). These donor charges were encased in 304 stainless steel. The transmitted two-dimensional pressure waves were measured by gauges in acceptor cylinders of Teflon, PBX 9501, or LX-04 that were in contact with the donors' steel case. A fifth experiment measured the pressure in an acceptor charge of PBX 9501 that had a 100 mm stand-off from the top of the steel case of the thermally cooked off PBX 9501 donor charge. Reactive flow hydrodynamic modeling using a rapid deflagration velocity of approximately 500 m/s was able to reproduce the pressure gauge records for both the in contact and stand off experiments that used PBX 9501 donors and acceptors.

  3. Landslide stability: Role of rainfall-induced, laterally propagating, pore-pressure waves

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Priest, G.R.; Schulz, W.H.; Ellis, W.L.; Allan, J.A.; Niem, A.R.; Niem, W.A.

    2011-01-01

    The Johnson Creek Landslide is a translational slide in seaward-dipping Miocene siltstone and sandstone (Astoria Formation) and an overlying Quaternary marine terrace deposit. The basal slide plane slopes sub-parallel to the dip of the Miocene rocks, except beneath the back-tilted toe block, where it slopes inland. Rainfall events raise pore-water pressure in the basal shear zone in the form of pulses of water pressure traveling laterally from the headwall graben down the axis of the slide at rates of 1-6 m/hr. Infiltration of meteoric water and vertical pressure transmission through the unsaturated zone has been measured at ~50 mm/hr. Infiltration and vertical pressure transmission were too slow to directly raise head at the basal shear zone prior to landslide movement. Only at the headwall graben was the saturated zone shallow enough for rainfall events to trigger lateral pulses of water pressure through the saturated zone. When pressure levels in the basal shear zone exceeded thresholds defined in this paper, the slide began slow, creeping movement as an intact block. As pressures exceeded thresholds for movement in more of the slide mass, movement accelerated, and differential displacement between internal slide blocks became more pronounced. Rainfall-induced pore-pressure waves are probably a common landslide trigger wherever effective hydraulic conductivity is high and the saturated zone is located near the surface in some part of a slide. An ancillary finding is apparently greater accuracy of grouted piezometers relative to those in sand packs for measurement of pore pressures at the installed depth.

  4. Numerical Analysis of Secondary Undulations in Urauchi Bay Caused by an Eastward Pressure Wave over the East China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saita, T.; Asano, T.

    2012-12-01

    Background and Methods Seiches, called abiki in Japanese, are frequently observed along the west coast of Kyushu Island, Japan. In 2009, an abiki of almost 3 m in total height occurred in Urauchi Bay at the Koshiki Islands located off Kyushu Island. The Seiches in the bay have been attributed to a meteorological disturbance over the East China Sea. Here, the response of the East China Sea to propagating pressure waves and the resulting oscillations in Urauchi Bay are evaluated by numerical analysis. The computational domains are the East China Sea (Domain I) and Urauchi Bay (Domain II). The primitive equations are a continuity equation and nonlinear shallow-water equations, taking into account the effect of an atmospheric pressure gradient at the sea surface. Results (1) Development of long-period waves in the East China Sea The water surface undulations generated by pressure waves propagating eastward over the East China Sea are evaluated. In the calculations, the shapes of pressure waves are simplified such that barometric pressure changes along the east-west direction only. The pressure is constant along the meridional direction. The pressure waves move from west to east in Domain I at a constant speed. Calculations are executed under 891 conditions where the wave lengths L, amplitude Pmax, and phase velocity Cp of the pressure waves are changed in the ranges of 10-140 km, 1-3 hPa, and 60-210 km/h, respectively. Eastward pressure waves over the East China Sea generate water level fluctuations of sufficient duration to put Urauchi Bay into resonance. For Cp of 80-140 km/h, surface wave heights become especially large. The increase in wave height is attributed to Proudman resonance because Cp is close to 88.3 km/h which is the propagation speed of a surface wave estimated for the mean water depth in the western area of the Okinawa Trough. A smaller L increases the amplitude of water level fluctuations and shortens their period. L of 10-40 km leads to fluctuations

  5. Bisferiens peaks in the radial artery pressure wave during patent ductus arteriosus in newborn infants: relationship with ascending aortic flow.

    PubMed

    Gevers, M; van der Mooren, K; Stergiopulos, N; Van Genderingen, H R; Lafeber, H N; Hack, W W; Westerhof, N

    1996-07-01

    Previously, we found evidence that bisferiens peaks in the radial artery pressure wave in the newborn infant may suggest the presence of a left-to-right shunt through a patent ductus arteriosus (PDA). The purpose of the present study was to analyze the origin of this pulsus bisferiens. Starting from the assumption that the radial artery pressure wave form is similar to the aortic pressure wave form, as described previously, we attempted to explain the bisferiens peaks on the basis of echocardiographically obtained ascending aortic flow. We studied 11 preterm mechanically ventilated infants with a left-to-right shunt through a PDA and 7 without. Aortic volume flow was established echocardiographically, and radial artery blood pressure measurement was performed with a high fidelity cathetermanometer system. Ascending aortic peak flow during PDA was significantly higher in the case of PDA, compared with the case without PDA. An augmented peak flow with an abrupt decline after the high peak in PDA, resulting in a sharp pressure peak with a steep decline after the peak, was thought to explain the first sharp peak of pulsus bisferiens. An abrupt decline of flow after peak flow is thought to be due to the fast runoff of blood through the ductus. According to the pulsatile pressure dynamics theories, which state that pressure wave forms consist of forward and backward wave forms, the second peak of the pulsus bisferiens can be explained by the return of the reflected (backward) wave form when the forward wave form has already considerably decreased. We conclude that the bisferiens peaks found in PDA result from a combination of large stroke volume (augmented first peak) and large runoff (quick decline of the forward wave) before the return of the reflected wave.

  6. Experimental validation of a millimeter wave radar technique to remotely sense atmospheric pressure at the Earth's surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flower, D. A.; Peckham, G. E.; Bradford, W. J.

    1984-01-01

    Experiments with a millimeter wave radar operating on the NASA CV-990 aircraft which validate the technique for remotely sensing atmospheric pressure at the Earth's surface are described. Measurements show that the precise millimeter wave observations needed to deduce pressure from space with an accuracy of 1 mb are possible, that sea surface reflection properties agree with theory and that the measured variation of differential absorption with altitude corresponds to that expected from spectroscopic models.

  7. Cavitation inception by the backscattering of pressure waves from a bubble interface

    SciTech Connect

    Takahira, Hiroyuki Ogasawara, Toshiyuki Mori, Naoto Tanaka, Moe

    2015-10-28

    The secondary cavitation that occurs by the backscattering of focused ultrasound from a primary cavitation bubble caused by the negative pressure part of the ultrasound (Maxwell, et al., 2011) might be useful for the energy exchange due to bubble oscillations in High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU). The present study is concerned with the cavitation inception by the backscattering of ultrasound from a bubble. In the present experiment, a laser-induced bubble which is generated by a pulsed focused laser beam with high intensity is utilized as a primary cavitation bubble. After generating the bubble, focused ultrasound is emitted to the bubble. The acoustic field and the bubble motion are observed with a high-speed video camera. It is confirmed that the secondary cavitation bubble clouds are generated by the backscattering from the laser-induced bubble. The growth of cavitation bubble clouds is analyzed with the image processing method. The experimental results show that the height and width of the bubble clouds grow in stepwise during their evolution. The direct numerical simulations are also conducted for the backscattering of incident pressure waves from a bubble in order to evaluate a pressure field near the bubble. It is shown that the ratio of a bubble collapse time t{sub 0} to a characteristic time of wave propagation t{sub S}, η = t{sub 0}/t{sub s}, is an important determinant for generating negative pressure region by backscattering. The minimum pressure location by the backscattering in simulations is in good agreement with the experiment.

  8. The 24-hour pulse wave velocity, aortic augmentation index, and central blood pressure in normotensive volunteers.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsova, Tatyana Y; Korneva, Viktoria A; Bryantseva, Evgeniya N; Barkan, Vitaliy S; Orlov, Artemy V; Posokhov, Igor N; Rogoza, Anatoly N

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the pulse wave velocity, aortic augmentation index corrected for heart rate 75 (AIx@75), and central systolic and diastolic blood pressure during 24-hour monitoring in normotensive volunteers. Overall, 467 subjects (206 men and 261 women) were recruited in this study. Participants were excluded from the study if they were less than 19 years of age, had blood test abnormalities, had a body mass index greater than 2 7.5 kg/m(2), had impaired glucose tolerance, or had hypotension or hypertension. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) with the BPLab(®) device was performed in each subject. ABPM waveforms were analyzed using the special automatic Vasotens(®) algorithm, which allows the calculation of pulse wave velocity, AIx@75, central systolic and diastolic blood pressure for "24-hour", "awake", and "asleep" periods. Circadian rhythms and sex differences in these indexes were identified. Pending further validation in prospective outcome-based studies, our data may be used as preliminary diagnostic values for the BPLab ABPM additional index in adult subjects.

  9. The 24-hour pulse wave velocity, aortic augmentation index, and central blood pressure in normotensive volunteers.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsova, Tatyana Y; Korneva, Viktoria A; Bryantseva, Evgeniya N; Barkan, Vitaliy S; Orlov, Artemy V; Posokhov, Igor N; Rogoza, Anatoly N

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the pulse wave velocity, aortic augmentation index corrected for heart rate 75 (AIx@75), and central systolic and diastolic blood pressure during 24-hour monitoring in normotensive volunteers. Overall, 467 subjects (206 men and 261 women) were recruited in this study. Participants were excluded from the study if they were less than 19 years of age, had blood test abnormalities, had a body mass index greater than 2 7.5 kg/m(2), had impaired glucose tolerance, or had hypotension or hypertension. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) with the BPLab(®) device was performed in each subject. ABPM waveforms were analyzed using the special automatic Vasotens(®) algorithm, which allows the calculation of pulse wave velocity, AIx@75, central systolic and diastolic blood pressure for "24-hour", "awake", and "asleep" periods. Circadian rhythms and sex differences in these indexes were identified. Pending further validation in prospective outcome-based studies, our data may be used as preliminary diagnostic values for the BPLab ABPM additional index in adult subjects. PMID:24812515

  10. A Study of Standing Pressure Waves Within Open and Closed Acoustic Resonators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniels, C.; Steinetz, B.; Finkbeiner, J.; Raman, G.; Li, X.

    2002-01-01

    The first section of the results presented herein was conducted on an axisymmetric resonator configured with open ventilation ports on either end of the resonator, but otherwise closed and free from obstruction. The remaining section presents the results of a similar resonator shape that was closed, but contained an axisymmetric blockage centrally located through the axis of the resonator. Ambient air was used as the working fluid. In each of the studies, the resonator was oscillated at the resonant frequency of the fluid contained within the cavity while the dynamic pressure, static pressure, and temperature of the fluid were recorded at both ends of the resonator. The baseline results showed a marked reduction in the amplitude of the dynamic pressure waveforms over previous studies due to the use of air instead of refrigerant as the working fluid. A sharp reduction in the amplitude of the acoustic pressure waves was expected and recorded when the configuration of the resonators was modified from closed to open. A change in the resonant frequency was recorded when blockages of differing geometries were used in the closed resonator, while acoustic pressure amplitudes varied little from baseline measurements.

  11. Analytical analysis of slow and fast pressure waves in a two-dimensional cellular solid with fluid-filled cells.

    PubMed

    Dorodnitsyn, Vladimir; Van Damme, Bart

    2016-06-01

    Wave propagation in cellular and porous media is widely studied due to its abundance in nature and industrial applications. Biot's theory for open-cell media predicts the existence of two simultaneous pressure waves, distinguished by its velocity. A fast wave travels through the solid matrix, whereas a much slower wave is carried by fluid channels. In closed-cell materials, the slow wave disappears due to a lack of a continuous fluid path. However, recent finite element (FE) simulations done by the authors of this paper also predict the presence of slow pressure waves in saturated closed-cell materials. The nature of the slow wave is not clear. In this paper, an equivalent unit cell of a medium with square cells is proposed to permit an analytical description of the dynamics of such a material. A simplified FE model suggests that the fluid-structure interaction can be fully captured using a wavenumber-dependent spring support of the vibrating cell walls. Using this approach, the pressure wave behavior can be calculated with high accuracy, but with less numerical effort. Finally, Rayleigh's energy method is used to investigate the coexistence of two waves with different velocities. PMID:27369159

  12. Cyclooxygenase inhibition augments central blood pressure and aortic wave reflection in aging humans.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Jill N; Casey, Darren P; Hines, Casey N; Nicholson, Wayne T; Joyner, Michael J

    2012-06-15

    The augmentation index and central blood pressure increase with normal aging. Recently, cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitors, commonly used for the treatment of pain, have been associated with transient increases in the risk of cardiovascular events. We examined the effects of the COX inhibitor indomethacin (Indo) on central arterial hemodynamics and wave reflection characteristics in young and old healthy adults. High-fidelity radial arterial pressure waveforms were measured noninvasively by applanation tonometry before (control) and after Indo treatment in young (25 ± 5 yr, 7 men and 6 women) and old (64 ± 6 yr, 5 men and 6 women) subjects. Aortic systolic (control: 115 ± 3 mmHg vs. Indo: 125 ± 5 mmHg, P < 0.05) and diastolic (control: 74 ± 2 mmHg vs. Indo: 79 ± 3 mmHg, P < 0.05) pressures were elevated after Indo treatment in older subjects, whereas only diastolic pressure was elevated in young subjects (control: 71 ± 2 mmHg vs. Indo: 76 ± 1 mmHg, P < 0.05). Mean arterial pressure increased in both young and old adults after Indo treatment (P < 0.05). The aortic augmentation index and augmented pressure were elevated after Indo treatment in older subjects (control: 30 ± 5% vs. Indo 36 ± 6% and control 12 ± 1 mmHg vs. Indo: 18 ± 2 mmHg, respectively, P < 0.05), whereas pulse pressure amplification decreased (change: 8 ± 3%, P < 0.05). In addition, older subjects had a 61 ± 11% increase in wasted left ventricular energy after Indo treatment (P < 0.05). In contrast, young subjects showed no significant changes in any of the variables of interest. Taken together, these results demonstrate that COX inhibition with Indo unfavorably increases central wave reflection and augments aortic pressure in old but not young subjects. Our results suggest that aging individuals have a limited ability to compensate for the acute hemodynamic changes caused by systemic COX inhibition.

  13. Evaluation of mechanical losses in a linear motor pressure wave generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacob, Subhash; Rangasamy, Karunanithi; Jonnalagadda, Kranthi Kumar; Chakkala, Damu; Achanur, Mallappa; Govindswamy, Jagadish; Gour, Abhay Singh

    2012-06-01

    A moving magnet linear motor compressor or pressure wave generator (PWG) of 2 cc swept volume with dual opposed piston configuration has been developed to operate miniature pulse tube coolers. Prelimnary experiments yielded only a no-load cold end temperature of 180 K. Auxiliary tests and the interpretation of detailed modeling of a PWG suggest that much of the PV power has been lost in the form of blow-by at piston seals due to large and non-optimum clearance seal gap between piston and cylinder. The results of experimental parameters simulated using Sage provide the optimum seal gap value for maximizing the delivered PV power.

  14. Study of the Pressure Rise Across Shock Waves Required to Separate Laminar and Turbulent Boundary Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donaldson, Coleman Dup; Lange, Roy H

    1952-01-01

    Results are presented of a dimensional study and an experimental investigation of the pressure rise across a shock wave which causes separation of the boundary layer on a flat plate. The experimental part of the investigation was conducted at a Mach number of 3.03 for a Reynolds number range of 2 x 10 (sup) 6 to 19 x 10 (sup) 6. The available experimental data are compared with the predictions of the present study, and the significance of the results obtained is discussed relative to certain practical design problems.

  15. Deformation of drop due to radiation pressure of acoustic standing wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamanaka, T.; Saito, M.; Kamimura, H.

    To investigate the deformation of a liquid drop due to radiation pressure of acoustic standing waves, an analytical and experimental study was carried out. An approximate axisymmetric figure of equilibrium is obtained. The experimental study was carried out in the laboratory by using a triaxial acoustic chamber. An injection syringe was placed at the center of the triaxial acoustic resonance chamber. Holding a small liquid drop at the pointed end of the syringe, deformations of the liquid drop were measured. Assuming an oblate spheroid for the deformation, the experimental results were compared with theory.

  16. Enhanced acoustic sensing through wave compression and pressure amplification in anisotropic metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yongyao; Liu, Haijun; Reilly, Michael; Bae, Hyungdae; Yu, Miao

    2014-10-01

    Acoustic sensors play an important role in many areas, such as homeland security, navigation, communication, health care and industry. However, the fundamental pressure detection limit hinders the performance of current acoustic sensing technologies. Here, through analytical, numerical and experimental studies, we show that anisotropic acoustic metamaterials can be designed to have strong wave compression effect that renders direct amplification of pressure fields in metamaterials. This enables a sensing mechanism that can help overcome the detection limit of conventional acoustic sensing systems. We further demonstrate a metamaterial-enhanced acoustic sensing system that achieves more than 20 dB signal-to-noise enhancement (over an order of magnitude enhancement in detection limit). With this system, weak acoustic pulse signals overwhelmed by the noise are successfully recovered. This work opens up new vistas for the development of metamaterial-based acoustic sensors with improved performance and functionalities that are highly desirable for many applications.

  17. Studies on an improved indigenous pressure wave generator and its testing with a pulse tube cooler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacob, S.; Karunanithi, R.; Narsimham, G. S. V. L.; Kranthi, J. Kumar; Damu, C.; Praveen, T.; Samir, M.; Mallappa, A.

    2014-01-01

    Earlier version of an indigenously developed Pressure Wave Generator (PWG) could not develop the necessary pressure ratio to satisfactorily operate a pulse tube cooler, largely due to high blow by losses in the piston cylinder seal gap and due to a few design deficiencies. Effect of different parameters like seal gap, piston diameter, piston stroke, moving mass and the piston back volume on the performance is studied analytically. Modifications were done to the PWG based on analysis and the performance is experimentally measured. A significant improvement in PWG performance is seen as a result of the modifications. The improved PWG is tested with the same pulse tube cooler but with different inertance tube configurations. A no load temperature of 130 K is achieved with an inertance tube configuration designed using Sage software. The delivered PV power is estimated to be 28.4 W which can produce a refrigeration of about 1 W at 80 K.

  18. The Loss Spiral of Work Pressure, Work-Home Interference and Exhaustion: Reciprocal Relations in a Three-Wave Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Demerouti, Evangelia; Bakker, Arnold B.; Bulters, Annemieke J.

    2004-01-01

    This study tested the "loss spiral" hypothesis of work-home interference (WHI). Accordingly, work pressure was expected to lead to WHI and exhaustion, and, vice versa, exhaustion was expected to result in more WHI and work pressure over time. Results of SEM-analyses using three waves of data obtained from 335 employees of an employment agency…

  19. On the influence of the hysteretic behavior of the capillary pressure on the wave propagation in partially saturated soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albers, Bettina

    2016-06-01

    It is well known that the capillary pressure curve of partially saturated soils exhibits a hysteresis. For the same degree of saturation it has different values depending on the initial state of the soil, thus for drying of a wet soil or wetting of a dry soil. The influence of these different values of the capillary pressure on the propagation of sound waves is studied by use of a linear hyperbolic model. Even if the model does not contain a hysteresis operator, the effect of hysteresis in the capillary pressure curve is accounted for. In order to obtain the limits of phase speeds and attenuations for the two processes the correspondent values for main drying and main wetting are inserted into the model separately. This is done for two examples of soils, namely for Del Monte sand and for a silt loam both filled by an air-water mixture. The wave analysis reveals four waves: one transversal wave and three longitudinal waves. The waves which are driven by the immiscible pore fluids are influenced by the hysteresis in the capillary pressure curve while the waves which are mainly driven by the solid are not.

  20. Effect of anisotropic dust pressure and superthermal electrons on propagation and stability of dust acoustic solitary waves

    SciTech Connect

    Bashir, M. F.; Behery, E. E.; El-Taibany, W. F.

    2015-06-15

    Employing the reductive perturbation technique, Zakharov–Kuznetzov (ZK) equation is derived for dust acoustic (DA) solitary waves in a magnetized plasma which consists the effects of dust anisotropic pressure, arbitrary charged dust particles, Boltzmann distributed ions, and Kappa distributed superthermal electrons. The ZK solitary wave solution is obtained. Using the small-k expansion method, the stability analysis for DA solitary waves is also discussed. The effects of the dust pressure anisotropy and the electron superthermality on the basic characteristics of DA waves as well as on the three-dimensional instability criterion are highlighted. It is found that the DA solitary wave is rarefactive (compressive) for negative (positive) dust. In addition, the growth rate of instability increases rapidly as the superthermal spectral index of electrons increases with either positive or negative dust grains. A brief discussion for possible applications is included.

  1. Lower solar chromosphere-corona transition region. II - Wave pressure effects for a specific form of the heating function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woods, D. Tod; Holzer, Thomas E.; Macgregor, Keith B.

    1990-01-01

    Lower transition region models with a balance between mechanical heating and radiative losses are expanded to include wave pressure effects. The models are used to study the simple damping length form of the heating function. The results are compared to the results obtained by Woods et al. (1990) for solutions in the lower transition region. The results suggest that a mixture of fast-mode and slow-mode waves may provide the appropriate heating mechanism in the lower transition region, with the decline in effective vertical wave speed caused by the refraction and eventual total reflection of the fast-mode wave resulting from the decreasing atmospheric density.

  2. New Experimental Capabilities and Theoretical Insights of High Pressure Compression Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlikowski, Daniel; Nguyen, Jeffrey H.; Patterson, J. Reed; Minich, Roger; Martin, L. Peter; Holmes, Neil C.

    2007-12-01

    Currently there are three platforms that offer quasi-isentropic compression or ramp-wave compression (RWC): light-gas gun, magnetic flux (Z-pinch), and laser. We focus here on the light-gas gun technique and on some current theoretical insights from experimental data. An impedance gradient through the length of the impactor provides the pressure pulse upon impact to the subject material. Applications and results are given concerning high-pressure strength and the liquid-to-solid, phase transition of water giving its first associated phase fraction history. We also introduce the Korteweg-deVries-Burgers equation as a means to understand the evolution of these RWC waves as they propagate through the thickness of the subject material. This model equation has the necessary competition between non-linear, dispersion, and dissipation processes, which is shown through observed structures that are manifested in the experimental particle velocity histories. Such methodology points towards a possibility of quantifying dissipation, through which RWC experiments may be analyzed.

  3. Experimental determination of radiated internal wave power without pressure field data

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Frank M.; Morrison, P. J.; Paoletti, M. S.; Swinney, Harry L.

    2014-04-15

    We present a method to determine, using only velocity field data, the time-averaged energy flux (J) and total radiated power P for two-dimensional internal gravity waves. Both (J) and P are determined from expressions involving only a scalar function, the stream function ψ. We test the method using data from a direct numerical simulation for tidal flow of a stratified fluid past a knife edge. The results for the radiated internal wave power given by the stream function method agree to within 0.5% with results obtained using pressure and velocity data from the numerical simulation. The results for the radiated power computed from the stream function agree well with power computed from the velocity and pressure if the starting point for the stream function computation is on a solid boundary, but if a boundary point is not available, care must be taken to choose an appropriate starting point. We also test the stream function method by applying it to laboratory data for tidal flow past a knife edge, and the results are found to agree with the direct numerical simulation. The supplementary material includes a Matlab code with a graphical user interface that can be used to compute the energy flux and power from two-dimensional velocity field data.

  4. Nonlinear wave evolution in pressure-driven stratified flow of Newtonian and Herschel-Bulkley fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valluri, Prashant; Sahu, Kirti; Ding, Hang; Spelt, Peter; Matar, Omar; Lawrence, Chris

    2007-11-01

    Pressure-driven stratified channel flow of a Newtonian fluid flowing over a Herschel-Bulkley (HB) fluid is considered. The effects of yield stress and shear-thinning rheology on the nonlinear wave evolution are studied using numerical simulations; the HB rheology is regularized at low shear rates using a bi-viscosity formulation. Two different numerical methods were used to carry out the computations: a level-set method (based on that by Spelt, J. Comput. Phys. 2005) and a diffuse-interface method (based on that by Ding et al., J. Comput. Phys., in press). The simulations, which account for fluid inertia, surface tension and gravity are validated against linear theory predictions at early times. The results at later times show the spatio-temporal evolution into the nonlinear regime wherein waves are strongly deformed, leading to the onset of drop entrainment. It is shown that the apparent viscosity in the region of the HB fluid directly involved in the onset of entrainment is almost constant; unyielded regions are confined to wave troughs at late stages of the nonlinear evolution.

  5. External and internal waves in stream-potential pressure-coordinate dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zirk, Marko; Rõõm, Rein

    2014-05-01

    In stream-potential dynamics pressure coordinate velocity -→v = {dx/dt,dy/dt,dp/dt} = {vx,vy,vp} = {u,v,ω } is presented in terms of 4D stream-potential {ψ0,ψx,ψy,ψp} -→v = downtriangleψ0 + downtriangle× -→ψ leftrightarrow vi = Giαδαψ0 + ɛαβγδβψγ, with diagonal metric tensor with main elements G11 = G22 = 1, G33 = p2/H2 (H = RT/g is the height scale). Vector potential -→ ψ is further expressed via horizontal curl and divergence of the stream function ω = δxψy - δyψx ≠¡ dp/dt, Ξ = δxψx + δyψy. The wave-vector components in linearized stream-potential dynamics are the scalar flow potential ψ0, surface pressure fluctuation p's, horizontal divergence Ξ and curl ω of the fluctuative part -→ψ' of complete vector potential -→ψ = -→ψ + -→ψ' . Equations for ψ0 and p's form the external wave subsystem δp' δ« ps dξ0 - -→- p2 δ2 -s+ downtriangle2 ψ0dp = 0, -+gH downtriangle2(p's/ps) = A0(ψ ,ω,Ξ), L0ψ0 = ξ0, L0 =-2 -2+downtriangle2, δt 0 dt H δp (1) while the equations for Ξ, ω and temperature fluctuation T' form the internal wave subsystem d-→ξ -→ -→- dT ' Tiω ( ) ( p2 δ2 ) p2 -dt = A (ψ,ω,Ξ), -dt = -p-+Q, L0Ξ = δp p2ξp/H2 , H2- δp2 + downtriangle2 ω = H2-(δyξx - δxξy) (2) with Ti = (R/cp)T - pδpT. In these equations 0 -→ α -→ -→ i iαβ ξ = downtriangle · v = δαv , ξ = downtriangle ×v leftrightarrow ξ = ɛ δαvβ are the 3D divergence and curl of velocity. In the presentation equation systems (1) and (2) are solved both analytically and numerically. Interaction of external waves with stationary internal orographic waves is investigated.

  6. Methodology and evaluation of intracranial pressure response in rats exposed to complex shock waves.

    PubMed

    Dal Cengio Leonardi, Alessandra; Keane, Nickolas J; Hay, Kathryn; Ryan, Anne G; Bir, Cynthia A; VandeVord, Pamela J

    2013-12-01

    Studies on blast neurotrauma have focused on investigating the effects of exposure to free-field blast representing the simplest form of blast threat scenario without considering any reflecting surfaces. However, in reality personnel are often located within enclosures or nearby reflecting walls causing a complex blast environment, that is, involving shock reflections and/or compound waves from different directions. The purpose of this study was to design a complex wave testing system and perform a preliminary investigation of the intracranial pressure (ICP) response of rats exposed to a complex blast wave environment (CBWE). The effects of head orientation in the same environment were also explored. Furthermore, since it is hypothesized that exposure to a CBWE would be more injurious as compared to a free-field blast wave environment (FFBWE), a histological comparison of hippocampal injury (cleaved caspase-3 and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP)) was conducted in both environments. Results demonstrated that, regardless of orientation, peak ICP values were significantly elevated over the peak static air overpressure. Qualitative differences could be noticed compared to the ICP response in rats exposed to simulated FFBWE. In the CBWE scenario, after the initial loading the skull/brain system was not allowed to return to rest and was loaded again reaching high ICP values. Furthermore, results indicated consistent and distinct ICP-time profiles according to orientation, as well as distinctive values of impulse associated with each orientation. Histologically, cleaved caspase-3 positive cells were significantly increased in the CBWE as compared to the FFBWE. Overall, these findings suggest that the geometry of the skull and the way sutures are distributed in the rats are responsible for the difference in the stresses observed. Moreover, this increase stress contributes to correlation of increased injury in the CBWE. PMID:23904049

  7. Bisferiens peaks in the radial artery pressure wave in newborn infants: a sign of patent ductus arteriosus.

    PubMed

    Gevers, M; Van Genderingen, H R; Van der Mooren, K; Lafeber, H N; Hack, W W; Westerhof, N

    1995-06-01

    Previously, we found evidence that radial artery pressure wave forms in newborns represent central aortic wave forms, provided that pressure is measured with adequate accuracy. Therefore, we postulated that the neonatal radial artery wave form, like the adult aortic wave form, may contribute to cardiovascular diagnosis. We investigated whether radial artery wave forms in infants suffering from patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) are different from the wave forms as seen without the presence of PDA. We studied 34 newborn infants with a radial artery line and with the possible clinical diagnosis of PDA with left-to-right shunt. On the basis of echocardiographic examination to assess PDA, these infants were divided in two groups: infants with PDA (n = 24) and without PDA (n = 10). In 15 out of 24 infants with PDA, recordings were repeated after ductal closure. Blood pressure measurement was performed with a high fidelity cathetermanometer system using a tip-transducer (natural frequency 95 Hz, damping coefficient 0.15). Contour analysis was performed by describing morphology of the waves during PDA and without PDA. In 23 out of 24 infants with PDA, a pulsus bisferiens was present: two peaks separated by a deep cleft. The average pressure difference between the first pressure peak and the cleft [delta Ppeak1] was 0.35 +/- 0.19 kPa, and the average difference between the cleft and the second pressure peak [delta Ppeak2] was 0.44 +/- 0.23 kPa. the ratio of mean magnitude of delta Ppeak1 and delta Ppeak2 was 0.81 +/- 0.26. None of the 10 infants without PDA showed pulsus bisferiens.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  8. Effects that internal gravity waves from convective clouds have on atmospheric pressure and spatial temperature-disturbance distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kshevetskii, S. P.; Kulichkov, S. N.

    2015-01-01

    Experimental data on variations in atmospheric surface pressure in the region of thunderstorm phenomena are analyzed. A relationship between variations in atmospheric pressure at the land surface and those in tropospheric temperature has been found, and the relation between the vertical distribution of tropospheric temperature and variations in atmospheric pressure at the land surface is studied. The propagation of internal gravity waves caused by atmospheric heating due to water-vapor condensation during the formation of a convective cloud is simulated. The results of calculations show that the lifetime of these internal gravity waves may significantly exceed the lifetime of this cloud. It is shown that the form of the disturbance of atmospheric pressure under such a convective cloud is a sequence of minimum and maximum pressure variations and the amplitude of maxima may exceed that of minima.

  9. In the trail of a fiber Bragg grating sensor to assess the central arterial pressure wave profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leitão, Cátia; Antunes, Paulo; Bastos, José M.; André, Paulo; Pinto, João. L.

    2013-05-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are one of the primary causes of death in the world. Hemodynamics is the study of the blood propagation and the physics aspects concerned to it, relating pressure, flow and resistance. One of the most important topics on hemodynamics is the evaluation of arterial wave reflections. Recently this physical parameter of the pressure wave propagation through the arterial tree was considered as a novel strong risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. Arterial pressure reflections can be quantified by central pressure profile analysis. In this work we study in the trial of an optical fibre Bragg grating based sensor of assess the central pressure profile, with the goal of to achieve a superior sensitivity, with a better signal quality than electromechanical probes, measured directly in the carotid artery.

  10. The relationship between gas hydrate saturation and P-wave velocity of pressure cores obtained in the Eastern Nankai Trough

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konno, Y.; Yoneda, J.; Jin, Y.; Kida, M.; Suzuki, K.; Nakatsuka, Y.; Fujii, T.; Nagao, J.

    2014-12-01

    P-wave velocity is an important parameter to estimate gas hydrate saturation in sediments. In this study, the relationship between gas hydrate saturation and P-wave velocity have been analyzed using natural hydrate-bearing-sediments obtained in the Eastern Nankai Trough, Japan. The sediment samples were collected by the Hybrid Pressure Coring System developed by Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology during June-July 2012, aboard the deep sea drilling vessel CHIKYU. P-wave velocity was measured on board by the Pressure Core Analysis and Transfer System developed by Geotek Ltd. The samples were maintained at a near in-situ pressure condition during coring and measurement. After the measurement, the samples were stored core storage chambers and transported to MHRC under pressure. The samples were manipulated and cut by the Pressure-core Non-destructive Analysis Tools or PNATs developed by MHRC. The cutting sections were determined on the basis of P-wave velocity and visual observations through an acrylic window equipped in the PNATs. The cut samples were depressurized to measure gas volume for saturation calculations. It was found that P-wave velocity correlates well with hydrate saturation and can be reproduced by the hydrate frame component model. Using pressure cores and pressure core analysis technology, nondestructive and near in-situ correlation between gas hydrate saturation and P-wave velocity can be obtained. This study was supported by funding from the Research Consortium for Methane Hydrate Resources in Japan (MH21 Research Consortium) planned by the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry (METI), Japan.

  11. Experimental feasibility of investigating acoustic waves in Couette flow with entropy and pressure gradients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrott, Tony L.; Zorumski, William E.; Rawls, John W., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    The feasibility is discussed for an experimental program for studying the behavior of acoustic wave propagation in the presence of strong gradients of pressure, temperature, and flow. Theory suggests that gradients effects can be experimentally observed as resonant frequency shifts and mode shape changes in a waveguide. A convenient experimental geometry for such experiments is the annular region between two co-rotating cylinders. Radial temperature gradients in a spinning annulus can be generated by differentially heating the two cylinders via electromagnetic induction. Radial pressure gradients can be controlled by varying the cylinder spin rates. Present technology appears adequate to construct an apparatus to allow independent control of temperature and pressure gradients. A complicating feature of a more advanced experiment, involving flow gradients, is the requirement for independently controlled cylinder spin rates. Also, the boundary condition at annulus terminations must be such that flow gradients are minimally disturbed. The design and construction of an advanced apparatus to include flow gradients will require additional technology development.

  12. Magnetospheric ULF waves with increasing amplitude related to solar wind dynamic pressure changes: The Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS) observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, X. C.; Zong, Q.-G.; Shi, Q. Q.; Tian, A. M.; Sun, W. J.; Wang, Y. F.; Zhou, X. Z.; Fu, S. Y.; Hartinger, M. D.; Angelopoulos, V.

    2015-09-01

    Ultralow frequency (ULF) waves play an important role in transferring energy by buffeting the magnetosphere with solar wind pressure impulses. The amplitudes of magnetospheric ULF waves, which are induced by solar wind dynamic pressure enhancements or shocks, are thought to damp in one half a wave cycle or an entire wave cycle. We report in situ observations of solar wind dynamic pressure impulse-induced magnetospheric ULF waves with increasing amplitudes. We found six ULF wave events induced by solar wind dynamic pressure enhancements with slow but clear wave amplitude increase. During three or four wave cycles, the amplitudes of ion velocities and electric field of these waves increased continuously by 1.3-4.4 times. Two significant events were selected to further study the characteristics of these ULF waves. We found that the wave amplitude growth is mainly contributed by the toroidal mode wave. Three possible mechanisms of causing the wave amplitude increase are discussed. First, solar wind dynamic pressure perturbations, which are observed in a duration of 20-30 min, might transfer energy to the magnetospheric ULF waves continually. Second, the wave amplitude increase in the radial electric field may be caused by superposition of two wave modes, a standing wave excited by the solar wind dynamic impulse and a propagating compressional wave directly induced by solar wind oscillations. When superposed, the two wave modes fit observations as does a calculation that superposes electric fields from two wave sources. Third, the normal of the solar wind discontinuity is at an angle to the Sun-Earth line. Thus, the discontinuity will affect the dayside magnetopause continuously for a long time.

  13. Shock wave equation of state experiments at multi-TPa pressures on NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celliers, P. M.; Fratanduono, D. E.; Peterson, J. L.; Meezan, N. B.; MacKinnon, A. J.; Braun, D. G.; Millot, M.; Fry, J.; Boehm, K. J.; Collins, G. W.; Nikroo, A.; Fitzsimmons, P.

    2015-06-01

    The National Ignition Facility provides an unprecedented capability to generate steady, planar, ultra-high pressure shock waves (around 10 TPa) in solid samples. Building on successful laser shock equation of state experiments performed on a variety of other laser facilities, we have designed and fielded experiments to perform impedance match experiments on samples of C, Be, quartz and CH, in the range of 3 to 7 TPa. The experiments use a line-imaging VISAR as the primary diagnostic to measure the shock velocity in an Al reference standard and in an array of the four samples. Initial tests with the line-imaging VISAR show that the NIF is capable of driving shocks that are steady for several ns, with smooth planar breakout patterns over a 2 mm diameter spot. Initial results will be discussed. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  14. Low-cost rapid miniature optical pressure sensors for blast wave measurements.

    PubMed

    Wu, Nan; Wang, Wenhui; Tian, Ye; Zou, Xiaotian; Maffeo, Michael; Niezrecki, Christopher; Chen, Julie; Wang, Xingwei

    2011-05-23

    This paper presents an optical pressure sensor based on a Fabry-Perot (FP) interferometer formed by a 45° angle polished single mode fiber and an external silicon nitride diaphragm. The sensor is comprised of two V-shape grooves with different widths on a silicon chip, a silicon nitride diaphragm released on the surface of the wider V-groove, and a 45° angle polished single mode fiber. The sensor is especially suitable for blast wave measurements: its compact structure ensures a high spatial resolution; its thin diaphragm based design and the optical demodulation scheme allow a fast response to the rapid changing signals experienced during blast events. The sensor shows linearity with the correlation coefficient of 0.9999 as well as a hysteresis of less than 0.3%. The shock tube test demonstrated that the sensor has a rise time of less than 2 µs from 0 kPa to 140 kPa. PMID:21643336

  15. Wave reflection and central aortic pressure are increased in response to static and dynamic muscle contraction at comparable workloads.

    PubMed

    Edwards, David G; Mastin, Corey R; Kenefick, Robert W

    2008-02-01

    We determined the effects of static and dynamic muscle contraction at equivalent workloads on central aortic pressure and wave reflection. At random, 14 healthy men and women (23 +/- 5 yr of age) performed a static handgrip forearm contraction [90 s at 30% of maximal voluntary contraction (MVC)], dynamic handgrip contractions (1 contraction/s for 180 s at 30% MVC), and a control trial. During static and dynamic trials, tension-time index was controlled by holding peak tension constant. Measurements of brachial artery blood pressure and the synthesis of a central aortic pressure waveform (by radial artery applanation tonometry and generalized transfer function) were conducted at baseline, during each trial, and during 1 min of postexercise ischemia (PEI). Aortic augmentation index (AI), an index of wave reflection, was calculated from the aortic pressure waveform. AI increased during both static and dynamic trials (static, 5.2 +/- 3.1 to 11.8 +/- 3.4%; dynamic, 5.8 +/- 3.0 to 13.3 +/- 3.4%; P < 0.05) and further increased during PEI (static, 18.5 +/- 3.1%; dynamic, 18.6 +/- 2.9%; P < 0.05). Peripheral and central systolic and diastolic pressures increased (P < 0.05) during both static and dynamic trials and remained elevated during PEI. AI and pressure responses did not differ between static and dynamic trials. Peripheral and central pressures increased similarly during static and dynamic contraction; however, the rise in central systolic pressure during both conditions was augmented by increased wave reflection. The present data suggest that wave reflection is an important determinant of the central blood pressure response during forearm muscle contractions.

  16. On the influence of low initial pressure and detonation stochastic nature on Mach reflection of gaseous detonation waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, C. J.; Guo, C. M.

    2014-09-01

    The two-dimensional, time-dependent and reactive Navier-Stokes equations were solved to obtain an insight into Mach reflection of gaseous detonation in a stoichiometric hydrogen-oxygen mixture diluted by 25 % argon. This mixture generates a mode-7 detonation wave under an initial pressure of 8.00 kPa. Chemical kinetics was simulated by an eight-species, forty-eight-reaction mechanism. It was found that a Mach reflection mode always occurs for a planar detonation wave or planar air shock wave sweeping over wedges with apex angles ranging from to . However, for cellular detonation waves, regular reflection always occurs first, which then transforms into Mach reflection. This phenomenon is more evident for detonations ignited under low initial pressure. Low initial pressure may lead to a curved wave front, that determines the reflection mode. The stochastic nature of boundary shape and transition distance, during deflagration-to-detonation transition, leads to relative disorder of detonation cell location and cell shape. Consequently, when a detonation wave hits the wedge apex, there appears a stochastic variation of triple point origin and variation of the angle between the triple point trajectory and the wedge surface. As the wedge apex angle increases, the distance between the triple point trajectory origin and the wedge apex increases, and the angle between the triple point trajectory and the wedge surface decreases exponentially.

  17. Blood pressure and obesity exert independent influences on pulse wave velocity in youth.

    PubMed

    Lurbe, Empar; Torro, Isabel; Garcia-Vicent, Consuelo; Alvarez, Julio; Fernández-Fornoso, José Antonio; Redon, Josep

    2012-08-01

    The objective was to analyze pulse wave velocity (PWV) in normotensive, high-normal, and hypertensive youths by using aortic-derived parameters from peripheral recordings. The impact of obesity on vascular phenotypes was also analyzed. A total of 501 whites from 8 to 18 years of age were included. The subjects were divided according to BP criteria: 424 (85%) were normotensive, 56 (11%) high-normal, and 21 (4%) hypertensive. Obesity was present in 284 (56%) and overweight in 138 (28%). Pulse wave analysis using a SphygmoCor device was performed to determine central blood pressure (BP), augmentation index, and measurement of PWV. Among the BP groups, differences appeared in age, sex, and height but not in body mass index. Significant differences in peripheral and central systolic and diastolic BPs and pulse pressures were observed within groups. A graded increase in PWV was present across the BP strata without differences in augmentation index. Using a multiple regression analysis, age, BP groups, and obesity status were independently associated with PWV. Older and hypertensive subjects had the highest PWV, whereas, from normal weight status to obesity, PWV decreased. Likewise, PWV was positively related to peripheral or central systolic BP and negatively related to body mass index z score. For 1 SD of peripheral systolic BP, PWV increased 0.329 m/s, and for 1 SD of body mass index z score PWV decreased 0.129 m/s. In conclusion, PWV is increased in hypertensive and even in high-normal children and adolescents. Furthermore, obesity, the factor most frequently related to essential hypertension in adolescents, blunted the expected increment in PWV of hypertensive and high-normal subjects.

  18. Pressure-induced quenching of the charge-density-wave state observed by x-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Sacchetti, A.

    2010-05-03

    We report an x-ray diffraction study on the charge-density-wave (CDW) LaTe{sub 3} and CeTe{sub 3} compounds as a function of pressure. We extract the lattice constants and the CDW modulation wave-vector, and provide direct evidence for a pressure-induced quenching of the CDW phase. We observe subtle differences between the chemical and mechanical compression of the lattice. We account for these with a scenario where the effective dimensionality in these CDW systems is dependent on the type of lattice compression and has a direct impact on the degree of Fermi surface nesting and on the strength of fluctuation effects.

  19. Changes in Central Aortic Pressure Levels, Wave Components and Determinants Associated with High Peripheral Blood Pressure States in Childhood: Analysis of Hypertensive Phenotype.

    PubMed

    García-Espinosa, Victoria; Curcio, Santiago; Marotta, Marco; Castro, Juan M; Arana, Maite; Peluso, Gonzalo; Chiesa, Pedro; Giachetto, Gustavo; Bia, Daniel; Zócalo, Yanina

    2016-10-01

    The aims were to determine whether children's high peripheral blood pressure states (HBP) are associated with increased central aortic blood pressure (BP) and to characterize hemodynamic and vascular changes associated with HBP in terms of changes in cardiac output (stroke volume, SV), arterial stiffness (aortic pulse wave velocity, PWV), peripheral vascular resistances (PVR) and net and relative contributions of reflected waves to the aortic pulse amplitude. We included 154 subjects (mean age 11; range 4-16 years) assigned to one of two groups: normal peripheral BP (NBP, n = 101), defined as systolic and diastolic BP < 90th percentile, or high BP (HBP, n = 53), defined as average systolic and/or diastolic BP levels ≥90th percentile (curves for sex, age and body height). The HBP group included children with hypertensive and pre-hypertensive BP levels. After a first analysis, groups were compared excluding obese and dyslipidemic children. Peripheral and central aortic BP, PWV and pulse wave-derived parameters (augmentation index, forward and backward wave components' amplitude) were measured using gold-standard techniques, applanation tonometry (SphygmoCor) and oscillometry (Mobil-O-Graph). Independent of the presence of dyslipidemia and/or obesity, aortic systolic and pulse BP were higher in HBP than in NBP children. The increase in central BP could not be explained by an increase in the relative contribution of reflections to the aortic pressure wave, higher PVR or by an augmented peripheral reflection coefficient. Instead, the rise in central BP would be explained by an increase in the amplitude of both incident and reflected wave components.

  20. On the unsteady gravity-capillary wave pattern found behind a slow moving localized pressure distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masnadi, N.; Duncan, J. H.

    2013-11-01

    The non-linear response of a water surface to a slow-moving pressure distribution is studied experimentally using a vertically oriented carriage-mounted air-jet tube that is set to translate over the water surface in a long tank. The free surface deformation pattern is measured with a full-field refraction-based method that utilizes a vertically oriented digital movie camera (under the tank) and a random dot pattern (above the water surface). At towing speeds just below the minimum phase speed of gravity-capillary waves (cmin ~ 23 cm/s), an unsteady V-shaped pattern is formed behind the pressure source. Localized depressions are generated near the source and propagate in pairs along the two arms of the V-shaped pattern. These depressions are eventually shed from the tips of the pattern at a frequency of about 1 Hz. It is found that the shape and phase speeds of the first depressions shed in each run are quantitatively similar to the freely-propagating gravity-capillary lumps from potential flow calculations. In the experiments, the amplitudes of the depressions decrease by approximately 60 percent while travelling 12 wavelengths. The depressions shed later in each run behave in a less consistent manner, probably due to their interaction with neighboring depressions.

  1. Diagnostics of surface wave driven low pressure plasmas based on indium monoiodide-argon system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ögün, C. M.; Kaiser, C.; Kling, R.; Heering, W.

    2015-06-01

    Indium monoiodide is proposed as a suitable alternative to hazardous mercury, i.e. the emitting component inside the compact fluorescent lamps (CFL), with comparable luminous efficacy. Indium monoiodide-argon low pressure lamps are electrodelessly driven with surface waves, which are launched and coupled into the lamp by the ‘surfatron’, a microwave coupler optimized for an efficient operation at a frequency of 2.45 GHz. A non intrusive diagnostic method based on spatially resolved optical emission spectroscopy is employed to characterize the plasma parameters. The line emission coefficients of the plasma are derived by means of Abel’s inversion from the measured spectral radiance data. The characteristic plasma parameters, e.g. electron temperature and density are determined by comparing the experimentally obtained line emission coefficients with simulated ones from a collisional-radiative model. Additionally, a method to determine the absolute plasma efficiency via irradiance measurements without any goniometric setup is presented. In this way, the relationship between the plasma efficiency and the plasma parameters can be investigated systematically for different operating configurations, e.g. electrical input power, buffer gas pressure and cold spot temperature. The performance of indium monoiodide-argon plasma is compared with that of conventional CFLs.

  2. Optimization of pressure waveform, distribution and sequence in shock wave lithotripsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yufeng

    This work aims to improve shock wave lithotripsy (SWL) technology by increasing stone comminution efficiency while reducing simultaneously the propensity of tissue injury. First, the mechanism of vascular injury in SWL was investigated. Based on in vitro vessel phantom experiment and theoretical calculation, it was found that SWL-induced large intraluminal bubble expansion may constitute a primary mechanism for the rupture of capillaries and small blood vessels. However, when the large intraluminal bubble expansion is suppressed by inversion of the pressure waveform of the lithotripter shock wave (LSW), rupture of a 200-mum cellulose hollow fiber vessel phantom can be avoided. Based on these experimental observations and theoretical assessment of bubble dynamics using the Gilmore model an in situ pulse superposition technique was developed to reduce tissue injury without compromising stone comminution in SWL. A thin shell ellipsoidal reflector insert was fabricated to fit snugly with the original HM-3 reflector. Using the Hamilton model, the effects of reflector geometry on the pulse profile and sequence of the shock waves were evaluated qualitatively. Guided by this analysis, the design of the reflector insert had been refined to suppress the intraluminal bubble expansion, which was confirmed by high-speed imaging of bubble dynamics both in free field and inside a vessel phantom. The pulse pressure, beam size and stone comminution efficiency of the upgraded reflector were all found to be comparable to those of the original reflector. However, the greatest difference lies in the propensity for tissue injury. At the lithotripter focus, about 30 shocks are needed to cause a rupture of the vessel phantom using the original reflector, but no rupture can be produced after 200 shocks by the upgraded reflector. Overall, the upgraded reflector could significantly reduce the propensity of vessel rupture while maintaining satisfactory stone comminution. Second, to improve

  3. Biomechanical assessment of brain dynamic responses due to blast pressure waves.

    PubMed

    Chafi, M S; Karami, G; Ziejewski, M

    2010-02-01

    A mechanized and integrated computational scheme is introduced to determine the human brain responses in an environment where the human head is exposed to explosions from trinitrotoluene (TNT), or other high-yield explosives, in military applications. The procedure is based on a three-dimensional (3-D) non-linear finite element method (FEM) that implements a simultaneous conduction of explosive detonation, shock wave propagation, blast-head interactions, and the confronting human head. The processes of blast propagation in the air and blast interaction with the head are modeled by an Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) multi-material FEM formulation, together with a penalty-based fluid/structure interaction (FSI) algorithm. Such a model has already been successfully validated against experimental data regarding air-free blast and plate-blast interactions. The human head model is a 3-D geometrically realistic configuration that has been previously validated against the brain intracranial pressure (ICP), as well as shear and principal strains under different impact loadings of cadaveric experimental tests of Hardy et al. [Hardy W. N., C. Foster, M. Mason, S. Chirag, J. Bishop, M. Bey, W. Anderst, and S. Tashman. A study of the response of the human cadaver head to impact. Proc. 51 ( st ) Stapp. Car Crash J. 17-80, 2007]. Different scenarios have been assumed to capture an appropriate picture of the brain response at a constant stand-off distance of nearly 80 cm from the core of the explosion, but exposed to different amounts of a highly explosive (HE) material such as TNT. The over-pressures at the vicinity of the head are in the range of about 2.4-8.7 atmosphere (atm), considering the reflected pressure from the head. The methodology provides brain ICP, maximum shear stresses and maximum principal strain within the milli-scale time frame of this highly dynamic phenomenon. While focusing on the two mechanical parameters of pressure, and also on the maximum shear

  4. Pressure Wave Propagation along the Décollement of the Nankai Accretionary Wedge: Implications for Aseismic Slip Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, A.; Appold, M. S.

    2015-12-01

    Seismic and hydrologic observations of the Nankai subduction zone made by the Ocean Drilling Program suggest that pore fluid pressures within the accretionary wedge décollement are highly overpressured to near lithostatic values below depths of 2 km beneath the sea floor as a result of sediment diagenesis and dehydration of the subducting oceanic plate. This overpressured zone is also observed to discharge pulses of high fluid pressure that migrate up-dip along the décollement at rates of 1's of km/day. These high pressure pulses along the décollement may cause large enough reductions in the local effective stress to account for aseismic slip events that have been found to propagate also at rates of 1's of km/day. Because elevated fluid pressure and correspondingly decreased effective stress can lead to a dilation of porosity, the pressure waves may become effective agents of fluid transport that can travel more quickly than fluids flowing in the background Darcian flow regime. The purpose of the present study was to seek theoretical confirmation that pressure waves are able to travel quickly enough to account for the seismic and hydrological observations documented. This confirmation was sought through a transient one-dimensional numerical solution to the differential fluid mass conservation equation for an elastic porous medium. Results of the numerical simulations show that when overpressures at depths greater than 2 km in the décollement exceed lithostatic pressure by at least 3%, pressure waves are formed that migrate up-dip at rates fast enough to account for aseismic slip over a broad range of geologic conditions. Pressure waves spawned from these depths in the décollement may travel fast enough to account for aseismic slip when overpressures there are as low as 99% of lithostatic pressure, but require low specific storage of 3×10-6 m-1, high sensitivity of permeability to effective stress, low permeability no higher than about 10-21 m2 at depths below

  5. Macro-mechanical modeling of blast-wave mitigation in foams. Part II: reliability of pressure measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Britan, A.; Liverts, M.; Shapiro, H.; Ben-Dor, G.

    2013-02-01

    A phenomenological study of the process occurring when a plane shock wave reflected off an aqueous foam column filling the test section of a vertical shock tube has been undertaken. The experiments were conducted with initial shock wave Mach numbers in the range 1.25le {M}_s le 1.7 and foam column heights in the range 100-450 mm. Miniature piezotrone circuit electronic pressure transducers were used to record the pressure histories upstream and alongside the foam column. The aim of these experiments was to find a simple way to eliminate a spatial averaging as an artifact of the pressure history recorded by the side-on transducer. For this purpose, we discuss first the common behaviors of the pressure traces in extended time scales. These observations evidently quantify the low frequency variations of the pressure field within the different flow domains of the shock tube. Thereafter, we focus on the fronts of the pressure signals, which, in turn, characterize the high-frequency response of the foam column to the shock wave impact. Since the front shape and the amplitude of the pressure signal most likely play a significant role in the foam destruction, phase changes and/or other physical factors, such as high capacity, viscosity, etc., the common practice of the data processing is revised and discussed in detail. Generally, side-on pressure measurements must be used with great caution when performed in wet aqueous foams, because the low sound speed is especially prone to this effect. Since the spatial averaged recorded pressure signals do not reproduce well the real behaviors of the pressure rise, the recorded shape of the shock wave front in the foam appears much thicker. It is also found that when a thin liquid film wet the sensing membrane, the transducer sensitivity was changed. As a result, the pressure recorded in the foam could exceed the real amplitude of the post-shock wave flow. A simple procedure, which allows correcting this imperfection, is discussed in

  6. Using line broadening to determine the electron density in an argon surface-wave discharge at atmospheric pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Christova, M.; Christov, L.; Castanos-Martinez, E.; Moisan, M.; Dimitrijevic, M. S.

    2008-10-22

    Broadening due to collisions with charged particles (Stark broadening ) and neutral atoms, was determined for Ar I 522.1, 549.6 and 603.2 nm spectral lines from the spectral series 3p{sup 5}nd-3p{sup 5}4p, in order to evaluate the electron density in a surface-wave discharge at atmospheric pressure.

  7. Effects of an acoustic diode on the pressure waveform and cavitation bubble dynamics produced by a piezoelectric shock wave generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Songlin; Zhong, Pei

    2003-10-01

    High-speed schlieren imaging, combined with fiber optical probe hydrophone (FOPH) and passive cavitation detection (PCD) were used to access the effects of an acoustic diode (AD) on the pressure waveform and associated cavitation activities produced by a piezoelectric shock wave (PSW) generator. Without the AD, a typical pressure waveform at the focus of the PSW generator consists of a leading shock wave, followed by a tensile wave and several oscillation waves (OWs) of gradually reduced amplitudes. When the AD was placed 30 mm in front of the focus, the amplitude of the tensile wave was reduced and the subsequent OWs were removed. The pulse intensity integral of the tensile wave was reduced by 58%, and subsequently, PSW-induced bubble dynamics were altered significantly. Based on PCD data, the collapse time of cavitation bubble(s) was reduced by about 11%. Although intensive collapse of microbubbles was observed in about 10 μs following the shock front of the original PSW, the forced collapse of microbubbles was not observed when the AD was used, presumably due to the removal of the OWs. Theoretical calculation based on the Gilmore model confirmed these experimental observations. [Work supported by the Whitaker Foundation and NIH.

  8. Generation of sub-Mbar pressure by converging shock waves produced by the underwater electrical explosion of a wire array.

    PubMed

    Krasik, Ya E; Grinenko, A; Sayapin, A; Gurovich, V Tz; Schnitzer, I

    2006-05-01

    We report a demonstration of a generation of sub-Mbar pressure on the axis of the implosion wave produced by an underwater electrical explosion of a cylindrical wire array. The array was exploded by microsecond time scale discharge of a capacitor bank having a stored energy of 4.5 kJ and discharge current amplitude of up to 90 kA. Optical diagnostics were used to determine the time of flight and the trajectory of the converging shock wave. This data were applied for a calculation of the water flow parameters using one-dimensional (1D) and 2D hydrodynamic calculations and the Whitham method. All three methods have shown that the shock wave pressure at 0.1 mm from the axis reaches . PMID:16803082

  9. Effects of Heat Wave on Body Temperature and Blood Pressure in the Poor and Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Soyeon; Cheong, Hae-Kwan; Ahn, Byungok; Choi, Kyusik

    2012-01-01

    Objectives We aimed to investigate the acute effects of heat stress on body temperature and blood pressure of elderly individuals living in poor housing conditions. Methods Repeated measurements of the indoor temperature, relative humidity, body temperature, and blood pressure were conducted for 20 elderly individuals living in low-cost dosshouses in Seoul during hot summer days in 2010. Changes in the body temperature, systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) according to variations in the indoor and outdoor temperature and humidity were analyzed using a repeated-measures ANOVA controlling for age, sex, alcohol, and smoking. Results Average indoor and outdoor temperatures were 31.47℃ (standard deviation [SD], 0.97℃) and 28.15℃ (SD, 2.03℃), respectively. Body temperature increased by 0.21℃ (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.16 to 0.26℃) and 0.07℃ (95% CI, 0.04 to 0.10℃) with an increase in the indoor and outdoor temperature of 1℃. DBP decreased by 2.05 mmHg (95% CI, 0.05 to 4.05 mmHg), showing a statistical significance, as the indoor temperature increased by 1℃, while it increased by 0.20 mmHg (95% CI, -0.83 to 1.22 mmHg) as outdoor temperature increased by 1℃. SBP decreased by 1.75 mmHg (95% CI, -1.11 to 4.61 mmHg) and 0.35 mmHg (95% CI, -1.04 to 1.73 mmHg), as the indoor and outdoor temperature increased by 1℃, respectively. The effects of relative humidity on SBP and DBP were not statistically significant for both indoor and outdoor. Conclusions The poor and elderly are directly exposed to heat waves, while their vital signs respond sensitively to increase in temperature. Careful adaptation strategies to climate change considering socioeconomic status are therefore necessary. PMID:22888472

  10. Signal Analysis and Waveform Reconstruction of Shock Waves Generated by Underwater Electrical Wire Explosions with Piezoelectric Pressure Probes

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Haibin; Zhang, Yongmin; Han, Ruoyu; Jing, Yan; Wu, Jiawei; Liu, Qiaojue; Ding, Weidong; Qiu, Aici

    2016-01-01

    Underwater shock waves (SWs) generated by underwater electrical wire explosions (UEWEs) have been widely studied and applied. Precise measurement of this kind of SWs is important, but very difficult to accomplish due to their high peak pressure, steep rising edge and very short pulse width (on the order of tens of μs). This paper aims to analyze the signals obtained by two kinds of commercial piezoelectric pressure probes, and reconstruct the correct pressure waveform from the distorted one measured by the pressure probes. It is found that both PCB138 and Müller-plate probes can be used to measure the relative SW pressure value because of their good uniformities and linearities, but none of them can obtain precise SW waveforms. In order to approach to the real SW signal better, we propose a new multi-exponential pressure waveform model, which has considered the faster pressure decay at the early stage and the slower pressure decay in longer times. Based on this model and the energy conservation law, the pressure waveform obtained by the PCB138 probe has been reconstructed, and the reconstruction accuracy has been verified by the signals obtained by the Müller-plate probe. Reconstruction results show that the measured SW peak pressures are smaller than the real signal. The waveform reconstruction method is both reasonable and reliable. PMID:27110789

  11. Signal Analysis and Waveform Reconstruction of Shock Waves Generated by Underwater Electrical Wire Explosions with Piezoelectric Pressure Probes.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Haibin; Zhang, Yongmin; Han, Ruoyu; Jing, Yan; Wu, Jiawei; Liu, Qiaojue; Ding, Weidong; Qiu, Aici

    2016-01-01

    Underwater shock waves (SWs) generated by underwater electrical wire explosions (UEWEs) have been widely studied and applied. Precise measurement of this kind of SWs is important, but very difficult to accomplish due to their high peak pressure, steep rising edge and very short pulse width (on the order of tens of μs). This paper aims to analyze the signals obtained by two kinds of commercial piezoelectric pressure probes, and reconstruct the correct pressure waveform from the distorted one measured by the pressure probes. It is found that both PCB138 and Müller-plate probes can be used to measure the relative SW pressure value because of their good uniformities and linearities, but none of them can obtain precise SW waveforms. In order to approach to the real SW signal better, we propose a new multi-exponential pressure waveform model, which has considered the faster pressure decay at the early stage and the slower pressure decay in longer times. Based on this model and the energy conservation law, the pressure waveform obtained by the PCB138 probe has been reconstructed, and the reconstruction accuracy has been verified by the signals obtained by the Müller-plate probe. Reconstruction results show that the measured SW peak pressures are smaller than the real signal. The waveform reconstruction method is both reasonable and reliable. PMID:27110789

  12. A nonlinear solid shell element formulation for analysis of composite panels under blast wave pressure loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hun

    A comprehensive methodology to accurately predict the dynamic response of composite panels under blast wave pressure loading has been successfully developed for the first time. It includes the modeling of geometrically nonlinear dynamic effect, progressive failure and strain-rate effect on constitutive equation and strength. For dynamic analysis, a nonlinear solid shell element formulation is combined with the trapezoidal rule for numerical integration in time. The progressive damage incorporates the effect of the material failure, such as fiber failure, matrix cracking and fiber-matrix shearing failure on the stiffness and strength. Material degradation models based on the rule of mixtures are proposed for each failure mode. To implement the strain-rate effect on the constitutive equation of the material, a viscoplastic model is adopted. In this model, three material parameters are determined by conducting uniaxial tension tests on off-axis specimen. The effect of strain rates on material strength is implemented via the linear least square fit of the test data. A key ingredient of the analysis is a geometrically nonlinear solid shell element based on the assumed strain formulation to alleviate element locking. In this approach, the composite shell is treated as a three-dimensional solid. Accordingly, the change of shell thickness is allowed and the kinematics of deformation is described by six vector components at a point on the shell midsurface. The mass matrix always remains constant during the analysis. Example problems under static and dynamic loadings are solved to investigate the behavior of composite panels undergoing large deformation while experiencing material damage. The analysis results are compared with the test data available. Results of the numerical analysis show that the effect of the progressive failure and strain-rates on structural responses are considerable. For a composite plate under static pressure loadings, maximum displacement and

  13. Influences of non-uniform pressure field outside bubbles on the propagation of acoustic waves in dilute bubbly liquids.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuning; Du, Xiaoze

    2015-09-01

    Predictions of the propagation of the acoustic waves in bubbly liquids is of great importance for bubble dynamics and related applications (e.g. sonochemistry, sonochemical reactor design, biomedical engineering). In the present paper, an approach for modeling the propagation of the acoustic waves in dilute bubbly liquids is proposed through considering the non-uniform pressure field outside the bubbles. This approach is validated through comparing with available experimental data in the literature. Comparing with the previous models, our approach mainly improves the predictions of the attenuation of acoustic waves in the regions with large kR0 (k is the wave number and R0 is the equilibrium bubble radius). Stability of the oscillating bubbles under acoustic excitation are also quantitatively discussed based on the analytical solution.

  14. Polydiagnostic calibration performed on a low pressure surface wave sustained argon plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vries, N.; Palomares, J. M.; Iordanova, E. I.; van Veldhuizen, E. M.; van der Mullen, J. J. A. M.

    2008-10-01

    The electron density and electron temperature of a low pressure surface wave sustained argon plasma have been determined using passive and active (laser) spectroscopic methods simultaneously. In this way the validity of the various techniques is established while the plasma properties are determined more precisely. The electron density, ne, is determined with Thomson scattering (TS), absolute continuum measurements, Stark broadening and an extrapolation of the atomic state distribution function (ASDF). The electron temperature, Te, is obtained using TS and absolute line intensity (ALI) measurements combined with a collisional-radiative (CR) model for argon. At an argon pressure of 15 mbar, the ne values obtained with TS and Stark broadening agree with each other within the error bars and are equal to (4 ± 0.5) × 1019 m-3, whereas the ne value (2 ± 0.5) × 1019 m-3 obtained from the continuum is about 30% lower. This suggests that the used formula and cross-section values for the continuum method have to be reconsidered. The electron density determined by means of extrapolation of the ASDF to the continuum is too high (~1020 m-3). This is most probably related to the fact that the plasma is strongly ionizing so that the extrapolation method is not justified. At 15 mbar, the Te values obtained with TS are equal to 13 400 ± 1100 K while the ALI/CR-model yields an electron temperature that is about 10% lower. It can be concluded that the passive results are in good or fair agreement with the active results. Therefore, the calibrated passive methods can be applied to other plasmas in a similar regime for which active diagnostic techniques cannot be used.

  15. Shear waves in the diamond-anvil cell reveal pressure-induced instability in (Mg,Fe)O.

    PubMed

    Jacobsen, Steven D; Spetzler, Hartmut; Reichmann, Hans J; Smyth, Joseph R

    2004-04-20

    The emerging picture of Earth's deep interior from seismic tomography indicates more complexity than previously thought. The presence of lateral anisotropy and heterogeneity in Earth's mantle highlights the need for fully anisotropic elasticity data from mineral physics. A breakthrough in high-frequency (gigahertz) ultrasound has resulted in transmission of pure-mode elastic shear waves into a high-pressure diamond-anvil cell using a P-to-S elastic-wave conversion. The full elastic tensor (c(ij)) of high-pressure minerals or metals can be measured at extreme conditions without optical constraints. Here we report the effects of pressure and composition on shear-wave velocities in the major lower-mantle oxide, magnesiowüstite-(Mg,Fe)O. Magnesiowüstite containing more than approximately 50% iron exhibits pressure-induced c(44) shear-mode softening, indicating an instability in the rocksalt structure. The oxide closer to expected lower-mantle compositions ( approximately 20% iron) shows increasing shear velocities more similar to MgO, indicating that it also should have a wide pressure-stability field. A complete sign reversal in the c(44) pressure derivative points to a change in the topology of the (Mg,Fe)O phase diagram at approximately 50-60% iron. The relative stability of Mg-rich (Mg,Fe)O and the strong compositional dependence of shear-wave velocities (and partial differential c(44)/ partial differential P) in (Mg,Fe)O implies that seismic heterogeneity in Earth's lower mantle may result from compositional variations rather than phase changes in (Mg,Fe)O.

  16. Shock wave equation of state experiments at multi-TPa pressures on NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celliers, P. M.; Fratanduono, D. E.; Peterson, J. L.; Meezan, N. B.; MacKinnon, A. J.; Braun, D. G.; Millot, M.; Fry, J.; Boehm, K. J.; Sterne, P. A.; Collins, G. W.; Nikroo, A.; Fitzsimmons, P.

    2015-11-01

    The National Ignition Facility provides an unprecedented capability to generate steady, planar, ultra-high pressure shock waves (up to 10 TPa or more) in solid samples. Building on successful laser shock equation of state experiments performed on a variety of other laser facilities, we have designed and fielded experiments to perform impedance match experiments on samples of C, Be, SiO2 and CH, in the range of 3 to 7 TPa. The experiments use a line-imaging VISAR as the primary diagnostic to measure the shock velocity in an Al reference standard and in an array of the four samples. Initial tests with the line-imaging VISAR show that the NIF is capable of driving shocks that are steady to better than 2% in velocity for several ns, with smooth planar breakout patterns over a 2 mm diameter spot. Hugoniot data points will be compared to current equation-of-state models for the various materials under study. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by LLNL under contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  17. Propagation of ULF waves into mid-latitudes ionosphere directly driven by solar wind dynamic pressure variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsushita, T.; Seki, K.; Nishitani, N.; Hori, T.; Teramoto, M.; Kikuchi, T.; Miyoshi, Y.; Reme, H.; Singer, H. J.

    2012-12-01

    ULF waves such as Pc5 in the magnetosphere have been observed using many methods such as ground-based magnetometers, HF radars, and satellites. It is thought that these magnetospheric ULF waves are generated either directly on the dayside by solar wind dynamic pressure pulses and/or, Kelvin-Helmholtz surface waves, or indirectly on the nightside by mechanisms such as substorms. ULF waves can play an important role in mass and energy transport within the inner magnetosphere. It is well known that energetic particles in the inner magnetosphere can be significantly affected by ULF waves and many studies have suggested their importance in the acceleration of radiation belt electrons. One outstanding problem in ULF studies is to clarify their global characteristics, especially, how energy for the acceleration is transported from the solar wind to the magnetosphere, and finally to the ionosphere. In this study, we report on ULF wave events observed globally in the magnetosphere down to 43 degrees MLAT, at mid-latitudes ionosphere, at about 14:40 and 15:30UT January 31, 2008. During the events, the solar wind had a low speed of 350 km/s, a high density of 30 /cc, and large fluctuations in dynamic pressure from 6 nPa to 10 nPa. In order to investigate propagation characteristics of the ULF waves based on multi-point observations from geospace to the ground, data obtained by multiple satellite observations (Cluster, GOES, and THEMIS), ground-based magnetometer observations (210 MM of nightside and GBO of dayside), and SuperDARN Hokkaido HF radar are used. The power spectra of ULF waves observed in the magnetosphere by the satellites are similar to those of dynamic pressure fluctuation in the magnetosheath. Time delay of ULF waves in the magnetosphere to the dynamic pressure fluctuation in the magnetosheath estimated through cross-correlation indicates that the ULF waves propagated from dayside to nightside, and propagation speed of about 400 and 1000 km/s estimated through

  18. Elastic stability of β-Ti under pressure calculated using a first-principles plane-wave pseudopotential method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Qing-Miao; Lu, Song; Yang, Rui

    2008-08-01

    The elastic moduli c' and c44 of β-Ti with respect to external pressure P (up to about 138 GPa) are calculated with a first-principles plane-wave pseudopotential method. The accuracy of the calculations regarding the plane-wave cut-off energy, k -point mesh, and transferability of the pseudopotentials is carefully tested. It is found that the critical pressure beyond which β-Ti satisfies the elastic stability conditions is about 60 GPa. The Mulliken population analysis shows that both s and p electrons transfer to the d orbitals with increasing pressure, however, the number of s electrons starts to increase when the pressure exceeds about 70 GPa. The number of d electrons at the critical pressure is about 2.96, in perfect agreement with the critical number of d electrons for a stable bcc Ti-V alloy, which demonstrates the correlation between the stability of bcc metals and their d orbital occupation. The bonding charge density calculations show charge accumulation on the d-t2g orbitals under high pressure, which may improve the elastic stability of β-Ti .

  19. Investigation on the generation characteristic of pressure pulse wave signal during the measurement-while-drilling process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Changqing, Zhao; Kai, Liu; Tong, Zhao; Takei, Masahiro; Weian, Ren

    2014-04-01

    The mud-pulse logging instrument is an advanced measurement-while-drilling (MWD) tool and widely used by the industry in the world. In order to improve the signal transmission rate, ensure the accurate transmission of information and address the issue of the weak signal on the ground of oil and gas wells, the signal generator should send out the strong mud-pulse signals with the maximum amplitude. With the rotary valve pulse generator as the study object, the three-dimensional Reynolds NS equations and standard k - ɛ turbulent model were used as a mathematical model. The speed and pressure coupling calculation was done by simple algorithms to get the amplitudes of different rates of flow and axial clearances. Tests were done to verify the characteristics of the pressure signals. The pressure signal was captured by the standpiece pressure monitoring system. The study showed that the axial clearances grew bigger as the pressure wave amplitude value decreased and caused the weakening of the pulse signal. As the rate of flow got larger, the pressure wave amplitude would increase and the signal would be enhanced.

  20. High speed interference heating loads and pressure distributions resulting from elevon deflections. [shock wave interaction effects on hypersonic aircraft surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, C. B.; Kaufman, L. G., III

    1979-01-01

    Effects of elevon-induced three-dimensional shock-wave turbulent boundary-layer interactions on hypersonic aircraft surfaces are analyzed. Detailed surface pressure and heating rate distributions obtained on wing-elevon-fuselage models representative of aft portions of hypersonic aircraft are compared with analytical and experimental results from other sources. Examples are presented that may be used to evaluate the adequacy of current theoretical methods for estimating the effects of three-dimensional shock-wave turbulent boundary-layer interactions on hypersonic aircraft surfaces.

  1. Pressure waves in liquid mercury target from pulsed heat loads and the possible way controlling their effects

    SciTech Connect

    Ni, L.; Skala, K.

    1996-06-01

    In ESS project liquid metals are selected as the main target for the pulsed spallation neutron source. Since the very high instantaneous energy is deposited on the heavy molten target in a very short period time, pressure waves are generated. They travel through the liquid and cause high stress in the container. Also, additional stress should be considered in the wall which is the result of direct heating of the target window. These dynamic processes were simulated with computational codes with the static response being analized first. The total resulting dynamic wall stress has been found to have exceeded the design stress for the selected container material. Adding a small amount of gas bubbles in the liquid could be a possible way to reduce the pressure waves.

  2. Turbulent Heating and Wave Pressure in Solar Wind Acceleration Modeling: New Insights to Empirical Forecasting of the Solar Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woolsey, L. N.; Cranmer, S. R.

    2013-12-01

    The study of solar wind acceleration has made several important advances recently due to improvements in modeling techniques. Existing code and simulations test the competing theories for coronal heating, which include reconnection/loop-opening (RLO) models and wave/turbulence-driven (WTD) models. In order to compare and contrast the validity of these theories, we need flexible tools that predict the emergent solar wind properties from a wide range of coronal magnetic field structures such as coronal holes, pseudostreamers, and helmet streamers. ZEPHYR (Cranmer et al. 2007) is a one-dimensional magnetohydrodynamics code that includes Alfven wave generation and reflection and the resulting turbulent heating to accelerate solar wind in open flux tubes. We present the ZEPHYR output for a wide range of magnetic field geometries to show the effect of the magnetic field profiles on wind properties. We also investigate the competing acceleration mechanisms found in ZEPHYR to determine the relative importance of increased gas pressure from turbulent heating and the separate pressure source from the Alfven waves. To do so, we developed a code that will become publicly available for solar wind prediction. This code, TEMPEST, provides an outflow solution based on only one input: the magnetic field strength as a function of height above the photosphere. It uses correlations found in ZEPHYR between the magnetic field strength at the source surface and the temperature profile of the outflow solution to compute the wind speed profile based on the increased gas pressure from turbulent heating. With this initial solution, TEMPEST then adds in the Alfven wave pressure term to the modified Parker equation and iterates to find a stable solution for the wind speed. This code, therefore, can make predictions of the wind speeds that will be observed at 1 AU based on extrapolations from magnetogram data, providing a useful tool for empirical forecasting of the sol! ar wind.

  3. Apparatus and method for enhanced chemical processing in high pressure and atmospheric plasmas produced by high frequency electromagnetic waves

    DOEpatents

    Efthimion, Philip C.; Helfritch, Dennis J.

    1989-11-28

    An apparatus and method for creating high temperature plasmas for enhanced chemical processing of gaseous fluids, toxic chemicals, and the like, at a wide range of pressures, especially at atmospheric and high pressures includes an electro-magnetic resonator cavity, preferably a reentrant cavity, and a wave guiding structure which connects an electro-magnetic source to the cavity. The cavity includes an intake port and an exhaust port, each having apertures in the conductive walls of the cavity sufficient for the intake of the gaseous fluids and for the discharge of the processed gaseous fluids. The apertures are sufficiently small to prevent the leakage of the electro-magnetic radiation from the cavity. Gaseous fluid flowing from the direction of the electro-magnetic source through the guiding wave structure and into the cavity acts on the plasma to push it away from the guiding wave structure and the electro-magnetic source. The gaseous fluid flow confines the high temperature plasma inside the cavity and allows complete chemical processing of the gaseous fluids at a wide range of pressures.

  4. Small model experiment on the gradient of pressure wave formed by train entering into the tunnel at 160km/h

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yonemoto, Temma; Endo, Hirokazu; Meguro, Fumiya; Ota, Masanori; Maeno, Kazuo

    2014-06-01

    In recent years, running speed of the trains of conventional lines becomes faster with improving vehicle and rail performance. At the high-speed range compression wave is formed when a high speed train enters a tunnel. This compression wave propagates in the tunnel at the speed of sound. This propagated wave is called "tunnel pressure wave". In some cases, when the station of conventional lines is located in the tunnel, problems such as breaking the window glass have been reported by the tunnel pressure wave at the station. Though the research on pressure wave inside the tunnel of the Shinkansen has been widely studied in connection with "tunnel micro-pressure wave" problems, the number of research reports on the operating speed of conventional lines(130~160km/h) is insufficient. In this study we focused on Hokuhoku line which has maximum operating speed of conventional lines in Japan (160km/h), and we performed the experiment on the gradient of the pressure wave by using diaphragmless driver acceleration system, small train nose model, and tunnel model of the limited express of Hokuhoku line. We have performed the pressure-time variation measurement on the tunnel model, including a station model or signal crossing station [SCS] model. As the thpical train model, we used Streamline-type or Gangway-type for train nose geometry. We have obtained pressure gradient data on several running conditions and observed the temporal .behavior in the tunnel pressure wave. As a result, we clarified large difference in pressure gradient with the train nose geometry and with the cross-sectional area of the tunnel.

  5. The dependence on geomagnetic conditions and solar wind dynamic pressure of the spatial distributions of EMIC waves observed by the Van Allen Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saikin, A. A.; Zhang, J.-C.; Smith, C. W.; Spence, H. E.; Torbert, R. B.; Kletzing, C. A.

    2016-05-01

    A statistical examination on the spatial distributions of electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves observed by the Van Allen Probes against varying levels of geomagnetic activity (i.e., AE and SYM-H) and dynamic pressure has been performed. Measurements taken by the Electric and Magnetic Field Instrument Suite and Integrated Science for the first full magnetic local time (MLT) precession of the Van Allen Probes (September 2012-June 2014) are used to identify over 700 EMIC wave events. Spatial distributions of EMIC waves are found to vary depending on the level of geomagnetic activity and solar wind dynamic pressure. EMIC wave events were observed under quiet (AE ≤ 100 nT, 325 wave events), moderate (100 nT < AE ≤ 300 nT, 218 wave events), and disturbed (AE > 300 nT, 228 wave events) geomagnetic conditions and are primarily observed in the prenoon sector (~800 < MLT ≤ ~1100) at L ≈ 5.5 during quiet activity times. As AE increases to disturbed levels, the peak occurrence rates shift to the afternoon sector (1200 < MLT ≤ 1800) between L = 4 and L = 6. A majority of EMIC wave events (~56%) were observed during nonstorm times (defined by SYM-H). Consistent with the quiet AE levels, nonstorm EMIC waves are observed in the prenoon sector. EMIC waves observed through the duration of a geomagnetic storm are primarily located in the afternoon sector. High solar wind pressure (Pdyn > 3 nPa) correlates to mostly afternoon EMIC wave observations.

  6. Optical study of BaFe2As2 under pressure: Coexistence of spin-density-wave gap and superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uykur, E.; Kobayashi, T.; Hirata, W.; Miyasaka, S.; Tajima, S.; Kuntscher, C. A.

    2015-12-01

    Temperature-dependent reflectivity measurements in the frequency range 85 -7000 cm-1 were performed on BaFe2As2 single crystals under pressure up to ˜5 GPa. The corresponding pressure- and temperature-dependent optical conductivity was analyzed with the Drude-Lorentz model to extract the coherent and incoherent contributions. The gradual suppression of the spin-density-wave (SDW) state with increasing pressure and the appearance of the superconducting phase coexisting with the SDW phase at 3.6 GPa were observed. At 3.6 GPa, the reflectivity reaches unity below ˜95 cm-1 indicating the opening of the superconducting gap and shows a full gap tendency at 6 K.

  7. On the Role of Osmosis for Non-Linear Shock Waves f Pressure and Solute in Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanivesky, Roman; Salusti, Ettore; Caserta, Arrigo

    2013-04-01

    A novel non-Osanger model focusing on non-linear mechanic and chemo-poroelastic coupling of fluids and solute in porous rocks is developed based on the modern wave theory. Analyzing in 1-D a system of two adjacent rocks with different conditions we obtain two coupled non-linear equations for fluid pressure and solute (salt or pollutants) concentration, evolving under the action of strong stress from one "source" rock towards the other rock. Their solutions allow to identify quick non-linear solitary (Burgers) waves of coupled fluid pressure and solute density, that are different from diffusive or perturbative solutions found in other analyses. The strong transient waves for low permeability porous media, such as clay and shale, are analyzed in detail. For medium and high-permeability porous media (sandstones) this model is also tentatively applied. Indeed in recent works of Alexander (1990) and Hart(2009) is supported the presence of small osmotic phenomena in other rocks where osmosis was previously ignored. An attempt to apply our model to soils in Calabria (Italy), such as clastic marine and fluvial deposits as well as discontinuous remnants of Miocene and Pliocene carbonate and terrigeneous deposits, is also discussed.

  8. Experimental study on the pressure and pulse wave propagation in viscoelastic vessel tubes-effects of liquid viscosity and tube stiffness.

    PubMed

    Ikenaga, Yuki; Nishi, Shohei; Komagata, Yuka; Saito, Masashi; Lagrée, Pierre-Yves; Asada, Takaaki; Matsukawa, Mami

    2013-11-01

    A pulse wave is the displacement wave which arises because of ejection of blood from the heart and reflection at vascular bed and distal point. The investigation of pressure waves leads to understanding the propagation characteristics of a pulse wave. To investigate the pulse wave behavior, an experimental study was performed using an artificial polymer tube and viscous liquid. A polyurethane tube and glycerin solution were used to simulate a blood vessel and blood, respectively. In the case of the 40 wt% glycerin solution, which corresponds to the viscosity of ordinary blood, the attenuation coefficient of a pressure wave in the tube decreased from 4.3 to 1.6 dB/m because of the tube stiffness (Young's modulus: 60 to 200 kPa). When the viscosity of liquid increased from approximately 4 to 10 mPa·s (the range of human blood viscosity) in the stiff tube, the attenuation coefficient of the pressure wave changed from 1.6 to 3.2 dB/m. The hardening of the blood vessel caused by aging and the increase of blood viscosity caused by illness possibly have opposite effects on the intravascular pressure wave. The effect of the viscosity of a liquid on the amplitude of a pressure wave was then considered using a phantom simulating human blood vessels. As a result, in the typical range of blood viscosity, the amplitude ratio of the waves obtained by the experiments with water and glycerin solution became 1:0.83. In comparison with clinical data, this value is much smaller than that seen from blood vessel hardening. Thus, it can be concluded that the blood viscosity seldom affects the attenuation of a pulse wave.

  9. Extreme storm wave influence on sandy beach macrofauna with distinct human pressures.

    PubMed

    Machado, Phillipe M; Costa, Leonardo L; Suciu, Marjorie C; Tavares, Davi C; Zalmon, Ilana R

    2016-06-15

    We evaluated the influence of storm waves on the intertidal community structure of urbanized and non-urbanized areas of a sandy beach on the northern coast of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The macrofauna was sampled before (PREV) and after two storm wave events (POEV I; POEV II) in 2013 and 2014. Significant differences in community structure between PREV and POEV I in the urbanized sector demonstrate higher macrofauna vulnerability, and the community recovery within 41days on this scenario of less frequent events in 2013. On the other hand, significant differences in the macrofauna only in the urbanized sector between PREV and POEV II also highlight macrofauna vulnerability and community recovery failure within 42days on this scenario of more frequent storm in 2014. Urbanization and wave height were the variables that most influenced species, indicating that high storm wave events and increasing urbanization synergism are a threat to the macrofauna. PMID:27103425

  10. Extreme storm wave influence on sandy beach macrofauna with distinct human pressures.

    PubMed

    Machado, Phillipe M; Costa, Leonardo L; Suciu, Marjorie C; Tavares, Davi C; Zalmon, Ilana R

    2016-06-15

    We evaluated the influence of storm waves on the intertidal community structure of urbanized and non-urbanized areas of a sandy beach on the northern coast of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The macrofauna was sampled before (PREV) and after two storm wave events (POEV I; POEV II) in 2013 and 2014. Significant differences in community structure between PREV and POEV I in the urbanized sector demonstrate higher macrofauna vulnerability, and the community recovery within 41days on this scenario of less frequent events in 2013. On the other hand, significant differences in the macrofauna only in the urbanized sector between PREV and POEV II also highlight macrofauna vulnerability and community recovery failure within 42days on this scenario of more frequent storm in 2014. Urbanization and wave height were the variables that most influenced species, indicating that high storm wave events and increasing urbanization synergism are a threat to the macrofauna.

  11. Analysis of reflected blast wave pressure profiles in a confined room

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauvan, P. E.; Sochet, I.; Trélat, S.

    2012-05-01

    To understand the blast effects of confined explosions, it is necessary to study the characteristic parameters of the blast wave in terms of overpressure, impulse and arrival time. In a previous study, experiments were performed using two different scales of a pyrotechnic workshop. The main purpose of these experiments was to compare the TNT equivalent for solid and gaseous explosives in terms of mass to define a TNT equivalent in a reflection field and to validate the similitude between real and small scales. To study the interactions and propagations of the reflected shock waves, the present study was conducted by progressively building a confined volume around the charge. In this way, the influence of each wall and the origins of the reflected shock waves can be determined. The purpose of this paper is to report the blast wave interactions that resulted from the detonation of a stoichiometric propane-oxygen mixture in a confined room.

  12. Study on Excessive Pressure of Underwater Shock Wave Generated in Confined Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueda, H.; Abe, A.

    Recently, the underwater shock waves have been widely applied to the fields of mechanical engineering, medical treatments, food science, and so on [1, 2]. In the field of maritime sciences, it is expected that the using of underwater shock waves would solve some problems. Ships usually use seawater as ballast to ensure safety on navigation under the unloaded condition. Some of marine creatures contained in the ballast water are carried to another port and finally discharged.

  13. Simultaneous structure and elastic wave velocity measurement of SiO[subscript 2] glass at high pressures and high temperatures in a Paris-Edinburgh cell

    SciTech Connect

    Kono, Yoshio; Park, Changyong; Sakamaki, Tatsuya; Kenny-Benson, Curtis; Shen, Guoyin; Wang, Yanbin

    2015-02-19

    An integration of multi-angle energy-dispersive x-ray diffraction and ultrasonic elastic wave velocity measurements in a Paris-Edinburgh cell enabled us to simultaneously investigate the structures and elastic wave velocities of amorphous materials at high pressure and high temperature conditions. We report the first simultaneous structure and elastic wave velocity measurement for SiO{sub 2} glass at pressures up to 6.8 GPa at around 500 C. The first sharp diffraction peak (FSDP) in the structure factor S(Q) evidently shifted to higher Q with increasing pressure, reflecting the shrinking of intermediate-range order, while the Si-O bond distance was almost unchanged up to 6.8 GPa. In correlation with the shift of FSDP position, compressional wave velocity (Vp) and Poisson's ratio increased markedly with increasing pressure. In contrast, shear wave velocity (Vs) changed only at pressures below 4 GPa, and then remained unchanged at {approx}4.0-6.8 GPa. These observations indicate a strong correlation between the intermediate range order variations and Vp or Poisson's ratio, but a complicated behavior for Vs. The result demonstrates a new capability of simultaneous measurement of structures and elastic wave velocities at high pressure and high temperature conditions to provide direct link between microscopic structure and macroscopic elastic properties of amorphous materials.

  14. Preeclampsia Is Associated with Increased Central Aortic Pressure, Elastic Arteries Stiffness and Wave Reflections, and Resting and Recruitable Endothelial Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Torrado, Juan; Farro, Ignacio; Zócalo, Yanina; Farro, Federico; Sosa, Claudio; Scasso, Santiago; Alonso, Justo; Bia, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. An altered endothelial function (EF) could be associated with preeclampsia (PE). However, more specific and complementary analyses are required to confirm this topic. Flow-mediated dilation (FMD), low-flow-mediated constriction (L-FMC), and hyperemic-related changes in carotid-radial pulse wave velocity (PWVcr) offer complementary information about “recruitability” of EF. Objectives. To evaluate, in healthy and hypertensive pregnant women (with and without PE), central arterial parameters in conjunction with “basal and recruitable” EF. Methods. Nonhypertensive (HP) and hypertensive pregnant women (gestational hypertension, GH; preeclampsia, PE) were included. Aortic blood pressure (BP), wave reflection parameters (AIx@75), aortic pulse wave velocity (PWVcf) and PWVcr, and brachial and common carotid stiffness and intima-media thickness were measured. Brachial FMD and L-FMC and hyperemic-related change in PWVcr were measured. Results. Aortic BP and AIx@75 were elevated in PE. PE showed stiffer elastic but not muscular arteries. After cuff deflation, PWVcr decreased in HP, while GH showed a blunted PWVcr response and PE showed a tendency to increase. Maximal FMD and L-FMC were observed in HP followed by GH; PE did not reach significant arterial constriction. Conclusion. Aortic BP and wave reflections as well as elastic arteries stiffness are increased in PE. PE showed both “resting and recruitable” endothelial dysfunctions. PMID:26351578

  15. Preeclampsia Is Associated with Increased Central Aortic Pressure, Elastic Arteries Stiffness and Wave Reflections, and Resting and Recruitable Endothelial Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Torrado, Juan; Farro, Ignacio; Zócalo, Yanina; Farro, Federico; Sosa, Claudio; Scasso, Santiago; Alonso, Justo; Bia, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. An altered endothelial function (EF) could be associated with preeclampsia (PE). However, more specific and complementary analyses are required to confirm this topic. Flow-mediated dilation (FMD), low-flow-mediated constriction (L-FMC), and hyperemic-related changes in carotid-radial pulse wave velocity (PWVcr) offer complementary information about "recruitability" of EF. Objectives. To evaluate, in healthy and hypertensive pregnant women (with and without PE), central arterial parameters in conjunction with "basal and recruitable" EF. Methods. Nonhypertensive (HP) and hypertensive pregnant women (gestational hypertension, GH; preeclampsia, PE) were included. Aortic blood pressure (BP), wave reflection parameters (AIx@75), aortic pulse wave velocity (PWVcf) and PWVcr, and brachial and common carotid stiffness and intima-media thickness were measured. Brachial FMD and L-FMC and hyperemic-related change in PWVcr were measured. Results. Aortic BP and AIx@75 were elevated in PE. PE showed stiffer elastic but not muscular arteries. After cuff deflation, PWVcr decreased in HP, while GH showed a blunted PWVcr response and PE showed a tendency to increase. Maximal FMD and L-FMC were observed in HP followed by GH; PE did not reach significant arterial constriction. Conclusion. Aortic BP and wave reflections as well as elastic arteries stiffness are increased in PE. PE showed both "resting and recruitable" endothelial dysfunctions.

  16. Modeling radiation belt electron acceleration by ULF fast mode waves, launched by solar wind dynamic pressure fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degeling, A. W.; Rankin, R.; Zong, Q.-G.

    2014-11-01

    We investigate the magnetospheric MHD and energetic electron response to a Storm Sudden Commencement (SSC) and subsequent magnetopause buffeting, focusing on an interval following an SSC event on 25 November 2001. We find that the electron flux signatures observed by LANL, Cluster, and GOES spacecraft during this event can largely be reproduced using an advective kinetic model for electron phase space density, using externally prescribed electromagnetic field inputs, (herein described as a "test-kinetic model") with electromagnetic field inputs provided by a 2-D linear ideal MHD model for ULF waves. In particular, we find modulations in electron flux phase shifted by 90° from the local azimuthal ULF wave electric field (Eφ) and a net enhancement in electron flux after 1.5 h for energies between 500 keV and 1.5 MeV near geosynchronous orbit. We also demonstrate that electrons in this energy range satisfy the drift resonance condition for the ULF waves produced by the MHD model. This confirms the conclusions reached by Tan et al. (2011), that the energization process in this case is dominated by drift-resonant interactions between electrons and MHD fast mode waves, produced by fluctuations in solar wind dynamic pressure.

  17. Mechanisms of strong pressure wave generations during knocking combustion: compressible reactive flow simulations with detailed chemical kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terashima, Hiroshi; Koshi, Mitsuo

    2014-11-01

    Knocking is a very severe pressure oscillation caused by interactions between flame propagation and end-gas autoignition in spark-assisted engines. In this study, knocking combustion modeled in one-dimensional space is simulated using a highly efficient compressible flow solver with detailed chemical kinetics for clarifying the process of knocking occurrence. Especially, mechanisms of strong pressure wave generation are addressed. A robust and fast explicit integration method is used to efficiently handle stiff chemistry, and species bundling for effectively estimating the diffusion coefficients. The detailed mechanisms such as n-butane of 113 species and n-heptane of 373 species are directly applied. Results demonstrate that the negative temperature coefficient (NTC) region of n-heptane significantly influence the knocking timing and intensity. In the NTC region, stronger pressure wave is generated due to rapid heat release of a very small portion in the end-gas, which is attributed to low temperature oxidation and inhomogeneous temperature distributions in the end-gas. The knocking intensity is thus amplified in the NTC region, taking a maximum value. In the case of n-butane with no NTC region, relatively weak knocking intensity is observed in all conditions with no clear peak.

  18. Pulse wave myelopathy: An update of an hypothesis highlighting the similarities between syringomyelia and normal pressure hydrocephalus.

    PubMed

    Bateman, Grant A

    2015-12-01

    Most hypotheses trying to explain the pathophysiology of idiopathic syringomyelia involve mechanisms whereby CSF is pumped against a pressure gradient, from the subarachnoid space into the cord parenchyma. On review, these theories have universally failed to explain the disease process. A few papers have suggested that the syrinx fluid may originate from the cord capillary bed itself. However, in these papers, the fluid is said to accumulate due to impaired fluid drainage out of the cord. Again, there is little evidence to substantiate this. This proffered hypothesis looks at the problem from the perspective that syringomyelia and normal pressure hydrocephalus are almost identical in their manifestations but only differ in their site of effect within the neuraxis. It is suggested that the primary trigger for syringomyelia is a reduction in the compliance of the veins draining the spinal cord. This reduces the efficiency of the pulse wave dampening, occurring within the cord parenchyma, increasing arteriolar and capillary pulse pressure. The increased capillary pulse pressure opens the blood-spinal cord barrier due to a direct effect upon the wall integrity and interstitial fluid accumulates due to an increased secretion rate. An increase in arteriolar pulse pressure increases the kinetic energy within the cord parenchyma and this disrupts the cytoarchitecture allowing the fluid to accumulate into small cystic regions in the cord. With time the cystic regions coalesce to form one large cavity which continues to increase in size due to the ongoing interstitial fluid secretion and the hyperdynamic cord vasculature.

  19. Combined whole-body vibration training and l-citrulline supplementation improves pressure wave reflection in obese postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Wong, Alexei; Alvarez-Alvarado, Stacey; Jaime, Salvador J; Kinsey, Amber W; Spicer, Maria T; Madzima, Takudzwa A; Figueroa, Arturo

    2016-03-01

    Postmenopausal women have increased wave reflection (augmentation pressure (AP) and index (AIx)) and reduced muscle function that predispose them to cardiac diseases and disability. Our aim was to examine the combined and independent effects of whole-body vibration training (WBVT) and l-citrulline supplementation on aortic hemodynamics and plasma nitric oxide metabolites (NOx) in postmenopausal women. Forty-one obese postmenopausal women were randomized to 3 groups: l-citrulline, WBVT+l-citrulline and WBVT+Placebo for 8 weeks. Brachial and aortic systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, AP, AIx, AIx adjusted to 75 beats/min (AIx@75), and NOx were measured before and after 8 weeks. All groups similarly decreased (P < 0.05) brachial and aortic pressures as well as AP, and similarly increased (P < 0.05) NOx levels. AIx and AIx@75 decreased (P < 0.01) in the WBVT+l-citrulline and WBVT+Placebo groups, but not in the l-citrulline group. The improvement in AIx@75 (-10.5% ± 8.8%, P < 0.05) in the WBVT+l-citrulline group was significant compared with the l-citrulline group. l-Citrulline supplementation and WBVT alone and combined decreased blood pressures. The combined intervention reduced AIx@75. This study supports the effectiveness of WBVT+l-citrulline as a potential intervention for prevention of hypertension-related cardiac diseases in obese postmenopausal women. PMID:26863234

  20. Magnetic field and electromagnetic wave properties of carbon monoxide with high-pressure disproportionation single-walled carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Tooski, S. B.

    2009-10-15

    A double-fluid theory is used to find the electromagnetic wave absorption of carbon monoxide with iron-catalyzed high-pressure disproportionation (HiPco)-grown single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). The electromagnetic wave absorption of carbon monoxide with HiPco SWNTs is obtained and is studied numerically. The absorption is then deduced and their functional dependence on the number density, collision frequency, cyclotron frequency, and angle of propagation is studied. The double-fluid theory predicts that there is an electromagnetic frequency dependency on the energy absorption properties of the system under investigation. The calculation results show that effects of magnetic field strength and the angle of microwave propagation on the absorption coefficient as well as the frequency band of resonant absorption are very significant.

  1. Visual and somatosensory evoked potentials and F-wave latency measurements in hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies.

    PubMed

    Strenge, H; Soyka, D; Tackmann, W

    1982-01-01

    Pattern shift visual evoked potentials (VEPs), cervical and cortical somatosensory evoked responses (SEPs) and motor conduction velocities studied by F-wave latency measurements were investigated in two family members with hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HN-PP). In both cases in VEPs and SEP conduction times N13-N20 were normal. A bilateral pathological increase of latencies of early SEP components, N9-N13 transit times and F-wave latencies revealed a lesion in the proximal parts of the median nerves close to the spinal cord in the older patient. These abnormalities emphasize the close relationship of HN-PP with hereditary polyradiculopathy (Mayer 1975). PMID:6174708

  2. Tracking Ocean Gravity Waves in Real-time: Highlights of Bottom Pressure Data Recorded on Ocean Networks Canada's NEPTUNE observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heesemann, Martin; Mihaly, Steve; Gemmrich, Johannes; Davis, Earl; Thomson, Richard; Dewey, Richard

    2016-04-01

    Ocean Networks Canada operates two cabled ocean observatories off Vancouver Island on Canada's west coast. The regional NEPTUNE observatory spans the entire Juan de Fuca tectonic plate from the coast across the subduction zone to the hydrothermally active Endeavour Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge Segment while the VENUS observatory focuses on coastal processes. Both observatories collect data on physical, chemical, biological, and geological aspects of the ocean over long time periods, supporting research on complex earth processes. High-precision bottom pressure recorders (BPR) deployed on the NEPTUNE observatory are capable of detecting a wide range of phenomena related to sea level variations. The observatory BPRs provide observations of nano-resolution (with respect to full scale of the instrument) pressure variations which correspond to sub-millimeter scale surface water displacements in several kilometers of water. Detected signals include tides, tsunamis, infragravity waves, swell, wave-induced microseisms, storm surge, and seismic signals. Spectral analysis reveals many of these phenomena with periods ranging from a few seconds to many hours. Dispersion patterns from distant swells are prominent in the swell and microseism bands. By comparing the difference of arrival times between longer period waves, which arrive first, and shorter period waves we can estimate the distance the swells travelled since they were generated. Using this information, swell can be tracked back to specific storms across the Pacific. The presentation will high-light some examples of the mentioned phenomena in the continuous time-series that in some instances are more than seven years long.

  3. Dependencies of pore pressure on elastic wave velocities and Vp/Vs ratio for thermally cracked gabbro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimura, K.; Uehara, S. I.; Mizoguchi, K.

    2015-12-01

    Marine seismic refraction have found that there are high Vp/Vs ratio regions in oceanic crusts at subducting oceanic plates (e.g, Cascadia subduction zone (2.0-2.8) (Audet et al., 2009)). Previous studies based on laboratory measurements indicated that Vp/Vs ratio is high when porosity and/or pore pressure is high (Christensen, 1984; Peacock et al., 2011). Although several studies have investigated the relationships between fracture distributions and Vp, Vs (e.g., Wang et al., 2012; Blake et al., 2013), the relationships for rocks (e.g., gabbro and basalt) composing oceanic crust are still unclear. This study reports the results of laboratory measurements of Vp, Vs (transmission method) at controlled confining and pore pressure and estimation of Vp/Vs ratio for thermally cracked gabbro which mimic highly fractured rocks in the high Vp/Vs ratio zone, in order to declare the dependence of fracture distributions on Vp/Vs. For the measurements, we prepared three type specimens; a non-heated intact specimen, specimens heated up to 500 °C and 700 °C for 24 hours. Porosities of intact, 500 °C and 700 °C specimens measured under the atmospheric pressure are 0.5, 3.4 and 3.5%, respectively. Measurements were conducted at a constant confining pressure of 50 MPa, with decreasing pore pressure from 49 to 0.1 MPa and then increasing to 49 MPa. While Vp/Vs for the intact specimen is almost constant at elevated pore pressure, the Vp/Vs values for the thermally cracked ones were 2.0~2.2 when pore pressure was larger than 30 MPa. In future, we will reveal the relationship between the measured elastic wave velocities and the characteristics of the microfracture distribution. This work was supported by JSPS Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research (Grant Number 26400492).

  4. Interaction between a normal shock wave and a turbulent boundary layer at high transonic speeds. I - Pressure distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Messiter, A. F.

    1980-01-01

    Asymptotic solutions are derived for the pressure distribution in the interaction of a weak normal shock wave with a turbulent boundary layer. The undisturbed boundary layer is characterized by the law of the wall and the law of the wake for compressible flow. In the limiting case considered, for 'high' transonic speeds, the sonic line is very close to the wall. Comparisons with experiment are shown, with corrections included for the effect of longitudinal wall curvature and for the boundary-layer displacement effect in a circular pipe.

  5. Disjoining pressure and the film-height-dependent surface tension of thin liquid films: new insight from capillary wave fluctuations.

    PubMed

    MacDowell, Luis G; Benet, Jorge; Katcho, Nebil A; Palanco, Jose M G

    2014-04-01

    In this paper we review simulation and experimental studies of thermal capillary wave fluctuations as an ideal means for probing the underlying disjoining pressure and surface tensions, and more generally, fine details of the Interfacial Hamiltonian Model. We discuss recent simulation results that reveal a film-height-dependent surface tension not accounted for in the classical Interfacial Hamiltonian Model. We show how this observation may be explained bottom-up from sound principles of statistical thermodynamics and discuss some of its implications. PMID:24351859

  6. Study of atmospheric gravity waves and infrasonic sources using the USArray Transportable Array pressure data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hedlin, Michael; de Groot-Hedlin, Catherine; Hoffmann, Lars; Alexander, M. Joan; Stephan, Claudia

    2016-04-01

    The upgrade of the USArray Transportable Array (TA) with microbarometers and infrasound microphones has created an opportunity for a broad range of new studies of atmospheric sources and the large- and small-scale atmospheric structure through which signals from these events propagate. These studies are akin to early studies of seismic events and the Earth's interior structure that were made possible by the first seismic networks. In one early study with the new dataset we use the method of de Groot-Hedlin and Hedlin (2015) to recast the TA as a massive collection of 3-element arrays to detect and locate large infrasonic events. Over 2,000 events have been detected in 2013. The events cluster in highly active regions on land and offshore. Stratospherically ducted signals from some of these events have been recorded more than 2,000 km from the source and clearly show dispersion due to propagation through atmospheric gravity waves. Modeling of these signals has been used to test statistical models of atmospheric gravity waves. The network is also useful for making direct observations of gravity waves. We are currently studying TA and satellite observations of gravity waves from singular events to better understand how the waves near ground level relate to those observed aloft. We are also studying the long-term statistics of these waves from the beginning of 2010 through 2014. Early work using data bandpass filtered from 1-6 hr shows that both the TA and satellite data reveal highly active source regions, such as near the Great Lakes. de Groot-Hedlin and Hedlin, 2015, A method for detecting and locating geophysical events using clusters of arrays, Geophysical Journal International, v203, p960-971, doi: 10.1093/gji/ggv345.

  7. Numerical survey of pressure wave propagation around and inside an underground cavity with high order FEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esterhazy, Sofi; Schneider, Felix; Schöberl, Joachim; Perugia, Ilaria; Bokelmann, Götz

    2016-04-01

    The research on purely numerical methods for modeling seismic waves has been more and more intensified over last decades. This development is mainly driven by the fact that on the one hand for subsurface models of interest in exploration and global seismology exact analytic solutions do not exist, but, on the other hand, retrieving full seismic waveforms is important to get insides into spectral characteristics and for the interpretation of seismic phases and amplitudes. Furthermore, the computational potential has dramatically increased in the recent past such that it became worthwhile to perform computations for large-scale problems as those arising in the field of computational seismology. Algorithms based on the Finite Element Method (FEM) are becoming increasingly popular for the propagation of acoustic and elastic waves in geophysical models as they provide more geometrical flexibility in terms of complexity as well as heterogeneity of the materials. In particular, we want to demonstrate the benefit of high-order FEMs as they also provide a better control on the accuracy. Our computations are done with the parallel Finite Element Library NGSOLVE ontop of the automatic 2D/3D mesh generator NETGEN (http://sourceforge.net/projects/ngsolve/). Further we are interested in the generation of synthetic seismograms including direct, refracted and converted waves in correlation to the presence of an underground cavity and the detailed simulation of the comprehensive wave field inside and around such a cavity that would have been created by a nuclear explosion. The motivation of this application comes from the need to find evidence of a nuclear test as they are forbidden by the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test Ban Treaty (CTBT). With this approach it is possible for us to investigate the wave field over a large bandwidth of wave numbers. This again will help to provide a better understanding on the characteristic signatures of an underground cavity, improve the protocols for

  8. Continuous-wave far-infrared ESR spectrometer for high-pressure measurements.

    PubMed

    Náfrádi, Bálint; Gaál, Richárd; Sienkiewicz, Andrzej; Fehér, Titusz; Forró, László

    2008-12-01

    We present a newly-developed microwave probe for performing sensitive high-field/multi-frequency electron spin resonance (ESR) measurements under high hydrostatic pressures. The system consists of a BeCu-made pressure-resistant vessel, which accommodates the investigated sample and a diamond microwave coupling window. The probe's interior is completely filled with a pressure-transmitting fluid. The setup operates in reflection mode and can easily be assembled with a standard oversized microwave circuitry. The probe-head withstands hydrostatic pressures up to 1.6 GPa and interfaces with our home-built quasi-optical high-field ESR facility, operating in a millimeter/submillimeter frequency range of 105-420 GHz and in magnetic fields up to 16 T. The overall performance of the probe was tested, while studying the pressure-induced changes in the spin-relaxation mechanisms of a quasi-1D conducting polymer, KC(60). The preliminary measurements revealed that the probe yields similar signal-to-noise ratio to that of commercially available low-frequency ESR spectrometers. Moreover, by observing the conduction electron spin resonance (CESR) linewidth broadening for KC(60) in an unprecedented microwave frequency range of 210-420 GHz and in the pressure range of up to 1.6 GPa, we demonstrate that a combination of high-pressure ESR probe and high-field/multi-frequency spectrometer allows us to measure the spin relaxation rates in conducting spin systems, like the quasi-1D conductor, KC(60).

  9. Effects of bleed-hole geometry and plenum pressure on three-dimensional shock-wave/boundary-layer/bleed interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chyu, Wei J.; Rimlinger, Mark J.; Shih, Tom I.-P.

    1993-01-01

    A numerical study was performed to investigate 3D shock-wave/boundary-layer interactions on a flat plate with bleed through one or more circular holes that vent into a plenum. This study was focused on how bleed-hole geometry and pressure ratio across bleed holes affect the bleed rate and the physics of the flow in the vicinity of the holes. The aspects of the bleed-hole geometry investigated include angle of bleed hole and the number of bleed holes. The plenum/freestream pressure ratios investigated range from 0.3 to 1.7. This study is based on the ensemble-averaged, 'full compressible' Navier-Stokes (N-S) equations closed by the Baldwin-Lomax algebraic turbulence model. Solutions to the ensemble-averaged N-S equations were obtained by an implicit finite-volume method using the partially-split, two-factored algorithm of Steger on an overlapping Chimera grid.

  10. Pressure-induced continuous phase transition of charge-density-wave state in a linear-chain complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuroda, Noritaka; Sakai, Masamichi; Nishina, Yuichiro; Sasaki, Kazuo

    1992-05-01

    [Pt(en)2][Pt(en)2Cl2](ClO4)4 (en=ethylenediamine) is found to undergo a novel phase transition from the charge-density-wave (CDW) state to a new phase under hydrostatic pressure. The new phase appears at 3 GPa and coexists with the CDW state up to 6 GPa, at least. The volume ratio between the two coexisting phases measured by Raman scattering spectroscopy changes continuously with pressure. The result is discussed in terms of the theoretical approach to the polymorphic phase transition developed recently by Bassler, Sasaki, and Griffiths. It is suggested that kink solitons play an important role in this phase transition.

  11. Comparison between Langmuir probe and microwave autointerferometry measurements at intermediate pressure in an argon surface wave discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Rousseau, A.; Teboul, E.; Bechu, S.

    2005-10-15

    This paper is devoted to the validation of Langmuir probe technique by microwave autointerferometry in a surface wave discharge at medium pressure (from 0.1 up to 10 Torr). Temperatures of neutrals, obtained from Rayleigh scattering, and electrons, given by double probe measurements, have been used to estimate the mean free path and the sheath length. Hence, the number of collisions in the sheath has been obtained. We have verified that two different phenomena occur in the sheath, while the pressure increases. These phenomena are depicted, in literature, as two different coefficients used to modify the value of the noncollisional current of Laframboise. Coefficients given by various authors have been investigated with accuracy knowing the number of collisions in the sheath. Very good agreements are obtained between Zakrzewski and Kopiczynski theory and autointerferometry measurements which are unaffected by collisional phenomena.

  12. Measurements of blast waves from bursting frangible spheres pressurized with flash-evaporation vapor or liquid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Esparaza, E. D.; Baker, W. E.

    1977-01-01

    Incident overpressure data from frangible spheres pressurized with a flash-evaporating fluid in liquid and vapor form were obtained in laboratory experiments. Glass spheres under higher than ambient internal pressure of Freon-12 were purposely burst to obtain time histories of overpressure. Nondimensional peak pressures, arrival and duration times, and impulses are presented, and whenever possible plotted and compared with compiled data for Pentolite high-explosive. The data are generally quite repeatable and show differences from blast data produced by condensed high-explosives.

  13. Efficient Generation of Cavitation Bubbles in Gel Phantom by Ultrasound Exposure with Negative-Followed by Positive-Peak-Pressure-Emphasized Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasuda, Jun; Asai, Ayumu; Yoshizawa, Shin; Umemura, Shin-ichiro

    2013-07-01

    Cavitation bubbles have much potential for emphasizing therapeutic treatments such as high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment, histotripsy, and sonodynamic therapy. Their highly efficient as well as controlled generation is important to utilize them effectively as well as safely. However, producing negative pressure over the cavitation threshold by focused ultrasound is difficult because of the nonlinear propagation combined with the focal phase shift. We have suggested a dual-frequency ultrasound exposure method, in which N- and P-waves emphasizing either the peak negative or positive pressure, respectively, are synthesized by superimposing the second harmonic onto the fundamental frequency. In this study, high-speed camera observation demonstrated that the exposure with N-waves immediately followed by P-waves could generate cavitation bubbles most efficiently in gel phantom. Furthermore, the measured negative and positive pressure distributions of the N- and P-wave fields, respectively, agreed well with the optically observed distributions of cavitation inception and cavitation cloud growth.

  14. Generation of ion-acoustic waves in an inductively coupled, low-pressure discharge lamp

    SciTech Connect

    Camparo, J. C.; Klimcak, C. M.

    2006-04-15

    For a number of years it has been known that the alkali rf-discharge lamps used in atomic clocks can exhibit large amplitude intensity oscillations. These oscillations arise from ion-acoustic plasma waves and have typically been associated with erratic clock behavior. Though large amplitude ion-acoustic plasma waves are clearly deleterious for atomic clock operation, it does not follow that small amplitude oscillations have no utility. Here, we demonstrate two easily implemented methods for generating small amplitude ion-acoustic plasma waves in alkali rf-discharge lamps. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the frequency of these waves is proportional to the square root of the rf power driving the lamp and therefore that their examination can provide an easily accessible parameter for monitoring and controlling the lamp's plasma conditions. This has important consequences for precise timekeeping, since the atomic ground-state hyperfine transition, which is the heart of the atomic clock signal, can be significantly perturbed by changes in the lamp's output via the ac-Stark shift.

  15. Workbook for predicting pressure wave and fragment effects of exploding propellant tanks and gas storage vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, W. E.; Kulesz, J. J.; Ricker, R. E.; Bessey, R. L.; Westine, P. S.; Parr, V. B.; Oldham, G. A.

    1975-01-01

    Technology needed to predict damage and hazards from explosions of propellant tanks and bursts of pressure vessels, both near and far from these explosions is introduced. Data are summarized in graphs, tables, and nomographs.

  16. Influence of autoignition delay time characteristics of different fuels on pressure waves and knock in reciprocating engines

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, D.; Kalghatgi, G.T.

    2009-12-15

    The functional relationship of autoignition delay time with temperature and pressure is employed to derive the propagation velocities of autoignitive reaction fronts for particular reactivity gradients, once autoignition has been initiated. In the present study of a variety of premixtures, with different functional relationships, such gradients comprise fixed initial temperature gradients. The smaller is the ratio of the acoustic speed through the mixture to the localised velocity of the autoignitive front, the greater are the amplitude and frequency of the induced pressure wave. This might lead to damaging engine knock. At higher values of the ratio, the autoignition can be benign with only small over-pressures. This approach to the effects of autoignition is confirmed by its application to a variety of experimental studies involving: (i)Imposed temperature gradients in a rapid compression and expansion machine. (ii)Onset of knock in an engine with advancing spark timing. (iii)Development of autoignition at a single hot spot in an engine. (iv)Autoignition fronts initiated by several hot spots. There is much diversity in the effects that can be produced by different fuels in different ranges of temperature and pressure. Higher values of autoignitive propagation speeds lead to increasingly severe engine knock. Such effects cannot always be predicted from the Research and Motor octane numbers. (author)

  17. Variable temperature pressure broadening of HNO3 in the millimeter wave spectral region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goyette, Thomas M.; Guo, Wei; Delucia, Frank C.; Helminger, Paul

    1991-01-01

    Measurements were performed for both O2 and N2 broadening in the 100-380 K temperature range by using a heated equilibrium cell for elevated temperatures and the utilization of a collisionally cooled cell at the lower temperatures where HNO3 has a small vapor pressure. Observed pressure-broadening data can be fit to the normal empirical law, giving n values between 0.62 and 0.84.

  18. The Effect of CardioWaves Interval Training on Resting Blood Pressure, Resting Heart Rate, and Mind-Body Wellness

    PubMed Central

    NIELSON, CAMILLA M.; LOCKHART, BARBARA D.; HAGER, RONALD L.; GEORGE, JAMES D.; EGGETT, DENNIS L.; STEFFEN, PATRICK R.; MITCHELL, ULRIKE H.; BAILEY, BRUCE W.

    2016-01-01

    An experimental study to examine the effects of CardioWaves interval training (CWIT) and continuous training (CT) on resting blood pressure, resting heart rate, and mind-body wellness. Fifty-two normotensive (blood pressure <120/80 mmHg), pre-hypertensive (120–139/80–89 mmHg), and hypertensive (>140/90 mmHg) participants were randomly assigned and equally divided between the CWIT and CT groups. Both groups participated in the assigned exercise protocol 30 minutes per day, four days per week for eight weeks. Resting blood pressure, resting heart rate, and mind-body wellness were measured pre- and post-intervention. A total of 47 participants (15 females and 32 males) were included in the analysis. The CWIT group had a non-significant trend of reduced systolic blood pressure (SBP) and increased diastolic blood pressure (DBP) while the CT group had a statistically significant decrease in awake SBP (p = 0.01) and total SBP (p = 0.01) and a non-significant decrease in DBP. With both groups combined, the female participants had a statistically significant decrease in awake SBP (p = 0.002), asleep SBP (p = 0.01), total SBP (p = 0.003), awake DBP (p = 0.02), and total DBP (p = 0.05). The male participants had an increase in SBP and DBP with total DBP showing a statistically significant increase (p = 0.05). Neither group had a consistent change in resting heart rate. Both groups showed improved mind-body wellness. CWIT and CT reduced resting blood pressure, with CT having a greater effect. Resting heart rate did not change in either group. Additionally, both CWIT and CT improved mind-body wellness. PMID:27182421

  19. Dependence of P-wave dispersion on mean arterial pressure as an independent hemodynamic variable in school children

    PubMed Central

    González, Emilio F.; Llanes, María del Carmen; Llanes, Merlin Garí; García, Yosvany

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: The relationship between diastolic dysfunction and P-wave dispersion (PWD) in the electrocardiogram has been studied for some time. In this regard, echocardiography is emerging as a diagnostic tool to improve risk stratification for mild hypertension. Objective: To determine the dependence of PWD on the electrocardiogram and on echocardiographic variables in a pediatric population. Methods: 515 children from three elementary schools were studied from a total of 565 children. Those whose parents did not want them to take part in the study, as well as those with known congenital diseases, were excluded. Tests including 12-lead surface ECGs and 4 blood pressure (BP) measurements were performed. Maximum and minimum P-values were measured, and the PWD on the electrocardiogram was calculated. Echocardiography for structural measurements and the pulsed Doppler of mitral flow were also performed. Results: A significant correlation in statistical variables was found between PWD and mean BP for pre-hypertensive and hypertensive children, i.e., r = 0.32, p <0.01 and r = 0.33, p <0.01, respectively. There was a significant correlation found between PWD and the left atrial area (r = 0.45 and p <0.01). Conclusions: We highlight the dependency between PWD, the electrocardiogram and mean blood pressure. We also draw attention to the dependence of PWD on the duration of the mitral inflow A-wave. This result provides an explanation for earlier changes in atrial electrophysiological and hemodynamic characteristics in pediatric patients. PMID:24892616

  20. Model of a surface-wave discharge at atmospheric pressure with a fixed profile of the gas temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikovski, M.; Kiss'ovski, Zh; Tatarova, E.

    2016-03-01

    We present a 3D model of a surface-wave-sustained discharge at 2.45 GHz at atmospheric pressure. A small plasma source creates a plasma column in a dielectric tube and a plasma torch is observed above the top. The plasma parameters and the axial profile of the gas temperature are significantly changed in the presence of the substrate above the plasma torch. The Boltzmann equation for electrons under the local approximation is solved, together with the heavy particle balance equations at a fixed axial profile of the gas temperature. The model of this finite length plasma column includes also the dispersion relation of azimuthally-symmetric surface waves. A detailed collisional-radiative model is also implemented for argon discharge at atmospheric pressure, which includes 21 rate balance equations for excited Ar atoms [(Ar(1s5-1s2), Ar(2p10-2p1), Ar(2s3d), Ar(3p)], for positive Ar+ and Ar2 + ions and for excited molecules. The changes in the EEDF shape and the mean electron energy along the plasma column are investigated and the axial structures of the discharge and plasma parameters are obtained.

  1. Influence of field emission on the propagation of cylindrical fast ionization wave in atmospheric-pressure nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levko, Dmitry; Raja, Laxminarayan L.

    2016-04-01

    The influence of field emission of electrons from surfaces on the fast ionization wave (FIW) propagation in high-voltage nanosecond pulse discharge in the atmospheric-pressure nitrogen is studied by a one-dimensional Particle-in-Cell Monte Carlo Collisions model. A strong influence of field emission on the FIW dynamics and plasma parameters is obtained. Namely, the accounting for the field emission makes possible the bridging of the cathode-anode gap by rather dense plasma (˜1013 cm-3) in less than 1 ns. This is explained by the generation of runaway electrons from the field emitted electrons. These electrons are able to cross the entire gap pre-ionizing it and promoting the ionization wave propagation. We have found that the propagation of runaway electrons through the gap cannot be accompanied by the streamer propagation, because the runaway electrons align the plasma density gradients. In addition, we have obtained that the field enhancement factor allows controlling the speed of ionization wave propagation.

  2. Black tea lowers blood pressure and wave reflections in fasted and postprandial conditions in hypertensive patients: a randomised study.

    PubMed

    Grassi, Davide; Draijer, Richard; Desideri, Giovambattista; Mulder, Theo; Ferri, Claudio

    2015-02-04

    Hypertension and arterial stiffening are independent predictors of cardiovascular mortality. Flavonoids may exert some vascular protection. We investigated the effects of black tea on blood pressure (BP) and wave reflections before and after fat load in hypertensives. According to a randomized, double-blind, controlled, cross-over design, 19 patients were assigned to consume black tea (129 mg flavonoids) or placebo twice a day for eight days (13 day wash-out period). Digital volume pulse and BP were measured before and 1, 2, 3 and 4 h after tea consumption. Measurements were performed in a fasted state and after a fat load. Compared to placebo, reflection index and stiffness index decreased after tea consumption (p<0.0001). Fat challenge increased wave reflection, which was counteracted by tea consumption (p<0.0001). Black tea decreased systolic and diastolic BP (-3.2 mmHg, p<0.005 and -2.6 mmHg, p<0.0001; respectively) and prevented BP increase after a fat load (p<0.0001). Black tea consumption lowers wave reflections and BP in the fasting state, and during the challenging haemodynamic conditions after a fat load in hypertensives. Considering lipemia-induced impairment of arterial function may occur frequently during the day, our findings suggest regular consumption of black tea may be relevant for cardiovascular protection.

  3. Unusual properties of high-compliance porosity extracted from measurements of pressure-dependent wave velocities in rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaitsev, Vladimir Y.; Radostin, Andrey V.; Pasternak, Elena; Dyskin, Arcady

    2016-04-01

    Conventionally the interpretation of wave velocities and their variations under load is conducted assuming that closable cracks have simple planar shapes, like the popular model of penny-shape cracks. For such cracks, the proportion between complementary variations in different elastic parameters of rocks (such as S- and P-wave velocities) is strictly pre-determined, in particular, it is independent of the crack aspect ratio and rather weakly dependent on the Poisson's ratio of the intact rock. Real rocks, however, contain multitude of cracks of different geometry. Faces of such cracks can exhibit complex modes of interaction when closed by external load, which may result in very different ratios between normal- and shear compliances of such defects. In order to describe the reduction of different elastic moduli, we propose a model in which the compliances of crack-like defects are explicitly decoupled and are not predetermined, so that the ratio q between total normal- and shear- compliances imparted to the rock mass (as well as individual values of these compliances) can be estimated from experimental data on reduction of different elastic moduli (e.g., pressure dependences of P- and S-wave velocities). Physically, the so-extracted ratio q can be interpreted as intrinsic property of individual crack-like defects similar to each other, or as a characteristic of proportion between concentrations of pure normal cracks with very large q and pure shear cracks with q→0. The latter case can correspond, e.g., to saturated cracks in which weakly-compressible liquid prevents crack closing under normal loading. It can be shown that for conventional dry planar cracks, the compliance ratio is q ˜2. The developed model applied to the data on wave-velocity variations with external pressure indicates that elastic properties of the real crack-like defects in rocks can differ considerably from the usually assumed ones. Comparison with experimental data on variations P- and S-wave

  4. A ceramic damage model for analyses of multi-layered ceramic-core sandwich panels under blast wave pressure loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Keejoo

    2005-11-01

    A damage model for ceramic materials is developed and incorporated into the geometrically nonlinear solid shell element formulation for dynamic analyses of multi-layered ceramic armor panels under blast wave pressure loading. The damage model takes into account material behaviors observed from multi-axial dynamic tests on Aluminum Nitride (AlN) ceramic. The ceramic fails in a brittle or gradual fashion, depending upon the hydrostatic pressure and applied strain-rate. In the model, the gradual failure is represented by two states: the initial and final failure states. These states are described by two separate failure surfaces that are pressure-dependent and strain-rate-dependent. A scalar damage parameter is defined via using the two failure surfaces, based on the assumption that the local stress state determines material damage and its level. In addition, the damage model accounts for the effect of existing material damage on the new damage. The multi-layered armor panel of interest is comprised of an AlN-core sandwich with unidirectional composite skins and a woven composite back-plate. To accommodate the material damage effect of composite layers, a composite failure model in the open literature is adopted and modified into two separate failure models to address different failure mechanisms of the unidirectional and woven composites. In addition, the effect of strain-rates on the material strengths is incorporated into the composite failure models. For finite element modeling, multiple eighteen-node elements are used in the thickness direction to properly describe mechanics of the multi-layered panel. Dynamic analyses of a multi-layered armor panel are conducted under blast wave pressure loadings. The resulting dynamic responses of the panel demonstrate that dynamic analyses that do not take into account material damage and failure significantly under-predict the peak displacement. The under-prediction becomes more pronounced as the blast load level increases

  5. Nonlinear standing wave excitation by series resonance-enhanced harmonics in low pressure capacitive discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lieberman, M. A.; Lichtenberg, A. J.; Kawamura, Emi; Marakhtanov, A. M.

    2015-09-01

    It is well known that standing waves having radially center-high rf voltage profiles exist in high frequency capacitive discharges. It is also known that in radially uniform discharges, the capacitive sheath nonlinearities excite strong nonlinear series resonance harmonics that enhance the electron power deposition. In this work, we consider the coupling of the series resonance-enhanced harmonics to the standing waves. A one-dimensional, asymmetric radial transmission line model is developed incorporating the wave and nonlinear sheath physics and a self-consistent dc potential. The resulting coupled pde equation set is solved numerically to determine the discharge voltages and currents. A 10 mT argon base case is chosen with plasma density 2 ×1016 m-3, gap width 2 cm and conducting electrode radius 15 cm, driven by a high frequency 500 V source with source resistance 0.5 ohms. We find that nearby resonances lead to an enhanced ratio of 4.5 of the electron power per unit area on axis, compared to the average. The radial dependence of electron power with frequency shows significant variations, with the central enhancement and sharpness of the spatial resonances depending in a complicated way on the harmonic structure. Work supported by DOE Fusion Energy Science Contract DE-SC000193 and by a gift from the Lam Research Corporation.

  6. Optimized Shapes of Ocsillating Resonators for Generating High-Amplitude Pressure Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Xiao-Fan; Finkbeiner, Joshua; Daniels, Christopher; Steinetz, Bruce M.

    2003-01-01

    It is well known that the resonator geometry strongly influences the resonant frequencies of an acoustical resonator and the generated nonlinear standing pressure waveform. Maximizing the ratio of maximum to minimum gas pressure at an end of an oscillating resonator by optimizing the cavity contour is investigated numerically. A quasi-Newton type scheme is used to find optimized axisymmetric resonator shapes to achieve the maximum pressure compression ratio. The acoustical field is solved using a one-dimensional model, and the resonance frequency shift and hysteresis effects are obtained through an automation scheme based on continuation methods. Results are presented from optimizing cone, horn-cone, and cosine resonator geometries. Significant performance improvement is found in the optimized shapes over others previously published. Different optimized shapes are found when starting with different initial guesses, indicating multiple local extrema. The numerical model is validated by comparing with the experimental results of a horn-cone shaped resonator.

  7. Experimental and numerical characterization of the sound pressure in standing wave acoustic levitators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stindt, A.; Andrade, M. A. B.; Albrecht, M.; Adamowski, J. C.; Panne, U.; Riedel, J.

    2014-01-01

    A novel method for predictions of the sound pressure distribution in acoustic levitators is based on a matrix representation of the Rayleigh integral. This method allows for a fast calculation of the acoustic field within the resonator. To make sure that the underlying assumptions and simplifications are justified, this approach was tested by a direct comparison to experimental data. The experimental sound pressure distributions were recorded by high spatially resolved frequency selective microphone scanning. To emphasize the general applicability of the two approaches, the comparative studies were conducted for four different resonator geometries. In all cases, the results show an excellent agreement, demonstrating the accuracy of the matrix method.

  8. Methane oxidation behind reflected shock waves: Ignition delay times measured by pressure and flame band emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brabbs, T. A.; Robertson, T. F.

    1986-01-01

    Ignition delay data were recorded for three methane-oxygen-argon mixtures (phi = 0.5, 1.0, 2.0) for the temperature range 1500 to 1920 K. Quiet pressure trances enabled us to obtain delay times for the start of the experimental pressure rise. These times were in good agreement with those obtained from the flame band emission at 3700 A. The data correlated well with the oxygen and methane dependence of Lifshitz, but showed a much stronger temperature dependence (phi = 0.5 delta E = 51.9, phi = 1.0 delta = 58.8, phi = 2.0 delta E = 58.7 Kcal). The effect of probe location on the delay time measurement was studied. It appears that the probe located 83 mm from the reflecting surface measured delay times which may not be related to the initial temperature and pressure. It was estimated that for a probe located 7 mm from the reflecting surface, the measured delay time would be about 10 microseconds too short, and it was suggested that delay times less than 100 microsecond should not be used. The ignition period was defined as the time interval between start of the experimental pressure rise and 50 percent of the ignition pressure. This time interval was measured for three gas mixtures and found to be similar (40 to 60 micro sec) for phi = 1.0 and 0.5 but much longer (100 to 120) microsecond for phi = 2.0. It was suggested that the ignition period would be very useful to the kinetic modeler in judging the agreement between experimental and calculated delay times.

  9. On the Stability of Wave Disturbances in Non-Pressure Round-Cylindrical Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagoshidze, Shalva

    2015-04-01

    In hydraulic engineering practice, is well know of and take into account the fact that for a nearly fully filled gravity-flow tunnel with a circular cross section the water flows with shocks, i.e. unstable. Such a phenomenon also occurs when emptying a bottle, but no mathematical confirmation has so far been found for it. In the paper, the estimate of the flow stability is obtained for two limiting cases: - when the channel of circular cross-section is nearly fully filled with water and when it is nearly empty, i.e. the water flow in the channel has a small depth as compared with the radius of the water conduit. Wave equations written in a cylindrical system of coordinates x,r,θ where the x- axis coincides with the axis of the channel; r is the radius vector, θ is the angle counted off from the equatorial plane of the channel upward (with sign "+') and downward (with sign "-') are simplified by neglecting the change of the polar angle (π 2 -θ)in limit of a small width of the free surface of the flow. As a result of this simplification the Helmholtz equation for the wave potential reduces to a Bessel equation with respect to the function ψ(r) not depending on the angle θ and its asymptotic solution will be expressed by the relation ° -- R0 ψ(r) = C -r-cosh k(R0 - r). (1) Dispersion relations will take the form σ = kU0 ± i°gk-tanh-k(R0--h) (2) - for channels with nearly full filling, and ° -------- σ = kU0 ± gktanhk(R0 - h) (3) - for round-cylindrical channels with a small water depth. In these relations, R0 is the radius of the channel, U0 is the stationary water flow velocity, i is the imaginary unit, h is the distance between the horizontal axis and the water level in the channel, σ is the wave disturbance frequency, k is the wave number, C is an arbitrary constant. In the first case, the relation (2) indicates the occurrence of Helmholtz instability of wave disturbances independently of a velocity value of stationary water flow. This result fully

  10. SMALL-SCALE PRESSURE-BALANCED STRUCTURES DRIVEN BY MIRROR-MODE WAVES IN THE SOLAR WIND

    SciTech Connect

    Yao, Shuo; He, J.-S.; Tu, C.-Y.; Wang, L.-H.; Marsch, E.

    2013-10-20

    Recently, small-scale pressure-balanced structures (PBSs) have been studied with regard to their dependence on the direction of the local mean magnetic field B{sub 0} . The present work continues these studies by investigating the compressive wave mode forming small PBSs, here for B{sub 0} quasi-perpendicular to the x-axis of Geocentric Solar Ecliptic coordinates (GSE-x). All the data used were measured by WIND in the quiet solar wind. From the distribution of PBSs on the plane determined by the temporal scale and angle θ{sub xB} between the GSE-x and B{sub 0} , we notice that at θ{sub xB} = 115° the PBSs appear at temporal scales ranging from 700 s to 60 s. In the corresponding temporal segment, the correlations between the plasma thermal pressure P{sub th} and the magnetic pressure P{sub B}, as well as that between the proton density N{sub p} and the magnetic field strength B, are investigated. In addition, we use the proton velocity distribution functions to calculate the proton temperatures T and T{sub ∥}. Minimum Variance Analysis is applied to find the magnetic field minimum variance vector B{sub N} . We also study the time variation of the cross-helicity σ{sub c} and the compressibility C{sub p} and compare these with values from numerical predictions for the mirror mode. In this way, we finally identify a short segment that has T > T{sub ∥}, proton β ≅ 1, both pairs of P{sub th}-P{sub B} and N{sub p}-B showing anti-correlation, and σ{sub c} ≈ 0 with C{sub p} > 0. Although the examination of σ{sub c} and C{sub p} is not conclusive, it provides helpful additional information for the wave mode identification. Additionally, B{sub N} is found to be highly oblique to B{sub 0} . Thus, this work suggests that a candidate mechanism for forming small-scale PBSs in the quiet solar wind is due to mirror-mode waves.

  11. Pyroxenes and olivines: Structural implications of shock-wave data for high pressure phases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeanloz, R.; Ahrens, T. J.

    1975-01-01

    The nature of the shock-induced, high-pressure phases of olivine and pyroxene rocks is examined in the light of data for the densities of a new class of perovskite-related silicate structures. Also examined are some new Hugoniot and release adiabat data for bronzite. Reexamining available shock data for magnesian pyroxenes and olivines leads to the conclusion that they define a mixed phase (or disequilibrium) region to about the 100 GPa range, related to the kinetics of phase transformation in these silicates. By recognizing this point, certain discrepancies in previous interpretations of shock data can be explained. A set of theoretical Hugonoits for pyroxene and olivine stoichiometry, perovskite-bearing assemblages was constructed based on their properties deduced from high-pressure work, showing that the shock data is compatible with transformations to perovskites in the 45-7GPa region. Finally, the shock data indicate very similar properties for olivine and pyroxene at high pressures making them both equally likely candidates for the lower mantle.

  12. Nonlinear standing wave excitation by series resonance-enhanced harmonics in low pressure capacitive discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lieberman, M. A.; Lichtenberg, A. J.; Kawamura, E.; Marakhtanov, A. M.

    2015-10-01

    It is well-known that standing waves having radially center-high rf voltage profiles exist in high frequency capacitive discharges. It is also known that in radially uniform discharges, the capacitive sheath nonlinearities excite strong nonlinear series resonance harmonics that enhance the electron power deposition. In this work, we consider the coupling of the series resonance-enhanced harmonics to the standing waves. A one-dimensional, asymmetric radial transmission line model is developed incorporating the wave and nonlinear sheath physics and a self-consistent dc potential, for both conducting and insulating electrode surfaces. The resulting coupled pde equation set is solved numerically to determine the discharge voltages and currents. A 10 mTorr argon plasma is chosen with density 2× {{10}16} m-3, gap width 2 cm and conducting electrode radius 15 cm, driven by a 500 V rf source with resistance 0.5 Ω . We examine a set of frequencies from near 30 MHz up to frequencies more than three times as high. For most frequencies, no harmonics correspond exactly with the series or spatial resonances, which is the generic situation. Nevertheless, nearby resonances lead to a significantly enhanced ratio of the electron power per unit area on axis, compared to the average. Nearly similar results are found for insulating electrodes. Strong effects are seen for varying source resistance: high (50 Ω ) resistance damps out most of the harmonic activity, while zero source resistance leads to a non-steady discharge with bias voltage relaxation oscillations. Stronger harmonic effects are seen for an increased radius of 30 cm, as lower harmonics become spatially resonant at lower frequencies. The radial dependence of electron power with frequency showed significant variations, with the central enhancement and sharpness of the spatial resonances depending in a complicated way on the amplitudes of the nearby series resonance current harmonics and the phase relations among

  13. Measurement of high-pressure shock waves in cryogenic deuterium-tritium ice layered capsule implosions on NIF.

    PubMed

    Robey, H F; Moody, J D; Celliers, P M; Ross, J S; Ralph, J; Le Pape, S; Berzak Hopkins, L; Parham, T; Sater, J; Mapoles, E R; Holunga, D M; Walters, C F; Haid, B J; Kozioziemski, B J; Dylla-Spears, R J; Krauter, K G; Frieders, G; Ross, G; Bowers, M W; Strozzi, D J; Yoxall, B E; Hamza, A V; Dzenitis, B; Bhandarkar, S D; Young, B; Van Wonterghem, B M; Atherton, L J; Landen, O L; Edwards, M J; Boehly, T R

    2013-08-01

    The first measurements of multiple, high-pressure shock waves in cryogenic deuterium-tritium (DT) ice layered capsule implosions on the National Ignition Facility have been performed. The strength and relative timing of these shocks must be adjusted to very high precision in order to keep the DT fuel entropy low and compressibility high. All previous measurements of shock timing in inertial confinement fusion implosions [T. R. Boehly et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 195005 (2011), H. F. Robey et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 215004 (2012)] have been performed in surrogate targets, where the solid DT ice shell and central DT gas regions were replaced with a continuous liquid deuterium (D2) fill. This report presents the first experimental validation of the assumptions underlying this surrogate technique.

  14. Efficient prediction methods for the micro-pressure wave from a high-speed train entering a tunnel using the Kirchhoff formulation.

    PubMed

    Yoon, T; Lee, S

    2001-11-01

    The compression wave generated by a high-speed train emerging from the exit portal of a tunnel gives rise to an impulsive noise called a micro-pressure wave. In this study, new methods for the prediction of sonic-boom noise are proposed. The first method combines acoustic monopole analysis and the method of characteristics with the Kirchhoff method. The compression wave from a train entering a tunnel is calculated by an approximate compact Green's function, and the resultant noise at the tunnel exit is predicted by a linear Kirchhoff formulation. The second method couples the Kirchhoff formulation with the Euler equation, which is solved numerically for the generation and propagation of the compression wave. Numerical prediction of the compression wave, the propagation in the tunnel, and the micro-pressure wave obtained by the present methods are compared with measured data. The numerical results exhibit a reasonable agreement with the experimental data. The proposed methods in this study are shown to be very useful design tools for the nose shape of trains and the geometry of tunnels, and they can be utilized to minimize the pressure fluctuation in the tunnel and the corresponding booming noise. PMID:11757928

  15. Two-wave photon Doppler velocimetry measurements in direct impact Hopkinson pressure bar experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lea, Lewis J.; Jardine, Andrew P.

    2015-09-01

    Direct impact Hopkinson pressure bar systems offer many potential advantages over split Hopkinson pressure bars, including access to higher strain rates, higher strains for equivalent striker velocity and system length, lower dispersion and faster achievement of force equilibrium. Currently advantages are gained at a significant cost: the fact that input bar data is unavailable removes all information about the striker impacted specimen face, preventing the determination of force equilibrium, and requiring approximations to be made on the sample deformation history. Recently photon Doppler velocimetry methods have been developed, which can replace strain gauges on Hopkinson bars. In this paper we discuss an experimental method and complementary data analysis for using Doppler velocimetry to measure surface velocities of the striker and output bars in a direct impact bar experiment, allowing similar data to be recorded as in a split bar system, with the same level of convenience. We discuss extracting velocity and force measurements, and improving the accuracy and convenience of Doppler velocimetry on Hopkinson bars. Results obtained using the technique are compared to equivalent split bar tests, showing improved stress measurements for the lowest and highest strains.

  16. Shock-wave properties and high-pressure equations of state of geophysically important materials. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boslough, M. B.

    1983-01-01

    Shock wave (Hugoniot), shock temperature, and release data are presented for several geophysically important, refractory materials. A sensitive multichannel optical pyrometer was developed to measure shock temperatures (2500 to 5600 K at pressures from 48 to 117 GPa) in anorthite (CaAl2Si2O8) glass. Shock temperatures of 3750 to 6000 K at pressures from 140 to 182 GPa were measured in calcium oxide (CaO). Temperature data were used to constrain the energetics of the B1-B2 phase transition at 70 GPa in CaO, and to construct a finite strain equation of state for CaO consistent with previous Hugoniot data. The CaO equation of state was used with equation of state parameters of other oxides to construct a theoretical mixed oxide Hugoniot of anorthite, which is in agreement with new Hugoniot data above about 50 GPa, determined using experimental techniques developed. The mixed oxide model, however, overestimates the shock temperatures, and does not accurately predict measured release paths.

  17. Theoretical study of turbulent channel flow: Bulk properties, pressure fluctuations, and propagation of electromagnetic waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canuto, V. M.; Hartke, G. J.; Battaglia, A.; Chasnov, J.; Albrecht, G. F.

    1988-01-01

    In this paper, we apply two theoretical turbulence models, DIA and the recent GISS model, to study properties of a turbulent channel flow. Both models provide a turbulent kinetic energy spectral function E(k) as the solution of a non-linear equation; the two models employ the same source function but different closures. The source function is characterized by a rate n sub s (k) which is derived from the complex eigenvalues of the Orr--Sommerfeld (OS) equation in which the basic flow is taken to be of a Poiseuille type. The O--S equation is solved for a variety of Reynolds numbers corresponding to available experimental data. A physical argument is presented whereby the central line velocity characterizing the basic flow, U0 sup L, is not to be identified with the U0 appearing in the experimental Reynolds number. The theoretical results are compared with two types of experimental data: (1) turbulence bulk properties, and (2) properties that depend stongly on the structure of the turbulence spectrun at low wave numbers. The only existing analytical expression for Pi (k) cannot be used in the present case because it applies to the case of a flat plate, not a finite channel.

  18. Theoretical study of turbulent channel flow - Bulk properties, pressure fluctuations, and propagation of electromagnetic waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canuto, V. M.; Hartke, G. J.; Battaglia, A.; Chasnov, J.; Albrecht, G. F.

    1990-01-01

    In this paper, we apply two theoretical turbulence models, DIA and the recent GISS model, to study properties of a turbulent channel flow. Both models provide a turbulent kinetic energy spectral function E(k) as the solution of a non-linear equation; the two models employ the same source function but different closures. The source function is characterized by a rate n sub s (k) which is derived from the complex eigenvalues of the Orr-Sommerfeld (OS) equation in which the basic flow is taken to be of a Poiseuille type. The O-S equation is solved for a variety of Reynolds numbers corresponding to available experimental data. A physical argument is presented whereby the central line velocity characterizing the basic flow, U0 sup L, is not to be identified with the U0 appearing in the experimental Reynolds number. The theoretical results are compared with two types of experimental data: (1) turbulence bulk properties, and (2) properties that depend strongly on the structure of the turbulence spectrum at low wave numbers. The only existing analytical expression for Pi (k) cannot be used in the present case because it applies to the case of a flat plate, not a finite channel.

  19. Harvey with a modern twist: how and why conducting arteries amplify the pressure wave originating from the heart.

    PubMed

    Schaafsma, A

    2014-05-01

    Current views on cardiovascular physiology differ little from that published by William Harvey in 1628: the heart delivers all energy for blood circulation, forcing its contents into the aorta, via arteries, arterioles and capillaries into the venous system that collects the blood and returns it to the right side of the heart. Similarly, blood from the right side passes through pulmonary arteries and arterioles to pulmonary veins before returning to the left side of the heart. However, from aorta to capillaries there is a great increase in overall cross-sectional area. The arterial system can be seen as a funnel, the heart pumping blood into its narrow end. Theoretically, this implies that pulsatile energy delivered by the heart dilutes significantly along its way through the arterial tree. Also, unfavorable tissue conditions, such as elevated pressure, impede proper perfusion when blood can pass just as easy through adjacent capillary systems. Finally, blood will experience more resistance to flow for capillary systems more distant to the heart due to its longer trajectory. This implies that capillary systems closer to the heart are more easily perfused than more distant ones. In reality, the pulse from the heart has been shown to increase and accelerate towards periphery. This, together with transcranial Doppler observations on the variation in wave morphology in intracranial arteries, for instance during CO2-reactivity testing and during cardiac arrhythmia, has led to the theory of arterial acceleration: at stroke onset, the arterial pressure wave resulting from myocardial contraction is enhanced by a short-lasting and well-synchronised contraction within the smooth muscle layers of conducting arteries. This results in a temporary 'stiffening' of the arterial tree by which cardiac pressure during early systole is amplified and distributed into all the body's capillary systems. This theory would overcome all theoretical and observational concerns sketched above

  20. Harvey with a modern twist: how and why conducting arteries amplify the pressure wave originating from the heart.

    PubMed

    Schaafsma, A

    2014-05-01

    Current views on cardiovascular physiology differ little from that published by William Harvey in 1628: the heart delivers all energy for blood circulation, forcing its contents into the aorta, via arteries, arterioles and capillaries into the venous system that collects the blood and returns it to the right side of the heart. Similarly, blood from the right side passes through pulmonary arteries and arterioles to pulmonary veins before returning to the left side of the heart. However, from aorta to capillaries there is a great increase in overall cross-sectional area. The arterial system can be seen as a funnel, the heart pumping blood into its narrow end. Theoretically, this implies that pulsatile energy delivered by the heart dilutes significantly along its way through the arterial tree. Also, unfavorable tissue conditions, such as elevated pressure, impede proper perfusion when blood can pass just as easy through adjacent capillary systems. Finally, blood will experience more resistance to flow for capillary systems more distant to the heart due to its longer trajectory. This implies that capillary systems closer to the heart are more easily perfused than more distant ones. In reality, the pulse from the heart has been shown to increase and accelerate towards periphery. This, together with transcranial Doppler observations on the variation in wave morphology in intracranial arteries, for instance during CO2-reactivity testing and during cardiac arrhythmia, has led to the theory of arterial acceleration: at stroke onset, the arterial pressure wave resulting from myocardial contraction is enhanced by a short-lasting and well-synchronised contraction within the smooth muscle layers of conducting arteries. This results in a temporary 'stiffening' of the arterial tree by which cardiac pressure during early systole is amplified and distributed into all the body's capillary systems. This theory would overcome all theoretical and observational concerns sketched above

  1. Experimental study of pressure and heating rate on a swept cylindrical leading edge resulting from swept shock wave interference. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glass, Christopher E.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of cylindrical leading edge sweep on surface pressure and heat transfer rate for swept shock wave interference were investigated. Experimental tests were conducted in the Calspan 48-inch Hypersonic Shock Tunnel at a nominal Mach number of 8, nominal unit Reynolds number of 1.5 x 10 to the 6th power per foot, leading edge and incident shock generator sweep angles of 0, 15, and 30 deg, and incident shock generator angle-of-attack fixed at 12.5 deg. Detailed surface pressure and heat transfer rate on the cylindircal leading edge of a swept shock wave interference model were measured at the region of the maximum surface pressure and heat transfer rate. Results show that pressure and heat transfer rate on the cylindrical leading edge of the shock wave interference model were reduced as the sweep was increased over the range of tested parameters. Peak surface pressure and heat transfer rate on the cylinder were about 10 and 30 times the undisturbed flow stagnation point value, respectively, for the 0 deg sweep test. A comparison of the 15 and 30 deg swept results with the 0 deg swept results showed that peak pressure was reduced about 13 percent and 44 percent, respectively, and peak heat transfer rate was reduced about 7 percent and 27 percent, respectively.

  2. Effect of positive end-expiratory pressure on acoustic wave propagation in experimental porcine lung injury.

    PubMed

    Räsänen, Jukka; Nemergut, Michael E; Gavriely, Noam

    2015-03-01

    To evaluate the effect of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) on sound propagation through injured lungs, we injected a multifrequency broad-band sound signal into the airway of eight anesthetized, intubated and mechanically ventilated pigs, while recording transmitted sound at three locations bilaterally on the chest wall. Oleic acid injections effected a severe pulmonary oedema predominately in the dependent lung regions, with an average increase in venous admixture from 19 ± 15 to 59 ± 14% (P < 0.001), and a reduction in dynamic respiratory system compliance from 34 ± 7 to 14 ± 4 ml cmH2 O(-1) (P < 0.001). A concomitant decrease in sound transit time was seen in the dependent lung regions (P < 0.05); no statistically significant change occurred in the lateral or non-dependent areas. The application of PEEP resulted in a decrease in venous admixture, increase in respiratory system compliance and return of the sound transit time to pre-injury levels in the dependent lung regions. Our results indicate that sound transmission velocity increases in lung tissue affected by permeability-type pulmonary oedema in a manner reversible during alveolar recruitment with PEEP.

  3. Abnormal acoustic wave velocities in basaltic and (Fe,Al)-bearing silicate glasses at high pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jin; Lin, Jung-Fu

    2014-12-01

    We have measured acoustic VP and VS velocities of (Fe,Al)-bearing MgSiO3 silicate glasses and an Icelandic basalt glass up to 25 GPa. The velocity profiles of the (Fe,Al)-bearing and basaltic silicate glasses display decreased VP and VS with minima at approximately 5 and 2 GPa, respectively, which could be explained by the mode softening in the aluminosilicate networks. Our results represent the first observation of such velocity softening extending into the chemically complex basaltic glass at a relatively low transition pressure, which is likely due to its degree of polymerization, while the Fe and Al substitutions reduce sound velocities in MgSiO3 glass. If the velocity softening in the basaltic and silicate glasses can be used as analogs for understanding melts in Earth's interior, these observations suggest that the melt fraction needed to account for the velocity reduction in the upper mantle low-velocity zone may be smaller than previously thought.

  4. Steady normal shock wave solution tables of parahydrogen for total temperatures from 30 K to 290 K and for total pressure from 1 ATM to 10 ATM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haut, R. C.; Adcock, J. B.

    1976-01-01

    The steady normal shock wave solutions of parahydrogen at various total pressures and total temperatures were numerically determined by iterating the upstream Mach number and by using a modified interval halving technique. The results obtained are compared with the ideal diatomic gas values and are presented in tabulated form.

  5. Childhood Obesity Associates Haemodynamic and Vascular Changes That Result in Increased Central Aortic Pressure with Augmented Incident and Reflected Wave Components, without Changes in Peripheral Amplification

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Juan M.; García-Espinosa, Victoria; Curcio, Santiago; Arana, Maite; Chiesa, Pedro; Giachetto, Gustavo; Zócalo, Yanina; Bia, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    The aims were to determine if childhood obesity is associated with increased central aortic blood pressure (BP) and to characterize haemodynamic and vascular changes associated with BP changes in obese children and adolescents by means of analyzing changes in cardiac output (stroke volume, SV), arterial stiffness (aortic pulse wave velocity, PWV), peripheral vascular resistances (PVR), and net and relative contributions of reflected waves to the aortic pulse wave amplitude. We included 117 subjects (mean/range age: 10 (5–15) years, 49 females), who were obese (OB) or had normal weight (NW). Peripheral and central aortic BP, PWV, and pulse wave-derived parameters (augmentation index, amplitude of forward and backward components) were measured with tonometry (SphygmoCor) and oscillometry (Mobil-O-Graph). With independence of the presence of dyslipidemia, hypertension, or sedentarism, the aortic systolic and pulse BP were higher in OB than in NW subjects. The increase in central BP could not be explained by the elevation in the relative contribution of reflections to the aortic pressure wave and higher PVR or by an augmented peripheral reflection coefficient. Instead, the rise in central BP could be explained by an increase in the amplitude of both incident and reflect wave components associated to augmented SV and/or PWV. PMID:26881081

  6. Ellagic acid improves electrocardiogram waves and blood pressure against global cerebral ischemia rat experimental models

    PubMed Central

    Nejad, Khojasteh Hoseiny; Dianat, Mahin; Sarkaki, Alireza; Naseri, Mohammad Kazem Gharib; Badavi, Mohammad; Farbood, Yaghoub

    2015-01-01

    Background: Global cerebral ischemia (GCIR) arises in patients that are shown a variety of clinical difficulty including cardiac arrest, asphyxia, and shock. In spite of advances in understanding of the brain, ischemia and protective effects to improve ischemic injury still remain unknown. The aim of our study was to investigate the effect of ellagic acid (EA) pretreatment in the rat models of global cerebral ischemia reperfusion. Methods: This experimental study was conducted in 2014 at the Physiology Research Center of the Ahvaz Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences in Ahvaz, Iran. Adult male Wistar rats (250–300 g) were used in this study. GCIR was induced by bilateral vertebral and common carotid arteries occlusion (4-VO). 32 rats were divided randomly to four groups: 1) So (Sham) received normal saline as vehicle of EA, 2) EA, 3) normal saline + GCIR, and 4) EA + GCIR. After anesthesia (a mix of xylazine and ketamine), animal subjected to 20 minutes of ischemia followed by 30 minutes of reperfusion in related groups. EA (100 mg/kg, dissolved in normal saline) or 1.5 ml/kg normal saline was administered (gavage, 10 days) to the related groups. EEG was recorded from NTS in GCIR treated groups. Results: Present data showed that: 1) EEG in GCIR treated groups was flattened; 2) Blood pressure, voltage of QRS and P-R interval were reduced significantly in the ischemic groups compared to before ischemia, and pretreatment with EA prevented this reduction; and 3) MDA level and heart rate was increased by GCIR and pretreatment with EA reduced MDA level and restored the HR to normal level. Conclusion: Results indicate that global cerebral ischemia-reperfusion impairs certain heart functions and ellagic acid as an antioxidant can restore these parameters. The results of this study suggest the possible utility of ellagic acid in patients with brain stroke. PMID:26396728

  7. Developing a platform for high-resolution phase contrast imaging of high pressure shock waves in matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schropp, Andreas; Patommel, Jens; Seiboth, Frank; Arnold, Brice; Galtier, Eric C.; Lee, Hae Ja; Nagler, Bob; Hastings, Jerome B.; Schroer, Christian G.

    2012-10-01

    Current and upcoming X-ray sources, such as the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC, USA), the SPring-8 Angstrom Compact Free Electron Laser (SACLA, Japan), or the X-ray Free Electron Laser (XFEL, Germany) will provide X-ray beams with outstanding properties.1, 2 Short and intense X-ray pulses of about 50 fs time duration and even shorter will push X-ray science to new frontiers such as, e. g., in high-resolution X-ray imaging, high-energy-density physics or in dynamical studies based on pump-probe techniques. Fast processes in matter often require high-resolution imaging capabilities either by magnified imaging in direct space or diffractive imaging in reciprocal space. In both cases highest resolutions require focusing the X-ray beam.3, 4 In order to further develop high-resolution imaging at free-electron laser sources we are planning a platform to carry out high-resolution phase contrast imaging experiments based on Beryllium compound refractive X-ray lenses (Be-CRLs) at the Matter in Extreme Conditions (MEC) endstation of the LCLS. The instrument provides all necessary equipment to induce high pressure shock waves by optical lasers. The propagation of a shock wave is then monitored with an X-ray Free Electron Laser (FEL) pulse by magnified phase contrast imaging. With the CRL optics, X-ray beam sizes in the sub-100nm range are expected, leading to a similar spatial resolution in the direct coherent projection image. The experiment combines different state-of-the art scientific techniques that are currently available at the LCLS. In this proceedings paper we describe the technical developments carried out at the LCLS in order to implement magnified X-ray phase contrast imaging at the MEC endstation.

  8. 3D velocity distribution of P- and S-waves in a biotite gneiss, measured in oil as the pressure medium: Comparison with velocity measurements in a multi-anvil pressure apparatus and with texture-based calculated data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lokajíček, T.; Kern, H.; Svitek, T.; Ivankina, T.

    2014-06-01

    Ultrasonic measurements of the 3D velocity distribution of P- and S-waves were performed on a spherical sample of a biotite gneiss from the Outokumpu scientific drill hole. Measurements were done at room temperature and pressures up to 400 and 70 MPa, respectively, in a pressure vessel with oil as a pressure medium. A modified transducer/sample assembly and the installation of a new mechanical system allowed simultaneous measurements of P- and S-wave velocities in 132 independent directions of the sphere on a net in steps of 15°. Proper signals for P- and S-waves could be recorded by coating the sample surface with a high-viscosity shear wave gel and by temporal point contacting of the transmitter and receiver transducers with the sample surface during the measurements. The 3D seismic measurements revealed a strong foliation-related directional dependence (anisotropy) of P- and S-wave velocities, which is confirmed by measurements in a multi-anvil apparatus on a cube-shaped specimen of the same rock. Both experimental approaches show a marked pressure sensitivity of P- and S-wave velocities and velocity anisotropies. With increasing pressure, P- and S-wave velocities increase non-linearly due to progressive closure of micro-cracks. The reverse is true for velocity anisotropy. 3D velocity calculations based on neutron diffraction measurements of crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO) of major minerals show that the intrinsic bulk anisotropy is basically caused by the CPO of biotite constituting about 23 vol.% of the rock. Including the shape of biotite grains and oriented low-aspect ratio microcracks into the modelling increases bulk anisotropy. An important finding from this study is that the measurements on the sample sphere and on the sample cube displayed distinct differences, particularly in shear wave velocities. It is assumed that the differences are due to the different geometries of the samples and the configuration of the transducer-sample assembly

  9. Status of R&D on Mitigating the Effects of Pressure Waves for the Spallation Neutron Source Mercury Target

    SciTech Connect

    Riemer, Bernie; Wendel, Mark W; Felde, David K; Abdou, Ashraf A; McClintock, David A

    2012-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory has been conducting R&D on mitigating the effects of pressure waves in mercury spallation targets since 2001. More precisely, cavitation damage of the target vessel caused by the short beam pulse threatens to limit its lifetime more severely than radiation damage as well as limit its ultimate power capacity and hence its neutron intensity performance. The R&D program has moved from verification of the beam-induced damage phenomena to study of material and surface treatments for damage resistance to the current emphasis on gas injection techniques for damage mitigation. Two techniques are being worked on: injection of small dispersed gas bubbles that mitigate the pressure waves volumetrically; and protective gas walls that isolate the vessel from the damaging effects of collapsing cavitation bubbles. The latter has demonstrated good damage mitigation during in-beam testing with limited pulses, and adequate gas wall coverage at the beam entrance window has been demonstrated with the SNS mercury target flow configuration using a full scale mercury test loop. A question on the required area coverage remains which depends on results from SNS target post irradiation examination. The small gas bubble technique has been less effective during past in-beam tests but those results were with un-optimized and un-verified bubble populations. Another round of in-beam tests with small gas bubbles is planned for 2011. The first SNS target was removed from service in mid 2009 and samples were cut from two locations at the target s beam entrance window. Through-wall damage was observed at the innermost mercury vessel wall (not a containment wall). The damage pattern suggested correlation with the local mercury flow condition which is nearly stagnant at the peak damage location. Detailed post irradiation examination of the samples is under way that will assess the erosion and measure irradiation-induced changes

  10. Unified Application Vapor Screen Flow Visualization and Pressure Sensitive Paint Measurement Techniques to Vortex- and Shock Wave-Dominated Flow Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, Gary E.

    2008-01-01

    Laser vapor screen (LVS) flow visualization and pressure sensitive paint (PSP) techniques were applied in a unified approach to wind tunnel testing of slender wing and missile configurations dominated by vortex flows and shock waves at subsonic, transonic, and supersonic speeds. The off-surface cross-flow patterns using the LVS technique were combined with global PSP surface static pressure mappings to characterize the leading-edge vortices and shock waves that coexist and interact at high angles of attack (alpha). The synthesis of LVS and PSP techniques was also effective in identifying the significant effects of passive surface porosity and the presence of vertical tail surfaces on the flow topologies. An overview is given of LVS and PSP applications in selected experiments on small-scale models of generic slender wing and missile configurations in the NASA Langley Research Center (NASA LaRC) Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel (UPWT) and 8-Foot Transonic Pressure Tunnel (8-Foot TPT).

  11. Unified Application of Vapor Screen Flow Visualization and Pressure Sensitive Paint Measurement Techniques to Vortex- and Shock Wave-Dominated Flow Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, Gary E.

    2010-01-01

    Laser vapor screen (LVS) flow visualization and pressure sensitive paint (PSP) techniques were applied in a unified approach to wind tunnel testing of slender wing and missile configurations dominated by vortex flows and shock waves at subsonic, transonic, and supersonic speeds. The off-surface cross-flow patterns using the LVS technique were combined with global PSP surface static pressure mappings to characterize the leading-edge vortices and shock waves that coexist and interact at high angles of attack. The synthesis of LVS and PSP techniques was also effective in identifying the significant effects of passive surface porosity and the presence of vertical tail surfaces on the flow topologies. An overview is given of LVS and PSP applications in selected experiments on small-scale models of generic slender wing and missile configurations in the NASA Langley Research Center (NASA LaRC) Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel (UPWT) and 8-Foot Transonic Pressure Tunnel (8-Foot TPT).

  12. Wave propagation in the silicon tube: comparison of the two-point and three-point pressure methods.

    PubMed

    Ursino, M; Artioli, E

    1992-01-01

    The values of the propagation coefficient measured on a silicon rubber tube in the frequency range 1-15 Hz were compared, using four different equations. The first formula is based on three simultaneous pressure measurements performed at equidistant points; the remaining three equations are original, and make use of only two of the three pressure measurements together with a no-flow condition at the terminal tube section. The results of our trials demonstrate that the experimental phase velocity, obtained with all equations, settles at a value about 25% in excess of the theoretical one computed with a classic linear mathematical model. This result may be explained by an increase in the dynamical Young modulus with respect to that measured in static conditions. However, the three-point method introduces great errors in the results in the frequency range 11-14 Hz where the spectrum of the second signal becomes minimum. In all cases, the experimental value of attenuation per wavelength at mid-high frequencies is greater than the theoretical one valid for a purely elastic tube. The attenuation values obtained with the two-point method can be explained by introducing a small contribution of wall viscoelasticity (2-3 degrees) into the linear model. Attenuation per wavelength computed with the three-point methods turns out about threefold that computed with each of the two-point formulas. This result supports the idea that the accuracy of the three-point method may be insufficient to achieve correct estimation of wave attenuation, especially when the distance between transducers is small compared to wavelength.

  13. Wave propagation in the silicon tube: comparison of the two-point and three-point pressure methods.

    PubMed

    Ursino, M; Artioli, E

    1992-01-01

    The values of the propagation coefficient measured on a silicon rubber tube in the frequency range 1-15 Hz were compared, using four different equations. The first formula is based on three simultaneous pressure measurements performed at equidistant points; the remaining three equations are original, and make use of only two of the three pressure measurements together with a no-flow condition at the terminal tube section. The results of our trials demonstrate that the experimental phase velocity, obtained with all equations, settles at a value about 25% in excess of the theoretical one computed with a classic linear mathematical model. This result may be explained by an increase in the dynamical Young modulus with respect to that measured in static conditions. However, the three-point method introduces great errors in the results in the frequency range 11-14 Hz where the spectrum of the second signal becomes minimum. In all cases, the experimental value of attenuation per wavelength at mid-high frequencies is greater than the theoretical one valid for a purely elastic tube. The attenuation values obtained with the two-point method can be explained by introducing a small contribution of wall viscoelasticity (2-3 degrees) into the linear model. Attenuation per wavelength computed with the three-point methods turns out about threefold that computed with each of the two-point formulas. This result supports the idea that the accuracy of the three-point method may be insufficient to achieve correct estimation of wave attenuation, especially when the distance between transducers is small compared to wavelength. PMID:1458210

  14. Small Gas Bubble Experiment for Mitigation of Cavitation Damage and Pressure Waves in Short-pulse Mercury Spallation Targets

    SciTech Connect

    Wendel, Mark W; Felde, David K; Sangrey, Robert L; Abdou, Ashraf A; West, David L; Shea, Thomas J; Hasegawa, Shoichi; Kogawa, Hiroyuki; Naoe, Dr. Takashi; Farny, Dr. Caleb H.; Kaminsky, Andrew L

    2014-01-01

    Populations of small helium gas bubbles were introduced into a flowing mercury experiment test loop to evaluate mitigation of beam-pulse induced cavitation damage and pressure waves. The test loop was developed and thoroughly tested at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) prior to irradiations at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center - Weapons Neutron Research Center (LANSCE-WNR) facility. Twelve candidate bubblers were evaluated over a range of mercury flow and gas injection rates by use of a novel optical measurement technique that accurately assessed the generated bubble size distributions. Final selection for irradiation testing included two variations of a swirl bubbler provided by Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC) collaborators and one orifice bubbler developed at SNS. Bubble populations of interest consisted of sizes up to 150 m in radius with achieved gas void fractions in the 10^-5 to 10^-4 range. The nominal WNR beam pulse used for the experiment created energy deposition in the mercury comparable to SNS pulses operating at 2.5 MW. Nineteen test conditions were completed each with 100 pulses, including variations on mercury flow, gas injection and protons per pulse. The principal measure of cavitation damage mitigation was surface damage assessment on test specimens that were manually replaced for each test condition. Damage assessment was done after radiation decay and decontamination by optical and laser profiling microscopy with damaged area fraction and maximum pit depth being the more valued results. Damage was reduced by flow alone; the best mitigation from bubble injection was between half and a quarter that of flow alone. Other data collected included surface motion tracking by three laser Doppler vibrometers (LDV), loop wall dynamic strain, beam diagnostics for charge and beam profile assessment, embedded hydrophones and pressure sensors, and sound measurement by a suite of conventional and contact microphones.

  15. Population transfer and rapid passage effects in a low pressure gas using a continuous wave quantum cascade laser.

    PubMed

    McCormack, E A; Lowth, H S; Bell, M T; Weidmann, D; Ritchie, G A D

    2012-07-21

    A continuous wave quantum cascade laser (cw-QCL) operating at 10 μm has been used to record absorption spectra of low pressure samples of OCS in an astigmatic Herriott cell. As a result of the frequency chirp of the laser, the spectra show clearly the effects of rapid passage on the absorption line shape. At the low chirp rates that can be obtained with the cw-QCL, population transfer between rovibrational quantum states is predicted to be much more efficient than in typical pulsed QCL experiments. This optical pumping is investigated by solving the Maxwell Bloch equations to simulate the propagation of the laser radiation through an inhomogeneously broadened two-level system. The calculated absorption profiles show good quantitative agreement with those measured experimentally over a range of chirp rates and optical thicknesses. It is predicted that at a low chirp rate of 0.13 MHz ns(-1), the population transfer between rovibrational quantum states is 12%, considerably more than that obtained at the higher chirp rates utilised in pulsed QCL experiments.

  16. Simulation of the pressure field beneath a turbulent boundary layer using realizations of uncorrelated wall plane waves.

    PubMed

    Maxit, Laurent

    2016-08-01

    This paper investigates the modeling of a vibrating structure excited by a turbulent boundary layer (TBL). Although the wall pressure field (WPF) of the TBL constitutes a random excitation, the element-based methods generally used for describing complex mechanical structures consider deterministic loads. The response of such structures to a random excitation like TBL is generally deduced from calculations of numerous Frequency Response Functions. Consequently, the process is computationally expansive. To tackle this issue, an efficient process is proposed for generating realizations of the WPF corresponding to the TBL. This process is based on a formulation of the problem in the wavenumber space and the interpretation of the WPF as uncorrelated wall plane waves. Once the WPF has been synthesized, the local vibroacoustic responses are calculated for the different realizations and averaged together in the last step. A numerical application of this process to a plate located beneath a TBL is used to verify its efficiency and ability to reproduce the partial space correlation of the excitation. To further illustrate the proposed method, a stiffened panel modeled using the finite element method is finally examined. PMID:27586754

  17. Experimental determination of blast-wave pressure loading, thermal radiation protection, and electrical transmission loss for parabolic antenna models in simulated nuclear blast environments

    SciTech Connect

    George, J.H.

    1991-01-01

    A twelve-inch-diameter parabolic antenna model instrumented with eleven differential pressure sensors was tested at the Ballistics Research Laboratory, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. Transient pressure loading was determined for 37 different antenna model angular positions with respect to the direction of the blast wave at a peak overpressure of 3.0 pounds per square inch; limited data at 4.5 and 6.0 pounds per square inch were also investigated. The first millisecond of shock-wave interaction with the antenna features the most prominent fully reversed triangular pressure pulse. A blast function, F, was developed that accurately approximates the transient behavior of the blast wave resultant force and moment loading on the antenna model. The resultant blast force on the antenna model is minimized when the axis of the paraboloid of the model is rotated 82{degree} with respect to the direction of the blast wave. Four different thermal protective coatings were tested to evaluate the effects of coating color and thickness. Transmission-loss measurements were completed on eight different quartz-polyimide antenna models coated with Caapcoat and Ocean 477 thermal protective coatings.

  18. Method of optical self-mixing for pulse wave transit time in comparison with other methods and correlation with blood pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meigas, Kalju; Lass, Jaanus; Kattai, Rain; Karai, Deniss; Kaik, Juri

    2004-07-01

    This paper is a part of research to develop convenient method for continuous monitoring of arterial blood pressure by non-invasive and non-oscillometric way. A simple optical method, using self-mixing in a diode laser, is used for detection of skin surface vibrations near the artery. These vibrations, which can reveal the pulsate propagation of blood pressure waves along the vasculature, are used for pulse wave registration. The registration of the Pulse Wave Transit Time (PWTT) is based on computing the time delay in different regions of the human body using an ECG as a reference signal. In this study, the comparison of method of optical self-mixing with other methods as photoplethysmographic (PPG) and bioimpedance (BI) for PWTT is done. Also correlation of PWTT, obtained with different methods, with arterial blood pressure is calculated. In our study, we used a group of volunteers (34 persons) who made the bicycle exercise test. The test consisted of cycling sessions of increasing workloads during which the HR changed from 60 to 180 beats per minute. In addition, a blood pressure (NIBP) was registered with standard sphygmomanometer once per minute during the test and all NIBP measurement values were synchronized to other signals to find exact time moments where the systolic blood pressure was detected (Korotkoff sounds starting point). Computer later interpolated the blood pressure signal in order to get individual value for every heart cycle. The other signals were measured continuously during all tests. At the end of every session, a recovery period was included until person's NIBP and heart rate (HR) normalized. As a result of our study it turned out that time intervals that were calculated from plethysmographic (PPG) waveforms were in the best correlation with systolic blood pressure. The diastolic pressure does not correlate with any of the parameters representing PWTT. The pulse wave signals measured by laser and piezoelectric transducer are very similar

  19. Interaction between a normal shock wave and a turbulent boundary layer at high transonic speeds. Part 1: Pressure distribution. Part 2: Wall shear stress. Part 3: Simplified formulas for the prediction of surface pressures and skin friction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamson, T. C., Jr.; Liou, M. S.; Messiter, A. F.

    1980-01-01

    An asymptotic description is derived for the interaction between a shock wave and a turbulent boundary layer in transonic flow, for a particular limiting case. The dimensionless difference between the external flow velocity and critical sound speed is taken to be much smaller than one, but large in comparison with the dimensionless friction velocity. The basic results are derived for a flat plate, and corrections for longitudinal wall curvature and for flow in a circular pipe are also shown. Solutions are given for the wall pressure distribution and the shape of the shock wave. Solutions for the wall shear stress are obtained, and a criterion for incipient separation is derived. Simplified solutions for both the wall pressure and skin friction distributions in the interaction region are given. These results are presented in a form suitable for use in computer programs.

  20. Early plume and shock wave dynamics in atmospheric-pressure ultraviolet-laser ablation of different matrix-assisted laser ablation matrices

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitz, Thomas A.; Koch, Joachim; Guenther, Detlef; Zenobi, Renato

    2011-06-15

    Pulsed laser ablation of molecular solids is important for identification and quantification in (bio-)organic mass spectrometry, for example using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI). Recently, there has been a major shift to using MALDI and related laser ablation/post-ionization methods at atmospheric pressure. However, the underlying laser ablation processes, in particular early plume formation and expansion, are still poorly understood. Here, we present a study of the early ablation processes on the ns-time scale in atmospheric pressure UV-laser ablation of anthracene as well as of different common MALDI matrices such as 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (2,5-DHB), {alpha}-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid and sinapinic acid. Material release as well as the formation and expansion of hemi-spherical shock waves were studied by shadowgraphy with high temporal resolution ({approx}5 ns). The applicability of the classical Taylor-Sedov model for expansion of strong shock waves ('point-blast model'), as well as the drag force model, were evaluated to mathematically describe the observed shock wave propagation. The time- and energy-dependent expansion of the shock waves could be described using a Taylor-Sedov scaling law of the form R {proportional_to} t{sup q}, when a q-exponent of {approx}0.5 instead of the theoretical value of q 0.4 was found, indicating a faster expansion than expected. The deviations from the ideal value of q were attributed to the non-negligible influence of ambient pressure, a weak versus strong shock regime, and additional acceleration processes present in laser ablation that surpass the limit of the point-blast model. The onset of shock wave formation at a fluence of {approx}15-30 mJ/cm{sup 2} for the compounds investigated coincides with the onset of bulk material release, whereas, pure desorption below this fluence threshold did not lead to features visible in shadowgraphy.

  1. Measured temperature and pressure dependence of compressional (Vp) and shear (Vs) wave speeds in compacted, polycrystalline ice lh

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Helgerud, M.B.; Waite, W.F.; Kirby, S.H.; Nur, A.

    2003-01-01

    We report on laboratory measurements of compressional- and shear-wave speeds in a compacted, polycrystalline ice-Ih sample. The sample was made from triply distilled water that had been frozen into single crystal ice, ground into small grains, and sieved to extract the 180-250 ??m diameter fraction. Porosity was eliminated from the sample by compacting the granular ice between a hydraulically driven piston and a fixed end plug, both containing shear-wave transducers. Based on simultaneous compressional- and shear-wave-speed measurements, we calculated Poisson's ratio and compressional-wave, bulk, and shear moduli from -20 to -5??C and 22 to 33 MPa.

  2. l-Citrulline supplementation attenuates blood pressure, wave reflection and arterial stiffness responses to metaboreflex and cold stress in overweight men.

    PubMed

    Figueroa, Arturo; Alvarez-Alvarado, Stacey; Jaime, Salvador J; Kalfon, Roy

    2016-07-01

    Combined isometric exercise or metaboreflex activation (post-exercise muscle ischaemia (PEMI)) and cold pressor test (CPT) increase cardiac afterload, which may lead to adverse cardiovascular events. l-Citrulline supplementation (l-CIT) reduces systemic arterial stiffness (brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV)) at rest and aortic haemodynamic responses to CPT. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of l-CIT on aortic haemodynamic and baPWV responses to PEMI+CPT. In all, sixteen healthy, overweight/obese males (age 24 (sem 6) years; BMI 29·3 (sem 4·0) kg/m2) were randomly assigned to placebo or l-CIT (6 g/d) for 14 d in a cross-over design. Brachial and aortic systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP) and mean arterial pressure (MAP), aortic augmented pressure (AP), augmentation index (AIx), baPWV, reflection timing (Tr) and heart rate (HR) were evaluated at rest and during isometric handgrip exercise (IHG), PEMI and PEMI+CPT at baseline and after 14 d. No significant effects were evident after l-CIT at rest. l-CIT attenuated the increases in aortic SBP and wave reflection (AP and AIx) during IHG, aortic DBP, MAP and AIx during PEMI, and aortic SBP, DBP, MAP, AP, AIx and baPWV during PEMI+CPT compared with placebo. HR and Tr were unaffected by l-CIT in all conditions. Our findings demonstrate that l-CIT attenuates aortic blood pressure and wave reflection responses to exercise-related metabolites. Moreover, l-CIT attenuates the exaggerated arterial stiffness response to combined metaboreflex activation and cold exposure, suggesting a protective effect against increased cardiac afterload during physical stress.

  3. l-Citrulline supplementation attenuates blood pressure, wave reflection and arterial stiffness responses to metaboreflex and cold stress in overweight men.

    PubMed

    Figueroa, Arturo; Alvarez-Alvarado, Stacey; Jaime, Salvador J; Kalfon, Roy

    2016-07-01

    Combined isometric exercise or metaboreflex activation (post-exercise muscle ischaemia (PEMI)) and cold pressor test (CPT) increase cardiac afterload, which may lead to adverse cardiovascular events. l-Citrulline supplementation (l-CIT) reduces systemic arterial stiffness (brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV)) at rest and aortic haemodynamic responses to CPT. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of l-CIT on aortic haemodynamic and baPWV responses to PEMI+CPT. In all, sixteen healthy, overweight/obese males (age 24 (sem 6) years; BMI 29·3 (sem 4·0) kg/m2) were randomly assigned to placebo or l-CIT (6 g/d) for 14 d in a cross-over design. Brachial and aortic systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP) and mean arterial pressure (MAP), aortic augmented pressure (AP), augmentation index (AIx), baPWV, reflection timing (Tr) and heart rate (HR) were evaluated at rest and during isometric handgrip exercise (IHG), PEMI and PEMI+CPT at baseline and after 14 d. No significant effects were evident after l-CIT at rest. l-CIT attenuated the increases in aortic SBP and wave reflection (AP and AIx) during IHG, aortic DBP, MAP and AIx during PEMI, and aortic SBP, DBP, MAP, AP, AIx and baPWV during PEMI+CPT compared with placebo. HR and Tr were unaffected by l-CIT in all conditions. Our findings demonstrate that l-CIT attenuates aortic blood pressure and wave reflection responses to exercise-related metabolites. Moreover, l-CIT attenuates the exaggerated arterial stiffness response to combined metaboreflex activation and cold exposure, suggesting a protective effect against increased cardiac afterload during physical stress. PMID:27160957

  4. Lower solar chromosphere-corona transition region. III - Implications of the observed quiet-sun emission measure including wave pressure effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woods, D. Tod; Holzer, Thomas E.; Macgregor, Keith B.

    1990-01-01

    The observed form of the emission measure (EM) is used as a function of temperature to infer the wave energy flux density and pressure throughout the lower transition region (TR). This procedure eliminates the need for specifying how the wave energy flux density is damped and addresses the question of whether there is any form of the mechanical heating associated with the degradation of an upward traveling wave energy flux density which is consistent with the observed EM and other observational constraints for the quiet sun. It is found that the observed form of the EM curve is incompatible with waves traveling vertically at the sound speed, regardless of any filling factor arguments. The same conclusion also applies to waves traveling at the Alfven speed, unless it is assumed that the emission in lower TR lines originates solely from small, spatially unresolved regions of large magnetic field strength (100 G), which cover a small fraction (filling factors of 1 percent) of the solar surface.

  5. Evaluation of the Colin STBP-680 at rest and during exercise: an automated blood pressure monitor using R-wave gating.

    PubMed Central

    Bond, V; Bassett, D R; Howley, E T; Lewis, J; Walker, A J; Swan, P D; Tearney, R J; Adams, R G

    1993-01-01

    The application of automated blood pressure measurement during exercise has been limited by inaccuracies introduced by the effects of accompanying motion and noise. We evaluated a newly developed automated blood pressure monitor for measuring exercise blood pressure (Colin STBP-680; Colin, San Antonio, Texas, USA). The STBP-680 uses acoustic transduction with the assistance of the electrocardiogram R-wave to trigger the sampling period for blood pressure measurement. The automated monitor readings were compared with simultaneous technician mercury sphygmomanometric readings in the same arm. Blood pressure was measured in 18 men at rest and during exercise at 40% VO2 peak, (low intensity), 70% VO2 peak (moderate intensity) and VO2 peak (high intensity) on the cycle ergometer. Mean(s.d.) systolic blood pressure difference between the automated monitor and mercury manometer readings at rest and during exercise at low, moderate and high work intensities were 3(0) mmHg, 3(2) mmHg, 1(1) mmHg, and 0(11) mmHg respectively (analysis of variance; P > 0.05). Resting diastolic blood pressure obtained with the STBP-680 was similar to the mercury manometer readings (78(10) versus 81(7) mmHg (P > 0.05). Exercise diastolic pressure at the low level of work intensity was almost identical between the automated monitor and mercury manometer readings (64(8) versus 65(10) mmHg (not significant)). Diastolic blood pressure readings between the STBP-680 and mercury manometer showed a greater difference at the moderate and high workloads (11 mmHg and 9 mmHg, respectively), but this difference was not significant (P > 0.05).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8358579

  6. Pressure dependence of the charge-density-wave and superconducting states in GdTe3, TbTe3, and DyTe3

    DOE PAGES

    Zocco, D. A.; Hamlin, J. J.; Grube, K.; Chu, J. -H.; Kuo, H. -H.; Fisher, I. R.; Maple, M. B.

    2015-05-14

    Here, we present electrical resistivity and ac-susceptibility measurements of GdTe3, TbTe3 and DyTe3 performed under pressure. An upper charge-density-wave (CDW) is suppressed at a rate of dTCW,1/dP~ –85K/GPa. For TbTe3 and DyTe3, a second CDW below TCDW,2 increases with pressure until it reaches the TCDW,1(P) line. For GdTe3, the lower CDW emerges as pressure is increased above ~1GPa. As these two CDW states are suppressed with pressure, superconductivity (SC) appears in the three compounds at lower temperatures. Ac-susceptibility experiments performed on TbTe3 provide compelling evidence for bulk SC in the low-pressure region of the phase diagram. We provide measurements ofmore » superconducting critical fields and discuss the origin of a high-pressure superconducting phase occurring above 5 GPa.« less

  7. The Effect of Nickel on the Seismic Wave Belocities of Iron at the Pressure Conditions of the Earth's Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martorell Masip, B.; Vocadlo, L.; Brodholt, J. P.; Wood, I.

    2011-12-01

    Understanding the physical properties of the Earth's core is a key step in the study of the evolution and dynamics of our planet. For much of the last century, based on studies of meteorites [1], it was believed that Earth's core was predominantly a mixture of iron and nickel. More specifically, the Earth's inner core is a solid Fe-Ni alloy at high temperature (T, 6000 K) and high pressure (P, 360 GPa). Furthermore, to account for the lower than expected density in the Earth's core, it has been suggested that light elements must also be present [2]. While the effect of light elements on the properties of iron have been the subject of an extensive literature [3-6], the effect of nickel on the properties of iron has often been overlooked; this is due to the expectation, based on their proximity in the periodic table, that the properties of Ni are sufficiently similar to those of iron that the presence of nickel can be neglected. Although recent research using high P-T experiments and theoretical studies of Fe-Ni alloys has been performed in order to establish whether nickel affects the physical properties of iron, the results have been inconclusive and sometimes contradictory [7-11]. Here we present a DFT study of the athermal elastic properties of solid Fe-Ni alloys at core pressures using the GGA. We have calculated the equation of state (EoS) for Fe-Ni alloys at several compositions for bcc, fcc and hcp structures, and fitted the results to Birch-Murnaghan 3rd order equations of state. We have also calculated the elastic constants for each structure at 360 GPa and evaluated the seismic wave velocities. Our results show that the effect of small amounts of Ni is significant (-1.9% in vp and -4.0% in vs for hcp structure of Fe93.25-Ni6.75 alloy), and therefore nickel must be taken into account if a detailed model of the Earth's inner core is to be constructed. Other aspects of the influence of nickel, such as its effect on the high P-T phase diagram and melting curve

  8. Characterization of a low-pressure chlorine plasma column sustained by propagating surface waves using phase-sensitive microwave interferometry and trace-rare-gas optical emission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Mattei, S.; Boudreault, O.; Stafford, L.; Khare, R.; Donnelly, V. M.

    2011-06-01

    Phase-sensitive microwave interferometry and trace-rare-gas optical emission spectroscopy were used to measure the line-integrated electron density, n{sub e}, and electron temperature, T{sub e}, in a high-density chlorine plasma sustained in a quartz discharge tube (inner diameter = 6 mm) by an electromagnetic surface wave at 2.45 GHz. For pressures in the 0.1-1 Torr range, n{sub e} decreased nearly linearly along the tube's z-axis down to the critical density for surface wave propagation, where the plasma decayed abruptly. At lower pressures (< 50 mTorr), however, the plasma extended well beyond this critical point, after which n{sub e} decreased quasiexponentially toward the end of the plasma column. The length of this expansion region increased with decreasing pressure, going from {approx}8 cm at 5 mTorr to {approx}1 cm at 50 mTorr. T{sub e} was nearly independent of the axial position in the main plasma region and strongly decreased in the expansion region at lower pressures. The Cl{sub 2} percent dissociation, {tau}{sub D}, obtained from the calibrated Cl{sub 2} (306 nm)-to-Xe (828 nm) emission ratio, displayed behavior similar to that of n{sub e} and T{sub e}. For example, at 5 mTorr, {tau}{sub D} was close to 100% near the wave launcher and {approx}70% at 0.5 cm from the end of the plasma column.

  9. An innovative method to measure the peripheral arterial elasticity: spring constant modeling based on the arterial pressure wave with radial vibration.

    PubMed

    Wei, Ching-Chuan

    2011-11-01

    In this study, we propose an innovative method for the direct measurement of the peripheral artery elasticity using a spring constant model, based on the arterial pressure wave equation, vibrating in a radial direction. By means of the boundary condition of the pressure wave equation at the maximum peak, we can derive the spring constant used for evaluating peripheral arterial elasticity. The calculated spring constants of six typical subjects show a coincidence with their proper arterial elasticities. Furthermore, the comparison between the spring constant method and pulse wave velocity (PWV) was investigated in 70 subjects (21-64 years, 47 normotensives and 23 hypertensives). The results reveal a significant negative correlation for the spring constant vs. PWV (correlation coefficient = -0.663, p < 0.001). Multivariate analysis also indicates the same close relationship. Furthermore, within-operator and between-operator analyses show significantly high reproducibility. Therefore, the use of the spring constant method to assess the arterial elasticity is carefully verified, and it is shown to be effective as well as fast. This method should be useful for healthcare, not only in improving clinical diagnosis of arterial stiffness but also in screening subjects for early evidence of cardio-vascular diseases and in monitoring responses to therapy in the future.

  10. A computer simulation of grain orientation and aspect ratio that promotes the reflection of a pressure wave by elastic rotational stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennefick, C. M.; Patillo, C. E.; Kupoluyi, T.; Gomes, C. A.

    2011-02-01

    Optimal orientation angles and aspect ratios of a grain are presented for the attenuation of a longitudinal pressure wave by elastic stresses that arise from the rotation of a grain. A computer program in C++ allows the grain to be a two-dimensional ellipse of several orientations with respect to the incoming load. The program also varies the aspect ratio of the grain. The induced elastic stresses from the rotation of the grain are calculated with complex variable methods that do not require meshes and elements. Low aspect ratios of 5/3, 10/7 and 5/4 were particularly effective in halting the stress from the pressure wave when the major axis of the grain was tilted between 15° and 45° and again above 70° with respect to the line of the incoming load. Attenuation was found to be more sensitive to grain orientation than to aspect ratio. The conclusion is supported by numerous switches in the extent of wave blockage over small angular variations in the orientation of the grain.

  11. On the response of a water surface to a surface pressure source moving at trans-critical gravity-capillary wave speeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masnadi, Naeem; Cho, Yeunwoo; Duncan, James H.; Akylas, Triantaphyllos

    2015-11-01

    The non-linear response of a water free surface to a pressure source moving at speeds near the minimum speed of linear gravity-capillary waves (Cmin ~ 23 cm/s) is investigated with experiments and theory. In the experiments, waves are generated by a vertically oriented air-jet that moves at a constant speed over the water surface in a long tank. The 3-D surface shape behind the air-jet is measured using a cinematic refraction-based technique combined with an LIF technique. At towing speeds just below Cmin, an unsteady pattern is formed where localized depressions periodically appear in pairs and move away from the source along the arms of a downstream V-shaped pattern. This behavior is analogous to the periodic shedding of solitary waves upstream of a source moving at the maximum wave speed in shallow water. The gravity-capillary depressions are rapidly damped by viscosity and their speed-amplitude characteristics closely match those from inviscid calculations of gravity-capillary lumps. The shedding frequency of the lumps in the present experiments increases with both increasing towing speed and air-flow rate. Predictions of this behavior using a model equation that incorporates damping and a quadratic nonlinearity are in good agreement with the experiments. The partial support of the National Science Foundation under grant OCE0751853 is gratefully acknowledged.

  12. Utility of continuous wave Doppler echocardiography in the noninvasive assessment of left ventricular outflow tract pressure gradient in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Panza, J A; Petrone, R K; Fananapazir, L; Maron, B J

    1992-01-01

    Subaortic obstruction is an important determinant of the clinical presentation of and therapeutic approach to patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Therefore, assessment of the presence and magnitude of the intraventricular pressure gradient is paramount in the clinical evaluation of these patients. To establish the utility of continuous wave Doppler echocardiography in assessing the pressure gradient in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, 28 patients representing the wide hemodynamic spectrum of this disease underwent simultaneous determination of the subaortic gradient by continuous wave Doppler ultrasound and cardiac catheterization. With use of the modified Bernoulli equation, the Doppler-estimated gradient showed a strong correlation with the maximal instantaneous pressure difference measured at catheterization, both under basal conditions (r = 0.93; p less than 0.0001) and during provocative maneuvers (r = 0.89; p less than 0.0001). In 26 of the 28 patients, all assessments of the subaortic gradient were in agreement within 15 mm Hg (average difference 5 +/- 3 mm Hg). In the other two patients there were substantial differences between these measurements (under basal conditions in one patient and after provocation in another), although the Doppler technique predicted the presence of marked subaortic obstruction in each. In both patients the erroneous interpretation was due to superimposition of the mitral regurgitation signal on that of left ventricular outflow. Doppler waveforms from the left ventricular outflow tract showed variability in contour among different patients and in individual patients. Hence, continuous wave Doppler echocardiography is a useful noninvasive method for estimating the subaortic gradient in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. However, technical factors such as contamination of the outflow tract jet with that of mitral regurgitation and variability in waveform configuration may importantly influence such assessments of the

  13. Role of anion ordering and effective pressure in the field-induced spin-density-wave phase of (TMTSF)2X

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minamidate, T.; Matsunaga, N.; Nomura, K.; Sasaki, T.

    2016-08-01

    Magnetoresistance and Hall resistance measurements were conducted in the field-induced spin-density-wave (FISDW) phase of (TMTSF)2ReO4 above 1.0 GPa, with an anion ordering specified by Q_\\text{AO}=(0, 1/2, 1/2) . The quantized Hall resistance shows the sequence N = 0, 1, 2, -2, 4, -4, -6, -8, \\cdots , with decreasing field that is successfully explained by the “extended standard model”. Consequently, we demonstrate that the difference between the chemical and hydrostatic pressures is linked to the appearance of the peculiar FISDW phase of the TMTSF salts with Q_\\text{AO}=(0, 1/2, *) .

  14. Effects of pomegranate juice supplementation on pulse wave velocity and blood pressure in healthy young and middle-aged men and women.

    PubMed

    Lynn, Anthony; Hamadeh, Hiba; Leung, Wing Chi; Russell, Jean M; Barker, Margo E

    2012-09-01

    Pomegranate juice may improve cardiovascular risk because of its content of antioxidant polyphenols. We conducted a randomized placebo-controlled parallel study to examine the effect of pomegranate juice on pulse wave velocity (PWV), blood pressure (BP) and plasma antioxidant status (ferric reducing power; FRAP) in 51 healthy adults (30-50 years). Participants consumed 330 ml/day of pomegranate juice or control drink for four weeks. Measurements were made at baseline and at four weeks. There was no effect of the intervention on PWV (P = 0.694) and plasma FRAP (P = 0.700). However, there was a significant fall in systolic blood pressure (-3.14 mmHg, P < 0.001), diastolic blood pressure (-2.33 mmHg P < 0.001) and mean arterial pressure (-2.60 mmHg, P < 0.001). Change in weight was similar in the two groups over the intervention period (P = 0.379). The fall in BP was not paralleled by changes in concentration of serum angiotensin converting enzyme. We conclude that pomegranate juice supplementation has benefits for BP in the short term, but has no effect on PWV. The mechanism for the effect is uncertain.

  15. Toward comprehensive studies of liquids at high pressures and high temperatures: Combined structure, elastic wave velocity, and viscosity measurements in the Paris-Edinburgh cell

    SciTech Connect

    Kono, Yoshio; Park, Changyong; Kenney-Benson, Curtis; Shen, Guoyin; Wang, Yanbin

    2014-08-19

    Techniques for measuring liquid structure, elastic wave velocity, and viscosity under high pressure have been integrated using a Paris–Edinburgh cell at Beamline 16-BM-B, HPCAT of the Advanced Photon Source. The Paris–Edinburgh press allows for compressing large volume samples (up to 2 mm in both diameter and length) up to ~7 GPa and 2000 °C. Multi-angle energy dispersive X-ray diffraction provides structure factors of liquid to a large Q of ~19 Å. Ultrasonic techniques have been developed to investigate elastic wave velocity of liquids combined with the X-ray imaging. Falling sphere viscometry, using high-speed X-ray radiography (>1000 frames/s), enables us to investigate a wide range of viscosity, from those of high viscosity silicates or oxides melts to low viscosity (<1 mPa s) liquids and fluids such as liquid metals or salts. The integration of these multiple techniques has promoted comprehensive studies of structure and physical properties of liquids as well as amorphous materials at high pressures and high temperatures, making it possible to investigate correlations between structure and physical properties of liquids in situ.

  16. Concentration and chemical-state profiles at heterogeneous interfaces with sub-nm accuracy from standing-wave ambient-pressure photoemission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemšák, Slavomír; Shavorskiy, Andrey; Karslioglu, Osman; Zegkinoglou, Ioannis; Rattanachata, Arunothai; Conlon, Catherine S.; Keqi, Armela; Greene, Peter K.; Burks, Edward C.; Salmassi, Farhad; Gullikson, Eric M.; Yang, See-Hun; Liu, Kai; Bluhm, Hendrik; Fadley, Charles S.

    2014-11-01

    Heterogeneous processes at solid/gas, liquid/gas and solid/liquid interfaces are ubiquitous in modern devices and technologies but often difficult to study quantitatively. Full characterization requires measuring the depth profiles of chemical composition and state with enhanced sensitivity to narrow interfacial regions of a few to several nm in extent over those originating from the bulk phases on either side of the interface. We show for a model system of NaOH and CsOH in an ~1-nm thick hydrated layer on α-Fe2O3 (haematite) that combining ambient-pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and standing-wave photoemission spectroscopy provides the spatial arrangement of the bulk and interface chemical species, as well as local potential energy variations, along the direction perpendicular to the interface with sub-nm accuracy. Standing-wave ambient-pressure photoemission spectroscopy is thus a very promising technique for measuring such important interfaces, with relevance to energy research, heterogeneous catalysis, electrochemistry, and atmospheric and environmental science.

  17. Roles of arbitrarily charged heavy ions and degenerate plasma pressure in cylindrical and spherical IA shock waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossen, M. R.; Nahar, L.; Mamun, A. A.

    2014-10-01

    A rigorous theoretical investigation has been made to study the existence and basic features of the ion acoustic (IA) shock structures in an unmagnetized, collisionless dense plasma system containing degenerate electron and ion fluids, and arbitrarily charged static heavy ions. This investigation is valid for both the non-relativistic limit and the ultra-relativistic limit. The reductive perturbation technique has been employed to derive the standard Burgers equation. The solution of this equation has been analyzed both for planar geometry and for nonplanar geometry. The basic features (speed, amplitude, width, and so on) of these electrostatic shock structures have been briefly discussed. The basic properties of the IA shock waves are found to be significantly modified by the effects of arbitrarily charged static heavy ions. It has also been found that the properties of IA shock waves in nonplanar (cylindrical or spherical) geometry significantly differ from those in planar (one-dimensional) geometry. The implications of our results for space and interstellar compact objects such as white dwarfs, neutron stars, black holes, and so on have been briefly discussed.

  18. Central blood pressure estimation by using N-point moving average method in the brachial pulse wave.

    PubMed

    Sugawara, Rie; Horinaka, Shigeo; Yagi, Hiroshi; Ishimura, Kimihiko; Honda, Takeharu

    2015-05-01

    Recently, a method of estimating the central systolic blood pressure (C-SBP) using an N-point moving average method in the radial or brachial artery waveform has been reported. Then, we investigated the relationship between the C-SBP estimated from the brachial artery pressure waveform using the N-point moving average method and the C-SBP measured invasively using a catheter. C-SBP using a N/6 moving average method from the scaled right brachial artery pressure waveforms using VaSera VS-1500 was calculated. This estimated C-SBP was compared with the invasively measured C-SBP within a few minutes. In 41 patients who underwent cardiac catheterization (mean age: 65 years), invasively measured C-SBP was significantly lower than right cuff-based brachial BP (138.2 ± 26.3 vs 141.0 ± 24.9 mm Hg, difference -2.78 ± 1.36 mm Hg, P = 0.048). The cuff-based SBP was significantly higher than invasive measured C-SBP in subjects with younger than 60 years old. However, the estimated C-SBP using a N/6 moving average method from the scaled right brachial artery pressure waveforms and the invasively measured C-SBP did not significantly differ (137.8 ± 24.2 vs 138.2 ± 26.3 mm Hg, difference -0.49 ± 1.39, P = 0.73). N/6-point moving average method using the non-invasively acquired brachial artery waveform calibrated by the cuff-based brachial SBP was an accurate, convenient and useful method for estimating C-SBP. Thus, C-SBP can be estimated simply by applying a regular arm cuff, which is greatly feasible in the practical medicine.

  19. Structure and phase diagram of an adhesive colloidal dispersion under high pressure: A small angle neutron scattering, diffusing wave spectroscopy, and light scattering study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vavrin, R.; Kohlbrecher, J.; Wilk, A.; Ratajczyk, M.; Lettinga, M. P.; Buitenhuis, J.; Meier, G.

    2009-04-01

    We have applied small angle neutron scattering (SANS), diffusing wave spectroscopy (DWS), and dynamic light scattering (DLS) to investigate the phase diagram of a sterically stabilized colloidal system consisting of octadecyl grafted silica particles dispersed in toluene. This system is known to exhibit gas-liquid phase separation and percolation, depending on temperature T, pressure P, and concentration φ. We have determined by DLS the pressure dependence of the coexistence temperature and the spinodal temperature to be dP /dT=77 bar/K. The gel line or percolation limit was measured by DWS under high pressure using the condition that the system became nonergodic when crossing it and we determined the coexistence line at higher volume fractions from the DWS limit of turbid samples. From SANS measurements we determined the stickiness parameter τB(P,T,φ) of the Baxter model, characterizing a polydisperse adhesive hard sphere, using a global fit routine on all curves in the homogenous regime at various temperatures, pressures, and concentrations. The phase coexistence and percolation line as predicted from τB(P,T,φ) correspond with the determinations by DWS and were used to construct an experimental phase diagram for a polydisperse sticky hard sphere model system. A comparison with theory shows good agreement especially concerning the predictions for the percolation threshold. From the analysis of the forward scattering we find a critical scaling law for the susceptibility corresponding to mean field behavior. This finding is also supported by the critical scaling properties of the collective diffusion.

  20. Birch's Law for high-pressure metals and ionic solids: Sound velocity data comparison between shock wave experiments and recent diamond anvil cell experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boness, David; Ware, Lucas

    2015-06-01

    Sound velocity-density systematics has long been a fruitful way to take shock wave measurements on elements, alloys, oxides, rocks, and other materials, and allow reasonable extrapolation to densities found deep in the Earth. Recent detection of super-Earths has expanded interest in terrestrial planetary interiors to an even greater range of materials and pressures. Recent published DAC experimental measurements of sound velocities in iron and iron alloys, relevant to planetary cores, are inconsistent with each other with regard to the validity of Birch's Law, a linear relation between sound velocity and density. We examine the range of validity of Birch's Law for several shocked metallic elements, including iron, and shocked ionic solids and make comparisons to the recent DAC data.

  1. Pressure Wave Measurements Resulting from Thermal Cook-Off of the HMX Based High Explosive LX-04

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, F; Vandersall, K S; Forbes, J W; Tarver, C M; Greenwood, D

    2003-07-11

    Experiments that investigate thermal and nearby explosion scenarios are needed to provide essential data to models for accurate predictions. A porous LX-04 (85/15 wt% HMX/Viton) sample was heated in a heavily confined donor charge until it thermally exploded. The reaction accelerated a steel cover plate across a 10 cm gap into a preheated gauged acceptor cylinder (near its theoretical maximum density) of LX-04. The carbon resistor gauges in the acceptor measured the resulting multi-dimensional ramp wave as it propagated through the pre-heated LX-04. Detonation of the LX-04 acceptor does not occur. Results are compared to similar experiments with acceptors at room temperature.

  2. Non-β-blocking R-carvedilol enantiomer suppresses Ca2+ waves and stress-induced ventricular tachyarrhythmia without lowering heart rate or blood pressure

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jingqun; Zhou, Qiang; Smith, Chris D.; Chen, Haiyan; Tan, Zhen; Chen, Biyi; Nani, Alma; Wu, Guogen; Song, Long-Sheng; Fill, Michael; Back, Thomas G.; Wayne Chen, S.R.

    2016-01-01

    Carvedilol is the current β-blocker of choice for suppressing ventricular tachyarrhythmia (VT). However, carvedilol’s benefits are dose-limited, attributable to its potent β-blocking activity that can lead to bradycardia and hypotension. The clinically used carvedilol is a racemic mixture of β-blocking S-carvedilol and non-β-blocking R-carvedilol. We recently reported that novel non-β-blocking carvedilol analogues are effective in suppressing arrhythmogenic Ca2+ waves and stress-induced VT without causing bradycardia. Thus, the non-β-blocking R-carvedilol enantiomer may also possess this favourable anti-arrhythmic property. To test this possibility, we synthesized R-carvedilol and assessed its effect on Ca2+ release and VT. Like racemic carvedilol, R-carvedilol directly reduces the open duration of the cardiac ryanodine receptor (RyR2), suppresses spontaneous Ca2+ oscillations in human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells, Ca2+ waves in cardiomyocytes in intact hearts and stress-induced VT in mice harbouring a catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT)-causing RyR2 mutation. Importantly, R-carvedilol did not significantly alter heart rate or blood pressure. Therefore, the non-β-blocking R-carvedilol enantiomer represents a very promising prophylactic treatment for Ca2+-triggered arrhythmia without the bradycardia and hypotension often associated with racemic carvedilol. Systematic clinical assessments of R-carvedilol as a new anti-arrhythmic agent may be warranted. PMID:26348911

  3. Non-β-blocking R-carvedilol enantiomer suppresses Ca2+ waves and stress-induced ventricular tachyarrhythmia without lowering heart rate or blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingqun; Zhou, Qiang; Smith, Chris D; Chen, Haiyan; Tan, Zhen; Chen, Biyi; Nani, Alma; Wu, Guogen; Song, Long-Sheng; Fill, Michael; Back, Thomas G; Chen, S R Wayne

    2015-09-01

    Carvedilol is the current β-blocker of choice for suppressing ventricular tachyarrhythmia (VT). However, carvedilol's benefits are dose-limited, attributable to its potent β-blocking activity that can lead to bradycardia and hypotension. The clinically used carvedilol is a racemic mixture of β-blocking S-carvedilol and non-β-blocking R-carvedilol. We recently reported that novel non-β-blocking carvedilol analogues are effective in suppressing arrhythmogenic Ca(2+) waves and stress-induced VT without causing bradycardia. Thus, the non-β-blocking R-carvedilol enantiomer may also possess this favourable anti-arrhythmic property. To test this possibility, we synthesized R-carvedilol and assessed its effect on Ca(2+) release and VT. Like racemic carvedilol, R-carvedilol directly reduces the open duration of the cardiac ryanodine receptor (RyR2), suppresses spontaneous Ca(2+) oscillations in human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells, Ca(2+) waves in cardiomyocytes in intact hearts and stress-induced VT in mice harbouring a catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT)-causing RyR2 mutation. Importantly, R-carvedilol did not significantly alter heart rate or blood pressure. Therefore, the non-β-blocking R-carvedilol enantiomer represents a very promising prophylactic treatment for Ca(2+)- triggered arrhythmia without the bradycardia and hypotension often associated with racemic carvedilol. Systematic clinical assessments of R-carvedilol as a new anti-arrhythmic agent may be warranted.

  4. Effects of Acupuncture Stimulation on the Radial artery’s Pressure Pulse Wave in Healthy Young Participants: Protocol for a prospective, single-Arm, Exploratory, Clinical Study

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Jae-Young; Lee, Jun-Hwan; Ku, Boncho; Bae, Jang Han; un, Min-Ho; Kim, Jaeuk U.; Kim, Tae-Hun

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: This study aims to investigate the effects of acupuncture stimulation on the radial artery’s pressure pulse wave, along with various hemodynamic parameters, and to explore the possible underlying mechanism of pulse diagnosis in healthy participants in their twenties. Methods and analysis: This study is a prospective, single-arm, exploratory clinical study. A total of 25 healthy participants, without regard to gender, in their twenties will be recruited by physicians. Written informed consent will be obtained from all participants. The participants will receive acupuncture once at ST36 on both sides. The radial arterial pulse waves will be measured on the left arm of the subjects by using an applicable pulse tonometric device (KIOM-PAS). On the right arm (appearing twice), electrocardiogram (ECG), photoplethysmogram (PPG), respiration and cardiac output (CO) signals, will be measured using a physiological data acquisition system (Biopac module), while the velocity of blood flow, and the diameter and the depth of the blood vessel will be measured using an ultrasonogram machine on the right arm (appearing twice). All measurements will be conducted before, during, and after acupuncture. The primary outcome will be the spectral energy at high frequencies above 10 Hz (SE10-30Hz) calculated from the KIOM-PAS device signal. Secondary outcomes will be various variables obtained from the KIOM-PAS device, ECG, PPG, impedance cardiography modules, and an ultrasonogram machine. Discussion: The results of this trial will provide information regarding the physiological and the hemodynamic mechanisms underlying acupuncture stimulation and clinical evidence for the influence of acupuncture on the pressure pulse wave in the radial artery. Ethics and dissemination: This study was approved by the Institutional Review Board (IRB) of Kyung Hee University’s Oriental Medical Center, Seoul, Korea (KOMCIRB-150818-HR-030). The study findings will be published in peer

  5. Effects of Acupuncture Stimulation on the Radial artery’s Pressure Pulse Wave in Healthy Young Participants: Protocol for a prospective, single-Arm, Exploratory, Clinical Study

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Jae-Young; Lee, Jun-Hwan; Ku, Boncho; Bae, Jang Han; un, Min-Ho; Kim, Jaeuk U.; Kim, Tae-Hun

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: This study aims to investigate the effects of acupuncture stimulation on the radial artery’s pressure pulse wave, along with various hemodynamic parameters, and to explore the possible underlying mechanism of pulse diagnosis in healthy participants in their twenties. Methods and analysis: This study is a prospective, single-arm, exploratory clinical study. A total of 25 healthy participants, without regard to gender, in their twenties will be recruited by physicians. Written informed consent will be obtained from all participants. The participants will receive acupuncture once at ST36 on both sides. The radial arterial pulse waves will be measured on the left arm of the subjects by using an applicable pulse tonometric device (KIOM-PAS). On the right arm (appearing twice), electrocardiogram (ECG), photoplethysmogram (PPG), respiration and cardiac output (CO) signals, will be measured using a physiological data acquisition system (Biopac module), while the velocity of blood flow, and the diameter and the depth of the blood vessel will be measured using an ultrasonogram machine on the right arm (appearing twice). All measurements will be conducted before, during, and after acupuncture. The primary outcome will be the spectral energy at high frequencies above 10 Hz (SE10-30Hz) calculated from the KIOM-PAS device signal. Secondary outcomes will be various variables obtained from the KIOM-PAS device, ECG, PPG, impedance cardiography modules, and an ultrasonogram machine. Discussion: The results of this trial will provide information regarding the physiological and the hemodynamic mechanisms underlying acupuncture stimulation and clinical evidence for the influence of acupuncture on the pressure pulse wave in the radial artery. Ethics and dissemination: This study was approved by the Institutional Review Board (IRB) of Kyung Hee University’s Oriental Medical Center, Seoul, Korea (KOMCIRB-150818-HR-030). The study findings will be published in peer

  6. Low-Pressure Burst-Mode Focused Ultrasound Wave Reconstruction and Mapping for Blood-Brain Barrier Opening: A Preclinical Examination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Jingjing; Tsui, Po-Hsiang; Liu, Hao-Li

    2016-06-01

    Burst-mode focused ultrasound (FUS) exposure has been shown to induce transient blood-brain barrier (BBB) opening for potential CNS drug delivery. FUS-BBB opening requires imaging guidance during the intervention, yet current imaging technology only enables postoperative outcome confirmation. In this study, we propose an approach to visualize short-burst low-pressure focal beam distribution that allows to be applied in FUS-BBB opening intervention on small animals. A backscattered acoustic-wave reconstruction method based on synchronization among focused ultrasound emission, diagnostic ultrasound receiving and passively beamformed processing were developed. We observed that focal beam could be successfully visualized for in vitro FUS exposure with 0.5–2 MHz without involvement of microbubbles. The detectable level of FUS exposure was 0.467 MPa in pressure and 0.05 ms in burst length. The signal intensity (SI) of the reconstructions was linearly correlated with the FUS exposure level both in-vitro (r2 = 0.9878) and in-vivo (r2 = 0.9943), and SI level of the reconstructed focal beam also correlated with the success and level of BBB-opening. The proposed approach provides a feasible way to perform real-time and closed-loop control of FUS-based brain drug delivery.

  7. Low-Pressure Burst-Mode Focused Ultrasound Wave Reconstruction and Mapping for Blood-Brain Barrier Opening: A Preclinical Examination

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Jingjing; Tsui, Po-Hsiang; Liu, Hao-Li

    2016-01-01

    Burst-mode focused ultrasound (FUS) exposure has been shown to induce transient blood-brain barrier (BBB) opening for potential CNS drug delivery. FUS-BBB opening requires imaging guidance during the intervention, yet current imaging technology only enables postoperative outcome confirmation. In this study, we propose an approach to visualize short-burst low-pressure focal beam distribution that allows to be applied in FUS-BBB opening intervention on small animals. A backscattered acoustic-wave reconstruction method based on synchronization among focused ultrasound emission, diagnostic ultrasound receiving and passively beamformed processing were developed. We observed that focal beam could be successfully visualized for in vitro FUS exposure with 0.5–2 MHz without involvement of microbubbles. The detectable level of FUS exposure was 0.467 MPa in pressure and 0.05 ms in burst length. The signal intensity (SI) of the reconstructions was linearly correlated with the FUS exposure level both in-vitro (r2 = 0.9878) and in-vivo (r2 = 0.9943), and SI level of the reconstructed focal beam also correlated with the success and level of BBB-opening. The proposed approach provides a feasible way to perform real-time and closed-loop control of FUS-based brain drug delivery. PMID:27295608

  8. Development of numerical model to investigate the laser driven shock waves from aluminum target into ambient air at atmospheric pressure and its comparison with experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paturi, Prem Kiran; Sakaraboina, Sai Shiva; Chelikani, Leela; Ikkurthi, Venkata Ramana; C. D., Sijoy; Chaturvedi, Shashank; Acrhem Collaboration; Cad Collaboration

    2015-06-01

    A one-dimensional, three-temperature (electron, ion and thermal radiation) numerical model to study the laser induced shock wave (LISW) propagation from aluminum target in ambient air at atmospheric pressure is developed. The hydrodynamic equations of mass, momentum and energy are solved by using an implicit scheme in Lagrangian form. The model considers the laser absorption to take place via inverse-bremsstrahlung due to electron-ion (e-i) process. The flux limited electron thermal energy transport and e-i thermal energy relaxation equations are solved implicitly. The experimental characterization of spatio-temporal evolution of the LISW in air generated by focusing a second harmonic (532 nm, 7ns) of Nd:YAG laser on to surface of Al is performed using shadowgraphy technique with a temporal resolution of 1.5 ns. The radius of SW (2 - 5 mm) and its pressure (40 - 80 MPa) observed in the experiments over 0.2 μs-10 μs time scales were comparable with the numerical results for laser intensities ranging from 2.0 × 1010 to 1.4 × 1011 W/cm2. The work is supported by Defence Research and Developement Organization, India through Grants-in-Aid Program.

  9. High-efficiency generation of pulsed Lyman-α radiation by resonant laser wave mixing in low pressure Kr-Ar mixture.

    PubMed

    Saito, Norihito; Oishi, Yu; Miyazaki, Koji; Okamura, Kotaro; Nakamura, Jumpei; Louchev, Oleg A; Iwasaki, Masahiko; Wada, Satoshi

    2016-04-01

    We report an experimental generation of ns pulsed 121.568 nm Lyman-α radiation by the resonant nonlinear four-wave mixing of 212.556 nm and 845.015 nm radiation pulses providing a high conversion efficiency 1.7x10-3 with the output pulse energy 3.6 μJ achieved using a low pressure Kr-Ar mixture. Theoretical analysis shows that this efficiency is achieved due to the advantage of using (i) the high input laser intensities in combination with (ii) the low gas pressure allowing us to avoid the onset of full-scale discharge in the laser focus. In particular, under our experimental conditions the main mechanism of photoionization caused by the resonant 2-photon 212.556 nm radiation excitation of Kr atoms followed by the 1-photon ionization leads to ≈17% loss of Kr atoms and efficiency loss only by the end of the pulse. The energy of free electrons, generated by 212.556 nm radiation via (2 + 1)-photon ionization and accelerated mainly by 845.015 nm radiation, remains during the pulse below the level sufficient for the onset of full-scale discharge by the electron avalanche. Our analysis also suggests that ≈30-fold increase of 845.015 nm pulse energy can allow one to scale up the L-α radiation pulse energy towards the level of ≈100 μJ. PMID:27137045

  10. Effect of excited nitrogen atoms on inactivation of spore-forming microorganisms in low pressure N2/O2 surface-wave plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaoli; Chang, Xijiang; Tei, Reitou; Nagatsu, Masaaki

    2016-06-01

    Using a vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) absorption spectroscopy with a compact low pressure plasma light source, the absolute nitrogen atom density was measured to study its role in the spore inactivation with low pressure N2/O2 gas mixture surface-wave plasmas (SWPs). Self-absorption effect of the resonance emission lines of nitrogen atoms near 120 nm was minimized by optimizing its discharge conditions of the plasma light source. Experimental results showed that excited nitrogen atom densities monotonically decreased with the decrease of N2 gas percentage in N2/O2 gas mixture SWPs, concomitantly with similar decrease of VUV/UV emission intensities of nitrogen atoms and molecules. In the pure N2 gas SWPs, it was confirmed that a dominant lethal factor was VUV/UV emission generated by N2 plasma, while spore etching occurred via physical and chemical interactions with nitrogen species. With an addition of O2 gas, significant spore etching by excited oxygen atoms made it much easier for the VUV/UV photons emitted by nitrogen atoms, N2 and NO molecules to penetrate through the etched spore coats to the core and cause the fatal DNA damage of the microorganisms. As a result, more rapid inactivation was achieved in the middle region of N2/O2 gas mixture ratio, such as 30–80% O2 gas addition, in the present N2/O2 gas mixture SWPs.

  11. High-efficiency generation of pulsed Lyman-α radiation by resonant laser wave mixing in low pressure Kr-Ar mixture.

    PubMed

    Saito, Norihito; Oishi, Yu; Miyazaki, Koji; Okamura, Kotaro; Nakamura, Jumpei; Louchev, Oleg A; Iwasaki, Masahiko; Wada, Satoshi

    2016-04-01

    We report an experimental generation of ns pulsed 121.568 nm Lyman-α radiation by the resonant nonlinear four-wave mixing of 212.556 nm and 845.015 nm radiation pulses providing a high conversion efficiency 1.7x10-3 with the output pulse energy 3.6 μJ achieved using a low pressure Kr-Ar mixture. Theoretical analysis shows that this efficiency is achieved due to the advantage of using (i) the high input laser intensities in combination with (ii) the low gas pressure allowing us to avoid the onset of full-scale discharge in the laser focus. In particular, under our experimental conditions the main mechanism of photoionization caused by the resonant 2-photon 212.556 nm radiation excitation of Kr atoms followed by the 1-photon ionization leads to ≈17% loss of Kr atoms and efficiency loss only by the end of the pulse. The energy of free electrons, generated by 212.556 nm radiation via (2 + 1)-photon ionization and accelerated mainly by 845.015 nm radiation, remains during the pulse below the level sufficient for the onset of full-scale discharge by the electron avalanche. Our analysis also suggests that ≈30-fold increase of 845.015 nm pulse energy can allow one to scale up the L-α radiation pulse energy towards the level of ≈100 μJ.

  12. Modeling and three-dimensional simulation of the neutral dynamics in an air discharge confined in a microcavity. I. Formation and free expansion of the pressure waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichwald, O.; Yousfi, M.; Bayle, P.; Jugroot, M.

    1998-11-01

    A three-dimensional numerical analysis of the neutral dynamics is performed in the case of a short-gap (0.5 mm) spark discharge in air confined in microcavities at atmospheric pressure (760 Torr) and ambient temperature (293 K). This work is undertaken in the framework of silicon microsystems bearing a micropump actuated by pressure waves which result from a discharge. The short-gap discharge characteristics are taken from experimental results namely 470 ns for the duration and 13.5 W for the maximum injected power. The neutral gas evolution is described by the classical transport equations and solved by a powerful numerical monotonic upstream-centered scheme for conversion laws. The gas-solid interaction occurring in thermal and hydrodynamic boundary layers is taken into account assuming that the microcavity temperature remains invariant (293 K). This article (part I) is devoted to the first evolution phase of the neutral dynamics whose the duration corresponds to the discharge time. Our results clearly show that the first phase can again be split into a neutral inertia phase (during which the thermal energy transferred is stored in the ionized channel) followed by a free expansion one where this thermal energy is dissipated in the microcavity volume. The latter phase is analyzed before the neutral heterogeneities reach the microcavity's walls. We also discuss the specific gas behaviors of the gas nearby the electrode surfaces, following heat exchanges and viscous stress.

  13. Improvement of erectile dysfunction by the active pepide from Urechis unicinctus by high temperature/pressure and ultra - wave assisted lysis in Streptozotocin Induced Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kang Sup; Bae, Woong Jin; Kim, Su Jin; Kang, Kyong-Hwa; Kim, Se-Kwon; Cho, Hyuk Jin; Hong, Sung-Hoo; Lee, Ji Youl; Kim, Sae Woong

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: We investigate the effect of active peptide from Urechis unicinctus (UU) by high temperature/pressure and ultra-wave assisted lysis on erectile dysfunction in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Materials and Methods: Forty 12-week-old Sprague-Dawley rats were used in this study. Diabetes was induced by a one-time intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (50mg/kg). One week later, the diabetic rats were randomly divided into four groups: normal control, untreated diabetes control, and groups treated with 100 or 500mg/kg/d UU peptide. Rats were fed with UU peptide by intragastric administration for 8 weeks. After 8 weeks, penile hemodynamic function was evaluated in all groups by measuring the intracavernosal pressure after electrostimulating the cavernous nerve. Nitric oxide (NO) and cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) activities were measured and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and neuronal NOS (nNOS) protein expression was determined by Western blot. Results: Maximum intracavernosal pressure in diabetic control rats decreased significantly compared to normal control rats, and was increased significantly compared to untreated diabetic rats after UU peptide supplementation. Treatment with the higher dose of UU peptide significantly increased the NO and cGMP levels compared with the diabetic control group. Decreased activity and expression eNOS and nNOS were found in the diabetic rats compared with the normal control group. Decreased eNOS and nNOS in diabetic rats were improved by UU peptide administration. Conclusions: Active peptide from UU ameliorates erectile function in a streptozotocin induced diabetic rat model of erectile dysfunction. PMID:27564297

  14. Oceanic-wave-measurement system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, J. F.; Miles, R. T.

    1980-01-01

    Barometer mounted on bouy senses wave heights. As wave motion raises and lowers barometer, pressure differential is proportional to wave height. Monitoring circuit samples barometer output every half cycle of wave motion and adds magnitudes of adjacent positive and negative peaks. Resulting output signals, proportional to wave height, are transmitted to central monitoring station.

  15. P-wave velocity features of methane hydrate-bearing turbidity sediments sampled by a pressure core tool, from the first offshore production test site in the eastern Nankai Trough, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, K.; Santamarina, C. J.; Waite, W. F.; Winters, W. J.; Ito, T.; Nakatsuka, Y.; Konno, Y.; Yoneda, J.; Kida, M.; Jin, Y.; Egawa, K.; Fujii, T.; Nagao, J.

    2013-12-01

    Turbidite sediments around the production test site at Daini-Atsumi knoll were deposited under channel and lobe environments of a submarine fan. Changes in physical properties of the sediments are likely caused by differences in the depositional environments. In addition, methane hydrate (MH) crystals growing among sediment grains alter the sediment's original physical properties. Thus, distinguishing between hydrate-bearing sediment and hydrate-free sediment based only on physical property changes measured during downhole logging can be difficult. To more precisely analyze sediment properties, core samples of MH-bearing sediments were taken at the first offshore MH production test site. Samples were collected using a wireline hybrid pressure coring system (Hybrid PCS), which retains downhole pressure, thereby preventing dissociation of MH in the sampled cores. Nondestructive, high-pressure analyses were conducted in both the 2012 summer drilling campaign and a 2013 winter laboratory study in Sapporo. To handle Hybrid PCS cores during the pressure coring campaign in the summer of 2012, a pressure core analysis and transfer system (PCATS) was installed on the research vessel Chikyu (Yamamoto et al., 2012). PCATS P-wave velocity measurements were made at in situ water pressure without causing any core destruction or MH dissociation. In January 2013, Georgia Tech (GT), USGS, AIST, and JOGMEC researchers used pressure core characterization tools (PCCTs) developed by GT to re-measure the P-wave velocity of the MH-bearing sediments at high pressure and low, non-freezing temperature. In the PCATS analysis, results showed a difference of more than 1,200 m/s in P-wave velocities between the MH-bearing sandy and muddy layers. This difference in P-wave velocities was confirmed by PCCTs measurements. P-wave velocities within the turbidite interval tend to decrease upward with the textural grading of the turbidite. Our result implies that MH concentration, which is related to

  16. Pressure Distributions and Wave Drag Due to Two-Dimensional Fabrication-Type Surface Roughness on an Ogive Cylinder at Mach Numbers of 1.61 and 2.01

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Czarnecki, K. R.; Monta, William J.

    1961-01-01

    An investigation has been made at Mach numbers of 1.61 and 2.01 and over a range of free-stream Reynolds number per foot from about 1.2 x 10(exp 6) to 8.3 x 10(exp 6) to determine the pressure distributions and wave drags due to two-dimensional fabrication-type surface roughness. Ten types of surface roughness, including step, wave, crease, and swept configurations were investigated. The tests were made on an ogive cylinder of fineness ratio 12.2, the roughness elements covering the cylindrical portion of the model. The results indicate that wave drag is the major component of the drag due to roughness at supersonic speeds. The pressure distributions over the roughness elements were generally found to be in good agreement with linearized two-dimensional theory except for regions of the elements affected by boundary-layer separation and shock detachment. There was little or no effect of Reynolds number except on the pressures within the regions influenced by separation or shock detachment. Inasmuch as most of the roughness configurations were affected by flow separation and shock detachment, there was generally an effect of Reynolds number on the roughness wave drag. This wave drag decreased as the free-stream Reynolds number was decreased.

  17. Characteristics of an atmospheric-pressure line plasma excited by 2.45 GHz microwave travelling wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Haruka; Nakano, Suguru; Itoh, Hitoshi; Sekine, Makoto; Hori, Masaru; Toyoda, Hirotaka

    2016-01-01

    An atmospheric-pressure line plasma was produced by microwave discharge using a slot antenna with travelling microwave power. Two different types of plasma mode, i.e., “pseudo” and “real” line plasma were investigated using a high-speed camera under different discharge conditions, such as slot gap width and power. Using wide slot gaps (0.5 mm) and low powers (<1.0 kW), the pseudo line plasma mode, i.e., the time-averaged line plasma mode with the fast movement of small plasmas along the slot, was observed. By reducing the slot gap width to 0.1 mm and by increasing the peak microwave power, the plasma mode changed from the pseudo to real line plasma mode, i.e., the spatiotemporally uniform plasma mode along the slot. A gas temperature was obtained from N2 second positive band spectra as low as 400 K. The movement of the plasma in the pseudo line plasma mode was well explained by a one-dimensional diffusion model including the spatial distribution of the ionization rate in a moving plasma.

  18. MHD simple waves and the divergence wave

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, G. M.; Pogorelov, N. V.; Zank, G. P.

    2010-03-25

    In this paper we investigate magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simple divergence waves in MHD, for models in which nablacentre dotBnot =0. These models are related to the eight wave Riemann solvers in numerical MHD, in which the eighth wave is the divergence wave associated with nablacentre dotBnot =0. For simple wave solutions, all physical variables (the gas density, pressure, fluid velocity, entropy, and magnetic field induction in the MHD case) depend on a single phase function phi. We consider the form of the MHD equations used by both Powell et al. and Janhunen. It is shown that the Janhunen version of the equations possesses fully nonlinear, exact simple wave solutions for the divergence wave, but no physically meaningful simple divergence wave solution exists for the Powell et al. system. We suggest that the 1D simple, divergence wave solution for the Janhunen system, may be useful for the testing and validation of numerical MHD codes.

  19. Association of long-term blood pressure variability and brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity: a retrospective study from the APAC cohort

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yang; Yang, Yuling; Wang, Anxin; An, Shasha; Li, Zhifang; Zhang, Wenyan; Liu, Xuemei; Ruan, Chunyu; Liu, Xiaoxue; Guo, Xiuhua; Zhao, Xingquan; Wu, Shouling

    2016-01-01

    We investigated associations between long-term blood pressure variability (BPV) and brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV). Within the Asymptomatic Polyvascular Abnormalities Community (APAC) study, we retrospectively collected long-term BPV and baPWV measures. Long-term BPV was calculated using the mean and standard deviation of systolic blood pressure (SBP) across 4 years based on annual values of SBP. In total, 3,994 subjects (2,284 men) were eligible for inclusion in this study. We stratified the study population into four SBP quartiles. Left and right baPWV was higher in participants with long-term SBPV in the fourth quartile compared with the first quartile (left: 1,725 ± 488 vs. 1,461 ± 340 [p < 0.001]; right: 1,722 ± 471 vs. 1,455 ± 341 [p < 0.001], respectively). We obtained the same result for total baPWV (fourth vs. first quartile: 1,772 ± 429 vs. 1,492 ± 350 [p < 0.001]). Furthermore, there was a trend for gradually increased baPWV (≥1,400 cm/s) with increased SBPV (p < 0.001). After multivariable adjustment, baPWV was positively correlated with long-term BPV (p < 0.001). In conclusion, long-term BPV is significantly associated with arterial stiffness as assessed by baPWV. PMID:26892486

  20. Association of long-term blood pressure variability and brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity: a retrospective study from the APAC cohort.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yang; Yang, Yuling; Wang, Anxin; An, Shasha; Li, Zhifang; Zhang, Wenyan; Liu, Xuemei; Ruan, Chunyu; Liu, Xiaoxue; Guo, Xiuhua; Zhao, Xingquan; Wu, Shouling

    2016-02-19

    We investigated associations between long-term blood pressure variability (BPV) and brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV). Within the Asymptomatic Polyvascular Abnormalities Community (APAC) study, we retrospectively collected long-term BPV and baPWV measures. Long-term BPV was calculated using the mean and standard deviation of systolic blood pressure (SBP) across 4 years based on annual values of SBP. In total, 3,994 subjects (2,284 men) were eligible for inclusion in this study. We stratified the study population into four SBP quartiles. Left and right baPWV was higher in participants with long-term SBPV in the fourth quartile compared with the first quartile (left: 1,725 ± 488 vs. 1,461 ± 340 [p < 0.001]; right: 1,722 ± 471 vs. 1,455 ± 341 [p < 0.001], respectively). We obtained the same result for total baPWV (fourth vs. first quartile: 1,772 ± 429 vs. 1,492 ± 350 [p < 0.001]). Furthermore, there was a trend for gradually increased baPWV (≥1,400 cm/s) with increased SBPV (p < 0.001). After multivariable adjustment, baPWV was positively correlated with long-term BPV (p < 0.001). In conclusion, long-term BPV is significantly associated with arterial stiffness as assessed by baPWV.

  1. Atmospheric Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    With its Multispectral Visible Imaging Camera (MVIC), half of the Ralph instrument, New Horizons captured several pictures of mesoscale gravity waves in Jupiter's equatorial atmosphere. Buoyancy waves of this type are seen frequently on Earth - for example, they can be caused when air flows over a mountain and a regular cloud pattern forms downstream. In Jupiter's case there are no mountains, but if conditions in the atmosphere are just right, it is possible to form long trains of these small waves. The source of the wave excitation seems to lie deep in Jupiter's atmosphere, below the visible cloud layers at depths corresponding to pressures 10 times that at Earth's surface. The New Horizons measurements showed that the waves move about 100 meters per second faster than surrounding clouds; this is about 25% of the speed of sound on Earth and is much greater than current models of these waves predict. Scientists can 'read' the speed and patterns these waves to learn more about activity and stability in the atmospheric layers below.

  2. Relationship between Sum of the Four Limbs' Pulse Pressure and Brachial-Ankle Pulse Wave Velocity and Atherosclerosis Risk Factors in Chinese Adults

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Yansong; Li, Zongbin; Shu, Hua; Liu, Minyan; Chen, Zhilai; Huang, Jianhua

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to analyze the relationship between the sum of the four limbs' pulse pressure (Sum-PP) and brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) and atherosclerosis risk factors and evaluate the feasibility of Sum-PP in diagnosing atherosclerosis systemically. For the purpose, a cross-sectional study was conducted on the basis of medical information of 20748 adults who had a health examination in our hospital. Both Sum-PP and baPWV exhibited significant variations among different human populations grouped by gender, smoking, drinking, and age. Interestingly, Sum-PP had similar varying tendency with baPWV in different populations. And further study in different populations showed that Sum-PP was significantly positively related to baPWV. We also investigated the relationship between Sum-PP, baPWV, and cardiovascular risk factors, respectively. We found that both Sum-PP and baPWV had significant positive correlation with atherosclerosis risk factors while both of them were negatively related to HDL-c. In addition, there was a significant close correlation between Sum-PP and baPWV in the whole population (r = 0.4616, P < 0.0001). Thus, Sum-PP is closely related to baPWV and is of important value for clinical diagnosis of atherosclerosis. PMID:25695080

  3. Multisatellite studies of ULF waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takahashi, Kazue

    1988-01-01

    Multisatellite studies of ULF waves are reviewed, with a special emphasis on compressional Pc 5 waves. The observations of the radial extent, azimuthal wave number and the field-aligned standing wave structure of the waves are described. When combined with plasma data, the waves appear to be consistent with drift-mirror waves originating from the pressure anisotropy of the ring current plasma. The most recent observations revealed some features not considered in previous theories of the drift-mirror wave: antisymmetric standing wave structure and rather small pressure anisotropy that can drive the waves to instability. Recent theoretical work shows that these observations can be explained if the coupling of the drift-mirror wave to the shear Alfven wave is properly treated in a realistic magnetic field geometry.

  4. Sub-nanosecond time-resolved ambient-pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy setup for pulsed and constant wave X-ray light sources.

    PubMed

    Shavorskiy, Andrey; Neppl, Stefan; Slaughter, Daniel S; Cryan, James P; Siefermann, Katrin R; Weise, Fabian; Lin, Ming-Fu; Bacellar, Camila; Ziemkiewicz, Michael P; Zegkinoglou, Ioannis; Fraund, Matthew W; Khurmi, Champak; Hertlein, Marcus P; Wright, Travis W; Huse, Nils; Schoenlein, Robert W; Tyliszczak, Tolek; Coslovich, Giacomo; Robinson, Joseph; Kaindl, Robert A; Rude, Bruce S; Ölsner, Andreas; Mähl, Sven; Bluhm, Hendrik; Gessner, Oliver

    2014-09-01

    An apparatus for sub-nanosecond time-resolved ambient-pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies with pulsed and constant wave X-ray light sources is presented. A differentially pumped hemispherical electron analyzer is equipped with a delay-line detector that simultaneously records the position and arrival time of every single electron at the exit aperture of the hemisphere with ~0.1 mm spatial resolution and ~150 ps temporal accuracy. The kinetic energies of the photoelectrons are encoded in the hit positions along the dispersive axis of the two-dimensional detector. Pump-probe time-delays are provided by the electron arrival times relative to the pump pulse timing. An average time-resolution of (780 ± 20) ps (FWHM) is demonstrated for a hemisphere pass energy E(p) = 150 eV and an electron kinetic energy range KE = 503-508 eV. The time-resolution of the setup is limited by the electron time-of-flight (TOF) spread related to the electron trajectory distribution within the analyzer hemisphere and within the electrostatic lens system that images the interaction volume onto the hemisphere entrance slit. The TOF spread for electrons with KE = 430 eV varies between ~9 ns at a pass energy of 50 eV and ~1 ns at pass energies between 200 eV and 400 eV. The correlation between the retarding ratio and the TOF spread is evaluated by means of both analytical descriptions of the electron trajectories within the analyzer hemisphere and computer simulations of the entire trajectories including the electrostatic lens system. In agreement with previous studies, we find that the by far dominant contribution to the TOF spread is acquired within the hemisphere. However, both experiment and computer simulations show that the lens system indirectly affects the time resolution of the setup to a significant extent by inducing a strong dependence of the angular spread of electron trajectories entering the hemisphere on the retarding ratio. The scaling of the angular spread with

  5. Syn-eruptive, soft-sediment deformation of deposits from dilute pyroclastic density current: triggers from granular shear, dynamic pore pressure, ballistic impacts and shock waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douillet, G. A.; Taisne, B.; Tsang-Hin-Sun, E.; Muller, S. K.; Kueppers, U.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2015-05-01

    Soft-sediment deformation structures can provide valuable information about the conditions of parent flows, the sediment state and the surrounding environment. Here, examples of soft-sediment deformation in deposits of dilute pyroclastic density currents are documented and possible syn-eruptive triggers suggested. Outcrops from six different volcanoes have been compiled in order to provide a broad perspective on the variety of structures: Soufriere Hills (Montserrat), Tungurahua (Ecuador), Ubehebe craters (USA), Laacher See (Germany), and Tower Hill and Purrumbete lakes (both Australia). The variety of features can be classified in four groups: (1) tubular features such as pipes; (2) isolated, laterally oriented deformation such as overturned or oversteepened laminations and vortex-shaped laminae; (3) folds-and-faults structures involving thick (>30 cm) units; (4) dominantly vertical inter-penetration of two layers such as potatoids, dishes, or diapiric flame-like structures. The occurrence of degassing pipes together with basal intrusions suggest fluidization during flow stages, and can facilitate the development of other soft-sediment deformation structures. Variations from injection dikes to suction-driven, local uplifts at the base of outcrops indicate the role of dynamic pore pressure. Isolated, centimeter-scale, overturned beds with vortex forms have been interpreted to be the signature of shear instabilities occurring at the boundary of two granular media. They may represent the frozen record of granular, pseudo Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities. Their recognition can be a diagnostic for flows with a granular basal boundary layer. Vertical inter-penetration and those folds-and-faults features related to slumps are driven by their excess weight and occur after deposition but penecontemporaneous to the eruption. The passage of shock waves emanating from the vent may also produce trains of isolated, fine-grained overturned beds that disturb the surface bedding

  6. Syn-eruptive, soft-sediment deformation of dilute pyroclastic density current deposits: triggers from granular shear, dynamic pore pressure, ballistic impacts and shock waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douillet, Guilhem Amin; Kueppers, Ulrich; Taisne, Benoit; Tsang-Hin-Sun, Ève; Müller, Sebastian K.; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2015-04-01

    Dilute pyroclastic density currents (PDCs) represent peculiar transport mechanisms sharing similarities with turbidity currents, wind-blown transport and granular flows. Outcrops of syn-eruptive, soft-sediment deformation are compiled from seven volcanic centers in order to provide a broad perspective on the variety of structures: Ubehebe craters (USA), Tungurahua (Ecuador), Soufrière Hills (Montserrat), Laacher See (Germany), Lago di Albano (Italy), Tower Hill and Purrumbete lake (both Australia). The interpretation of the variety of triggers enlightens the understanding of the sedimentary environment and basal boundary processes for PDCs: 1/ Isolated, cm-scale, overturned beds with vortex forms have been interpreted to be the signature of shear instabilities occurring at the boundary of two granular media. They may represent the frozen record of granular, pseudo Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities. 2/ The occurrence of degassing pipes together with basal intrusive dikes suggest fluidization during flow stages. This, in turn, can facilitate the development of Kelvin-Helmholtz structures. The occurrence of injection dikes at the base of flow units in some outcrops compared with suction-driven local uplifts in others indicates the role of dynamic pore pressure and local changes between depletive and accumulative dynamics of flows. 3/ Isolated slumps as well as sinking pseudonodules are driven by their excess weight and occur after deposition but penecontemporaneous to the eruption. 4/ Impact of ballistic blocks can trigger local displacement or liquefaction. Based on the deformation depth, these can yield precise insights into depositional unit boundaries. Such impact structures may also be at the origin of some of the steep truncation planes visible at the base of the so-called "chute and pool" structures. 5/ Finally, the passage of shock waves emanating from the vent may be preserved in the form of trains of isolated, fine-grained overturned beds, which may disturb

  7. Syn-eruptive, soft-sediment deformation of dilute pyroclastic density current deposits: triggers from granular shear, dynamic pore pressure, ballistic impacts and shock waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douillet, G. A.; Taisne, B.; Tsang-Hin-Sun, È.; Müller, S. K.; Kueppers, U.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2014-12-01

    Soft-sediment deformation produces intriguing sedimentary structures and can occur in diverse environments and from a variety of triggers. From the observation of such structures and their interpretation in terms of trigger mechanisms, valuable information can be extracted about former conditions. Here we document examples of syn-eruptive deformation in dilute pyroclastic density current deposits. Outcrops from 6 different volcanoes have been compiled in order to provide a broad perspective on the variety of structures: Ubehebe craters (USA), Tungurahua (Ecuador), Soufrière Hills (Montserrat), Laacher See (Germany), Tower Hill and Purrumbete lake (both Australia). Isolated slumps as well as sinking pseudonodules are driven by their excess weight and occur after deposition but penecontemporaneous to the eruption. Isolated, cm-scale, overturned beds with vortex forms have been interpreted to be the signature of shear instabilities occurring at the boundary of two granular media. They may represent the frozen record of granular, pseudo Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities. Their recognition can be a diagnostic for flows with a granular basal boundary layer. The occurrence of degassing pipes together with basal intrusive dikes suggest fluidization during flow stages, and can facilitate the development of Kelvin-Helmholtz structures. The occurrence at the base of flow units of injection dikes in some outcrops compared with suction-driven local uplifts in others indicates the role of dynamic pore pressure. Variations of the latter are possibly related to local changes between depletive and accumulative dynamics of flows. Ballistic impacts can trigger unconventional sags producing local displacement or liquefaction. Based on the deformation depth, these can yield precise insights into depositional unit boundaries. Such impact structures may also be at the origin of some of the steep truncation planes visible at the base of the so-called "chute and pool" structures. Finally

  8. Sub-nanosecond time-resolved ambient-pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy setup for pulsed and constant wave X-ray light sources.

    PubMed

    Shavorskiy, Andrey; Neppl, Stefan; Slaughter, Daniel S; Cryan, James P; Siefermann, Katrin R; Weise, Fabian; Lin, Ming-Fu; Bacellar, Camila; Ziemkiewicz, Michael P; Zegkinoglou, Ioannis; Fraund, Matthew W; Khurmi, Champak; Hertlein, Marcus P; Wright, Travis W; Huse, Nils; Schoenlein, Robert W; Tyliszczak, Tolek; Coslovich, Giacomo; Robinson, Joseph; Kaindl, Robert A; Rude, Bruce S; Ölsner, Andreas; Mähl, Sven; Bluhm, Hendrik; Gessner, Oliver

    2014-09-01

    An apparatus for sub-nanosecond time-resolved ambient-pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies with pulsed and constant wave X-ray light sources is presented. A differentially pumped hemispherical electron analyzer is equipped with a delay-line detector that simultaneously records the position and arrival time of every single electron at the exit aperture of the hemisphere with ~0.1 mm spatial resolution and ~150 ps temporal accuracy. The kinetic energies of the photoelectrons are encoded in the hit positions along the dispersive axis of the two-dimensional detector. Pump-probe time-delays are provided by the electron arrival times relative to the pump pulse timing. An average time-resolution of (780 ± 20) ps (FWHM) is demonstrated for a hemisphere pass energy E(p) = 150 eV and an electron kinetic energy range KE = 503-508 eV. The time-resolution of the setup is limited by the electron time-of-flight (TOF) spread related to the electron trajectory distribution within the analyzer hemisphere and within the electrostatic lens system that images the interaction volume onto the hemisphere entrance slit. The TOF spread for electrons with KE = 430 eV varies between ~9 ns at a pass energy of 50 eV and ~1 ns at pass energies between 200 eV and 400 eV. The correlation between the retarding ratio and the TOF spread is evaluated by means of both analytical descriptions of the electron trajectories within the analyzer hemisphere and computer simulations of the entire trajectories including the electrostatic lens system. In agreement with previous studies, we find that the by far dominant contribution to the TOF spread is acquired within the hemisphere. However, both experiment and computer simulations show that the lens system indirectly affects the time resolution of the setup to a significant extent by inducing a strong dependence of the angular spread of electron trajectories entering the hemisphere on the retarding ratio. The scaling of the angular spread with

  9. The Independent and Joint Association of Blood Pressure, Serum Total Homocysteine, and Fasting Serum Glucose Levels With Brachial-Ankle Pulse Wave Velocity in Chinese Hypertensive Adults.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoyun; Sun, Ningling; Yu, Tao; Fan, Fangfang; Zheng, Meili; Qian, Geng; Wang, Binyan; Wang, Yu; Tang, Genfu; Li, Jianping; Qin, Xianhui; Hou, Fanfan; Xu, Xiping; Yang, Xinchun; Chen, Yundai; Wang, Xiaobin; Huo, Yong

    2016-09-28

    This study aimed to investigate the independent and joint association of blood pressure (BP), homocysteine (Hcy), and fasting blood glucose (FBG) levels with brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV, a measure of arterial stiffness) in Chinese hypertensive adults.The analyses included 3967 participants whose BP, Hcy, FBG, and baPWV were measured along with other covariates. Systolic BP (SBP) was analyzed as 3 categories (SBP < 160 mmHg; 160 to 179 mmHg; ≥ 180 mmHg); Hcy as 3 categories (< 10 μmol/L; 10 to 14.9 μmol/L; ≥ 15.0 μmol/L) and FBG: normal (FBG < 5.6 mmol/L), impaired (5.6 mmol/L ≤ FBG < 7.0 mmol/L), and diabetes mellitus (FBG ≥ 7.0 mmol/L). We performed linear regression analyses to evaluate their associations with baPWV with adjustment for covariables.When analyzed individually, BP, Hcy, and FBG were each associated with baPWV. When BP and FBG were analyzed jointly, the highest baPWV value (mean ± SD: 2227 ± 466 cm/s) was observed in participants with FBG ≥ 7.0 mmol/L and SBP ≥ 180 mmHg (β = 432.5, P < 0.001), and the lowest baPWV value (mean ± SD: 1692 ± 289 cm/s) was seen in participants with NFG and SBP < 160 mmHg. When Hcy and FBG were analyzed jointly, the highest baPWV value (2072 ± 480 cm/s) was observed in participants with FBG ≥ 7.0 mmol/L and Hcy ≥ 15.0 μmol/L (β = 167.6, P < 0.001), while the lowest baPWV value (mean ± SD: 1773 ± 334 cm/s) was observed in participants with NFG and Hcy < 10 μmol/L.In Chinese hypertensive adults, SBP, Hcy, and FBG are individually and jointly associated with baPWV.Our findings underscore the importance of identifying individuals with multiple risk factors of baPWV including high SBP, FBG, and Hcy.

  10. Wave Engine Topping Cycle Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welch, Gerard E.

    1996-01-01

    The performance benefits derived by topping a gas turbine engine with a wave engine are assessed. The wave engine is a wave rotor that produces shaft power by exploiting gas dynamic energy exchange and flow turning. The wave engine is added to the baseline turboshaft engine while keeping high-pressure-turbine inlet conditions, compressor pressure ratio, engine mass flow rate, and cooling flow fractions fixed. Related work has focused on topping with pressure-exchangers (i.e., wave rotors that provide pressure gain with zero net shaft power output); however, more energy can be added to a wave-engine-topped cycle leading to greater engine specific-power-enhancement The energy addition occurs at a lower pressure in the wave-engine-topped cycle; thus the specific-fuel-consumption-enhancement effected by ideal wave engine topping is slightly lower than that effected by ideal pressure-exchanger topping. At a component level, however, flow turning affords the wave engine a degree-of-freedom relative to the pressure-exchanger that enables a more efficient match with the baseline engine. In some cases, therefore, the SFC-enhancement by wave engine topping is greater than that by pressure-exchanger topping. An ideal wave-rotor-characteristic is used to identify key wave engine design parameters and to contrast the wave engine and pressure-exchanger topping approaches. An aerodynamic design procedure is described in which wave engine design-point performance levels are computed using a one-dimensional wave rotor model. Wave engines using various wave cycles are considered including two-port cycles with on-rotor combustion (valved-combustors) and reverse-flow and through-flow four-port cycles with heat addition in conventional burners. A through-flow wave cycle design with symmetric blading is used to assess engine performance benefits. The wave-engine-topped turboshaft engine produces 16% more power than does a pressure-exchanger-topped engine under the specified topping

  11. Central blood pressure and pulse wave velocity: relationship to target organ damage and cardiovascular morbidity-mortality in diabetic patients or metabolic syndrome. An observational prospective study. LOD-DIABETES study protocol

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Diabetic patients show an increased prevalence of non-dipping arterial pressure pattern, target organ damage and elevated arterial stiffness. These alterations are associated with increased cardiovascular risk. The objectives of this study are the following: to evaluate the prognostic value of central arterial pressure and pulse wave velocity in relation to the incidence and outcome of target organ damage and the appearance of cardiovascular episodes (cardiovascular mortality, myocardial infarction, chest pain and stroke) in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus or metabolic syndrome. Methods/Design Design: This is an observational prospective study with 5 years duration, of which the first year corresponds to patient inclusion and initial evaluation, and the remaining four years to follow-up. Setting: The study will be carried out in the urban primary care setting. Study population: Consecutive sampling will be used to include patients diagnosed with type 2 diabetes between 20-80 years of age. A total of 110 patients meeting all the inclusion criteria and none of the exclusion criteria will be included. Measurements: Patient age and sex, family and personal history of cardiovascular disease, and cardiovascular risk factors. Height, weight, heart rate and abdominal circumference. Laboratory tests: hemoglobin, lipid profile, creatinine, microalbuminuria, glomerular filtration rate, blood glucose, glycosylated hemoglobin, blood insulin, fibrinogen and high sensitivity C-reactive protein. Clinical and 24-hour ambulatory (home) blood pressure monitoring and self-measured blood pressure. Common carotid artery ultrasound for the determination of mean carotid intima-media thickness. Electrocardiogram for assessing left ventricular hypertrophy. Ankle-brachial index. Retinal vascular study based on funduscopy with non-mydriatic retinography and evaluation of pulse wave morphology and pulse wave velocity using the SphygmoCor system. The medication used for

  12. Fascial hierarchies and the relevance of crossed-helical arrangements of collagen to changes in shape; part II: The proposed effect of blood pressure (Traube-Hering-Mayer) waves on the fascia.

    PubMed

    Scarr, Graham

    2016-07-01

    Periodic changes in arterial pressure and volume have long been related to respiratory and sympathetic nerve activity (Traube-Hering-Mayer waves) but their origins and nomenclature have caused considerable confusion since they were first discovered in the eighteenth century. However, although they remain poorly understood and the underlying details of their control are complicated, these waves do provide valuable clinical information on the state of blood pressure regulation in both normal and pathological conditions; and a correlation with oscillatory motions observed by certain practitioners suggests that they may also have some physiological value that relates to changes in the volume of fascial 'tubes'. Part I of this paper (Scarr, 2016) described a complex fascial network of collagen-reinforced tubular sheaths that are an integral part of muscle structure and function, and continuous with 'higher-level' fascial tubes surrounding groups of muscles, the limbs and entire body. The anisotropic arrangements of collagen fibres within the walls of these tubes reflect the most efficient distribution of mechanical stresses and have been considered to coordinate changes in shape, and a proposed link between cyclic variations in arterial pressure and volume, and the behaviour of these fascial compartments is now described. PMID:27634089

  13. Opposite predictive value of pulse pressure and aortic pulse wave velocity on heart failure with reduced left ventricular ejection fraction: insights from an Eplerenone Post-Acute Myocardial Infarction Heart Failure Efficacy and Survival Study (EPHESUS) substudy.

    PubMed

    Regnault, Veronique; Lagrange, Jérémy; Pizard, Anne; Safar, Michel E; Fay, Renaud; Pitt, Bertram; Challande, Pascal; Rossignol, Patrick; Zannad, Faiez; Lacolley, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Although hypertension contributes significantly to worsen cardiovascular risk, blood pressure increment in subjects with heart failure is paradoxically associated with lower risk. The objective was to determine whether pulse pressure and pulse wave velocity (PWV) remain prognostic markers, independent of treatment in heart failure with reduced left ventricular function. The investigation involved 6632 patients of the Eplerenone Post-Acute Myocardial Infarction Heart Failure Efficacy and Survival Study. All subjects had acute myocardial infarction with left ventricular ejection fraction <40% and signs/symptoms of heart failure. Carotid-femoral PWV was measured in a subpopulation of 306 subjects. In the overall population, baseline mean arterial pressure <90 mm Hg was associated with higher all-cause death (hazard ratio, 1.14 [95% confidence interval, 1.00-1.30]; P<0.05), whereas higher left ventricular ejection fraction or pulse pressure was associated with lower rates of all-cause death, cardiovascular death/hospitalization, and cardiovascular death. In the subpopulation, increased baseline PWV was associated with worse outcomes (all-cause death: 1.16 [1.03-1.30]; P<0.05 and cardiovascular deaths: 1.16 [1.03-1.31]; P<0.05), independent of age and left ventricular ejection fraction. Using multiple regression analysis, systolic blood pressure and age were the main independent factors positively associated with pulse pressure or PWV, both in the entire population or in the PWV substudy. In heart failure and low ejection fraction, our results suggest that pulse pressure, being negatively associated with outcome, is more dependent on left ventricular function and thereby no longer a marker of aortic elasticity. In contrast, increased aortic stiffness, assessed by PWV, contributes significantly to cardiovascular death.

  14. The wave grouping effect on wave forces on a vertical breakwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Wei-Qi; Huang, Pei-Ji

    1996-03-01

    Linear wave theory and Longuet-Higgins and Steward's (1964) group-induced second-order long wave (GSLW) theory were used in this study on the grouping effect on wave forces acting on a vertical breakwater. The calculated variance of total wave pressure on the vertical breakwater was closer to the measured value if the wave grouping effect was considered.

  15. Dynamics of coupled light waves and electron-acoustic waves.

    PubMed

    Shukla, P K; Stenflo, L; Hellberg, M

    2002-08-01

    The nonlinear interaction between coherent light waves and electron-acoustic waves in a two-electron plasma is considered. The interaction is governed by a pair of equations comprising a Schrödinger-like equation for the light wave envelope and a driven (by the light pressure) electron-acoustic wave equation. The newly derived nonlinear equations are used to study the formation and dynamics of envelope light wave solitons and light wave collapse. The implications of our investigation to space and laser-produced plasmas are pointed out.

  16. Bound infragravity waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okihiro, Michele; Guza, R. T.; Seymour, R. J.

    1992-07-01

    Model predictions of bound (i.e., nonlinearly forced by and coupled to wave groups) infragravity wave energy are compared with about 2 years of observations in 8- to 13-m depths at Imperial Beach, California, and Barbers Point, Hawaii. Frequency-directional spectra of free waves at sea and swell frequencies, estimated with a small array of four pressure sensors, are used to predict the bound wave spectra below 0.04 Hz. The predicted total bound wave energy is always less than the observed infragravity energy, and the underprediction increases with increasing water depth and especially with decreasing swell energy. At most half, and usually much less, of the observed infragravity energy is bound. Bound wave spectra are also predicted with data from a single wave gage in 183-m depth at Point Conception, California, and the assumption of unidirectional sea and swell. Even with energetic swell, less than 10% of the total observed infragravity energy in 183-m depth is bound. Free waves, either leaky or edge waves, are more energetic than bound waves at both the shallow and deep sites. The low level of infragravity energy observed in 183-m depth compared with 8- to 13-m depths, with similarly moderate sea and swell energy, suggests that leaky (and very high-mode edge) waves contribute less than 10% of the infragravity energy in 8-13 m. Most of the free infragravity energy in shallow water is refractively trapped and does not reach deep water.

  17. Alfven Waves in Interstellar Gasdynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKee, Christopher F.; Zweibel, Ellen G.

    1995-02-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves contribute a significant pressure in both the diffuse interstellar medium and in molecular clouds. Alfvén waves are subject to less damping than compressive MHD waves and are therefore likely to be the dominant mode in astrophysical environments. Provided that the medium in which the waves are propagating is slowly varying, the dynamical effects of ideal MHD waves are governed by equations derived by Dewar. We show that these equations are similar in form to the equations of radiation hydrodynamics to order υ/c, provided that the radiation is nearly isotropic. For the case of Alfvén waves, the pressure due the waves, Pw, is isotropic. Furthermore, Pw is directly observable through the non- thermal line width σnt; for a randomly oriented field, Pw = (3/2)ρσ2nt. In several simple cases, including that in which the Alfvén waves are isotropic, that in which the density is spatially uniform, and that in which the medium undergoes a self-similar contraction or expansion, undamped Alfvén waves behave like a gas with a ratio of specific heats of 3/2; i.e., pressure variations are related to density variations by Δ ln Pw = γwΔ ln ρ with γw = 3/2. In a spatially nonuniform cloud, γw generally depends on position; an explicit expression is given. In the opposite limit of rapid variations, such as in a strong shock, the wave magnetic field behaves like a static field and the wave pressure can increase as fast as ρ2, depending on the orientation of the shock and the polarization of the waves. The jump conditions for a shock in a medium containing MHD waves are given. For strong nonradiative shocks, neither the wave pressure nor the static magnetic field pressure is significant downstream, but for radiative shocks these two pressures can become dominant. Alfvén waves are essential in supporting molecular clouds against gravitational collapse. In a static cloud with a nonuniform density ρ(r), the spatial variation of the wave

  18. Subduction Factory 3: An Excel worksheet and macro for calculating the densities, seismic wave speeds, and H2O contents of minerals and rocks at pressure and temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hacker, Bradley R.; Abers, Geoffrey A.

    2004-01-01

    An Excel macro to calculate mineral and rock physical properties at elevated pressure and temperature is presented. The workbook includes an expandable database of physical parameters for 52 rock-forming minerals stable at high pressures and temperatures. For these minerals the elastic moduli, densities, seismic velocities, and H2O contents are calculated at any specified P and T conditions, using basic thermodynamic relationships and third-order finite strain theory. The mineral modes of suites of rocks are also specifiable, so that their predicted aggregate properties can be calculated using standard solid mixing theories. A suite of sample rock modes taken from the literature provides a useful starting point. The results of these calculations can be applied to a wide variety of geophysical questions including estimating the alteration of the oceanic crust and mantle; predicting the seismic velocities of lower-crustal xenoliths; estimating the effects of changes in mineralogy, pressure and temperature on buoyancy; and assessing the H2O content and mineralogy of subducted lithosphere from seismic observations.

  19. No More Snow Pits? Potential to Retrieve Bulk Snow Pack Structure from Transient Barometric Pressure Waves measured from a Prototype Embedded Wireless Sensor Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lampkin, D. J.

    2007-12-01

    Networked micro-sensors have the capacity to enable improvements in ground-based data collection at resolutions that are currently unresolved. Crossbow® Environmental Motes (MEP410 Models) were embedded in an accumulated snow pack in a meadow at Niwot Ridge Long-Term Ecological Research (LTER) C1 site. Motes were mounted to a custom designed deployment structure that constitutes an adaptive sensor "tower" at a maximum height of 142 with sensors deployed at depths of 122cm, 71cm, and 17cm from the ground. Barometric pressures measured from this embedded wireless network indicate low frequency fluctuations over the study period with higher frequency components varying as a function of depth. Mean pressure measured over the analysis period were 707.82 mb (122cm), 702.48 mb (71cm), and 704.09mb (17cm). Results indicate filtering of high frequency components of pressure measured at depth with reduced amplitude and time-lag (phase shift) modulated by changes in snow pack permeability related to density changes.

  20. Magnetospheric ULF Waves with an Increasing Amplitude as a Superposition of Two Wave Modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Xiaochen; Zong, Qiugang; Shi, Quanqi; Tian, Anmin; Sun, Weijie; Wang, Yongfu; Zhou, Xuzhi; Fu, Suiyan; Hartinger, Michael; Angelopoulos, Vassilis

    2015-04-01

    Ultra-low frequency (ULF) waves play an important role in transferring energy by buffeting the magnetosphere with solar wind pressure impulses. The amplitudes of magnetospheric ULF waves, which are induced by solar wind dynamic pressure enhancements or shocks, are thought to damp in half or one wave cycle. We report on in situ observations of the solar wind dynamic pressure impulses-induced magnetospheric ULF waves with increasing amplitudes. We have found six ULF wave events, which were induced by solar wind dynamic pressure enhancements, with slow but clear wave amplitude increase. During three or four wave cycles, the amplitudes of ion velocities and electric field of these waves increased continuously by 1.3 ~4.4 times. Two significant events were selected to further study the characteristics of these ULF waves. We have found that the wave amplitude growth is mainly contributed by the toroidal mode wave. We suggest that the wave amplitude increase in the radial electric field is caused by the superposition of two wave modes, a standing wave excited by the solar wind dynamic impulse and a propagating compressional wave. When superposed, the two wave modes fit observations as does a calculation that superposes electric fields from two wave sources.

  1. COMPRESSION WAVES AND PHASE PLOTS: SIMULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Orlikowski, D; Minich, R

    2011-08-01

    Compression wave analysis started nearly 50 years ago with Fowles. Coperthwaite and Williams gave a method that helps identify simple and steady waves. We have been developing a method that gives describes the non-isentropic character of compression waves, in general. One result of that work is a simple analysis tool. Our method helps clearly identify when a compression wave is a simple wave, a steady wave (shock), and when the compression wave is in transition. This affects the analysis of compression wave experiments and the resulting extraction of the high-pressure equation of state.

  2. Wave propagation phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groenenboom, P. H. L.

    The phenomenon of wave propagation is encountered frequently in a variety of engineering disciplines. It has been realized that for a growing number of problems the solution can only be obtained by discretization of the boundary. Advantages of the Boundary Element Method (BEM) over domain-type methods are related to the reduction of the number of space dimensions and of the modelling effort. It is demonstrated how the BEM can be applied to wave propagation phenomena by establishing the fundamental relationships. A numerical solution procedure is also suggested. In connection with a discussion of the retarded potential formulation, it is shown how the wave propagation problem can be cast into a Boundary Integral Formulation (BIF). The wave propagation problem in the BIF can be solved by time-successive evaluation of the boundary integrals. The example of pressure wave propagation following a sodium-water reaction in a Liquid Metal cooled Fast Breeder Reactor steam generator is discussed.

  3. Making Waves.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeClark, Tom

    2000-01-01

    Presents an activity on waves that addresses the state standards and benchmarks of Michigan. Demonstrates waves and studies wave's medium, motion, and frequency. The activity is designed to address different learning styles. (YDS)

  4. Measurement uncertainty in pulmonary vascular input impedance and characteristic impedance estimated from pulsed-wave Doppler ultrasound and pressure: clinical studies on 57 pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Tian, Lian; Hunter, Kendall S; Kirby, K Scott; Ivy, D Dunbar; Shandas, Robin

    2010-06-01

    Pulmonary vascular input impedance better characterizes right ventricular (RV) afterload and disease outcomes in pulmonary hypertension compared to the standard clinical diagnostic, pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR). Early efforts to measure impedance were not routine, involving open-chest measurement. Recently, the use of pulsed-wave (PW) Doppler-measured velocity to non-invasively estimate instantaneous flow has made impedance measurement more practical. One critical concern remains with clinical use: the measurement uncertainty, especially since previous studies only incorporated random error. This study utilized data from a large pediatric patient population to comprehensively examine the systematic and random error contributions to the total impedance uncertainty and determined the least error prone methodology to compute impedance from among four different methods. We found that the systematic error contributes greatly to the total uncertainty and that one of the four methods had significantly smaller propagated uncertainty; however, even when this best method is used, the uncertainty can be large for input impedance at high harmonics and for the characteristic impedance modulus. Finally, we found that uncertainty in impedance between normotensive and hypertensive patient groups displays no significant difference. It is concluded that clinical impedance measurement would be most improved by advancements in instrumentation, and the best computation method is proposed for future clinical use of the input impedance.

  5. A MATLAB toolbox and Excel workbook for calculating the densities, seismic wave speeds, and major element composition of minerals and rocks at pressure and temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abers, Geoffrey A.; Hacker, Bradley R.

    2016-02-01

    To interpret seismic images, rock seismic velocities need to be calculated at elevated pressure and temperature for arbitrary compositions. This technical report describes an algorithm, software, and data to make such calculations from the physical properties of minerals. It updates a previous compilation and Excel® spreadsheet and includes new MATLAB® tools for the calculations. The database of 60 mineral end-members includes all parameters needed to estimate density and elastic moduli for many crustal and mantle rocks at conditions relevant to the upper few hundreds of kilometers of Earth. The behavior of α and β quartz is treated as a special case, owing to its unusual Poisson's ratio and thermal expansion that vary rapidly near the α-β transition. The MATLAB tools allow integration of these calculations into a variety of modeling and data analysis projects.

  6. The role of Biot slow waves in electroseismic wave phenomena.

    PubMed

    Pride, Steven R; Garambois, Stéphane

    2002-02-01

    The electromagnetic fields that are generated as a spherical seismic wave (either P or S) traverses an interface separating two porous materials are numerically modeled both with and without the generation of Biot slow waves at the interface. In the case of an incident fast-P wave, the predicted electric-field amplitudes when slow waves are neglected can easily be off by as much as an order of magnitude. In the case of an incident S wave, the error is much smaller (typically on the order of 10% or less) because not much S-wave energy gets converted into slow waves. In neglecting the slow waves, only six plane waves (reflected and transmitted fast-P, S, and EM waves) are available with which to match the eight continuity conditions that hold at each interface. This overdetermined problem is solved by placing weights on the eight continuity conditions so that those conditions that are most important for obtaining the proper response are emphasized. It is demonstrated that when slow waves are neglected, it is best to also neglect the continuity of the Darcy flow and fluid pressure across an interface. The principal conclusion of this work is that to properly model the electromagnetic (EM) fields generated at an interface by an incident seismic wave, the full Biot theory that allows for generation of slow waves must be employed.

  7. Independent and Joint Effect of Brachial-Ankle Pulse Wave Velocity and Blood Pressure Control on Incident Stroke in Hypertensive Adults.

    PubMed

    Song, Yun; Xu, Benjamin; Xu, Richard; Tung, Renee; Frank, Eric; Tromble, Wayne; Fu, Tong; Zhang, Weiyi; Yu, Tao; Zhang, Chunyan; Fan, Fangfang; Zhang, Yan; Li, Jianping; Bao, Huihui; Cheng, Xiaoshu; Qin, Xianhui; Tang, Genfu; Chen, Yundai; Yang, Tianlun; Sun, Ningling; Li, Xiaoying; Zhao, Lianyou; Hou, Fan Fan; Ge, Junbo; Dong, Qiang; Wang, Binyan; Xu, Xiping; Huo, Yong

    2016-07-01

    Pulse wave velocity (PWV) has been shown to influence the effects of antihypertensive drugs in the prevention of cardiovascular diseases. Data are limited on whether PWV is an independent predictor of stroke above and beyond hypertension control. This longitudinal analysis examined the independent and joint effect of brachial-ankle PWV (baPWV) with hypertension control on the risk of first stroke. This report included 3310 hypertensive adults, a subset of the China Stroke Primary Prevention Trial (CSPPT) with baseline measurements for baPWV. During a median follow-up of 4.5 years, 111 participants developed first stroke. The risk of stroke was higher among participants with baPWV in the highest quartile than among those in the lower quartiles (6.3% versus 2.4%; hazard ratio, 1.66; 95% confidence interval, 1.06-2.60). Similarly, the participants with inadequate hypertension control had a higher risk of stroke than those with adequate control (5.1% versus 1.8%; hazard ratio, 2.32; 95% confidence interval, 1.49-3.61). When baPWV and hypertension control were examined jointly, participants in the highest baPWV quartile and with inadequate hypertension control had the highest risk of stroke compared with their counterparts (7.5% versus 1.3%; hazard ratio, 3.57; 95% confidence interval, 1.88-6.77). There was a significant and independent effect of high baPWV on stroke as shown among participants with adequate hypertension control (4.2% versus 1.3%; hazard ratio, 2.29, 95% confidence interval, 1.09-4.81). In summary, among hypertensive patients, baPWV and hypertension control were found to independently and jointly affect the risk of first stroke. Participants with high baPWV and inadequate hypertension control had the highest risk of stroke compared with other groups. PMID:27217412

  8. Blood pressure

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... called diastole. Normal blood pressure is considered to be a systolic blood pressure of 115 millimeters of ... pressure reading of 140 over 90, he would be evaluated for having high blood pressure. If left ...

  9. Particle-Wave Micro-Dynamics in Nonlinear Self-Excited Dust Acoustic Waves

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, C.-Y.; Teng, L.-W.; Liao, C.-T.; I Lin

    2008-09-07

    The large amplitude dust acoustic wave can be self-excited in a low-pressure dusty plasma. In the wave, the nonlinear wave-particle interaction determines particle motion, which in turn determines the waveform and wave propagation. In this work, the above behaviors are investigated by directly tracking particle motion through video-microscopy. A Lagrangian picture for the wave dynamics is constructed. The wave particle interaction associated with the transition from ordered to disordered particle oscillation, the wave crest trapping and wave heating are demonstrated and discussed.

  10. Wave turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazarenko, Sergey

    2015-07-01

    Wave turbulence is the statistical mechanics of random waves with a broadband spectrum interacting via non-linearity. To understand its difference from non-random well-tuned coherent waves, one could compare the sound of thunder to a piece of classical music. Wave turbulence is surprisingly common and important in a great variety of physical settings, starting with the most familiar ocean waves to waves at quantum scales or to much longer waves in astrophysics. We will provide a basic overview of the wave turbulence ideas, approaches and main results emphasising the physics of the phenomena and using qualitative descriptions avoiding, whenever possible, involved mathematical derivations. In particular, dimensional analysis will be used for obtaining the key scaling solutions in wave turbulence - Kolmogorov-Zakharov (KZ) spectra.

  11. Wave/current interaction model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, A. K.

    1988-01-01

    The wave-current interaction for the application to remote sensing data via numerical simulations and data comparison is modelled. Using the field data of surface current shear, wind condition and ambient wave spectrum, the numerical simulations of directional wave spectrum evolution were used to interpret and to compare with the aircraft data from Radar Ocean Wave Spectrometer (ROWS) and Surface Contour Radar (SCR) across the front during Frontal Air Sea Interaction Experiment (FASINEX). The wave-ice interaction was inspired by the observation of large amplitude waves hundreds of kms inside the ice pack in the Weddell Sea, resulting in breakup of the ice pack. The developed analysis of processes includes the refraction of waves at the pack edge, the effects of pack compression on wave propagation, wave train stability and buckling stability in the ice pack. Sources of pack compression and interaction between wave momentum and pack compression are investigated. Viscous camping of propagating waves in the marginal ice zone are also studied. The analysis suggests an explanation for the change in wave dispersion observed from the ship and the sequence of processes that cause ice pack breakup, pressure ridge formation and the formation of open bands of water.

  12. High-resolution numerical simulation and analysis of Mach reflection structures in detonation waves in low-pressure H2 - O2 - Ar mixtures: a summary of results obtained with the adaptive mesh refinement framework AMROC

    SciTech Connect

    Deiterding, Ralf

    2011-01-01

    Numerical simulation can be key to the understanding of the multi-dimensional nature of transient detonation waves. However, the accurate approximation of realistic detonations is demanding as a wide range of scales needs to be resolved. This paper describes a successful solution strategy that utilizes logically rectangular dynamically adaptive meshes. The hydrodynamic transport scheme and the treatment of the non-equilibrium reaction terms are sketched. A ghost fluid approach is integrated into the method to allow for embedded geometrically complex boundaries. Large-scale parallel simulations of unstable detonation structures of Chapman-Jouguet detonations in low-pressure hydrogen-oxygen-argon mixtures demonstrate the efficiency of the described techniques in practice. In particular, computations of regular cellular structures in two and three space dimensions and their development under transient conditions, i.e. under diffraction and for propagation through bends are presented. Some of the observed patterns are classified by shock polar analysis and a diagram of the transition boundaries between possible Mach reflection structures is constructed.

  13. High-Resolution Numerical Simulation and Analysis of Mach Reflection Structures in Detonation Waves in Low-Pressure H 2 –O 2 –Ar Mixtures: A Summary of Results Obtained with the Adaptive Mesh Refinement Framework AMROC

    DOE PAGES

    Deiterding, Ralf

    2011-01-01

    Numerical simulation can be key to the understanding of the multidimensional nature of transient detonation waves. However, the accurate approximation of realistic detonations is demanding as a wide range of scales needs to be resolved. This paper describes a successful solution strategy that utilizes logically rectangular dynamically adaptive meshes. The hydrodynamic transport scheme and the treatment of the nonequilibrium reaction terms are sketched. A ghost fluid approach is integrated into the method to allow for embedded geometrically complex boundaries. Large-scale parallel simulations of unstable detonation structures of Chapman-Jouguet detonations in low-pressure hydrogen-oxygen-argon mixtures demonstrate the efficiency of the described techniquesmore » in practice. In particular, computations of regular cellular structures in two and three space dimensions and their development under transient conditions, that is, under diffraction and for propagation through bends are presented. Some of the observed patterns are classified by shock polar analysis, and a diagram of the transition boundaries between possible Mach reflection structures is constructed.« less

  14. Large electric polarization in high pressure synthesized orthorhombic manganites RMnO3 (R=Ho,Tm,Yb and Lu) by using the double-wave PE loop measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chai, Y. S.; Oh, Y. S.; Manivannan, N.; Yang, Y. S.; Kim, Kee Hoon; Feng, S. M.; Wang, L. J.; Jin, C. Q.

    2009-03-01

    The magnitude of electric polarization via the conventional pyroelectric current and/or PE loop measurements often is ambiguous due to resistive components of the sample. To avoid this, a new technique called the double-wave method has been recently developed [1], in which only hysteretic PE components can be measured. Using this technique, we have measured the ferroelectric polarization of the orthorhombic RMnO3 (R=Ho, Tm, Yb, and Lu) synthesized under high pressure. Large remnant polarization Pr up to 920 μC/m^2 is observed at 10 K for LuMnO3. Furthermore, the Pr vs. temperature data from the PE loop has shown consistency with that measured through the pyroelectric current measurements, supporting a theoretical prediction of large polarization in the E-type spin structure in this system [2]. We also discuss the influence of thermal histories on the ferroelectric domain dynamics and possible internal bias field effects originating from oxygen vacancies in RMnO3. [1] M. Fukunaga, et al. J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. 77, 064706 (2008). [2] I. A. Sergienko, et al. Phys. Rev. Lett., 97, 227204 (2006)

  15. Gravity Waves

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-19

    article title:  Gravity Waves Ripple over Marine Stratocumulus Clouds ... Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR), a fingerprint-like gravity wave feature occurs over a deck of marine stratocumulus clouds. Similar ... that occur when a pebble is thrown into a still pond, such "gravity waves" sometimes appear when the relatively stable and stratified air ...

  16. Wave reflections in the pulmonary arteries analysed with the reservoir-wave model.

    PubMed

    Bouwmeester, J Christopher; Belenkie, Israel; Shrive, Nigel G; Tyberg, John V

    2014-07-15

    Conventional haemodynamic analysis of pressure and flow in the pulmonary circulation yields incident and reflected waves throughout the cardiac cycle, even during diastole. The reservoir-wave model provides an alternative haemodynamic analysis consistent with minimal wave activity during diastole. Pressure and flow in the main pulmonary artery were measured in anaesthetized dogs and the effects of hypoxia and nitric oxide, volume loading and positive end-expiratory pressure were observed. The reservoir-wave model was used to determine the reservoir contribution to pressure and flow and once subtracted, resulted in 'excess' quantities, which were treated as wave-related. Wave intensity analysis quantified the contributions of waves originating upstream (forward-going waves) and downstream (backward-going waves). In the pulmonary artery, negative reflections of incident waves created by the right ventricle were observed. Overall, the distance from the pulmonary artery valve to this reflection site was calculated to be 5.7 ± 0.2 cm. During 100% O2 ventilation, the strength of these reflections increased 10% with volume loading and decreased 4% with 10 cmH2O positive end-expiratory pressure. In the pulmonary arterial circulation, negative reflections arise from the junction of lobar arteries from the left and right pulmonary arteries. This mechanism serves to reduce peak systolic pressure, while increasing blood flow.

  17. Secondary atomization by high amplitude pressure waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eastes, T. W.; Samuelsen, G. S.

    1992-07-01

    Secondary atomization or (drop breakup) can occur in at least three different manners in liquid rocket engine combustion chambers: (1) in the high velocity shearing flowfield in the near injector region of a shear coaxial injector, (2) as gases expand and accelerate in the reaction zone, and (3) during combustion instability. In all of these situations the convective flow relative to the droplet can be quite high and easily simulated in the laboratory by a shock tube. This paper presents preliminary activity in the undertaking of a set of experiments designed to investigate drop breakup by the convective flowfield associated with the passing of a shock. Topics to be covered include the background, previous work, the apparatus, the diagnostic technique, scaling to actual rocket engine conditions, and preliminary results.

  18. Ionospheric Stimulation By High Power Radio Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minami, S.; Nishino, M.; Suzuki, Y.; Sato, S.; Tanikawa, T.; Nakamura, Y.; Wong, A. Y.

    1999-01-01

    We have performed an experiment to artificially stimulate the ionosphere using higher power radio waves at the HIPAS (High Power Auroral Stimulation) facility in Alaska. A radio transmission of 2.85 MHz was made at 80 MW (ERP). Diagnostics were made at the other site located 35 km from the transmission site. The results of cross-correlating the excited HF wave and observed with an 8 channel, 30 MHz scanning cosmic radio noise absorption records revealed the excited height of 90 km. Also atmospheric pressure waves observed on the ground show evident propagation of pressure waves which are generated in the ionosphere by the high-power HF wave. The results determine the excitation height of 90 km in the ionosphere and show evidence of the pressure wave coupling between the ionosphere and the lower atmosphere for periods of 10 min

  19. Refrigeration system having standing wave compressor

    DOEpatents

    Lucas, Timothy S.

    1992-01-01

    A compression-evaporation refrigeration system, wherein gaseous compression of the refrigerant is provided by a standing wave compressor. The standing wave compressor is modified so as to provide a separate subcooling system for the refrigerant, so that efficiency losses due to flashing are reduced. Subcooling occurs when heat exchange is provided between the refrigerant and a heat pumping surface, which is exposed to the standing acoustic wave within the standing wave compressor. A variable capacity and variable discharge pressure for the standing wave compressor is provided. A control circuit simultaneously varies the capacity and discharge pressure in response to changing operating conditions, thereby maintaining the minimum discharge pressure needed for condensation to occur at any time. Thus, the power consumption of the standing wave compressor is reduced and system efficiency is improved.

  20. Standing wave compressor

    DOEpatents

    Lucas, Timothy S.

    1991-01-01

    A compressor for compression-evaporation cooling systems, which requires no moving parts. A gaseous refrigerant inside a chamber is acoustically compressed and conveyed by means of a standing acoustic wave which is set up in the gaseous refrigerant. This standing acoustic wave can be driven either by a transducer, or by direct exposure of the gas to microwave and infrared sources, including solar energy. Input and output ports arranged along the chamber provide for the intake and discharge of the gaseous refrigerant. These ports can be provided with optional valve arrangements, so as to increase the compressor's pressure differential. The performance of the compressor in either of its transducer or electromagnetically driven configurations, can be optimized by a controlling circuit. This controlling circuit holds the wavelength of the standing acoustical wave constant, by changing the driving frequency in response to varying operating conditions.

  1. Deflagration Wave Profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Menikoff, Ralph

    2012-04-03

    Shock initiation in a plastic-bonded explosives (PBX) is due to hot spots. Current reactive burn models are based, at least heuristically, on the ignition and growth concept. The ignition phase occurs when a small localized region of high temperature (or hot spot) burns on a fast time scale. This is followed by a growth phase in which a reactive front spreads out from the hot spot. Propagating reactive fronts are deflagration waves. A key question is the deflagration speed in a PBX compressed and heated by a shock wave that generated the hot spot. Here, the ODEs for a steady deflagration wave profile in a compressible fluid are derived, along with the needed thermodynamic quantities of realistic equations of state corresponding to the reactants and products of a PBX. The properties of the wave profile equations are analyzed and an algorithm is derived for computing the deflagration speed. As an illustrative example, the algorithm is applied to compute the deflagration speed in shock compressed PBX 9501 as a function of shock pressure. The calculated deflagration speed, even at the CJ pressure, is low compared to the detonation speed. The implication of this are briefly discussed.

  2. On the Role of Shock Wave Reflections in Impact Cratering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertoglio, O.

    2015-07-01

    When the downward impact shockwave meets a rock discontinuity, an upward reflected pressure wave is created. When travelling through the crater fill deposits, this wave projects upwards the shattered rocks which so may contribute to the rim creation.

  3. Plane waves as tractor beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forgács, Péter; Lukács, Árpád; Romańczukiewicz, Tomasz

    2013-12-01

    It is shown that in a large class of systems, plane waves act as tractor beams: i.e., an incident plane wave can exert a pulling force on the scatterer. The underlying physical mechanism for the pulling force is due to the sufficiently strong scattering of the incoming wave into another mode carrying more momentum, in which case excess momentum is created behind the scatterer. This tractor beam or negative radiation pressure (NRP) effect, is found to be generic in systems with multiple scattering channels. In a birefringent medium, electromagnetic plane waves incident on a thin plate exert NRP of the same order of magnitude as optical radiation pressure, while in artificial dielectrics (metamaterials), the magnitude of NRP can even be macroscopic. In two dimensions, we study various scattering situations on vortices, and NRP is shown to occur by the scattering of heavy baryons into light leptons off cosmic strings, and by neutron scattering off vortices in the XY model.

  4. Estimation of central systolic blood pressure using an oscillometric blood pressure monitor.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Hao-Min; Wang, Kang-Ling; Chen, Ying-Hwa; Lin, Shing-Jong; Chen, Lung-Ching; Sung, Shih-Hsien; Ding, Philip Yu-An; Yu, Wen-Chung; Chen, Jaw-Wen; Chen, Chen-Huan

    2010-06-01

    Current noninvasive techniques for assessing central aortic pressure require the recording of an arterial pressure wave using a high-fidelity applanation tonometer. We therefore developed and validated a novel method to estimate the central aortic systolic pressure using an oscillometric blood pressure monitor alone. Invasive high-fidelity right brachial and central aortic pressure waves, and left-brachial pulse volume plethysmography from an oscillometric blood pressure monitor, were obtained at baseline and 3 min after administration of sublingual nitroglycerin in 100 patients during cardiac catheterization. In the initial 50 patients (Generation Group), Central systolic blood pressure was predicted by a multi-variate prediction model generated from the comprehensive analysis of the invasive brachial pressure wave, including brachial late-systolic shoulder pressure value and parameters related to wave reflection and arterial compliance. Another prediction model was similarly constructed from the noninvasively calibrated pulse volume plethysmography. Both models were validated in the subsequent 50 patients (Validation Group) with results: r=0.98 (P<0.001) and mean difference=0.5+/-4.5 (95% confidence interval -8.3 to 9.3) mm Hg for the invasive model, and r=0.93 (P<0.001) and mean difference=-0.1+/-7.6 (95% confidence interval -15.0 to 14.8) mm Hg for the noninvasive model. Thus, our results indicate that central aortic systolic blood pressure could be estimated by analysis of the noninvasive brachial pressure wave alone from an oscillometric blood pressure monitor.

  5. Preliminary investigation on the relation between maximum wave height and wave spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Aifeng; Wen, Cheng; Wu, Yuqing; Wu, Haoran; Li, Shuo; Cao, Guangsui

    2016-04-01

    The maximum wave height is important not only for the determination of design wave parameters but also for the marine disaster defense. While it cannot be predicted straightforwardly at present, since the general numerical models for wave forecasting are all based on phase averaged spectra model. Then it becomes very useful to make clear the relationship between the maximum wave height and wave spectra parameters, such as average wave steepness, spectra width and spectra type, such as one single peak spectra or multi peaks spectra. In order to perform this research procedure, plenty of observed wave data are required. We collected ten years wave data measured from a ship in North Sea, one year wave pressure data from nine points around Korea, four years buoy data from three points along Chinese coast. The preliminary investigation results on the relations between maximum waves and spectra via the mention observed data will be present here.

  6. Gigabar shock wave in a laboratory experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gus'kov, S. Yu.

    2016-03-01

    The current status of research on generating a powerful shock wave with a pressure of up to several gigabars in a laboratory experiment is reviewed. The focus is on results which give a possibility of shock-wave experiments to study an equation of state of matter (EOS) at the level of gigabar pressure. The proposals are discussed to achieve a plane record-pressure shock wave driven by laser-accelerated fast electrons with respect to EOS-experiment as well as to prospective method of inertial fusion target (ICF) ignition as shock ignition.

  7. Pulse Wave Well Development Demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Burdick, S.

    2001-02-23

    Conventional methods of well development at the Savannah River Site generate significant volumes of investigative derived waste (IDW) which must be treated and disposed of at a regulated Treatment, Storage, or Disposal (TSD) facility. Pulse Wave technology is a commercial method of well development utilizing bursts of high pressure gas to create strong pressure waves through the well screen zone, extending out into the formation surrounding the well. The patented process is intended to reduce well development time and the amount of IDW generated as well as to micro-fracture the formation to improve well capacity.

  8. Pressure Sores

    MedlinePlus

    Pressure sores are areas of damaged skin caused by staying in one position for too long. They ... wheelchair, or are unable to change your position. Pressure sores can cause serious infections, some of which ...

  9. Barometric pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Billings, C. E.

    1973-01-01

    The effects of alterations in barometric pressure on human beings are described. Human tolerances for gaseous environments and low and high barometric pressure are discussed, including effects on specific areas, such as the ear, lungs, teeth, and sinuses. Problems due to trapped gas within the body, high dynamic pressures on the body, and blasts are also considered.

  10. Pressure dependence of the charge-density-wave and superconducting states in GdTe3, TbTe3, and DyTe3

    SciTech Connect

    Zocco, D. A.; Hamlin, J. J.; Grube, K.; Chu, J. -H.; Kuo, H. -H.; Fisher, I. R.; Maple, M. B.

    2015-05-14

    Here, we present electrical resistivity and ac-susceptibility measurements of GdTe3, TbTe3 and DyTe3 performed under pressure. An upper charge-density-wave (CDW) is suppressed at a rate of dTCW,1/dP~ –85K/GPa. For TbTe3 and DyTe3, a second CDW below TCDW,2 increases with pressure until it reaches the TCDW,1(P) line. For GdTe3, the lower CDW emerges as pressure is increased above ~1GPa. As these two CDW states are suppressed with pressure, superconductivity (SC) appears in the three compounds at lower temperatures. Ac-susceptibility experiments performed on TbTe3 provide compelling evidence for bulk SC in the low-pressure region of the phase diagram. We provide measurements of superconducting critical fields and discuss the origin of a high-pressure superconducting phase occurring above 5 GPa.

  11. Gravity waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fritts, David

    1987-01-01

    Gravity waves contributed to the establishment of the thermal structure, small scale (80 to 100 km) fluctuations in velocity (50 to 80 m/sec) and density (20 to 30%, 0 to peak). Dominant gravity wave spectrum in the middle atmosphere: x-scale, less than 100 km; z-scale, greater than 10 km; t-scale, less than 2 hr. Theorists are beginning to understand middle atmosphere motions. There are two classes: Planetary waves and equatorial motions, gravity waves and tidal motions. The former give rise to variability at large scales, which may alter apparent mean structure. Effects include density and velocity fluctuations, induced mean motions, and stratospheric warmings which lead to the breakup of the polar vortex and cooling of the mesosphere. On this scale are also equatorial quasi-biennial and semi-annual oscillations. Gravity wave and tidal motions produce large rms fluctuations in density and velocity. The magnitude of the density fluctuations compared to the mean density is of the order of the vertical wavelength, which grows with height. Relative density fluctuations are less than, or of the order of 30% below the mesopause. Such motions may cause significant and variable convection, and wind shear. There is a strong seasonal variation in gravity wave amplitude. Additional observations are needed to address and quantify mean and fluctuation statistics of both density and mean velocity, variability of the mean and fluctuations, and to identify dominant gravity wave scales and sources as well as causes of variability, both temporal and geographic.

  12. Moreton Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, B. J.

    1999-01-01

    "Moreton waves," named for the observer who popularized them, are a solar phenomenon also known in scientific literature as "Moreton-Ramsey wave," "flare waves," "flare-associated waves," "MHD blast waves," "chromospheric shock fronts" and various other combinations of terms which connote violently propagating impulsive disturbances. It is unclear whether all of the observations to which these terms have been applied pertain to a single physical phenomenon: there has perhaps been some overlap between the observations and the assumed physical properties of the observed occurrence. Moreton waves are ideally observed in the wings of H alpha, and appear as semi-circular fronts propagating at speeds ranging from several hundred to over a thousand km/sec. They form an arc, or "brow shape" which can span up to 180 degrees. Extrapolating the speed and locations of the arc indicates that the phenomenon's origin intersects well with the impulsive phase of the associated H alpha flare (if the flare exhibits an impulsive phase). However, the arc may not form or may not be observable until it is tens of megameters from the flaring region, and subsequently can propagate to distances exceeding 100 megameters. The high speeds and distances of propagation, plus the associated radio and energetic particle observations, provided strong evidence of a coronal, rather than a chromospheric origin. The H alpha manifestation of the wave is assumed to be the "ground track" or "skirt" of a three-dimensional disturbance.

  13. Infragravity waves across the oceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rawat, Arshad; Ardhuin, Fabrice; Aucan, Jerome

    2014-05-01

    The propagation of transoceanic Infragravity (IG) wave was investigated using a global spectral wave model together with deep-ocean pressure recorders. IG waves are generated mostly at the shorelines due to non-linear hydrodynamic effects that transfer energy from the main windsea and swell band, with periods of 1 to 25 s, to periods up to 500 s. IG waves are important for the study of near-shore processes and harbor agitation, and can also be a potential source of errors in satellite altimetry measurements. Setting up a global IG model was motivated by the investigation of these errors for the future planned SWOT mission. Despite the fact that the infragravity waves exhibit much smaller vertical amplitudes than the usual high frequency wind-driven waves, of the order of 1 cm in the deep oceans, their propagation throughout the oceans and signature in the wave spectrum can be clearly observed. Using a simplified empirical parameterization of the nearshore source of free IG waves as a function of the incoming wave parameters we extended to WAVEWATCH III model, used so far for windseas and swell, to the IG band, up to periods of 300 s. The spatial and temporal variability of the modeled IG energy was well correlated to the DART station records, making it useful to interpret the records of IG waves. Open ocean IG wave records appear dominated by trans-oceanic events with well defined sources concentrated on a few days, usually on West coasts, and affecting the entire ocean basin, with amplitude patterns very similar to those of tsunamis. Three particular IG bursts during 2008 are studied, 2 in the Pacific Ocean and 1 in the North Atlantic. It was observed that the liberated IG waves can travel long distances often crossing whole oceans with negligible dissipation. The IG signatures are clearly observed at sensors along their propagation paths.

  14. Acoustic field distribution of sawtooth wave with nonlinear SBE model

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Xiaozhou Zhang, Lue; Wang, Xiangda; Gong, Xiufen

    2015-10-28

    For precise prediction of the acoustic field distribution of extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy with an ellipsoid transducer, the nonlinear spheroidal beam equations (SBE) are employed to model acoustic wave propagation in medium. To solve the SBE model with frequency domain algorithm, boundary conditions are obtained for monochromatic and sawtooth waves based on the phase compensation. In numerical analysis, the influence of sinusoidal wave and sawtooth wave on axial pressure distributions are investigated.

  15. Arctic Climate and Atmospheric Planetary Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cavalieri, D. J.; Haekkinen, S.; Zukor, Dorothy J. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Analysis of a fifty-year record (1946-1995) of monthly-averaged sea level pressure data provides a link between the phases of planetary-scale sea level pressure waves and Arctic Ocean and ice variability. Results of this analysis show: (1) a breakdown of the dominant wave 1 pattern in the late 1960's, (2) shifts in the mean phase of waves 1 and 2 since this breakdown, (3) an eastward shift in the phases of both waves 1 and 2 during the years of simulated cyclonic Arctic Ocean circulation relative to their phases during the years of anticyclonic circulation, (4) a strong decadal variability of wave phase associated with simulated Arctic Ocean circulation changes. Finally, the Arctic atmospheric circulation patterns that emerge when waves 1 and 2 are in their extreme eastern and western positions suggest an alternative approach for determining significant forcing patterns of sea ice and high-latitude variability.

  16. Arctic Climate and Atmospheric Planetary Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cavalieri, D. J.; Haekkinen, S.

    2000-01-01

    Analysis of a fifty-year record (1946-1995) of monthly-averaged sea level pressure data provides a link between the phases of planetary-scale sea level pressure waves and Arctic Ocean and ice variability. Results of this analysis show: (1) a breakdown of the dominant wave I pattern in the late 1960's, (2) shifts in the mean phase of waves 1 and 2 since this breakdown, (3) an eastward shift in the phases of both waves 1 and 2 during the years of simulated cyclonic Arctic Ocean circulation relative to their phases during the years of anticyclonic circulation, (4) a strong decadal variability of wave phase associated with simulated Arctic Ocean circulation changes. Finally, the Arctic atmospheric circulation patterns that emerge when waves 1 and 2 are in their extreme eastern and western positions suggest an alternative approach to determine significant forcing patterns of sea ice and high-latitude variability.

  17. Stagnation pressure probe. [for measuring pressure of supersonic gas streams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodyer, M. J. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A method and apparatus for measuring the stagnation pressure of supersonic velocity gas streams without the generation of shock waves which interfere with such measurements are given. The technique is insensitive to the type of gas and Mach number and is therefore particularly useful in the study of jet engine exhausts.

  18. Standing waves along a microwave generated surface wave plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, J.; Asmussen, J.

    1982-01-01

    Two surface wave plasma columns, generated by microwave power in argon at gas pressures of 0.05 torr to 330 torr, interact in the same discharge tube to form standing surface waves. Radial electric field and azimuthal magnetic field outside the discharge tube are measured to be 90 deg out of phase with respect to axial position and to decay exponentially with radial distance from the tube axis. Maximum light emission occurs at the position of maximum azimuthal magnetic field and minimum radial electric field. Electron temperature and density are measured at low pressures with double probes inserted into the plasma at a null of radial electric field. Measured electron densities compare well with those predicted by Gould-Trivelpiece surface wave theory.

  19. Boat powered by sea waves

    SciTech Connect

    Gargos, G.

    1984-11-06

    A boat having an external float pivotally fixed to the boat. Through linkage, the motion of the float relative to the boat resulting from wave motion drives a dual cylinder pump. The pump admits water from the body of water in which the boat is suspended and pressurizes that water for direction aft as a means for propulsion.

  20. Passive tire pressure sensor and method

    DOEpatents

    Pfeifer, Kent Bryant; Williams, Robert Leslie; Waldschmidt, Robert Lee; Morgan, Catherine Hook

    2007-09-04

    A surface acoustic wave device includes a micro-machined pressure transducer for monitoring tire pressure. The device is configured having a micro-machined cavity that is sealed with a flexible conductive membrane. When an external tire pressure equivalent to the cavity pressure is detected, the membrane makes contact with ridges on the backside of the surface acoustic wave device. The ridges are electrically connected to conductive fingers of the device. When the detected pressure is correct, selected fingers on the device will be grounded producing patterned acoustic reflections to an impulse RF signal. When the external tire pressure is less than the cavity reference pressure, a reduced reflected signal to the receiver results. The sensor may further be constructed so as to identify itself by a unique reflected identification pulse series.

  1. Passive tire pressure sensor and method

    DOEpatents

    Pfeifer, Kent Bryant; Williams, Robert Leslie; Waldschmidt, Robert Lee; Morgan, Catherine Hook

    2006-08-29

    A surface acoustic wave device includes a micro-machined pressure transducer for monitoring tire pressure. The device is configured having a micro-machined cavity that is sealed with a flexible conductive membrane. When an external tire pressure equivalent to the cavity pressure is detected, the membrane makes contact with ridges on the backside of the surface acoustic wave device. The ridges are electrically connected to conductive fingers of the device. When the detected pressure is correct, selected fingers on the device will be grounded producing patterned acoustic reflections to an impulse RF signal. When the external tire pressure is less than the cavity reference pressure, a reduced reflected signal to the receiver results. The sensor may further be constructed so as to identify itself by a unique reflected identification pulse series.

  2. Shock waves data for minerals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahrens, Thomas J.; Johnson, Mary L.

    1994-01-01

    Shock compression of the materials of planetary interiors yields data which upon comparison with density-pressure and density-sound velocity profiles constrain internal composition and temperature. Other important applications of shock wave data and related properties are found in the impact mechanics of terrestrial planets and solid satellites. Shock wave equation of state, shock-induced dynamic yielding and phase transitions, and shock temperature are discussed. In regions where a substantial phase change in the material does not occur, the relationship between the particle velocity, U(sub p), and the shock velocity, U(sub s), is given by U(sub s) = C(sub 0) + S U(sub p), where C(sub 0) is the shock velocity at infinitesimally small particle velocity, or the ambient pressure bulk sound velocity. Numerical values for the shock wave equation of state for minerals and related materials of the solar system are provided.

  3. Waves in a gas centrifuge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogovalov, S. V.; Kislov, V. A.; Tronin, I. V.

    2016-09-01

    Impact of the pulsed braking force on the axial gas circulation and gas content in centrifuges for uranium isotope separation was investigated by the method of numerical simulation. Pulsed brake of the rotating gas by the momentum source results into generation of the waves which propagate along the rotor of the centrifuge. The waves almost doubles the axial circulation flux in the working camera in compare with the case of the steady state breaking force with the same average power in the model under the consideration. Flux through the hole in the bottom baffle on 15% exceeds the flux in the stationary case for the same pressure and temperature in the model. We argue that the waves reduce the pressure in the GC on the same 15%.

  4. Shock wave reflections in a liquid filled thin tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Shota; Tagawa, Yoshiyuki; Kameda, Masaharu

    2013-11-01

    We investigate a behavior of an underwater shock wave in a thin glass tube using an ultra high-speed camera up to 107 frames per second. We here focus on the pressure of the reflected shock wave at interfaces (water-glass wall / water-air). A shock wave is visualized using the Background Oriented Schlieren (BOS) technique. We measure the time evolution of the shock front position and estimate the shock velocity, pressure, and internal energy as a function of the distance from the shock center. At the water-wall interface the reflected shock pressure is lower than the incident shock pressure, which agrees well with the theoretical estimation for an acoustic pressure wave. The reflected pressure at the air-water interface is much lower than the incident shock, indicating that the shape of the air-water interface may affect this reduction of the reflected pressure.

  5. Pressure-driven peristaltic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mingalev, S. V.; Lyubimov, D. V.; Lyubimova, T. P.

    2013-03-01

    The peristaltic motion of an incompressible fluid in two-dimensional channel is investigated. Instead of fixing the law of wall's coordinate variation, the law of pressure variation on the wall is fixed and the border's coordinate changes to provide the law of pressure variation on the wall. In case of small amplitude of pressure-variation on the wall A, expansion wave propagates along the length of channel and the wave results in the peristaltic transport of fluid. In the case of large A, the channel divides into two parts. The small pulsating part in the end of the tube creates the flow as a human heart, while the other big part loses this function. The solution of problem for the first peristaltic mode is stable, while the solution for the second "heart" mode is unstable and depends heavily on boundary conditions.

  6. Calculated mean arterial blood pressure in critically ill neonates.

    PubMed

    Gevers, M; Hack, W W; Ree, E F; Lafeber, H N; Westerhof, N

    1993-01-01

    Mean arterial pressure (MAP) is the area under the pressure wave form averaged over the cardiac cycle. A widely used rule of thumb to estimate MAP of peripheral arterial pressure waves in adults is adding one-third of the pulse pressure (PP) to diastolic arterial pressure (DAP). However, radial artery pressure waves in newborns differ from those in adults and resemble proximal aortic pressure waves, so that the above-mentioned calculation of MAP may not be correct. The present study was set up to obtain an arithmetical approximation to derive MAP from blood pressure waves measured in the radial artery of the neonate. We accurately recorded about 300 invasively obtained blood pressure curves in the radial artery of 10 neonates admitted for intensive care. We found that MAP in the radial artery in these neonates can be well approximated by adding 46.6% PP to DAP (range 43.0-50.1%). We suggest that the rule of thumb to derive MAP from radial artery waves in the neonate to be approximately the average of systolic and diastolic pressure, as opposed to adding one-third of the pulse pressure to the diastolic value in the adult.

  7. Nonlinear Wave-particle Interaction and Particle Trapping in Large Amplitude Dust Acoustic Waves

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Mei-Chu; Teng, Lee-Wen; Lin, I.

    2011-11-29

    Large amplitude dust acoustic wave can be self-excited by the strong downward ion flow in a dusty plasma liquid formed by negatively charged dusts suspended in a weakly ionized low pressure discharge. In this work, we investigate experimentally the wave-particle phase space dynamics of the large amplitude dust acoustic wave by connecting the Lagrangian and Eulerian views, through directly tracking particle motion and measuring local dust density fluctuations. The microscopic pictures of wave steepening and breaking, resonant particle-wave crest trapping, and the absence of trough trapping observed in our experiment are constructed.

  8. Pressure transient in liquid lines

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, J.G.; Wang, X.Q.

    1995-07-01

    The pressure surge that results from a step change of flow in liquid pipelines, commonly known as water hammer, was analyzed by an eigenfunction method. A differential-integral Pressure wave equation and a linearized velocity equation were derived from the equations of mass and momentum conservation. Waveform distortion due to viscous dissipation and pipe-wall elastic expansion is characterized by a dimensionless transmission number K. The pressure surge condition, which is mathematically singular, was used in the solution procedure. The exact solutions from numerical calculation of the differential-integral equation provide a complete Pressure transient in the pipe. The problems are also calculated With the general-purpose computer code COMMIX, which solves the exact mass conservation equation and Navier-Stokes equations. These solutions were compared with published experimental results, and agreement was good. The effect of turbulence on the pressure transient is discussed in the light of COMMIX calculational results.

  9. Meteorological waves (by Ocean Color Scanner Data)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evdoshenko, M. A.

    2014-10-01

    Data of normalized water leaving radiance at a wavelength 859 nm Lwn(859) of 250-m spatial resolution obtained from Moderate Ocean Color Scanners (MODIS) installed on Aqua and Terra satellites were used to study meteorological waves. These waves are caused by atmospheric internal gravity waves at the expense of a change of atmospheric pressure impacting the sea surface and bringing a change in its level; they are observable everywhere in the ocean. Examples of meteorological waves were considered for the eastern part of the Black Sea, where they appeared as stripes of alternate brightness on Lwn(859) images. It is shown that meteorological waves at one and the same place can be totally generated by atmospheric waves spreading at different heights of the lower troposphere. The 3D characteristics of meteorological waves were evaluated including the direction of wave propagation, crest length reaching more than one hundred kilometers, wavelength of several tens centimeters, and wave amplitude of several tens of centimeters. For conditions of intermittent cloudiness, imposition in a difference mode of the level L1b radiance image with the signature of atmospheric waves in a cloud and of the level L2 water leaving the radiance image with the signature of meteorological waves enabled us to examine the phase structure of waves and to reveal the existence of resonance.

  10. Standing Sound Waves in Air with DataStudio

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraftmakher, Yaakov

    2010-01-01

    Two experiments related to standing sound waves in air are adapted for using the ScienceWorkshop data-acquisition system with the DataStudio software from PASCO scientific. First, the standing waves are created by reflection from a plane reflector. The distribution of the sound pressure along the standing wave is measured. Second, the resonance…

  11. Evaporation waves in superheated dodecane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simões-Moreira, J. R.; Shepherd, J. E.

    1999-03-01

    We have observed propagating adiabatic evaporation waves in superheated liquid dodecane, C12H26. Experiments were performed with a rapid decompression apparatus at initial temperatures of 180 300°C. Saturated dodecane in a tube was suddenly depressurized by rupturing a diaphragm. Motion pictures and still photographic images, and pressure and temperature data were obtained during the evaporation event that followed depressurization. Usually, a front or wave of evaporation started at the liquid free surface and propagated into the undisturbed regions of the metastable liquid. The evaporation wave front moved with a steady mean velocity but the front itself was unstable and fluctuating in character. At low superheats, no waves were observed until a threshold superheat was exceeded. At moderate superheats, subsonic downstream states were observed. At higher superheats, the downstream flow was choked, corresponding to a Chapman Jouguet condition. At the most extreme superheat tested, a vapour content of over 90% was estimated from the measured data, indicating a nearly complete evaporation wave. Our results are interpreted by modelling the evaporation wave as a discontinuity, or jump, between a superheated liquid state and a two-phase liquid vapour downstream state. Reasonable agreement is found between the model and observations; however, there is a fundamental indeterminacy that prevents the prediction of the observed wave speeds.

  12. Features of the dynamics of postdetonation waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gimaltdinov, I. K.; Arslanbekova, R. R.; Levina, T. M.

    2016-05-01

    We present the results of numerical investigations of the parameters of postdetonation waves forming at a passage from the zone occupied with a bubbly liquid formed by the detonation wave to a zone filled with a liquid without bubbles. The dependence of the pressure amplitude of detonation waves and postdetonation waves on the gas volumetric content of bubbles has been studied. A possibility of the detonation transfer through the layer of a bubble-free liquid separating the regions of the bubbly liquid has been shown, the map of possible situations at the detonation transfer through the layer of this liquid has been presented.

  13. Shock wave interaction with turbulence: Pseudospectral simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Buckingham, A.C.

    1986-12-30

    Shock waves amplify pre-existing turbulence. Shock tube and shock wave boundary layer interaction experiments provide qualitative confirmation. However, shock pressure, temperature, and rapid transit complicate direct measurement. Computational simulations supplement the experimental data base and help isolate the mechanisms responsible. Simulations and experiments, particularly under reflected shock wave conditions, significantly influence material mixing. In these pseudospectral Navier-Stokes simulations the shock wave is treated as either a moving (tracked or fitted) domain boundary. The simulations assist development of code mix models. Shock Mach number and pre-existing turbulence intensity initially emerge as key parameters. 20 refs., 8 figs.

  14. Pressure sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Mee, David K.; Ripley, Edward B.; Nienstedt, Zachary C.; Nienstedt, Alex W.; Howell, Jr., Layton N.

    2015-09-29

    Disclosed is a passive, in-situ pressure sensor. The sensor includes a sensing element having a ferromagnetic metal and a tension inducing mechanism coupled to the ferromagnetic metal. The tension inducing mechanism is operable to change a tensile stress upon the ferromagnetic metal based on a change in pressure in the sensing element. Changes in pressure are detected based on changes in the magnetic switching characteristics of the ferromagnetic metal when subjected to an alternating magnetic field caused by the change in the tensile stress. The sensing element is embeddable in a closed system for detecting pressure changes without the need for any penetrations of the system for power or data acquisition by detecting changes in the magnetic switching characteristics of the ferromagnetic metal caused by the tensile stress.

  15. Peer Pressure

    MedlinePlus

    ... and behaviors. This is often positive — it's human nature to listen to and learn from other people ... Responding to peer pressure is part of human nature — but some people are more likely to give ...

  16. Pressure Drop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawson, Mike

    2010-01-01

    Mike Lawson briefly discussed pressure drop for aerospace applications and presented short stories about adventures experienced while working at NASA and General Dynamics, including exposure to technologies like the Crew and Equipment Translation Aid (CETA) cart and the SWME.

  17. PRESSURE TRANSDUCER

    DOEpatents

    Sander, H.H.

    1959-10-01

    A pressure or mechanical force transducer particularly adaptable to miniature telemetering systems is described. Basically the device consists of a transistor located within a magnetic field adapted to change in response to mechanical force. The conduction characteristics of the transistor in turn vary proportionally with changes in the magnetic flux across the transistor such that the output (either frequency of amplitude) of the transistor circuit is proportional to mechanical force or pressure.

  18. Pressure regulator

    DOEpatents

    Ebeling, Jr., Robert W.; Weaver, Robert B.

    1979-01-01

    The pressure within a pressurized flow reactor operated under harsh environmental conditions is controlled by establishing and maintaining a fluidized bed of uniformly sized granular material of selected density by passing the gas from the reactor upwardly therethrough at a rate sufficient to fluidize the bed and varying the height of the bed by adding granular material thereto or removing granular material therefrom to adjust the backpressure on the flow reactor.

  19. Modeling explosion generated Scholte waves in sandy sediments with power law dependent shear wave speed.

    PubMed

    Soloway, Alexander G; Dahl, Peter H; Odom, Robert I

    2015-10-01

    Experimental measurements of Scholte waves from underwater explosions collected off the coast of Virginia Beach, VA in shallow water are presented. It is shown here that the dispersion of these explosion-generated Scholte waves traveling in the sandy seabed can be modeled using a power-law dependent shear wave speed profile and an empirical source model that determines the pressure time-series at 1 m from the source as a function of TNT-equivalent charge weight.

  20. Analysis of Measured and Simulated Supraglottal Acoustic Waves.

    PubMed

    Fraile, Rubén; Evdokimova, Vera V; Evgrafova, Karina V; Godino-Llorente, Juan I; Skrelin, Pavel A

    2016-09-01

    To date, although much attention has been paid to the estimation and modeling of the voice source (ie, the glottal airflow volume velocity), the measurement and characterization of the supraglottal pressure wave have been much less studied. Some previous results have unveiled that the supraglottal pressure wave has some spectral resonances similar to those of the voice pressure wave. This makes the supraglottal wave partially intelligible. Although the explanation for such effect seems to be clearly related to the reflected pressure wave traveling upstream along the vocal tract, the influence that nonlinear source-filter interaction has on it is not as clear. This article provides an insight into this issue by comparing the acoustic analyses of measured and simulated supraglottal and voice waves. Simulations have been performed using a high-dimensional discrete vocal fold model. Results of such comparative analysis indicate that spectral resonances in the supraglottal wave are mainly caused by the regressive pressure wave that travels upstream along the vocal tract and not by source-tract interaction. On the contrary and according to simulation results, source-tract interaction has a role in the loss of intelligibility that happens in the supraglottal wave with respect to the voice wave. This loss of intelligibility mainly corresponds to spectral differences for frequencies above 1500 Hz. PMID:26377510

  1. On neutron surface waves

    SciTech Connect

    Ignatovich, V. K.

    2009-01-15

    It is shown that neutron surface waves do not exist. The difference between the neutron wave mechanics and the wave physics of electromagnetic and acoustic processes, which allows the existence of surface waves, is analyzed.

  2. Relativistic spherical plasma waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulanov, S. S.; Maksimchuk, A.; Schroeder, C. B.; Zhidkov, A. G.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P.

    2012-02-01

    Tightly focused laser pulses that diverge or converge in underdense plasma can generate wake waves, having local structures that are spherical waves. Here we study theoretically and numerically relativistic spherical wake waves and their properties, including wave breaking.

  3. Wave Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newell, Alan C.; Rumpf, Benno

    2011-01-01

    In this article, we state and review the premises on which a successful asymptotic closure of the moment equations of wave turbulence is based, describe how and why this closure obtains, and examine the nature of solutions of the kinetic equation. We discuss obstacles that limit the theory's validity and suggest how the theory might then be modified. We also compare the experimental evidence with the theory's predictions in a range of applications. Finally, and most importantly, we suggest open challenges and encourage the reader to apply and explore wave turbulence with confidence. The narrative is terse but, we hope, delivered at a speed more akin to the crisp pace of a Hemingway story than the wordjumblingtumbling rate of a Joycean novel.

  4. Acoustic Remote Sensing of Rogue Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons, Wade; Kadri, Usama

    2016-04-01

    We propose an early warning system for approaching rogue waves using the remote sensing of acoustic-gravity waves (AGWs) - progressive sound waves that propagate at the speed of sound in the ocean. It is believed that AGWs are generated during the formation of rogue waves, carrying information on the rogue waves at near the speed of sound, i.e. much faster than the rogue wave. The capability of identifying those special sound waves would enable detecting rogue waves most efficiently. A lot of promising work has been reported on AGWs in the last few years, part of which in the context of remote sensing as an early detection of tsunami. However, to our knowledge none of the work addresses the problem of rogue waves directly. Although there remains some uncertainty as to the proper definition of a rogue wave, there is little doubt that they exist and no one can dispute the potential destructive power of rogue waves. An early warning system for such extreme waves would become a demanding safety technology. A closed form expression was developed for the pressure induced by an impulsive source at the free surface (the Green's function) from which the solution for more general sources can be developed. In particular, we used the model of the Draupner Wave of January 1st, 1995 as a source and calculated the induced AGW signature. In particular we studied the AGW signature associated with a special feature of this wave, and characteristic of rogue waves, of the absence of any local set-down beneath the main crest and the presence of a large local set-up.

  5. Gravity Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanzandt, T. E.

    1985-01-01

    Atmospheric parameters fluctuate on all scales. In the mesoscale these fluctuations are occasionally sinusoidal so that they can be interpreted as gravity waves. Usually, however, the fluctuations are noise like, so that their cause is not immediately evident. Results of mesoscale observations in the 20 to 120 m altitude range that are suitable for incorporation into a model atmosphere are very limited. In the stratosphere and lower mesosphere observations are sparse and very little data has been summarized into appropriate form. There is much more data in the upper mesosphere and lower thermosphere, but again very little of it has been summarized. The available mesoscale spectra of horizontal wind u versus vertical wave number m in the 20 to 120 km altitude range are shown together with a spectrum from the lower atmosphere for comparison. Further information about these spectra is given. In spite of the large range of altitudes and latitudes, the spectra from the lower atmosphere (NASA, 1971 and DEWAN, 1984) are remarkably similar in both shape and amplitude. The mean slopes of -2.38 for the NASA spectrum and -2.7 for the Dewan spectra are supported by the mean slope of -2.75 found by ROSENBERG et al. (1974). The mesospheric spectrum is too short to establish a shape. Its amplitude is about an order of magnitude larger than the NASA spectrum in the same wave number range. The NASA and Dewan spectra suggest that the mesoscale spectra in the lower atmosphere are insensitive to meteorological conditions.

  6. Incompressible magnetohydrodynamic surface waves - Nonlinear aspects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollweg, Joseph V.

    1987-01-01

    The nonlinear properties of MHD surface waves in the solar atmosphere are investigated analytically, assuming that the fluid is incompressible and that the waves are confined to a single surface, with semiinfinite regions on both sides. The governing equations are derived in detail, and qualitative results are presented in a graph. For propagating waves, second-order terms in the wave amplitude are found to lead to wave steepening at leading or trailing edges, the steepening rate becoming very large as the threshold for the linear Kelvin-Helmholtz instability is approached. Second-order effects on standing waves include crest and trough sharpening (increasing with time), a current independent of distance on the surface but decreasing exponentially with distance from the surface, and pressure-field fluctuations of infinite extent. It is suggested that these effects could account for a large fraction of solar-atmosphere heating.

  7. Wave Forced Normal Modes on Fringing Reefs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pequignet, A. N.; Becker, J. M.; Merrifield, M. M.; Aucan, J.

    2008-12-01

    In an effort to assess wave-driven coastal inundation at the shoreline of fringing reefs, pressure and current observations were collected at reefs on Guam (Ipan) and Oahu, Hawaii (Mokuleia) as part of the PILOT (Pacific Island Land-Ocean Typhoon) experiment. Similar to dissipative sandy beaches, nearshore surface elevation at both reefs is dominated by energy in the infragravity frequency band. Coherent infragravity oscillations across the reef tend to occur at discrete frequencies and with standing wave cross-shore structures that are consistent with open basin resonant modes. The modes are forced by swell wave groups, similar to a time-dependent setup. The resonant modes are most apparent during energetic wave events, in part because wave setup over the reef increases the low mode resonant frequencies to a range that is conducive to wave group forcing. Evidence of the excitation of resonant modes during tropical storm Man-Yi at Ipan, Guam is presented.

  8. Subharmonic Wave Generation at Interfaces of a Thin Layer between Metal Blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Takahiro; Biwa, Shiro

    2013-07-01

    Subharmonic waves were significantly generated at the interfaces of aluminum blocks and an aluminum foil subjected to a 6 MHz burst incident wave. Although the fundamental wave amplitude was linearly varied with input voltage, the subharmonic waves generated at the interfaces indicated strong nonlinearity. Analyzing the relationship of the subharmonic wave generation, the applied contact pressure, and the stress of the ultrasonic wave has revealed that subharmonic components can be generated when the incident ultrasonic wave has sufficiently large stress to separate the contacting interfaces. At rough surfaces, the subharmonic peak could not be observed because a large true contact pressure prevented the interfaces from separating.

  9. Compaction Waves in Granular HMX

    SciTech Connect

    E. Kober; R. Menikoff

    1999-01-01

    Piston driven compaction waves in granular HMX are simulated with a two-dimensional continuum mechanics code in which individual grains are resolved. The constitutive properties of the grains are modeled with a hydrostatic pressure and a simple elastic-plastic model for the shear stress. Parameters are chosen to correspond to inert HMX. For a tightly packed random grain distribution (with initial porosity of 19%) we varied the piston velocity to obtain weak partly compacted waves and stronger fully compacted waves. The average stress and wave speed are compatible with the porous Hugoniot locus for uni- axial strain. However, the heterogeneities give rise to stress concentrations, which lead to localized plastic flow. For weak waves, plastic deformation is the dominant dissipative mechanism and leads to dispersed waves that spread out in time. In addition to dispersion, the granular heterogeneities give rise to subgrain spatial variation in the thermodynamic variables. The peaks in the temperature fluctuations, known as hot spots, are in the range such that they are the critical factor for initiation sensitivity.

  10. Stochastic excitation of seismic waves by a hurricane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanimoto, Toshiro; Valovcin, Anne

    2015-11-01

    We investigate how a tropical cyclone (Hurricane Isaac in 2012) generated seismic ground motions using seismic and barometric data from the Earthscope network. In the frequency band 0.01-0.02 Hz, seismic and surface pressure amplitudes show a systematic decreasing trend with distance from the center of the hurricane. However, the decreasing rate is much higher for seismic waves than for pressure. We develop a stochastic theory of seismic wave excitation by surface pressure that connects these two observed data sets; surface pressure is the excitation source, and seismic data are the resulting seismic wave field. This theory contains two parameters: (i) the pressure power spectral density (Sp) and (ii) the correlation length in the pressure field (L). Using the formula, we solve for the spatial variation of correlation lengths. The solution shows that longer correlation lengths in pressure are near the hurricane center. Because seismic wave excitation is proportional to L2Sp, the excitation for seismic waves becomes effectively more localized closer to the center. Also, the scaling relation between L and Sp leads to an excitation source which is approximately proportional to the third power of surface pressure. This centralized source for seismic wave excitation explains why the decreasing rate with distance is higher for seismic data than for barometric data. However, this spatial coherence mechanism may not be the only process, as strong turbulence near the center may cause transient bursts of pressure and also induce higher temporal correlation. These alternative mechanisms need to be carefully analyzed in the future.

  11. High Blood Pressure

    MedlinePlus

    ... version High Blood Pressure Overview What is blood pressure? Blood pressure is the amount of force that your ... called your blood pressure. What is high blood pressure? High blood pressure (also called hypertension) occurs when your blood ...

  12. Engineering studies of vectorcardiographs in blood pressure measuring systems, appendix 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mark, R. G.

    1975-01-01

    The development of a cardiovascular monitoring system to noninvasively monitor the blood pressure and heart rate using pulse wave velocity was described. The following topics were covered: (1) pulse wave velocity as a measure of arterial blood pressure, (2) diastolic blood pressure and pulse wave velocity in humans, (3) transducer development for blood pressure measuring device, and (4) cardiovascular monitoring system. It was found, in experiments on dogs, that the pulse wave velocity is linearly related to diastolic blood pressure over a wide range of blood pressure and in the presence of many physiological perturbations. A similar relationship was observed in normal, young human males over a moderate range of pressures. Past methods for monitoring blood pressure and a new method based on pulse wave velocity determination were described. Two systems were tested: a Doppler ultrasonic transducer and a photoelectric plethysmograph. A cardiovascular monitoring system was described, including operating instructions.

  13. Making Waves: Seismic Waves Activities and Demonstrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braile, S. J.; Braile, L. W.

    2011-12-01

    The nature and propagation of seismic waves are fundamental concepts necessary for understanding the exploration of Earth's interior structure and properties, plate tectonics, earthquakes, and seismic hazards. Investigating seismic waves is also an engaging approach to learning basic principles of the physics of waves and wave propagation. Several effective educational activities and demonstrations are available for teaching about seismic waves, including the stretching of a spring to demonstrate elasticity; slinky wave propagation activities for compressional, shear, Rayleigh and Love waves; the human wave activity to demonstrate P- and S- waves in solids and liquids; waves in water in a simple wave tank; seismic wave computer animations; simple shake table demonstrations of model building responses to seismic waves to illustrate earthquake damage to structures; processing and analysis of seismograms using free and easy to use software; and seismic wave simulation software for viewing wave propagation in a spherical Earth. The use of multiple methods for teaching about seismic waves is useful because it provides reinforcement of the fundamental concepts, is adaptable to variable classroom situations and diverse learning styles, and allows one or more methods to be used for authentic assessment. The methods described here have been used effectively with a broad range of audiences, including K-12 students and teachers, undergraduate students in introductory geosciences courses, and geosciences majors.

  14. A mesoscale gravity wave event observed during CCOPE. II - Interactions between mesoscale convective systems and the antecedent waves. [Cooperative Convection Precipitation Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koch, Steven E.; Golus, Robert E.; Dorian, Paul B.

    1988-01-01

    The interactions between preexisting gravity waves and convective systems were investigated using data obtained by the Cooperative Convection Precipitation Experiment observational network in Montana on July 11-12, 1981. The results indicate that strong convection substantially affects gravity waves locally by augmenting the wave amplitude, reducing its wavelength, distorting the wave shape, altering the wave phase velocity, and greatly weakening the in-phase covariance between the perturbation wind and pressure fields. These convective effects upon gravity waves are explained in terms of hydrostatic and nonhydrostatic pressure forces and gust front processes associated with thunderstorms.

  15. Shear waves in inhomogeneous, compressible fluids in a gravity field.

    PubMed

    Godin, Oleg A

    2014-03-01

    While elastic solids support compressional and shear waves, waves in ideal compressible fluids are usually thought of as compressional waves. Here, a class of acoustic-gravity waves is studied in which the dilatation is identically zero, and the pressure and density remain constant in each fluid particle. These shear waves are described by an exact analytic solution of linearized hydrodynamics equations in inhomogeneous, quiescent, inviscid, compressible fluids with piecewise continuous parameters in a uniform gravity field. It is demonstrated that the shear acoustic-gravity waves also can be supported by moving fluids as well as quiescent, viscous fluids with and without thermal conductivity. Excitation of a shear-wave normal mode by a point source and the normal mode distortion in realistic environmental models are considered. The shear acoustic-gravity waves are likely to play a significant role in coupling wave processes in the ocean and atmosphere.

  16. Shear waves in inhomogeneous, compressible fluids in a gravity field.

    PubMed

    Godin, Oleg A

    2014-03-01

    While elastic solids support compressional and shear waves, waves in ideal compressible fluids are usually thought of as compressional waves. Here, a class of acoustic-gravity waves is studied in which the dilatation is identically zero, and the pressure and density remain constant in each fluid particle. These shear waves are described by an exact analytic solution of linearized hydrodynamics equations in inhomogeneous, quiescent, inviscid, compressible fluids with piecewise continuous parameters in a uniform gravity field. It is demonstrated that the shear acoustic-gravity waves also can be supported by moving fluids as well as quiescent, viscous fluids with and without thermal conductivity. Excitation of a shear-wave normal mode by a point source and the normal mode distortion in realistic environmental models are considered. The shear acoustic-gravity waves are likely to play a significant role in coupling wave processes in the ocean and atmosphere. PMID:24606251

  17. Diffusion Driven Combustion Waves in Porous Media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aldushin, A. P.; Matkowsky, B. J.

    2000-01-01

    Filtration of gas containing oxidizer, to the reaction zone in a porous medium, due, e.g., to a buoyancy force or to an external pressure gradient, leads to the propagation of Filtration combustion (FC) waves. The exothermic reaction occurs between the fuel component of the solid matrix and the oxidizer. In this paper, we analyze the ability of a reaction wave to propagate in a porous medium without the aid of filtration. We find that one possible mechanism of propagation is that the wave is driven by diffusion of oxidizer from the environment. The solution of the combustion problem describing diffusion driven waves is similar to the solution of the Stefan problem describing the propagation of phase transition waves, in that the temperature on the interface between the burned and unburned regions is constant, the combustion wave is described by a similarity solution which is a function of the similarity variable x/square root of(t) and the wave velocity decays as 1/square root of(t). The difference between the two problems is that in the combustion problem the temperature is not prescribed, but rather, is determined as part of the solution. We will show that the length of samples in which such self-sustained combustion waves can occur, must exceed a critical value which strongly depends on the combustion temperature T(sub b). Smaller values of T(sub b) require longer sample lengths for diffusion driven combustion waves to exist. Because of their relatively small velocity, diffusion driven waves are considered to be relevant for the case of low heat losses, which occur for large diameter samples or in microgravity conditions, Another possible mechanism of porous medium combustion describes waves which propagate by consuming the oxidizer initially stored in the pores of the sample. This occurs for abnormally high pressure and gas density. In this case, uniformly propagating planar waves, which are kinetically controlled, can propagate, Diffusion of oxidizer decreases

  18. Application of Underwater Shock Wave Focusing to the Development of Extracorporeal Shock Wave Lithotripsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takayama, Kazuyoshi

    1993-05-01

    This paper describes a summary of a research project for the development of extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL), which has been carried out, under close collaboration between the Shock Wave Research Center of Tohoku University and the School of Medicine, Tohoku University. The ESWL is a noninvasive clinical treatment of disintegrating human calculi and one of the most peaceful applications of shock waves. Underwater spherical shock waves were generated by explosion of microexplosives. Characteristics of the underwater shock waves and of ultrasound focusing were studied by means of holographic interferometric flow visualization and polyvinyliden-difluoride (PVDF) pressure transducers. These focused pressures, when applied to clinical treatments, could effectively and noninvasively disintegrate urinary tract stones or gallbladder stones. However, despite clincal success, tissue damage occurs during ESWL treatments, and the possible mechanism of tissue damage is briefly described.

  19. Wave-Particle Interactions in Electron Acoustic Waves in Pure Ion Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Anderegg, F.; Driscoll, C. F.; Dubin, D. H. E.; O'Neil, T. M.

    2009-03-06

    Electron acoustic waves (EAW) with a phase velocity less than twice the plasma thermal velocity are observed on pure ion plasma columns. At low excitation amplitudes, the EAW frequencies agree with theory, but at moderate excitation the EAW is more frequency variable than typical Langmuir waves, and at large excitations resonance is observed over a broad range. Laser induced fluorescence measurements of the wave-coherent ion velocity distribution show phase reversals and wave-particle trapping plateaus at {+-}v{sub ph}, as expected, and corroborate the unusual role of kinetic pressure in the EAW.

  20. The Role of Wave Nonlinearity on Sediment Motion and Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, D. L.; Kaihatu, J. M.; Frank, D. P.

    2014-12-01

    It has long been assumed that higher moments of velocity and acceleration affect the motion and transport of mobile sediment beds. The goal of this effect is to identify the influence of wave shape on sediment motion and mobile layer thickness. Theoretic predictions of neared velocity and horizontal pressure gradient will be approximated with Dean's 1965 stream function theory for representing nonlinear waves. The formulation also allows for the inclusion of mean flow. Wave nonlinearity is characterized with skewness and asymmetry of the wave shape. An incipient motion criterion that resolves the fluid forcing due to both the bed shear stress and the horizontal pressure gradients is applied to a slab of sediment. The resulting formulation provides a measure of sediment transport vulnerability to commonly available wave parameters (wave height, wave period, water depth, skewness, and asymmetry). The formulation is compared with several available data sets with a range of forcing and sediment conditions. Particle image velocimetry observations of velocity and sediment motion and acoustic Doppler observations of the three-dimensional velocity field provide high resolution of the near bed dynamics. The wave shape is characterized with mid water column pressure sensors and wave gages. As the wave nonlinearities increase, the role of the horizontal pressure gradient also increases. The influence of the pressure gradient also is shown to be particularly sensitive to a decrease in the wave period and an increase in the wave asymmetry. The influence of the bed shear is shown to be particularly sensitive to wave skewness. The analysis demonstrates the potential for improving the larger scale predictions of sediment transport in our nearshore and coastal waters.

  1. Wave-wave interactions and deep ocean acoustics.

    PubMed

    Guralnik, Z; Bourdelais, J; Zabalgogeazcoa, X; Farrell, W E

    2013-10-01

    Deep ocean acoustics, in the absence of shipping and wildlife, is driven by surface processes. Best understood is the signal generated by non-linear surface wave interactions, the Longuet-Higgins mechanism, which dominates from 0.1 to 10 Hz, and may be significant for another octave. For this source, the spectral matrix of pressure and vector velocity is derived for points near the bottom of a deep ocean resting on an elastic half-space. In the absence of a bottom, the ratios of matrix elements are universal constants. Bottom effects vitiate the usual "standing wave approximation," but a weaker form of the approximation is shown to hold, and this is used for numerical calculations. In the weak standing wave approximation, the ratios of matrix elements are independent of the surface wave spectrum, but depend on frequency and the propagation environment. Data from the Hawaii-2 Observatory are in excellent accord with the theory for frequencies between 0.1 and 1 Hz, less so at higher frequencies. Insensitivity of the spectral ratios to wind, and presumably waves, is indeed observed in the data.

  2. Interaction of Oblique Instability Waves with a Nonlinear Plane Wave

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wundrow, David W.; Hultgren, Lennart S.; Goldstein, M. E.

    1994-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the downstream evolution of a resonant triad of initially non-interacting linear Instability waves in a boundary layer with a weak adverse pressure gradient. The triad consists of a two-dimensional fundamental mode and a pair of equal-amplitude oblique modes that form a subharmonic standing wave in the spanwise direction. The growth rates are small and there is a well-defined common critical layer for these waves. As in Goldstein & Lee (1992), the wave interaction takes place entirely within this critical layer and is initially of the parametric-resonance type. This enhances the spatial growth rate of the subharmonic but does not affect that of the fundamental. However, in contrast to Goldstein & Lee (1992), the initial subharmonic amplitude is assumed to be small enough so that the fundamental can become nonlinear within its own critical layer before it is affected by the subharmonic. The subharmonic evolution is then dominated by the parametric-resonance effects and occurs on a much shorter streamwise scale than that of the fundamental. The subharmonic amplitude continues to increase during this parametric-resonance stage - even as the growth rate of the fundamental approaches zero - and the subharmonic eventually becomes large enough to influence the fundamental which causes both waves to evolve on the same shorter streamwise scale.

  3. Pressurized hopper

    SciTech Connect

    Densley, P.J.; Goldmann, L.H. Jr.

    1980-04-01

    A Secure Automated Fuel Fabrication Line is being developed to reduce personnel exposure and to improve safeguards. Fertile and fissile fuel powders are blended in the line for making fuel pellets. A pressurized hopper was developed for use not only as a blender, but also as a storage and feeding device. It works with or without injection tubes to produce a well-blended powder with reduced agglomerate population. Results of blending experiments using dry Kaolin clay and Tempra pigment are given. (DLC)

  4. Pressure transducer

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, T.T.; Roop, C.J.; Schmidt, K.J.; Gunchin, E.R.

    1987-02-13

    A pressure transducer suitable for use in high temperature environments includes two pairs of induction coils, each pair being bifilarly wound together, and each pair of coils connected as opposite arms of a four arm circuit; an electrically conductive target moveably positioned between the coil pairs and connected to a diaphragm such that deflection of the diaphragm causes axial movement of the target and an unbalance in the bridge output. 7 figs.

  5. Pressure transducer

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Thomas T.; Roop, Conard J.; Schmidt, Kenneth J.; Gunchin, Elmer R.

    1989-01-01

    A pressure transducer suitable for use in high temperature environments includes two pairs of induction coils, each pair being bifilarly wound together, and each pair of coils connected as opposite arms of a four arm circuit; an electrically conductive target moveably positioned between the coil pairs and connected to a diaphragm such that deflection of the diaphragm causes axial movement of the target and an unbalance in the bridge output.

  6. Observations of gravity waves at atmospheric fronts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abusamah, Azizan B. Hj

    1990-09-01

    An observational study of pressure perturbations associated with the passage of atmospheric fronts over the British Isles using a triangular array of sensitive microbarographs reveals the preponderance of gravity wave activities in the vicinity of the surface cold front (SCF). Examination of the time series of these pressure perturbations in the frequency domain shows an enhancement for frequencies less than the local buoyancy frequency N after the passage of the SCF. The spectral analysis also shows two predominant frequency peaks usually located near N and N/2 s(exp -1). Isolating these frequencies shows that there is a systematic amplitude modulation with an amplification near the SCF and at a region 2-3 hours before and after the SCF passage. The cross-correlation analysis reveals that the gravity waves in the post SCF region propagate towards the SCF. As these waves approach the SCF, the across front component of the phase speed decreases and the direction of propagation of the wave rotates in an anticlockwise manner. It is found that a consistent description of the gravity waves can only be made if first the waves are assumed to be ducted, i.e. there is a reflecting layer aloft, and second that as these waves propagate through the frontal environment, due to the inhomogeneity, they are refracted. A number of conceptual models are then developed to account for the observed wave behavior in a frontal region. In this investigation it is shown that the stable layer associated with the frontal zone can form a good upper reflector for non-hydrostatic gravity waves. It is also argued that the slope of this layer plays an important role in the refraction of the observed gravity waves. A model of wave propagation in a wedge is then used to account for this slope.

  7. Laser-induced shock waves effects in materials

    SciTech Connect

    Dingus, R.S.; Shafer, B.P.

    1990-01-01

    A review of the effects of pressure pulses on materials is presented with an orientation toward laser-induced shock wave effects in biological tissue. The behavior is first discussed for small amplitudes, namely sound waves, since many important features in this region are also applicable at large amplitudes. The generation of pressure pulses by lasers is discussed along with amplitudes. The origin and characteristic properties of shock waves are discussed along with the different types of effects they can produce. The hydrodynamic code techniques required for shock wave calculations are discussed along with the necessary empirical data base and methods for generating that data base. 7 refs., 15 figs.

  8. Urethral pressure variations in healthy male volunteers.

    PubMed

    Kirkeby, H J; Sørensen, S; Poulsen, E U

    1989-01-01

    Urethral pressures are usually considered to be static and only few authors have emphasized time-related pressure changes. We conducted a study on 10 healthy male volunteers, monitoring the urethral pressures at maximal urethral closure pressure, 2.5 cm proximal (bladder neck) and 2.5 cm distal (pars bulbosa) respectively over 30 min periods. At the bladder neck only sporadic waves were seen. At maximal closure pressure almost permanent oscillations were found, the wavelengths and amplitudes showing big differences. At the pars bulbosa 2 persons showed only sporadic oscillations and in 7 we found permanent pressure variations. The pressure variations are proposed to represent peristaltic activity with the ability of expelling the last drops of urine after micturition and posing a mechanical barrier to ascending microorganisms. PMID:2749948

  9. Pressure broadening of H(2)O absorption lines in the 1.3 microm region measured by continuous wave-cavity ring-down spectroscopy: application in the trace detection of water vapor in N(2), SiH(4), CF(4), and PH(3).

    PubMed

    Fiadzomor, Phyllis A Y; Baker, Derek M; Keen, Anthony M; Grant, Robert B; Orr-Ewing, Andrew J

    2008-12-01

    A continuous wave cavity ring-down (cw-CRD) spectrometer has been developed for the measurement of trace levels of water vapor by absorption spectroscopy at wavelengths in the vicinity of 1358 nm and 1392 nm. The speed of data acquisition and selectivity make cavity ringdown spectroscopy potentially more useful than current techniques for measurement of trace water in process gases and vacuum environments used for semiconductor manufacture where water vapor contamination has a detrimental effect on the final product. The pressure broadening coefficients (gamma) for bath gases N(2), air, and Ar and semiconductor process gases SiH(4), PH(3), and CF(4) were determined for a range of absorption lines in the 2nu(1) and nu(1) + nu(3) bands of H(2)O. For the transitions investigated, the concentration of water vapor in the sample gas varied from 1.7 x 10(12) to 2.9 x 10(15) molecule cm(-3) in N(2) at a total pressure of <10 mbar and was mixed with the bath gas of increasing pressure up to approximately 200 mbar. The values of gamma quantify the reduction in peak absorption cross-sections with bath gas pressure and, thus, their effects on the detection limit of water vapor. For a CRD spectrometer with a ring-down time of tau = 12.0 mus measured with a precision of 0.6%, detection limits for the measurement of water vapor in 1 atm N(2) and of CF(4) were estimated to be 18 and 14 ppbv, respectively. Competing absorption by SiH(4) and PH(3) in the 1.3 mum wavelength region results in respective detection limits for water vapor of 98 and 319 ppbv (relative to 1 atm) in 0.2 atm SiH(4) and 0.37 atm PH(3).

  10. Head waves, diving waves, and interface waves at the seafloor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephen, Ralph A.

    2005-09-01

    Brekhovskikh (1960) summarizes the system of waves that arises from reflection and refraction of spherical waves at the interface between homogeneous solid half-spaces. By eliminating the shear wave potential in one half-space, the system for fluid-solid half-spaces like the seafloor is obtained. There are two cases: one where the shear speed in the bottom is less than the compressional speed in the fluid (soft sediments), and the other where the shear speed in the bottom is greater than the compressional speed in the fluid (hard volcanic basement). This model is the basis for defining interface phenomena such as evanescent waves, head waves, pseudo-Rayleigh waves, and Stoneley/Scholte waves. If a positive gradient is introduced into the compressional and shear sound speeds in the bottom, one obtains diving waves and interference head waves (Cerveny and Ravindra, 1971). There are two types of interface waves: pseudo-Rayleigh waves that are evanescent in the bottom but propagate in the water, and Stoneley/Scholte waves that are evanescent in both media. In multi-interface models there are of course normal modes. In actual seafloors, low speed layers, sound and shear speed gradients, and interface and volume lateral heterogeneities affect the characteristics of propagation and scattering. [Work supported by ONR.

  11. Wave transmission characteristics and anisotropy of canine carotid arteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moritz, W. E.; Anliker, M.

    1974-01-01

    A method was developed to generate and record three types of small amplitude waves (pressure, torsion and axial) in the exposed carotid artery of anesthetized dogs. The pressure waves were studied with the aid of miniature pressure transducers; electro-optical tracking units monitored the axial and circumferential surface displacements. Results from 6 dogs are presented in the form of the phase velocities and attenuation of three types of waves. The data demonstrate incompatibility with an isotropic elastic model for the mechanical behavior of the artery. The measured damping appears to be primarily due to the viscoelastic properties of the vessel wall material.

  12. Effect of Viscoelasticity of Vessel Walls on Pulse Wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Masashi; Yamamoto, Yuya; Matsukawa, Mami; Watanabe, Yoshiaki; Furuya, Mio; Asada, Takaaki

    2010-07-01

    The pulse wave comes from the displacement of surface skin and is composed of incident and reflected waves. Since the properties of the reflected wave change considerably owing to the viscoelasticity of the vessel walls, the analysis of the reflected wave is considered to be useful for evaluating arterial stiffness; thereby, appropriate estimation of the incident wave is important for separating the pulse wave. Here, the incident wave is generated by a forward wave, which is the intravascular pressure caused by blood flow. In the former analysis, we assumed the blood vessel as an elastic tube and estimated the forward wave from the blood flow velocity waveform. In this study, we used a viscoelastic model to estimate a more appropriate forward wave. In this estimation, we used viscoelastic properties similar to those of bovine aorta, human aorta, or human artery. The estimated forward waves showed that the difference in the viscous properties of vessel walls causes minimal changes in the forward waves, which were also similar to that estimated using the elastic model. The result tells us that the elastic model is acceptable and useful for the estimation of forward wave, incident wave, and reflected wave, which enables the simple evaluation of the viscoelastic properties of vessel walls.

  13. Waves and Tsunami Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frashure, K. M.; Chen, R. F.; Stephen, R. A.; Bolmer, T.; Lavin, M.; Strohschneider, D.; Maichle, R.; Micozzi, N.; Cramer, C.

    2007-01-01

    Demonstrating wave processes quantitatively in the classroom using standard classroom tools (such as Slinkys and wave tanks) can be difficult. For example, waves often travel too fast for students to actually measure amplitude or wavelength. Also, when teaching propagating waves, reflections from the ends set up standing waves, which can confuse…

  14. Restoration of Surface Waves Elevation Using the 5-th Order Stokes Waves Approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maximov, Vasily; Nudner, Igor; Semenov, Konstantin; Titova, Natalia

    2014-05-01

    It is very useful from the engineering point of view to get the way to recalculate the pressure values measured inside the liquid to the elevation of the free surface. Up to now this problem, despite its obvious importance, has not received any satisfactory solution. This is mostly due to the fact that the waves on the surface may have a different nature and complex degree of description. In our study, we examined both theoretically and experimentally the ability to restore the elevation of the free surface, using the data for the pressure within the fluid in the case of nonlinear periodic waves. We have seen how the wave surface elevation restores using the first, third, and fifth approximations for Stokes waves. The algorithm of wave height restoration is presented for each order from the list above. We examined how the measurements errors propagate through our algorithms of wave height restoration with Monte-Carlo techniques. The experiments were fulfilled in the hydro flume having 40 m length, 1.0 m width, and 1.2 m height. The depth of fluid was 0.6 m. The shield-type wavemaker produced the periodic waves having large amplitude. The wave height was varied in the range of 4 to 22 cm. The wave periods were from 1.0 to 2.6 sec. The wave steepness was from 0.006 to 0.064. Depth of the liquid was 66 cm. In the experiments, we have measured the pressure wave at about half the depth (more precisely, at a depth of 26.5 cm) and at the bottom. The free surface elevation was measured directly by wavemeter. The comparison of experimental and numerical data shows clearly that theoretical results describe satisfactory the physics of the problem. The rules for the selection of varying order of approximation depending on the measurement accuracy of the initial parameters are proposed.

  15. Blood pressure measurement

    MedlinePlus

    Diastolic blood pressure; Systolic blood pressure; Blood pressure reading; Measuring blood pressure ... your health care provider will wrap the blood pressure cuff snugly around your upper arm. The lower ...

  16. Blood Pressure Quiz

    MedlinePlus

    ... page please turn Javascript on. Feature: High Blood Pressure Blood Pressure Quiz Past Issues / Fall 2011 Table of Contents ... About High Blood Pressure / Treatment: Types of Blood Pressure Medications / Blood Pressure Quiz Fall 2011 Issue: Volume 6 Number ...

  17. Understanding Blood Pressure Readings

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Understanding Blood Pressure Readings Updated:Aug 17,2016 Blood pressure is typically ... Your doctor should evaluate unusually low blood pressure readings. How is high blood pressure diagnosed? Your healthcare ...

  18. Nonlinear Landau damping and Alfven wave dissipation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vinas, Adolfo F.; Miller, James A.

    1995-01-01

    Nonlinear Landau damping has been often suggested to be the cause of the dissipation of Alfven waves in the solar wind as well as the mechanism for ion heating and selective preacceleration in solar flares. We discuss the viability of these processes in light of our theoretical and numerical results. We present one-dimensional hybrid plasma simulations of the nonlinear Landau damping of parallel Alfven waves. In this scenario, two Alfven waves nonresonantly combine to create second-order magnetic field pressure gradients, which then drive density fluctuations, which in turn drive a second-order longitudinal electric field. Under certain conditions, this electric field strongly interacts with the ambient ions via the Landau resonance which leads to a rapid dissipation of the Alfven wave energy. While there is a net flux of energy from the waves to the ions, one of the Alfven waves will grow if both have the same polarization. We compare damping and growth rates from plasma simulations with those predicted by Lee and Volk (1973), and also discuss the evolution of the ambient ion distribution. We then consider this nonlinear interaction in the presence of a spectrum of Alfven waves, and discuss the spectrum's influence on the growth or damping of a single wave. We also discuss the implications for wave dissipation and ion heating in the solar wind.

  19. Pulse Wave Propagation in the Arterial Tree

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van de Vosse, Frans N.; Stergiopulos, Nikos

    2011-01-01

    The beating heart creates blood pressure and flow pulsations that propagate as waves through the arterial tree that are reflected at transitions in arterial geometry and elasticity. Waves carry information about the matter in which they propagate. Therefore, modeling of arterial wave propagation extends our knowledge about the functioning of the cardiovascular system and provides a means to diagnose disorders and predict the outcome of medical interventions. In this review we focus on the physical and mathematical modeling of pulse wave propagation, based on general fluid dynamical principles. In addition we present potential applications in cardiovascular research and clinical practice. Models of short- and long-term adaptation of the arterial system and methods that deal with uncertainties in personalized model parameters and boundary conditions are briefly discussed, as they are believed to be major topics for further study and will boost the significance of arterial pulse wave modeling even more.

  20. Freak waves observations in the coastal zone of Okhotsk Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, Konstantin; Zaytsev, Andrey; Kostenko, Irina; Pelinovsky, Efim; Kurkin, Andrey

    2015-04-01

    Instrumental data of the long-term observation of abnormally large waves (freak waves) on the shelf of Sakhalin Island near the village Vsmorie, cape Ostriy, orifice of the Izmenchivae Lake, cape Svobodniy and cape Aniva since 2007 are adduced. These measurements were made with using bottom stations, measuring variations in bottom pressure, induced by surface waves. These sensors do not interfere with navigation and do not affect the ecology of the area. The important problem of the translation variations of bottom pressure in the vertical oscillations of the sea surface is discussed. The linear theory of water waves used here as a first approximation. About 1,400 waves that are abnormal, and their height twice the height of the background waves (amplitude criterion killer waves) are allocated from the total number of individual waves (several million). About 20 waves have a height greater than the height of the background by 2.7 times. The wave group, which was fixed for the term «three sisters» is typical form of abnormal waves. On average, two or three abnormal waves are recorded per day.

  1. Analytic methods for design of wave cycles for wave rotor core engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Resler, Edwin L., Jr.; Mocsari, Jeffrey C.; Nalim, M. R.

    1993-01-01

    A procedure to design a preliminary wave rotor cycle for any application is presented. To complete a cycle with heat addition there are two separate but related design steps that must be followed. The 'wave' boundary conditions determine the allowable amount of heat added in any case and the ensuing wave pattern requires certain pressure discharge conditions to allow the process to be made cyclic. This procedure, when applied, gives a first estimate of the cycle performance and the necessary information for the next step in the design process, namely the application of a characteristic based or other appropriate detailed one dimensional wave calculation that locates the proper porting around the periphery of the wave rotor. Four examples of the design procedure are given to demonstrate its utility and generality. These examples also illustrate the large gains in performance that could be realized with the use of wave rotor enhanced propulsion cycles.

  2. Pressure Transfer Functions for Interfacial Fluids Problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Robin Ming; Hur, Vera Mikyoung; Walsh, Samuel

    2016-06-01

    We make a consistent derivation, from the governing equations, of the pressure transfer function in the small-amplitude Stokes wave regime and the hydrostatic approximation in the small-amplitude solitary water wave regime, in the presence of a background shear flow. The results agree with the well-known formulae in the zero vorticity case, but they incorporate the effects of vorticity through solutions to the Rayleigh equation. We extend the results to permit continuous density stratification and to internal waves between two constant-density fluids. Several examples are discussed.

  3. Computing unsteady shock waves for aeroacoustic applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meadows, Kristine R.; Caughey, David A.; Casper, Jay

    1994-01-01

    The computation of unsteady shock waves, which contribute significantly to noise generation in supersonic jet flows, is investigated. The paper focuses on the difficulties of computing slowly moving shock waves. Numerical error is found to manifest itself principally as a spurious entropy wave. Calculations presented are performed using a third-order essentially nonoscillatory scheme. The effect of stencil biasing parameters and of two versions of numerical flux formulas on the magnitude of spurious entropy are investigated. The level of numerical error introduced in the calculation is quantified as a function of shock pressure ratio, shock speed, Courant number, and mesh density. The spurious entropy relative to the entropy jump across a static shock decreases with increasing shock strength and shock velocity relative to the grid, but is insensitive to Courant number. The structure of the spurious entropy wave is affected by the choice of flux formulas and algorithm biasing parameters. The effect of the spurious numerical waves on the calculation of sound amplification by a shock wave is investigated. For this class of problem, the acoustic pressure waves are relatively unaffected by the spurious numerical phenomena.

  4. Computing unsteady shock waves for aeroacoustic applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meadows,, Kristine r.; Caughey, David A.; Casper, Jay

    1994-01-01

    The computation of unsteady shock waves, which contribute significantly to noise generation in supersonic jet flows, is investigated. This paper focuses on the difficulties of computing slowly moving shock waves. Numerical error is found to manifest itself principally as a spurious entropy wave. Calculations presented are performed using a third order essentially nonoscillatory scheme. The effect of stencil biasing parameters and of two versions of numerical flux formulas on the magnitude of spurious entropy are investigated. The level of numerical error introduced in the calculation in quantified as a function of shock pressure ratio, shock speed, Courant number, and mesh density. The spurious entropy relative to the entropy jump across a static shock decreases with increasing shock strength and shock velocity relative to the grid, but is insensitive to Courant number. The structure of the spurious entropy wave is affected by the choice of flux formulas and algorithm biasing parameters. The effect of the spurious numerical waves on the calculation of sound amplification by a shock wave is investigated. For this class of problem, the acoustic pressure waves are relatively unaffected by the spurious numerical phenomena.

  5. Rayleigh wave effects in an elastic half-space.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aggarwal, H. R.

    1972-01-01

    Consideration of Rayleigh wave effects in a homogeneous isotropic linearly elastic half-space subject to an impulsive uniform disk pressure loading. An approximate formula is obtained for the Rayleigh wave effects. It is shown that the Rayleigh waves near the center of loading arise from the portion of the dilatational and shear waves moving toward the axis, after they originate at the edge of the load disk. A study is made of the vertical displacement due to Rayleigh waves at points on the axis near the surface of the elastic half-space.

  6. Wave propagation in sandwich panels with a poroelastic core.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hao; Finnveden, Svante; Barbagallo, Mathias; Arteaga, Ines Lopez

    2014-05-01

    Wave propagation in sandwich panels with a poroelastic core, which is modeled by Biot's theory, is investigated using the waveguide finite element method. A waveguide poroelastic element is developed based on a displacement-pressure weak form. The dispersion curves of the sandwich panel are first identified as propagating or evanescent waves by varying the damping in the panel, and wave characteristics are analyzed by examining their motions. The energy distributions are calculated to identify the dominant motions. Simplified analytical models are also devised to show the main physics of the corresponding waves. This wave propagation analysis provides insight into the vibro-acoustic behavior of sandwich panels lined with elastic porous materials.

  7. Geometrical versus wave optics under gravitational waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angélil, Raymond; Saha, Prasenjit

    2015-06-01

    We present some new derivations of the effect of a plane gravitational wave on a light ray. A simple interpretation of the results is that a gravitational wave causes a phase modulation of electromagnetic waves. We arrive at this picture from two contrasting directions, namely, null geodesics and Maxwell's equations, or geometric and wave optics. Under geometric optics, we express the geodesic equations in Hamiltonian form and solve perturbatively for the effect of gravitational waves. We find that the well-known time-delay formula for light generalizes trivially to massive particles. We also recover, by way of a Hamilton-Jacobi equation, the phase modulation obtained under wave optics. Turning then to wave optics—rather than solving Maxwell's equations directly for the fields, as in most previous approaches—we derive a perturbed wave equation (perturbed by the gravitational wave) for the electromagnetic four-potential. From this wave equation it follows that the four-potential and the electric and magnetic fields all experience the same phase modulation. Applying such a phase modulation to a superposition of plane waves corresponding to a Gaussian wave packet leads to time delays.

  8. Frequency and wavelength prediction of ultrasonic induced liquid surface waves.

    PubMed

    Mahravan, Ehsan; Naderan, Hamid; Damangir, Ebrahim

    2016-12-01

    A theoretical investigation of parametric excitation of liquid free surface by a high frequency sound wave is preformed, using potential flow theory. Pressure and velocity distributions, resembling the sound wave, are applied to the free surface of the liquid. It is found that for impinging wave two distinct capillary frequencies will be excited: One of them is the same as the frequency of the sound wave, and the other is equal to the natural frequency corresponding to a wavenumber equal to the horizontal wavenumber of the sound wave. When the wave propagates in vertical direction, mathematical formulation leads to an equation, which has resonance frequency equal to half of the excitation frequency. This can explain an important contradiction between the frequency and the wavelength of capillary waves in the two cases of normal and inclined interaction of the sound wave and the free surface of the liquid.

  9. Ducted kinetic Alfven waves in plasma with steep density gradients

    SciTech Connect

    Houshmandyar, Saeid; Scime, Earl E.

    2011-11-15

    Given their high plasma density (n {approx} 10{sup 13} cm{sup -3}), it is theoretically possible to excite Alfven waves in a conventional, moderate length (L {approx} 2 m) helicon plasma source. However, helicon plasmas are decidedly inhomogeneous, having a steep radial density gradient, and typically have a significant background neutral pressure. The inhomogeneity introduces regions of kinetic and inertial Alfven wave propagation. Ion-neutral and electron-neutral collisions alter the Alfven wave dispersion characteristics. Here, we present the measurements of propagating kinetic Alfven waves in helium helicon plasma. The measured wave dispersion is well fit with a kinetic model that includes the effects of ion-neutral damping and that assumes the high density plasma core defines the radial extent of the wave propagation region. The measured wave amplitude versus plasma radius is consistent with the pile up of wave magnetic energy at the boundary between the kinetic and inertial regime regions.

  10. Frequency and wavelength prediction of ultrasonic induced liquid surface waves.

    PubMed

    Mahravan, Ehsan; Naderan, Hamid; Damangir, Ebrahim

    2016-12-01

    A theoretical investigation of parametric excitation of liquid free surface by a high frequency sound wave is preformed, using potential flow theory. Pressure and velocity distributions, resembling the sound wave, are applied to the free surface of the liquid. It is found that for impinging wave two distinct capillary frequencies will be excited: One of them is the same as the frequency of the sound wave, and the other is equal to the natural frequency corresponding to a wavenumber equal to the horizontal wavenumber of the sound wave. When the wave propagates in vertical direction, mathematical formulation leads to an equation, which has resonance frequency equal to half of the excitation frequency. This can explain an important contradiction between the frequency and the wavelength of capillary waves in the two cases of normal and inclined interaction of the sound wave and the free surface of the liquid. PMID:27566141

  11. An investigation of the modulation of capillary and short gravity waves in the open ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, D. D.; Shemdin, O. H.

    1980-01-01

    A preliminary investigation of the modulation of capillary and gravity waves by long ocean waves is described. A pressure transducer is used to obtain water surface displacements, and a high-response laser-optical system is used to detect short-wave slopes. Analytical techniques are developed to account for the orbital motion of long waves. The local mean squared wave slope is found to be maximum leeward of the long-wave crests. For the long waves studied here and for short waves from 1 cm to 1 m, the longer a short-wave component is, the more leeward its maximum tends to occur. Also, the shortest waves tend to modulate least. The modulation of short waves is found to be strong enough to be an important component of the synthetic aperture radar image formation mechanism for long ocean waves.

  12. Underwater shock wave focusing in an ellipsoidal cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takayama, K.; Saito, K.; Obara, T.; Kameshima, N.

    1990-07-01

    A primary study was made experimentally and numerically of spherical underwater shock wave focusing and high pressure generation in an ellipsoidal cavity. Spherical shock waves were produced by microexplosion of silver azide or PETN of 10 to 100 mg. The ellipsoidal cavity has major and minor axes of 700 and 500 mm, respectively. The focused pressure was measured along the major axis by PVDF pressure gauges. By exploding a 100 mg PETN pellet the peak pressure at 8 kbar was obtained near the second focal point. The TVD finite difference numerical simulation was also conducted. Good agreement was obtained between the experiment and simulation.

  13. Effect of amiloride and spironolactone on renal tubular function, ambulatory blood pressure, and pulse wave velocity in healthy participants in a double-blinded, randomized, placebo-controlled, crossover trial.

    PubMed

    Matthesen, Solveig Klok; Larsen, Thomas; Lauridsen, Thomas Guldager; Vase, Henrik; Gjørup, Pia Holland; Nykjær, Karen Marie; Nielsen, Søren; Pedersen, Erling Bjerregaard

    2012-01-01

    We wanted to test the hypothesis that treatment with amiloride or spironolactone reduced ambulatory (ABP) and central blood pressure (CBP) and that tubular transport via ENaCγ and AQP2 was increased after furosemide treatment. During baseline conditions, there were no differences in ABP, CBP, renal tubular function, or plasma concentrations of vasoactive hormones. After furosemide treatment, an increase in CBP, CH(2)o, FE(Na), FE(K), u-AQP2/min, u-ENaCγ/min, PRC, p-Ang II, and p-Aldo was observed. The increases in water and sodium absorption via AQP2 and ENaC after furosemide treatment most likely are compensatory phenomena to antagonize water and sodium depletion. PMID:22591021

  14. Torsional ultrasonic wave based level measurement system

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, David E.; Kisner, Roger A.

    2012-07-10

    A level measurement system suitable for use in a high temperature and pressure environment to measure the level of coolant fluid within the environment, the system including a volume of coolant fluid located in a coolant region of the high temperature and pressure environment and having a level therein; an ultrasonic waveguide blade that is positioned within the desired coolant region of the high temperature and pressure environment; a magnetostrictive electrical assembly located within the high temperature and pressure environment and configured to operate in the environment and cooperate with the waveguide blade to launch and receive ultrasonic waves; and an external signal processing system located outside of the high temperature and pressure environment and configured for communicating with the electrical assembly located within the high temperature and pressure environment.

  15. Uniform shock waves in disordered granular matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez, Leopoldo R.; Turner, Ari M.; Vitelli, Vincenzo

    2012-10-01

    The confining pressure P is perhaps the most important parameter controlling the properties of granular matter. Strongly compressed granular media are, in many respects, simple solids in which elastic perturbations travel as ordinary phonons. However, the speed of sound in granular aggregates continuously decreases as the confining pressure decreases, completely vanishing at the jamming-unjamming transition. This anomalous behavior suggests that the transport of energy at low pressures should not be dominated by phonons. In this work we use simulations and theory to show how the response of granular systems becomes increasingly nonlinear as pressure decreases. In the low-pressure regime the elastic energy is found to be mainly transported through nonlinear waves and shocks. We numerically characterize the propagation speed, shape, and stability of these shocks and model the dependence of the shock speed on pressure and impact intensity by a simple analytical approach.

  16. Wave model downscaling for coastal applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valchev, Nikolay; Davidan, Georgi; Trifonova, Ekaterina; Andreeva, Nataliya

    2010-05-01

    Downscaling is a suitable technique for obtaining high-resolution estimates from relatively coarse-resolution global models. Dynamical and statistical downscaling has been applied to the multidecadal simulations of ocean waves. Even as large-scale variability might be plausibly estimated from these simulations, their value for the small scale applications such as design of coastal protection structures and coastal risk assessment is limited due to their relatively coarse spatial and temporal resolutions. Another advantage of the high resolution wave modeling is that it accounts for shallow water effects. Therefore, it can be used for both wave forecasting at specific coastal locations and engineering applications that require knowledge about extreme wave statistics at or near the coastal facilities. In the present study downscaling is applied to both ECMWF and NCEP/NCAR global reanalysis of atmospheric pressure over the Black Sea with 2.5 degrees spatial resolution. A simplified regional atmospheric model is employed for calculation of the surface wind field at 0.5 degrees resolution that serves as forcing for the wave models. Further, a high-resolution nested WAM/SWAN wave model suite of nested wave models is applied for spatial downscaling. It aims at resolving the wave conditions in a limited area at the close proximity to the shore. The pilot site is located in the northern part the Bulgarian Black Sea shore. The system involves the WAM wave model adapted for basin scale simulation at 0.5 degrees spatial resolution. The WAM output for significant wave height, mean wave period and mean angle of wave approach is used in terms of external boundary conditions for the SWAN wave model, which is set up for the western Black Sea shelf at 4km resolution. The same model set up on about 400m resolution is nested to the first SWAN run. In this case the SWAN 2D spectral output provides boundary conditions for the high-resolution model run. The models are implemented for a

  17. Low frequency wave modes of liquid-filled flexible tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Yuan-Fang; Peng, Tzu-Huan

    2015-09-01

    Many canals in the human body are liquid-filled thin wall flexible tubes. In general the P-wave and S-wave velocities of tube material are much slower than the sound velocity of the liquid. It is interested to study the dynamic deformation of the wall caused by pressure fluctuation of liquid. In the low frequency range, the liquid pressure is essentially axial symmetric. Therefore, axial symmetric wave propagation modes are investigated. The calculated spectrum shows there are two modes with zero frequency limit. Phase velocities of these two modes are much smaller than the sound velocity of the liquid. They are also slower than the P-wave velocity of the tube material. At very low wave number, radial displacements of both liquid particles and tube are very small compared to their axial counter parts. As the frequency goes higher, boundary waves are observed.

  18. Plane shock wave interaction with a cylindrical water column

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sembian, S.; Liverts, M.; Tillmark, N.; Apazidis, N.

    2016-05-01

    A complex system of waves propagating inside a water column due to the impact of plane shock wave is investigated both experimentally and numerically. Flow features, such as, focusing of expansion waves generating large negative pressure, nucleation of cavitation bubbles, and a re-circulation zone are observed and discussed qualitatively and quantitatively. Experiments are conducted on a 22 mm diametrical water column hit by shock waves with Mach numbers 1.75 and 2.4 in a newly constructed exploding wire facility. A new technique to create a properly shaped, repeatable, large diameter water column with straight walls is presented. Qualitative features of the flow are captured using the shadowgraph technique. With the aid of numerical simulations the wave motions inside the column are analyzed; the spatial location of the expansion wave focusing point and the corresponding negative peak pressures is estimated.

  19. Detonation waves in relativistic hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Cissoko, M. )

    1992-02-15

    This paper is concerned with an algebraic study of the equations of detonation waves in relativistic hydrodynamics taking into account the pressure and the energy of thermal radiation. A new approach to shock and detonation wavefronts is outlined. The fluid under consideration is assumed to be perfect (nonviscous and nonconducting) and to obey the following equation of state: {ital p}=({gamma}{minus}1){rho} where {ital p}, {rho}, and {gamma} are the pressure, the total energy density, and the adiabatic index, respectively. The solutions of the equations of detonation waves are reduced to the problem of finding physically acceptable roots of a quadratic polynomial {Pi}({ital X}) where {ital X} is the ratio {tau}/{tau}{sub 0} of dynamical volumes behind and ahead of the detonation wave. The existence and the locations of zeros of this polynomial allow it to be shown that if the equation of state of the burnt fluid is known then the variables characterizing the unburnt fluid obey well-defined physical relations.

  20. Blood Pressure Modifies Retinal Susceptibility to Intraocular Pressure Elevation

    PubMed Central

    He, Zheng; Nguyen, Christine T. O.; Armitage, James A.; Vingrys, Algis J.; Bui, Bang V.

    2012-01-01

    Primary open angle glaucoma affects more than 67 million people. Elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) is a risk factor for glaucoma and may reduce nutrient availability by decreasing ocular perfusion pressure (OPP). An interaction between arterial blood pressure and IOP determines OPP; but the exact contribution that these factors have for retinal function is not fully understood. Here we sought to determine how acute modifications of arterial pressure will affect the susceptibility of neuronal function and blood flow to IOP challenge. Anaesthetized (ketamine:xylazine) Long-Evan rats with low (∼60 mmHg, sodium nitroprusside infusion), moderate (∼100 mmHg, saline), or high levels (∼160 mmHg, angiotensin II) of mean arterial pressure (MAP, n = 5–10 per group) were subjected to IOP challenge (10–120 mmHg, 5 mmHg steps every 3 minutes). Electroretinograms were measured at each IOP step to assess bipolar cell (b-wave) and inner retinal function (scotopic threshold response or STR). Ocular blood flow was measured using laser-Doppler flowmetry in groups with similar MAP level and the same IOP challenge protocol. Both b-wave and STR amplitudes decreased with IOP elevation. Retinal function was less susceptible to IOP challenge when MAP was high, whereas the converse was true for low MAP. Consistent with the effects on retinal function, higher IOP was needed to attenuated ocular blood flow in animals with higher MAP. The susceptibility of retinal function to IOP challenge can be ameliorated by acute high BP, and exacerbated by low BP. This is partially mediated by modifications in ocular blood flow. PMID:22359566

  1. A Comparison between Oceanographic Parameters and Seafloor Pressures; Measured, Theoretical and Modelled, and Terrestrial Seismic Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donne, Sarah; Bean, Christopher; Craig, David; Dias, Frederic; Christodoulides, Paul

    2016-04-01

    Microseisms are continuous seismic vibrations which propagate mainly as surface Rayleigh and Love waves. They are generated by the Earth's oceans and there are two main types; primary and secondary microseisms. Primary microseisms are generated through the interaction of travelling surface gravity ocean waves with the seafloor in shallow waters relative to the wavelength of the ocean wave. Secondary microseisms, on the other hand are generated when two opposing wave trains interact and a non-linear second order effect produces a pressure fluctuation which is depth independent. The conditions necessary to produce secondary microseisms are presented in Longuet-Higgins (1950) through the interaction of two travelling waves with the same wave period and which interact at an angle of 180 degrees. Equivalent surface pressure density (p2l) is modelled using the numerical ocean wave model Wavewatch III and this term is considered as the microseism source term. This work presents an investigation of the theoretical second order pressures generated through the interaction of travelling waves with varying wave amplitude, period and angle of incidence. Predicted seafloor pressures calculated off the Southwest coast of Ireland are compared with terrestrially recorded microseism records, measured seafloor pressures and oceanographic parameters. The work presented in this study suggests that a broad set of sea states can generate second order seafloor pressures that are consistent with seafloor pressure measurements. Local seismic arrays throughout Ireland allow us to investigate the temporal covariance of these seafloor pressures with microseism source locations.

  2. Central blood pressure and chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Ohno, Yoichi; Kanno, Yoshihiko; Takenaka, Tsuneo

    2016-01-01

    In this review, we focused on the relationship between central blood pressure and chronic kidney diseases (CKD). Wave reflection is a major mechanism that determines central blood pressure in patients with CKD. Recent medical technology advances have enabled non-invasive central blood pressure measurements. Clinical trials have demonstrated that compared with brachial blood pressure, central blood pressure is a stronger risk factor for cardiovascular (CV) and renal diseases. CKD is characterized by a diminished renal autoregulatory ability, an augmented direct transmission of systemic blood pressure to glomeruli, and an increase in proteinuria. Any elevation in central blood pressure accelerates CKD progression. In the kidney, interstitial inflammation induces oxidative stress to handle proteinuria. Oxidative stress facilitates atherogenesis, increases arterial stiffness and central blood pressure, and worsens the CV prognosis in patients with CKD. A vicious cycle exists between CKD and central blood pressure. To stop this cycle, vasodilator antihypertensive drugs and statins can reduce central blood pressure and oxidative stress. Even in early-stage CKD, mineral and bone disorders (MBD) may develop. MBD promotes oxidative stress, arteriosclerosis, and elevated central blood pressure in patients with CKD. Early intervention or prevention seems necessary to maintain vascular health in patients with CKD. PMID:26788468

  3. Compressional ULF waves in the outer magnetosphere. 2: A case study of Pc 5 type wave activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Xiaoming; Kivelson, Margaret G.

    1994-01-01

    In previously published work (Zhu and Kivelson, 1991) the spatial distribution of compressional magnetic pulsations of period 2 - 20 min in the outer magnetosphere was described. In this companion paper, we study some specific compressional events within our data set, seeking to determine the structure of the waves and identifying the wave generation mechanism. We use both the magnetic field and three-dimensional plasma data observed by the International Sun-Earth Explorer (ISEE) 1 and/or 2 spacecraft to characterize eight compressional ultra low frequency (ULF) wave events with frequencies below 8 mHz in the outer magnetosphere. High time resolution plasma data for the event of July 24, 1978, made possible a detailed analysis of the waves. Wave properties specific to the event of July 24, 1978, can be summarized as follows: (1) Partial plasma pressures in the different energy ranges responded to the magnetic field pressure differently. In the low-energy range they oscillated in phase with the magnetic pressure, while oscillations in higher-energy ranges were out-of-phase; (2) Perpendicular wavelengths for the event were determined to be 60,000 and 30,000 km in the radial and azimuthal directions, respectively. Wave properties common to all events can be summarized as follows: (1) Compressional Pc 5 wave activity is correlated with Beta, the ratio of the plasma pressure to the magnetic pressure; the absolute magnitude of the plasma pressure plays a minor role for the wave activity; (2) The magnetic equator is a node of the compressional perturbation of the magnetic field; (3) The criterion for the mirror mode instability is often satisfied near the equator in the outer magnetosphere when the compressional waves are present. We believe these waves are generated by internal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities.

  4. Wave rotor-enhanced gas turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welch, Gerard E.; Scott, Jones M.; Paxson, Daniel E.

    1995-01-01

    The benefits of wave rotor-topping in small (400 to 600 hp-class) and intermediate (3000 to 4000 hp-class) turboshaft engines, and large (80,000 to 100,000 lb(sub f)-class) high bypass ratio turbofan engines are evaluated. Wave rotor performance levels are calculated using a one-dimensional design/analysis code. Baseline and wave rotor-enhanced engine performance levels are obtained from a cycle deck in which the wave rotor is represented as a burner with pressure gain. Wave rotor-toppings is shown to significantly enhance the specific fuel consumption and specific power of small and intermediate size turboshaft engines. The specific fuel consumption of the wave rotor-enhanced large turbofan engine can be reduced while operating at significantly reduced turbine inlet temperature. The wave rotor-enhanced engine is shown to behave off-design like a conventional engine. Discussion concerning the impact of the wave rotor/gas turbine engine integration identifies tenable technical challenges.

  5. Laser-generated waves and wakes in rotating ion crystals.

    PubMed

    Kriesel, J M; Bollinger, J J; Mitchell, T B; King, L B; Dubin, D H E

    2002-03-25

    Locally excited plasma waves are generated in a Coulomb crystal by "pushing" with radiation pressure on a rotating cloud of laser-cooled 9Be+ ions. The waves form a stationary wake that is directly imaged through the dependence of the ion fluorescence on Doppler shifts, and theoretical calculations in a slab geometry are shown to accurately reproduce these images. The technique demonstrates a new method of exciting and studying waves in cold ion clouds.

  6. Travelling wave solution of the Buckley-Leverett equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tychkov, Sergey

    2016-09-01

    A two-dimensional Buckley-Leverett system governing motion of two-phase flow is considered. Travelling-wave solutions for these equations are found. Wavefronts of these solutions may be circles, lines and parabolae. Values of pressure and saturation on the wave fronts are found.

  7. Review of methods to attenuate shock/blast waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Igra, O.; Falcovitz, J.; Houas, L.; Jourdan, G.

    2013-04-01

    Quick and reliable shock wave attenuation is the goal of every protection facility and therefore it is not surprising that achieving this has drawn much attention during the past hundred years. Different options have been suggested; their usefulness varying from a reasonable protection to the opposite, a shock enhancement. An example for a suggestion for shock mitigation that turned out to be an enhancement of the impinging shock wave was the idea to cover a protected object with a foam layer. While the pressure behind the reflected shock wave from the foam frontal surface was smaller than that recorded in a similar reflection from a rigid wall [25], the pressure on the “protected” surface, attached to the foam's rear-surface, was significantly higher than that recorded in a similar reflection from a bare, rigid wall [11]. In protecting humans and installations from destructive shock and/or blast waves the prime goal is to reduce the wave amplitude and the rate of pressure increase across the wave front. Both measures result in reducing the wave harmful effects. During the past six decades several approaches for achieving the desired protection have been offered in the open literature. We point out in this review that while some of the suggestions offered are practical, others are impractical. In our discussion we focus on recent schemes for shock/blast wave attenuation, characterized by the availability of reliable measurements (notably pressure and optical diagnostics) as well as high-resolution numerical simulations.

  8. EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF SHOCK WAVE DYNAMICS IN MAGNETIZED PLASMAS

    SciTech Connect

    Nirmol K. Podder

    2009-03-17

    In this four-year project (including one-year extension), the project director and his research team built a shock-wave-plasma apparatus to study shock wave dynamics in glow discharge plasmas in nitrogen and argon at medium pressure (1–20 Torr), carried out various plasma and shock diagnostics and measurements that lead to increased understanding of the shock wave acceleration phenomena in plasmas. The measurements clearly show that in the steady-state dc glow discharge plasma, at fixed gas pressure the shock wave velocity increases, its amplitude decreases, and the shock wave disperses non-linearly as a function of the plasma current. In the pulsed discharge plasma, at fixed gas pressure the shock wave dispersion width and velocity increase as a function of the delay between the switch-on of the plasma and shock-launch. In the afterglow plasma, at fixed gas pressure the shock wave dispersion width and velocity decrease as a function of the delay between the plasma switch-off and shock-launch. These changes are found to be opposite and reversing towards the room temperature value which is the initial condition for plasma ignition case. The observed shock wave properties in both igniting and afterglow plasmas correlate well with the inferred temperature changes in the two plasmas.

  9. Augmentation pressure is influenced by ventricular contractility/relaxation dynamics: novel mechanism of reduction of pulse pressure by nitrates.

    PubMed

    Fok, Henry; Guilcher, Antoine; Li, Ye; Brett, Sally; Shah, Ajay; Clapp, Brian; Chowienczyk, Phil

    2014-05-01

    Augmentation pressure (AP), the increment in aortic pressure above its first systolic shoulder, is thought to be determined mainly by pressure wave reflection but could be influenced by ventricular ejection characteristics. We sought to determine the mechanism by which AP is selectively reduced by nitroglycerin (NTG). Simultaneous measurements of aortic pressure and flow were made at the time of cardiac catheterization in 30 subjects (11 women; age, 61±13 years [mean±SD]) to perform wave intensity analysis and calculate forward and backward components of AP generated by the ventricle and arterial tree, respectively. Measurements were made at baseline and after NTG given systemically (800 μg sublingually, n=20) and locally by intracoronary infusion (1 μg/min; n=10). Systemic NTG had no significant effect on first shoulder pressure but reduced augmentation (and central pulse pressure) by 12.8±3.1 mm Hg (P<0.0001). This resulted from a reduction in forward and backward wave components of AP by 7.0±2.4 and 5.8±1.3 mm Hg, respectively (each P<0.02). NTG had no significant effect on the ratio of amplitudes of either backward/forward waves or backward/forward compression wave energies, suggesting that effects on the backward wave were largely secondary to those on the forward wave. Time to the forward expansion wave was reduced (P<0.05). Intracoronary NTG decreased AP by 8.3±3.6 mm Hg (P<0.05) with no significant effect on the backward wave. NTG reduces AP and central pulse pressure by a mechanism that is, at least in part, independent of arterial reflections and relates to ventricular contraction/relaxation dynamics with enhanced myocardial relaxation. PMID:24516104

  10. Augmentation pressure is influenced by ventricular contractility/relaxation dynamics: novel mechanism of reduction of pulse pressure by nitrates.

    PubMed

    Fok, Henry; Guilcher, Antoine; Li, Ye; Brett, Sally; Shah, Ajay; Clapp, Brian; Chowienczyk, Phil

    2014-05-01

    Augmentation pressure (AP), the increment in aortic pressure above its first systolic shoulder, is thought to be determined mainly by pressure wave reflection but could be influenced by ventricular ejection characteristics. We sought to determine the mechanism by which AP is selectively reduced by nitroglycerin (NTG). Simultaneous measurements of aortic pressure and flow were made at the time of cardiac catheterization in 30 subjects (11 women; age, 61±13 years [mean±SD]) to perform wave intensity analysis and calculate forward and backward components of AP generated by the ventricle and arterial tree, respectively. Measurements were made at baseline and after NTG given systemically (800 μg sublingually, n=20) and locally by intracoronary infusion (1 μg/min; n=10). Systemic NTG had no significant effect on first shoulder pressure but reduced augmentation (and central pulse pressure) by 12.8±3.1 mm Hg (P<0.0001). This resulted from a reduction in forward and backward wave components of AP by 7.0±2.4 and 5.8±1.3 mm Hg, respectively (each P<0.02). NTG had no significant effect on the ratio of amplitudes of either backward/forward waves or backward/forward compression wave energies, suggesting that effects on the backward wave were largely secondary to those on the forward wave. Time to the forward expansion wave was reduced (P<0.05). Intracoronary NTG decreased AP by 8.3±3.6 mm Hg (P<0.05) with no significant effect on the backward wave. NTG reduces AP and central pulse pressure by a mechanism that is, at least in part, independent of arterial reflections and relates to ventricular contraction/relaxation dynamics with enhanced myocardial relaxation.

  11. Gas Hydrate and Pore Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinivella, Umberta; Giustiniani, Michela

    2014-05-01

    Many efforts have been devoted to quantify excess pore pressures related to gas hydrate dissociation in marine sediments below the BSR using several approaches. Dissociation of gas hydrates in proximity of the BSR, in response to a change in the physical environment (i.e., temperature and/or pressure regime), can liberate excess gas incrising the local pore fluid pressure in the sediment, so decreasing the effective normal stress. So, gas hydrate dissociation may lead to excess pore pressure resulting in sediment deformation or failure, such as submarine landslides, sediment slumping, pockmarks and mud volcanoes, soft-sediment deformation and giant hummocks. Moreover, excess pore pressure may be the result of gas hydrate dissociation due to continuous sedimentation, tectonic uplift, sea level fall, heating or inhibitor injection. In order to detect the presence of the overpressure below the BSR, we propose two approachs. The fist approach models the BSR depth versus pore pressure; in fact, if the free gas below the BSR is in overpressure condition, the base of the gas hydrate stability is deeper with respect to the hydrostatic case. This effect causes a discrepancy between seismic and theoretical BSR depths. The second approach models the velocities versus gas hydrate and free gas concentrations and pore pressure, considering the approximation of the Biot theory in case of low frequency, i.e. seismic frequency. Knowing the P and S seismic velocity from seismic data analysis, it is possibile to jointly estimate the gas hydrate and free gas concentrations and the pore pressure regime. Alternatively, if the S-wave velocity is not availbale (due to lack of OBS/OBC data), an AVO analysis can be performed in order to extract information about Poisson ratio. Our modeling suggests that the areas characterized by shallow waters (i.e., areas in which human infrastructures, such as pipelines, are present) are significantly affected by the presence of overpressure condition

  12. A Simple Wave Driver

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Temiz, Burak Kagan; Yavuz, Ahmet

    2015-01-01

    This study was done to develop a simple and inexpensive wave driver that can be used in experiments on string waves. The wave driver was made using a battery-operated toy car, and the apparatus can be used to produce string waves at a fixed frequency. The working principle of the apparatus is as follows: shortly after the car is turned on, the…

  13. Practical and highly sensitive elemental analysis for aqueous samples containing metal impurities employing electrodeposition on indium-tin oxide film samples and laser-induced shock wave plasma in low-pressure helium gas.

    PubMed

    Kurniawan, Koo Hendrik; Pardede, Marincan; Hedwig, Rinda; Abdulmadjid, Syahrun Nur; Lahna, Kurnia; Idris, Nasrullah; Jobiliong, Eric; Suyanto, Hery; Suliyanti, Maria Margaretha; Tjia, May On; Lie, Tjung Jie; Lie, Zener Sukra; Kurniawan, Davy Putra; Kagawa, Kiichiro

    2015-09-01

    We have conducted an experimental study exploring the possible application of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) for practical and highly sensitive detection of metal impurities in water. The spectrochemical measurements were carried out by means of a 355 nm Nd-YAG laser within N2 and He gas at atmospheric pressures as high as 2 kPa. The aqueous samples were prepared as thin films deposited on indium-tin oxide (ITO) glass by an electrolysis process. The resulting emission spectra suggest that concentrations at parts per billion levels may be achieved for a variety of metal impurities, and it is hence potentially feasible for rapid inspection of water quality in the semiconductor and pharmaceutical industries, as well as for cooling water inspection for possible leakage of radioactivity in nuclear power plants. In view of its relative simplicity, this LIBS equipment offers a practical and less costly alternative to the standard use of inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) for water samples, and its further potential for in situ and mobile applications. PMID:26368882

  14. Wave-current interaction in Willapa Bay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olabarrieta, M.; Warner, J.C.; Kumar, N.

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the importance of wave-current interaction in an inlet-estuary system. The three-dimensional, fully coupled, Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere-Wave-Sediment Transport (COAWST) modeling system was applied in Willapa Bay (Washington State) from 22 to 29 October 1998 that included a large storm event. To represent the interaction between waves and currents, the vortex-force method was used. Model results were compared with water elevations, currents, and wave measurements obtained by the U.S. Army Corp of Engineers. In general, a good agreement between field data and computed results was achieved, although some discrepancies were also observed in regard to wave peak directions in the most upstream station. Several numerical experiments that considered different forcing terms were run in order to identify the effects of each wind, tide, and wave-current interaction process. Comparison of the horizontal momentum balances results identified that wave-breaking-induced acceleration is one of the leading terms in the inlet area. The enhancement of the apparent bed roughness caused by waves also affected the values and distribution of the bottom shear stress. The pressure gradient showed significant changes with respect to the pure tidal case. During storm conditions the momentum balance in the inlet shares the characteristics of tidal-dominated and wave-dominated surf zone environments. The changes in the momentum balance caused by waves were manifested both in water level and current variations. The most relevant effect on hydrodynamics was a wave-induced setup in the inner part of the estuary. Copyright 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

  15. Wind-wave transformations in an elongated bay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caliskan, Hande; Valle-Levinson, Arnoldo

    2008-08-01

    In order to determine wave transformations in an elongated bay, a numerical solution was used to interpret yearlong records of bottom pressure and wind velocity obtained at the mouth and head of Concepción Bay, on the Gulf of California side of the Baja California peninsula. Observed wind waves were predominantly produced by southeastward winds in the winter and north-northwestward winds in the summer. Typical mean wave periods at the bay entrance were between 3 and 5 s. In contrast, the waves at the head of the bay had predominant periods <3 s. The energetic long-period swell waves were dissipated somewhere in the bay as they were not observed at the head of the bay. This study centered in identifying the effects that caused swell waves to attenuate in the bay. The 'Simulating WAves Nearshore (SWAN)' model was used to determine the cause for such wave attenuation. Model results showed that swell waves were attenuated because of the combined effects of bottom friction, wave breaking, whitecapping, refraction and wave blocking by the coastline. Most of the attenuation (close to 90%), however, was caused by wave blocking owing to the change of coastline orientation of the bay. This wave blocking mechanism should therefore be explored further in embayments of complex coastline morphology.

  16. Models and Observations of Shock Wave Propagation in Volcanic Settings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, J.; Johnson, J. B.; Ruiz, M. C.; Steele, A.

    2013-12-01

    High-amplitude air waves (shock waves) propagate nonlinearly; although this strongly affects recorded signals, it is not commonly modeled in studies of volcanic explosions. Failure to account for the shock wave component of air waves can lead to underestimation of source power and inaccurate source times. Additionally, propagation effects can significantly alter waveforms from the original source signals. In order to permit more accurate studies of shock wave sources, we examine modeling techniques and observations of shock waves. Shock wave signals begin with strong, abrupt compressions that, compared to typical sound waves, propagate and decay more quickly. Because of the high-amplitude discontinuities, numerical methods that are commonly used to study linear sound waves become unstable and inaccurate when applied to shock waves. We discuss the use of other techniques that are capable of modeling shock wave propagation. Equations relating wave speed to the difference of various physical quantities across the shock (such as pressure, density, and particle velocity) are useful for modeling these waves. Addressing the shock explicitly as such, in conjunction with use of traditional numerical methods for the remainder of the signal, permits modeling of full shock waveforms. Additionally, we present examples of recorded volcanic signals that propagate nonlinearly and demonstrate propagation effects on amplitude, waveform, and spectrum.

  17. Shock wave absorber having a deformable liner

    DOEpatents

    Youngdahl, C.K.; Wiedermann, A.H.; Shin, Y.W.; Kot, C.A.; Ockert, C.E.

    1983-08-26

    This invention discloses a shock wave absorber for a piping system carrying liquid. The absorber has a plastically deformable liner defining the normal flow boundary for an axial segment of the piping system, and a nondeformable housing is spaced outwardly from the liner so as to define a gas-tight space therebetween. The flow capacity of the liner generally corresponds to the flow capacity of the piping system line, but the liner has a noncircular cross section and extends axially of the piping system line a distance between one and twenty times the diameter thereof. Gas pressurizes the gas-tight space equal to the normal liquid pressure in the piping system. The liner has sufficient structural capacity to withstand between one and one-half and two times this normal liquid pressures; but at greater pressures it begins to plastically deform initially with respect to shape to a more circular cross section, and then with respect to material extension by circumferentially stretching the wall of the liner. A high energy shock wave passing through the liner thus plastically deforms the liner radially into the gas space and progressively also as needed in the axial direction of the shock wave to minimize transmission of the shock wave beyond the absorber.

  18. Teleseismic S wave microseisms.

    PubMed

    Nishida, Kiwamu; Takagi, Ryota

    2016-08-26

    Although observations of microseisms excited by ocean swells were firmly established in the 1940s, the source locations remain difficult to track. Delineation of the source locations and energy partition of the seismic wave components are key to understanding the excitation mechanisms. Using a seismic array in Japan, we observed both P and S wave microseisms excited by a severe distant storm in the Atlantic Ocean. Although nonlinear forcing of an ocean swell with a one-dimensional Earth model can explain P waves and vertically polarized S waves (SV waves), it cannot explain horizontally polarized S waves (SH waves). The precise source locations may provide a new catalog for exploring Earth's interior.

  19. Planetary plasma waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurnett, Donald A.

    1993-01-01

    The primary types of plasma waves observed in the vicinity of the planets Venus, Mars, Earth, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune are described. The observations are organized according to the various types of plasma waves observed, ordered according to decreasing distance from the planet, starting from the sunward side of the planet, and ending in the region near the closest approach. The plasma waves observed include: electron plasma oscillations and ion acoustic waves; trapped continuum radiation; electron cyclotron and upper hybrid waves; whistler-mode emissions; electrostatic ion cyclotron waves; and electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves.

  20. Low Blood Pressure

    MedlinePlus

    ... High Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Low Blood Pressure Updated:Aug 30,2016 To know if you ... to learn more about blood pressure . If my blood pressure stays around 85/55, do I have a ...